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Sample records for jefferson county alabama

  1. Primary and secondary syphilis - Jefferson county, Alabama, 2002-2007.

    PubMed

    2009-05-01

    In June 2006, the Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH) requested assistance from CDC to investigate and control a multiyear epidemic of syphilis in Jefferson County. The county had experienced a decrease in primary and secondary (P&S) syphilis cases, from 279 in 1995 to nine in 2002. By 2005, the incidence had begun to rise substantially, culminating with 238 cases in 2006 and 166 in 2007. Beginning in August 2006, CDC assisted the Jefferson County Department of Health (JCDH) in investigating the increase in cases and in planning control measures. This report summarizes the results of that investigation, which found that the characteristics of cases during 2002-2004 differed substantially from cases during 2005-2007. Declines in U.S. syphilis rates, which reached their lowest point in 2000, led to optimism that syphilis elimination (defined as the absence of sustained syphilis transmission) in the United States was possible, and CDC's National Syphilis Elimination Plan was launched in 1999. Although increased U.S. syphilis rates in the early 2000s have been reported to be associated primarily with transmission among men who have sex with men (MSM), the findings from this investigation indicate reemergence of syphilis among women and heterosexual men in Jefferson County. Public health officials in other areas should remain alert for similar epidemiologic shifts. Public health departments should facilitate access to effective treatment in sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics or other settings, consider selective screening in high-prevalence populations (e.g., in correctional settings), and ensure adequate partner notification and treatment. PMID:19444149

  2. Economic-environmental modeling of point source pollution in Jefferson County, Alabama, USA.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Ellene; Schreiner, Dean F; Huluka, Gobena

    2002-05-01

    This paper uses an integrated economic-environmental model to assess the point source pollution from major industries in Jefferson County, Northern Alabama. Industrial expansion generates employment, income, and tax revenue for the public sector; however, it is also often associated with the discharge of chemical pollutants. Jefferson County is one of the largest industrial counties in Alabama that experienced smog warnings and ambient ozone concentration, 1996-1999. Past studies of chemical discharge from industries have used models to assess the pollution impact of individual plants. This study, however, uses an extended Input-Output (I-O) economic model with pollution emission coefficients to assess direct and indirect pollutant emission for several major industries in Jefferson County. The major findings of the study are: (a) the principal emission by the selected industries are volatile organic compounds (VOC) and these contribute to the ambient ozone concentration; (b) the direct and indirect emissions are significantly higher than the direct emission by some industries, indicating that an isolated analysis will underestimate the emission by an industry; (c) while low emission coefficient industries may suggest industry choice they may also emit the most hazardous chemicals. This study is limited by the assumptions made, and the data availability, however it provides a useful analytical tool for direct and cumulative emission estimation and generates insights on the complexity in choice of industries. PMID:12173425

  3. Homicide among black males in Jefferson County, Alabama 1978-1989.

    PubMed

    Fine, P R; Roseman, J M; Constandinou, C M; Brissie, R M; Glass, J M; Wrigley, J M

    1994-05-01

    This study examined 1505 of 1573 (96%) homicides occurring in Jefferson County, Alabama, between 1978 and 1989, that were investigated by the Coroner/Medical Examiners' Office. During this 12 year period, Jefferson County's average annual homicide rate was 18.9 per 100,000 compared to an 11.3 per 100,000 State of Alabama's rate and a 9.3 per 100,000 US rate. In Jefferson County, the average annual homicide rate among blacks (41.4) was almost six times the rate among whites (7.1). The highest average annual race-specific homicide rate was in black males (75.9), followed by black females (12.4), white males (10.4) and white females (4.1). Black males in the 25-34 year age group had the highest rate (159.7), followed by black males in the 35-44 year age group (151.7) and then by black males in the 15-24 year age group (96.2). These rates ranged from almost eight to over eleven times the rates of similarly aged, black females or white males and were over 33 times higher than the rates for white females of the same age. Our results emphasize the high rates of black male on black male violence, the acquaintance of the black male victim and perpetrator, and the importance of arguments as an inciting event. Moreover, we determined that while the raw numbers and rates for black homicides were and are staggering, the average annual homicide rate for black males was actually declining at a greater rate than for all other race-sex groups. Further, our results suggest that a number of hypothesized determinants commonly believed to be associated with the increase in the homicide rate among black males between 15 and 24 years of age, such as drug use, increased availability of firearms and increased child abuse were not, in fact, major determinants of the change in homicide rates. PMID:8006616

  4. Effect of Surface Coal Mining on the Hydrology of Crooked and Turkey Creek Basins, Jefferson County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puente, Celso; Newton, John G.

    1979-01-01

    Streamflow, sediment yield, and water quality were monitored from October 1975 through May 1977 to determine the impact of surface coal mining on the hydrology of Crooked and Turkey Creek basins in Jefferson County, Alabama. The basins are in the northeast part of the Warrior coal field. Coal is and has been mined from the Blue Creek, Mary Lee, and and Newcastel coal beds in the Mary Lee group. Results show water-quality degradation, increased sediment yields, and increased low flow in most tributaries draining mined areas. The impact of mine drainage and sediment yield from mined subbasins on water in the main stem of Turkey Creek was small due to the alkalinity of the water in the creek and to dilution ratios that ranged from 1:30 to 1:300. Mine drainage has affected the quality of water in Crooked Creek. The dissolved solids concentration in water downstream from the mined areas was as much as 7 times greater than that in water in unmined parts of the basin. The sediment yield to Crooked Creek was lower in the mined area than in the unmined segment of the stream. The lower yield is due, in part, to the trapping of sediment in sediment ponds in the mines and in a swamp downstream from the mines. (USGS)

  5. 75 FR 80524 - Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ...notice, we finalize the CCP process for Watercress Darter NWR. We started this process through a notice in the...Darter NWR, near the city of Bessemer, Jefferson County, Alabama...activities occur in the city of Bessemer, Alabama. Watercress...

  6. A Multilevel Analysis of Individual, Household, and Neighborhood Correlates of Intimate Partner Violence Among Low-Income Pregnant Women in Jefferson County, Alabama

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Russell S.; Sigler, Robert T.; Hwang, Sean-Shong; LaGory, Mark E.; Goldenberg, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We examined individual, household, and neighborhood correlates of intimate partner violence (IPV) before and during pregnancy. Methods. We used multilevel modeling to investigate IPV among 2887 pregnant women in 112 census tracts who sought prenatal care in 8 public clinics in Jefferson County, Alabama, from 1997 through 2001. Data were collected from the Perinatal Emphasis Research Center project, the 2000 Census, and the local Sheriff and Police Departments Uniform Crime Reports for 1997 through 2001. Results. Participants were predominantly young, African American, on Medicaid, and residents of low-income neighborhoods. The prevalence of past-year male partner–perpetrated physical or sexual violence was 7.4%. Neighborhood residential stability, women performing most of the housework (lack of involvement among partners), being unmarried (being in an uncommitted relationship), and alcohol use were positively associated with elevated IPV risk. Significant protective factors for IPV included older age at first vaginal intercourse and a greater sense of mastery (e.g., the perception of oneself as an effective person). Conclusions. Both neighborhood contextual and individual and household compositional effects are associated with IPV among low-income pregnant women. The results imply that combined interventions to improve neighborhood conditions and strengthen families may effectively reduce IPV. PMID:19696385

  7. 75 FR 80524 - Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ... 12, 2007 (72 FR 11048). Watercress Darter NWR, near the city of Bessemer, Jefferson County, Alabama... Register on April 16, 2010 (75 FR 19988). We received five comments on the Draft CCP/EA. Selected... Fish and Wildlife Service Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, AL AGENCY:...

  8. Investigation of Water Quality and Aquatic-Community Structure in Village and Valley Creeks, City of Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama 2000-01

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherson, A. K.

    2002-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a 16-month investigation of water quality, aquatic-community structure, bed sediment, and fish tissue in Village and Valley Creeks, two urban streams that drain areas of residential, commercial, and industrial land use in Birmingham, Alabama. Water-quality data were collected between February 2000 and March 2001 at four sites on Village Creek, three sites on Valley Creek, and at two reference sites near Birmingham, Fivemile Creek and Little Cahaba River, that drain less urbanized areas. The occurrence and distribution of chemical constituents in the water column and bed sediment provided an initial assessment of water quality in the streams. Aquatic-community structure, physical condition of fish, and analysis of fish tissue provided an indication of the cumulative effects of the water quality on the aquatic biota. Degraded water quality was seen at the more urbanized sites on Village and Valley Creeks. Elevated concentrations of nutrients, bacteria, trace elements, and organic contaminants were detected in the water column. Trace-element priority pollutants, pesticides, and other organic compounds were detected in higher concentrations in bed sediment and fish tissue at the Village and Valley Creek sites than at the reference site. The richness and density of the fish and benthic-invertebrate communities indicate that the integrity of the aquatic communities in Village and Valley Creeks is poor in comparison to that observed at the two reference sites. Correlations between land use and aquatic-community structure, water quality, bed sediment, and fish tissue were observed. The abundance of mayflies and the number of EPT (ephemeroptera, plecoptera, tricoptera) taxa were negatively correlated with industrial land use. The abundance of midges (an indicator of poor water quality) was positively correlated with industrial land use; the percentage of mosquitofishes (a tolerant species) was positively correlated with commercial land use. In contrast, the numbers of fish species, fish families, and the percentage of sunfishes (intolerant species) were positively correlated with forested land use, indicating that the more diverse fish communities were found in basins with a higher percentage of forested land. The concentrations of 12 water-quality constituents and 18 organic compounds detected in bed sediment were positively correlated with industrial land use. Mercury and molybdenum concentrations detected in fish-liver tissue also were positively correlated with industrial land use. The water quality and aquatic-community structure in Village and Valley Creeks are degraded in comparison to streams flowing through less urbanized areas. Decreased diversity and elevated concentrations of trace elements and organic contaminants in the water column, bed sediment, and fish tissues at Village and Valley Creeks are indicative of the effects of urbanization. Industrial land use, in particular, was significantly correlated to elevated contaminant levels in the water column, bed sediment, fish tissues, and to the declining health of the benthic-invertebrate communities. The results of this 16-month study have long-range watershed management implications, demonstrating the association between urban development and stream degradation. These data can serve as a baseline from which to determine the effectiveness of stream-restoration programs.

  9. Housing Desegregation Increases as Schools Desegregate in Jefferson County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foushee, Ray; Hamilton, Doug

    The number of black pupils living in traditionally all white suburban Jefferson County neighborhoods has increased significantly since 1974. Data taken from school enrollment information indicate a 63 percent increase in the three years from 1974 to 1977. Increases in housing desegregation in suburban areas are complemented by a slight lessening…

  10. 77 FR 124 - Biological Processors of Alabama; Decatur, Morgan County, AL; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ... AGENCY Biological Processors of Alabama; Decatur, Morgan County, AL; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Biological Processors of Alabama Superfund Site located in Decatur, Morgan County, Alabama. DATES: The Agency... name Biological Processors of Alabama Superfund Site by one of the following methods:...

  11. Jefferson County State of the Community Report 

    E-print Network

    Chen, Xi; Lee, Kanghyun; Aldalbahi, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    of Incorporation 1861 Square Miles 773 Square Miles Unincorporated Je?erson County Area 653 Miles Percentage days of Sunshine 70% sunshine Hottest Month July (74 degree average) Coldest Month January (30 degrees average) Annual Precipitation 15.4 inches...

  12. Oak Mountain High School, Shelby County, Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Design Cost Data, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents design features of the Oak Mountain High School (Alabama) consisting of an academic side of classrooms, administration, and media center; and an activity side consisting of cafeteria, gymnasium, practice gym, and a theater. The school's floor plan and photos are included. (GR)

  13. Bedrock Geology of the Turkey Creek Drainage Basin, Jefferson County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Char, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    This geospatial data set describes bedrock geology of the Turkey Creek drainage basin in Jefferson County, Colorado. It was digitized from maps of fault locations and geologic map units based on age and lithology. Created for use in the Jefferson County Mountain Ground-Water Resources Study, it is to be used at a scale no more detailed than 1:50,000.

  14. Groundwater management and protection Madison County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    French, J.H.; Strunk, J.W.

    1990-07-01

    Groundwater is extremely important to Madison County as it provides nearly three quarters of the county's drinking water. In recent years, Madison County has increasingly recognized the need to protect its groundwater resource. A supply of usable groundwater is one element of a high quality environment, which can help spur economic development and provide for the needs of a growing population. Without planning protection and understanding of possible consequences, however, economic development and population pressures can cause a gradual degradation of groundwater. In April 1987, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) convened a local groundwater steering group in Madison County. At the first meeting the ground agreed upon these goals: (1) to seek incorporate groundwater protection into the planning and development process for Madison County, (2) to support efforts by Madison County to obtain authority to adopt zoning ordinances and subdivision regulations, and (3) to develop a groundwater management plan for the county. This report provides essential information needed in developing a plan and is based on the following assumptions: the citizens of Madison County value the environment in which they live and wish to protect it from pollution; continued economic development is necessary for a healthy local economy; and a healthy economy can be sustained and nurtured, without degradation of the groundwater resource, through countywide planning, education, and participation.

  15. Geomorphology of coastal sand dunes, Baldwin County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bearden, Bennett L.; Hummell, Richard L.; Mink, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    Alabama's coastal eolian deposits are primarily vegetated dunes that are exemplified by sand ridges with flat to undulating upper surfaces and continuous irregular crests. Dune fields occur along Morgan peninsula between the foredune line and Little Lagoon and the Mobile Bay area. These dune fields consist primarily of one or more continuous ridges that parallel the coast and are generally vegetaed to grassy. Washover of the beach and backshore during Hurricane Frederic (1979) and subsequent smaller scale storms resulted in significant erosion of many of Alabama's dune fields. The primary dunes or foredunes are beginning to recover from the effects of these storms; however, numerous breaks in the primary dune line are present. Sand dunes in coastal Alabama provide protection against storm-generated waves and washover. The foredunes are protected by adherence to a Coastal Construction Control Line (CCCL) or construction setback line identified by markers along coastal Baldwin County.

  16. 75 FR 34735 - Adequacy Status of the Alabama Portion (Jackson County) of the Chattanooga, Tennessee Tri-State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ...5 nonattainment area is comprised of a portion of Jackson County, Alabama; Catoosa and Walker Counties, Georgia; and Hamilton County, Tennessee. As a result of EPA's finding, the portion of Jackson County within the tri-state Chattanooga...

  17. Alteration and vein mineralization, Ladwig uranium mine, Jefferson County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Alan R.

    1979-01-01

    Uranium ore at the Ladwig mine, Jefferson County, Colo., occurs in steeply dipping, northwest-striking faults and related fractures with a carbonate-adularia assemblage that forms in altered wallrocks and fills veins. The faults occur between large intrusive pegmatites and garnetiferous gneisses of Precambrian age, and were reactivated as the result of the early Paleocene uplift of the Front Range foothills. Mineralization in the deposit includes both wallrock alteration and vein filling. Alteration was intense but local, and chiefly involved the carbonatization of mafic minerals in the wallrocks. Felsic minerals in the wallrocks are relatively unaltered. The veins are filled with an adularia-pitchblende-carbonate assemblage with minor related sulfides and coffinite. Many of the iron-bearing carbonates in both the alteration and vein assemblages have been altered to hematite. The mineralization and alteration are believed to have formed in response to initially high amounts of CO2 and the subsequent release of dissolved CO2 by boiling or effervescence. Uranium, carried in a dicarbonate complex, was precipitated directly as pitchblende when the CO2 was released. The expulsion of H+ during boiling created a net oxidizing environment which oxidized the iron-bearing carbonates. Late stage calcite and sulfides were deposited in existing voids in the veins.

  18. Problem: Computer Science not Taught in Most Alabama High Schools

    E-print Network

    Gray, Jeffrey G.

    Problem: Computer Science not Taught in Most Alabama High Schools · According to the Alabama; this is not Computer Science! · Within Jefferson county, less than a handful of high schools teach Computer Science will involve computing. · High school graduates in the 21st century cannot afford to be ignorant of Computer

  19. An archaeological survey of the proposed Riverfront Park in the city of Beaumont (Jefferson County), Texas 

    E-print Network

    Moore, William

    2015-06-03

    in Jefferson County occurred in 1940 - 1941 when G. E. Arnold of the University of Texas surveyed portions of Jefferson and Orange counties. This work was conducted under the auspices of the Work Projects Administration (WPA) and the University of Texas... at Austin. Arnold succeeded in recording 23 sites (41JF1 - 41JF23) during this time. Except for a minor historic component at 41JF15, all are prehistoric sites such as camps or shell middens. At five sites (41JF10, 41JF18, 41JF20, 41JF27, and 41JF62...

  20. Digital computer processing of LANDSAT data for North Alabama. [Linestone County, Madison County, Jackson County, Marshall County, and DeKalb County

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. D.; Atkinson, R. J.; Lybanon, M.; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    1977-01-01

    Computer processing procedures and programs applied to Multispectral Scanner data from LANDSAT are described. The output product produced is a level 1 land use map in conformance with a Universal Transverse Mercator projection. The region studied was a five-county area in north Alabama.

  1. Integrated reservoir study of the Appleton Oil Field, Escambia County, Alabama 

    E-print Network

    Chijuka, Ekene F

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study is the development of a reservoir characterization of the Appleton Oil Field, Escambia County, Alabama, using petrophysical data, reservoir performance data and reservoir simulation. Appleton Field is comprised of two...

  2. 75 FR 19988 - Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... on March 12, 2007 (72 FR 11048). Background The CCP Process The National Wildlife Refuge System... Fish and Wildlife Service Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, AL AGENCY: Fish... assessment (Draft CCP/EA) for Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) for public review and...

  3. 75 FR 57053 - Camas National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, ID; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Camas National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, ID; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of intent; request for comments. SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), intend...

  4. Use of Satellite Data to Study the Impact of Land-Cover/Land-Use Change in Madison County Alabama.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing was used to analyze and study land-use/land-cover use changes impact on the environment of Madison County Alabama. This study area was selected because it is one of the fastest growing counties in the state of Alabama. The study used data sets obtained from several sources. Remote sen...

  5. 32. 1700 BLOCK OF JEFFERSON AVE. 172125 JEFFERSON AVE., DOUGAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. 1700 BLOCK OF JEFFERSON AVE. 1721-25 JEFFERSON AVE., DOUGAN BUILDING (1891), PICKLES & SUTTON, ARCHITECTS. 1735 JEFFERSON AVE., MOFFITT & TOWNE COMPANY BUILDING (1910). - Union Depot Area Study, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  6. Water-quality investigation of the Flat Bayou watershed, Jefferson County, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamb, T.E.

    1979-01-01

    The results of a 1-year study, in 1977-78, of surface-water quality in the Flat Bayou watershed, Jefferson County, Ark. are presented to document conditions before implementation of Soil Conservation Service programs. Analysis of samples collected at two sites showed that oxygen depletion, as low as 32 percent of saturation at times, and high concentrations of pesticides on the streambed were the most serious water-quality problems in the watershed. The pesticides aldrin, DDD, DDE, DDT, dieldrin, endrin, heptachlor epoxide, lindane, and toxaphene were found in samples of the bottom material. One sample of bottom material contained an unusually high toxaphene concentration of 160 micrograms per kilogram. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. Diagenesis of Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation, Mobile and Baldwin Counties and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, R.L. Jr.; Benson, D.J.

    1988-09-01

    The Upper Jurassic Norphlet Formation is an important deep gas reservoir in Mobile and Baldwin Counties and offshore Alabama. The producing reservoir consists of a well-sorted fine-grained subarkose to arkose. Sedimentological studies indicate this unit was deposited on a broad desert plain in environments ranging from eolian dune and interdune to wadi and beach-shoreface. Diagenetic minerals comprise from 5 to 20% of the bulk volume of the sandstone. Porosity ranges from less than 3% to more than 25% and averages around 10%. Most of the porosity consists of hybrid solution-enlarged intergranular and intragranular pores resulting from the dissolution of cements, framework grains, and grain replacements.

  8. Subaqueous evaporites of Buckner member, Haynesville Formation, northeastern Mobile County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, S.D.

    1988-09-01

    The lower part of the Buckner anhydrite member of the Haynesville Formation (Upper Jurassic) was deposited as shallowing upward cycles of subaqueous to subaerial deposits on the north flank of the Wiggins arch in northeastern Mobile County, Alabama. The unit studied conformably overlies the Smackover Formation and is generally evaporite dominated. The Buckner anhydrite averages about 35 m (115 ft) thick and has been buried to depths of 5.5 km (> 18,000 ft). Despite this deep burial, the unit has suffered little deformation since alteration of gypsum to anhydrite.

  9. Procedure for locating 10 km UTM grid on Alabama County general highway maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paludan, C. T. N.

    1975-01-01

    Each county highway map has a geographic grid of degrees and tens of minutes in both longitude and latitude in the margins and within the map as intersection crosses. These will be used to locate the universal transverse mercator (UTM) grid at 10 km intervals. Since the maps used may have stretched or shrunk in height and/or width, interpolation should be done between the 10 min intersections when possible. A table of UTM coordinates of 10 min intersections is required and included. In Alabama, all eastings are referred to a false easting of 500,000 m at 87 deg W longitude (central meridian, CM).

  10. 12,000-year record of forest history from Cahaba Pond, St. Clair County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Delcourt, H.R.; Delcourt, P.A.; Spiker, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    A 650-cm sediment sequence from Cahaba Pond, St. Clair County, Alabama, spans the past 12,000 y and has yielded a pollen and plant-macrofossil record indicating major changes in forest composition during the Holocene interglacial. Both pollen and plant macrofossils from sediments of this 0.2-ha pond primarily reflect changes in local and extralocal forests within the surrounding watershed. Four distinct pollen assemblage zones were recognized: a Fagus-Ostrya zone from 12,000 to 10,200 BP, a Pinus-Magnolia zone from 10,200 to 10,000 BP, a Quercus-Carya zone from 10,000 to 8400 BP, and a Nyssa-Pinus zone from 8400 BP to the present. Forests of the early Holocene (12,000 to 10,000 BP) were mesic and predominantly composed of broadleaved deciduous trees, dominated by beech (Fagus grandifolia). Atlantic white cedar (Chamaecyparis thyoides), today a coastal species, extended inland to St. Clair County during the early Holocene, Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus), hemlock (Tsuga), striped maple (Acer pensylvanicum), and mountain maple (Acer spicatum), today rare or absent in Alabama, extended southward of their present ranges into central Alabama 10,000 y ago. After 10,000 BP, forests became more xeric, with oaks and hickories predominant. After 8400 BP, black gum (Nyssa sylvatica), southern pines (Diploxylon Pinus), red maple (Acer rubrum), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis), and other elements of the modern flora became established locally. Water levels in the pond became higher, and sedimentation rate diminished. An increase in effective precipitation in the late Holocene reflects in the establishment of the modern atmospheric circulation patterns.

  11. Shapefile of the Elevation of the Bedrock Surface Beneath the Rocky Flats Alluvial Fan, Boulder and Jefferson Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knepper, Daniel H.

    2003-01-01

    The Rocky Flats alluvial fan is a large early Pleistocene gravel deposit at the mouth of Coal Creek Canyon along the eastern flank of the Colorado Front Range in Jefferson and Boulder Counties, Colorado. Elevations of the bedrock surface beneath the alluvial fan gravels have been compiled at selected points from a variety of sources and recorded in a digital dataset suitable for importing into commonly used GIS and image processing software packages.

  12. Hydrogeologic Factors Affecting Base-Flow Yields in the Jefferson County Area, West Virginia, October-November 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evaldi, Ronald D.; Paybins, Katherine S.; Kozar, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Base-flow yields at approximately the annual 75-percent-duration flow were determined for watersheds in the Jefferson County area, WV, from stream-discharge measurements made during October 31 to November 2, 2007. Five discharge measurements of Opequon Creek defined increased flow from 29,000,000 gallons per day (gal/d) at Carters Ford to 51,400,000 gal/d near Vanville. No flow was observed at 45 of 110 additional stream sites inspected, and discharge at the 65 flowing stream sites ranged from 1,940 to 17,100,000 gallons per day (gal/d). Discharge at 28 springs ranged from no flow to 2,430,000 gal/d. Base-flow yields were computed as the change in stream-channel discharge between measurement sites divided by the change in drainage area between the sites. Yields were negative for losing (influent) channel reaches and positive for gaining (effluent) reaches. Channels in 14 watersheds were determined to have lost flow ranging from -9.6 to -1,770 gallons per day per acre (gal/d/acre). Channels in 51 watersheds were determined to have gained flow ranging from 3.4 to 235,000 gal/d/acre. Water temperature at the stream sites ranged from 5.0 to 16.3 deg C (quarry pumpage), and specific conductance ranged from 51 to 881 microsiemens per centimeter (uS/cm). Water temperature at the springs ranged from 11.5 to 15.0 deg C, and specific conductance ranged from 22 to 958 uS/cm. Large springs in some watersheds in western Jefferson County are adjacent to other watersheds with little or no surface-water discharge; this is probably the result of interbasin transfer of groundwater along faults that dissect the area. Most watersheds located adjacent to the Potomac River in northeastern Jefferson County were not flowing during this study; this is most likely because the Potomac River is deeply incised, and groundwater flows directly to it rather than to the local stream systems in these areas. Except for one watershed with a yield of 651 gal/d/acre, no watersheds in northeastern Jefferson County yielded more than 305 gal/d/acre. Base-flow yields of several watersheds in south-central Jefferson County exceeded 400 gal/d/acre, and the effect of the Shenadoah River on base flows in the watershed appears to be less than that of the Potomac River in the northeastern part of the county. In the southeastern part of the county, because of steep relief and low-permeability bedrock, several streams were not flowing at the time of the study, and yields from all flowing streams were all less than 100 gal/d/acre. On the basis of historical data from 1961 through 2008, the mean and median depths to groundwater in 213 wells in western Jefferson County were 33.4 and 29.3 ft, respectively. Mean and median depths to groundwater in 69 wells in the northeastern county area were 56.0 and 55.0 ft below land surface, respectively. However, mean and median depths to groundwater in 28 wells within 1.5 miles of the Potomac River were 70.0 and 71.3 ft below land surface, respectively. Mean and median depths to groundwater in 108 wells in the south-central county area were 53.9 and 52.8 ft below land surface, respectively. Mean and median depths to groundwater of 26 wells in the southeastern county area were 86.6 and 59.5 ft below land surface, respectively.

  13. Production and use of industrial wood and bark residues for 44 counties in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, and Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-05-01

    An estimate is given of the tons of industrial wood and bark residues produced and left unused in 44 of the 170 Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) power service area counties in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, and Mississippi. This report supplements the data appearing in TVA's Technical Note B45 Production and Use of Industrial Wood and Bark Residues in the Tennessee Valley, 1979. Together, these reports present residue estimates for all the 201-county Tennessee Valley region. 6 tables.

  14. A theoretical model of subsidence caused by petroleum production: Big Hill Field, Jefferson County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.W.; Sharp, J.M. Jr. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-02-01

    In the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain, there is a history of oil and gas production extending over 2 to 5 decades. Concurrent with this production history, there has been unprecedented population growth accompanied by vastly increased groundwater demands. Land subsidence on both local and regional bases in this geologic province has been measured and predicted in several studies. The vast majority of these studies have addressed the problem from the standpoint of groundwater usage while only a few have considered the effects of oil and gas production. Based upon field-based computational techniques (Helm, 1984), a model has been developed to predict land subsidence caused by oil and gas production. This method is applied to the Big Hill Field in Jefferson County, Texas. Inputs include production data from a series of wells in this field and lithologic data from electric logs of these same wells. Outputs include predicted amounts of subsidence, the time frame of subsidence, and sensitivity analyses of compressibility and hydraulic conductivity estimates. Depending upon estimated compressibility, subsidence, to date, is predicted to be as high as 20 cm. Similarly, depending upon estimated vertical hydraulic conductivity, the time frame may be decades for this subsidence. These same methods can be applied to other oil/gas fields with established production histories as well as new fields when production scenarios are assumed. Where subsidence has been carefully measured above petroleum reservoir, the model may be used inversely to calculate sediment compressibilities.

  15. Natural radioactivity in geothermal waters, Alhambra Hot Springs and nearby areas, Jefferson County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leonard, Robert B.; Janzer, Victor J.

    1978-01-01

    Radioactive hot springs issue from a fault zone in crystalline rock of the Boulder batholith at Alhambra, Jefferson County, in southwestern Montana. The discharge contains high concentrations of radon, and the gross alpha activity and the concentration of adium-226 exceed maximum levels recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Part of the discharge is diverted for space heating, bathing, and domestic use. The radioactive thermal waters at measured temperatures of about 60°C are of the sodium bicarbonate type and saturated with respect to calcium carbonate. Radium-226 in the rock and on fractured surfaces or coprecipitated with calcium carbonate probably is the principal source of radon that is dissolved in the thermal water and discharged with other gases from some wells and springs. Local surface water and shallow ground water are of the calcium bicarbonate type and exhibit low background activity. The temperature, percent sodium, and radioactivity of mixed waters adjacent to the fault zone increase with depth. Samples from most of the major hot springs in southwestern Montana have been analyzed for gross alpha and beta activity. The high level of radioactivity at Alhambra appears to be related to leaching of radioactive material from siliceous veins by ascending thermal waters and is not a normal characteristic of hot springs issuing from fractured crystalline rock in Montana.

  16. Digital Data Set of Orchards Where Arsenical Pesticides Were Likely Used in Clarke and Frederick Counties, Virginia, and Berkeley and Jefferson Counties, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Bradley W.; Larkins, Peter; Robinson, Gilpin R., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    This Fact Sheet provides information on a digital data set that identifies orchard areas under cultivation between the 1920s and 1960s in Clarke and Frederick Counties, Virginia and Berkeley and Jefferson Counties, West Virginia. The apple orchards in these areas likely used arsenical pesticides during this time. The digital data set can be used in a geographic information system (GIS) to identify where elevated arsenic and lead concentrations may be present in soils. The digital data set, the associated metadata, and the related files are available on the World Wide Web at http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2006/1330/shapefile/.

  17. A subsurface study of the Denkman sandstone member, Norphlet Formation, hatters Pond field, Mobile County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.M.; Anderson, E.G.; Baria, L.R. ); Higginbotham, R.S.

    1990-09-01

    Hatters Pond field is in east-central Mobile County in southwestern Alabama and it produces from both the Norphlet and Smackover formations. The structural trap involves salt movement along the west side of the Mobile Fault System that resulted in a faulted salt anticline. The Norphlet Formation of southwestern Alabama consists of red to gray siltstone and pinkish to gray sandstone with conglomerate layers. Three facies have been distinguished within the Norphlet Formation: a lower shale, a red siltstone sequence, and an upper quartzose unit. The thickness of the formation ranges from a feather edge to more than 800 ft (234.8 m) in southwestern Alabama. The Upper Jurassic Denkman Sandstone Member of the Norphlet Formation at Hatters Pond field is a medium- to fine-grained, well-sorted arkosic sandstone between the underlying Norphlet redbed lithofacies and the carbonates of the overlying Smackover Formation. Here, the Denkman Member can be subdivided into a massive upper unit and a low- to high-angle cross-stratified lower unit. The sandstones are quartz-rich with a high percentage of feldspars. The majority of the feldspar grains observed are potassium feldspar. Microcline is usually less altered when compared with other types of feldspar grains. The major types of feldspar replacement include illitization, hematitization, dolomitization, chloritization, calcitization, vacuolization, and anhydritization. Carbonate replacement of feldspars is very abundant, mostly by ferroan dolomite. Rock fragments are not abundant in the Denkman Member, although there is good evidence of a metamorphic/volcanic source area. The sandstones are cemented by dolomite, calcite, anhydrite, and quartz and feldspar overgrowths. The lower Denkman unit is slightly more porous than the upper Denkman unit. The pore-lining authigenic clay, illite, greatly reduces permeability and porosity in these sandstones.

  18. Geology of the Ralston Buttes district, Jefferson County, Colorado: a preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheridan, Douglas M.; Maxwell, Charles H.; Albee, Arden L.; Van Horn, Richard

    1956-01-01

    The Ralston Buttes district in Jefferson County is one of the most significant new uranium districts located east of the Continental Divide in Colorado. The district is east of the Colorado Front Range mineral belt, along the east front of the range. From November 1953 through October 1956, about 10,000 tons of uranium ore, much of which was high-grade pitchblende-bearing vein material, was shipped from the district. The ore occurs in deposits that range in size from bodies containing less than 50 tons to ore shoots containing over 1,000 tons. The only other mining activity in the area has been a sporadic production of beryl, feldspar, and scrap mica from Precambrian pegmatites, and quarrying of dimension stone, limestone, and clay from sedimentary rocks. Most of the Ralston Buttes district consists of complexly folded Precambrian metamorphic and igneous rocks - gneiss, schist, quartzite, amphibolite, and granodiorite. Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks crop out in the northeastern part of the district. These rocks are cut by northwesterly-trending fault systems of Laramide age and by small bodies of intrusive rocks that are Tertiary in age. The typical uranium deposits in the district are hydrothermal veins occupying openings in Laramide fault breccias or related fractures that cut the Precambrian rocks. Pitchblende and lesser amounts of secondary uranium minerals are associated with sparse base-mental sulfides in a gangue of carbonate minerals, potash feldspar, and, more rarely, quartz. Less common types of deposits consist of pitchblende and secondary uranium minerals that occupy fractures cutting pegmatites and quartz veins. The uranium deposits are concentrated in two areas, the Ralston Creek area and the Golden Gate Canyon area. The deposits in the Ralston Creek area are located along the Rogers fault system, and the deposits in the Golden Gate Canyon area are along the Hurricane Hill fault system. Two geologic factors were important to the localization of the uranium deposits: (1) favorable structural environment and (2) favorable host rocks. The deposits in each of the two major areas are located where a northwesterly-trending Laramide fault system splits into a complex network of faults. Also, most of the deposits appear to be localized where the faults cut Precambrian rocks rich in hornblende, biotite, or garnet and biotite. The ore controls recognized in this relatively new uranium district may have wider application in areas of similar geology elsewhere in the Front Range.

  19. 75 FR 19988 - Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ...notice, we continue the CCP process for Watercress Darter NWR. We started the process through a notice in the Federal...11048). Background The CCP Process The National Wildlife Refuge...activities occur in the city of Bessemer, Alabama. Watercress...

  20. Boron mineralization in Louann Salt and Norphlet Shale, Clarke County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, W.B.

    1988-09-01

    A suite of unusual boron minerals is present in the upper Louann Salt and immediately overlying Norphlet Shale in Clarke County, Alabama. Core samples come from a depth of about 12,000 ft in a well located on the flank of a nonpiecement salt dome. The suite consists of calcium and magnesium borates similar to those occurring in the Zechstein salt deposits of Germany. Well-developed micron-size to millimeter-size crystals were recovered from water-insoluble residue from the salt. The minerals identified include boracite (modified pseudoisometric cubes), hilgardite (prismatic crystal aggregates), szaibelyite (acicular crystal aggregates), and volkovskite (plates, rare prisms). Associated minerals are anhydrite, gypsum, magnesite, phlogopite, tlc, and quartz. Boracite and hilgardite have boron isotopic compositions indicative of marine evaporite deposits. Danburite occurs in irregular nodules up to 2 cm in diameter in the overlying Norphlet Shale. The nodules constitute up to 30% of the Norphlet immediately adjacent to the Louann but disappear within about 1 m from the contact. The danburite appears to be the result of boron-rich fluids derived from the underlying marine evaporite sequence, infiltrating and reacting with the shale.

  1. Analysis of Landsat-4 Thematic Mapper data for classification of forest stands in Baldwin County, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. L.

    1984-01-01

    A computer-implemented classification has been derived from Landsat-4 Thematic Mapper data acquired over Baldwin County, Alabama on January 15, 1983. One set of spectral signatures was developed from the data by utilizing a 3x3 pixel sliding window approach. An analysis of the classification produced from this technique identified forested areas. Additional information regarding only the forested areas. Additional information regarding only the forested areas was extracted by employing a pixel-by-pixel signature development program which derived spectral statistics only for pixels within the forested land covers. The spectral statistics from both approaches were integrated and the data classified. This classification was evaluated by comparing the spectral classes produced from the data against corresponding ground verification polygons. This iterative data analysis technique resulted in an overall classification accuracy of 88.4 percent correct for slash pine, young pine, loblolly pine, natural pine, and mixed hardwood-pine. An accuracy assessment matrix has been produced for the classification.

  2. Building District Capacity for System-Wide Instructional Improvement in Jefferson County Public Schools. Working Paper. GE Foundation "Developing Futures"™ in Education Evaluation Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darfler, Anne; Riggan, Matt

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes findings from one component of the Consortium for Policy Research in Education's (CPRE) evaluation of the General Electric Foundation's (GEF) "Developing Futures"™ in Education program in Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS). As described in the CPRE proposal and research design, the purpose was to…

  3. Environmental assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Big Hill facility storage of commercial crude oil project, Jefferson County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    The Big Hill SPR facility located in Jefferson County, Texas has been a permitted operating crude oil storage site since 1986 with benign environmental impacts. However, Congress has not authorized crude oil purchases for the SPR since 1990, and six storage caverns at Big Hill are underutilized with 70 million barrels of available storage capacity. On February 17, 1999, the Secretary of Energy offered the 70 million barrels of available storage at Big Hill for commercial use. Interested commercial users would enter into storage contracts with DOE, and DOE would receive crude oil in lieu of dollars as rental fees. The site could potentially began to receive commercial oil in May 1999. This Environmental Assessment identified environmental changes that potentially would affect water usage, power usage, and air emissions. However, as the assessment indicates, changes would not occur to a major degree affecting the environment and no long-term short-term, cumulative or irreversible impacts have been identified.

  4. Facies and reservoir characterization of an upper Smackover interval, East Barnett Field, Conecuh County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Bergan, G.R. ); Hearne, J.H. )

    1990-09-01

    Excellent production from an upper Smackover (Jurassic) ooid grainstone was established in April 1988 by Coastal Oil and Gas Corporation with the discovery of the East Barnett field in Conecuh County, Alabama. A structure map on the top of the Smackover Formation and net porosity isopach map of the producing intervals show that the trapping mechanism at the field has both structural and stratigraphic components. Two diamond cores were cut from 13,580 to 13,701 ft, beginning approximately 20 ft below the top of the Smackover. Two shallowing-upward sequences are identified in the cores. The first sequence starts at the base of the cored interval and is characterized by thick, subtidal algal boundstones capped by a collapse breccia facies. This entire sequence was deposited in the shallow subtidal to lower intertidal zone. Subsequent lowering of sea level exposed the top portion of the boundstones to meteoric or mixing zone waters, creating the diagenetic, collapse breccia facies. The anhydrite associated with the breccia also indicates surface exposure. The second sequence begins with algal boundstones that sharply overlie the collapse breccia facies of the previous sequence. These boundstones grade upward into high-energy, cross-bedded ooid beach ( ) and oncoidal, peloidal beach shoreface deposits. Proximity of the overlying Buckner anhydrite, representing a probable sabkha system, favors a beach or a very nearshore shoal interpretation for the ooid grainstones. The ooid grainstone facies, which is the primary producing interval, has measured porosity values ranging from 5.3% to 17.8% and averaging 11.0%. Measured permeability values range from 0.04 md to 701 md and average 161.63 md. These high porosity and permeability values result from abundant primary intergranular pore space, as well as secondary pore space created by dolomitization and dissolution of framework grains.

  5. Ash-flow eruptive megabreccias of the Manhattan and Mount Jefferson calderas, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Shawe, D.R.; Snyder, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed field study of ash-flow megabreccias associated with the Manhattan and Mount Jefferson calderas shows that megaclasts were brecciated in sub-caldera level before incorporation in ash flows. This evidence in addition to the presence of some clast lithologies that are nowhere recognized in caldera walls and the occurrence of some megabreccia units as outflow suggest an origin by eruption rather than by collapse of caldera walls. Geophysical investigations and a mathematical analysis are presented in the paper.

  6. Analyses of geochemical samples and descriptions of rock samples, Adams Gap and Shinbone Creek Roadless Areas, Clay County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, M.S.; Hanley, J.T.; Kelley, D.L.; Sherlock, L.J.

    1983-01-01

    Semiquantitative spectrographic analyses for 31 elements on 105 rocks, 47 stream-sediment, and 70 soil samples from the Adams Gap and Shinbone Creek Roadless Areas and vicinity, Talladega National Forest, Clay County, Alabama are reported here in detail. Atomic-absorption analyses for zinc in all samples and for gold in 5 selected rock samples are also reported. Localities for all sables are given in Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) coordinates. A brief description of each rock sample is included. Rocks analyzed include quartzite, phyllite, vein quartz, and schist.

  7. Geohydrology and susceptibility of Coldwater Spring and Jacksonville fault areas to surface contamination in Calhoun County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, J.C.; Harris, W.F.; Cobb, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Coldwater Spring in eastern Calhoun County, Alabama, is one of the largest springs in Alabama. The spring, which has an average discharge of about 31 million gallons per day, supplies water for about 70,000 people in the Anniston, Alabama area. A potentiometric map of the study area indicates that the recharge area for the aquifer system that supplies the spring is only about 23 square miles. However, base-flow data for streams in the area indicate that this recharge area is not sufficient to account for an average discharge of 31 million gallons per day from Coldwater Spring. Complex folding and faulting of the carbonate and quart zitic rocks that comprise the aquifer system may have produced fractures and joints that increase recharge to the spring. Some recharge to the spring may be derived from outside the recharge area delineated from the potentiometric map or from the surface. This part of the recharge area contamination from the surface. This part of the recharge area consists of flat to gently rolling terrain underlain by cavernous limestone and fractured quartzite. (USGS)

  8. Informal Adoption in Black Families in Lowndes and Wilcox Counties, Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lewis W.

    This research deals with the legal, social and cultural contexts in which informal adoption of black children by adults takes place in rural south Alabama. A total of 306 parent surrogates were identified, interviewed and compared on the basis of 10 socioeconomic characteristics. Information was also collected on the number of children informally…

  9. Occurrence and hydrogeochemistry of radiochemical constituents in groundwater of Jefferson County and surrounding areas, southwestern Montana, 2007 through 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caldwell, Rodney R.; Nimick, David A.; DeVaney, Rainie M.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Jefferson County and the Jefferson Valley Conservation District, sampled groundwater in southwestern Montana to evaluate the occurrence and concentration of naturally-occurring radioactive constituents and to identify geologic settings and environmental conditions in which elevated concentrations occur. A total of 168 samples were collected from 128 wells within Broadwater, Deer Lodge, Jefferson, Lewis and Clark, Madison, Powell, and Silver Bow Counties from 2007 through 2010. Most wells were used for domestic purposes and were primary sources of drinking water for individual households. Water-quality samples were collected from wells completed within six generalized geologic units, and analyzed for constituents including uranium, radon, gross alpha-particle activity, and gross beta-particle activity. Thirty-eight wells with elevated concentrations or activities were sampled a second time to examine variability in water quality throughout time. These water-quality samples were analyzed for an expanded list of radioactive constituents including the following: three isotopes of uranium (uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238), three isotopes of radium (radium-224, radium-226, and radium-228), and polonium-210. Existing U.S. Geological Survey and Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology uranium and radon water-quality data collected as part of other investigations through 2011 from wells within the study area were compiled as part of this investigation. Water-quality data from this study were compared to data collected nationwide by the U.S. Geological Survey through 2011. Radionuclide samples for this study typically were analyzed within a few days after collection, and therefore data for this study may closely represent the concentrations and activities of water being consumed locally from domestic wells. Radioactive constituents were detected in water from every well sampled during this study regardless of location or geologic unit. Nearly 41 percent of sampled wells had at least one radioactive constituent concentration that exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water standards or screening levels. Uranium concentrations were higher than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 30 micrograms per liter in samples from 14 percent of the wells. Radon concentrations exceeded a proposed MCL of 4,000 picocuries per liter in 27 percent of the wells. Combined radium (radium-226 and radium-228) exceeded the MCL of 5 picocuries per liter in samples from 10 of 47 wells. About 40 percent (42 of 104 wells) of the wells had gross alpha-particle activities (72-hour count) at or greater than a screening level of 15 pCi/L. Gross beta-particle activity exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 50 picocuries per liter screening level in samples from 5 of 104 wells. Maximum radium-224 and polonium-210 activities in study wells were 16.1 and 3.08 picocuries per liter, respectively; these isotopes are constituents of human-health concern, but the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has not established MCLs for them. Radioactive constituent concentrations or activities exceeded at least one established drinking-water standard, proposed drinking-water standard, or screening level in groundwater samples from five of six generalized geologic units assessed during this study. Radioactive constituent concentrations or activities were variable not only within each geologic unit, but also among wells that were completed in the same geologic unit and in close proximity to one another. Established or proposed drinking-water standards were exceeded most frequently in water from wells completed in the generalized geologic unit that includes rocks of the Boulder batholith and other Tertiary through Cretaceous igneous intrusive rocks (commonly described as granite). Specifically, of the wells completed in the Boulder batholith and related rocks sampled as part of this study, 24 percent exceeded the MCL of 30 micrograms per liter for uranium, 50 perce

  10. Pipeline Corridors through wetlands -- Impacts on plant communities: Mill Creek Tributary Crossing, Jefferson County, New York, 1992 Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, G.D.; Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to identify representative impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of the survey July 1992, at the Mills Creek tributary crossing, Jefferson County, New York. Data were collected from three wetland communities along the 1991 pipeline and compared with predisturbance data obtained in a June 1991 survey. Within one year after pipeline installation, 50% of the soil surface of the ROW in the scrub-shrub community was covered by emergent vegetation. Average wetland values for the ROW in 1992 were lower than in 1991, indicating that the removal of woody plants resulted in a community composed of species with greater fidelity to wetlands. In the emergent marsh community after one year, the average percentage of surface covered by standing water was greater in the ROW than in the adjacent natural areas. The ROW in the forested wetland community also contained standing water, although none was found in the natural forest areas. The entire study site remains a wetland, with the majority of plant species in all sites being either obligate or facultative wetland species. Weighted and unweighted average wetland indices for each community, using all species, indicated wetland vegetation within the newly established ROW.

  11. Sample descriptions for test wells penetrating deep aquifers in Dallas and Sumpter counties, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newton, John G.

    1979-01-01

    Test wells in Dallas and Sumter Counties, Ala., penetrated deep Cretaceous aquifers that are sources of future groundwater withdrawals. The test well in Dallas County was drilled to a depth of 1,460 feet, and the test well in Sumter County was drilled to a depth of 2,311 feet. The deep aquifers in Sumter County are in an area of future residential and industrial development along the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway. Descriptions of drill cuttings are given in the report. (USGS)

  12. Changes in ground-water quality resulting from surface coal mining of small watershed in Jefferson County, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hren, Janet

    1986-01-01

    Two samples were collected from each of six wells in a small watershed in Jefferson County, Ohio, in 1984. The watershed was mined and reclamation begun in 1980. Data collected from 1976 through 1982 indicate that ground-water quality was still changing at that time. The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent ground-water quality continued to change 4 years after mining. The upper saturated zone was destroyed by mining and replaced by spoiled material during reclamation. A new saturated zone then formed in the spoils material. The premining median concentrations of sulfate, manganese, and dissolved solids in the upper saturated zone were 84 milligrams per liter (mg/L). 30 micrograms per liter (?g/L), and 335 mg/L, respectively. The postmining median concentrations of these constituents in the upper-zone wells disturbed by mining were 360 mg/L, 595 ?g/L, and 814 mg/L, respectively. Concentrations of these constituents were still increasing in 1984 in the upper saturated zone. In the area not disturbed by mining, concentrations have remained nearly at premining levels. The premining median concentrations of sulfate, manganese, and dissolved solids in the middle saturated zone were 47 mg/L, 10 ?g/L and 405 mg/L, respectively. The postmining median concentrations were 390 mg/L, 490 ?g/L, and 959 mg/L, respectively. In the middle saturated zone, concentrations of these constituents also were still increasing in 1984, probably due to mixing with water if the upper saturated zone.

  13. An Archaeological Survey of Two Borrow Pit Areas: Tract 1 (Gabby's Pit) and Tract 3 (Doorn Bo's Pit) in South East Jefferson County Texas 

    E-print Network

    Moore, William

    2015-07-28

    Coast Guard station – and this is reflected in the conclusions that I wrote. The Spanish colonizers and their Catholic Corps capped every known native religious site with a church or destroyed the site if they could. The United States Army... in the extreme eastern part of Texas. The landscape ranges from the high ground on the west bank of the Neches River in the eastern part of Jefferson County to a low marshy area along the coast. The borrow pit is located along a Chenier Ridge, a stranded sand...

  14. Lineaments and fracture traces, Jennings County and Jefferson Proving Ground, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greeman, T.K.

    1981-01-01

    Location of vertical or near-vertical bedrock fractures observed throughout the study area in Indiana are shown on a lineament and fracture trace map. Wells drilled on these mapped features may yield adequate supplies for domestic use. Large yields may be available in southwest Jennings County. Two nearly horizontal sequences of middle-Paleozic limestone and dolomite, separated by a thin discontinuous shale unit, constitute the prinicpal aquifer. Many wells in this aquifer fail to supply household needs, whereas others supply several households. All wells in the aquifer have been located for the owners ' convenience and are randomly located in relation to lineaments and fracture traces. Pleistocene drift, averaging 25-30 feet in thickness, did not restict lineament nad fracture-trace mapping. Well placement is important in this area, as fractures are a principal source of water to wells. In fractured bedrock areas, the most productive wells are at mapped lineament or fracture-trace intersections and at the lowest local altitude. Use of the lineament and fracture-trace map will not guarantee a sufficient ground-water supply, but it will minimize the chance of drilling an inadequate well. (USGS)

  15. 40 CFR 81.301 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Birmingham area is a maintenance area for the 1-hour NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Alabama... affecting § 81.301 see the List of CFR Sections Affected which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... County Choctaw County Clarke County Clay County Cleburne County Coffee County Colbert County...

  16. 40 CFR 81.301 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Alabama—NO2 (1971 Annual Standard) Designated area Does not... see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume... County Choctaw County Clarke County Clay County Cleburne County Coffee County Colbert County...

  17. 40 CFR 81.301 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... maintenance area for the 1-hour NAAQS for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Alabama—NO2 (1971 Annual... see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume... County Cherokee County Chilton County Choctaw County Clarke County Clay County Cleburne County...

  18. 40 CFR 81.301 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Alabama—NO2 (1971 Annual Standard) Designated area Does not... see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume... County Choctaw County Clarke County Clay County Cleburne County Coffee County Colbert County...

  19. 40 CFR 81.301 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for purposes of 40 CFR part 51 subpart X. Alabama—NO2 Designated area Does not meet primary standards... affecting § 81.301 see the List of CFR Sections Affected which appears in the Finding Aids section of the... County Choctaw County Clarke County Clay County Cleburne County Coffee County Colbert County...

  20. 77 FR 11533 - Anniston PCB Superfund Site, Anniston, Calhoun County, Alabama; Notice of Amended Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ...CERCLA-04-2012-3763; FRL 9637-7] Anniston PCB Superfund Site, Anniston, Calhoun County...past response costs concerning the Anniston PCB Superfund Site located in Anniston, Calhoun...Submit your comments by Site name Anniston PCB by one of the following methods:...

  1. A spatial resolution threshold of land cover in estimating terrestrial carbon sequestration in four counties in Georgia and Alabama, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, S.Q.; Liu, S.; Li, Z.; Sohl, T.L.

    2010-01-01

    Changes in carbon density (i.e., carbon stock per unit area) and land cover greatly affect carbon sequestration. Previous studies have shown that land cover change detection strongly depends on spatial scale. However, the influence of the spatial resolution of land cover change information on the estimated terrestrial carbon sequestration is not known. Here, we quantified and evaluated the impact of land cover change databases at various spatial resolutions (250 m, 500 m, 1 km, 2 km, and 4 km) on the magnitude and spatial patterns of regional carbon sequestration in four counties in Georgia and Alabama using the General Ensemble biogeochemical Modeling System (GEMS). Results indicated a threshold of 1 km in the land cover change databases and in the estimated regional terrestrial carbon sequestration. Beyond this threshold, significant biases occurred in the estimation of terrestrial carbon sequestration, its interannual variability, and spatial patterns. In addition, the overriding impact of interannual climate variability on the temporal change of regional carbon sequestration was unrealistically overshadowed by the impact of land cover change beyond the threshold. The implications of these findings directly challenge current continental- to global-scale carbon modeling efforts relying on information at coarse spatial resolution without incorporating fine-scale land cover dynamics.

  2. Digital Data Set of Orchards Where Arsenical Pesticides Were Likely Used in Clarke and Frederick Counties, Virginia, and Berkeley and Jefferson Counties, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Bradley W.; Larkins, Peter; Robinson, Gilpin R., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    This data set shows orchard locations in Clarke and Frederick Counties, Virginia and Berkeley and Jefferson Counties, West Virginia where arsenical pesticides were likely used. The orchard locations are based on air photos and topographic maps prepared using information from the time period of extensive use of arsenical pesticides between the 1920s and 1960s. An orchard's presence in this data set does not necessarily indicate the use of arsenical pesticides on the site or that elevated arsenic and metal concentrations are present. Arsenical pesticides may have been used on part, or none, of the land and, under current land use, the land may have been remediated and no longer contain elevated arsenic and metal concentrations in soil. The data set was created to be used in an assessment of soil contamination related to past use of arsenical pesticides in orchards in the northern part of the Great Valley region, Virginia and West Virginia. Previous studies have documented that elevated concentrations of arsenic, lead, and sometimes copper occur in the soils of former apple orchards (Veneman et al., 1983; Jones and Hatch, 1937). Arsenical pesticide use was most extensive and widespread in agricultural applications from the 1920s to the late 1950s, and largely ceased agricultural use by the early 1960s in the nation. During this time period, lead arsenate was the most extensively used arsenical pesticide (Peryea, 1998), particularly in apple orchards. Other metal-bearing pesticides, such as copper acetoarsenite (Paris Green), Bordeaux Blue (a mixture of copper sulfate and calcium hydroxide), and organic mercury fumigants were used to a lesser degree in orchards (Peryea, 1998; Shepard, 1939; Veneman et al., 1983). During the time arsenical pesticides were extensively used, federal and state pesticide laws did not require farmers to keep accurate records of the quantity, location, and type of arsenical pesticides used on their property, thus the quantity and distribution of this past arsenical pesticide use is not known in the region. Based on estimates from other areas (D'Angelo et al., 1996), cumulate application over the period of arsenical pesticide use may have been as much as 22.4 g/m2 of arsenic and 100 g/m2 of lead in orchard areas. In minimally disturbed orchard soils, arsenic and lead are largely retained in the top few centimeters of the soil horizon; intra-soil redistribution of these metals occurs but appears to be limited (Veneman et al. 1983; Peryea, 1998). Surface concentrations of arsenic and lead in undisturbed orchard soils where arsenical pesticides were used commonly exceed 20 mg/kg As and 100 mg/kg Pb (Veneman et al., 1983; Jones and Hatch, 1937). The digital data set of orchard locations was used to aid assessment of the likely occurrence and distribution of arsenical pesticide residues in surface soils. Most areas of orchard cultivation were sited in areas overlying carbonate bedrock in the Valley and Ridge province. This data set needed to be created since there was no reliable and complete land cover data set identifying areas under orchard cultivation during the time period of extensive use of arsenical pesticides in the study area as of the time of the study. The spatial database of orchard areas was compiled using twenty-seven USGS 7.5 minute series topographical maps covering the study area of Clarke and Frederick Counties, Virginia, and Berkeley and Jefferson Counties, West Virginia. These maps were published between 1943 and 1972 at 1:24,000 scale, with the oldest topographic map available from the US Geological Survey map archive for each area being chosen, going back only as far as the 1920s when use of arsenical pesticides started. Orchard areas on the topographic maps were traced in order to aid in the digitization of the sites. The topographic maps were then scanned and geographically referenced using ERDAS Imagine version 8.7, a raster editing program, turning them into rectifi

  3. Mineralogy and paragenesis of the McAllister Sn-Ta-bearing pegmatite, Coosa County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foord, Eugene E.; Cook, Robert B.

    1989-01-01

    The McAllister Sn-Ta deposit (Alabama) is localized in a complex pegmatite that contains large zones of mineralized late-stage replacement-type saccharoidal albite and nearly monomineralic muscovite 'greisen-like' pipes. The dyke is at least 450 m long and averages approximately 9 m in thickness. At least two 'greisen-like' pipes, as much as 7.6 m by 4.5 m in cross-section and extending at least 76 m down a steep easterly pitch, occur near the center of the dyke. The dyke is hosted by an approximately 300-Ma-old pluton of a group referred to as the Rockford Granite, a mesozonal to epizonal two-mica, peraluminous tin-bearing granite. The pluton is genetically affiliated with a well-defined sequence of simple to complex pegmatite dykes and quartz-casiterite veins that occur near its margin and within the immediately adjacent metasedimentary rocks of the Wedowee Group.

  4. Alabama SEP Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, Elizabeth M.

    2014-06-30

    Executive Summary In the fall of 2010, the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA) launched the Multi-State Model for Catalyzing the National Home Energy Retrofit Market Project (Multi-State Project). This residential energy efficiency pilot program was a collaborative effort among the states of Alabama, Massachusetts, Virginia, and Washington, and was funded by competitive State Energy Program (SEP) awards through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this project was to catalyze the home energy efficiency retrofit market in select areas within the state of Alabama. To achieve this goal, the project addressed a variety of marketplace elements that did not exist, or were underdeveloped, at the outset of the effort. These included establishing minimum standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency, among others. The anticipated effect of the activities would be increased market demand for retrofits, improved audit to retrofit conversion rates and growth in overall community understanding of energy efficiency. The four-state collaborative was created with the intent of accelerating market transformation by allowing each state to learn from their peers, each of whom possessed different starting points, resources, and strategies for achieving the overall objective. The four partner states engaged the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) to oversee a project steering committee and to manage the project evaluation for all four states. The steering committee, comprised of key program partners, met on a regular basis to provide overall project coordination, guidance, and progress assessment. While there were variances in program design among the states, there were several common elements: use of the Energy Performance Score (EPS) platform; an audit and home energy rating tool; emphasis on community based coordination and partnerships; marketing and outreach to increase homeowner participation; training for market actors; access to financing options including rebates, incentives, and loan products; and an in depth process evaluation to support continual program improvement and analysis. In Alabama, Nexus Energy Center operated energy efficiency retrofit programs in Huntsville and Birmingham. In the Huntsville community the AlabamaWISE program was available in five Alabama counties: Cullman, Lawrence, Limestone, Madison, and Morgan. In Birmingham, the program was available to residents in Jefferson and Shelby Counties. In both communities, the program was similar in terms of program design but tailored marketing and partnerships to address the unique local conditions and population of each community. ADECA and the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) provided overall project management services and common resources to the local program administrator Nexus Energy Center, including contracted services for contractor training, quality assurance testing, data collection and reporting, and compliance. The fundamental components of the AlabamaWISE program included a vertical contractor-based business model; comprehensive energy assessments; third-party quality assurance; rebates for installation of energy saving measures; accessible, low-interest financing; targeted and inbound marketing; Energy Performance Score (EPS) tool to engage and educate homeowners; training for auditors, contractors, and real estate professionals; and online resources for education and program enrollment. Program participants were eligible to receive rebates or financing toward the assessments and upgrades to their home provided they reached at least 20 percent deemed or modeled energy savings. The design of each program focused on addressing several known barriers including: limited homeowner knowledge on the benefits of energy efficiency, lack of financing options, lack of community support for energy efficiency programs, and

  5. Depositional history of the Smackover Formation, Appleton Field, Escambia County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.J.; Pultz, L.M.; Bruner, D.D.; Lu, G.

    1996-12-31

    Appleton Field is a Smackover field situated above two pre-Mesozoic paleohighs near the updip limit of the Smackover in the Conecuh Embayment of southwestern Alabama, Smackover deposition in Appleton Field was influenced by both pre-Smackover paleotopography and sea level fluctuation. Fourteen lithofacies were identified in the Smackover and the overlying Buckner Anhydrite Member of the Haynesville Formation. These lithofacies were deposited in three depositional stages (early, middle, and late Smackover) that correspond to periods dominated by marine transgression, aggradation, and ultimately progradation. Early Smackover deposition accompanied a rapid sea level rise that inundated the paleohighs. Rapid sedimentation produced a system that was first transgressive and then aggradational in nature. Algal patch reefs developed around the periphery of the paleohighs and onlapped the structures as sea level rose. Middle Smackover deposition was the result of a decrease in the rate of sea level rise. Tidal flat, lagoon, and shoal complexes formed across topographically higher parts of the field, while subwavebase sediments were deposited off structure. Short-term sea level fluctuations produced seven shallowing-upward packages. During Late Smackover deposition long term sea level was relatively stable allowing the Smackover to aggrade and prograde. Upper Smackover deposits are peritidal dominated. Short-term sea level fluctuations again produced shallowing upward packages capped in crestal locations by exposure surfaces. With continued sedimentation, supratidal sabkhas formed over the crests of the paleohighs and prograded offstructure during early Buckner deposition. Short term fluctuations in sea level produced a series of shallowing upward sabkha cycles. Development of coastal salinas or restriction of the northern Conecuh Embayment led to deposition of subaqueous evaporites in the upper Buckner.

  6. Depositional history of the Smackover Formation, Appleton Field, Escambia County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.J.; Pultz, L.M.; Bruner, D.D.; Lu, G. )

    1996-01-01

    Appleton Field is a Smackover field situated above two pre-Mesozoic paleohighs near the updip limit of the Smackover in the Conecuh Embayment of southwestern Alabama, Smackover deposition in Appleton Field was influenced by both pre-Smackover paleotopography and sea level fluctuation. Fourteen lithofacies were identified in the Smackover and the overlying Buckner Anhydrite Member of the Haynesville Formation. These lithofacies were deposited in three depositional stages (early, middle, and late Smackover) that correspond to periods dominated by marine transgression, aggradation, and ultimately progradation. Early Smackover deposition accompanied a rapid sea level rise that inundated the paleohighs. Rapid sedimentation produced a system that was first transgressive and then aggradational in nature. Algal patch reefs developed around the periphery of the paleohighs and onlapped the structures as sea level rose. Middle Smackover deposition was the result of a decrease in the rate of sea level rise. Tidal flat, lagoon, and shoal complexes formed across topographically higher parts of the field, while subwavebase sediments were deposited off structure. Short-term sea level fluctuations produced seven shallowing-upward packages. During Late Smackover deposition long term sea level was relatively stable allowing the Smackover to aggrade and prograde. Upper Smackover deposits are peritidal dominated. Short-term sea level fluctuations again produced shallowing upward packages capped in crestal locations by exposure surfaces. With continued sedimentation, supratidal sabkhas formed over the crests of the paleohighs and prograded offstructure during early Buckner deposition. Short term fluctuations in sea level produced a series of shallowing upward sabkha cycles. Development of coastal salinas or restriction of the northern Conecuh Embayment led to deposition of subaqueous evaporites in the upper Buckner.

  7. Comparison of NLCD with NWI Classifications of Baldwin and Mobile Counties, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Handley, Larry; Wells, Chris

    2009-01-01

    An assessment of the accuracy of National Land Cover Data 2001 as compared to National Wetlands Inventory mapping of Mobile and Baldwin Counties conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Wetlands Research Center (NWRC). Both classifications were checked against stratified randomly selected ground-based sites and with each other to compare the accuracy of the NLCD with NWI classification methods. For this accuracy comparison, numerous visits were made by photointerpreters to the Mobile Bay area to establish signatures for the modified NWI mapping. After all of the quadrangles in Baldwin and Mobile Counties were mapped, an accuracy assessment of those maps was conducted by field-checking the mapped classes with ground-based check sites. These same sites were used to check the accuracy of the NLCD and also as the basis for cross-walking the NLCD and NWI classification systems for direct comparison of the two methods. This accuracy assessment is dependent on a methodology and analysis developed for the unique characteristics and properties of NWI classification, which is mapped to polygon, as compared to NLCD, which uses raster classification and mapping. This cartographic presentation results in fundamentally different classification boundaries. Overlaying these map types cannot prevent boundary differences resulting in a tremendous proliferation of sliver polygons. The intersection of both maps resulted in three-quarters of a million polygons, nearly half of which were less than the 900-m2 pixel size used in NLCD mapping (the smaller of the minimum mapping units of NWI and NLCD versus NWI mapping was about 0.5 ha). It is the authors' opinion that this cartographic difference needs to be more fully explored before accepting the accuracy difference between NWI and NLCD presented here at face value.

  8. Age and source of water in springs associated with the Jacksonville Thrust Fault Complex, Calhoun County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, James L.

    2004-01-01

    Water from wells and springs accounts for more than 90 percent of the public water supply in Calhoun County, Alabama. Springs associated with the Jacksonville Thrust Fault Complex are used for public water supply for the cities of Anniston and Jacksonville. The largest ground-water supply is Coldwater Spring, the primary source of water for Anniston, Alabama. The average discharge of Coldwater Spring is about 32 million gallons per day, and the variability of discharge is about 75 percent. Water-quality samples were collected from 6 springs and 15 wells in Calhoun County from November 2001 to January 2003. The pH of the ground water typically was greater than 6.0, and specific conductance was less than 300 microsiemens per centimeter. The water chemistry was dominated by calcium, carbonate, and bicarbonate ions. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of the water samples indicates the occurrence of a low-temperature, water-rock weathering reaction known as silicate hydrolysis. The residence time of the ground water, or ground-water age, was estimated by using analysis of chlorofluorocarbon, sulfur hexafluoride, and regression modeling. Estimated ground-water ages ranged from less than 10 to approximately 40 years, with a median age of about 18 years. The Spearman rho test was used to identify statistically significant covariance among selected physical properties and constituents in the ground water. The alkalinity, specific conductance, and dissolved solids increased as age increased; these correlations reflect common changes in ground-water quality that occur with increasing residence time and support the accuracy of the age estimates. The concentration of sodium and chloride increased as age increased; the correlation of these constituents is interpreted to indicate natural sources for chloride and sodium. The concentration of silica increased as the concentration of potassium increased; this correlation, in addition to the isotopic data, is evidence that silicate hydrolysis of clay minerals occurred. The geochemical modeling program NETPATH was used to investigate possible mixing scenarios that could yield the chemical composition of water collected from springs associated with the Jacksonville Thrust Fault Complex. The results of NETPATH modeling suggest that the primary source of water in Coldwater Spring is a deep aquifer, and only small amounts of rainwater from nearby sources are discharged from the spring. Starting with Piedmont Sports Spring and moving southwest along a conceptual ground-water flow path that parallels the Jacksonville Thrust Fault Complex, NETPATH simulated the observed water quality of each spring, in succession, by mixing rainwater and water from the spring just to the northeast of the spring being modeled. The percentage of rainwater and ground water needed to simulate the quality of water flowing from the springs ranged from 1 to 25 percent rainwater and 75 to 99 percent ground water.

  9. Hydrologic conditions and assessment of water resources in the Turkey Creek watershed, Jefferson County, Colorado, 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bossong, Clifford R.; Caine, Jonathan Saul; Stannard, David I.; Flynn, Jennifer L.; Stevens, Michael R.; Heiny-Dash, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    The 47.2-square-mile Turkey Creek watershed, in Jefferson County southwest of Denver, Colorado, is relatively steep with about 4,000 feet of relief and is in an area of fractured crystalline rocks of Precambrian age. Water needs for about 4,900 households in the watershed are served by domestic wells and individual sewage-disposal systems. Hydrologic conditions are described on the basis of contemporary hydrologic and geologic data collected in the watershed from early spring 1998 through September 2001. The water resources are assessed using discrete fracture-network modeling to estimate porosity and a physically based, distributed-parameter watershed runoff model to develop estimates of water-balance terms. A variety of climatologic and hydrologic data were collected. Direct measurements of evapotranspiration indicate that a large amount (3 calendar-year mean of 82.9 percent) of precipitation is returned to the atmosphere. Surface-water records from January 1, 1999, through September 30, 2001, indicate that about 9 percent of precipitation leaves the watershed as streamflow in a seasonal pattern, with highest streamflows generally occurring in spring related to snowmelt and precipitation. Although conditions vary considerably within the watershed, overall watershed streamflow, based on several records collected during the 1940's, 1950's, 1980', and 1990's near the downstream part of watershed, can be as high as about 200 cubic feet per second on a daily basis during spring. Streamflow typically recedes to about 1 cubic foot per second or less during rainless periods and is rarely zero. Ground-water level data indicate a seasonal pattern similar to that of surface water in which water levels are highest, rising tens of feet in some locations, in the spring and then receding during rainless periods at relatively constant rates until recharged. Synoptic measurements of water levels in 131 mostly domestic wells in fall of 2001 indicate a water-table surface that conforms to topography. Analyses of reported well-construction records indicate a median reported well yield of 4 gallons per minute and a spatial distribution for reported well yield that has relatively uniform conditions of small-scale variability. Results from quarterly samples collected in water year 1999 at about 112 wells and 22 streams indicate relatively concentrated calcium-bicarbonate to calcium-chloride type water that has a higher concentration of chloride than would be expected on the basis of chloride content in precipitation and evapotranspiration rates. Comparison of the 1999 data to similar data collected in the 1970's indicates that concentrations for many constituents appear to have increased. Reconnaissance sampling in the fall of 2000 indicates that most ground water in the watershed was recharged recently, although some ground water was recharged more than 50 years ago. Additional reconnaissance sampling in the spring and fall of 2001 identified some compounds indicative of human wastewater in ground water and surface water. Outcrop fracture measurements were used to estimate potential porosities in three rock groups (metamorphic, intrusive, and fault zone) that have distinct fracture characteristics. The characterization, assuming a uniform aperture size of 100 microns, indicates very low potential fracture porosities, on the order of hundredths of a percent for metamorphic and intrusive rocks and up to about 2 percent for fault-zone rocks. A fourth rock group, Pikes Peak Granite, was defined on the basis of weathering characteristics. Short-term continuous and synoptic measurements of streamflow were used to describe base-flow characteristics in areas of the watershed underlain by each of the four rock groups and are the basis for characterization of base flow in a physically based, distributed-parameter watershed model. The watershed model, the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS), was used to characterize hydrologic conditions

  10. 77 FR 60904 - Air Quality Implementation Plans; Alabama; Attainment Plan for the Alabama Portion of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ...Plan for the Alabama Portion of the Chattanooga 1997 Annual PM2.5 Nonattainment Area AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...the Chattanooga 1997 Jackson County, citation of Annual PM2.5 Nonattainment Area. Alabama....

  11. 40 CFR 81.267 - Southeast Alabama Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Alabama: Barbour County, Coffee County, Covington County, Dale County, Geneva County, Henry County, Houston...

  12. Assessment of water-quality conditions in the J.B. Converse Lake watershed, Mobile County, Alabama, 1990-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Journey, Celeste A.; Gill, Amy C.

    2001-01-01

    J.B. Converse (Converse) Lake is a 3,600-acre, tributary-storage reservoir in Mobile County, southwestern Alabama. The lake serves as the primary drinking-water supply for the city of Mobile. The Converse Lake watershed lies within the Coastal Plain Physiographic Province. Semiconsolidated to unconsolidated sediments of sand, silt, gravel, and clay underlie the watershed, and are covered by acidic soils. Land use in the watershed is mainly forest (64 percent) and agriculture (31 percent). Residential and commercial development account for only 1 percent of the total land use in the watershed. Converse Lake receives inflow from seven major tributaries. The greatest inflows are from Big Creek, Crooked Creek, and Hamilton Creek that had mean annual streamflows of 72.2, 19.4, and 25.0 cubic feet per second, respectively, for the period 1990 to 1998, which represents about 72 percent of the total annual streamflow to the lake. The total mean annual inflow to the lake is estimated to be about 163 cubic feet per second. In general, water quality in Converse Lake and its tributaries meets the criteria established by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) for drinking-water supplies, whole-body contact, and aquatic life. The exceptions include acidic pH levels, iron and manganese levels above secondary or aesthetic criteria, and fecal bacterial levels in some tributaries above whole-body contact (swimmable) criteria. The pH levels throughout the watershed were commonly below the criteria level of 6.0, but this appears to have been a naturally occurring phenomenon caused by poorly buffered soil types, resistant sediments, and forested land use. Median iron and manganese levels were above aesthetic criteria levels of 300 and 50 micrograms per liter, respectively, in some tributaries. All tributary sites in the Converse Lake watershed had median and minimum dissolved-oxygen concentrations above the ADEM criteria level of 5 milligrams per liter except for Boggy Branch, which had a minimum dissolved-oxygen concentration of 3.7 milligrams per liter. The degree to which nutrient contributions from tributaries were causing nutrient enrichment and eutrophication in Converse Lake was assessed. Trend analysis detected little or no change in nutrient concentrations at the tributary and lake sites in the Converse Lake watershed from the 1991 to 1998 water years. Nutrient concentrations at most tributary sites exhibited a significant, positive relation with streamflow that indicated the dominant source of nutrient input to the watershed is from nonpoint contributions. From 1990 to 1998, computed mean annual loads of 75,400 kilograms of total nitrogen, 36,950 kilograms of total Kjeldahl nitrogen, 28,870 kilograms of total inorganic nitrogen, and 3,480 kilograms of total phosphorus were contributed to the lake by Big Creek, Hamilton Creek, and Crooked Creek combined. These mean annual loads of nutrients corresponded to borderline eutrophic/mesotrophic conditions in the lake. Of the combined loads, 62 percent of the total nitrogen, 70 percent of the total Kjeldahl nitrogen, 54 percent of the total inorganic nitrogen, and 47 percent of the total phosphorus originated from the forested subbasin of Big Creek. The more residential and agricultural subbasins of Crooked Creek and Hamilton Creek, however, yielded over twice the total phosphorus load per hectare of land use. Crooked and Hamilton Creek subbasins also had higher yields of the more bioavailable total inorganic nitrogen. A simplistic empirical model could not explain the relation between year-to-year nutrient contributions to Converse Lake from the tributaries and the lake's ability to assimilate those contributions. The potential presence of pathogens in the lake and its tributaries was assessed based on fecal bacterial concentrations. Fecal bacterial concentrations at some tributary sites were above existing criteria for swimmable uses. Contributions of fecal bacte

  13. CARDING MACHINES, JEFFERSON MILL. PHOTOCOPY OF c. 1900 VIEW. From ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CARDING MACHINES, JEFFERSON MILL. PHOTOCOPY OF c. 1900 VIEW. From the collection of the Manchester Historic Association, Manchester, N. H. - Amoskeag Millyard, Canal Street, Manchester, Hillsborough County, NH

  14. WEST FRONT; STATUE ON STEPS IS THOMAS JEFFERSON (PLACED THERE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WEST FRONT; STATUE ON STEPS IS THOMAS JEFFERSON (PLACED THERE IN 1927); FLANKING BRONZE STATUES DEPICT "THE GREAT RIVERS," THE MISSOURI AND THE MISSISSIPPI; FIGURE OF CERES, GODDESS OF GRAIN TOPS DOME (PLACED THERE IN SEPTEMBER, 1916) - Missouri State Capitol, High Street between Broadway & Jefferson Streets, Jefferson City, Cole County, MO

  15. 1. WEST FRONT; STATUE ON STEPS IS THOMAS JEFFERSON (PLACED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. WEST FRONT; STATUE ON STEPS IS THOMAS JEFFERSON (PLACED THERE IN 1927); FLANKING BRONZE STATUES DEPICT 'THE GREAT RIVERS,' THE MISSOURI AND THE MISSISSIPPI; FIGURE OF CERES, GODDESS OF GRAIN TOPS DOME (PLACED THERE IN SEPTEMBER, 1916) - Missouri State Capitol, High Street between Broadway & Jefferson Streets, Jefferson City, Cole County, MO

  16. Final Technical Report. Upgrades to Alabama Power Company Hydroelectric Developments

    SciTech Connect

    Crew, James F.; Johnson, Herbie N.

    2015-03-31

    From 2010 to 2014, Alabama Power Company (“Alabama Power”) performed upgrades on four units at three of the hydropower developments it operates in east-central Alabama under licenses issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (“FERC”). These three hydropower developments are located on the Coosa River in Coosa, Chilton, and Elmore counties in east-central Alabama.

  17. Public health assessment for T. H. Agriculture and Nutrition (Montgomery), Montgomery, Montgomery County, Alabama, Region 4. Cerclis No. ALD007454085. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-28

    The T.H. Agriculture and Nutrition/Montgomery Plant (THAN) National Priorities List (NPL) site is an industrial facility in Montgomery, Montgomery County, Alabama. Two different properties comprise the THAN site. On-site groundwater, subsurface soils, shallow soils, sediments, and surface water are contaminated. Some contaminants of concern were found in off-site monitoring and domestic water wells. Surface water, shallow soils, and sediment found off-site have been contaminated. The authors found no evidence to suggest that a completed exposure pathway exists for contaminants of concern to reach the Twin Lakes community. Also, the evidence indicates that fish caught in the ponds are not a completed human exposure pathway.

  18. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY FROM UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER CARBONATES THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES AT WOMACK HILL OIL FIELD, CHOCTAW AND CLARKE COUNTIES, ALABAMA, EASTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-12-06

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is drilling an infill well in the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama. The objectives of the project are to drill and core an infill well in Womack Hill Field; to utilize samples from the core to evaluate further the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the field; and to use the new information resulting from the drilling of the well to revise and modify the 3-D geologic model, to further modify the injection strategy for the existing pressure maintenance program, and to assess whether a second infill well should be drilled using lateral/multilateral well completions.

  19. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY FROM UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER CARBONATES THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES AT WOMACK HILL OIL FIELD, CHOCTAW AND CLARKE COUNTIES, ALABAMA, EASTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-12-13

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is drilling an infill well in the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama. The objectives of the project are to drill and core an infill well in Womack Hill Field; to utilize samples from the core to evaluate further the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the field; and to use the new information resulting from the drilling of the well to revise and modify the 3-D geologic model, to further modify the injection strategy for the existing pressure maintenance program, and to assess whether a second infill well should be drilled using lateral/multilateral well completions.

  20. Drinking-water quality and variations in water levels in the fractured crystalline-rock aquifer, west-central Jefferson County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Dennis C.; Johnson, Carl J.

    1979-01-01

    In parts of Jefferson County, CO, water for domestic use from the fractured crystalline-rock aquifer contained excessive concentrations of major ions, coliform bacteria, trace elements, or radiochemicals. Based on results of analyses from 26 wells, water from 21 of the wells contained excessive concentrations of one or more constituents. Drinking water standards were exceeded for fluoride in water from 2 wells, nitrate plus nitrite in 2 wells, dissolved solids in 1 well, iron in 6 wells, manganese in 8 wells, zinc in 2 wells, coliform bacteria in 4 wells, gross alpha radiation in 11 wells and possibly 4 more, and gross beta radiation possibly in 1 well. Local variations in concentrations of 15 chemical constituents, specific conductance, and water temperature were statistically significant. Specific conductance increased significantly during 1973-75 only in the vicinity of Indian Hills. Annual range in depths to water in 11 observation wells varied from 1 to 15 feet. The shallowest water levels were recorded in late winter, usually in February. The deepest water levels occurred during summer or fall, depending on the well and the year. Three-year trends in water level changes in 6 of the 11 wells indicated decreasing water storage in the aquifer. (USGS).

  1. Analysis of geophysical logs from six boreholes at Lariat Gulch, former U.S. Air Force site PJKS, Jefferson County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Hodges, Richard E.; Corland, Barbara S.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents and describes geophysical logs for six boreholes in Lariat Gulch, a topographic gulch at the former U.S. Air Force site PJKS in Jefferson County near Denver, Colorado. Geophysical logs include gamma, normal resistivity, fluid-column temperature and resistivity, caliper, televiewer, and heat-pulse flowmeter. These logs were run in two boreholes penetrating only the Fountain Formation of Pennsylvanian and Permian age (logged to depths of about 65 and 570 feet) and in four boreholes (logged to depths of about 342 to 742 feet) penetrating mostly the Fountain Formation and terminating in Precambrian crystalline rock, which underlies the Fountain Formation. Data from the logs were used to identify fractures and bedding planes and to locate the contact between the two formations. The logs indicated few fractures in the boreholes and gave no indication of higher transmissivity in the contact zone between the two formations. Transmissivities for all fractures in each borehole were estimated to be less than 2 feet squared per day.

  2. 2. ALABAMA GATES LOOKING SOUTHEAST ALONG LINED CHANNEL, NOTE CHEMICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. ALABAMA GATES LOOKING SOUTHEAST ALONG LINED CHANNEL, NOTE CHEMICAL PURIFICATION TANK IN DISTANCE FOR KEEPING DOWN GROWTH OF ALGAE - Los Angeles Aqueduct, Alabama Gates, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. 75 FR 34735 - Adequacy Status of the Alabama Portion (Jackson County) of the Chattanooga, Tennessee Tri-State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... requirement for hot-spot analysis. (See 73 FR 4419, January 24, 2008.) Please note that an adequacy review is...: Response to Court Decision and Additional Rule Changes'' (69 FR 40004). Authority: 42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq...; Catoosa and Walker Counties, Georgia; and Hamilton County, Tennessee. As a result of EPA's finding,...

  4. Geology and geothermal resources of the Santiam Pass area of the Oregon Cascade Range, Deschutes, Jefferson and Linn Counties, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.E.

    1992-10-01

    This open-file report presents the results of the Santiam Pass drilling program. The first phase of this program was to compile all available geological, geophysical and geothermal data for the Santiam Pass area and select a drill site on the basis of these data (see Priest and others, 1987a), A summary of the drilling operations and costs associated with the project are presented in chapter 1 by Hill and Benoit. An Overview of the geology of the Santiam Pass area is presented by Hill and Priest in chapter 2. Geologic mapping and isotopic age determinations in the Santiam Pass-Mount Jefferson area completed since 1987 are summarized in chapter 2. One of the more important conclusions reached in chapter 2 is that a minimum of 2 km vertical displacement has occurred in the High Cascade graben in the Santiam Pass area. The petrology of the Santiam Pass drill core is presented by Hill in chapter 3. Most of the major volcanic units in the core have been analyzed for major, minor, and trace element abundances and have been studied petrographically. Three K-Ar ages are interpreted in conjunction with the magnetostratigraphy of the core to show that the oldest rocks in the core are approximately 1.8 Ma. Geothermal and geophysical data collected from the Santiam Pass well are presented by Blackwell in chapter 4. The Santiam Pass well failed to penetrate beneath the zone of lateral groundwater flow associated with highly permeable Quaternary volcanic rocks. Calculated geothermal gradients range from about 50[degree]C/km at depth 700-900 m, to roughly 110[degree]C/km from 900 m to the bottom of the well at 929 m. Heat-flow values for the bottom part of the hole bracket the regional average for the High Cascades. Blackwell concludes that heat flow along the High Cascades axis is equal to or higher than along the western edge of the High Cascades.

  5. FLORIDA HAZARDOUS WASTE AND SANITARY LANDFILL REPORT, COUNTY DATA. GENERATOR DATA AND CHARACTERISTICS OF SANITARY LANDFILLS. PART 5. COUNTIES: HILLSBOROUGH, HOLMES, INDIAN RIVER, JACKSON, JEFFERSON, LAFAYETTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report provides data on the use of sanitary landfills (Subtitle D facilities) for hazardous waste disposal in Florida by small quantity generators. It consists of eleven parts including a part called Study Area Data which contains the data aggregated across the counties cover...

  6. Analysis of stream-aquifer system interrelationships in the Big Blue and Little Blue River basins in Gage and Jefferson Counties, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Seepage measurements made during the fall of 1978 at 21 sites in the Big Blue River basin and at 35 sites in the Little Blue River basin were used to determine stream gains or losses in 20 drainage areas in the Big Blue River basin and 31 drainage areas in the Little Blue River basin. Analyses of data from these seepage measurements and of available hydrogeologic data indicate that the most significant ground-water contributions to streamflow in the Big Blue and Little Blue River drainage basins in Gage and Jefferson Counties, Nebr., occur where a direct hydraulic connection exists between a stream and buried coarse-grained deposits of Quaternary age. These deposits occur in two buried bedrock valleys that trend east-northeasterly across the area. The largest ground-water contributions to streamflow in the Big Blue River occur in the reaches of the river between the mouth of Mud Creek and the dam at Blue Springs (about 13 cubic feet per second) and between the mouth of Turkey Creek and the Beatrice gaging station (about 22 cubic feet per second). Ground-water contributions to streamflow also occur in two tributaries of the Big Blue River; Bear Creek (4.39 cubic feet per second) and Big Indian Creek (6.23 cubic feet per second). In the Little Blue River basin the largest contributions to streamflow occur between the mouths of Big Sandy Creeks (about 6.5 cubic feet per second) and in the vicinity of Fairbury (about 16 cubic feet per second). A ground-water contribution to streamflow of about 6.5 cubic feet per second also occurs in Rose Creek, a tributary of the Little Blue River. (USGS)

  7. Community Engagement in Health-Related Research: A Case Study of a Community-Linked Research Infrastructure, Jefferson County, Arkansas, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Holly C.; Olson, Mary; Cottoms, Naomi; Bachelder, Ashley; Smith, Johnny; Ford, Tanesha; Dawson, Leah C.; Greene, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Underrepresentation of racial minorities in research contributes to health inequities. Important factors contributing to low levels of research participation include limited access to health care and research opportunities, lack of perceived relevance, power differences, participant burden, and absence of trust. We describe an enhanced model of community engagement in which we developed a community-linked research infrastructure to involve minorities in research both as participants and as partners engaged in issue selection, study design, and implementation. Community Context We implemented this effort in Jefferson County, Arkansas, which has a predominantly black population, bears a disproportionate burden of chronic disease, and has death rates above state and national averages. Methods Building on existing community–academic partnerships, we engaged new partners and adapted a successful community health worker model to connect community residents to services and relevant research. We formed a community advisory board, a research collaborative, a health registry, and a resource directory. Outcome Newly formed community–academic partnerships resulted in many joint grant submissions and new projects. Community health workers contacted 2,665 black and 913 white community residents from December 2011 through April 2013. Eighty-five percent of blacks and 88% of whites were willing to be re-contacted about research of potential interest. Implementation challenges were addressed by balancing the needs of science with community needs and priorities. Interpretation Our experience indicates investments in community-linked research infrastructure can be fruitful and should be considered by academic health centers when assessing institutional research infrastructure needs. PMID:26203813

  8. Pipeline corridors through wetlands - impact on plant communities: Mill Creek Tributary Crossing, Jefferson County, New York, 1991 survey. Topical report, June 1991--April 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, G.D. |; Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of a survey conducted in June 1991 at the Mill Creek tributary crossing, Jefferson County, New York. One pipeline had been installed through the wetland in 1966, and another was scheduled to be installed later in 1991. Data were collected along the existing pipeline ROW and also along the planned ROW for use as baseline data in future studies. Four separate communities were surveyed. A scrub-shrub wetland and a forested wetland were sampled along the existing ROW where the planned pipeline was to be installed. A mixed vegetation community was sampled along the existing ROW, west of where the planned pipeline would joint the ROW. A marsh community was sampled along the route of the planned pipeline. All plant species found on the ROW of the scrub-shrub community were also present in the adjacent natural areas. The vegetation on the ROW of the forested wetland community also consisted mostly of species found in the adjacent natural areas. In the mixed vegetation community, a small drainage channel present on the ROW, possibly resulting from the pipeline construction, provided habitat for a number of obligate species not found in other areas of this community. Differences noted among different areas of this community were also attributed to slight variations in elevation.

  9. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Cameron, Clarion, Elk, Forest, Jefferson, McKean, Potter, and Warren Counties, Pennsylvania, 2004-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milheim, L. E.; Slonecker, E. T.; Roig-Silva, C. M.; Winters, S. G.; Ballew, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract unconventional natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in this area of Pennsylvania. Conventional natural gas wells, which sometimes use the same technique for extraction, are commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and are frequently developed in clusters across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Cameron, Clarion, Elk, Forest, Jefferson, McKean, Potter, and Warren Counties in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is also used to quantify these changes and is included in this publication. In this region, natural gas and oil development disturbed approximately 5,255 hectares (ha) (conventional, 2,400 ha; Marcellus, 357 ha; and oil, 1,883 ha) of land of which 3,507 ha were forested land and 610 ha were agricultural land. Eighty percent of that total disturbance was from conventional natural gas and oil development.

  10. Regional assessment of nonforestry related biomass resources: Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This document is a collection of spreadsheets detailing on a county by county basis the agricultural crop, agricultural wastes, municipal wastes and industrial wastes of Alabama that are potential biomass energy sources.

  11. 76 FR 48879 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Alabama Beach Mouse General Conservation Plan for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Alabama Beach Mouse General... endangered Alabama beach mouse (Peromyscus polionotus ammobates) in Baldwin County, Alabama. The GCP analyzes... availability of the proposed GCP and the dEIS. These documents analyze the take of the Alabama beach...

  12. 41. Photocopy of engraving from History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Photocopy of engraving from History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford and Gasconade Counties, Missouri (Chicago: Goodpeed Publishing Co., 1888) Wittenberg-Sorber, St. Louis, engraver, ca. 1888 'STONE HILL VINEYARDS AND CELLARS OF THE STONE HILL WINE COMPANY, HERMANN, MO.' - Stone Hill Winery, 401 West Twelfth Street, Hermann, Gasconade County, MO

  13. 25. VIEW OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) FROM OFF PORT BOW; VESSEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. VIEW OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) FROM OFF PORT BOW; VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON STATION IN GULF OF MEXICO WITH MOTOR BOAT TIED AT STERN Original 4-3/4'x6-3/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  14. 23. VIEW FROM STARBOARD BOW OF ALABAMA AS 'ALABAMIAN.' Uncopyrighted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW FROM STARBOARD BOW OF ALABAMA AS 'ALABAMIAN.' Uncopyrighted 3-1/2'x5-5/8' postcard; image taken on station in Gulf of Mexico, c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  15. 24. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN); VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN); VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON STATION IN GULF OF MEXICO WITH MOTOR BOAT TIED AT STERN Original 4-3/4'x6-3/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  16. 77 FR 67660 - Cahaba River National Wildlife Refuge, Alabama

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Cahaba River National Wildlife Refuge, Alabama AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... Cahaba River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Bibb County, Alabama. We provide this notice in compliance... National Wildlife Refuge, 2700 Refuge Headquarters Road, Decatur, AL 35603; 256-353-7243, Ext....

  17. 14. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Southern RR at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Southern RR at Epes Alabama Great Southern RR bridge. View from S. Copy of photo taken in 1922 by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms., Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  18. 77 FR 12829 - Alabama Power Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Alabama Power Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and...: Amendment of License. b. Project No.: 2146-135. c. Date Filed: February 7, 2012. d. Applicant: Alabama Power..., Alabama, and Floyd County, Georgia. g. Filed Pursuant to: Federal Power Act, 16 U.S.C. 791(a)-825(r)....

  19. 46. LINED SECTION OF AQUEDUCT LOOKING NORTH TO ALABAMA HILLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. LINED SECTION OF AQUEDUCT LOOKING NORTH TO ALABAMA HILLS - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. 11. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11 N of Epes Southern RR. lift span, S tower. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, MS. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  1. 8. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11, N of Epes Southern RR. lift span, from SW. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  2. Thomas Jefferson and the Constitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Merrill D.

    1987-01-01

    Examines Thomas Jefferson's role in the making and interpretation of the United States Constitution. Discusses the dominant features of Jefferson's constitutional theory; the character of Jefferson's presidency; and Jefferson's ongoing concern about constitutional preservation and change. Lists important dates in the history of the constitution.…

  3. Ground Breaking Ceremony for the Alabama Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Ground breaking ceremony for the Alabama Space Science Center, later renamed the U.S. Space and Rocket Center. Shown in this picture, left to right, are Edward O. Buckbee, Space Center Director; Jack Giles, Alabama State Senator of Huntsville; Dr. Wernher on Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director; Martin Darity, head of the Alabama Publicity Bureau (representing Governor Albert Brewer); James Allen, former Lieutenant governor, chairman of the Alabama Space Science Exhibit Commission; Major General Charles Eifler, commanding general of the Army Ordnance Missile Command; and Huntsville Mayor Glenrn Hearn. (Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public Library)

  4. FACING SOUNT AT JEFFERSON STREET AND 16TH STREET. NORTH AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACING SOUNT AT JEFFERSON STREET AND 16TH STREET. NORTH AND WEST BACKSIDES OF JOHN BREUNER AND COMPANY BUILDING IN CENTER (BACKGROUND), SURROUNDING STRUCTURES ON CLAY, JEFFERSON AND 15TH STREETS AT LEFT, RIGHT, AND FOREGROUND - John Breuner & Company Building, 1515 Clay Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  5. 75 FR 36676 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Jefferson City, MO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... City, MO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is here given in accordance..., Jefferson City, MO. The human remains were removed from Oregon County, MO. This notice is published as part... Resources, P.O. Box 179, Jefferson City, MO 65101, telephone (573) 751-7862, before July 28,...

  6. Geology and geothermal resources of the Santiam Pass area of the Oregon Cascade Range, Deschutes, Jefferson and Linn Counties, Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.E.

    1992-10-01

    This open-file report presents the results of the Santiam Pass drilling program. The first phase of this program was to compile all available geological, geophysical and geothermal data for the Santiam Pass area and select a drill site on the basis of these data (see Priest and others, 1987a), A summary of the drilling operations and costs associated with the project are presented in chapter 1 by Hill and Benoit. An Overview of the geology of the Santiam Pass area is presented by Hill and Priest in chapter 2. Geologic mapping and isotopic age determinations in the Santiam Pass-Mount Jefferson area completed since 1987 are summarized in chapter 2. One of the more important conclusions reached in chapter 2 is that a minimum of 2 km vertical displacement has occurred in the High Cascade graben in the Santiam Pass area. The petrology of the Santiam Pass drill core is presented by Hill in chapter 3. Most of the major volcanic units in the core have been analyzed for major, minor, and trace element abundances and have been studied petrographically. Three K-Ar ages are interpreted in conjunction with the magnetostratigraphy of the core to show that the oldest rocks in the core are approximately 1.8 Ma. Geothermal and geophysical data collected from the Santiam Pass well are presented by Blackwell in chapter 4. The Santiam Pass well failed to penetrate beneath the zone of lateral groundwater flow associated with highly permeable Quaternary volcanic rocks. Calculated geothermal gradients range from about 50{degree}C/km at depth 700-900 m, to roughly 110{degree}C/km from 900 m to the bottom of the well at 929 m. Heat-flow values for the bottom part of the hole bracket the regional average for the High Cascades. Blackwell concludes that heat flow along the High Cascades axis is equal to or higher than along the western edge of the High Cascades.

  7. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-05-22

    Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

  8. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-13

    Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

  9. 76 FR 19781 - Protection Island and San Juan Islands National Wildlife Refuges, Jefferson, San Juan, Skagit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ...Service [FWS-R1-R-2010-N222; 10137-1265-0000 S3] Protection Island and San Juan Islands National Wildlife Refuges, Jefferson, San Juan, Skagit, Island, and Whatcom Counties, WA; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan,...

  10. 75 FR 51098 - Protection Island and San Juan Islands National Wildlife Refuges, Jefferson, Island, San Juan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ...Wildlife Service [FWS-R1-R-2010-N131; 1265-0000-10137-S3] Protection Island and San Juan Islands National Wildlife Refuges, Jefferson, Island, San Juan, Skagit, and Whatcom Counties, WA AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife...

  11. 40 CFR 81.301 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...County Clay County Cleburne County Coffee County Colbert County Conecuh County...County Clay County Cleburne County Coffee County Colbert County Conecuh County...County Clay County Cleburne County Coffee County Colbert County Conecuh...

  12. 40 CFR 81.301 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...County Clay County Cleburne County Coffee County Colbert County Conecuh County...County Clay County Cleburne County Coffee County Colbert County Conecuh County...County Clay County Cleburne County Coffee County Colbert County Conecuh...

  13. Jefferson and Democratic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holowchak, M. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This essay is a reply to James Carpenter's "Thomas Jefferson and the Ideology of Democratic Schooling." In it, I argue that there is an apophatic strain in the essay that calls into question the motivation for the undertaking.

  14. Analytical results for 35 mine-waste tailings cores and six bed-sediment samples, and an estimate of the volume of contaminated material at Buckeye meadow on upper Basin Creek, northern Jefferson County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fey, D.L.; Church, S.E.; Finney, C.J.

    1999-01-01

    Metal-mining related wastes in the Boulder River basin study area in northern Jefferson County, Montana have been implicated in their detrimental effects on water quality with regard to acidgeneration and toxic-metal solubilization. Flotation-mill tailings in the meadow below the Buckeye mine, hereafter referred to as the Buckeye mill-tailings site, have been identified as significant contributors to water quality degradation of Basin Creek, Montana. Basin Creek is one of three tributaries to the Boulder River in the study area; bed sediments and waters draining from the Buckeye mine have also been implicated. Geochemical analysis of 35 tailings cores and six bed-sediment samples was undertaken to determine the concentrations of Ag, As, Cd, Cu, Pb,and Zn present in these materials. These elements are environmentally significant, in that they can be toxic to fish and/or the invertebrate organisms that constitute their food. A suite of one-inch cores of dispersed flotation-mill tailings and underlying premining material was taken from a large, flat area north of Basin Creek near the site of the Buckeye mine. Thirty-five core samples were taken and divided into 204 subsamples. The samples were analyzed by ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy) using a mixed-acid digestion. Results of the core analyses show that the elements listed above are present at moderate to very high concentrations (arsenic to 63,000 ppm, silver to 290 ppm, cadmium to 370 ppm, copper to 4,800 ppm, lead to 93,000 ppm, and zinc to 23,000 ppm). Volume calculations indicate that an estimated 8,400 metric tons of contaminated material are present at the site. Six bed-sediment samples were also subjected to the mixed-acid total digestion, and a warm (50oC) 2M HCl-1% H2O2 leach and analyzed by ICP-AES. Results indicate that bed sediments of Basin Creek are only slightly impacted by past mining above the Buckeye-Enterprise complex, moderately impacted at the upper (eastern) end of the tailings area, and heavily impacted at the lower (western) end of the area and downstream. The metals are mostly contained in the 2M HCl-1% H2O2 leachable phase, which are the hydrous amorphous iron- and manganese-hydroxide coatings on detrital sediment particles.

  15. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plan (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini; Joe Benson; David Hilton; David Cate; Lewis Brown

    2006-05-29

    The principal research efforts for Phase II of the project were drilling an infill well strategically located in Section 13, T. 10 N., R. 2 W., of the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, and obtaining fresh core from the upper Smackover reservoir to test the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in this field. The Turner Land and Timber Company 13-10 No. 1 well was successfully drilled and tested at a daily rate of 132 barrels of oil in Section 13. The well has produced 27,720 barrels of oil, and is currently producing at a rate of 60 barrels of oil per day. The 13-10 well confirmed the presence of 175,000 barrels of attic (undrained) oil in Section 13. As predicted from reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation, the top of the Smackover reservoir in the 13-10 well is structurally high to the tops of the Smackover in offsetting wells, and the 13-10 well has significantly more net pay than the offsetting wells. The drilling and testing of the 13-10 well showed that the eastern part of the field continues to have a strong water drive and that there is no need to implement a pressure maintenance program in this part of the Womack Hill Field at this time. The success achieved in drilling and testing the 13-10 infill well demonstrates the benefits of building a geologic model to target areas in mature fields that have the potential to contain undrained oil, thus increasing the productivity and profitability of these fields. Microbial cultures that grew at 90 C and converted ethanol to acid were recovered from fresh cuttings from the Smackover carbonate reservoir in an analogous field to the Womack Hill Field in southwest Alabama; however, no viable microorganisms were found in the Smackover cores recovered from the drilling of the 13-10 well in Womack Hill Field. Further evaluation is, therefore, required prior to implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the Womack Hill Field.

  16. Tornado disaster--Alabama, March 27, 1994.

    PubMed

    1994-05-20

    On Sunday, March 27, 1994, a series of severe thunderstorms and tornadoes moved across Alabama, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. These storms accounted for injuries to at least 422 persons, including 47 fatalities. Twenty-three fatalities were associated with a tornado that cut a path across St. Clair, Calhoun, and Cherokee counties in northeastern Alabama from 10:55 a.m. to 11:39 a.m. (Figure 1). This tornado damaged or destroyed three churches while services were being conducted. This report provides a summary of the injuries and deaths associated with this tornado based on information from death certificates from coroners' offices in the three counties and from emergency department and inpatient medical records from eight area hospitals. PMID:8177194

  17. 32. PORT PROFILE OF THE ALABAMA. Uncopyrighted 31/4'x5'photograph taken by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. PORT PROFILE OF THE ALABAMA. Uncopyrighted 3-1/4'x5'photograph taken by Thigpen Photography, c. 1965. Written on back of photo: 'This is what the vessel looked like when I bought her in 1966 R.S. Douglas.' Also, stamped on back is: Thigpen Photography 1442 So. Beltline Highway Mobile, Alabama 46609 to reorder specify no. M7062-1 - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  18. 40 CFR 81.301 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...County Clay County Cleburne County Coffee County Colbert County Conecuh County...County Clay County Cleburne County Coffee County Colbert County Conecuh County...County Unclassifiable/Attainment. Coffee County...

  19. 40 CFR 81.301 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...County Clay County Cleburne County Coffee County Colbert County Conecuh County...County Clay County Cleburne County Coffee County Colbert County Conecuh County...County Unclassifiable/Attainment. Coffee County...

  20. 40 CFR 81.301 - Alabama.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...County Clay CountyCleburne County Coffee CountyColbert County Conecuh County...County Clay CountyCleburne County Coffee CountyColbert County Conecuh County...County Unclassifiable/Attainment.Coffee County...

  1. Positrons at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    A.W. Thomas

    2009-09-01

    We review the compelling case for establishing a capability to accelerate positrons at Jefferson Lab. The potential appplications range from the study of two-photon exchange and deeply-virtual Compton scattering to exploiting the charge current weak interaction to probe the flavor structure of hadrons and nuclei. There are also fascinating ideas for using such a capability to discover new physics beyond the Standard Model of nuclear and particle physics.

  2. 3. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE RAILROAD BRIDGE AND FERRY 1.5 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE RAILROAD BRIDGE AND FERRY 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17. Copy of photo by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., 1927. West ferry landing ferry barge, andcar in foreground. Alabama, Tennessee & Northern (later Frisco) RR bridge in background. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  3. 4. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE COLLAPSED RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE COLLAPSED RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17. Western half of collapsed Alabama, Tenn. & Northern RR. Bridge Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., photographer, 1973. Copy by Sarcone Photography, Columbs, Ms Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  4. Evaluating Humane Education: The Jefferson County Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Thomas A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a study which analyzes the impact of three different humane education treatments, all examples of traditional programs taught by local humane societies to fifth- and sixth-grade students. Results are compared with similar studies previously conducted. (CS)

  5. Shoreline assessment of Jefferson County, Texas 

    E-print Network

    Lee, Hoo Il

    2004-09-30

    . Illustration of storm surge (NOAA web site)????????????........16 6. Historic tide data of Sabine Pass north.??????????????...?..19 7. Comparison of three profiles at line 134??????????????...?.22 8. Near CATT where road is destroyed, picture taken... October 5, 2002????????????????????...??.23 9. Line 22 onshore data?????????????????????...?...23 10. Near VASTAR where the beach no longer exists, picture taken May 24, 2002????????????????????????24 11. Line 114 onshore data...

  6. CSU Extension Jefferson County Quarterly Report

    E-print Network

    : the sale of market animals raised by youth and other project-related items at the Livestock Auction in a showmanship class, then celebrities competed in two classes of showmanship; all walked away with ribbons

  7. 13. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES HIGHWAY BRIDGE U.S. 11 N ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES HIGHWAY BRIDGE U.S. 11 N of Epes Gorgas Bridge from NW. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  8. Cardboard Houses with Wings: The Architecture of Alabama's Rural Studio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botz-Bornstein, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    The Rural Studio, an outreach program of Auburn University, designs innovative houses for poor people living in Alabama's Hale County by using "junk" such as car windshields, carpet tiles, baled cardboard, and old license plates. The article theorizes this particular architecture in terms of Critical Regionalism, developed by Tzonis/Lefaivre and…

  9. 12. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11 N of Epes Southern RR. lift span, wide angle side view from SE. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  10. 10. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11 of Epes Wouthern RR. lift span, wide=angle view from SW. bank. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  11. 9. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11 N of Epes Southern RR. lift span, view from S approach. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  12. Neutron Transversity at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen; Xiaodong Jiang; Jen-chieh Peng; Lingyan Zhu

    2005-09-07

    Nucleon transversity and single transverse spin asymmetries have been the recent focus of large efforts by both theorists and experimentalists. On-going and planned experiments from HERMES, COMPASS and RHIC are mostly on the proton or the deuteron. Presented here is a planned measurement of the neutron transversity and single target spin asymmetries at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a transversely polarized {sup 3}He target. Also presented are the results and plans of other neutron transverse spin experiments at Jefferson Lab. Finally, the factorization for semi-inclusive DIS studies at Jefferson Lab is discussed.

  13. Thomas Jefferson: image and ideology 

    E-print Network

    Wilson, Gaye N. S. B.

    2012-11-30

    This thesis explores the public image of Thomas Jefferson as recorded in his major life portraits. It consults the traditions that surrounded eighteenth-century portraiture and the history of the portrait as a means of ...

  14. 77 FR 73480 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ..., AL 35126. index.php/alabama/ City Hall, 4410 jefferson-3/. Main Street, Pinson, AL 35126. Jefferson..., Courthouse, Land www.bakeraecom.com/ Jefferson County President, Development index.php/alabama/ (12-04-3890P....bakeraecom.com/ Mayor, City of Department, 205 index.php/alabama/ Mobile, P. O. Box Government mobile/....

  15. 77 FR 73480 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ...of Pinson, Pinson, AL 35126. index.php/alabama/ City Hall, 4410 jefferson-3...Jefferson County President, Development index.php/alabama/ (12-04-3890P). Jefferson...Mayor, City of Department, 205 index.php/alabama/ Mobile, P. O. Box...

  16. Homonegativity among Alabama Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satcher, Jamie; Leggett, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Members of the Alabama Counseling Association were surveyed to examine the extent to which they demonstrate homonegativity (prejudicial attitudes toward homosexuality). The majority of the counselors did not appear to approach homosexuality from traditional prejudices, although almost one-third believed homosexuality to be immoral. The counselors…

  17. Alabama Water Use, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutson, Susan S.; Littlepage, Thomas M.; Harper, Michael J.; Tinney, James O.

    2009-01-01

    Water is one of Alabama's most precious natural resources. It is a vital component of human existence and essential to the overall quality of life. Wise stewardship of this valuable resource depends on a continuing assessment of water availability and water use. Population growth in many parts of the State has resulted in increased competition for available water resources. This competition includes offstream uses, such as residential, agricultural, and industrial, and instream uses for maintenance of species habitat and diversity, navigation, power generation, recreation, and water quality. Accurate water-use information is required for sound management decisions within this competitive framework and is necessary for a more comprehensive understanding of the link between water use, water supply, and overall water availability. A study of water use during 2005 was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs, Office of Water Resources, Water Management Branch (ADECA-OWR), to provide water-use data for local and State water managers. The results of the study about the amount of water used, how it was used, and where it was used in Alabama have been published in 'Estimated use of water in Alabama in 2005' by Hutson and others, 2009, and is accessible on the Web at http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2009/5163 and available upon request as a CD-ROM through USGS and ADECA-OWR.

  18. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Grames, Douglas Higinbotham, Hugh Montgomery

    2010-09-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia, USA, is one of ten national laboratories under the aegis of the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It is managed and operated by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC. The primary facility at Jefferson Lab is the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) as shown in an aerial photograph in Figure 1. Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 as CEBAF and started operations for physics in 1995. The accelerator uses superconducting radio-frequency (srf) techniques to generate high-quality beams of electrons with high-intensity, well-controlled polarization. The technology has enabled ancillary facilities to be created. The CEBAF facility is used by an international user community of more than 1200 physicists for a program of exploration and study of nuclear, hadronic matter, the strong interaction and quantum chromodynamics. Additionally, the exceptional quality of the beams facilitates studies of the fundamental symmetries of nature, which complement those of atomic physics on the one hand and of high-energy particle physics on the other. The facility is in the midst of a project to double the energy of the facility and to enhance and expand its experimental facilities. Studies are also pursued with a Free-Electron Laser produced by an energy-recovering linear accelerator.

  19. Alabama English, 1989-1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Isabelle K., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    These 1989-1996 issues of "Alabama English" contain articles that address current theory and practice in the teaching of reading, writing, and literature at any grade level. The first two issues focus specifically on the teaching of writing. The third issue is a special issue featuring Alabama authors, while the fourth issue presents articles on a…

  20. Adsorption kinetics of CO2, CH4, and their equimolar mixture on coal from the Black Warrior Basin, West-Central Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Naney, M.T.; Blencoe, J.G.; Cole, D.R.; Pashin, J.C.; Carroll, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetic behavior of pure and mixed gases (CO2, CH4, approximately equimolar CO2 + CH4 mixtures, and He) on a coal sample obtained from the Black Warrior Basin at the Littleton Mine (Twin Pine Coal Company), Jefferson County, west-central Alabama. The sample was from the Mary Lee coal zone of the Pottsville Formation (Lower Pennsylvanian). Experiments with three size fractions (45-150????m, 1-2??mm, and 5-10??mm) of crushed coal were performed at 40????C and 35????C over a pressure range of 1.4-6.9??MPa to simulate coalbed methane reservoir conditions in the Black Warrior Basin and provide data relevant for enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations. The following key observations were made: (1) CO2 adsorption on both dry and water-saturated coal is much more rapid than CH4 adsorption; (2) water saturation decreases the rates of CO2 and CH4 adsorption on coal surfaces, but it appears to have minimal effects on the final magnitude of CO2 or CH4 adsorption if the coal is not previously exposed to CO2; (3) retention of adsorbed CO2 on coal surfaces is significant even with extreme pressure cycling; and (4) adsorption is significantly faster for the 45-150????m size fraction compared to the two coarser fractions. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Adsorption Kinetics of CO2, CH4, and their Equimolar Mixture on Coal from the Black Warrior Basin, West-Central Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S; Naney, Michael {Mike} T; Blencoe, James {Jim} G; Cole, David R; Pashin, Jack C.; Carroll, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetic behavior of pure and mixed gases (CO2, CH4, approximately equimolar CO2 + CH4 mixtures, and He) on a coal sample obtained from the Black Warrior Basin at the Littleton Mine (Twin Pine Coal Company), Jefferson County, west-central Alabama. The sample was from the Mary Lee coal zone of the Pottsville Formation (Lower Pennsylvanian). Experiments with three size fractions (45-150 m, 1-2 mm, and 5-10 mm) of crushed coal were performed at 40 C and 35 C over a pressure range of 1.4 6.9 MPa to simulate coalbed methane reservoir conditions in the Black Warrior Basin and provide data relevant for enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations. The following key observations were made: (1) CO2 adsorption on both dry and water-saturated coal is much more rapid than CH4 adsorption; (2) water saturation decreases the rates of CO2 and CH4 adsorption on coal surfaces, but it appears to have minimal effects on the final magnitude of CO2 or CH4 adsorption if the coal is not previously exposed to CO2; (3) retention of adsorbed CO2 on coal surfaces is significant even with extreme pressure cycling; and (4) adsorption is significantly faster for the 45-150 m size fraction compared to the two coarser fractions.

  2. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama," as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  3. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  4. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  5. Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  6. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  7. Alabama Education News. Volume 33, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  8. Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  9. Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  10. Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  11. Alabama Education News. Volume 29, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  12. Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  13. Alabama Education News. Volume 32, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  14. BALDWIN COUNTY SEPTIC TANK MAINTENANCE DEMONSTRATION PROJECT MX974480

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baldwin County is located on the Gulf of Mexico in Alabama and has a rapidly growing population. Almost 3,000 permits for septic systems are approved annually by by the Baldwin County Health Department. More than 50% of the county's residents rely on septic systems for their d...

  15. Horticulture for Secondary Level Handicapped Adolescents: The Cherokee County Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frith, Greg H.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The Cherokee County (Alabama) horticulture training program provides 40 mildly mentally retarded adolescents with vocational training in a marketable skills. The broad spectrum of vocational skills makes horticulture ideal for the handicapped. (DB)

  16. Latest results from FROST at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, Barry G.

    2014-06-01

    The spectrum of broad and overlapping nucleon excitations can be greatly clarified by use of a polarized photon beam incident on a polarized target in meson photoproduction experiments. At Jefferson Lab, a program of such measurements has made use of the Jefferson Lab FROzen Spin Target (FROST). An overview of preliminary results are presented.

  17. The DVCS program at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Niccolai, Silvia

    2014-06-01

    Recent promising results, obtained at Jefferson Lab, on cross sections and asymmetries for DVCS and their link to the Generalized Parton Distributions are the focus of this paper. The extensive experimental program to measure DVCS with the 12-GeV-upgraded CEBAF in three experimental Halls (A, B, C) of Jefferson Lab, will also be presented.

  18. Water EducaTion for Alabama's Black Belt (WET Alabama): Facilitating Scientific Understanding of the Hydrologic Cycle in Low-Resource Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, L. W.; Lee, M.; Stone, K.

    2008-12-01

    Youth, as future citizens, play an important role in obtaining and maintaining water resources. Water EducaTion for Alabama's Black Belt (WET Alabama) provides off-campus environmental and water-education activities designed to increase the appreciation, knowledge, conservation, and protection of water resources by middle-school teachers and children from predominantly African-American families in some of Alabama's poorest counties. The project is structured around a variety of indoor and outdoor activities held at two field sites, Auburn University's E. V. Smith Center in Macon County and the Robert G. Wehle Nature Center in Bullock County located in Alabama's "Black Belt" region, a region in which the prosperity of local communities is low. The educational activities provide an engaging laboratory and field experience for children from rural schools that lack scientific facilities and equipment. Both hosting centers have easy access to surface water (ponds, wetlands, streams) and offer facilities for basic hydrologic experiments (e.g., aquifer models, permeameter, water quality). The E.V. Smith site has access to groundwater through pairs of nested wells. Educational activities are designed to help students and teachers visualize groundwater flow and its interaction with surface water in an aquifer tank model; compare the hydrologic properties (porosity and permeability) of different aquifer materials (sands, gravels, and clays); learn about groundwater purging and sampling; and assess water quality and flow direction in the field. Simple exercises demonstrate (1) the balance of recharge and discharge, (2) the effects of flooding, drought and pumping, and (3) movement of contaminants through aquifers. A set of ready-to-teach laboratory exercises and tutorials address goals specified by the State of Alabama science curriculum for grades 6 to 8. The ultimate goal of Project WET Alabama is to help students and teachers from resource-poor schools become knowledgeable about surface water and groundwater so they can identify and sustain "safe" aquifer zones, where clean water resources are available for long-term use and economic development.

  19. 77 FR 18857 - Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision for Alabama Beach Mouse General...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... species. On August 9, 2011, we published a notice of availability for a draft EIS (76 FR 48879) for a 90... Mouse General Conservation Plan for Incidental Take on the Fort Morgan Peninsula, Baldwin County, AL... Alabama beach mouse (Peromyscus polionotus ammobates). For record of decision (ROD) availability,...

  20. Luminous electrical phenomena in Huntsville, Alabama, tornadoes on April 3, 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, O. H., Jr.; Vonnegut, B.

    1976-01-01

    Unusual lightning and varicolored luminous phenomena were observed on the evening of April 3, 1974, when severe tornadoes passed through Madison County, Alabama. Photographs and eyewitness accounts of this electrical activity are related to the trajectories of the tornadoes and the damage areas they produced.

  1. 2. ALABAMA, PICKENS, CO., COCHRANE HIGHWAY BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. ALABAMA, PICKENS, CO., COCHRANE HIGHWAY BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17. Aerial view of Milner bridge, from SE. David J. Kaminsky, Architecturl Photography, Atlanta Ga. Aug 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  2. 1. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE HIGHWAY BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE HIGHWAY BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17 Aerial view of Milner bridge, from SW. David J. Kaminsky, Architectural Photography, Atlanta Ga. Aug 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  3. 7. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just off U.S. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just off U.S. 11, N of Epes Copy of photo by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms. 1922. Picture of earlier bridge: turn span and fixed spans. Ala. Great Southern RR. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  4. 6. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17 Copy of photo by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., 192. Shows center turn span and part of one fixed span. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  5. 5. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE COLLAPSED RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE COLLAPSED RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17. Copy of photo by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., after bridge collapsed in 1973. Shows broken turn span and overturned center pier. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL ATTITUDES OF ALABAMA COASTAL RESIDENTS: PUBLIC OPINION POLLS AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Given these conclusions at the national level, it follows that the continued health and vitality of the Alabama coastal zone is associated with the current environmental knowledge of Mobile and Baldwin county residents. In this research, we collected information from coa...

  7. Diet Quality Is Low among Female Food Pantry Clients in Eastern Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Patricia; Zizza, Claire; Jacoby, Jocelynn; Tayie, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Examine diet quality, food security, and obesity among female food pantry clients. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A food pantry in Lee County, Alabama. Participants: Fifty-five female food pantry clients between 19 and 50 years of age. Main Outcome Measure(s): Diet quality using United States (US) Department of Agriculture…

  8. Jefferson Lab phenomenology: selected highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Wolodymyr Melnitchouk

    2005-07-07

    An overview of recent experimental highlights from Jefferson Lab is presented. We review the status of baryon spectroscopy, including the search for pentaquarks, as well as measurements of electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon, featuring the proton G{sub E}/G{sub M} ratio and the determination of the strangeness form factors. In inclusive scattering, we describe recent studies of quark-hadron duality in structure functions in the resonance-scaling transition region, and outline future physics plans at an energy upgraded 12 GeV facility.

  9. Electroweak Physics at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    R. D. McKeown

    2012-03-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility provides CW electron beams with high intensity, remarkable stability, and a high degree of polarization. These capabilities offer new and unique opportunities to search for novel particles and forces that would require extension of the standard model. CEBAF is presently undergoing an upgrade that includes doubling the energy of the electron beam to 12 GeV and enhancements to the experimental equipment. This upgraded facility will provide increased capability to address new physics beyond the standard model.

  10. 77 FR 39717 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... index.php/alabama/ Birmingham, 710 20th Street, 5th jefferson-3/. North 20th floor, Street, Birmingham...- President, Mobile 205 Government index.php/alabama/ 5872P). County Street, 3rd mobile/. Commission, P.O....bakeraecom.com/ County (11-04- President, Mobile 205 Government index.php/alabama/ 6441P). County Street,...

  11. Sections and Elevations U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Sections and Elevations - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Rehabilitation Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  12. First Floor Plan U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    First Floor Plan - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Rehabilitation Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  13. Elevations U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Officer in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevations - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Officer in Charge Residence, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  14. First Floor Plan U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    First Floor Plan - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  15. Landscape Plan U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Landscape Plan - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  16. Window Details U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Window Details - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  17. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  18. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  19. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  20. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  1. 33 CFR 117.101 - Alabama River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alabama River. 117.101 Section 117.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.101 Alabama River. (a) The...

  2. 76 FR 9700 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... Alabama program in the May 20, 1982, Federal Register (47 FR 22030). You can also find later actions... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 901 Alabama Regulatory Program AGENCY... regulatory program (Alabama program) under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA...

  3. 77 FR 54490 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... approval of the Alabama program in the May 20, 1982, Federal Register (47 FR 22030). You can also find... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 901 Alabama Regulatory Program AGENCY... regulatory program (Alabama program) under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA...

  4. 76 FR 30008 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ...the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation operations on...the regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation operations in...seq.). Alabama's revised mining regulations are found at Alabama...15 and 732.17. The full text of Alabama's program...

  5. University Based Welfare to Work Project and Materials. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohler, Maxie P.

    Staff from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) and the Jefferson County, Alabama, Department of Human Resources (DHS) worked together to create a "pipeline to employment" at UAB for welfare recipients by combining on-the-job training with educational opportunities. Welfare recipients referred to UAB by the Jefferson County DHS were given…

  6. Ground-water resources of the Alabama River Basin in Alabama; Subarea 8 of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint and Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa River Basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kidd, Robert E.; Atkins, J. Brian; Scott, John C.

    1997-01-01

    Drought conditions in the 1980's focused attention on the multiple uses of the surface- and ground-water resources in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) and Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa (ACT) River basins in Georgia, Alabama, and Florida. State and Federal agencies also have proposed projects that would require additional water resources and revise operating practices within the river basins. The existing and proposed water projects create conflicting demands for water by the States and emphasize the problem of water-resource allocation. This study was initiated to describe ground-water availability in the Alabama River basin of Alabama, Subarea 8 of the ACF and ACT River basins, and to estimate the possible effects of increased ground-water use within the basin. Subarea 8 encompasses about 6,750 square miles in the Coastal Plain physiographic province in central and southwestern Alabama. The Alabama River extends from the juncture of the Coosa and Tallapoosa Rivers near the city of Montgomery, to its juncture with the Tombigbee River, near the town of Calvert in Washington County. Subarea 8 includes the Cahaba River basin from the physiographic 'Fall Line' at the city of Centreville in Bibb County, to its mouth in Dallas County; and the Alabama River basin from near Montgomery to the Alabama River cutoff, about 6 miles northeast of its juncture with the Tombigbee River. The study area is underlain by sedimentary deposits of Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Quaternary ages. Major aquifers underlying Subarea 8 are, from shallowest to deepest, the Coastal lowlands aquifer system, the Floridan aquifer system, the Lisbon aquifer, The Nanafalia-Clayton aquifer, the Ripley aquifer, the Eutaw aquifer, and the Tuscaloosa aquifer. The conceptual model described for this study qualitatively subdivides the ground-water flow system into local (shallow), intermediate, and regional (deep) flow regimes. Ground-water discharge to tributaries mainly is from local and intermediate flow regimes and varies seasonally. The regional flow regime probably approximates steady- state conditions and discharges chiefly to major drains such as the Alabama River, and in upstream areas, to the Cahaba River. Ground-water discharge to major drains originates from all flow regimes. Mean-annual ground-water discharge to streams (baseflow) is considered to approximate the long-term, average recharge to ground water. The mean-annual baseflow was estimated using an automated hydrograph- separation method, and represents discharge from the local, intermediate, and regional flow regimes of the ground-water flow system. Mean-annual baseflow discharging from Subarea 8 was estimated to be 20,300 cubic feet per second. Mean-annual baseflow represented about 61 percent of total mean-annual stream discharge for the period of record. Estimated and measured stream discharge for selected sites on the Alabama River and its tributaries were compiled for the years 1941, 1954, and 1986, during which sustained droughts occurred throughout most of the ACF-ACT area. Stream discharges were assumed to be sustained entirely by baseflow during the latter periods of these droughts. Estimated baseflow near the end of the individual drought years was about 17 percent of the estimated mean-annual baseflow at the Alabama River cutoff, the most downstream point of Subarea 8. The potential exists for the development of ground-water resources on a regional scale throughout Subarea 8. Estimated ground-water use in 1990 was less than 1 percent of the estimated mean-annual baseflow, and about 2.4 percent of baseflow during the droughts of 1941, 1954, and 1986. Because ground-water use in Subareas 5 and 6 represents a relatively minor percentage of ground-water recharge, even a large increase in ground-water use in Subareas 5 and 6 in Georgia probably would have little effect on the quantity of ground water and surface water in Alabama. In addition, ground-water use in Subarea 3 in Georgia probably h

  7. Jefferson Lab's Trim Card II

    SciTech Connect

    Trent Allison; Sarin Philip; C. Higgins; Edward Martin; William Merz

    2005-05-01

    Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) uses Trim Card I power supplies to drive approximately 1900 correction magnets. These trim cards have had a long and illustrious service record. However, some of the employed technology is now obsolete, making it difficult to maintain the system and retain adequate spares. The Trim Card II is being developed to act as a transparent replacement for its aging predecessor. A modular approach has been taken in its development to facilitate the substitution of sections for future improvements and maintenance. The resulting design has been divided into a motherboard and 7 daughter cards which has also allowed for parallel development. The Trim Card II utilizes modern technologies such as a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and a microprocessor to embed trim card controls and diagnostics. These reprogrammable devices also provide the versatility to incorporate future requirements.

  8. The Jefferson Lab Trigger Supervisor System

    SciTech Connect

    Ed Jastrzembsi; David Abbott; Graham Heyes; R.W. MacLeod; Carl Timmer; Elliott Wolin

    2000-04-01

    We discuss the design and performance of a Trigger Supervisor System for use in nuclear physics experiments at Jefferson Lab. We also discuss the enhanced features of a new Trigger Supervisor Module now under construction.

  9. Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Gypsy, Ed.; Elliott, Glenda R., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Communicating ideas and information that will help counselors to implement the counseling role and develop the profession of counseling is the purpose of this journal. The first issue in volume 21 contains the following articles: "Policies and Procedures for Reporting Child Abuse in Alabama: Considerations for Counselors, Teachers, and School…

  10. PLC Support Software at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    P. Chevtsov; S. Higgins; S. Schaffner; D. Seidman

    2002-10-01

    Several Automation Direct (DirectNet) Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) have been integrated into the accelerator control system at Jefferson Lab. The integration is based on new software that consists of three main parts: a PLC driver with a state machine control block, a device support module, and a common serial driver. The components of new software and experience gained with the use of this software for beam dump systems at Jefferson Lab are presented.

  11. Jefferson Lab Plotting Toolkit for accelerator controls

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J; Keesee, M; Larrieu, C; Lei, G

    1999-03-01

    Experimental physics generates numerous data sets that scientists analyze using plots, graphs, etc. The Jefferson Lab Plotting Toolkit, JPT, a graphical user interface toolkit, was developed at Jefferson Lab to do data plotting. JPT provides data structures for sets of data, analyzes the range of the data, calculates the reasonable maximum, minimum, and scale of axes, sets line styles and marker styles, plots curves and fills areas.

  12. Thermal maturity patterns in Pennsylvanian coal-bearing rocks in Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, Maryland, and Pennsylvania: Chapter F.2 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Trippi, Michael H.; Hower, James C.; Grady, William C.; Levine, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal maturation patterns of Pennsylvanian strata in the Appalachian basin and part of the Black Warrior basin were determined by compiling previously published and unpublished percent-vitrinite-reflectance (%R0) measurements and preparing isograd maps on the basis of the measurements. The isograd values range from 0.6 %R0 in Ohio and the western side of the Eastern Kentucky coal field to 5.5 %R0 in the Southern field in the Pennsylvania Anthracite region, Schuylkill County, Pa. The vitrinite-reflectance values correspond to the American Society of Testing Materials (ASTM) coal-rank classes of high-volatile C bituminous to meta-anthracite, respectively. In general, the isograds show that thermal maturity patterns of Pennsylvanian coals within the Appalachian basin generally decrease from east to west. In the Black Warrior basin of Alabama, the isograds show a circular pattern with the highest values (greater than 1.6 %R0) centered in Jefferson County, Ala. Most of the observed patterns can be explained by variations in the depth of burial, variations in geothermal gradient, or a combination of both; however, there are at least four areas of higher ranking coal in the Appalachian basin that are difficult to explain by these two processes alone: (1) a set of west- to northwest-trending salients centered in Somerset, Cambria, and Fayette Counties, Pa.; (2) an elliptically shaped, northeast-trending area centered in southern West Virginia and western Virginia; (3) the Pennsylvania Anthracite region in eastern Pennsylvania; and (4) the eastern part of the Black Warrior coal field in Alabama. The areas of high-ranking coal in southwestern Pennsylvania, the Black Warrior coal field, and the Pennsylvania Anthracite region are interpreted here to represent areas of higher paleo-heat flow related to syntectonic movement of hot fluids towards the foreland associated with Alleghanian deformation. In addition to the higher heat flow from these fluids, the Pennsylvania Anthracite region also was buried more deeply than other parts of the Appalachian basin. The area of high rank coal in southwestern Virginia probably was controlled primarily by overburden thickness, but may also have been influenced by higher geothermal gradients.

  13. Sustaining Alabama's Gulf Coast Fishery Sustaining Alabama's Gulf Coast Fishery Resources Resources

    E-print Network

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    : ­ Aging industry infrastructure ­ Negative effects of: · population growth & · industrial development affected by: Aging industry infrastructure population growth & industrial development Rising costsSustaining Alabama's Gulf Coast Fishery Sustaining Alabama's Gulf Coast Fishery Resources

  14. Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Thomas Jefferson University

    Cancer.gov

    The Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Thomas Jefferson University (TJU) was originally established in July 1991 as the Jefferson Cancer Center (JCC), with Dr. Carlo Croce appointed as its first Director.

  15. Soils of Bell, Jefferson, Smith, Taylor and Webb Counties

    E-print Network

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1922-01-01

    costs about $1 .00 a ton in carload lots. ( 4) Potash. The soils of Texas as a rule contain an abundance of potash to produce good crops, though there is a variation in this respect. In general, potash is lea t often needed of any fertilizer... and the total plant food is low, then fertilizers should be used to supply plant food and increase crop yields. EXPLANATION OF TERMS Total phosphoric acid is the entire quantity of phosphoric acid con tained in the soil. It represents the entire quantity...

  16. Preliminary report on the Comet area, Jefferson County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becraft, George Earle

    1952-01-01

    Several radioactivity anomalies and a few specimens of sooty pitchblende and other uranium minerals have been found on the mine dumps of formerly productive base-and precious-metal mines along the Comet-Gray Eagle shear zone in the Comet area in southwestern Montana. The shear zone is from 50 to 200 feet wide and has been traced for at least 5 1/2 miles. It trends N. 80° W. across the northern part of the area and cuts the quartz monzonitic rocks of the Boulder batholith and younger silicic intrusive rocks, as well as the pre-batholitic volcanic rocks, and is in turn cut by dacite and andesite dikes. The youngest period of mineralization is represented by chalcedonic vein zones comprising one or more discontinuous stringers and veins of cryptocrystalline silica in silicified quartz monzonite and in alaskite that has not been appreciably silicified. In some places these zones contain no distinct chalcedonic veins, but are represented only by silicified quartz monzonite. These zones locally contain uranium in association with very small amounts of the following minerals: pyrite, galena, ruby silver, argentite, native silver, molybdenite, chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, and barite. At the Free Enterprise mine, uranium has been produced from a narrow chalcedonic vein that contains disseminated secondary uranium minerals and local small pods of pitchblende and from disseminated secondary uranium minerals in the adjacent quartz monzonite. Undiscovered commercial deposits of uranium ore may occur spatially associated with the base-and precious-metal deposits along the Comet-Gray Eagle shear zone, and chalcedonic vein zones similar to the Free Enterprise.

  17. Preliminary report on the Comet area, Jefferson County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becraft, George Earle

    1953-01-01

    Several radioactivity anomalies and a few specimens of sooty pitchblende and other uranium minerals have been found on the mine dumps of formerly productive base- and precious-metal mines along the Comet-Gray Eagle shear zone in the Comet area in southwestern Montana. The shear zone is from 50 to 200 feet wide and has been traced for at least 5? miles. It trends N. 80 ? W. across the northern part of the area and cuts the quartz monzonitic rocks of the Boulder batholith and younger silicic intrusive rocks, as well as prebatholithic volcanic rocks, and is in turn cut by dacite and andesite dikes. The youngest period of mineralization is represented by chalcedonic vein zones comprising one or more discontinuous stringers and veins of cryptocrystalline silica in silicified quartz monzonite and in alaskite that has not been appreciably silicified. In some places these zones contain no distinct chalcedonic veins but are represented only by silicified quartz monzonite. These zones locally contain uranium in association with very small amounts of pyrite, galena, ruby silver, arqentite, native silver, molybdenite, chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, and barite. At the Free Enterprise mine, uranium has been produced from a narrow chalcedonic vein that contains disseminated secondary uranium minerals and local small pods of pitchblende and also from disseminated secondary uranium ,minerals in the adjacent quartz monzonite. Undiscovered deposits of uranium ore may occur spatially associated with the base- and precious-metal deposits along the Comet-Gray Eagle shear zone and with chalcedonic vein zones similar to the Free Enterprise.

  18. Thomas Jefferson and Slaves: Teaching an American Paradox. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehn, Bruce

    2000-01-01

    Provides 11 primary sources that enable students to contemplate how Thomas Jefferson and his slaves produced a culture and community at Monticello (Virginia) and his other plantations. Focuses on Jefferson's relationship with his slaves, particularly addressing Sally Hemming's relationship with Jefferson, in order to study the complicated history…

  19. Dietary patterns and diet quality among diverse older adults: The University of Alabama at Birmingham study of aging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: To characterize dietary patterns among a diverse sample of older adults (= 65 years). Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Five counties in west central Alabama. Participants: Community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries (N=416; 76.8 ± 5.2 years, 56% female, 39% African American) in the Univer...

  20. 76 FR 48941 - Alabama & Florida Railway Co., Inc.-Abandonment Exemption-in Geneva, Coffee, and Covington...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Alabama & Florida Railway Co., Inc.--Abandonment Exemption--in Geneva, Coffee..., Coffee and Covington Counties, Ala. The line constitutes A&F's entire rail system and traverses...

  1. Is Jefferson a Founding Father of Democratic Education? A Response to "Jefferson and the Ideology of Democratic Schooling"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neem, Johann

    2013-01-01

    This response argues that it is reasonable to consider Thomas Jefferson a proponent of democratic education. It suggests that Jefferson's education proposals sought to ensure the wide distribution of knowledge and that Jefferson's legacy remains important to us today.

  2. Recent results in DIS from Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    David Gaskell

    2010-04-01

    Recent results in Deep Inelastic processes measured at Jefferson Lab are presented. In addition to the inclusive reactions typically discussed in the context of Deep Inelastic (electron) Scattering, particular emphasis is given to Deep Exclusive and semi#19;inclusive reactions. Jefferson Lab has made significant contributions to the understanding of the partonic structure of the nucleon at large x, and with its first dedicated measurements is already providing important contributions to understanding the three-dimensional structure of the nucleon via constraints on Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) and Transverse Momentum Distributions (TMDs).

  3. Alabama Public Library Service: 1997 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    The Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) serves the information needs of Alabama public libraries. As a state agency, APLS is charged with improving library services throughout the state to ensure that all citizens have access to quality library and information services. The agency is responsible for receiving and administering federal and state…

  4. Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    The Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) is charged with improving library services throughout the state to ensure that all citizens have access to quality library and information services. The agency is responsible for receiving and administering federal and state funds for the more than 200 public libraries in Alabama. Information is reported…

  5. 75 FR 60371 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... Register (47 FR 22030). You can also find later actions concerning the Alabama program and program... Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 901 Alabama Regulatory Program AGENCY: Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION: Proposed rule; public...

  6. Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    This annual report highlights the accomplishments of the Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) during 1990. Introductory materials include a map of Alabama's Congressional districts, photographs of the executive board of APLS, and comments from the chairman of the executive board and from APLS' director. Accomplishments are reported under the…

  7. Alabama Allied Health Needs Assessment Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Libby V.

    This study assessed the supply of and demand for allied health professionals in Alabama, focusing on the relationship between supply and demand in various workplace settings in the context of Alabama's demographics, current educational programs, and projected changes in health care. The health care professions included in the study were all fields…

  8. Alabama Department of Education Quick Facts, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This brochure presents state statistics; Alabama public schools 2007-08; Alabama State Board of Education members; financial data; public school size and enrollment; transportation; school meals; school personnel, 2007-2008; graduation requirements; student assessment; additional enrollment; and dropouts, 2006-07.

  9. Alabama Education Quick Facts: Plan 2020

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This brochure presents state statistics for the following categories; Alabama public schools, 2012-13; Alabama State Board of Education members; financial data, FY 2012; public school size and enrollment, 2012-13 school year; transportation, 2012-13; school meals, 2011-12; school personnel, 2012-13; graduation rates, 2010-11; graduation…

  10. Alabama Education Quick Facts, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This brochure presents state statistics; Alabama public schools 2009-10; Alabama State Board of Education members; financial data; public school size and enrollment, 2009-10 school year; transportation; school meals; school personnel, 2009-2010; graduation requirements; student assessment; additional enrollment; and dropouts in school year 2008-09.

  11. MMS 91-0062 Mississippi-Alabama

    E-print Network

    Miller, Scott

    Admk MMS 91-0062 Mississippi-Alabama Continental Shelf Ecosystem Study Data Summary and Synthesis of Mexico OCS Region #12;OCS Study MMS 91-0062 Mississippi-Alabama Continental Shelf Ecosystem Study Data under MMS Contract 14-12-0001-30346 by Texas A&M University Texas A&M Research Foundation College

  12. Alabama's Appalachian overthrust amid exploratory drilling resurgence

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.D. ); Epsman, M.L.

    1991-06-24

    Oil and gas exploration has been carried out sporadically in the Appalachian overthrust region of Alabama for years, but recently interest in the play has had a major resurgence. The Appalachian overthrust region of Alabama is best exposed in the valley and ridge physiographic province in the northeast part of the state. Resistant ridges of sandstone and chert and valleys of shales and carbonate have been thrust toward the northwest. Seismic data show that this structural style continues under the Cretaceous overlap. The surface and subsurface expression of the Alabama overthrust extends for more than 4,000 sq miles. Oil and gas have been produced for many years from Cambro-Ordovician, Ordovician, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian rocks in the nearby Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi and the Cumberland plateau in Tennessee. The same zones are also potential producing horizons in the Alabama overthrust region.

  13. The Hall D Detector at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis A. Meyer

    2000-12-12

    The Hall D experiment at Jefferson Lab is part of the proposed CEBAF upgrade to 12 GeV beam energy. The Experiment will study gluonic excitations of mesons in the 1.5 to 2.5 GeV/c{sup 2} mass region using an 8 to 9 GeV beam of linearly polarized photons.

  14. Mutation Operators for Ada A. Jefferson Offutt

    E-print Network

    Offutt, Jeff

    Mutation Operators for Ada A. Jefferson Offutt Department of ISSE George Mason University Fairfax@rstcorp.com March 1996 Technical Report ISSE­TR­96­09 Abstract Mutation analysis is a method for testing software. It provides a method for assessing the adequacy of test data. This report describes the mutation operators

  15. Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 1 #12;Introduction The Alabama Water Resources Research on pressing problems in Alabama's water resources. The AWRRI - in partnership with state and federal agencies

  16. Triassic/Jurassic faulting patterns of Conecuh Ridge, southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Hutley, J.K.

    1985-02-01

    Two major fault systems influenced Jurassic structure and deposition on the Conecuh Ridge, southwest Alabama. Identification and dating of these fault systems are based on seismic-stratigraphic interpretation of a 7-township grid in Monroe and Conecuh Counties. Relative time of faulting is determined by fault geometry and by formation isopachs and isochrons. Smackover and Norphlet Formations, both Late Jurassic in age, are mappable seismic reflectors and are thus reliable for seismicstratigraphic dating. The earlier of the 2 fault systems is a series of horsts and grabens that trends northeast-southwest and is Late Triassic to Early Jurassic in age. The system formed in response to tensional stress associated with the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. The resulting topography was a series of northeast-southwest-trending ridges. Upper Triassic Eagle Mills and Jurassic Werner Formations were deposited in the grabens. The later fault system is also a series of horsts and grabens trending perpendicular to the first. This system was caused by tensional stress related to a pulse in the opening of the Gulf of Mexico. Faulting began in Early Jurassic and continued into Late Jurassic, becoming progressively younger basinward. At the basin margin, faulting produced a very irregular shoreline. Submerged horst blocks became centers for shoaling or carbonate buildups. Today, these blocks are exploration targets in southwest Alabama.

  17. Catastrophic subsidence: An environmental hazard, shelby county, Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamoreaux, Philip E.; Newton, J. G.

    1986-03-01

    Induced sinkholes (catastrophic subsidence) are those caused or accelerated by human activities These sinkholes commonly result from a water level decline due to pumpage Construction activities in a cone of depression greatly increases the likelihood of sinkhole occurrence Almost all occur where cavities develop in unconsolidated deposits overlying solution openings in carbonate rocks. Triggering mechanisms resulting from water level declines are (1) loss of buoyant support of the water, (2) increased gradient and water velocity, (3) water-level fluctuations, and (4) induced recharge Construction activities triggering sinkhole development include ditching, removing overburden, drilling, movement of heavy equipment, blasting and the diversion and impoundment of drainage Triggering mechanisms include piping, saturation, and loading Induced sinkholes resulting from human water development/management activities are most predictable in a youthful karst area impacted by groundwater withdrawals Shape, depth, and timing of catastrophic subsidence can be predicted in general terms Remote sensing techniques are used in prediction of locations of catastrophic subsidence. This provides a basis for design and relocation of structures such as a gas pipeline, dam, or building Utilization of techniques and a case history of the relocation of a pipeline are described

  18. 78 FR 56980 - Muscle Shoals Reservation Redevelopment, Colbert County, Alabama

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... surplus, TVA would dispose of the property without land use restrictions other than those designed to..., retail and residential uses. Consequently, it could take on a suburban or urban character. Under... than those designed to protect TVA's program interests or to meet legal or environmental...

  19. 78 FR 56980 - Muscle Shoals Reservation Redevelopment, Colbert County, Alabama

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ...future land uses under this alternative could include recreation, nature and historic interpretation, open green spaces, ecotourism, botanical gardens, environmental education, and wildlife viewing and management. Under Alternative C, TVA would...

  20. 78 FR 20334 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... index.php/alabama/ Gulf Shores, P.O. West 1st Street, baldwin/. Box 299, Gulf Gulf Shores, AL Shores, AL..., Mayor, Broadway Street, index.php/colorado/ City of Boulder, Boulder, CO 80302. boulder/. P.O. Box 791... and index.php/colorado/ 0863P). Jefferson County Zoning, 100 jefferson-5/. Board of Jefferson...

  1. Ground Floor Plan (Section B) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Ground Floor Plan (Section B) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  2. Second Floor Plan (Section B) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Second Floor Plan (Section B) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  3. First Floor Plan (Section B) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    First Floor Plan (Section B) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  4. Floor Plan, Section, and Elevation U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Floor Plan, Section, and Elevation - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Main Switchgear Station, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  5. U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  6. Second Floor Plan (Section A) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Second Floor Plan (Section A) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  7. Ground Floor Plan (Section A) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Ground Floor Plan (Section A) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  8. First Floor Plan (Section A) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    First Floor Plan (Section A) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  9. Floor Plans and Stair Section U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Floor Plans and Stair Section - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Officer in Charge Residence, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  10. North and South Elevations U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North and South Elevations - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  11. Making the Case for Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Franz Gross

    2011-06-01

    This chapter is a personal account of the initial planning and competition for a new laboratory, which eventually became known as the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, with the official nickname "Jefferson Lab." The period covered starts as far back as 1964, with the introduction of quarks, and extends up to the late 1980s after the initial team was assembled, the superconducting design was in place, and construction was well underway. I describe some of the major experiments that were proposed to justify the laboratory, reflect on the present status of those initially proposed experiments, and very briefly outline some of the new ideas that emerged after the laboratory was constructed. The science is presented in a simple manner intended for a lay audience, with some of the ideas illustrated by cartoons that were often used in popular lectures given during this period.

  12. Harmonic Lasing Characterization at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Benson; Michelle D. Shinn

    2006-08-27

    Harmonic lasing is normally suppressed because of lasing at the fundamental wavelength. It can, however, be achieved by using any of several methods that suppress fundamental lasing. In this paper we discuss two methods used at Jefferson Lab. The first is to use the characteristics of dielectric coatings to allow harmonic lasing at cavity lengths longer than the synchronous length for the fundamental. The second is to use a dielectric coating that has little reflectivity at the fundamental. This allows us to directly compare fundamental and harmonic lasing with the same optical resonator and electron beam. We present measurement carried out at Jefferson Lab using the IR Upgrade FEL operating at 0.53, 0.94, 1.04, 1.6, and 2.8 microns in which both schemes are used to produce lasing at both the 3rd and 5th harmonic of the fundamental.

  13. Jefferson Lab Science Past and Future

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Robert

    2015-09-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for experimental nuclear physics. This facility is presently being upgraded, which will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in nuclear, hadronic, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  14. Water resources of Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prakken, Lawrence B.; Lovelace, John K.

    2014-01-01

    This fact sheet presents a brief overview of groundwater and surface-water resources in Jefferson Parish, Louisiana. Information on the availability, use, and quality of water from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is discussed. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of this information.

  15. Jefferson Lab Science: Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, R. D.

    2015-09-01

    The continuous electron beam accelerator facility and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for experimental nuclear physics. This facility is presently being upgraded, which will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in nuclear, hadronic, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  16. Overview of Nuclear Physics at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Robert D.

    2013-08-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for experimental nuclear physics. This facility is presently being upgraded, which will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in nuclear, hadronic, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  17. HYDROLOGIC INITIATIVE IN COASTAL MISSISSIPPI AND ALABAMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Nature Conservancy has completed a comprehensive site conservation plan at Grand Bay, Alabama. The primary stressors impacting the coastal habitats and significant conservation targets at Grand Bay include: habitat loss, fire suppression, exotic species, alteration of hydro...

  18. Assessment of the geothermal/geopressure potential of the Gulf Coastal Plan of Alabama. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G.V.; Wang, G.C.; Mancini, E.A.; Benson, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Geothermal and geopressure as well as geologic and geophysical data were studied to evaluate the potential for future development of geothermal resources underlying the Alabama Coastal Plain. Wire-line log data compiled and interpreted from more than 1300 oil and gas test wells included maximum recorded temperatures, mud weights, rock resistivities as related to geopressure, formation tops, fault locations, and depths to basement rock. The Alabama Coastal Plain area is underlain by a conduction dominated, deep sedimentary basin where geothermal gradients are low to moderate (1.0 to 1.8/sup 0/F/100 feet). In some areas of southwest Alabama, abnormally high temperatures are found in association with geopressured zones within the Haynesville Formation of Jurassic age; however, rocks of poor reservoir quality dominate this formation, with the exception of a 200-square-mile area centered in southernmost Clarke County where a porous and permeable sand unit is encased within massive salt deposits of the lower Haynesville. The results of a petrograhic study of the Smackover Formation, which underlies the Haynesville, indicate that this carbonate rock unit has sufficient porosity in some areas to be considered a potential geothermal reservoir. Future development of geothermal resources in south Alabama will be restricted to low or moderate temperature, non-electric applications, which constitute a significant potential energy source for applications in space heating and cooling and certain agricultural and industrial processes.

  19. 40 CFR 81.304 - Arkansas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Garland County Grant County Hot Spring County Jefferson County Lincoln County... Garland County Grant County Hot Spring County Jefferson County Lincoln County... Unclassifiable/Attainment. Hot Spring County...

  20. Beam dynamics activities at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab)

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, D.R.

    1997-12-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has been funded by the US Navy to build an infra-red FEL driven by an energy-recovering compact SRF-based linear accelerator. The machine is to produce a 1 kW IR photon beam. The Jefferson Lab Accelerator Division is presently engaged in detailed design and beam dynamics studies for the driver accelerator. Principle beam dynamics and beam transport considerations include: (1) generation and transport of a high-quality, high-current, space-charge dominated beam; (2) the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) during beam recirculation transport; (3) low-loss transport of a large momentum spread, high-current beam; (4) beam break up (BBU) instabilities in the recirculating accelerator; (5) impedance policing of transport system components; and (6) RF drive system control during energy recovery and FEL operation.

  1. 76 FR 13615 - B&B Manufacturing Site; Mobile, Mobile County, AL; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY B&B Manufacturing Site; Mobile, Mobile County, AL; Notice of Settlement AGENCY: Environmental... Manufacturing Site located in Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama for publication. DATES: The Agency will...

  2. Jefferson Lab: A Long Decade of Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hugh Montgomery

    2011-06-01

    Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 and started operating in about 1996. 2011 is an appropriate time to try to take a look at the results that have appeared, what has been learned, and what has been exciting for our scientific community. Rather than attempt to construct a coherent view with a single author or at least a small number, we have, instead, invited small groups of people who have been intimately involved in the work itself to make contributions. These people are accelerator experts, experimentalists and theorists, staff and users. We have, in the main, sought reviews of the actual sub-fields. The primary exception is the first paper, which sets the scene as it was, in one person's view, at the beginning of Jefferson Lab. In reviewing the material as it appeared, I was impressed by the breadth of the material. Major advances are documented from form factors to structure functions, from spectroscopy to physics beyond the standard model of nuclear and particle physics. Recognition of the part played by spin, the helicities of the beams, the polarizations of the targets, and the polarizations of final state particles, is inescapable. Access to the weak interaction amplitudes through measurements of the parity violating asymmetries has led to quantification of the strange content of the nucleon and the neutron radius of lead, and to measurements of the electroweak mixing angle. Lattice QCD calculations flourished and are setting the platform for understanding of the spectroscopy of baryons and mesons. But the star of the game was the accelerator. Its performance enabled the physics and also the use of the technology to generate a powerful free electron laser. These important pieces of Jefferson Lab physics are given their place. As the third Director of Jefferson Lab, and on behalf of the other physicists and others presently associated with the lab, I would like to express my admiration and gratitude for the efforts of the directors, chief scientists, associate directors, physicists, engineers, technicians and administrators who made it all possible. In sum, we should celebrate the science that Jefferson Lab has realized in this, its first long decade of physics.

  3. Integration of vertical and in-seam horizontal well production analyses with stochastic geostatistical algorithms to estimate pre-mining methane drainage efficiency from coal seams: Blue Creek seam, Alabama

    PubMed Central

    Karacan, C. Özgen

    2015-01-01

    Coal seam degasification and its efficiency are directly related to the safety of coal mining. Degasification activities in the Black Warrior basin started in the early 1980s by using vertical boreholes. Although the Blue Creek seam, which is part of the Mary Lee coal group, has been the main seam of interest for coal mining, vertical wellbores have also been completed in the Pratt, Mary Lee, and Black Creek coal groups of the Upper Pottsville formation to degasify multiple seams. Currently, the Blue Creek seam is further degasified 2–3 years in advance of mining using in-seam horizontal boreholes to ensure safe mining. The studied location in this work is located between Tuscaloosa and Jefferson counties in Alabama and was degasified using 81 vertical boreholes, some of which are still active. When the current long mine expanded its operation into this area in 2009, horizontal boreholes were also drilled in advance of mining for further degasification of only the Blue Creek seam to ensure a safe and a productive operation. This paper presents an integrated study and a methodology to combine history matching results from vertical boreholes with production modeling of horizontal boreholes using geostatistical simulation to evaluate spatial effectiveness of in-seam boreholes in reducing gas-in-place (GIP). Results in this study showed that in-seam wells' boreholes had an estimated effective drainage area of 2050 acres with cumulative production of 604 MMscf methane during ~2 years of operation. With horizontal borehole production, GIP in the Blue Creek seam decreased from an average of 1.52 MMscf to 1.23 MMscf per acre. It was also shown that effective gas flow capacity, which was independently modeled using vertical borehole data, affected horizontal borehole production. GIP and effective gas flow capacity of coal seam gas were also used to predict remaining gas potential for the Blue Creek seam. PMID:26435557

  4. Alabama Bridges: A Comprehensive Model for a Program of Care and Supervision of Older Children and Young Adolescents in Out-of-School Time. Program Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowles, Laura; Piggott, Gail B.

    The Employers' Child Care Alliance, a group of major employers in Lee County, Alabama, developed the "Bridges" program, an innovative program for children ages 10-14 during out-of-school time. The program focuses on the growth of the whole child, specifically in areas not traditionally focused on in school, such as creative development, cultural…

  5. Older Adult Health in Alabama's Black Belt Region.

    PubMed

    Lian, Brad; Schoenberger, Yu-Mei; Kohler, Connie

    2015-12-01

    Health issues are a concern in Alabama's Black Belt region, which runs across the southwestern part of the state and includes some of the poorest counties in the USA. As part of a Center for Disease Control (CDC)-sponsored study, we collected data covering several cancer (e.g., prostate, breast, skin) and other health-related indicators (e.g., stress, insurance, stroke, heart disease) from 647 predominantly African-American adults over the age of 50 in 20 communities in 7 Black Belt counties in 2005 and 2006. Here, we provide an account of the state of the health of older African-Americans and compare their outcomes to those of their White counterparts in the region. African-Americans report having generally lower levels of health and were less apt to have a cancer history (ps?

  6. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Page 1 Internal Software Review

    E-print Network

    Gilfoyle, Jerry

    -003. Updated to new clas-io libraries, bank definitions. New test version for event builder development. FirstThomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Page 1 Internal Software Review Jefferson Lab November 6-7, 2014 Hall B:User Software Contributions Gerard Gilfoyle University of Richmond #12;Thomas

  7. NOAA Ship THOMAS JEFFERSON S-222 The National Oceanic and

    E-print Network

    NOAA Ship THOMAS JEFFERSON S-222 Mission The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ship Thomas Jefferson in one of a fleet of research and survey vessels owned and operated by NOAA surveys for the primary purpose of updating NOAA's suite of nautical charts. Commercial shipping

  8. Quark Hadron Duality - Recent Jefferson Lab Results

    E-print Network

    Ioana Niculescu

    2015-09-25

    The duality between the partonic and hadronic descriptions of electron--nucleon scattering is a remarkable feature of nuclear interactions. When averaged over appropriate energy intervals the cross section at low energy which is dominated by nucleon resonances resembles the smooth behavior expected from perturbative QCD. Recent Jefferson Lab results indicate that quark-hadron duality is present in a variety of observables, not just the proton F2 structure function. An overview of recent results, especially local quark-hadron duality on the neutron, are presented here.

  9. Water resources of Jefferson Davis Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Vincent E.; Prakken, Lawrence B.

    2014-01-01

    Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in Jefferson Davis Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

  10. Strangeness Physics with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhard Schumacher

    2010-08-01

    We review recent developments in strangeness photo- and electro- production off the proton and neutron, as investigated using CLAS in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. By measuring sufficient spin observables one can decompose the reaction mechanism into elementary amplitudes. We discuss progress toward this end in recent data from CLAS, including cross sections and spin observables. We next discuss new results on the mass distribution of the Lambda(1405), which shows signs of being a composite meson-baryon object of mixed isospin. The work on other hyperons such as the Xi resonances will be mentioned, and future prospects for the CLAS program outlined.

  11. 40 CFR 282.50 - Alabama State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Alabama State-Administered Program. 282...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED...STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.50 Alabama State-Administered Program....

  12. 40 CFR 282.50 - Alabama State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Alabama State-Administered Program. 282...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED...STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.50 Alabama State-Administered Program....

  13. THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

    E-print Network

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering Laboratory Manager chemical engineering laboratory courses, working alongside faculty, including teaching Position A laboratory manager is sought at The University of Alabama's Department of Chemical

  14. Graptemys pulchra Baur 1893: Alabama Map Turtle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Godwin, James C.; McCoy, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    The Alabama Map Turtle, Graptemys pulchra (Family Emydidae), is a moderately large riverine species endemic to the Mobile Bay drainage system of Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi. Sexual size dimorphism is pronounced, with adult females (carapace length [CL] to 273 mm) attaining more than twice the size of adult males (CL to 117 mm). The species is an inhabitant of relatively large, swift creeks and rivers, often with wide sandbars. Stream sections open to the sun and with abundant basking sites in the form of logs and brush are preferred. Six to seven clutches of 4–7 eggs are laid each year on river sandbars. Although the species is locally abundant, populations are threatened by habitat destruction, declines in their prey base, commercial collection, and vandalism. It is listed as a Species of Special Concern in Alabama.

  15. Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 1 #12;Introduction The Alabama Water Resources Research with the newly created Auburn University Water Resources Center (AU-WRC), and in 2008 it was designated as part

  16. Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2014 Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2014 1 #12;Introduction The Alabama Water Resources Research with the newly created Auburn University Water Resources Center (AU-WRC), and in 2008 it was designated as part

  17. Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The Alabama Water Resources Research with the newly created Auburn University Water Resources Center (AU-WRC), and in 2008 it was designated as part

  18. Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Alabama Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 1 #12;Introduction The Alabama Water Resources Research with the newly created Auburn University Water Resources Center (AU-WRC), and in 2008 it was designated as part

  19. Alabama's Education Report Card, 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Educational progress has been moving in the right direction for several years in Alabama. Now, with the implementation of Alabama's own Plan 2020, an even higher level of accountability for students, teachers, administrators, support systems, and schools/school systems, Alabama is poised to experience unprecedented growth. Add to that, the…

  20. A lone biodetrital mound in the Chesterian (Carboniferous) of Alabama?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kopaska-Merkel, D. C.; Haywick, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    A carbonate mound in the Chesterian Bangor Limestone of Lawrence County, Alabama, consists chiefly of packstone and grainstone dominated by echinoderm ossicles and fragments of fenestrate bryozoans. In-situ colonies of the rugose coral Caninia flaccida comprise about 8% of the mound by volume. The exposed portion of the mound is approximately 25 m wide, 1.6 m thick at the thickest point and roughly circular in plan. The mound developed on top of a shallow ooid shoal that had been cemented and stabilised during an earlier episode of sub-aerial exposure. Subsequent flooding of the exposed shoal surface permitted establishment of the mound biota. Lateral and vertical facies relationships suggest that the mound possessed about 45 cm of synoptic relief when fully developed. Rugose corals, fenestrate and ramose bryozoans, stalked echinoderms, and sessile soft-bodied organisms encrusted by foraminifera colonised the shoal, forming a mound. Baffling resulted in deposition of mixed-fossil packstone containing locally derived debris and coated grains from the surrounding sea floor. Strong currents within the mound are indicated by preferred orientation of corals and by coarse, commonly cross-stratified grainstone in channels between neighboring coral colonies. Corals are most abundant on the windward side of the mound, where they account for about 13% of the mound compared to 6- 10% in the central part of the mound, and 2-4% on the leeward flank. Biodetrital mounds such as the one described here are uncommon in upper Paleozoic strata and previously unknown in the Bangor Limestone. Of 10 carbonate buildups we examined in the Bangor in Alabama and Tennessee, only one is a biodetrital mound. Two are rugose coral-microbial reefs, one is a coral biostrome, and six are dominated by microbialite. The Bangor shelf, previously interpreted as sedimentologically simple, appears to contain many small mounds of quite varied characteristics. Also, the discovery of a biodetrital mound in the Chesterian of Alabama suggests that there may be more kinds of upper Paleozoic mounds than commonly acknowledged. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. New GPIB Control Software at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew Bickley; Pavel Chevtsov

    2005-09-21

    The control of GPIB devices at Jefferson Lab is based on the GPIB device/driver library. The library is a part of the device/driver development framework. It is activated with the use of the device configuration files that define all hardware components used in the control system to communicate with GPIB devices. As soon as the software is activated, it is ready to handle any device connected to these components and only needs to know the set of commands that the device can understand. The old GPIB control software at Jefferson Lab requires the definition of these commands in the form of a device control software module written in C for each device. Though such modules are relatively simple, they have to be created, successfully compiled, and supported for all control computer platforms. In the new version of GPIB control software all device communication commands are defined in device protocol (ASCII text) files. This makes the support of GPIB devices in the control system much easier.

  2. PC/104 Embedded IOCs at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Jianxun Yan, Trent Allison, Sue Witherspoon, Anthony Cuffe

    2009-10-01

    Jefferson Lab has developed embedded IOCs based on PC/104 single board computers (SBC) for low level control systems. The PC/104 IOCs run EPICS on top of the RTEMS operating system. Two types of control system configurations are used in different applications, PC/104 SBC with commercial PC/104 I/O cards and PC/104 SBC with custom designed FPGA-based boards. RTEMS was built with CEXP shell to run on the PC/104 SBC. CEXP shell provides the function of dynamic object loading, which is similar to the widely used VxWorks operating system. Standard software configurations were setup for PC/104 IOC application development to provide a familiar format for new projects as well as ease the conversion of applications from VME based IOCs to PC/104 IOCs. Many new projects at Jefferson Lab are going to employ PC/104 SBCs as IOCs and some applications have already been running them for accelerator operations. The PC/104 - RTEMS IOC provides a free open source Real-Time Operating System (RTOS), low cost/maintenance, easily installed/ configured, flexible, and reliable solution for accelerator control and 12GeV Upgrade projects.

  3. 68. VIEW OF THE SOUTH END OF THE GENTLEMEN'S LOUNGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. VIEW OF THE SOUTH END OF THE GENTLEMEN'S LOUNGE WITH AN ENGLISH HUNT THEME, ON THE BASEMENT LEVEL, LOOKING FROM THE NORTH - Alabama Theatre, 1811 Third Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  4. 78 FR 45265 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Resource Management Plan Amendment and Associated Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ...Associated Environmental Assessment for Coal Lease by Application ALES-55199, AL...Assessment (EA) to consider leasing Federal coal in response to lease application ALES-55199 for Jefferson County, Alabama. Coal industry representatives, State and...

  5. 3. EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING QUENCH TOWER, WITH QUENCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING QUENCH TOWER, WITH QUENCH IN PROGRESS, WILPUTTE BATTERY, COAL PRE-HEATING UNIT, INCLINE CONVEYOR AND BATHHOUSE. - Alabama By-Products Company, Coke Plant, Highway 79 (Pinson Valley Parkway), Tarrant City, Jefferson County, AL

  6. Upper Carboniferous Insects from the Pottsville Formation of Northern Alabama (Insecta: Ephemeropterida, Palaeodictyopterida, Odonatoptera)

    E-print Network

    Beckemeyer, Roy J.; Engel, Michael S.

    2011-10-21

    for producing large numbers of high quality fossils (Buta et al., 2005). The mine covers parts of the eastern half of sec. 21 and the western half of sec. 22, T. 14S, R. 6W, in the Cordova 7.5-minute topographic quadrangle (Pa- shin, 2005... was collected in 1993 at an open pit coal mine “ap- proximately 100 yards east of Alabama Highway 13, ap- proximately 2 miles north of Eldridge in Walker County” (Lacefield, pers. comm., 2010) (Sec. 5, T. 13S, R. 10W). Ac- cording to Lacefield, the mine...

  7. Practice Location Preferences of Alabama Medical Students;

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs, David W.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Factors that help determine physicians' practice locations and specialties were listed by students and medical school faculty at the University of Alabama School of Medicine. Students, while acknowledging the importance of clinical experiences, said faculty members had little influence on their specialty choices. (Author/MLW)

  8. Chemical Technician Manpower Survey: State of Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Donald; And Others

    The study was undertaken to assess the needs of Alabama's industry for chemical technicians and to determine the kinds and levels of skills required by major employers. Of the 75 organizations responding to the questionnaire with usable data, 62 were private industries, 6 were testing laboratories, and 7 were federal agencies. Generally, the study…

  9. 76 FR 30008 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... Alabama program in the May 20, 1982, Federal Register (47 FR 22057). You can also find later actions..., 2011, Federal Register (76 FR 9700). In the same document, we opened the public comment period and... regions; and (c) Does not have significant adverse effects on competition, employment,...

  10. 76 FR 9642 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... Alabama program in the May 20, 1982, Federal Register (47 FR 22030). You can also find later actions... the proposed amendment in the September 30, 2010, Federal Register (75 FR 60371). In the same document... geographic regions; and (c) Does not have significant adverse effects on competition, employment,...

  11. 78 FR 11577 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... Alabama program in the May 20, 1982, Federal Register (47 FR 22030). You can also find later actions... initiative. We announced receipt of the proposed amendment in the September 5, 2012, Federal Register (77 FR... geographic regions; and (c) Does not have significant adverse effects on competition, employment,...

  12. Implementation of Alabama Resources Information System, ARIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, B. E.

    1978-01-01

    Development of ARIS - Alabama Resources Information System is summarized. Development of data bases, system simplification for user access, and making information available to personnel having a need to use ARIS or in the process of developing ARIS type systems are discussed.

  13. Alabama Kids Count 2002 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Apreill; Bogie, Don

    This Kids Count data book examines statewide trends in well-being of Alabamas children. The statistical portrait is based on 18 indicators in the areas of child health, education, safety, and security: (1) infant mortality rate; (2) low weight births; (3) child health index; (4) births to unmarried teens; (5) first grade retention; (6) school…

  14. Alabama Kids Count 2001 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Apreill; Bogie, Don

    This Kids Count data book examines statewide trends in well-being for Alabama's children. The statistical portrait is based on 17 indicators in the areas of health, education, safety, and security. The indicators are: (1) infant mortality rate; (2) low weight births; (3) child health index; (4) births to unmarried teens; (5) first grade retention;…

  15. EPIC FOR ALABAMA AND GULF COAST AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project provides an essential environmental analysis center to serve the Alabama coastal community and the regional community of the Gulf of Mexico as a member of the Gulf of Mexico Program's Virtual GIS team. The center provides GIS and information products that address e...

  16. Innovations in Alabama, Annual Dissemination Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This publication provides information on the 1973 Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), Title III projects in Alabama. The Title III program is designed to encourage school systems to develop imaginative solutions to educational problems; to more effectively use research findings; and to create, design, and make intelligent use of…

  17. 77 FR 54490 - Alabama Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ...regulation of surface coal mining and reclamation operations...by Alabama. The full text of the program amendment...areas developed for post- mining landuse of forest land...proposed amendment, its text or a summary of its terms...Intergovernmental relations, Surface mining, Underground...

  18. State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This Alabama edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher quality…

  19. Teacher Test Accountability: From Alabama to Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludlow, Larry H.

    2001-01-01

    Highlights some of the psychometric results reported by National Evaluation Systems in their study of the Massachusetts Educator Certification Test and identifies characteristics of this test that are inconsistent with the "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing." Comments also on an Alabama class action lawsuit dealing with teacher…

  20. Reservoir heterogeneity in Carter Sandstone, North Blowhorn Creek oil unit and vicinity, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.

    1992-05-01

    This report presents accomplishments made in completing Task 3 of this project which involves development of criteria for recognizing reservoir heterogeneity in the Black Warrior basin. The report focuses on characterization of the Upper Mississippian Carter sandstone reservoir in North Blowhorn Creek and adjacent oil units in Lamar County, Alabama. This oil unit has produced more than 60 percent of total oil extracted from the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The Carter sandstone in North Blowhorn Creek oil unit is typical of the most productive Carter oil reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report synthesizes data derived from geophysical well logs and cores from North Blowhorn Creek oil unit to develop a depositional model for the Carter sandstone reservoir. The second part of the report describes the detrital and diagenetic character of Carter sandstone utilizing data from petrographic and scanning electron microscopes and the electron microprobe. The third part synthesizes porosity and pore-throat-size-distribution data determined by high-pressure mercury porosimetry and commercial core analyses with results of the sedimentologic and petrographic studies. The final section of the report discusses reservoir heterogeneity within the context of the five-fold classification of Moore and Kugler (1990).

  1. The Jefferson lab FEL driver ERLs

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, David R.; Tennant, Christopher D.

    2013-11-01

    Jefferson Lab has - for over a decade - been operating high power IR and UV FELs using CW energy recovering linacs based on DC photocathode electron sources and CEBAF SRF technology. These machines have unique combinations of beam quality, power, and operational flexibility, and thus offer significant opportunity for experiments that use low and medium energy (several tens - few hundreds of MeV) electron beams. We will describe the systems and detail their present and near-term (potential) performance. Recent internal-target analysis and validation testing will be discussed, and schemes for single- and two-pass fixed target operation described. An introduction to subsequent discussions of beam quality and upgrade paths to polarized operation/higher energy will be given.

  2. The Jefferson Lab Frozen Spin Target

    E-print Network

    Keith, C D; Carlin, C; Comer, S A; Kashy, D; McAndrew, J; Meekins, D G; Pasyuk, E; Pierce, J J; Seely, M L

    2012-01-01

    A frozen spin polarized target, constructed at Jefferson Lab for use inside a large acceptance spectrometer, is described. The target has been utilized for photoproduction measurements with polarized tagged photons of both longitudinal and circular polarization. Protons in TEMPO-doped butanol were dynamically polarized to approximately 90% outside the spectrometer at 5 T and 200--300 mK. Photoproduction data were acquired with the target inside the spectrometer at a frozen-spin temperature of approximately 30 mK with the polarization maintained by a thin, superconducting coil installed inside the target cryostat. A 0.56 T solenoid was used for longitudinal target polarization and a 0.50 T dipole for transverse polarization. Spin-lattice relaxation times as high as 4000 hours were observed. We also report polarization results for deuterated propanediol doped with the trityl radical OX063.

  3. The Jefferson Lab Frozen Spin Target

    E-print Network

    C. D. Keith; J. Brock; C. Carlin; S. A. Comer; D. Kashy; J. McAndrew; D. G. Meekins; E. Pasyuk; J. J Pierce; M. L. Seely

    2012-04-05

    A frozen spin polarized target, constructed at Jefferson Lab for use inside a large acceptance spectrometer, is described. The target has been utilized for photoproduction measurements with polarized tagged photons of both longitudinal and circular polarization. Protons in TEMPO-doped butanol were dynamically polarized to approximately 90% outside the spectrometer at 5 T and 200--300 mK. Photoproduction data were acquired with the target inside the spectrometer at a frozen-spin temperature of approximately 30 mK with the polarization maintained by a thin, superconducting coil installed inside the target cryostat. A 0.56 T solenoid was used for longitudinal target polarization and a 0.50 T dipole for transverse polarization. Spin-lattice relaxation times as high as 4000 hours were observed. We also report polarization results for deuterated propanediol doped with the trityl radical OX063.

  4. The Jefferson Lab frozen spin target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, C. D.; Brock, J.; Carlin, C.; Comer, S. A.; Kashy, D.; McAndrew, J.; Meekins, D. G.; Pasyuk, E.; Pierce, J. J.; Seely, M. L.

    2012-08-01

    A frozen spin polarized target, constructed at Jefferson Lab for use inside a large acceptance spectrometer, is described. The target has been utilized for photoproduction measurements with polarized tagged photons of both longitudinal and circular polarization. Protons in TEMPO-doped butanol were dynamically polarized to approximately 90% outside the spectrometer at 5 T and 200-300 mK. Photoproduction data were acquired with the target inside the spectrometer at a frozen-spin temperature of approximately 30 mK with the polarization maintained by a thin, superconducting coil installed inside the target cryostat. A 0.56 T solenoid was used for longitudinal target polarization and a 0.50 T dipole for transverse polarization. Spin-lattice relaxation times as high as 4000 h were observed. We also report polarization results for deuterated propanediol doped with the trityl radical OX063.

  5. The Jefferson Lab 1 KW IR FEL

    SciTech Connect

    D. Douglas for the Jefferson Lab IR Demo FEL Team

    2000-08-01

    The Jefferson Lab (JLab) IR Demo Free Electron Laser (FEL) has completed commissioning and is initiating user service. The FEL - a high repetition rate, low extraction efficiency wiggler-driven optical cavity resonator - produces over 1 kW of tuneable light on intervals in a 3-6 lim wavelength range. It is driven by a 35-48 MeV, 5 mA superconducting RF (SRF) based energy-recovering continuous wave (CW) electron linac. The driver accelerator meets requirements imposed by low energy, high current, and a demand for stringent beam control at the wiggler and during energy recovery. These constraints are driven by the need for six-dimensional phase space management, the existence of deleterious collective phenomena (space charge, wake-fields, beam break-up, and coherent synchrotron radiation), and interactions between the FEL and the accelerator RF. The authors detail the system design, relate commissioning highlights, and discuss present performance.

  6. The Jefferson Lab Frozen Spin Target

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Keith, James Brock, Christopher Carlin, Sara Comer, David Kashy, Josephine McAndrew, David Meekins, Eugene Pasyuk, Joshua Pierce, Mikell Seely

    2012-08-01

    A frozen spin polarized target, constructed at Jefferson Lab for use inside a large acceptance spectrometer, is described. The target has been utilized for photoproduction measurements with polarized tagged photons of both longitudinal and circular polarization. Protons in TEMPO-doped butanol were dynamically polarized to approximately 90% outside the spectrometer at 5 T and 200-300 mK. Photoproduction data were acquired with the target inside the spectrometer at a frozen-spin temperature of approximately 30 mK with the polarization maintained by a thin, superconducting coil installed inside the target cryostat. A 0.56 T solenoid was used for longitudinal target polarization and a 0.50 T dipole for transverse polarization. Spin relaxation times as high as 4000 hours were observed. We also report polarization results for deuterated propanediol doped with the trityl radical OX063.

  7. The Jefferson lab FEL driver ERLs

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, David R.; Tennant, Christopher D.

    2013-11-07

    Jefferson Lab has - for over a decade - been operating high power IR and UV FELs using CW energy recovering linacs based on DC photocathode electron sources and CEBAF SRF technology. These machines have unique combinations of beam quality, power, and operational flexibility, and thus offer significant opportunity for experiments that use low and medium energy (several tens - few hundreds of MeV) electron beams. We will describe the systems and detail their present and near-term (potential) performance. Recent internal-target analysis and validation testing will be discussed, and schemes for single- and two-pass fixed target operation described. An introduction to subsequent discussions of beam quality and upgrade paths to polarized operation/higher energy will be given.

  8. APEX: A Prime EXperiment at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Beacham, James B.

    2014-06-01

    APEX is an experiment at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) in Virginia, USA, that searches for a new gauge boson (A') with sub-GeV mass and coupling to ordinary matter of g' ? (10{sup ?6} ? 10{sup ?2})e. Electrons impinge upon a fixed target of high-Z material. An A' is produced via a process analogous to photon bremsstrahlung, decaying to an e{sup +}e{sup -} pair. A test run was held in July of 2010, covering m{sub A?} = 175 to 250?MeV and couplings g?/e > 10{sup ?3}. A full run is approved and will cover m{sub A?} ?65 to 525?MeV and g?/e > 2.3 × 10{sup ?4}.

  9. Petabyte Class Storage at Jefferson Lab (CEBAF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Rita; Davis, Mark

    1996-01-01

    By 1997, the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility will collect over one Terabyte of raw information per day of Accelerator operation from three concurrently operating Experimental Halls. When post-processing is included, roughly 250 TB of raw and formatted experimental data will be generated each year. By the year 2000, a total of one Petabyte will be stored on-line. Critical to the experimental program at Jefferson Lab (JLab) is the networking and computational capability to collect, store, retrieve, and reconstruct data on this scale. The design criteria include support of a raw data stream of 10-12 MB/second from Experimental Hall B, which will operate the CEBAF (Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility) Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). Keeping up with this data stream implies design strategies that provide storage guarantees during accelerator operation, minimize the number of times data is buffered allow seamless access to specific data sets for the researcher, synchronize data retrievals with the scheduling of postprocessing calculations on the data reconstruction CPU farms, as well as support the site capability to perform data reconstruction and reduction at the same overall rate at which new data is being collected. The current implementation employs state-of-the-art StorageTek Redwood tape drives and robotics library integrated with the Open Storage Manager (OSM) Hierarchical Storage Management software (Computer Associates, International), the use of Fibre Channel RAID disks dual-ported between Sun Microsystems SMP servers, and a network-based interface to a 10,000 SPECint92 data processing CPU farm. Issues of efficiency, scalability, and manageability will become critical to meet the year 2000 requirements for a Petabyte of near-line storage interfaced to over 30,000 SPECint92 of data processing power.

  10. The Jefferson Lab High Power Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Boyce

    2006-01-01

    Jefferson Lab has designed, built and operated two high average power free-electron lasers (FEL) using superconducting RF (SRF) technology and energy recovery techniques. Between 1999-2001 Jefferson Lab operated the IR Demo FEL. This device produced over 2 kW in the mid-infrared, in addition to producing world record average powers in the visible (50 W), ultraviolet (10 W) and terahertz range (50 W) for tunable, short-pulse (< ps) light. This FEL was the first high power demonstration of an accelerator configuration that is being exploited for a number of new accelerator-driven light source facilities that are currently under design or construction. The driver accelerator for the IR Demo FEL uses an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) configuration that improves the energy efficiency and lowers both the capital and operating cost of such devices by recovering most of the power in the spent electron beam after optical power is extracted from the beam. The IR Demo FEL was de-commissioned in late 2001 for an upgraded FEL for extending the IR power to over 10 kW and the ultraviolet power to over 1 kW. The FEL Upgrade achieved 10 kW of average power in the mid-IR (6 microns) in July of 2004, and its IR operation currently is being extended down to 1 micron. In addition, we have demonstrated the capability of on/off cycling and recovering over a megawatt of electron beam power without diminishing machine performance. A complementary UV FEL will come on-line within the next year. This paper presents a summary of the FEL characteristics, user community accomplishments with the IR Demo, and planned user experiments.

  11. Diversity and Educational Gains: A Plan for a Changing County and Its Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orfield, Gary; Frankenberg, Erica

    2011-01-01

    This report is a response to the Jefferson County School Board's request for an independent study of the best way to carry successfully into the future its long-term commitment to diversity in its schools. The Board's first principle is preservation of diversity in the schools. The authors' assignment from the board was two-fold: to build on the…

  12. Production of Resonances Using CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Kei

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of hadronic resonances produced in photoproduction reactions at Jefferson Lab are shown and discussed. Emphasis is placed on the production of the excited hyperon states Sigma(1385), Lambda(1405), and Lambda(1520). Some future prospects for the upcoming Jefferson Lab 12 GeV era are given, where the CLAS12 and GlueX detectors will see unprecedented amounts of data using electromagnetic probes and further our knowledge of hadronic resonances.

  13. Investigation of coal deposits in the Fairview and Coal City basins, Coosa Field, St. Clair County, Ala.: reserves, petrography, and chemical properties of coals: washability characteristics of coal from Fairview bed: geology of area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toenges, Albert L.; Turnbull, Louis A.; Jolley, Theodore R.; Shields, Joseph J.; Smith, H.L.; O'Donnell, H. J.; Cooper, H.M.; Abernethy, R.F.; Gandrud, B.W.; Riley, H.L.; Rothrock, Howard E.

    1949-01-01

    Report issued by the Bureau of Mines discussing the coal deposits in Saint Clair County, Alabama. Investigations of the estimated reserves and analyses of the coal fields in this area are presented. This report includes tables, maps, illustrations, and photographs.

  14. Haynesville sandstone reservoirs in the Updip Jurassic trend of Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Kugler, R.L.; Mink, R.M.

    1994-09-01

    Subsequent to the 1986 drilling of the 1 Carolyn McCollough Unit 1-13 well, which initiated production from the Frisco City sand of the Haynesville Formation in Monroe County, Alabama, seven Haynesville fields have been established in Covington, Escambia, and Monroe counties. Initial flow rates of several hundred BOPD are typical for wells in these fields, and maximum rates exceed 2000 BOPD in North Frisco City field. As of August 1993, these fields produced more than 3,400,000 bbl of oil and 4,000,000 mcf of gas from depths of 12,000 to 13,000 ft. Haynesville sandstone reservoirs are concentrated in two distinct areas: (1) an eastern area (Hickory Branch, North Rome, and West Falco fields; API oil gravity = 40{degrees}) in the Conecuh embayment and (2) a western area (Frisco City, North Frisco City, southeast Frisco City, and Megargel fields; API oil gravity = 58-59{degrees}) on the Conecuh ridge complex. Eastern fields are productive from Haynesville sandstone, which is not continuous with the two distinct, productive sandstone bodies in western fields, the Frisco City sand and the Megargel sand. Hydrocarbon traps are structural or combination traps associated with basement paleohighs. Reservoir bodies generally consist of conglomerate (igneous clasts in western fields; limestone clasts in eastern fields), sandstone (subarkose-arkose), and shale (some of which is red) in stacked fining-upward sequences. Shale at the tops of these sequences is bioturbated. These marine strata were deposited in shoal-water braid-delta fronts. Petrophysical properties differ between the two areas. Maximum and average permeability in western fields (k{sub max} = 2000 md; k{sub ave} = 850-1800 md) is an order of magnitude higher than in eastern fields. The distribution of diagenetic components, including a variety of carbonate minerals, evaporate minerals (anhydrite and halite in western fields), and carbonate-replaced pseudomatrix, commonly is related to depositional architecture.

  15. Development of Alabama Resources Information System (ARIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, B. E.; Vachon, R. I.

    1976-01-01

    A formal, organized set of information concerning the development status of the Alabama Resources Information System (ARIS) as of September 1976 is provided. A series of computer source language programs, and flow charts related to each of the computer programs to provide greater ease in performing future change are presented. Listings of the variable names, and their meanings, used in the various source code programs, and copies of the various user manuals which were prepared through this time are given.

  16. 330 Jefferson Dr. Pittsburgh, PA 15228

    E-print Network

    Eckhardt, Dave

    to purchase "Direct Recording Elec- tronic" (DRE) machines manufactures by Sequoia. The DRE machines currently to deploy unverifiable Sequoia DRE machines due to concerns about the recurring costs of printing are at least competitive, and often cheaper, than DRE's. #12;We urge the County to scrap the current Sequoia

  17. 75 FR 23264 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Alabama

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-03

    ...State of Alabama is revising its approved Public Water System Supervision Program. Alabama has adopted the following rules: Arsenic Rule, Lead and Copper Minor Revisions Rule, and Radionuclides Rule. EPA has determined that Alabama's rules are no...

  18. 75 FR 52549 - Environmental Impact Statement; Alabama Beach Mouse Draft General Conservation Plan; Fort Morgan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ...Environmental Impact Statement; Alabama Beach Mouse Draft General Conservation Plan; Fort...statement (EIS) on the draft Alabama Beach Mouse General Conservation Plan (ABM GCP) Project...are included in the plan: Alabama beach mouse (ABM) (Peromyscus polionotus...

  19. 76 FR 48879 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Alabama Beach Mouse General Conservation Plan for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ...Environmental Impact Statement for Alabama Beach Mouse General Conservation Plan for Incidental...the federally endangered Alabama beach mouse (Peromyscus polionotus ammobates) in...documents analyze the take of the Alabama beach mouse incidental to construction of up to...

  20. Di-hadron production at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Anefalos Pereira, Sergio; et. al.,

    2014-10-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) has been used extensively in recent years as an important testing ground for QCD. Studies so far have concentrated on better determination of parton distribution functions, distinguishing between the quark and antiquark contributions, and understanding the fragmentation of quarks into hadrons. Hadron pair (di-hadron) SIDIS provides information on the nucleon structure and hadronization dynamics that complement single hadron SIDIS. Di-hadrons allow the study of low- and high-twist distribution functions and Dihadron Fragmentation Functions (DiFF). Together with the twist-2 PDFs ( f1, g1, h1), the Higher Twist (HT) e and hL functions are very interesting because they offer insights into the physics of the largely unexplored quark-gluon correlations, which provide access into the dynamics inside hadrons. The CLAS spectrometer, installed in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab, has collected data using the CEBAF 6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron beam on longitudinally polarized solid NH3 targets. Preliminary results on di-hadron beam-, target- and double-spin asymmetries will be presented.

  1. The BDX experiment at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Celentano, Andrea; et. al.,

    2015-06-01

    The existence of MeV-GeV dark matter (DM) is theoretically well motivated but remarkably unexplored. The Beam Dump eXperiment (BDX) at Jefferson Laboratory aims to investigate this mass range. Dark matter particles will be detected trough scattering on a segmented, plastic scintillator detector placed downstream of the beam-dump at one of the high intensity JLab experimental Halls. The experiment will collect up to 10^22 electrons-on-target (EOT) in a one-year period. For these conditions, BDX is sensitive to the DM-nucleon elastic scattering at the level of a thousand counts per year, and is only limited by cosmogenic backgrounds. The experiment is also sensitive to DM-electron elastic and inelastic scattering, at the level of 10 counts/year. The foreseen signal for these channels is an high-energy (> 100 MeV) electromagnetic shower, with almost no background. The experiment, has been presented in form of a Letter of Intent to the laboratory, receiving positive feedback, and is currently being designed.

  2. The BDX experiment at Jefferson Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celentano, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    The existence of MeV-GeV dark matter (DM) is theoretically well motivated but remarkably unexplored. The Beam Dump eXperiment (BDX) at Jefferson Laboratory aims to investigate this mass range. Dark matter particles will be detected trough scattering on a segmented, plastic scintillator detector placed downstream of the beam-dump at one of the high intensity JLab experimental Halls. The experiment will collect up to 1022 electrons-on-target (EOT) in a one-year period. For these conditions, BDX is sensitive to the DM-nucleon elastic scattering at the level of a thousand counts per year, and is only limited by cosmogenic backgrounds. The experiment is also sensitive to DM-electron elastic and inelastic scattering, at the level of 10 counts/year. The foreseen signal for these channels is an high-energy (> 100 MeV) electromagnetic shower, with almost no background. The experiment, has been presented in form of a Letter of Intent to the laboratory, receiving positive feedback, and is currently being designed.

  3. Deeply virtual Compton scattering at Jefferson Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Angela Biselli

    2015-10-15

    The generalized parton distributions (GPDs) have emerged as a universal tool to describe hadrons in terms of their elementary constituents, the quarks and the gluons. Deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) on a proton or neutron ($N$), $e N \\rightarrow e' N' \\gamma$, is the process more directly interpretable in terms of GPDs. The amplitudes of DVCS and Bethe-Heitler, the process where a photon is emitted by either the incident or scattered electron, can be accessed via cross-section measurements or exploiting their interference which gives rise to spin asymmetries. Spin asymmetries, cross sections and cross-section differences can be connected to different combinations of the four leading-twist GPDs (${H}$, ${E}$, ${\\tilde{H}}$, ${\\tilde{E}}$) for each quark flavors, depending on the observable and on the type of target. This paper gives an overview of recent experimental results obtained for DVCS at Jefferson Laboratory in the halls A and B. Several experiments have been done extracting DVCS observables over large kinematics regions. Multiple measurements with overlapping kinematic regions allow to perform a quasi-model independent extraction of the Compton form factors, which are GPDs integrals, revealing a 3D image of the nucleon.

  4. Jefferson Lab: New opportunities in hadronic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2014-11-11

    Jefferson Lab (JLab) is a fundamental research laboratory located in Newport News (Virginia-USA) whose primary mission is to explore the fundamental nature of confined states of quarks and gluons. It consists of a high-intensity electron accelerator based on continuous wave superconducting radio frequency technology and a sophisticated array of particle detectors. The design features and excellent performance of the accelerator made it possible to plan an upgrade in energy from 6 to 12 GeV without substantially altering the construction scheme of the accelerator. The program includes the construction of major new experimental facilities for the existing three Halls, A, B, C and the construction of the new experimental Hall D. The research program that motivated the upgrade in energy includes: the study of the nucleon 'tomography' through the study of generalized parton distribution functions (GPDs) and transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs), the study of exotics and hybrid mesons to explore the nature of the quarks confinement, precision test of the Standard Model through parity-violating electron scattering experiments. Major highlights of the program at 6 GeV will be presented as well as an overview of the 12 GeV physics program.

  5. Jefferson Lab: New opportunities in hadronic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2014-11-01

    Jefferson Lab (JLab) is a fundamental research laboratory located in Newport News (Virginia-USA) whose primary mission is to explore the fundamental nature of confined states of quarks and gluons. It consists of a high-intensity electron accelerator based on continuous wave superconducting radio frequency technology and a sophisticated array of particle detectors. The design features and excellent performance of the accelerator made it possible to plan an upgrade in energy from 6 to 12 GeV without substantially altering the construction scheme of the accelerator. The program includes the construction of major new experimental facilities for the existing three Halls, A, B, C and the construction of the new experimental Hall D. The research program that motivated the upgrade in energy includes: the study of the nucleon "tomography" through the study of generalized parton distribution functions (GPDs) and transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs), the study of exotics and hybrid mesons to explore the nature of the quarks confinement, precision test of the Standard Model through parity-violating electron scattering experiments. Major highlights of the program at 6 GeV will be presented as well as an overview of the 12 GeV physics program.

  6. Beamline Insertions Manager at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michael C.

    2015-09-01

    The beam viewer system at Jefferson Lab provides operators and beam physicists with qualitative and quantitative information on the transverse electron beam properties. There are over 140 beam viewers installed on the 12 GeV CEBAF accelerator. This paper describes an upgrade consisting of replacing the EPICS based system tasked with managing all viewers with a mixed system utilizing EPICS and high level software. Most devices, particularly the beam viewers, cannot be safely inserted into the beam line during high-current beam operations. Software is partly responsible for protecting the machine from untimely insertions. The multiplicity of beam-blocking and beam-vulnerable devices motivate us to try a data-driven approach. The beamline insertions application components are centrally managed and configured through an object-oriented software framework created for this purpose. A rules-based engine tracks the configuration and status of every device, along with the beam status of the machine segment containing the device. The application uses this information to decide on which device actions are allowed at any given time.

  7. 40 CFR 81.190 - Eastern Idaho Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...County, Bear Lake County, Bingham County, Bonneville County, Butte County, Caribou County, Clark County, Franklin County, Fremont County, Jefferson County, Madison County, Oneida County, Power County, Teton...

  8. 76 FR 18753 - Jefferson Island Storage & Hub, L.L.C.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Jefferson Island Storage & Hub, L.L.C.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on March 28, 2011, Jefferson Island Storage & Hub, L.L.C. (Jefferson Island) submitted a revised...

  9. Jefferson Lab personnel safety fast beam kicker system

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, K.; Garza, O.; Stitts, E.; Areti, H.; O`Sullivan, M.

    1997-08-01

    The CEBAF accelerator at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) uses a continuous electron beam with up to 800 kilowatts of average beam power. The laboratory beam containment policy requires that in the event of an errant beam striking a beam blocking device, the beam must be shut off by three methods in less than 1 millisecond. One method implemented is to shut off the beam at the gun. Two additional methods have been developed which use fast beam kickers to deflect the injector beam on to a water cooled aperture. The kickers designed and implemented at Jefferson lab are able to deflect the injector beam in less than 200 microseconds. The kicker system includes self-test and monitoring capabilities that enable the system to be used for personnel safety.

  10. The work smart standards process at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, James R.; Prior, Sandra; Hanson, Eric; Morgan, Barbara

    1997-02-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has developed a set of Work Smart Standards for the Lab. The effort incorporated the Lab's performance-based contract into the Necessary and Sufficient (N&S) Standards identification process of the DOE. A rigorous protocol identified hazards in the workplace and standards that provide adequate protection of workers, public, and the environment at reasonable cost. The intensive process was a joint effort between the Lab and DOE and it required trained teams of knowledgeable experts in three fields: 1.) actual required work conditions at Jefferson Lab; 2.) laws, regulations, DOE directives and performance-based contracts; and 3.) Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S), Rad Con, and QA. The criteria for selection of the teams, the database designed and used for the process, and lessons learned are discussed.

  11. AL State Profile. Alabama: Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE), 3rd Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides information about Alabama High School Graduation Exam, 3rd Edition, a comprehensive standards-based exam. The purpose of the exam is to: (1) Provide schools with student academic diagnostic information; (2) Determine prospective high school graduates' mastery of the state curriculum; (3) Increase alignment of local curriculum…

  12. Alabama Bound: Identifying Factors Associated with Secondary Education Students' Choice of Attending The University of Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acker, Jon Charles; Hughes, William W.; Fendley, William R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Alabama's primary competitor in recruiting is in-state rival Auburn University which lures away roughly one in eight of UA's admitted students. Two factors stand above all others in attracting students to UA--academic reputation and social activities reputation. Factors following distantly are a visit to the UA campus, financial assistance and the…

  13. 77 FR 41132 - Air Quality Implementation Plans; Alabama; Attainment Plan for the Alabama Portion of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... portion of the Chattanooga Area on February 8, 2012 (77 FR 6469). EPA has determined that Alabama's PM 2.5... for EPA's proposed action? A. Designation History On July 18, 1997 (62 FR 38652), EPA established the... PM 2.5 NAAQS (70 FR 944), which became effective on April 5, 2005, based on air quality...

  14. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE STUDENT POPULATION, UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA RESIDENT CENTER, HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FRANKLIN, ELTON

    THE MAIN PURPOSE OF THIS 1959 SURVEY WAS TO ANALYZE SOME OF THE BASIC CHARACTERISTICS OF STUDENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA RESIDENT CENTER, HUNTSVILLE. FINDINGS WERE TABULATED IN SUMMARY FORM AND BY MAJOR FIELDS OF ACADEMIC INTEREST. OF THE STUDENTS (LARGELY YOUNG ADULTS), 51 PERCENT WERE IN ENGINEERING. ONLY 16 PERCENT WERE FEMALE. MOST…

  15. Proton Form Factor Measurements at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi

    2004-09-27

    In two experiments at Jefferson Lab in Hall A, the first one in 1998 and the second in 2000, the ratio of the electromagnetic form factors of the proton was obtained by measuring P{sub t} and P{sub ell}, the transverse and longitudinal recoil proton polarization components, respectively, in {rvec e}p {yields} e{rvec p}; the ratio G{sub E{sub p}}/G{sub M{sub p}} is proportional to P{sub t}/P{sub {ell}}. Simultaneous measurement of P{sub t} and P{sub {ell}} provides good control of the systematic uncertainty. The first measurement of G{sub E{sub p}}/G{sub M{sub p}} ratio was made to Q{sup 2} = 3.5 GeV{sup 2} and the second measurement to Q{sup 2} = 5.6 GeV{sup 2}. The results from these two experiments indicate that the ratio scales like 1/Q{sup 2}, in stark contrast with cross section data analyzed by the Rosenbluth separation method which gives a constant value for this ratio. The incompatibility of the recoil polarization results with most of the Rosenbluth separation results appears now well established above Q{sup 2} of about 3 GeV{sup 2}. The consensus at the present time is that the interference of the two-photon exchange with the Born term, which had been deemed negligible until recently, might explain the discrepancy between the results of the two techniques; the possibility that the discrepancy is due to incomplete radiative correction has also been recently discussed.

  16. Soil Sampling Techniques For Alabama Grain Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A. N.; Shaw, J. N.; Mask, P. L.; Touchton, J. T.; Rickman, D.

    2003-01-01

    Characterizing the spatial variability of nutrients facilitates precision soil sampling. Questions exist regarding the best technique for directed soil sampling based on a priori knowledge of soil and crop patterns. The objective of this study was to evaluate zone delineation techniques for Alabama grain fields to determine which method best minimized the soil test variability. Site one (25.8 ha) and site three (20.0 ha) were located in the Tennessee Valley region, and site two (24.2 ha) was located in the Coastal Plain region of Alabama. Tennessee Valley soils ranged from well drained Rhodic and Typic Paleudults to somewhat poorly drained Aquic Paleudults and Fluventic Dystrudepts. Coastal Plain s o i l s ranged from coarse-loamy Rhodic Kandiudults to loamy Arenic Kandiudults. Soils were sampled by grid soil sampling methods (grid sizes of 0.40 ha and 1 ha) consisting of: 1) twenty composited cores collected randomly throughout each grid (grid-cell sampling) and, 2) six composited cores collected randomly from a -3x3 m area at the center of each grid (grid-point sampling). Zones were established from 1) an Order 1 Soil Survey, 2) corn (Zea mays L.) yield maps, and 3) airborne remote sensing images. All soil properties were moderately to strongly spatially dependent as per semivariogram analyses. Differences in grid-point and grid-cell soil test values suggested grid-point sampling does not accurately represent grid values. Zones created by soil survey, yield data, and remote sensing images displayed lower coefficient of variations (8CV) for soil test values than overall field values, suggesting these techniques group soil test variability. However, few differences were observed between the three zone delineation techniques. Results suggest directed sampling using zone delineation techniques outlined in this paper would result in more efficient soil sampling for these Alabama grain fields.

  17. 2012 Alabama Lunabotics Systems Engineering Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Justin; Ricks, Kenneth; Hull, Bethanne J.

    2012-01-01

    Excavation will hold a key role for future lunar missions. NASA has stated that "advances in lunar regolith mining have the potential to significantly contribute to our nation's space vision and NASA space exploration operations." [1]. The Lunabotics Mining Competition is an event hosted by NASA that is meant to encourage "the development of innovative lunar excavation concepts from universities which may result in clever ideas and solutions which could be applied to an actual lunar excavation device or payload." [2]. Teams entering the competition must "design and build a remote controlled or autonomous excavator, called a lunabot, that can collect and deposit a minimum of 10 kilograms of lunar simulant within 10 minutes." [2]. While excavation will play an important part in lunar missions, there will still be many other tasks that would benefit from robotic assistance. An excavator might not be as well suited for these tasks as other types of robots might be. For example a lightweight rover would do well with reconnaissance, and a mobile gripper arm would be fit for manipulation, while an excavator would be comparatively clumsy and slow in both cases. Even within the realm of excavation it would be beneficial to have different types of excavators for different tasks, as there are on Earth. The Alabama Lunabotics Team at the University of Alabama has made it their goal to not only design and build a robot that could compete in the Lunabotics Mining Competition, but would also be a multipurpose tool for future NASA missions. The 2010-2011 resulting robot was named the Modular Omnidirectional Lunar Excavator (MOLE). Using the Systems Engineering process and building off of two years of Lunabotics experience, the 20ll-2012 Alabama Lunabotics team (Team NASACAR) has improved the MOLE 1.0 design and optimized it for the 2012 Lunabotics Competition rules [I]. A CAD model of MOLE 2.0 can be seen below in Fig. 1.

  18. Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 2000. Year in Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

    The objectives of the Alabama Public Library Service are to: provide library services to the citizens directly or through local libraries; provide library services for those with special needs through the Regional Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped; provide library services to employees of the State of Alabama to meet their…

  19. THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH ALABAMA COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

    E-print Network

    Williams, Susan

    THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH ALABAMA COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES RANDOM LATTICE TANGLES BY Irina P this project and for her constant support and encouragement. Thanks go to professors Michael Keane and Serge and to everyone in the Department of Math- ematics and Statistics at the University of South Alabama, who showed

  20. Inservice Education at a Distance: A Rural Consortium in Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addleton, Robert L.; Edmonds, Charles; Gamble, Lanny; Watkins, J. Foster

    1983-01-01

    The articles describes the efforts of seven rural systems in northeast Alabama to respond in a cooperative manner to new initiatives from the State Department of Education to improve their inservice/staff development programs. The University of Alabama, primarily through its Gadsden Center, provided professional support and coordinating…

  1. Alabama Linkage: An Innovative Higher Education Consortium Maximizing Statewide Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joiner, Charles L.; And Others

    In the late 1960's and early 1970's, attracting physicians to areas of rural Alabama was virtually impossible because of the lack of professional health care workers available to become part of the necessary health care team. To address this problem, the University of Alabama (UA) adopted a plan to create a consortium of higher education…

  2. Workforce Illiteracy in Alabama: Report of the Survey Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horne, Herbert R., Jr.; And Others

    A survey group of the State Literacy Workforce Development Council studied the impact of illiteracy on Alabama's work force and economy using census data. Findings indicated that 55 percent of Alabama's adults functioned at literacy levels inadequate to meet the demands of a modern, technical society. Costs to business and industry were lost…

  3. Alabama's Education Report Card 2010-11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Public education in Alabama is moving in the right direction and is poised to be a national model for the college and career readiness of its students. Through some of the most challenging financial circumstances, public education in Alabama has continued to show great promise in many areas, including reading, math, and science. The success of…

  4. Aeromonas hydrophila in 2010: Characteristics of Alabama outbreaks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For a second year, epidemics associated with a virulent strain of Aeromonas hydrophila resulted in losses of hundreds of thousands of pounds of market size Alabama (AL) catfish. During this period, the Alabama Fish Farming Center diagnosed outbreaks of this strain of A. hydrophila on 25% (28/113) o...

  5. Phorid Flies in Alabama: A tale of two species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two species of phorid fly have been released at 11 sites in Alabama and have been recovered from 9 sites. Pseudacteon tricuspis Borgmeier (Diptera: Phoridae) was released in South Alabama in populations of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), and Pseudacteon...

  6. Alabama Commission on Higher Education. Occasional Papers on Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Commission on Higher Education, Montgomery.

    Two papers on the funding formula of the Alabama Commission for Higher Education are presented. The first paper, by John F. Porter, Jr., "The Origins and Evolutions of the Funding Formula Model Utilized by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education, 1973-82," presents the historical antecedents for the existing formula elements and notes…

  7. Alabama's Education Report Card, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In a more consistent and viable manner than ever before, education in Alabama is moving toward its ultimate goal of providing every student with a quality education, thereby preparing them for work, college, and life after high school. Alabama's graduation rates from 2002 to 2008 increased significantly, tripling the national average increase…

  8. Alabama University Professor's View of the Birmingham Bombing Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents the views of Alabama university scholars regarding the historical significance of the 2001 trial of Thomas Blanton for his role in the Ku Klux Klan bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist church in Birmingham, Alabama thet killed four girls. Their discussions note the need to examine the American judicial system, the weak case against Mr.…

  9. 76 FR 32982 - Alabama; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Alabama; Emergency and Related Determinations AGENCY: Federal... of an emergency for the State of Alabama (FEMA-3319-EM), dated April 27, 2011, and related... Response and Recovery, Federal Emergency Management Agency, 500 C Street, SW., Washington, DC 20472,...

  10. Flood of April 13, 1980, Mobile, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hannum, Curtis H.; Nelson, George H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    This report presents basic data collected during the flood of April 13, 1980, in Mobile, Alabama. The data consists of high-water marks, accumulative rainfall, peak discharge at local gaging stations, hydrographs of discharge and rainfall, and photographs at various locations taken during and immediately after the flood. The report presented in map-series and lists data that are readily usable by local planners and developers. During th afternoon of April 13, 1980, the National Weather Service at Mobile recorded a total of 10.4 inches of rainfall. Immediately after the flood approximately 60 to 70 percent of the roads in the Mobile area were impassable. (USGS)

  11. Jefferson Lab Accelerator Operations Training and Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Epps

    2008-01-23

    The mission of the Jefferson Lab Operations Group is to provide safe and efficient delivery of high quality electron beam for Jefferson Laboratory's nuclear and accelerator physics programs. The Operations staff must be able to setup, transport, maintain, and troubleshoot beam to all three experimental halls in a safe, efficient, and expeditious manner. Due to the nature of shift work, high employee turnover is always as issue. This creates a unique situation where highly trained staff members must quickly be produced and maintained in order to meet the needs of the Laboratory. Some methods used to address this problem will be presented here.

  12. Reservoir characterization of the Smackover Formation in southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Hall, D.R.; Mann, S.D.; Tew, B.H.

    1993-02-01

    The Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation is found in an arcuate belt in the subsurface from south Texas to panhandle Florida. The Smackover is the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing formation in Alabama and is an important hydrocarbon reservoir from Florida to Texas. In this report Smackover hydrocarbon reservoirs in southwest Alabama are described. Also, the nine enhanced- and improved-recovery projects that have been undertaken in the Smackover of Alabama are evaluated. The report concludes with recommendations about potential future enhanced- and improved-recovery projects in Smackover reservoirs in Alabama and an estimate of the potential volume of liquid hydrocarbons recoverable by enhanced- and improved-recovery methods from the Smackover of Alabama.

  13. An Electron-Ion Collider at Jefferson lab

    SciTech Connect

    A.W. Thomas

    2009-10-01

    Long term plans for the investigation of the quark and gluon structure of matter have for some time focussed on the possibility of an electron-ion collider, with the nuclear physics communities associated with JLab and BNL being particularly active. We briefly outline the current thinking on this subject at Jefferson lab.

  14. Secession and Slavery: Jefferson Davis's Rhetorical Visions of the South.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, David A.

    Using some of the tools of fantasy theme analysis, this paper analyzes the rhetoric of Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederacy during the United States Civil War, as an expression of the rhetorical visions of the American South. Specifically, the paper deals with two speeches--Davis's farewell to the United States Senate, from which he…

  15. Phospholipid Catalysis of Diabetic Amyloid Assembly Jefferson D. Knight1

    E-print Network

    Miranker, Andrew

    reserved. Abbreviations used: NIDDM, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus; IAPP, human islet amyloidPhospholipid Catalysis of Diabetic Amyloid Assembly Jefferson D. Knight1 and Andrew D. Miranker2 of patients with type II diabetes (NIDDM). A potential origin for cytotoxicity is disruption of lipid

  16. Pair spectrometer hodoscope for Hall D at Jefferson Lab

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barbosa, Fernando J.; Hutton, Charles L.; Sitnikov, Alexandre; Somov, Alexander S.; Somov, S.; Tolstukhin, Ivan

    2015-09-21

    We present the design of the pair spectrometer hodoscope fabricated at Jefferson Lab and installed in the experimental Hall D. The hodoscope consists of thin scintillator tiles; the light from each tile is collected using wave-length shifting fibers and detected using a Hamamatsu silicon photomultiplier. Light collection was measured using relativistic electrons produced in the tagger area of the experimental Hall B.

  17. Generating Test Data from SOFL Specifications \\Lambda A. Jefferson Offutt

    E-print Network

    Offutt, Jeff

    Generating Test Data from SOFL Specifications \\Lambda A. Jefferson Offutt ISSE Department, 4A4@cs.hiroshima­cu.ac.jp Abstract Software testing can only be formalized and quantified when a solid basis for test generation can be defined. Tests are commonly generated from the source code, control flow graphs, design representations

  18. Alabama Education News. Volume 29, Number 3, November-December 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama," as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

  19. 75 FR 27340 - Enterprise Alabama Intrastate, LLC; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Enterprise Alabama Intrastate, LLC; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval May 6, 2010. Take notice that on May 3, 2010, Enterprise Alabama Intrastate, LLC (Enterprise Alabama.... Enterprise Alabama states it is filing to justify its current system-wide transportation rate of 47.93...

  20. 75 FR 43964 - Enterprise Alabama Intrastate, LLC; Notice of Compliance Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Enterprise Alabama Intrastate, LLC; Notice of Compliance Filing July 20, 2010. Take notice that on July 19, 2010, Enterprise Alabama Intrastate, LLC (Enterprise Alabama) pursuant to a July 8, 2010, Letter Order which required Enterprise Alabama to file within 30 days of...

  1. Geohydrology and susceptibility of aquifers to surface contamination in Alabama; area 5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kidd, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Environmental Management, is conducting a series of geohydrologic studies to delineate the major aquifers and their susceptibility to contamination in Alabama. This report delineates and describes the geohydrology and susceptibility of the major aquifers to contamination in Area 5--Chambers, Clay, Cleburne, Coosa, Lee, Randolph, and Tallapoosa Counties. Little groundwater is used for public water supplies in Area 5. Groundwater withdrawals for public supply in 1985 were 0.88 million gal/day. Most cities and towns that formerly used groundwater presently use surface water. None of the sedimentary rocks or unconsolidated deposits is tapped by public supply wells. None of the igneous and metamorphic rocks are considered a major aquifer because of low yields. Aquifers in the study area are susceptible to surface contamination throughout their entire outcrop area. Areas that are highly faulted and valley areas where groundwater is at or near land surface have potential to be highly susceptible to surface contamination. (USGS)

  2. Mortality associated with Hurricane Katrina--Florida and Alabama, August-October 2005.

    PubMed

    2006-03-10

    On August 25, 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall between Hallandale Beach and Aventura, Florida, as a Category 1 hurricane, with sustained winds of 80 mph. Storm effects, primarily rain, flooding, and high winds, were substantial; certain areas reported nearly 12 inches of rainfall. After crossing southern Florida and entering the Gulf of Mexico, the hurricane strengthened and made landfall in southeastern Louisiana on August 29 as a Category 3 hurricane, with sustained winds of 125 mph. Katrina was one of the strongest hurricanes to strike the United States during the past 100 years and was likely the nation's costliest natural disaster to date. This report summarizes findings and recommendations from a review of mortality records of Florida's Medical Examiners Commission (FMEC) and the Alabama Department of Forensic Science (ADFS). CDC was invited by the Florida Department of Health (FDOH) and the Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH) to assess the mortality related to Hurricane Katrina. The mortality review was intended to provide county-based information that would be used to 1) define the impact of the hurricane, 2) describe the etiology of deaths, and 3) identify strategies to prevent or reduce future hurricane-related mortality. Combined, both agencies identified five, 23, and 10 deaths, respectively, that were directly, indirectly, or possibly related to Hurricane Katrina. Information from the characterization of these deaths will be used to reduce hurricane-related mortality through early community awareness of hurricane-related risk, prevention measures, and effective communication of a coordinated hurricane response plan. PMID:16528231

  3. Alabama Tin Belt. Metallogenesis and mineral resource evaluation. Final report for the 1983-1984 project year

    SciTech Connect

    Green, N.L.; Tompa, B.; Gomolka, J.; Wade, G.; Usdansky, S.I.

    1986-03-01

    The Alabama Tin Belt covers an area of approximately 180 km/sup 2/ within the Tallapoosa lithotectonic block of the Northern Alabama Piedmont. In the second year of this three year project, efforts continued towards detailing the distribution and petrogenesis of tin-bearing peraluminous granitoids in central Coosa County. In particular, mapping, structural analysis and petrographical/petrological studies have been used to examine the geologic settings, geochemical and mineralogical variations, crystallization conditions and nature of source rock(s) of selected granitic plutons and related pegmatite bodies in the vicinity of Rockford, Alabama. Thermobarometeric techniques (a ternary feldspar thermobarometer and a plagioclase-muscovite geothermometer), that could be used in conjunction with compositions of constituent minerals to yield reasonable estmates of granite crystallization and alteration temperatures, were also developed. Preliminary results provide evidence that: (1) the granitoids possess characteristics possibly derived from both sedimentary (S-type) and igneous (I-type) sources; (2) feldspars of the tin-bearing pegmatites possess extremely high Rb and Cs concentrations; (3) the peraluminous granitoids crystallized under varying oxygen fugacity conditions at temperatures of 510 to 710/sup 0/ and pressures greater than 6 kbar; and, (4) the Rockford Pluton occupies the core of a post-D/sub 1/, antiformal structure that is overturned to the northwest.

  4. Small to large-scale diagenetic variation in Norphlet sandstone, onshore and offshore Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Kugler, R.L.

    1989-03-01

    The detrital composition of Norphlet sandstone is relatively uniform on a regional scale, consisting of quartz, potassium feldspar, albite, and rock fragments comprised of these minerals. However, the diagenetic character of the sandstones is variable on a scale ranging from the individual laminations to single hydrocarbon-producing fields to regions encompassing several fields or offshore blocks. Small-scale variation results primarily from textural differences related to depositional processes in eolian and shallow marine systems. Degree of feldspar alteration and types of authigenic clay and carbonate minerals vary on a regional scale. Illite, dolomite, ferroan dolomite, and ferroan magnesite (breunnerite) are common in onshore wells in Alabama, whereas magnesium-rich chlorite and calcite are present in offshore Alabama and Florida. However, diagenetic character is more variable on a fieldwide scale than previously recognized. In Hatter's Pond field, Mobile County, Alabama, breunnerite, which has not been described previously in these sandstones, is the dominant cement in some wells but is absent others. Although illite is the most common authigenic clay throughout the field, chlorite is the most abundant clay in some wells. Because of uniformity of detrital composition, diagenetic variations cannot be related to differences in provenance, particularly on the scale of a single field. Factors that must account for variations in diagenesis include (1) differences in burial history relative to thermal sulfate reduction; (2) variation in fluid flow relative to subbasins, structural highs, fault systems, depositional texture, and early diagenetic character of the sandstones; and (3) variation in composition of underlying Louann evaporites.

  5. Study to define points of entry for potential contaminants in limestone aquifers. [in Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, F. L.

    1973-01-01

    Visual examinations of both prints and transparencies from ERTS 1 and U-2 aircraft imagery provided a method for discovering possible points of entry of potential contaminants into the limestone aquifer in Madison County, Alabama. Knowledge of the locations at which contaminants could enter the aquifer is an important consideration in water quality management, particularly for regions that depend, at least partially, on ground water for their water supply. ERTS 1 imagery recorded on December 28, 1972 in the Multispectral Scanner-5 (MSS-5) and MSS-7 bands, and a false-color composite of the MSS-4 (green), MSS-5 (red), and MSS-7 (near infrared) bands were the principal materials used, along with thermography recorded by an RS-7 infrared scanner onboard a U-2 aircraft. The results of the study are discussed in detail, providing information on prominent lineations and major fracture trends which are related to aquifer contamination. Maps depicting the observations are also presented.

  6. Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind Biodiesel Project Green

    SciTech Connect

    Edmiston, Jessica L

    2012-09-28

    Through extensive collaboration, Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind (AIDB) is Alabama's first educational entity to initiate a biodiesel public education, student training and production program, Project Green. With state and national replication potential, Project Green benefits local businesses and city infrastructures within a 120-mile radius; provides alternative education to Alabama school systems and to schools for the deaf and blind in Appalachian States; trains students with sensory and/or multiple disabilities in the acquisition and production of biodiesel; and educates the external public on alternative fuels benefits.

  7. Low-flow characteristics of Alabama streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bingham, Roy H.

    1982-01-01

    A new procedure for estimating the 7-day, 2-year and the 7-day, 10-year low flow of ungaged Alabama streams is based on geology, drainage area, and mean annual precipitation. One equation for each of the two low-flow frequencies applies statewide to all natural flow streams; the equations do not apply to streams where flow is significantly altered by activities of man. The standard error of estimate of each equation based on map values is 40 percent for 7-day, 2-year low flow and 44 percent for 7-day, 10-year low flow. The rate of streamflow recession is used to account for the effects of geology on low flow. Streamflow recession rate depends primarily on transmissivity and storage characteristics of the aquifers, and average distance from stream channels to divides. Relations of low-flow discharge to geology, drainage area, and mean annual precipitation were analyzed by multiple regression techniques.

  8. The Complexity of Thomas Jefferson. A Response to "'The Diffusion of Light': Jefferson's Philosophy of Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, James

    2014-01-01

    This response argues that Jefferson's educational philosophy must be considered in a proper historical context. Holowchak accurately demonstrates both Jefferson's obsession with education and the political philosophy on which his educational beliefs are built. However, the effort to apply modern democratic and meritocratic attributes to…

  9. FOREWORD: Jefferson Lab: A Long Decade of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Hugh

    2011-04-01

    Jefferson Lab Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 and started operating in about 1996. 2011 is an appropriate time to try to take a look at the results that have appeared, what has been learned, and what has been exciting for our scientific community. Rather than attempt to construct a coherent view with a single author or at least a small number, we have, instead, invited small groups of people who have been intimately involved in the work itself to make contributions. These people are accelerator experts, experimentalists and theorists, staff and users. We have, in the main, sought reviews of the actual sub-fields. The primary exception is the first paper, which sets the scene as it was, in one person's view, at the beginning of Jefferson Lab. In reviewing the material as it appeared, I was impressed by the breadth of the material. Major advances are documented from form factors to structure functions, from spectroscopy to physics beyond the standard model of nuclear and particle physics. Recognition of the part played by spin, the helicities of the beams, the polarizations of the targets, and the polarizations of final state particles, is inescapable. Access to the weak interaction amplitudes through measurements of the parity violating asymmetries has led to quantification of the strange content of the nucleon and the neutron radius of lead, and to measurements of the electroweak mixing angle. Lattice QCD calculations flourished and are setting the platform for understanding of the spectroscopy of baryons and mesons. But the star of the game was the accelerator. Its performance enabled the physics and also the use of the technology to generate a powerful free electron laser. These important pieces of Jefferson Lab physics are given their place. As the third Director of Jefferson Lab, and on behalf of the other physicists and others presently associated with the lab, I would like to express my admiration and gratitude for the efforts of the directors, chief scientists, associate directors, physicists, engineers, technicians and administrators who made it all possible. In sum, we should celebrate the science that Jefferson Lab has realized in this, its first long decade of physics. Hugh Montgomery, Director Hugh Montgomery signature

  10. Phase III Early Restoration Alabama Florida Louisiana Mississippi Texas

    E-print Network

    Phase III Early Restoration Alabama · Florida · Louisiana · Mississippi · Texas NOAA · Department-scale recirculating aquaculture systems to support research and demonstration of technology for live bait husbandry or reconditioned, including a Mississippi River water intake structure and pumping station, infrastructure

  11. 75 FR 27844 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00031

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ...for Public Assistance Only for the State of Alabama (FEMA-1908-DR), dated 05/03/2010. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 04/24/2010 through 04/25/2010. DATES: Effective...

  12. 76 FR 30225 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ...for Public Assistance Only for the State of Alabama (FEMA-1971-DR), dated 05/10/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 04/15/2011 and continuing. Effective Date:...

  13. 76 FR 27139 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00036

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Alabama (FEMA-1971-DR), dated 04/28/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 04/15/2011 and continuing. Effective Date:...

  14. 76 FR 27740 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00036

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Alabama (FEMA-1971-DR), dated 04/28/ 2011. Incident: Severe storms, tornadoes, straight-line winds, and flooding. Incident Period: 04/15/2011 and continuing. Effective Date:...

  15. Special Spotlight: The Alabama Project Celebrates Survivors and Their Communities

    Cancer.gov

    In recognition of cancer survivors and their families, CRCHD celebrates cancer survivorship this month. In this spotlight article, we focus in on The Alabama Project and its visual storytelling of the powerful impact of community in survivorship.

  16. The Object-Oriented Trivia Show (TOOTS) University of Alabama

    E-print Network

    Gray, Jeffrey G.

    The Object-Oriented Trivia Show (TOOTS) Jeff Gray University of Alabama Department of Computer, Languages. Keywords Objects, Game Show. 1. Overview of the OOPSLA Trivia Show OOPSLA (and now SPLASH) has

  17. Occurrence of the megatoothed sharks (Lamniformes: Otodontidae) in Alabama, USA

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The Otodontidae include some of the largest sharks to ever live in the world’s oceans (i.e., Carcharocles megalodon). Here we report on Paleocene and Eocene occurrences of Otodus obliquus and Carcharocles auriculatus from Alabama, USA. Teeth of Otodus are rarely encountered in the Gulf Coastal Plain and this report is one of the first records for Alabama. Carcharocles auriculatus is more common in the Eocene deposits of Alabama, but its occurrence has been largely overlooked in the literature. We also refute the occurrence of the Oligocene Carcharocles angustidens in the state. Raised awareness and increased collecting of under-sampled geologic formations in Alabama will likely increase sample sizes of O. obliquus and C. auriculatus and also might unearth other otodontids, such as C. megalodon and C. chubutensis. PMID:25332848

  18. Occurrence of the megatoothed sharks (Lamniformes: Otodontidae) in Alabama, USA.

    PubMed

    Ehret, Dana J; Ebersole, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The Otodontidae include some of the largest sharks to ever live in the world's oceans (i.e., Carcharocles megalodon). Here we report on Paleocene and Eocene occurrences of Otodus obliquus and Carcharocles auriculatus from Alabama, USA. Teeth of Otodus are rarely encountered in the Gulf Coastal Plain and this report is one of the first records for Alabama. Carcharocles auriculatus is more common in the Eocene deposits of Alabama, but its occurrence has been largely overlooked in the literature. We also refute the occurrence of the Oligocene Carcharocles angustidens in the state. Raised awareness and increased collecting of under-sampled geologic formations in Alabama will likely increase sample sizes of O. obliquus and C. auriculatus and also might unearth other otodontids, such as C. megalodon and C. chubutensis. PMID:25332848

  19. 76 FR 77995 - Southcross Alabama Pipeline LLC; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ... December 7, 2011, Southcross Alabama Pipeline LLC (SAP) submitted a revised Statement of Operating Conditions for services provided under Section 311 of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978 (``NGPA'')....

  20. 78 FR 75306 - Television Broadcasting Services; Birmingham, Alabama

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ...Television Commission (``AETC''), the licensee of station WBIQ(TV), channel *39, Birmingham, Alabama, requesting to return...this petition. AETC concludes that the proposed return of WBIQ(TV) to channel *10 will serve the public interest by allowing...

  1. Topographic data of selected areas along the Alabama River near Montgomery, Alabama, collected using mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging (T-LiDAR) technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimbrow, D.R.

    2014-01-01

    Topographic data at selected areas within the Alabama River flood plain near Montgomery, Alabama, were collected using a truck-mounted mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging system. These data were collected for inclusion in a flood inundation model developed by the National Weather Service in Birmingham, Alabama. Data are presented as ArcGIS point shapefiles with the extension .shp.

  2. Device Configuration Handler for Accelerator Control Applications at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Matt Bickley; P. Chevtsov; T. Larrieu

    2003-10-01

    The accelerator control system at Jefferson Lab uses hundreds of physical devices with such popular instrument bus interfaces as Industry Pack (IPAC), GPIB, RS-232, etc. To properly handle all these components, control computers (IOCs) must be provided with the correct information about the unique memory addresses of the used interface cards, interrupt numbers (if any), data communication channels and protocols. In these conditions, the registration of a new control device in the control system is not an easy task for software developers. Because the device configuration is distributed, it requires the detailed knowledge about not only the new device but also the configuration of all other devices on the existing system. A configuration handler implemented at Jefferson Lab centralizes the information about all control devices making their registration user-friendly and very easy to use. It consists of a device driver framework and the device registration software developed on the basis of ORACLE database and freely available scripting tools (perl, php).

  3. The Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    R.D. McKeown

    2010-09-01

    Construction of the 12 GeV upgrade to the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is presently underway. This upgrade includes doubling the energy of the electron beam to 12 GeV, the addition of a new fourth experimental hall, and the construction of upgraded detector hardware. An overview of this upgrade project is presented, along with highlights of the anticipated experimental program. The 12 GeV upgrade project at Jefferson Lab will enable a powerful new experimental program that will advance our understanding of the quark/gluon structure of hadronic matter, the nature of Quantum Chromodynamics, and the properties of a new extended standard model of particle interactions. Commissioning of the upgraded beam will be begin in 2013, and the full complement of upgraded experimental equipment will be completed in 2015. This unique facility will provide many opportunities for exploration and discovery for a large international community of nuclear scientists.

  4. Comparison of Health-Related Measures of Two Groups of Adolescents in a Rural Southeastern County in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Charles D.; Hensarling, Robert W.; Angel, James B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to establish baseline values on physiological parameters for 7-11 graders (n = 146) in a rural area of Alabama and to examine whether differences existed among the adolescents in the county. Design: Descriptive. Setting: Many adolescents in the southern portion of the United States suffer disproportionately…

  5. Performance characteristics of Jefferson Lab's new SRF infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, Charles E.; Denny, Philip; Reilly, Anthony

    2013-09-01

    In the past two years, Jefferson Lab has reconfigured and renovated its SRF support infrastructure as part of the Technology and Engineering Development Facility project, TEDF. The most significant changes are in the cleanroom and chemistry facilities. We report the initial characterization data on the new ultra-pure water systems, cleanroom facilities, describe the reconfiguration of existing facilities and also opportunities for flexible growth presented by the new arrangement.

  6. 40 CFR 81.72 - Tennessee River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality...River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality...River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air...

  7. 40 CFR 81.72 - Tennessee River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality...River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality...River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air...

  8. 40 CFR 81.72 - Tennessee River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality...River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality...River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air...

  9. 40 CFR 81.72 - Tennessee River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality...River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality...River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air...

  10. 40 CFR 81.72 - Tennessee River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality...River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality...River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air...

  11. Diachronous ranges of benthonic Foraminifera in the Eocene of Alabama and South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Willard, G.D.; Fallaw, W.C. . Dept. of Geology); Price, V. ); Snipes, D.S. . Dept. of Earth Sciences)

    1994-03-01

    Seventeen species of benthonic Foraminifera reported by Bandy (1949) from the Eocene of Little Stave Creek in Clarke County, Alabama were identified from the middle eocene Santee Limestone and the upper Eocene Dry Branch Formation in Aiken and Barnwell counties, South Carolina. Of the 17 species, seven occurred in South Carolina stratigraphically above or below the ranges listed by Bandy. Bandy made a detailed study of Foraminifera from the Claibornian and Jacksonian Tallahatta, Lisbon, Gosport, Moodys Branch, and Yazoo formations exposed on Little Stave Creek and plotted the stratigraphic ranges within the section of numerous species. The authors' samples came from well cores at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Of 13 species from the middle Eocene Santee and also reported by Bandy, four are stratigraphically below the lowest occurrence listed by Bandy, and one is stratigraphically above the highest occurrence. Of four species from the upper Eocene Dry Branch Formation and also listed by Bandy, two are stratigraphically above his highest occurrence. Dockery and Nystrom (1992) and Campbell (1993) have described diachroneity among mollusks in the Eocene of South Carolina. Caution should be used in relying on a small number of species in correlating Eocene deposits in the Atlantic and Gulf coastal plains.

  12. 75 FR 34634 - Special Local Regulation; Swim Across the Sound, Long Island Sound, Port Jefferson, NY to Captain...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ...1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Swim Across the Sound, Long Island Sound, Port Jefferson, NY to Captain's Cove Seaport...Local Regulation on the navigable waters of Long Island Sound between Port Jefferson, NY and Captain's Cove...

  13. 75 FR 16700 - Special Local Regulation, Swim Across the Sound, Long Island Sound, Port Jefferson, NY to Captain...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ...1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation, Swim Across the Sound, Long Island Sound, Port Jefferson, NY to Captain's Cove Seaport...Local Regulation on the navigable waters of Long Island Sound between Port Jefferson, NY and Captain's Cove...

  14. 77 FR 47051 - The Incorporated Village of Port Jefferson v. National Grid Generation LLC; Notice of Complaint

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The Incorporated Village of Port Jefferson v. National Grid Generation LLC... Jefferson (Complainant) filed a formal complaint against the National Grid Generation LLC...

  15. Ground-water resources of the Coosa River basin in Georgia and Alabama; Subarea 6 of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint and Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa river basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, James L.; Journey, Celeste A.; Atkins, J. Brian

    1997-01-01

    Drought conditions in the 1980's focused attention on the multiple uses of the surface- and ground-water resources in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) and Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa (ACT) River basins in Georgia, Alabama, and Florida. State and Federal agencies also have proposed projects that would require additional water resources and revise operating practices within the river basins. The existing and proposed water projects create conflicting demands for water by the States and emphasize the problem of water-resource allocation. This study was initiated to describe ground-water availability in the Coosa River basin of Georgia and Alabama, Subarea 6 of the ACF and ACT River basins, and estimate the possible effects of increased ground-water use within the basin. Subarea 6 encompasses about 10,060 square miles in Georgia and Alabama, totaling all but about 100 mi2 of the total area of the Coosa River basin; the remainder of the basin is in Tennessee. Subarea 6 encompasses parts of the Piedmont, Blue Ridge, Cumberland Plateau, Valley and Ridge, and Coastal Plain physiographic provinces. The major rivers of the subarea are the Oostanaula, Etowah, and Coosa. The Etowah and Oostanaula join in Floyd County, Ga., to form the Coosa River. The Coosa River flows southwestward and joins with the Tallapoosa River near Wetumpka, Ala., to form the Alabama River. The Piedmont and Blue Ridge Provinces are underlain by a two-component aquifer system that is composed of a fractured, crystalline-rock aquifer characterized by little or no primary porosity or permeability; and the overlying regolith, which generally behaves as a porous-media aquifer. The Valley and Ridge and Cumberland Plateau Provinces are underlain by fracture- and solution-conduit aquifer systems, similar in some ways to those in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge Provinces. Fracture-conduit aquifers predominate in the well-consolidated sandstones and shales of Paleozoic age; solution-conduit aquifers predominate in the carbonate rocks of Paleozoic age. The Coastal Plain is underlain by southward-dipping, poorly consolidated deposits of sand, gravel, and clay of fluvial and marine origin. The conceptual model described for this study qualitatively subdivides the ground-water flow system into local (shallow), intermediate, and regional (deep) flow regimes. Ground-water discharge to tributaries mainly is from local and intermediate flow regimes and varies seasonally. The regional flow regime probably approximates steady-state conditions and discharges chiefly to major drains such as the Coosa River, and in upstream areas, to the Etowah and Oostanaula Rivers. Ground-water discharge to major drains originates from all flow regimes. Mean-annual ground-water discharge to streams (baseflow) is considered to approximate the long-term, average recharge to ground water. The mean-annual baseflow was estimated using an automated hydrograph-separation method, and represents discharge from the local, intermediate, and regional flow regimes of the ground-water flow system. Mean-annual baseflow in Georgia was estimated to be about 4,000 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) (from the headwaters to the Georgia-Alabama State Line), 5,360 ft3/s in Alabama, and 9,960 ft3/s for all of Subarea 6 (at the Subarea 7-Subarea 8 boundary). Mean annual baseflow represented about 60 percent of total mean-annual stream discharge for the period of record. Stream discharge for selected sites on the Coosa River and its tributaries were compiled for the years 1941, 1954, and 1986, during which sustained droughts occurred throughout most of the ACF-ACT area. Stream discharges were assumed to be sustained entirely by baseflow during the latter periods of these droughts. Estimated baseflow near the end of the individual drought years ranged from about 11 to 27 percent of the estimated mean-annual baseflow in Subarea 6. The potential exists for the development of ground-water resources on a regional scale throughout Su

  16. 78 FR 35603 - Foreign-Trade Zone 83-Huntsville, Alabama; Application for Production Authority; Toray Carbon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ...Foreign-Trade Zone 83--Huntsville, Alabama; Application for Production Authority; Toray Carbon Fibers America, Inc.; (Polyacrylonitrile Fiber/Carbon Fiber Production), Decatur, Alabama An application has been submitted to the...

  17. 76 FR 55378 - Alabama Power Company; Notice of Proposed Restricted Service List for a Programmatic Agreement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ...Alabama Historical Chief Christine Norris, Jena Band Commission, 468 South Perry of Choctaw...Street, Montgomery, AL 36130-0900. Jena, LA 71342. Barry Lovett or Representative, Michael Tarpley, THPO, Jena Band of Alabama Power Company, 600...

  18. 75 FR 57412 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans Alabama: Volatile Organic Compounds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans Alabama: Volatile Organic... ``volatile organic compounds'' (VOCs) found at Alabama Administrative Code section...

  19. 75 FR 57412 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans Alabama: Volatile Organic Compounds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ...Implementation Plans Alabama: Volatile Organic Compounds AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...the definition of ``volatile organic compounds'' (VOCs) found at Alabama Administrative...Specifically, the revision would add two compounds (propylene carbonate and dimethyl...

  20. ATM Coastal Topography-Alabama 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Alabama coastline, acquired October 3-4, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative scanning Lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning Lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface, and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for pre-survey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is routinely used to create maps that represent submerged or first surface topography.

  1. Origin of Smackover Dolomites: Southwest Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Dolomite is a major component of the Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation in southwest Alabama Dolomite comprises most of the unit in updip areas and across paleohighs. The amount of dolomite decreases basinward where dolomite is restricted for the most part to the upper and lower parts of the Smackover. Paragenetic relationships indicate that the majority of the replacement dolomite formed early in the diagenetic history of the Smackover, prior to or contemporaneous with deposition of overlying Buckner evaporites. On the basis of isotopic composition, two major types of replacement dolomite can be identified. Type 1 dolomites are characterized by positive (0.0 to +3.1{per thousand} PDB) {delta}{sup 18}O values. They are restricted to the uppermost and lowermost parts of the Smackover in the depositional basins, but comprise virtually the entire Smackover section over paleohighs. Type 2 dolomites are characterized by negative ({minus}0.1 to {minus}5.9{per thousand}) {delta}{sup 18}O signatures and comprise most Smackover dolomite in downdip areas. {delta}{sup 13}C values for both types range from +6.4 to +2.6 and show a regular downward decrease within the Smackover. The distribution, timing of formation, and isotopic composition of the dolomites indicate two distinct mechanisms were responsible for dolomite formation. The isotopically heavy type 1 dolomites were brine derived and formed during refluxion of brines from Smackover and Buckner sabkhas or brine pools. The type 2 dolomites formed from mixed marine and meteoric waters. Dolomitization occurred in isolated mixing zones that developed around shoal complexes during short-term falls of eustatic sea level. The distribution of dolomite and specific dolomitization mechanisms in any area are a function of eustatic sea level fluctuations and paleotopography.

  2. 75 FR 81640 - President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home National Historic Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... National Park Service President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home National Historic Site AGENCY... Birthplace Home National Historic Site.'' FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Contact Nick Chevance, Midwest... Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home site located at 117 South Hervey Street, Hope, Arkansas, 71801, and to...

  3. Jefferson and the Wolf: The Sage of Monticello Confronts the Law of Slavery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Philip J.

    1994-01-01

    Asserts that American revolutionaries so revered the rule of law that they relied on it to help rule their slaves. Maintains that Thomas Jefferson was no exception to this dilemma of justifying slavery while upholding liberty. Describes slavery at Jefferson's plantation, Monticello, within a legal and social structure. (CFR)

  4. Thomas Jefferson's Plan for the University of Virginia: Lessons from the Lawn. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Mary; Wilson, Sara

    This lesson is based on the National Register of Historic Places registration file, "University of Virginia Historic District," and other primary and secondary materials about Thomas Jefferson and the ctreation of the University of Virginia. Thomas Jefferson did not begin the effort of designing the University of Virginia (Charlottesville) until…

  5. "The Diffusion of Light": Jefferson's Philosophy of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holowchak, M. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Jefferson's republicanism--a people-first, mostly bottom-up political vision with a moral underpinning--was critically dependent on general education for the citizenry and higher education for those who would govern. This paper contains an analysis of Jefferson's general philosophy of education by enumerating some of its most fundamental…

  6. 78 FR 20314 - Jefferson Island Storage & Hub, L.L.C.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Jefferson Island Storage & Hub, L.L.C.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on March 28, 2013, Jefferson Island Storage & Hub, L.L.C. filed to revise its Statement of...

  7. 77 FR 74784 - Safety Zone for Recovery Operations for East Jefferson Street Train Derailment, Mantua Creek...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ...Street Railroad Bridge, Mantua Creek...release of hazardous materials into Mantua Creek...Jefferson Street Rail Bridge train derailment...2012 and hazardous material response and railcar...Jefferson Street Rail Bridge located in Paulsboro...release of hazardous material from the...

  8. Beyond the Schoolhouse Door: Educating the Political Animal in Jefferson's Little Republics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dotts, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    Jefferson believed that citizenship must exhibit republican virtue. While education was necessary in a republican polity, it alone was insufficient in sustaining a revolutionary civic spirit. This paper examines Jefferson's expectations for citizen virtue, specifically related to militia and jury service in his "little republics."…

  9. An evaluation of rainfall-runoff data for the Denver Federal Center, Lakewood, Jefferson County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarrett, R.D.; Veenhuis, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was made to monitor the storm runoff in McIntyre Gulch basin to determine the rainfall-runoff chracteristics. Results may now be used to evaluate the effects of future development on storm runoff from the Denver Federal Center, which is located in the McIntyre Gulch basin in Lakewood , CO. Rainfall and runoff data were collected at eight streamflow stations and three auxiliary rainfall stations in and adjacent to the Denver Federal Center. The outflow peak discharges from McIntyre Gulch in the Denver Federal Center were higher than the inflow peak discharges for eight of the storms by an average of 38 percent. Outflow peak discharges for eight of the storms were lower by an average of 12 percent. The study demonstrated that runoff varies with location of a storm--even for a relatively small basin. Peak discharges of McIntyre Gulch outflow from the Denver Federal Center were 27 percent greater than the inflow for all storms, but only 15 percent greater for evenly distributed storms. Runoff from the Denver Federal Center increased storm-runoff volumes in McIntyre Gulch by an average of 46 percent. Proper management of storm runoff in the Denver Federal Center requires that proposed improvements to the existing storm-runoff system maintain peak flows at their present levels. (USGS)

  10. Rutile and topaz in Precambrian gneiss, Jefferson and Clear Creek Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheridan, Douglas M.; Taylor, Richard B.; Marsh, Sherman P.

    1968-01-01

    Disseminated rutile and major amounts of topaz have been identified in Precambrian topaz-quartz gneiss northwest of Evergreen, Colo. The rutile occurs in quartz-topaz-sillimanite gneiss that forms a stratigraphic unit which is 11 to 100 feet thick and is identified along strike for more than 7,000 feet. Three composite chip samples taken across this unit contain 2.2 to 4.2 percent of rutile, by weight, in grains averaging from 0.1 to 0.3 millimeter in size. The topaz content, by weight, in the same samples ranges from 23 to 67 percent.

  11. An Archaeological Survey for the Vidor Pipeline Project in Jefferson and Orange Counties Texas 

    E-print Network

    moore, William

    2015-07-28

    inspection of all exposed areas due to erosion and or human disturbance. On the high ground above the river, a larger area was examined because the crew was told that the route of the pipeline may deviate from what is depicted in this report... and filled during installation of the existing pipelines to the south plus others that converge from another right-of-way, the area was shovel tested because of its proximity to Anderson Gully to the south. In all, 10 tests were excavated. They were dug...

  12. Vascular flora of the Rocky Flats area, Jefferson County, Colorado, USA

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nelson, Jody K.

    2010-08-01

    The Rocky Flats Site (Site) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility near Golden, Colorado that produced nuclear weapons components during the Cold War. Like many federal properties that have been off-limits to public access for decades, it has become a refugia for biodiversity as surrounding landscapes have been lost to agriculture and urbanization. A floristic study of the area was conducted on approximately 2,505 ha (6,189 ac) and includes the parcels currently managed and operated by DOE and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge). A flora of 630 species of vascular plants inmore »84 families and 340 genera was documented, including 12 species endemic to the southern Rocky Mountains and seven species considered rare or imperiled by the Colorado Natural Heritage Program. The flora of the Site is characterized by a predominantly Western North American floristic element, however, an Adventive floristic element contributes the greatest number of species. The vegetation is dominated by xeric tallgrass prairie and mixed grass prairie, with areas of wetland, shrubland, and riparian woodland.« less

  13. Vascular flora of the Rocky Flats area, Jefferson County, Colorado, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Jody K.

    2010-08-01

    The Rocky Flats Site (Site) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility near Golden, Colorado that produced nuclear weapons components during the Cold War. Like many federal properties that have been off-limits to public access for decades, it has become a refugia for biodiversity as surrounding landscapes have been lost to agriculture and urbanization. A floristic study of the area was conducted on approximately 2,505 ha (6,189 ac) and includes the parcels currently managed and operated by DOE and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge). A flora of 630 species of vascular plants in 84 families and 340 genera was documented, including 12 species endemic to the southern Rocky Mountains and seven species considered rare or imperiled by the Colorado Natural Heritage Program. The flora of the Site is characterized by a predominantly Western North American floristic element, however, an Adventive floristic element contributes the greatest number of species. The vegetation is dominated by xeric tallgrass prairie and mixed grass prairie, with areas of wetland, shrubland, and riparian woodland.

  14. Bedrock erosion surface beneath the rocky flats alluvial fan, Jefferson and Boulder counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knepper, D.H., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The early Pleistocene Rocky Flats alluvial fan formed at the mouth of unglaciated Coal Creek Canyon along the eastern flank of the Colorado Front Range. The fan consists of boulder, cobble, and pebble gravel deposited on an erosional surface cut on tilted Mesozoic sedimentary strata. A north-trending hogback of steeply dipping Cretaceous Laramie Formation and Fox Hills Sandstone is exposed through the gravel across the central portion of the fan. Elevations on the gravel-bedrock contact were used in a GIS to reconstruct the bedrock surface at the base of the gravel, providing a glimpse of the geomorphology of the early Pleistocene Colorado Piedmont. The reconstructed erosional bedrock surface portrays a landscape carved by a series of easterly flowing streams that eroded headward to the resistant hogback units, creating a bedrock step up to 37 m high. East-trending ridges on the bedrock surface are remnants of drainage divides between the Pleistocene streams. Water gaps in the bedrock step allowed the streams access to the upper surface of the step. This entire surface, except the hogback, was covered by gravel about 1.35 to 1.5 Ma ago. Subsequent erosion of the alluvial fan has been by headward (westward) erosion of easterly flowing streams incising into the eastern portion of the fan. Because the gravel is more resistant than the underlying bedrock, modern streams are established over the Pleistocene drainage divides, where the gravel was thinnest. Thicker gravel in the Pleistocene paleovalleys now caps modern drainage divides, producing an inverted topography.

  15. Evaluation of coastal wave attenuation due to viscous fluid sediment at Jefferson County, Texas 

    E-print Network

    Tuttle, Meghan I

    2000-01-01

    . The paper also investigates a natural 'fluid mud' phenomenon. A viscous seabed exists at the eastern survey area, causing water wave attenuation. The interdependent effects of seafloor mud on progressive surface waves are discussed. The reduction in wave...

  16. Hydrology of a nuclear-processing plant site, Rocky Flats, Jefferson County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurr, R. Theodore

    1976-01-01

    Accidental releases of contaminants resulting from the operation of the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration's nuclear-processing and recovery plant located on Rocky Flats will move at different rates through -different parts of the hydrologic system. Rates of movement are dependent upon the magnitude of the accidental release and the hydrologic conditions at the time of the release. For example, during wet periods, a contaminant resulting from a 5,000-gallon (19,000-1itre) release on the land surface would enter the ground-water system in about 2 to 12 hours. Ground-water flow in the Rocky Flats Alluvium might move the contaminant eastward at a rate of about 3 to 11 feet (0.9 to 3.4 metres) per day, if it remains dissolved. Maximum time to a point of discharge would be about 3 years; minimum time could be a few days. A contaminant entering a stream would then move at a rate of about 60 feet (18 metres) per minute under pool-and-riffle conditions. The rate of movement might be about 420 feet (128 metres) per minute under open-channel-flow conditions following intense thunderstorms.

  17. The Needs of the Soils of Brazos and Jefferson Counties for Sulphur 

    E-print Network

    Lomanitz, S. (Sebastian)

    1922-01-01

    ' ~grohomist- Soil E: B.. REYNOL~. M:'s., ~gronomtist; ! Groins G. N. STROMAN. M. S.. Agronomist ant Superrntendeni **PEARL DRUMMOND, Seed Analyst PLANT PATHOLOGY AND PHYSIOLi J. J. TAUBENHAUS. Ph. D., Chief COTTON BREEDING G. F. FREEMAN, D. SC., Chief... in Soils and Plants 9 ................................... uetails of Pot Experiments 9 ................ Description of the Soils Used in the Experiments 11 ............................. Chemical Composition of the Soils 12...

  18. Map Showing Areas Containing Swelling Clay in the Morrison Quadrangle, Jefferson County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Glenn R.

    1972-01-01

    Formations that contain clays having swelling pressures higher than 2,500 pounds per square foot (as measured by the Potential Volume Change meter) are listed in order of decreasing swelling pressure: Denver Formation, Pierre Shale, Laramie Formation, Green Mountain Conglomerate, Fox Hills Sandstone, and Arapahoe Formation. Some landslides derived from these formations also contain swelling clay and are mapped with the bedrock formations listed above.

  19. Criteria for Private Placement Reimbursement: Jefferson County School District R-1 v. Elizabeth E.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsiyannis, Antonis; Losinski, Mickey; Ennis, Robin; Lane, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA), children with identified disabilities are entitled to a free appropriate public education (FAPE). As it relates to FAPE, IDEA requires that each identified student receive special education and related services specifically designed to confer educational benefit that individual.…

  20. 75 FR 57053 - Camas National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, ID; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ...from the perennial flow of Camas Creek, and natural artesian wells which discharged groundwater and continually flooded...to waterbirds nesting and migrating on the refuge, as well as other wildlife? How the refuge can meet...

  1. Metamorphic Mountain, Mount Jefferson State Park: An Environmental Education Learning Experience Designed for Grades 5-7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, George K., II; Hubbard, William F.; Lambert, Michael D.; Beazley, Lea J.

    Mount Jefferson State Natural Area is located in the southern Blue Ridge highlands of North Carolina and covers 489 acres, which includes peaks and upper slopes to the Mount Jefferson mountain. This document introduces students to the geology of Mount Jefferson State Park and focuses on the geologic processes and rocks and minerals of Mount…

  2. Current water resources activities in Alabama, fiscal year 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, L.J.; Meadows, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the current (as of 1986) water resources activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in Alabama. The responsibilities and objectives of the Survey; organization of the Alabama District; sources of funding; current projects; hydrologic data program; and a selected bibliography of hydrologic reports are presented. Water resources projects are undertaken usually at the request of and with partial funding from another agency, provided: they are high priority problems and generally identified to fall within the mission of the Water Resources Division and they are consistent with the Program Management Plan developed by the Water Resources Division in Alabama to meet the long range plan for hydrologic data in the State. (USGS)

  3. Reporting on the Holocaust: the view from Jim Crow Alabama.

    PubMed

    Puckett, Dan J

    2011-01-01

    The press in Alabama covered major events taking place in Germany from the rise of Adolf Hitler and the Nazis in 1933 through the Nuremberg Trials in 1946. Journalists in the state provided extensive coverage, and editors did not hesitate to opine on the persecution of the Jews in Europe. Yet, Alabama’s white-run press failed in the end to explain the events as a singularly Jewish tragedy. The state’s black-run press, for its part, used the news of the mass killings of the Jews to warn against the dangers of conceptions of racial superiority—a primary concern for black southerners living in the Jim Crow South. PMID:22073444

  4. Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on Alabama beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayworth, J. S.; Clement, T. P.; Valentine, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    From mid June 2010 to early August 2010, the white sandy beaches along Alabama's Gulf coast were inundated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon well. The long-term consequences of this environmental catastrophe are still unfolding. Although BP has attempted to clean up some of these beaches, there still exist many unanswered questions regarding the physical, chemical, and ecological state of the oil contaminated beach system. In this paper, we present our understanding of what is known and known to be unknown with regard to the current state of Alabama's beaches in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Motivated by our observations of the evolving distribution of oil in Alabama's beaches and BP's clean-up activities, we offer our thoughts on the lessons learned from this oil spill disaster.

  5. Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on Alabama beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayworth, J. S.; Clement, T. P.; Valentine, J. F.

    2011-07-01

    From mid June 2010 to early August 2010, the white sandy beaches along Alabama's Gulf coast were inundated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon well. The long-term consequences of this environmental catastrophe are still unfolding. Although BP has attempted to clean up some of these beaches, there still exist many unanswered questions regarding the physical, chemical, and ecological state of the oil contaminated beach system. In this paper, we present our understanding of what is known and known to be unknown with regard to the current state of Alabama's beaches in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Motivated by our observations of the evolving distribution of oil in Alabama's beaches and BP's clean-up activities, we offer our thoughts on the lessons learned from this oil spill disaster.

  6. Cyclic platform dolomites of Devonian Jefferson Formation, Montana and Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Dorobek, S.L.

    1986-05-01

    Preliminary field study indicates that the Devonian Jefferson Formation in southwestern Montana and adjacent parts of Idaho consists of cyclic sequences of shallow marine platformal dolomites that grade basinward into slope sediments deposited on a steepened carbonate ramp. Individual shallowing-upward, platformal cycles are 25 to < 1 m (82 to 3 ft) thick and, from top to bottom, consist of: solution-collapse breccia caps; cryptalgal dolomudstone; rare ooid dolograinstone; thin-bedded Amphipora dolowackestone; sucrosic dolostones with abundant lenticular to domal stromatoporoids; thin-bedded, fine-grained, shaly dolostones with closely spaced hardgrounds that grade upward into burrow-homogenized, irregularly bedded dolostones. Thinner cycles (< 5 m or 16 ft thick) contain fewer basal lithologies and typically consist only of cryptalgal dolomudstone with breccia caps. The 1 to 25-m thick cycles comprise larger scale sequences (30-60 m or 100-200 ft thick), in which smaller scale cycles become progressively thinner toward the top of large-scale sequences. These shallowing-upward carbonate cycles probably formed in response to glacio-eustatic sea level fluctuations. Current estimates for the time span represented by the Jefferson formation (9 m.y.), divided by the number of shallowing-upward cycles, indicate that each cycle represents an average time span of 0.6 to 1.0 m.y.. This time span suggests that either: (1) average sedimentation rates were unrealistically slow during deposition of each cycle (< 0.1-3 cm/1000 years); (2) breccia caps represent long periods of subaerial exposure (> 0.5 to about 0.2 m.y.); or (3) the Jefferson Formation was deposited during a much shorter time span than previously thought.

  7. Policies and Procedures for Foreign Exchange Agencies. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Donald D.

    The guide details the policy of the Jefferson County (Alabama) Board of Education policy concerning international exchange of students (travel both to and from United States) in elementary and secondary grades. The first section specifies the standards by which the county will evaluate all international exchange agencies concerning structure,…

  8. Today's Students, Tomorrow's Citizens: Pathways for Learning, Science. Alabama High School Graduation Exam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery. Div. of Instructional Services.

    This document introduces the Alabama Graduation Examination Program (AGEP) which provides learning opportunities for high school students to meet the minimum competency requirements to earn a high school diploma in the state of Alabama. The Alabama High School Graduation Examination (AHSGE) content includes the subject areas of reading…

  9. 77 FR 18857 - Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision for Alabama Beach Mouse General...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ...and Record of Decision for Alabama Beach Mouse General Conservation Plan for Incidental...as amended, for take of Alabama beach mouse (Peromyscus polionotus ammobates). For...proposed action, take of the Alabama beach mouse incidental to construction of up to...

  10. Opening the Schoolhouse Doors: Tax Credits and Educational Access in Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Dick M., II.; Erickson, Angela C.

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, Alabama adopted the Alabama Accountability Act, an education reform measure that includes two new school choice programs that extend a lifeline to Alabama students trapped in failing public schools. One program offers a tax credit to help offset the cost of tuition for families who move their children from public schools designated as…

  11. 76 FR 72495 - Alabama Metal Coil Securement Act; Petition for Determination of Preemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ...Docket No. FMCSA-2011-0318] Alabama Metal Coil Securement Act; Petition for Determination...determination that the State of Alabama's Metal Coil Securement Act is preempted by Federal...comments on what effect, if any, Alabama's metal coil load securement certification...

  12. Alabama's Cullars Rotation: The Oldest, Continuous Soil Fertility Experiment in the South

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 1911, Alabama Agricultural and Experiment Station at Alabama Polytechnic Institute (now Auburn University) received state funding to conduct fertilizer experiments on farmers' fields throughout Alabama. One of those fields was near Auburn on the farm of J.A. Cullars. Today, the “Cullars Rotation”...

  13. Evaluation of Alabama Public School Wellness Policies and State School Mandate Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaines, Alisha B.; Lonis-Shumate, Steven R.; Gropper, Sareen S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated wellness policies created by Alabama public school districts and progress made in the implementation of Alabama State Department of Education (ALSDE) school food and nutrition mandates. Methods: Wellness policies from Alabama public school districts were compared to minimum requirements under the Child Nutrition…

  14. 76 FR 72495 - Alabama Metal Coil Securement Act; Petition for Determination of Preemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Alabama Metal Coil Securement Act; Petition for Determination... determination that the State of Alabama's Metal Coil Securement Act is preempted by Federal law. FMCSA requests comments on what effect, if any, Alabama's metal coil load securement certification requirements may...

  15. The Generalized Parton Distribution Program at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    C. Munoz Camacho

    2010-05-01

    Recent results on the Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD) program at Jefferson Lab (JLab) will be presented. The emphasis will be in the Hall A program aiming at measuring Q^2-dependences of different terms of the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) cross section. This is a fundamental step before one can extract GPD information from JLab DVCS data. The upcoming program in Hall A, using both a 6 GeV beam (2010) and a 11 GeV beam (~2015) will also be described.

  16. Hard exclusive neutral pion production at Jefferson Lab Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchey, E.

    2011-10-24

    We present measurements of the ep{yields}ep{pi}{sup 0} cross section extracted at two values of four-momentum transfer Q{sup 2} = 1.9 GeV{sup 2} and Q{sup 2} = 2.3 GeV{sup 2} at Jefferson Lab Hall A. The kinematic range allows to study the evolution of the cross section as a function of Q{sup 2} and W. Results will be confronted with Regge inspired calculations and GPD predictions. An intepretation of our data within the framework of semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering has also been attempted.

  17. RF System High Power Amplifier Software Conversion at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    G. Lahti; H. Dong; T. Seegerger

    2006-10-31

    Jefferson Lab is in the process of converting the RF system from analog RF modules and non-smart high power amplifiers (HPAs) to digital RF modules and smart HPAs. The present analog RF module controls both the RF signal and the non-smart HPA hardware. The new digital RF module will only control the RF signal, so the new HPA must include embedded software. This paper will describe the conversion from a software perspective, including the initial testing, the intermediate mixed system of old and new units, and finally the totally new RF system.

  18. The 4th Generation Light Source at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Donald Bullard; James Coleman; David Douglas; H. Dylla; Richard Evans; Pavel Evtushenko; Albert Grippo; Christopher Gould; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; Kevin Jordan; John Klopf; Steven Moore; George Neil; Thomas Powers; Joseph Preble; Daniel Sexton; Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Tennant; Richard Walker; Shukui Zhang; Gwyn Williams

    2007-04-25

    A number of "Grand Challenges" in Science have recently been identified in reports from The National Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. Many of these require a new generation of linac-based light source to study dynamical and non-linear phenomena in nanoscale samples. In this paper we present a summary of the properties of such light sources, comparing them with existing sources, and then describing in more detail a specific source at Jefferson Lab. Importantly, the JLab light source has developed some novel technology which is a critical enabler for other new light sources.

  19. Deep exclusive reactions at Jefferson Lab Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    C. Munoz Camacho

    2010-04-01

    Recent results on the Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD) program at Jefferson Lab (JLab) will be presented. The emphasis will be in the Hall A program aiming at measuring Q2-dependences of different terms of the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) cross section. This is a fundamental step before one can extract GPD information from JLab DVCS data. The upcoming program in Hall A, using both a 6 GeV beam (2010) and a 11 GeV beam (? 2015) will also be described.

  20. Integrated Distribution Management System for Alabama Principal Investigator

    SciTech Connect

    Schatz, Joe

    2013-03-31

    Southern Company Services, under contract with the Department of Energy, along with Alabama Power, Alstom Grid (formerly AREVA T&D) and others moved the work product developed in the first phase of the Integrated Distribution Management System (IDMS) from “Proof of Concept” to true deployment through the activity described in this Final Report. This Project – Integrated Distribution Management Systems in Alabama – advanced earlier developed proof of concept activities into actual implementation and furthermore completed additional requirements to fully realize the benefits of an IDMS. These tasks include development and implementation of a Distribution System based Model that enables data access and enterprise application integration.

  1. DRAFT LANDSAT DATA MOSAIC: MONTGOMERY COUNTY, TEXAS; HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS; FORT BEND COUNTY, TEXAS; BRAZORIA COUNTY, TEXAS; GALVESTON COUNTY, TEXAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a draft Landsat Data Mosaic, which contains remote sensing information for Montgomery County, Texas Harris County, Texas Fort Bend County, Texas Brazoria County, Texas Galveston County, and Texas Imagery dates on the following dates: October 6, 1999 and September 29, 200...

  2. Detector development for Jefferson Lab's 12GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers, the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.

  3. Detector development for Jefferson Lab's 12 GeV Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers, the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.

  4. Photon Source Capabilities of the Jefferson Lab FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Stephen V.; Douglas, David R.; Evtushenko, Pavel; Hannon, Fay E.; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Klopf, John M.; Legg, Robert A.; Neil, George R.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Tennant, Christopher D.; Zhang, Shukui; Williams, Gwyn P.

    2013-03-01

    Jefferson Lab operates a superconducting energy recovered linac which is operated with CW RF and which powers oscillator-based IR and UV Free Electron Lasers (FELs) with diffraction limited sub-picosecond pulses with >10{sup 13} photons per pulse (1.0%BW) at pulse repetition frequencies up to 75 MHz. Useful harmonics extend into the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV). Based on FEL model calculations validated using this facility, we have designed both an oscillator-based VUV-FEL that would produce 6 ? 10{sup12} coherent (0.5% BW) 100 eV photons per pulse at multi-MHz repetition rates in the fundamental, and a dual FEL configuration that would allow simultaneous lasing lasing at THz and UV wavelengths. The VUV-FEL would utilize a novel high gain, low Q cavity, while the THz source would be an FEL oscillator with a short wiggler providing diffraction limited pulses with pulse energy exceeding 50 microJoules. The THz source would use the exhaust beam from a UVFEL. Such multiphoton capabilities would provide unique opportunities for out of equilibrium dynamical studies at time-scales down to 50 fs. The fully coherent nature of all these sources results in peak and average brightness values that are many orders of magnitude higher than storage rings. * We acknowledge support from the Commonwealth of Virginia. Jefferson Lab is supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC05-84-ER40150.

  5. RF Power Upgrade for CEBAF at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Kimber,Richard Nelson

    2011-03-01

    Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) is currently upgrading the 6GeV Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) to 12GeV. As part of the upgrade, RF systems will be added, bringing the total from 340 to 420. Existing RF systems can provide up to 6.5 kW of CW RF at 1497 MHZ. The 80 new systems will provide increased RF power of up to 13 kW CW each. Built around a newly designed and higher efficiency 13 kW klystron developed for JLab by L-3 Communications, each new RF chain is a completely revamped system using hardware different than our present installations. This paper will discuss the main components of the new systems including the 13 kW klystron, waveguide isolator, and HV power supply using switch-mode technology. Methodology for selection of the various components and results of initial testing will also be addressed. Notice: Authored by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC under U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177. The U.S. Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce this manuscript for U.S. Government purposes.

  6. Detector development for Jefferson Lab's 12GeV Upgrade

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qiang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers,more »the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.« less

  7. 33 CFR 334.782 - SUPSHIP Gulf Coast, Pascagoula, Mississippi, Detachment Mobile, Alabama at AUSTAL, USA, Mobile...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Detachment Mobile, Alabama at AUSTAL, USA, Mobile, Alabama; restricted area. (a) The area. The restricted area would encompass all navigable waters of the United States, as defined at 33 CFR part 329..., Mississippi, Detachment Mobile, Alabama at AUSTAL, USA, Mobile, Alabama; restricted area. 334.782 Section...

  8. 33 CFR 334.782 - SUPSHIP Gulf Coast, Pascagoula, Mississippi, Detachment Mobile, Alabama at AUSTAL, USA, Mobile...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Detachment Mobile, Alabama at AUSTAL, USA, Mobile, Alabama; restricted area. (a) The area. The restricted area would encompass all navigable waters of the United States, as defined at 33 CFR part 329..., Mississippi, Detachment Mobile, Alabama at AUSTAL, USA, Mobile, Alabama; restricted area. 334.782 Section...

  9. Alabama's Old Rotation: The World's Oldest, Continuous Cotton Experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the late 19th Century, most of the South was devoted to cotton production. Few soil amendments were used and crop rotation and soil conservation were unknown. A young professor at the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama (now Auburn University), J.F. Duggar, started an experiment near c...

  10. The Citizens' Viewpoint: Higher Education in Alabama, 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owings, Thomas G.

    Results of a survey assessing public opinions and attitudes about higher education in Alabama are presented. A representative sample of 736 households was contacted by telephone, and 546 agreed to be interviewed. The survey was designed to evaluate public opinions and attitudes about higher education teaching, research, service, finance,…

  11. 76 FR 39149 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00036

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Alabama (FEMA-1971-DR), dated 04/28/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 04/15/2011 through 05/31/2011. Effective Date:...

  12. Business Education. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1990, No. 59.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This course of study provides a framework for the content of a program in business education as part of the Alabama vocational education program. The course of study was designed to assist educators in developing and maintaining high quality vocational programs and to ensure uniformity of vocational programs. Following a description of the…

  13. 75 FR 2896 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00028

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster Number AL-00028 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY... Numbers 59002 and 59008) James E. Rivera, Associate Administrator for Disaster Assistance. BILLING...

  14. 76 FR 38264 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster Number AL-00037 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 5. SUMMARY... declaration remains unchanged. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James...

  15. 77 FR 8942 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Alabama Disaster Number AL-00040 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY... unchanged. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James E. Rivera,...

  16. The University of Alabama in Huntsville 1 Colleges and Departments

    E-print Network

    Alabama in Huntsville, University of

    and Medieval Studies Minor (http://catalog.uah.edu/undergrad/colleges-departments/arts-humanities-social-sciences/english/technical-writing- cognate-studies) · Global Studies (http://catalog.uah.edu/undergrad/colleges-departments/arts-humanities-social-sciences/global-studiesThe University of Alabama in Huntsville 1 Colleges and Departments · Arts, Humanities, and Social

  17. An Analysis of Optometric Practices in Rural Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wild, Bradford W.; Maisiak, Richard

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-nine Alabama optometric practices were studied using an optometrist survey, one-week patient flow analysis, and audit of patient records. Results indicate some special facets of the rural practices that may require a different kind of educational preparation. (MSE)

  18. Parables and Politics: Clergy Attitudes toward Illegal Immigration in Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickersham, Mary Eleanor

    2013-01-01

    The passage of a stringent immigration law in Alabama in 2011 makes relevant the juxtaposition of clergy and congregant attitudes and behaviors toward illegal immigrants as related to Biblical teachings that require charity to aliens. In order to examine the relationship between religious attitudes and illegal immigration, approximately 426…

  19. Alabama DOT 1. Briefly summarize your current pavement smoothness requirements.

    E-print Network

    Alabama DOT 1. Briefly summarize your current pavement smoothness requirements. Concrete pavement string applied parallel to the surface. The surface is checked 1' inside the edges of the pavement, consolidated and refinished. High areas shall be cut down and refinished. The pavement is also checked

  20. Agribusiness Education. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1990, No. 60.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This course of study provides a framework for the content of a program in agribusiness education as part of the Alabama vocational education program. The course of study was designed to assist educators in developing and maintaining high quality vocational programs and to ensure uniformity of vocational programs. Following a description of the…

  1. Phase III Early Restoration Projects Alabama Florida Louisiana Mississippi Texas

    E-print Network

    Phase III Early Restoration Projects Alabama · Florida · Louisiana · Mississippi · Texas NOAA-based) recirculating aquaculture systems that reduce water usage and effluent discharge. Effluent would flow through a small filtration marsh composed of native coastal wetland plant species (to be built as part

  2. Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Shannon Golden, Alabama DOT

    E-print Network

    Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Shannon Golden, Alabama DOT PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENT may be substituted for part of the required Portland cement. Substitution of mineral admixtures shall Cement shall not exceed the percentages shown in the following table: MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE SUBSTITUTION

  3. The OOPSLA Trivia Show (TOOTS) University of Alabama at Birmingham

    E-print Network

    Gray, Jeffrey G.

    The OOPSLA Trivia Show (TOOTS) Jeff Gray University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Computer participation. 1. Overview of the OOPSLA Trivia Show OOPSLA has one of the most diverse collections of attendees on topics related to OOPSLA. 2. The OOPSLA Trivia Show Rules The panel will follow the general rules

  4. The Alabama Space and Rocket Center: The Second Decade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckbee, Edward O.

    1983-01-01

    The Alabama Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, the world's largest rocket and space museum, includes displays illustrating American rocket history, exhibits and demonstrations on rocketry principles and experiences, and simulations of space travel. A new project includes an integrated recreational-educational complex, described in the three…

  5. The University of Alabama 1 Department of Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    The University of Alabama 1 Department of Computer Science Computer science is a multifaceted discipline that encompasses a broad range of topics. At one end of the spectrum, computer science focuses. At the other applications-oriented end of the spectrum, computer science deals with techniques for the design

  6. Job Satisfaction among Library Support Staff in Alabama Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Donna K.

    1990-01-01

    Describes a study that used the Job Description Index to survey job satisfaction of academic library support staff in Alabama. The need for better compensation and opportunities for promotion for academic library support staff is discussed, as well as the need to relate satisfaction to quality of working life issues. (23 references) (CLB)

  7. Assessing Job Satisfaction among Alabama's Community College Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howton, Russell Warren

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between selected demographic and educational variables of faculty members employed in the Alabama Community College System and their impact on job satisfaction. The variables included in the study are the demographic variables of age, gender, ethnicity, salary, and degree status, along with…

  8. Alabama Community College Presidents' Perceptions regarding Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nobles, Janina LaKeshea

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Alabama community college presidents' perceptions regarding distance education. Further, this study was intended to determine the adequacy of the training opportunities and support for faculty that teach distance education courses and what services are available for distance education students. This study…

  9. Smoking, Sociodemographic Determinants, and Stress in the Alabama Black Belt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuaib, Faisal; Foushee, H. R.; Ehiri, John; Bagchi, Suparna; Baumann, Angela; Kohler, Connie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In the Alabama Black Belt, poverty is high, and the educational level is low. Studies have found increased tobacco use among individuals exposed to high levels of stress. Few studies have been conducted in this region to measure smoking status, its sociodemographic determinants, and how smoking status relates to stressful environmental…

  10. Marketing Education. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1996, No. 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

    This guide, which is intended for classroom teachers, supervisors, and administrators throughout Alabama, contains the minimum required content (core program) for public school instruction in marketing education in grades 7-12. Presented first are the following: introduction examining the mission, purpose, goals, and structure of marketing…

  11. Erosion monitoring along the Coosa River below Logan Martin Dam near Vincent, Alabama, using terrestrial light detection and ranging (T-LiDAR) technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimbrow, Dustin R.; Lee, Kathryn G.

    2013-01-01

    Alabama Power operates a series of dams on the Coosa River in east central Alabama. These dams form six reservoirs that provide power generation, flood control, recreation, economic opportunity, and fish and wildlife habitats to the region. The Logan Martin Reservoir is located approximately 45 kilometers east of Birmingham and borders Saint Clair and Talladega Counties. Discharges below the reservoir are controlled by power generation at Logan Martin Dam, and there has been an ongoing concern about the stability of the streambanks downstream of the dam. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Alabama Power conducted a scientific investigation of the geomorphic conditions of a 115-meter length of streambank along the Coosa River by using tripod-mounted terrestrial light detection and ranging technology. Two surveys were conducted before and after the winter flood season of 2010 to determine the extent and magnitude of geomorphic change. A comparison of the terrestrial light detection and ranging datasets indicated that approximately 40 cubic meters of material had been eroded from the upstream section of the study area. The terrestrial light detection and ranging data included in this report consist of electronic point cloud files containing several million georeferenced data points, as well as a surface model measuring changes between scans.

  12. Topobathymetric model of Mobile Bay, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Brock, John C.; Howard, Daniel M.; Gesch, Dean B.; Bonisteel-Cormier, Jamie M.; Travers, Laurinda J.

    2013-01-01

    Topobathymetric Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are a merged rendering of both topography (land elevation) and bathymetry (water depth) that provides a seamless elevation product useful for inundation mapping, as well as for other earth science applications, such as the development of sediment-transport, sea-level rise, and storm-surge models. This 1/9-arc-second (approximately 3 meters) resolution model of Mobile Bay, Alabama was developed using multiple topographic and bathymetric datasets, collected on different dates. The topographic data were obtained primarily from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Elevation Dataset (NED) (http://ned.usgs.gov/) at 1/9-arc-second resolution; USGS Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) data (2 meters) (http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/400/); and topographic lidar data (2 meters) and Compact Hydrographic Airborne Rapid Total Survey (CHARTS) lidar data (2 meters) from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) (http://www.csc.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/data/coastallidar/). Bathymetry was derived from digital soundings obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/geodas/geodas.html) and from water-penetrating lidar sources, such as EAARL and CHARTS. Mobile Bay is ecologically important as it is the fourth largest estuary in the United States. The Mobile and Tensaw Rivers drain into the bay at the northern end with the bay emptying into the Gulf of Mexico at the southern end. Dauphin Island (a barrier island) and the Fort Morgan Peninsula form the mouth of Mobile Bay. Mobile Bay is 31 miles (50 kilometers) long by a maximum width of 24 miles (39 kilometers) with a total area of 413 square miles (1,070 square kilometers). The vertical datum of the Mobile Bay topobathymetric model is the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88). All the topographic datasets were originally referenced to NAVD 88 and no transformations were made to these input data. The NGDC hydrographic, multibeam, and trackline surveys were transformed from mean low water (MLW) or mean lower low water (MLLW) to NAVD 88 using VDatum (http://vdatum.noaa.gov). VDatum is a tool developed by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) that performs transformations among tidal, ellipsoid-based, geoid-based, and orthometric datums using calibrated hydrodynamic models. The vertical accuracy of the input topographic data varied depending on the input source. Because the input elevation data were derived primarily from lidar, the vertical accuracy ranges from 6 to 20 centimeters in root mean square error (RMSE). he horizontal datum of the Mobile Bay topobathymetric model is the North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83), geographic coordinates. All the topographic and bathymetric datasets were originally referenced to NAD 83, and no transformations were made to the input data. The bathymetric surveys were downloaded referenced to NAD 83 geographic, and therefore no horizontal transformations were required. The topbathymetric model of Mobile Bay and detailed metadata can be obtained from the USGS Web sites: http://nationalmap.gov/.

  13. A procedure used for a ground truth study of a land use map of North Alabama generated from LANDSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, S. W., Jr.; Sharma, G. C.; Bagwell, C.

    1977-01-01

    A land use map of a five county area in North Alabama was generated from LANDSAT data using a supervised classification algorithm. There was good overall agreement between the land use designated and known conditions, but there were also obvious discrepancies. In ground checking the map, two types of errors were encountered - shift and misclassification - and a method was developed to eliminate or greatly reduce the errors. Randomly selected study areas containing 2,525 pixels were analyzed. Overall, 76.3 percent of the pixels were correctly classified. A contingency coefficient of correlation was calculated to be 0.7 which is significant at the alpha = 0.01 level. The land use maps generated by computers from LANDSAT data are useful for overall land use by regional agencies. However, care must be used when making detailed analysis of small areas. The procedure used for conducting the ground truth study together with data from representative study areas is presented.

  14. Eliminating Malaria in the American South: An Analysis of the Decline of Malaria in 1930s Alabama

    PubMed Central

    Mohler, George

    2013-01-01

    Until the 1930s, malaria was endemic throughout large swaths of the American South. We used a Poisson mixture model to analyze the decline of malaria at the county level in Alabama (an archetypical Deep South cotton state) during the 1930s. Employing a novel data set, we argue that, contrary to a leading theory, the decline of malaria in the American South was not caused by population movement away from malarial areas or the decline of Southern tenant farming. We elaborate and provide evidence for an alternate explanation that emphasizes the role of targeted New Deal–era public health interventions and the development of local-level public health infrastructure. We show that, rather than disappearing as a consequence of social change or economic improvements, malaria was eliminated in the Southern United States in the face of economic dislocation and widespread and deep-seated poverty. PMID:23763415

  15. Appendix A - County Codes

    Cancer.gov

    January 1998 SEER Program Code Manual, 3 rd Edition A-1 APPENDIX A COUNTY CODES APPENDIX A COUNTY CODES A-2 SEER Program Code Manual, 3rd Edition January 1998 The following are the valid county codes for coding county of residence at diagnosis: Reference:

  16. Purchasing in Texas Counties

    E-print Network

    Hervey, E. J.; Bradshaw, H. C.

    1944-01-01

    were carefully studied. Following this detailed examination in four counties, purchasing pro- cedures were studied in considerably less detail in the following counties: Wharton, Waller, Liberty, Milam, Anderson, Harrison, Kaufman, Dallas, Tarrant... (After the program) 7,667 If the program had included a larger portion of the county road system, the saving would undoubtedly have been larger.' Harrison County In Harrison County in 1941, second grade (regular) gasoline was pur- chased in lots...

  17. 40 CFR 81.58 - Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...defined in section 302(f) of the Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C. 1857h(f)) geographically located within the outermost...Schley County, Stewart County, Sumter County, Talbot County, Taylor County, Webster...

  18. 40 CFR 81.187 - Olympic-Northwest Washington Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...so delimited): In the State of Washington: Clallam County, Grays Harbor County, Island County, Jefferson County, Mason County, Pacific County, San Juan County, Skagit County, Thurston County, Whatcom...

  19. 40 CFR 81.187 - Olympic-Northwest Washington Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...so delimited): In the State of Washington: Clallam County, Grays Harbor County, Island County, Jefferson County, Mason County, Pacific County, San Juan County, Skagit County, Thurston County, Whatcom...

  20. 40 CFR 81.187 - Olympic-Northwest Washington Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...so delimited): In the State of Washington: Clallam County, Grays Harbor County, Island County, Jefferson County, Mason County, Pacific County, San Juan County, Skagit County, Thurston County, Whatcom...

  1. 40 CFR 81.187 - Olympic-Northwest Washington Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...so delimited): In the State of Washington: Clallam County, Grays Harbor County, Island County, Jefferson County, Mason County, Pacific County, San Juan County, Skagit County, Thurston County, Whatcom...

  2. 40 CFR 81.187 - Olympic-Northwest Washington Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...so delimited): In the State of Washington: Clallam County, Grays Harbor County, Island County, Jefferson County, Mason County, Pacific County, San Juan County, Skagit County, Thurston County, Whatcom...

  3. Rich Detector at Jefferson Lab, Design, Performance and Physics Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisbani, E.; Colilli, S.; Cusanno, F.; Frullani, S.; Frantoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Magliozzi, M. L.; Pierangeli, L.; Santavenere, F.; Veneroni, P.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Iodice, M.; de Cataldo, G.; de Leo, R.; Lagamba, L.; Marrone, S.; Nappi, E.; Paticchio, V.; Feuerbach, R.; Higinbotham, D.; Lerose, J.; Kross, B.; Michaels, R.; Qiang, Y.; Reitz, B.; Segal, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Zorn, C.; Acha, A.; Markowitz, P.; Chang, C. C.; Breuer, H.

    2006-04-01

    Since 2004 the hadron spectrometer of Hall A at Jefferson Lab is equipped with a proximity focusing RICH. This detector is capable of identify kaon from pion and proton with a angular separation starting from 6 sigma at 2 GeV/c. The RICH design is conceptually similar to the ALICE HMPID RICH; it uses a C6F14 liquid radiator and a 300 nm layer of CsI deposited on the cathode pad plane of an asymeetric MWPC. The RICH has operated for the Hypernuclear Spectroscopy Experiment E94-107, which took data in the last two years. Design details and performance along with first physics results from the hypernuclear experiment are shortly presented.

  4. Study of CSR Effects in the Jefferson Laboratory FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, C. C.; Biedron, S.; Burleson, Theodore A.; Milton, Stephen V.; Morin, Auralee L.; Benson, Stephen V.; Douglas, David R.; Evtushenko, Pavel E.; Hannon, Fay E.; Li, Rui; Tennant, Christopher D.; Zhang, Shukui; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Lewellen, John W.

    2013-08-01

    In a recent experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR FEL driver the effects of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR chicane. This experiment also provides a valuable opportunity to benchmark existing CSR models in a system that may not be fully represented by a 1-D CSR model. Here we present results from this experiment and compare to initial simulations of CSR in the magnetic compression chicane of the machine. Finally, we touch upon the possibility for CSR induced microbunching gain in the magnetic compression chicane, and show that parameters in the machine are such that it should be thoroughly damped.

  5. The Heavy Photon Search experiment at Jefferson Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Andrea Celentano; for the HPS collaboration

    2015-05-08

    The Heavy Photon Search experiment (HPS) at Jefferson Laboratory will search for a new $U(1)$ massive gauge boson, or "heavy-photon," mediator of a new fundamental interaction, called "dark-force," that couples to ordinary photons trough kinetic mixing. HPS has sensitivity in the mass range 20 MeV - 1 GeV and coupling $\\varepsilon^2$ between 10$^{-5}$ and 10$^{-10}$. The HPS experiment will search for the $e^+e^-$ decay of the heavy photon, by resonance search and detached vertexing, in an electron beam fixed target experiment. HPS will use a compact forward spectrometer, which employs silicon microstrip detectors for vertexing and tracking, and a PbWO$_4$ electromagnetic calorimeter for energy measurement and fast triggering.

  6. Spin physics program in Jefferson Lab's Hall C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondón, Oscar A.

    2015-04-01

    The nucleon spin structure has been studied at Jefferson Lab's Hall C in experiments RSS (E01-006) and SANE (E07-003), which measured double spin asymmetries using the U. of Virginia solid polarized target and CEBAF's 6 GeV polarized electrons. The proton longitudinal spin structure g1 and transverse structure g2 have been investigated at kinematics extending from the elastic point to DIS, for four-momenta squared ranging from 0.8 to 5 GeV2. The neutron structures have been measured in the region of the nucleon resonances at 1.3 GeV2 on a deuteron target. Results of both experiments will be highlighted. A brief survey of approved experiments for the 12 GeV program will also be presented.

  7. The GlueX Project at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Papandreou, Zisis

    2009-01-01

    One of the main scientific questions that remains unanswered in subatomic physics is the nature and behaviour of the "Glue" which holds the quarks together. The puzzling feature of this construction is that quarks are never found free, but only in triplets or pairs, a phenomenon known as "confinement". Since gluons carry colour charge, they can form chromoelectric flux tubes, which may result in unusual objects, such as glue-balls or hybrid combinations of gluons and quarks. In certain models, the later can be produced with quantum numbers not allowed in the simple quark picture. An international experiment (GlueX) at Jefferson Lab, Virginia, is being designed to search for such exotic hybrid mesons and thus elucidate the phenomenon of confinement. GlueX is considered a 'discovery' experiment; its salient features, the planned methodology of partial- wave analysis, and the R&D progress of its detector subsystems will be

  8. ELECTROSTATIC MODELING OF THE JEFFERSON LABORATORY INVERTED CERAMIC GUN

    SciTech Connect

    P. Evtushenko ,F.E. Hannon, C. Hernandez-Garcia

    2010-05-01

    Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) is currently developing a new 500kV DC electron gun for future use with the FEL. The design consists of two inverted ceramics which support a central cathode electrode. This layout allows for a load-lock system to be located behind the gun chamber. The electrostatic geometry of the gun has been designed to minimize surface electric field gradients and also to provide some transverse focusing to the electron beam during transit between the cathode and anode. This paper discusses the electrode design philosophy and presents the results of electrostatic simulations. The electric field information obtained through modeling was used with particle tracking codes to predict the effects on the electron beam.

  9. Overview of Spin Structure Program at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Prok, Yelena

    2013-04-01

    An extensive experimental program to study spin physics at low and moderate four - momentum transfer, Q{sup 2}, has been pursued by Jefferson Lab during the last 15 years, with complementary measurements taking place in all 3 experimental halls. Our inclusive data with high statistical precision and extensive kinematic coverage allow us to better constrain the polarized parton distributions, to accurately determine various moments of spin structure functions, to test the spin content of valent quarks, and to investigate the effects of resonance excitations and higher twist, dominant in this kinematic regime. Our recent semi-inclusive and exclusive measurements have given us new avenues of exploration, and inspired a new generation of experiments planned with 12 GeV beam. Highlights from 6 GeV experimental program are discussed, along with the 12 GeV data projections, and expected impact on the NLO global fits and phenomenological models of valent spin structure.

  10. Probing the nucleon structure with SIDIS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Sergio Anafalos

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, measurements of azimuthal moments of polarized hadronic cross sections in hard processes have emerged as a powerful tool to probe nucleon structure. Many experiments worldwide are currently trying to pin down various effects related to nucleon structure through Semi-Inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS). Azimuthal distributions of final-state particles in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, in particular, are sensitive to the orbital motion of quarks and play an important role in the study of Transverse Momentum Dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) of quarks in the nucleon. The CLAS spectrometer, installed in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab, has collected semi-inclusive data using the CEBAF 6 GeV polarized electron beam on polarized solid NH{sub 3} and ND{sub 3} targets. An overview of these measurements is presented.

  11. SANE Of Jefferson Lab: Spin Asymmetries on the Nucleon Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmidouch, Abdellah

    2011-07-15

    The Spin Asymmetry on the Nucleon Experiment (SANE) at Jefferson Lab measures proton spin observables A{sub 1}{sup p}, A{sub 2}{sup p} and structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p} and g{sub 2}{sup p} over a broad range of Bjorken scaling variable x from 0.3 to 0.8, for four-momentum transfers ranging from 2.5 GeV{sup 2} to 6.5 GeV{sup 2}. Inclusive double spin asymmetries were measured by scattering 4.7 and 5.9-GeV longitudinally polarized electron beam off a polarized solid NH{sub 3} target, in both parallel and near-perpendicular configuration. Scattered electrons were detected using a novel non-magnetic detector array with 194-msr acceptance. This paper presents the physics motivation for the experiment, the detector performance, and the latest status of the ongoing data analysis.

  12. The Heavy Photon Search experiment at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Celentano, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    The Heavy Photon Search experiment (HPS) at Jefferson Laboratory will search for a new U(1) massive gauge boson, or "heavy-photon", mediator of a new fundamental interaction, called "dark-force", that couples to ordinary photons through kinetic mixing. HPS has sensitivity in the mass range 20 MeV – 1 GeV and coupling epsilon2 between 10?5 and 10?10. The HPS experiment will look for the e+e? decay of the heavy photon, by resonance search and detached vertexing, in an electron beam fixed target experiment. HPS will use a compact forward spectrometer, which employs silicon microstrip detectors for vertexing and tracking, and a PbWO4 electromagnetic calorimeter for energy measurement and fast triggering.

  13. Status of Jefferson Lab's Load Locked Polarized Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    M.L. Stutzman; P. Adderley; M. Baylac; J. Clark; A. Day; J. Grames; J. Hansknecht; M. Poelker

    2002-09-01

    A new 100 kV load locked polarized electron gun has been built at Jefferson Lab. The gun is installed in a test stand on a beam line that resembles the first few meters of the CEBAF nuclear physics photoinjector. With this gun, a GaAs photocathode can be loaded from atmosphere, hydrogen cleaned, activated and taken to high voltage in less than 8 hours. The gun is a three chamber design, with all of the moving parts remaining at ground potential during gun operation. Studies of gun performance, photocathode life times, transverse emittance at high bunch charge, helicity correlated effects and beam polarizations from new photocathode samples will all be greatly facilitated by the use of this load locked gun.

  14. A SYNCHRONIZED FIR/VUV LIGHT SOURCE AT JEFFERSON LAB

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Benson, David Douglas, George Neil, Michelle D. Shinn, Gwyn Williams

    2012-07-01

    We describe a dual free-electron laser (FEL) configuration on the UV Demo FEL at Jefferson Lab that allows simultaneous lasing at FIR/THz and UV wavelengths. The FIR/THz source would be an FEL oscillator with a short wiggler providing nearly diffraction-limited pulses with pulse energy exceeding 50 microJoules. The FIR source would use the exhaust beam from a UVFEL. The coherent harmonics in the VUV from the UVFEL are out-coupled through a hole. The FIR source uses a shorter resonator with either hole or edge coupling to provide very high power FIR pulses. Simulations indicate excel-lent spectral brightness in the FIR region with over 100 W/cm-1 output.

  15. A syncrhronized FIR/VUV light source at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, Michelle D.

    2013-05-31

    This slide show presents an introduction to Free-Electron Lasers (FELs) and what makes the JLab FELs unique. Ways of exploring the nature of matter with the FEL are shown, including applications in the THz, IR, UV, and VUV. The Jefferson Lab FEL Facility is unique in its high average brightness in the THz, and IR -- VUV spectral regions and Sub ps-pulses at MHz repetition rates. With an installation of a rebuilt 'F100' cryomodule the linac energy will increase to > 150MeV. This will permit lasing further into the UV and extend VUV. With the swap of our CEBAF-style cryounit for an improved booster, we could lase in the VUV. Addition of a wiggler and optical cavity slightly canted from the UV beamline would allow simultaneous lasing of UV and THz for high E-field 2 color experiments.

  16. The 6 GeV TMD Program at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Puckett, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs) of the nucleon in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) has emerged as one of the major physics motivations driving the experimental program using the upgraded 11 GeV electron beam at Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). The accelerator construction phase of the CEBAF upgrade is essentially complete and commissioning of the accelerator has begun as of April, 2014. As the new era of CEBAF operations begins, it is appropriate to review the body of published and forthcoming results on TMDs from the 6 GeV era of CEBAF operations, discuss what has been learned, and discuss the key challenges and opportunities for the 11 GeV SIDIS program of CEBAF.

  17. The Heavy Photon Search experiment at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    De Napoli, Marzio; et. al.,

    2015-06-01

    Many beyond Standard Model theories predict a new massive gauge boson, aka 'dark' or 'heavy photon', directly coupling to hidden sector particles with dark charge. The heavy photon is expected to mix with the Standard Model photon through kinetic mixing and therefore couple weakly to normal charge. The Heavy Photon Search (HPS) experiment will search for the heavy photon at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), in the mass range 20-1000 MeV/c^2 and coupling to electric charge ?^2 = alpha'/alpha in the range 10^-5 to 10^-10. HPS will look for the e^+e^- decay channel of heavy photons radiated by electron Bremsstrahlung, employing both invariant mass search and detached vertexing techniques. The experiment employs a compact forward spectrometer comprising silicon microstrip detectors for vertexing and tracking and an electromagnetic calorimeter for particle identification and triggering.

  18. The Early Psychological Impacts of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill on Florida and Alabama Communities

    PubMed Central

    Grattan, Lynn M.; Roberts, Sparkle; Mahan, William T.; McLaughlin, Patrick K.; Otwell, W. Steven; Morris, J. Glenn

    2011-01-01

    Background Although public concern has focused on the environmental impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the public health impact on a broad range of coastal communities is minimally known. Objective We sought to determine the acute level of distress (depression, anxiety), mechanisms of adjustment (coping, resilience), and perceived risk in a community indirectly impacted by the oil spill and to identify the extent to which economic loss may explain these factors. Methods Using a community-based participatory model, we performed standardized assessments of psychological distress (mood, anxiety), coping, resilience, neurocognition, and perceived risk on residents of fishing communities who were indirectly impacted (n = 71, Franklin County, Florida) or directly exposed (n = 23, Baldwin County, Alabama) to coastal oil. We also compared findings for participants who reported income stability (n = 47) versus spill-related income loss (n = 47). Results We found no significant differences between community groups in terms of psychological distress, adjustment, neurocognition, or environmental worry. Residents of both communities displayed clinically significant depression and anxiety. Relative to those with stable incomes, participants with spill-related income loss had significantly worse scores on tension/anxiety, depression, fatigue, confusion, and total mood disturbance scales; had higher rates of depression; were less resilient; and were more likely to use behavioral disengagement as a coping strategy. Conclusions Current estimates of human health impacts associated with the oil spill may underestimate the psychological impact in Gulf Coast communities that did not experience direct exposure to oil. Income loss after the spill may have a greater psychological health impact than the presence of oil on the immediately adjacent shoreline. PMID:21330230

  19. Haynesville sandstone reservoirs in the updip-Jurassic trend of Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Kugler, R.L.; Mink, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    Since the 1986 drilling of the 1 Carolyn McCollough Unit 1-13 well, which initiated production from the Frisco City sandstone of the Haynesville Formation in Monroe County, Alabama, seven Haynesville fields have been established in Covington, Escambia, and Monroe Counties. Initial flow rates of several hundred BOPD are typical in wells in these fields, and maximum rates exceed 2,000 BOPD in North Frisco City field. As of August 1993, these fields had produced more than 3,400,000 bbl of oil and 4,000,000 Mcf of gas from depths of 12,000 to 13,000 ft. Haynesville sandstone reservoirs are concentrated in two distinct areas: (1) an eastern area (Hickory Branch, North Rome, and West Falco fields; API oil gravity = 40{degrees}) in the Conecuh embayment and (2) a western area (Frisco City, North Frisco City, southeast Frisco City, and Megargel fields, API oil gravity = 58-59{degrees}) on the Conecuh ridge complex. Eastern fields are productive from Haynesville sandstone, which is not continuous with the two distinct, productive sandstone bodies in western fields, the Frisco City sandstone and the Megargel sandstone. Hydrocarbon traps are structural or combination traps associated with basement paleohighs. Reservoir bodies generally consist of conglomerate (igneous clasts in western fields; limestone clasts in eastern fields), sandstone (subarkose-arkose), and shale (some of which is red) in stacked upward-fining sequences. Shale at the tops of these sequences is bioturbated. These marine strata were deposited in shoal-water braid-delta fronts. Maximum and average permeability in western fields (k{sub max} = 2,000 md; k{sub ave} = 850-1,800 md) is an order of magnitude higher than that in eastern fields. The distribution of diagenetic components, including a variety of carbonate minerals, evaporite minerals (anhydrite and halite in western fields), and carbonate-replaced pseudomatrix, commonly is related to depositional architecture.

  20. Studies of the Electromagnetic Structure of Mesons at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Daniel, S.

    2012-11-11

    The Jefferson Laboratory Hall B PrimEx Collaboration is using tagged photons to perform an absolute 1.4% level cross section measurement of the photoproduction of neutral pions in the Coulomb field of a nucleus. The absolute cross section for this process is directly proportional to the neutral pion radiative decay width and consequently the uncertainty in the luminosity is directly reflected in the final error bar of the measurement. The PI has taken primary responsibility for the photon flux determination and in this technical report, we outline the steps taken to limit the uncertainty in the tagged photon flux to the 1% level. These include the use of a total absorption counter for absolute flux calibration, a pair spectrometer for online relative flux monitoring, and updated procedures for postbremsstrahlung electron counting. The photon tagging technique has been used routinely in its various forms to provide quasimonochromatic photons for absolute photonuclear cross section measurements. The analysis of such experiments in the context of bremsstrahlung photon tagging was summarized by Owens in 1990. Since then, a number of developments have made possible significant improvements in the implementation of this technique. Here, we describe the steps taken by the PrimEx Collaboration in Hall B of Jefferson Laboratory to limit the systematic uncertainty in the absolute photon flux to 1%. They include an absolute flux calibration at low intensity with a total absorption counter, online relative flux monitoring with a pair spectrometer, and the use of multihit time to digital converters for post bremsstrahlung electron counting during production data runs. While this discussion focuses on the analysis techniques utilized by the PrimEx Collaboration which involves a bremsstrahlung based photon tagging system to measure the neutral pion lifetime, the methods described herein readily apply to other types of photon tagging systems.

  1. Chester (Mississippian) ostracodes from Bangor Formation of Black Warrior basin, northern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Devery, H.; Dewey, C.

    1986-05-01

    A previously unreported ostracode fauna is described from the Bangor Limestone in Franklin, Lawrence, and Colbert Counties, Alabama. The Bangor formation is a Chesterian (Mississippian) platformal carbonate sequence. The predominant carbonates are bioclastic and oolitic grainstones to wackestones with less abundant micritic claystones. Intercalated fine clastics are common in the upper and lower parts of the sequence. This study focuses on the bioclastic limestones with interbedded shales of the lower Bangor. The megafaunal associations include crinoid and blastoid pelmatozoans, orthotetid, and spiriferid brachiopids, and both fenestrate and nonfenestrate bryozoans. Solitary rugose corals and trilobites may be locally abundant. Gastropods and bivalves form a consistent but accessory part of the fauna, which indicates a shallow, nearshore shelf environment. A diverse ostracode fauna of variable abundance has been collected from the shaly units and friable limestones. The ostracode fauna indicates shallow, open-marine conditions and is dominated by bairdiaceans, including Bairdia spp. Rectobairdia and Bairdiacypris. Several species of Cavellina, healdia, and Seminolites are also abundant. Palaeocopids present include Coryellina, Kirkbya, and Polytylites. Kloedenellaceans include Beyrichiopsis, Glyptopleura, Glypotpleurina, and .Hypotetragona. Paraparchitaceans are notably more scarce, but specimens of Shishaella have been found. Some sample have a high valve to carapace ratio, suggesting postmortem transport. Although diversity is high, numerical abundances can be low. Initial studies suggest the ostracodes have a Mid-Continent affinity, which may indicate that the Appalachians were acting as a barrier to migration of European forms.

  2. 75 FR 61463 - The Narragansett Electric Company; Arcadia Gas Storage, LLC; Salt Plains Storage, LLC; Jefferson...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Consolidated)] The Narragansett Electric Company; Arcadia Gas Storage, LLC; Salt Plains Storage, LLC; Jefferson Island Storage & Hub, L.L.C.; Eagle Rock Desoto Pipeline, L.P.; The Brooklyn Union Gas Company;...

  3. Jefferson Park : case study of a public housing project in transformation

    E-print Network

    Powers, David Thomas

    1984-01-01

    This study focuses on the redevelopment of Jefferson Park, a public housing project in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The work establishes the historical political, social, and physical context in which that redevelopment takes ...

  4. Alabama Children: A Matter of Commitment and Priority. Special Report to Governor Fob James and the Alabama Legislature. Volume I and Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Bobbie H.

    This report in two volumes is the product of a year-long needs assessment undertaken by the Governor of Alabama's Commission for the Alabama Year of the Child. Volume I, which contains an overview and recommendations to the governor and the legislature, includes position papers and letters from the commission and interested citizens. These…

  5. Land use mapping and change detection using ERTS imagery in Montgomery County, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilms, R. P.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of using remotely sensed data from ERTS-1 for mapping land use and detecting land use change was investigated. Land use information was gathered from 1964 air photo mosaics and from 1972 ERTS data. The 1964 data provided the basis for comparison with ERTS-1 imagery. From this comparison, urban sprawl was quite evident for the city of Montgomery. A significant trend from forestland to agricultural was also discovered. The development of main traffic arteries between 1964 and 1972 was a vital factor in the development of some of the urban centers. Even though certain problems in interpreting and correlating land use data from ERTS imagery were encountered, it has been demonstrated that remotely sensed data from ERTS is useful for inventorying land use and detecting land use change.

  6. Hydrogeologic characterization of the Coldwater Spring recharge area, Calhoun County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kidd, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    The complex ground-water flow in the Coldwater Spring aquifer system is the result of complicated geologic structures, porous media flow within the shallow unconsolidated zone, conduit flow in the karst bedrock aquifers, and discontinuities in hydrogeologic units caused by faulting. Recharge water in the unconsolidated zone percolates slowly to the underlying bedrock aquifer. The bedrock aquifer includes fractured zones in the Chilhowee Group and solution features in the Shady Dolomite, Conasauga Formation, Knox Groud, and Newala and Little Oak Limestones. Ground-water movement in the shallow unconsolidated zone roughly follows the topographic surface as it moves deeper into the ground-water system. Ground water flowing south through the bedrock aquifers is bloced by less permeable rocks in the area of the Jacksonville Fault; and possibly moves south and west along the fault to discharge at Coldwater Spring. The recharge area for Coldwater Spring encompasses the recharge areas of the shallow unconsolidated zone and the bedrock aquifers.

  7. 78 FR 57852 - Warrior Rosin Spill Superfund Site, Holt, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama ; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ...Painter.Paula@epa.gov. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula V. Painter at 404/562-8887. Dated: August 16, 2013. Anita L. Davis, Chief, Superfund Enforcement & Information Management Branch, Superfund Division. [FR Doc. 2013-22928...

  8. Physics opportunities with the 12 GeV upgrade at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudek, Jozef; Ent, Rolf; Essig, Rouven; Kumar, K. S.; Meyer, Curtis; McKeown, R. D.; Meziani, Zein Eddine; Miller, Gerald A.; Pennington, Michael; Richards, David; Weinstein, Larry; Young, Glenn; Brown, Susan

    2012-12-01

    We summarize the scientific opportunities for utilization of the upgraded 12GeV Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab. This is based primarily on the 52 proposals recommended for approval by the Jefferson Lab Program Advisory Committee to date. The upgraded facility will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in nuclear, hadronic, and electroweak physics.

  9. Update of High Resolution (e,e'K^+) Hypernuclear Spectroscopy at Jefferson Lab's Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    Cusanno, F; Bydzovsky, P; Chang, C C; Cisbani, E; De Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Higinbotham, D W; Iodice, M; LeRose, J J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; Sotona, M

    2010-03-01

    Updated results of the experiment E94-107 hypernuclear spectroscopy in Hall A of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab), are presented. The experiment provides high resolution spectra of excitation energy for 12B_\\Lambda, 16N_\\Lambda, and 9Li_\\Lambda hypernuclei obtained by electroproduction of strangeness. A new theoretical calculation for 12B_\\Lambda, final results for 16N_\\Lambda, and discussion of the preliminary results of 9Li_\\Lambda are reported.

  10. Performance of the Huntsville, Alabama Marx Meter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchfield, J. C.; Bitzer, P. M.; Franklin, V.; Christian, H. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Huntsville, Alabama Marx Meter Array (HAMMA) is a network of ground-based electric field change meters (Marx meters) deployed in Huntsville, Alabama and the surrounding areas. The Marx meters use GPS timing and have a sampling rate of 1 MHz. It has been shown previously, using several particular events, that time-of-arrival analysis can be used on HAMMA waveforms to locate lightning events. The natural next step is to devise an automated method for parsing HAMMA data and determining cloud-to-ground stroke locations and times for many strokes, which then should be compared with results from other well-characterized data sets. We will report on the results from this analysis and the comparison of these results with those from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). The discussion will include location errors and detection efficiency as a function of distance from the center of the array.

  11. Mississippi/Alabama Pinnacle Trend Ecosystem Monitoring Final Synthesis Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Continental Shelf Associates Inc.; Texas A&M University, Geochemical and Environmental Research Group

    2001-01-01

    This Final Synthesis Report summarizes a four-year program to characterize and monitor carbonate mounds on the Mississippi/Alabama outer continental shelf (OCS). The study area is shown in Fig.ES.1. The study was conducted by Continental Shelf Associates, Inc. and the Geochemical and Environmental Research Group (GERG) of Texas A&M University (TAMU), for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Biological Resources Division.

  12. Solar-Heated Water at a Motel--Mobile, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Solar-assisted hot-water system for a new 122-unit motor inn in Mobile, Alabama, generates more than half the energy needed for hot-water heating at motel each year. System consists of 93 flat-plate collectors, 2,500 gallon (9,500 1) insulated storage tank located outdoors, heat exchangers and controls. Electronic thermometers, measuring the temperatures at 22 locations monitor system performance.

  13. 77 FR 8942 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ...This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Alabama (FEMA-4052-DR), dated 02/01/2012. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-Line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 01/22/2012 through 01/23/2012. Effective Date: 02/07/2012. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 04/02/2012. EIDL Loan Application Deadline Date:...

  14. 2014 County Commissioner Satisfaction Survey

    E-print Network

    2014 County Commissioner Satisfaction Survey: CSU Extension Services in Colorado Survey Results Summary Report April 2015 #12;Colorado State University Extension 2014 County Commissioner Survey Results Introduction: 2014 County Commissioner Survey The seventh annual County Commissioner Satisfaction Survey

  15. 40 CFR 81.265 - Southeast Illinois Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...County, Effingham County, Fayette County, Franklin County, Gallatin County, Hamilton County, Hardin County, Jackson County, Jasper County, Jefferson County, Lawrence County, Marion County, Perry County, Richland County, Saline County, Wabash...

  16. 40 CFR 81.265 - Southeast Illinois Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...County, Effingham County, Fayette County, Franklin County, Gallatin County, Hamilton County, Hardin County, Jackson County, Jasper County, Jefferson County, Lawrence County, Marion County, Perry County, Richland County, Saline County, Wabash...

  17. 40 CFR 81.265 - Southeast Illinois Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...County, Effingham County, Fayette County, Franklin County, Gallatin County, Hamilton County, Hardin County, Jackson County, Jasper County, Jefferson County, Lawrence County, Marion County, Perry County, Richland County, Saline County, Wabash...

  18. 40 CFR 81.265 - Southeast Illinois Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...County, Effingham County, Fayette County, Franklin County, Gallatin County, Hamilton County, Hardin County, Jackson County, Jasper County, Jefferson County, Lawrence County, Marion County, Perry County, Richland County, Saline County, Wabash...

  19. 40 CFR 81.91 - Jacksonville (Florida)-Brunswick (Georgia) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...County, Columbia County, Dixie County, Duval County, Flagler County, Franklin County, Gadsden County, Gilchrist County, Hamilton County, Jefferson County, Lafayette County, Leon County, Liberty County, Madison County, Marion County, Nassau...

  20. Development of ground-water resources in Orange County, Texas, and adjacent areas in Texas and Louisiana, 1971-80

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonnet, C.W.; Gabrysch, R.K.

    1982-01-01

    The major water-bearing unit in the study area is the Chicot aquifer. The Chicot aquifer overlies the Evangeline aquifer. The Evangeline aquifer is undeveloped in Orange County, but is developed at Evadale in Jasper County, Texas, and at Silsbee in Hardin County, Texas. Both aquifers consist of unconsolidated and discontinuous layers of sand and clay that dip toward the Gulf of Mexico. Pumpage in Orange County from the lower unit of the Chicot aquifer averaged 21.2 million gallons per day and pumpage from the upper unit of the Chicot averaged about 2 million gallons per day from 1971-79. Pumpage increased in municipal areas and decreased in industrial areas with little net change in total pumpage during the report period. Most water levels continued to decline in Orange County, generally at a slower rate than before 1971. Water levels tended to stabilize in areas where ground-water withdrawals decreased. In some of the areas water levels rose. Bench-mark elevations determined during 1973 show regional land-surface subsidence from 1918-73, generally attributed to ground-water development, to be less than 0.5 foot. Locally, subsidence due to production of oil, gas , saltwater, or sulphur was about 15 feet at Spindletop Dome, Jefferson County, Texas, and as much as 3 feet (.9 meter) near Port Acres gas field, Jefferson County, Texas. Although saltwater encroachment is evident in parts of southern Orange County, the encroachment is not expected to increase because artesian pressure is unlikely to be decreased further due to stable ground-water pumping and a projected increase in the use of surface water to meet future demands. (USGS)