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Sample records for jefferson county alabama

  1. Economic-environmental modeling of point source pollution in Jefferson County, Alabama, USA.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Ellene; Schreiner, Dean F; Huluka, Gobena

    2002-05-01

    This paper uses an integrated economic-environmental model to assess the point source pollution from major industries in Jefferson County, Northern Alabama. Industrial expansion generates employment, income, and tax revenue for the public sector; however, it is also often associated with the discharge of chemical pollutants. Jefferson County is one of the largest industrial counties in Alabama that experienced smog warnings and ambient ozone concentration, 1996-1999. Past studies of chemical discharge from industries have used models to assess the pollution impact of individual plants. This study, however, uses an extended Input-Output (I-O) economic model with pollution emission coefficients to assess direct and indirect pollutant emission for several major industries in Jefferson County. The major findings of the study are: (a) the principal emission by the selected industries are volatile organic compounds (VOC) and these contribute to the ambient ozone concentration; (b) the direct and indirect emissions are significantly higher than the direct emission by some industries, indicating that an isolated analysis will underestimate the emission by an industry; (c) while low emission coefficient industries may suggest industry choice they may also emit the most hazardous chemicals. This study is limited by the assumptions made, and the data availability, however it provides a useful analytical tool for direct and cumulative emission estimation and generates insights on the complexity in choice of industries. PMID:12173425

  2. Effect of Surface Coal Mining on the Hydrology of Crooked and Turkey Creek Basins, Jefferson County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puente, Celso; Newton, John G.

    1979-01-01

    Streamflow, sediment yield, and water quality were monitored from October 1975 through May 1977 to determine the impact of surface coal mining on the hydrology of Crooked and Turkey Creek basins in Jefferson County, Alabama. The basins are in the northeast part of the Warrior coal field. Coal is and has been mined from the Blue Creek, Mary Lee, and and Newcastel coal beds in the Mary Lee group. Results show water-quality degradation, increased sediment yields, and increased low flow in most tributaries draining mined areas. The impact of mine drainage and sediment yield from mined subbasins on water in the main stem of Turkey Creek was small due to the alkalinity of the water in the creek and to dilution ratios that ranged from 1:30 to 1:300. Mine drainage has affected the quality of water in Crooked Creek. The dissolved solids concentration in water downstream from the mined areas was as much as 7 times greater than that in water in unmined parts of the basin. The sediment yield to Crooked Creek was lower in the mined area than in the unmined segment of the stream. The lower yield is due, in part, to the trapping of sediment in sediment ponds in the mines and in a swamp downstream from the mines. (USGS)

  3. A Multilevel Analysis of Individual, Household, and Neighborhood Correlates of Intimate Partner Violence Among Low-Income Pregnant Women in Jefferson County, Alabama

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Russell S.; Sigler, Robert T.; Hwang, Sean-Shong; LaGory, Mark E.; Goldenberg, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We examined individual, household, and neighborhood correlates of intimate partner violence (IPV) before and during pregnancy. Methods. We used multilevel modeling to investigate IPV among 2887 pregnant women in 112 census tracts who sought prenatal care in 8 public clinics in Jefferson County, Alabama, from 1997 through 2001. Data were collected from the Perinatal Emphasis Research Center project, the 2000 Census, and the local Sheriff and Police Departments Uniform Crime Reports for 1997 through 2001. Results. Participants were predominantly young, African American, on Medicaid, and residents of low-income neighborhoods. The prevalence of past-year male partner–perpetrated physical or sexual violence was 7.4%. Neighborhood residential stability, women performing most of the housework (lack of involvement among partners), being unmarried (being in an uncommitted relationship), and alcohol use were positively associated with elevated IPV risk. Significant protective factors for IPV included older age at first vaginal intercourse and a greater sense of mastery (e.g., the perception of oneself as an effective person). Conclusions. Both neighborhood contextual and individual and household compositional effects are associated with IPV among low-income pregnant women. The results imply that combined interventions to improve neighborhood conditions and strengthen families may effectively reduce IPV. PMID:19696385

  4. Assessment of Water-Quality Conditions in Fivemile Creek in the Vicinity of the Fivemile Creek Greenway, Jefferson County, Alabama, 2003-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gill, Amy C.; Robinson, John A.; Redmond, Jymalyn E.; Bradley, Michael W.

    2008-01-01

    The watershed of Fivemile Creek (FMC), a tributary to the Locust Fork of the Black Warrior River, is located north of Birmingham, Alabama. Areas that have been previously coal-mined border the creek, and portions of the upper watershed have been and are currently (2007) being used for industrial and urban uses. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Tarrant, the Freshwater Land Trust, and the Jefferson County Commission, conducted a water-quality assessment of 12 sites along FMC during 2003?2005. Water samples were analyzed for basic physical and chemical properties and concentrations of major ions, nutrients, fecal indicator bacteria, organic wastewater compounds, pesticides, trace elements, and semivolatile organic compounds. Streambed-sediment samples were analyzed for concentrations of trace elements and semivolatile organic compounds. Benthic invertebrate communities were evaluated for taxonomic composition and relation to water-quality conditions. Nutrient concentrations in the FMC watershed reflect the influences of natural and anthropogenic sources. Concentrations of total nitrogen in all samples and total Kjeldahl nitrogen in at least one sample each collected from FMC at Hewitt Park, FMC below Springdale Road, FMC at Lewisburg, FMC near Republic, FMC at Brookside, and FMC at Linn Crossing exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) ecoregion nutrient criteria. Total phosphorus concentrations in about 58 percent of all samples were above the ecoregion nutrient criteria. Concentrations of chlorophyll a, an indicator of algal biomass, in the FMC watershed were below the appropriate USEPA ecoregion criteria. Fecal indicator bacteria concentrations occasionally exceeded criteria established by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) and the USEPA to protect human health and aquatic life. Median fecal-coliform concentrations equaled or exceeded USEPA criteria at four of the six sites with multiple samples

  5. Education in Jefferson County: The Changing Scene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Alicita; And Others

    This report describes significant changes which have taken place in the public schools of Jefferson County, Colorado, and discusses issues which affect the quality of education in the county's school district. After a brief introduction, the report profiles the Jefferson County Public School District, presents information about the county's public…

  6. 75 FR 80524 - Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ... 12, 2007 (72 FR 11048). Watercress Darter NWR, near the city of Bessemer, Jefferson County, Alabama... Register on April 16, 2010 (75 FR 19988). We received five comments on the Draft CCP/EA. Selected... high-quality of life. Monitoring environmental parameters and flora and fauna will be incorporated...

  7. Investigation of Water Quality and Aquatic-Community Structure in Village and Valley Creeks, City of Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama 2000-01

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherson, A. K.

    2002-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a 16-month investigation of water quality, aquatic-community structure, bed sediment, and fish tissue in Village and Valley Creeks, two urban streams that drain areas of residential, commercial, and industrial land use in Birmingham, Alabama. Water-quality data were collected between February 2000 and March 2001 at four sites on Village Creek, three sites on Valley Creek, and at two reference sites near Birmingham, Fivemile Creek and Little Cahaba River, that drain less urbanized areas. The occurrence and distribution of chemical constituents in the water column and bed sediment provided an initial assessment of water quality in the streams. Aquatic-community structure, physical condition of fish, and analysis of fish tissue provided an indication of the cumulative effects of the water quality on the aquatic biota. Degraded water quality was seen at the more urbanized sites on Village and Valley Creeks. Elevated concentrations of nutrients, bacteria, trace elements, and organic contaminants were detected in the water column. Trace-element priority pollutants, pesticides, and other organic compounds were detected in higher concentrations in bed sediment and fish tissue at the Village and Valley Creek sites than at the reference site. The richness and density of the fish and benthic-invertebrate communities indicate that the integrity of the aquatic communities in Village and Valley Creeks is poor in comparison to that observed at the two reference sites. Correlations between land use and aquatic-community structure, water quality, bed sediment, and fish tissue were observed. The abundance of mayflies and the number of EPT (ephemeroptera, plecoptera, tricoptera) taxa were negatively correlated with industrial land use. The abundance of midges (an indicator of poor water quality) was positively correlated with industrial land use; the percentage of mosquitofishes (a tolerant species) was positively correlated with commercial land

  8. Investigation of water quality and aquatic-community structure in Village and Valley Creeks, City of Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama, 2000-01

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPherson, Ann K.; Abrahamsen, Thomas A.; Journey, Celeste A.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a 16-month investigation of water quality, aquatic-community structure, bed sediment, and fish tissue in Village and Valley Creeks, two urban streams that drain areas of highly intensive residential, commercial, and industrial land use in Birmingham, Alabama. Water-quality data were collected between February 2000 and March 2001 at four sites on Village Creek, three sites on Valley Creek, and at two reference sites near Birmingham?Fivemile Creek and Little Cahaba River, both of which drain less-urbanized areas. Stream samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, fecal bacteria, trace and major elements, pesticides, and selected organic constituents. Bed-sediment and fish-tissue samples were analyzed for trace and major elements, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and additional organic compounds. Aquatic-community structure was evaluated by conducting one survey of the fish community and in-stream habitat and two surveys of the benthic-invertebrate community. Bed-sediment and fish-tissue samples, benthic-invertebrates, and habitat data were collected between June 2000 and October 2000 at six of the nine water-quality sites; fish communities were evaluated in April and May 2001 at the six sites where habitat and benthic-invertebrate data were collected. The occurrence and distribution of chemical constituents in the water column and bed sediment provided an initial assessment of water quality in the streams. The structure of the aquatic communities, the physical condition of the fish, and the chemical analyses of fish tissue provided an indication of the cumulative effects of water quality on the aquatic biota. Water chemistry was similar at all sites, characterized by strong calcium-bicarbonate component and magnesium components. Median concentrations of total nitrogen and total phosphorus were highest at the headwaters of Valley Creek and lowest at the reference site on Fivemile Creek. In Village Creek, median

  9. Jefferson County Adult Reading Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson County Board of Education, Louisville, KY.

    The 1980-81 Jefferson County (Kentucky) Adult Reading Program served 601 students functioning below 6.0 grade level during the 1980-81 year. The project's instructional methods and materials were developed based on the experiences of the program for the previous two years. The program was considered a success not only from the viewpoint of the…

  10. 76 FR 8808 - Supplemental Final Environmental Impact Statement: Clark County, Indiana, and Jefferson County, KY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... County, Indiana and Jefferson County, Kentucky. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Duane Thomas..., and Jefferson County, KY AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of intent... Frankfort, KY 40601, Telephone: (502) 223-6720, e-mail: Duane.Thomas@dot.gov or Mr. Gary Valentine,...

  11. 77 FR 124 - Biological Processors of Alabama; Decatur, Morgan County, AL; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ... AGENCY Biological Processors of Alabama; Decatur, Morgan County, AL; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Biological Processors of Alabama Superfund Site located in Decatur, Morgan County, Alabama. DATES: The Agency... name Biological Processors of Alabama Superfund Site by one of the following methods:...

  12. Jefferson County Public Schools Special Education Resource Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson County School District R-1, Lakewood, CO.

    The booklet describes the services of the Special Education Resource Center in Jefferson County (Colorado) Public Schools. Among service components reviewed are educational programming, information services, materials and equipment information, and training programs for personnel other than special educators. (CL)

  13. 78 FR 57852 - Warrior Rosin Spill Superfund Site, Holt, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama ; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Warrior Rosin Spill Superfund Site, Holt, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama ; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... costs concerning the Warrior Rosin Spill Superfund Site located in Holt, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama....

  14. Foreign Language Camps: Jefferson County Public Schools R-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trujillo, Lorenzo A.; And Others

    The planning and operation of Jefferson County (Colorado) Public Schools' foreign language camps are described. The weekend-long camps attempt to duplicate an authentic cultural experience in a foreign village through cultural activities and language immersion. French, Spanish, Russian, and German camps are conducted for county high school foreign…

  15. The Leyden uranium prospect, Jefferson County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gott, Garland B.

    1950-01-01

    The Leyden uranium prospect is in sec. 28, T, 2 S., R. 70 W, Jefferson County, Cplo, Examination of the property was made in February 1950. Uranium was first reported in this locality in 1875 by Captain E. L. Berthoud, who noted uranium minerals associated with the main coal bed. The Old Leyden coal mine workings have long been abandoned and caved, but specimens of the uranium-bearing rock can be seen on the old dump 700 feet to the south. The mineralized coal bed is 10 to 12 feet thick and occurs near the base of the Laramie formation of Upper Cretaceous age. Uranium minerals are present in the form of yellow incrustations and inclusions in fractured and partly silicified coal. Petrographic studies indicate that the silica and uranium minerals were deposited after deposition and carbonization of the coal. Secondary uranium minerals also were found by C. R. Butler along the outcrop of the sandstones in the Laramie formation. No uranium minerals were found in place by the writer, but four samples from the dump contained 0.001, 0,005, 0.17 and 0.69 percent uranium.

  16. The isolation of spiroplasmas from mosquitoes in Macon County, Alabama.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, A A; Johnson, W E; Stevens, C; Tang, A Y

    1987-06-01

    During the summer months of 1985, 1,298 adult mosquitoes comprising 21 species and 7 genera were collected in Macon County, Alabama. Mosquitoes were collected from four sections of the county with CO2-baited light traps. Spiroplasma cultures were isolated from two pools of 24 and 25 Aedes fulvus pallens, one pool of 22 Anopheles punctipennis and one pool of 7 Culex nigripalpus. Electron microscopic studies of the isolates revealed helical, wall-less cells. PMID:2904950

  17. Oak Mountain High School, Shelby County, Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Design Cost Data, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents design features of the Oak Mountain High School (Alabama) consisting of an academic side of classrooms, administration, and media center; and an activity side consisting of cafeteria, gymnasium, practice gym, and a theater. The school's floor plan and photos are included. (GR)

  18. Geomorphology of coastal sand dunes, Baldwin County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bearden, Bennett L.; Hummell, Richard L.; Mink, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    Alabama's coastal eolian deposits are primarily vegetated dunes that are exemplified by sand ridges with flat to undulating upper surfaces and continuous irregular crests. Dune fields occur along Morgan peninsula between the foredune line and Little Lagoon and the Mobile Bay area. These dune fields consist primarily of one or more continuous ridges that parallel the coast and are generally vegetaed to grassy. Washover of the beach and backshore during Hurricane Frederic (1979) and subsequent smaller scale storms resulted in significant erosion of many of Alabama's dune fields. The primary dunes or foredunes are beginning to recover from the effects of these storms; however, numerous breaks in the primary dune line are present. Sand dunes in coastal Alabama provide protection against storm-generated waves and washover. The foredunes are protected by adherence to a Coastal Construction Control Line (CCCL) or construction setback line identified by markers along coastal Baldwin County.

  19. Groundwater management and protection Madison County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    French, J.H.; Strunk, J.W.

    1990-07-01

    Groundwater is extremely important to Madison County as it provides nearly three quarters of the county's drinking water. In recent years, Madison County has increasingly recognized the need to protect its groundwater resource. A supply of usable groundwater is one element of a high quality environment, which can help spur economic development and provide for the needs of a growing population. Without planning protection and understanding of possible consequences, however, economic development and population pressures can cause a gradual degradation of groundwater. In April 1987, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) convened a local groundwater steering group in Madison County. At the first meeting the ground agreed upon these goals: (1) to seek incorporate groundwater protection into the planning and development process for Madison County, (2) to support efforts by Madison County to obtain authority to adopt zoning ordinances and subdivision regulations, and (3) to develop a groundwater management plan for the county. This report provides essential information needed in developing a plan and is based on the following assumptions: the citizens of Madison County value the environment in which they live and wish to protect it from pollution; continued economic development is necessary for a healthy local economy; and a healthy economy can be sustained and nurtured, without degradation of the groundwater resource, through countywide planning, education, and participation.

  20. Unconventional gas - exploratory drilling, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    BF Goodrich owns and operates a large tire manufacturing plant located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. This plant consumes approximately 3000 MCF of natural gas daily in generating steam for the manufacturing process. In addition, Goodrich has other facilities with requirements for gaseous fuels. Because of increased costs for gas and oil, and forecasted shortages of gas, Goodrich is investigating alternative sources for energy. In the Tuscaloosa vicinity, Goodrich studied in depth the possibility of obtaining methane gas from coal beds. In this process, BF Goodrich worked with the Unites States Bureau of Mines, the University of Alabama School of Mines and Energy Development and various other companies having experience in coalbed degasification. The information available to Goodrich led to the conclusion that degasification may have the potential of meeting the Company's energy and financial objectives. With DOE funding, a test well was drilled and various analyses necessary to verify this potential were made. BF Goodrich management would contemplate investing Goodrich capital to develop production wells if the test well analyses indicated such development to be feasible and the economics of production were consistent with corporate objectives for return on investment. The completed analyses, however, indicate that investment in this program is not justified at this time. 20 figures, 13 tables.

  1. Project EPIC. Jefferson County Public Schools, Louisville, Kentucky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Carol B.; Preli, Barbara

    This description of career education activities in Jefferson County (Louisville, Kentucky) was prepared as part of a study conducted to identify evaluated, exemplary career education activities which represent the best of the current career education programs and practices referred to in Public Law 93-380. (See CE 018 212 for the final report of…

  2. Surface-water availability, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knight, Alfred L.; Davis, Marvin E.

    1975-01-01

    The average annual runoff, about 1,270 mgd (million gallons per day), originating in Tuscaloosa County is equivalent to 20 inches or 0.95 mgd per square mile. The Black Warrior and Sipsey Rivers, the largest streams in the county, have average flows of 5,230 mgd and 580 mgd, respectively, where they leave the county, and median annual 7-day low flows in excess of 150 mgd and 35 mgd, respectively. North River, Big Sandy Creek, and Hurricane Creek have average flows in excess of 100 mgd and median annual 7-day low flows in excess of 2 mgd. Surface water generally contains less than 100 mg/l (milligrams per liter) dissolved solids, less than 10 mg/l chloride, and is soft to moderately hard. Streams having the higher hardness and the higher dissolved-solids content are in eastern Tuscaloosa County.

  3. 78 FR 14414 - The Alabama Great Southern Railroad Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Gadsden, Etowah County, Ala...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... Gadsden, Etowah County, Ala.; Tennessee, Alabama, and Georgia Railway Company--Abandonment Exemption--in Gadsden, Etowah County, AL The Alabama Great Southern Railroad Company (AGS) and Tennessee, Alabama, and... approximately 4.25 miles of interconnected rail line in Gadsden, Etowah County, Ala. Specifically, AGS...

  4. Bedrock Geology of the Turkey Creek Drainage Basin, Jefferson County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Char, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    This geospatial data set describes bedrock geology of the Turkey Creek drainage basin in Jefferson County, Colorado. It was digitized from maps of fault locations and geologic map units based on age and lithology. Created for use in the Jefferson County Mountain Ground-Water Resources Study, it is to be used at a scale no more detailed than 1:50,000.

  5. 78 FR 17468 - Alabama Railroad Co.-Abandonment Exemption-in Monroe County, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Alabama Railroad Co.--Abandonment Exemption--in Monroe County, AL Alabama Railroad Co. (ALAB) has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR part 1152 subpart F-Exempt Abandonments to abandon approximately...

  6. Digital computer processing of LANDSAT data for North Alabama. [Linestone County, Madison County, Jackson County, Marshall County, and DeKalb County

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. D.; Atkinson, R. J.; Lybanon, M.; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    1977-01-01

    Computer processing procedures and programs applied to Multispectral Scanner data from LANDSAT are described. The output product produced is a level 1 land use map in conformance with a Universal Transverse Mercator projection. The region studied was a five-county area in north Alabama.

  7. The Extent of Salt Water Intrusion, Southern Baldwin County, Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgulet, D.; Tick, G.; Zheng, C.

    2006-12-01

    Contamination of groundwater due to saltwater intrusion has become a major concern for coastal communities which rely on groundwater as their principal source of drinking water. With increasing development and tourism in these regions both groundwater resources and environmentally sensitive areas such as coastal wetlands and ecological coastal habitats will be at risk. As a result, the protection of groundwater resources from saltwater intrusion and groundwater overdraft has become and will continue to be a critical concern in these areas. A regional-scale study evaluating the extent of saltwater intrusion as a result of increased groundwater pumping was conducted for Baldwin County, Alabama, a region on the gulf coast which has experienced continuously increasing growth and development over the last decade. An extensive reconnaissance of groundwater wells that includes water supply wells, irrigation and agricultural wells, monitoring wells, and private wells was conducted for the study area. The wells were sampled and analyzed for chloride, salinity, and TDS to determine the extent of saltwater intrusion, chloride and salinity fluxes, and the location of the saltwater/freshwater interface in the region. Groundwater pumping rates in addition to critical well-point data including hydraulic head, construction details, and lithology (well logs) were collected to determine the hydrogeological conditions in the region. ArcGIS software was used to develop head contour maps and iso-concentration maps for chloride, TDS, and salinity. A variable-density flow model SEAWAT based on MODFLOW and MT3DMS was developed to test management scenarios incorporating current and predicted demands on groundwater pumping to evaluate changing freshwater/saltwater interface, salinity and chloride fluxes, and rates of saltwater encroachment. The study will provide scientific basis for effective management of the coastal aquifers in the study region.

  8. Use of Satellite Data to Study the Impact of Land-Cover/Land-Use Change in Madison County Alabama.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing was used to analyze and study land-use/land-cover use changes impact on the environment of Madison County Alabama. This study area was selected because it is one of the fastest growing counties in the state of Alabama. The study used data sets obtained from several sources. Remote sen...

  9. Assessment of aquatic macroinvertebrate communities in the Autauga Creek watershed, Autauga County, Alabama, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mooty, Will S.; Gill, Amy C.

    2011-01-01

    Only four families within the Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera orders were found during a 1999 survey of aquatic macroinvertebrates in Autauga Creek, Autauga County, Alabama, by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management. The low number of taxa of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera families indicated that the aquatic macroinvertebrate community was in poor condition, and the creek was placed on the Alabama Department of Environmental Management 303(d) list. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in 2009 to provide data for the Alabama Department of Environmental Management and other water management agencies to re-evaluate aquatic macroinvertebrate communities in Autauga Creek to see if they meet Alabama Department of Environmental Management water-quality criteria. Aquatic macroinvertebrate communities were evaluated at three sites in the Autauga Creek watershed. Macroinvertebrates were sampled at two sites on Autauga Creek and one on Bridge Creek, the largest tributary to Autauga Creek. Water-quality field parameters were assessed at 11 sites. During the 2009 sampling, 12 families within the orders of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera were found at the Alabama Department of Environmental Management's assessment site whereas only four were found in 1999. The upstream site on Autauga Creek had consistently higher numbers of taxa than the Bridge Creek site and the lower site on Autauga Creek which is the Alabama Department of Environmental Management's assessment site. Chironomid richness was noticeably higher on the two Autauga Creek sites than the Bridge Creek site.

  10. Alteration and vein mineralization, Ladwig uranium mine, Jefferson County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Alan R.

    1979-01-01

    Uranium ore at the Ladwig mine, Jefferson County, Colo., occurs in steeply dipping, northwest-striking faults and related fractures with a carbonate-adularia assemblage that forms in altered wallrocks and fills veins. The faults occur between large intrusive pegmatites and garnetiferous gneisses of Precambrian age, and were reactivated as the result of the early Paleocene uplift of the Front Range foothills. Mineralization in the deposit includes both wallrock alteration and vein filling. Alteration was intense but local, and chiefly involved the carbonatization of mafic minerals in the wallrocks. Felsic minerals in the wallrocks are relatively unaltered. The veins are filled with an adularia-pitchblende-carbonate assemblage with minor related sulfides and coffinite. Many of the iron-bearing carbonates in both the alteration and vein assemblages have been altered to hematite. The mineralization and alteration are believed to have formed in response to initially high amounts of CO2 and the subsequent release of dissolved CO2 by boiling or effervescence. Uranium, carried in a dicarbonate complex, was precipitated directly as pitchblende when the CO2 was released. The expulsion of H+ during boiling created a net oxidizing environment which oxidized the iron-bearing carbonates. Late stage calcite and sulfides were deposited in existing voids in the veins.

  11. 77 FR 11533 - Anniston PCB Superfund Site, Anniston, Calhoun County, Alabama; Notice of Amended Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... AGENCY Anniston PCB Superfund Site, Anniston, Calhoun County, Alabama; Notice of Amended Settlement... Agency has entered into a settlement for past response costs concerning the Anniston PCB Superfund Site... available from Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Anniston PCB by one of the...

  12. A Phonological and Lexical Study of the Speech of Tuscaloosa County, Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Lawrence Mason

    This study examines the lexical and phonological features in the speech of 27 native informants of Tuscaloosa County, Alabama which show distinctive regional or social distribution. The questionnaire used in the study is based on the short work sheets of the Linguistic Atlas of the United States and Canada, and the methodology is similar to that…

  13. Transforming Our Schools: Lessons from the Jefferson County Public Schools/Gheens Professional Development Academy, 1983-1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyle, Regina M. J.

    A school/community partnership in Louisville, Kentucky, the Jefferson County Public Schools/Gheens Professional Development Academy, is described. This report provides a framework for assessing Jefferson County School System reforms in the past 8 years or more designed to enhance student success in learning. A Spiral of Assessment was used to…

  14. Floods of July 1956 in Clarke County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peirce, L.B.

    1957-01-01

    A weak tropical disturbance formed just off the coast of Alabama on July 5, 1956. Moving inland over the southeastern part of the State, the storm produced heavy rains on the 7th and the morning of the 8th before it dissipated and moved out toward the north.

  15. 75 FR 68788 - Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site; Jefferson, Ashe County, North Carolina; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... AGENCY Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site; Jefferson, Ashe County, North Carolina; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Protection Agency has entered into a settlement for reimbursement of past response costs concerning the Ore..., identified by Docket ID No. EPA-RO4- SFUND-2010-0893 or Site name Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site by one of...

  16. The Jefferson County Effective Schools Project: Description and Analysis of Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Stephen K.; And Others

    In 1982-83 the Jefferson County Public Schools (Kentucky) (JCPS) implemented a pilot effective schools project for 10 elementary buildings, based on the inservice program, "Creating Effective Schools," by Brookover and others (1982). This paper provides an overview of the origin of the program in JCPS, how the program was conducted, and a brief…

  17. 75 FR 57053 - Camas National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, ID; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Camas National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, ID; Comprehensive... prepare a comprehensive conservation plan (CCP) for Camas National Wildlife Refuge (refuge) in Hamer, ID... Refuge, 2150 East 2350 North, Hamer, ID 83425. In-Person Drop-off: You may drop off comments...

  18. Health Care Needs of a Hispanic Population in Dane, Dodge, and Jefferson Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesinger, Doris P.; And Others

    In the summer of 1976, 133 permanent residents in the Hispano community in Wisconsin's Dane, Dodge and Jefferson counties were interviewed to determine their perceptions of their own and their families' health needs and of their unmet health needs. Respondents were primarily women since it was felt they were the best informed about the family's…

  19. Cyclicity in Upper Mississippian Bangor Limestone, Blount County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Bronner, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Upper Mississippian (Chesterian) Bangor Limestone in Alabama consists of a thick, complex sequence of carbonate platform deposits. A continuous core through the Bangor on Blount Mountain in north-central Alabama provides the opportunity to analyze the unit for cyclicity and to identify controls on vertical facies sequence. Lithologies from the core represent four general environments of deposition: (1) subwave-base, open marine, (2) shoal, (3) lagoon, and (4) peritidal. Analysis of the vertical sequence of lithologies in the core indicates the presence of eight large-scale cycles dominated by subtidal deposits, but defined on the basis of peritidal caps. These large-scale cycles can be subdivided into 16 small-scale cycles that may be entirely subtidal but illustrate upward shallowing followed by rapid deepening. Large-scale cycles range from 33 to 136 ft thick, averaging 68 ft; small-scale cycles range from 5 to 80 ft thick and average 34 ft. Small-scale cycles have an average duration of approximately 125,000 years, which is compatible with Milankovitch periodicity. The large-scale cycles have an average duration of approximately 250,000 years, which may simply reflect variations in amplitude of sea level fluctuation or the influence of tectonic subsidence along the southeastern margin of the North American craton.

  20. Results of a test well in the Nanafalia Formation near Melvin, Choctaw County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, M.E.; Sparkes, A.K.; Peacock, B.S.

    1983-01-01

    Test drilling at Melvin, Choctaw County, Alabama, discloses that the Nanafalia Formation (Paleocene) contains freshwater in sand at a distance of 25 miles downdip from the outcrop area. A nearby fault on the north side of Gilberttown-Pickens fault zone does not appear to affect either the head or the water quality in sand of the Nanafalia. This presently undeveloped aquifer could be a source of water supply in this area. (USGS)

  1. Water availability and geology of Sumter County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Marvin E.; Sanford, Thomas H.; Jefferson, Patrick O.

    1975-01-01

    Geologic units that crop out in Sumter County include the Selma Group of Late Cretaceous age; the Midway and Wilcox Groups of Tertiary Age; and terrace deposits and alluvium of Quaternary age. The Tuscaloosa Group, consisting of the Coker and Gordo Formations, and Eutaw Formation of Late Cretaceous age underlie the entire county. The Cretaceous units dip southwestward about 45 feet per mile and strike northwestward. They consist chiefly of deposits of sand, gravel, chalk, and clay. Potential sources of large supplies of ground water are major aquifers in the Coker, Gordo, and Eutaw Formations; expected yields are 1.6 mgd (million gallons per day or more per well. The Naheola and Nanafalia formations, Tuscahome Sand, and terrace deposits and alluvium are expected to yield 10 to 50 gallons per minute per well.

  2. Health InfoNet of Jefferson County: collaboration in consumer health information service.

    PubMed

    Smith, K H

    2001-01-01

    Health InfoNet of Jefferson County is a new collaborative consumer health information service of the Jefferson County public libraries and the UAB Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences. Working with the input and cooperation of local voluntary health agencies, health care professionals and other health information providers, the intent is to improve the efficiency with which consumers might access such information while avoiding duplication of effort on the part of the information providers. Various considerations in InfoNet's mission include providing service not only to established library and Internet users, but also those on the other side of the "digital divide" as well as those with low literacy skills or English as a second language. The role of health care professionals in guiding their patients to the best consumer health information resources is emphasized. PMID:11757392

  3. Procedure for locating 10 km UTM grid on Alabama County general highway maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paludan, C. T. N.

    1975-01-01

    Each county highway map has a geographic grid of degrees and tens of minutes in both longitude and latitude in the margins and within the map as intersection crosses. These will be used to locate the universal transverse mercator (UTM) grid at 10 km intervals. Since the maps used may have stretched or shrunk in height and/or width, interpolation should be done between the 10 min intersections when possible. A table of UTM coordinates of 10 min intersections is required and included. In Alabama, all eastings are referred to a false easting of 500,000 m at 87 deg W longitude (central meridian, CM).

  4. Diagenesis of Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation, Mobile and Baldwin Counties and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, R.L. Jr.; Benson, D.J.

    1988-09-01

    The Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation is an important deep gas reservoir in Mobile and Baldwin Counties and offshore Alabama. The producing reservoir consists of a well-sorted fine-grained subarkose to arkose. Sedimentological studies indicate this unit was deposited on a broad desert plain in environments ranging from eolian dune and interdune to wadi and beach-shoreface. Diagenetic minerals comprise from 5 to 20% of the bulk volume of the sandstone. Porosity ranges from less than 3% to more than 25% and averages around 10%. Most of the porosity consists of hybrid solution-enlarged intergranular and intragranular pores resulting from the dissolution of cements, framework grains, and grain replacements.

  5. Effectiveness of a Pharmacist-Led Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Clinic in Rural Perry County, Alabama

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Charles; Ford, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Background. The Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Clinic (CRRC) in Perry County, Alabama, provides free pharmacist-led services. Clinic goals include improving health outcomes and reducing cardiovascular risk factors. Objective. To investigate the effectiveness of the CRRC in rural Perry County, Alabama. The reduction of the modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, blood pressure and body mass index, was evaluated to measure a decrease from baseline to last clinic date. Methods. This retrospective chart review identified 130 patients with at least two blood pressure and BMI measurements from baseline to June 30, 2010. The patients' paper files were used to collect baseline data and most recent measurements, which were recorded on a data collection sheet. Results. There was a statistically significant reduction in systolic blood pressure of 4.08 mmHg, 3.25 mmHg reduction in diastolic blood pressure, and 0.42 kg/m2 reduction in mean BMI. At their last visit prior to June 30, 2010, 59% of hypertensive patients and 35% of diabetic patients were meeting their blood pressure goals. Conclusion. Pharmacist-led management of patients with cardiovascular risk factors significantly reduced blood pressure and allowed more patients to meet their hypertension treatment goals. Despite being modest, reductions in blood pressure and BMI help reduce overall cardiovascular risks. PMID:27525302

  6. An examination of population changes in Alabama's Black Belt counties: 1960-1970 and 1970-1980.

    PubMed

    Bogie, D W; Harrison, D E

    1982-01-01

    "Population changes in 11 Alabama Black Belt counties are examined by comparing annual average birth, death, and migration rates during the 1960s with those of the 1970s. The specific focus of the study is migration patterns among the nonwhite segment of the population. Data from the 1980 and earlier censuses are utilized, along with birth and death data from Alabama vital statistics reports." The results show "that net migration losses among nonwhites declined substantially during the 1970s compared with the 1960s and that in two Black Belt counties there was a reversal from heavy net losses to moderate net gains. Whites, on a county-to-county basis, however, were generally characterized by significantly higher rates of loss during the 1970s than in the 1960s." PMID:12266445

  7. Production and use of industrial wood and bark residues for 44 counties in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, and Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-05-01

    An estimate is given of the tons of industrial wood and bark residues produced and left unused in 44 of the 170 Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) power service area counties in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, and Mississippi. This report supplements the data appearing in TVA's Technical Note B45 Production and Use of Industrial Wood and Bark Residues in the Tennessee Valley, 1979. Together, these reports present residue estimates for all the 201-county Tennessee Valley region. 6 tables.

  8. 32. 1700 BLOCK OF JEFFERSON AVE. 172125 JEFFERSON AVE., DOUGAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. 1700 BLOCK OF JEFFERSON AVE. 1721-25 JEFFERSON AVE., DOUGAN BUILDING (1891), PICKLES & SUTTON, ARCHITECTS. 1735 JEFFERSON AVE., MOFFITT & TOWNE COMPANY BUILDING (1910). - Union Depot Area Study, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  9. A Community Response to a Crisis. The Effective Use of Detention and Alternatives to Detention in Jefferson County, Kentucky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Champaign. Community Research Center.

    Jefferson County, Kentucky youth detention practices were studied after alleged incidents of physical and sexual abuse. For many years juvenile detention practices had been the subject of local controversy. Strict, objective, and specific criteria for detention were implemented on a trial basis. These criteria described specific crimes or…

  10. A subsurface study of the North Frisco City field, Monroe County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanson, M.A.; Cox, J.G.; Harmount, M.; Bruno, L. )

    1993-09-01

    The 1991 discovery of the North Frisco City field has led to a resurgence of industry activity in the updip Jurassic trend of Monroe County, Alabama. Six wells in the field are presently delivering 6,000 BOPD and 5 MMJCFGP out of the Frisco City Sand Member of the lower Haynesville Formation. The North Frisco City field is a combination structural-stratigraphic trap associated with Paleozoic basement topography. A geological and geophysical exploration model for Haynesville production in Alabama was developed from existing subsurface and seismic control. The model predicted hydrocarbons generated from Smackover carbonates migrated through an incompetent or absent Buckner Anhydrite seal into the overlying Frisco City Sand. The Frisco City Sand is vertically sealed by overlying Haynesville shales and anhydrites. The sedimentary strata of the Frisco City Sand Member at North Frisco City field are interpreted to have accumulated as fluvial deposits. The predominant lithology is a coarse- to fine-grained sandstone deposited in a sandy braided-stream environment. The sandy braided-stream deposits occur in stacked fining-upward sequences and have excellent reservoir character. Some of these sequences are very gravel rich and may have accumulated in braided streams associated with alluvial fans. A nonconformity exists totally between the Jurassic sediments and the underlying crystalline metamorphic basement rock. A three-dimensional (3-D) seismic survey was acquired after the discovery well was drilled. The survey covered 8 mi[sup 2] of surface area with a bin size of 82.5 ft. This provided excellent structural control across the prospective area and resulted in better drilling decisions. Also, once 3-D acquisition was complete, the field was developed at an accelerated pace, which has had a positive impact on cash flow and field economics.

  11. Spatial analysis of geologic and hydrologic features relating to sinkhole occurrence in Jefferson County, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doctor, Daniel H.; Doctor, Katarina Z.

    2012-01-01

    In this study the influence of geologic features related to sinkhole susceptibility was analyzed and the results were mapped for the region of Jefferson County, West Virginia. A model of sinkhole density was constructed using Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) that estimated the relations among discrete geologic or hydrologic features and sinkhole density at each sinkhole location. Nine conditioning factors on sinkhole occurrence were considered as independent variables: distance to faults, fold axes, fracture traces oriented along bedrock strike, fracture traces oriented across bedrock strike, ponds, streams, springs, quarries, and interpolated depth to groundwater. GWR model parameter estimates for each variable were evaluated for significance, and the results were mapped. The results provide visual insight into the influence of these variables on localized sinkhole density, and can be used to provide an objective means of weighting conditioning factors in models of sinkhole susceptibility or hazard risk.

  12. Trails through time: A geologist's guide to Jefferson County open space parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Jefferson County Open Space Parks, as well as other nearby parks and National Forest lands, offer marvelousopportunities to explore the geologic story behind this singular landscape. At first the distribution of rocks of differentages and types seems almost random, but careful study of the rocks and landscape features reveals a captivatinggeologic story, a history that tells of the building of the foundations of the continent, the rise and destruction of longvanishedmountain ranges, the ebb and flow of ancient seas, and the constant shaping and reshaping of the landscape inresponse to the never-ending interplay between uplift and erosion. This historical account is constantly being improvedand expanded as new evidence accumulates and new interpretations evolve.

  13. Impervious Surface Assessment of the Towne Creek Watershed, Etowah County, Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffy, D. A.; Blalock, C.

    2004-12-01

    A Geographic Information System (GIS) based approach was used to do a preliminary assessment of a watershed's vulnerability and has been proven to be a quick, inexpensive, and effective means to provide guidance to the watershed manager. This GIS-based approach was used in an assessment of a watershed's proportion of impervious surface as a quantifiable measurement its vulnerability. The percent of a watershed area that is impervious was determined by utilizing the Impervious Surface Analysis Tool (ISAT), which is an extension of the ArcGIS program. ISAT uses landuse/landcover, watershed boundary, and population density data sets to calculate the percent impervious surface (%IS). The Towne Creek watershed covers 24,730 acres in southern Etowah County, Alabama, was investigated. The watershed, which empties into the Middle Coosa River, includes the suburbs of the City of Gadsden. The watershed was delineated into 75 catchments ranging from 230 to 3,163 acres. Initial assessment of the watershed estimated 10.5% of the area is impervious. Individual catchments within the watershed were then classified as being degraded (>25 %IS), impaired (10 to 25 %IS) or protected (<10 %IS). According to this classification scheme, 5 catchments covering 2.6% of the watershed is classified as being degraded, and 5 catchments covering 3.6% of the watershed is impaired, and the remaining 65 catchments covering 93.8% of the watershed is protected.

  14. Analysis of Landsat-4 Thematic Mapper data for classification of forest stands in Baldwin County, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. L.

    1984-01-01

    A computer-implemented classification has been derived from Landsat-4 Thematic Mapper data acquired over Baldwin County, Alabama on January 15, 1983. One set of spectral signatures was developed from the data by utilizing a 3x3 pixel sliding window approach. An analysis of the classification produced from this technique identified forested areas. Additional information regarding only the forested areas. Additional information regarding only the forested areas was extracted by employing a pixel-by-pixel signature development program which derived spectral statistics only for pixels within the forested land covers. The spectral statistics from both approaches were integrated and the data classified. This classification was evaluated by comparing the spectral classes produced from the data against corresponding ground verification polygons. This iterative data analysis technique resulted in an overall classification accuracy of 88.4 percent correct for slash pine, young pine, loblolly pine, natural pine, and mixed hardwood-pine. An accuracy assessment matrix has been produced for the classification.

  15. Shapefile of the Elevation of the Bedrock Surface Beneath the Rocky Flats Alluvial Fan, Boulder and Jefferson Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knepper, Daniel H.

    2003-01-01

    The Rocky Flats alluvial fan is a large early Pleistocene gravel deposit at the mouth of Coal Creek Canyon along the eastern flank of the Colorado Front Range in Jefferson and Boulder Counties, Colorado. Elevations of the bedrock surface beneath the alluvial fan gravels have been compiled at selected points from a variety of sources and recorded in a digital dataset suitable for importing into commonly used GIS and image processing software packages.

  16. Facies and reservoir characterization of an upper Smackover interval, East Barnett Field, Conecuh County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Bergan, G.R. ); Hearne, J.H. )

    1990-09-01

    Excellent production from an upper Smackover (Jurassic) ooid grainstone was established in April 1988 by Coastal Oil and Gas Corporation with the discovery of the East Barnett field in Conecuh County, Alabama. A structure map on the top of the Smackover Formation and net porosity isopach map of the producing intervals show that the trapping mechanism at the field has both structural and stratigraphic components. Two diamond cores were cut from 13,580 to 13,701 ft, beginning approximately 20 ft below the top of the Smackover. Two shallowing-upward sequences are identified in the cores. The first sequence starts at the base of the cored interval and is characterized by thick, subtidal algal boundstones capped by a collapse breccia facies. This entire sequence was deposited in the shallow subtidal to lower intertidal zone. Subsequent lowering of sea level exposed the top portion of the boundstones to meteoric or mixing zone waters, creating the diagenetic, collapse breccia facies. The anhydrite associated with the breccia also indicates surface exposure. The second sequence begins with algal boundstones that sharply overlie the collapse breccia facies of the previous sequence. These boundstones grade upward into high-energy, cross-bedded ooid beach ( ) and oncoidal, peloidal beach shoreface deposits. Proximity of the overlying Buckner anhydrite, representing a probable sabkha system, favors a beach or a very nearshore shoal interpretation for the ooid grainstones. The ooid grainstone facies, which is the primary producing interval, has measured porosity values ranging from 5.3% to 17.8% and averaging 11.0%. Measured permeability values range from 0.04 md to 701 md and average 161.63 md. These high porosity and permeability values result from abundant primary intergranular pore space, as well as secondary pore space created by dolomitization and dissolution of framework grains.

  17. Digital Data Set of Orchards Where Arsenical Pesticides Were Likely Used in Clarke and Frederick Counties, Virginia, and Berkeley and Jefferson Counties, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Bradley W.; Larkins, Peter; Robinson, Gilpin R., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    This Fact Sheet provides information on a digital data set that identifies orchard areas under cultivation between the 1920s and 1960s in Clarke and Frederick Counties, Virginia and Berkeley and Jefferson Counties, West Virginia. The apple orchards in these areas likely used arsenical pesticides during this time. The digital data set can be used in a geographic information system (GIS) to identify where elevated arsenic and lead concentrations may be present in soils. The digital data set, the associated metadata, and the related files are available on the World Wide Web at http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2006/1330/shapefile/.

  18. Analyses of geochemical samples and descriptions of rock samples, Adams Gap and Shinbone Creek Roadless Areas, Clay County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, M.S.; Hanley, J.T.; Kelley, D.L.; Sherlock, L.J.

    1983-01-01

    Semiquantitative spectrographic analyses for 31 elements on 105 rocks, 47 stream-sediment, and 70 soil samples from the Adams Gap and Shinbone Creek Roadless Areas and vicinity, Talladega National Forest, Clay County, Alabama are reported here in detail. Atomic-absorption analyses for zinc in all samples and for gold in 5 selected rock samples are also reported. Localities for all sables are given in Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) coordinates. A brief description of each rock sample is included. Rocks analyzed include quartzite, phyllite, vein quartz, and schist.

  19. Geohydrology and susceptibility of Coldwater Spring and Jacksonville fault areas to surface contamination in Calhoun County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, J.C.; Harris, W.F.; Cobb, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Coldwater Spring in eastern Calhoun County, Alabama, is one of the largest springs in Alabama. The spring, which has an average discharge of about 31 million gallons per day, supplies water for about 70,000 people in the Anniston, Alabama area. A potentiometric map of the study area indicates that the recharge area for the aquifer system that supplies the spring is only about 23 square miles. However, base-flow data for streams in the area indicate that this recharge area is not sufficient to account for an average discharge of 31 million gallons per day from Coldwater Spring. Complex folding and faulting of the carbonate and quart zitic rocks that comprise the aquifer system may have produced fractures and joints that increase recharge to the spring. Some recharge to the spring may be derived from outside the recharge area delineated from the potentiometric map or from the surface. This part of the recharge area contamination from the surface. This part of the recharge area consists of flat to gently rolling terrain underlain by cavernous limestone and fractured quartzite. (USGS)

  20. Natural radioactivity in geothermal waters, Alhambra Hot Springs and nearby areas, Jefferson County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leonard, Robert B.; Janzer, Victor J.

    1978-01-01

    Radioactive hot springs issue from a fault zone in crystalline rock of the Boulder batholith at Alhambra, Jefferson County, in southwestern Montana. The discharge contains high concentrations of radon, and the gross alpha activity and the concentration of adium-226 exceed maximum levels recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Part of the discharge is diverted for space heating, bathing, and domestic use. The radioactive thermal waters at measured temperatures of about 60°C are of the sodium bicarbonate type and saturated with respect to calcium carbonate. Radium-226 in the rock and on fractured surfaces or coprecipitated with calcium carbonate probably is the principal source of radon that is dissolved in the thermal water and discharged with other gases from some wells and springs. Local surface water and shallow ground water are of the calcium bicarbonate type and exhibit low background activity. The temperature, percent sodium, and radioactivity of mixed waters adjacent to the fault zone increase with depth. Samples from most of the major hot springs in southwestern Montana have been analyzed for gross alpha and beta activity. The high level of radioactivity at Alhambra appears to be related to leaching of radioactive material from siliceous veins by ascending thermal waters and is not a normal characteristic of hot springs issuing from fractured crystalline rock in Montana.

  1. A theoretical model of subsidence caused by petroleum production: Big Hill Field, Jefferson County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.W.; Sharp, J.M. Jr. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-02-01

    In the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain, there is a history of oil and gas production extending over 2 to 5 decades. Concurrent with this production history, there has been unprecedented population growth accompanied by vastly increased groundwater demands. Land subsidence on both local and regional bases in this geologic province has been measured and predicted in several studies. The vast majority of these studies have addressed the problem from the standpoint of groundwater usage while only a few have considered the effects of oil and gas production. Based upon field-based computational techniques (Helm, 1984), a model has been developed to predict land subsidence caused by oil and gas production. This method is applied to the Big Hill Field in Jefferson County, Texas. Inputs include production data from a series of wells in this field and lithologic data from electric logs of these same wells. Outputs include predicted amounts of subsidence, the time frame of subsidence, and sensitivity analyses of compressibility and hydraulic conductivity estimates. Depending upon estimated compressibility, subsidence, to date, is predicted to be as high as 20 cm. Similarly, depending upon estimated vertical hydraulic conductivity, the time frame may be decades for this subsidence. These same methods can be applied to other oil/gas fields with established production histories as well as new fields when production scenarios are assumed. Where subsidence has been carefully measured above petroleum reservoir, the model may be used inversely to calculate sediment compressibilities.

  2. Hydrologic and water-quality characterization and modeling of the Chenoweth Run basin, Jefferson County, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Gary R.; Zarriello, Phillip J.; Shipp, Allison A.

    2001-01-01

    Rainfall, streamflow, and water-quality data collected in the Chenoweth Run Basin during February 1996?January 1998, in combination with the available historical sampling data, were used to characterize hydrologic conditions and to develop and calibrate a Hydrological Simulation Program?Fortran (HSPF) model for continuous simulation of rainfall, streamflow, suspended-sediment, and total-orthophosphate (TPO4) transport relations. Study results provide an improved understanding of basin hydrology and a hydrologic-modeling framework with analytical tools for use in comprehensive waterresource planning and management. Chenoweth Run Basin, encompassing 16.5 mi2 in suburban eastern Jefferson County, Kentucky, contains expanding urban development, particularly in the upper third of the basin. Historical water-quality problems have interfered with designated aquatic-life and recreation uses in the stream main channel (approximately 9 mi in length) and have been attributed to organic enrichment, nutrients, metals, and pathogens in urban runoff and wastewater inflows. Hydrologic conditions in Jefferson County are highly varied. In the Chenoweth Run Basin, as in much of the eastern third of the county, relief is moderately sloping to steep. Also, internal drainage in pervious areas is impeded by the shallow, fine-textured subsoils that contain abundant silts and clays. Thus, much of the precipitation here tends to move rapidly as overland flow and (or) shallow subsurface flow (interflow) to the stream channels. Data were collected at two streamflowgaging stations, one rain gage, and four waterquality- sampling sites in the basin. Precipitation, streamflow, and, consequently, constituent loads were above normal during the data-collection period of this study. Nonpoint sources contributed the largest portion of the sediment loads. However, the three wastewatertreatment plants (WWTP?s) were the source of the majority of estimated total phosphorus (TP) and TPO4 transport

  3. Maps showing mines, quarries, oil and gas activity, and sample localities in and near the Sipsey Wilderness and additions, Lawrence and Winston Counties, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mory, P.C.; Behum, P.T.; Ross, R.B. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This report presents the results of a mineral survey of the Sipsey Wilderness and additions, William B. Bankhead National Forest, Lawrence and Winston Counties, Alabama. The survey includes: limestone quarrying, coal mining, and oil and gas activity. 7 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Public health assessment for Redwing Carriers Inc. /Saraland, Saraland, Mobile County, Alabama, Region 4. Cerclis No. ALD980844385. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-23

    The Redwing Carriers, Inc.,/ Saraland Apartment site is located at 527 U.S. Highway 43 in the City of Saraland, Mobile County, Alabama. Redwing Carriers, Inc. owned and operated a trucking terminal used for parking, maintaining, and cleaning trucks and trailers. Redwing transported a variety of substances including asphalt, diesel fuel, chemicals, and pesticides. The operation began in 1961 and continued until 1971. Redwing emptied residue from cleaning the trucks into pits and surrounding ditches at the site. Investigations since then have revealed on-site contamination of soil and groundwater. Contaminants of concern include volatile organic compounds, heavy metals, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and pesticides. The Redwing Carriers/Saraland Apartments site is categorized as a public health hazard based on potential for skin irritation and exposure to benzo(a)pyrene and other PAHs from the ingestion of 5 grams per day of tar-like material by pica children at the site.

  5. Building District Capacity for System-Wide Instructional Improvement in Jefferson County Public Schools. Working Paper. GE Foundation "Developing Futures"™ in Education Evaluation Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darfler, Anne; Riggan, Matt

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes findings from one component of the Consortium for Policy Research in Education's (CPRE) evaluation of the General Electric Foundation's (GEF) "Developing Futures"™ in Education program in Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS). As described in the CPRE proposal and research design, the purpose was to…

  6. Agricultural irrigated land-use inventory for Jackson, Calhoun, and Gadsden Counties in Florida, and Houston County in Alabama, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marella, Richard L.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2015-01-01

    The irrigated acreage estimated for Jackson County in 2014 (31,608) is about 47 percent higher than the 2012 estimated acreage published by the USDA (21,508 acres). The estimates of irrigated acreage field verified during 2014 for Calhoun and Gadsden Counties are also higher than those published by the USDA for 2012 (86 percent and 71 percent, respectively). In Calhoun County the USDA reported 1,647 irrigated acres while the current study estimated 3,060 acres, and in Gadsden County the USDA reported 2,650 acres while the current study estimated 4,547 acres. For Houston County the USDA-reported value of 9,138 acres in 2012 was 13 percent below the 10,333 acres field verified in the current study. Differences between the USDA 2012 values and 2014 field verified estimates in these two datasets may occur because (1) irrigated acreage for some specific crops increased or decreased substantially during the 2-year interval due to commodity prices or economic changes, (2) irrigated acreage calculated for the current study may be estimated high because irrigation was assumed if an irrigation system was present and therefore the acreage was counted as irrigated, when in fact that may not have been the case as some farmers may not have used their irrigation systems during this growing period even if they had a crop in the field, or (3) the amount of irrigated acreages published by the USDA for selected crops may be underestimated in some cases.

  7. Environmental assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Big Hill facility storage of commercial crude oil project, Jefferson County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    The Big Hill SPR facility located in Jefferson County, Texas has been a permitted operating crude oil storage site since 1986 with benign environmental impacts. However, Congress has not authorized crude oil purchases for the SPR since 1990, and six storage caverns at Big Hill are underutilized with 70 million barrels of available storage capacity. On February 17, 1999, the Secretary of Energy offered the 70 million barrels of available storage at Big Hill for commercial use. Interested commercial users would enter into storage contracts with DOE, and DOE would receive crude oil in lieu of dollars as rental fees. The site could potentially began to receive commercial oil in May 1999. This Environmental Assessment identified environmental changes that potentially would affect water usage, power usage, and air emissions. However, as the assessment indicates, changes would not occur to a major degree affecting the environment and no long-term short-term, cumulative or irreversible impacts have been identified.

  8. Freshwater mussels (Unionidae) in the headwaters of Chipola River, Houston County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garner, J.T.; McGregor, S.W.; Tarpley, T.A.; Buntin, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Big and Cowarts creeks lie in extreme southeastern Alabama and form the headwaters of Chipola River. Qualitative and quantitative sampling for freshwater mussels in these reaches during 2006 and 2007 revealed an intact fauna, relative to historical reports. A cumulative total of 17 species, including federally protected Elliptio chipolaensis (Chipola Slabshell), Lampsilis subangulata (Shinyrayed Pocketbook), Medionidus penicillatus (Gulf Moccasinshell), and Pleurobema pyriforme (Oval Pigtoe), was encountered. A total of 3382 mussels (density 5.84 per m2) was estimated for one 65-m reach of Big Creek and 9627 mussels (density 8.09 per m2) were estimated to occur in one 170-m reach of Cowarts Creek. Tributaries had depauperate faunas, apparently due to substrate instability.

  9. Ash-flow eruptive megabreccias of the Manhattan and Mount Jefferson calderas, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Shawe, D.R.; Snyder, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed field study of ash-flow megabreccias associated with the Manhattan and Mount Jefferson calderas shows that megaclasts were brecciated in sub-caldera level before incorporation in ash flows. This evidence in addition to the presence of some clast lithologies that are nowhere recognized in caldera walls and the occurrence of some megabreccia units as outflow suggest an origin by eruption rather than by collapse of caldera walls. Geophysical investigations and a mathematical analysis are presented in the paper.

  10. 40 CFR 81.301 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Birmingham area is a maintenance area for the 1-hour NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Alabama... affecting § 81.301 see the List of CFR Sections Affected which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... County Blount County Bullock County Butler County Calhoun County Chambers County Cherokee County...

  11. WILCOX COUNTY, ALABAMA--A STUDY OF SOCIAL, ECONOMIC, AND EDUCATIONAL BANKRUPTCY. REPORT OF AN INVESTIGATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BROADUS, JAMES; AND OTHERS

    THE REQUEST FOR THIS INVESTIGATION BY THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE OF THE NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION COMMISSION ON PROFESSIONAL RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES RESULTED FROM THE FIRING OF NINE NEGRO TEACHERS IN WILCOX COUNTY. THE STUDY ITSELF IS MORE INCLUSIVE, INCORPORATING THE FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS OF SEPARATE STUDIES IN POVERTY, SCHOOL FINANCE,…

  12. A spatial resolution threshold of land cover in estimating terrestrial carbon sequestration in four counties in Georgia and Alabama, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, S.Q.; Liu, S.; Li, Z.; Sohl, T.L.

    2010-01-01

    Changes in carbon density (i.e., carbon stock per unit area) and land cover greatly affect carbon sequestration. Previous studies have shown that land cover change detection strongly depends on spatial scale. However, the influence of the spatial resolution of land cover change information on the estimated terrestrial carbon sequestration is not known. Here, we quantified and evaluated the impact of land cover change databases at various spatial resolutions (250 m, 500 m, 1 km, 2 km, and 4 km) on the magnitude and spatial patterns of regional carbon sequestration in four counties in Georgia and Alabama using the General Ensemble biogeochemical Modeling System (GEMS). Results indicated a threshold of 1 km in the land cover change databases and in the estimated regional terrestrial carbon sequestration. Beyond this threshold, significant biases occurred in the estimation of terrestrial carbon sequestration, its interannual variability, and spatial patterns. In addition, the overriding impact of interannual climate variability on the temporal change of regional carbon sequestration was unrealistically overshadowed by the impact of land cover change beyond the threshold. The implications of these findings directly challenge current continental- to global-scale carbon modeling efforts relying on information at coarse spatial resolution without incorporating fine-scale land cover dynamics.

  13. Mineralogy and paragenesis of the McAllister Sn-Ta-bearing pegmatite, Coosa County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foord, Eugene E.; Cook, Robert B.

    1989-01-01

    The McAllister Sn-Ta deposit (Alabama) is localized in a complex pegmatite that contains large zones of mineralized late-stage replacement-type saccharoidal albite and nearly monomineralic muscovite 'greisen-like' pipes. The dyke is at least 450 m long and averages approximately 9 m in thickness. At least two 'greisen-like' pipes, as much as 7.6 m by 4.5 m in cross-section and extending at least 76 m down a steep easterly pitch, occur near the center of the dyke. The dyke is hosted by an approximately 300-Ma-old pluton of a group referred to as the Rockford Granite, a mesozonal to epizonal two-mica, peraluminous tin-bearing granite. The pluton is genetically affiliated with a well-defined sequence of simple to complex pegmatite dykes and quartz-casiterite veins that occur near its margin and within the immediately adjacent metasedimentary rocks of the Wedowee Group.

  14. Age and source of water in springs associated with the Jacksonville Thrust Fault Complex, Calhoun County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, James L.

    2004-01-01

    Water from wells and springs accounts for more than 90 percent of the public water supply in Calhoun County, Alabama. Springs associated with the Jacksonville Thrust Fault Complex are used for public water supply for the cities of Anniston and Jacksonville. The largest ground-water supply is Coldwater Spring, the primary source of water for Anniston, Alabama. The average discharge of Coldwater Spring is about 32 million gallons per day, and the variability of discharge is about 75 percent. Water-quality samples were collected from 6 springs and 15 wells in Calhoun County from November 2001 to January 2003. The pH of the ground water typically was greater than 6.0, and specific conductance was less than 300 microsiemens per centimeter. The water chemistry was dominated by calcium, carbonate, and bicarbonate ions. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of the water samples indicates the occurrence of a low-temperature, water-rock weathering reaction known as silicate hydrolysis. The residence time of the ground water, or ground-water age, was estimated by using analysis of chlorofluorocarbon, sulfur hexafluoride, and regression modeling. Estimated ground-water ages ranged from less than 10 to approximately 40 years, with a median age of about 18 years. The Spearman rho test was used to identify statistically significant covariance among selected physical properties and constituents in the ground water. The alkalinity, specific conductance, and dissolved solids increased as age increased; these correlations reflect common changes in ground-water quality that occur with increasing residence time and support the accuracy of the age estimates. The concentration of sodium and chloride increased as age increased; the correlation of these constituents is interpreted to indicate natural sources for chloride and sodium. The concentration of silica increased as the concentration of potassium increased; this correlation, in addition to the isotopic data, is evidence that

  15. Comparison of NLCD with NWI Classifications of Baldwin and Mobile Counties, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Handley, Larry; Wells, Chris

    2009-01-01

    An assessment of the accuracy of National Land Cover Data 2001 as compared to National Wetlands Inventory mapping of Mobile and Baldwin Counties conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Wetlands Research Center (NWRC). Both classifications were checked against stratified randomly selected ground-based sites and with each other to compare the accuracy of the NLCD with NWI classification methods. For this accuracy comparison, numerous visits were made by photointerpreters to the Mobile Bay area to establish signatures for the modified NWI mapping. After all of the quadrangles in Baldwin and Mobile Counties were mapped, an accuracy assessment of those maps was conducted by field-checking the mapped classes with ground-based check sites. These same sites were used to check the accuracy of the NLCD and also as the basis for cross-walking the NLCD and NWI classification systems for direct comparison of the two methods. This accuracy assessment is dependent on a methodology and analysis developed for the unique characteristics and properties of NWI classification, which is mapped to polygon, as compared to NLCD, which uses raster classification and mapping. This cartographic presentation results in fundamentally different classification boundaries. Overlaying these map types cannot prevent boundary differences resulting in a tremendous proliferation of sliver polygons. The intersection of both maps resulted in three-quarters of a million polygons, nearly half of which were less than the 900-m2 pixel size used in NLCD mapping (the smaller of the minimum mapping units of NWI and NLCD versus NWI mapping was about 0.5 ha). It is the authors' opinion that this cartographic difference needs to be more fully explored before accepting the accuracy difference between NWI and NLCD presented here at face value.

  16. Pipeline Corridors through wetlands -- Impacts on plant communities: Mill Creek Tributary Crossing, Jefferson County, New York, 1992 Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, G.D.; Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to identify representative impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of the survey July 1992, at the Mills Creek tributary crossing, Jefferson County, New York. Data were collected from three wetland communities along the 1991 pipeline and compared with predisturbance data obtained in a June 1991 survey. Within one year after pipeline installation, 50% of the soil surface of the ROW in the scrub-shrub community was covered by emergent vegetation. Average wetland values for the ROW in 1992 were lower than in 1991, indicating that the removal of woody plants resulted in a community composed of species with greater fidelity to wetlands. In the emergent marsh community after one year, the average percentage of surface covered by standing water was greater in the ROW than in the adjacent natural areas. The ROW in the forested wetland community also contained standing water, although none was found in the natural forest areas. The entire study site remains a wetland, with the majority of plant species in all sites being either obligate or facultative wetland species. Weighted and unweighted average wetland indices for each community, using all species, indicated wetland vegetation within the newly established ROW.

  17. Fair Housing: A Better Answer than Busing. A Plan for Louisville and Jefferson County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Commission on Human Rights, Louisville.

    In this paper, the Kentucky Commisssion on Human Rights outlines ways in which housing-related institutions and agencies can revise their policies and procedures to reverse the trend towards housing segregation. Recommendations are made to the city and county with regard to how Section 8 housing assistance programs can be used to promote…

  18. Assessment of water-quality conditions in the J.B. Converse Lake watershed, Mobile County, Alabama, 1990-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Journey, Celeste A.; Gill, Amy C.

    2001-01-01

    J.B. Converse (Converse) Lake is a 3,600-acre, tributary-storage reservoir in Mobile County, southwestern Alabama. The lake serves as the primary drinking-water supply for the city of Mobile. The Converse Lake watershed lies within the Coastal Plain Physiographic Province. Semiconsolidated to unconsolidated sediments of sand, silt, gravel, and clay underlie the watershed, and are covered by acidic soils. Land use in the watershed is mainly forest (64 percent) and agriculture (31 percent). Residential and commercial development account for only 1 percent of the total land use in the watershed. Converse Lake receives inflow from seven major tributaries. The greatest inflows are from Big Creek, Crooked Creek, and Hamilton Creek that had mean annual streamflows of 72.2, 19.4, and 25.0 cubic feet per second, respectively, for the period 1990 to 1998, which represents about 72 percent of the total annual streamflow to the lake. The total mean annual inflow to the lake is estimated to be about 163 cubic feet per second. In general, water quality in Converse Lake and its tributaries meets the criteria established by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) for drinking-water supplies, whole-body contact, and aquatic life. The exceptions include acidic pH levels, iron and manganese levels above secondary or aesthetic criteria, and fecal bacterial levels in some tributaries above whole-body contact (swimmable) criteria. The pH levels throughout the watershed were commonly below the criteria level of 6.0, but this appears to have been a naturally occurring phenomenon caused by poorly buffered soil types, resistant sediments, and forested land use. Median iron and manganese levels were above aesthetic criteria levels of 300 and 50 micrograms per liter, respectively, in some tributaries. All tributary sites in the Converse Lake watershed had median and minimum dissolved-oxygen concentrations above the ADEM criteria level of 5 milligrams per liter except for

  19. Final Technical Report. Upgrades to Alabama Power Company Hydroelectric Developments

    SciTech Connect

    Crew, James F.; Johnson, Herbie N.

    2015-03-31

    From 2010 to 2014, Alabama Power Company (“Alabama Power”) performed upgrades on four units at three of the hydropower developments it operates in east-central Alabama under licenses issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (“FERC”). These three hydropower developments are located on the Coosa River in Coosa, Chilton, and Elmore counties in east-central Alabama.

  20. Teaching Jefferson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson has long fascinated Americans. Even though Jefferson biographer Merrill Peterson once termed Jefferson "impenetrable," a host of recent scholars have tried to penetrate the "inner Jefferson" in an attempt to make him "more vital to people." Trying to understand Jefferson, one could argue, is akin to trying to understand America,…

  1. Alabama SEP Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, Elizabeth M.

    2014-06-30

    audit and home energy rating tool; emphasis on community based coordination and partnerships; marketing and outreach to increase homeowner participation; training for market actors; access to financing options including rebates, incentives, and loan products; and an in depth process evaluation to support continual program improvement and analysis. In Alabama, Nexus Energy Center operated energy efficiency retrofit programs in Huntsville and Birmingham. In the Huntsville community the AlabamaWISE program was available in five Alabama counties: Cullman, Lawrence, Limestone, Madison, and Morgan. In Birmingham, the program was available to residents in Jefferson and Shelby Counties. In both communities, the program was similar in terms of program design but tailored marketing and partnerships to address the unique local conditions and population of each community. ADECA and the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) provided overall project management services and common resources to the local program administrator Nexus Energy Center, including contracted services for contractor training, quality assurance testing, data collection and reporting, and compliance. The fundamental components of the AlabamaWISE program included a vertical contractor-based business model; comprehensive energy assessments; third-party quality assurance; rebates for installation of energy saving measures; accessible, low-interest financing; targeted and inbound marketing; Energy Performance Score (EPS) tool to engage and educate homeowners; training for auditors, contractors, and real estate professionals; and online resources for education and program enrollment. Program participants were eligible to receive rebates or financing toward the assessments and upgrades to their home provided they reached at least 20 percent deemed or modeled energy savings. The design of each program focused on addressing several known barriers including: limited homeowner knowledge on the benefits of energy

  2. Hydrogeologic framework, groundwater movement, and water budget in the Chimacum Creek basin and vicinity, Jefferson County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Joseph L.; Welch, Wendy B.; Frans, Lonna M.; Olsen, Theresa D.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents information used to characterize the groundwater flow system in the Chimacum Creek basin. It includes descriptions of the geology and hydrogeologic framework; groundwater recharge and discharge; groundwater levels and flow directions; seasonal fluctuations in groundwater level; interactions between aquifers and the surface-water system; and a groundwater budget. The study area covers 124 square miles in northeastern Jefferson County, Washington, and includes the Chimacum Creek basin, which drains an area of about 37 square miles. The area is underlain by a north-thickening sequence of unconsolidated glacial and interglacial deposits that overlie sedimentary and igneous bedrock units that crop out along the margins and western interior of the study area. Six hydrogeologic units consisting of unconsolidated aquifers and confining units, along with an underlying bedrock unit, were identified. A surficial hydrogeologic map was developed and used with well information from 187 drillers' logs to construct 4 hydrogeologic sections, and maps showing the extent and thickness of the units. Natural recharge was estimated using precipitation-recharge relation regression equations developed for western Washington, and estimates were calculated for return flow from data on domestic indoor and outdoor use and irrigated agriculture. Results from synoptic streamflow measurements and water table elevations determined from monthly measurements at monitoring wells are presented and compared with those from a study conducted during 2002-03. A water budget was calculated comprising long-term average recharge, domestic public-supply withdrawals and return flow, self-supplied domestic withdrawals and return flow, and irrigated agricultural withdrawals and return flow.

  3. Changes in ground-water quality resulting from surface coal mining of small watershed in Jefferson County, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hren, Janet

    1986-01-01

    Two samples were collected from each of six wells in a small watershed in Jefferson County, Ohio, in 1984. The watershed was mined and reclamation begun in 1980. Data collected from 1976 through 1982 indicate that ground-water quality was still changing at that time. The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent ground-water quality continued to change 4 years after mining. The upper saturated zone was destroyed by mining and replaced by spoiled material during reclamation. A new saturated zone then formed in the spoils material. The premining median concentrations of sulfate, manganese, and dissolved solids in the upper saturated zone were 84 milligrams per liter (mg/L). 30 micrograms per liter (?g/L), and 335 mg/L, respectively. The postmining median concentrations of these constituents in the upper-zone wells disturbed by mining were 360 mg/L, 595 ?g/L, and 814 mg/L, respectively. Concentrations of these constituents were still increasing in 1984 in the upper saturated zone. In the area not disturbed by mining, concentrations have remained nearly at premining levels. The premining median concentrations of sulfate, manganese, and dissolved solids in the middle saturated zone were 47 mg/L, 10 ?g/L and 405 mg/L, respectively. The postmining median concentrations were 390 mg/L, 490 ?g/L, and 959 mg/L, respectively. In the middle saturated zone, concentrations of these constituents also were still increasing in 1984, probably due to mixing with water if the upper saturated zone.

  4. 26. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) WITH SAILS SET Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) WITH SAILS SET Original 2-3/4'x2-1/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  5. 2. ALABAMA GATES LOOKING SOUTHEAST ALONG LINED CHANNEL, NOTE CHEMICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. ALABAMA GATES LOOKING SOUTHEAST ALONG LINED CHANNEL, NOTE CHEMICAL PURIFICATION TANK IN DISTANCE FOR KEEPING DOWN GROWTH OF ALGAE - Los Angeles Aqueduct, Alabama Gates, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. Digital Data Set of Orchards Where Arsenical Pesticides Were Likely Used in Clarke and Frederick Counties, Virginia, and Berkeley and Jefferson Counties, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Bradley W.; Larkins, Peter; Robinson, Gilpin R., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    This data set shows orchard locations in Clarke and Frederick Counties, Virginia and Berkeley and Jefferson Counties, West Virginia where arsenical pesticides were likely used. The orchard locations are based on air photos and topographic maps prepared using information from the time period of extensive use of arsenical pesticides between the 1920s and 1960s. An orchard's presence in this data set does not necessarily indicate the use of arsenical pesticides on the site or that elevated arsenic and metal concentrations are present. Arsenical pesticides may have been used on part, or none, of the land and, under current land use, the land may have been remediated and no longer contain elevated arsenic and metal concentrations in soil. The data set was created to be used in an assessment of soil contamination related to past use of arsenical pesticides in orchards in the northern part of the Great Valley region, Virginia and West Virginia. Previous studies have documented that elevated concentrations of arsenic, lead, and sometimes copper occur in the soils of former apple orchards (Veneman et al., 1983; Jones and Hatch, 1937). Arsenical pesticide use was most extensive and widespread in agricultural applications from the 1920s to the late 1950s, and largely ceased agricultural use by the early 1960s in the nation. During this time period, lead arsenate was the most extensively used arsenical pesticide (Peryea, 1998), particularly in apple orchards. Other metal-bearing pesticides, such as copper acetoarsenite (Paris Green), Bordeaux Blue (a mixture of copper sulfate and calcium hydroxide), and organic mercury fumigants were used to a lesser degree in orchards (Peryea, 1998; Shepard, 1939; Veneman et al., 1983). During the time arsenical pesticides were extensively used, federal and state pesticide laws did not require farmers to keep accurate records of the quantity, location, and type of arsenical pesticides used on their property, thus the quantity and distribution

  7. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY FROM UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER CARBONATES THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES AT WOMACK HILL OIL FIELD, CHOCTAW AND CLARKE COUNTIES, ALABAMA, EASTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-12-13

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is drilling an infill well in the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama. The objectives of the project are to drill and core an infill well in Womack Hill Field; to utilize samples from the core to evaluate further the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the field; and to use the new information resulting from the drilling of the well to revise and modify the 3-D geologic model, to further modify the injection strategy for the existing pressure maintenance program, and to assess whether a second infill well should be drilled using lateral/multilateral well completions.

  8. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY FROM UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER CARBONATES THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES AT WOMACK HILL OIL FIELD, CHOCTAW AND CLARKE COUNTIES, ALABAMA, EASTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-12-06

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is drilling an infill well in the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama. The objectives of the project are to drill and core an infill well in Womack Hill Field; to utilize samples from the core to evaluate further the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the field; and to use the new information resulting from the drilling of the well to revise and modify the 3-D geologic model, to further modify the injection strategy for the existing pressure maintenance program, and to assess whether a second infill well should be drilled using lateral/multilateral well completions.

  9. Children Under the Umbrella: A Report on a Project to Develop and Demonstrate the Mechanisms Involved in Operating as a Sponsoring Organization for Nutrition Services in Day Care Centers in Louisville and Jefferson County, Kentucky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Lois J.; And Others

    This program was developed by Community Coordinated Child Care (4-C) of Louisville and Jefferson County, Kentucky, to improve nutritional services to 2,146 infants and preschool children enrolled in fifteen area day care centers, by developing the role of a sponsoring organization and by developing standards of expectations for other sponsoring…

  10. Occurrence and hydrogeochemistry of radiochemical constituents in groundwater of Jefferson County and surrounding areas, southwestern Montana, 2007 through 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caldwell, Rodney R.; Nimick, David A.; DeVaney, Rainie M.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Jefferson County and the Jefferson Valley Conservation District, sampled groundwater in southwestern Montana to evaluate the occurrence and concentration of naturally-occurring radioactive constituents and to identify geologic settings and environmental conditions in which elevated concentrations occur. A total of 168 samples were collected from 128 wells within Broadwater, Deer Lodge, Jefferson, Lewis and Clark, Madison, Powell, and Silver Bow Counties from 2007 through 2010. Most wells were used for domestic purposes and were primary sources of drinking water for individual households. Water-quality samples were collected from wells completed within six generalized geologic units, and analyzed for constituents including uranium, radon, gross alpha-particle activity, and gross beta-particle activity. Thirty-eight wells with elevated concentrations or activities were sampled a second time to examine variability in water quality throughout time. These water-quality samples were analyzed for an expanded list of radioactive constituents including the following: three isotopes of uranium (uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238), three isotopes of radium (radium-224, radium-226, and radium-228), and polonium-210. Existing U.S. Geological Survey and Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology uranium and radon water-quality data collected as part of other investigations through 2011 from wells within the study area were compiled as part of this investigation. Water-quality data from this study were compared to data collected nationwide by the U.S. Geological Survey through 2011. Radionuclide samples for this study typically were analyzed within a few days after collection, and therefore data for this study may closely represent the concentrations and activities of water being consumed locally from domestic wells. Radioactive constituents were detected in water from every well sampled during this study regardless of location or

  11. 75 FR 34735 - Adequacy Status of the Alabama Portion (Jackson County) of the Chattanooga, Tennessee Tri-State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... requirement for hot-spot analysis. (See 73 FR 4419, January 24, 2008.) Please note that an adequacy review is...: Response to Court Decision and Additional Rule Changes'' (69 FR 40004). Authority: 42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq...; Catoosa and Walker Counties, Georgia; and Hamilton County, Tennessee. As a result of EPA's finding,...

  12. Lidar-revised geologic map of the Uncas 7.5' quadrangle, Clallam and Jefferson Counties, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tabor, Rowland W.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Haugerud, Ralph A.; Wells, Ray E.

    2011-01-01

    In 2000 and 2001, the Puget Sound Lidar Consortium obtained 1 pulse/m2 lidar data for about 65 percent of the Uncas 7.5' quadrangle. For a brief description of LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) and this data acquisition program, see Haugerud and others (2003). This map combines geologic interpretation (mostly by Haugerud and Tabor) of the 6-ft (2-m) lidar-derived digital elevation model (DEM) with the geology depicted on the Preliminary Geologic Map of the Uncas 7.5' Quadrangle, Clallam and Jefferson Counties, Washington, by Peter J. Haeussler and others (1999). The Uncas quadrangle in the northeastern Olympic Peninsula covers the transition from the accreted terranes of the Olympic Mountains on the west to the Tertiary and Quaternary basin fills of the Puget Lowland to the east. Elevations in the map area range from sea level at Port Discovery to 4,116 ft (1,255 m) on the flank of the Olympic Mountains to the southwest. Previous geologic mapping within and marginal to the Uncas quadrangle includes reports by Cady and others (1972), Brown and others (1960), Tabor and Cady (1978a), Yount and Gower (1991), and Yount and others (1993). Paleontologic and stratigraphic investigations by University of Washington graduate students (Allison, 1959; Thoms, 1959; Sherman, 1960; Hamlin, 1962; Spencer, 1984) also encompass parts of the Uncas quadrangle. Haeussler and Wells mapped in February 1998, following preliminary mapping by Yount and Gower in 1976 and 1979. The description of surficial map units follows Yount and others (1993) and Booth and Waldron (2004). Bedrock map units are modified from Yount and Gower (1991) and Spencer (1984). We used the geologic time scale of Gradstein and others (2005). The Uncas quadrangle lies in the forearc of the Cascadia subduction zone, about 6.25 mi (10 km) east of the Cascadia accretionary complex exposed in the core of the Olympic Mountains (Tabor and Cady, 1978b). Underthrusting of the accretionary complex beneath the forearc

  13. Hydrologic conditions and assessment of water resources in the Turkey Creek watershed, Jefferson County, Colorado, 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bossong, Clifford R.; Caine, Jonathan Saul; Stannard, David I.; Flynn, Jennifer L.; Stevens, Michael R.; Heiny-Dash, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    The 47.2-square-mile Turkey Creek watershed, in Jefferson County southwest of Denver, Colorado, is relatively steep with about 4,000 feet of relief and is in an area of fractured crystalline rocks of Precambrian age. Water needs for about 4,900 households in the watershed are served by domestic wells and individual sewage-disposal systems. Hydrologic conditions are described on the basis of contemporary hydrologic and geologic data collected in the watershed from early spring 1998 through September 2001. The water resources are assessed using discrete fracture-network modeling to estimate porosity and a physically based, distributed-parameter watershed runoff model to develop estimates of water-balance terms. A variety of climatologic and hydrologic data were collected. Direct measurements of evapotranspiration indicate that a large amount (3 calendar-year mean of 82.9 percent) of precipitation is returned to the atmosphere. Surface-water records from January 1, 1999, through September 30, 2001, indicate that about 9 percent of precipitation leaves the watershed as streamflow in a seasonal pattern, with highest streamflows generally occurring in spring related to snowmelt and precipitation. Although conditions vary considerably within the watershed, overall watershed streamflow, based on several records collected during the 1940's, 1950's, 1980', and 1990's near the downstream part of watershed, can be as high as about 200 cubic feet per second on a daily basis during spring. Streamflow typically recedes to about 1 cubic foot per second or less during rainless periods and is rarely zero. Ground-water level data indicate a seasonal pattern similar to that of surface water in which water levels are highest, rising tens of feet in some locations, in the spring and then receding during rainless periods at relatively constant rates until recharged. Synoptic measurements of water levels in 131 mostly domestic wells in fall of 2001 indicate a water-table surface that

  14. Public health assessment for State Marine of Port Arthur, Port Arthur, Jefferson County, Texas, Region 6, CERCLIS number TXD099801102. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-30

    The State Marine of Port Arthur National Priorities List site, is a 17,197-acre former barge cleaning facility on a small peninsula in the northeastern part of Port Arthur, Jefferson County, Texas. The facility operated from 1974 until 1988. Barge cleaning operations at the site have resulted in the contamination of surface soil and sediment with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) reviewed available environmental information for the site and evaluated several potential exposure situations. These exposure situations include potential contact with site contaminants in surface water, sediment, surface soil, and groundwater. Although site-related contaminants have been found in several of these media, currently the contaminants on or off the site do not pose a public health threat. Based on available information, the authors have concluded that, overall, the State Marine site poses an indeterminate public health hazard.

  15. Analysis of data acquired by Shuttle Imaging Radar SIR-A and Landsat Thematic Mapper over Baldwin County, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S.-T.

    1985-01-01

    Seasonally compatible data collected by SIR-A and by Landsat 4 TM over the lower coastal plain in Alabama were coregistered, forming a SIR-A/TM multichannel data set with 30 m x 30 m pixel size. Spectral signature plots and histogram analysis of the data were used to observe data characteristics. Radar returns from pine forest classes correlated highly with the tree ages, suggesting the potential utility of microwave remote sensing for forest biomass estimation. As compared with the TM-only data set, the use of SIR-A/TM data set improved classification accuracy of the seven land cover types studied. In addition, the SIR-A/TM classified data support previous finding by Engheta and Elachi (1982) that microwave data appear to be correlated with differing bottomland hardwood forest vegetation as associated with varying water regimens (i.e., wet versus dry).

  16. 76 FR 48879 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Alabama Beach Mouse General Conservation Plan for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Alabama Beach Mouse General... endangered Alabama beach mouse (Peromyscus polionotus ammobates) in Baldwin County, Alabama. The GCP analyzes... availability of the proposed GCP and the dEIS. These documents analyze the take of the Alabama beach...

  17. CARDING MACHINES, JEFFERSON MILL. PHOTOCOPY OF c. 1900 VIEW. From ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CARDING MACHINES, JEFFERSON MILL. PHOTOCOPY OF c. 1900 VIEW. From the collection of the Manchester Historic Association, Manchester, N. H. - Amoskeag Millyard, Canal Street, Manchester, Hillsborough County, NH

  18. Estimation of vertical hydraulic conductivity of the clay layer between the Eutaw and Gordo aquifers in the vicinity of Faunsdale, Marengo County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Planert, Michael; Sparkes, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    The vertical hydraulic conductivity of the confining bed between the Eutaw and Gordo aquifers in the vicinity of Faunsdale, in northeast Marengo County, Alabama, is 1x10(-5) foot per day or less. Modeling vertical conductivities larger than 1x50(-5) foot per day produced drawdowns in the Eutaw aquifer greater than those observed in a test where 750 gallons per minute were pumped from the Gordo aquifer. Modeling has shown that vertical hydraulic conductivity of the confining bed is the controlling factor on the drawdown in the Eutaw aquifer. At equilibrium (steady-state) pumping 750 gallons per minute there was 3 feet of drawdown in the Eutaw aquifer with a confining bed conductivity of 1x10(-5) foot per day. When the conductivity was decreased to 1x10(-6) foot per day drawdown in the Eutaw aquifer was only 0.35 foot. A conductivity of 1x10(-5) foot per day in the 48-hour simulation reproduced the drawdown in the well from the 48-hour pumping test, but the conductivity may be as small as an untested 1x10(-6) foot per day. (USGS)

  19. Flood of June 14-15, 1990, in Belmont, Jefferson, and Harrison counties, Ohio, with emphasis on Pipe and Wegee Creek basins near Shadyside

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shindel, H.L.

    1991-01-01

    A series of violent thunderstorms caused severe floods and consequent damage in the central part of Ohio during June 14-15, 1990. The eastern part of the State, particularly Belmont, Harrison, and Jefferson Counties, sustained the most damage. In the Pipe and Wegee Creek basins near Shadyside, Belmont County, at least 24 people died and property damage exceeded $10 million. An indirect measurement of discharge on Pipe Creek made near the mouth, indicates a peak discharge of 15,000 ft? /s (cubic feet per second) for the drainage area of 11.3 mi? (square miles) and a unit discharge of 1,330 (ft? /s)/mi? (cubic feet per second per square mile). The recurrence interval for this peak discharge is greater than 100 years. An indirect measurement of discharge of Wegee Creek, made 3 miles upstream from the mouth, indicates a peak discharge of 2,200 (ft? /s) /mi? . The recurrence interval for this peak discharge also is greater than 100 years. Longitudal water-surface profiles showed depths ranging from 7 ft. to 22 ft. The severity of flooding was highly variable. For example, the recurrence interval of the peak discharge at one U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging station was only 2 years, whereas the recurrence interval for the peak discharge was greater than 100 years at another gaging station about 22 miles away.

  20. Regional assessment of nonforestry related biomass resources: Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This document is a collection of spreadsheets detailing on a county by county basis the agricultural crop, agricultural wastes, municipal wastes and industrial wastes of Alabama that are potential biomass energy sources.

  1. WEST FRONT; STATUE ON STEPS IS THOMAS JEFFERSON (PLACED THERE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WEST FRONT; STATUE ON STEPS IS THOMAS JEFFERSON (PLACED THERE IN 1927); FLANKING BRONZE STATUES DEPICT "THE GREAT RIVERS," THE MISSOURI AND THE MISSISSIPPI; FIGURE OF CERES, GODDESS OF GRAIN TOPS DOME (PLACED THERE IN SEPTEMBER, 1916) - Missouri State Capitol, High Street between Broadway & Jefferson Streets, Jefferson City, Cole County, MO

  2. 1. WEST FRONT; STATUE ON STEPS IS THOMAS JEFFERSON (PLACED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. WEST FRONT; STATUE ON STEPS IS THOMAS JEFFERSON (PLACED THERE IN 1927); FLANKING BRONZE STATUES DEPICT 'THE GREAT RIVERS,' THE MISSOURI AND THE MISSISSIPPI; FIGURE OF CERES, GODDESS OF GRAIN TOPS DOME (PLACED THERE IN SEPTEMBER, 1916) - Missouri State Capitol, High Street between Broadway & Jefferson Streets, Jefferson City, Cole County, MO

  3. 75 FR 47808 - Alabama Municipal Electric Authority; Notice of Competing Preliminary Permit Application Accepted...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-09

    ... Lock and Dam on the Chattahoochee River in Huston County, near the town of Columbia, Alabama. The... acres of land on the levee section of the Corps' facility, on the Alabama shore, opposite the river...

  4. Multielement chemical and statistical analyses from a uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment survey in and near the Elkhorn Mountains, Jefferson County, Montana; Part II, Stream sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suits, V.J.; Wenrich, K.J.

    1982-01-01

    Fifty-two stream-sediment samples, collected from an area south of Helena, Jefferson County, Montana, were sieved into two size fractions (50 ppm for the fine fraction) were encountered in samples from the Warm Springs Creek drainage area, along Prickly Pear Creek near Welmer and Golconda Creeks and along Muskrat Creek. All groups showed a significant correlation at the 99 percent confidence level (r between 0.73 and 0.77) between U and Th. Uranium was found to correlate significantly only with Th (as mentioned above) and with -Ni in the fine fraction of the volcanics group. U correlates significantly with -Al2O3, Ba, organic C, -K2O, -Sr and Y in both size fractions for the Boulder batholith. Correlations between U and each of several elements differ for the fine and coarse fractions of the Boulder batholith group, suggesting that the U distribution in these stream sediments is in large part controlled by grain size. Correlations were found between U and CaO, Cr, Fe203, -Na2O, Sc, -SiO2, TiO2, Yb and Zr in the coarse fraction but not in the fine fraction. U correlates weakly (to the 90% confidence level, crc<.37) with -Co and -Cu in the fine but not the coarse fraction. These results are compared to a previous study in the northern Absaroka mountains. Correlation coefficients between all other elements determined from these samples are also shown in Tables 12 to 15.

  5. Drinking-water quality and variations in water levels in the fractured crystalline-rock aquifer, west-central Jefferson County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Dennis C.; Johnson, Carl J.

    1979-01-01

    In parts of Jefferson County, CO, water for domestic use from the fractured crystalline-rock aquifer contained excessive concentrations of major ions, coliform bacteria, trace elements, or radiochemicals. Based on results of analyses from 26 wells, water from 21 of the wells contained excessive concentrations of one or more constituents. Drinking water standards were exceeded for fluoride in water from 2 wells, nitrate plus nitrite in 2 wells, dissolved solids in 1 well, iron in 6 wells, manganese in 8 wells, zinc in 2 wells, coliform bacteria in 4 wells, gross alpha radiation in 11 wells and possibly 4 more, and gross beta radiation possibly in 1 well. Local variations in concentrations of 15 chemical constituents, specific conductance, and water temperature were statistically significant. Specific conductance increased significantly during 1973-75 only in the vicinity of Indian Hills. Annual range in depths to water in 11 observation wells varied from 1 to 15 feet. The shallowest water levels were recorded in late winter, usually in February. The deepest water levels occurred during summer or fall, depending on the well and the year. Three-year trends in water level changes in 6 of the 11 wells indicated decreasing water storage in the aquifer. (USGS).

  6. Continuous hydrologic simulation of runoff for the Middle Fork and South Fork of the Beargrass Creek basin in Jefferson County, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarrett, G. Lynn; Downs, Aimee C.; Grace-Jarrett, Patricia A.

    1998-01-01

    The Hydrological Simulation Pro-gram-FORTRAN (HSPF) was applied to an urban drainage basin in Jefferson County, Ky to integrate the large amounts of information being collected on water quantity and quality into an analytical framework that could be used as a management and planning tool. Hydrologic response units were developed using geographic data and a K-means analysis to characterize important hydrologic and physical factors in the basin. The Hydrological Simulation Program FORTRAN Expert System (HSPEXP) was used to calibrate the model parameters for the Middle Fork Beargrass Creek Basin for 3 years (June 1, 1991, to May 31, 1994) of 5-minute streamflow and precipitation time series, and 3 years of hourly pan-evaporation time series. The calibrated model parameters were applied to the South Fork Beargrass Creek Basin for confirmation. The model confirmation results indicated that the model simulated the system within acceptable tolerances. The coefficient of determination and coefficient of model-fit efficiency between simulated and observed daily flows were 0.91 and 0.82, respectively, for model calibration and 0.88 and 0.77, respectively, for model confirmation. The model is most sensitive to estimates of the area of effective impervious land in the basin; the spatial distribution of rain-fall; and the lower-zone evapotranspiration, lower-zone nominal storage, and infiltration-capacity parameters during recession and low-flow periods. The error contribution from these sources varies with season and antecedent conditions.

  7. Analysis of geophysical logs from six boreholes at Lariat Gulch, former U.S. Air Force site PJKS, Jefferson County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Hodges, Richard E.; Corland, Barbara S.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents and describes geophysical logs for six boreholes in Lariat Gulch, a topographic gulch at the former U.S. Air Force site PJKS in Jefferson County near Denver, Colorado. Geophysical logs include gamma, normal resistivity, fluid-column temperature and resistivity, caliper, televiewer, and heat-pulse flowmeter. These logs were run in two boreholes penetrating only the Fountain Formation of Pennsylvanian and Permian age (logged to depths of about 65 and 570 feet) and in four boreholes (logged to depths of about 342 to 742 feet) penetrating mostly the Fountain Formation and terminating in Precambrian crystalline rock, which underlies the Fountain Formation. Data from the logs were used to identify fractures and bedding planes and to locate the contact between the two formations. The logs indicated few fractures in the boreholes and gave no indication of higher transmissivity in the contact zone between the two formations. Transmissivities for all fractures in each borehole were estimated to be less than 2 feet squared per day.

  8. Geology and geothermal resources of the Santiam Pass area of the Oregon Cascade Range, Deschutes, Jefferson and Linn Counties, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.E.

    1992-10-01

    This open-file report presents the results of the Santiam Pass drilling program. The first phase of this program was to compile all available geological, geophysical and geothermal data for the Santiam Pass area and select a drill site on the basis of these data (see Priest and others, 1987a), A summary of the drilling operations and costs associated with the project are presented in chapter 1 by Hill and Benoit. An Overview of the geology of the Santiam Pass area is presented by Hill and Priest in chapter 2. Geologic mapping and isotopic age determinations in the Santiam Pass-Mount Jefferson area completed since 1987 are summarized in chapter 2. One of the more important conclusions reached in chapter 2 is that a minimum of 2 km vertical displacement has occurred in the High Cascade graben in the Santiam Pass area. The petrology of the Santiam Pass drill core is presented by Hill in chapter 3. Most of the major volcanic units in the core have been analyzed for major, minor, and trace element abundances and have been studied petrographically. Three K-Ar ages are interpreted in conjunction with the magnetostratigraphy of the core to show that the oldest rocks in the core are approximately 1.8 Ma. Geothermal and geophysical data collected from the Santiam Pass well are presented by Blackwell in chapter 4. The Santiam Pass well failed to penetrate beneath the zone of lateral groundwater flow associated with highly permeable Quaternary volcanic rocks. Calculated geothermal gradients range from about 50[degree]C/km at depth 700-900 m, to roughly 110[degree]C/km from 900 m to the bottom of the well at 929 m. Heat-flow values for the bottom part of the hole bracket the regional average for the High Cascades. Blackwell concludes that heat flow along the High Cascades axis is equal to or higher than along the western edge of the High Cascades.

  9. Evaluation of the Origin and Fate of Nitrate in the Aquifer System of Southern Baldwin County, Alabama Using Multi-isotopic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgulet, D.; Tick, G. R.

    2008-12-01

    Continued and extensive residential and agricultural development of near-shore areas in southern Baldwin County, Alabama has led to increased inputs of nitrogen (N) to groundwater and to the Gulf of Mexico. Nitrate (NO3-) concentrations in several groundwater wells exceeded the regulatory drinking water standards (10 mg/L nitrate-N). Groundwater and surface water samples were analyzed for nitrate, phosphate, salinity, chloride, and total dissolved solids concentrations to assess the extent of nitrate contamination. Nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate (e.g., δ15N and δ18O of nitrate) were used in conjunction with other isotopic data (e.g., 13C, and 14C, and hydrogen and oxygen isotopes of groundwater) and hydrogeochemical data to place constraints on potential sources of nitrate. The δ15N and δ18O of groundwater nitrate values ranged between +3.1 and +9.6‰ and +4.2 and +8.7‰, respectively. This range of values suggests that nitrate is primarily derived from nitrification of reduced N compounds (primarily ammonia) from fertilizer and manure or septic waste. However, an overwhelming number of samples show isotopic signatures which indicate that the predominant source of nitrate in these aguifers is the fertilizer and to some extent, for deeper wells with older groundwater, the atmospheric nitrate. The narrow range of δ18O values further confirms the primary nitrate sources. The δ15N and δ18O of nitrate data indicate that denitrification was not an important processes in these aquifers. This conclusion is also supported by the 114C data which revealed relatively young groundwaters with sufficiently high oxygen levels. In the absence of denitrification and the presence of a permanent source, it is expected that the elevated groundwater nitrate concentrations will not be readily attenuated posing a potential contamination and degradation problem of coastal discharge zones into the future. The δ13C and δ18O of groundwater data indicates that water in the

  10. Analysis of stream-aquifer system interrelationships in the Big Blue and Little Blue River basins in Gage and Jefferson Counties, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Seepage measurements made during the fall of 1978 at 21 sites in the Big Blue River basin and at 35 sites in the Little Blue River basin were used to determine stream gains or losses in 20 drainage areas in the Big Blue River basin and 31 drainage areas in the Little Blue River basin. Analyses of data from these seepage measurements and of available hydrogeologic data indicate that the most significant ground-water contributions to streamflow in the Big Blue and Little Blue River drainage basins in Gage and Jefferson Counties, Nebr., occur where a direct hydraulic connection exists between a stream and buried coarse-grained deposits of Quaternary age. These deposits occur in two buried bedrock valleys that trend east-northeasterly across the area. The largest ground-water contributions to streamflow in the Big Blue River occur in the reaches of the river between the mouth of Mud Creek and the dam at Blue Springs (about 13 cubic feet per second) and between the mouth of Turkey Creek and the Beatrice gaging station (about 22 cubic feet per second). Ground-water contributions to streamflow also occur in two tributaries of the Big Blue River; Bear Creek (4.39 cubic feet per second) and Big Indian Creek (6.23 cubic feet per second). In the Little Blue River basin the largest contributions to streamflow occur between the mouths of Big Sandy Creeks (about 6.5 cubic feet per second) and in the vicinity of Fairbury (about 16 cubic feet per second). A ground-water contribution to streamflow of about 6.5 cubic feet per second also occurs in Rose Creek, a tributary of the Little Blue River. (USGS)

  11. Pipeline corridors through wetlands - impact on plant communities: Mill Creek Tributary Crossing, Jefferson County, New York, 1991 survey. Topical report, June 1991--April 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, G.D. |; Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of a survey conducted in June 1991 at the Mill Creek tributary crossing, Jefferson County, New York. One pipeline had been installed through the wetland in 1966, and another was scheduled to be installed later in 1991. Data were collected along the existing pipeline ROW and also along the planned ROW for use as baseline data in future studies. Four separate communities were surveyed. A scrub-shrub wetland and a forested wetland were sampled along the existing ROW where the planned pipeline was to be installed. A mixed vegetation community was sampled along the existing ROW, west of where the planned pipeline would joint the ROW. A marsh community was sampled along the route of the planned pipeline. All plant species found on the ROW of the scrub-shrub community were also present in the adjacent natural areas. The vegetation on the ROW of the forested wetland community also consisted mostly of species found in the adjacent natural areas. In the mixed vegetation community, a small drainage channel present on the ROW, possibly resulting from the pipeline construction, provided habitat for a number of obligate species not found in other areas of this community. Differences noted among different areas of this community were also attributed to slight variations in elevation.

  12. Community Engagement in Health-Related Research: A Case Study of a Community-Linked Research Infrastructure, Jefferson County, Arkansas, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Holly C.; Olson, Mary; Cottoms, Naomi; Bachelder, Ashley; Smith, Johnny; Ford, Tanesha; Dawson, Leah C.; Greene, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Underrepresentation of racial minorities in research contributes to health inequities. Important factors contributing to low levels of research participation include limited access to health care and research opportunities, lack of perceived relevance, power differences, participant burden, and absence of trust. We describe an enhanced model of community engagement in which we developed a community-linked research infrastructure to involve minorities in research both as participants and as partners engaged in issue selection, study design, and implementation. Community Context We implemented this effort in Jefferson County, Arkansas, which has a predominantly black population, bears a disproportionate burden of chronic disease, and has death rates above state and national averages. Methods Building on existing community–academic partnerships, we engaged new partners and adapted a successful community health worker model to connect community residents to services and relevant research. We formed a community advisory board, a research collaborative, a health registry, and a resource directory. Outcome Newly formed community–academic partnerships resulted in many joint grant submissions and new projects. Community health workers contacted 2,665 black and 913 white community residents from December 2011 through April 2013. Eighty-five percent of blacks and 88% of whites were willing to be re-contacted about research of potential interest. Implementation challenges were addressed by balancing the needs of science with community needs and priorities. Interpretation Our experience indicates investments in community-linked research infrastructure can be fruitful and should be considered by academic health centers when assessing institutional research infrastructure needs. PMID:26203813

  13. The Rural Alabama Pregnancy and Infant Health (RAPIH) Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeper, J. D.; And Others

    The impact of the Rural Alabama Pregnancy and Infant Health (RAPIH) Program was evaluated in relation to prenatal care, birth outcome measures, and several child health and home environment outcomes. Begun in 1983, RAPIH targets poor rural blacks in three of west-central Alabama's poorest counties, where economic conditions and infant mortality…

  14. 14. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Southern RR at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Southern RR at Epes Alabama Great Southern RR bridge. View from S. Copy of photo taken in 1922 by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms., Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  15. 24. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN); VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN); VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON STATION IN GULF OF MEXICO WITH MOTOR BOAT TIED AT STERN Original 4-3/4'x6-3/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  16. 25. VIEW OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) FROM OFF PORT BOW; VESSEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. VIEW OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) FROM OFF PORT BOW; VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON STATION IN GULF OF MEXICO WITH MOTOR BOAT TIED AT STERN Original 4-3/4'x6-3/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  17. 23. VIEW FROM STARBOARD BOW OF ALABAMA AS 'ALABAMIAN.' Uncopyrighted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW FROM STARBOARD BOW OF ALABAMA AS 'ALABAMIAN.' Uncopyrighted 3-1/2'x5-5/8' postcard; image taken on station in Gulf of Mexico, c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  18. Migrant Children in Alabama. A Survey to Identify Children of Migrant Workers and Certain Former Migrant Workers in Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Univ., Tuscaloosa. Coll. of Education.

    A 1-year study was completed in August of 1969 by the University of Alabama on procedures to identify the children of migrant workers and of former migrant workers in 6 school systems in Alabama (Blount, Cullman, Pike, and Washington County School Systems and Demopolis and Elba City School Systems). The report of this study (1) includes detailed…

  19. 11. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11 N of Epes Southern RR. lift span, S tower. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, MS. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  20. 8. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11, N of Epes Southern RR. lift span, from SW. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  1. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH, CAMPUS OF UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA IN TUSCALOOSA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING SOUTH, CAMPUS OF UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA IN TUSCALOOSA. SOUTH LOCK WALL, LOCK NO. 3 (LATER NO. 12). - Warrior River, Lock No. 3 Wall, River Road at University Park, Tuscaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, AL

  2. Ground Breaking Ceremony for the Alabama Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Ground breaking ceremony for the Alabama Space Science Center, later renamed the U.S. Space and Rocket Center. Shown in this picture, left to right, are Edward O. Buckbee, Space Center Director; Jack Giles, Alabama State Senator of Huntsville; Dr. Wernher on Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director; Martin Darity, head of the Alabama Publicity Bureau (representing Governor Albert Brewer); James Allen, former Lieutenant governor, chairman of the Alabama Space Science Exhibit Commission; Major General Charles Eifler, commanding general of the Army Ordnance Missile Command; and Huntsville Mayor Glenrn Hearn. (Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public Library)

  3. Multielement chemical and statistical analyses from a uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment survey in and near the Elkhorn Mountains, Jefferson County, Montana; Part I, Surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suits, V.J.; Wenrich, K.J.

    1982-01-01

    Fifty-two surface-water samples, collected from an area south of Helena, Jefferson County, were analyzed for 51 chemical species. Of these variables, 35 showed detectable variation over the area, and 29 were utilized in a correlation analysis. Two populations are distinguished in the collected samples and are especially evident in the plot of Ca versus U. Samples separated on the basis of U versus Ca proved to represent drainage areas of two differing lithologies. One group was from waters that drain the Boulder batholith, the other from those that drain the Elkhorn Mountains volcanic rocks. These two groups of samples, in general, proved to have parallel but different linear trends between U and other elements. Therefore, the two groups of samples were treated separately in the statistical analyses. Over the area that drains the Boulder batholith, U concentrations in water ranged from 0.37 to 13.0 ?g/l , with a mean of 1.9 ?g/l. The samples from streams draining volcanic areas ranged from 0.04 to 1.5 ?g/l, with a mean of 0.42 ?g/l. The highest U values (12 and 13 ?g/l) occur along Badger Creek, Rawhide Creek, Little Buffalo Gulch, and an unnamed tributary to Clancy Creek. Conductivity, hardness, Ba, Ca, CI, K, Mg, Na and Sr are significantly correlated with U at or better than the 95 percent confidence limit in both populations. For water draining the Boulder batholith, uranium correlates significantly with akalinity, pH, bicarbonate, Li, Mo, NO2+NO3, P04, SiO2, SO4, F, and inorganic carbon. These correlations are similar to those found in a previous study of water samples in north-central New Mexico (Wenrich-Verbeek, 1977b). Uranium in water from the volcanic terrane does not show correlations with any of the above constituents, but does correlate well with V. This relationship with V is absent within the Boulder batholith samples.

  4. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Cameron, Clarion, Elk, Forest, Jefferson, McKean, Potter, and Warren Counties, Pennsylvania, 2004-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milheim, L. E.; Slonecker, E. T.; Roig-Silva, C. M.; Winters, S. G.; Ballew, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract unconventional natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in this area of Pennsylvania. Conventional natural gas wells, which sometimes use the same technique for extraction, are commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and are frequently developed in clusters across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Cameron, Clarion, Elk, Forest, Jefferson, McKean, Potter, and Warren Counties in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is also used to quantify these changes and is included in this publication. In this region, natural gas and oil development disturbed

  5. State Education Finance and Governance Profile: Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Key, Logan

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the state education finance and governance profile of Alabama. The state is home to 1,538 public schools distributed across 67 county school systems and 64 city school systems. State spending is allocated via two separate budgets, "the general fund" for all noneducation related expenditures and the Education Trust Fund (ETF)…

  6. 1. OVERALL VIEW OF VIADUCT, WITH JEFFERSON STREET IN FOREGROUND, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERALL VIEW OF VIADUCT, WITH JEFFERSON STREET IN FOREGROUND, LOOKING SOUTH ALONG SIXTH STREET - Sixth Street Viaduct, Spanning Burlington Northern Railroad & Valley Street, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  7. 77 FR 26541 - Alabama Power Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    ... Request: Due to drought conditions in the Coosa River basin, Alabama Power proposes to release from Jordan.... d. Applicant: Alabama Power Company. e. Name of Project: Jordan Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: On the Coosa River, in Elmore, Chilton and Coosa Counties, Alabama. g. Filed Pursuant to:...

  8. The Economic Impact of Jefferson College on the Community and the State, FY 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson Coll., Hillsboro, MO.

    This document is a report on the economic impact of Jefferson College on Jefferson County and the State of Missouri. The information from the this study can be used to support the community college's effectiveness, assessment, public relations, and accreditation efforts. Results show that: (1) the community college impacts the county economically…

  9. Alabama Public Library Service Library Directory and 1996 Statistical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This publication presents library contact information and statistics for Alabama public libraries for fiscal year 1996 (October 1, 1995-September 30, 1996). The library directory is arranged by type of library: public libraries, single-county public library systems, multi-county public library systems, and multitype library systems. Entries…

  10. 32. PORT PROFILE OF THE ALABAMA. Uncopyrighted 31/4'x5'photograph taken by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. PORT PROFILE OF THE ALABAMA. Uncopyrighted 3-1/4'x5'photograph taken by Thigpen Photography, c. 1965. Written on back of photo: 'This is what the vessel looked like when I bought her in 1966 R.S. Douglas.' Also, stamped on back is: Thigpen Photography 1442 So. Beltline Highway Mobile, Alabama 46609 to reorder specify no. M7062-1 - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  11. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plan (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini; Joe Benson; David Hilton; David Cate; Lewis Brown

    2006-05-29

    The principal research efforts for Phase II of the project were drilling an infill well strategically located in Section 13, T. 10 N., R. 2 W., of the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, and obtaining fresh core from the upper Smackover reservoir to test the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in this field. The Turner Land and Timber Company 13-10 No. 1 well was successfully drilled and tested at a daily rate of 132 barrels of oil in Section 13. The well has produced 27,720 barrels of oil, and is currently producing at a rate of 60 barrels of oil per day. The 13-10 well confirmed the presence of 175,000 barrels of attic (undrained) oil in Section 13. As predicted from reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation, the top of the Smackover reservoir in the 13-10 well is structurally high to the tops of the Smackover in offsetting wells, and the 13-10 well has significantly more net pay than the offsetting wells. The drilling and testing of the 13-10 well showed that the eastern part of the field continues to have a strong water drive and that there is no need to implement a pressure maintenance program in this part of the Womack Hill Field at this time. The success achieved in drilling and testing the 13-10 infill well demonstrates the benefits of building a geologic model to target areas in mature fields that have the potential to contain undrained oil, thus increasing the productivity and profitability of these fields. Microbial cultures that grew at 90 C and converted ethanol to acid were recovered from fresh cuttings from the Smackover carbonate reservoir in an analogous field to the Womack Hill Field in southwest Alabama; however, no viable microorganisms were found in the Smackover cores recovered from the drilling of the 13-10 well in Womack Hill Field. Further evaluation is, therefore, required prior to implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the Womack Hill Field.

  12. 41. Photocopy of engraving from History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Photocopy of engraving from History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford and Gasconade Counties, Missouri (Chicago: Goodpeed Publishing Co., 1888) Wittenberg-Sorber, St. Louis, engraver, ca. 1888 'STONE HILL VINEYARDS AND CELLARS OF THE STONE HILL WINE COMPANY, HERMANN, MO.' - Stone Hill Winery, 401 West Twelfth Street, Hermann, Gasconade County, MO

  13. High Performing Alabama School Systems: What Do the Best Have in Common?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller-Whitehead, Marie

    The Alabama State Department of Education School System Report Card provides annual data for each of Alabama's city and county public school systems, including student achievement indicators on the Stanford Achievement Test, High School Exit exam, writing tests, ACT test, dropouts, ADA expenditures, free and reduced lunch, system revenues, and…

  14. 4. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE COLLAPSED RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE COLLAPSED RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17. Western half of collapsed Alabama, Tenn. & Northern RR. Bridge Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., photographer, 1973. Copy by Sarcone Photography, Columbs, Ms Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  15. 3. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE RAILROAD BRIDGE AND FERRY 1.5 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE RAILROAD BRIDGE AND FERRY 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17. Copy of photo by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., 1927. West ferry landing ferry barge, andcar in foreground. Alabama, Tennessee & Northern (later Frisco) RR bridge in background. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  16. 13. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES HIGHWAY BRIDGE U.S. 11 N ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES HIGHWAY BRIDGE U.S. 11 N of Epes Gorgas Bridge from NW. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  17. Effects of Jefferson Road stormwater-detention basin on loads and concentrations of selected chemical constituents in East Branch of Allen Creek at Pittsford, Monroe County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherwood, Donald A.

    2004-01-01

    Discharge and water-quality data collection at East Branch Allen Creek from 1990 through 2000 provide a basis for estimating the effect of the Jefferson Road detention basin on loads and concentrations of chemical constituents downstream from the basin. Mean monthly flow for the 5 years prior to construction of the detention basin (8.71 ft3/s) was slightly lower than after (9.08 ft3/s). The slightly higher mean monthly flow after basin construction may have been influenced by the peak flow for the period of record that occurred in July 1998 or variations in flow diverted from the canal. No statistically significant difference in average monthly mean flow before and after basin installation was indicated. Total phosphorus was the only constituent to show no months with significant differences in load after basin construction. Several constituents showed months with significantly smaller loads after basin construction than before, whereas some constituents showed certain months with smaller and some months with greater loads, after basin construction. Statistical analysis of the 'mean monthly load' for all months before and all months after construction of the detention basin showed only one constituent (ammonia + organic nitrogen) with a significantly lower load after construction and none with higher loads. Median concentrations of ammonia + organic nitrogen showed a statistically significant decrease (from 0.78 mg/L to 0.60 mg/L) after basin installation, as did nitrite + nitrate (from 1.50 mg/L to 0.96 mg/L); in contrast, the median concentration of dissolved chloride increased from 95.5 mg/L before basin installation to 109 mg/L thereafter. A trend analysis of constituent concentrations before and after installation of the detention basin showed that total phosphorus had a downward trend after installation. Analysis of the data collected at East Branch Allen Creek indicates that the Jefferson Road detention basin, in some cases, provides an improvement

  18. Pesticide occurrence in groundwater in areas of high-density row crop production in Alabama, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moreland, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    High-density row crop production occurs in three areas of Alabama that are underlain by productive aquifers, northern Alabama, southeastern Alabama, and Baldwin County in southwestern Alabama. The U.S. Geological Survey collected five groundwater samples from each of these three areas during 2009 for analysis of selected pesticides. Results of these analyses showed detections for 37 of 152 analytes. The three most frequently detected compounds were atrazine, 2-Chloro-4-isopropylamino-6-amino-triazine (CIAT), and metolachlor. The highest concentration for any analyte was 4.08 micrograms per liter for metolachlor.

  19. FACING SOUNT AT JEFFERSON STREET AND 16TH STREET. NORTH AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACING SOUNT AT JEFFERSON STREET AND 16TH STREET. NORTH AND WEST BACKSIDES OF JOHN BREUNER AND COMPANY BUILDING IN CENTER (BACKGROUND), SURROUNDING STRUCTURES ON CLAY, JEFFERSON AND 15TH STREETS AT LEFT, RIGHT, AND FOREGROUND - John Breuner & Company Building, 1515 Clay Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  20. The Economic Impact of Jefferson College on the Community and State--FY1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson Coll., Hillsboro, MO.

    This document provides an estimation of the ways in which Jefferson College (Missouri) impacts the economy of Jefferson County and the state as a whole. It offers quantitative information and acts as a reference for the Board of Trustees, administrators, faculty, and staff regarding the economic significance of the college to the area it serves.…

  1. The Economic Impact of Jefferson College on the Community and the State, FY 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson Coll., Hillsboro, MO.

    The purpose of this study is to provide an estimation of the ways in which Jefferson College impacts and stimulates the economy of Jefferson County and the state of Missouri as a whole. It provides quantitative information for use by the Board of Trustees and the Administrative Cabinet in institutional planning endeavors. It is also a useful…

  2. Late Pleistocene fishes of the Tennessee River Basin: an analysis of a late Pleistocene freshwater fish fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2) in Colbert County, Alabama, USA.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, Stephen J; Ebersole, Jun A; Dickinson, William C; Ciampaglio, Charles N

    2016-01-01

    The Tennessee River Basin is considered one of the most important regions for freshwater biodiversity anywhere on the globe. The Tennessee River Basin currently includes populations of at least half of the described contemporary diversity of extant North American freshwater fishes, crayfish, mussel, and gastropod species. However, comparatively little is known about the biodiversity of this basin from the Pleistocene Epoch, particularly the late Pleistocene (∼10,000 to 30,000 years B.P.) leading to modern Holocene fish diversity patterns. The objective of this study was to describe the fish assemblages of the Tennessee River Basin from the late Pleistocene using a series of faunas from locales throughout the basin documented from published literature, unpublished reports, and an undocumented fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2, Colbert County, AL). Herein we discuss 41 unequivocal taxa from 10 late Pleistocene localities within the basin and include a systematic discussion of 11 families, 19 genera, and 24 identifiable species (28 unequivocal taxa) specific to the Bell Cave locality. Among the described fauna are several extirpated (e.g., Northern Pike Esox lucius, Northern Madtom Noturus stigmosus) and a single extinct (Harelip Sucker Moxostoma lacerum) taxa that suggest a combination of late Pleistocene displacement events coupled with more recent changes in habitat that have resulted in modern basin diversity patterns. The Bell Cave locality represents one of the most intact Pleistocene freshwater fish deposits anywhere in North America. Significant preservational, taphonomic, sampling, and identification biases preclude the identification of additional taxa. Overall, this study provides a detailed look into paleo-river ecology, as well as freshwater fish diversity and distribution leading up to the contemporary biodiversity patterns of the Tennessee River Basin and Mississippi River Basin as a whole. PMID:26855876

  3. Late Pleistocene fishes of the Tennessee River Basin: an analysis of a late Pleistocene freshwater fish fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2) in Colbert County, Alabama, USA

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, Jun A.; Dickinson, William C.; Ciampaglio, Charles N.

    2016-01-01

    The Tennessee River Basin is considered one of the most important regions for freshwater biodiversity anywhere on the globe. The Tennessee River Basin currently includes populations of at least half of the described contemporary diversity of extant North American freshwater fishes, crayfish, mussel, and gastropod species. However, comparatively little is known about the biodiversity of this basin from the Pleistocene Epoch, particularly the late Pleistocene (∼10,000 to 30,000 years B.P.) leading to modern Holocene fish diversity patterns. The objective of this study was to describe the fish assemblages of the Tennessee River Basin from the late Pleistocene using a series of faunas from locales throughout the basin documented from published literature, unpublished reports, and an undocumented fauna from Bell Cave (site ACb-2, Colbert County, AL). Herein we discuss 41 unequivocal taxa from 10 late Pleistocene localities within the basin and include a systematic discussion of 11 families, 19 genera, and 24 identifiable species (28 unequivocal taxa) specific to the Bell Cave locality. Among the described fauna are several extirpated (e.g., Northern Pike Esox lucius, Northern Madtom Noturus stigmosus) and a single extinct (Harelip Sucker Moxostoma lacerum) taxa that suggest a combination of late Pleistocene displacement events coupled with more recent changes in habitat that have resulted in modern basin diversity patterns. The Bell Cave locality represents one of the most intact Pleistocene freshwater fish deposits anywhere in North America. Significant preservational, taphonomic, sampling, and identification biases preclude the identification of additional taxa. Overall, this study provides a detailed look into paleo-river ecology, as well as freshwater fish diversity and distribution leading up to the contemporary biodiversity patterns of the Tennessee River Basin and Mississippi River Basin as a whole. PMID:26855876

  4. Geology and geothermal resources of the Santiam Pass area of the Oregon Cascade Range, Deschutes, Jefferson and Linn Counties, Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.E.

    1992-10-01

    This open-file report presents the results of the Santiam Pass drilling program. The first phase of this program was to compile all available geological, geophysical and geothermal data for the Santiam Pass area and select a drill site on the basis of these data (see Priest and others, 1987a), A summary of the drilling operations and costs associated with the project are presented in chapter 1 by Hill and Benoit. An Overview of the geology of the Santiam Pass area is presented by Hill and Priest in chapter 2. Geologic mapping and isotopic age determinations in the Santiam Pass-Mount Jefferson area completed since 1987 are summarized in chapter 2. One of the more important conclusions reached in chapter 2 is that a minimum of 2 km vertical displacement has occurred in the High Cascade graben in the Santiam Pass area. The petrology of the Santiam Pass drill core is presented by Hill in chapter 3. Most of the major volcanic units in the core have been analyzed for major, minor, and trace element abundances and have been studied petrographically. Three K-Ar ages are interpreted in conjunction with the magnetostratigraphy of the core to show that the oldest rocks in the core are approximately 1.8 Ma. Geothermal and geophysical data collected from the Santiam Pass well are presented by Blackwell in chapter 4. The Santiam Pass well failed to penetrate beneath the zone of lateral groundwater flow associated with highly permeable Quaternary volcanic rocks. Calculated geothermal gradients range from about 50{degree}C/km at depth 700-900 m, to roughly 110{degree}C/km from 900 m to the bottom of the well at 929 m. Heat-flow values for the bottom part of the hole bracket the regional average for the High Cascades. Blackwell concludes that heat flow along the High Cascades axis is equal to or higher than along the western edge of the High Cascades.

  5. 9. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11 N of Epes Southern RR. lift span, view from S approach. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  6. 10. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11 of Epes Wouthern RR. lift span, wide=angle view from SW. bank. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  7. 12. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11 N of Epes Southern RR. lift span, wide angle side view from SE. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  8. Cardboard Houses with Wings: The Architecture of Alabama's Rural Studio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botz-Bornstein, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    The Rural Studio, an outreach program of Auburn University, designs innovative houses for poor people living in Alabama's Hale County by using "junk" such as car windshields, carpet tiles, baled cardboard, and old license plates. The article theorizes this particular architecture in terms of Critical Regionalism, developed by Tzonis/Lefaivre and…

  9. Thomas Jefferson's Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Catherine F.

    1996-01-01

    Notes that taken together, Thomas Jefferson's contributions to the history of writing technology demonstrate a virtual "computer." Links Jefferson's development of writing technology to his democratic political philosophy. Argues that this link should interest writing teachers. Suggests that Jeffersonian optimism effectively counters Foucaultian…

  10. Thomas Jefferson and the Constitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Merrill D.

    1987-01-01

    Examines Thomas Jefferson's role in the making and interpretation of the United States Constitution. Discusses the dominant features of Jefferson's constitutional theory; the character of Jefferson's presidency; and Jefferson's ongoing concern about constitutional preservation and change. Lists important dates in the history of the constitution.…

  11. Alabama Education Quick Facts, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This document is a quick look at general information about Alabama schools. The document contains 11 sections: (1) state statistics; (2) Alabama public schools, 2006-07; (3) Alabama state board of education members; (4) financial data; (5) school size and enrollment; (6) transportation and school meals; (7) graduation requirements; (8) additional…

  12. Alabama Water Use, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutson, Susan S.; Littlepage, Thomas M.; Harper, Michael J.; Tinney, James O.

    2009-01-01

    Water is one of Alabama's most precious natural resources. It is a vital component of human existence and essential to the overall quality of life. Wise stewardship of this valuable resource depends on a continuing assessment of water availability and water use. Population growth in many parts of the State has resulted in increased competition for available water resources. This competition includes offstream uses, such as residential, agricultural, and industrial, and instream uses for maintenance of species habitat and diversity, navigation, power generation, recreation, and water quality. Accurate water-use information is required for sound management decisions within this competitive framework and is necessary for a more comprehensive understanding of the link between water use, water supply, and overall water availability. A study of water use during 2005 was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs, Office of Water Resources, Water Management Branch (ADECA-OWR), to provide water-use data for local and State water managers. The results of the study about the amount of water used, how it was used, and where it was used in Alabama have been published in 'Estimated use of water in Alabama in 2005' by Hutson and others, 2009, and is accessible on the Web at http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2009/5163 and available upon request as a CD-ROM through USGS and ADECA-OWR.

  13. Alabama and SREB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Alabama and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead Goals for Education", which call for the region to lead the…

  14. Homonegativity among Alabama Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satcher, Jamie; Leggett, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Members of the Alabama Counseling Association were surveyed to examine the extent to which they demonstrate homonegativity (prejudicial attitudes toward homosexuality). The majority of the counselors did not appear to approach homosexuality from traditional prejudices, although almost one-third believed homosexuality to be immoral. The counselors…

  15. Alabama's Decree of Difficulty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evelyn, Jamilah

    1998-01-01

    Nearly 30 years after the official end of de jure segregation, Alabama is struggling to level educational opportunities for both black and white citizens. Critics say this goal will be difficult to reach unless the state hires and retains more black faculty. Only recently, because of a court decree, are state black institutions getting equal…

  16. Academic Standards in Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    A+ Education Partnership, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Education policymakers and educators in Alabama are committed to improving the state's public education system to ensure that students gain the knowledge and skills they need to graduate from high school ready for real life. The state is on the path to implementing higher academic standards--the College and Career Ready Standards--which lay a…

  17. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-13

    Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

  18. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-05-22

    Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

  19. Analytical results for 35 mine-waste tailings cores and six bed-sediment samples, and an estimate of the volume of contaminated material at Buckeye meadow on upper Basin Creek, northern Jefferson County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fey, D.L.; Church, S.E.; Finney, C.J.

    1999-01-01

    Metal-mining related wastes in the Boulder River basin study area in northern Jefferson County, Montana have been implicated in their detrimental effects on water quality with regard to acidgeneration and toxic-metal solubilization. Flotation-mill tailings in the meadow below the Buckeye mine, hereafter referred to as the Buckeye mill-tailings site, have been identified as significant contributors to water quality degradation of Basin Creek, Montana. Basin Creek is one of three tributaries to the Boulder River in the study area; bed sediments and waters draining from the Buckeye mine have also been implicated. Geochemical analysis of 35 tailings cores and six bed-sediment samples was undertaken to determine the concentrations of Ag, As, Cd, Cu, Pb,and Zn present in these materials. These elements are environmentally significant, in that they can be toxic to fish and/or the invertebrate organisms that constitute their food. A suite of one-inch cores of dispersed flotation-mill tailings and underlying premining material was taken from a large, flat area north of Basin Creek near the site of the Buckeye mine. Thirty-five core samples were taken and divided into 204 subsamples. The samples were analyzed by ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy) using a mixed-acid digestion. Results of the core analyses show that the elements listed above are present at moderate to very high concentrations (arsenic to 63,000 ppm, silver to 290 ppm, cadmium to 370 ppm, copper to 4,800 ppm, lead to 93,000 ppm, and zinc to 23,000 ppm). Volume calculations indicate that an estimated 8,400 metric tons of contaminated material are present at the site. Six bed-sediment samples were also subjected to the mixed-acid total digestion, and a warm (50oC) 2M HCl-1% H2O2 leach and analyzed by ICP-AES. Results indicate that bed sediments of Basin Creek are only slightly impacted by past mining above the Buckeye-Enterprise complex, moderately impacted at the upper (eastern

  20. Foraminifera from Paleocene Clayton Formation lithostratotype, Barbour Count, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Fluegeman, R.H. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    A detailed search of the Clayton lithostratotype for microfossils has produced the first significant foraminifera fauna from the section and only the second occurrence of foraminifera in the Clayton Formation in eastern Alabama. The fauna is well preserved, but low in abundance and diversity; all assemblages are dominated by species of Anomalinoides. No planktonic species were identified in the studied samples. The benthic assemblages bear little resemblance to the more diverse foraminifera faunas of the Pine Barren and McBryde Members of the Clayton in western Alabama. The fauna from the Clayton lithostratotype closely resembles an assemblage collected from a sand unit within the middle part of the Porters Creek Formation of Butler County, Alabama. Biostratigraphic information is presently unavailable for the Clayton Formation in eastern Alabama; therefore, the authors cannot determine whether the Clayton and Porters Creek are time-equivalent units. However, occurrences of like foraminiferal assemblages imply equivalent paleoecologic conditions, and similarities in lithology are found between the Clayton Formation at its stratotype and the Porters Creek in Butler County, both of which indicate that both units represent the same depositional aspect of the early Paleocene transgressive-regressive cycle.

  1. Alabama Education News. Volume 29, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  2. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  3. Alabama Education News. Volume 32, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  4. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  5. Alabama Education News. Volume 27, Number 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  6. Alabama Education News. Volume 33, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  7. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama," as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  8. Alabama Education News. Volume 33, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  9. Alabama Education News. Volume 27, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  10. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  11. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  12. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  13. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  14. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  15. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  16. Alabama Education News. Volume 27, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama," as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  17. Alabama Education News. Volume 27, Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  18. Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  19. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  20. Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  1. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  2. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  3. Alabama Education News. Volume 29, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  4. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  5. Jefferson Township Schools Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dayton Univ., OH. Office of Educational Services.

    This report presents a study that examines the possibility of reorganizing the Jefferson Township (Ohio) Schools' junior high and high school from their present 7-9/10-12 configuration to a 7-8/9-12 grade plan. Data for the study were gathered through 1) a facilities study of the junior high and high school to examine space availability, present…

  6. Jefferson and Democratic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holowchak, M. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This essay is a reply to James Carpenter's "Thomas Jefferson and the Ideology of Democratic Schooling." In it, I argue that there is an apophatic strain in the essay that calls into question the motivation for the undertaking.

  7. Paleocene lignite deposits of southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.

    1984-04-01

    In southwest Alabama, lignite having economic potential occurs in the Oak Hill Member of the Naheola Formation. This middle Paleocene lignite generally consists of a single bed of 1-14 ft (0.5-4 m) in thickness and is the most extensive lignite in the southwest Alabama region. The Oak Hill lignite deposit accumulated in lower delta plain coastal marshes in interchannel areas behind a barrier system. The source area for the deltaic sediments was probably to the west and/or northwest of Choctaw County, Alabama. The lignite occurs in a clay-dominated sequence. Oak Hill interdistributary bay ripple-laminated clays are interbedded with ripple-laminated, crevasse splay sands generally less than 15 ft (5 m) thick. The glauconitic sands of the overlying Coal Bluff Marl Member of the Naheola Formation represent times of marine encroachment into the interchannel basin area. Lignite having subeconomic value at present occurs in the upper part of the Tuscahoma Sand. This upper Paleocene lignite is irregular in its outcrop pattern and apparently is not represented over extensive areas. It is locally persistent with one or more beds less than 3 ft (1 m) thick. The Tuscahoma may contain up to 6 lignite seams that may exceed a total thickness of 5 ft (1.5 m). These lignite beds were deposited in lower delta-plain coastal marshes adjacent to high constructive deltaic bar finger sands. Tuscahoma marsh clays are interbedded with ripple-laminated and cross-bedded bar finger sands. The Tuscahoma Sand is overlain by the Bashi Marl Member of the Hatchetigbee Formation. The Bashi contains a diverse lower Eocene marine fossil assemblage.

  8. Paleocene lignite deposits of southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.

    1984-04-01

    In southwest Alabama, lignite having economic potential occurs in the Oak Hill Member of the Naheola Formation. This middle Paleocene lignite generally consists of a single bed of 1-14 ft (0.5-4 m) in thickness and is the most extensive lignite in the southwest Alabama region. The Oak Hill lignite deposit accumulated in lower delta plain coastal marshes in interchannel areas behind a barrier system. The source area for the deltaic sediments was probably to the west and/or northwest of Choctaw County, Alabama. The lignite occurs in a clay-dominated sequence. Oak Hill interdistributary bay ripple-laminated clays are interbedded with ripple-laminated, crevasse splay sands generally less than 15 ft (5 m) thick. The glauconitic sands of the overlying Coal Bluff Marl Member of the Naheola Formation represent times of marine encroachment into the interchannel basin area. Lignite haing subeconomic value at present occurs in the upper part of the Tuscahoma Sand. This upper Paleocene lignite is irregular in its outcrop pattern and apparently is not represented over extensive areas. It is locally persistent with one or more beds less than 3 ft (1 m) thick. The Tuscahoma may contain up to 6 lignite seams that may exceed a total thickness of 5 ft (1.5 m). These lignite beds were deposited in lower delta-plain coastal marshes adjacent to high constructive deltaic bar finger sands. Tuscahoma marsh clays are interbedded with ripple-laminated and cross-bedded bar finger sands. The Tuscahoma Sand is overlain by the Bashi Marl Member of the Hatchetigbee Formation. The Bashi contains a diverse lower Eocene marine fossil assemblage.

  9. Evaluation of broiler litter transportation in northern Alabama, USA.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Krishna P; Adhikari, Murali; Martin, Neil R

    2004-10-01

    The profitability of using broiler litter as a source of crop nutrients was calculated using a phosphorus-consistent litter application rule. A ton of litter can cost effectively be transported up to 164 miles from the production facility. A cost-minimizing phosphorus-consistent transportation model developed to meet the nutrient needs of 29 counties in northern Alabama revealed that not all of the litter can be utilized in the region. The total cost increased when transportation of the litter out of the heavily surplus counties was prioritized. Total litter use was minimally affected by changes in chemical fertilizer prices. Shadow prices indicated the robustness of the model. PMID:15327843

  10. Hurricane Frederic tidal floods of September 12-13, 1979, along the Gulf Coast, Heron Bay, Little Dauphin Island, Fort Morgan, and Fort Morgan NW quadrangles, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohman, Larry R.; Scott, John C.

    1980-01-01

    Shown on a topographic map are floodmark elevations and approximate areas flooded by Hurricane Frederic tides of September 12-13, 1979, along the southeastern tip of Mobile County, including Dauphin Island, Alabama. Nearly all the mainland area shown on the map was inundated by the tidal surge. The Dauphin Island Parkway Bridge (Alabama State Highway 163) was almost totally demolished. Storm-tide frequency and records of annual maximum tides at Mobile, Alabama, since 1772, are presented. Offshore winds reached about 160 miles per hour. A wind-velocity of about 145 miles per hour was recorded near Dauphin Island, Alabama. (USGS)

  11. Adsorption kinetics of CO2, CH4, and their equimolar mixture on coal from the Black Warrior Basin, West-Central Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Naney, M.T.; Blencoe, J.G.; Cole, D.R.; Pashin, J.C.; Carroll, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetic behavior of pure and mixed gases (CO2, CH4, approximately equimolar CO2 + CH4 mixtures, and He) on a coal sample obtained from the Black Warrior Basin at the Littleton Mine (Twin Pine Coal Company), Jefferson County, west-central Alabama. The sample was from the Mary Lee coal zone of the Pottsville Formation (Lower Pennsylvanian). Experiments with three size fractions (45-150????m, 1-2??mm, and 5-10??mm) of crushed coal were performed at 40????C and 35????C over a pressure range of 1.4-6.9??MPa to simulate coalbed methane reservoir conditions in the Black Warrior Basin and provide data relevant for enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations. The following key observations were made: (1) CO2 adsorption on both dry and water-saturated coal is much more rapid than CH4 adsorption; (2) water saturation decreases the rates of CO2 and CH4 adsorption on coal surfaces, but it appears to have minimal effects on the final magnitude of CO2 or CH4 adsorption if the coal is not previously exposed to CO2; (3) retention of adsorbed CO2 on coal surfaces is significant even with extreme pressure cycling; and (4) adsorption is significantly faster for the 45-150????m size fraction compared to the two coarser fractions. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Adsorption Kinetics of CO2, CH4, and their Equimolar Mixture on Coal from the Black Warrior Basin, West-Central Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S; Naney, Michael {Mike} T; Blencoe, James {Jim} G; Cole, David R; Pashin, Jack C.; Carroll, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetic behavior of pure and mixed gases (CO2, CH4, approximately equimolar CO2 + CH4 mixtures, and He) on a coal sample obtained from the Black Warrior Basin at the Littleton Mine (Twin Pine Coal Company), Jefferson County, west-central Alabama. The sample was from the Mary Lee coal zone of the Pottsville Formation (Lower Pennsylvanian). Experiments with three size fractions (45-150 m, 1-2 mm, and 5-10 mm) of crushed coal were performed at 40 C and 35 C over a pressure range of 1.4 6.9 MPa to simulate coalbed methane reservoir conditions in the Black Warrior Basin and provide data relevant for enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations. The following key observations were made: (1) CO2 adsorption on both dry and water-saturated coal is much more rapid than CH4 adsorption; (2) water saturation decreases the rates of CO2 and CH4 adsorption on coal surfaces, but it appears to have minimal effects on the final magnitude of CO2 or CH4 adsorption if the coal is not previously exposed to CO2; (3) retention of adsorbed CO2 on coal surfaces is significant even with extreme pressure cycling; and (4) adsorption is significantly faster for the 45-150 m size fraction compared to the two coarser fractions.

  13. Positrons at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, A W

    2009-09-01

    We review the compelling case for establishing a capability to accelerate positrons at Jefferson Lab. The potential appplications range from the study of two-photon exchange and deeply-virtual Compton scattering to exploiting the charge current weak interaction to probe the flavor structure of hadrons and nuclei. There are also fascinating ideas for using such a capability to discover new physics beyond the Standard Model of nuclear and particle physics.

  14. Horticulture for Secondary Level Handicapped Adolescents: The Cherokee County Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frith, Greg H.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The Cherokee County (Alabama) horticulture training program provides 40 mildly mentally retarded adolescents with vocational training in a marketable skills. The broad spectrum of vocational skills makes horticulture ideal for the handicapped. (DB)

  15. Water EducaTion for Alabama's Black Belt (WET Alabama): Facilitating Scientific Understanding of the Hydrologic Cycle in Low-Resource Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, L. W.; Lee, M.; Stone, K.

    2008-12-01

    Youth, as future citizens, play an important role in obtaining and maintaining water resources. Water EducaTion for Alabama's Black Belt (WET Alabama) provides off-campus environmental and water-education activities designed to increase the appreciation, knowledge, conservation, and protection of water resources by middle-school teachers and children from predominantly African-American families in some of Alabama's poorest counties. The project is structured around a variety of indoor and outdoor activities held at two field sites, Auburn University's E. V. Smith Center in Macon County and the Robert G. Wehle Nature Center in Bullock County located in Alabama's "Black Belt" region, a region in which the prosperity of local communities is low. The educational activities provide an engaging laboratory and field experience for children from rural schools that lack scientific facilities and equipment. Both hosting centers have easy access to surface water (ponds, wetlands, streams) and offer facilities for basic hydrologic experiments (e.g., aquifer models, permeameter, water quality). The E.V. Smith site has access to groundwater through pairs of nested wells. Educational activities are designed to help students and teachers visualize groundwater flow and its interaction with surface water in an aquifer tank model; compare the hydrologic properties (porosity and permeability) of different aquifer materials (sands, gravels, and clays); learn about groundwater purging and sampling; and assess water quality and flow direction in the field. Simple exercises demonstrate (1) the balance of recharge and discharge, (2) the effects of flooding, drought and pumping, and (3) movement of contaminants through aquifers. A set of ready-to-teach laboratory exercises and tutorials address goals specified by the State of Alabama science curriculum for grades 6 to 8. The ultimate goal of Project WET Alabama is to help students and teachers from resource-poor schools become knowledgeable

  16. Confronting Thomas Jefferson, Slave Owner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, James A.

    1992-01-01

    Although Thomas Jefferson's view of freedom was the cornerstone of the Declaration of Independence, this founding father owned 170 slaves to run his 5,000 acre plantation. This article describes a unit developed by the Monticello (Virginia) Education Department that teaches secondary students about slave Isaac Jefferson while exposing them to…

  17. The Vision of Thomas Jefferson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    Contends that it was the blend of public service and public interests that distinguish the life of Thomas Jefferson. Discusses Jefferson's political philosophy found in his writings. Explains that nearly all of his writing was done to accomplish specific goals, although it had significance far beyond the immediate context. (CFR)

  18. Fifteen Years Ago...Rural Alabama Revisited. Clearinghouse Publication Number 82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wanda B.; Pearson, Curtis W. D.

    Re-examination of a 16-county area of southern Alabama last studied in 1968 found it still economically depressed, especially for blacks. Black unemployment remains two to three times higher and black poverty rates up to five times higher than those of whites. Blacks are generally employed in the lowest paying jobs. Both black median family income…

  19. An Analysis of Child Count Data and Personnel Needs in Special Education Programs in Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogie, Donald W.; Martin, Larry

    The study analyzed data concerning students enrolled in special education classes in Alabama's 130 (67 county and 63 city) public school systems, including student counts by age, grade in school, school district, type of exceptionality, and personnel needs. Analysis indicated a considerable variation among school systems in the distribution of…

  20. Luminous electrical phenomena in Huntsville, Alabama, tornadoes on April 3, 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, O. H., Jr.; Vonnegut, B.

    1976-01-01

    Unusual lightning and varicolored luminous phenomena were observed on the evening of April 3, 1974, when severe tornadoes passed through Madison County, Alabama. Photographs and eyewitness accounts of this electrical activity are related to the trajectories of the tornadoes and the damage areas they produced.

  1. 7. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just off U.S. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just off U.S. 11, N of Epes Copy of photo by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms. 1922. Picture of earlier bridge: turn span and fixed spans. Ala. Great Southern RR. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  2. 5. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE COLLAPSED RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE COLLAPSED RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17. Copy of photo by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., after bridge collapsed in 1973. Shows broken turn span and overturned center pier. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  3. 6. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17 Copy of photo by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., 192. Shows center turn span and part of one fixed span. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  4. 77 FR 18857 - Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision for Alabama Beach Mouse General...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... species. On August 9, 2011, we published a notice of availability for a draft EIS (76 FR 48879) for a 90... Mouse General Conservation Plan for Incidental Take on the Fort Morgan Peninsula, Baldwin County, AL... Alabama beach mouse (Peromyscus polionotus ammobates). For record of decision (ROD) availability,...

  5. Diet Quality Is Low among Female Food Pantry Clients in Eastern Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Patricia; Zizza, Claire; Jacoby, Jocelynn; Tayie, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Examine diet quality, food security, and obesity among female food pantry clients. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A food pantry in Lee County, Alabama. Participants: Fifty-five female food pantry clients between 19 and 50 years of age. Main Outcome Measure(s): Diet quality using United States (US) Department of Agriculture…

  6. Glyphosate-resistant horseweed (conyza canadensis) control with dicamba in Alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Widespread horseweed resistance to glyphosate has resulted in the use of dicamba as an alternative treatment. Horseweed populations in Cherokee and DeKalb counties in northern Alabama were not well controlled following glyphosate and dicamba treatments. This research evaluates horseweed populations ...

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL ATTITUDES OF ALABAMA COASTAL RESIDENTS: PUBLIC OPINION POLLS AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Given these conclusions at the national level, it follows that the continued health and vitality of the Alabama coastal zone is associated with the current environmental knowledge of Mobile and Baldwin county residents. In this research, we collected information from coa...

  8. Assessing the Quality of Life in Rural Alabama: Results of High School Students' Community Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knopke, Harry J.; And Others

    Rural Alabama high school freshmen and sophomores collected and analyzed data about community drinking water supplies in a social science research project designed to acquaint them with health care issues in their communities. Students interviewed government and business leaders, health care professionals, and residents in three rural counties. In…

  9. 2. ALABAMA, PICKENS, CO., COCHRANE HIGHWAY BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. ALABAMA, PICKENS, CO., COCHRANE HIGHWAY BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17. Aerial view of Milner bridge, from SE. David J. Kaminsky, Architecturl Photography, Atlanta Ga. Aug 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  10. 1. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE HIGHWAY BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE HIGHWAY BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17 Aerial view of Milner bridge, from SW. David J. Kaminsky, Architectural Photography, Atlanta Ga. Aug 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  11. Libraries in Alabama: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/alabama.html Libraries in Alabama To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. Birmingham American Sports Medicine Institute Sports Medicine LIBRARY 833 St. Vincent's Drive Suite 205 Birmingham, AL ...

  12. Alabama Public Library Service: 1998 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    The Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) is responsible for receiving and administering federal and state funds for the more than 200 public libraries in Alabama. This document represents the annual report for the Alabama Public Library Service for fiscal year 1998. Information is reported under the following categories: Evaluation and Research;…

  13. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  14. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  15. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  16. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  17. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  18. Alabama Public Library Service 1996 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    The Alabama Public Library Service is charged with improving library services throughout Alabama to ensure that all citizens have access to quality library and information services. The agency is responsible for administering federal and state funds for the more than 200 public libraries in Alabama. Building renovations were completed in April…

  19. 78 FR 20937 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ... modification No. Alabama: Jefferson City of Bessemer The Honorable City Hall, http:// May 23, 2013 010115 (12.../alabama/ City of Bessemer, 3rd Avenue North, jefferson-3/. 1800 3rd Avenue Bessemer, AL North, Bessemer...-0685P- City of Murrieta, Department, 26442 060751-102IAC.pdf. 24601 Jefferson Beckman County,...

  20. Neutron Transversity at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen; Xiaodong Jiang; Jen-chieh Peng; Lingyan Zhu

    2005-09-07

    Nucleon transversity and single transverse spin asymmetries have been the recent focus of large efforts by both theorists and experimentalists. On-going and planned experiments from HERMES, COMPASS and RHIC are mostly on the proton or the deuteron. Presented here is a planned measurement of the neutron transversity and single target spin asymmetries at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a transversely polarized {sup 3}He target. Also presented are the results and plans of other neutron transverse spin experiments at Jefferson Lab. Finally, the factorization for semi-inclusive DIS studies at Jefferson Lab is discussed.

  1. Ground-water resources of the Alabama River Basin in Alabama; Subarea 8 of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint and Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa River Basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kidd, Robert E.; Atkins, J. Brian; Scott, John C.

    1997-01-01

    Drought conditions in the 1980's focused attention on the multiple uses of the surface- and ground-water resources in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) and Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa (ACT) River basins in Georgia, Alabama, and Florida. State and Federal agencies also have proposed projects that would require additional water resources and revise operating practices within the river basins. The existing and proposed water projects create conflicting demands for water by the States and emphasize the problem of water-resource allocation. This study was initiated to describe ground-water availability in the Alabama River basin of Alabama, Subarea 8 of the ACF and ACT River basins, and to estimate the possible effects of increased ground-water use within the basin. Subarea 8 encompasses about 6,750 square miles in the Coastal Plain physiographic province in central and southwestern Alabama. The Alabama River extends from the juncture of the Coosa and Tallapoosa Rivers near the city of Montgomery, to its juncture with the Tombigbee River, near the town of Calvert in Washington County. Subarea 8 includes the Cahaba River basin from the physiographic 'Fall Line' at the city of Centreville in Bibb County, to its mouth in Dallas County; and the Alabama River basin from near Montgomery to the Alabama River cutoff, about 6 miles northeast of its juncture with the Tombigbee River. The study area is underlain by sedimentary deposits of Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Quaternary ages. Major aquifers underlying Subarea 8 are, from shallowest to deepest, the Coastal lowlands aquifer system, the Floridan aquifer system, the Lisbon aquifer, The Nanafalia-Clayton aquifer, the Ripley aquifer, the Eutaw aquifer, and the Tuscaloosa aquifer. The conceptual model described for this study qualitatively subdivides the ground-water flow system into local (shallow), intermediate, and regional (deep) flow regimes. Ground-water discharge to tributaries mainly is from local and intermediate flow

  2. Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, R. Joel, II, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This document consists of the two issues of the "Alabama Counseling Association Journal" published during 1996. The focus of the journal is on communicating ideas and information that will help counselors to implement the counseling role and develop the profession of counseling. Issue number 1 includes the following articles: "Commitment through…

  3. Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Gypsy, Ed.; Elliott, Glenda R., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Communicating ideas and information that will help counselors to implement the counseling role and develop the profession of counseling is the purpose of this journal. The first issue in volume 21 contains the following articles: "Policies and Procedures for Reporting Child Abuse in Alabama: Considerations for Counselors, Teachers, and School…

  4. Alabama's Child Nutrition Certification Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery. Div. of Administration and Finance.

    This handbook presents the plan for the Alabama computerized certification program for school food service employees. The first section contains the following information and materials pertaining to the child nutrition certification program: rationale; position titles (Child Nutrition Program Director or Supervisor, Child Nutrition Program…

  5. Thomas Jefferson and American Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coonen, Lester P.; Porter, Charlotte M.

    1976-01-01

    Presented are the numerous contributions made by Thomas Jefferson to the fields of biological sciences. In addition to his actual contributions and discoveries, his extensive verbal and literacy support of the sciences is traced. (SL)

  6. 75 FR 51098 - Protection Island and San Juan Islands National Wildlife Refuges, Jefferson, Island, San Juan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... Register on August 14, 2007 (72 FR 45444), announcing our intent to complete a CCP/EA and inviting public... Fish and Wildlife Service Protection Island and San Juan Islands National Wildlife Refuges, Jefferson, Island, San Juan, Skagit, and Whatcom Counties, WA AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior....

  7. Silent reminders: geologic wonders of the George Washington and Jefferson National Forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey; U.S. Forest Service

    2001-01-01

    The iron industry played a vital role in the industrialization of the United States and in the development of the U.S. economy and society. Much of the early history of the iron industry took place in Virginia. The remains of 11 iron furnaces and nearby mines in the George Washington and Jefferson National Forests in Virginia and West Virginia are silent reminders of a time when iron mines and furnaces operated along a belt that extended through the Appalachian Mountains from New York State to Alabama.

  8. Community food environment measures in the Alabama Black Belt: Implications for cancer risk reduction

    PubMed Central

    Gyawu, Rebecca; Quansah, Joseph E.; Fall, Souleymane; Gichuhi, Peter N.; Bovell-Benjamin, Adelia C.

    2015-01-01

    In-store measures were utilized to evaluate the availability of healthy food choices and nutrition/health promotion messages for cancer risk reduction in the selected Alabama Black Belt counties/cities. Sixty one retail food outlets (RFOs) were audited in 12 Alabama Black Belt cities. Store types included convenience stores (49.2%), restaurants (19.7%), fast food restaurants (16.4%), small supermarkets (8.2%), and large supermarket and farmers' markets (3.3 %), respectively. Although there were low numbers of farmers' markets/street stands and large supermarkets, these had significantly (p < 0.0001) higher health scores than the other store types. A few health promotion messages were highly visible or obscurely positioned in some RFOs. The Alabama Black Belt food environment had limited opportunities for healthy food choices. PMID:26844138

  9. Ecological characterization atlas of coastal Alabama: Map narrative

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.F. Jr. )

    1984-08-01

    The southwest Alabama coastal region is the study area of this narrative and accompanying maps. The offshore area includes the region from the State-Federal demarcation to the shoreline, and the inland area includes Mobile and Baldwin Counties. These counties are included in the following six US Geological Survey 1:100,000-scale topographic maps: Citronelle, Atmore, Mobile, Bay Minette, Biloxi, and Pensacola. The data in this atlas meet all cartographic and narrative specifications of the Minerals Management Service and the US Fish and Wildlife Service and should be useful for coastal decisionmakers. The topics included within this map narrative are biological resources; socioeconomic features; soils and landforms; oil, gas, and mineral resources; and hydrology and climatology. 21 figs., 52 tabs.

  10. Site Visit Report: Seven Counties Services, Louisville, Kentucky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Racino, Julie Ann

    The report describes a site visit to the Seven Counties Services Region in Kentucky to identify and document promising practices for serving people with severe disabilities in integrated community-based services. The regional agency serves Jefferson, Oldham, Henry, Trimble, Spencer, Bullitt and Shelby Counties. Regional service priorities have…

  11. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Grames, Douglas Higinbotham, Hugh Montgomery

    2010-09-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia, USA, is one of ten national laboratories under the aegis of the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It is managed and operated by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC. The primary facility at Jefferson Lab is the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) as shown in an aerial photograph in Figure 1. Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 as CEBAF and started operations for physics in 1995. The accelerator uses superconducting radio-frequency (srf) techniques to generate high-quality beams of electrons with high-intensity, well-controlled polarization. The technology has enabled ancillary facilities to be created. The CEBAF facility is used by an international user community of more than 1200 physicists for a program of exploration and study of nuclear, hadronic matter, the strong interaction and quantum chromodynamics. Additionally, the exceptional quality of the beams facilitates studies of the fundamental symmetries of nature, which complement those of atomic physics on the one hand and of high-energy particle physics on the other. The facility is in the midst of a project to double the energy of the facility and to enhance and expand its experimental facilities. Studies are also pursued with a Free-Electron Laser produced by an energy-recovering linear accelerator.

  12. 78 FR 60181 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Definition of Vanderburgh County, Indiana, to a Nonappropriated Fund...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... INFORMATION: On May 21, 2013, OPM issued a proposed rule (78 FR 29657) to define Vanderburgh County, IN, as an... 3206-AM82 Prevailing Rate Systems; Definition of Vanderburgh County, Indiana, to a Nonappropriated Fund...: Vanderburgh Missouri: (city) St. Louis Missouri: (counties) Jefferson Pulaski * * * * * BILLING CODE 6325-39-P...

  13. The Southern Rural Access Program and Alabama's Rural Health Leaders Pipeline: A Partnership To Develop Needed Minority Health Care Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rackley, Benjamin P.; Wheat, John R.; Moore, Cynthia E.; Garner, Robert G.; Harrell, Barbara W.

    2003-01-01

    In Alabama's Black Belt counties, two organizations collaborate to recruit and prepare rural minority and disadvantaged students for health care careers. Premedical students and other college students in the programs shadow health professionals, visit medical schools, complete health projects, participate in summer seminars and tutorials, receive…

  14. 76 FR 48941 - Alabama & Florida Railway Co., Inc.-Abandonment Exemption-in Geneva, Coffee, and Covington...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Alabama & Florida Railway Co., Inc.--Abandonment Exemption--in Geneva, Coffee..., Coffee and Covington Counties, Ala. The line constitutes A&F's entire rail system and traverses...

  15. Dietary patterns and diet quality among diverse older adults: The University of Alabama at Birmingham study of aging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: To characterize dietary patterns among a diverse sample of older adults (= 65 years). Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Five counties in west central Alabama. Participants: Community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries (N=416; 76.8 ± 5.2 years, 56% female, 39% African American) in the Univer...

  16. First report of the cucurbit yellow vine disease caused by Serratia marcescens in watermelon and yellow squash in Alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Symptoms typical of cucurbit yellow vine disease (CYVD) were first observed in a 2 ha watermelon field in Crawford, Russell County, Alabama on 8 June 2010. Watermelon plants, cv. 'Jubilee,' exhibited a yellow or chlorotic appearance and some plants were completely wilted. On 24 June plant samples ...

  17. 76 FR 74116 - Alabama & Florida Railway Co., Inc. d/b/a Ripley & New Albany Railroad Co.-Acquisition and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-30

    ... Tennessee Railroad, LLC Alabama & Florida Railway Co., Inc. d/b/a Ripley & New Albany Railroad Co. (RNA), a... Ripley, a distance of 22.54 miles in Union and Tippah Counties, Miss. RNA states that it proposes to... amended notice was filed on November 14, 2011. RNA certifies that its projected annual revenues as...

  18. Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This annual report highlights the accomplishments of the Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) during 1989. Introductory materials include a map of Alabama's Congressional districts, photographs of the executive board of APLS, and comments from the chairman of the executive board and from APLS' director. The following accomplishments are then…

  19. 40 CFR 81.301 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alabama. 81.301 Section 81.301 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.301 Alabama. Alabama—TSP Designated area Does not...

  20. Alabama Allied Health Needs Assessment Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Libby V.

    This study assessed the supply of and demand for allied health professionals in Alabama, focusing on the relationship between supply and demand in various workplace settings in the context of Alabama's demographics, current educational programs, and projected changes in health care. The health care professions included in the study were all fields…

  1. Accountability in Alabama Schools. Report 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Education Study Commission, Montgomery.

    The Alabama Education Study Commission conducted a five-year project to find adequate measures of accountability for schools. The result, developed, implemented, and tested in 11 school districts in Alabama, was a Program Management and Budgeting (PMB) system combining elements of zero-base budgeting and management by objectives. PMB has the…

  2. Alabama Public Library Service: 1997 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    The Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) serves the information needs of Alabama public libraries. As a state agency, APLS is charged with improving library services throughout the state to ensure that all citizens have access to quality library and information services. The agency is responsible for receiving and administering federal and state…

  3. Alabama Education Highlights. Bulletin 1979, No. 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This booklet provides a chronology of public education in Alabama from 1799 to 1979. Objectives are to provide an abbreviated educational history to interested Alabamans and citizens of other states and to inspire researchers to investigate local school systems and other educational topics throughout Alabama. The document is presented in three…

  4. 76 FR 30008 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... Alabama program in the May 20, 1982, Federal Register (47 FR 22057). You can also find later actions..., 2011, Federal Register (76 FR 9700). In the same document, we opened the public comment period and... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 901 Alabama Regulatory Program...

  5. Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1998-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnuson, Sandy, Ed.; Norem, Ken, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document consists of the two issues of the "Alabama Counseling Association Journal" that make up volume 24. Articles in Issue 1 include: (1) "Learning Comes in Many Forms" (Holly Forester-Miller); (2) "Legislative, Legal, and Sociological Aspects of Alabama's Mental Health System" (David Gamble; Jamie S. Satcher); (3) "Peer Supervision: A…

  6. Federal Public Library Programs in Alabama, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    The Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) is charged with improving library services throughout the state to ensure that all citizens have access to quality library and information services. Part of this charge includes the responsibility for receiving and administering federal funds to the more than 200 public libraries in Alabama. Federal…

  7. Federal Public Library Programs in Alabama, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    The Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) is charged with improving library services throughout the state to ensure that all citizens have access to quality library and information services. Part of this charge includes the responsibility for receiving and administering federal funds to the more than 200 public libraries in Alabama. Federal…

  8. Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This annual report highlights the accomplishments of the Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) during 1990. Introductory materials include a map of Alabama's Congressional districts, photographs of the executive board of APLS, and comments from the chairman of the executive board and from APLS' director. Accomplishments are reported under the…

  9. Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    The Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) is charged with improving library services throughout the state to ensure that all citizens have access to quality library and information services. The agency is responsible for receiving and administering federal and state funds for the more than 200 public libraries in Alabama. Information is reported…

  10. 2008-2009 Alabama Education Report Card

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Year after year, the goal of educators, parents, and concerned citizens throughout Alabama is to provide this state's children with the highest level of quality education possible. The future of Alabama's businesses, industries, commerce, labor force, arts, humanities, and countless other areas are determined by the education that is provided to…