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1

Industrial X-Ray Study in Jefferson County, Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

A field study concerned with the education and experience background of operators of industrial x-ray equipment was conducted in Jefferson County, Alabama. The study included physical surveys of 21 industrial units and background data on operators, supervisors, and safety directors in eight industries. The procedure used is described along with findings of background and physical survey data and conclusions are

Edgar F. Seagle; Kelly G. Sauer; Frank E. Russey

1966-01-01

2

Economic-environmental modeling of point source pollution in Jefferson County, Alabama, USA.  

PubMed

This paper uses an integrated economic-environmental model to assess the point source pollution from major industries in Jefferson County, Northern Alabama. Industrial expansion generates employment, income, and tax revenue for the public sector; however, it is also often associated with the discharge of chemical pollutants. Jefferson County is one of the largest industrial counties in Alabama that experienced smog warnings and ambient ozone concentration, 1996-1999. Past studies of chemical discharge from industries have used models to assess the pollution impact of individual plants. This study, however, uses an extended Input-Output (I-O) economic model with pollution emission coefficients to assess direct and indirect pollutant emission for several major industries in Jefferson County. The major findings of the study are: (a) the principal emission by the selected industries are volatile organic compounds (VOC) and these contribute to the ambient ozone concentration; (b) the direct and indirect emissions are significantly higher than the direct emission by some industries, indicating that an isolated analysis will underestimate the emission by an industry; (c) while low emission coefficient industries may suggest industry choice they may also emit the most hazardous chemicals. This study is limited by the assumptions made, and the data availability, however it provides a useful analytical tool for direct and cumulative emission estimation and generates insights on the complexity in choice of industries. PMID:12173425

Kebede, Ellene; Schreiner, Dean F; Huluka, Gobena

2002-05-01

3

A 15-year review of railway-related deaths in Jefferson County, Alabama.  

PubMed

A retrospective computer search of the records of the Jefferson County Coroner/Medical Examiner Office covering the 15-year period from 1981 to 1995 revealed 86 cases in which either a train caused death or in which a body was found dead by the tracks. The average age of the decedents was 39 years (range, 3 weeks-87 years). Men accounted for 88% of the deaths. The manners of death were as follows: three natural, 64 accident, seven suicide, six homicide, and six undetermined. Six decedents were found dead by the tracks, but death was not caused by a train. Six decedents were railroad employees who died on the job. In 47 cases, the decedents were trespassing on railroad property. Five trespassers were riding the rails, and 42 were pedestrians struck by a train. Motor vehicle collisions with trains claimed 27 lives--19 drivers and eight passengers. All together, 45% of the decedents were intoxicated. Intoxication was greatest by far in individuals witnessed to have been lying on the tracks before being hit by a train. The nature of individuals riding the rails has changed in the past few decades. Freight trains today are being used by illegal immigrants as transportation within the United States. The majority of traffic fatalities occurred because the driver intentionally tried to beat the train to the crossing. These drivers were seldom intoxicated, and only two were teenagers. Lives of such impatient drivers might be spared by the installation of a crossing guard-rail that cannot be circumvented. PMID:9430289

Davis, G G; Alexander, C B; Brissie, R M

1997-12-01

4

Effect of Surface Coal Mining on the Hydrology of Crooked and Turkey Creek Basins, Jefferson County, Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Streamflow, sediment yield, and water quality were monitored from October 1975 through May 1977 to determine the impact of surface coal mining on the hydrology of Crooked and Turkey Creek basins in Jefferson County, Alabama. The basins are in the northeast part of the Warrior coal field. Coal is and has been mined from the Blue Creek, Mary Lee, and and Newcastel coal beds in the Mary Lee group. Results show water-quality degradation, increased sediment yields, and increased low flow in most tributaries draining mined areas. The impact of mine drainage and sediment yield from mined subbasins on water in the main stem of Turkey Creek was small due to the alkalinity of the water in the creek and to dilution ratios that ranged from 1:30 to 1:300. Mine drainage has affected the quality of water in Crooked Creek. The dissolved solids concentration in water downstream from the mined areas was as much as 7 times greater than that in water in unmined parts of the basin. The sediment yield to Crooked Creek was lower in the mined area than in the unmined segment of the stream. The lower yield is due, in part, to the trapping of sediment in sediment ponds in the mines and in a swamp downstream from the mines. (USGS)

Puente, Celso; Newton, John G.

1979-01-01

5

Degasification of the Mary Lee coalbed near Oak Grove, Jefferson County, Alabama, by vertical borehole in advance of mining  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 5-hole pattern was drilled from the surface at a site near Oak Grove, Jefferson County, Ala., to degasify the gassy Mary Lee coalbed in advance of mining. Gas and water production was monitored for 1 year, 4 months to allow gas flow to stabilize fully. A thickened water stimulation treatment was designed and applied in one hole of the

C. H. Elder; M. Deul

1974-01-01

6

Vision and Hearing Screening in Jefferson County Public Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The document contains materials from the Jefferson County (Alabama) vision and hearing screening program to identify students with sensory impairments, to monitor "at risk" students, and to provide appropriate educational intervention. The package contains the following: instructions for the principle on vision screening; procedures for…

O'Brien, Esther; Sanspree, Mary Jean

7

Assessment of Water-Quality Conditions in Fivemile Creek in the Vicinity of the Fivemile Creek Greenway, Jefferson County, Alabama, 2003-2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The watershed of Fivemile Creek (FMC), a tributary to the Locust Fork of the Black Warrior River, is located north of Birmingham, Alabama. Areas that have been previously coal-mined border the creek, and portions of the upper watershed have been and are currently (2007) being used for industrial and urban uses. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Tarrant, the Freshwater Land Trust, and the Jefferson County Commission, conducted a water-quality assessment of 12 sites along FMC during 2003?2005. Water samples were analyzed for basic physical and chemical properties and concentrations of major ions, nutrients, fecal indicator bacteria, organic wastewater compounds, pesticides, trace elements, and semivolatile organic compounds. Streambed-sediment samples were analyzed for concentrations of trace elements and semivolatile organic compounds. Benthic invertebrate communities were evaluated for taxonomic composition and relation to water-quality conditions. Nutrient concentrations in the FMC watershed reflect the influences of natural and anthropogenic sources. Concentrations of total nitrogen in all samples and total Kjeldahl nitrogen in at least one sample each collected from FMC at Hewitt Park, FMC below Springdale Road, FMC at Lewisburg, FMC near Republic, FMC at Brookside, and FMC at Linn Crossing exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) ecoregion nutrient criteria. Total phosphorus concentrations in about 58 percent of all samples were above the ecoregion nutrient criteria. Concentrations of chlorophyll a, an indicator of algal biomass, in the FMC watershed were below the appropriate USEPA ecoregion criteria. Fecal indicator bacteria concentrations occasionally exceeded criteria established by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) and the USEPA to protect human health and aquatic life. Median fecal-coliform concentrations equaled or exceeded USEPA criteria at four of the six sites with multiple samples. Maximum Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentrations usually occurred during high-flow conditions and exceeded the single-sample criterion for infrequently-used whole-body contact (576 colonies per 100 milliliters) at all but one site. Median E. coli concentrations for two of the seven sites with multiple samples exceeded USEPA criteria. Twenty-nine samples were collected from sites along FMC and analyzed by the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory for the presence of 57 organic wastewater compounds. Forty-six of the 57 organic wastewater compounds, representing all 11 general-use categories, were detected in samples from FMC. All detections of organic wastewater compounds were estimated below laboratory reporting limits except for several detections of the herbicide bromacil. Herbicides accounted for approximately 62 percent of the number of pesticide detections in the FMC study area. Two herbicides, atrazine and simazine, were detected most frequently, in 100 percent of the surface-water samples. Fipronil sulfide was the most commonly detected insecticide-derived compound, occurring in 52 percent of the surface-water samples. Concentrations of one insecticide, dieldrin, exceeded the USEPA?s health advisory level for drinking water in one sample at FMC at Hewitt Park and in one sample at FMC below Springdale Road. Concentrations of carbaryl in two samples and malathion in one sample exceeded aquatic-life criteria. Only a few trace element concentrations measured in FMC exceeded established standards or criteria. Some concentrations of aluminum and manganese were above secondary drinking-water standards. One cadmium concentration and three selenium concentrations measured at FMC at Lewisburg exceeded ADEM chronic aquatic-life criteria. Streambed-sediment samples were collected at seven sites along FMC, and analyzed for selected semivolatile organic compounds and trace elements. Forty-nine of 98 semivolatile organic compounds were detected in stre

Gill, Amy C.; Robinson, John A.; Redmond, Jymalyn E.; Bradley, Michael W.

2008-01-01

8

Jefferson County Adult Reading Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Through the 1979-80 Jefferson County Adult Reading Project, 508 students functioning at a 5.9 reading level and below attended reading classes. Test results demonstrated the growth in educational advancement while retention rates and growing enrollment showed other measures of success in the project components. Recruitment techniques used were…

Jefferson County Board of Education, Louisville, KY.

9

Investigation of water quality and aquatic-community structure in Village and Valley Creeks, City of Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama, 2000-01  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a 16-month investigation of water quality, aquatic-community structure, bed sediment, and fish tissue in Village and Valley Creeks, two urban streams that drain areas of highly intensive residential, commercial, and industrial land use in Birmingham, Alabama. Water-quality data were collected between February 2000 and March 2001 at four sites on Village Creek, three sites on Valley Creek, and at two reference sites near Birmingham?Fivemile Creek and Little Cahaba River, both of which drain less-urbanized areas. Stream samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, fecal bacteria, trace and major elements, pesticides, and selected organic constituents. Bed-sediment and fish-tissue samples were analyzed for trace and major elements, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and additional organic compounds. Aquatic-community structure was evaluated by conducting one survey of the fish community and in-stream habitat and two surveys of the benthic-invertebrate community. Bed-sediment and fish-tissue samples, benthic-invertebrates, and habitat data were collected between June 2000 and October 2000 at six of the nine water-quality sites; fish communities were evaluated in April and May 2001 at the six sites where habitat and benthic-invertebrate data were collected. The occurrence and distribution of chemical constituents in the water column and bed sediment provided an initial assessment of water quality in the streams. The structure of the aquatic communities, the physical condition of the fish, and the chemical analyses of fish tissue provided an indication of the cumulative effects of water quality on the aquatic biota. Water chemistry was similar at all sites, characterized by strong calcium-bicarbonate component and magnesium components. Median concentrations of total nitrogen and total phosphorus were highest at the headwaters of Valley Creek and lowest at the reference site on Fivemile Creek. In Village Creek, median concentrations of nitrite and ammonia increased in a downstream direction. In Valley Creek, median concentrations of nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, organic nitrogen, suspended phosphorus, and orthophosphate decreased in a downstream direction. Median concentrations of Escherichia coli and fecal coliform bacteria were highest at the most upstream site of Valley Creek and lowest at the reference site on Fivemile Creek. Concentrations of enterococci exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency criterion in 80 percent of the samples; concentrations of Escherichia coli exceeded the criterion in 56 percent of the samples. Concentrations of bacteria at the downstream sites on Village and Valley Creeks were elevated during high flow rather than low flow, indicating the presence of nonpoint sources. Surface-water samples were analyzed for chemical compounds that are commonly found in wastewater and urban runoff. The median number of wastewater indicators was highest at the most upstream site on Valley Creek and lowest at the reference site on Fivemile Creek. Concentrations of total recoverable cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in surface water exceeded acute and chronic aquatic life criteria in up to 24 percent of the samples that were analyzed for trace and major elements. High concentrations of trace and major elements in the water column were detected most frequently during high flow, indicating the presence of nonpoint sources. Of the 24 pesticides detected in surface water, 17 were herbicides and 7 were insecticides. Atrazine, simazine, and prometon were the most commonly detected herbicides; diazinon, chlorpyrifos, and carbaryl were the most commonly detected insecticides. Concentrations of atrazine, carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, and malathion periodically exceeded criteria for the protection of aquatic life. Trace-element priority pollutants, pesticides, and other organic compounds were detected in higher concentrations in bed sediment at the Village and Valley Creek sites t

McPherson, Ann K.; Abrahamsen, Thomas A.; Journey, Celeste A.

2002-01-01

10

The isolation of spiroplasmas from mosquitoes in Macon County, Alabama.  

PubMed

During the summer months of 1985, 1,298 adult mosquitoes comprising 21 species and 7 genera were collected in Macon County, Alabama. Mosquitoes were collected from four sections of the county with CO2-baited light traps. Spiroplasma cultures were isolated from two pools of 24 and 25 Aedes fulvus pallens, one pool of 22 Anopheles punctipennis and one pool of 7 Culex nigripalpus. Electron microscopic studies of the isolates revealed helical, wall-less cells. PMID:2904950

Shaikh, A A; Johnson, W E; Stevens, C; Tang, A Y

1987-06-01

11

Geology and Geomorphology of the Coastal Counties in Mississippi - Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

The geological units that form the surface of coastal counties in Mississippi and Alabama range in age from the late Pliocene Epoch (3.4 million years ago) to the present. The oldest unit that is exposed in the area that roughly includes the Tidal Fringe Marsh environment is the Citronelle Formation (Figure 1). It consists mostly of sand and silt, with

Keil Schmid; Ervin Otvos

12

Geomorphology of coastal sand dunes, Baldwin County, Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Alabama's coastal eolian deposits are primarily vegetated dunes that are exemplified by sand ridges with flat to undulating upper surfaces and continuous irregular crests. Dune fields occur along Morgan peninsula between the foredune line and Little Lagoon and the Mobile Bay area. These dune fields consist primarily of one or more continuous ridges that parallel the coast and are generally vegetaed to grassy. Washover of the beach and backshore during Hurricane Frederic (1979) and subsequent smaller scale storms resulted in significant erosion of many of Alabama's dune fields. The primary dunes or foredunes are beginning to recover from the effects of these storms; however, numerous breaks in the primary dune line are present. Sand dunes in coastal Alabama provide protection against storm-generated waves and washover. The foredunes are protected by adherence to a Coastal Construction Control Line (CCCL) or construction setback line identified by markers along coastal Baldwin County.

Bearden, Bennett, L.; Hummell, Richard, L.; Mink, Robert, M.

1989-01-01

13

Assessment of Aquatic Macroinvertebrate Communities in the Autauga Creek Watershed, Autauga County, Alabama, 2009.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Only four families within the Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera orders were found during a 1999 survey of aquatic macroinvertebrates in Autauga Creek, Autauga County, Alabama, by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management. The low number of t...

A. C. Gill W. S. Moody

2011-01-01

14

75 FR 80524 - Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, AL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...40136-1265-0000-S3] Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County...environmental assessment for Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). In...finalize the CCP process for Watercress Darter NWR. We started this process...

2010-12-22

15

Mush Creek Watershed, Dallas County and Lowndes County, Alabama.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The proposal is for the development of a watershed project in Dallas and Lowndes Counties, AL. This project includes an accelerated conservation land treatment program and the installation of floodwater retarding structures. The planned combination of con...

1973-01-01

16

Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in Jefferson County, Arkansas, 1991  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Office in Jefferson County, Arkansas. The number of withdrawal registrations for Jefferson County was 1,636 (1,227 groundwater and 409 surface water). Water with- drawals reported during the registration process total 5.64 Mgal/day (3.89 Mgal/d groundwater and 1.75 Mgal/d surface water) for agriculture and 197.49 Mgal/d (161.39 Mgal/d groundwater and 36.10 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The regis- tration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 132,667 acres of land to irrigate rice, sorghum, corn, soybeans, milo, cash grains, cotton, vegetables, and unknown crops as well as for the agricultural uses of animal aquaculture, crawfish, minnows, timber, and ducks. (USGS) {descriptors: *Water use, *Arkansas, *Jefferson County, Selective withdrawal, Groundwater, Surface water

Holland, T. W.; Manning, C. A.; Stafford, K. L.

1993-01-01

17

Health Care Needs of a Hispanic Population in Dane, Dodge, and Jefferson Counties.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the summer of 1976, 133 permanent residents in the Hispano community in Wisconsin's Dane, Dodge and Jefferson counties were interviewed to determine their perceptions of their own and their families' health needs and of their unmet health needs. Respondents were primarily women since it was felt they were the best informed about the family's…

Slesinger, Doris P.; And Others

18

77 FR 65843 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for Montgomery County, Alabama and Incorporated Areas  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...No. FEMA-B-1223] Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for Montgomery County, Alabama and Incorporated Areas AGENCY: Federal...issuance of a revised preliminary Flood Insurance Rate Map and Flood Insurance Study report....

2012-10-31

19

Alabama  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What can we learn about Alabama?s economy, bodies of water, population, and residents? First, use the Idea Wheel and label each section of the circle as the following: Population, Famous Alabamian, Economy, and Bodies of Water. Now go to Information on Economy and find out about Alabama's economy. Locate where it says "Agriculture " and " Industry." List in your Idea Wheel a few of the items that Alabama produces. Next, ...

Msblackmon

2012-04-05

20

Further Analysis of 22 Prehistoric Sites within the Teton Replacement Farmland, Snake River Plain, Jefferson County, Idaho.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Intensive surface collection and mapping were conducted on 22 previously recorded prehistoric sites in the proposed Teton Replacement Farmland in Jefferson County, Idaho. The work was conducted for Water and Power Resources Service so they may fulfill the...

W. M. McCallum

1981-01-01

21

Chemical quality of bottom sediments in selected streams, Jefferson County, Kentucky, April-July 1992  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Bottom sediments from 25 stream sites in Jefferson County, Ky., were analyzed for percent volatile solids and concentrations of nutrients, major metals, trace elements, miscellaneous inorganic compounds, and selected organic compounds. Statistical high outliers of the constituent concentrations analyzed for in the bottom sediments were defined as a measure of possible elevated concentrations. Statistical high outliers were determined for at least 1 constituent at each of 12 sampling sites in Jefferson County. Of the 10 stream basins sampled in Jefferson County, the Middle Fork Beargrass Basin, Cedar Creek Basin, and Harrods Creek Basin were the only three basins where a statistical high outlier was not found for any of the measured constituents. In the Pennsylvania Run Basin, total volatile solids, nitrate plus nitrite, and endrin constituents were statistical high outliers. Pond Creek was the only basin where five constituents were statistical high outliers-barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, and silver. Nitrate plus nitrite and copper constituents were the only statistical high outliers found in the Mill Creek Basin. In the Floyds Fork Basin, nitrate plus nitrite, phosphorus, mercury, and silver constituents were the only statistical high outliers. Ammonia was the only statistical high outlier found in the South Fork Beargrass Basin. In the Goose Creek Basin, mercury and silver constituents were the only statistical high outliers. Cyanide was the only statistical high outlier in the Muddy Fork Basin.

Moore, B. L.; Evaldi, R. D.

1995-01-01

22

Assessment of aquatic macroinvertebrate communities in the Autauga Creek watershed, Autauga County, Alabama, 2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Only four families within the Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera orders were found during a 1999 survey of aquatic macroinvertebrates in Autauga Creek, Autauga County, Alabama, by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management. The low number of taxa of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera families indicated that the aquatic macroinvertebrate community was in poor condition, and the creek was placed on the Alabama Department of Environmental Management 303(d) list. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in 2009 to provide data for the Alabama Department of Environmental Management and other water management agencies to re-evaluate aquatic macroinvertebrate communities in Autauga Creek to see if they meet Alabama Department of Environmental Management water-quality criteria. Aquatic macroinvertebrate communities were evaluated at three sites in the Autauga Creek watershed. Macroinvertebrates were sampled at two sites on Autauga Creek and one on Bridge Creek, the largest tributary to Autauga Creek. Water-quality field parameters were assessed at 11 sites. During the 2009 sampling, 12 families within the orders of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera were found at the Alabama Department of Environmental Management's assessment site whereas only four were found in 1999. The upstream site on Autauga Creek had consistently higher numbers of taxa than the Bridge Creek site and the lower site on Autauga Creek which is the Alabama Department of Environmental Management's assessment site. Chironomid richness was noticeably higher on the two Autauga Creek sites than the Bridge Creek site.

Mooty, Will S.; Gill, Amy C.

2011-01-01

23

Floods of July 1956 in Clarke County, Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A weak tropical disturbance formed just off the coast of Alabama on July 5, 1956. Moving inland over the southeastern part of the State, the storm produced heavy rains on the 7th and the morning of the 8th before it dissipated and moved out toward the north.

Peirce, L. B.

1957-01-01

24

Tin mineralization and related geology, Coosa County, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

The Alabama tin belt was studied to determine the relationship of the tin mineralization to the deformational history and igneous intrusives of the area. Studies included thin section modal analyses, polished section observations, biotite and feldspar mineral separate analyses, whole rock major- and minor-element analyses, quantitative Sn determination in rock and mineral samples, and electron-microprobe mineral analyses. (ACR)

Schrader, E.L.; Tull, J.F.; Stow, S.H.

1981-02-01

25

Waste Disposal Inventory for Mississippi-Alabama Coastal Counties.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this report is to determine the physical magnitudes of air, water, and solid waste pollution generated through the economic activities of the coastal region of Mississippi and Alabama. It is a joint effort undertaken by two separate study g...

E. Nissan D. C. Williams B. M. Brister R. G. Nelson W. E. Hardy

1980-01-01

26

Archeological Overview and Management Plan for the Coosa River Storage Annex, Talladega County, Alabama.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Coosa River Storage Annex, located in east central Alabama in Talladega County, is comprised of 2834 acres. The facility is a government-owned operation under the jurisdiction of the U. S. Army Depot System (DESCOM, a DARCOM sub-command). Its primary ...

D. H. Dye P. M. Quillian R. B. Meek

1984-01-01

27

A subsurface study of the North Frisco City field, Monroe County, Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 1991 discovery of the North Frisco City field has led to a resurgence of industry activity in the updip Jurassic trend of Monroe County, Alabama. Six wells in the field are presently delivering 6,000 BOPD and 5 MMJCFGP out of the Frisco City Sand Member of the lower Haynesville Formation. The North Frisco City field is a combination structural-stratigraphic

J. G. Cox; M. Harmount; L. Bruno

1993-01-01

28

Facies and reservoir characterization of an upper Smackover interval, East Barnett Field, Conecuh County, Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

Excellent production from an upper Smackover (Jurassic) ooid grainstone was established in April 1988 by Coastal Oil and Gas Corporation with the discovery of the East Barnett field in Conecuh County, Alabama. A structure map on the top of the Smackover Formation and net porosity isopach map of the producing intervals show that the trapping mechanism at the field has

G. R. Bergan; J. H. Hearne

1990-01-01

29

Location Approval Project S-681-K, Etowah County, Additional Bridge Across Coosa River Between Rainbow City and Southside, Alabama.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The proposed Project S-681-K, Etowah County Alabama, is more or less a bridge project across the Coosa River between Southside and Rainbow City. The project begins in Southside on Alabama State Route 77, 2100' south of the Coosa River and runs in a northe...

1973-01-01

30

Project S-681-K, Etowah County, Additional Bridge, Across Coosa River Between Rainbow City, and Southside, Alabama.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The proposed Project S-681-K, Etowah County Alabama, covers a bridge across the Coosa River between Southside and Rainbow City. The project begins in Southside on Alabama State Route 77, 2100' south of the Coosa River and runs in a northerly direction on ...

1972-01-01

31

Alabama Cave Shrimp ('Palaemonias alabamae') Recovery Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Alabama cave shrimp, Palaemonias alabamae Smalley, is an albinistic troglobitic (cave-dwelling) shrimp known from five caves (three cave systems or three groundwater basins) in Madison County, Alabama. A member of the shrimp family Atyidae, it is one ...

P. Hartfield T. R. Jacobson

1997-01-01

32

Cyclicity in Upper Mississippian Bangor Limestone, Blount County, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Mississippian (Chesterian) Bangor Limestone in Alabama consists of a thick, complex sequence of carbonate platform deposits. A continuous core through the Bangor on Blount Mountain in north-central Alabama provides the opportunity to analyze the unit for cyclicity and to identify controls on vertical facies sequence. Lithologies from the core represent four general environments of deposition: (1) subwave-base, open marine, (2) shoal, (3) lagoon, and (4) peritidal. Analysis of the vertical sequence of lithologies in the core indicates the presence of eight large-scale cycles dominated by subtidal deposits, but defined on the basis of peritidal caps. These large-scale cycles can be subdivided into 16 small-scale cycles that may be entirely subtidal but illustrate upward shallowing followed by rapid deepening. Large-scale cycles range from 33 to 136 ft thick, averaging 68 ft; small-scale cycles range from 5 to 80 ft thick and average 34 ft. Small-scale cycles have an average duration of approximately 125,000 years, which is compatible with Milankovitch periodicity. The large-scale cycles have an average duration of approximately 250,000 years, which may simply reflect variations in amplitude of sea level fluctuation or the influence of tectonic subsidence along the southeastern margin of the North American craton.

Bronner, R.L.

1988-01-01

33

Warm Springs Confederated Tribes: A Study of the Economic Impact on Jefferson County School District 509-J.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Jefferson County School District 509-J (Madras, Oregon), the Warm Springs Confederated Tribes, and selected community leaders cooperated in a 1979 study to determine the financial impact of the Warm Springs community on the district's budget and to provide reliable financial information for planning purposes. A task force gathered data dating…

Aitken, Donald; And Others

34

Jefferson County Public Schools. 1993-94 Annual Report to the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1988, the Jefferson County Public Schools, in Louisville (Kentucky), received an initial planning grant from the Program for Student Achievement of the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation to focus on three "highs" in education--high content, high expectations, and high support. The school district chose three middle schools to participate in this…

Jefferson County Public Schools, Louisville, KY.

35

A Community Response to a Crisis. The Effective Use of Detention and Alternatives to Detention in Jefferson County, Kentucky.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Jefferson County, Kentucky youth detention practices were studied after alleged incidents of physical and sexual abuse. For many years juvenile detention practices had been the subject of local controversy. Strict, objective, and specific criteria for detention were implemented on a trial basis. These criteria described specific crimes or…

Illinois Univ., Champaign. Community Research Center.

36

Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Facies characterization at Little Cedar Creek Field, Conecuh County, Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation is a shallow-marine carbonate unit in the subsurface of the U.S. Gulf Coast, spanning from south Texas to west Florida. This field case-study focuses on Little Cedar Creek Field located in southeastern Conecuh County, Alabama. The objectives of this study are to (1) construct a 3-D depositional model for the Smackover Formation at Little

John Grayson Ridgway

2010-01-01

37

Water availability and geology of Sumter County, Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geologic units that crop out in Sumter County include the Selma Group of Late Cretaceous age; the Midway and Wilcox Groups of Tertiary Age; and terrace deposits and alluvium of Quaternary age. The Tuscaloosa Group, consisting of the Coker and Gordo Formations, and Eutaw Formation of Late Cretaceous age underlie the entire county. The Cretaceous units dip southwestward about 45 feet per mile and strike northwestward. They consist chiefly of deposits of sand, gravel, chalk, and clay. Potential sources of large supplies of ground water are major aquifers in the Coker, Gordo, and Eutaw Formations; expected yields are 1.6 mgd (million gallons per day or more per well. The Naheola and Nanafalia formations, Tuscahome Sand, and terrace deposits and alluvium are expected to yield 10 to 50 gallons per minute per well.

Davis, Marvin E.; Sanford, Thomas H.; Jefferson, Patrick O.

1975-01-01

38

Estimation of peak-discharge frequency of urban streams in Jefferson County, Kentucky  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An investigation of flood-hydrograph characteristics for streams in urban Jefferson County, Kentucky, was made to obtain hydrologic information needed for waterresources management. Equations for estimating peak-discharge frequencies for ungaged streams in the county were developed by combining (1) long-term annual peakdischarge data and rainfall-runoff data collected from 1991 to 1995 in 13 urban basins and (2) long-term annual peak-discharge data in four rural basins located in hydrologically similar areas of neighboring counties. The basins ranged in size from 1.36 to 64.0 square miles. The U.S. Geological Survey Rainfall- Runoff Model (RRM) was calibrated for each of the urban basins. The calibrated models were used with long-term, historical rainfall and pan-evaporation data to simulate 79 years of annual peak-discharge data. Peak-discharge frequencies were estimated by fitting the logarithms of the annual peak discharges to a Pearson-Type III frequency distribution. The simulated peak-discharge frequencies were adjusted for improved reliability by application of bias-correction factors derived from peakdischarge frequencies based on local, observed annual peak discharges. The three-parameter and the preferred seven-parameter nationwide urban-peak-discharge regression equations previously developed by USGS investigators provided biased (high) estimates for the urban basins studied. Generalized-least-square regression procedures were used to relate peakdischarge frequency to selected basin characteristics. Regression equations were developed to estimate peak-discharge frequency by adjusting peak-dischargefrequency estimates made by use of the threeparameter nationwide urban regression equations. The regression equations are presented in equivalent forms as functions of contributing drainage area, main-channel slope, and basin development factor, which is an index for measuring the efficiency of the basin drainage system. Estimates of peak discharges for streams in the county can be made for the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year recurrence intervals by use of the regression equations. The average standard errors of prediction of the regression equations ranges from ? 34 to ? 45 percent. The regression equations are applicable to ungaged streams in the county having a specific range of basin characteristics.

Martin, Gary R.; Ruhl, Kevin J.; Moore, Brian L.; Rose, Martin F.

1997-01-01

39

Hydrologic and water-quality characterization and modeling of the Chenoweth Run basin, Jefferson County, Kentucky  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Rainfall, streamflow, and water-quality data collected in the Chenoweth Run Basin during February 1996?January 1998, in combination with the available historical sampling data, were used to characterize hydrologic conditions and to develop and calibrate a Hydrological Simulation Program?Fortran (HSPF) model for continuous simulation of rainfall, streamflow, suspended-sediment, and total-orthophosphate (TPO4) transport relations. Study results provide an improved understanding of basin hydrology and a hydrologic-modeling framework with analytical tools for use in comprehensive waterresource planning and management. Chenoweth Run Basin, encompassing 16.5 mi2 in suburban eastern Jefferson County, Kentucky, contains expanding urban development, particularly in the upper third of the basin. Historical water-quality problems have interfered with designated aquatic-life and recreation uses in the stream main channel (approximately 9 mi in length) and have been attributed to organic enrichment, nutrients, metals, and pathogens in urban runoff and wastewater inflows. Hydrologic conditions in Jefferson County are highly varied. In the Chenoweth Run Basin, as in much of the eastern third of the county, relief is moderately sloping to steep. Also, internal drainage in pervious areas is impeded by the shallow, fine-textured subsoils that contain abundant silts and clays. Thus, much of the precipitation here tends to move rapidly as overland flow and (or) shallow subsurface flow (interflow) to the stream channels. Data were collected at two streamflowgaging stations, one rain gage, and four waterquality- sampling sites in the basin. Precipitation, streamflow, and, consequently, constituent loads were above normal during the data-collection period of this study. Nonpoint sources contributed the largest portion of the sediment loads. However, the three wastewatertreatment plants (WWTP?s) were the source of the majority of estimated total phosphorus (TP) and TPO4 transport downstream from the WWTP?s. HSPF, a hydrologic model capable of simulating mixed-land-use basins, includes land surface, subsurface, and instream waterquantity- and water-quality-modeling components. The HSPF model was used to represent several important hydrologic features of the Chenoweth Run Basin including (1) numerous small lakes and ponds, through which approximately 25 percent of the basin drains; (2) potential seasonal ground-waterseepage losses in stream channels; (3) contributions from WWTP effluents and bypass flows; and (4) the transport and transformations of sediments and nutrients. The HSPF model was calibrated and verified for flow simulation on the basis of measured total, annual, seasonal, monthly, daily, hourly, and 5-minute-interval storm discharge data. The occurrence of numerous storms during the study period permitted a splitsample procedure to be used for a model verification on the basis of storm volumes and peaks. Total simulated and observed discharge during the model calibration period differed by approximately -5.4 percent at the upper gaging station and 3.1 percent at the lower station. The model results for the total and annual water balances were classified as very good on the basis of the calibration criteria reported in other modeling studies. The model had correlation coefficients ranging from 0.89 to 0.98 for hourly to monthly mean flows, respectively. The coefficients of model-fit efficiency for daily and monthly discharge simulations were near the excellent range (exceeding 0.97). However, the model was calibrated for a comparatively short 24-month period during which flows were above normal. Increased model error might be expected during an extended period of nearnormal flows. The model was calibrated for simulation of sediment and TPO4 transport. The simulated mean-annual load (over 24 months) ranged from -33 to -28 percent of the estimated sediment load and within +/- 1 percent of the estimated TPO4 load at the two streamflow-gaging s

Martin, Gary R.; Zarriello, Phillip J.; Shipp, Allison A.

2001-01-01

40

Digital Data Set of Orchards Where Arsenical Pesticides Were Likely Used in Clarke and Frederick Counties, Virginia, and Berkeley and Jefferson Counties, West Virginia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This Fact Sheet provides information on a digital data set that identifies orchard areas under cultivation between the 1920s and 1960s in Clarke and Frederick Counties, Virginia and Berkeley and Jefferson Counties, West Virginia. The apple orchards in these areas likely used arsenical pesticides during this time. The digital data set can be used in a geographic information system (GIS) to identify where elevated arsenic and lead concentrations may be present in soils. The digital data set, the associated metadata, and the related files are available on the World Wide Web at http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2006/1330/shapefile/.

Reed, Bradley W.; Larkins, Peter; Robinson, Gilpin R., Jr.

2006-01-01

41

Public health assessment for Resin Disposal Site, Jefferson Borough, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. Cerclis No. PAD063766828. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Resin Disposal is a National Priorities List (NPL) site located approximately one-half mile west of the town of West Elizabeth in Jefferson Borough, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. The landfill waste is chemically and physically heterogeneous but generally contains elevated concentrations of benzene, styrene, naphthalene and lead. Approximately 85,000 tons of waste were deposited in the landfill. Site soils, groundwater, surface water, sediment and seeps are contaminated with volatile organic compounds and other chemicals. The Resin Disposal site currently represents an indeterminate public health hazard since comprehensive data are not available for all environmental media to which humans may be exposed.

Not Available

1994-01-06

42

NASSP's Assessment Center: Practitioners Speak Out. Jefferson County School District, Birmingham, Ala.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The second in a series of articles on the NASSP Assessment Center for administrator evaluation and selection, this article sets forth the experiences administrators from Birmingham, Alabama, had with the center and their opinions of it. (JM)

Jones, Ron; And Others

1980-01-01

43

A subsurface study of the North Frisco City field, Monroe County, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

The 1991 discovery of the North Frisco City field has led to a resurgence of industry activity in the updip Jurassic trend of Monroe County, Alabama. Six wells in the field are presently delivering 6,000 BOPD and 5 MMJCFGP out of the Frisco City Sand Member of the lower Haynesville Formation. The North Frisco City field is a combination structural-stratigraphic trap associated with Paleozoic basement topography. A geological and geophysical exploration model for Haynesville production in Alabama was developed from existing subsurface and seismic control. The model predicted hydrocarbons generated from Smackover carbonates migrated through an incompetent or absent Buckner Anhydrite seal into the overlying Frisco City Sand. The Frisco City Sand is vertically sealed by overlying Haynesville shales and anhydrites. The sedimentary strata of the Frisco City Sand Member at North Frisco City field are interpreted to have accumulated as fluvial deposits. The predominant lithology is a coarse- to fine-grained sandstone deposited in a sandy braided-stream environment. The sandy braided-stream deposits occur in stacked fining-upward sequences and have excellent reservoir character. Some of these sequences are very gravel rich and may have accumulated in braided streams associated with alluvial fans. A nonconformity exists totally between the Jurassic sediments and the underlying crystalline metamorphic basement rock. A three-dimensional (3-D) seismic survey was acquired after the discovery well was drilled. The survey covered 8 mi[sup 2] of surface area with a bin size of 82.5 ft. This provided excellent structural control across the prospective area and resulted in better drilling decisions. Also, once 3-D acquisition was complete, the field was developed at an accelerated pace, which has had a positive impact on cash flow and field economics.

Stephanson, M.A.; Cox, J.G.; Harmount, M.; Bruno, L. (Paramount Petroleum Company, Inc., Jackson, MS (United States))

1993-09-01

44

Facies analysis, sea level history, and platform evolution of Jurassic Smackover Formation, Conecuh basin, Escambia County, Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Smackover Formation (Jurassic, Oxfordian) in the Conecuh basin, Escambia County, Alabama, is divided into six carbonate sedimentary facies. In approximate stratigraphic order, they are (1) intertidal algal mudstone, (2) basinal carbonate mudstone and calcareous shale, (3) graded slope packstone and wackestone, (4) Tubiphytes-bearing, slope debris-flow grainstone and packstone, (5) distal-ramp wackestone, and (6) shoal-produced oolitic grainstone. Facies correlation and

R. A. Jr. Esposito; D. T. Jr. King

1987-01-01

45

Early Nineteenth Century Consumer Preferences at the Mount Pleasant Site (46Jf215) Jefferson County, West Virginia: An Interpretation of a Rural Farmstead  

Microsoft Academic Search

At the turn of the nineteenth century, consumer preference for purchasable items among European Americans was being influenced by many factors including the Industrial Revolution, the ascendancy of Romanticism, Jeffersonian republicanism and by extension the Enlightenment. The Mount Pleasant Site (46Jf215) located in the Route 9 highway corridor of Jefferson County, West Virginia, was an extended Phase II excavation that

Michael A. Bednarchuk

46

Consumerism in the Late Eighteenth Century: The Treatment of Disposed Tobacco Pipes from the Mount Pleasant Site (46JF215) Jefferson County, West Virginia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Excavations at historic sites often result in the recovery of an abundance of white clay tobacco pipe fragments. There are several theories that explain why large quantities of stem fragments are recovered from sites; however, no systematic studies have been done to evaluate these theories. The 1999 cultural resources field investigation in Jefferson County, West Virginia uncovered a rural homestead,

Lauren J. Jagielski

47

Topics Project T 9017 (2) in Port Arthur, Ninth Avenue: From 17th Street, North to St. Mary's Hospital, Jefferson County, Texas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project consists of the widening of Ninth Avenue from 17th Street, North to St. Mary's Hospital in Jefferson County, Texas. A small tract of right of way will be needed from the St. Mary's Hospital property, but the hospital has no objections. All pos...

1971-01-01

48

Jefferson County Schools Reduce Teacher Segregation. Non-Teaching Staff Far From Singleton Goals. A Report on 1977-78 Assignments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this report, progress made since 1975 in the desegregation of faculty and staff of schools in Jefferson County, Kentucky, is described in light of the Singleton standard. Although overall progress towards teacher and administrator desegregation is evidenced, it is shown that black teachers are still significantly underutilized in the high…

Hamilton, Douglas

49

Environmental assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Big Hill facility storage of commercial crude oil project, Jefferson County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Big Hill SPR facility located in Jefferson County, Texas has been a permitted operating crude oil storage site since 1986 with benign environmental impacts. However, Congress has not authorized crude oil purchases for the SPR since 1990, and six storage caverns at Big Hill are underutilized with 70 million barrels of available storage capacity. On February 17, 1999, the Secretary of Energy offered the 70 million barrels of available storage at Big Hill for commercial use. Interested commercial users would enter into storage contracts with DOE, and DOE would receive crude oil in lieu of dollars as rental fees. The site could potentially began to receive commercial oil in May 1999. This Environmental Assessment identified environmental changes that potentially would affect water usage, power usage, and air emissions. However, as the assessment indicates, changes would not occur to a major degree affecting the environment and no long-term short-term, cumulative or irreversible impacts have been identified.

NONE

1999-03-01

50

Analysis of Landsat-4 Thematic Mapper data for classification of forest stands in Baldwin County, Alabama  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A computer-implemented classification has been derived from Landsat-4 Thematic Mapper data acquired over Baldwin County, Alabama on January 15, 1983. One set of spectral signatures was developed from the data by utilizing a 3x3 pixel sliding window approach. An analysis of the classification produced from this technique identified forested areas. Additional information regarding only the forested areas. Additional information regarding only the forested areas was extracted by employing a pixel-by-pixel signature development program which derived spectral statistics only for pixels within the forested land covers. The spectral statistics from both approaches were integrated and the data classified. This classification was evaluated by comparing the spectral classes produced from the data against corresponding ground verification polygons. This iterative data analysis technique resulted in an overall classification accuracy of 88.4 percent correct for slash pine, young pine, loblolly pine, natural pine, and mixed hardwood-pine. An accuracy assessment matrix has been produced for the classification.

Hill, C. L.

1984-01-01

51

Impervious Surface Assessment of the Towne Creek Watershed, Etowah County, Alabama  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A Geographic Information System (GIS) based approach was used to do a preliminary assessment of a watershed's vulnerability and has been proven to be a quick, inexpensive, and effective means to provide guidance to the watershed manager. This GIS-based approach was used in an assessment of a watershed's proportion of impervious surface as a quantifiable measurement its vulnerability. The percent of a watershed area that is impervious was determined by utilizing the Impervious Surface Analysis Tool (ISAT), which is an extension of the ArcGIS program. ISAT uses landuse/landcover, watershed boundary, and population density data sets to calculate the percent impervious surface (%IS). The Towne Creek watershed covers 24,730 acres in southern Etowah County, Alabama, was investigated. The watershed, which empties into the Middle Coosa River, includes the suburbs of the City of Gadsden. The watershed was delineated into 75 catchments ranging from 230 to 3,163 acres. Initial assessment of the watershed estimated 10.5% of the area is impervious. Individual catchments within the watershed were then classified as being degraded (>25 %IS), impaired (10 to 25 %IS) or protected (<10 %IS). According to this classification scheme, 5 catchments covering 2.6% of the watershed is classified as being degraded, and 5 catchments covering 3.6% of the watershed is impaired, and the remaining 65 catchments covering 93.8% of the watershed is protected.

Steffy, D. A.; Blalock, C.

2004-12-01

52

Facies and reservoir characterization of an upper Smackover interval, East Barnett Field, Conecuh County, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

Excellent production from an upper Smackover (Jurassic) ooid grainstone was established in April 1988 by Coastal Oil and Gas Corporation with the discovery of the East Barnett field in Conecuh County, Alabama. A structure map on the top of the Smackover Formation and net porosity isopach map of the producing intervals show that the trapping mechanism at the field has both structural and stratigraphic components. Two diamond cores were cut from 13,580 to 13,701 ft, beginning approximately 20 ft below the top of the Smackover. Two shallowing-upward sequences are identified in the cores. The first sequence starts at the base of the cored interval and is characterized by thick, subtidal algal boundstones capped by a collapse breccia facies. This entire sequence was deposited in the shallow subtidal to lower intertidal zone. Subsequent lowering of sea level exposed the top portion of the boundstones to meteoric or mixing zone waters, creating the diagenetic, collapse breccia facies. The anhydrite associated with the breccia also indicates surface exposure. The second sequence begins with algal boundstones that sharply overlie the collapse breccia facies of the previous sequence. These boundstones grade upward into high-energy, cross-bedded ooid beach ( ) and oncoidal, peloidal beach shoreface deposits. Proximity of the overlying Buckner anhydrite, representing a probable sabkha system, favors a beach or a very nearshore shoal interpretation for the ooid grainstones. The ooid grainstone facies, which is the primary producing interval, has measured porosity values ranging from 5.3% to 17.8% and averaging 11.0%. Measured permeability values range from 0.04 md to 701 md and average 161.63 md. These high porosity and permeability values result from abundant primary intergranular pore space, as well as secondary pore space created by dolomitization and dissolution of framework grains.

Bergan, G.R. (Reservoirs, Inc., Houston, TX (USA)); Hearne, J.H. (Coastal Oil and Gas Corp., Jackson, MS (USA))

1990-09-01

53

Effects of Potential Changes in Groundwater Withdrawals from the Sparta Aquifer on Water-Level Altitudes in Jefferson County, Arkansas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A groundwater-flow model of the Sparta aquifer was used to evaluate changes in water-level altitudes associated with the withdrawal of groundwater at varying rates from a well field near Pine Bluff, Arkansas, in Jefferson County. Water-level altitudes at three different model cell locations from five different scenarios for varying withdrawal rates from the well field were compared for the period 1998 to 2048. The three model cells used for the comparison were located (1) near the center of the well field, (2) near the center of the city of Pine Bluff (about 5 miles west of the center of the well field), and (3) about 15 miles north of the well field. Pumping rates at the well field were varied from 7.2 million gallons per day to 27 million gallons per day for the five scenarios analyzed, and water-level hydrographs were constructed for each scenario for each of the three model cell locations. Water-level altitudes near the center of the well field changed the most of the three model cell locations analyzed. Water-level altitudes were approximately 90 feet higher for the 7.2 million gallon per day scenario in 2048 compared to the baseline scenario of 25.4 million gallons per day. Whereas, water-level altitudes at the same location were 9 feet lower for the 27 million gallon per day scenario in 2048 compared to the baseline scenario.

Czarnecki, John B.

2009-01-01

54

Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Facies characterization at Little Cedar Creek Field, Conecuh County, Alabama  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation is a shallow-marine carbonate unit in the subsurface of the U.S. Gulf Coast, spanning from south Texas to west Florida. This field case-study focuses on Little Cedar Creek Field located in southeastern Conecuh County, Alabama. The objectives of this study are to (1) construct a 3-D depositional model for the Smackover Formation at Little Cedar Creek Field; (2) establish a sequence stratigraphic framework for the construction of the depositional model; (3) characterize and map lithofacies with high resource potential based on the depositional model; and (4) demonstrate the use of the depositional model to maximize hydrocarbon recovery in the field area. Little Cedar Creek Field is located near the up-dip limit of the Smackover Formation. The top of the Smackover is found at depths between 10,000 to 12,000 feet, and the formation ranges in thickness from 60 to 120 feet. The Smackover Formation overlies the Callovian-Oxfordian Norphlet Formation and underlies the Kimmeridgian Haynesville Formation. The petroleum reservoirs in Little Cedar Creek Field, unlike most Smackover fields in the eastern Gulf region, are composed predominantly of limestone, not dolomite, and do not possess a Buckner Anhydrite top seal immediately above the reservoir. Beginning from the top of the Smackover, the facies are: (S-1) Peritidal lime mudstone-wackestone; (S-2) tidal channel conglomeratic floatstone-rudstone; (S-3) peloid-ooid shoal grainstone-packstone; (S-4) subtidal lime wackestone-mudstone; (S-5) microbially-influenced packstone-wackestone; (S-6) microbial (thrombolite) boundstone; and (S-7) transgressive lime mudstone-dolostone. Production is from both the thrombolite boundstone and shoal grainstone facies, though pressure and fluid data indicate no communication between the two reservoirs. The data indicate that the microbial communities developed on subtle topographic highs overlying the transgressive lime mudstone-dolostone in a shallow-water, low-energy, hypersaline environment, parallel to the southwest-northeast trending paleoshoreline. The Conecuh Embayment, formed by the Conecuh and Pensacola Ridges to the northwest and southeast, respectively, created low-energy, tranquil conditions that promoted the development of these opportunistic microbial organisms.

Ridgway, John Grayson

55

Village Creek: An Architectural and Historical Resources Survey of the Village Creek Project Neighborhoods, City of Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A cultural resources survey conducted by the Birmingham Historical Society from April to June 1984 recorded 651 domestic dwellings and other structures in selected sections of the flood plain of Village Creek, a small tributary of the Black Warrior River ...

C. L. Hudgins M. L. White

1984-01-01

56

Informal Adoption in Black Families in Lowndes and Wilcox Counties, Alabama.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research deals with the legal, social and cultural contexts in which informal adoption of black children by adults takes place in rural south Alabama. A total of 306 parent surrogates were identified, interviewed and compared on the basis of 10 socioeconomic characteristics. Information was also collected on the number of children informally…

Jones, Lewis W.

57

Changes in ground-water quality resulting from surface coal mining of small watershed in Jefferson County, Ohio  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Two samples were collected from each of six wells in a small watershed in Jefferson County, Ohio, in 1984. The watershed was mined and reclamation begun in 1980. Data collected from 1976 through 1982 indicate that ground-water quality was still changing at that time. The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent ground-water quality continued to change 4 years after mining. The upper saturated zone was destroyed by mining and replaced by spoiled material during reclamation. A new saturated zone then formed in the spoils material. The premining median concentrations of sulfate, manganese, and dissolved solids in the upper saturated zone were 84 milligrams per liter (mg/L). 30 micrograms per liter (?g/L), and 335 mg/L, respectively. The postmining median concentrations of these constituents in the upper-zone wells disturbed by mining were 360 mg/L, 595 ?g/L, and 814 mg/L, respectively. Concentrations of these constituents were still increasing in 1984 in the upper saturated zone. In the area not disturbed by mining, concentrations have remained nearly at premining levels. The premining median concentrations of sulfate, manganese, and dissolved solids in the middle saturated zone were 47 mg/L, 10 ?g/L and 405 mg/L, respectively. The postmining median concentrations were 390 mg/L, 490 ?g/L, and 959 mg/L, respectively. In the middle saturated zone, concentrations of these constituents also were still increasing in 1984, probably due to mixing with water if the upper saturated zone.

Hren, Janet

1986-01-01

58

Hydrogeologic framework, groundwater movement, and water budget in the Chimacum Creek basin and vicinity, Jefferson County, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents information used to characterize the groundwater flow system in the Chimacum Creek basin. It includes descriptions of the geology and hydrogeologic framework; groundwater recharge and discharge; groundwater levels and flow directions; seasonal fluctuations in groundwater level; interactions between aquifers and the surface-water system; and a groundwater budget. The study area covers 124 square miles in northeastern Jefferson County, Washington, and includes the Chimacum Creek basin, which drains an area of about 37 square miles. The area is underlain by a north-thickening sequence of unconsolidated glacial and interglacial deposits that overlie sedimentary and igneous bedrock units that crop out along the margins and western interior of the study area. Six hydrogeologic units consisting of unconsolidated aquifers and confining units, along with an underlying bedrock unit, were identified. A surficial hydrogeologic map was developed and used with well information from 187 drillers' logs to construct 4 hydrogeologic sections, and maps showing the extent and thickness of the units. Natural recharge was estimated using precipitation-recharge relation regression equations developed for western Washington, and estimates were calculated for return flow from data on domestic indoor and outdoor use and irrigated agriculture. Results from synoptic streamflow measurements and water table elevations determined from monthly measurements at monitoring wells are presented and compared with those from a study conducted during 2002-03. A water budget was calculated comprising long-term average recharge, domestic public-supply withdrawals and return flow, self-supplied domestic withdrawals and return flow, and irrigated agricultural withdrawals and return flow.

Jones, Joseph L.; Welch, Wendy B.; Frans, Lonna M.; Olsen, Theresa D.

2011-01-01

59

Public health assessment for Redwing Carriers Inc. /Saraland, Saraland, Mobile County, Alabama, Region 4. Cerclis No. ALD980844385. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Redwing Carriers, Inc.,/ Saraland Apartment site is located at 527 U.S. Highway 43 in the City of Saraland, Mobile County, Alabama. Redwing Carriers, Inc. owned and operated a trucking terminal used for parking, maintaining, and cleaning trucks and trailers. Redwing transported a variety of substances including asphalt, diesel fuel, chemicals, and pesticides. The operation began in 1961 and continued until 1971. Redwing emptied residue from cleaning the trucks into pits and surrounding ditches at the site. Investigations since then have revealed on-site contamination of soil and groundwater. Contaminants of concern include volatile organic compounds, heavy metals, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and pesticides. The Redwing Carriers/Saraland Apartments site is categorized as a public health hazard based on potential for skin irritation and exposure to benzo(a)pyrene and other PAHs from the ingestion of 5 grams per day of tar-like material by pica children at the site.

Not Available

1994-02-23

60

Jefferson's Blood  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This companion Website to the recent broadcast of the Frontline documentary "Jefferson's Blood" is unusually rich in content, perhaps because it was used post-airing to feature Frontline's presence on the Web. Exploring the history and current controversy over Jefferson's longtime relationship with his slave and mistress Sally Hemings, the site features video excerpts from the broadcast; extended documentation of the DNA debate over Jefferson's extant ancestry; memoirs of four of Jefferson's slaves; essays and interviews from well-known Jefferson scholars, such as Joseph Ellis and Annette Gordon-Reed; discussions by sociologists, historians, and journalists of the nation's historical response to mixed ancestry and its threat to the white mystique; annotated links to premium Jefferson Websites; a teacher's guide; and a good deal more. The site admirably confirms that, when it comes to the question of race in America, there are few historical narratives more telling or more complicated than the one Thomas Jefferson wrote in his own blood.

61

Digital Data Set of Orchards Where Arsenical Pesticides Were Likely Used in Clarke and Frederick Counties, Virginia, and Berkeley and Jefferson Counties, West Virginia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This data set shows orchard locations in Clarke and Frederick Counties, Virginia and Berkeley and Jefferson Counties, West Virginia where arsenical pesticides were likely used. The orchard locations are based on air photos and topographic maps prepared using information from the time period of extensive use of arsenical pesticides between the 1920s and 1960s. An orchard's presence in this data set does not necessarily indicate the use of arsenical pesticides on the site or that elevated arsenic and metal concentrations are present. Arsenical pesticides may have been used on part, or none, of the land and, under current land use, the land may have been remediated and no longer contain elevated arsenic and metal concentrations in soil. The data set was created to be used in an assessment of soil contamination related to past use of arsenical pesticides in orchards in the northern part of the Great Valley region, Virginia and West Virginia. Previous studies have documented that elevated concentrations of arsenic, lead, and sometimes copper occur in the soils of former apple orchards (Veneman et al., 1983; Jones and Hatch, 1937). Arsenical pesticide use was most extensive and widespread in agricultural applications from the 1920s to the late 1950s, and largely ceased agricultural use by the early 1960s in the nation. During this time period, lead arsenate was the most extensively used arsenical pesticide (Peryea, 1998), particularly in apple orchards. Other metal-bearing pesticides, such as copper acetoarsenite (Paris Green), Bordeaux Blue (a mixture of copper sulfate and calcium hydroxide), and organic mercury fumigants were used to a lesser degree in orchards (Peryea, 1998; Shepard, 1939; Veneman et al., 1983). During the time arsenical pesticides were extensively used, federal and state pesticide laws did not require farmers to keep accurate records of the quantity, location, and type of arsenical pesticides used on their property, thus the quantity and distribution of this past arsenical pesticide use is not known in the region. Based on estimates from other areas (D'Angelo et al., 1996), cumulate application over the period of arsenical pesticide use may have been as much as 22.4 g/m2 of arsenic and 100 g/m2 of lead in orchard areas. In minimally disturbed orchard soils, arsenic and lead are largely retained in the top few centimeters of the soil horizon; intra-soil redistribution of these metals occurs but appears to be limited (Veneman et al. 1983; Peryea, 1998). Surface concentrations of arsenic and lead in undisturbed orchard soils where arsenical pesticides were used commonly exceed 20 mg/kg As and 100 mg/kg Pb (Veneman et al., 1983; Jones and Hatch, 1937). The digital data set of orchard locations was used to aid assessment of the likely occurrence and distribution of arsenical pesticide residues in surface soils. Most areas of orchard cultivation were sited in areas overlying carbonate bedrock in the Valley and Ridge province. This data set needed to be created since there was no reliable and complete land cover data set identifying areas under orchard cultivation during the time period of extensive use of arsenical pesticides in the study area as of the time of the study. The spatial database of orchard areas was compiled using twenty-seven USGS 7.5 minute series topographical maps covering the study area of Clarke and Frederick Counties, Virginia, and Berkeley and Jefferson Counties, West Virginia. These maps were published between 1943 and 1972 at 1:24,000 scale, with the oldest topographic map available from the US Geological Survey map archive for each area being chosen, going back only as far as the 1920s when use of arsenical pesticides started. Orchard areas on the topographic maps were traced in order to aid in the digitization of the sites. The topographic maps were then scanned and geographically referenced using ERDAS Imagine version 8.7, a raster editing program, turning them into rectifi

Reed, Bradley W.; Larkins, Peter; Robinson, Gilpin R., Jr.

2006-01-01

62

Thomas Jefferson  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In celebration of its Bicentennial, the Library of Congress presents this Website (and a large number of other programs). The online preview of the Jefferson exhibition examines Jefferson's intellectual development, using his own writings, supplemented by all manner of related items from the Library's collections. A draft fragment of the Declaration of Independence, letters Jefferson wrote, and his drawing of his own gravestone and epitaph are accompanied by images such as (his father) Peter Jefferson's 1755 Map of Virginia and an oil painting, "Congress Voting the Declaration of Independence."

63

WILCOX COUNTY, ALABAMA--A STUDY OF SOCIAL, ECONOMIC, AND EDUCATIONAL BANKRUPTCY. REPORT OF AN INVESTIGATION.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE REQUEST FOR THIS INVESTIGATION BY THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE OF THE NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION COMMISSION ON PROFESSIONAL RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES RESULTED FROM THE FIRING OF NINE NEGRO TEACHERS IN WILCOX COUNTY. THE STUDY ITSELF IS MORE INCLUSIVE, INCORPORATING THE FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS OF SEPARATE STUDIES IN POVERTY, SCHOOL FINANCE,…

BROADUS, JAMES; AND OTHERS

64

77 FR 11533 - Anniston PCB Superfund Site, Anniston, Calhoun County, Alabama; Notice of Amended Settlement  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...CERCLA-04-2012-3763; FRL 9637-7] Anniston PCB Superfund Site, Anniston, Calhoun County...past response costs concerning the Anniston PCB Superfund Site located in Anniston, Calhoun...Submit your comments by Site name Anniston PCB by one of the following methods:...

2012-02-27

65

Mineralogy and paragenesis of the McAllister Sn-Ta-bearing pegmatite, Coosa County, Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The McAllister Sn-Ta deposit (Alabama) is localized in a complex pegmatite that contains large zones of mineralized late-stage replacement-type saccharoidal albite and nearly monomineralic muscovite 'greisen-like' pipes. The dyke is at least 450 m long and averages approximately 9 m in thickness. At least two 'greisen-like' pipes, as much as 7.6 m by 4.5 m in cross-section and extending at least 76 m down a steep easterly pitch, occur near the center of the dyke. The dyke is hosted by an approximately 300-Ma-old pluton of a group referred to as the Rockford Granite, a mesozonal to epizonal two-mica, peraluminous tin-bearing granite. The pluton is genetically affiliated with a well-defined sequence of simple to complex pegmatite dykes and quartz-casiterite veins that occur near its margin and within the immediately adjacent metasedimentary rocks of the Wedowee Group.

Foord, Eugene, E.; Cook, Robert, B.

1989-01-01

66

A spatial resolution threshold of land cover in estimating terrestrial carbon sequestration in four counties in Georgia and Alabama, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Changes in carbon density (i.e., carbon stock per unit area) and land cover greatly affect carbon sequestration. Previous studies have shown that land cover change detection strongly depends on spatial scale. However, the influence of the spatial resolution of land cover change information on the estimated terrestrial carbon sequestration is not known. Here, we quantified and evaluated the impact of land cover change databases at various spatial resolutions (250 m, 500 m, 1 km, 2 km, and 4 km) on the magnitude and spatial patterns of regional carbon sequestration in four counties in Georgia and Alabama using the General Ensemble biogeochemical Modeling System (GEMS). Results indicated a threshold of 1 km in the land cover change databases and in the estimated regional terrestrial carbon sequestration. Beyond this threshold, significant biases occurred in the estimation of terrestrial carbon sequestration, its interannual variability, and spatial patterns. In addition, the overriding impact of interannual climate variability on the temporal change of regional carbon sequestration was unrealistically overshadowed by the impact of land cover change beyond the threshold. The implications of these findings directly challenge current continental- to global-scale carbon modeling efforts relying on information at coarse spatial resolution without incorporating fine-scale land cover dynamics.

Zhao, S. Q.; Liu, S.; Li, Z.; Sohl, T. L.

2010-01-01

67

Comparison of NLCD with NWI Classifications of Baldwin and Mobile Counties, Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An assessment of the accuracy of National Land Cover Data 2001 as compared to National Wetlands Inventory mapping of Mobile and Baldwin Counties conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Wetlands Research Center (NWRC). Both classifications were checked against stratified randomly selected ground-based sites and with each other to compare the accuracy of the NLCD with NWI classification methods. For this accuracy comparison, numerous visits were made by photointerpreters to the Mobile Bay area to establish signatures for the modified NWI mapping. After all of the quadrangles in Baldwin and Mobile Counties were mapped, an accuracy assessment of those maps was conducted by field-checking the mapped classes with ground-based check sites. These same sites were used to check the accuracy of the NLCD and also as the basis for cross-walking the NLCD and NWI classification systems for direct comparison of the two methods. This accuracy assessment is dependent on a methodology and analysis developed for the unique characteristics and properties of NWI classification, which is mapped to polygon, as compared to NLCD, which uses raster classification and mapping. This cartographic presentation results in fundamentally different classification boundaries. Overlaying these map types cannot prevent boundary differences resulting in a tremendous proliferation of sliver polygons. The intersection of both maps resulted in three-quarters of a million polygons, nearly half of which were less than the 900-m2 pixel size used in NLCD mapping (the smaller of the minimum mapping units of NWI and NLCD versus NWI mapping was about 0.5 ha). It is the authors' opinion that this cartographic difference needs to be more fully explored before accepting the accuracy difference between NWI and NLCD presented here at face value.

Handley, Larry; Wells, Chris

2009-01-01

68

Age and source of water in springs associated with the Jacksonville Thrust Fault Complex, Calhoun County, Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water from wells and springs accounts for more than 90 percent of the public water supply in Calhoun County, Alabama. Springs associated with the Jacksonville Thrust Fault Complex are used for public water supply for the cities of Anniston and Jacksonville. The largest ground-water supply is Coldwater Spring, the primary source of water for Anniston, Alabama. The average discharge of Coldwater Spring is about 32 million gallons per day, and the variability of discharge is about 75 percent. Water-quality samples were collected from 6 springs and 15 wells in Calhoun County from November 2001 to January 2003. The pH of the ground water typically was greater than 6.0, and specific conductance was less than 300 microsiemens per centimeter. The water chemistry was dominated by calcium, carbonate, and bicarbonate ions. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of the water samples indicates the occurrence of a low-temperature, water-rock weathering reaction known as silicate hydrolysis. The residence time of the ground water, or ground-water age, was estimated by using analysis of chlorofluorocarbon, sulfur hexafluoride, and regression modeling. Estimated ground-water ages ranged from less than 10 to approximately 40 years, with a median age of about 18 years. The Spearman rho test was used to identify statistically significant covariance among selected physical properties and constituents in the ground water. The alkalinity, specific conductance, and dissolved solids increased as age increased; these correlations reflect common changes in ground-water quality that occur with increasing residence time and support the accuracy of the age estimates. The concentration of sodium and chloride increased as age increased; the correlation of these constituents is interpreted to indicate natural sources for chloride and sodium. The concentration of silica increased as the concentration of potassium increased; this correlation, in addition to the isotopic data, is evidence that silicate hydrolysis of clay minerals occurred. The geochemical modeling program NETPATH was used to investigate possible mixing scenarios that could yield the chemical composition of water collected from springs associated with the Jacksonville Thrust Fault Complex. The results of NETPATH modeling suggest that the primary source of water in Coldwater Spring is a deep aquifer, and only small amounts of rainwater from nearby sources are discharged from the spring. Starting with Piedmont Sports Spring and moving southwest along a conceptual ground-water flow path that parallels the Jacksonville Thrust Fault Complex, NETPATH simulated the observed water quality of each spring, in succession, by mixing rainwater and water from the spring just to the northeast of the spring being modeled. The percentage of rainwater and ground water needed to simulate the quality of water flowing from the springs ranged from 1 to 25 percent rainwater and 75 to 99 percent ground water.

Robinson, James L.

2004-01-01

69

Flood of June 14-15, 1990, in Belmont, Jefferson, and Harrison counties, Ohio, with emphasis on Pipe and Wegee Creek basins near Shadyside  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A series of violent thunderstorms caused severe floods and consequent damage in the central part of Ohio during June 14-15, 1990. The eastern part of the State, particularly Belmont, Harrison, and Jefferson Counties, sustained the most damage. In the Pipe and Wegee Creek basins near Shadyside, Belmont County, at least 24 people died and property damage exceeded $10 million. An indirect measurement of discharge on Pipe Creek made near the mouth, indicates a peak discharge of 15,000 ft? /s (cubic feet per second) for the drainage area of 11.3 mi? (square miles) and a unit discharge of 1,330 (ft? /s)/mi? (cubic feet per second per square mile). The recurrence interval for this peak discharge is greater than 100 years. An indirect measurement of discharge of Wegee Creek, made 3 miles upstream from the mouth, indicates a peak discharge of 2,200 (ft? /s) /mi? . The recurrence interval for this peak discharge also is greater than 100 years. Longitudal water-surface profiles showed depths ranging from 7 ft. to 22 ft. The severity of flooding was highly variable. For example, the recurrence interval of the peak discharge at one U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging station was only 2 years, whereas the recurrence interval for the peak discharge was greater than 100 years at another gaging station about 22 miles away.

Shindel, H. L.

1991-01-01

70

Streamflow, water-quality, and biological conditions in the Big Black Creek basin, St. Clair County, Alabama, 1997  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 1997 synoptic streamflow, water-quality, and biological investi- gations in the Big Black Creek Basin were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the City of Moody, St. Clair County, and the Birmingham Water Works Board. Data obtained during these synoptic investigations provide a one-time look at the streamflow and water-quality conditions in the Big Black Creek Basin during a stable, base-flow period when streamflow originated only from ground-water discharge. These data were used to assess the degree of water-quality degradation in the Big Black Creek Basin from land-use activities in the basin, including leakage of leachate from the Acmar Regional Land- fill. Biological data from the benthic invertebrate community investigation provided an assessment of the cumulative effects of stream conditions on organisms in the basin. The synoptic measurement of streamflow at 28 sites was made during a period of baseflow on August 27, 1997. Two stream reaches above the landfill lost water to the ground-water system, but those below the landfill had significantly higher ground-water gains. If significant leakage of leachate from the landfill had occurred during the measurement period, the distribution of ground-water discharge suggests that leachate would travel relatively short distances before resurfacing as ground-water discharge to the stream. Benthic invertebrate communities were sampled at four sites in the Big Black Creek Basin during July 16-17, 1997. Based on Alabama Department of Environmental Management criteria and on comparison with a nearby unimparied reference site, the benthic invertebrate communities at the sites sampled were considered unimpaired or only slightly impaired during the sample period. This would imply that landfill and coal-mining activities did not have a detrimental effect on the benthic invertebrate communities at the time of the study. Synoptic water-column samples were collected at nine sites on Big Black Creek and its tributaries at the same time that the synoptic streamflow measurements were made. Trace-element and organic compound concentrations in the stream water were below established water-quality standards and criteria for the State of Alabama, with the exception of secondary (aesthetic) drinking-water levels for iron and manganese. Oil and grease concentrations detected in bed sediments were below the corrective action limit of 100 milligrams per kilogram. No significant increases in chloride, specific conductance, total dissolved solids, oil and grease, color, or biochemical oxygen demand were observed at sites downgradient from the landfill. Ground-water samples were collected from three drive-point wells in the vicinity of the landfill. These samples were analyzed for a suite of volatile organic compounds. The solvent 1,1-dichloroethane (the same solvent detected in the ground-water monitoring system at the landfill) was detected in a sample from a drive-point well downgradient from the landfill--an indication of the potential risk of landfill-derived contamination migrating toward Big Black Creek. No distinguishing trend or pattern of contamination was identified that could be attributed solely to landfill activities. Landfill activities did not appear to contribute significant contamination to Big Black Creek during these streamflow conditions. Any contaminant contribution from coal-mining activities in the basin may have served to mask any leachate contributions from the landfill; however, the overall effects on stream water and benthic intervebrate communities apparently were only minimal.

Journey, Celeste A.; Clark, Amy E.; Stricklin, Victor E.

1998-01-01

71

Assessment of water-quality conditions in the J.B. Converse Lake watershed, Mobile County, Alabama, 1990-98  

USGS Publications Warehouse

J.B. Converse (Converse) Lake is a 3,600-acre, tributary-storage reservoir in Mobile County, southwestern Alabama. The lake serves as the primary drinking-water supply for the city of Mobile. The Converse Lake watershed lies within the Coastal Plain Physiographic Province. Semiconsolidated to unconsolidated sediments of sand, silt, gravel, and clay underlie the watershed, and are covered by acidic soils. Land use in the watershed is mainly forest (64 percent) and agriculture (31 percent). Residential and commercial development account for only 1 percent of the total land use in the watershed. Converse Lake receives inflow from seven major tributaries. The greatest inflows are from Big Creek, Crooked Creek, and Hamilton Creek that had mean annual streamflows of 72.2, 19.4, and 25.0 cubic feet per second, respectively, for the period 1990 to 1998, which represents about 72 percent of the total annual streamflow to the lake. The total mean annual inflow to the lake is estimated to be about 163 cubic feet per second. In general, water quality in Converse Lake and its tributaries meets the criteria established by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) for drinking-water supplies, whole-body contact, and aquatic life. The exceptions include acidic pH levels, iron and manganese levels above secondary or aesthetic criteria, and fecal bacterial levels in some tributaries above whole-body contact (swimmable) criteria. The pH levels throughout the watershed were commonly below the criteria level of 6.0, but this appears to have been a naturally occurring phenomenon caused by poorly buffered soil types, resistant sediments, and forested land use. Median iron and manganese levels were above aesthetic criteria levels of 300 and 50 micrograms per liter, respectively, in some tributaries. All tributary sites in the Converse Lake watershed had median and minimum dissolved-oxygen concentrations above the ADEM criteria level of 5 milligrams per liter except for Boggy Branch, which had a minimum dissolved-oxygen concentration of 3.7 milligrams per liter. The degree to which nutrient contributions from tributaries were causing nutrient enrichment and eutrophication in Converse Lake was assessed. Trend analysis detected little or no change in nutrient concentrations at the tributary and lake sites in the Converse Lake watershed from the 1991 to 1998 water years. Nutrient concentrations at most tributary sites exhibited a significant, positive relation with streamflow that indicated the dominant source of nutrient input to the watershed is from nonpoint contributions. From 1990 to 1998, computed mean annual loads of 75,400 kilograms of total nitrogen, 36,950 kilograms of total Kjeldahl nitrogen, 28,870 kilograms of total inorganic nitrogen, and 3,480 kilograms of total phosphorus were contributed to the lake by Big Creek, Hamilton Creek, and Crooked Creek combined. These mean annual loads of nutrients corresponded to borderline eutrophic/mesotrophic conditions in the lake. Of the combined loads, 62 percent of the total nitrogen, 70 percent of the total Kjeldahl nitrogen, 54 percent of the total inorganic nitrogen, and 47 percent of the total phosphorus originated from the forested subbasin of Big Creek. The more residential and agricultural subbasins of Crooked Creek and Hamilton Creek, however, yielded over twice the total phosphorus load per hectare of land use. Crooked and Hamilton Creek subbasins also had higher yields of the more bioavailable total inorganic nitrogen. A simplistic empirical model could not explain the relation between year-to-year nutrient contributions to Converse Lake from the tributaries and the lake's ability to assimilate those contributions. The potential presence of pathogens in the lake and its tributaries was assessed based on fecal bacterial concentrations. Fecal bacterial concentrations at some tributary sites were above existing criteria for swimmable uses. Contributions of fecal bacte

Journey, Celeste A.; Gill, Amy C.

2001-01-01

72

Reservoir characterization, three-dimensional geological modeling, and reservoir simulation of North Blowhorn Creek Oil Field, Lamar County, Alabama  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

North Blowhorn Creek Oil Field is located in northeastern Lamar County, Alabama. The field was unitized and a water flood project started in 1983. In 1992, a microbial permeability profile modification project began as a result of continued declining production. The original oil in place was estimated to be 16 million barrels. The Carter sandstone lies within the Carter interval which is underlain by the Bangor Limestone and is overlain by the Millerella limestone. The depositional model proposed interprets the Carter sandstone, at North Blowhorn Creek Field, as a delta-destructive barrier island spit complex characterized by spit accretion and later drowned and covered by open shelf deposits. Eight facies were identified within the Carter interval from describing 20 well cores. The Carter is an elongate sand body that trends northwest to southeast. The primary reservoir facies is the foreshore/upper shoreface facies. The trapping mechanism is stratigraphic. Reservoir characterization and modeling of the Carter sandstone has the potential to improve field-scale reservoir management. Resistivity logs were used to identify reservoir rocks in wells without core. 3-D modeling shows the heterogeneous nature of the reservoir facies. Heterogeneities within the reservoir reduce waterflood sweep efficiency across the main axis of the reservoir in the field. Flow is also restricted along the axis of the sand body due in part to spit accretion. The purpose of this study was to integrate 3-D geologic modeling, decline curve and type curve analysis and reservoir simulation to characterize the geology, geometry and flow characteristics of North Blowhorn Creek Oil Field in an effort to provide a reservoir management strategy to increase the ultimate recovery from the field. Decline curve analysis was performed for all production wells to calculate an estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) and amount of remaining reserves for each well. Type curve analysis was performed in an effort to characterize the effectiveness of the water flood and MPPM projects. A reservoir simulation was performed based on the 3-D geologic model that was constructed in a previous study. The simulation work was an effort to find areas of remaining reserves and validate the geologic model.

Panetta, Brian

73

Subsurface geology of southwest Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

A subsurface study of SW. Alabama was undertaken to evaluate the petroleum potential of the region and to provide structural information to assist in the development of the subsurface resources of Baldwin, Clarke, Escambia, Mobile, Monroe, Washington and parts of Choctaw, Conecuh, Marengo, and Wilcox counties. Exploration for oil and gas in SW. Alabama was intensified after the discovery of

1971-01-01

74

WEST FRONT; STATUE ON STEPS IS THOMAS JEFFERSON (PLACED THERE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

WEST FRONT; STATUE ON STEPS IS THOMAS JEFFERSON (PLACED THERE IN 1927); FLANKING BRONZE STATUES DEPICT "THE GREAT RIVERS," THE MISSOURI AND THE MISSISSIPPI; FIGURE OF CERES, GODDESS OF GRAIN TOPS DOME (PLACED THERE IN SEPTEMBER, 1916) - Missouri State Capitol, High Street between Broadway & Jefferson Streets, Jefferson City, Cole County, MO

75

1. WEST FRONT; STATUE ON STEPS IS THOMAS JEFFERSON (PLACED ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. WEST FRONT; STATUE ON STEPS IS THOMAS JEFFERSON (PLACED THERE IN 1927); FLANKING BRONZE STATUES DEPICT 'THE GREAT RIVERS,' THE MISSOURI AND THE MISSISSIPPI; FIGURE OF CERES, GODDESS OF GRAIN TOPS DOME (PLACED THERE IN SEPTEMBER, 1916) - Missouri State Capitol, High Street between Broadway & Jefferson Streets, Jefferson City, Cole County, MO

76

Drinking-water quality and variations in water levels in the fractured crystalline-rock aquifer, west-central Jefferson County, Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In parts of Jefferson County, CO, water for domestic use from the fractured crystalline-rock aquifer contained excessive concentrations of major ions, coliform bacteria, trace elements, or radiochemicals. Based on results of analyses from 26 wells, water from 21 of the wells contained excessive concentrations of one or more constituents. Drinking water standards were exceeded for fluoride in water from 2 wells, nitrate plus nitrite in 2 wells, dissolved solids in 1 well, iron in 6 wells, manganese in 8 wells, zinc in 2 wells, coliform bacteria in 4 wells, gross alpha radiation in 11 wells and possibly 4 more, and gross beta radiation possibly in 1 well. Local variations in concentrations of 15 chemical constituents, specific conductance, and water temperature were statistically significant. Specific conductance increased significantly during 1973-75 only in the vicinity of Indian Hills. Annual range in depths to water in 11 observation wells varied from 1 to 15 feet. The shallowest water levels were recorded in late winter, usually in February. The deepest water levels occurred during summer or fall, depending on the well and the year. Three-year trends in water level changes in 6 of the 11 wells indicated decreasing water storage in the aquifer. (USGS).

Hall, Dennis C.; Johnson, Carl J.

1979-01-01

77

Continuous hydrologic simulation of runoff for the Middle Fork and South Fork of the Beargrass Creek basin in Jefferson County, Kentucky  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Hydrological Simulation Pro-gram-FORTRAN (HSPF) was applied to an urban drainage basin in Jefferson County, Ky to integrate the large amounts of information being collected on water quantity and quality into an analytical framework that could be used as a management and planning tool. Hydrologic response units were developed using geographic data and a K-means analysis to characterize important hydrologic and physical factors in the basin. The Hydrological Simulation Program FORTRAN Expert System (HSPEXP) was used to calibrate the model parameters for the Middle Fork Beargrass Creek Basin for 3 years (June 1, 1991, to May 31, 1994) of 5-minute streamflow and precipitation time series, and 3 years of hourly pan-evaporation time series. The calibrated model parameters were applied to the South Fork Beargrass Creek Basin for confirmation. The model confirmation results indicated that the model simulated the system within acceptable tolerances. The coefficient of determination and coefficient of model-fit efficiency between simulated and observed daily flows were 0.91 and 0.82, respectively, for model calibration and 0.88 and 0.77, respectively, for model confirmation. The model is most sensitive to estimates of the area of effective impervious land in the basin; the spatial distribution of rain-fall; and the lower-zone evapotranspiration, lower-zone nominal storage, and infiltration-capacity parameters during recession and low-flow periods. The error contribution from these sources varies with season and antecedent conditions.

Jarrett, G. Lynn; Downs, Aimee C.; Grace-Jarrett, Patricia A.

1998-01-01

78

40 CFR 81.267 - Southeast Alabama Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Alabama: Barbour County, Coffee County, Covington County, Dale County, Geneva County, Henry County, Houston...

2013-07-01

79

FLORIDA HAZARDOUS WASTE AND SANITARY LANDFILL REPORT, COUNTY DATA. GENERATOR DATA AND CHARACTERISTICS OF SANITARY LANDFILLS. PART 5. COUNTIES: HILLSBOROUGH, HOLMES, INDIAN RIVER, JACKSON, JEFFERSON, LAFAYETTE  

EPA Science Inventory

The report provides data on the use of sanitary landfills (Subtitle D facilities) for hazardous waste disposal in Florida by small quantity generators. It consists of eleven parts including a part called Study Area Data which contains the data aggregated across the counties cover...

80

Age and Source of Water in Springs Associated with the Jacksonville Thrust Fault Complex, Calhoun County, Alabama.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the results of a study performed by the USGS, in cooperation with the Water Works and Sewer Board of the City of Anniston, Alabama, to determine the age and source of water to springs associated with the Jacksonville Thrust Fault Com...

J. L. Robinson

2004-01-01

81

Jefferson Lecture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The 29th Annual Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities, which featured acclaimed Civil War historian James McPherson, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Battle Cry of Freedom (1988) and several other notable works on Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War. The site features the full text of McPherson's engaging lecture, entitled, "For a Vast Future Also: Lincoln and the Millennium." In addition, the site offers a brief biography and appreciation of McPherson, an interview, book excerpts, and a bibliography.

Mcpherson, James M.

2000-01-01

82

Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) is a user facility for scientists worldwide. Its primary mission is to conduct basic research of the atomâs nucleus at the quark level.

2003-11-10

83

Analysis of data acquired by Shuttle Imaging Radar SIR-A and Landsat Thematic Mapper over Baldwin County, Alabama  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Seasonally compatible data collected by SIR-A and by Landsat 4 TM over the lower coastal plain in Alabama were coregistered, forming a SIR-A/TM multichannel data set with 30 m x 30 m pixel size. Spectral signature plots and histogram analysis of the data were used to observe data characteristics. Radar returns from pine forest classes correlated highly with the tree ages, suggesting the potential utility of microwave remote sensing for forest biomass estimation. As compared with the TM-only data set, the use of SIR-A/TM data set improved classification accuracy of the seven land cover types studied. In addition, the SIR-A/TM classified data support previous finding by Engheta and Elachi (1982) that microwave data appear to be correlated with differing bottomland hardwood forest vegetation as associated with varying water regimens (i.e., wet versus dry).

Wu, S.-T.

1985-01-01

84

Alabama-Ferry field, Leon County, Texas: facies types and diagenetic aspects of an Upper Glen Rose stratigraphic trap  

SciTech Connect

Alabama-Ferry field is a mid-shelf cyclic shoal complex located approximately 15 mi (24 km) landward of the Glen Rose shelf margin. Since its discovery in 1983, over 110 wells have been drilled to develop the field and define the limits. The interplay of dominant particle type, texture, and diagenesis controls reservoir quality. Grainstone and some packstone textures composed of skeletal, intraclast, and ooid particle types are the principal reservoir facies. Overall particle composition of grainstone units varies from near-pure end members to various mixed subfacies, with accessory peloids, forams, echinoderm fragments, and others. Grainstone facies belts vary from east to west across the field. Skeletal grainstones dominate the eastern portion of the field in a roughly north-south belt. Intraclast, ooid, skeletal, and mixed grainstone subfacies are spread across the broad western portion of the field. The highest-quality reservoir textural type is skeletal grainstone, with interparticle and well-developed moldic porosity. Intraclast and ooid grainstone end members are good and moderate-to-poor reservoir rock types, respectively, with interparticle and microporosity as the principal pore types. Abundant microporosity, often found within ooids and intraclasts, is associated with relatively higher irreducible water saturations and less-effective pore systems (lower interconnectivity). The overall reservoir quality of different mixed-particle subfacies is generally dependent on the proportion of dissolution-prone skeletal fragments (moldic porosity). The suite of pore types and diagenetic events in Alabama-Ferry field are similar to many Lower Cretaceous carbonate reservoirs in the Gulf Coast province.

Lomando, A.J.; Roy, D.L.; Bruno, L.

1987-05-01

85

Photocopy of a Postcard, Alabama Archives: circa 1915. VIEW LOOKING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of a Postcard, Alabama Archives: circa 1915. VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST - Louisville & Nashville Railroad, Union Station Train Shed, Water Street, opposite Lee Street, Montgomery, Montgomery County, AL

86

Regional assessment of nonforestry related biomass resources: Alabama  

SciTech Connect

This document is a collection of spreadsheets detailing on a county by county basis the agricultural crop, agricultural wastes, municipal wastes and industrial wastes of Alabama that are potential biomass energy sources.

Not Available

1988-11-01

87

Health Consultation: (Updated Assessment of PCB Exposures in Anniston, AL) Anniston PCB Site, Anniston, Calhoun County, Alabama. EPA Facility ID: ALD004019048.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 2001, an Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) Exposure Investigation (EI) evaluated polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) levels in the blood of certain persons living near a former PCB production facility in Anniston, Alabama. In response...

2006-01-01

88

Six Months Evaluation of the Implementation of the Group Work Method as a Pilot Project in Carter, Boyd, Pulaski, Floyd, Jefferson, Hart and Fayette Counties.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A pilot project initiated in 1970 demonstrated ways of implementing the group work method in dealing with the social and economic problems of families receiving public assistance in seven counties in Kentucky. Four types of group meetings were structured ...

D. McClure

1970-01-01

89

78 FR 21924 - Alabama Power Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Applicant: Alabama Power Company. e. Name of Project: Jordan Dam Project. f. Location: The project is located on the Coosa River in Chilton, Coosa, and Elmore Counties, Alabama. g. Filed Pursuant to: Federal Power Act, 16 U.S.C....

2013-04-12

90

76 FR 30328 - Alabama Power Company; Notice of Application For Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...November 12, 2010 and supplemented April 14, 2011. d. Applicant: Alabama Power Company. e. Name of Project: Coosa River Project. f. Location: Logan Martin Development in Elmore and Talladega Counties, Alabama. g. Filed Pursuant...

2011-05-25

91

78 FR 35015 - Alabama Power Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments, Motions to...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Date Filed: April 16, 2013. d. Applicant: Alabama Power Company. e. Name of Project: Coosa River Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: Coosa River near the city of Gadsden, in Etowah County, in northeastern Alabama. g. Filed...

2013-06-11

92

78 FR 30297 - Alabama Power Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Project No: 2146-139. c. Date Filed: March 19, 2013. d. Applicant: Alabama Power Company. e. Name of Project: Coosa River Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: Lake Logan Martin in Talladega County, Alabama. g. Filed Pursuant to:...

2013-05-22

93

Evaluation of the Origin and Fate of Nitrate in the Aquifer System of Southern Baldwin County, Alabama Using Multi-isotopic Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Continued and extensive residential and agricultural development of near-shore areas in southern Baldwin County, Alabama has led to increased inputs of nitrogen (N) to groundwater and to the Gulf of Mexico. Nitrate (NO3-) concentrations in several groundwater wells exceeded the regulatory drinking water standards (10 mg/L nitrate-N). Groundwater and surface water samples were analyzed for nitrate, phosphate, salinity, chloride, and total dissolved solids concentrations to assess the extent of nitrate contamination. Nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate (e.g., ?15N and ?18O of nitrate) were used in conjunction with other isotopic data (e.g., 13C, and 14C, and hydrogen and oxygen isotopes of groundwater) and hydrogeochemical data to place constraints on potential sources of nitrate. The ?15N and ?18O of groundwater nitrate values ranged between +3.1 and +9.6‰ and +4.2 and +8.7‰, respectively. This range of values suggests that nitrate is primarily derived from nitrification of reduced N compounds (primarily ammonia) from fertilizer and manure or septic waste. However, an overwhelming number of samples show isotopic signatures which indicate that the predominant source of nitrate in these aguifers is the fertilizer and to some extent, for deeper wells with older groundwater, the atmospheric nitrate. The narrow range of ?18O values further confirms the primary nitrate sources. The ?15N and ?18O of nitrate data indicate that denitrification was not an important processes in these aquifers. This conclusion is also supported by the 114C data which revealed relatively young groundwaters with sufficiently high oxygen levels. In the absence of denitrification and the presence of a permanent source, it is expected that the elevated groundwater nitrate concentrations will not be readily attenuated posing a potential contamination and degradation problem of coastal discharge zones into the future. The ?13C and ?18O of groundwater data indicates that water in the aquifer system of the study area is most likely to have originated from precipitation and soil infiltration through relatively localized recharge.

Murgulet, D.; Tick, G. R.

2008-12-01

94

Thomas Jefferson's Computer.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Notes that taken together, Thomas Jefferson's contributions to the history of writing technology demonstrate a virtual "computer." Links Jefferson's development of writing technology to his democratic political philosophy. Argues that this link should interest writing teachers. Suggests that Jeffersonian optimism effectively counters Foucaultian…

Smith, Catherine F.

1996-01-01

95

Effects of Jefferson Road stormwater-detention basin on loads and concentrations of selected chemical constituents in East Branch of Allen Creek at Pittsford, Monroe County, New York  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Discharge and water-quality data collection at East Branch Allen Creek from 1990 through 2000 provide a basis for estimating the effect of the Jefferson Road detention basin on loads and concentrations of chemical constituents downstream from the basin. Mean monthly flow for the 5 years prior to construction of the detention basin (8.71 ft3/s) was slightly lower than after (9.08 ft3/s). The slightly higher mean monthly flow after basin construction may have been influenced by the peak flow for the period of record that occurred in July 1998 or variations in flow diverted from the canal. No statistically significant difference in average monthly mean flow before and after basin installation was indicated. Total phosphorus was the only constituent to show no months with significant differences in load after basin construction. Several constituents showed months with significantly smaller loads after basin construction than before, whereas some constituents showed certain months with smaller and some months with greater loads, after basin construction. Statistical analysis of the 'mean monthly load' for all months before and all months after construction of the detention basin showed only one constituent (ammonia + organic nitrogen) with a significantly lower load after construction and none with higher loads. Median concentrations of ammonia + organic nitrogen showed a statistically significant decrease (from 0.78 mg/L to 0.60 mg/L) after basin installation, as did nitrite + nitrate (from 1.50 mg/L to 0.96 mg/L); in contrast, the median concentration of dissolved chloride increased from 95.5 mg/L before basin installation to 109 mg/L thereafter. A trend analysis of constituent concentrations before and after installation of the detention basin showed that total phosphorus had a downward trend after installation. Analysis of the data collected at East Branch Allen Creek indicates that the Jefferson Road detention basin, in some cases, provides an improvement (reduction) in loads of some constituents. These results are uncertain, however, because hydrologic conditions before basin installation differed from those in the 5 years that followed, and because inflow from the Erie-Barge canal may alter the water quality in the 1-mi reach between the basin outflow and the gaging station.

Sherwood, Donald A.

2004-01-01

96

41. Photocopy of engraving from History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

41. Photocopy of engraving from History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford and Gasconade Counties, Missouri (Chicago: Goodpeed Publishing Co., 1888) Wittenberg-Sorber, St. Louis, engraver, ca. 1888 'STONE HILL VINEYARDS AND CELLARS OF THE STONE HILL WINE COMPANY, HERMANN, MO.' - Stone Hill Winery, 401 West Twelfth Street, Hermann, Gasconade County, MO

97

Thomas Jefferson and the Constitution.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines Thomas Jefferson's role in the making and interpretation of the United States Constitution. Discusses the dominant features of Jefferson's constitutional theory; the character of Jefferson's presidency; and Jefferson's ongoing concern about constitutional preservation and change. Lists important dates in the history of the constitution.…

Peterson, Merrill D.

1987-01-01

98

Mount Jefferson, Oregon  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource about Mount Jefferson, a stratovolcano in the Cascade Range, features links to all aspects of the volcano, including its geographic setting, geologic and eruptive history, and historical information about it. The site explains that Mount Jefferson has erupted repeatedly for hundreds of thousands of years, with its last eruptive episode during the last major glaciation, which culminated about 15,000 years ago. Geologic evidence shows that Mount Jefferson is capable of large explosive eruptions. Links labeled 'Special Items of Interest' include information about volcanic highlights and features, and points of interest. Other links lead to maps, graphics, images, publications, reports, and other items of interest involving this volcano and others.

99

Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour  

ScienceCinema

Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

None

2014-05-22

100

Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour  

SciTech Connect

Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

None

2013-07-13

101

14. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Southern RR at ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

14. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Southern RR at Epes Alabama Great Southern RR bridge. View from S. Copy of photo taken in 1922 by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms., Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

102

25. VIEW OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) FROM OFF PORT BOW; VESSEL ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

25. VIEW OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) FROM OFF PORT BOW; VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON STATION IN GULF OF MEXICO WITH MOTOR BOAT TIED AT STERN Original 4-3/4'x6-3/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

103

24. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN); VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

24. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN); VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON STATION IN GULF OF MEXICO WITH MOTOR BOAT TIED AT STERN Original 4-3/4'x6-3/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

104

23. VIEW FROM STARBOARD BOW OF ALABAMA AS 'ALABAMIAN.' Uncopyrighted ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

23. VIEW FROM STARBOARD BOW OF ALABAMA AS 'ALABAMIAN.' Uncopyrighted 3-1/2'x5-5/8' postcard; image taken on station in Gulf of Mexico, c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

105

The Rural Alabama Pregnancy and Infant Health (RAPIH) Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The impact of the Rural Alabama Pregnancy and Infant Health (RAPIH) Program was evaluated in relation to prenatal care, birth outcome measures, and several child health and home environment outcomes. Begun in 1983, RAPIH targets poor rural blacks in three of west-central Alabama's poorest counties, where economic conditions and infant mortality…

Leeper, J. D.; And Others

106

Blacks in Alabama; A Study of Selected Characteristics: Population, Place of Residence, Sex, Age.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using 1970 Federal Census data, this paper analyzes selected characteristics of the black population in Alabama, focusing on the following categories: (1) blacks in Alabama counties; (2) urban and rural blacks; and (3) blacks in Alabama by sex and age. Special emphasis is placed on producing and interpreting data by which postsecondary education…

Jones, Alice; Diener, Thomas

107

Geohydrology and susceptibility of major aquifers to surface contamination in Alabama; area 4  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Environmental Management, is conducting a series of geohydrologic studies to delineate the major aquifers (those which provide water for public supplies) in Alabama, their recharge areas, and areas susceptible to contamination. This report summarizes these factors for two major aquifers in Area 4--Calhoun, Jefferson, St. Clair, Shelby, and Talladega Counties. The major aquifers in the study area are in Cambrian and Ordovician and Mississippian rocks. Highest yields from aquifers are associated with solution openings in carbonate rocks. Springs in the area provide substantial amounts of water for municipal supply. Coldwater Spring provides 17 million gal of water/day to the city of Anniston, the largest groundwater user in the area. All recharge areas for the aquifers are susceptible to contamination from land surface. Two conditions exist in the study area that may cause the aquifers to be highly susceptible to contamination on a local scale: fracturing of rock materials due to faulting and the production of a porous cherty soil through weathering. Where sinkholes are present, there may be a direct connection between the land surface and the aquifer. Areas with sinkholes are considered to be extremely susceptible to contamination. (USGS)

Planert, Michael; Pritchett, J. L., Jr.

1989-01-01

108

8. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11, N of Epes Southern RR. lift span, from SW. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

109

11. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

11. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11 N of Epes Southern RR. lift span, S tower. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, MS. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

110

Photocopy of a Photograph, Alabama Archives: circa 189798. VIEW LOOKING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of a Photograph, Alabama Archives: circa 1897-98. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Louisville & Nashville Railroad, Union Station Train Shed, Water Street, opposite Lee Street, Montgomery, Montgomery County, AL

111

Jefferson Lab: Science Education  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage of the Office of Science Education of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). The aim of the site is to aid Jefferson Lab's long-term commitment to science education by increasing the number of teachers with a substantial background in math and science, strengthening the motivation and preparation of all students, especially minorities and females, and addressing the serious under-representation of minorities and females in science, math, engineering and technology careers. The page offers links to teacher resources, a student zone, games and puzzles, and programs and events. The site focuses on physical science, but some sections are useful to students and teachers of the earth system sciences.

112

State Education Finance and Governance Profile: Alabama  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the state education finance and governance profile of Alabama. The state is home to 1,538 public schools distributed across 67 county school systems and 64 city school systems. State spending is allocated via two separate budgets, "the general fund" for all noneducation related expenditures and the Education Trust Fund (ETF)…

Key, Logan

2010-01-01

113

Alabama Science in Motion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Alabama Science in Motion program is a project established by the Alabama State Legislature. The goals are to provide high tech laboratory experiences for students and effective professional development for teachers.

2004-04-05

114

76 FR 19781 - Protection Island and San Juan Islands National Wildlife Refuges, Jefferson, San Juan, Skagit...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Service [FWS-R1-R-2010-N222; 10137-1265-0000 S3] Protection Island and San Juan Islands National Wildlife Refuges, Jefferson, San Juan, Skagit, Island, and Whatcom Counties, WA; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan,...

2011-04-08

115

75 FR 51098 - Protection Island and San Juan Islands National Wildlife Refuges, Jefferson, Island, San Juan...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Wildlife Service [FWS-R1-R-2010-N131; 1265-0000-10137-S3] Protection Island and San Juan Islands National Wildlife Refuges, Jefferson, Island, San Juan, Skagit, and Whatcom Counties, WA AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife...

2010-08-18

116

Analytical results for 35 mine-waste tailings cores and six bed-sediment samples, and an estimate of the volume of contaminated material at Buckeye meadow on upper Basin Creek, northern Jefferson County, Montana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Metal-mining related wastes in the Boulder River basin study area in northern Jefferson County, Montana have been implicated in their detrimental effects on water quality with regard to acidgeneration and toxic-metal solubilization. Flotation-mill tailings in the meadow below the Buckeye mine, hereafter referred to as the Buckeye mill-tailings site, have been identified as significant contributors to water quality degradation of Basin Creek, Montana. Basin Creek is one of three tributaries to the Boulder River in the study area; bed sediments and waters draining from the Buckeye mine have also been implicated. Geochemical analysis of 35 tailings cores and six bed-sediment samples was undertaken to determine the concentrations of Ag, As, Cd, Cu, Pb,and Zn present in these materials. These elements are environmentally significant, in that they can be toxic to fish and/or the invertebrate organisms that constitute their food. A suite of one-inch cores of dispersed flotation-mill tailings and underlying premining material was taken from a large, flat area north of Basin Creek near the site of the Buckeye mine. Thirty-five core samples were taken and divided into 204 subsamples. The samples were analyzed by ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy) using a mixed-acid digestion. Results of the core analyses show that the elements listed above are present at moderate to very high concentrations (arsenic to 63,000 ppm, silver to 290 ppm, cadmium to 370 ppm, copper to 4,800 ppm, lead to 93,000 ppm, and zinc to 23,000 ppm). Volume calculations indicate that an estimated 8,400 metric tons of contaminated material are present at the site. Six bed-sediment samples were also subjected to the mixed-acid total digestion, and a warm (50oC) 2M HCl-1% H2O2 leach and analyzed by ICP-AES. Results indicate that bed sediments of Basin Creek are only slightly impacted by past mining above the Buckeye-Enterprise complex, moderately impacted at the upper (eastern) end of the tailings area, and heavily impacted at the lower (western) end of the area and downstream. The metals are mostly contained in the 2M HCl-1% H2O2 leachable phase, which are the hydrous amorphous iron- and manganese-hydroxide coatings on detrital sediment particles.

Fey, D. L.; Church, S. E.; Finney, C. J.

1999-01-01

117

Encyclopedia of Alabama  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Sponsored by the Alabama Humanities Foundation and Auburn University, the Encyclopedia of Alabama (EOA) is a veritable cornucopia of material about the Yellowhammer State. The EOA draws on the work of many trustworthy and learned authors, and as a statement of the homepage notes, "Alabama's problems are not glossed over, nor are its accomplishments and successes overlooked." Visitors who might not be familiar with the state in the least are encouraged to read historian Wayne Flynt's fine essay on Alabama featured on the homepage. After that, visitors can look over the entries alphabetically, or they can use of the thematic headings (such as "Peoples" and "Religion") to start their journey. The "Features" articles are a treat as well, and they include "Alabama and the Civil War" and "College Football in Alabama". The site also includes several photo galleries, a glossary, and some educational resources for teachers.

118

Water EducaTion for Alabama's Black Belt (WET Alabama): Facilitating Scientific Understanding of the Hydrologic Cycle in Low-Resource Schools  

Microsoft Academic Search

Youth, as future citizens, play an important role in obtaining and maintaining water resources. Water EducaTion for Alabama's Black Belt (WET Alabama) provides off-campus environmental and water-education activities designed to increase the appreciation, knowledge, conservation, and protection of water resources by middle-school teachers and children from predominantly African-American families in some of Alabama's poorest counties. The project is structured around

L. W. Wolf; M. Lee; K. Stone

2008-01-01

119

Jefferson Lab: Science Education  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Jefferson Lab carries out its long-term commitment to science education by providing a host of teacher resources, games, and science lessons. Students can find a periodic table offering physical characteristics and information on the history and uses of each element. The Student Zone contains a virtual lab tour, glossary of scientific terms, and materials on internships. Teachers can locate pdf downloads of many hands-on activities on many science subjects such as microscopes, magnets, and measuring. The website introduces educational events and educational programs for both teachers and students.

120

Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plan (Phase II)  

SciTech Connect

The principal research efforts for Phase II of the project were drilling an infill well strategically located in Section 13, T. 10 N., R. 2 W., of the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, and obtaining fresh core from the upper Smackover reservoir to test the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in this field. The Turner Land and Timber Company 13-10 No. 1 well was successfully drilled and tested at a daily rate of 132 barrels of oil in Section 13. The well has produced 27,720 barrels of oil, and is currently producing at a rate of 60 barrels of oil per day. The 13-10 well confirmed the presence of 175,000 barrels of attic (undrained) oil in Section 13. As predicted from reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation, the top of the Smackover reservoir in the 13-10 well is structurally high to the tops of the Smackover in offsetting wells, and the 13-10 well has significantly more net pay than the offsetting wells. The drilling and testing of the 13-10 well showed that the eastern part of the field continues to have a strong water drive and that there is no need to implement a pressure maintenance program in this part of the Womack Hill Field at this time. The success achieved in drilling and testing the 13-10 infill well demonstrates the benefits of building a geologic model to target areas in mature fields that have the potential to contain undrained oil, thus increasing the productivity and profitability of these fields. Microbial cultures that grew at 90 C and converted ethanol to acid were recovered from fresh cuttings from the Smackover carbonate reservoir in an analogous field to the Womack Hill Field in southwest Alabama; however, no viable microorganisms were found in the Smackover cores recovered from the drilling of the 13-10 well in Womack Hill Field. Further evaluation is, therefore, required prior to implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the Womack Hill Field.

Ernest A. Mancini; Joe Benson; David Hilton; David Cate; Lewis Brown

2006-05-29

121

76 FR 48941 - Alabama & Florida Railway Co., Inc.-Abandonment Exemption-in Geneva, Coffee, and Covington...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Railway Co., Inc.--Abandonment Exemption--in Geneva, Coffee, and Covington Counties, Ala. Alabama & Florida Railway Co...at Geneva, Ala., a distance of 42.9 miles, in Geneva, Coffee and Covington Counties, Ala. The line constitutes...

2011-08-09

122

The Vision of Thomas Jefferson.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contends that it was the blend of public service and public interests that distinguish the life of Thomas Jefferson. Discusses Jefferson's political philosophy found in his writings. Explains that nearly all of his writing was done to accomplish specific goals, although it had significance far beyond the immediate context. (CFR)

Jones, Robert F.

1993-01-01

123

Spatial and temporal variability of air pollution in Birmingham, Alabama  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quantification of the spatial and temporal variations of outdoor air pollutant concentrations provides important information for epidemiological and other air-pollution studies, many of which have relied in the past on data from a single, centrally-located air pollution monitoring site. A method is developed for combining air pollution measurements from multiple monitors and monitoring networks to generate daily air pollution concentration fields representing spatial variations over distances of approximately 1-10 km. Meteorological and co-pollutant data are used to estimate missing site measurements, yielding more realistic concentration fields as the number of monitoring locations with available data increases. Monitoring data are interpolated with weights computed from intersite pollutant correlations, which decay with distance, so distances between interpolation points and monitoring sites are factored into the interpolation weights. The approach minimizes the influence of source-oriented sites that represent limited areas, because data from such sites exhibit low intersite correlations and yield interpolation weights that decay rapidly to zero. Interpolated values represent pollutant concentrations averaged over spatial scales that depend on intersite distances and the interpolation grid, and do not delineate sharp spatial gradients associated with roadside or near-source conditions. The approach yields quantified interpolation errors the values of which depend on measurement uncertainties, intersite distances, and the representativeness of monitoring site locations. The method is illustrated using an 11-year period of measurements of ozone, PM2.5, and PM10 concentrations from Jefferson County, Alabama. The principal city is Birmingham, which is influenced by regional-scale air pollution and by local emissions from mobile sources, industrial facilities, and residential communities. Emission sources are not distributed uniformly throughout Birmingham, the ridge-and-valley topography complicates dispersion of local emissions, and monitoring data indicate that air pollutant concentrations vary spatially as well as temporally. No single monitor represents air quality across the entire study area.

Blanchard, C. L.; Tanenbaum, S.; Hidy, G. M.

2014-06-01

124

Alabama Special Days  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Today, we are going to look at special days in Alabama history. Today we are going to look at four special Alabama Days: 1) Boll Weevil Festival 2) Helen Keller Day 3) Mardi Gras 4) Shrimp Festival I am giving you videos to watch about each special day. I am ...

Lucky, Ms.

2012-04-04

125

Alabama Marine Law Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Alabama Marine Law Program at the University of Alabama Law Center was funded from January 1, 1979 to May 31, 1982. During this period, the Program had as its continuing objective research, service and education in issues relating to law and the coast...

1982-01-01

126

32. PORT PROFILE OF THE ALABAMA. Uncopyrighted 31/4'x5'photograph taken by ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

32. PORT PROFILE OF THE ALABAMA. Uncopyrighted 3-1/4'x5'photograph taken by Thigpen Photography, c. 1965. Written on back of photo: 'This is what the vessel looked like when I bought her in 1966 R.S. Douglas.' Also, stamped on back is: Thigpen Photography 1442 So. Beltline Highway Mobile, Alabama 46609 to reorder specify no. M7062-1 - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

127

Neutron Transversity at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

Nucleon transversity and single transverse spin asymmetries have been the recent focus of large efforts by both theorists and experimentalists. On-going and planned experiments from HERMES, COMPASS and RHIC are mostly on the proton or the deuteron. Presented here is a planned measurement of the neutron transversity and single target spin asymmetries at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a transversely polarized {sup 3}He target. Also presented are the results and plans of other neutron transverse spin experiments at Jefferson Lab. Finally, the factorization for semi-inclusive DIS studies at Jefferson Lab is discussed.

Jian-Ping Chen; Xiaodong Jiang; Jen-chieh Peng; Lingyan Zhu

2005-09-07

128

3. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE RAILROAD BRIDGE AND FERRY 1.5 ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE RAILROAD BRIDGE AND FERRY 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17. Copy of photo by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., 1927. West ferry landing ferry barge, andcar in foreground. Alabama, Tennessee & Northern (later Frisco) RR bridge in background. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

129

4. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE COLLAPSED RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE COLLAPSED RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17. Western half of collapsed Alabama, Tenn. & Northern RR. Bridge Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., photographer, 1973. Copy by Sarcone Photography, Columbs, Ms Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

130

Porosity and cementation in upper Cretaceous Mooreville and Demopolis Chalks, central Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cyclically arranged chalky marl, marl, limestone, and sand facies comprise the Upper Cretaceous Mooreville and Demopolis Chalks, the lower two formation in the Selma Group, inner Coastal Plain of Alabama. In the central Alabama study area (Dallas, Lowndes, and Montgomery Counties), the Mooreville-Demopolis section is 305 m thick and the two main facies are chalky marl and marl. Chalky marl

I. Holston; D. T. Jr. King; E. Bittner

1989-01-01

131

Thomas Jefferson and American Biology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented are the numerous contributions made by Thomas Jefferson to the fields of biological sciences. In addition to his actual contributions and discoveries, his extensive verbal and literacy support of the sciences is traced. (SL)

Coonen, Lester P.; Porter, Charlotte M.

1976-01-01

132

75 FR 76000 - Alabama Power Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Number: 2146-130. c. Date Filed: November 11, 2010. d. Applicant: Alabama Power Company. e. Name of Project: Coosa River Project. f. Location: The proposed non-project use is located on Logan Martin Lake, in Talladega County,...

2010-12-07

133

76 FR 68746 - Alabama Power Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...supplemented on September 30, and October 27, 2011. d. Applicant: Alabama Power Company. e. Name of Project: Coosa River Project. f. Location: At Curley's Cove RV Park near the town of Cedar Bluff in Cherokee County, AL. g....

2011-11-07

134

13. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES HIGHWAY BRIDGE U.S. 11 N ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

13. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES HIGHWAY BRIDGE U.S. 11 N of Epes Gorgas Bridge from NW. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

135

Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia, USA, is one of ten national laboratories under the aegis of the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It is managed and operated by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC. The primary facility at Jefferson Lab is the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) as shown in an aerial photograph in Figure 1. Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 as CEBAF and started operations for physics in 1995. The accelerator uses superconducting radio-frequency (srf) techniques to generate high-quality beams of electrons with high-intensity, well-controlled polarization. The technology has enabled ancillary facilities to be created. The CEBAF facility is used by an international user community of more than 1200 physicists for a program of exploration and study of nuclear, hadronic matter, the strong interaction and quantum chromodynamics. Additionally, the exceptional quality of the beams facilitates studies of the fundamental symmetries of nature, which complement those of atomic physics on the one hand and of high-energy particle physics on the other. The facility is in the midst of a project to double the energy of the facility and to enhance and expand its experimental facilities. Studies are also pursued with a Free-Electron Laser produced by an energy-recovering linear accelerator.

Joseph Grames, Douglas Higinbotham, Hugh Montgomery

2010-09-01

136

Spatial pattern of wildfire occurrences in Alabama, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identifying the spatial pattern of wildfire occurrences and its relationships with environmental and social conditions at a state and county scale may help to reinforce strategic and diverse solutions in wildfire and land management throughout different environmental conditions and management practices. In this study, a dataset of wildfire occurrences from 1999 to 2004 in Alabama, USA, was used to analyze

Xiongwen Chen

2007-01-01

137

9. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

9. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11 N of Epes Southern RR. lift span, view from S approach. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

138

10. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11 of Epes Wouthern RR. lift span, wide=angle view from SW. bank. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

139

12. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

12. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just N of U.S. 11 N of Epes Southern RR. lift span, wide angle side view from SE. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

140

Cardboard Houses with Wings: The Architecture of Alabama's Rural Studio  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Rural Studio, an outreach program of Auburn University, designs innovative houses for poor people living in Alabama's Hale County by using "junk" such as car windshields, carpet tiles, baled cardboard, and old license plates. The article theorizes this particular architecture in terms of Critical Regionalism, developed by Tzonis/Lefaivre and…

Botz-Bornstein, Thorsten

2010-01-01

141

Alabama Education Quick Facts, 2007  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is a quick look at general information about Alabama schools. The document contains 11 sections: (1) state statistics; (2) Alabama public schools, 2006-07; (3) Alabama state board of education members; (4) financial data; (5) school size and enrollment; (6) transportation and school meals; (7) graduation requirements; (8) additional…

Alabama Department of Education, 2007

2007-01-01

142

Alabama Education Quick Facts, 2004  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is a quick look at general information about Alabama schools. The document contains 11 sections: (1) state statistics; (2) Alabama public schools; (3) Alabama board of education members; (4) financial data; (5) school size and enrollment; (6) transportation and school meals; (7) graduation requirements; (8) additional enrollment;…

Alabama State Department of Education, 2004

2004-01-01

143

Hadron Spectroscopy at Jefferson Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Recent results on hadron spectroscopy from Jefferson Laboratory's CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) are presented. In particular we present results from the baryon resonance program for both electro- and photo- production. Also, we present very preliminary results on meson spectroscopy in p interactions, and new results on the observation of the exotic baryon, the Theta +.

Dennis P. Weygand

2004-08-01

144

Geology of the Huntsville quadrangle, Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The 7 1/2-minute Huntsville quadrangle is in south-central Madison County, Ala., and includes part of the city of Hunstville. The south, north, east, and west boundaries of the quadrangle are about 3 miles north of the Tennessee River, 15 1/2 miles south of the Tennessee line, 8 miles west of the Jackson County line, and 9 miles east of the Limestone County line. The bedrock geology of the Huntsville quadrangle was mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the city of Hunstville and the Geological Survey of Alabama as part of a detailed study of the geology and ground-water resources of Madison County, with special reference to the Huntsville area. G. T. Malmberg began the geologic mapping of the county in July 1953, and completed it in April 1954. T. H. Sanford, Jr., assisted Malmberg in the final phases of the county mapping, which included measuring geologic sections with hand level and steel tape. In November 1958 Sanford, assisted by L. R. West, checked contacts and elevations in the Hunstville quadrangle; made revisions in the contact lines; and wrote the text for this report. The fieldwork for this report was completed in April 1959.

Sanford, T. H., Jr.; Malmberg, G. T.; West, L. R.

1961-01-01

145

Alabama Coastal Birding Trail.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Birding the Alabama Gulf Coast can be a fantastic experience. This is particularly true during spring migration if a front moves in from the north forcing the migrants down at first landfall onto Dauphin Island or Fort Morgan. Fall migration is equally gr...

2001-01-01

146

Alabama Water Use, 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water is one of Alabama's most precious natural resources. It is a vital component of human existence and essential to the overall quality of life. Wise stewardship of this valuable resource depends on a continuing assessment of water availability and water use. Population growth in many parts of the State has resulted in increased competition for available water resources. This competition includes offstream uses, such as residential, agricultural, and industrial, and instream uses for maintenance of species habitat and diversity, navigation, power generation, recreation, and water quality. Accurate water-use information is required for sound management decisions within this competitive framework and is necessary for a more comprehensive understanding of the link between water use, water supply, and overall water availability. A study of water use during 2005 was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs, Office of Water Resources, Water Management Branch (ADECA-OWR), to provide water-use data for local and State water managers. The results of the study about the amount of water used, how it was used, and where it was used in Alabama have been published in 'Estimated use of water in Alabama in 2005' by Hutson and others, 2009, and is accessible on the Web at http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2009/5163 and available upon request as a CD-ROM through USGS and ADECA-OWR.

Hutson, Susan S.; Littlepage, Thomas M.; Harper, Michael J.; Tinney, James O.

2009-01-01

147

Top of Alabama Regional Education Service Agency Adult Secondary Education Program: Final Report for FY 74-75.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The document is the final report for fiscal year 1974-75 of a rural adult secondary education demonstration project sponsored by the regional agency, Top of Alabama Regional Education Service Agency (TARESA), serving five northeastern Alabama counties. Program features include the use of educational television on a statewide basis and the…

Jhin, Kyo R.

148

The Alabama Historical Quarterly  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Alabama Department of Archives and History has a distinguished tradition of presenting a range of presentations, talks, and seminars for educators across the state. Over the past several years, they have been working to digitize a number of state publications, and this archive brings together issues of the Alabama Historical Quarterly. Here, interested parties can view all issues from 1930 to 1982, and the topics covered include vernacular architecture, the Civil War, local traditions, and in earlier issues, poems. There is a gap in publication from 1931 to 1941, but other than, all of the other years are covered. Users can save their favorite items here, and also look at complete document descriptions.

149

Archive-In: Alabama  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Many states are working to craft digital archives of their online activities, leading some committed states to even include tweets, Facebook pages, and other alternative sources. This site from the Alabama Department of Archives & History contains everything from the online activities of the Alabama Legislature to the Twitter feeds of selected political parties in the state. All told, there are 31 different groups chronicled here and visitors can search each groups' activities individually or via an omnibus search engine. Additionally, users can search the archive by creator, language, publisher, and subject keywords. It's a great initiative and one that will be of interest to librarians, cataloguers, and others with an interest in modern history.

150

Electroweak Physics at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility provides CW electron beams with high intensity, remarkable stability, and a high degree of polarization. These capabilities offer new and unique opportunities to search for novel particles and forces that would require extension of the standard model. CEBAF is presently undergoing an upgrade that includes doubling the energy of the electron beam to 12 GeV and enhancements to the experimental equipment. This upgraded facility will provide increased capability to address new physics beyond the standard model.

R. D. McKeown

2012-03-01

151

Electroweak physics at Jefferson Lab  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility provides CW electron beams with high intensity, remarkable stability, and a high degree of polarization. These capabilities offer new and unique opportunities to search for novel particles and forces that would require extension of the standard model. CEBAF is presently undergoing an upgrade that includes doubling the energy of the electron beam to 12 GeV and enhancements to the experimental equipment. This upgraded facility will provide increased capability to address new physics beyond the standard model.

McKeown, R. D.

2012-02-01

152

Polarized Positrons at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

A novel concept for producing polarized positrons at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF polarized electron photo-injector is presented. This approach relies on the polarization transfer from low energy highly polarized electrons to positrons via bremsstrahlung followed by pair production in a conversion target. An experiment to test this concept is discussed on the basis of GEANT4 simulations. It is shown that this low energy approach, which benefits from recent advances in high current high polarization electron sources, can yield positron longitudinal polarization up to 40%.

Dumas, Jonathan; Grames, Joseph; Voutier, Eric

2009-01-01

153

Polarized Positrons at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

A novel concept for producing polarized positrons at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF polarized electron photo-injector is presented. This approach relies on the polarization transfer from low energy highly polarized electrons to positrons via bremsstrahlung followed by pair production in a conversion target. An experiment to test this concept is discussed on the basis of GEANT4 simulations. It is shown that this low energy approach, which benefits from recent advances in high current high polarization electron sources, can yield positron longitudinal polarization up to 40%.

J. Dumas, J. Grames, E. Voutier

2009-08-01

154

Polarized Positrons at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

A novel concept for producing polarized positrons at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF polarized electron photo-injector is presented. This approach relies on the polarization transfer from low energy highly polarized electrons to positrons via bremsstrahlung followed by pair production in a conversion target. An experiment to test this concept is discussed on the basis of GEANT4 simulations. It is shown that this low energy approach, which benefits from recent advances in high current high polarization electron sources, can yield positron longitudinal polarization up to 40%.

Dumas, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, IN2P3/CNRS-Universite Joseph Fourier-INP 53, rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Grames, J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Voutier, E. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, IN2P3/CNRS-Universite Joseph Fourier-INP 53, rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France)

2009-08-04

155

Jefferson Lab phenomenology: selected highlights  

SciTech Connect

An overview of recent experimental highlights from Jefferson Lab is presented. We review the status of baryon spectroscopy, including the search for pentaquarks, as well as measurements of electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon, featuring the proton G{sub E}/G{sub M} ratio and the determination of the strangeness form factors. In inclusive scattering, we describe recent studies of quark-hadron duality in structure functions in the resonance-scaling transition region, and outline future physics plans at an energy upgraded 12 GeV facility.

Wolodymyr Melnitchouk

2005-07-07

156

University of Alabama Digital Collections  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For devotees of Alabama history (and even for those who aren't), the University of Alabama's Digital Collections are a real find. Currently, the site offers up more than a dozen digital collections, including The University of Alabama Encyclopedia and the Hugh Davis Farm Journals. The Hugh Davis Farm Journals are quite a find, as they offer an insightful portrait of a 19th century attorney and plantation owner in Marion, Alabama. Here visitors can read his farm journals, which contain records regarding slaves and accounts of life on the plantation. The other collections offered here include the Marjorie L. Smith Slide Collection of images related to cotton agriculture in the 1960s and selected issues of the University of Alabama Yearbook, which is titled "The Corolla".

157

Roadless areas and biodiversity: a case study in Alabama, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Roadless areas are important for biodiversity maintenance and nature conservation but remain politically controversial due\\u000a to conflicting interests of conservation and development. In this study, we applied a recently developed index of roadless\\u000a volume (RV) across 67 counties of Alabama, USA as a case study to examine the relationships between roadless areas and local\\u000a species richness. Our results indicated that

Xiongwen Chen; Kathleen A. Roberts

2008-01-01

158

Thomas Jefferson and Architecture. Lesson Plan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the importance of architecture in Thomas Jefferson's life. Presents a lesson plan based on Jefferson's Monticello and designed to encourage students to identify and understand elements of classical architecture in their local area. Includes a photograph of Monticello and six architectural illustrations. (CFR)

Gabriel, Robin H.

1994-01-01

159

Jefferson Lab Hands-on Activities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These are some of the hands-on activities used in Jefferson Lab's BEAMS program. In BEAMS, classes of 6th, 7th and 8th grade students are exposed to the Lab's scientific environment. For five consecutive days during school hours, classes of 6th grade students and their teachers participate in these science and math activities conducted with Jefferson Lab staff.

Education, Thomas J.

160

Alabama Education News. Volume 29, Number 7  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

2006-01-01

161

Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 4  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

2011-01-01

162

Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 2  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

2006-01-01

163

Alabama Education News. Volume 29, Number 4  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

2006-01-01

164

Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 9  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

2005-01-01

165

Alabama Education News. Volume 32, Number 2  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

2008-01-01

166

Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 4  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

2008-01-01

167

Alabama Education News. Volume 33, Number 6  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

2010-01-01

168

Alabama Education News. Volume 27, Number 5  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

2004-01-01

169

Alabama Education News. Volume 28, Number 1  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama," as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

White, Rebecca Leigh, Ed.

2004-01-01

170

Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 8  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

2007-01-01

171

Alabama Education News. Volume 34, Number 2  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

2010-01-01

172

Alabama Education News. Volume 30, Number 3  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

2006-01-01

173

Alabama Education News. Volume 31, Number 2  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Alabama Education News" is published monthly except for June, July, and December by the Alabama Department of Education. This publication, authorized by Section 16-2-4 of the "Code of Alabama", as recompiled in 1975, is a public service of the Alabama Department of Education designed to inform citizens and educators about programs and goals of…

Sibley, Michael O., Ed.

2007-01-01

174

Adsorption Kinetics of CO2, CH4, and their Equimolar Mixture on Coal from the Black Warrior Basin, West-Central Alabama  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetic behavior of pure and mixed gases (CO2, CH4, approximately equimolar CO2 + CH4 mixtures, and He) on a coal sample obtained from the Black Warrior Basin at the Littleton Mine (Twin Pine Coal Company), Jefferson County, west-central Alabama. The sample was from the Mary Lee coal zone of the Pottsville Formation (Lower Pennsylvanian). Experiments with three size fractions (45-150 m, 1-2 mm, and 5-10 mm) of crushed coal were performed at 40 C and 35 C over a pressure range of 1.4 6.9 MPa to simulate coalbed methane reservoir conditions in the Black Warrior Basin and provide data relevant for enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations. The following key observations were made: (1) CO2 adsorption on both dry and water-saturated coal is much more rapid than CH4 adsorption; (2) water saturation decreases the rates of CO2 and CH4 adsorption on coal surfaces, but it appears to have minimal effects on the final magnitude of CO2 or CH4 adsorption if the coal is not previously exposed to CO2; (3) retention of adsorbed CO2 on coal surfaces is significant even with extreme pressure cycling; and (4) adsorption is significantly faster for the 45-150 m size fraction compared to the two coarser fractions.

Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S [ORNL; Naney, Michael {Mike} T [ORNL; Blencoe, James {Jim} G [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Pashin, Jack C. [Geological Survey of Alabama; Carroll, Richard E. [Geological Survey of Alabama

2009-01-01

175

Early History of Jefferson Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This talk will focus on the history of Jefferson Laboratory from its inception as the NEAL proposal by the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA) in 1980, to about 1986 -- two years after the arrival of Hermann Grunder and his Berkeley team. Major themes are (i) a national decision to build a high energy, high duty factor electron accelerator for basic nuclear physics research, (ii) open competition established by the DOE, (iii) formation of SURA, and (iv) interest of SURA physicists (particularly at UVA and W&M) in this research. I will discuss the scientific, technical, and political issues that eventually lead to the selection of the SURA proposal, the choice of Newport News as the site, and the decision to adopt a recirculating superconducting ring for the final design.

Gross, Franz

2011-10-01

176

Early History of Jefferson Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This talk will focus on the history of Jefferson Laboratory from its inception as the NEAL proposal by the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA) in 1980, to about 1986 -- two years after the arrival of Hermann Grunder and his Berkeley team. Major themes are (i) a national decision to build a high energy, high duty factor electron accelerator for basic nuclear physics research, (ii) open competition established by the DOE, (iii) formation of SURA, and (iv) interest of SURA physicists (particularly at UVA and W&M) in this research. I will discuss the scientific, technical, and political issues that eventually lead to the choice of Newport News as the site and the choice of a recirculating superconducting ring as the final design.

Gross, Franz

2006-11-01

177

Jefferson Lab Experimental Hall A  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Jefferson Lab's Hall A has a pair of thirty-meter long, high-resolution (10-4), 4 GeV/c superconducting spectrometers. Most Hall A experiments will use these spectrometers in coincidence, with one detecting scattered electrons and the other protons or pions. The proton spectrometer includes a focal plane polarimeter. Planned experiments include: high-precision nucleon form factor measurements using polarization transfer; investigations of weak neutral currents via parity violation; systematic studies of few nucleon systems; and measurements of the nuclear response at small inter-nucleon distances and of the effect of the nuclear medium on nucleon structure. This paper will review the design of the spectrometers, detection systems, and beam line, and present the results of early measurements of the characteristics of the equipment. The planned experimental program will also be discussed. Additional information is available at URL http://www.cebaf.gov/halla/halla.html.

Cardman, Lawrence S.

1996-10-01

178

Jefferson Lab Experimental Hall C  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Jefferson Lab's Hall C went into initial operation in November 1995. The hall has a short orbit spectrometer (SOS) for short-lived particles such as pions and kaons and a high-momentum spectrometer (HMS) usually used for electrons. The SOS can also be used for protons. The HMS can range to 7 GeV/c. Both the SOS and HMS have typical resolutions of (10-3). Experiments for this hall range from measuring the neutron electric form factor, to color transparency, to creating strange nuclei. This paper will present the optical capabilities of the spectrometers, the parameters of the detection systems, and the overall beam line characteristics of the hall as determined from the results from the recent physics experiments along with the upcoming experimental schedule. Additional information is available at URL http://www.cebaf.gov/hallc.html.

Carlini, Roger D.

1996-10-01

179

Jefferson Lab. FEL user facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Jefferson Lab's IR Demo FEL Facility includes an associated 600 m2 user facility containing six separate laboratory areas. In the summer of 1999 we began delivery of beam int two of these labs as part of our commissioning of the FEL optical transport and laser safety systems. The high average power capability in the mid-IR, along with an ultrafast high PRF temporal structure makes this laser a unique source for both applied and basic research. While commissioning, we conducted several test, primarily of laser-materials interactions that take advantage of the unique characteristics of this FEL. An overview of the FEL facility and its current performance, along with a synopsis of current and future experiments, will be presented.

Shinn, Michelle D.; Benson, Stephen V.; Biallas, George; Bohn, Courtlandt L.; Douglas, David; Dylla, F.; Evans, Richard; Fugitt, Jock; Gubeli, J.; Hill, Richard; Jordan, Kevin; Krafft, Geoffrey; Li, Rui; Merminga, Lia; Neil, George R.; Oepts, Dick; Piot, Phillipe; Preble, Joe; Siggins, Tim; Walker, Richard; Yunn, Byung

2000-03-01

180

Thomas Jefferson and the Purposes of Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Thomas Jefferson was the first conspicuous U.S. advocate of free education supported by local taxation and of state aid to higher education. He believed that only an educated citizenry could assume the responsibilities of self-government. (SK)

Jewett, Thomas O.

1997-01-01

181

Hurricane Frederic tidal floods of September 12-13, 1979, along the Gulf Coast, Heron Bay, Little Dauphin Island, Fort Morgan, and Fort Morgan NW quadrangles, Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Shown on a topographic map are floodmark elevations and approximate areas flooded by Hurricane Frederic tides of September 12-13, 1979, along the southeastern tip of Mobile County, including Dauphin Island, Alabama. Nearly all the mainland area shown on the map was inundated by the tidal surge. The Dauphin Island Parkway Bridge (Alabama State Highway 163) was almost totally demolished. Storm-tide frequency and records of annual maximum tides at Mobile, Alabama, since 1772, are presented. Offshore winds reached about 160 miles per hour. A wind-velocity of about 145 miles per hour was recorded near Dauphin Island, Alabama. (USGS)

Bohman, Larry R.; Scott, John C.

1980-01-01

182

Water EducaTion for Alabama's Black Belt (WET Alabama): Facilitating Scientific Understanding of the Hydrologic Cycle in Low-Resource Schools  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Youth, as future citizens, play an important role in obtaining and maintaining water resources. Water EducaTion for Alabama's Black Belt (WET Alabama) provides off-campus environmental and water-education activities designed to increase the appreciation, knowledge, conservation, and protection of water resources by middle-school teachers and children from predominantly African-American families in some of Alabama's poorest counties. The project is structured around a variety of indoor and outdoor activities held at two field sites, Auburn University's E. V. Smith Center in Macon County and the Robert G. Wehle Nature Center in Bullock County located in Alabama's "Black Belt" region, a region in which the prosperity of local communities is low. The educational activities provide an engaging laboratory and field experience for children from rural schools that lack scientific facilities and equipment. Both hosting centers have easy access to surface water (ponds, wetlands, streams) and offer facilities for basic hydrologic experiments (e.g., aquifer models, permeameter, water quality). The E.V. Smith site has access to groundwater through pairs of nested wells. Educational activities are designed to help students and teachers visualize groundwater flow and its interaction with surface water in an aquifer tank model; compare the hydrologic properties (porosity and permeability) of different aquifer materials (sands, gravels, and clays); learn about groundwater purging and sampling; and assess water quality and flow direction in the field. Simple exercises demonstrate (1) the balance of recharge and discharge, (2) the effects of flooding, drought and pumping, and (3) movement of contaminants through aquifers. A set of ready-to-teach laboratory exercises and tutorials address goals specified by the State of Alabama science curriculum for grades 6 to 8. The ultimate goal of Project WET Alabama is to help students and teachers from resource-poor schools become knowledgeable about surface water and groundwater so they can identify and sustain "safe" aquifer zones, where clean water resources are available for long-term use and economic development.

Wolf, L. W.; Lee, M.; Stone, K.

2008-12-01

183

Landscape Plan U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Landscape Plan - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

184

First Floor Plan U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

First Floor Plan - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

185

Window Details U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Window Details - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

186

First Floor Plan U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

First Floor Plan - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Rehabilitation Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

187

Sections and Elevations U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Sections and Elevations - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Rehabilitation Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

188

Jefferson Lab Experimental Hall B  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Jefferson Lab's Hall B contains the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). Its main mission is to study electron- and photon-induced reactions that require the detection of several, only loosely correlated particles in the hadronic final state. Experiments range from the study of meson and nucleon resonances to spin structure function measurements, and multi-nucleon knockout. The CLAS is a toroidal multi-gap spectrometer; its magnetic field is generated by six iron-free superconducting coils. The particle detection system consists of drift chambers to follow the trajectories of charged particles, Cerenkov counters for the identification of electrons, scintillation counters for time-of-flight measurements, and shower counters to identify electrons, and to detect photons and neutrons. A Bremsstrahlung tagging spectrometer for real photon experiments is located at the entrance of the hall. CLAS' high data rate will result in a terabyte per day to permanent storage media. This paper will address the anticipated performance of CLAS as well as the upcoming experimental schedule. Additional information is available at URL http://www.cebaf.gov/clas/CLAS.html.

Mecking, Bernhard A.

1996-10-01

189

7. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just off U.S. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. ALABAMA, SUMTER CO., EPES RAILROAD BRIDGE Just off U.S. 11, N of Epes Copy of photo by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms. 1922. Picture of earlier bridge: turn span and fixed spans. Ala. Great Southern RR. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

190

6. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17 Copy of photo by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., 192. Shows center turn span and part of one fixed span. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

191

2. ALABAMA, PICKENS, CO., COCHRANE HIGHWAY BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. ALABAMA, PICKENS, CO., COCHRANE HIGHWAY BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17. Aerial view of Milner bridge, from SE. David J. Kaminsky, Architecturl Photography, Atlanta Ga. Aug 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

192

5. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE COLLAPSED RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE COLLAPSED RAILROAD BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17. Copy of photo by Jack Donnell, Columbus, Ms., after bridge collapsed in 1973. Shows broken turn span and overturned center pier. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms. Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

193

Sediment and Runoff Losses following Harvesting\\/Site Prep Operations on a Piedmont Soil in Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

lmpacfs of soil erosion on water quality from forest harvesting and site preparation have received increased concern in recent years. The study presented here was performed in Lee County, Alabama to investigate the impact of harvesting and site preparation on a 20-year- old lob\\/o\\/\\/y pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation on sediment and runoff yield. Sediment and runoff yield responses on

Emily A. Carter

194

1. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE HIGHWAY BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. ALABAMA, PICKENS CO., COCHRANE HIGHWAY BRIDGE 1.5 miles N. from Cochrane on Ala. route 17 Aerial view of Milner bridge, from SW. David J. Kaminsky, Architectural Photography, Atlanta Ga. Aug 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Cochrane, Pickens County, AL

195

Luminous electrical phenomena in Huntsville, Alabama, tornadoes on April 3, 1974  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Unusual lightning and varicolored luminous phenomena were observed on the evening of April 3, 1974, when severe tornadoes passed through Madison County, Alabama. Photographs and eyewitness accounts of this electrical activity are related to the trajectories of the tornadoes and the damage areas they produced.

Vaughan, O. H., Jr.; Vonnegut, B.

1976-01-01

196

Preliminary report on the Comet area, Jefferson County, Montana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Several radioactivity anomalies and a few specimens of sooty pitchblende and other uranium minerals have been found on the mine dumps of formerly productive base- and precious-metal mines along the Comet-Gray Eagle shear zone in the Comet area in southwestern Montana. The shear zone is from 50 to 200 feet wide and has been traced for at least 5? miles. It trends N. 80 ? W. across the northern part of the area and cuts the quartz monzonitic rocks of the Boulder batholith and younger silicic intrusive rocks, as well as prebatholithic volcanic rocks, and is in turn cut by dacite and andesite dikes. The youngest period of mineralization is represented by chalcedonic vein zones comprising one or more discontinuous stringers and veins of cryptocrystalline silica in silicified quartz monzonite and in alaskite that has not been appreciably silicified. In some places these zones contain no distinct chalcedonic veins but are represented only by silicified quartz monzonite. These zones locally contain uranium in association with very small amounts of pyrite, galena, ruby silver, arqentite, native silver, molybdenite, chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, and barite. At the Free Enterprise mine, uranium has been produced from a narrow chalcedonic vein that contains disseminated secondary uranium minerals and local small pods of pitchblende and also from disseminated secondary uranium ,minerals in the adjacent quartz monzonite. Undiscovered deposits of uranium ore may occur spatially associated with the base- and precious-metal deposits along the Comet-Gray Eagle shear zone and with chalcedonic vein zones similar to the Free Enterprise.

Becraft, George Earle

1953-01-01

197

Preliminary report on the Comet area, Jefferson County, Montana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Several radioactivity anomalies and a few specimens of sooty pitchblende and other uranium minerals have been found on the mine dumps of formerly productive base-and precious-metal mines along the Comet-Gray Eagle shear zone in the Comet area in southwestern Montana. The shear zone is from 50 to 200 feet wide and has been traced for at least 5 1/2 miles. It trends N. 80° W. across the northern part of the area and cuts the quartz monzonitic rocks of the Boulder batholith and younger silicic intrusive rocks, as well as the pre-batholitic volcanic rocks, and is in turn cut by dacite and andesite dikes. The youngest period of mineralization is represented by chalcedonic vein zones comprising one or more discontinuous stringers and veins of cryptocrystalline silica in silicified quartz monzonite and in alaskite that has not been appreciably silicified. In some places these zones contain no distinct chalcedonic veins, but are represented only by silicified quartz monzonite. These zones locally contain uranium in association with very small amounts of the following minerals: pyrite, galena, ruby silver, argentite, native silver, molybdenite, chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, and barite. At the Free Enterprise mine, uranium has been produced from a narrow chalcedonic vein that contains disseminated secondary uranium minerals and local small pods of pitchblende and from disseminated secondary uranium minerals in the adjacent quartz monzonite. Undiscovered commercial deposits of uranium ore may occur spatially associated with the base-and precious-metal deposits along the Comet-Gray Eagle shear zone, and chalcedonic vein zones similar to the Free Enterprise.

Becraft, George Earle

1952-01-01

198

Habitat Management for Birds of Alabama.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is a synthesis of existing literature and survey data for Alabama birds. The objectives of this report are to summarize available bird population data for major habitat types in Alabama, to indicate how changes in habitat influence population ...

S. H. Anderson C. S. Robbins J. R. Partelow

1981-01-01

199

Alabama Public Library Service 1996 Annual Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Alabama Public Library Service is charged with improving library services throughout Alabama to ensure that all citizens have access to quality library and information services. The agency is responsible for administering federal and state funds for the more than 200 public libraries in Alabama. Building renovations were completed in April…

Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

200

Ground-water resources of the Alabama River Basin in Alabama; Subarea 8 of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint and Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa River Basins  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Drought conditions in the 1980's focused attention on the multiple uses of the surface- and ground-water resources in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) and Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa (ACT) River basins in Georgia, Alabama, and Florida. State and Federal agencies also have proposed projects that would require additional water resources and revise operating practices within the river basins. The existing and proposed water projects create conflicting demands for water by the States and emphasize the problem of water-resource allocation. This study was initiated to describe ground-water availability in the Alabama River basin of Alabama, Subarea 8 of the ACF and ACT River basins, and to estimate the possible effects of increased ground-water use within the basin. Subarea 8 encompasses about 6,750 square miles in the Coastal Plain physiographic province in central and southwestern Alabama. The Alabama River extends from the juncture of the Coosa and Tallapoosa Rivers near the city of Montgomery, to its juncture with the Tombigbee River, near the town of Calvert in Washington County. Subarea 8 includes the Cahaba River basin from the physiographic 'Fall Line' at the city of Centreville in Bibb County, to its mouth in Dallas County; and the Alabama River basin from near Montgomery to the Alabama River cutoff, about 6 miles northeast of its juncture with the Tombigbee River. The study area is underlain by sedimentary deposits of Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Quaternary ages. Major aquifers underlying Subarea 8 are, from shallowest to deepest, the Coastal lowlands aquifer system, the Floridan aquifer system, the Lisbon aquifer, The Nanafalia-Clayton aquifer, the Ripley aquifer, the Eutaw aquifer, and the Tuscaloosa aquifer. The conceptual model described for this study qualitatively subdivides the ground-water flow system into local (shallow), intermediate, and regional (deep) flow regimes. Ground-water discharge to tributaries mainly is from local and intermediate flow regimes and varies seasonally. The regional flow regime probably approximates steady- state conditions and discharges chiefly to major drains such as the Alabama River, and in upstream areas, to the Cahaba River. Ground-water discharge to major drains originates from all flow regimes. Mean-annual ground-water discharge to streams (baseflow) is considered to approximate the long-term, average recharge to ground water. The mean-annual baseflow was estimated using an automated hydrograph- separation method, and represents discharge from the local, intermediate, and regional flow regimes of the ground-water flow system. Mean-annual baseflow discharging from Subarea 8 was estimated to be 20,300 cubic feet per second. Mean-annual baseflow represented about 61 percent of total mean-annual stream discharge for the period of record. Estimated and measured stream discharge for selected sites on the Alabama River and its tributaries were compiled for the years 1941, 1954, and 1986, during which sustained droughts occurred throughout most of the ACF-ACT area. Stream discharges were assumed to be sustained entirely by baseflow during the latter periods of these droughts. Estimated baseflow near the end of the individual drought years was about 17 percent of the estimated mean-annual baseflow at the Alabama River cutoff, the most downstream point of Subarea 8. The potential exists for the development of ground-water resources on a regional scale throughout Subarea 8. Estimated ground-water use in 1990 was less than 1 percent of the estimated mean-annual baseflow, and about 2.4 percent of baseflow during the droughts of 1941, 1954, and 1986. Because ground-water use in Subareas 5 and 6 represents a relatively minor percentage of ground-water recharge, even a large increase in ground-water use in Subareas 5 and 6 in Georgia probably would have little effect on the quantity of ground water and surface water in Alabama. In addition, ground-water use in Subarea 3 in Georgia probably h

Kidd, Robert E.; Atkins, J. Brian; Scott, John C.

1997-01-01

201

Thomas Jefferson, the Community College and the Pursuit of Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Demonstrates the strong philosophical ties between Thomas Jefferson's views on public education and the modern day community college. Reviews Jefferson's proposals for publicly financed education and for increased access to education and discusses the mission of the community college. (AYC)

Vaughan, George B.

1980-01-01

202

Patterns of infant mortality and cancer death in Alabama, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim  To use recent information of infant and cancer mortality in Alabama counties of the USA to test their relationships with social,\\u000a economic, and environmental conditions at a large scale to identify potential public health issues.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Subjects and methods  The data of infant mortality rates and cancer deaths in the recent years, biodiversity, including species number of plants,\\u000a fishes, reptiles, and amphibians,

Xiongwen Chen

2009-01-01

203

High oil rates gauged from Haynesville in Alabama  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that oil wells with among the highest flowing capacities in the onshore U.S. are being completed in Alabama as operators press development of North Frisco City field. Five wells have been completed in the Monroe County field. A sixth well will be drilled in September, and four more locations have been identified on the 2,100 acre leasehold. The area is 4 miles west of Monroeville, Ala. Nuevo Energy Co., Houston, completed the field's most recent well earlier this month.

Not Available

1992-08-24

204

Major Thoroughfare Plan, Foley, Alabama.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report presents a major thoroughfare plan for the City of Foley, Alabama. The plan provides a framework for development of Foley's streets on a neighborhood and community basis that is consistent with the Regional Transportation Plan. The plan will ac...

1973-01-01

205

Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1995.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Communicating ideas and information that will help counselors to implement the counseling role and develop the profession of counseling is the purpose of this journal. The first issue in volume 21 contains the following articles: "Policies and Procedures for Reporting Child Abuse in Alabama: Considerations for Counselors, Teachers, and School…

Abbott, Gypsy, Ed.; Elliott, Glenda R., Ed.

1995-01-01

206

Domestic Violence in Alabama, 2003.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report was produced by the Statistical Analysis Center of the Alabama Criminal Justice Information Center. Data presented in this report was provided by the Uniform Crime Reporting Division of ACJIC for the calendar year of 2003. For purposes of this...

2003-01-01

207

The 1965 Alabama Literacy Test.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews a fascinating lesson plan designed to acquaint students with the methods and devices used to deny blacks the right to vote in the pre-Civil Rights era south. Students take the same test that Alabama required of resident blacks to vote. Includes a copy of the exceptionally difficult test. (MJP)

Social Education, 1996

1996-01-01

208

Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1996.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document consists of the two issues of the "Alabama Counseling Association Journal" published during 1996. The focus of the journal is on communicating ideas and information that will help counselors to implement the counseling role and develop the profession of counseling. Issue number 1 includes the following articles: "Commitment through…

Farrell, R. Joel, II, Ed.

1996-01-01

209

Thomas Jefferson and Slaves: Teaching an American Paradox. Lesson Plan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides 11 primary sources that enable students to contemplate how Thomas Jefferson and his slaves produced a culture and community at Monticello (Virginia) and his other plantations. Focuses on Jefferson's relationship with his slaves, particularly addressing Sally Hemming's relationship with Jefferson, in order to study the complicated history…

Fehn, Bruce

2000-01-01

210

Strangeness production experiments at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

Experimental results for photo- and electro-production of open strangeness from the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility are discussed. The results are from work completed by mid-2003 on elementary $KY$ production, nuclear targets, and the exotic $\\Theta^+$ state. It is shown how the increases in intensity and precision of JLab experiments over earlier work have allowed new phenomena to become measurable.

Schumacher, Reinhard

2004-06-01

211

To: Thomas Jefferson. Re: Your Proposal.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A tongue-in-check response claimed to be from the prime minister of England to Thomas Jefferson regarding the "Declaration of Independence." Claims that the declaration fails to meet recently adopted specifications for proposals to the Crown and lacks a line-item budget, citations from recent literature, and measurable goals. (MLF)

Deyoe-Chiullan, Rita M.

1993-01-01

212

Thomas Jefferson versus Wellesley High School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One reason for the concern with high schools is that their performance limits, sometimes severely, what the colleges and universities can accomplish. Thomas Jefferson's views of education are used as criteria to judge the quality of liberal education the author received from Wellesley (Massachusetts) High School. (RM)

Loss, Richard

1983-01-01

213

Strategies: The Thomas Jefferson University Model.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Thomas Jefferson University (Pennsylvania) has two dental professional hygiene education programs, one a prelicensure, entry-level clinical education program and the other a postcertificate or baccalaureate degree completion program. Recruitment strategies include prerequisite restructuring and part-time programs, and retention efforts begin with…

Forrest, Jane L.

1991-01-01

214

The Hall D Detector at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

The Hall D experiment at Jefferson Lab is part of the proposed CEBAF upgrade to 12 GeV beam energy. The Experiment will study gluonic excitations of mesons in the 1.5 to 2.5 GeV/c{sup 2} mass region using an 8 to 9 GeV beam of linearly polarized photons.

Curtis A. Meyer (Hall D Collaboration)

2000-12-12

215

Ecological characterization atlas of coastal Alabama: Map narrative  

SciTech Connect

The southwest Alabama coastal region is the study area of this narrative and accompanying maps. The offshore area includes the region from the State-Federal demarcation to the shoreline, and the inland area includes Mobile and Baldwin Counties. These counties are included in the following six US Geological Survey 1:100,000-scale topographic maps: Citronelle, Atmore, Mobile, Bay Minette, Biloxi, and Pensacola. The data in this atlas meet all cartographic and narrative specifications of the Minerals Management Service and the US Fish and Wildlife Service and should be useful for coastal decisionmakers. The topics included within this map narrative are biological resources; socioeconomic features; soils and landforms; oil, gas, and mineral resources; and hydrology and climatology. 21 figs., 52 tabs.

Smith, M.F. Jr. (ed.) (Soils Systems, Inc., Marietta, GA (USA))

1984-08-01

216

Department of surgery/college of medicine university of South alabama: historical and contemporaneous perspectives.  

PubMed

Many members of the medical profession in Mobile, Alabama, have exemplified a strong commitment to the education of their colleagues and successors, a tradition (L., traditio, "to hand over") that dates from the early 18th century. The Mobile General (city/county) Hospital (1830 to 1970) and its successor, the Medical Center, University of South Alabama (1971 to the present), were the institutional foci of those endeavors. Because it is individuals who create, design, and vitalize institutions, this monograph is an acknowledgment of the accomplishments of those who gave that endeavor purpose, direction, and meaning, particularly with reference to the evolution of surgical education. Numerous clinical and societal forces-cultural, economic, political, and social-influenced that evolution. This compilation gives attribution to a legacy of commitment to health and medical/surgical care, education, and research within southern Alabama. PMID:24887719

Richards, William O; Luterman, Arnold; Simmons, Jon D; Rodning, Charles B

2014-05-01

217

Prattville, Alabama--Governmental Management Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study includes an analysis of management of the Prattville, Alabama government. The study also includes, ways for systematically viewing both planning and management as continuous processes. (Author)

1973-01-01

218

Harmonic Lasing Characterization at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

Harmonic lasing is normally suppressed because of lasing at the fundamental wavelength. It can, however, be achieved by using any of several methods that suppress fundamental lasing. In this paper we discuss two methods used at Jefferson Lab. The first is to use the characteristics of dielectric coatings to allow harmonic lasing at cavity lengths longer than the synchronous length for the fundamental. The second is to use a dielectric coating that has little reflectivity at the fundamental. This allows us to directly compare fundamental and harmonic lasing with the same optical resonator and electron beam. We present measurement carried out at Jefferson Lab using the IR Upgrade FEL operating at 0.53, 0.94, 1.04, 1.6, and 2.8 microns in which both schemes are used to produce lasing at both the 3rd and 5th harmonic of the fundamental.

Stephen Benson; Michelle D. Shinn

2006-08-27

219

Making the Case for Jefferson Lab  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This chapter is a personal account of the initial planning and competition for a new laboratory, which eventually became known as the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, with the official nickname "Jefferson Lab." The period covered starts as far back as 1964, with the introduction of quarks, and extends up to the late 1980s after the initial team was assembled, the superconducting design was in place, and construction was well underway. I describe some of the major experiments that were proposed to justify the laboratory, reflect on the present status of those initially proposed experiments, and very briefly outline some of the new ideas that emerged after the laboratory was constructed. The science is presented in a simple manner intended for a lay audience, with some of the ideas illustrated by cartoons that were often used in popular lectures given during this period.

Gross, Franz

2011-05-01

220

Jefferson Lab Data Acquisition Run Control System  

SciTech Connect

A general overview of the Jefferson Lab data acquisition run control system is presented. This run control system is designed to operate the configuration, control, and monitoring of all Jefferson Lab experiments. It controls data-taking activities by coordinating the operation of DAQ sub-systems, online software components and third-party software such as external slow control systems. The main, unique feature which sets this system apart from conventional systems is its incorporation of intelligent agent concepts. Intelligent agents are autonomous programs which interact with each other through certain protocols on a peer-to-peer level. In this case, the protocols and standards used come from the domain-independent Foundation for Intelligent Physical Agents (FIPA), and the implementation used is the Java Agent Development Framework (JADE). A lightweight, XML/RDF-based language was developed to standardize the description of the run control system for configuration purposes.

Vardan Gyurjyan; Carl Timmer; David Abbott; William Heyes; Edward Jastrzembski; David Lawrence; Elliott Wolin

2004-10-01

221

Overview of Nuclear Physics at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for experimental nuclear physics. This facility is presently being upgraded, which will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in nuclear, hadronic, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

McKeown, Robert D. [JLAB

2013-08-01

222

Strangeness photoproduction with CLAS at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

The CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab has been used to measure the elementary photoproduction of kaons and hyperons in the energy range of the nucleon resonances. Data have been obtained for the reactions gamma + p --> K{sup +} + {Lambda}, Sigma{sup o}, Lambda(1405)/Sigma(1385), Lambda(1520). These channels test our understanding of pseudoscalar meson photoproduction, and may extend our knowledge of the spectrum of non-strange baryons which decay to strangeness-containing final states.

Reinhard Schumacher

2000-01-01

223

Jefferson Lab: A Long Decade of Physics  

SciTech Connect

Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 and started operating in about 1996. 2011 is an appropriate time to try to take a look at the results that have appeared, what has been learned, and what has been exciting for our scientific community. Rather than attempt to construct a coherent view with a single author or at least a small number, we have, instead, invited small groups of people who have been intimately involved in the work itself to make contributions. These people are accelerator experts, experimentalists and theorists, staff and users. We have, in the main, sought reviews of the actual sub-fields. The primary exception is the first paper, which sets the scene as it was, in one person's view, at the beginning of Jefferson Lab. In reviewing the material as it appeared, I was impressed by the breadth of the material. Major advances are documented from form factors to structure functions, from spectroscopy to physics beyond the standard model of nuclear and particle physics. Recognition of the part played by spin, the helicities of the beams, the polarizations of the targets, and the polarizations of final state particles, is inescapable. Access to the weak interaction amplitudes through measurements of the parity violating asymmetries has led to quantification of the strange content of the nucleon and the neutron radius of lead, and to measurements of the electroweak mixing angle. Lattice QCD calculations flourished and are setting the platform for understanding of the spectroscopy of baryons and mesons. But the star of the game was the accelerator. Its performance enabled the physics and also the use of the technology to generate a powerful free electron laser. These important pieces of Jefferson Lab physics are given their place. As the third Director of Jefferson Lab, and on behalf of the other physicists and others presently associated with the lab, I would like to express my admiration and gratitude for the efforts of the directors, chief scientists, associate directors, physicists, engineers, technicians and administrators who made it all possible. In sum, we should celebrate the science that Jefferson Lab has realized in this, its first long decade of physics.

Hugh Montgomery

2011-06-01

224

Alabama Public Library Service Annual Report, 1990.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This annual report highlights the accomplishments of the Alabama Public Library Service (APLS) during 1990. Introductory materials include a map of Alabama's Congressional districts, photographs of the executive board of APLS, and comments from the chairman of the executive board and from APLS' director. Accomplishments are reported under the…

Alabama Public Library Service, Montgomery.

225

Coosa River Navigation, Georgia and Alabama.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes the proposal for the construction of six single-lift locks at the existing Alabama Power Company's Walter Bouldin, Mitchell, Lay, Logan Martin, H. Neely Henry, and Weiss Dams on the Coosa River between Montgomery, Alabama, and Rome, G...

1972-01-01

226

Alabama Agricultural Statistics, 1993-1998.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the 1993-1998 Alabama Agricultural Statistics publication. The Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries will strive to help farms of all sizes grow and prosper in spite of factors that it has so little control, such as foreign monetary pro...

1998-01-01

227

Alabama Education Quick Facts, 2009-2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This brochure presents state statistics; Alabama public schools 2009-10; Alabama State Board of Education members; financial data; public school size and enrollment, 2009-10 school year; transportation; school meals; school personnel, 2009-2010; graduation requirements; student assessment; additional enrollment; and dropouts in school year 2008-09.

Alabama Department of Education, 2010

2010-01-01

228

2008-2009 Alabama Education Report Card  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Year after year, the goal of educators, parents, and concerned citizens throughout Alabama is to provide this state's children with the highest level of quality education possible. The future of Alabama's businesses, industries, commerce, labor force, arts, humanities, and countless other areas are determined by the education that is provided to…

Alabama Department of Education, 2010

2010-01-01

229

Outdoor recreational opportunities in Alabama  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What comes to mind when you think about outdoor recreational opportunities? Diagram of the recreational opportunities to enjoy First we will look at the forest services and recreational opportunities. Forest Services There is plenty of hunting opportunities in Alabama to enjoy. Hunting Opportunities Outdoor tips can be essential when enjoying the outdoors. Outdoor Tips What a better way to spend a weekend then going fishing with family and friends. Places to Fish A great way to spend a weekend could also consist of hiking. Hiking Now ...

Smith, Adam

2012-04-04

230

Alabama's Appalachian overthrust amid exploratory drilling resurgence  

SciTech Connect

Oil and gas exploration has been carried out sporadically in the Appalachian overthrust region of Alabama for years, but recently interest in the play has had a major resurgence. The Appalachian overthrust region of Alabama is best exposed in the valley and ridge physiographic province in the northeast part of the state. Resistant ridges of sandstone and chert and valleys of shales and carbonate have been thrust toward the northwest. Seismic data show that this structural style continues under the Cretaceous overlap. The surface and subsurface expression of the Alabama overthrust extends for more than 4,000 sq miles. Oil and gas have been produced for many years from Cambro-Ordovician, Ordovician, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian rocks in the nearby Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi and the Cumberland plateau in Tennessee. The same zones are also potential producing horizons in the Alabama overthrust region.

Taylor, J.D. (J.R. Holland and Associates, Northport, AL (US)); Epsman, M.L.

1991-06-24

231

Borrelia sp. in Ticks Recovered from White-tailed Deer in Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

Six hundred sixty-five hunter-killed white-tailed deer (Odocoileus vrirginianus) from 18 counties in Alabama (USA) were examined for ticks. Most of the collections were made at state-operated wildlife management areas. Four species of ticks (n = 4,527) were recovered: the lone star tick Amblyomma americanum (n = 482); the Gulf Coast tick A. maculatum (n = 11); the winter tick Dermacentor

Gary R. Mullen; Lance A. Durden; James C. Wright

1992-01-01

232

Thirty Thousand Years of Vegetation Changes in the Alabama Hills, Owens Valley, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty packrat (Neotoma) middens recovered from three sites (1265-1535 m) in the Alabama Hills, Inyo County, California, provide a ca. 31,450-yr record of vegetation change. Located ca. 7 km east of the Sierra Nevada, the middens document that Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma), Joshua tree (Yucca brevifolia), and bitterbush (Purshia tridentata) occupied the site between 31,450 and 19,070 yr B.P. Joshua

Peter A. Koehler; R. Scott Anderson

1995-01-01

233

First Floor Plan (Section A) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

First Floor Plan (Section A) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

234

Ground Floor Plan (Section A) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Ground Floor Plan (Section A) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

235

Second Floor Plan (Section A) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Second Floor Plan (Section A) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

236

Second Floor Plan (Section B) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Second Floor Plan (Section B) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

237

U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

238

First Floor Plan (Section B) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

First Floor Plan (Section B) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

239

Ground Floor Plan (Section B) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Ground Floor Plan (Section B) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

240

75 FR 81640 - President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home National Historic Site  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Account Number: 6365-SZM] President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home National...Arkansas 71801, as the ``President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home National...fee simple, unencumbered title to the William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home...

2010-12-28

241

North and South Elevations U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

North and South Elevations - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

242

Geohydrology and susceptibility of major aquifers to surface contamination in Alabama; area 2  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The major aquifers in the study area (Blount, Cherokee, DeKalb, Etowah, Jackson, and Marshall Counties in northern Alabama) are the Knox-Shady, Tuscumbia-Fort Payne, and Pottsville aquifers. These aquifers are sources of public water supply and are recharged in each of the six counties. Major aquifers are susceptible to contamination from the surface throughout their recharge areas. In addition, water in these aquifers is highly susceptible to contamination in general topographic settings such as poorly drained areas and in areas where specific features such as sinkholes occur. (USGS)

Bossong, C. R.

1989-01-01

243

Water use, availability, and net demand in the Tennessee River watershed within Alabama, 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey worked in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs—Office of Water Resources to estimate water use and water availability for 2005 for the portion of the Tennessee River watershed contained within the borders of the State of Alabama. Estimates of water use and availability are an important part of planning for population and economic growth in the Tennessee River watershed in Alabama. Total water use for the region in 2005 was 5,197 million gallons per day (Mgal/d). Total surface-water withdrawals were 5,139 Mgal/d, and total groundwater withdrawals were about 58 Mgal/d. About 92 percent of the total water withdrawn was surface water used for once-through cooling for thermoelectric power generation. Self-supplied industrial and public-supply water uses accounted for the next greatest uses of water, constituting approximately 49 and 42 percent, respectively, of the total water use excluding thermoelectric power use. Summaries of water use by county and subbasin indicated the areas of greatest water withdrawals and use within the Tennessee River watershed. Limestone (2,012 Mgal/d), Jackson (1,498 Mgal/d), and Colbert (1,363 Mgal/d) Counties were the counties with the greatest total water use in 2005 and had large amounts of water withdrawn for thermoelectric power generation. When water use from thermoelectric power generation was not considered, the counties with the greatest withdrawals were Morgan (124 Mgal/d), Madison (72 Mgal/d), Colbert (69 Mgal/d), and Lawrence (67 Mgal/d). The subbasin with the greatest total water use was Wheeler Lake (2,260 Mgal/d) in the Middle Tennessee—Elk subregion. Wheeler Lake subbasin also had the greatest public-supply, irrigation, industrial, mining, and thermoelectric withdrawals of any subbasin in the Tennessee River watershed within Alabama. Total water availability for the Tennessee River watershed within Alabama was estimated to be 34,567 Mgal/d by the Geological Survey of Alabama. Net water demand for the watershed was calculated by subtracting the Tennessee Valley Authority estimates of return flow from water withdrawals. The net water demand was 136 Mgal/d, which is less than 1 percent of the estimated water available.

Gill, Amy C.; Harper, Michael J.; Littlepage, Thomas M.

2013-01-01

244

Catastrophic subsidence: An environmental hazard, shelby county, Alabama  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Induced sinkholes (catastrophic subsidence) are those caused or accelerated by human activities These sinkholes commonly result from a water level decline due to pumpage Construction activities in a cone of depression greatly increases the likelihood of sinkhole occurrence Almost all occur where cavities develop in unconsolidated deposits overlying solution openings in carbonate rocks. Triggering mechanisms resulting from water level declines are (1) loss of buoyant support of the water, (2) increased gradient and water velocity, (3) water-level fluctuations, and (4) induced recharge Construction activities triggering sinkhole development include ditching, removing overburden, drilling, movement of heavy equipment, blasting and the diversion and impoundment of drainage Triggering mechanisms include piping, saturation, and loading Induced sinkholes resulting from human water development/management activities are most predictable in a youthful karst area impacted by groundwater withdrawals Shape, depth, and timing of catastrophic subsidence can be predicted in general terms Remote sensing techniques are used in prediction of locations of catastrophic subsidence. This provides a basis for design and relocation of structures such as a gas pipeline, dam, or building Utilization of techniques and a case history of the relocation of a pipeline are described

Lamoreaux, Philip E.; Newton, J. G.

1986-03-01

245

Building in the Coastal Counties: A Guide to the Permitting Process with Special Emphasis on the Coastal Area.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This booklet provides general information to the permitting process for some of the more common activities conducted within Alabama's two coastal counties with special emphasis on those permits which may be required within the Coastal Area.

1980-01-01

246

Jefferson Lab's Journey into the Nucleus  

SciTech Connect

The year 1969 saw the publication of the first results indicating that hard scattering centres exist deep inside protons. A collaboration between the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was using SLAC's new high-energy electron LINAC to pioneer a rich new field in the study of the nucleus--deep inelastic scattering. Their measurements revealed that nucleons are made up of point-like particles, which Richard Feynman dubbed ''partons''. Thirty-five years on, studies of the parton-nature of the nucleus continue, not only at the traditional high-energy centres, but also at lower-energy laboratories, and in particular at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Virginia. Jefferson Lab is home to the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). Its main mission is to explore the atomic nucleus and the fundamental building-blocks of matter. As part of this mission, researchers there study the transition from the picture of the nucleus as a bound state of neutrons and protons to its deeper structure in terms of quarks and gluons--in other words, the transition from the hadronic degrees of freedom of nuclear physics to the quark-gluon degrees of freedom of high-energy physics. In exploring this transition, a wide range of experiments has been performed, from measurements of elastic form factors at large momentum transfers to studies of deep inelastic scattering. An array of spectrometers together with electron-beam energies of up to 5.7 GeV has allowed the laboratory to make significant contributions to this field. This article describes three experiments, each aimed at improving our understanding of a different aspect of the partonic nature of matter. The first, a classic deep inelastic scattering experiment, seeks to further our understanding of the composition of nucleon spin. The second experiment studies the concept of quark-hadron duality--a link between the deep inelastic region and the resonance region. The third experiment uses the atomic nucleus as a laboratory to improve understanding of the propagation and hadronization of quarks. Jefferson Lab's ability to perform this range of measurements is illustrated by the plot from the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) shown on the cover of this magazine, where the hadronic resonance peaks are seen to be washed out as one goes from the delta resonance around 1.2 GeV to higher invariant masses and into the deep inelastic scattering realm of quarks and gluons.

Douglas Higinbotham

2004-11-01

247

Strangeness Physics with CLAS at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

We review recent developments in strangeness photo- and electro- production off the proton and neutron, as investigated using CLAS in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. By measuring sufficient spin observables one can decompose the reaction mechanism into elementary amplitudes. We discuss progress toward this end in recent data from CLAS, including cross sections and spin observables. We next discuss new results on the mass distribution of the Lambda(1405), which shows signs of being a composite meson-baryon object of mixed isospin. The work on other hyperons such as the Xi resonances will be mentioned, and future prospects for the CLAS program outlined.

Reinhard Schumacher

2010-08-01

248

Strangeness Physics with CLAS at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

We review recent developments in strangeness photo- and electro- production off the proton and neutron, as investigated using CLAS in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. By measuring sufficient spin observables one can decompose the reaction mechanism into elementary amplitudes. We discuss progress toward this end in recent data from CLAS, including cross sections and spin observables. We next discuss new results on the mass distribution of the {Lambda}(1405), which shows signs of being a composite meson-baryon object of mixed isospin. The work on other hyperons such as the {Xi} resonances will be mentioned, and future prospects for the CLAS program outlined.

Schumacher, Reinhard [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

2010-08-05

249

Runtime accelerator configuration tools at Jefferson Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

RF and magnet system configuration and monitoring tools are being implemented at Jefferson Lab to improve system reliability and reduce operating costs. They are prototype components of the Momentum Management System being developed. The RF is of special interest because it affects the momentum and momentum spread of the beam, and because of the immediate financial benefit of managing the klystron DC supply power. The authors describe present and planned monitoring of accelerating system parameters, use of these data, RF system performance calculations, and procedures for magnet configuration for handling beam of any of five beam energies to any of three targets.

Tiefenback, M.G.; Doolittle, L.; Benesch, J.F.

1997-07-01

250

Jefferson Lab personnel safety fast beam kicker system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The CEBAF accelerator at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) uses a continuous electron beam with up to 800 kilowatts of average beam power. The laboratory beam containment policy requires that in the event of an errant beam striking a beam blocking device, the beam must be shut off by three methods in less than 1 millisecond. One method

K. Mahoney; O. Garza; E. Stitts; H. Areti

1997-01-01

251

Thomas Jefferson: The Architect of Democracy. Classroom Focus.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a biographical sketch and teaching activities on the life of Thomas Jefferson. Asserts that the world's political geography changed dramatically during his lifetime and presents a classroom lesson on this topic. Includes a chronology of Jefferson's life and six quotations exemplifying his political and social views. (CFR)

Peterson, Merrill D.

1994-01-01

252

PC/104 Embedded IOCs at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

Jefferson Lab has developed embedded IOCs based on PC/104 single board computers (SBC) for low level control systems. The PC/104 IOCs run EPICS on top of the RTEMS operating system. Two types of control system configurations are used in different applications, PC/104 SBC with commercial PC/104 I/O cards and PC/104 SBC with custom designed FPGA-based boards. RTEMS was built with CEXP shell to run on the PC/104 SBC. CEXP shell provides the function of dynamic object loading, which is similar to the widely used VxWorks operating system. Standard software configurations were setup for PC/104 IOC application development to provide a familiar format for new projects as well as ease the conversion of applications from VME based IOCs to PC/104 IOCs. Many new projects at Jefferson Lab are going to employ PC/104 SBCs as IOCs and some applications have already been running them for accelerator operations. The PC/104 - RTEMS IOC provides a free open source Real-Time Operating System (RTOS), low cost/maintenance, easily installed/ configured, flexible, and reliable solution for accelerator control and 12GeV Upgrade projects.

Jianxun Yan, Trent Allison, Sue Witherspoon, Anthony Cuffe

2009-10-01

253

Alabama Magnet School Races toward Job Market.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes Alabama's Brewbaker Technology Magnet High School, which was built for only $70 per square foot. Explores the relationship between its school-to-work, collaborative-learning approach and the building's design. (EV)

Jones, Morgan

2002-01-01

254

40 CFR 81.58 - Columbus (Georgia)-Phenix City (Alabama) Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Montgomery County, Pike County, Russell County. In the State of Georgia: Chattahoochee County, Dooly County, Harris County, Marion County, Muscogee County, Quitman County, Schley County, Stewart County, Sumter County, Talbot County, Taylor County,...

2013-07-01

255

Geohydrology and susceptibility of major aquifers to surface contamination in Alabama; Area 8  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Environmental Management, is conducting a series of geohydrologic studies to delineate the major aquifers and their susceptibility to contamination in Alabama. This report delineates and describes the geohydrology and susceptibility of the major aquifers to contamination in Area 8--Autauga, Chilton, Elmore, Lowndes, and Montgomery Counties. The major aquifers in the study area are the Eutaw, Gordo, and Coker aquifers of Cretaceous age. One or more of these aquifers are sources of public water supply in each of the five counties. The recharge areas for these aquifers are in Autauga, Chilton, Elmore, and Montgomery and Prattville. Maximum groundwater use in the Prattville area is more than 8 mgd (million gallons per day). Estimated maximum groundwater withdrawal for all uses in the study area is about 65 mgd. The potentiometric map of the Gordo aquifer indicates that the Alabama River may serve as a recharging boundary to the Gordo aquifer along the flood plain of the river in the Montgomery-Prattville area. The river also is acting as a recharging boundary to the Eutaw and Coker aquifers, where the potentiometric surfaces in the aquifers have been lowered. All recharge areas for the major aquifers are susceptible to contamination from the surface. However, the areas that are highly susceptible to contamination extend from Jemison to Clanton in Chilton County where the Coker aquifer generally is < 100 ft below land surface, and the flood plains of the Alabama, Coosa, and Tallapoosa Rivers, which are underlain by alluvial deposits that are in hydraulic contact with the major aquifers. Within the highly susceptible areas, the areas especially susceptible to contamination are the flood plain of the Alabama River in the Montgomery area and the flood plain of the Tallapoosa River. Pumpage from the major aquifers in this area has significantly lowered the potentiometric surface in the aquifers resulting in a downward gradient between the major aquifers and the Alabama River and the alluvial deposits underlying the flood plain along the river. (Lantz-PTT)

Scott, J. C.; Cobb, R. H.; Castleberry, R. D.

1987-01-01

256

76 FR 13615 - B&B Manufacturing Site; Mobile, Mobile County, AL; Notice of Settlement  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...EPA-RO4-SFUND-2011-0192, FRL-9280-4] B&B Manufacturing Site; Mobile, Mobile County, AL; Notice of Settlement AGENCY: Environmental...costs concerning the B&B Manufacturing Site located in Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama for publication....

2011-03-14

257

The Jefferson lab FEL driver ERLs  

SciTech Connect

Jefferson Lab has - for over a decade - been operating high power IR and UV FELs using CW energy recovering linacs based on DC photocathode electron sources and CEBAF SRF technology. These machines have unique combinations of beam quality, power, and operational flexibility, and thus offer significant opportunity for experiments that use low and medium energy (several tens - few hundreds of MeV) electron beams. We will describe the systems and detail their present and near-term (potential) performance. Recent internal-target analysis and validation testing will be discussed, and schemes for single- and two-pass fixed target operation described. An introduction to subsequent discussions of beam quality and upgrade paths to polarized operation/higher energy will be given.

Douglas, David R. [JLAB; Tennant, Christopher D. [JLAB

2013-11-01

258

APEX: A Prime EXperiment at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

APEX is an experiment at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) in Virginia, USA, that searches for a new gauge boson (A' ) with sub-GeV mass and coupling to ordinary matter of g'~ (10{sup -6} - 10{sup -2} )e. Electrons impinge upon a fixed target of high-Z material. An A' is produced via a process analogous to photon bremsstrahlung, decaying to an e +e pair. A test run was held in July of 2010, covering m{sub A'} = 175 to 250 MeV and couplings g'/e > 10{sup -3} . A full run is approved and will cover m{sub A'} 65 to 525 MeV and g'/e > 2.3 x 10{sup -4} .

Beacham, James Baker [New York U.

2013-02-01

259

Nucleon spin structure at Jefferson Lab  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the past decade an extensive experimental program to measure the spin structure of the nucleon has been carried out in the three halls at Jefferson Lab. Using a longitudinally polarized beam scattering off longitudinally or transversely polarized 3He, NH3 and ND3 targets, the double spin asymmetries A? and A? were measured, providing data of impressively high precision that gives a better understanding of the structure of the nucleon in the deep inelastic scattering and the valence quarks regions. The virtual photon asymmetries A1,2 and polarized structure functions g1,2 were also extracted for the proton, neutron and deuteron over large kinematic ranges, allowing the extraction of first moments and the testing of sum rules and duality.

Biselli, Angela

2011-10-01

260

Jefferson Lab 12 GEV Cebaf Upgrade  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The existing continuous electron beam accelerator facility (CEBAF) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) is a 5-pass, recirculating cw electron Linac operating at ~6 GeV and is devoted to basic research in nuclear physics. The 12 GeV CEBAF Upgrade is a $310 M project, sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Physics, that will expand its research capabilities substantially by doubling the maximum energy and adding major new experimental apparatus. The project received construction approval in September 2008 and has started the major procurement process. The cryogenic aspects of the 12 GeV CEBAF Upgrade includes: doubling the accelerating voltages of the Linacs by adding ten new high-performance, superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cryomodules (CMs) to the existing 42 1/4 cryomodules; doubling of the 2 K cryogenics plant; and the addition of eight superconducting magnets.

Rode, C. H.

2010-04-01

261

The Jefferson Lab 1 KW IR FEL  

SciTech Connect

The Jefferson Lab (JLab) IR Demo Free Electron Laser (FEL) has completed commissioning and is initiating user service. The FEL - a high repetition rate, low extraction efficiency wiggler-driven optical cavity resonator - produces over 1 kW of tuneable light on intervals in a 3-6 lim wavelength range. It is driven by a 35-48 MeV, 5 mA superconducting RF (SRF) based energy-recovering continuous wave (CW) electron linac. The driver accelerator meets requirements imposed by low energy, high current, and a demand for stringent beam control at the wiggler and during energy recovery. These constraints are driven by the need for six-dimensional phase space management, the existence of deleterious collective phenomena (space charge, wake-fields, beam break-up, and coherent synchrotron radiation), and interactions between the FEL and the accelerator RF. The authors detail the system design, relate commissioning highlights, and discuss present performance.

D. Douglas for the Jefferson Lab IR Demo FEL Team

2000-08-01

262

JEFFERSON LAB 12 GEV CEBAF UPGRADE  

SciTech Connect

The existing continuous electron beam accelerator facility (CEBAF) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) is a 5-pass, recirculating cw electron Linac operating at approx6 GeV and is devoted to basic research in nuclear physics. The 12 GeV CEBAF Upgrade is a $310 M project, sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Physics, that will expand its research capabilities substantially by doubling the maximum energy and adding major new experimental apparatus. The project received construction approval in September 2008 and has started the major procurement process. The cryogenic aspects of the 12 GeV CEBAF Upgrade includes: doubling the accelerating voltages of the Linacs by adding ten new high-performance, superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cryomodules (CMs) to the existing 42 1/4 cryomodules; doubling of the 2 K cryogenics plant; and the addition of eight superconducting magnets.

Rode, C. H. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, 23606 (United States)

2010-04-09

263

Debris Spillway and Chute for Millers Ferry Powerhouse, Alabama River, Alabama: Hydraulic Model Investigation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A 1:25-scale model of the Millers Ferry Lock and Dam, Alabama River, Alabama, reproduced a 24-ft-wide by 170-ft-long ogee spillway and existing powerhouse, 200 ft of the approach immediately upstream of the spillway crest, and 600 ft of exit channel. The ...

D. R. Cooper

1992-01-01

264

The Jefferson Lab High Power Light Source  

SciTech Connect

Jefferson Lab has designed, built and operated two high average power free-electron lasers (FEL) using superconducting RF (SRF) technology and energy recovery techniques. Between 1999-2001 Jefferson Lab operated the IR Demo FEL. This device produced over 2 kW in the mid-infrared, in addition to producing world record average powers in the visible (50 W), ultraviolet (10 W) and terahertz range (50 W) for tunable, short-pulse (< ps) light. This FEL was the first high power demonstration of an accelerator configuration that is being exploited for a number of new accelerator-driven light source facilities that are currently under design or construction. The driver accelerator for the IR Demo FEL uses an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) configuration that improves the energy efficiency and lowers both the capital and operating cost of such devices by recovering most of the power in the spent electron beam after optical power is extracted from the beam. The IR Demo FEL was de-commissioned in late 2001 for an upgraded FEL for extending the IR power to over 10 kW and the ultraviolet power to over 1 kW. The FEL Upgrade achieved 10 kW of average power in the mid-IR (6 microns) in July of 2004, and its IR operation currently is being extended down to 1 micron. In addition, we have demonstrated the capability of on/off cycling and recovering over a megawatt of electron beam power without diminishing machine performance. A complementary UV FEL will come on-line within the next year. This paper presents a summary of the FEL characteristics, user community accomplishments with the IR Demo, and planned user experiments.

James R. Boyce

2006-01-01

265

Geohydrology and susceptibility of major aquifers to surface contamination in Alabama; area 6  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report delineates and describes the geohyrology and susceptibility of the major aquifers to contamination in Area 6, Greene, Marengo, Pickens, Sumter, and Tuscaloosa Counties in west-central Alabama. The major aquifers in the study area are the Nanafalia, Eutaw, Gordo, and Coker aquifers of Tertiary and Cretaceous age. The recharge areas for one or more of these aquifers are in each of the five counties. East aquifer is a source of public water supply in one or more of the five counties. All recharge areas for the major aquifers are susceptible to contamination from the surface. However, large parts of the recharge areas are in rural settings that are used for timberlands, farms, and pastures, and are several miles from pumping centers; therefore, these areas are not highly susceptible to contamination. (USGS)

DeJarnette, S. S.; Crownover, J. E.

1987-01-01

266

The "Other Jeffersons" and the State University Idea.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Thomas Jefferson and the University of Virginia as the quintessential beginning of the state university is seen as simplistic. Two contributors to the new type university, William R. Davie and Abraham Baldwin are discussed. (Author/MLW)

Johnson, Eldon L.

1987-01-01

267

"I Cannot Live Without Books": Thomas Jefferson, Bibliophile  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article discusses Thomas Jefferson's preoccupation with collecting books and some of his other intellectual pursuits, including the classification scheme he developed for his personal library. The sale of his personal library to the federal government is briefly described. (JPF)

Ladenson, Alex

1978-01-01

268

40 CFR 282.50 - Alabama State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 false Alabama State-Administered Program...AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED...TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.50...1751 W.L. Dickinson Drive, Montgomery, Alabama 36130. (1) State statutes and...

2009-07-01

269

40 CFR 282.50 - Alabama State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Alabama State-Administered Program...AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED...TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.50...1751 W.L. Dickinson Drive, Montgomery, Alabama 36130. (1) State statutes and...

2010-07-01

270

Survey of the Commercially Important Marine Finfish Landings of Alabama.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The marine finfish landings from Alabama waters and statistical zones 10 and 11 were determined for calendar year 1975. The recreational landings were determined via a four-part creel survey conducted by personnel of the Alabama Marine Resources Division....

C. W. Wade

1977-01-01

271

40 CFR 282.50 - Alabama State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Alabama State-Administered Program. 282...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED...STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.50 Alabama State-Administered Program....

2013-07-01

272

Graptemys pulchra Baur 1893: Alabama Map Turtle  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Alabama Map Turtle, Graptemys pulchra (Family Emydidae), is a moderately large riverine species endemic to the Mobile Bay drainage system of Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi. Sexual size dimorphism is pronounced, with adult females (carapace length [CL] to 273 mm) attaining more than twice the size of adult males (CL to 117 mm). The species is an inhabitant of relatively large, swift creeks and rivers, often with wide sandbars. Stream sections open to the sun and with abundant basking sites in the form of logs and brush are preferred. Six to seven clutches of 4–7 eggs are laid each year on river sandbars. Although the species is locally abundant, populations are threatened by habitat destruction, declines in their prey base, commercial collection, and vandalism. It is listed as a Species of Special Concern in Alabama.

Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Godwin, James C.; McCoy, C. J.

2014-01-01

273

Alabama's Education Report Card, 2011-2012  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educational progress has been moving in the right direction for several years in Alabama. Now, with the implementation of Alabama's own Plan 2020, an even higher level of accountability for students, teachers, administrators, support systems, and schools/school systems, Alabama is poised to experience unprecedented growth. Add to that, the…

Alabama Department of Education, 2013

2013-01-01

274

Integrated sequence stratigraphic concepts and carbonate depositional models as a predictive tool for reservoir heterogeneity: Alabama Ferry Field (Albian), Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alabama Ferry Field, Leon County, Texas, produces oil and gas from carbonate grainstones of the Albian Glen Rose {open_quotes}D{close_quotes} interval. The field extends over approximately 40,000 acres, and has estimated reserves of 100 million barrels of oil and 250 bcf of gas. It is notable for its shelf-interior position, approximately 40 km (25 miles) NW of the Glen Rose shelf

J. A. Kupecz; P. Tompson

1995-01-01

275

Sedimentological cross section of Cambro-Ordovician carbonate shelf (Knox group, Conasauga Formation) in central Alabama: facies, diagenesis, potential reservoirs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cambro-Ordovician thrust-imbricated carbonates in central Alabama are the focus of renewed exploration interest. Samples from east-west-trending core holes within the surface-most thrust plates reconstruct the carbonate shelf and shelf-edge facies before deformation. The Upper Cambrian shelf margin now is in the subsurface of Talledega County; coeval dolostones in the western part of the state represent the former shelf interior. Rock

Linda Raine Sternbach

1984-01-01

276

A lone biodetrital mound in the Chesterian (Carboniferous) of Alabama?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A carbonate mound in the Chesterian Bangor Limestone of Lawrence County, Alabama, consists chiefly of packstone and grainstone dominated by echinoderm ossicles and fragments of fenestrate bryozoans. In-situ colonies of the rugose coral Caninia flaccida comprise about 8% of the mound by volume. The exposed portion of the mound is approximately 25 m wide, 1.6 m thick at the thickest point and roughly circular in plan. The mound developed on top of a shallow ooid shoal that had been cemented and stabilised during an earlier episode of sub-aerial exposure. Subsequent flooding of the exposed shoal surface permitted establishment of the mound biota. Lateral and vertical facies relationships suggest that the mound possessed about 45 cm of synoptic relief when fully developed. Rugose corals, fenestrate and ramose bryozoans, stalked echinoderms, and sessile soft-bodied organisms encrusted by foraminifera colonised the shoal, forming a mound. Baffling resulted in deposition of mixed-fossil packstone containing locally derived debris and coated grains from the surrounding sea floor. Strong currents within the mound are indicated by preferred orientation of corals and by coarse, commonly cross-stratified grainstone in channels between neighboring coral colonies. Corals are most abundant on the windward side of the mound, where they account for about 13% of the mound compared to 6-10% in the central part of the mound, and 2-4% on the leeward flank. Biodetrital mounds such as the one described here are uncommon in upper Paleozoic strata and previously unknown in the Bangor Limestone. Of 10 carbonate buildups we examined in the Bangor in Alabama and Tennessee, only one is a biodetrital mound. Two are rugose coral-microbial reefs, one is a coral biostrome, and six are dominated by microbialite. The Bangor shelf, previously interpreted as sedimentologically simple, appears to contain many small mounds of quite varied characteristics. Also, the discovery of a biodetrital mound in the Chesterian of Alabama suggests that there may be more kinds of upper Paleozoic mounds than commonly acknowledged.

Kopaska-Merkel, David C.; Haywick, Douglas W.

2001-12-01

277

Assessing needs and resources for the home visiting system in alabama: a mixed methods approach.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to describe the initial assessment for the development of a home visiting (HV) system in a state with no existing system. We outline a mixed methods process where the quantitative component was used to identify the communities that possess "at-risk" profiles, and the qualitative component explored the resources and gaps in existing HV services. We employed a mixed methods approach, using six categories of indicators from quantitative secondary data sources to identify "at-risk" profiles for Alabama's 67 counties. A weighted score for each indicator was calculated and counties were ranked. Surveys and focus groups were conducted to further define resources and gaps of existing HV programs. The composite indicator scores identified 13 counties as having the highest level of risk. Five of these 13 communities had no HV home visitation services. Areas of focus for future HV system development include trust, communication, availability, cost, and timeliness. In this assessment related to the Alabama HV system, we used quantitative data to apply criteria to the indicators being measured and qualitative data to supplement the quantitative findings. We examined resources, gaps, program quality, and capacity of the existing HV programs in order to assist in the future development of the HV system and early childhood system. The methods presented in this paper have potential applications beyond HV programs and systems, including broader examinations of complex systems for service provision to the maternal and child health populations. PMID:23922159

Wingate, Martha S; Fifolt, Matthew; Preskitt, Julie; Mulvihill, Beverly; Pass, Mary Ann; Wallace, Lauren; Sims, Dianne; McKim, Susan

2014-07-01

278

Marine Traffic Data of Mobile, Alabama.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Data was collected on the marine traffic and VHF-FM marine communications channel usage at Mobile, Alabama, during the period of 23-30 January 1978. The marine traffic data was recorded by means of time-lapse photography of a radar display. Recordings wer...

J. J. Cherny D. E. Watson R. A. Silva B. H. Charters M. R. Young

1978-01-01

279

Psychometric Properties of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We examined the psychometric properties of a German translation of the Child Global Report version of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire (APQ). A total of 1219 German school-children (644 boys and 575 girls), ages 10-14 years participated in the study. The APQ was subjected to exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Exploratory factor…

Essau, Cecilia A.; Sasagawa, Satoko; Frick, Paul J.

2006-01-01

280

RCP Local School Projects in Alabama.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of 6 state reports generated by the Regional Curriculum Project (funded under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act), the document describes 4 specific projects implemented through the Alabama State Superintendent's Office beginning in 1966. All 4 projects were designed to improve instructional leadership by defining the role(s) of the…

Regional Curriculum Project, Atlanta, GA.

281

Chemical Technician Manpower Survey: State of Alabama.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study was undertaken to assess the needs of Alabama's industry for chemical technicians and to determine the kinds and levels of skills required by major employers. Of the 75 organizations responding to the questionnaire with usable data, 62 were private industries, 6 were testing laboratories, and 7 were federal agencies. Generally, the study…

Watkins, Donald; And Others

282

Alabama Counseling Association Journal, 1997-1998.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document consists of the two issues of the "Alabama Counseling Association Journal" published during 1997. The focus of the journal is on communicating ideas and information that will help counselors to implement the counseling role and develop the profession of counseling. The following articles are contained in issue 1: "Management and…

Magnuson, Sandy, Ed.; Norem, Ken, Ed.

1998-01-01

283

Alabama Kids Count 2001 Data Book.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count data book examines statewide trends in well-being for Alabama's children. The statistical portrait is based on 17 indicators in the areas of health, education, safety, and security. The indicators are: (1) infant mortality rate; (2) low weight births; (3) child health index; (4) births to unmarried teens; (5) first grade retention;…

Curtis, Apreill; Bogie, Don

284

Alabama Kids Count 2002 Data Book.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count data book examines statewide trends in well-being of Alabamas children. The statistical portrait is based on 18 indicators in the areas of child health, education, safety, and security: (1) infant mortality rate; (2) low weight births; (3) child health index; (4) births to unmarried teens; (5) first grade retention; (6) school…

Curtis, Apreill; Bogie, Don

285

Financial Reporting for Alabama Public Universities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Guidelines for preparing year-end financial reports are provided for Alabama public university staff to insure that reporting formats produce comparable financial reports and to keep up with recent developments in college accounting and financial reporting. The public institutions comply with two publications issued by the American Institute of…

Alabama State Commission on Higher Education, Montgomery.

286

Proton Form Factor Measurements at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

In two experiments at Jefferson Lab in Hall A, the first one in 1998 and the second in 2000, the ratio of the electromagnetic form factors of the proton was obtained by measuring P{sub t} and P{sub ell}, the transverse and longitudinal recoil proton polarization components, respectively, in {rvec e}p {yields} e{rvec p}; the ratio G{sub E{sub p}}/G{sub M{sub p}} is proportional to P{sub t}/P{sub {ell}}. Simultaneous measurement of P{sub t} and P{sub {ell}} provides good control of the systematic uncertainty. The first measurement of G{sub E{sub p}}/G{sub M{sub p}} ratio was made to Q{sup 2} = 3.5 GeV{sup 2} and the second measurement to Q{sup 2} = 5.6 GeV{sup 2}. The results from these two experiments indicate that the ratio scales like 1/Q{sup 2}, in stark contrast with cross section data analyzed by the Rosenbluth separation method which gives a constant value for this ratio. The incompatibility of the recoil polarization results with most of the Rosenbluth separation results appears now well established above Q{sup 2} of about 3 GeV{sup 2}. The consensus at the present time is that the interference of the two-photon exchange with the Born term, which had been deemed negligible until recently, might explain the discrepancy between the results of the two techniques; the possibility that the discrepancy is due to incomplete radiative correction has also been recently discussed.

Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi

2004-09-27

287

FIVE MILE CREEK WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT FEASIBILITY STUDY AND CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS DESIGN PROJECT, BIRMINGHAM, AL  

Microsoft Academic Search

ENTRIX Inc. (ENTRIX) recently conducted a feasibility study looking at water quality and flood reduction projects in the Five Mile Creek watershed, north of Birmingham, Alabama. The property is owned by the Freshwater Land Trust as part of the Jefferson County Greenways Plan. This project was driven by the supplemental projects required by the consent decree on Jefferson County Department

Terrell Gibbs; Aylin Lewallen; Doug Mooney; Wendy Allen-Jackson

288

Reservoir heterogeneity in Carter Sandstone, North Blowhorn Creek oil unit and vicinity, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

This report presents accomplishments made in completing Task 3 of this project which involves development of criteria for recognizing reservoir heterogeneity in the Black Warrior basin. The report focuses on characterization of the Upper Mississippian Carter sandstone reservoir in North Blowhorn Creek and adjacent oil units in Lamar County, Alabama. This oil unit has produced more than 60 percent of total oil extracted from the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The Carter sandstone in North Blowhorn Creek oil unit is typical of the most productive Carter oil reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report synthesizes data derived from geophysical well logs and cores from North Blowhorn Creek oil unit to develop a depositional model for the Carter sandstone reservoir. The second part of the report describes the detrital and diagenetic character of Carter sandstone utilizing data from petrographic and scanning electron microscopes and the electron microprobe. The third part synthesizes porosity and pore-throat-size-distribution data determined by high-pressure mercury porosimetry and commercial core analyses with results of the sedimentologic and petrographic studies. The final section of the report discusses reservoir heterogeneity within the context of the five-fold classification of Moore and Kugler (1990).

Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.

1992-05-01

289

Alternative Approaches to Developing a Cadre of 'Teacher Technologists',  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Enabling teachers to use technologies: Seven case studies; Hennigan School Headlight Project: Using LOGO throughout the curriculum; The multi-media project of Jefferson County, Alabama: 'Let's Make a Movie'; Albuquerque public schools computer e...

J. H. Strange S. A. Tucker G. E. Uhlig P. Feldman

1988-01-01

290

The work smart standards process at Jefferson Lab  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has developed a set of Work Smart Standards for the Lab. The effort incorporated the Lab's performance-based contract into the Necessary and Sufficient (N&S) Standards identification process of the DOE. A rigorous protocol identified hazards in the workplace and standards that provide adequate protection of workers, public, and the environment at reasonable cost. The intensive process was a joint effort between the Lab and DOE and it required trained teams of knowledgeable experts in three fields: 1.) actual required work conditions at Jefferson Lab; 2.) laws, regulations, DOE directives and performance-based contracts; and 3.) Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S), Rad Con, and QA. The criteria for selection of the teams, the database designed and used for the process, and lessons learned are discussed.

Boyce, James R.; Prior, Sandra; Hanson, Eric; Morgan, Barbara

1997-02-01

291

The Work Smart Standards process at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has developed a set of Work Smart Standards for the Lab. The effort incorporated the Lab`s performance-based contract into the Necessary and Sufficient (N and S) Standards identification process of the DOE. A rigorous protocol identified hazards in the workplace and standards that provide adequate protection of workers, public, and the environment at reasonable cost. The intensive process was a joint effort between the Lab and DOE and it required trained teams of knowledgeable experts in three fields: (1) actual required work conditions at Jefferson Lab; (2) laws, regulations, DOE directives and performance-based contracts; and (3) Environmental Health and Safety (EH and S), Rad Con, and QA. The criteria for selection of the teams, the database designed and used for the process, and lessons learned are discussed.

Boyce, J.R.; Prior, S.; Hanson, E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Morgan, B. [Dept. of Energy, Newport News, VA (United States). Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Site Office

1997-12-01

292

Investigation of coal deposits in the Fairview and Coal City basins, Coosa Field, St. Clair County, Ala.: reserves, petrography, and chemical properties of coals: washability characteristics of coal from Fairview bed: geology of area  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Report issued by the Bureau of Mines discussing the coal deposits in Saint Clair County, Alabama. Investigations of the estimated reserves and analyses of the coal fields in this area are presented. This report includes tables, maps, illustrations, and photographs.

Toenges, Albert L.; Turnbull, Louis A.; Jolley, Theodore R.; Shields, Joseph J.; Smith, H. L.; O'Donnell, H. J.; Cooper, H. M.; Abernethy, R. F.; Gandrud, B. W.; Riley, H. L.; Rothrock, Howard E.

1949-01-01

293

Dumas Malone - A Journey with Mr. Jefferson (VHS 3/4 inch) (Video).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Professor Dumas Malone, author of the Pulitzer prize winning six volume biography 'Jefferson and His Time', is interviewed by Marc Lachter, chief historian of the National Portrait Gallery. Both discuss Jefferson's life from the Declaration of Independenc...

1983-01-01

294

Jefferson Lab Accelerator Operations Training and Development Program  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Jefferson Lab Operations Group is to provide safe and efficient delivery of high quality electron beam for Jefferson Laboratory's nuclear and accelerator physics programs. The Operations staff must be able to setup, transport, maintain, and troubleshoot beam to all three experimental halls in a safe, efficient, and expeditious manner. Due to the nature of shift work, high employee turnover is always as issue. This creates a unique situation where highly trained staff members must quickly be produced and maintained in order to meet the needs of the Laboratory. Some methods used to address this problem will be presented here.

Michael A. Epps

2008-01-23

295

40 CFR 81.72 - Tennessee River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...County, Cumberland County, Fentress County, Franklin County, Grundy County, Marion County, Morgan County, Overton County, Pickett County, Putnam County, Scott County, Sequatchie County, Warren County, White County, Van Buren...

2009-07-01

296

Geohydrology and susceptibility of major aquifers to surface contamination in Alabama; area 10  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report delineates and describes the geohydrology and susceptibility of major aquifers to contamination in Area 10--Choctaw, Clarke, and Washington Counties in southwest Alabama. The major aquifers in the study area are the Nanafalia-Clayton, Lisbon, and Pliocene-Miocene aquifers of Tertiary age. The recharge areas for these aquifers generally coincide with their areas of use. Each aquifer is a source of public water supply in one or more of the three counties. All recharge areas for the major aquifers are susceptible to contamination from the surface. However, large parts of the recharge areas are rural areas that are used for timberlands, farms, and pastures; these areas have low potential for contamination and are several miles from pumping centers. (USGS)

DeJarnette, S. S.

1989-01-01

297

Haynesville sandstone reservoirs in the Updip Jurassic trend of Alabama  

SciTech Connect

Subsequent to the 1986 drilling of the 1 Carolyn McCollough Unit 1-13 well, which initiated production from the Frisco City sand of the Haynesville Formation in Monroe County, Alabama, seven Haynesville fields have been established in Covington, Escambia, and Monroe counties. Initial flow rates of several hundred BOPD are typical for wells in these fields, and maximum rates exceed 2000 BOPD in North Frisco City field. As of August 1993, these fields produced more than 3,400,000 bbl of oil and 4,000,000 mcf of gas from depths of 12,000 to 13,000 ft. Haynesville sandstone reservoirs are concentrated in two distinct areas: (1) an eastern area (Hickory Branch, North Rome, and West Falco fields; API oil gravity = 40{degrees}) in the Conecuh embayment and (2) a western area (Frisco City, North Frisco City, southeast Frisco City, and Megargel fields; API oil gravity = 58-59{degrees}) on the Conecuh ridge complex. Eastern fields are productive from Haynesville sandstone, which is not continuous with the two distinct, productive sandstone bodies in western fields, the Frisco City sand and the Megargel sand. Hydrocarbon traps are structural or combination traps associated with basement paleohighs. Reservoir bodies generally consist of conglomerate (igneous clasts in western fields; limestone clasts in eastern fields), sandstone (subarkose-arkose), and shale (some of which is red) in stacked fining-upward sequences. Shale at the tops of these sequences is bioturbated. These marine strata were deposited in shoal-water braid-delta fronts. Petrophysical properties differ between the two areas. Maximum and average permeability in western fields (k{sub max} = 2000 md; k{sub ave} = 850-1800 md) is an order of magnitude higher than in eastern fields. The distribution of diagenetic components, including a variety of carbonate minerals, evaporate minerals (anhydrite and halite in western fields), and carbonate-replaced pseudomatrix, commonly is related to depositional architecture.

Kugler, R.L.; Mink, R.M. [Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

1994-09-01

298

Gray bats and pollution in Missouri and northern Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Gray bats died with lethal brain concentrations of dieldrin and rising levels of heptachlor epoxide in 1976, 1977, and 1978 at Bat Caves No. 2-3, Franklin County, Missouri. The colony disappeared in 1979. Dieldrin was banned in 1974 and 1981 was the last year for heptachlor use in Missouri. The State is recommendiing three organophosphates (chlorpyrifos or Dursban, dyfonate or Fonophos, and ethoprop or Mocap) as substitutes for heptachlor. All three compounds have excellent records in the environment. Analyses of insects collected where bats of this colony fed showed beetles, particularly rove beetles (Staphylinidae), to be the most heavily contaminated part of the bat's diet. Lactation concentrated these residues so that levels in milk were approximately 30 times those in the insect diet. Gray bats found dead in caves in northern Alabama showed DDD (a DDT derivative) contamination. Bats from the colony at Cave Springs Cave on the Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge contained up to 29 ppm DDD in their brains, but this is probably less than one-half the lethal level. Bats from other colonies contained less. The DDD contamination enters the Terinessee River just above the Wheeler Refuge and is seen in gray bat colonies as far as 60 miles downriver.

Clark, D. R., Jr.; Bunck, C. M.; Cromartie, E.; LaVal, R. K.; Tuttle, M. D.

1981-01-01

299

Development of Alabama Resources Information System (ARIS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A formal, organized set of information concerning the development status of the Alabama Resources Information System (ARIS) as of September 1976 is provided. A series of computer source language programs, and flow charts related to each of the computer programs to provide greater ease in performing future change are presented. Listings of the variable names, and their meanings, used in the various source code programs, and copies of the various user manuals which were prepared through this time are given.

Herring, B. E.; Vachon, R. I.

1976-01-01

300

76 FR 72495 - Alabama Metal Coil Securement Act; Petition for Determination of Preemption  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...No. FMCSA-2011-0318] Alabama Metal Coil Securement Act; Petition for Determination...determination that the State of Alabama's Metal Coil Securement Act is preempted by Federal...what effect, if any, Alabama's metal coil load securement certification...

2011-11-23

301

The search for QCD in nuclei: A Jefferson lab perspective  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the phenomenon of Color Transparency, and give an overview of the extensive experimental searches for signatures of QCD in nuclei at Jefferson Lab, Hall-C. The results from protons, pions and kaons are compared with each other and with results from hadron scattering.

D. Dutta

2012-04-01

302

Thomas Jefferson: A Teacher's Guide and Video Segment Index.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teacher's guide accompanies the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) two-part videotape documentary that uses portraits and paintings, original architectural drawings and excerpts from Thomas Jefferson's journals, letters, scientific papers, and political writings to tell the story of this remarkable yet contradictory man. The guide introduces…

Osterman, Leah, Ed.; Logan, Claudia

303

New Type of Compton Polarimeter for Jefferson Lab Hall A.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In this paper, we present the principle and the studies for a new type of Compton polarimeter based on the use of power buildup Fabry-Perot cavity to get a 3% measurement of the Jefferson Lab electron polarization within minutes.

J. P. Jorda M. Authier M. Baylac E. Burtin C. Cavata

1998-01-01

304

Scientific Images from the Jefferson Lab Picture Exchange  

DOE Data Explorer

JPIX makes available the photo collections from the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLAB). The images can be searched by keywords and titles, by dates, and by any of the 21 categories. Categories include Halls A, B, and C, user facilities, events, medical research, and more.

305

Basic instrumentation for Hall A at Jefferson Lab  

Microsoft Academic Search

The instrumentation in Hall A at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility was designed to study electro- and photo-induced reactions at very high luminosity and good momentum and angular resolution for at least one of the reaction products. The central components of Hall A are two identical high resolution spectrometers, which allow the vertical drift chambers in the focal plane

J. Alcorn; B. D. Anderson; K. A. Aniol; J. R. M. Annand; L. Auerbach; J. Arrington; T. Averett; F. T. Baker; M. Baylac; E. J. Beise; J. Berthot; P. Y. Bertin; W. Bertozzi; L. Bimbot; T. Black; W. U. Boeglin; D. V. Boykin; E. J. Brash; V. Breton; H. Breuer; P. Brindza; D. Brown; E. Burtin; J. R. Calarco; L. S. Cardman; R. Carr; G. D. Cates; C. Cavata; Z. Chai; C. C. Chang; N. S. Chant; J.-P. Chen; S. Choi; E. Chudakov; S. Churchwell; M. Coman; E. Cisbani; S. Colilli; N. Colombel; R. Crateri; D. S. Dale; N. Degrande; C. W. de Jager; R. De Leo; A. Deur; G. Dezern; B. Diederich; S. Dieterich; R. di Salvo; P. Djawotho; J. Domingo; J.-E. Ducret; D. Dutta; K. Egiyan; M. B. Epstein; S. Escoffier; S. Esp; L. A. Ewell; J. M. Finn; K. G. Fissum; E. Folts; H. Fonvieille; B. Frois; S. Frullani; H. Gao; J. Gao; F. Garibaldi; A. Gasparian; A. Gavalya; O. Gayou; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; F. Giuliani; A. Glamazdin; C. Glashausser; J. Gomez; V. Gorbenko; T. Gorringe; M. Gricia; K. Griffioen; J.-O. Hansen; F. W. Hersman; D. W. Higinbotham; R. Holmes; H. Holmgren; M. Holtrop; N. d'Hose; E. Hovhannisyan; C. Howell; G. M. Huber; E. Hughes; C. E. Hyde-Wright; H. Ibrahim; S. Incerti; M. Iodice; R. Iommi; D. Ireland; S. Jaminion; J. Jardillier; S. Jensen; X. Jiang; C. E. Jones; M. K. Jones; K. Joo; C. Jutier; W. Kahl; S. Kato; A. T. Katramatou; J. J. Kelly; S. Kerhoas; A. Ketikyan; M. Khandaker; M. Khayat; K. Kino; I. Kominis; W. Korsch; S. Kox; K. Kramer; K. S. Kumar; G. Kumbartzki; M. Kuss; L. Lagamba; G. Laveissière; A. Leone; J. J. Lerose; F. Marie; L. Levchuk; M. Leuschner; D. Lhuillier; M. Liang; K. Livingston; R. A. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; G. J. Lolos; R. W. Lourie; M. Lucentini; R. Madey; K. Maeda; S. Malov; D. M. Manley; D. J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; J. Marroncle; J. Martine; S. Mayilyan; J. S. McCarthy; K. McCormick; J. McLntyre; R. D. McKeown; D. Meekins; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Milbrath; J. A. Miller; W. Miller; J. Mitchell; J. Mougey; S. Nanda; A. Nathan; D. Neyret; E. A. J. M. Offermann; Z. Papandreou; C. F. Perdrisat; R. Perrino; G. G. Petratos; A. Petrosyan; L. Pierangeli; S. Platchkov; R. Pomatsalyuk; D. Pripstein; D. L. Prout; V. A. Punjabi; T. Pussieux; G. Quéméner; R. D. Ransomez; O. Ravel; B. Reitz; Y. Roblin; R. Roche; M. Roedelbronn; O. A. Rondon-Aramayo; P. G. Roos; G. Rosner; D. Rowntree; G. A. Rutledge; P. M. Rutt; M. Rvachev; F. Sabatavenere; A. Saha; T. Saito; F. Santavenere; A. J. Sarty; W. J. Schneider; J. P. Segal; A. Serdarevic-Offermann; A. Shahinyan; K. Slifer; T. P. Smith; A. Soldi; P. Sorokin; P. Souder; S. L. Spiegel; M. A. Stevens; S. Strauch; R. Suleiman; J. A. Templon; T. Terasawa; L. Todor; H. Tsubota; H. Ueno; P. E. Ulmer; G. M. Urciuoli; L. Van Hoorebeke; R. van de Vyver; S. van Verst; P. Vernin; B. Vlahovic; H. Voskanyan; E. Voutier; R. Walter; J. W. Watson; D. P. Watts; L. B. Weinstein; K. Wijesooriya; B. Wojtsekhowski; H. Xiang; F. Xiong; W. Xu; D. G. Zainea; V. Zeps; J. Zhao; X. Zheng; Z.-L. Zhou; L. Zhu; P. A. Zolnierczuk

2004-01-01

306

AL State Profile. Alabama: Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE), 3rd Edition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides information about Alabama High School Graduation Exam, 3rd Edition, a comprehensive standards-based exam. The purpose of the exam is to: (1) Provide schools with student academic diagnostic information; (2) Determine prospective high school graduates' mastery of the state curriculum; (3) Increase alignment of local curriculum…

Center on Education Policy, 2010

2010-01-01

307

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE STUDENT POPULATION, UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA RESIDENT CENTER, HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE MAIN PURPOSE OF THIS 1959 SURVEY WAS TO ANALYZE SOME OF THE BASIC CHARACTERISTICS OF STUDENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA RESIDENT CENTER, HUNTSVILLE. FINDINGS WERE TABULATED IN SUMMARY FORM AND BY MAJOR FIELDS OF ACADEMIC INTEREST. OF THE STUDENTS (LARGELY YOUNG ADULTS), 51 PERCENT WERE IN ENGINEERING. ONLY 16 PERCENT WERE FEMALE. MOST…

FRANKLIN, ELTON

308

76 FR 36527 - Alabama Power Company (Alabama Power); Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...non-generation to 17,900 cubic feet per second (cfs) during generation. The Martin Dam Project...required to release a minimum flow of 1,200 cfs. Releases from Martin Dam are often necessary to maintain the 1,200-cfs minimum flow requirement. Alabama...

2011-06-22

309

Alabama Bound: Identifying Factors Associated with Secondary Education Students' Choice of Attending The University of Alabama  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Alabama's primary competitor in recruiting is in-state rival Auburn University which lures away roughly one in eight of UA's admitted students. Two factors stand above all others in attracting students to UA--academic reputation and social activities reputation. Factors following distantly are a visit to the UA campus, financial assistance and the…

Acker, Jon Charles; Hughes, William W.; Fendley, William R., Jr.

2004-01-01

310

Regional stratigraphy, depositional environments, and tectonic framework of Mississippian clastic rocks between Tuscumbia and Bangor Limestones in Black Warrior basin of Alabama and Mississippi  

SciTech Connect

Detailed correlations in the subsurface and outcrop of northern Alabama document that Mississippian clastic rocks between the Tuscumbia and Bangor Limestones are thickest along a band across the northern and eastern parts of the Black Warrior basin. The interval thins markedly southeastward across a northeast-trending line in Monroe County, Mississippi, and Lamar County, Alabama, from more than 350 ft to less than 150 ft. The thickness distribution suggests synsedimentary differential subsidence of crustal blocks. The northeast-trending block boundary in the Black Warrior basin nearly parallels an interpreted northeast-trending late Precambrian rift segment farther southeast. The northwest-striking boundary closely parallels an interpreted northwest-trending transform fault farther southwest. The block boundaries are interpreted as basement faults that originated during late Precambrian rifting. Subsequently, the older faults were reactivated by convergenced during the Mississippian, simultaneously with the initial dispersal of clastic sediment into the Black Warrior foreland basin.

Higginbotham, D.R.

1986-09-01

311

Groundwater quality at Alabama Plating and Vincent Spring, Vincent, Alabama, 2007–2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The former Alabama Plating site in Vincent, Alabama, includes the location where the Alabama Plating Company operated an electroplating facility from 1956 until 1986. The operation of the facility generated waste containing cyanide, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, zinc, and other heavy metals. Contamination resulting from the site operations was identified in groundwater, soil, and sediment. Vincent Spring, used as a public water supply by the city of Vincent, Alabama, is located about ½ mile southwest of the site. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, conducted an investigation at Vincent Spring and the Alabama Plating site, Vincent, Alabama, during 2007–2008 to evaluate the groundwater quality and evaluate the potential effect of contaminated groundwater on the water quality of Vincent Spring. The results of the investigation will provide scientific data and information on the occurrence, fate, and transport of contaminants in the water resources of the area and aid in the evaluation of the vulnerability of the public water supply to contamination. Samples were analyzed to evaluate the water quality at the former plating site, investigate the presence of possible contaminant indicators at Vincent Spring, and determine the usefulness of stable isotopes and geochemical properties in understanding groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the area. Samples collected from 16 monitor wells near the plating site and Vincent Spring were analyzed for major constituents, trace metals, nutrients, and the stable isotopes for hydrogen (2H/H) and oxygen (18O/16O). Groundwater collected from Vincent Spring was characterized as a calcium-magnesium-bicarbonate water type with total dissolved solids concentrations ranging from 110 to 120 milligrams per liter and pH ranging from about 7.5 to 7.9 units. Groundwater chemistry at the monitor wells at the Alabama Plating site was highly variable by location and depth. Dissolved solids concentrations ranged from 28 to 2,880 milligrams per liter, and the water types varied from calcium-magnesium-bicarbonate-chloride, to calcium-sulfate or calcium-magnesium-sulfate, to sodium-chloride water types. The stable isotope ratios for hydrogen (2H/H) and oxygen (18O/16O) for water from the monitor wells and from Vincent Spring, based on a single sampling event, can be separated into three groups: (1) Vincent Spring, (2) monitor wells MW03 and MW28, and (3) the remaining Alabama Plating monitor wells. The geochemical and stable isotope analyses indicate that water from Vincent Spring is distinct from water from the Alabama Plating monitor wells; however, this evaluation is based on a single sampling event. Although the water from Vincent Spring, for this sampling event, is different and does not seem to be affected by contaminated groundwater from the Alabama Plating site, additional hydrologic and water-quality data are needed to fully identify flow paths, the potential for contaminant transport, and water-quality changes through time.

Bradley, Michael W.; Gill, Amy C.

2014-01-01

312

Collaborative for Alabama Urban School Educators. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The major purpose of Project CAUSE (Collaborative for Alabama Urban School Educators) as explained in section I of this report was to get educators in the Birmingham and Mobile school systems, in the Alabama State Department of Education, and in the Appalachia Educational Laboratory to (1) collaborate in identifying and solving problems; and (2)…

Scott, Marie; Guy, R. Meade

313

The Alabama College System Statistical Profiles, 1992-93.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed to communicate information to the public and to assist decision-makers at Alabama's two-year colleges in making institutional comparisons, this document provides a systemwide profile for 1992-93 of the state's public two-year colleges and profiles of Athens State College (ASC) and the Alabama Industrial Development Training Institute…

Alabama State Dept. of Postsecondary Education, Montgomery.

314

Workforce 21: A Strategic Plan for Developing Alabama's Workforce.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Under the direction and leadership of the Alabama Department of Postsecondary Education and the Alabama Department of Education, Workforce 21 was created as a response to the lack of skilled workers necessary to fill high-skill, high-wage jobs of the 21st century. More than 600 Alabamians representing industry, labor, parents, students,…

Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

315

A Study of School Size among Alabama's Public High Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the size of Alabama's public high schools, selected school quality and financial indicators, and their students' performance on standardized exams. When the socioeconomic level of the student bodies is held constant, the size of high schools in Alabama has relatively little…

Lindahl, Ronald A.; Cain, Patrick M., Sr.

2012-01-01

316

Soil Sampling Techniques For Alabama Grain Fields  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Characterizing the spatial variability of nutrients facilitates precision soil sampling. Questions exist regarding the best technique for directed soil sampling based on a priori knowledge of soil and crop patterns. The objective of this study was to evaluate zone delineation techniques for Alabama grain fields to determine which method best minimized the soil test variability. Site one (25.8 ha) and site three (20.0 ha) were located in the Tennessee Valley region, and site two (24.2 ha) was located in the Coastal Plain region of Alabama. Tennessee Valley soils ranged from well drained Rhodic and Typic Paleudults to somewhat poorly drained Aquic Paleudults and Fluventic Dystrudepts. Coastal Plain s o i l s ranged from coarse-loamy Rhodic Kandiudults to loamy Arenic Kandiudults. Soils were sampled by grid soil sampling methods (grid sizes of 0.40 ha and 1 ha) consisting of: 1) twenty composited cores collected randomly throughout each grid (grid-cell sampling) and, 2) six composited cores collected randomly from a -3x3 m area at the center of each grid (grid-point sampling). Zones were established from 1) an Order 1 Soil Survey, 2) corn (Zea mays L.) yield maps, and 3) airborne remote sensing images. All soil properties were moderately to strongly spatially dependent as per semivariogram analyses. Differences in grid-point and grid-cell soil test values suggested grid-point sampling does not accurately represent grid values. Zones created by soil survey, yield data, and remote sensing images displayed lower coefficient of variations (8CV) for soil test values than overall field values, suggesting these techniques group soil test variability. However, few differences were observed between the three zone delineation techniques. Results suggest directed sampling using zone delineation techniques outlined in this paper would result in more efficient soil sampling for these Alabama grain fields.

Thompson, A. N.; Shaw, J. N.; Mask, P. L.; Touchton, J. T.; Rickman, D.

2003-01-01

317

2012 Alabama Lunabotics Systems Engineering Paper  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Excavation will hold a key role for future lunar missions. NASA has stated that "advances in lunar regolith mining have the potential to significantly contribute to our nation's space vision and NASA space exploration operations." [1]. The Lunabotics Mining Competition is an event hosted by NASA that is meant to encourage "the development of innovative lunar excavation concepts from universities which may result in clever ideas and solutions which could be applied to an actual lunar excavation device or payload." [2]. Teams entering the competition must "design and build a remote controlled or autonomous excavator, called a lunabot, that can collect and deposit a minimum of 10 kilograms of lunar simulant within 10 minutes." [2]. While excavation will play an important part in lunar missions, there will still be many other tasks that would benefit from robotic assistance. An excavator might not be as well suited for these tasks as other types of robots might be. For example a lightweight rover would do well with reconnaissance, and a mobile gripper arm would be fit for manipulation, while an excavator would be comparatively clumsy and slow in both cases. Even within the realm of excavation it would be beneficial to have different types of excavators for different tasks, as there are on Earth. The Alabama Lunabotics Team at the University of Alabama has made it their goal to not only design and build a robot that could compete in the Lunabotics Mining Competition, but would also be a multipurpose tool for future NASA missions. The 2010-2011 resulting robot was named the Modular Omnidirectional Lunar Excavator (MOLE). Using the Systems Engineering process and building off of two years of Lunabotics experience, the 20ll-2012 Alabama Lunabotics team (Team NASACAR) has improved the MOLE 1.0 design and optimized it for the 2012 Lunabotics Competition rules [I]. A CAD model of MOLE 2.0 can be seen below in Fig. 1.

Baker, Justin; Ricks, Kenneth; Hull, Bethanne J.

2012-01-01

318

Flood of April 13, 1980, Mobile, Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents basic data collected during the flood of April 13, 1980, in Mobile, Alabama. The data consists of high-water marks, accumulative rainfall, peak discharge at local gaging stations, hydrographs of discharge and rainfall, and photographs at various locations taken during and immediately after the flood. The report presented in map-series and lists data that are readily usable by local planners and developers. During th afternoon of April 13, 1980, the National Weather Service at Mobile recorded a total of 10.4 inches of rainfall. Immediately after the flood approximately 60 to 70 percent of the roads in the Mobile area were impassable. (USGS)

Hannum, Curtis H.; Nelson, George H., Jr.

1980-01-01

319

Reservoir characterization of the Smackover Formation in southwest Alabama  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation is found in an arcuate belt in the subsurface from south Texas to panhandle Florida. The Smackover is the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing formation in Alabama and is an important hydrocarbon reservoir from Florida to Texas. In this report Smackover hydrocarbon reservoirs in southwest Alabama are described. Also, the nine enhanced- and improved-recovery projects that have been undertaken in the Smackover of Alabama are evaluated. The report concludes with recommendations about potential future enhanced- and improved-recovery projects in Smackover reservoirs in Alabama and an estimate of the potential volume of liquid hydrocarbons recoverable by enhanced- and improved-recovery methods from the Smackover of Alabama.

Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Hall, D.R.; Mann, S.D.; Tew, B.H.

1993-02-01

320

40 CFR 81.68 - Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Escambia County, Mobile County. In the State of Florida: Bay County, Calhoun County, Escambia County, Gulf County, Holmes County, Jackson County, Okaloosa County, Santa Rosa County, Walton County, Washington County. In the State of...

2012-07-01

321

40 CFR 81.68 - Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Escambia County, Mobile County. In the State of Florida: Bay County, Calhoun County, Escambia County, Gulf County, Holmes County, Jackson County, Okaloosa County, Santa Rosa County, Walton County, Washington County. In the State of...

2011-07-01

322

The Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Construction of the 12 GeV upgrade to the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is presently underway. This upgrade includes doubling the energy of the electron beam to 12 GeV, the addition of a new fourth experimental hall, and the construction of upgraded detector hardware. An overview of this upgrade project is presented, along with highlights of the anticipated experimental program.

McKeown, R. D.

2011-09-01

323

Jefferson Lab Experiments Shed new Light on the Proton  

Microsoft Academic Search

In experiments 93-027 and 99-007 at Jefferson Lab (JLab) the ratio of the electromagnetic elastic form factors of the proton, G{sub E{sub p}}\\/G{sub M{sub p}}, was measured with high precision, up to four momentum transfer Q² of 3.5 GeV² and 5.6 GeV², respectively, with the recoil polarization technique. The data from these two JLab experiments have shown an unexpected and

Vina Punjabi

2005-01-01

324

Sweet Home Alabama: Hot Spot for Phylogeography  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Phylogeographers use molecular methods to map herpetological biodiversity in the heart of Dixie. In the mid-1990s, the diversity of freshwater fishes, snails, mussels, and turtles endemic to the waterways of Alabama and neighboring states prompted biologists to call for more attention to the region. They noted that conservation measures there were not comparable to efforts being made in tropical locations, even though the aquatic systems of Alabama qualified as hot spots. Now, using molecular methods, phylogeographers are documenting and expanding the understanding of the amphibian biodiversity of the regionâÂÂand continuing to call for conservation. Researchers in the field of phylogeography, founded two decades ago, use such strategies as ecological niche modeling and gene sequencing to map where species occur and to determine how they vary genetically across their range. Comparative phylogeographers then look for common genetic breaks across various species. By mapping breaks for many species across a landscape, researchers gain clues about when adaptations may have occurred and what may have prompted them.

Amy Mayer (freelancer;)

2009-04-01

325

77 FR 44238 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Alabama  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

Notice is hereby given that the State of Alabama is revising its approved Public Water System Supervision Program. Alabama has adopted the following rule: Public Notification Rule. EPA has determined that Alabama's rule is no less stringent than the corresponding federal regulation. Therefore, EPA is tentatively approving this revision to the State of Alabama's Public Water System Supervision......

2012-07-27

326

Geohydrology and susceptibility of aquifers to surface contamination in Alabama; area 5  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Environmental Management, is conducting a series of geohydrologic studies to delineate the major aquifers and their susceptibility to contamination in Alabama. This report delineates and describes the geohydrology and susceptibility of the major aquifers to contamination in Area 5--Chambers, Clay, Cleburne, Coosa, Lee, Randolph, and Tallapoosa Counties. Little groundwater is used for public water supplies in Area 5. Groundwater withdrawals for public supply in 1985 were 0.88 million gal/day. Most cities and towns that formerly used groundwater presently use surface water. None of the sedimentary rocks or unconsolidated deposits is tapped by public supply wells. None of the igneous and metamorphic rocks are considered a major aquifer because of low yields. Aquifers in the study area are susceptible to surface contamination throughout their entire outcrop area. Areas that are highly faulted and valley areas where groundwater is at or near land surface have potential to be highly susceptible to surface contamination. (USGS)

Kidd, R. E.

1989-01-01

327

Thirty Thousand Years of Vegetation Changes in the Alabama Hills, Owens Valley, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Twenty packrat ( Neotoma) middens recovered from three sites (1265-1535 m) in the Alabama Hills, Inyo County, California, provide a ca. 31,450-yr record of vegetation change. Located ca. 7 km east of the Sierra Nevada, the middens document that Utah juniper ( Juniperus osteosperma), Joshua tree ( Yucca brevifolia), and bitterbush ( Purshia tridentata) occupied the site between 31,450 and 19,070 yr B.P. Joshua tree and bitterbush departed by ca. 17,760 yr B.P., with cliffrose ( Purshia mexicana) and joint-fir ( Ephedra viridis) appearing. By 13,350 yr B.P., blackbush ( Coleogyne ramosissima) and cholla ( Opuntia echinocarpa) entered the record. Between 9540 and 7990 yr B.P., Utah juniper and other species now extralocal to the sites departed and modern components such as wolfberry ( Lycium andersonii) and rubber rabbitbrush ( Chrysothamnus teretifolius) appeared. The middle Holocene records little variation in plant macrofossil composition; however, pollen analysis reflects an increase in aquatic pollen types which might suggest more-open conditions. The transition to the modern vegetation associations at the sites occurred after ca. 2800 yr B.P. The record from the Alabama Hills correlates well with that of other regional vegetation data but documents conditions of increasing aridity earlier than many other packrat midden sites. A shift in understory vegetation between 19,070 and 17,760 yr B.P. may reflect a transition from glacial maximum to post-maximum conditions in the eastern Sierra Nevada.

Koehler, Peter A.; Anderson, R. Scott

1995-03-01

328

Geoscience research databases for coastal Alabama ecosystem management  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Effective management of complex coastal ecosystems necessitates access to scientific knowledge that can be acquired through a multidisciplinary approach involving Federal and State scientists that take advantage of agency expertise and resources for the benefit of all participants working toward a set of common research and management goals. Cooperative geostatic investigations have led toward building databases of fundamental scientific knowledge that can be utilized to manage coastal Alabama's natural and future development. These databases have been used to assess the occurrence and economic potential of hard mineral resources in the Alabama EFZ, and to support oil spill contingency planning and environmental analysis for coastal Alabama.

Hummell, Richard, L.

1995-01-01

329

Alabama Tin Belt. Metallogenesis and mineral resource evaluation. Final report for the 1983-1984 project year  

SciTech Connect

The Alabama Tin Belt covers an area of approximately 180 km/sup 2/ within the Tallapoosa lithotectonic block of the Northern Alabama Piedmont. In the second year of this three year project, efforts continued towards detailing the distribution and petrogenesis of tin-bearing peraluminous granitoids in central Coosa County. In particular, mapping, structural analysis and petrographical/petrological studies have been used to examine the geologic settings, geochemical and mineralogical variations, crystallization conditions and nature of source rock(s) of selected granitic plutons and related pegmatite bodies in the vicinity of Rockford, Alabama. Thermobarometeric techniques (a ternary feldspar thermobarometer and a plagioclase-muscovite geothermometer), that could be used in conjunction with compositions of constituent minerals to yield reasonable estmates of granite crystallization and alteration temperatures, were also developed. Preliminary results provide evidence that: (1) the granitoids possess characteristics possibly derived from both sedimentary (S-type) and igneous (I-type) sources; (2) feldspars of the tin-bearing pegmatites possess extremely high Rb and Cs concentrations; (3) the peraluminous granitoids crystallized under varying oxygen fugacity conditions at temperatures of 510 to 710/sup 0/ and pressures greater than 6 kbar; and, (4) the Rockford Pluton occupies the core of a post-D/sub 1/, antiformal structure that is overturned to the northwest.

Green, N.L.; Tompa, B.; Gomolka, J.; Wade, G.; Usdansky, S.I.

1986-03-01

330

Metal contamination and post-remediation recovery in the Boulder River watershed, Jefferson County, Montana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The legacy of acid mine drainage and toxic trace metals left in streams by historical mining is being addressed by many important yet costly remediation efforts. Monitoring of environmental conditions frequently is not performed but is essential to evaluate remediation effectiveness, determine whether clean-up goals have been met, and assess which remediation strategies are most effective. Extensive pre- and post-remediation data for water and sediment quality for the Boulder River watershed in southwestern Montana provide an unusual opportunity to demonstrate the importance of monitoring. The most extensive restoration in the watershed occurred at the Comet mine on High Ore Creek and resulted in the most dramatic improvement in aquatic habitat. Removal of contaminated sediment and tailings, and stream-channel reconstruction reduced Cd and Zn concentrations in water such that fish are now present, and reduced metal concentrations in streambed sediment by a factor of c. 10, the largest improvement in the district. Waste removals at the Buckeye/Enterprise and Bullion mine sites produced limited or no improvement in water and sediment quality, and acidic drainage from mine adits continues to degrade stream aquatic habitat. Recontouring of hillslopes that had funnelled runoff into the workings of the Crystal mine substantially reduced metal concentrations in Uncle Sam Gulch, but did not eliminate all of the acidic adit drainage. Lead isotopic evidence suggests that the Crystal mine rather than the Comet mine is now the largest source of metals in streambed sediment of the Boulder River. The completed removal actions prevent additional contaminants from entering the stream, but it may take many years for erosional processes to diminish the effects of contaminated sediment already in streams. Although significant strides have been made, additional efforts to seal draining adits or treat the adit effluent at the Bullion and Crystal mines would need to be completed to achieve the desired restoration. ?? 2009 AAG/Geological Society of London.

Unruh, D. M.; Church, S. E.; Nimick, D. A.; Fey, D. L.

2009-01-01

331

The geology and mineralogy of the W. Wilson mine near Clancey, Jefferson County, Montana  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The W. Wilson mine, near Clancey, Mont., explores a siliceous vein in quartz monzonite of the Boulder batholith. The vein is a composite structure that consists of several closely spaced veinlets of quartz and chalcedony separated by silicified quartz monzonite. The vein has been recurrently brecciated and silicified. Typically, the quartz monzonite has been hydrothermally altered in zones of decreasing intensity outward from the vein. Pitchblende was deposited in and along the vein during one stage of the silicification that is characterized by fine-grained disseminated pyrite in black chalcedony. Subsequently most of the pitchblende was oxidized and hydrated to form a series of brightly colored secondary uranium minerals that exhibit a zonal relationship. Most of the known uranium minerals are localized in two small elongate ore bodies.

Meschter, D.Y.

1953-01-01

332

Bedrock erosion surface beneath the rocky flats alluvial fan, Jefferson and Boulder counties, Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The early Pleistocene Rocky Flats alluvial fan formed at the mouth of unglaciated Coal Creek Canyon along the eastern flank of the Colorado Front Range. The fan consists of boulder, cobble, and pebble gravel deposited on an erosional surface cut on tilted Mesozoic sedimentary strata. A north-trending hogback of steeply dipping Cretaceous Laramie Formation and Fox Hills Sandstone is exposed through the gravel across the central portion of the fan. Elevations on the gravel-bedrock contact were used in a GIS to reconstruct the bedrock surface at the base of the gravel, providing a glimpse of the geomorphology of the early Pleistocene Colorado Piedmont. The reconstructed erosional bedrock surface portrays a landscape carved by a series of easterly flowing streams that eroded headward to the resistant hogback units, creating a bedrock step up to 37 m high. East-trending ridges on the bedrock surface are remnants of drainage divides between the Pleistocene streams. Water gaps in the bedrock step allowed the streams access to the upper surface of the step. This entire surface, except the hogback, was covered by gravel about 1.35 to 1.5 Ma ago. Subsequent erosion of the alluvial fan has been by headward (westward) erosion of easterly flowing streams incising into the eastern portion of the fan. Because the gravel is more resistant than the underlying bedrock, modern streams are established over the Pleistocene drainage divides, where the gravel was thinnest. Thicker gravel in the Pleistocene paleovalleys now caps modern drainage divides, producing an inverted topography.

Knepper, Jr. , D. H.

2005-01-01

333

Cenomanian Angiosperm Leaf Megafossils, Dakota Formation, Rose Creek Locality, Jefferson County, Southeastern Nebraska.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the study is to partially redress the systematic problem for early angiosperm foliage through analysis of leaf architecture and cuticular anatomy in well-preserved leaf remains from the mid-Cretaceous (uppermost Albian to middle Cenomanian)...

G. R. Upchurch D. L. Dilcher

1990-01-01

334

Map Showing Areas Containing Swelling Clay in the Morrison Quadrangle, Jefferson County, Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Formations that contain clays having swelling pressures higher than 2,500 pounds per square foot (as measured by the Potential Volume Change meter) are listed in order of decreasing swelling pressure: Denver Formation, Pierre Shale, Laramie Formation, Green Mountain Conglomerate, Fox Hills Sandstone, and Arapahoe Formation. Some landslides derived from these formations also contain swelling clay and are mapped with the bedrock formations listed above.

Scott, Glenn R.

1972-01-01

335

An evaluation of rainfall-runoff data for the Denver Federal Center, Lakewood, Jefferson County, Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An investigation was made to monitor the storm runoff in McIntyre Gulch basin to determine the rainfall-runoff chracteristics. Results may now be used to evaluate the effects of future development on storm runoff from the Denver Federal Center, which is located in the McIntyre Gulch basin in Lakewood , CO. Rainfall and runoff data were collected at eight streamflow stations and three auxiliary rainfall stations in and adjacent to the Denver Federal Center. The outflow peak discharges from McIntyre Gulch in the Denver Federal Center were higher than the inflow peak discharges for eight of the storms by an average of 38 percent. Outflow peak discharges for eight of the storms were lower by an average of 12 percent. The study demonstrated that runoff varies with location of a storm--even for a relatively small basin. Peak discharges of McIntyre Gulch outflow from the Denver Federal Center were 27 percent greater than the inflow for all storms, but only 15 percent greater for evenly distributed storms. Runoff from the Denver Federal Center increased storm-runoff volumes in McIntyre Gulch by an average of 46 percent. Proper management of storm runoff in the Denver Federal Center requires that proposed improvements to the existing storm-runoff system maintain peak flows at their present levels. (USGS)

Jarrett, R. D.; Veenhuis, J. E.

1984-01-01

336

75 FR 19988 - Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, AL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...or the results of management practices on refuge lands. Research, management, protection, education...conducted to maximize benefits to Watercress Darter...Alternative C--Integrated Landscape Management (Proposed...

2010-04-16

337

75 FR 57053 - Camas National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, ID; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...during March and April, and again in October, up to 50,000 ducks, 3,000 geese, and several hundred tundra and trumpeter swans...the refuge. The refuge also hosts elk, white- tailed deer, mule deer, pronghorn, and moose. Scoping: Preliminary...

2010-09-17

338

Hydrology of a nuclear-processing plant site, Rocky Flats, Jefferson County, Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Accidental releases of contaminants resulting from the operation of the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration's nuclear-processing and recovery plant located on Rocky Flats will move at different rates through -different parts of the hydrologic system. Rates of movement are dependent upon the magnitude of the accidental release and the hydrologic conditions at the time of the release. For example, during wet periods, a contaminant resulting from a 5,000-gallon (19,000-1itre) release on the land surface would enter the ground-water system in about 2 to 12 hours. Ground-water flow in the Rocky Flats Alluvium might move the contaminant eastward at a rate of about 3 to 11 feet (0.9 to 3.4 metres) per day, if it remains dissolved. Maximum time to a point of discharge would be about 3 years; minimum time could be a few days. A contaminant entering a stream would then move at a rate of about 60 feet (18 metres) per minute under pool-and-riffle conditions. The rate of movement might be about 420 feet (128 metres) per minute under open-channel-flow conditions following intense thunderstorms.

Hurr, R. Theodore

1976-01-01

339

Rutile and topaz in Precambrian gneiss, Jefferson and Clear Creek Counties, Colorado  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Disseminated rutile and major amounts of topaz have been identified in Precambrian topaz-quartz gneiss northwest of Evergreen, Colo. The rutile occurs in quartz-topaz-sillimanite gneiss that forms a stratigraphic unit which is 11 to 100 feet thick and is identified along strike for more than 7,000 feet. Three composite chip samples taken across this unit contain 2.2 to 4.2 percent of rutile, by weight, in grains averaging from 0.1 to 0.3 millimeter in size. The topaz content, by weight, in the same samples ranges from 23 to 67 percent.

Sheridan, Douglas M.; Taylor, Richard B.; Marsh, Sherman P.

1968-01-01

340

Low-flow characteristics of Alabama streams  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A new procedure for estimating the 7-day, 2-year and the 7-day, 10-year low flow of ungaged Alabama streams is based on geology, drainage area, and mean annual precipitation. One equation for each of the two low-flow frequencies applies statewide to all natural flow streams; the equations do not apply to streams where flow is significantly altered by activities of man. The standard error of estimate of each equation based on map values is 40 percent for 7-day, 2-year low flow and 44 percent for 7-day, 10-year low flow. The rate of streamflow recession is used to account for the effects of geology on low flow. Streamflow recession rate depends primarily on transmissivity and storage characteristics of the aquifers, and average distance from stream channels to divides. Relations of low-flow discharge to geology, drainage area, and mean annual precipitation were analyzed by multiple regression techniques.

Bingham, Roy H.

1982-01-01

341

Study to define points of entry for potential contaminants in limestone aquifers. [in Alabama  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Visual examinations of both prints and transparencies from ERTS 1 and U-2 aircraft imagery provided a method for discovering possible points of entry of potential contaminants into the limestone aquifer in Madison County, Alabama. Knowledge of the locations at which contaminants could enter the aquifer is an important consideration in water quality management, particularly for regions that depend, at least partially, on ground water for their water supply. ERTS 1 imagery recorded on December 28, 1972 in the Multispectral Scanner-5 (MSS-5) and MSS-7 bands, and a false-color composite of the MSS-4 (green), MSS-5 (red), and MSS-7 (near infrared) bands were the principal materials used, along with thermography recorded by an RS-7 infrared scanner onboard a U-2 aircraft. The results of the study are discussed in detail, providing information on prominent lineations and major fracture trends which are related to aquifer contamination. Maps depicting the observations are also presented.

Doyle, F. L.

1973-01-01

342

Site Investigation Report for Fort McClellan, Alabama.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report documents the findings of environmental investigations at 17 sites identified by USAEC at Fort McClellan, Alabama. The investigated sites included 12 former chemical warfare agent (CWA) training areas, 2 possible chemical munitions disposal ar...

C. S. Manikas

1993-01-01

343

Physical and Chemical Characteristics of Alabama Tar Sands.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The tar sand deposits of northwest Alabama contain large reserves of oil, part of which may one day be tapped to supplement conventional oil production. The largest reserves occur in the Hartselle Sandstone and Price Mountain Formation, both of Mississipp...

G. V. Wilson

1983-01-01

344

Description and Status of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) is a network LMA detectors that detects and maps lightning using VHF radiation (TV Channel 5) in a region centered about Huntsville, Alabama that includes North Alabama, Central Tennessee and parts of Georgia and Mississippi. The North Alabama LMA has been in operation since late 2001, and has been providing real time data to regional National Weather Service (NSF) Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) since mid 2003 through the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) center. Data from this network (as well as other from other LMA systems) are now being used to create proxy Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) data sets for GOES-R risk reduction and algorithm development activities. In addition, since spring 2009 data are provided to the Storm Prediction Center in support of Hazardous Weather Testbed and GOES-R Proving Ground activities during the Spring Program. Description, status and plans will be discussed.

Blakeslee, Richard J.; Christian, Hugh J.; Bailey, Jeffrey C.; Buechler, Dennis E.; Hall, John M.; McCaul, Eugene W.; Stano, Geoffrey T.

2011-01-01

345

Alabama: A Successful Home-Based Business Model.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Alabama Cooperative Extension Service transformed a traditional textile/clothing program into a home-based business program. It was delivered by multiple methods including meetings, printed materials, audiovisual resources, and, in the second phase, videoconferencing. (SK)

Centrallo, Carol B.

1999-01-01

346

Basewide Energy Systems Plan, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama; Executive Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Included in this summary are the results of the Basewide Energy Systems Plan for Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. This plan includes an analysis and recommendation of energy conservation projects for the reduction of the installation's present energy consumptio...

1983-01-01

347

78 FR 75306 - Television Broadcasting Services; Birmingham, Alabama  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Alabama Educational Television Commission (``AETC...petitions for rulemaking by television stations seeking channel...Denysyk@fcc.gov, Media Bureau, (202) 418-1600...Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Television. Federal Communications...Chief, Video Division, Media Bureau. Proposed...

2013-12-11

348

76 FR 27740 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00036  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Alabama (FEMA-1971-DR), dated 04/28/ 2011. Incident: Severe storms, tornadoes, straight-line winds, and flooding. Incident Period: 04/15/2011 and continuing. Effective Date:...

2011-05-12

349

75 FR 27844 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00031  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for Public Assistance Only for the State of Alabama (FEMA-1908-DR), dated 05/03/2010. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 04/24/2010 through 04/25/2010. DATES: Effective...

2010-05-18

350

76 FR 27139 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00036  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Alabama (FEMA-1971-DR), dated 04/28/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 04/15/2011 and continuing. Effective Date:...

2011-05-10

351

76 FR 30225 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00037  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...for Public Assistance Only for the State of Alabama (FEMA-1971-DR), dated 05/10/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 04/15/2011 and continuing. Effective Date:...

2011-05-24

352

The Distribution of Mud Crabs (Xanthidae) in Alabama Estuaries.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Xanthid mud crabs are abundant associates of Alabama oyster reefs. Their distribution is affected by salinity, substrate, and water quality. The crabs appear to function as commensals and scavengers rather than predators of oysters.

E. B. May

1974-01-01

353

RF System High Power Amplifier Software Conversion at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

Jefferson Lab is in the process of converting the RF system from analog RF modules and non-smart high power amplifiers (HPAs) to digital RF modules and smart HPAs. The present analog RF module controls both the RF signal and the non-smart HPA hardware. The new digital RF module will only control the RF signal, so the new HPA must include embedded software. This paper will describe the conversion from a software perspective, including the initial testing, the intermediate mixed system of old and new units, and finally the totally new RF system.

G. Lahti; H. Dong; T. Seegerger

2006-10-31

354

Jefferson Lab IR demo FEL photocathode quantum efficiency scanner  

SciTech Connect

Jefferson Laboratory's Free Electron Laser (FEL) incorporates a cesiated gallium arsenide (GaAs) DC photocathode gun as its electron source. By using a setof scanning mirrors, the surface of the GaAs wafer is illuminated with a 543.5nm helium-neon laser. Measuring the current flow across the biased photocathodegenerates a quantum efficiency (QE) map of the 1-in. diameter wafer surface. The resulting QE map provides a very detailed picture of the efficiency of thewafer surface. By generating a QE map in a matter of minutes, the photocathode scanner has proven to be an exceptional tool in quickly determining sensitivityand availability of the photocathode for operation.

Grippo, Albert; Gubeli, Joseph; Jordan, Kevin; Michelle D. Shinn; Evans, Richard

2001-12-01

355

Investigation using data in Alabama from ERTS-A  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There are no author-identified significant results in this report. Brief summaries are presented of accomplishments by the state of Alabama in the areas of: (1) investigation of environmental factors; (2) land use compilation; (3) data processing for land use compilation; (4) photo-reproduction and unsupervised land use classification from digital tape; (5) data collection buoys; and (6) activities of the Geological Survey of Alabama.

Henry, H. R. (principal investigator)

1972-01-01

356

Topographic data of selected areas along the Alabama River near Montgomery, Alabama, collected using mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging (T-LiDAR) technology  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Topographic data at selected areas within the Alabama River flood plain near Montgomery, Alabama, were collected using a truck-mounted mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging system. These data were collected for inclusion in a flood inundation model developed by the National Weather Service in Birmingham, Alabama. Data are presented as ArcGIS point shapefiles with the extension .shp.

Kimbrow, D. R.

2014-01-01

357

33 CFR 100.121 - Swim Across the Sound, Long Island Sound, Port Jefferson, NY to Captain's Cove Seaport...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Sound, Port Jefferson, NY to Captain's Cove Seaport, Bridgeport, CT...Sound, Port Jefferson, NY to Captain's Cove Seaport, Bridgeport, CT...north-westerly to the finishing point at Captain's Cove Seaport at approximate location...

2010-07-01

358

75 FR 34634 - Special Local Regulation; Swim Across the Sound, Long Island Sound, Port Jefferson, NY to Captain...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Swim Across the Sound, Long Island Sound, Port Jefferson, NY to Captain's Cove Seaport...Local Regulation on the navigable waters of Long Island Sound between Port Jefferson, NY and Captain's Cove...

2010-06-18

359

75 FR 16700 - Special Local Regulation, Swim Across the Sound, Long Island Sound, Port Jefferson, NY to Captain...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation, Swim Across the Sound, Long Island Sound, Port Jefferson, NY to Captain's Cove Seaport...Local Regulation on the navigable waters of Long Island Sound between Port Jefferson, NY and Captain's Cove...

2010-04-02

360

Thomas Jefferson University scientists find eliminating the ‘good cholesterol’ receptor may fight breast cancer  

Cancer.gov

Removing a lipoprotein receptor known as SR-BI may help protect against breast cancer, as suggested by new findings presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2012 by Jefferson’s Kimmel Cancer Center researchers. In vitro and mouse studies revealed that depletion of the SR-BI resulted in a decrease in breast cancer cell growth.

361

3 CFR 8124 - Proclamation 8124 of April 11, 2007. Thomas Jefferson Day, 2007  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

On Thomas Jefferson Day, we commemorate the birthday of a monumental figure whose place in our Nation's history will always be cherished. Thomas Jefferson was a scholar, statesman, author, architect, and patriot, and today we celebrate his many accomplishments and lasting...

2008-01-01

362

Thomas Jefferson's Plan for the University of Virginia: Lessons from the Lawn. Teaching with Historic Places.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This lesson is based on the National Register of Historic Places registration file, "University of Virginia Historic District," and other primary and secondary materials about Thomas Jefferson and the ctreation of the University of Virginia. Thomas Jefferson did not begin the effort of designing the University of Virginia (Charlottesville) until…

Hughes, Mary; Wilson, Sara

363

Overview Of Control System For Jefferson Lab's High Power Free Electron Laser.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In this paper the current plans for the control system for Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's (Jefferson Lab's) Infrared Free Electron Laser (FEL) are presented. The goals for the FEL control system are fourfold: (1) to use EPICS and EPICS c...

A. Hofler A. Grippo M. Keesee J. Song

1997-01-01

364

History of Science and Technology through Primary Sources: Thomas Jefferson's "Notes on the State of Virginia."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Advocates the use of primary source materials in the classroom. Describes a lesson based on Thomas Jefferson's "Notes on the State of Virginia" in which students consider Jefferson's ideas on science and technology in the United States and Europe. Explores the links among science, technology, politics and social issues. (RW)

Mutchler, Kent D.

1989-01-01

365

The Gep-III Experiment at Jefferson Lab Hall C  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measurements of the elastic electric and magnetic form factors of the proton, GEp and GMp, respectively, at large momentum transfer, Q^2, shed new light on its internal nonperturbative structure. The ratio, Rp= ?pGEp/GMp, where ?p is the proton magnetic moment, has been measured extensively over the last decade at the Jefferson Laboratory, using the polarization transfer method, where one measures Rp directly by measuring the ratio of transverse to longitudinal polarizations of the recoiling proton in elastic electron-proton scattering. These data have revealed that the ratio decreases approximately linearly with increasing Q^2 above a Q^2 ˜ 1 GeV^2. At the same time, they are in disagreement with previous results obtained using the Rosenbluth method based on cross section measurements. The polarization transfer results are of unprecedented high precision and accuracy, due in large part to the small systematic uncertainties associated with the experimental technique. Most recently, the Gep-III Experiment was completed in June of 2008 in Hall C at Jefferson Laboratory. It extends the Q^2-range from 5.6 to 8.54 GeV^2. In this presentation, I will review the status of the proton elastic electromagnetic form factor data, including the latest results from the Gep-III experiment, and discuss a number of theoretical approaches to describing nucleon form factors.

Brash, Edward

2009-10-01

366

RF Power Upgrade for CEBAF at Jefferson Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) is currently upgrading the 6GeV Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) to 12GeV. As part of the upgrade, RF systems will be added, bringing the total from 340 to 420. Existing RF systems can provide up to 6.5 kW of CW RF at 1497 MHZ. The 80 new systems will provide increased RF power of up to 13 kW CW each. Built around a newly designed and higher efficiency 13 kW klystron developed for JLab by L-3 Communications, each new RF chain is a completely revamped system using hardware different than our present installations. This paper will discuss the main components of the new systems including the 13 kW klystron, waveguide isolator, and HV power supply using switch-mode technology. Methodology for selection of the various components and results of initial testing will also be addressed. Notice: Authored by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC under U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177. The U.S. Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce this manuscript for U.S. Government purposes.

Andrew Kimber,Richard Nelson

2011-03-01

367

Photon Source Capabilities of the Jefferson Lab FEL  

SciTech Connect

Jefferson Lab operates a superconducting energy recovered linac which is operated with CW RF and which powers oscillator-based IR and UV Free Electron Lasers (FELs) with diffraction limited sub-picosecond pulses with >10{sup 13} photons per pulse (1.0%BW) at pulse repetition frequencies up to 75 MHz. Useful harmonics extend into the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV). Based on FEL model calculations validated using this facility, we have designed both an oscillator-based VUV-FEL that would produce 6 ? 10{sup12} coherent (0.5% BW) 100 eV photons per pulse at multi-MHz repetition rates in the fundamental, and a dual FEL configuration that would allow simultaneous lasing lasing at THz and UV wavelengths. The VUV-FEL would utilize a novel high gain, low Q cavity, while the THz source would be an FEL oscillator with a short wiggler providing diffraction limited pulses with pulse energy exceeding 50 microJoules. The THz source would use the exhaust beam from a UVFEL. Such multiphoton capabilities would provide unique opportunities for out of equilibrium dynamical studies at time-scales down to 50 fs. The fully coherent nature of all these sources results in peak and average brightness values that are many orders of magnitude higher than storage rings. * We acknowledge support from the Commonwealth of Virginia. Jefferson Lab is supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC05-84-ER40150.

Benson, Stephen V.; Douglas, David R.; Evtushenko, Pavel; Hannon, Fay E.; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Klopf, John M.; Legg, Robert A.; Neil, George R.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Tennant, Christopher D.; Zhang, Shukui; Williams, Gwyn P.

2013-03-01

368

EMC effect for light nuclei: new results from Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

High energy lepton scattering has been the primary tool for mapping out the quark distributions of nucleons and nuclei. Measurements of deep inelastic scattering in nuclei show that the quark distributions in heavy nuclei are not simply the sum of the quark distributions of the constituent proton and neutron, as one might expect for a weakly bound system. This modification of the quark distributions in nuclei is known as the EMC effect. I will discuss the results from Jefferson Lab (JLab) experiment E03-103, a precise measurement of the EMC effect in few-body nuclei with emphasis on the large x region. Data from the light nuclei suggests that the nuclear dependence of the high x quark distribution may depend on the nucleon's local environment, rather than being a purely bulk effect. In addition, I will also discuss about a future experiment at the upgraded 12 GeV Jefferson Lab facility which will further investigate the role of the local nuclear environment and the influence of detailed nuclear structure to the modification of quark distributions.

Daniel, A. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens OH 45701 (United States)

2011-10-24

369

EMC effect for light nuclei: New results from Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

High energy lepton scattering has been the primary tool for mapping out the quark distributions of nucleons and nuclei. Measurements of deep inelastic scattering in nuclei show that the quark distributions in heavy nuclei are not simply the sum of the quark distributions of the constituent proton and neutron, as one might expect for a weakly bound system. This modification of the quark distributions in nuclei is known as the EMC effect. I will discuss the results from Jefferson Lab (JLab) experiment E03-103, a precise measurement of the EMC effect in few-body nuclei with emphasis on the large x region. Data from the light nuclei suggests that the nuclear dependence of the high x quark distribution may depend on the nucleon's local environment, rather than being a purely bulk effect. In addition, I will also discuss about a future experiment at the upgraded 12 GeV Jefferson Lab facility which will further investigate the role of the local nuclear environment and the influence of detailed nuclear structure to the modification of quark distributions.

Aji Daniel

2011-10-01

370

EMC effect for light nuclei: new results from Jefferson Lab  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High energy lepton scattering has been the primary tool for mapping out the quark distributions of nucleons and nuclei. Measurements of deep inelastic scattering in nuclei show that the quark distributions in heavy nuclei are not simply the sum of the quark distributions of the constituent proton and neutron, as one might expect for a weakly bound system. This modification of the quark distributions in nuclei is known as the EMC effect. I will discuss the results from Jefferson Lab (JLab) experiment E03-103, a precise measurement of the EMC effect in few-body nuclei with emphasis on the large x region. Data from the light nuclei suggests that the nuclear dependence of the high x quark distribution may depend on the nucleon's local environment, rather than being a purely bulk effect. In addition, I will also discuss about a future experiment at the upgraded 12 GeV Jefferson Lab facility which will further investigate the role of the local nuclear environment and the influence of detailed nuclear structure to the modification of quark distributions.

Daniel, A.

2011-10-01

371

40 CFR 81.68 - Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi...Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi...Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Gulfport...

2009-07-01

372

40 CFR 81.68 - Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi Interstate Air Quality...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi...Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Southern Mississippi...Mobile (Alabama)-Pensacola-Panama City (Florida)-Gulfport...

2010-07-01

373

"That Knowledge Most Useful to Us:" Thomas Jefferson's Concept of "Utility" in the Education of Republican Citizens.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses Thomas Jefferson's evolving concept of the form and manner of education most useful for republican citizens. Jefferson both respected and resented Europe's claims of superiority in cultural matters. But as captivated as Jefferson was by European artistic and literary attainments, he was appalled at the misery and squalor that…

Wagoner, Jennings L., Jr.

374

Trace element and isotopic evidence for two types of crustal melting beneath a High Cascade volcanic center, Mt. Jefferson, Oregon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mt. Jefferson is an andesite-dacite composite volcano in the Cascade Range, the locus of andesite and dacite-dominated volcanism for at least 1 million years. A large trace element data set for Mt. Jefferson and its surrounding mafic volcanic platform effectively rules out any fractionation based model (FC or AFC) for the generation of Mt. Jefferson andesites. Several incompatible element (Zr,

Richard M. Conrey; Peter R. Hooper; Peter B. Larson; John Chesley; Joaquin Ruiz

2001-01-01

375

Synoptic water-level measurements of the Upper Floridan aquifer in Florida and parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama, May-June 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water levels for the Upper Floridan aquifer were measured throughout Florida and in parts of Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama in May-June 2010. These measurements were compiled for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Floridan Aquifer System Groundwater Availability Study and conducted as part of the USGS Groundwater Resources Program. Data were collected by personnel from the USGS Florida Water Science Center, Georgia Water Science Center, South Carolina Water Science Center and several state and county agencies in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama using standard techniques. Data collected by USGS personnel are stored in the USGS National Water Information System (NWIS), Groundwater Site-Inventory System (GWSI). Furnished records from cooperators are stored in NWIS/GWSI when possible, but are available from the source agency.

Kinnaman, Sandra L.

2012-01-01

376

Geohydrology and susceptibility of major aquifers to surface contamination in Alabama; area 12  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report delineates and describes the geohydrology and susceptibility of major aquifers to contamination in Coffee, Dale, Henry, Houston, and Geneva Counties, Alabama. The major aquifers are the Upper Floridan, Lisbon, Nanafalia-Clayton, and Providence-Ripley aquifers. Estimated groundwater withdrawals for public water supplies are about 42 million gal/day. Maximum withdrawals for irrigation are 15 to 20 million gal/day. Withdrawals for self-supplied industrial and domestic uses are estimated to be 3 and 2.5 million gal/day, respectively. Long-term withdrawals of water from the Nanafalia-Clayton aquifer have resulted in significant declines in the potentiometric surface in Coffee, Dale, and Houston Counties. Significant declines in the potentiometric surfaces of the other major aquifers are not apparent. Recharge areas for all major aquifers are susceptible to contamination, but the probability of contamination of the Lisbon, Nanafalia-Clayton, and Providence-Ripley aquifers is low because the recharge areas are remote from areas of withdrawal. The recharge area for the Floridan aquifer, which consists largely of flat, sandy farmland , coincides with the area of use. This area is highly susceptible to contamination from insecticides and herbicides. (USGS)

Scott, J. C.; Cobb, R. H.

1988-01-01

377

76 FR 14611 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Alabama; 110(a)(1) and (2) Infrastructure...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Mobile, and Columbus areas. This Web site can be accessed at: http://adem.alabama.gov/programs/air/airquality.cnt. EPA has made the preliminary determination that Alabama's SIP and practices adequately demonstrate the State's...

2011-03-17

378

33 CFR 165.836 - Security Zone; Escorted Vessels, Mobile, Alabama, Captain of the Port.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Escorted Vessels, Mobile, Alabama, Captain... § 165.836 Security Zone; Escorted Vessels, Mobile, Alabama, Captain...permission of the COTP Mobile or a designated...representative to enter the security zone...

2010-07-01

379

33 CFR 165.836 - Security Zone; Escorted Vessels, Mobile, Alabama, Captain of the Port.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 false Security Zone; Escorted Vessels, Mobile, Alabama, Captain... § 165.836 Security Zone; Escorted Vessels, Mobile, Alabama, Captain...permission of the COTP Mobile or a designated...representative to enter the security zone...

2009-07-01

380

Uruguay Round: Opportunities for State Exports. Uruguay Round State Highlights. Volume 1. Alabama-Indiana.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 1993, Alabama recorded merchandise exports of $2.5 billion. The state's top three export markets in 1993 were Canada, Japan, and Mexico. Alabama boosted export sales of a range of manufactured products over the 1987-93 period.

1994-01-01

381

77 FR 38796 - Alabama Power Company; Holt Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Revised Restricted Service List for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Alabama] Alabama Power Company; Holt Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Revised Restricted...issuance of a new license for the Holt Hydroelectric Project No. 2203. The programmatic...restricted service list for the Holt Hydroelectric Project. On June 21, 2012, the...

2012-06-29

382

Children in Need of Supervision (CHINS): A New Concept in Alabama Law.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes youth affected by a provision in the Alabama Judicial Code called CHINS -- Children in Need of Supervision. It addresses the personnel in Alabama's public and private agencies at all levels, such as judges, juvenile probation officer...

M. R. Lewis

1977-01-01

383

Choctawhatchee Beach Mouse, Perdido Key Beach Mouse and Alabama Beach Mouse Recovery Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The old field mouse (Peromyscus polionotus) is distributed throughout northeastern Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, and Florida. Certain subspecies occur on beaches and dunes of the Atlantic coast of Florida and the Gulf Coast of Alabama and...

1987-01-01

384

ELECTROSTATIC MODELING OF THE JEFFERSON LABORATORY INVERTED CERAMIC GUN  

SciTech Connect

Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) is currently developing a new 500kV DC electron gun for future use with the FEL. The design consists of two inverted ceramics which support a central cathode electrode. This layout allows for a load-lock system to be located behind the gun chamber. The electrostatic geometry of the gun has been designed to minimize surface electric field gradients and also to provide some transverse focusing to the electron beam during transit between the cathode and anode. This paper discusses the electrode design philosophy and presents the results of electrostatic simulations. The electric field information obtained through modeling was used with particle tracking codes to predict the effects on the electron beam.

P. Evtushenko ,F.E. Hannon, C. Hernandez-Garcia

2010-05-01

385

Experimental Results in DIS, SIDIS and DES from Jefferson Lab  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Jefferson Lab's electron accelerator in its present incarnation, with a maximum beam energy slightly above 6 GeV, has already enabled a large number of experiments expanding our knowledge of nucleon and nuclear structure (especially in Deep Inelastic Scattering--DIS--at moderately high x, and in the resonance region). Several pioneering experiments have yielded first results on Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and other Deep Exclusive Processes (DES), and the exploration of the rich landscape of transverse momentum-dependent (TMD) structure functions using Semi-Inclusive electron scattering (SIDIS) has begun. With the upgrade of CEBAF to 12 GeV now underway, a significantly larger kinematic space will become available. The 12 GeV program taking shape will complete a detailed mapping of inclusive, TMD and generalized distribution functions for quarks, antiquarks and gluons in the valence region and beyond.

Kuhn, Sebastian E.

2011-07-01

386

Jefferson Lab injector development for next generation parity violation experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To meet the challenging requirements of next generation parity violation experiments at Jefferson Lab, the Center for Injectors and Sources is working on improving the parity-quality of the electron beam. These improvements include new electron photogun design and fast helicity reversal of the Pockels Cell. We proposed and designed a new scheme for slow helicity reversal using a Wien Filter and two Solenoids. This slow reversal complements the insertable half-wave plate reversal of the laser-light polarization by reversing the electron beam polarization at the injector while maintaining a constant accelerator configuration. For position feedback, fast air-core magnets located in the injector were commissioned and a new scheme for charge feedback is planned.

Grames, J.; Hansknect, J.; Poelker, M.; Suleiman, R.

2011-11-01

387

Jefferson Lab 12 GeV CEBAF Upgrade  

SciTech Connect

The existing continuous electron beam accelerator facility (CEBAF) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) is a 5-pass, recirculating cw electron Linac operating at ~6 GeV and is devoted to basic research in nuclear physics. The 12 GeV CEBAF Upgrade is a $310 M project, sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Physics, that will expand its research capabilities substantially by doubling the maximum energy and adding major new experimental apparatus. The project received construction approval in September 2008 and has started the major procurement process. The cryogenic aspects of the 12 GeV CEBAF Upgrade includes: doubling the accelerating voltages of the Linacs by adding ten new high-performance, superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cryomodules (CMs) to the existing 42 1/4 cryomodules; doubling of the 2 K cryogenics plant; and the addition of eight superconducting magnets.

Claus Rode

2010-04-01

388

A syncrhronized FIR/VUV light source at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

This slide show presents an introduction to Free-Electron Lasers (FELs) and what makes the JLab FELs unique. Ways of exploring the nature of matter with the FEL are shown, including applications in the THz, IR, UV, and VUV. The Jefferson Lab FEL Facility is unique in its high average brightness in the THz, and IR -- VUV spectral regions and Sub ps-pulses at MHz repetition rates. With an installation of a rebuilt 'F100' cryomodule the linac energy will increase to > 150MeV. This will permit lasing further into the UV and extend VUV. With the swap of our CEBAF-style cryounit for an improved booster, we could lase in the VUV. Addition of a wiggler and optical cavity slightly canted from the UV beamline would allow simultaneous lasing of UV and THz for high E-field 2 color experiments.

Shinn, Michelle D. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

2013-05-31

389

Basic instrumentation for Hall A at Jefferson Lab  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The instrumentation in Hall A at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility was designed to study electro- and photo-induced reactions at very high luminosity and good momentum and angular resolution for at least one of the reaction products. The central components of Hall A are two identical high resolution spectrometers, which allow the vertical drift chambers in the focal plane to provide a momentum resolution of better than 2×10 -4. A variety of Cherenkov counters, scintillators and lead-glass calorimeters provide excellent particle identification. The facility has been operated successfully at a luminosity well in excess of 10 38 cm-2 s-1. The research program is aimed at a variety of subjects, including nucleon structure functions, nucleon form factors and properties of the nuclear medium.

Alcorn, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Aniol, K. A.; Annand, J. R. M.; Auerbach, L.; Arrington, J.; Averett, T.; Baker, F. T.; Baylac, M.; Beise, E. J.; Berthot, J.; Bertin, P. Y.; Bertozzi, W.; Bimbot, L.; Black, T.; Boeglin, W. U.; Boykin, D. V.; Brash, E. J.; Breton, V.; Breuer, H.; Brindza, P.; Brown, D.; Burtin, E.; Calarco, J. R.; Cardman, L. S.; Carr, R.; Cates, G. D.; Cavata, C.; Chai, Z.; Chang, C. C.; Chant, N. S.; Chen, J.-P.; Choi, S.; Chudakov, E.; Churchwell, S.; Coman, M.; Cisbani, E.; Colilli, S.; Colombel, N.; Crateri, R.; Dale, D. S.; Degrande, N.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deur, A.; Dezern, G.; Diederich, B.; Dieterich, S.; di Salvo, R.; Djawotho, P.; Domingo, J.; Ducret, J.-E.; Dutta, D.; Egiyan, K.; Epstein, M. B.; Escoffier, S.; Esp, S.; Ewell, L. A.; Finn, J. M.; Fissum, K. G.; Folts, E.; Fonvieille, H.; Frois, B.; Frullani, S.; Gao, H.; Gao, J.; Garibaldi, F.; Gasparian, A.; Gavalya, A.; Gayou, O.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Giuliani, F.; Glamazdin, A.; Glashausser, C.; Gomez, J.; Gorbenko, V.; Gorringe, T.; Gricia, M.; Griffioen, K.; Hamilton, D.; Hansen, J.-O.; Hersman, F. W.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmes, R.; Holmgren, H.; Holtrop, M.; d'Hose, N.; Hovhannisyan, E.; Howell, C.; Huber, G. M.; Hughes, E.; Hyde-Wright, C. E.; Ibrahim, H.; Incerti, S.; Iodice, M.; Iommi, R.; Ireland, D.; Jaminion, S.; Jardillier, J.; Jensen, S.; Jiang, X.; Jones, C. E.; Jones, M. K.; Joo, K.; Jutier, C.; Kahl, W.; Kato, S.; Katramatou, A. T.; Kelly, J. J.; Kerhoas, S.; Ketikyan, A.; Khandaker, M.; Khayat, M.; Kino, K.; Kominis, I.; Korsch, W.; Kox, S.; Kramer, K.; Kumar, K. S.; Kumbartzki, G.; Kuss, M.; Lagamba, L.; Laveissière, G.; Leone, A.; LeRose, J. J.; Marie, F.; Levchuk, L.; Leuschner, M.; Lhuillier, D.; Liang, M.; Livingston, K.; Lindgren, R. A.; Liyanage, N.; Lolos, G. J.; Lourie, R. W.; Lucentini, M.; Madey, R.; Maeda, K.; Malov, S.; Manley, D. M.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marroncle, J.; Martine, J.; Mayilyan, S.; McCarthy, J. S.; McCormick, K.; Mclntyre, J.; McKeown, R. D.; Meekins, D.; van der Meer, R. L. J.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Milbrath, B.; Miller, J. A.; Miller, W.; Mitchell, J.; Mougey, J.; Nanda, S.; Nathan, A.; Neyret, D.; Offermann, E. A. J. M.; Papandreou, Z.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Perrino, R.; Petratos, G. G.; Petrosyan, A.; Pierangeli, L.; Platchkov, S.; Pomatsalyuk, R.; Pripstein, D.; Prout, D. L.; Punjabi, V. A.; Pussieux, T.; Quéméner, G.; Ransomez, R. D.; Ravel, O.; Reitz, B.; Roblin, Y.; Roche, R.; Roedelbronn, M.; Rondon-Aramayo, O. A.; Roos, P. G.; Rosner, G.; Rowntree, D.; Rutledge, G. A.; Rutt, P. M.; Rvachev, M.; Sabatavenere, F.; Saha, A.; Saito, T.; Santavenere, F.; Sarty, A. J.; Schneider, W. J.; Segal, J. P.; Serdarevic-Offermann, A.; Shahinyan, A.; Slifer, K.; Smith, T. P.; Soldi, A.; Sorokin, P.; Souder, P.; Spiegel, S. L.; Stevens, M. A.; Strauch, S.; Suleiman, R.; Templon, J. A.; Terasawa, T.; Todor, L.; Tsubota, H.; Ueno, H.; Ulmer, P. E.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Van de Vyver, R.; van Verst, S.; Vernin, P.; Vlahovic, B.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walter, R.; Watson, J. W.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wijesooriya, K.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Xiang, H.; Xiong, F.; Xu, W.; Zainea, D. G.; Zeps, V.; Zhao, J.; Zheng, X.; Zhou, Z.-L.; Zhu, L.; Zolnierczuk, P. A.

2004-04-01

390

Residual Resistance Data from Cavity Production Projects at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

A fundamental limitation towards achieving high quality factors in superconducting radio-frequency cavities is the so-called residual resistance. Understanding and controlling the residual resistance has important implications towards improving the efficiency and reduce the operating cost of continuous wave superconducting linear accelerators. In this contribution we will report on the residual resistance values obtained from measurements of the quality factor of a large set of cavities, with resonant frequency between 805 MHz and 1.5 GHz, all of them processed and tested at Jefferson Lab. Surface treatments included both buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing. The results indicate an approximate value of the residual resistance of about 7-10 n Omega.

Gianluigi Ciovati, Rongli Geng, John Mammosser, Jeffrey Saunders

2010-11-01

391

The GlueX Project at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

One of the main scientific questions that remains unanswered in subatomic physics is the nature and behaviour of the "Glue" which holds the quarks together. The puzzling feature of this construction is that quarks are never found free, but only in triplets or pairs, a phenomenon known as "confinement". Since gluons carry colour charge, they can form chromoelectric flux tubes, which may result in unusual objects, such as glue-balls or hybrid combinations of gluons and quarks. In certain models, the later can be produced with quantum numbers not allowed in the simple quark picture. An international experiment (GlueX) at Jefferson Lab, Virginia, is being designed to search for such exotic hybrid mesons and thus elucidate the phenomenon of confinement. GlueX is considered a 'discovery' experiment; its salient features, the planned methodology of partial- wave analysis, and the R&D progress of its detector subsystems will be

Papandreou, Zisis

2009-01-01

392

Results on Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

After about 10 years of growing interest for Generalized Parton Distributions come the first results from dedicated experiments, using the golden Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering process. After a short introduction, we will explain the experimental methodology and show results of the Hall A E00-110 experiment, which aimed at measuring helicity-dependent photon electroproduction cross sections. We will emphasize how this experiment provided the first stringent tests of the scaling property of this process, allowing for the first time a model-independent extraction of a linear combination of Generalized Parton Distributions. We will also describe the Hall B E01-113 experiment which measured the photon electroproduction beam spin asymmetry over a wide kinematical range. The summary will include an outlook on the next generation of experiments which are already planned at Jefferson Lab at 6 GeV, but also after the planned 12 GeV upgrade.

Franck Sabatie

2006-10-02

393

High Resolution Hypernuclear Spectroscopy at Jefferson Lab Hall A  

SciTech Connect

The characteristics of the Jefferson Lab electron beam, together with those of the experimental equipment, offer a unique opportunity to study hypernuclear spectroscopy via electromagnetic induced reactions. Experiment 94-107 started a systematic study on 1p-shell targets, $^{12}C$, $^{9}Be$ and $^{16}O$. For $^{12}C$ for the first time measurable strength in the core-excited part of the spectrum between the ground state and the p state was shown in $^{12}_{\\Lambda}B$ spectrum. A high-quality $^{16}_{\\Lambda}N$ spectrum was produced for the first time with sub-MeV energy resolution. A very precise $\\Lambda$ binding energy value for $^{16}_{\\Lambda}N$, calibrated against the elementary $(e,e'K^+)$ reaction on hydrogen, has also been obtained. $^{9}_{\\Lambda}Li$ spectrum shows some disagreement in strength for the second and third doublet with respect to the theory.

Garibaldi,Franco; Bydzovsky,Petr; Cisbani,Evaristo; Cusanno, Francesco; De Leo, Raffaele; Frullani, Salvatore; Iodice, Mauro; LeRose, John; Markowitz, Pete; Millener, D.; Urciuoli, Guido

2013-09-01

394

Studies of the Electromagnetic Structure of Mesons at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

The Jefferson Laboratory Hall B PrimEx Collaboration is using tagged photons to perform an absolute 1.4% level cross section measurement of the photoproduction of neutral pions in the Coulomb field of a nucleus. The absolute cross section for this process is directly proportional to the neutral pion radiative decay width and consequently the uncertainty in the luminosity is directly reflected in the final error bar of the measurement. The PI has taken primary responsibility for the photon flux determination and in this technical report, we outline the steps taken to limit the uncertainty in the tagged photon flux to the 1% level. These include the use of a total absorption counter for absolute flux calibration, a pair spectrometer for online relative flux monitoring, and updated procedures for postbremsstrahlung electron counting. The photon tagging technique has been used routinely in its various forms to provide quasimonochromatic photons for absolute photonuclear cross section measurements. The analysis of such experiments in the context of bremsstrahlung photon tagging was summarized by Owens in 1990. Since then, a number of developments have made possible significant improvements in the implementation of this technique. Here, we describe the steps taken by the PrimEx Collaboration in Hall B of Jefferson Laboratory to limit the systematic uncertainty in the absolute photon flux to 1%. They include an absolute flux calibration at low intensity with a total absorption counter, online relative flux monitoring with a pair spectrometer, and the use of multihit time to digital converters for post bremsstrahlung electron counting during production data runs. While this discussion focuses on the analysis techniques utilized by the PrimEx Collaboration which involves a bremsstrahlung based photon tagging system to measure the neutral pion lifetime, the methods described herein readily apply to other types of photon tagging systems.

Dale, Daniel, S.

2012-11-11

395

Ground-water resources of the Coosa River basin in Georgia and Alabama; Subarea 6 of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint and Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa river basins  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Drought conditions in the 1980's focused attention on the multiple uses of the surface- and ground-water resources in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) and Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa (ACT) River basins in Georgia, Alabama, and Florida. State and Federal agencies also have proposed projects that would require additional water resources and revise operating practices within the river basins. The existing and proposed water projects create conflicting demands for water by the States and emphasize the problem of water-resource allocation. This study was initiated to describe ground-water availability in the Coosa River basin of Georgia and Alabama, Subarea 6 of the ACF and ACT River basins, and estimate the possible effects of increased ground-water use within the basin. Subarea 6 encompasses about 10,060 square miles in Georgia and Alabama, totaling all but about 100 mi2 of the total area of the Coosa River basin; the remainder of the basin is in Tennessee. Subarea 6 encompasses parts of the Piedmont, Blue Ridge, Cumberland Plateau, Valley and Ridge, and Coastal Plain physiographic provinces. The major rivers of the subarea are the Oostanaula, Etowah, and Coosa. The Etowah and Oostanaula join in Floyd County, Ga., to form the Coosa River. The Coosa River flows southwestward and joins with the Tallapoosa River near Wetumpka, Ala., to form the Alabama River. The Piedmont and Blue Ridge Provinces are underlain by a two-component aquifer system that is composed of a fractured, crystalline-rock aquifer characterized by little or no primary porosity or permeability; and the overlying regolith, which generally behaves as a porous-media aquifer. The Valley and Ridge and Cumberland Plateau Provinces are underlain by fracture- and solution-conduit aquifer systems, similar in some ways to those in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge Provinces. Fracture-conduit aquifers predominate in the well-consolidated sandstones and shales of Paleozoic age; solution-conduit aquifers predominate in the carbonate rocks of Paleozoic age. The Coastal Plain is underlain by southward-dipping, poorly consolidated deposits of sand, gravel, and clay of fluvial and marine origin. The conceptual model described for this study qualitatively subdivides the ground-water flow system into local (shallow), intermediate, and regional (deep) flow regimes. Ground-water discharge to tributaries mainly is from local and intermediate flow regimes and varies seasonally. The regional flow regime probably approximates steady-state conditions and discharges chiefly to major drains such as the Coosa River, and in upstream areas, to the Etowah and Oostanaula Rivers. Ground-water discharge to major drains originates from all flow regimes. Mean-annual ground-water discharge to streams (baseflow) is considered to approximate the long-term, average recharge to ground water. The mean-annual baseflow was estimated using an automated hydrograph-separation method, and represents discharge from the local, intermediate, and regional flow regimes of the ground-water flow system. Mean-annual baseflow in Georgia was estimated to be about 4,000 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) (from the headwaters to the Georgia-Alabama State Line), 5,360 ft3/s in Alabama, and 9,960 ft3/s for all of Subarea 6 (at the Subarea 7-Subarea 8 boundary). Mean annual baseflow represented about 60 percent of total mean-annual stream discharge for the period of record. Stream discharge for selected sites on the Coosa River and its tributaries were compiled for the years 1941, 1954, and 1986, during which sustained droughts occurred throughout most of the ACF-ACT area. Stream discharges were assumed to be sustained entirely by baseflow during the latter periods of these droughts. Estimated baseflow near the end of the individual drought years ranged from about 11 to 27 percent of the estimated mean-annual baseflow in Subarea 6. The potential exists for the development of ground-water resources on a regional scale throughout Su

Robinson, James L.; Journey, Celeste A.; Atkins, J. Brian

1997-01-01

396

Percent Uninsured by County  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a county by county visualization of the percentage of residents that are uninsured. The data are from a set available here: http://manyeyes.alphaworks.ibm.com/manyeyes/datasets/percent-uninsured-by-county/versions/1

Manyeyes

397

ATM Coastal Topography-Alabama 2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Alabama coastline, acquired October 3-4, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative scanning Lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning Lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface, and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for pre-survey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is routinely used to create maps that represent submerged or first surface topography.

Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

2009-01-01

398

Reporting on the Holocaust: the view from Jim Crow Alabama.  

PubMed

The press in Alabama covered major events taking place in Germany from the rise of Adolf Hitler and the Nazis in 1933 through the Nuremberg Trials in 1946. Journalists in the state provided extensive coverage, and editors did not hesitate to opine on the persecution of the Jews in Europe. Yet, Alabama’s white-run press failed in the end to explain the events as a singularly Jewish tragedy. The state’s black-run press, for its part, used the news of the mass killings of the Jews to warn against the dangers of conceptions of racial superiority—a primary concern for black southerners living in the Jim Crow South. PMID:22073444

Puckett, Dan J

2011-01-01

399

77 FR 36274 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Alabama  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

Notice is hereby given that the State of Alabama is revising its approved Public Water System Supervision Program. Alabama has adopted the following rules: Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule, Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule, and Stage 2 Disinfection/Disinfection Byproducts Rule. EPA has determined that Alabama's rules are no less stringent than the corresponding......

2012-06-18

400

Model Collaborative Intervention Project for Hearing Impaired Elderly in Rural Alabama.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Purpose of the project was to implement a model hearing screening program for the elderly in rural Alabama. It was conducted jointly by the UAB and the East Alabama Regional Planning and Development Commission AAA, and the Alabama Institute for the De...

D. G. Folks

1992-01-01

401

DRAFT LANDSAT DATA MOSAIC: MONTGOMERY COUNTY, TEXAS; HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS; FORT BEND COUNTY, TEXAS; BRAZORIA COUNTY, TEXAS; GALVESTON COUNTY, TEXAS  

EPA Science Inventory

This is a draft Landsat Data Mosaic, which contains remote sensing information for Montgomery County, Texas Harris County, Texas Fort Bend County, Texas Brazoria County, Texas Galveston County, and Texas Imagery dates on the following dates: October 6, 1999 and September 29, 200...

402

Integrated Distribution Management System for Alabama Principal Investigator  

SciTech Connect

Southern Company Services, under contract with the Department of Energy, along with Alabama Power, Alstom Grid (formerly AREVA T&D) and others moved the work product developed in the first phase of the Integrated Distribution Management System (IDMS) from “Proof of Concept” to true deployment through the activity described in this Final Report. This Project – Integrated Distribution Management Systems in Alabama – advanced earlier developed proof of concept activities into actual implementation and furthermore completed additional requirements to fully realize the benefits of an IDMS. These tasks include development and implementation of a Distribution System based Model that enables data access and enterprise application integration.

Schatz, Joe

2013-03-31

403

Factors associated with intention to vaccinate a daughter against HPV: a statewide survey in Alabama  

PubMed Central

Purpose Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. Adolescent and young adults aged 15–24 were estimated to account for three quarters of new infections in 2000. Two HPV vaccines are currently available. The vaccine is recommended for girls aged 11–12 years. Previous research has indicated that African- American and Asian-American parents are less likely to vaccinate their daughters than Caucasians. This investigation examines the relationship between demographic, medical, and behavioral risk factors for HPV vaccine acceptability among Alabama residents. Methods The cross sectional survey was conducted using random digit dialing. Eligible participants were female caregivers of adolescent girls between the ages of 10 and 14 years. Factors related to intention to vaccinate a daughter within the next 6 months were examined using chi-square and logistic regression. Results Caregivers who were informed about HPV vaccination from a health care provider were more likely to intend to vaccinate their daughter within the next 6 months compared to caregivers who did not report this source of information (OR=3.59 , 95% CI= 1.52, 8.45). Race, education, county of residence, child’s age, religious attendance, knowledge and history of HPV, perceived susceptibility and severity of infection were not significantly related to intention to vaccinate against HPV. Conclusion Caregivers who were informed of the vaccine by their health care provider were more likely to vaccinate their adolescent daughters. Provider attitudes and caregiver education is an essential link to improvement of HPV vaccination uptake in Alabama.

Litton, Allison G.; Desmond, Renee A.; Gilliland, Janice; Huh, Warner K.; Franklin, Frank A.

2011-01-01

404

Geophysical Characterization for Potential Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The southeastern US is a leading producer of carbon dioxide emissions in large part due to the high number of coal-fired power plants in the region. As part of a Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) funded geological characterization project we have collected a number of geophysical data sets that characterize the Black Warrior Basin in the vicinity of the Alabama Power Gorgas Steam Plant in Walker County, Alabama. These geophysical data sets are important for extending the results from our 8000-foot characterization hole throughout the basin. Two 5-mile seismic reflection profiles processed through pre-stack time migration image the Cambrian through Pennsylvanian stratigraphy in the basin. The major injection targets in the saline reservoirs of the Hartselle Sandstone, Tuscumbia Limestone, Stones River Group and Knox Group. Initial examination of the data show that it is well suited for techniques such as Amplitude Versus Offset (AVO) analysis and inversion with the downhole data. Multiple offset vertical seismic profiles (VSP) image the formations close to and at multiple azimuths away from the drill hole. These VSPs also provide an important link to the seismic reflection profiles, which pass a little less than a mile to the north of the drill hole. Three shallow microseismic wells in the vicinity of the main drill hole have 3-component geophones cemented at depths of 50, 150, and 250 foot. These wells, designed to record small magnitude seismic events resulting from low-volume water injection, are important for characterizing the local fracture pathways and stress fields. Downhole gravity data complements the usual suite of downhole tools by imaging density variations deeper into the formations and ensuring that the identified saline reservoirs are not locally discontinuous.

Goodliffe, A. M.; Harris, W.; Rutter, R. S.; Clark, P.; Pashin, J. C.; Esposito, R. A.

2011-12-01

405

Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) Report. Jefferson Proving Ground, Madison, Indiana.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the results of the Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) investigation conducted by The Technology Corporation (TETC) at Jefferson Proving Ground, a U.S. Government property selected for closure by the Base Realign...

M. Ethridge J. Kang B. Young

1994-01-01

406

Relational Database Model for Managing Accelerator Control System Software at Jefferson Lab.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The operations software group at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility faces a number of challenges common to facilities which manage a large body of software developed in-house. Developers include members of the software group, operators, ha...

S. Schaffner T. Larrieu

2001-01-01

407

75 FR 61463 - The Narragansett Electric Company; Arcadia Gas Storage, LLC; Salt Plains Storage, LLC; Jefferson...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Jefferson Island Storage & Hub, L.L.C.; Eagle Rock Desoto Pipeline, L.P.; The Brooklyn Union Gas Company; Arkansas Ok Gas Corporation; Notice of Baseline Filings September 29, 2010. Take notice that on September 22, 2010, September 23,...

2010-10-05

408

Jefferson University-led team studies high dose vitamin C for advanced pancreatic cancer:  

Cancer.gov

A small phase I clinical trial at Jefferson University Hospitals of high-dose, intravenous vitamin C in combination with chemotherapy medications show that this treatment is safe and may have promise for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

409

Thomas Jefferson University study finds leukemia drug reverses tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer cells:  

Cancer.gov

Taking a leukemia chemotherapy drug may help breast cancer patients who don’t respond to tamoxifen overcome resistance to the widely-used drug, new research from the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson suggests.

410

Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 94-0033-2552, Ladish Malting Company, Jefferson, Wisconsin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In response to a confidential request, worker exposures to mycotoxins during barley storage and malting operations at Landish Malting Company (SIC-2083), Jefferson, Wisconsin were investigated. Medical and industrial hygiene surveys were conducted, and vi...

E. Knutti G. J. Kullman

1996-01-01

411

77 FR 2120 - Environmental Impact Statement for New Orleans Rail Gateway (NORG), Jefferson and Orleans...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Environmental Impact Statement for New Orleans Rail Gateway (NORG), Jefferson and Orleans...related impacts of upgrading the New Orleans Rail Gateway (NORG) and infrastructure in...will prepare the EIS for the New Orleans Rail Gateway Program and infrastructure...

2012-01-13

412

33 CFR 334.782 - SUPSHIP Gulf Coast, Pascagoula, Mississippi, Detachment Mobile, Alabama at AUSTAL, USA, Mobile...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Mobile, Alabama at AUSTAL, USA, Mobile, Alabama; restricted...Mobile, Alabama at AUSTAL, USA, Mobile, Alabama; restricted...navigable waters of the United States, as defined at 33 CFR...area identified as AUSTAL, USA and the mean high water level within a...

2013-07-01

413

Digital Data for Volcano Hazards in the Mount Jefferson Region, Oregon  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Mount Jefferson has erupted repeatedly for hundreds of thousands of years, with its last eruptive episode during the last major glaciation which culminated about 15,000 years ago. Geologic evidence shows that Mount Jefferson is capable of large explosive eruptions. The largest such eruption occurred between 35,000 and 100,000 years ago. If Mount Jefferson erupts again, areas close to the eruptive vent will be severely affected, and even areas tens of kilometers (tens of miles) downstream along river valleys or hundreds of kilometers (hundreds of miles) downwind may be at risk. Numerous small volcanoes occupy the area between Mount Jefferson and Mount Hood to the north, and between Mount Jefferson and the Three Sisters region to the south. These small volcanoes tend not to pose the far-reaching hazards associated with Mount Jefferson, but are nonetheless locally important. A concern at Mount Jefferson, but not at the smaller volcanoes, is the possibility that small-to-moderate sized landslides could occur even during periods of no volcanic activity. Such landslides may transform as they move into lahars (watery flows of rock, mud, and debris) that can inundate areas far downstream. The geographic information system (GIS) volcano hazard data layer used to produce the Mount Jefferson volcano hazard map in USGS Open-File Report 99-24 (Walder and others, 1999) is included in this data set. Both proximal and distal hazard zones were delineated by scientists at the Cascades Volcano Observatory and depict various volcano hazard areas around the mountain.

Schilling, S. P.; Doelger, S.; Walder, J. S.; Gardner, C. A.; Conrey, R. M.; Fisher, B. J.

2008-01-01

414

Geology Of Mt. Jefferson, Oregon: A Showcase Of High Cascade Stratocone Magmatic Components  

Microsoft Academic Search

The small (~25 km3) Mt. Jefferson andesite-dacite stratocone overlies the south side of an 150 km2 volcanic field dominated by intermediate and silicic domes and small shield-like volcanoes. The volcanic field has been active for ~1.5 Ma, flanked along-arc to both north and south by similarly long-lived intra-arc mafic volcanism. Mt. Jefferson was built at the junction of two segments

R. M. Conrey

2010-01-01

415

Thomas Jefferson University study finds deviating from radiation protocols increases risk of treatment failure and death  

Cancer.gov

Implementing measures to ensure radiation therapy protocols are followed not only decreases deviations, but it can also improve overall survival in cancer patients, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital researchers suggest in a first-of-its kind study presented during a plenary session at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 54th Annual Meeting in Boston. Thomas Jefferson University Hospital is home to the Kimmel Cancer Center.

416

Design of the SRF Driver ERL for the Jefferson Lab UV FEL  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe the design of the SRF Energy-Recovering Linac (ERL) providing the CW electron drive beam at the Jefferson Lab UV FEL. Based on the same 135 MeV linear accelerator as  and sharing portions of the recirculator with  the Jefferson Lab 10 kW IR Upgrade FEL, the UV driver ERL uses a novel bypass geometry to provide transverse

David R. Douglas; Stephen Benson; George Biallas; Keith Blackburn; James Boyce; Donald Bullard; James Coleman; Cody Dickover; Forrest Ellingsworth; Pavel Evtushenko; Christopher Gould; Joseph Gubeli; Fay Hannon; David Hardy; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; Kevin Jordan; Michael Klopf; James Kortze; Matthew Marchlik; Steven Moore; George Neil; Thomas Powers; Daniel Sexton; Michelle Shinn; Christopher Tennant; Richard Walker; Frederick Wilson; Shukui Zhang

2011-01-01

417

Parameters of triggered-lightning flashes in Florida and Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

Channel base currents from triggered lightning were measured at the NASA Kennedy Space Center, Florida, during summer 1990 and at Fort McClellan, Alabama, during summer 1991. Additionally, 16-mm cinematic records with 3- or 5-ms resolution were obtained for all flashes, and streak camera records were obtained for three of the Florida flashes. The 17 flashes analyzed contained 69 strokes, all

R. J. Fisher; G. H. Schnetzer; R. Thottappillil; V. A. Rakov; M. A. Uman; J. D. Goldberg

1993-01-01

418

Marketing Education. Alabama Course of Study. Bulletin 1990, No. 55.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This course of study provides a framework for the content of a program in marketing education as part of the Alabama vocational education program. The course of study was designed to assist educators in developing and maintaining high quality vocational programs and to ensure uniformity of vocational programs. Following a description of the…

Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

419

Emergent spatial pattern of herpetofauna in Alabama, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analyzing spatial pattern of regional biodiversity and its relationships with environmental factors is important for biodiversity conservation at large scales. The emergent spatial pattern of herpetofauna in Alabama is examined by combining thousands of historical records from 132 species of 24 families and environmental conditions. Our results indicate that species richness of herpetofauna increases with the increase of latitude, while

Xiongwen Chen; Yong Wang

420

Sampling Fish Populations in the Coosa River, Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fish populations were sampled in two quarter-mile sections of the Coosa River near Childersburg, Alabama, during July and August, 1949. Sampling was done with hoop nets, wire baskets, and rotenone. In addition, the catch of a permanent fish trap was observed. The selectivity and limitations of each of these sampling methods are discussed. Since the methods used were to an

Donald C. Scott

1951-01-01

421

Back to the Basics: Birmingham, Alabama, Measurement and Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Back to the Basics: Birmingham, Alabama" is the fourth in a series of workshops that focus on teaching foundational map reading and spatial differentiation skills. It is the second published exercise from the Back to the Basics series developed by the Wetland Education through Maps and Aerial Photography (WETMAAP) Program (see "Journal of…

Handley, Lawrence R.; Lockwood, Catherine M.; Handley, Nathan

2005-01-01

422

Smoking, Sociodemographic Determinants, and Stress in the Alabama Black Belt  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: In the Alabama Black Belt, poverty is high, and the educational level is low. Studies have found increased tobacco use among individuals exposed to high levels of stress. Few studies have been conducted in this region to measure smoking status, its sociodemographic determinants, and how smoking status relates to stressful environmental…

Shuaib, Faisal; Foushee, H. R.; Ehiri, John; Bagchi, Suparna; Baumann, Angela; Kohler, Connie

2011-01-01

423

Parables and Politics: Clergy Attitudes toward Illegal Immigration in Alabama  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The passage of a stringent immigration law in Alabama in 2011 makes relevant the juxtaposition of clergy and congregant attitudes and behaviors toward illegal immigrants as related to Biblical teachings that require charity to aliens. In order to examine the relationship between religious attitudes and illegal immigration, approximately 426…

Wickersham, Mary Eleanor

2013-01-01

424

Alabama Commission on Higher Education. Annual Report, 1993-94.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This annual report of the Alabama Commission on Higher Education describes new academic programs approved, allied health programs, off-campus instruction, computer-based articulation, rising junior exam, the Academic Common Market, educational technologies, Governor's Conference on Higher Education, Eminent Scholars Program, Meharry Medical…

Alabama State Commission on Higher Education, Montgomery.

425

Recovery of Heavy Minerals from Alabama Sand and Gravel Operations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A study was made of 25 samples from 15 Alabama sand and gravel operations to determine their heavy mineral content. All of the samples contained some heavy minerals (4 to 188 pounds per ton), and 80 percent contained 20 or more pounds of heavy minerals pe...

G. V. Sullivan J. S. Browning

1970-01-01

426

Comprehension Strategies: Grades K-1. Alabama Reading Initiative.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This inservice professional development module, part of the Alabama Reading Initiative, presents research summaries, notes for presenters, and activities. The Comprehension Strategies module explains the process of building comprehension in readers so that they read for meaning and understanding. There are six interferences to comprehension that…

Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

427

Comprehension Strategies: Grades 2-3. Alabama Reading Initiative.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This inservice professional development module, part of the Alabama Reading Initiative, presents research summaries, notes for presenters, and activities. The Comprehension Strategies module explains the process of building comprehension in readers so that they read for meaning and understanding. There are six interferences to comprehension that…

Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

428

An Analysis of Optometric Practices in Rural Alabama.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Twenty-nine Alabama optometric practices were studied using an optometrist survey, one-week patient flow analysis, and audit of patient records. Results indicate some special facets of the rural practices that may require a different kind of educational preparation. (MSE)

Wild, Bradford W.; Maisiak, Richard

1981-01-01

429

Alabama District Improves by Sharpening Data and Goals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When students already are achieving at high levels, it can be easy for teachers to become complacent. However, Mountain Brook Schools in suburban Birmingham, Alabama, has developed a culture committed to continuous improvement that has resulted in an excellent system becoming outstanding. The key is professional development. Professional learning…

Newman, Jane L.

2006-01-01

430

Oral Language & Vocabulary Development: Grades K-1. Alabama Reading Initiative.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This inservice professional development module, part of the Alabama Reading Initiative, presents research summaries, notes for presenters, and activities. The Oral Language and Vocabulary module elaborates on a student's comprehension of text as it relates to the overlap between the student's system of language and the author's system of language.…

Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery.

431

Sea-Level Rise Visualization for Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an interactive map that illustrates the scale of potential flooding in Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida due to projected sea level rise. It is a collaborative project of NOAA Sea Grant Consortium and U.S.G.S. It is a pilot project, so there is some possibility that the resource may not be maintained over time.

Center, Noaa C.; Consortium, Mississippi-Alabama S.; Survey, U. S.; Usgs

432

Day Care Training in Alabama: A Follow-Up Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study reports information gathered from 82 of the 1,056 child care workers who participated in the Alabama Statewide Day Care Training Project, the first comprehensive training program for child care providers in the state. The project sponsored training workshops in four regions of the state and included correspondence study as an option.…

Eddowes, E. Anne; Martin, Kathleen

433

76 FR 39149 - Alabama Disaster Number AL-00036  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Alabama (FEMA-1971-DR), dated 04/28/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 04/15/2011 through 05/31/2011. Effective Date:...

2011-07-05

434

Performance of Virus Resistant Transgenic Yellow Summer Squash in Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

Production of summer squash in Alabama and the southeastern United States is generally limited to spring and early summer due to the abundance of aphid transmitted viruses during the late summer and fall. Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV), Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), and Papaya ring spot virus (PRSV) are the most common viruses affecting Cucurbits in

Edward J. Sikora; John F. Murphy; Jason Burkett

2006-01-01

435

A Planned Jefferson Lab Experiment on Spin-Flavor Decomposition  

SciTech Connect

Experiment E04-113 at Jefferson Lab Hall C plans to measure the beam-target double-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic {rvec p}(e, e{prime}h)X and {rvec d}(e, e{prime}h)X reactions (h = {pi}{sup +}, {pi}{sup -}, K{sup +} or K{sup -}) with a 6 GeV polarized electron beam and longitudinally polarized NH{sub 3} and LiD targets. The high statistic data will allow a spin-flavor decomposition in the region of x = 0.12 {approx} 0.41 at Q{sup 2} = 1.21 {approx} 3.14 GeV{sup 2}. Especially, leading-order and next-to-leading order spin-flavor decomposition of {Delta}u{sub v}, {delta}d{sub v} and {delta}{bar u} - {Delta}{bar d} will be extracted based on the measurement of the combined asymmetries A{sub 1N}{sup {pi}{sup +}-{pi}{sup -}}. The possible flavor asymmetry of the polarized sea will be addressed in this experiment.

Xiaodong Jiang; Peter Bosted; Mark Jones; Donal Day

2004-10-01

436

Mesons in the medium: Experiments with CLAS at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

In this article, we report on on investigations of the in-medium meson-nucleon interaction for the omega, phi, and K^0_s mesons. Their in-medium cross sections and collisional widths can be measured by their absorption in a nucleus. In Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), the CLAS detector was used to study these long-lived mesons in nuclei. All of the mesons were produced by a photon beam with Egamma < 4 GeV in targets of 2H, C, Fe, and Pb. The vector mesons were reconstructed through their decay into e+e-. The K^0_s mesons were measured with their dominant pi+pi- decay. The in-medium widths of the omega and phi mesons are found to be substantially larger than their values from the elementary reaction with a free nucleon. The analysis with the K^0_s is preliminary, and its status will be discussd in this paper.

Michael Wood, Rakhsha Nasseripour, Michael Paolone, Chaden Djalali, Dennis Weygand

2011-02-01

437

The GEp-2? Experiment at Jefferson Lab Hall-C  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Intensive theoretical and experimental efforts have been made over the past decade aiming at explaining the discrepancy between the data for the proton form factor ratio, GEp/GMp, obtained at Jefferson Lab using polarization transfer technique, and the world data obtained by the Rosenbluth method based on cross section measurements. One possible explanation for this difference is a two-photon exchange contribution, where both photons share the momentum transfer about equally. In the Born approximation for a fixed Q^2, the form factors do not depend upon the energy of the incident electron as they are relativistic invariants. We will report the results of the Jlab Hall-C GEp-2? experiment which was designed to measure a possible kinematical variation of the ratio GEp/GMp with statistical uncertainties of ±0.01 at Q^2=2.5 GeV^2, using the recoil polarization technique. Three kinematics were chosen, corresponding to values of the kinematic factor ?=0.15, 0.63 and 0.77. We will describe the new detectors built for both GEp-2? and GEp-III experiments, the electromagnetic calorimeter BigCal which detected the scattered electron, and the focal plane polarimeter (FPP) which measured the polarization of the recoil proton.

Meziane, Mehdi

2009-10-01

438

The Proton Form Factor Ratio Measurements at Jefferson Lab  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ratio of the proton form factors, GEp/GMp, has been measured from Q2 of 0.5 GeV2 to 8.5 GeV2, at the Jefferson Laboratory, using the polarization transfer method. This ratio is extracted directly from the measured ratio of the transverse and longitudinal polarization components of the recoiling proton in elastic electron-proton scattering. The discovery that the proton form factor ratio measured in these experiments decreases approximately linearly with four-momentum transfer, Q2, for values above ? 1 GeV2, is one of the most significant results to come out of JLab. These results have had a large impact on progress in hadronic physics; and have required a significant rethinking of nucleon structure. There is an approved experiment at JLab, GEp(5), to continue the ratio measurements to 12 GeV2. A dedicated experimental setup, the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS), will be built for this purpose. In this paper, the present status of the proton elastic electromagnetic form factors and a number of theoretical approaches to describe nucleon form factors will be discussed.

Punjabi, Vina; Perdrisat, Charles F.

2014-03-01

439

Photon Source Capabilities of the Jefferson Lab FEL  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Jefferson Lab operates a superconducting energy recovered linac which is operated with CW RF and which powers oscillator-based IR and UV Free-Electron Lasers (FELs) with diffraction limited sub-picosecond pulses with >1013 photons per pulse (1.0%BW) at pulse repetition frequencies up to 75 MHz. Useful harmonics extend into the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV). Based on FEL model calculations validated using this facility, we have designed both an oscillator-based VUV-FEL that would produce 6 × 1012 coherent (0.5% BW) 100 eV photons per pulse at multi-MHz repetition rates in the fundamental, and a dual FEL configuration that would allow simultaneous lasing lasing at THz and UV wavelengths. The VUV-FEL would utilize a novel high gain, low Q cavity, while the THz source would be an FEL oscillator with a short wiggler providing diffraction limited pulses with pulse energy exceeding 50 microJoules. The THz source would use the exhaust beam from a UV FEL. Such multiphoton capabilities would provide unique opportunities for out of equilibrium dynamical studies at time-scales down to 50 fs. The fully coherent nature of all these sources results in peak and average brightness values that are many orders of magnitude higher than storage rings.

Benson, S. V.; Douglas, D. R.; Evtushenko, P.; Hannon, F. E.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Klopf, J. M.; Legg, R. A.; Neil, G. R.; Shinn, M. D.; Tennant, C. D.; Zhang, S.; Williams, G. P.

2013-03-01

440

The eye disease of Jefferson Davis (1808-1889).  

PubMed

The only Confederate president, Jefferson Davis, led a long and eventful life. He was a Mississippi planter, a husband, a father, West Point graduate, war hero, congressman, senator, secretary of war, and finally President of the Confederate States of America. In many ways he was a study of contrast with his northern counterpart Abraham Lincoln. Davis was personally courageous and a rich, educated, southern aristocrat who did not deeply understand the political process or have the refined personal skills necessary to work well with others. Prior to his Presidency he served with distinction in two wars, but as a result of his confederate activity and pro-slavery philosophy he is one of the least discussed famous Americans. Davis's health was a constant problem and he suffered an almost fatal attack of 'malaria' in 1836. In the winter of 1857-1858, he again was seriously ill and by the end of February 1858, a chronic, relapsing, ocular inflammatory condition began. Using historical evidence from multiple sources, this paper will propose a diagnosis of the Confederate President's ocular condition and consider how this could have influenced his military and political decisions. PMID:21894645

Hertle, Richard W; Spellman, Robert

2007-01-01

441

The eye disease of Jefferson Davis (1808-1889).  

PubMed

The only Confederate president, Jefferson Davis, led a long and eventful life. He was a Mississippi planter, a husband, a father, West Point graduate, war hero, congressman, senator, secretary of war, and finally President of the Confederate States of America. In many ways he was a study of contrast with his northern counterpart, Abraham Lincoln. Davis was personally courageous and a rich, educated, southern aristocrat who did not deeply understand the political process or have the refined personal skills necessary to work well with others. Prior to his Presidency he served with distinction in two wars, but as a result of his confederate activity and pro-slavery philosophy he is one of the least discussed famous Americans. Davis's health was a constant problem and he suffered an almost fatal attack of "malaria" in 1836. In the winter of 1857-1858 he again was seriously ill and by the end of February 1858 a chronic, relapsing, ocular inflammatory condition began. Using historical evidence from multiple sources, this paper will propose a diagnosis of the Confederate President's ocular condition and consider how this could have influenced his military and political decisions. PMID:17134650

Hertle, Richard W; Spellman, Robert

2006-01-01

442

Jefferson Lab IR FEL cryomodule modifications and test results  

SciTech Connect

The Infrared Free Electron Laser being constructed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility will require a 42 MeV, 5 mA electron accelerator. The accelerator design requires a 10 MeV injector and a two pass 32 MeV linac, one pass for acceleration and one pass for energy recovery. In order to minimize the cost of the linac, standard CEBAF 1497 MHZ Superconducting Radio Frequency cavities and cryomodules are being used with minimal changes. Two SRF cavities, housed in a quarter cryomodule, operate at a nominal 10 MV/m to provide the injector energy. The linac is composed of one cryomodule, housing eight SRF cavities operating at an average gradient of 8 MV/m. The modifications to the cryomodule are being made to handle the higher beam current, to improve RF control, and to increase machine reliability. The modifications to the higher order mode (HOM) loads, cavity tuners, cavity beam line, warm and cold RF windows, and cryogenic shield are described. Test results from the injector quarter cryomodule are also presented.

Wiseman, M.; Benesch, J.; Drury, M.; Fisher, J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)] [and others

1997-06-01

443

Precision Compton polarimetry for the QWeak experiment at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

The Q Weak experiment, scheduled to run in 2010-2012 in Hall C at Jefferson Lab, will measure the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering at 1.1 GeV to determine the weak charge of the proton, Q{sub Weak}{sup p} = 1 - 4 sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}. The dominant experimental systematic uncertainty will be the knowledge of the electron beam polarization. With a new Compton polarimeter we aim to measure the beam polarization with a statistical precision of 1% in one hour and a systematic uncertainty of 1%. A low-gain Fabry-Perot cavity laser system provides the circularly polarized photons. The scattered electrons are detected in radiation-hard diamond strip detectors, and form the basis for a coincidence trigger using distributed logic boards. The photon detector uses a fast, undoped CsI crystal with simultaneous sampling and integrating read-out. Coincident events are used to cross-calibrate the photon and electron detectors.

Wouter Deconinck

2011-10-01

444

12 GeV detector technology at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) is presently in the middle of an upgrade to increase the energy of its CW electron beam from 6 GeV to 12 GeV along with the addition of a fourth experimental hall. Driven both by necessity and availability, novel detectors and electronics modules have been used in the upgrade. One such sensor is the Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM), specifically a Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC), which is an array of avalanche photodiode pixels operating in Geiger mode that are used to sense photons. The SiPMs replace conventional photomultiplier tubes and have several distinct advantages including the safe operation in a magnetic field and the lack of need for high voltage. Another key to 12 GeV success is advanced fast electronics. Jlab will use custom 250 MHz and 125 MHz 12-bit analog to digital converters (ADCs) and time to digital converters (TDCs) all of which take advantage of VME Switched Serial (VXS) bus with its GB/s high bandwidth readout capability. These new technologies will be used to readout drift chambers, calorimeters, spectrometers and other particle detectors at Jlab once the 12 GeV upgrade is complete. The largest experiment at Jlab utilizing these components is GlueX - an experiment in the newly constructed Hall D that will study the photoproduction of light mesons in the search for hybrid mesons. The performance of these components and their respective detectors will be presented.

Leckey, John P. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Collaboration: GlueX Collaboration

2013-04-19

445

Erosion monitoring along the Coosa River below Logan Martin Dam near Vincent, Alabama, using terrestrial light detection and ranging (T-LiDAR) technology  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Alabama Power operates a series of dams on the Coosa River in east central Alabama. These dams form six reservoirs that provide power generation, flood control, recreation, economic opportunity, and fish and wildlife habitats to the region. The Logan Martin Reservoir is located approximately 45 kilometers east of Birmingham and borders Saint Clair and Talladega Counties. Discharges below the reservoir are controlled by power generation at Logan Martin Dam, and there has been an ongoing concern about the stability of the streambanks downstream of the dam. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Alabama Power conducted a scientific investigation of the geomorphic conditions of a 115-meter length of streambank along the Coosa River by using tripod-mounted terrestrial light detection and ranging technology. Two surveys were conducted before and after the winter flood season of 2010 to determine the extent and magnitude of geomorphic change. A comparison of the terrestrial light detection and ranging datasets indicated that approximately 40 cubic meters of material had been eroded from the upstream section of the study area. The terrestrial light detection and ranging data included in this report consist of electronic point cloud files containing several million georeferenced data points, as well as a surface model measuring changes between scans.

Kimbrow, Dustin R.; Lee, Kathryn G.

2013-01-01

446

Topobathymetric model of Mobile Bay, Alabama  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Topobathymetric Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are a merged rendering of both topography (land elevation) and bathymetry (water depth) that provides a seamless elevation product useful for inundation mapping, as well as for other earth science applications, such as the development of sediment-transport, sea-level rise, and storm-surge models. This 1/9-arc-second (approximately 3 meters) resolution model of Mobile Bay, Alabama was developed using multiple topographic and bathymetric datasets, collected on different dates. The topographic data were obtained primarily from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Elevation Dataset (NED) (http://ned.usgs.gov/) at 1/9-arc-second resolution; USGS Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) data (2 meters) (http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/400/); and topographic lidar data (2 meters) and Compact Hydrographic Airborne Rapid Total Survey (CHARTS) lidar data (2 meters) from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) (http://www.csc.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/data/coastallidar/). Bathymetry was derived from digital soundings obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/geodas/geodas.html) and from water-penetrating lidar sources, such as EAARL and CHARTS. Mobile Bay is ecologically important as it is the fourth largest estuary in the United States. The Mobile and Tensaw Rivers drain into the bay at the northern end with the bay emptying into the Gulf of Mexico at the southern end. Dauphin Island (a barrier island) and the Fort Morgan Peninsula form the mouth of Mobile Bay. Mobile Bay is 31 miles (50 kilometers) long by a maximum width of 24 miles (39 kilometers) with a total area of 413 square miles (1,070 square kilometers). The vertical datum of the Mobile Bay topobathymetric model is the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88). All the topographic datasets were originally referenced to NAVD 88 and no transformations were made to these input data. The NGDC hydrographic, multibeam, and trackline surveys were transformed from mean low water (MLW) or mean lower low water (MLLW) to NAVD 88 using VDatum (http://vdatum.noaa.gov). VDatum is a tool developed by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) that performs transformations among tidal, ellipsoid-based, geoid-based, and orthometric datums using calibrated hydrodynamic models. The vertical accuracy of the input topographic data varied depending on the input source. Because the input elevation data were derived primarily from lidar, the vertical accuracy ranges from 6 to 20 centimeters in root mean square error (RMSE). he horizontal datum of the Mobile Bay topobathymetric model is the North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83), geographic coordinates. All the topographic and bathymetric datasets were originally referenced to NAD 83, and no transformations were made to the input data. The bathymetric surveys were downloaded referenced to NAD 83 geographic, and therefore no horizontal transformations were required. The topbathymetric model of Mobile Bay and detailed metadata can be obtained from the USGS Web sites: http://nationalmap.gov/.

Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Brock, John C.; Howard, Daniel M.; Gesch, Dean B.; Bonisteel-Cormier, Jamie M.; Travers, Laurinda J.

2013-01-01

447

A procedure used for a ground truth study of a land use map of North Alabama generated from LANDSAT data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A land use map of a five county area in North Alabama was generated from LANDSAT data using a supervised classification algorithm. There was good overall agreement between the land use designated and known conditions, but there were also obvious discrepancies. In ground checking the map, two types of errors were encountered - shift and misclassification - and a method was developed to eliminate or greatly reduce the errors. Randomly selected study areas containing 2,525 pixels were analyzed. Overall, 76.3 percent of the pixels were correctly classified. A contingency coefficient of correlation was calculated to be 0.7 which is significant at the alpha = 0.01 level. The land use maps generated by computers from LANDSAT data are useful for overall land use by regional agencies. However, care must be used when making detailed analysis of small areas. The procedure used for conducting the ground truth study together with data from representative study areas is presented.

Downs, S. W., Jr.; Sharma, G. C.; Bagwell, C.

1977-01-01

448

Significance of the goniatite Bilinguites eliasi and associated biotas, Parkwood Formation and Bangor Limestone, northwestern Alabama ( USA).  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Bangor Limestone contains conodonts, smaller calcareous foraminifers, and a sparse marine macrofauna dating it as late or latest Chesterian (Late Mississippian). The Parkwood Formation, a paralic sequence disconformably overlying the Bangor, has yielded a fauna containing the reticuloceratid ammonoid Bilinguites eliasi Manger and Saunders which permits correlation of the Parkwood Formation in north-western Alabama to the upper part of the Prairie Grove Member of the Hale Formation in the type Morrowan sequence. The macrofauna occurring with the ammonoid, supports this correlation. Bilinguites eliasi also alows correlation with the lower part of the Yeadonian Stage (lowest Namurian 'C') of Europe. Florules collected just below and above the goniatite occurrence in Frankling County correlate with those in the lower two-thirds of the New River Formation, southern West Virgina, and with the upper Namurian of western Europe. -from Authors

Henry, T. W.; Gordon, Jr, M.; Schweinfurth, S. P.; Gillespie, W. H.

1985-01-01

449

Impervious Surface Assessment of the Towne Creek Watershed, Etowah County, Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Geographic Information System (GIS) based approach was used to do a preliminary assessment of a watershed's vulnerability and has been proven to be a quick, inexpensive, and effective means to provide guidance to the watershed manager. This GIS-based approach was used in an assessment of a watershed's proportion of impervious surface as a quantifiable measurement its vulnerability. The percent

D. A. Steffy; C. Blalock

2004-01-01

450

Ground-Water Resources of the Coosa River Basin in Georgia and Alabama - Subarea 6 of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint and Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa River Basins.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Drought conditions in the 1980's focused attention on the multiple uses of the surface- and ground-water resources in the Apalachicola- Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) and Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa (ACT) River basins in Georgia, Alabama, and Florida. State ...

J. L. Robinson C. A. Journey J. B. Atkins

1996-01-01

451

Alabama Children: A Matter of Commitment and Priority. Special Report to Governor Fob James and the Alabama Legislature. Volume I and Volume II.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report in two volumes is the product of a year-long needs assessment undertaken by the Governor of Alabama's Commission for the Alabama Year of the Child. Volume I, which contains an overview and recommendations to the governor and the legislature, includes position papers and letters from the commission and interested citizens. These…

Ames, Bobbie H.

452

Jefferson Lab Experiments Shed new Light on the Proton  

SciTech Connect

In experiments 93-027 and 99-007 at Jefferson Lab (JLab) the ratio of the electromagnetic elastic form factors of the proton, G{sub E{sub p}}/G{sub M{sub p}}, was measured with high precision, up to four momentum transfer Q{sup 2} of 3.5 GeV{sup 2} and 5.6 GeV{sup 2}, respectively, with the recoil polarization technique. The data from these two JLab experiments have shown an unexpected and significantly different Q{sup 2}-dependence for the electric and magnetic form factors, starting at about Q{sup 2}=1 GeV{sup 2}, up to the maximum value of 5.6 GeV{sup 2}, revealing a definite difference in spatial distribution of charge and magnetization at short distances. The combined results of the two JLab experiments were surprising as they appeared to contradict the consensus based on Rosenbluth separation results for (G{sub E{sub p}}){sup 2} and G{sub M{sub p}}{sup 2}: the ratio {mu}{sub p}G{sub E{sub p}}/G{sub M{sub p}} obtained with the Rosenbluth method appear to be near 1 up to about 6 GeV{sup 2}. This un-bridgeable difference between cross section and polarization experiments has been reinforced with two recent JLab Rosenbluth experiments; it appears increasingly difficult to explain it away by methodological or systematic errors. We are currently preparing a third experiment at JLab, this time in Hall C, to extend the Q{sup 2}-range to 9 GeV{sup 2}.

Vina Punjabi

2005-09-15

453

The Early Psychological Impacts of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill on Florida and Alabama Communities  

PubMed Central

Background Although public concern has focused on the environmental impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the public health impact on a broad range of coastal communities is minimally known. Objective We sought to determine the acute level of distress (depression, anxiety), mechanisms of adjustment (coping, resilience), and perceived risk in a community indirectly impacted by the oil spill and to identify the extent to which economic loss may explain these factors. Methods Using a community-based participatory model, we performed standardized assessments of psychological distress (mood, anxiety), coping, resilience, neurocognition, and perceived risk on residents of fishing communities who were indirectly impacted (n = 71, Franklin County, Florida) or directly exposed (n = 23, Baldwin County, Alabama) to coastal oil. We also compared findings for participants who reported income stability (n = 47) versus spill-related income loss (n = 47). Results We found no significant differences between community groups in terms of psychological distress, adjustment, neurocognition, or environmental worry. Residents of both communities displayed clinically significant depression and anxiety. Relative to those with stable incomes, participants with spill-related income loss had significantly worse scores on tension/anxiety, depression, fatigue, confusion, and total mood disturbance scales; had higher rates of depression; were less resilient; and were more likely to use behavioral disengagement as a coping strategy. Conclusions Current estimates of human health impacts associated with the oil spill may underestimate the psychological impact in Gulf Coast communities that did not experience direct exposure to oil. Income loss after the spill may have a greater psychological health impact than the presence of oil on the immediately adjacent shoreline.

Grattan, Lynn M.; Roberts, Sparkle; Mahan, William T.; McLaughlin, Patrick K.; Otwell, W. Steven; Morris, J. Glenn

2011-01-01

454

Geohydrology and susceptibility of major aquifers to surface contamination in Alabama; area 13  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The geohydrology and susceptibility to surface contamination of the major aquifers in Area 13--Baldwin and Mobile Counties Alabama--are described. Within this area are two major aquifers. The Pliocene-Miocene aquifer occurs throughout the study area. The Alluvial-Coastal aquifer is found near the major rivers and coastal areas and overlies the Pliocene-Miocene aquifer. There is no continuous confining unit between these two aquifers, thus , they are hydraulically connected and act as a single hydrologic unit. The entire study area is susceptible to surface contamination. The sediments are highly permeable, which allows rapid infiltration of water. Areas around some of the large pumping centers are highly susceptible to contamination, not only because of permeable sediments and flat terrain, but also because of depressions created in the potentiometric surface by large withdrawals of water from the aquifers. These depressions act as funnels to direct groundwater flow toward pumping centers; this increases the possibility of a contaminant migrating into the groundwater system. Other areas of high susceptibility are regions characterized by flat terrain and highly permeable soils, which increase the rate of infiltration from the surface. (USGS)

Mooty, W. S.

1988-01-01

455

Geohydrology and susceptibility of major aquifers to surface contamination in Alabama; area 11  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report delineates and describes the geohydrology and susceptibility of major aquifers to contamination in Butler, Conecuh, Covington, Crenshaw, Escambia, and Monroe Counties, Alabama. The major aquifers are the Pliocene-Miocene, Upper Floridan, Lisbon, Nanafalia-Clayton, and Providence-Ripley. The largest pumping centers in the area are Andalusia and Monroeville, where groundwater use is about 5 and 4 million gal/day, respectively. Estimated maximum withdrawal in 1987 for all uses in the area was about 44 million gal/day. Depressions have developed in the potentiometric surfaces of the Lisbon aquifer near Andalusia and Opp, the Nanafalia-Clayton aquifer near Luverne, Andalusia, Beatrice, and Monroeville, and the Providence-Ripley aquifer at Greenville. Significant declines in the potentiometric surfaces of the other major aquifers are not apparent. Recharge areas for all major aquifers are susceptible to contamination, but the probability of contamination of the Lisbon, Nanafalia-Clayton, and Providence-Ripley aquifers is low because the recharge areas are remote from areas of the withdrawal. The depressions in the recharge area for the Upper Floridan aquifer and the area where the Pliocene-Miocene aquifer is overlain by the gravelly sands of the Citronelle Formation are highly susceptible to contamination from the surface. (USGS)

Castleberry, R. D.; Moreland, R. S.; Scott, J. C.

1989-01-01

456

Geohydrology and susceptibility of major aquifers to surface contamination in Alabama; area 3  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report delineates and describes the geohydrology and the susceptibility to contamination of the major aquifers in Area 3--Cullman, Fayette, Lamar, Marion, Walker, and Winston Counties , Alabama. The major aquifers in the study area are the Tuscaloosa, Pottsville, and Bangor aquifers. The Pottsville aquifer is the most extensively used in the study area. The aquifer consists of sandstones and conglomerates with fractures and bedding plane openings. The Tuscaloosa aquifer, primarily used in the west and southwest part of the study area, is composed of sands and gravels in the Tuscaloosa Group. The Bangor aquifer, the least used aquifer in the study area, consists of limestone with bedding planes, solution cavaties, and fractures. All three aquifers are recharged throughout their outcrop areas and are susceptible to contamination from the surface within these areas. The Tuscaloosa aquifer is the most susceptible aquifer to contamination within the study area because of the absence of confining layers, shallow depth to the water surface, and relatively uniform porosity and permeability of aquifer materials. The Pottsville and Bangor aquifers are less susceptible to surface contamination than the Tuscaloosa aquifer; generally having lower permeability and receiving less recharge than the Tuscaloosa aquifer thereby making surface contamination less likely. (USGS)

Stricklin, V. E.

1989-01-01

457

Relationship between habitat type, fire frequency, and Amblyomma americanum populations in east-central Alabama.  

PubMed

Ticks were collected from 20 sites in the Calhoun, Cherokee, and Cleburne Counties in east-central Alabama areas to determine the relationship between plant physiognomy, environmental variables, and tick populations. Sites investigated included various burning regimes, wildland-urban-interface (WUI), a college campus, and an unmanaged area. Amblyomma americanum (L.) (Acari: Ixodidae) dominated the tick population while Ixodes scapularis Say was not encountered. There were complex differences in tick populations among site conditions. After prescribed burning, the tick population size was small but was larger in subsequent 2- and 5-year post-burn sites. An increase in Odocoileus virginianus foraging in recently burned sites is likely responsible for this phenomenon. WUI areas had the largest tick populations likely due to Odocoileus virginianus activity in an area that provides cover, forage, and a connection to a wildlife refuge. It is possible that the likelihood of humans coming in contact with ticks and tick-borne diseases is greater in WUI areas than in unbroken contiguous forest. A. americanum showed a positive correlation with percent cover of grass and leaf litter mass and a negative relationship with pine sapling density. Variables expected to be strongly correlated with A. americanum populations such as soil moisture, canopy closure, and tree density were found to have weak correlations. PMID:23181862

Willis, Damien; Carter, Robert; Murdock, Chris; Blair, Benjie

2012-12-01

458

Mississippi/Alabama Pinnacle Trend Ecosystem Monitoring Final Synthesis Report  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This Final Synthesis Report summarizes a four-year program to characterize and monitor carbonate mounds on the Mississippi/Alabama outer continental shelf (OCS). The study area is shown in Fig.ES.1. The study was conducted by Continental Shelf Associates, Inc. and the Geochemical and Environmental Research Group (GERG) of Texas A&M University (TAMU), for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Biological Resources Division.

Continental Shelf Associates, Inc.; Texas A&M University, Geochemical and Environmental Research Group

2001-01-01

459

Consortium for Alabama Regional Center for Automotive Manufacturing (CARCAM)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Consortium for Alabama Regional Center for Automotive Manufacturing's (CARCAM) mission is "to promote, develop and deliver effective training programs in Automotive Manufacturing." CARCAM is an educational resource for those looking to enter the automotive industry. It is also useful tool for the professional development of those already working in the industry. Their site provides information on training programs, events and news about the automotive industry.

2007-08-20

460

Frisco City sand: New Jurassic reservoir in southwest Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first commercial production of hydrocarbons from the Jurassic Haynesville Formation in southwestern Alabama was from the Frisco City field. The field currently produces 57.8° API gravity oil on 160-ac well spacing from a depth of approximately 12,000 ft. Perforations are in the Frisco City sand interval, in the lower part of the Haynesville Formation. Average porosity is 15% and

S. D. Mann; R. M. Mink; B. L. Bearden; R. D. Jr. Schneeflock

1989-01-01

461

Frisco City sandstone: Upper Jurassic play in southern Alabama  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Frisco City sandstone play in southern Alabama is an example of hydrocarbon entrapment on the flanks of basement erosional features, with principal reservoirs occurring in proximal alluvial-fan to marine shoreface facies. Productive fields are developed on four-way closures of complex geometry, with reservoir sandstones showing maximum thickness along the margins of basement highs that are roughly 1.3-5.18 km² in

S. L. Montgomery; L. R. Baria; C. R. Handford

1997-01-01

462

Solar-Heated Water at a Motel--Mobile, Alabama  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Solar-assisted hot-water system for a new 122-unit motor inn in Mobile, Alabama, generates more than half the energy needed for hot-water heating at motel each year. System consists of 93 flat-plate collectors, 2,500 gallon (9,500 1) insulated storage tank located outdoors, heat exchangers and controls. Electronic thermometers, measuring the temperatures at 22 locations monitor system performance.

1982-01-01

463

Temperate Pollen Genera in the Eocene (Claiborne) Flora, Alabama.  

PubMed

Pollen, spores, hystrichospherids, dinoflagellates, and the fresh-water alga Pediastrum occur in marine clays at the classic Claiborne Bluffs locality, Alabama. The presence of Ephedra pollen provides the first documented Tertiary record of this genus from the southeastern states. The occurrence of several characteristically temperate genera lends support to the idea that a deciduous hardwood forest was present in the Appalachian uplands during the Eocene. PMID:17813748

Gray, J

1960-09-23

464

A study of decision making in the power plant permitting process in Appalachia. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Results of prior work and prevalent opinion in both private and public sectors suggested that an improved permitting process that assures better communications among decision-making bodies, utility companies and regulating agencies, and which removes inefficiencies could shorten this time lag. Four recently-permitted Appalachian power stations were selected for detailed analysis: Pleasants Power Station, Pleasants County, West Virginia; Miller Steam Plant, Jefferson County, Alabama; Cherokee Power Station, Cherokee County, South Carolina; Homer City Power Station, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

Not Available

1981-03-01

465

Percent Uninsured by County  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a county by county visualization of the percentage of residents that are uninsured. The data are from a set available here: http://www-958.ibm.com/software/data/cognos/manyeyes/datasets/percent-uninsured-by-county/versions/1

Manyeyes

466

Reviewing County Extension Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A review of the effectiveness of extension education programs in Douglas County, Kansas is presented. Data were collected through a review of program data, interviews, and questionnaires sent to county residents. The results indicate a general knowledge and acceptance of the county's extension services among the respondents. (EC)

Prawl, Warren L.; Jorns, William J.

1976-01-01

467

Use of data from space for earth resources exploration and management in Alabama  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The University of Alabama, the Geological Survey of Alabama, and the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center are involved in an interagency, interdisciplinary effort to use remotely sensed, multispectral observations to yield improved and timely assessment of earth resources and environmental quality in Alabama. It is the goal of this effort to interpret these data and provide them in a format which is meaningful to and readily usable by agencies, industries, and individuals who are potential users throughout the State.

Lamoreaux, P. E.; Henry, H. R.

1972-01-01

468

Thomas Jefferson University researchers find new biomarker to identify hepatitis B-infected patients at risk for liver cancer  

Cancer.gov

Hepatitis B-infected patients with significantly longer telomeres—the caps on the end of chromosomes that protect our genetic data— were found to have an increased risk of getting liver cancer compared to those with shorter ones, according to findings presented by researchers at Jefferson’s Kimmel Cancer Center at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2012.

469

SPIN Effects, QCD, and Jefferson Laboratory with 12 GeV electrons  

SciTech Connect

QCD and Spin physics are playing important role in our understanding of hadron structure. I will give a short overview of origin of hadron structure in QCD and highlight modern understanding of the subject. Jefferson Laboratory is undergoing an upgrade that will increase the energy of electron beam up to 12 GeV. JLab is one of the leading facilities in nuclear physics studies and once operational in 2015 JLab 12 will be crucial for future of nuclear physics. I will briefly discuss future studies in four experimental halls of Jefferson Lab.

Prokudin, Alexey [JLAB

2013-11-01

470

Health Hazard Evaluation Report No. HHE-80-143-1001, Jefferson Electric Company, Williamstown, Kentucky.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

On May 16, 1980, NIOSH received a request from the employees of the Jefferson Electric Co., Williamstown, KY., to evaluate an exposure that occurred on April 23, 1980. The request stated that approximately 20 employees of the subassembly and adjacent repa...

B. Froneberg J. R. Love

1981-01-01

471

EXPERIENCES WITH GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON FILTRATION ON-SITE REACTIVATION AT JEFFERSON PARISH, LOUISIANA  

EPA Science Inventory

Under a jointly funded cooperative agreement with U.S. EPA, three 1-mgd granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorbers and a reactivation pilot facility were constructed at Jefferson Parish, Louisiana. The project objectives were to assess the economic impact of removing trace organic...

472

Jefferson Lab IEC 61508\\/61511 Safety PLC Based Safety System  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the design of the new 12 GeV Upgrade Personnel Safety System (PSS) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF). The new PSS design is based on the implementation of systems designed to meet international standards IEC61508 and IEC 61511 for programmable safety systems. In order to meet the IEC standards, TJNAF engineers evaluated several SIL 3

Kelly Mahoney; Henry Robertson

2009-01-01

473

Changing site distribution patterns of colorectal cancer at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analyzed data from an earlier reported experience with colorectal cancer at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, compared\\u000a with findings observed and analyzed from 1959 to 1977 indicate a changing pattern of distribution of colorectal cancers. These\\u000a changes lead to therapeutic conclusion that fiberoptic flexible sigmoidoscopy is the preferred diagnostic tool.

Francis E. Rosato; Gerald Marks

1981-01-01

474

Jefferson researchers find that cancer information on Wikipedia is accurate, but not very readable:  

Cancer.gov

It is a commonly held that information on Wikipedia should not be trusted, since it is written and edited by non-experts without professional oversight. But researchers from the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson have found differently, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in the Journal of Oncology Practice.

475

Terahertz imaging using the Jefferson Lab -- FEL high power broadband terahertz source  

Microsoft Academic Search

Imaging using THz radiation is of considerable interest due to the non-ionizing nature of the radiation as well as the relative transmission, absorption, and reflection of various materials of interest. With a source of sufficient power and spectral characteristics, it is possible to realize imaging capabilities that were not previously possible. At the Jefferson Lab -- Free Electron Laser Facility,

J. Michael Klopf; Matthew Coppinger; Nathan Sustersic; James Kolodzey; Gwyn P. Williams

2007-01-01

476

The Reverend Thomas Jefferson Bowen: An Introductory Background to His Linguistic Works, 1850-1856  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A historical narrative background for the linguistic works of Thomas Jefferson Bowen, an American missionary who was the first non-Nigerian to publish a grammar of Yoruba (1858). The author points up a need for further scholarly review of Bowen's pioneering work and contribution to Yoruba studies. (JT)

Awoniyi, Timothy A.

1974-01-01

477

Thomas Jefferson University researchers discover new pathways that drive metastatic prostate cancer  

Cancer.gov

Elevated levels of Cyclin D1b could function as a novel biomarker of lethal metastatic disease in prostate cancer patients, according to a pre-clinical study published ahead of print on December 21 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation by researchers at the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson.

478

Hospital Web site 'tops' in Louisiana. Hospital PR, marketing group cites East Jefferson General Hospital.  

PubMed

East Jefferson General Hospital in Metairie, La., launched a new Web site in October 2001. Its user-friendly home page offers links to hospital services, medical staff, and employer information. Its jobline is a powerful tool for recruitment. The site was awarded the 2002 Pelican Award for Best Consumer Web site by the Louisiana Society for Hospital Public Relations & Marketing. PMID:12238238

Rees, Tom

2002-01-01

479

Brazilian version of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy: psychometric properties and factor analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Empathy is a central characteristic of medical professionalism and has recently gained attention in medical education research. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy is the most commonly used measure of empathy worldwide, and to date it has been translated in 39 languages. This study aimed to adapt the Jefferson Scale of Empathy to the Brazilian culture and to test its reliability and validity among Brazilian medical students. Methods The Portuguese version of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy was adapted to Brazil using back-translation techniques. This version was pretested among 39 fifth-year medical students in September 2010. During the final fifth- and sixth-year Objective Structured Clinical Examination (October 2011), 319 students were invited to respond to the scale anonymously. Cronbach’s alpha, exploratory factor analysis, item-total correlation, and gender comparisons were performed to check the reliability and validity of the scale. Results The student response rate was 93.7% (299 students). Cronbach’s coefficient for the scale was 0.84. A principal component analysis confirmed the construct validity of the scale for three main factors: Compassionate Care (first factor), Ability to Stand in the Patient’s Shoes (second factor), and Perspective Taking (third factor). Gender comparisons did not reveal differences in the scores between female and male students. Conclusions The adapted Brazilian version of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy proved to be a valid, reliable instrument for use in national and cross-cultural studies in medical education.

2012-01-01

480

Thomas Jefferson and the Education of a New Nation. Fastback 73, Bicentennial Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although Thomas Jefferson was not an educator, his concern with issues relating to education raised controversy during the founding years of the United States and these issues continue to be topics of serious debate today. Some are the relationship between public and private education, school administration, equal opportunity for education, and…

Wagoner, Jennings L., Jr.

481

Video Distribution and Analog Monitoring System for the Jefferson Lab FEL.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Jefferson Lab Infrared Free Electron Laser (IRFEL) has used the 200MHq 16 x 16 buffered crosspoint switch, AD81 16 to implement video and analog distribution. These switches are configured as 64 inputs x 16 outputs packaged into a rack mount chassis, ...

K. Jordan R. Evans A. Grippo R. Hill

2000-01-01

482

Thomas Jefferson's Road to the White House. Teaching with Historic Places.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This unit focuses on Thomas Jefferson's route from his home at Monticello in Virginia to the White House when he traveled to Washington in November of 1800 for the upcoming presidential election. The document traces his journey by phaeton, a four wheeled light carriage, from Monticello to: (1) James Madison's home at Montpelier, a distance of 28…

Hunter, Kathleen

483

78 FR 14403 - Alabama Metal Coil Securement Act; Petition for Determination of Preemption  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...No. FMCSA-2011-0318] Alabama Metal Coil Securement Act; Petition for Determination...determination that the State of Alabama's Metal Coil Securement Act (the Act) is preempted...75 FR 82132). Background The Metal Coil Securement Act The Act, adopted in...

2013-03-05

484

Transition V & VI in Alabama: A Profile of Commitment. State Conference Proceedings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication provides information on the Alabama Transition Initiative for students with disabilities, including papers presented at two statewide transition conferences. Conference papers include: (1) "Pell City School System's Community Transition Team Model" (Deloris Frasier); (2) "Alabama's MH/MR Service Coordinators in Transition" (Billy…

Browning, Philip; Rabren, Karen

485

Teacher Preparation Cost Study: A Comparative Analysis of Select Alabama and National Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Southeast Center for Teaching Quality (The Center) has conducted a study of the costs of high quality Teacher Preparation on behalf of the Regional Education Laboratory at SERVE and at the request of the Alabama State Department of Education. In light of the recommendations issued by Alabama's Task Force to Improve Educator Preparation and the…

Hirsch, Eric; Emerick, Scott; Barnes, Gary; Berry, Barnett

2004-01-01

486

Alabama Industrial Technician Education Cooperative Demonstration Program (I-TEC). Final Performance Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A cooperative demonstration program between industry (General Electric) and education (John Patterson State Technical College, Alabama) designed and conducted a training program and competency assessment for individuals entering high technology positions related to industrial production in Alabama. The program was designed to develop employees as…

John M. Patterson State Technical Coll., Montgomery, AL.

487

Adding Layers of Support: Alabama's Program Helps Site-Based Coaches Succeed  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Alabama Reading Initiative (ARI) is a multiyear effort to implement a scientifically based approach to reading instruction in all schools with grades K-3. Since 1998, using a process of continuous evaluation and improvement, the Alabama Reading Initiative has fashioned a multilayered professional development system that now trains and supports…

Norton, John

2007-01-01

488

Today's Students, Tomorrow's Citizens: Pathways for Learning, Mathematics. Alabama High School Graduation Exam.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is designed to assist classroom teachers in preparing students to successfully complete the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE). It consists of activities that are correlated with the Alabama Course of Study: Mathematics, Bulletin 1997, No. 4, and Standards and Objectives (Reading Comprehension, Language, Mathematics, and…

Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery. Div. of Instructional Services.

489