Science.gov

Sample records for jejunal rotation caused

  1. [Jejunal diverticulosis: a cause of infrequent gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Case report].

    PubMed

    Zapata, R; Rojas, C; Gaete, F

    2000-10-01

    Jejunal diverticulosis is a very uncommon acquired disease. Clinical manifestations include acute life threatening complication such as perforation, obstruction and bleeding. Jejunal diverticulosis is an extremely rare site of origin of gastrointestinal bleeding, with fewer than seventy cases reported in the literature. We report a 77-year-old patient with a recurrent severe gastrointestinal bleeding manifested by melena and hematochaezia. During the hospitalization the tagged red blood cell scanning was positive for bleeding in the jejunum. At laparotomy, several large-mouthed diverticula at the proximal jejunum were identified. Approximately 30 centimeters of the involved segment was resected with primary end-to-end anastomosis. Postoperative 7 month evolution has been favorable, without any evidence of rebleeding. This report reviews the literature concerning this disease, discusses some diagnostic methods of studying small bowel bleeding and highlights the need to consider this diagnosis in old patients with a gastrointestinal hemorrhage of unknown origin (Rev Méd Chile 2000; 128: 1133-38). PMID:11349513

  2. Jejunal choristoma: a very rare cause of abdominal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Olajide, T A; Agodirin, S O; Ojewola, R W; Akanbi, O O; Solaja, T O; Odesanya, Johnson Oluremi; Ariyibi, O O

    2014-01-01

    Choristoma is development of a normal tissue in an aberrant location. This report describes jejunal salivary choristoma (JSC) causing recurring episodes of abdominal discomfort in a 5-year-old girl. Exploratory laporatomy revealed a pale yellow subserosal jejunal lesion. Wedge resection of the lesion and repair of the bowel were performed. The child did well postoperatively and has since that time been free of pain at follow-up. Histopathological examination of the resected lesion revealed salivary gland choriostoma. Literature review (PUBMED search engine) revealed no previous report of this rare clinicopathologic entity. We conclude that choriostoma should be considered a possible differential when evaluating abdominal complaint in children. PMID:24511408

  3. One of the Rare Causes of Acute Abdomen Leading to Subileus: Jejunal Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Elçin; Yerli, Hasan; Avcı, Tevfik; Yılmaz, Tuğbahan; Gülay, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Jejunal diverticulitis is one of the rare causes of acute abdomen generally seen in the elderly. Jejunal diverticulosis was defined as the herniation of the mucosa and the submucosa from the inside of the muscular layer of the bowel wall on the mesenteric side of the intestine. Case Report: We presented the intraoperative and pathological findings of a 69-year-old male patient who had presented with complaints about abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting and been operated upon due to subileus and peritonitis induced by large-sized jejunal diverticulitis, along with his computed tomography (CT) findings. Conclusion: Jejunal diverticulitis is uncommon and may be a disease which might be difficult to diagnose when it develops on the basis of the large-sized diverticula resembling intestinal ansae. To the best of our knowledge, the computed tomography and intraoperative findings of a case in which partial resection is applied to the jejunum due to subileus have not been previously presented in the literature. PMID:27308082

  4. Late-onset dysphagia caused by severe spastic peristalsis of a free jejunal graft in a case of hypopharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Imai, Takayuki; Goto, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Ko; Kurosawa, Koreyuki; Asada, Yukinori; Saijo, Shigeru; Matsuura, Kazuto

    2016-12-01

    Free jejunal transfer is the main technique used for reconstructing a circumferential defect caused by total pharyngo-laryngo-cervical-esophagectomy in certain cancer cases. We report a rare case of severe late-onset dysphagia caused by autonomous spastic peristalsis, which led to complete obstruction of the free jejunal route. A 70-year-old man underwent treatment for hypopharyngeal cancer involving total pharyngolaryngectomy with free jejunal transfer. After uneventful peri- and postoperative recovery, he developed sudden-onset severe dysphagia 22 months later. Gastrografin fluoroscopy revealed abnormal peristalsis and contraction of the transferred jejunum, leading to complete obstruction. Nutritional treatment, application of depressants of peristalsis, and xylocaine injection into the outer space of the jejunal mucosa all failed to alleviate the dysphagia. Surgical treatment involving a longitudinal incision of the jejunal graft, and interposing a cutaneous flap, as a fixed wall, between the incised jejunal margins to prevent obstruction was performed. After further reconstructive surgery involving using a pectoralis major musculocutaneous flap and a split-thickness skin graft to close a refractory jejunum-skin fistula, the dysphagia was permanently alleviated. To our knowledge, this is the first report of severe dysphagia caused by peristalsis of a free jejunal graft. PMID:27068782

  5. Peritonitis caused by jejunal perforation with Taenia saginata: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Bekraki, Ali; Hanna, Khalil

    2016-03-01

    Complicated Taeniasis necessitating surgical intervention is extremely rare and is usually reported to occur in the distal ileal region of the Gastrointestinal tract. A case of peritonitis secondary to proximal jejunal perforation due to Taenia saginata is presented. Preoperative evaluation suggested the diagnosis of acute duodenal ulcer perforation. Although no real change in management and outcome is present, Taenia remains an exceptional direct cause of intestinal perforation, and should be kept on the list of differential diagnosis of peritonitis and acute abdomen in endemic geographical locations. PMID:27065626

  6. Toxoplasma gondii causes death and plastic alteration in the jejunal myenteric plexus

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Eduardo José de Almeida; Zaniolo, Larissa Marchi; Vicentino, Suellen Laís; Góis, Marcelo Biondaro; Zanoni, Jacqueline Nelisis; da Silva, Aristeu Vieira; Sant’Ana, Débora de Mello Gonçales

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effects of ME-49 Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) strain infection on the myenteric plexus and external muscle of the jejunum in rats. METHODS: Thirty rats were distributed into two groups: the control group (CG) (n = 15) received 1 mL of saline solution orally, and the infected group (IG) (n = 15) inoculated with 1 mL of saline solution containing 500 oocysts of M-49 T. gondii strain orally. After 36 d of infection, the rats were euthanized. Infection with T. gondii was confirmed by blood samples collected from all rats at the beginning and end of the experiment. The jejunum of five animals was removed and submitted to routine histological processing (paraffin) for analysis of external muscle thickness. The remaining jejunum from the others animals was used to analyze the general population and the NADH-diaphorase, VIPergic and nitrergic subpopulations of myenteric neurons; and the enteric glial cells (S100-IR). RESULTS: Serological analysis showed that animals from the IG were infected with the parasite. Hypertrophy affecting jejunal muscle thickness was observed in the IG rats (77.02 ± 42.71) in relation to the CG (51.40 ± 12.34), P < 0.05. In addition, 31.2% of the total number of myenteric neurons died (CG: 39839.3 ± 5362.3; IG: 26766.6 ± 2177.6; P < 0.05); hyperplasia of nitrergic myenteric neurons was observed (CG: 7959.0 ± 1290.4; IG: 10893.0 ± 1156.3; P < 0.05); general hypertrophy of the cell body in the remaining myenteric neurons was noted [CG: 232.5 (187.2-286.0); IG: 248.2 (204.4-293.0); P < 0.05]; hypertrophy of the smallest varicosities containing VIP neurotransmitter was seen (CG: 0.46 ± 0.10; IG: 0.80 ± 0.16; P < 0.05) and a reduction of 25.3% in enteric glia cells (CG: 12.64 ± 1.27; IG: 10.09 ± 2.10; P < 0.05) was observed in the infected rats. CONCLUSION: It was concluded that infection with oocysts of ME-49 T. gondii strain caused quantitative and plastic alterations in the myenteric plexus of the jejunum in rats. PMID

  7. Eosinophilic jejunitis presenting as intractable abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Mungan, Zeynel; Attila, Tan; Kapran, Yersu; Tokatli, Ilyas Pinar; Unal, Zeynep

    2014-09-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon disease characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract. The clinical manifestations are related to the layer(s) and extent of the bowel involved. In this paper, we present a case of intractable abdominal pain caused by jejunal submucosal eosinophilic infiltration without mucosal involvement, diagnosed by deep endoscopic biopsies. The patient was successfully treated with steroids without need for surgery for diagnosis or therapy. PMID:25565932

  8. On the causes of plasmaspheric rotation variability: IMAGE EUV observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvan, David A.; Moldwin, Mark B.; Sandel, Bill R.; Crowley, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    IMAGE EUV observations demonstrate that the plasmasphere usually does not corotate as assumed in simple convection models, even at low L shells. We carry out a statistical survey of plasmaspheric rotation rates over several months of IMAGE EUV data in 2001, using two different measurement techniques. We test the prevailing hypothesis, that subcorotation is due to enhanced auroral zone Joule heating driving equatorward thermospheric winds, by testing for correlation of rotation rates with several geomagnetic indices. Azimuthal features such as "notches" are tracked in local time over a single pass of the IMAGE satellite, both visually and using an automated cross-correlation routine. Each technique provides an estimate of the plasmasphere's rotation rate. We find a weak correlation between rotation rate and Dst, Kp, AE, the midnight boundary index (MBI), and Joule heating estimates from assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics (AMIE) at L = 2.5, but not at L = 3.5. In general, lower rotation rates correspond to higher auroral and geomagnetic activity. We also make the first direct observation of plasmaspheric superrotation. The plasmaspheric rotation rate is found to be highly variable on multiday timescales, but the typical state of the plasmasphere is subcorotation, with inferred mean values ranging from 88% to 95% of corotation, depending on L shell. In addition, a statistical analysis shows that rotation rates near dusk are generally lower than those at dawn, suggesting that local time and magnetospheric convection contribute to the variation in rotation rate as well. We conclude that the cause of variability in plasmaspheric rotation rate is a combination of storm phase, local-time-dependent convection, and westward ionospheric drift.

  9. Rotator Cuff Damage: Reexamining the Causes and Treatments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Heyward L.

    1988-01-01

    Sports medicine specialists are beginning to reexamine the causes and treatments of rotator cuff problems, questioning the role of primary impingement in a deficient or torn cuff and trying new surgical procedures as alternatives to the traditional open acromioplasty. (Author/CB)

  10. Uncomplicated jejunal diverticulosis with pneumoperitoneum

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Jae Young; Park, Eun Hwa; Park, Cheon Soo; Kim, Ji Hoon; Han, Myeong Sik

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel diverticulosis is a rare finding within all bowel diverticuloses and jejunal diverticulosis is even rarer. Their relative clinical rarity and varied presentation may make diagnosis both delayed and difficult. We experienced a case of jejunal diverticulosis, which was diagnosed intraoperatively. A 55-year-old woman was admitted to Emergency Department with pneumoperitoneum on plain chest and abdominal film from a local clinic. She was hemodynamically stable with minimal tenderness on the left upper quadrant of the abdomen but no rebound tenderness. At surgery, small bowel torsion and jejunal diverticulosis were confirmed. Over 30 variable sized small bowel diverticula were noted on the mesenteric side of the proximal jejunum. The affected segment of the jejunum was about 180 cm. On exploration, we could not find any perforation site. No postoperative complications were observed, and the patient made a full recovery. Jejunal diverticulosis is rare, but it should not be regarded as insignificant. PMID:27274511

  11. A Rare Case of Jejunal Atresia Due to Intrauterine Intussusception.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sanjeev B; Kinhal, Vidyadhar; Desai, Mahesh; Tilak; Choudhari, Fazal Ur Rehman

    2015-09-01

    Intestinal atresia is generally caused by intrauterine vascular obstructions involving mesenteric vessels. Intrauterine intussusceptions (IUI) are one of these disruptive events. Intestinal intussusceptions affects children commonly between 3 months and 3 years of age, but it rarely affects in intrauterine life. The relationship between intrauterine intussusception and intestinal atresia has been demonstrated by few cases in literature, suggesting intrauterine intussusception as a rare cause of intestinal atresia. We report a 7-day-old full term neonate presenting with intrauterine intussusceptions (jejuno-jejunal) resulting in jejunal atresia. PMID:26500958

  12. Eagle Syndrome Causing Vascular Compression with Cervical Rotation: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Demirtaş, Hakan; Kayan, Mustafa; Koyuncuoğlu, Hasan Rıfat; Çelik, Ahmet Orhan; Kara, Mustafa; Şengeze, Nihat

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Eagle syndrome is a condition caused by an elongated styloid process. Unilateral face, neck and ear pain, stinging pain, foreign body sensation and dysphagia can be observed with this syndrome. Rarely, the elongated styloid process may cause pain by compressing the cervical segment of the internal carotid and the surrounding sympathetic plexus, and that pain spreading along the artery can cause neurological symptoms such as vertigo and syncope. Case Report In this case report we presented a very rare eagle syndrome with neurological symptoms that occurred suddenly with cervical rotation. The symptoms disappeared as suddenly as they occurred, with the release of pressure in neutral position. We also discussed CT angiographic findings of this case. Conclusions Radiological diagnosis of the Eagle syndrome that is manifested with a wide variety of symptoms and causes diagnostic difficulties when it is not considered in the differential diagnosis is easy in patients with specific findings. CT angiography is a fast and effective examination in terms of showing compression in patients with the Eagle syndrome that is considered to be atypical and causes vascular compression. PMID:27354882

  13. Paraduodenal hernia and jejunal diverticulosis.

    PubMed

    Goodney, Philip P; Pindyck, Frank

    2004-02-01

    A case of left-sided paraduodenal hernia and jejunal diverticulosis is described in 75-year-old man who presented with chronic intermittent abdominal pain, weight loss, and anemia. A brief review of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical presentation displays the variety of symptoms associated with these rare conditions. PMID:14731138

  14. Jejunal adenocarcinoma-a case report with review.

    PubMed

    Shah, Priti Prasad; Kothari, Sudhir

    2013-06-01

    Primary Small bowel tumours are rare accounting for only 3-6% of GI neoplasm; 1-2% of these are malignant. Their presentation is usually with nonspecific symptoms that causes delay in diagnosis and consequently a worse outcome for the patient. We report a case of Jejunal adenocarcinoma where early diagnosis and treatment lead to good outcome. PMID:24426522

  15. [Perforating injuries of the eyes caused by rotating steel brushes].

    PubMed

    Höh, H; Krannig, H J

    1990-03-01

    Three cases of perforating lamellating injuries to the eyes are described which illustrate the hazards of using rotating wire brushes. All three patients were home handymen who failed to take the customary safety precautions. In one case the eye injury was partially due to an inappropriate combination of tools (a low-speed wire brush used with a high-speed drill). In view of the constantly increasing popularity of DIY work tool manufacturers, social insurance funds, private insurance companies and public institutions are called upon to help reduce the frequency of accidents in the DIY sector through appropriate design, organizational measures and publicity campaigns. Practical proposals are outlined in this paper. Perforating eye injuries caused by wire brushes can easily be overlooked. Thorough ophthalmological examination is therefore essential, and a diagnostic intervention may be required. PMID:2342318

  16. Non-occlusive mesenteric ischaemia of a free jejunal flap.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Satoshi; Kimata, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Koshimune, Seijiro; Onoda, Tomoo; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro

    2013-05-01

    Free jejunal transfer using microsurgery after oesophageal or pharyngeal cancer resection is a useful operative approach. However, the disadvantage of free tissue transfer is the risk of necrosis of the transferred tissue due to impaired blood supply. In addition, jejunal flaps are more prone to blood-flow disorders such as ischaemia and congestion compared with other types of flaps. The causes of local blood supply disorders after microsurgery are divided broadly into two classes: one is thrombosis of an artery and/or vein in the anastomotic region and the other consists of local physical factors such as compressive pressure derived from haematoma formation and the effect of infection of the vascular pedicle. In this report, two rare cases of blood-flow disorder of the transferred free jejunum are described. In both cases, no signs of significant infection or occlusion of the vascular pedicles were present and late necrosis progressed gradually. The patients showed remarkable weight loss and a poor nutritional state due to inadequate preoperative nutritional intake. The necrosis was considered to be a result of non-occlusive mesenteric ischaemia of a free jejunal flap, and the factors contributing to free jejunal necrosis were reviewed. PMID:23395151

  17. [A case of bile peritonitis caused by jejunal perforation after radiofrequency ablation for the multiple liver metastases from cholangiocarcinoma successfully treated with various interventional radiological procedures after pancreatoduodenectomy].

    PubMed

    Yasumoto, Taku; Shimizu, Junzo; Watanabe, Noriyuki; Inada, Masami; Nakata, Saki; Sato, Masayuki; Hayashi, Shoho; Dono, Keizo; Kitada, Masashi; Shimano, Takashi

    2009-11-01

    The case is a man in his 50s who had a curative surgical resection for cholangiocarcinoma in August 2006. The lesion was judged to be T3, N1, H0, P0, M0 and Stage III, and then he received various treatments including thermotherapy, CD3-activated T lymphocyte therapy. Then from June 2007, he was treated for multiple liver metastases by GEM, radiofrequency ablation (RFA), stereotactic radiotherapy, S-1, dendritic cell therapy. But there were multiple liver metastases whose maximum size was 17 mm in diameter and he was introduced to our hospital. In September 2008, ultrasonography and CT fluoroscopy guided RFA was operated on him for the liver tumors with a safety margin. But 2 hours after the ablation, he complained of epigastralgia. CT examination revealed a bile peritonitis caused by perforation of the jejunum which has been anastomosed to the pancreas, and was adjacent to the avascular area caused by RFA in segment 4 of the liver. We treated him by various interventional procedures including percutaneous drainage for bile leakage, pancreatic fistula, abscess in peritoneal cavity, and biloma in segment 3. Fifty days after the ablation, T-tube, with which pancreatic fluid and bile was induced from the cecal portion of the anastomosed jejunum to the anal side slipping through the perforated point, was successfully inserted through right flank, and resulted in complete recovery from a major technical complication of the bile peritonitis. PMID:20037334

  18. Total and Cause-Specific Mortality of U.S. Nurses Working Rotating Night Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Fangyi; Han, Jiali; Laden, Francine; Pan, An; Caporaso, Neil E.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Rexrode, Kathryn M.; Willett, Walter C.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Speizer, Frank; Schernhammer, Eva S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotating night shift work imposes circadian strain and is linked to the risk of several chronic diseases. Purpose To examine associations between rotating night shift work and all-cause, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer mortality in a prospective cohort study of 74,862 registered U.S. nurses from the Nurses’ Health Study. Methods Lifetime rotating night shift work (defined as ≥3 nights/month) information was collected in 1988. During 22 years (1988–2010) of follow-up, 14,181 deaths were documented, including 3,062 CVD and 5,413 cancer deaths. Cox proportional hazards models (2013) estimated multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs. Results All-cause and CVD mortality were significantly increased among women with ≥5 years of rotating night shift work, compared to women who never worked night shifts. Specifically, for women with 6–14 and ≥15 years of rotating night shift work, the HRs were 1.11 (95% CI=1.06, 1.17) and 1.11 (95% CI=1.05, 1.18) for all-cause mortality and 1.19 (95% CI=1.07, 1.33) and 1.23 (95% CI=1.09, 1.38) for CVD mortality. There was no association between rotating night shift work and all-cancer mortality (HR≥15years=1.08, 95% CI=0.89, 1.19) or any other cancer, with the exception of lung cancer (HR≥15years=1.25, 95% CI=1.04, 1.51). Conclusions Women working rotating night shifts for ≥5 five years have a modest increase in all-cause and CVD mortality; those working ≥15 years of rotating night shift work have a modest increase in lung cancer mortality. These results add to prior evidence of a potentially detrimental effect of rotating night shift work on health and longevity. PMID:25576495

  19. New Portal-Superior Mesenteric Vein Reconstructions Using First Jejunal Vein Flap in Pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Nobuyuki; Miki, Kenji; Kosuge, Tomoo

    2016-06-01

    Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) is the only potential treatment for pancreatic head adenocarcinomas, which are sometimes located close to or invade the portal-superior mesenteric vein (PSMV). Surgeons often attempt to obtain a negative resectional margin after resection of the PSMV. This attempt requires PSMV reconstruction through graft replacements or end-to-end anastomosis; however, possible complications should be concerned including anastomosis stenosis, damage to some of the PSMV branches, prosthetic graft infection, and that associated with autologous graft harvesting. The first jejunal artery and vein are often resected in PD with the intent of lymphadenectomy. In this study, jejunal vein flap was used for PSMV reconstruction without causing damage to any of the PSMV branches in two patients. Here, we describe the new methods of PSMV reconstruction using first jejunal vein flap in PD. PMID:26801505

  20. Rotation change in the orientation of the center-of-figure frame caused by large earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiangcun; Sun, Wenke; Jin, Shuanggen; Sun, Heping; Xu, Jianqiao

    2016-05-01

    A method to estimate the rotation change in the orientation of the center-of-figure (CF) frame caused by earthquakes is the first time proposed. This method involves using the point dislocation theory based on a spherical, non-rotating, perfectly elastic and isotropic (SNREI) Earth. The rotation change in the orientation is related solely to the toroidal displacements of degree one induced by the vertical dip slip dislocation, and the spheroidal displacements induced by an earthquake have no contribution. The effects of two recent large earthquakes, the 2004 Sumatra and the 2011 Tohoku-Oki, are studied. Results showed that the Sumatra and Tohoku-Oki earthquakes both caused the CF frame to rotate by at least tens of μas (micro-arc-second). Although the visible co-seismic displacements are identified and removed from the coordinate time series, the rotation change due to the unidentified ones and errors in removal is non-negligible. Therefore, the rotation change in the orientation of the CF frame due to seismic deformation should be taken into account in the future in reference frame and geodesy applications.

  1. Rotation change in the orientation of the centre-of-figure frame caused by large earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiangcun; Sun, Wenke; Jin, Shuanggen; Sun, Heping; Xu, Jianqiao

    2016-08-01

    A method to estimate the rotation change in the orientation of the centre-of-figure (CF) frame caused by earthquakes is proposed for the first time. This method involves using the point dislocation theory based on a spherical, non-rotating, perfectly elastic and isotropic (SNREI) Earth. The rotation change in the orientation is related solely to the toroidal displacements of degree one induced by the vertical dip slip dislocation, and the spheroidal displacements induced by an earthquake have no contribution. The effects of two recent large earthquakes, the 2004 Sumatra and the 2011 Tohoku-Oki, are studied. Results showed that the Sumatra and Tohoku-Oki earthquakes both caused the CF frame to rotate by at least tens of μas (micro-arc-second). Although the visible co-seismic displacements are identified and removed from the coordinate time-series, the rotation change due to the unidentified ones and errors in removal is non-negligible. Therefore, the rotation change in the orientation of the CF frame due to seismic deformation should be taken into account in the future in reference frame and geodesy applications.

  2. Demanding response time requirements on coherent receivers due to fast polarization rotations caused by lightning events.

    PubMed

    Krummrich, Peter M; Ronnenberg, David; Schairer, Wolfgang; Wienold, Daniel; Jenau, Frank; Herrmann, Maximilian

    2016-05-30

    Lightning events can cause fast polarization rotations and phase changes in optical transmission fibers due to strong electrical currents and magnetic fields. Whereas these are unlikely to affect legacy transmission systems with direct detection, different mechanisms have to be considered in systems with local oscillator based coherent receivers and digital signal processing. A theoretical analysis reveals that lightning events can result in polarization rotations with speeds as fast as a few hundred kRad/s. We discuss possible mechanisms how such lightning events can affect coherent receivers with digital signal processing. In experimental investigations with a high current pulse generator and transponder prototypes, we observed post FEC errors after polarization rotation events which can be expected from lightning strikes. PMID:27410158

  3. Causes of variability in plasmasphere rotation rate: IMAGE EUV observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvan, D. A.; Moldwin, M.; Sandel, B. R.; Crowley, G.

    2010-12-01

    IMAGE EUV observations demonstrate that the plasmasphere usually does not corotate as assumed in simple convection models, even at low L shells. The prevailing hypothesis states that plasmaspheric subcorotation is due to enhanced auroral zone Joule heating which drives equatorward thermospheric winds. As the neutral thermospheric material moves to lower latitudes, it grows farther from the Earth’s spin axis and turns westward to conserve angular momentum. This induces a westward motion in the ionosphere (a subcorotation), which produces a change in the corotation electric field that maps out to the plasmasphere, causing a subcorotation there as well. We test this hypothesis by searching for a correlation between plasmaspheric rotation rates and several geomagnetic indices (used as proxies for enhanced Joule heating in the auroral zone). We carry out a statistical survey of plasmaspheric rotation rates over several months of IMAGE EUV data in 2001, using two different measurement techniques. Azimuthal features such as “notches” are tracked in local time over a single pass of the IMAGE satellite, both visually and using an automated cross-correlation routine. Each technique provides an estimate of the plasmasphere’s rotation rate. We find a weak correlation between rotation rate and Dst, Kp, AE, the midnight boundary index (MBI), and Joule heating estimates from assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics (AMIE) at L = 2.5, but not at L = 3.5. In general, lower rotation rates correspond to higher auroral and geomagnetic activity. We also make the first direct observation of plasmaspheric superrotation. The rotation rate is found to be highly variable on multi-day timescales, but the typical state of the plasmasphere is subcorotation, with inferred mean values ranging from 88% to 95% of corotation, depending on L shell. In addition, a statistical analysis shows that rotation rates near dusk are generally lower than those at dawn, suggesting that local

  4. Limited efficacy of early postoperative jejunal feeding.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, J T; Wolfe, B M; Calvert, C C

    1985-07-01

    Twenty patients underwent placement of a jejunal catheter for early postoperative feeding at the time of upper abdominal operations, and a control group of 11 patients underwent operative procedures of similar magnitude without jejunostomy. Advancement of the rate of feeding to target intake over 6 to 7 days was attempted. Complications from the feeding led to cessation or curtailment of intake in 65 percent of the patients. Specific complications included abdominal pain and distention, diarrhea, and retrograde reflux of the feeding into the stomach. No statistically significant difference in nitrogen balance was demonstrated between the fed and unfed groups, presumably due to the limitations of nutrient delivery or absorption in the fed groups or elevated breath hydrogen excretion in patients with abdominal pain and distention suggests that the nature of the nutrients, particularly complex carbohydrates, is a factor in the development of feeding complications. Caution must be exercised in advancing the rate of postoperative jejunal feeding. PMID:3925800

  5. Crystal settling and crystal growth caused by Ostwald Ripening in a terrestrial magma ocean under rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, C.; Moeller, A.; Hansen, U.

    2013-12-01

    About 4.5 billion years ago the earth was covered by a heavily convecting and rotating global magma ocean which was caused by an impact of a mars-sized impactor in a later stage of the earth's accretion. After the separation of metal and silicate (see A. Möller, U. Hansen (2013)) and the formation of the earth's core it began to crystallize. Small silicate crystals emerge and grow by Ostwald Ripening when the fluid is supersaturated. This process results in shrinking of small crystals and growing of large crystals on behalf of the smaller ones. This leads to an altering of the crystal settling time. One question which is still under great debate is whether fractional or equilibrium crystallization occurred in the magma ocean. Fractional crystallization means that different mineral fractions settle one after the other which would lead to a strongly differentiated mantle after solidification of the magma ocean. In contrast to that equilibrium crystallization would result in a well mixed mantle. Whether fractional or equilibrium crystallization occurred is for example important for the starting model of plate tectonics or the understanding of the mantle development until today. To study the change of crystal radius in a convecting and rotating magma ocean we employed a 3D numerical model. Due to the low viscosity and strong rotation the influence of rotation on the early magma Ocean cannot be neglected. In the model the crystals are able to influence each other and the fluid flow. They are able to grow, shrink, vanish and form and gravitational, Coriolis and drag forces due to the fluid act on them. In our present work we study the crystal settling depending on different rotation rates and rotation axes with two configurations. For the polar setting the rotation axis is parallel, at the equator it is perpendicular to gravity. Low rotation at the pole leads to a large fraction of suspended crystals. With increasing rotation the crystals settle and form a thick layer

  6. Root cause determination of on-orbit degradation of the VIIRS rotating telescope assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrie, J. D.; Fuqua, P. D.; Meshishnek, M. J.; Ciofalo, M. R.; Chu, C. T.; Chaney, J. A.; Moision, R. M.; Graziani, L.

    2012-09-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a sensor onboard the recently launched Suomi NPP spacecraft. Shortly after launch, VIIRS was found to exhibit a pronounced decrease in the optical throughput of several bands, with the near-infrared bands being more affected than those in the visible. The anomaly investigation team performed several experiments that concluded the primary source of degradation was throughput loss in the VIIRS rotating telescope assembly, likely caused by ultraviolet light illumination. This paper will discuss the laboratory investigation that determined the root cause of the telescope degradation to be UV photo-darkening of a tungsten oxide contaminant film that had been inadvertently deposited during the mirror manufacturing process. We will present data from experiments conducted on witness mirrors manufactured along with the telescope, as well as other mirrors of the same type that were not contaminated.

  7. Jejunal duplication in an adult presenting with hematochezia.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kazuhiko; Sakiyama, Toshio; Setoyama, Kanae; Iwashita, Yuji; Saito, Seiya; Hanada, Norihisa; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Fumisato; Numata, Masatsugu; Ido, Akio

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with appetite loss, palpitations, orthostatic syncope, and hematochezia. Contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a proximal jejunal diverticulum with contrast extravasation. We immediately performed transoral double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) to treat the bleed in the jejunum, and this revealed a small ulcer with an exposed vessel at the opening of the jejunal diverticulum. Hemostasis was achieved endoscopically with argon plasma coagulation (APC) and hemoclips. During subsequent surgery, the diverticulum was found on the mesenteric side of the jejunum. We performed laparoscopy-assisted partial resection of the jejunum, and pathological examination showed that the diverticulum shared a common proper muscle layer with the jejunum and was covered by jejunal mucosa with no ectopic mucosa. Therefore, we diagnosed jejunal duplication. After hospital discharge, the patient had no recurrence of hematochezia or anemia. We report a rare case of jejunal duplication presenting with hematochezia, which was diagnosed as jejunal diverticular bleeding by CT and DBE before surgery. Pathological analysis confirmed jejunal duplication after surgery. We suggest that intestinal diverticular bleeding, as well as duplication of the gastrointestinal tract, should be considered as part of the differential diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:27052396

  8. Response of the jejunal mucosa of dogs with aerobic and anaerobic bacterial overgrowth to antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Batt, R M; McLean, L; Riley, J E

    1988-01-01

    Dogs with naturally occurring aerobic or anaerobic bacterial overgrowth have been examined before and after antibiotic therapy in order to assess reversibility of damage to the jejunal mucosa. Histological changes in peroral jejunal biopsies were relatively minor before and after treatment, but sucrose density gradient centrifugation revealed specific biochemical abnormalities that responded to antibiotic therapy. Aerobic overgrowth was initially associated with a marked loss of the main brush border component of alkaline phosphatase activity; this recovered following treatment, suggesting that aerobic bacteria may cause reversible damage to the hydrophobic region of the brush border membrane. In contrast, anaerobic overgrowth was initially associated with a marked reduction in brush border density, indicative of a considerable fall in the glycoprotein-to-lipid ratio of the membrane. Density increased from 1.17 to 1.21 g/ml after antibiotic therapy, consistent with recovery from this relatively severe damage to the brush border caused by anaerobic bacteria. Reductions in soluble and peroxisomal catalase activities which could compromise mucosal protection against free radicals in dogs with aerobic overgrowth, and a loss of particulate malate dehydrogenase activity indicative of mitochondrial disruption in dogs with anaerobic overgrowth, were also reversed after treatment. These findings indicate that aerobic and anaerobic bacterial overgrowth can result in contrasting but potentially reversible damage to the jejunal mucosa which would not be detected by conventional investigative procedures. PMID:3371716

  9. Rotation of the ionospheric electric potential caused by spatial gradients of ionospheric conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamizo, A.; Yoshikawa, A.; Ohtani, S.; Ieda, A.; Seki, K.

    2013-12-01

    The present study focuses on the relationship between the inhomogeneity of the ionospheric conductivity and the rotation of the ionospheric potential. By applying a simplified version of the Hall-conjugate separation method [Yoshikawa, in preparation] to a global ionospheric potential solver, we analyze calculated potential structures separating them into the primary field and secondary field (the polarization field generated by the Hall effect). Calculations are performed with the following conditions for simplification. Here we call the diagonal and off-diagonal components of the conductivity tensor used in the potential solver SGTT/SGPP and SGTP, respectively, and we regard them as Pedersen and Hall conductivities for the high-latitude region. Besides, we call SGTP 'effective-Hall conductivity' based on its characteristics. (1) The input is a dawn-dusk and day-night symmetric R1-FAC. (2) The basic conductivity distribution is homogeneous in the longitudinal direction with only the latitudinal gradient by solar EUV and equatorial enhancement, no day-night difference and no auroral enhancement. (3) From the basic distribution, SGTP is changed with respect to the fixed SGTT/SGPP with the Hall-Pedersen ratio and offset that are applied globally. It is confirmed that the rotation angle (polarization field) is not so changed when we add only offsets but it becomes larger as the Hall-Pedersen ratio increases. This result is not only consistent with a theoretical prediction [Yoshikawa et al., 2013b] but also provides the fact that the ionospheric internal process, the primary-secondary fields generation process, does affect largely on the potential structure, and eventually on the magnetosphere-ionosphere processes. By combining the previously obtained and current results, we will clarify how the potential structure is actually described by the primary field and secondary field. The results can be applied to qualitatively/quantitatively identify the ionospheric causes

  10. A Sporadic Small Jejunal GIST Presenting with Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage: A Review of the Literature and Management Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Govindaraj, Sridar; Dias, Brendan Hermenigildo; Gautham, S L

    2015-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) represent the majority of primary nonepithelial neoplasms of the digestive tract, most frequently expressing the KIT protein detected by immunohistochemical staining for the CD117 antigen. Jejunal GISTs account for approximately 10 % of GISTs. Patients usually present with abdominal discomfort. Jejunal GISTs may cause symptoms secondary to obstruction or hemorrhage. Pressure necrosis and ulceration of the overlying mucosa may cause gastrointestinal bleeding, and patients who experience significant blood loss may suffer from malaise and fatigue. Literature has classified small-bowel GISTs on the basis of size, and various established guidelines have advised conservative management of small jejunal GISTs (<2 cm). We here report the clinical, macroscopic, and immunohistological features of a small jejunal GIST presenting with acute lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage in a 50-year-old postmenopausal woman necessitating an emergency laparotomy to control the bleed. The management of very small (<2 cm) small-bowel GISTs is controversial. While guidelines are primarily based on the risk of malignancy in GISTs, no guideline predicting the risk of complications in small-bowel GISTs exists. Hence, these tumors should be removed even if incidentally detected. PMID:25972676

  11. Exposure to a Rotating Virtual Environment During Treadmill Locomotion Causes Adaptation in Heading Direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, A. P.; Richards, J. T.; Marshburn, A.; Nomura, Y.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the adaptive effects of variation in the direction of optic flow, experienced during linear treadmill walking, on modifying locomotor trajectory. Subjects (n = 30) walked on a motorized linear treadmill at 4.0 km/h for 24 minutes while viewing the interior of a 3D virtual scene projected onto a screen 1.5 m in front of them. The virtual scene depicted constant self-motion equivalent to either 1) walking around the perimeter of a room to one s left (Rotating Room group) 2) walking down the center of a hallway (Infinite Hallway group). The scene was static for the first 4 minutes, and then constant rate self-motion was simulated for the remaining 20 minutes. Before and after the treadmill locomotion adaptation period, subjects performed five stepping trials where in each trial they marched in place to the beat of a metronome at 90 steps/min while blindfolded in a quiet room. The subject s final heading direction (deg), final X (for-aft, cm) and final Y (medio-lateral, cm) positions were measured for each trial. During the treadmill locomotion adaptation period subject s 3D torso position was measured. We found that subjects in the Rotating Room group as compared to the Infinite Hallway group: 1) showed significantly greater deviation during post exposure testing in the heading direction and Y position opposite to the direction of optic flow experienced during treadmill walking 2) showed a significant monotonically increasing torso yaw angular rotation bias in the direction of optic flow during the treadmill adaptation exposure period. Subjects in both groups showed greater forward translation (in the +X direction) during the post treadmill stepping task that differed significantly from their pre exposure performance. Subjects in both groups reported no perceptual deviation in position during the stepping tasks. We infer that 3 viewing simulated rotary self-motion during treadmill locomotion causes adaptive modification

  12. Exposure to a Rotating Virtual Environment During Treadmill Locomotion Causes Adaptation in Heading Direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruttley, T; Marshburn, A.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Richards, J. T.; Nomura, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the adaptive effects of variation in the direction of optic flow, experienced during linear treadmill walking, on modifying locomotor trajectory. Subjects (n = 30) walked on a motorized linear treadmill at 4.0 kilometers per hour for 24 minutes while viewing the interior of a 3D virtual scene projected onto a screen 1.5 in in front of them. The virtual scene depicted constant self-motion equivalent to either 1) walking around the perimeter of a room to one s left (Rotating Room group) 2) walking down the center of a hallway (Infinite Hallway group). The scene was static for the first 4 minutes, and then constant rate self-motion was simulated for the remaining 20 minutes. Before and after the treadmill locomotion adaptation period, subjects performed five stepping trials where in each trial they marched in place to the beat of a metronome at 90 steps/min while blindfolded in a quiet room. The subject's final heading direction (deg), final X (for-aft, cm) and final Y (medio-lateral, cm) positions were measured for each trial. During the treadmill locomotion adaptation period subject's 3D torso position was measured. We found that subjects in the Rotating Room group as compared to the Infinite Hallway group: 1) showed significantly greater deviation during post exposure testing in the heading direction and Y position opposite to the direction of optic flow experienced during treadmill walking 2) showed a significant monotonically increasing torso yaw angular rotation bias in the direction of optic flow during the treadmill adaptation exposure period. Subjects in both groups showed greater forward translation (in the +X direction) during the post treadmill stepping task that differed significantly from their pre exposure performance. Subjects in both groups reported no perceptual deviation in position during the stepping tasks. We infer that viewing simulated rotary self-motion during treadmill locomotion causes

  13. On the experimental prediction of the stability threshold speed caused by rotating damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervisch, B.; Derammelaere, S.; Stockman, K.; De Baets, P.; Loccufier, M.

    2016-08-01

    An ever increasing demand for lighter rotating machinery and higher operating speeds results in a raised probability of instabilities. Rotating damping is one of the reasons, instability occurs. Rotating damping, or rotor internal damping, is the damping related to all rotating parts while non-rotating damping appearing in the non-rotating parts. The present study describes a rotating setup, designed to investigate rotating damping experimentally. An efficient experimental procedure is presented to predict the stability threshold of a rotating machine. The setup consists of a long thin shaft with a disk in the middle and clamped boundary conditions. The goal is to extract the system poles as a function of the rotating speed. The real parts of these poles are used to construct the decay rate plot, which is an indication for the stability. The efficiency of the experimental procedure relies on the model chosen for the rotating shaft. It is shown that the shaft behavior can be approximated by a single degree of freedom model that incorporates a speed dependent damping. As such low measurement effort and only one randomly chosen measurement location are needed to construct the decay rate plot. As an excitation, an automated impact hammer is used and the response is measured by eddy current probes. The proposed method yields a reliable prediction of the stability threshold speed which is validated through measurements.

  14. Upper G.I. hemorrhage from glass fragments’ ingestion in a patient with jejunal diverticula – Case report☆

    PubMed Central

    Gattai, Riccardo; Pantalone, Desire’; Migliaccio, Maria Luisa; Bonizzoli, Manuela; Peris, Adriano; Bechi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common emergency. The ingestion of foreign bodies represents a less frequent cause of bleeding, but it is equally life-threatening, especially if the patient does not report the incident. Presentation of case We are reporting the case of a 77-year-old patient with a bleeding caused by ingestion of glass fragments with co-existing jejunal diverticula. Discussion The ingestion of foreign bodies is a rare, mostly accidental event. Another possible source of upper G.I. bleeding is jejunal diverticula; in this case, the examination of the specimens showed evidence of glass ingestion fragments as the likely cause of bleeding. Conclusion Surgeons should be aware that patients may fail to report correctly on the possible causes of bleeding, misleading the diagnosis, and delaying the diagnostic routes. PMID:25543882

  15. Ulcerative jejunitis in a child with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Celiac disease can present in children and adults with a variety of manifestations including a rare complication known as ulcerative jejunitis. The latter has been associated with refractory celiac disease in adult onset patients. The objective of this case report is to describe the first pediatric case of ulcerative jejunitis in celiac disease, diagnosed by capsule endoscopy, which was not associated with refractory celiac disease. Case presentation The 9 year old girl presented with a history of abdominal pain and vomiting. Laboratory investigations revealed a slightly elevated IgA tissue transglutaminase antibody level in the setting of serum IgA deficiency. Initial upper endoscopy with biopsies was not conclusive for celiac disease. Further investigations included positive IgA anti-endomysium antibody, and positive HLA DQ2 typing. Video capsule endoscopy showed delayed appearance of villi until the proximal to mid jejunum and jejunal mucosal ulcerations. Push enteroscopy with biopsies subsequently confirmed the diagnosis of celiac disease and ulcerative jejunitis. Immunohistochemical studies of the intraepithelial lymphocytes and PCR amplification revealed surface expression of CD3 and CD8 and oligoclonal T cell populations. A repeat capsule study and upper endoscopy, 1 year and 4 years following a strict gluten free diet showed endoscopic and histological normalization of the small bowel. Conclusion Ulcerative jejunitis in association with celiac disease has never previously been described in children. Capsule endoscopy was essential to both the diagnosis of celiac disease and its associated ulcerative jejunitis. The repeat capsule endoscopy findings, one year following institution of a gluten free diet, also suggest that ulcerative jejunitis is not always associated with refractory celiac disease and does not necessarily dictate a poor outcome. PMID:24524552

  16. Jejunal Amyloidoma - a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of localized amyloid tumor of the jejunum which presented with abdominal pain and gastrointestinal bleeding. We reviewed the pathophysiologic process that precipitates bleeding in this rare tumor. We also examined the documented radiologic and endoscopic features of amyloidosis of the small bowel in the light of our reported case. All with a view to add to the growing evidence on this rare tumor which will facilitate accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:20062677

  17. Are children on jejunal feeds at risk of iron deficiency?

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li-Zsa; Adams, Susan E; Kennedy, Alison; Kepreotes, Helen; Ooi, Chee Y

    2015-01-01

    Children on exclusive jejunal feeding may be at risk of iron deficiency due to the feeds bypassing the duodenum, which is the primary site for iron absorption. We describe the biochemical and hematological features of six children on exclusive jejunal feeding who did not receive iron supplementation. At a mean (standard deviation) period of 11 (6.5) mo after commencing jejunal feeds, there was a significant reduction in both serum iron (18.5 g/L vs 9.8 g/L, P = 0.01) and transferrin saturation levels (23.1% vs 13.7%, P = 0.02), suggesting iron deficiency. However, there was no significant change in ferritin, hemoglobin and mean corpuscular volume levels post-commencement of jejunal feeds. This may be the result of small bowel adaptation in response to early iron deficiency. Larger and longer term prospective studies are required to investigate if children on jejunal feeds are at risk of developing iron deficiency. PMID:25987804

  18. Sciatic Nerve Palsy Caused by Ruptured and Contracted Short External Rotator Muscles after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Seok; Hong, Chang-Hwa; Soh, Jae-Wan; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Suh, You-Sung; Lee, Hwan-Woong

    2015-01-01

    Although the incidence of sciatic nerve palsy following total hip arthroplasty is low, this complication can cause devastating permanent nerve palsy. The authors experienced a case of sciatic nerve palsy caused by ruptured and contracted external rotator muscles following total hip arthroplasty in a patient suffering from osteonecrosis of the femoral head. We report this unusual case of sciatic nerve palsy with a review of the literature.

  19. Jejunal intussusception and small bowel transmural infarction in a baboon (Papio hamadryas anubis).

    PubMed

    Cary, Max E; Suarez-Chavez, Maria; Wolf, Roman F; Kosanke, Stanley D; White, Gary L

    2006-03-01

    A 4.3-y-old, colony-bred female baboon (Papio hamadryas anubis) of low social rank and exhibiting no clinically significant signs of illness or distress was found dead at the Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center baboon breeding facility at El Reno, OK. Prior to death she exhibited excessive grooming behavior both toward herself and other baboons. In addition, she was consistently shy, timid, reclusive, and prone to minimal sustained movement (that is, generally lethargic behavior). Animals of low social rank typically exhibit some degree of these behaviors in order to avoid surplus interactions with other animals within their groups, which can lead to conflict and injury. Accordingly, her death was surprising in view of the apparent lack of clinical signs. Necropsy established the cause for death as systemic shock with resultant cardiovascular collapse resulting from a massive jejunal intussusception. This intussusception and resulting entrapment of the jejunal mesenteric vasculature caused total occlusion of the small bowel blood supply, with resulting hemorrhage and ischemic necrosis (small bowel infarction). Jejunal intussusceptions generally are considered to be uncommon and therefore are rarely reported in either the veterinary or human literature. Of special interest was the cause for this intussusception, determined to have been a large hairball located at the most proximal portion of the jejunum. Extending from this hairball and traversing essentially the entire length of the jejunum was a braided strand of hair acting as a string foreign body about which the intussusception formed. In light of our findings we suggest that animals of low social rank exhibiting excessive grooming behavior and lethargy might merit clinical evaluation to rule out possible abdominal disorders. PMID:16542042

  20. Symbolic dynamics of jejunal motility in the irritable bowel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wackerbauer, Renate; Schmidt, Thomas

    1999-09-01

    Different studies of the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) by conventional analysis of jejunal motility report conflicting results. Therefore, our aim is to quantify the jejunal contraction activity by symbolic dynamics in order to discriminate between IBS and control subjects. Contraction amplitudes during fasting motility (phase II) are analyzed for 30 IBS and 30 healthy subjects. On the basis of a particular scale-independent discretization of the contraction amplitudes with respect to the median, IBS patients are characterized by increased block entropy as well as increased mean contraction amplitude. In a further more elementary level of analysis these differences can be reduced to specific contraction patterns within the time series, namely the fact that successive large contraction amplitudes are less ordered in IBS than in controls. These significant differences in jejunal motility may point to an altered control of the gut in IBS, although further studies on a representative number of patients have to be done for a validation of these findings.

  1. Jejunal disaccharidases in protein energy malnutrition and recovery.

    PubMed

    Mehra, R; Khambadkone, S M; Jain, M K; Ganapathy, S

    1994-11-01

    The jejunal disaccharidases, sucrase, maltase and lactase, were determined in jejunal biopsies obtained from 43 malnourished children and 10 controls. In the study group, 63% were girls and 93% had severe malnutrition. Lactase activity was significantly reduced in third and fourth degree malnutrition (p < 0.05 and p < 0.005, respectively), but maltase activity was significantly reduced only in the fourth degree malnutrition (p < 0.01). After recovery, maltase and sucrase activities showed a marginally significant increase (p = 0.06), where lactase showed no significant increase (p > 0.05). We conclude that jejunal disaccharidase activity decreases significantly with increasing severity of malnutrition, lactase being the most severely affected and the last to recover. PMID:7896332

  2. Line Shifts in Rotational Spectra of Polyatomic Chiral Molecules Caused by the Parity Violating Electroweak Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stohner, J.; Quack, M.

    2009-06-01

    Are findings in high-energy physics of any importance in molecular spectroscopy ? The answer is clearly `yes'. Energies of enantiomers were considered as exactly equal in an achiral environment, e.g. the gas phase. Today, however, it is well known that this is not valid. The violation of mirror-image symmetry (suggested theoretically and confirmed experimentally in 1956/57) was established in the field of nuclear, high-energy, and atomic physics since then, and it is also the cause for a non-zero energy difference between enantiomers. We expect today that the violation of mirror-image symmetry (parity violation) influences chemistry of chiral molecules as well as their spectroscopy. Progress has been made in the quantitative theoretical prediction of possible spectroscopic signatures of molecular parity violation. The experimental confirmation of parity violation in chiral molecules is, however, still open. Theoretical studies are helpful for the planning and important for a detailed analysis of rovibrational and tunneling spectra of chiral molecules. We report results on frequency shifts in rotational, vibrational and tunneling spectra of some selected chiral molecules which are studied in our group. If time permits, we shall also discuss critically some recent claims of experimental observations of molecular parity violation in condensed phase systems. T. D. Lee, C. N. Yang, Phys. Rev., 104, 254 (1956) C. S. Wu, E. Ambler, R. W. Hayward, D. D. Hoppes, R. P. Hudson, Phys. Rev., 105, 1413 (1957) M. Quack, Angew. Chem. Intl. Ed., 28, 571 (1989) Angew. Chem. Intl. Ed., 41, 4618 (2002) M. Quack, J. Stohner, Chimia, 59, 530 (2005) M. Quack, J. Stohner, M. Willeke, Ann Rev. Phys. Chem. 59, 741 (2008) M. Quack, J. Stohner, Phys. Rev. Lett., 84, 3807 (2000) M. Quack, J. Stohner, J. Chem. Phys., 119, 11228 (2003) J. Stohner, Int. J. Mass Spectrometry 233, 385 (2004) M. Gottselig, M. Quack, J. Stohner, M. Willeke, Int. J. Mass Spectrometry 233, 373 (2004) R. Berger, G

  3. Zonal concentration of some geophysical process intensity caused by tides and variations in the Earth's rotation velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, B.; Domanski, A.; Sasorova, E.

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed what kind of fundamental physical phenomena can be responsible for the generation of the anomalous latitudinal zones of the seismic activity, and the hotspots, and some other geophysical processes. The assessment of tidal effect contribution to the earthquake preparation process is discussed. A disk model of the Earth's rotation was proposed. The model is acceptable for the homogeneous Earth and for the heterogeneous one. The disk model explains the nucleation of two maximums of the gradient of the moment of inertia over latitude with respect to the Equator. Effects of the variations in the Earth's rotation angular velocity were estimated and the possible features caused by the rotation velocity instability were described. The variations in the relative velocity of the Earth's rotation (dimensionless value ν ≈ (T - P)/P) are approximately equal upon the average to 10-8, where T is the observed length of day for the Earth, and P is the astronomical day. These variations lead to the occurrence of the additional energy estimated as 1020 J. The authors proposed the hypothesis of a pulsating geoid based on effects of the Earth's rotation features, and tidal forces, and conception of critical latitudes in the solid Earth. This hypothesis may highlight the phenomenon of zonal intensification of some geological processes in the solid Earth (the seismic activity, and hotspot location, and major ore deposit locations).

  4. Synovial Chondromatosis of the Subacromial Bursa Causing a Bursal-Sided Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Julie A.; Garrigues, Grant E.

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is an uncommon condition, and involvement of the shoulder is even more rare. We report on a 39-year-old female who presented with symptoms, radiographic features, and intraoperative findings consistent with multiple subacromial loose bodies resulting in a partial-thickness, bursal-sided rotator cuff tear of the supraspinatus muscle. She was treated with an arthroscopic removal of loose bodies, complete excision of the subacromial/subdeltoid bursa, acromioplasty, and rotator cuff repair. To our knowledge, this is the first report of arthroscopic treatment for a bursal-sided, partial-thickness rotator cuff tear treated with greater than two-year clinical and radiographic follow-up. We utilized shoulder scores, preoperative and postoperative range of motion, and imaging to assess the results of treatment and surveillance for recurrence in our patient after two-year follow-up. PMID:25861500

  5. Synovial chondromatosis of the subacromial bursa causing a bursal-sided rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Julie A; Garrigues, Grant E

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is an uncommon condition, and involvement of the shoulder is even more rare. We report on a 39-year-old female who presented with symptoms, radiographic features, and intraoperative findings consistent with multiple subacromial loose bodies resulting in a partial-thickness, bursal-sided rotator cuff tear of the supraspinatus muscle. She was treated with an arthroscopic removal of loose bodies, complete excision of the subacromial/subdeltoid bursa, acromioplasty, and rotator cuff repair. To our knowledge, this is the first report of arthroscopic treatment for a bursal-sided, partial-thickness rotator cuff tear treated with greater than two-year clinical and radiographic follow-up. We utilized shoulder scores, preoperative and postoperative range of motion, and imaging to assess the results of treatment and surveillance for recurrence in our patient after two-year follow-up. PMID:25861500

  6. Jejunal perforation due to porcupine quill ingestion in a horse

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stacy L.; Panizzi, Luca; Bracamonte, Jose

    2014-01-01

    An 8-month-old Andalusian filly was treated for jejunal perforations due to ingestion of a porcupine quill. During exploratory laparotomy, 2 separate stapled side-to-side jejunojejunal resection and anastomoses were performed. Post-operative complications after 2 years follow-up included mild incisional herniation following incisional infection and chronic intermittent colic. PMID:24489394

  7. Jejunal perforation due to porcupine quill ingestion in a horse.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Stacy L; Panizzi, Luca; Bracamonte, Jose

    2014-02-01

    An 8-month-old Andalusian filly was treated for jejunal perforations due to ingestion of a porcupine quill. During exploratory laparotomy, 2 separate stapled side-to-side jejunojejunal resection and anastomoses were performed. Post-operative complications after 2 years follow-up included mild incisional herniation following incisional infection and chronic intermittent colic. PMID:24489394

  8. Acupuncture at heterotopic acupoints enhances jejunal motility in constipated and diarrheic rats

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Qing-Guang; Gao, Xin-Yan; Liu, Kun; Yu, Xiao-Chun; Li, Liang; Wang, Hai-Ping; Zhu, Bing

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect and mechanism of acupuncture at heterotopic acupoints on jejunal motility, particularly in pathological conditions. METHODS: Jejunal motility was assessed using a manometric balloon placed in the jejunum approximately 18-20 cm downstream from the pylorus and filled with approximately 0.1 mL warm water in anesthetized normal rats or rats with diarrhea or constipation. The heterotopic acupoints including LI11 (Quchi), ST37 (Shangjuxu), BL25 (Dachangshu), and the homotopic acupoint ST25 (Tianshu), and were stimulated for 60 s by rotating acupuncture needles right and left at a frequency of 2 Hz. To determine the type of afferent fibers mediating the regulation of jejunal motility by manual acupuncture, the ipsilateral sciatic A or C fibers of ST37 were inactivated by local application of the A-fiber selective demyelination agent cobra venom or the C fiber blocker capsaicin. Methoctramine, a selective M2 receptor antagonist, was injected intravenously to identify a specific role for M2 receptors in mediating the effect of acupuncture on jejunal motility. RESULTS: Acupuncture at heterotopic acupoints, such as LI11 and ST37, increased jejunal motility not only in normal rats, but also in rats with constipation or diarrhea. In normal rats, manual acupuncture at LI11 or ST37 enhanced jejunal pressure from 7.34 ± 0.19 cmH2O to 7.93 ± 0.20 cmH2O, an increase of 9.05% ± 0.82% (P < 0.05), and from 6.95 ± 0.14 cmH2O to 8.97 ± 0.22 cmH2O, a significant increase of 27.44% ± 1.96% (P < 0.01), respectively. In constipated rats, manual acupuncture at LI11 or ST37 increased intrajejunal pressure from 8.17 ± 0.31 cmH2O to 9.86 ± 0.36 cmH2O, an increase of 20.69% ± 2.10% (P < 0.05), and from 8.82 ± 0.28 cmH2O to 10.83 ± 0.28 cmH2O, an increase of 22.81% ± 1.46% (P < 0.05), respectively. In rats with diarrhea, MA at LI11 or ST37 increased intrajejunal pressure from 11.95 ± 0.35 cmH2O to 13.96 ± 0.39 cmH2O, an increase of 16.82% ± 2.35% (P

  9. [Rotational malalignment of the components may cause chronic pain or early failure in total knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, S; Romero, J; Roth-Schiffl, E; Albrecht, T

    2003-06-01

    Rotational alignment of the tibial and femoral component plays an important role in modern total knee replacement surgery. After correct frontal alignment and proper soft tissue balancing, the rotational placement of the components represents the "third dimension" in knee endoprosthetic surgery. Improved surgical techniques with modified instruments and better rotational component positioning will lead to better functional outcomes. Patients with painful total knee arthroplasties (TKA) or early failure without evident classic implantation failures or signs of infection should be evaluated for malrotation of the components. In a prospective study in 26 patients with painful TKA and malrotation of the tibia and/or femur component, revision surgery with exchange of the components was performed. Twenty-five cases showed clinically relevant internal malrotation of the tibial component (ø 8.4 degrees ) and/or femoral component (ø 5.6 degrees ). Only one patient had 10 degrees of external malrotation of the femoral component. Combined malrotations of the tibia and femur were found in ten knees (38%). After revision surgery and correction of malrotations, 20 patients (78%) were scored with excellent and good results. Patients with painful TKA resistant to conservative therapy and evident malrotations of the component should be considered for revision surgery with change of the malrotated components. PMID:12819885

  10. Fast rotational motion of water molecules increases ordering of hydrophobes in solutions and may cause hydrophobic chains to collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohorič, Tomaž; Bren, Urban; Vlachy, Vojko

    2015-12-01

    Using the molecular dynamics simulations with separate thermostats for translational and rotational degrees of freedom, we investigate the effects of water's rotational motion on the interaction among Lennard-Jones solutes. The situation with rotational temperature higher than the translational one (TR > TT) is mimicking the effects of microwaves on model solutions. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that solutions of Lennard-Jones solutes become increasingly more structured with the rise in TR, while keeping the TT constant. This is evidenced by an increase of the first and the second peak of the solute-solute radial distribution function. In addition, the first peak moves toward slightly larger distances; the effect seems to be caused by the destabilization of water molecules in the first hydration shell around hydrophobic solutes. More evidence of strong effects of the rotationally excited water is provided by the simulations of short hydrophobic polymers, which upon an increase in TR assume more compact conformations. In these simulations, we see the re-distribution of water molecules, which escape from hydrophobic "pockets" to better solvate the solvent exposed monomers.

  11. Fast rotational motion of water molecules increases ordering of hydrophobes in solutions and may cause hydrophobic chains to collapse.

    PubMed

    Mohorič, Tomaž; Bren, Urban; Vlachy, Vojko

    2015-12-28

    Using the molecular dynamics simulations with separate thermostats for translational and rotational degrees of freedom, we investigate the effects of water's rotational motion on the interaction among Lennard-Jones solutes. The situation with rotational temperature higher than the translational one (TR > TT) is mimicking the effects of microwaves on model solutions. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that solutions of Lennard-Jones solutes become increasingly more structured with the rise in TR, while keeping the TT constant. This is evidenced by an increase of the first and the second peak of the solute-solute radial distribution function. In addition, the first peak moves toward slightly larger distances; the effect seems to be caused by the destabilization of water molecules in the first hydration shell around hydrophobic solutes. More evidence of strong effects of the rotationally excited water is provided by the simulations of short hydrophobic polymers, which upon an increase in TR assume more compact conformations. In these simulations, we see the re-distribution of water molecules, which escape from hydrophobic "pockets" to better solvate the solvent exposed monomers. PMID:26723695

  12. Rotational Spin-up Caused CO2 Outgassing on Comet 103P/Hartley 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckloff, Jordan; Graves, Kevin; Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; Richardson, James

    2015-11-01

    The Deep Impact spacecraft’s flyby of comet 103P/Hartley 2 on November 4, 2010 revealed its nucleus to be a small, bilobate, and highly active world [1] [2]. The bulk of this activity is driven by CO2 sublimation, which is enigmatically restricted to the tip of the small lobe [1]. Because Hartley 2's CO2 production responds to the diurnal cycle of the nucleus [1], CO2 ice must be no deeper than a few centimeters below the surface of the small lobe. However the high volatility of CO2 would suggest that its sublimation front should recede deep below the surface, such that diurnal volatile production is dominated by more refractory species such as water ice, as was observed at comet Tempel 1 [3].Here we show that both the near surface CO2 ice and its geographic restriction to the tip of the small lobe suggest that Hartley 2 recently experienced an episode of fast rotation. We use the GRAVMAP code to compute the stability of slopes on the surface of Hartley 2 as a function of spin period. We determine that the surface of the active region of Hartley 2’s small lobe becomes unstable at a rotation period of ~10-12 hours (as opposed to its current spin period of ~ 18 hours [1]), and will flow toward the tip of the lobe, excavating buried CO2 ice and activating CO2-driven activity. However, the rest of the surface of the nucleus is stable at these spin rates, and will therefore not exhibit CO2 activity. We additionally use Finite Element Model (FEM) analysis to demonstrate that the interior of Hartley 2’s nucleus is structurally stable (assuming a cohesive strength of at least 5 Pa) at these spin rates.The uncommonly high angular acceleration of Hartley 2, which has changed the nucleus spin period by two hours in three months [4], suggests that this episode of fast rotation may have existed only a few years or decades ago. Thus, Hartley 2 may provide an excellent case study into the reactivation of quiescent comet nuclei via rotational spin up, as would result from

  13. An approach for online evaluations of dose consequences caused by small rotational setup errors in intracranial stereotactic radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Bo; Li, Jonathan; Kahler, Darren; Yan Guanghua; Mittauer, Kathryn; Shi Wenyin; Okunieff, Paul; Liu, Chihray

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to investigate the impact of small rotational errors on the magnitudes and distributions of spatial dose variations for intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) treatment setups, and to assess the feasibility of using the original dose map overlaid with rotated contours (ODMORC) method as a fast, online evaluation tool to estimate dose changes (using DVHs) to clinical target volumes (CTVs) and organs-at-risks (OARs) caused by small rotational setup errors. Methods: Fifteen intracranial SRT cases treated with either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques were chosen for the study. Selected cases have a variety of anatomical dimensions and pathologies. Angles of {+-}3 deg. and {+-}5 deg. in all directions were selected to simulate the rotational errors. Dose variations in different regions of the brain, CTVs, and OARs were evaluated to illustrate the various spatial effects of dose differences before and after rotations. DVHs accounting for rotations that were recomputed by the treatment planning system (TPS) and those generated by the ODMORC method were compared. A framework of a fast algorithm for multicontour rotation implemented by ODMORC is introduced as well. Results: The average values of relative dose variations between original dose and recomputed dose accounting for rotations were greater than 4.0% and 10.0% in absolute mean and in standard deviation, respectively, at the skull and adjacent regions for all cases. They were less than 1.0% and 2.5% in absolute mean and in standard deviation, respectively, for dose points 3 mm away from the skull. The results indicated that spatial dose to any part of the brain organs or tumors separated from the skull or head surface would be relatively stable before and after rotations. Statistical data of CTVs and OARs indicate the lens and cochleas have the large dose variations before and after rotations

  14. Late presentation of jejunal perforation after thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Kouritas, Vasileios K; Matheos, Efthimiou; Baloyiannis, Ioannis; Spyridakis, Michalis; Desimonas, Nikolaos; Hatzitheofilou, Kostas

    2009-11-01

    Jejunal perforation is extremely rare in trauma especially without initial involvement of the abdomen. We present the case of a delayed jejunal perforation after thoracic trauma with no initial indication of abdominal trauma in a 55-year-old man who was admitted to our department after a road traffic accident. The patient sustained thoracic trauma with rib fractures of the left hemithorax and hemopneumothorax and a mild head injury. On the fourth day of his in-hospital stay, he complained of severe abdominal pain and signs of acute abdomen were observed. He underwent emergency laparotomy where a perforation of the jejunum near the ligament of Treitz was noticed and sutured. His postoperative recovery was uneventful. Physicians treating trauma should always have a high degree of suspicion regarding rare abdominal injuries, with delayed presentation, even if no abdominal involvement is noticed during the initial survey. PMID:19931795

  15. [Jejunal perforation as initial metastatic manifestation of laryngeal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Claros González, I; Santonja Garriga, J L; Rubio Barbón, S; Santamaría Girón, L; Triviño López, A; Velasco Alvarez, A

    1994-01-01

    A case of acute abdominal pain due to jejunal perforation in a patient with dissemination of laryngeal carcinoma is presented. Six jejunal intramural nodes of squamous cell carcinoma, one of them perforated, were observed at laparotomy. At the same time, a lesion suspicious of local recurrence in the tracheostomy orifice was observed. The patient died in the postoperative period. The rarity of intestinal perforation as an initial manifestation of metastatical dissemination of a laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma as well as its poor prognosis are discussed. The hematogenous spread is proposed in our case. Finally the inclusion of metastases in the differential diagnosis in a clinical episode of intestinal perforation in patients with a history of neoplasm is emphasized. PMID:8186002

  16. Jejunal epithelial glucose metabolism: effects of Na+ replacement.

    PubMed

    Mallet, R T; Jackson, M J; Kelleher, J K

    1986-11-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the effects of replacement of extracellular Na+ with a nontransportable cation, N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG+) on jejunal epithelial glucose metabolism. Jejunal epithelium isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats was incubated in media containing 5 mM glucose, 0.5 mM glutamine, 0.5 mM beta-hydroxybutyrate, and 0.3 mM acetoacetate as the principal carbon sources. O2 consumption and total glucose utilization were reduced 30 and 50%, respectively, when Na+ was replaced with NMDG+. In both media, approximately 75% of utilized glucose carbon was converted to lactate. The rate of glucose metabolism via the hexose monophosphate shunt, as evaluated using specific 14CO2 yields from [1-14C]glucose and [6-14C]glucose, was not appreciably altered by Na+ replacement. Tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux was evaluated using 14CO2 production from [14C]glucose and [14C]pyruvate radioisotopes. Approximately 50% of TCA cycle flux was shunted into products other than CO2 in both media. The majority of the acetyl-CoA oxidized in the TCA cycle was derived from cytosolic pyruvate. It is concluded that removal of Na+ from the bathing medium substantially reduced glucose utilization via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway and TCA cycle in the jejunal epithelium. PMID:3777159

  17. Annoyance caused by advanced turboprop aircraft flyover noise: Counter-rotating-propeller configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccurdy, David A.

    1990-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to quantify the annoyance of people to flyover noise of advanced turboprop aircraft with counter rotating propellers. The first experiment examined configurations having an equal number of blades on each rotor and the second experiment examined configurations having an unequal number of blades on each rotor. The objectives were to determine the effects on annoyance of various tonal characteristics, and to compare annoyance to advanced turboprops with annoyance to conventional turboprops and turbofans. A computer was used to synthesize realistic, time-varying simulations of advanced turboprop aircraft takeoff noise. The simulations represented different combinations fundamental frequency and tone-to-broadband noise ratio. Also included in each experiment were recordings of 10 conventional turboprop and turbofan takeoffs. Each noise was presented at three sound pressure levels in an anechoic chamber. In each experiment, 64 subjects judged the annoyance of each noise stimulus. Analyses indicated that annoyance was significantly affected by the interaction of fundamental frequency with tone-to-broadband noise ratio. No significant differences in annoyance between the advanced turboprop aircraft and the conventional turbofans were found. The use of a duration correction and a modified tone correction improved the annoyance prediction for the stimuli.

  18. Geomechanical simulation of the stress tensor rotation caused by injection of cold water in a deep geothermal reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanne, Pierre; Rutqvist, Jonny; Dobson, Patrick F.; Garcia, Julio; Walters, Mark; Hartline, Craig; Borgia, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    We present a three-dimensional thermohydromechanical numerical study of the evolution and distribution of the stress tensor within the northwest part of The Geysers geothermal reservoir (in California), including a detailed study of the region around one injection well from 2003 to 2012. Initially, after imposing a normal faulting stress regime, we calculated local changes in the stress regime around injection wells. Our results were compared with previously published studies in which the stress state was inferred from inverting the focal plane mechanism of seismic events. Our main finding is that changes in stress tensor orientation are caused by injection-induced progressive cooling of the reservoir, as well as by the seasonal variations in injection rate. Because of the gravity flow and cooling around a liquid zone formed by the injection, the vertical stress reduction is larger and propagates far below the injection well. At the same time, the horizontal stress increases, mostly because of stress redistribution below and above the cooling area. These two phenomena cause the rotation of the stress tensor and the appearance of a strike-slip regime above, inside, and below the cooling area. The cooling and the associated rotation of the stress regime can play a significant role in the observed long-term deepening of the microseismicity below active injection wells.

  19. Influence of meal composition on canine jejunal water and electrolyte absorption.

    PubMed

    Bastidas, J A; Zinner, M J; Bastidas, J A; Orandle, M S; Yeo, C J

    1992-02-01

    The absorption of water and electrolytes from the proximal jejunal lumen increases immediately after a meal. This meal-induced jejunal absorption occurs in jejunal segments out of normal gastrointestinal continuity. This study was designed to characterize the jejunal absorptive response to a series of isovolumetric gavage-delivered stimuli. Twenty-five-centimeter canine proximal jejunal Thiry-Vella fistulas were constructed, and jejunal absorption studies (n = 66) were performed by luminal perfusion of the jejunal segments with an isotonic buffer containing 14C-labeled polyethylene glycol. Each study consisted of a 1-hour basal period, followed by a 3-hour experimental period. Nine groups were studied, each receiving one of the following isovolumetric stimuli delivered via the gavage route: water, 0.9% saline, mixed meal, protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mannitol (150 mmol/L, 300 mmol/L, and 600 mmol/L). The water and 0.9% saline gavage groups showed no significant changes in integrated postprandial water and electrolyte absorption above basal. The isocaloric mixed meal, protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mannitol groups all had significantly increased integrated postprandial jejunal water and electrolyte absorption above basal (P less than 0.05). These results indicate that a proabsorptive signal for meal-induced jejunal absorption originates from or distal to the stomach. Meal-induced jejunal absorption occurs in response to nutrients of diverse composition and is also responsive to nonnutritive solutes such as mannitol. These findings support a new role for gastric or intestinal chemo- or osmo-receptors in stimulating the neurohumoral mechanisms that mediate meal-induced jejunal absorption. PMID:1732119

  20. Saturn's periodic magnetic field perturbations caused by a rotating partial ring current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, P. C.; Khurana, K. K.; Mitchell, D. G.; Sergis, N.; Dialynas, K.; Carbary, J. F.; Roelof, E. C.; Paranicas, C. P.; Krimigis, S. M.; Mauk, B. H.

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate that the periodic magnetic field perturbations as observed from Cassini are caused by the plasma pressure of the energetic (>2 keV) particle distributions that are periodically injected and subsequently drift around Saturn. Plasma pressures inferred from the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) (<2 keV) and the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI) (>2 keV) are used to compute the three-dimensional pressure-driven currents and their associated magnetic field perturbations. The distribution of the “hot” (>2 keV) plasma pressure is derived from Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) images obtained by the Ion Neutral Camera (INCA) and in-situ spectral measurements. The radial profile of “cold” (<2 keV) plasma pressure is obtained from statistical studies and is assumed to be azimuthally symmetric.

  1. Magneto-rotation of nonmagnetic micro-crystals caused by diamagnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uyeda, Chiaki; Takashima, Ryoichi; Tanaka, Kenta

    2005-02-01

    Preferential alignments of magnetically stable axes of diamagnetic micro-crystals dispersed in liquid ethanol were observed at a low field of 1 T for basic inorganic oxides without the use of a superconducting magnet; alignments were newly observed for corundum, forsterite, gypsum, orthoclase, KDP, and Al(OH)3. Diamagnetic anisotropy (Δχ)dia of the material was the cause of alignment. Most of the inorganic oxides, other than the above-mentioned materials, are expected to show alignment at similar field intensities. This is because their calculated (Δχ)dia values exceed 1×10-9emu/g; it was assumed in the calculation that (Δχ)dia values originate from individual bonding orbital.

  2. A jejunal GIST presenting with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and small bowel obstruction secondary to intussusception.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Peter; Lanzon-Miller, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old man with episodes of overt obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding was investigated with multiple upper and lower GI endoscopies, CT enterography and capsule endoscopy, but no cause was found. He then presented acutely with small bowel obstruction. A laparotomy revealed complete small bowel obstruction secondary to jejunal intussusception over a 4 cm intraluminal polyp. Following resection and primary anastomosis, histology revealed that the polyp was a GI stromal tumour (GIST). This is an exceptionally uncommon presentation of a rare tumour. It is surprising that this tumour was not detected by CT enterography and not seen on capsule endoscopy. Immunohistochemistry and mutation analysis of the GIST suggested that it had a low risk of metastatic disease, but a high risk of recurrence. Staging CT scans did not reveal evidence of distal spread. The patient is currently receiving 3 years of chemotherapy with imatinib. PMID:26527610

  3. Familial Apple Peel Jejunal Atresia with Helical Umbilical Cord Ulcerations in Three Consecutive Pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Jaiman, Sunil; Gundabattula, Sirisha Rao; Ratha, Chinmayee

    2016-01-01

    Apple peel deformity is a rare form of upper intestinal atresia of unknown etiology. Umbilical cord ulcers can occur secondary to reflux of gastric juice and bile as a result of the atresia and can cause lethal intrauterine hemorrhage. The authors report 3 instances of congenital apple peel jejunal atresia with helical umbilical cord ulcers afflicting all female offspring in consecutive pregnancies in a single nonconsanguineous family. There was no hemorrhage from the cord ulcers, but all 3 pregnancies resulted in perinatal death. Although familial occurrence is known, our case series is probably the 1st from the Indian subcontinent and warrants further research into the genetic mechanisms and possible ethnic differences of congenital upper intestinal atresia. The causation of sudden fetal demise in the absence of antecedent cord hemorrhage remains elusive. PMID:26213797

  4. The immediate response of jejunal mucosa to small bowel heterotopic allotransplatation in rats.

    PubMed

    Jonecová, Z; Tóth, Š; Varga, J; Staško, P; Kovalčinová, B; Maretta, M; Veselá, J

    2014-02-01

    The course of histopathological alterations within jejunal graft architecture during the initial adaptation phase in the host body was investigated. Graft tissues were compared to the intestinal tissues of the recipients. This study demonstrates: (1) renewal of intestinal epithelial lining in the graft biopsies during initial hours after transplantation is more likely caused by migration and extension of remaining epithelial cells than by their increased mitotic division. (2) Distinct decrease in histopathological injury was observed in transplanted grafts after 6h, but the morphometrical parameters, particularly villus height and wall thickness, remained altered. (3) Significant decrease in apoptotic cell death in the epithelial lining within 6h of graft recirculation was accompanied by no effect on apoptosis levels of the cells in lamina propria connective tissue. (4) Although the apoptosis level in the connective tissue cells was not modulated in the grafts within the first hour after transplantation, caspase-3 dependent apoptosis was decreased significantly. PMID:24079856

  5. Filling in of Fraunhofer and gas-absorption lines in sky spectra as caused by rotational Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Sioris, C E; Evans, W F

    1999-04-20

    A line-by-line radiative-transfer model to quantify the Ring effect as caused by rotational Raman scattering has been developed for the 310-550-nm spectral interval. The solar zenith angle and the resolution are key input parameters, as is the sky spectrum (excluding inelastic atmospheric scattering), which was modeled with MODTRAN 3.5. The filling in is modeled for ground-based viewing geometry and includes surface reflection and single inelastic scattering. It is shown that O2 contributes half of the filling in of N2. A strong inverse relationship with wavelength is noted in the filling in. A comparison with observations shows moderate agreement. The largest filling in occurs in the Ca II K and H lines. PMID:18319844

  6. Ileal impaction and jejunal enterotomy in a 4-month-old Arabian filly.

    PubMed

    Davis, Heather A; Munsterman, Amelia

    2012-01-01

    A 4-month-old Arabian filly was treated by surgical correction of an ileal impaction. The impaction was resolved through a distal jejunal enterotomy. One-year follow-up showed no post-operative complications secondary to the enterotomy. Jejunal enterotomy may be a surgical option for resolution of an ileal impaction. PMID:22753967

  7. Ileal impaction and jejunal enterotomy in a 4-month-old Arabian filly

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Heather A.; Munsterman, Amelia

    2012-01-01

    A 4-month-old Arabian filly was treated by surgical correction of an ileal impaction. The impaction was resolved through a distal jejunal enterotomy. One-year follow-up showed no post-operative complications secondary to the enterotomy. Jejunal enterotomy may be a surgical option for resolution of an ileal impaction. PMID:22753967

  8. Embolization of a Jejunal Artery Pseudoaneurysm via Collateral Vessels.

    PubMed

    Breguet, Romain; Pupulim, Lawrence F; Terraz, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Visceral artery pseudoaneurysms are rare and only few cases have been reported. They are considered to be life threatening in case of rupture. Rapid treatment is mandatory and endovascular procedure is recommended as the treatment of choice. Occasionally, endovascular approach is difficult to achieve, owing to unusual vascular anatomy. Whenever it is the case, an alternative method has to be considered. We report the case of a jejunal artery pseudoaneurysm that required an access via collateral vessels to accomplish complete occlusion in a 34-year-old woman who presented with a sudden epigastric pain 14 days after a cephalic duodenopancreatectomy. PMID:26798541

  9. Embolization of a Jejunal Artery Pseudoaneurysm via Collateral Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Breguet, Romain; Pupulim, Lawrence F.; Terraz, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Visceral artery pseudoaneurysms are rare and only few cases have been reported. They are considered to be life threatening in case of rupture. Rapid treatment is mandatory and endovascular procedure is recommended as the treatment of choice. Occasionally, endovascular approach is difficult to achieve, owing to unusual vascular anatomy. Whenever it is the case, an alternative method has to be considered. We report the case of a jejunal artery pseudoaneurysm that required an access via collateral vessels to accomplish complete occlusion in a 34-year-old woman who presented with a sudden epigastric pain 14 days after a cephalic duodenopancreatectomy. PMID:26798541

  10. Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding from a jejunal Dieulafoy lesion

    PubMed Central

    Kozan, Ramazan; Gülen, Merter; Yılmaz, Tonguç Utku; Leventoğlu, Sezai; Yılmaz, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Dieulafoy lesion should be considered in massive gastrointestinal bleeding that may be difficult to localize. If the endoscopic and angiographic approaches fail, surgery must be considered according to the patient’s clinical condition within an appropriate time. Although mostly seen in the stomach of old male patients with co-morbidities, here we presented a Dieulafoy lesion in the jejunum of a 21-year-old female patient without any significant comorbidity. After endoscopic and angiographic attempts, surgical resection with the help of intraoperative endoscopy was performed. It was shown that perioperative endoscopy may reveal the localization of jejunal bleedings and may guide the definitive treatment. PMID:25931935

  11. Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding from a jejunal Dieulafoy lesion.

    PubMed

    Kozan, Ramazan; Gülen, Merter; Yılmaz, Tonguç Utku; Leventoğlu, Sezai; Yılmaz, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Dieulafoy lesion should be considered in massive gastrointestinal bleeding that may be difficult to localize. If the endoscopic and angiographic approaches fail, surgery must be considered according to the patient's clinical condition within an appropriate time. Although mostly seen in the stomach of old male patients with co-morbidities, here we presented a Dieulafoy lesion in the jejunum of a 21-year-old female patient without any significant comorbidity. After endoscopic and angiographic attempts, surgical resection with the help of intraoperative endoscopy was performed. It was shown that perioperative endoscopy may reveal the localization of jejunal bleedings and may guide the definitive treatment. PMID:25931935

  12. Jejunal microflora in malnourished Gambian children.

    PubMed Central

    Heyworth, B; Brown, J

    1975-01-01

    Growth of bacteria greater than 10-5 organisms/ml was found in 22 children, of whom 17 gave a histroy of chronic diarrhoea. The other 8 children had either no diarrhoea or where having an acute attack lasting for a few days. In those with chronic diarrhoea, Esch. coli, bacteroides, and enterococci tended to occur more frequently, whereas streptococci occurred more frequently in those with acute diarrhoea. Bacilli, staphylococci, micrococci, klebsiellas, pseudomonads, and candidas often occurred in both groups and in large numbers in those with chronic diarrhoea. This confirms previous reports in other parts of the world that some children with malnutrition have considerable bacterial contamination of the jejunum, and that this may be of aetiological significance as a cause of much of the diarrhoea seen in malnourished children. It is possible too that this may be important in the pathogenesis of malnutrition. The presence of intestinal parasites in these malnourished children is also noted. A double-blind trial in the use of antibiotics in this condition is advocated to determine whether it is possible to break the diarrhoea-malabsorption-malnutrition cycle. At the same time the effect of simply removing the child to a more sanitary environment, together with an estimate of the natural clearance of bacteria from the upper intestine, should be evaluated. PMID:1092272

  13. Jejunal and ileal absorption of oxprenolol in man: influence of nutrients and digestive secretions on jejunal absorption and systemic availability.

    PubMed Central

    Godbillon, J; Vidon, N; Palma, R; Pfeiffer, A; Franchisseur, C; Bovet, M; Gosset, G; Bernier, J J; Hirtz, J

    1987-01-01

    1 Study I evaluated the absorption of oxprenolol in the ileum, compared to jejunum, in healthy volunteers by an intestinal perfusion technique. Around 80 mg of drug were delivered as a saline solution directly in the small bowel. 2 Samples taken 30 cm distally to the site of perfusion showed that 63% of perfused oxprenolol was absorbed in the jejunum and 48% in the ileum; the differences were significant. 3 The plasma concentration-time profiles were similar for the two perfusions. The AUC and Cmax values of free and conjugated oxprenolol for the jejunal perfusion were significantly lower than those of ileum. They showed large but consistent intersubject variations in the two treatments. 4 Study II investigated, using the same technique, the influence of nutrients and digestive secretions on jejunal absorption and systemic availability of this drug. A saline (in treatments A and B) or a nutrient (in treatment C) solution containing oxprenolol was perfused into the jejunum below a balloon either inflated (A) or deflated (B and C). 5 The disappearance rate of oxprenolol from the jejunum was unaffected by endogenous secretions. The mean amount of drug absorbed along a 30-cm jejunal segment accounted for 52 (A) and 57% (B) of the total amount perfused. The intestinal absorption rate was markedly increased in the presence of nutrients (mean amount absorbed 96% for C). 6 The change in the rate of disappearance from the intestine had no effect on the systemic availability of oxprenolol (mean AUC values 8740, 8250 and 8020 nmol l-1 h for A, B and C, respectively) or its elimination from plasma.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3663450

  14. Improved cell line IPEC-J2, characterized as a model for porcine jejunal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewski, Silke S; Richter, Jan F; Krug, Susanne M; Jebautzke, Britta; Lee, In-Fah M; Rieger, Juliane; Sachtleben, Monika; Bondzio, Angelika; Schulzke, Jörg D; Fromm, Michael; Günzel, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Cell lines matching the source epithelium are indispensable for investigating porcine intestinal transport and barrier properties on a subcellular or molecular level and furthermore help to reduce animal usage. The porcine jejunal cell line IPEC-J2 is established as an in vitro model for porcine infection studies but exhibits atypically high transepithelial resistances (TER) and only low active transport rates so that the effect of nutritional factors cannot be reliably investigated. This study aimed to properly remodel IPEC-J2 and then to re-characterize these cells regarding epithelial architecture, expression of barrier-relevant tight junction (TJ) proteins, adequate TER and transport function, and reaction to secretagogues. For this, IPEC-J2 monolayers were cultured on permeable supports, either under conventional (fetal bovine serum, FBS) or species-specific (porcine serum, PS) conditions. Porcine jejunal mucosa was analyzed for comparison. Main results were that under PS conditions (IPEC-J2/PS), compared to conventional FBS culture (IPEC-J2/FBS), the cell height increased 6-fold while the cell diameter was reduced by 50%. The apical cell membrane of IPEC-J2/PS exhibited typical microvilli. Most importantly, PS caused a one order of magnitude reduction of TER and of trans- and paracellular resistance, and a 2-fold increase in secretory response to forskolin when compared to FBS condition. TJ ultrastructure and appearance of TJ proteins changed dramatically in IPEC-J2/PS. Most parameters measured under PS conditions were much closer to those of typical pig jejunocytes than ever reported since the cell line's initial establishment in 1989. In conclusion, IPEC-J2, if cultured under defined species-specific conditions, forms a suitable model for investigating porcine paracellular intestinal barrier function. PMID:24260272

  15. Improved Cell Line IPEC-J2, Characterized as a Model for Porcine Jejunal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewski, Silke S.; Richter, Jan F.; Krug, Susanne M.; Jebautzke, Britta; Lee, In-Fah M.; Rieger, Juliane; Sachtleben, Monika; Bondzio, Angelika; Schulzke, Jörg D.; Fromm, Michael; Günzel, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Cell lines matching the source epithelium are indispensable for investigating porcine intestinal transport and barrier properties on a subcellular or molecular level and furthermore help to reduce animal usage. The porcine jejunal cell line IPEC-J2 is established as an in vitro model for porcine infection studies but exhibits atypically high transepithelial resistances (TER) and only low active transport rates so that the effect of nutritional factors cannot be reliably investigated. This study aimed to properly remodel IPEC-J2 and then to re-characterize these cells regarding epithelial architecture, expression of barrier-relevant tight junction (TJ) proteins, adequate TER and transport function, and reaction to secretagogues. For this, IPEC-J2 monolayers were cultured on permeable supports, either under conventional (fetal bovine serum, FBS) or species-specific (porcine serum, PS) conditions. Porcine jejunal mucosa was analyzed for comparison. Main results were that under PS conditions (IPEC-J2/PS), compared to conventional FBS culture (IPEC-J2/FBS), the cell height increased 6-fold while the cell diameter was reduced by 50%. The apical cell membrane of IPEC-J2/PS exhibited typical microvilli. Most importantly, PS caused a one order of magnitude reduction of TER and of trans- and paracellular resistance, and a 2-fold increase in secretory response to forskolin when compared to FBS condition. TJ ultrastructure and appearance of TJ proteins changed dramatically in IPEC-J2/PS. Most parameters measured under PS conditions were much closer to those of typical pig jejunocytes than ever reported since the cell line’s initial establishment in 1989. In conclusion, IPEC-J2, if cultured under defined species-specific conditions, forms a suitable model for investigating porcine paracellular intestinal barrier function. PMID:24260272

  16. BBSO/NST Observations of the Sudden Differential Rotation of a Sunspot Caused by a Major Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Deng, Na; Cao, Wenda; Lee, Jeongwoo; Hudson, Hugh S.; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Jiasheng; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2016-05-01

    Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic field visible on the solar surface (photosphere), from which the field extends high into the corona. Complex plasma motions that drag field in the photosphere can build up free energy in the corona that powers solar eruptions. It is known that solar flares and the often associated coronal ejections (CMEs) can produce various radiations in the low atmosphere. However, it was considered implausible that disturbances created in the tenuous corona would cause a direct perturbation of the dense photosphere involving bulk motion. Here we report the sudden rotational motion of a sunspot clearly induced by a major solar flare (SOL2015-06-22T18:23 M6.6), using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). It is particularly striking that the rotation is not uniform over the sunspot: as the flare ribbon sweeps across, its different portions accelerate (up to ~50 degree per hour) at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. The intensity and magnetic field of the sunspot also change significantly associated with the flare. Our results reveal an intrinsic relationship between the photospheric plasma bulk motions and coronal energy release, with direct consequences for our understanding of energy and momentum balance in the flare/CME phenomenon. This work is mainly supported by NASA grants NNX13AF76G and NNX13AG13G (LWS), and NNX16AF72G, and NSF grants AGS 1250818 and 1408703.

  17. Effects of spaceflight on the proliferation of jejunal mucosal cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Robert W.; Moeller, C. L.; Sawyer, Heywood R.; Smirnov, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that the generalized, whole body decrease in synthetic activity due to microgravity conditions encountered during spaceflight would be demonstrable in cells and tissues characterized by a rapid rate of turnover. Jejunal mucosal cells were chosen as a model since these cells are among the most rapidly proliferating in the body. Accordingly, the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts of Lieberkuhn in each of 5 rats flown on the COSMOS 2044 mission were compared to the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts in rats included in each of 3 ground control groups (i.e., vivarium, synchronous and caudal-elevated). No significant difference (p greater than .05) was detected in mitotic indices between the flight and vivarium group. Although the ability of jejunal mucosal cells to divide by mitosis was not impaired in flight group, there was, however, a reduction in the length of villi and depth of crypts. The concommitant reduction in villus length and crypth depth in the flight group probably reflects changes in connective tissue components within the core of villi.

  18. The effects of progressive anemia on jejunal mucosal and serosal tissue oxygenation in pigs.

    PubMed

    Haisjackl, M; Luz, G; Sparr, H; Germann, R; Salak, N; Friesenecker, B; Deusch, E; Meusburger, S; Hasibeder, W

    1997-03-01

    Anemia may promote intestinal hypoxia. We studied the effects of progressive isovolemic hemodilution on jejunal mucosal (Po2muc), and serosal tissue oxygen tension (Po2ser, Clark-type surface electrodes), mucosal microvascular hemoglobin oxygen saturation (Hbo2muc), and hematocrit (Hctmuc; tissue reflectance spectophotometry) in a jejunal segment. Twelve domestic pigs were anesthetized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated. Laparatomy was performed, arterial supply of a jejunal segment isolated, and constant pressure pump perfused. Seven animals were progressively hemodiluted to systemic hematocrits (Hctsys) of 20%, 15%, 10%, and 6%. Baseline for Po2muc, Po2ser and Hbo2muc was 23.5 +/- 2.1 mm Hg, 57.5 +/- 4 mm Hg, and 47.0% +/- 6.4% which were not different from the five controls. Despite a significant increase in jejunal blood flow, jejunal oxygen delivery decreased and oxygen extraction ratio increased significantly at Hctsys 10% and 6%. Po2ser decreased significantly below or at Hctsys of 15%, whereas Po2muc and Hbo2muc were maintained to Hctsys of 10%, but less than 10% Hbo2muc and mesenteric venous pH decreased significantly, implying that physiological limits of jejunal microvascular adaptation to severe anemia were reached. Decrease of Hctmuc was less pronounced than Hctsys. In conclusion, redistribution of jejunal blood flow and an increase in the ratio of mucosal to systemic hematocrit are the main mechanisms maintaining mucosal oxygen supply during progressive anemia. PMID:9052297

  19. Laparoscopic gastro-jejunal anastomosis using novel r2 deflectable instruments in an ex vivo model.

    PubMed

    Zdichavsky, Marty; Krautwald, Martina; Feilitzsch, Maximilian V; Wichmann, Dörte; Königsrainer, Alfred; Schurr, Marc Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Objective A novel 5 mm steerable instrument system (r2-DRIVE) was developed with active tip deflection and tip and shaft rotation. The feasibility and training effect of the r2 instruments were determined in a phantom model. Material and methods Experienced laparoscopic surgeons and untrained novices performed laparoscopic gastro-jejunal anastomoses using porcine tissue and r2 DRIVE-instruments. Mean anastomosis time, anastomosis width and burst pressure were measured. Number of stitches, skipped stitches and dropped needles were counted. Results of trained and untrained subjects were compared. Results Mean time for suturing decreased rapidly for all participants, but was more evident for untrained persons. After five anastomoses no relevant improvement in anastomotic time was seen for the skilled group. The ease of use, efficacy of manipulation and swift training effect with the novel r2 instruments for both experienced laparoscopic surgeons and untrained non-surgeons could be demonstrated and after few cases stable anastomosis times and a fast learning curve were obtained. Conclusions This study demonstrates the ease of use, efficacy of manipulation and swift training effect with the novel r2 instruments for both experienced laparoscopic surgeons and untrained non-surgeons. After few cases stable anastomosis times and a fast learning curve were obtained. PMID:26635060

  20. Jejunal Perfusion of Simple and Conjugated Folates in Tropical Sprue

    PubMed Central

    Corcino, José J.; Reisenauer, Ann M.; Halsted, Charles H.

    1976-01-01

    Absorption of labeled simple 3′,5′,9′-3H pteroylmonoglutamate, ([3H]PG-1) and conjugated pteroyl-μ[14C]glutamyl-γ-hexaglutamate, ([14C]PG-7) folates was assessed in six patients with tropical sprue, before and after 6 mo of treatment, utilizing jejunal perfusion and urinary recovery techniques. Degradation products of [14C]PG-7 which were produced during perfusion were identified by DEAE-cellulose column chromatography. Jejunal mucosal activities of folate conjugase, lactase, sucrase, and maltase were measured in every patient. Malabsorption of both [3H]PG-1 and [14C]PG-7 was found in every untreated patient, with significant improvement after therapy. The urinary excretion of 3H and 14C paralleled the luminal disappearance of both isotopes. The chromatographic patterns of intraluminal degradation products of [14C]PG-7 obtained during perfusion did not differ from those previously found in normal subjects and were similar in studies performed before and after treatment. The activity of folate conjugase was increased in the mucosa of the untreated patients when compared to the post-treatment levels while the activities of mucosal lactase, sucrase, and maltase were originally low and increased significantly after therapy. These observations suggest that folate conjugase originates at a different mucosal locus than the brush border disaccharidases, and are consistent with previous evidence that folate conjugase is an intracellular enzyme. The present studies have demonstrated unequivocal malabsorption of both simple and conjugated folates in tropical sprue. In tropical sprue, folate malabsorption is the reflection of impaired folate transport and not of impaired hydrolysis. PMID:16695965

  1. FIXING JEJUNAL MANEUVER TO PREVENT PETERSEN HERNIA IN GASTRIC BYPASS

    PubMed Central

    MURAD-JUNIOR, Abdon José; SCHEIBE, Christian Lamar; CAMPELO, Giuliano Peixoto; de LIMA, Roclides Castro; MURAD, Lucianne Maria Moraes Rêgo Pereira; dos SANTOS, Eduardo Pachu Raia; RAMOS, Almino Cardoso; VALADÃO, José Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    Background : Among Roux-en-Y gastric bypass complications is the occurrence of intestinal obstruction by the appearance of internal hernias, which may occur in Petersen space or the opening in mesenteric enteroenteroanastomosis. Aim : To evaluate the efficiency and safety in performing a fixing jejunal maneuver in the transverse mesocolon to prevent internal hernia formation in Petersen space. Method : Two surgical points between the jejunum and the transverse mesocolon, being 5 cm and 10 cm from duodenojejunal angle are made. In all patients was left Petersen space open and closing the opening of the mesenteric enteroenteroanastomosis. Results : Among 52 operated patients, 35 were women (67.3%). The age ranged 18-63 years, mean 39.2 years. BMI ranged from 35 to 56 kg/m2 (mean 40.5 kg/m2). Mean follow-up was 15.1 months (12-18 months). The operative time ranged from 68-138 min. There were no intraoperative complications, and there were no major postoperative complications and no reoperations. The hospital stay ranged from 2-3 days. During the follow-up, no one patient developed suspect clinical presentation of internal hernia. Follow-up in nine patients (17.3%) showed asymptomatic cholelithiasis and underwent elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. During these procedures were verified the Petersen space and jejunal fixation. In all nine, there was no herniation of the jejunum to the right side in Petersen space. Conclusion : The fixation of the first part of the jejunum to left side of the transverse mesocolon is safe and effective to prevent internal Petersen hernia in RYGB postoperatively in the short and medium term. It may be interesting alternative to closing the Petersen space. PMID:26537279

  2. Percutaneous Retrograde Sclerotherapy for Refractory Bleeding of Jejunal Varices: Direct Injection via Superficial Epigastric Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Manabu Nakata, Waka; Isoda, Norio Yoshizawa, Mitsuyo; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2012-02-15

    Small-bowel varices are rare and almost always occur in cases with portal hypertension. We encountered a patient with bleeding jejunal varices due to liver cirrhosis. Percutaneous retrograde sclerotherapy was performed via the superficial epigastric vein. Melena disappeared immediately after treatment. Disappearance of jejunal varices was confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. After 24 months of follow-up, no recurrent melena was observed.

  3. [Usefulness of endoscopically guided nasogastric-jejunal feeding tube placement in a case of aspiration pneumonia due to postgastrectomy].

    PubMed

    Tamura, Kosei; Totsuka, Osamu; Tamura, Jun'ichi

    2015-01-01

    A 79-year-old man with a history of gastrectomy with Billroth II reconstruction 27 years previously was admitted to our hospital due to recurrent pneumonia. Because he had dysphagia and had frequently developed pneumonia over the course of a year, enteral nutrition via nasogastric tube was initiated approximately six months before admission. The clinical and computed tomography findings showed that the cause of pneumonia was aspiration of tube feeding nutrients due to gastroesophageal reflux. To prevent gastroesophageal reflux, he was continuously kept in a 30-degree or greater reclining position. However, gastroesophageal reflux was seen at an injection rate of 50 ml/h or greater. After we inserted a nasogastric-jejunal feeding tube guided by endoscopy, gastroesophageal reflux, dumping syndrome and diarrhea were not seen up to an injection rate of 300 ml/h. Endoscopically guided nasogastric-jejunal feeding tube placement is a simple method and may be useful for patients with aspiration pneumonia due to postgastrectomy. Moreover, long-term postgastrectomy patients appear to tolerate the postopyloric injection of enteral nutrition. Because the number of elderly patients who have dysphagia with postgastrectomy is increasing, these findings provide a basis for treatment in elderly medical settings. PMID:26700781

  4. [INTESTINAL NON-ROTATION AS CAUSE OF RECURRENT ABDOMINAL PAIN:REPORT OF A CASE AND LITERATURE REVIEW

    PubMed

    García Barrionuevo, Alcides; Castro De La Mata Guerra, Rodrigo; García; Rodríguez Castro, Manuel; Ganoza Arenas, Carmela

    2000-01-01

    A 32 years old male patient with recurrent abdominal pain was admitted to the hospital with the clinical picture of intestinal obstruction. An emergency laparotomy was performed and the diagnosis of intestinal non-rotation and cecum volvulus was done. Right hemicolectomy and terminoterminal ileocolic anastomosis was performed. Pathology showed ischemia and necrosis in the resected segment. Clinical presentation, diagnosis methods and therapeutic options of intestinal malrotation and non-rotation are discussed. PMID:12140578

  5. Lattice rotation caused by wedge indentation of a single crystal: Dislocation dynamics compared to crystal plasticity simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunhe; Gao, Yanfei; Nicola, Lucia

    2014-08-01

    A number of recent experimental efforts such as electron back scattering technique and three-dimensional X-ray structural microscopy have revealed the intriguing formation of sectors of lattice rotation fields under indentation. In the case of wedge indentation, the in-plane rotation changes sign from one sector to another. Although the lattice rotation fields can be used to compute the geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities, it remains unclear how these sectors can be related to the hardness and therefore to the indentation size effects, i.e., the increase of indentation hardness with the decrease of indentation depth. Crystal plasticity simulations in this work reproduce the experimental findings at large indentation depth. On the contrary, discrete dislocation plasticity can only capture the sectors found experimentally when there is a high obstacle density and large obstacle strength. Obstacle density and strength, however, have little effect on the hardness. In other words, there is no one-to-one correspondence between the lattice rotation patterns and the indentation size effects. The presence of obstacles favors the dislocation arrangements that lead to the experimentally found rotation sectors. Using the similarity solutions of indentation fields and the solution of localized deformation fields near a stationary crack, a simple model is developed that explains the dislocation pattern evolution, its relationship to the lattice misorientations, and more importantly its dependence on obstacles.

  6. The visual binary AG Tri in β Pictoris association: can a debris disc cause very different rotation periods of its components?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Sergio; Muro Serrano, Miguel; Artemenko, Svetlana; Bailey, John I.; Savushkin, Alexander; Nelson, Robert H.

    2015-12-01

    We measure the photometric rotation periods of the components of multiple systems in young stellar associations to investigate the causes of the observed rotation period dispersion. We present the case of the wide binary AG Tri in the 23-Myr young β Pictoris Association consisting of K4 + M1 dwarfs. Our multi-band, multi-season photometric monitoring allowed us to measure the rotation periods of both components PA = 12.4d and PB = 4.66d, to detect a prominent magnetic activity in the photosphere, likely responsible for the measured radial velocity variations, and for the first time, a flare event on the M1 component AG Tri B. We investigate either the possibility that the faster rotating component may have suffered an enhanced primordial disc dispersal, starting its PMS spin-up earlier than the slower rotating component, or the possibility that the formation of a debris disc may have prevented AG Tri A from gaining part of the angular momentum from the accreting disc.

  7. On the determination of heliographic positions and rotation velocities of sunspots. II - Systematic effects caused by the Wilson depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balthasar, H.; Woehl, H.

    1983-10-01

    Using sunspot positions of small sunspots observed at Debrecen and Locarno as well as positions of recurrent sunspots taken from the Greenwich Photoheliographic Results (1940-1976) the influence of the Wilson depression on the rotation velocities was investigated. It was found that the Wilson depression can be determined by minimizing errors of the rotation velocities or minimizing the differences of rotation velocities determined from disk passages and central meridian passages. The Wilson depressions found were between 765 km and 2500 km for the first sample while they were between 0 km and several 1000 km for the second sample. The averaged Wilson depression for the second sample is between 500 km and 965 km depending on the reduction method. A dependence of the Wilson depression on the age of the spots investigated seems not to exist.

  8. Tilted geostrophic convection in icy world oceans caused by the horizontal component of the planetary rotation vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Coriolis force provides dominant control over the motion of atmospheres and oceans, both on Earth and on many other worlds. At any point on a planet's surface, the planetary rotation vector has both a vertical component and a horizontal (north-south) component. We typically ignore the horizontal component, which is justified if vertical motions are hydrostatic and the fluid is relatively shallow. Neither of these conditions is true for hydrothermal convection within the thick ocean layers of Europa and other icy worlds. Using the MITGCM ocean model, we explore the behavior of buoyant hydrothermal plumes in a deep unstratified ocean, including both components of the planetary rotation vector. We find that warm water does not rise vertically: instead, it spirals along the axis of planetary rotation. Eddies form which are tilted with respect to the local vertical, but parallel to the rotation axis: turbulent exchange of heat between these canted eddies carries the warm water toward the surface. This is not an entirely new idea: however, the implications for icy worlds have not been previously discussed. We observe that when these tilted plumes heat the ice layer above the ocean, the heating "footprint" of these tilted plumes will be more circular near the pole, more ellipsoidal in the tropics. If surface features of the ice crust were created by plume heating, their shapes ought to show consistent latitude trends. Also, we observe that if warm fluid were totally constrained to move along the planetary rotation axis, geothermal heat generated in the icy world's interior could never reach the ice crust near the equator. (For Europa, the "forbidden zone" could extend as far as +/- 20-25° latitude.) In practice, we find that turbulent eddies do allow heat to move perpendicular to the rotation vector, so the "forbidden zone" is not a tight constraint; still, it may affect the overall heating pattern of icy world crusts. Snapshot of ascent of buoyant hydrothermal plume

  9. Reconstruction with Jejunal Pouch after Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Namikawa, Tsutomu; Munekage, Eri; Munekage, Masaya; Maeda, Hiromichi; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Michiya; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2016-06-01

    The construction of a gastric substitute pouch after gastrectomy for gastric cancer has been proposed to help ameliorate postprandial symptoms and nutritional performance. Adequate reconstruction after gastrectomy is an important issue, because postoperative patient quality of life (QOL) primarily depends on the reconstruction method. To this end, jejunal pouch (JP) reconstructions were developed to improve the patient's eating capacity and QOL by creating large reservoirs with improved reflux barriers to prevent esophagitis and residual gastritis. It is important that such reconstructions also preserve blood and extrinsic neural integrity for maintaining pouch function, because JP motility is associated directly with QOL. Some problems remain to be resolved with the JP reconstructions method including gastrointestinal motility, which plays a major role in food transfer, digestion, and absorption of nutrients. Further studies including basic research and larger prospective randomized control trials are also needed to obtain definitive results. With persistent innovations in surgical techniques, JP after gastrectomy could become a safe and preferable reconstructive modality to improve patient QOL after gastrectomy. PMID:27305882

  10. Isolated Jejunal Perforation Following Bicycle Handlebar Injury in Adults: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Neofytou, Kyriakos; Michailidou, Maria; Petrou, Athanasios; Loizou, Sakis; Andreou, Charalampos

    2013-01-01

    The small intestine is the third in frequency intraperitoneal organ which is injured after blunt trauma of the abdomen. In most of the cases, this type of injuries is accompanied by other injuries, which make it more difficult to diagnose. Failure of diagnosis and delay in treating these injuries significantly increase the morbidity and mortality of these patients. Abdominal visceral injuries after flipping the handlebar of the bike are common in children. Such injuries can cause injury to both solid and hollow abdominal viscera. Unlike children, adults' abdominal visceral injuries after flipping the bike's handlebar are extremely rare. A 25-year-old man was admitted to our department due to progressively abdominal pain after an accident with the handlebar of his bike. The subsequent CT scan after per os administration of contrast medium revealed the presence of free intraperitoneal contrast. It is a rare case of jejunal perforation after flipping the handlebar of the bicycle which was treated by partial removal of the injured part of jejunum and end-to-end anastomosis. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time we describe such an injury with this mechanism to an adult. PMID:23984116

  11. Ex vivo absorption of thymol and thymol-β-D-glucopyranoside in piglet everted jejunal segments.

    PubMed

    Petrujkić, Branko T; Sedej, Ivana; Beier, Ross C; Anderson, Robin C; Harvey, Roger B; Epps, Sharon V R; Stipanovic, Robert D; Krueger, Nathan A; Nisbet, David J

    2013-04-17

    Food-producing animals are reservoirs of Campylobacter, a leading bacterial cause of human foodborne illness. The natural product thymol can reduce the survivability of Campylobacter, but its rapid absorption in the proximal gastrointestinal tract may preclude its use as a feed additive to reduce intestinal colonization of these pathogens. This work examined the ex vivo absorption of thymol and thymol-β-d-glucopyranoside in everted porcine jejunal segments, as the latter was hypothesized to be more resistant to absorption. A modified gas chromatography and extraction method was developed to determine 1.0-500 mg/L thymol. From 1 and 3 mM solutions, 0.293 ± 0.04 and 0.898 ± 0.212 mM thymol, respectively, p = 0.0347, were absorbed, and 0.125 ± 0.041 and 0.317 ± 0.143 mM thymol-β-d-glucopyranoside, respectively, p = 0.0892, were absorbed. Results indicate that thymol-β-d-glucopyranoside was absorbed 2.3 to 2.8 times less effectively than thymol, thus providing evidence that thymol-β-d-glucopyranoside may potentially be used as a feed additive to transport thymol to the piglet lower gut. PMID:23551201

  12. Lysine fluxes across the jejunal epithelium in lysinuric protein intolerance.

    PubMed

    Desjeux, J F; Simell, R O; Dumontier, A M; Perheentupa, J

    1980-06-01

    Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI) is one of a group of genetic diseases in which intestinal absorption of the diamino acids lysine, arginine, and ornithine is impaired. In LPI, the clinical symptoms are more severe than in the kindred disorders. The mechanism of lysine absorption was, therefore, investigated in vitro on peroral jejunal biopsy specimens in seven patients with LPI and 27 controls. The lysine concentration ratio between cell compartment and medium was significantly higher in the LPI group (mean+/-SEM, 7.17+/-0.60) than in the controls (5.44+/-0.51). This was also true for the intracellular Na concentration (LPI, 73.6+/-10.8 mM; controls 42.3+/-3.7 mM). The rate of unidirectional influx of lysine across the luminal membrane was Na dependent and was the same in the two groups. In the absence of an electrochemical gradient, net transepithelial lysine secretion was observed in LPI. This was entirely the result of a 60% reduction of the unidirectional flux from mucosa to serosa. Calculation of unidirectional fluxes revealed the most striking difference at the basolateral membrane, where the flux from cells to serosa was reduced by 62% and the corresponding permeability coefficient reduced by 71%. A progressive reduction in short-circuit current appeared in the epithelia of all four patients with LPI tested after addition of 3 mM lysine. Thus, LPI appears to be the first disease in which a genetically determined transport defect has been demonstrated at the basolateral membrane. PMID:6773985

  13. Successful percutaneous angioembolisation of bleeding jejunal varix by acrylate glue and coils

    PubMed Central

    Haq, Tanveer Ul; AlQamari, Nauman; Sayani, Raza; Hilal, Kiran

    2013-01-01

    Portal hypertension is a common disease worldwide. One of its rare complications is bleeding jejunal varices which is usually asymptomatic and may present with gastrointestinal bleeding. We present a case of a jejunal bleeding that was successfully embolised with acrylate glue and embolisation coils. A middle-aged woman with a history of multiple abdominal surgeries for adenocarcinoma of right ovary, presented to us with multiple episodes of haematochezia. On a CT scan of the abdomen, she was diagnosed with chronic liver disease with portal hypertension, multiple varices at porto-systemic anastomosis and ectopic jejunal varix. She was treated by interventional radiologists by percutaneous embolisation of bleeding varix using glue and embolisation coils through a portal venous approach. PMID:24158303

  14. Challenges of banding jejunal varices in an 8-year-old child

    PubMed Central

    Belsha, Dalia; Thomson, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Endoscoic variceal ligation (EVL) by the application of bands on small bowel varices is a relatively rare procedure in gastroenterology and hepatology. There are no previously reported paediatric cases of EVL for jejunal varices. We report a case of an eight-year-old male patient with a complex surgical background leading to jejunal varices and short bowel syndrome, presenting with obscure but profound acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Wireless capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) confirmed jejunal varices as the source of bleeding. The commercially available variceal banding devices are not long enough to be used either with DBE or with push enteroscopes. With the use of an operating gastroscope, four bands were placed successfully on the afferent and efferent ends of the leads of the 2 of the varices. Initial hemostasis was achieved with obliteration of the varices after three separate applications. This case illustrates the feasibility of achieving initial hemostasis in the pediatric population. PMID:26722617

  15. Challenges of banding jejunal varices in an 8-year-old child.

    PubMed

    Belsha, Dalia; Thomson, Mike

    2015-12-25

    Endoscoic variceal ligation (EVL) by the application of bands on small bowel varices is a relatively rare procedure in gastroenterology and hepatology. There are no previously reported paediatric cases of EVL for jejunal varices. We report a case of an eight-year-old male patient with a complex surgical background leading to jejunal varices and short bowel syndrome, presenting with obscure but profound acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Wireless capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) confirmed jejunal varices as the source of bleeding. The commercially available variceal banding devices are not long enough to be used either with DBE or with push enteroscopes. With the use of an operating gastroscope, four bands were placed successfully on the afferent and efferent ends of the leads of the 2 of the varices. Initial hemostasis was achieved with obliteration of the varices after three separate applications. This case illustrates the feasibility of achieving initial hemostasis in the pediatric population. PMID:26722617

  16. Somatostatinoma of the first jejunal loop in a patient with neurofibromatosis von Recklinghausen and bilateral pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Constantinoiu, Silviu; Constantin, Adrian; Predescu, Dragos; Iosif, Cristina; Hoara, Petre; Achim, Florin; Surugiu, Paul; Bacanu, Florin; Cociu, Luminita

    2012-09-01

    Somatostatinoma is a rare neuroendocrine tumor which especially develops in the pancreas. There are few communicated cases about extra-pancreatic localization, having as a particularity the absence of somatostatin hypersecretion syndrome and frequent association with von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis. We present the case of a 42-year old patient with Von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis admitted in our clinic with a chronic upper digestive obstruction syndrome. The presence of a first jejunal loop somatostatinoma was an intraoperative surprising diagnosis that imposed jejunal resection and association of complementary specific treatment. Despite the therapeutic correct management, the status of the patient deteriorated very fast, confirming the aggressiveness of this neoplasia. PMID:22819908

  17. Embolization therapy for bleeding from jejunal loop varices due to extrahepatic portal vein obstruction.

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Rika; Yamagami, Takuji; Ishikawa, Masaki; Kajiwara, Kenji; Kakizawa, Hideaki; Hiyama, Eiso; Tashiro, Hirotaka; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Ohge, Hiroki; Awai, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Four patients underwent embolization therapy for hemorrhage from varices in the jejunal loop after choledochojejunostomy existing in hepatopetal collateral veins due to chronic extrahepatic portal vein obstruction through the afferent veins using microcoils and/or n-butyl cyanoacrylate. In all four patients, all afferent veins were successfully embolized and successful hemostasis was achieved without liver dysfunction. However, recurrence of the varices and rebleeding occurred within a year in two patients. Embolization for hemorrhage from varices in the jejunal loop after choledochojejunostomy through afferent veins is acceptable in terms of safety and is useful to achieve hemostasis in emergency circumstances. PMID:26330264

  18. Early immune response following Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium infection in porcine jejunal gut loops.

    PubMed

    Meurens, François; Berri, Mustapha; Auray, Gael; Melo, Sandrine; Levast, Benoît; Virlogeux-Payant, Isabelle; Chevaleyre, Claire; Gerdts, Volker; Salmon, Henri

    2009-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium, commonly called S. Typhimurium, can cause intestinal infections in humans and various animal species such as swine. To analyze the host response to Salmonella infection in the pig we used an in vivo gut loop model, which allows the analysis of multiple immune responses within the same animal. Four jejunal gut-loops were each inoculated with 3 x 10(8) cfu of S. Typhimurium in 3 one-month-old piglets and mRNA expressions of various cytokines, chemokines, transcription factors, antimicrobial peptides, toll like and chemokine receptors were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR in the Peyer's patch and the gut wall after 24 h. Several genes such as the newly cloned CCRL1/CCX-CKR were assessed for the first time in the pig at the mRNA level. Pro-inflammatory and T-helper type-1 (Th1) cytokine mRNA were expressed at higher levels in infected compared to non-infected control loops. Similarly, some B cell activation genes, NOD2 and toll like receptor 2 and 4 transcripts were more expressed in both tissues while TLR5 mRNA was down-regulated. Interestingly, CCL25 mRNA expression as well as the mRNA expressions of its receptors CCR9 and CCRL1 were decreased both in the Peyer's patch and gut wall suggesting a potential Salmonella strategy to reduce lymphocyte homing to the intestine. In conclusion, these results provide insight into the porcine innate mucosal immune response to infection with entero-invasive microorganisms such as S. Typhimurium. In the future, this knowledge should help in the development of improved prophylactic and therapeutic approaches against porcine intestinal S. Typhimurium infections. PMID:18922229

  19. Dominance of Lactobacillus acidophilus in the Facultative Jejunal Lactobacillus Microbiota of Fistulated Beagles

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yurui; Manninen, Titta J. K.

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacilli were isolated from jejunal chyme from five fistulated beagles. Cultivable lactobacilli varied from 104 to 108 CFU/ml. Seventy-four isolates were identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing and differentiated by repetitive element PCR (Rep-PCR), Lactobacillus acidophilus was dominant, and nearly 80% of 54 isolates shared the same DNA fingerprint pattern. PMID:22843523

  20. Gastrointestinal monitor: automatic titration of jejunal inflow to match peristaltic outflow.

    PubMed

    Moss, Gerald; Posada, Jose G

    2007-06-15

    A peristaltic gradient insures that chyme normally removed from the jejunal feeding site continues to be propelled caudad. The trigger for iatrogenic "feeding intolerance" is the inadvertently overwhelming of the jejunum's peristaltic outflow, even momentarily. Even minimum local stasis can stimulate a vagal reflex response. Motility of the sluggish gut further slows, leading to generalized abdominal distention, malaise, immobility, and impaired respiratory mechanics. Vagal vascular reflexes could explain the 1:1000 incidence of bowel necrosis for jejunally fed patients. We developed a clinical regimen that continuously "checks for residual" at the enteral feeding site, monitoring the adequacy of emptying. The jejunal inflow automatically is titrated to match peristaltic outflow if the latter cannot keep up. Intermittent suction aspirates the feeding catheter into a plastic chamber for 30 s. All swallowed air is removed efficiently within the close confines of the jejunal segment, without wasting digestive juices. The degassed aspirate is returned by gravity with the feedings during the second half of the 1-min cycle, unless incipient excess (>or=20 mL) fluid overflows. Only this relatively small volume of potentially excess fluid is discarded, forestalling the local distention. All patients tolerated immediate feeding without discomfort or abdominal distention, including three that had esophageal resection (including vagotomy) for carcinoma. Postoperative full enteral nutrition can be achieved quickly and safely with minimum attention, despite initially marginal gastrointestinal function. PMID:17509263

  1. Adult jejunojejunal intussusception in the face of jejunal adenocarcinoma: two infrequently encountered entities.

    PubMed

    Elmoghrabi, Adel; Mohamed, Mohamed; McCann, Michael; Sachwani-Daswani, Gul

    2016-01-01

    Adult intussusception and small bowel adenocarcinoma are rarely encountered together. Intussusception should be considered in the differential diagnosis of adult patients presenting with abdominal pain, especially those with unremitting symptoms. Concomitant anaemia should lower the threshold for suspicion of underlying malignancy. Jejunal adenocarcinoma represents a rare, but possible aetiology. PMID:26961563

  2. Multiple Primary Dedifferentiated Liposarcoma of the Jejunal Mesentery: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Vats, Manu; Pandey, Diwakar; Ahlawat, Himani; Akhtar, Azaz; Singh, Nain

    2016-01-01

    Liposarcoma arising primarily from the intestinal mesentery is a rare malignancy. Malignancy is said to be synchronous when there is occurrence of two or more tumours that have not spread from a common site or recurred and show no evidence of metastasis. Multiple synchronous primary liposarcoma of the mesentery is a very unusual clinical finding. Here, we report a rare case of synchronous multiple primary dedifferentiated liposarcoma of jejunal mesentery in a 36-year-old female patient. Radiological investigations aided in making a provisional diagnosis of an ovarian malignancy. A staging laparotomy was performed and general surgeon's help was sought due to the presence of three separate jejunal mesenteric masses of sizes 8x6 cms, 6x6 cms and 25x20 cms respectively. Complete excision of mesenteric masses with one feet of involved jejunum was done and a jejuno-jejunal anastomosis made. The histopathology report was indicative of multiple dedifferentiated liposarcoma of jejunal mesentery. Postoperatively patient received Doxorubicin, Dacarbazine and Ifosfamide based adjuvant chemotherapy in view of poorly differentiated tumour. Patient remains tumour free for the last 12 months of follow up. PMID:26894164

  3. The TRPA1 Activator Allyl Isothiocyanate (AITC) Contracts Human Jejunal Muscle: Pharmacological Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sandor, Zsolt; Dekany, Andras; Kelemen, Dezsö; Bencsik, Timea; Papp, Robert; Bartho, Lorand

    2016-09-01

    The contractile effect of AITC (300 μM) on human jejunal longitudinal strips was inhibited by the TRPA1 antagonist HC 030031 and atropine or scopolamine, but was insensitive to tetrodotoxin, purinoceptor antagonists or capsaicin desensitization. It is concluded that TRPA1 activation stimulates a cholinergic mechanism in a tetrodotoxin-resistant manner. PMID:26928772

  4. Jejunal administration of glucose enhances acyl ghrelin suppression in obese humans.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Robyn A; Sidani, Reem M; Garcia, Anna E; Antoun, Joseph; Isbell, James M; Albaugh, Vance L; Abumrad, Naji N

    2016-07-01

    Ghrelin is a gastric hormone that stimulates hunger and worsens glucose metabolism. Circulating ghrelin is decreased after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery; however, the mechanism(s) underlying this change is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that jejunal nutrient exposure plays a significant role in ghrelin suppression after RYGB. Feeding tubes were placed in the stomach or jejunum in 13 obese subjects to simulate pre-RYGB or post-RYGB glucose exposure to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, respectively, without the confounding effects of caloric restriction, weight loss, and surgical stress. On separate study days, the plasma glucose curves obtained with either gastric or jejunal administration of glucose were replicated with intravenous (iv) infusions of glucose. These "isoglycemic clamps" enabled us to determine the contribution of the GI tract and postabsorptive plasma glucose to acyl ghrelin suppression. Plasma acyl ghrelin levels were suppressed to a greater degree with jejunal glucose administration compared with gastric glucose administration (P < 0.05). Jejunal administration of glucose also resulted in a greater suppression of acyl ghrelin than the corresponding isoglycemic glucose infusion (P ≤ 0.01). However, gastric and isoglycemic iv glucose infusions resulted in similar degrees of acyl ghrelin suppression (P > 0.05). Direct exposure of the proximal jejunum to glucose increases acyl ghrelin suppression independent of circulating glucose levels. The enhanced suppression of acyl ghrelin after RYGB may be due to a nutrient-initiated signal in the jejunum that regulates ghrelin secretion. PMID:27279247

  5. Did clockwise rotation of Antarctica cause the break-up of Gondwanaland? An investigation in the 'deep-keeled cratons' frame for global dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmaston, M. F.

    2012-04-01

    Introduction. The 'deep-keeled cratons' frame for global dynamics is the result of seeking Earth-behaviour answers to the following outside-the-box proposition:- "If cratons have tectospheric keels that reach or approach the 660 km discontinuity, AND the 660 level is an effective barrier to mantle circulation, then obviously (i) when two cratons separate, the upper mantle to put under the nascent ocean must arrive by a circuitous route and, conversely, (ii) if they approach one another, the mantle volume that was in between them must get extruded sideways." Surprisingly it has turned out [1 - 4] that Earth dynamical behaviour for at least the past 150 Ma provides persuasive affirmation of both these expectations and that there is a rational petrological explanation for the otherwise-unexpected immobility of subcratonic material to such depths [5 - 7]. Clockwise rotation of Antarctica? This contribution greatly amplifies my original plate dynamical arguments for suggesting [8] that such rotation is ongoing. Convection is unsuited to causing rotation about a pole within the plate so, as noted then, a gearwheel-like linkage to Africa at the SWIR would provide its clearly CCW (Biscay-Caucasus) relationship to the Mediterranean belt for the past 100 Ma, also seen in its separation from South America. Gearwheel-like linkage of motion requires the presence of some kind of E-W restraint further north. In that case it was the N Africa/Arabia involvement in the Alpide belt, but the earlier opening of the central Atlantic by the eastward motion of Africa, suggests its rigid Gondwanan attachment to Antarctica rotation at that time, with little constraint in the north. Further east, the seafloor data show that Australia-Antarctica separation involved no such opposite rotational linkage, so, with no E-W mechanical constraint in the north by Indonesia, they must have rotated together, as is recorded by Australia's eastward motion to generate the Mesozoic seafloor at its western

  6. Functional outcomes and reevaluation of esophageal speech after free jejunal transfer in two hundred thirty-six cases.

    PubMed

    Yasumura, Tsuneo; Sakuraba, Minoru; Kimata, Yoshihiro; Nakatsuka, Takashi; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Ebihara, Satoshi; Hata, Yuiro

    2009-01-01

    Swallowing and communication are occasionally impaired after free jejunal transfer. Here, the relationship between surgical procedure and functional outcome was analyzed in 236 patients undergoing free jejunal transfer after total laryngopharyngectomy from 1992 through 2003. Swallowing and communication functions were also investigated with a questionnaire in 40 long-surviving patients. Although oral feeding could be resumed after surgery in most patients, anastomotic stricture and nasal regurgitation occurred in 12.7% and 29.7% of patients, respectively. Use of our standardized procedure, the tensed jejunal method, significantly reduced the incidence of stricture (P < 0.01) but increased the rate of nasal regurgitation; however, in most cases regurgitation gradually resolved. Of the 40 long-surviving patients, 17 attended a speech rehabilitation program at which 12 learned to perform esophageal speech without voice restoration procedures (11 of the 12 had received a tensed jejunal graft). Our standardized procedure helps prevent strictures and encourages esophageal speech. PMID:19131720

  7. Jejunal intussusception caused by metastasis of a giant cell carcinoma of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yuki; Homma, Shigenori; Yoshida, Tadashi; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2016-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital reporting of nausea, vomiting and anorexia. One month before admission, she had been diagnosed with lung cancer with intestinal metastasis. A CT scan confirmed intussusception due to intestinal metastasis and she underwent emergency laparoscopic surgery followed by resection of the primary lung cancer. Histopathological findings of the intestinal specimen suggested the metastasis was from a giant cell carcinoma of the lung, which had extensive necrosis. She was still alive without recurrence 11 months after the first surgery. Giant cell carcinoma of the lung is a rare type of non-small cell carcinoma and intestinal metastasis is one of the unique features. This type of tumour has such aggressive characteristics that oncological prognosis is reported to be extremely poor. In our case, however, complete surgical resection of both primary and metastatic tumours might result in a better outcome than has been reported. PMID:27485876

  8. Jejunal angiodysplasia causing recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding presenting as severe anaemia and melena.

    PubMed

    Tiwary, Satyendra K; Hakim, Md Zeeshan; Kumar, Puneet; Khanna, Ajay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Angiodysplasia of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract consists of ectasia of the submucosal vessels of the bowel. The evaluation of such patients needs proctoscopy, colonoscopy, small bowel enema, enteroscopy, capsule enteroscopy and angiography. Capsule enteroscopy has come up as an alternative to GI enteroscopy and colonoscopy in patients with occult GI bleeding; up to 52% cases of small bowel angiodysplasia in patients with occult GI bleed with negative upper GI and colonoscopy have been reported. The use of capsule enteroscopy potentially limits the hazard of radiation exposure from angiography and is less invasive than double balloon endoscopy. The treatment options for angiodysplasias include intra-arterial vasopressin injection, selective gel foam embolisation, endoscopic electrocoagulation and injection of sclerosants, with each of these being technically demanding, and requiring centres with good access to enteroscopy technology and trained gastroenterologists. Operative intervention has been indicated for refractory bleeding or lesions in sites not accessible to endoscopic interventions. PMID:26567241

  9. Jejunal intussusception caused by metastasis of a giant cell carcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yuki; Homma, Shigenori; Yoshida, Tadashi; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2016-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital reporting of nausea, vomiting and anorexia. One month before admission, she had been diagnosed with lung cancer with intestinal metastasis. A CT scan confirmed intussusception due to intestinal metastasis and she underwent emergency laparoscopic surgery followed by resection of the primary lung cancer. Histopathological findings of the intestinal specimen suggested the metastasis was from a giant cell carcinoma of the lung, which had extensive necrosis. She was still alive without recurrence 11 months after the first surgery. Giant cell carcinoma of the lung is a rare type of non-small cell carcinoma and intestinal metastasis is one of the unique features. This type of tumour has such aggressive characteristics that oncological prognosis is reported to be extremely poor. In our case, however, complete surgical resection of both primary and metastatic tumours might result in a better outcome than has been reported. PMID:27485876

  10. The Combination of Gastroschisis, Jejunal Atresia, and Colonic Atresia in a Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Zachary; Nanagas, Victor

    2015-01-01

    We encountered a rare case of gastroschisis associated with jejunal atresia and colonic atresia. In our case, the jejunal atresia was not discovered for 27 days after the initial abdominal wall closure. The colonic atresia was not discovered for 48 days after initial repair of the gastroschisis secondary to the rarity of the disorder. Both types of atresia were repaired with primary hand-sewn anastomoses. Other than the prolonged parenteral nutrition and hyperbilirubinemia, our patient did very well throughout his hospital course. Based on our case presentation, small bowel atresia and colonic atresia must be considered in patients who undergo abdominal wall closure for gastroschisis with prolonged symptoms suggestive of bowel obstruction. Our case report also demonstrates primary enteric anastomosis as a safe, well-tolerated surgical option for patients with types of intestinal atresia. PMID:26180651

  11. Retrograde jejunal intussusception after total gastrectomy: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Huang, G S; Jin, Y

    2016-01-01

    Retrograde jejunal intussusception is a rare disease. A 60-year-old female patient was hospitalized due to vomiting for 2 days, with a history of radical gastrectomy plus esophagus jejunum Rouxs-en-Y. On examination, there was a palpable wax-like mass on the left-hand side underneath the umbilicus. Computerized tomography scan showed a proximal jejunal intussusception. During surgery, the distal jejunum was found set into the proximal jejunum for a length of 30 cm, and bowel necrosis was also observed. The necrotic tube was resected and anastomosis was performed. Four days after the surgery, gastrointestinal function resumed. After a 10-month follow-up, the patient had no discomfort. PMID:27022810

  12. Delayed Presentation of Jejuno-Jejunal Fistula With Stricture After Physical Child Abuse.

    PubMed

    Solaiman, Adil Z; Kulaylat, Afif N; Santos, Mary C; Rocourt, Dorothy V; Methratta, Sosamma T; Millington, Karmaine; Alexander, Chandran P

    2016-07-01

    Small intestinal injury is seldom described in the context of child abuse. Signs and symptoms are subtle, often leading to delays in diagnosis. We describe a 3-year-old boy initially admitted with severe blunt abdominal trauma from physical child abuse. He was successfully managed nonoperatively. The child was then hospitalized several times for nonspecific abdominal symptoms until diagnostic laparoscopy discovered a jejunal stricture with a proximal jejuno-jejunal fistula. Symptoms fully resolved after resection. Delayed presentation of small intestinal injury should remain on the differential diagnosis in the evaluation of persistent abdominal symptoms in a child with a prior history of physical abuse, even if imaging studies do not reveal specific abnormalities. PMID:25899753

  13. Effect of pinaverium bromide on jejunal motility and colonic transit time in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Bouchoucha, M; Salles, J P; Fallet, M; Frileux, P; Cugnenc, P H; Barbier, J P

    1992-01-01

    Pinaverium bromide is a specific calcium channel blocker used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) for its spasmolytic activity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of orally administered pinaverium bromide on jejunal motility and total and segmental colonic transit time in control subjects. Gastrointestinal studies were performed in 10 healthy volunteers (30 +/- 3 years), before and after a treatment phase of 14 days (150 mg/d). Jejunal motility was measured by prolonged manometry (14 h) and colonic transit time by a multiple ingestion, single marker technique. No significant modification of phase III of the migrating motor complexes was demonstrated. On the contrary, a significant (p < 0.01) but weak decrease of the frequency of contraction was found. Unlike previous studies, no decrease of total or segmental colonic transit time was demonstrated. PMID:1421047

  14. The role of metoclopramide in peroral jejunal biopsy: a controlled randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Arvanitakis, C; Gonzalez, G; Rhodes, J B

    1976-10-01

    Metoclopramide is known to enhance gastric emptying and stimulate duodenal and small-intestinal peristaltic activity. The effect of the drug on peroral jejunal biopsy was examined in a controlled, double-blind, randomized trial. Forty-nine patients (24 females and 25 males) who required jejunal biopsy for diagnostic purposes were admitted to the study. All the biopsies were performed by the same operator using the Quinton multipurpose suction biopsy tube and applying the same technique. Twenty-four patients ranging in age from 18 to 67 years (mean 44.5) received placebo intravenously (sodium metabisulfite), and 25 patients from 16 to 73 years old (mean 39.9) received 10 mg of metoclopramide intravenously prior to the jejunal intubation. Objective parameters of the study were (1) time in minutes required for the intubation at the biopsy site, ie, the area at the ligament of Treitz, and (2) fluoroscopy time. Intubation time in the placebo group was 22.3 +/- 1.9 min (mean +/- SEM) vs 11.3 +/- 1.4 min in the metoclopramide group (P less than 0.001). Fluoroscopy exposure time was 2.47 +/- 0.25 in the placebo group vs 1.40 +/- 0.12 min in the metoclopramide group (P less than 0.001). Subjective clinical evaluation of the operator's assessment of the procedure was based on a 0-4 scale (much easier = 0, easier = 1, average = 2, harder = 3, and much harder = 4). Metoclopramide administration resulted in a significantly easier performance of the procedure (P less than 0.001) but did not influence patient tolerance. Three patients who received metoclopramide and one receiving placebo developed mild to moderate drowsiness of short duration. The results of this controlled trial indicate that metoclopramide significantly shortens the time required for jejunal biopsy and reduces fluoroscopy exposure. Its regulatory action on gastrointestinal motility contributes to the easier performance of a valuable diagnostic procedure. PMID:1015496

  15. Electroacupuncture at ST25 inhibits jejunal motility: Role of sympathetic pathways and TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhi; Zhang, Na; Lu, Chun-Xia; Pang, Ting-Ting; Wang, Kai-Yue; Jiang, Jing-Feng; Zhu, Bing; Xu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether electroacupuncture (EA) at ST25 affects jejunal motility in vivo and if so, whether a sympathetic pathway is involved. METHODS: Jejunal motility was assessed using a manometric balloon placed in the jejunum approximately about 3-5 cm away from the suspensory ligament of the duodenum in anesthetized animals. The effects of EA at ST25 were measured in male Sprague-Dawley rats, some of which were treated with propranolol or clenbuterol (EA intensities: 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 mA), and in male transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) (capsaicin receptor) knockout mice (EA intensities: 1, 2, and 4 mA). RESULTS: Anesthetized rats exhibited three types of fasting jejunal motor patterns (types A, B, and C), and only type C rats responded to EA stimulation. In type C rats, EA at ST25 significantly suppressed the motor activity of the jejunum in an intensity-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of EA was weakened by propranolol (β adrenoceptor antagonist) and disappeared with clenbuterol (β adrenoceptor agonist) induced inhibition of motility, suggesting that the effect of EA on motility is mediated via a sympathetic pathway. Compared with wild-type mice, EA at ST25 was less effective in TRPV1 knockout mice, suggesting that this multi-modal sensor channel participates in the mechanism. CONCLUSION: EA at ST25 was found to inhibit jejunal motility in an intensity-dependent manner, via a mechanism in which sympathetic nerves and TRPV1 receptors play an important role. PMID:26855542

  16. Substrate metabolism in isolated rat jejunal epithelium. Analysis using /sup 14/C-radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Mallet, R.T.

    1986-01-01

    The jejunal epithelium absorbs nutrients from the intestinal lumen and is therefore the initial site for metabolism of these compounds. The purpose of this investigation is to analyze substrate metabolism in a preparation of jejunal epithelium relatively free of other tissues. Novel radioisotopic labelling techniques allow quantitation of substrate metabolism in the TCA cycle, Embden-Meyerhof (glycolytic) pathway, and hexose monophosphate shunt. For example, ratios of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from pairs of /sup 14/C-pyruvate, and /sup 14/C-succinate radioisotopes (CO/sub 2/ ratios) indicate the probability of TCA cycle intermediate efflux to generate compounds other than CO/sub 2/. With (2,3-/sup 14/C)succinate as tracer, the ratio of /sup 14/C in carbon 4 + 5 versus carbon 2 + 3 of citrate, the citrate labelling ratio, equals the probability of TCA intermediate flux to the acetyl CoA-derived portion of citrate versus flux to the oxaloacetate-derived portion. The principal metabolic substrates for the jejunal epithelium are glucose and glutamine. CO/sub 2/ ratios indicate that glutamine uptake and metabolism is partially Na/sup +/-independent, and is saturable, with a half-maximal rate at physiological plasma glutamine concentrations. Glucose metabolism in the jejunal epithelium proceeds almost entirely via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway. Conversion of substrates to multi-carbon products in this tissue allows partial conservation of reduced carbon for further utilization in other tissues. In summary, metabolic modeling based on /sup 14/C labelling ratios is a potentially valuable technique for analysis of metabolic flux patterns in cell preparations.

  17. Ileal and jejunal Peyer’s patches in buffalo calves: Histomorphological comparison

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Kritima; Singh, Opinder

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was aimed to elucidate the histomorphology of ileal and jejunal Peyer’s patches in the small intestine of buffalo calves and their structural comparison. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on neonatal (n=10) and pre-pubertal (n=10) buffalo calves. The age of the postnatal buffalo calves was estimated by their temporary and permanent dentition. Results: The study revealed that several layers of oval to elongate elliptical lymphoid follicles were observed in submucosa on the anti-mesenteric side in the ileum of early neonatal calves. However, the follicles at this age, in jejunum were of all shapes present within one layer. The interfollicular space was occupied by the interfollicular tissue, which was diffuse and wider around jejunal lymphoid follicles as compared to ileal lymphoid follicles. However, toward the pubertal stage, the number of layers of lymphoid follicles was reduced in ileum due to involution while it remained similar in number in jejunum at this stage. Conclusion: The ileal Peyer’s patches were found to have started involution more or less around reaching puberty, whereas the jejunal Peyer’s patches appear to be functional throughout the lifespan of the animal. PMID:27047029

  18. Hepatic metastases of primary jejunal carcinoid tumor: A case report with radiological findings

    PubMed Central

    Avcu, Serhat; Özen, Özkan; Bulut, Mehmet Deniz; Bora, Aydın

    2009-01-01

    Context: Carcinoid tumors represent a group of well-differentiated tumors originating from the diffuse endocrine system outside the pancreas and thyroid. The overall prevalence of carcinoid tumors in the United States is estimated to be one to two cases per 100,000 persons. Various sites of origin of this neoplasm are appendix - 30-45%, small bowel - 25-35% (duodenum 2%, jejunum 7%, ileum 91%, multiple sites 15-35%), rectum 10-15%, caecum - 5%, and stomach - 0.5%. Liver metastases from jejunal and ileal carcinoids are generally hypervascular. Case report: Here we report a case of primary jejunal carcinoid tumor in a 66-year-old woman metastasizing to liver with ultrasonography, computed tomography, and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) findings. Conclusion: Primary jejunal carcinoid tumor is a rare entity. DWI can help in the differential diagnosis of hepatic hypervascular metastatic mass lesions from benign ones, as well as in the diagnosis of carcinoid tumor. PMID:22666712

  19. Diamine oxidase plasma activities after treatment with heparin and jejunal morphometry in untreated coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Corazza, G R; Ginaldi, L; Falasca, A; Strocchi, A; Rossi, C A; Quaglino, D; Gasbarrini, G

    1989-01-01

    Diamine oxidase plasma concentrations after treatment with heparin were measured and compared with the surface to volume ratio of jejunal biopsy samples assessed by a morphometric technique in patients with untreated and treated coeliac disease and in biopsied controls. As expected, enzyme activity was significantly lower in patients with untreated coeliac disease than in patients on a gluten-free diet and in biopsied controls. No difference was found between treated patients and biopsied controls. There was a significant overall correlation between plasma enzyme activity and surface to volume ratio of jejunal mucosa, although two untreated patients without an overt malabsorption syndrome but with a very low surface to volume ratio had normal enzyme activity. This study shows that in coeliac disease plasma diamine oxidase activity after treatment with heparin does not always mirror the extent of the jejunal lesions, particularly in those patients with minimal or unrelated symptoms who would benefit most from a valid screening test to identify their condition. PMID:2511229

  20. Jejunitis and brown bowel syndrome with multifocal carcinogenesis of the small bowel

    PubMed Central

    Raithel, Martin; Rau, Tilman T; Hagel, Alexander F; Albrecht, Heinz; de Rossi, Thomas; Kirchner, Thomas; Hahn, Eckhart G

    2015-01-01

    This is the first report describing a case where prolonged, severe malabsorption from brown bowel syndrome progressed to multifocally spread small bowel adenocarcinoma. This case involves a female patient who was initially diagnosed with chronic jejunitis associated with primary diffuse lymphangiectasia at the age of 26 years. The course of the disease was clinically, endoscopically, and histologically followed for 21 years until her death at the age 47 due to multifocal, metastasizing adenocarcinoma of the small bowel. Multiple lipofuscin deposits (so-called brown bowel syndrome) and severe jejunitis were observed microscopically, and sections of the small bowel showed dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the lamina propria as well as blocked lymphatic vessels. After several decades, multifocal nests of adenocarcinoma cells and extensive, flat, neoplastic mucosal proliferations were found only in the small bowel, along with a loss of the mismatch repair protein MLH1 as a long-term consequence of chronic jejunitis with malabsorption. No evidence was found for hereditary nonpolyposis colon carcinoma syndrome. This article demonstrates for the first time multifocal carcinogenesis in the small bowel in a malabsorption syndrome in an enteritis-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. PMID:26420973

  1. Jejunitis and brown bowel syndrome with multifocal carcinogenesis of the small bowel.

    PubMed

    Raithel, Martin; Rau, Tilman T; Hagel, Alexander F; Albrecht, Heinz; de Rossi, Thomas; Kirchner, Thomas; Hahn, Eckhart G

    2015-09-28

    This is the first report describing a case where prolonged, severe malabsorption from brown bowel syndrome progressed to multifocally spread small bowel adenocarcinoma. This case involves a female patient who was initially diagnosed with chronic jejunitis associated with primary diffuse lymphangiectasia at the age of 26 years. The course of the disease was clinically, endoscopically, and histologically followed for 21 years until her death at the age 47 due to multifocal, metastasizing adenocarcinoma of the small bowel. Multiple lipofuscin deposits (so-called brown bowel syndrome) and severe jejunitis were observed microscopically, and sections of the small bowel showed dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the lamina propria as well as blocked lymphatic vessels. After several decades, multifocal nests of adenocarcinoma cells and extensive, flat, neoplastic mucosal proliferations were found only in the small bowel, along with a loss of the mismatch repair protein MLH1 as a long-term consequence of chronic jejunitis with malabsorption. No evidence was found for hereditary nonpolyposis colon carcinoma syndrome. This article demonstrates for the first time multifocal carcinogenesis in the small bowel in a malabsorption syndrome in an enteritis-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. PMID:26420973

  2. [Early jejunal feeding in acute pancreatitis: prevention of septic complications and multiorgan failure].

    PubMed

    Oláh, A; Pardavi, G; Belágyi, T

    2000-02-01

    Authors evaluate the effect of early jejunal feeding on septic complications and mortality in acute pancreatitis, based on the results of a two-phase, prospective, randomized study. In the first part of the study they compared the conventional parenteral nutrition with early (started within 24 hours) enteral nutrition in a prospective, randomized trial on 89 patients. Forty-eight patients were randomized into the parenteral group "A" (Rindex 10, Infusamin S, Intralipid 10%: 30 kcal/kg) and 41 patients into the enteral group "B" (fed by nasogastric jejunal tube Survimed OPD, 30 kcal/kg). The rate of septic complications (infected necrosis, abscess, infected pseudocyst) were significantly lower in the enteral group (p = 0.08 chi-square test). In the second phase of the study early jejunal feeding was combined with imipenem prophylaxis (Tienam, 2 x 500 mg i.v.) in the necrotizing cases detected by CT scan. According to the results of 92 patients the rate of septic complications (p = 0.03), multiple organ failure (p = 0.14), and mortality (p = 0.13) were further reduced in this group. Authors believe that combination of early enteral nutrition and a selective, adequate antibiotic therapy may give a chance for prevention of multiple organ failure. PMID:11299593

  3. Microvascular Reconstruction of Free Jejunal Graft in Larynx-preserving Esophagectomy for Cervical Esophageal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Natori, Yuhei; Komoto, Masakazu; Matsumura, Takashi; Horiguchi, Masatoshi; Yoshizawa, Hidekazu; Iwanuma, Yoshimi; Tsurumaru, Masahioko; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Losing the ability to speak severely affects the quality of life, and patients who have undergone laryngectomy tend to become depressed, which may lead to social withdrawal. Recently, with advancements in chemoradiotherapy and with alternative perspectives on postoperative quality of life, larynx preservation has been pursued; however, the selection of candidates and the optimal reconstructive procedure remain controversial. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed our experience with free jejunal graft for larynx-preserving cervical esophagectomy (LPCE), focusing on microvascular reconstruction. Methods: Seven patients underwent LPCE for cervical esophageal carcinoma, and defects were reconstructed by free jejunal transfer subsequently. We collected preoperative and postoperative data of the patients and assessed the importance of the procedure. Results: We mostly used the transverse cervical artery as the recipient, and a longer operative time was required, particularly for the regrowth cases. The operative field for microvascular anastomosis was more limited and deeper than those in the laryngectomy cases. Two graft necrosis cases were confirmed at postoperative day 9 or 15, and vessels contralateral from the graft were chosen as recipients in both patients. Conclusions: Microvascular reconstruction for free jejunal graft in LPCE differed in several ways from the procedure combined with laryngectomy. Compression from the tracheal cartilage to the pedicle was suspected as the reason of the necrosis clinically and pathologically. Therefore, we should select recipient vessels from the ipsilateral side of the graft, and careful and extended monitoring of the flap should be considered to make this procedure successful. PMID:27257562

  4. Protection by polaprezinc against radiation-induced apoptosis in rat jejunal crypt cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuu-Matsuyama, Mutsumi; Shichijo, Kazuko; Okaichi, Kumio; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Nakashima, Masahiro; Uemura, Takashi; Niino, Daisuke; Sekine, Ichiro

    2008-07-01

    Polaprezinc, an anti-ulcer drug, is a chelate compound consisting of zinc and L-carnosine. Polaprezinc has been shown to prevent gastric mucosal injury. The anti ulcer effects of polaprezinc have been ascribed to its antioxidative property. The effect of polaprezinc on ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis was studied in the jejunal epithelial crypt cells of rats. Seven-to eight week-old Wistar rats, which were treated with 100 mg/kg of polaprezinc orally 1h before irradiation or 2% carboxymethyl cellulose sodium in controls, were exposed to whole body X-ray irradiation at 2 Gy. The number of apoptotic cells per jejunum crypt was counted in haematoxylin and eosin stained sections at 0-6 h after irradiation. TUNEL positive cells and immunopositive cells for active caspase-3 per crypt were also counted. Accumulation of p53, p21(WAF1/CIP1) and Bax expression in the jejunum after irradiation were examined by Western blot analyses. Polaprezinc treatment given prior to radiation resulted in a significant reduction in numbers of apoptotic cells, TUNEL positive cells and active caspase-3 immunopositive cells in jejunal crypt cells. Polaprezinc treatment resulted in decreases of p53 accumulation, p21(WAF1/CIP1) and Bax expression after irradiation. Polaprezinc has a protective effect against ionizing radiation induced apoptosis in rat jejunal crypt cells. PMID:18413982

  5. Did clockwise rotation of Antarctica cause the break-up of Gondwanaland? An investigation in the 'deep-keeled cratons' frame for global dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmaston, M. F.

    2012-04-01

    Introduction. The 'deep-keeled cratons' frame for global dynamics is the result of seeking Earth-behaviour answers to the following outside-the-box proposition:- "If cratons have tectospheric keels that reach or approach the 660 km discontinuity, AND the 660 level is an effective barrier to mantle circulation, then obviously (i) when two cratons separate, the upper mantle to put under the nascent ocean must arrive by a circuitous route and, conversely, (ii) if they approach one another, the mantle volume that was in between them must get extruded sideways." Surprisingly it has turned out [1 - 4] that Earth dynamical behaviour for at least the past 150 Ma provides persuasive affirmation of both these expectations and that there is a rational petrological explanation for the otherwise-unexpected immobility of subcratonic material to such depths [5 - 7]. Clockwise rotation of Antarctica? This contribution greatly amplifies my original plate dynamical arguments for suggesting [8] that such rotation is ongoing. Convection is unsuited to causing rotation about a pole within the plate so, as noted then, a gearwheel-like linkage to Africa at the SWIR would provide its clearly CCW (Biscay-Caucasus) relationship to the Mediterranean belt for the past 100 Ma, also seen in its separation from South America. Gearwheel-like linkage of motion requires the presence of some kind of E-W restraint further north. In that case it was the N Africa/Arabia involvement in the Alpide belt, but the earlier opening of the central Atlantic by the eastward motion of Africa, suggests its rigid Gondwanan attachment to Antarctica rotation at that time, with little constraint in the north. Further east, the seafloor data show that Australia-Antarctica separation involved no such opposite rotational linkage, so, with no E-W mechanical constraint in the north by Indonesia, they must have rotated together, as is recorded by Australia's eastward motion to generate the Mesozoic seafloor at its western

  6. Individual and combined cytotoxic effects of Fusarium toxins (deoxynivalenol, nivalenol, zearalenone and fumonisins B1) on swine jejunal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wan, Lam Yim Murphy; Turner, Paul C; El-Nezami, Hani

    2013-07-01

    Fusarium mycotoxins occur worldwide in foods such as cereals and animal forages, leading to acute and chronic exposures in human and animals. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) are an important first target site for these dietary toxins. This study investigated the cytotoxicity of four common Fusarium mycotoxins, deoxynivalenol (DON), nivalenol (NIV), zearalenone (ZEA) and fumonisin B1 (FB1) on a normal porcine jejunal epithelial cell line, IPEC-J2. A dose response relationship between individual mycotoxins and cell viability (MTT assay) was initially investigated, and subsequently cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic concentrations were selected to investigate combinations of two, three and all four of the mycotoxins. For individual mycotoxins, a dose response was observed with cell viability, such that the potency ranking was NIV>DON>ZEA>FB1. At cytotoxic doses of individual mycotoxins, all mixtures gave reduced cell viability compared to control. At noncytotoxic concentrations of individual mycotoxins, all mixtures were cytotoxic with DON-NIV, DON-ZEA, DON-NIV-FB1, DON-ZEA-FB1, NIV-ZEA-FB1 and all four mixed causing the greatest loss of cell viability. The latter observation in particular raises concerns over safety margins based on single toxin species, and suggests that the effects of multiple complex mixtures need to be better understood to assess health risks. PMID:23562706

  7. Effects of docosahexaenoic acid and sardine oil diets on the ultrastructure of jejunal absorptive cells in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, M; Suzuki, H

    1996-01-01

    The influence of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and sardine oil diets on the ultrastructure of jejunal absorptive cells was studied. Adult male Crj:CD-1 (ICR) mice were fed a fat-free semisynthetic diet supplemented with 5% (by weight) purified DHA ethyl ester, refined sardine oil, or palm oil. The mice received the DHA or palm oil diets for 7 days (groups 1 and 2) and the refined sardine oil or palm oil diets for 30 days (groups 3 and 4). There were significant ultrastructural changes in the jejunal absorptive cells between the mice fed on the palm oil diet and those receiving the DHA and sardine oil diets. The endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus of some jejunal absorptive cells in the mice fed on the palm oil diet for 7 and 30 days developed vacuolation on the upper site of the nucleus. In contrast, many granules, which appeared to be lipid droplets, were observed in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus of the jejunal absorptive cells in the DHA and sardine oil diet groups. These results suggest that ultrastructural differences in the jejunal absorptive cells between mice in the omega-3 fatty acid and palm oil diet groups may be associated with the changes in lipid metabolism. PMID:9001686

  8. Determination of the effect of single abomasal or jejunal inoculation of Clostridium perfringens Type A in dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract A randomized study was conducted to determine if inoculation of the abomasum or jejunum with Clostridium perfringens Type A would induce jejunal hemorrhage syndrome in healthy cows. Twelve adult nonlactating dairy cows were inoculated with 10 mL of pure culture broth of C. perfringens type A (beta2 toxin positive) into the abomasum (n = 6) or jejunum (n = 6). On day 6, the cows were euthanized and samples for culture were taken from the abomasum, jejunum, and feces. No cows developed clinical signs of jejunal hemorrhage syndrome during the course of the study. Five of 6 abomasal samples and 1 of 6 jejunal samples were positive for C. perfringens Type A (beta2 negative) prior to inoculation. Eight of 12 abomasal samples, 11 of 12 fecal samples, and 10 of 12 jejunal samples were positive for C. perfringens Type A (beta2 negative) after inoculation. Intraluminal inoculation of C. perfringens Type A alone at this dose and under these conditions did not induce clinical signs of jejunal hemorrhage syndrome in adult dairy cows. The multifactorial nature of the disease likely contributed to our inability to reproduce the disease in this study. PMID:16231652

  9. Glucose transport by brush-border membrane vesicles after proximal resection or ileo-jejunal transposition in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Menge, H; Murer, H; Robinson, J W

    1978-01-01

    1. The functional properties of the ileal mucosa following jejunal resection or interposition in the jejunum were studied with the help of membrane vesicles. 2. Despite the development of functional and morphological features in the mucosa which are more generally associated with the jejunum than with the ileum, examination of brush-border vesicles derived from ileal and jejunal enterocytes from resected or transposed intestines reveals that the functional characteristics of apical membranes isolated from the different regions of the intestine are maintained after these surgical manoeuvres. Vesicles from control ileum develop an 'overshoot' uptake of glucose that is 3-4 times smaller than that of jejunal vesicles, a difference that is still observed in membranes prepared from mucosa of ileal loops following proximal resection or interposition in the jejunum. Images Fig. 3 PMID:625015

  10. Fluoroscopy-guided jejunal extension tube placement through existing gastrostomy tubes: analysis of 391 procedures

    PubMed Central

    Uflacker, Andre; Qiao, Yujie; Easley, Genevieve; Patrie, James; Lambert, Drew; de Lange, Eduard E.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of fluoroscopically placed jejunal extension tubes (J-arm) in patients with existing gastrostomy tubes. METHODS We conducted a retrospective review of 391 J-arm placements performed in 174 patients. Indications for jejunal nutrition were aspiration risk (35%), pancreatitis (17%), gastroparesis (13%), gastric outlet obstruction (12%), and other (23%). Technical success, complications, malfunctions, and patency were assessed. Percutaneous gastrostomy (PEG) tube location, J-arm course, and fluoroscopy time were correlated with success/failure. Failure was defined as inability to exit the stomach. Procedure-related complications were defined as adverse events related to tube placement occurring within seven days. Tube malfunctions and aspiration events were recorded and assessed. RESULTS Technical success was achieved in 91.9% (95% CI, 86.7%–95.2%) of new tubes versus 94.2% (95% CI, 86.7%–95.2%) of replacements (P = 0.373). Periprocedural complications occurred in three patients (0.8%). Malfunctions occurred in 197 patients (50%). Median tube patency was 103 days (95% CI, 71–134 days). No association was found between successful J-arm placement and gastric PEG tube position (P = 0.677), indication for jejunal nutrition (P = 0.349), J-arm trajectory in the stomach and incidence of malfunction (P = 0.365), risk of tube migration and PEG tube position (P = 0.173), or J-arm length (P = 0.987). A fluoroscopy time of 21.3 min was identified as a threshold for failure. Malfunctions occurred more often in tubes replaced after 90 days than in tubes replaced before 90 days (P < 0.001). A total of 42 aspiration events occurred (OR 6.4, P < 0.001, compared with nonmalfunctioning tubes). CONCLUSION Fluoroscopy-guided J-arm placement is safe for patients requiring jejunal nutrition. Tubes indwelling for longer than 90 days have higher rates of malfunction and aspiration. PMID:26380895

  11. [Surgical therapy of segmental jejunal, primary intestinal lymphangiectasia].

    PubMed

    Kneist, W; Drescher, D G; Hansen, T; Kreitner, K F; Lang, H

    2013-06-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a protein-losing, exsudative gastroenteropathy causing lymphatic obstruction. Diagnosis depends on clinical examination and histological findings. Conservative treatment modalities include a low-fat diet and enteral nutritional therapy in order to reduce enteric protein loss and to improve fat metabolism. Other treatment options consist of administration of antiplasmin or octreotide to lower lymph flow and secretion. We report on a 58-year-old patient who underwent exploratory laparotomy due to a worsening physical status, recurrent chylaskos and leg oedema under conservative dietary therapy. Intraoperative findings showed a typical PIL of the jejunum about 20 cm distal to the Treitz's ligament. Histological examinations confirmed this diagnosis. One year after segmental small bowel resection (105 cm) with end-to-end anastomosis the patient is healthy, free of symptoms, has gained weight and his serum protein level has increased. Intraabdominal ascites and leg oedema have not reoccurred since. PMID:23229460

  12. Jejunal pseudodiverticulosis in a swamp wallaby (Wallabia bicolor).

    PubMed

    Haist, V; von Dörnberg, K; Jacobsen, B

    2012-11-01

    Necropsy examination of an 8-year-old female swamp wallaby (Wallabia bicolor) from a zoological garden revealed four intestinal diverticular outpouchings at the mesenteric border of the jejunum, which were partly ruptured causing a fatal peritonitis. Microscopically, affected small intestinal segments were characterized by an abrupt gap in the muscular layer with subsequent herniation of respective mucosal and submucosal layers, interpreted as acquired pseudodiverticula. Multifocal perforations of these diverticula were associated with prominent fibrinosuppurative serositis with leakage of ingesta. In addition, there was intestinal nematodal endoparasitism with accompanying neutrophilic to eosinophilic enteritis. Small intestinal pseudodiverticula resembling human colonic diverticulosis are rare in animals and can lead to fatal peritonitis by faecal impaction, subsequent transmural inflammation and eventual perforation. PMID:22717131

  13. Mouldy feed, mycotoxins and Shiga toxin - producing Escherichia coli colonization associated with Jejunal Hemorrhage Syndrome in beef cattle

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Both O157 and non-O157 Shiga toxin - producing Escherichia coli (STECs) cause serious human disease outbreaks through the consumption of contaminated foods. Cattle are considered the main reservoir but it is unclear how STECs affect mature animals. Neonatal calves are the susceptible age class for STEC infections causing severe enteritis. In an earlier study, we determined that mycotoxins and STECs were part of the disease complex for dairy cattle with Jejunal Hemorrhage Syndrome (JHS). For STECs to play a role in the development of JHS, we hypothesized that STEC colonization should also be evident in beef cattle with JHS. Aggressive medical and surgical therapies are effective for JHS, but rely on early recognition of clinical signs for optimal outcomes suggesting that novel approaches must be developed for managing this disease. The main objective of this study was to confirm that mouldy feeds, mycotoxins and STEC colonization were associated with the development of JHS in beef cattle. Results Beef cattle developed JHS after consuming feed containing several types of mycotoxigenic fungi including Fusarium poae, F. verticillioides, F. sporotrichioides, Penicillium roqueforti and Aspergillus fumigatus. Mixtures of STECs colonized the mucosa in the hemorrhaged tissues of the cattle and no other pathogen was identified. The STECs expressed Stx1 and Stx2, but more significantly, Stxs were also present in the blood collected from the lumen of the hemorrhaged jejunum. Feed extracts containing mycotoxins were toxic to enterocytes and 0.1% of a prebiotic, Celmanax Trademark, removed the cytotoxicity in vitro. The inclusion of a prebiotic in the care program for symptomatic beef calves was associated with 69% recovery. Conclusions The current study confirmed that STECs and mycotoxins are part of the disease complex for JHS in beef cattle. Mycotoxigenic fungi are only relevant in that they produce the mycotoxins deposited in the feed. A prebiotic, Celmanax

  14. Effect of 4'-oxythiamine on thiamin transport and phosphorylation by everted jejunal sacs, and on thiamin uptake by rat isolated enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Gastaldi, G; Casirola, D; Ferrari, G

    1982-06-30

    Two preparations were used for the present investigation. Rat everted jejunal sacs were incubated at 37 degrees C for 1 h in Krebs-Henseleit buffer, pH 7.4, containing 0.2 microM [thiazole-2-14C] -thiamin, with or without 2 microM 4'-oxythiamine. Suspensions of rat isolated enterocytes were incubated at 37 degrees C for 15 min in Ringer-Krebs, pH 7.4, containing 10 mM d-glucose and 0.125 microM [thiazole-2-14C] -thiamin, with or without 1.25 or 12.50 microM 4'-oxythiamine. Radiometric methods were used for the determination of: labeled thiamin net transport, free and phosphorylated thiamin content in the sac walls, total thiamin content in the isolated enterocytes. 4'-oxythiamine, at a molecular ratio with thiamin of 10:1, did not modify labeled thiamin net transport and accumulation by everted jejunal sacs, but caused a slight, statistically insignificant, decrease of labeled phosphorylated thiamin content of the sac walls. 4'-oxythiamine, at a molecular ratio of 10:1 or 100:1, did not inhibit labeled thiamin uptake by isolated enterocytes. Therefore, 4'-oxythiamine, which is known to be unable to inhibit thiamin enzymatic phosphorylation, did not affect thiamin intestinal transport both by everted intestinal sacs and isolated enterocytes. The present results can be interpreted as a further evidence that intracellular thiamin phosphorylation is an important step in thiamin intestinal transport. PMID:7104099

  15. Substrate metabolism of isolated jejunal epithelium: conservation of three-carbon units.

    PubMed

    Mallet, R T; Kelleher, J K; Jackson, M J

    1986-02-01

    This study characterizes the substrate metabolism of isolated jejunal epithelial cells. Utilization of substrates was assessed by spectrophotometric assay. Significant quantities of glucose, glutamine, and ketone bodies were consumed in a 1-h period; lactate and ammonia were produced. [U-14C]glucose was metabolized in this medium to approximately three moles of lactate per mole of CO2. The pattern of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolism was analyzed utilizing media containing different concentrations of potential metabolic substrates and trace quantities of [14C]- succinate. O2 consumption rates indicated that glutamine can serve as an energy source in the absence of other substrates. Relative 14CO2 production from [1,4-14C]succinate versus [2,3-14C]succinate, which estimates flux of TCA cycle intermediates to products other than CO2, was increased more than twofold when glutamine was the only major substrate available. Alanine was produced from TCA cycle intermediates. Analysis of the citrate labeling pattern in the presence of [2,3-14C] succinate suggested that carbon from the TCA cycle does not form a significant fraction of acetyl-CoA used for citrate synthesis and that glutamine carbon was not completely oxidized to CO2. These findings suggest that glucose and glutamine are converted to three-carbon compounds by the jejunal epithelium. PMID:3953776

  16. A case of lymphocytic-plasmacytic jejunitis diagnosed by double-balloon enteroscopy in a dog.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Ignacio; Latorre, Rafael; Soria, Federico; Carballo, Fernando; Lopez-Albors, Octavio; Buendia, Antonio J; Perez-Cuadrado, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    A 3 yr old male English setter dog was presented for evaluation of a 6-wk history of intermittent diarrhea. After standard gastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy showed normal mucosa, double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) was used via both oral and anal approaches. Gross changes consistent with inflammation in the jejunum were seen, and biopsy specimens were obtained. Histologic analysis confirmed a diagnosis of lymphocytic-plasmacytic jejunitis. Clinical remission of the disease occurred after 3 mo of therapy with prednisone, metronidazole, and a novel protein diet. Use of DBE has not been previously reported in dogs with inflammatory bowel disease, and isolated lymphocytic-plasmacytic jejunitis has not been described. The described cases of intestinal inflammatory disease diagnosed by conventional endoscopy were related to pathologic changes in the duodenum, ileum or colon, but not the jejunum. The main advantage of the DBE technique allowed examination of portions of the small intestine (jejunum) that were not commonly accessible by standard endoscopic techniques, and permitted a minimally invasive collection of biopsy samples compared with surgical biopsy. This case highlights the need to consider using DBE in animals with gastrointestinal disorders, whose symptoms are not readily explained by routine tests, conventional endoscopy, and dietary or therapeutic trials. PMID:21673335

  17. Experiment K-7-17: Effects of Spaceflight on the Proliferation of Jejunal Mucosal Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. W.; Moeller, C. L.; Sawyer, H. R.; Smirnov, K. L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that the generalized, whole body decrease in synthetic activity due to microgravity conditions encountered during spaceflight would be demonstrable in cells and tissues characterized by a rapid rate of turnover. Jejunal mucosal cells were chosen as a model since these cells are among the most rapidly proliferating in the body. Accordingly, the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts of Lieberkuhn in each of 5 rats flown on the COSMOS 2044 mission were compared to the percentage of mitotic cells present in the crypts in rats included in each of 3 ground control groups (i.e., vivarium, synchronous and caudal-elevated). No significant difference (p greater than .05) was detected in mitotic indices between the flight and vivarium group. Although the ability of jejunal mucosal cells to divide by mitosis was not impaired in flight group, there was, however, a reduction in the length of villi and depth of crypts. The concommitant reduction in villus length and crypth depth in the flight group probably reflects changes in connective tissue components within the core of villi.

  18. Transepithelial Transport of PAMAM Dendrimers across Isolated Rat Jejunal Mucosae in Ussing Chambers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Oral delivery remains a challenge for poorly permeable hydrophilic macromolecules. Poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers have shown potential for their possible oral delivery. Transepithelial transport of carboxyl-terminated G3.5 and amine-terminated G4 PAMAM dendrimers was assessed using isolated rat jejunal mucosae mounted in Ussing chambers. The 1 mM FITC-labeled dendrimers were added to the apical side of mucosae. Apparent permeability coefficients (Papp) from the apical to the basolateral side were significantly increased for FITC when conjugated to G3.5 PAMAM dendrimer compared to FITC alone. Minimal signs of toxicity were observed when mucosae were exposed to both dendrimers with respect to transepithelial electrical resistance changes, carbachol-induced short circuit current stimulation, and histological changes. [14C]-mannitol fluxes were not altered in the presence of 1 mM dendrimers, suggesting that the paracellular pathway was not affected at this concentration in this model. These results give insight into the mechanism of PAMAM dendrimer transepithelial rat jejunal transport, as well as toxicological considerations important for oral drug delivery. PMID:24992090

  19. Dietary protein reduction in sheep and goats: different effects on L-alanine and L-leucine transport across the brush-border membrane of jejunal enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Schröder, B; Schöneberger, M; Rodehutscord, M; Pfeffer, E; Breves, G

    2003-08-01

    It was the aim of this study to examine the potential regulatory effects of a long-term low dietary protein supply on the transport capacity of the jejunal brush-border membrane for amino acids. For this purpose, we used the neutral amino acids L-alanine (representative for nonessential amino acids) and L-leucine (representative for essential amino acids) as model substances. Ten sheep lambs, 8 weeks of age and 19-27 kg body weight, were allotted to two dietary regimes with either adequate or reduced protein supply which was achieved by 17.9% and 9.7% of crude protein in the concentrated feed, respectively. The feeding periods were 4-6 weeks in length. Similarly, eight goat kids of 5-7 weeks of age and 8-14 kg body weight were allotted to either adequate (crude protein 20.1%, feeding period 9-12 weeks) or reduced protein supply (10.1%, feeding period 17-18 weeks). Dietary protein reduction in lambs caused a significant body weight loss of 0.6 +/- 0.7 kg, whereas the body weight in control animals increased by 1.9 +/- 0.7 kg (P<0.05). Plasma urea concentrations decreased significantly by 60% (low protein 2.3 +/- 0.1 versus control 5.7 +/- 0.2 mmol l(-1), P<0.001). In kids, reduction of dietary protein intake led to significant decreases of the daily weight gain by 48% from 181 +/- 8 g to 94 +/- 3 g (P<0.001) and daily dry matter intake by 27% from 568 +/- 13 g to 417 +/- 6 g (P<0.01). Respective urea concentrations in plasma were reduced by 77% from 5.2 +/- 0.4 to 1.2 +/- 0.2 mmol l(-1) (P<0.01). Kinetic analyses of the initial rates of alanine uptake into isolated jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles from sheep and goats as affected by low dietary protein supply yielded that the apparent Km was neither significantly different between the species nor significantly affected by the feeding regime thus ranging between 0.12 and 0.16 mmol.l(-1). Reduction of dietary protein, however, resulted in significantly decreased Vmax values of the transport system by 25

  20. Intestinal transport of thiamin and thiamin monophosphate in rat everted jejunal sacs: a comparative study using some potential inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gastaldi, G; Casirola, D; Patrini, C; Ricci, V; Laforenza, U; Ferrari, G; Rindi, G

    1988-12-01

    Rat everted jejunal sacs were incubated for 15 and 30 min at 37 degrees C in oxygenated Krebs-Henseleit buffer, pH 7.4, containing 0.2 microM [3H]-thiamin (3H-T) or [3H]-thiamin monophosphate (3H-TMP) with and without 10 mM 1-phenylalanine (PAL) or 2.5 mM levamisole (LEV). The concentrations of 3H-T and its phosphoesters in sac wall and serosal fluid were determined by a radiometric method after electrophoretic separation. In separate experiments, thiamin pyrophosphokinase (TPKase) and thiamin pyrophosphatase (TPPase) activities were determined in mucosal scrapings, with and without PAL or LEV, by using a radiometric and a colorimetric method, respectively. 3H-TMP was transported partly unchanged by an active mechanism similarly to 3H-T, but less efficiently. During transport, 3H-TMP was also enzymatically transformed to thiamin (T) and thiamin pyrophosphate, which accumulated in the tissue. In the serosal fluid, the concentration of 3H-TMP exceeded that of 3H-T. Presence of PAL or LEV with 3H-T or 3H-TMP in the incubation medium reduced the serosal transport and the tissue content of T compounds. LEV caused a dose-dependent inhibition of TPKase without affecting TPPase, whereas PAL inhibited both activities to about the same extent. These results indicate that the transport of TMP involves a number of different processes similar to those responsible for T transport. The effects of PAL and LEV underline the importance of phosphorylation-dephosphorylation coupling. PMID:2474283

  1. Four-photon spectroscopy of rotational transitions in liquid: recording of changes in the chemical composition of water caused by cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Bunkin, Aleksei F; Pershin, S M

    2010-05-26

    It is shown for the first time by the method of four-photon coherent scattering by rotational molecular resonances that the cavitation action on water changes its chemical composition, resulting in the formation of hydrogen peroxide. It is found that the concentration of hydrogen peroxide during cavitation grows by several times and depends on the cavitation process technology.

  2. Rotator cuff problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... tear occurs when one of the tendons is torn from the bone from overuse or injury. Causes ... surgery with a larger incision) to repair the torn tendon. Outlook (Prognosis) With rotator cuff tendinitis, rest, ...

  3. Dietary Leucine Supplementation Improves the Mucin Production in the Jejunal Mucosa of the Weaned Pigs Challenged by Porcine Rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiangbing; Liu, Minghui; Tang, Jun; Chen, Hao; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The present study was mainly conducted to determine whether dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the decrease of the mucin production in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs infected by porcine rotavirus (PRV). A total of 24 crossbred barrows weaned at 21 d of age were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 diets supplemented with 1.00% L-leucine or 0.68% L-alanine (isonitrogenous control) for 17 d. On day 11, all pigs were orally infused PRV or the sterile essential medium. During the first 10 d of trial, dietary leucine supplementation could improve the feed efficiency (P = 0.09). The ADG and feed efficiency were impaired by PRV infusion (P<0.05). PRV infusion also increased mean cumulative score of diarrhea, serum rotavirus antibody concentration and crypt depth of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and decreased villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.07), goblet cell numbers (P<0.05), mucin 1 and 2 concentrations (P<0.05) and phosphorylated mTOR level (P<0.05) of the jejunal mucosa in weaned pigs. Dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the effects of PRV infusion on feed efficiency (P = 0.09) and mean cumulative score of diarrhea (P = 0.09), and improve the effects of PRV infusion on villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.06), goblet cell numbers (P<0.05), mucin 1 (P = 0.08) and 2 (P = 0.07) concentrations and phosphorylated mTOR level (P = 0.08) of the jejunal mucosa in weaned pigs. These results suggest that dietary 1% leucine supplementation alleviated the decrease of mucin production and goblet cell numbers in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs challenged by PRV possibly via activation of the mTOR signaling. PMID:26336074

  4. Dietary Leucine Supplementation Improves the Mucin Production in the Jejunal Mucosa of the Weaned Pigs Challenged by Porcine Rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiangbing; Liu, Minghui; Tang, Jun; Chen, Hao; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The present study was mainly conducted to determine whether dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the decrease of the mucin production in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs infected by porcine rotavirus (PRV). A total of 24 crossbred barrows weaned at 21 d of age were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 diets supplemented with 1.00% L-leucine or 0.68% L-alanine (isonitrogenous control) for 17 d. On day 11, all pigs were orally infused PRV or the sterile essential medium. During the first 10 d of trial, dietary leucine supplementation could improve the feed efficiency (P = 0.09). The ADG and feed efficiency were impaired by PRV infusion (P<0.05). PRV infusion also increased mean cumulative score of diarrhea, serum rotavirus antibody concentration and crypt depth of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and decreased villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.07), goblet cell numbers (P<0.05), mucin 1 and 2 concentrations (P<0.05) and phosphorylated mTOR level (P<0.05) of the jejunal mucosa in weaned pigs. Dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the effects of PRV infusion on feed efficiency (P = 0.09) and mean cumulative score of diarrhea (P = 0.09), and improve the effects of PRV infusion on villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.06), goblet cell numbers (P<0.05), mucin 1 (P = 0.08) and 2 (P = 0.07) concentrations and phosphorylated mTOR level (P = 0.08) of the jejunal mucosa in weaned pigs. These results suggest that dietary 1% leucine supplementation alleviated the decrease of mucin production and goblet cell numbers in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs challenged by PRV possibly via activation of the mTOR signaling. PMID:26336074

  5. The angiotensin II receptor type 2 agonist CGP 42112A stimulates NO production in the porcine jejunal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Ewert, Sara; Laesser, Mats; Johansson, Bernalt; Holm, Mathias; Aneman, Anders; Fandriks, Lars

    2003-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to elucidate if nitric oxide is released by the porcine jejunal mucosa upon selective stimulation of AT2 receptors and the possible involvement of iNOS, and to investigate the presence of jejunal AT1 and AT2 receptors. Young landrace pigs were anaesthetized with ketamine and α-chloralose. Jejunal luminal NO output was assessed by intraluminal tonometry and analysed by chemiluminescense. Western blot analysis quantified mucosal iNOS and detected AT1 and AT2 receptor protein expression. AT1 and AT2 receptor RNA expression was detected by rtPCR. Results Baseline luminal NO output correlated significantly to baseline mucosal iNOS-protein content. In animals treated with the AT2-receptor agonist CGP42112A (n = 11) luminal NO output increased significantly (at 0.1 micrograms kg-1 min-1 and 1.0 micrograms kg-1 min-1), but not in animals simultaneously treated with the AT2-receptor antagonist PD123319 (bolus 0.3 mgkg-1, infusion 0.03 mg kg-1 h-1) (n = 7). No differences in iNOS protein expression were found between groups or before/after the administration of drugs. Western blot and rtPCR recognised expression of the AT1 and AT2 receptors in jejunal tissue. Conclusion The results suggest that activation of AT2 receptors increases jejunal luminal NO output. This response was not due to an increase in the expression of the iNOS protein in the mucosa. PMID:12689346

  6. Volvulus of the ascending colon in a non-rotated midgut: Plain film and MDCT findings

    PubMed Central

    Camera, Luigi; Calabrese, Milena; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Masone, Stefania; Vecchio, Walter Del; Persico, Giovanni; Salvatore, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Colonic volvulus is a relatively uncommon cause of large bowel obstruction usually involving mobile, intra-peritoneal, colonic segments. Congenital or acquired anatomic variation may be associated with an increased risk of colonic volvulus which can occasionally involve retro-peritoneal segments. We report a case of 54-year-old female who presented to our Institution to perform a plain abdominal film series for acute onset of cramping abdominal pain. Both the upright and supine films showed signs of acute colonic obstruction which was thought to be due to an internal hernia of the transverse colon into the lesser sac. The patient was therefore submitted to a multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT). CT findings were initially thought to be consistent with the presumed diagnosis of internal hernia but further evaluation and coronal reformatting clearly depicted the presence of a colonic volvulus possibly resulting from a retro-gastric colon. At surgery, a volvulus of the ascending colon was found and a right hemi-colectomy had to be performed. However, a non rotated midgut with a right-sided duodeno-jejunal flexure and a left sided colon was also found at laparotomy and overlooked in the pre-operative CT. Retrospective evaluation of CT images was therefore performed and a number of CT signs of intestinal malrotation could be identified. PMID:23150768

  7. Mechanism of bile acid-regulated glucose and lipid metabolism in duodenal-jejunal bypass

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jie; Zou, Lei; Li, Xirui; Han, Dali; Wang, Shan; Hu, Sanyuan; Guan, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Bile acid plays an important role in regulating blood glucose, lipid and energy metabolism. The present study was implemented to determine the effect of duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB) on FXR, TGR-5expression in terminal ileum and its bile acid-related mechanism on glucose and lipid metabolism. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect relative gene or protein expression in liver and intestine. Firstly, we found that expression of FXR in liver and terminal ileum of DJB group was significantly higher than that in S-DJB group (P<0.05). In addition, DJB dramatically increased the activation of TGR-5 in the liver of rats. Furthermore, PEPCK, G6Pase, FBPase 1 and GLP-1 were up-regulated by DJB. In conclusion, these results showed that bile acid ameliorated glucose and lipid metabolism through bile acid-FXR and bile acid- TGR-5 signaling pathway. PMID:26884847

  8. In vitro exposure to Escherichia coli decreases ion conductance in the jejunal epithelium of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Awad, Wageha A; Hess, Claudia; Khayal, Basel; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Hess, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) infections are very widespread in poultry. However, little is known about the interaction between the intestinal epithelium and E. coli in chickens. Therefore, the effects of avian non-pathogenic and avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) on the intestinal function of broiler chickens were investigated by measuring the electrogenic ion transport across the isolated jejunal mucosa. In addition, the intestinal epithelial responses to cholera toxin, histamine and carbamoylcholine (carbachol) were evaluated following an E. coli exposure. Jejunal tissues from 5-week-old broilers were exposed to 6×10(8) CFU/mL of either avian non-pathogenic E. coli IMT11322 (Ont:H16) or avian pathogenic E. coli IMT4529 (O24:H4) in Ussing chambers and electrophysiological variables were monitored for 1 h. After incubation with E. coli for 1 h, either cholera toxin (1 mg/L), histamine (100 μM) or carbachol (100 μM) were added to the incubation medium. Both strains of avian E. coli (non-pathogenic and pathogenic) reduced epithelial ion conductance (Gt) and short-circuit current (Isc). The decrease in ion conductance after exposure to avian pathogenic E. coli was, at least, partly reversed by the histamine or carbachol treatment. Serosal histamine application produced no significant changes in the Isc in any tissues. Only the uninfected control tissues responded significantly to carbachol with an increase of Isc, while the response to carbachol was blunted to non-significant values in infected tissues. Together, these data may explain why chickens rarely respond to intestinal infections with overt secretory diarrhea. Instead, the immediate response to intestinal E. coli infections appears to be a tightening of the epithelial barrier. PMID:24637645

  9. In Vitro Exposure to Escherichia coli Decreases Ion Conductance in the Jejunal Epithelium of Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Wageha A.; Hess, Claudia; Khayal, Basel; Aschenbach, Jörg R.; Hess, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) infections are very widespread in poultry. However, little is known about the interaction between the intestinal epithelium and E. coli in chickens. Therefore, the effects of avian non-pathogenic and avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) on the intestinal function of broiler chickens were investigated by measuring the electrogenic ion transport across the isolated jejunal mucosa. In addition, the intestinal epithelial responses to cholera toxin, histamine and carbamoylcholine (carbachol) were evaluated following an E. coli exposure. Jejunal tissues from 5-week-old broilers were exposed to 6×108 CFU/mL of either avian non-pathogenic E. coli IMT11322 (Ont:H16) or avian pathogenic E. coli IMT4529 (O24:H4) in Ussing chambers and electrophysiological variables were monitored for 1 h. After incubation with E. coli for 1 h, either cholera toxin (1 mg/L), histamine (100 μM) or carbachol (100 μM) were added to the incubation medium. Both strains of avian E. coli (non-pathogenic and pathogenic) reduced epithelial ion conductance (Gt) and short-circuit current (Isc). The decrease in ion conductance after exposure to avian pathogenic E. coli was, at least, partly reversed by the histamine or carbachol treatment. Serosal histamine application produced no significant changes in the Isc in any tissues. Only the uninfected control tissues responded significantly to carbachol with an increase of Isc, while the response to carbachol was blunted to non-significant values in infected tissues. Together, these data may explain why chickens rarely respond to intestinal infections with overt secretory diarrhea. Instead, the immediate response to intestinal E. coli infections appears to be a tightening of the epithelial barrier. PMID:24637645

  10. A functional study on small intestinal smooth muscles in jejunal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Preeti; Mandal, Maloy B.; Gangopadhyay, Ajay N.; Patne, Shashikant C. U.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The present study was aimed to assess the contractile status of neonatal small intestinal smooth muscle of dilated pre-atretic part of intestinal atresia to resolve debatable issues related to mechanisms of persistent dysmotility after surgical repair. Materials and Methods: A total of 34 longitudinally sectioned strips were prepared from pre-atretic dilated part of freshly excised 8 jejunal atresia type III a cases. Spontaneous as well as acetylcholine- and histamine-induced contractions were recorded in vitro by using organ bath preparations. Chemically evoked contractions were further evaluated after application of atropine (muscarinic blocker), pheniramine (H1 blocker), and lignocaine (neuronal blocker) to ascertain receptors and neuronal involvement. Histological examinations of strips were made by using Masson trichrome stain to assess the fibrotic changes. Results: All 34 strips, except four showed spontaneous contractions with mean frequency and amplitude of 5.49 ± 0.26/min and 24.41 ± 5.26 g/g wet tissue respectively. The response to ACh was nearly twice as compared to histamine for equimolar concentrations (100 μM). ACh (100 μM) induced contractions were attenuated (by 60%) by atropine. Histamine (100 μM)-induced contractions was blocked by pheniramine (0.32 μM) and lignocaine (4 μM) by 74% and 78%, respectively. Histopathological examination showed varying degree of fibrotic changes in muscle layers. Conclusions: Pre-atretic dilated part of jejunal atresia retains functional activity but with definitive histopathologic abnormalities. It is suggested that excision of a length of pre-atretic part and early stimulation of peristalsis by locally acting cholinomimetic or H1 agonist may help in reducing postoperative motility problems in atresia patients. PMID:26862290

  11. ASSESSMENT OF THE GASTRO-JEJUNO-DUODENAL TRANSIT AFTER JEJUNAL POUCH INTERPOSITION

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Alcino Lázaro; GOMES, Célio Geraldo de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Background : The jejunal pouch interposition between the gastric body and the duodenum after the gastrectomy, although not frequent in the surgical practice today, has been successfully employed for the prevention and treatment of the postgastrectomy syndromes. In the latter, it is included the dumping syndrome, which affects 13-58% of the patients who undergo gastrectomy. Aim : Retrospective assessment of the results of this procedure for the prevention of the dumping syndrome. Methods : Fourty patients were selected and treatetd surgically for peptic ulcer, between 1965 and 1970. Of these, 29 underwent vagotomy, antrectomy, gastrojejunalduodenostomy at the lesser curvature level, and the 11 remaining were submitted to vagotomy, antrectomy, gastrojejunal-duodenostomy at the greater curvature level. The gastro-jejuno-duodenal transit was assessed in the immediate or late postoperative with the contrasted study of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum. The clinical evolution was assessed according to the Visick grade. Results : Of the 40 patients, 28 were followed with the contrast evaluation in the late postoperative. Among those who were followed until the first month (n=22), 20 (90%) had slow gastro-jejuno-duodenal transit and in two (10%) the transit was normal. Among those who were followed after the first month (n=16), three (19%) and 13 (81%) had slow and normal gastric emptying, respectively. None had the contrasted exam compatible with the dumping syndrome. Among the 40 patients, 22 underwent postoperative clinical evaluation. Of these, 19 (86,5%) had excellent and good results (Visick 1 and 2, respectively). Conclusions : The jejunal pouch interposition showed to be a very effective surgical procedure for the prevention of the dumping syndrome in gastrectomized patients. PMID:26734789

  12. Rotational moulding.

    PubMed

    Crawford, R J; Kearns, M P

    2003-10-01

    Rotational moulding promises designers attractive economics and a low-pressure process. The benefits of rotational moulding are compared here with other manufacturing methods such as injection and blow moulding. PMID:14603714

  13. Rotating Vesta

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronomers combined 146 exposures taken by NASA's Hubble SpaceTelescope to make this 73-frame movie of the asteroid Vesta's rotation.Vesta completes a rotation every 5.34 hours.› Asteroid and...

  14. On the determination of heliographic positions and rotation velocities of sunspots. III - Effects caused by wrong solar image radii and their corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balthasar, H.; Lustig, G.; Woehl, H.

    1984-03-01

    The effect of incorrect solar-image radius on the determination of the rotation velocity of sunspots is analyzed by comparing data collected at Sonnenobservatorium Kanzelhoehe with those from Locarno and Greenwich (for May and September, 1982, and for 27 stable recurrent sunspots during 1950-1976, respectively). While the Locarno data are insufficient to draw quantitative conclusions, the Kanzelhoehe/Greenwich comparison reveals a time-independent discrepancy of 0.004 deg/day, corresponding to a velocity difference of less than 1 m/s, from the 'true' values determined from successive passages through the central meridian.

  15. On the validity of boundary layer analysis for flow and mass transfer caused by rotation during the solution growth of large, single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartak, Bhushan; Yeckel, Andrew; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2005-10-01

    The rate of growth of single crystals from liquid solutions depends on coupled kinetic and transport phenomena. However, when continuum transport is limiting, the maximum crystal growth rate is determined by the rate of solute transport through the liquid phase to the growing crystal. We examine the validity of simple scaling and boundary layer theories to assess the behavior of a model solution crystal growth system, namely the growth of potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) from high-temperature solutions. The approximation of the transport to a crystal rotating steadily in a supersaturated solution is based on the classical analytical solution for flow driven by a semi-infinite rotating disk and associated mass transfer. Our results indicate that this boundary layer analysis is reasonable as long as the solution container is very large, the geometry of the system is nearly axisymmetric, and the imposed flows are predominantly steady. For many practical systems, these conditions do not hold and such boundary layer analyses are expected to be in considerable error.

  16. Late Palaeoproterozoic mafic dyking in the Ukrainian Shield of Volgo-Sarmatia caused by rotation during the assembly of supercontinent Columbia (Nuna)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanova, Svetlana V.; Gintov, Oleg B.; Kurlovich, Dzmitry M.; Lubnina, Nataliya V.; Nilsson, Mimmi K. M.; Orlyuk, Mykhailo I.; Pashkevich, Inna K.; Shumlyanskyy, Leonid V.; Starostenko, Vitaly I.

    2013-08-01

    and postcollisional collapse of the thickened lithosphere, as well as by mantle delamination coupled with the rotation of Volgo-Sarmatia between 1.80 and 1.75 Ga. This agrees with palaeomagnetic reconstruction suggesting rotation(s) of Volgo-Sarmatia during its protracted oblique docking with Fennoscandian terranes and Laurentia as supercontinent Columbia (Nuna) was assembled.

  17. Ceruletide increases dose dependently both jejunal motor activity and threshold and tolerance to experimentally induced pain in healthy man.

    PubMed Central

    Stacher, G; Steinringer, H; Schmierer, G; Schneider, C; Winklehner, S; Mittelbach, G; De Paolis, C; Praga, C

    1984-01-01

    The effects of ceruletide on jejunal motility and experimentally induced pain were studied in 16 healthy men, who participated each in four experiments and received in random double blind fashion 5, 10, or 20 micrograms ceruletide intramuscularly or placebo. Jejunal pressures were recorded by three perfused catheters with orifices between 10 and 20 cm aboral of the ligament of Treitz. Ceruletide dose dependently diminished phase I and increased phase II type activity and tended to reduce the number, but not the duration, of activity fronts. The number and amplitude of contractions as well as the area under the curve increased significantly and dose dependently as did threshold and tolerance to electrically and threshold to thermally induced pain. Only mild sedative and other side effects occurred. PMID:6714795

  18. Type 2 diabetes mellitus control and atherosclerosis prevention in a non-obese rat model using duodenal-jejunal bypass

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, XUAN; HUANG, ZHEN; RAN, WENHUA; LIAO, GANG; ZHA, LANG; WANG, ZIWEI

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a prevalent disease worldwide and during its conventional treatment, vascular complications remain unavoidable. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (GBP) is able to induce the remission of T2DM. However, studies of duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB), a modified procedure of GBP, are being carried out to investigate its ability to induce the remission of T2DM and protect the aorta from atherosclerosis. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of DJB on the rate of T2DM remission and the prevention of atherosclerosis in the aorta in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes without obesity, and to explore the mechanism of DJB in protecting the aorta from atherosclerosis. A T2DM rat model was established with a high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin. Surgery was performed to analyze its effects on glucose homeostasis, lipid metabolism, inflammation and pathological changes. Furthermore, changes in c-jun NH2-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and inhibitor of κB kinase (IKKβ) genes in the aorta following DJB surgery were examined. Levels of blood glucose, lipids, insulin and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were significantly elevated in the T2DM diabetic model compared with the non-diabetic control. A gradual recovery was observed in the DJB group following surgery. Foam cells and atherosclerotic plaques appeared in the ascending aortic tissue in the sham-surgery and T2DM groups, whereas only slight lesions were observed in the DJB group. The expression levels of JNK1 and IKKβ genes in the aorta were significantly increased in the sham-operated and T2DM groups compared with those in the DJB and normal control groups. The present study demonstrated that DJB caused remission of T2DM without weight loss in non-obese rats. Thus, DJB may delay or prevent the occurrence and development of atherosclerosis in the aorta and this may occur through the JNK1 and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways. PMID:25120614

  19. Jejunal morphology and blood metabolites in tail biting, victim and control pigs.

    PubMed

    Palander, P A; Heinonen, M; Simpura, I; Edwards, S A; Valros, A E

    2013-09-01

    Tail biting has several identified feeding-related risk factors. Tail biters are often said to be lighter and thinner than other pigs in the pen, possibly because of nutrition-related problems such as reduced feed intake or inability to use nutrients efficiently. This can lead to an increase in foraging behavior and tail biting. In this study, a total of 55 pigs of different ages were selected according to their tail-biting behavior (bouts/hour) and pen-feeding system to form eight experimental groups: tail-biting pigs (TB), victim pigs (V) and control pigs from a tail-biting pen (Ctb) and control pen (Cno) having either free access to feed with limited feeding space or meal feeding from a long trough. After euthanasia, a segment of jejunal cell wall was cut from 50 cm (S50) and 100 cm (S100) posterior to the bile duct. Villus height, crypt depth and villus : crypt ratio (V : C) were measured morphometrically. Blood serum concentration of minerals and plasma concentration of amino acids (AA) was determined. Villus height was greater in Cno than Ctb pigs in the proximal and mid-jejunum (P < 0.05), indicative of better ability to absorb nutrients, and increased with age in the proximal jejunum (P < 0.001). Serum mineral concentration of inorganic phosphate (Pi) and calcium (Ca) was lower in Ctb compared with Cno pigs, and that of Pi in V compared with all the other pigs. Many non-essential AA were lower in pigs from tail-biting pens, and particularly in victim pigs. Free access feeding with shared feeding space was associated with lower levels of essential AA in blood than meal feeding with simultaneous feeding space. Our data suggest that being a pig in a tail-biting pen is associated with decreased jejunal villus height and blood AA levels, possibly because of depressed absorption capacity, feeding behavior or environmental stress associated with tail biting. Victim pigs had lower concentrations of AA and Pi in plasma, possibly as a consequence of being bitten

  20. Jejunal hemorrhage syndrome in dairy and beef cattle: 11 cases (2001 to 2003)

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The medical records of 11 cattle with jejunal hemorrhage syndrome were reviewed. Female and male, lactating and pregnant, dairy and beef cattle were affected. Decreased feed intake and milk production, reduced amounts of dark feces, and abdominal discomfort were common historical findings. Common clinical findings included depressed demeanor, a “ping” and fluid-splashing sounds over the right abdomen, melena, and distended loops of intestine on rectal palpation. Surgery was done on 7 cases, 10 cases were euthanized, and 1 died. Clostridium perfringens type A was isolated from the intestinal contents from 7 of 7 cases. At necropsy, the characteristic finding was a varying length of a dark purple-red distended jejunum with an intraluminal blood clot. Histologically, there was segmental necrosis, ulceration, and mucosal and transmural hemorrhage of the jejunum. This is a sporadic disease of adult cattle characterized by mechanical obstruction of the small intestines by a large blood clot with a case fatality of almost 100%. PMID:16187715

  1. Differential proteome analysis along jejunal crypt-villus axis in piglets.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xia; Yang, Huansheng; Hu, Xihai; Wang, Xiaocheng; Li, Biao; Long, Lina; Li, Tiejun; Wang, Junjun; Hou, Yongqing; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    The brush-border membrane (BBM) of enterocytes is responsible for the digestion and absorption of nutrients and ions in the small intestine. To identify the BBM proteins involved in epithelial cell maturation along the crypt-villus axis, enterocytes were sequentially isolated from the villus tip to the crypt of the jejunum from 21-day-old suckling piglets. After preparation of BBM vesicles, we detected 194 proteins in the jejunal epithelial cells by isobaric tags using relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) techniques. Of these, 56 BBM proteins were differentially expressed along the crypt-villus axis. During differentiation, the expression of proteins related to digestion and absorption of nutrients was primarily downregulated at the upper, middle villus, or crypt compared to the villus tip, while expression of proteins related to structural and enzyme regulator proteins was largely upregulated. We verified the differences in Na(+)/K(+) -transporting ATPase, galectin-3, and an intestinal-type fatty acid binding protein by western blot or immunochemical analysis. Identification of BBM-associated proteins helps enhance our understanding of digestion and absorption in piglets and other mammals, including humans. PMID:26709777

  2. Recycling of jejunal effluent to enable enteral nutrition in short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    McCain, Stephen; McCain, Scott; Harris, Andrew; McCallion, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    A 41-year-old woman developed severe abdominal pain, distension and faeculent vomiting. CT of abdomen and pelvis revealed small bowel malrotation with a right paraduodenal hernia. At emergency laparotomy, a right paraduodenal hernia containing jejunum and ileum was identified. She had a viable duodenum with 50 cm of ischaemic proximal jejunum which was exteriorised as an end jejunostomy; 180 cm of infarcted jejunum and ileum was resected. The proximal end of 150 cm of healthy ileum was exteriorised as a closed mucous fistula and 50 cm distally a feeding ileostomy was constructed. On day 5 postoperatively, jejunal effluent began to be recycled via her feeding ileostomy and she never required parenteral nutrition. Despite having only 50 cm of jejunum proximal to her stoma, recycling of effluent enabled her electrolytes to remain normal. She put on weight postoperatively and proceeded to closure of her stomas at 6 months, not requiring laparotomy. PMID:24872491

  3. Stress and strain analysis of contractions during ramp distension in partially obstructed guinea pig jejunal segments

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua; Yang, Jian; Gregersen, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated morphological and biomechanical remodeling in the intestine proximal to an obstruction. The present study aimed to obtain stress and strain thresholds to initiate contraction and the maximal contraction stress and strain in partially obstructed guinea pig jejunal segments. Partial obstruction and sham operations were surgically created in mid-jejunum of male guinea pigs. The animals survived 2, 4, 7, and 14 days, respectively. Animals not being operated on served as normal controls. The segments were used for no-load state, zero-stress state and distension analyses. The segment was inflated to 10 cmH2O pressure in an organ bath containing 37°C Krebs solution and the outer diameter change was monitored. The stress and strain at the contraction threshold and at maximum contraction were computed from the diameter, pressure and the zero-stress state data. Young’s modulus was determined at the contraction threshold. The muscle layer thickness in obstructed intestinal segments increased up to 300%. Compared with sham-obstructed and normal groups, the contraction stress threshold, the maximum contraction stress and the Young’s modulus at the contraction threshold increased whereas the strain threshold and maximum contraction strain decreased after 7 days obstruction (P<0.05 and 0.01). In conclusion, in the partially obstructed intestinal segments, a larger distension force was needed to evoke contraction likely due to tissue remodeling. Higher contraction stresses were produced and the contraction deformation (strain) became smaller. PMID:21632056

  4. Viable intestinal passage of a canine jejunal commensal strain Lactobacillus acidophilus LAB20 in dogs.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yurui; Saris, Per E J

    2014-10-01

    The strain Lactobacillus acidophilus LAB20 with immunomodulatory properties was previously found dominant in the jejunal chyme of four dogs, and the novel surface layer protein of LAB20 suggested its competitive colonization in canine gut. To evaluate the persistence and survival of LAB20 in healthy dogs, LAB20 was fed to five healthy pet dogs for 3 days, at a dosage of 10(8) CFU daily as fermented milk supplement. The fecal samples, from 1 day prior to feeding, three continuous feeding days, and on day 5, 7, 14, and 21, were collected for strain-specific detection of LAB20 using real-time PCR. We found that LAB20 count was significantly increased in dog fecal samples at the second feeding day, but rapidly decreased after feeding ceased. The fecal samples from prior to feeding, during feeding, and post-cessation days were plated onto mLBS7 agar, from where LAB20 was recovered and distinguishable from other fecal lactobacilli based on its colony morphotype. Using strain-specific PCR detection, the colonies were further verified as LAB20 indicating that LAB20 can survive through the passage of the canine intestine. This study suggested that canine-derived strain LAB20 maintained at high numbers during feeding, viably transited through the dog gut, and could be identified based on its colony morphotype. PMID:24849733

  5. The lack of protective effects of tea supplementation on liver and jejunal epithelium in adult rats exposed to cadmium and lead.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewska, Ewa; Winiarska-Mieczan, Anna; Dobrowolski, Piotr

    2015-11-01

    Adult rats at the age of 12 weeks were divided into the control group and groups supplemented with green (GT), black (BT), red (RT), or white (WT) tea extracts. The diet (except that for the control) was mixed with 7 mg Cd/kg and 50 mg Pb/kg. The experiment lasted 12 weeks. Basal haematology and plasma biochemical parameters as well as the histomorphometrical parameters of jejunal epithelium and liver were determined. The lowest body mass was found in the RT and WT groups. Some functional (increased plasma ALT and AST, and the de Ritis coefficient) and structural changes in the liver (slight fatty degenerative changes, an increase in the intercellular space) were evident irrespective of the type of tea in the Cd and Pb poisoned rats. This toxic effect was visible especially in rats drinking black or red tea. However, the rats had no elevated LDH and ALT activities. The highest content of Cd and Pb in the liver and blood plasma was found in rats drinking red tea. Based on the results obtained, it is clear that long-term exposure of adult rats with a mature intestinal barrier to Cd and Pb contamination, under higher exposure conditions than the current estimates of weekly exposure of the general population to Cd and Pb through diet, causes a toxic effect, especially in the liver, and can change the structure of intestinal mucosa, irrespective of tea administration. PMID:26410089

  6. Bio-sensing based on plasmon-coupling caused by rotated sub-micrometer gratings in metal-dielectric interfacial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csete, M.; Sipos, Á.; Szalai, A.; Mathesz, A.; Deli, M. A.; Veszelka, Sz.; Schmatulla, A.; Kőházi-Kis, A.; Osvay, K.; Marti, O.; Bor, Zs.

    2007-09-01

    Novel plasmonic sensor chips are prepared by generating sub-micrometer periodic patterns in the interfacial layers of bimetal-polymer films via master-grating based interference method. Poly-carbonate films spin-coated onto vacuum evaporated silver-gold bimetallic layers are irradiated by the two interfering UV beams of a Nd:YAG laser. It is proven by pulsed force mode AFM that periodic adhesion pattern corresponds to the surface relief gratings, consisting of sub-micrometer droplet arrays and continuous polymer stripes, induced by p- and s-polarized beams, respectively. The characteristic periods are the same, but more complex and larger amplitude adhesion modulation is detectable on the droplet arrays. The polar and azimuthal angle dependence of the resonance characteristic of plasmons is studied by combining the prism- and grating-coupling methods in a modified Kretschmann arrangement, illuminating the structured metal-polymer interface by a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser through a semi-cylinder. It is proven that the grating-coupling results in double-peaked plasmon resonance curves on both of the droplet arrays and line gratings, when the grooves are rotated to an appropriate azimuthal angle, and the modulation amplitude of the structure is sufficiently large. Streptavidin seeding is performed to demonstrate that small amount of protein can be detected monitoring the shift of the secondary resonance minima. The available high concentration sensitivity is explained by the promotion of protein adherence in the structure's valleys due to the enhanced adhesion. The line-shaped polymer gratings resulting in narrow resonance peaks are utilized to demonstrate the effect of therapeutic molecules on Amyloid-Β peptide, a pathogenic factor in Alzheimer disease.

  7. Rotating Wavepackets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  8. Sixth-grade Indonesian student explanations of directions on flat maps and globes, of the Earth's rotation to cause night and day, and of the relative positions of the Earth, Moon, and Sun during an eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimyati, Surachman

    The purpose of the study was to elicit and analyze sixth grade students' explanations concerning concepts taught in the national Indonesian sixth grade science curriculum. In this study, students were asked to identify the cardinal directions on flat maps and a globe, to describe what causes night and day on the earth, to identify the direction of the earth's rotation, and to identify the relative positions of the earth, sun, and moon during either a solar or lunar eclipse. The findings in the study can be summarized as follows (1) Eighty out of 88 students (91%) were able to explain what causes night and day. (2) Approximately 50% could identify the direction the earth rotates to cause night and day. (3) Using a solar system model, about 64% of the students could describe the relative position of the earth, sun, and moon during an eclipse. (4) Cultural differences affect student thinking. One student thought that Mecca had to be west of everywhere, not just west of Indonesia. (5) The way teachers teach seems to influence student thinking. It is easy for students to form the misconception that up is north. Most maps in classrooms are hung vertically. (6) Some students were confused by the globe. Teachers need to explain why the globe is tilted. Also, they need to help students understand how to determine the cardinal directions on a globe. More research is needed to determine what is needed to help students truly understand these concepts and to determine whether these concepts are best taught at the elementary level.

  9. Balloon dilation of jejunal afferent loop functional stenosis following left hepatectomy and hepaticojejunostomy long time after pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Young-In; Ko, Gi-Young; Lee, Jae-Jun; Kang, Chul-Min; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Kwon, Yong-Jae; Cheon, Sung-Jin

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of functional stenosis of the jejunal loop following left hepatectomy and hepaticojejunostomy long after pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD), which was successfully managed by balloon dilation. A 70-year-old Korean man had undergone PPPD 6 years before due to 1.8 cm-sized distal bile duct cancer. Sudden onset of obstructive jaundice led to diagnosis of recurrent bile duct cancer mimicking perihilar cholangiocarcinoma of type IIIb. After left portal vein embolization, the patient underwent resection of the left liver and caudate lobe and remnant extrahepatic bile duct. The pre-existing jejunal loop and choledochojejunostomy site were used again for new hepaticojejunostomy. The patient recovered uneventfully, but clamping of the percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) tube resulted in cholangitis. Biliary imaging studies revealed that biliary passage into the afferent jejunal limb was significantly impaired. We performed balloon dilation of the afferent jejunal loop by using a 20 mm-wide balloon. Follow-up hepatobiliary scintigraphy showed gradual improvement in biliary excretion and the PTBD tube was removed at 1 month after balloon dilation. This very unusual condition was regarded as disuse atrophy of the jejunal loop, which was successfully managed by balloon dilation and intraluminal keeping of a large-bore PTBD tube for 1 month. PMID:26155279

  10. A Rare Case of Jejunal Arterio-Venous Fistula: Treatment with Superselective Catheter Embolization with a Tracker-18 Catheter and Microcoils

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenschein, Martin J. Anderson, Suzanne E.; Lourens, Steven; Triller, Juergen

    2004-11-15

    Arterio-venous fistulas may develop spontaneously, following trauma or infection, or be iatrogenic in nature. We present a rare case of a jejunal arterio- venous fistula in a 35-year-old man with a history of pancreatic head resection that had been performed two years previously because of chronic pancreatitis. The patient was admitted with acute upper abdominal pain, vomiting and an abdominal machinery-type bruit. The diagnosis of a jejunal arterio-venous fistula was established by MR imaging. Transfemoral angiography was performed to assess the possibility of catheter embolization. The angiographic study revealed a small aneurysm of the third jejunal artery, abnormal early filling of dilated jejunal veins and marked filling of the slightly dilated portal vein (13-14 mm). We considered the presence of segmental portal hypertension. The patient was treated with coil embolization in the same angiographic session. This case report demonstrates the importance of auscultation of the abdomen in the initial clinical examination. MR imaging and color Doppler ultrasound are excellent noninvasive tools in establishing the diagnosis. The role of interventional radiological techniques in the treatment of early portal hypertension secondary to jejunal arterio-venous fistula is discussed at a time when this condition is still asymptomatic. A review of the current literature is included.

  11. Balloon dilation of jejunal afferent loop functional stenosis following left hepatectomy and hepaticojejunostomy long time after pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Young-In; Hwang, Shin; Ko, Gi-Young; Lee, Jae-Jun; Kang, Chul-Min; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Kwon, Yong-Jae; Cheon, Sung-Jin

    2015-05-01

    We present a rare case of functional stenosis of the jejunal loop following left hepatectomy and hepaticojejunostomy long after pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD), which was successfully managed by balloon dilation. A 70-year-old Korean man had undergone PPPD 6 years before due to 1.8 cm-sized distal bile duct cancer. Sudden onset of obstructive jaundice led to diagnosis of recurrent bile duct cancer mimicking perihilar cholangiocarcinoma of type IIIb. After left portal vein embolization, the patient underwent resection of the left liver and caudate lobe and remnant extrahepatic bile duct. The pre-existing jejunal loop and choledochojejunostomy site were used again for new hepaticojejunostomy. The patient recovered uneventfully, but clamping of the percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) tube resulted in cholangitis. Biliary imaging studies revealed that biliary passage into the afferent jejunal limb was significantly impaired. We performed balloon dilation of the afferent jejunal loop by using a 20 mm-wide balloon. Follow-up hepatobiliary scintigraphy showed gradual improvement in biliary excretion and the PTBD tube was removed at 1 month after balloon dilation. This very unusual condition was regarded as disuse atrophy of the jejunal loop, which was successfully managed by balloon dilation and intraluminal keeping of a large-bore PTBD tube for 1 month. PMID:26155279

  12. Supergranulation rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schou, Jesper; Beck, John G.

    2001-01-01

    Simple convection models estimate the depth of supergranulation at approximately 15,000 km which suggests that supergranules should rotate at the rate of the plasma in the outer 2% of the Sun by radius. Previous measurements (Snodgrass & Ulrich, 1990; Beck & Schou, 2000) found that supergranules rotate significantly faster than this, with a size-dependent rotation rate. We expand on previous work and show that the torsional oscillation signal seen in the supergranules tracks that obtained for normal modes. We also find that the amplitudes and lifetimes of the supergranulation are size dependent.

  13. Solar rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziembowski, W.

    Sunspot observations made by Johannes Hevelius in 1642 - 1644 are the first ones providing significant information about the solar differential rotation. In modern astronomy the determination of the rotation rate is done in a routine way by measuring positions of various structures on the solar surface as well as by studying the Doppler shifts of spectral lines. In recent years a progress in helioseismology enabled determination of the rotation rate in the layers inaccessible for direct observations. There are still uncertainties concerning, especially, the temporal variations of the rotation rate and its behaviour in the radiative interior. We are far from understanding the observations. Theoretical works have not yet resulted in a satisfactory model for the angular momentum transport in the convective zone.

  14. Rotational aerophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, N. H.; Tarnopolsky, A. Z.; Lai, J. C. S.

    2002-03-01

    Free rotational aerophones such as the bullroarer, which consists of a wooden slat whirled around on the end of a string, and which emits a loud pulsating roar, have been used in many ancient and traditional societies for ceremonial purposes. This article presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of this instrument. The aerodynamics of rotational behavior is elucidated, and relates slat rotation frequency to slat width and velocity through the air. Analysis shows that sound production is due to generation of an oscillating-rotating dipole across the slat, the role of the vortices shed by the slat being relatively minor. Apparent discrepancies between the behavior of a bullroarer slat and a slat mounted on an axle in a wind tunnel are shown to be due to viscous friction in the bearings of the wind-tunnel experiment.

  15. Endocrine effects of duodenal-jejunal exclusion in obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kaválková, Petra; Mráz, Miloš; Trachta, Pavel; Kloučková, Jana; Cinkajzlová, Anna; Lacinová, Zdeňka; Haluzíková, Denisa; Beneš, Marek; Vlasáková, Zuzana; Burda, Václav; Novák, Daniel; Petr, Tomáš; Vítek, Libor; Pelikánová, Terezie; Haluzík, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Duodenal-jejunal bypass liner (DJBL) is an endoscopically implantable device designed to noninvasively mimic the effects of gastrointestinal bypass operations by excluding the duodenum and proximal jejunum from the contact with ingested food. The aim of our study was to assess the influence of DJBL on anthropometric parameters, glucose regulation, metabolic and hormonal profile in obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and to characterize both the magnitude and the possible mechanisms of its effect. Thirty obese patients with poorly controlled T2DM underwent the implantation of DJBL and were assessed before and 1, 6 and 10months after the implantation, and 3months after the removal of DJBL. The implantation decreased body weight, and improved lipid levels and glucose regulation along with reduced glycemic variability. Serum concentrations of fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) and bile acids markedly increased together with a tendency to restoration of postprandial peak of GLP1. White blood cell count slightly increased and red blood cell count decreased throughout the DJBL implantation period along with decreased ferritin, iron and vitamin B12 concentrations. Blood count returned to baseline values 3months after DJBL removal. Decreased body weight and improved glucose control persisted with only slight deterioration 3months after DJBL removal while the effect on lipids was lost. We conclude that the implantation of DJBL induced a sustained reduction in body weight and improvement in regulation of lipid and glucose. The increase in FGF19 and bile acids levels could be at least partially responsible for these effects. PMID:27474690

  16. Intracellular potassium as a possible inducer of amino acid transport across hamster jejunal enterocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Cremaschi, D; James, P S; Meyer, G; Rossetti, C; Smith, M W

    1986-01-01

    Brush border membrane potentials (Vm), intracellular K+ activity (aiK) and alanine uptake were measured in different parts of villi in mid-jejunal tissue taken from hamsters fed different amounts of food at high and low environmental temperatures. Basal villus enterocytes (Y cells) were found to have lower values for Vm and aiK than upper villus enterocytes (O cells). Alanine uptake was confined to O cells. The position on the villus where values for Vm and aiK changed, and where alanine uptake could first be seen to take place, depended on the energy intake and environmental temperature at which hamsters were kept. Na+-dependent alanine uptake and Vm were both higher in O cells of hamsters fed 10 kcal day-1 at 30 degrees C (10 k/30 degrees C) compared with animals fed 30 kcal day-1 at an environmental temperature of 12 degrees C (30 k/12 degrees C hamsters). The rates at which enterocytes migrated along the crypt-villus axis, measured separately in thymidine-labelling experiments, were 6.9 and 16.1 micron h-1 for 10 k/30 degrees C and 30 k/12 degrees C hamsters respectively. Both Vm and aiK were estimated, from these measurements, to have increased significantly by the time enterocytes became 30 h old. Alanine uptake began 15 h later. Neither of these parameters were influenced by previous adaptation conditions. The close temporal and variable positional relationship found between changes in aiK and onset of transport suggests that early changes in electrolyte composition might initiate a second phase of development enabling the enterocyte to absorb nutrients. The possibility that other ions besides K+ might also be involved in this aspect of regulation is also discussed. PMID:3795055

  17. Effect of pectin on jejunal glucose absorption and unstirred layer thickness in normal man.

    PubMed Central

    Flourie, B; Vidon, N; Florent, C H; Bernier, J J

    1984-01-01

    The effect of high methoxy apple pectin, a carbohydrate gelling agent, on the intestinal absorption of glucose, water, and sodium was studied in man. The effect of intraluminal fibre was evaluated in 22 healthy volunteers by the intestinal perfusion technique under an occlusive balloon. The test solutions (NaCl 130 mM, KCl 5 mM, glucose or mannitol 30 mM, PEG 4000 5 g/l) were perfused just beyond the ligament of Treitz at a rate of 10 ml/min. A 25 cm segment was studied. Three concentrations of pectin were tested: 6, 10, and 15 g/l. The effect of this pectin at two concentrations, 6 and 10 g/l, on the jejunal unstirred layer thickness was evaluated in nine other healthy subjects by an electrical technique. In mannitol solution, pectin reversed water and sodium absorption, whatever its concentration was, while in glucose solution it significantly reduced absorption of water and sodium at 10 and 15 g/l only (p less than 0.01). It significantly reduced glucose absorption at all concentrations (p less than 0.01). This reduction was found to be correlated with the solution viscosity (p less than 0.01). Pectin did not alter the glucose dependent sodium transport but increased significantly (p less than 0.001) the unstirred layer thickness. These results suggested that, in healthy man, pectin acutely given may impair intestinal absorption by means of an increased unstirred layer resistance. This effect could contribute to the diminished postprandial glycaemia observed in human subjects fed pectin. PMID:6432635

  18. Effect of pectin on jejunal glucose absorption and unstirred layer thickness in normal man.

    PubMed

    Flourie, B; Vidon, N; Florent, C H; Bernier, J J

    1984-09-01

    The effect of high methoxy apple pectin, a carbohydrate gelling agent, on the intestinal absorption of glucose, water, and sodium was studied in man. The effect of intraluminal fibre was evaluated in 22 healthy volunteers by the intestinal perfusion technique under an occlusive balloon. The test solutions (NaCl 130 mM, KCl 5 mM, glucose or mannitol 30 mM, PEG 4000 5 g/l) were perfused just beyond the ligament of Treitz at a rate of 10 ml/min. A 25 cm segment was studied. Three concentrations of pectin were tested: 6, 10, and 15 g/l. The effect of this pectin at two concentrations, 6 and 10 g/l, on the jejunal unstirred layer thickness was evaluated in nine other healthy subjects by an electrical technique. In mannitol solution, pectin reversed water and sodium absorption, whatever its concentration was, while in glucose solution it significantly reduced absorption of water and sodium at 10 and 15 g/l only (p less than 0.01). It significantly reduced glucose absorption at all concentrations (p less than 0.01). This reduction was found to be correlated with the solution viscosity (p less than 0.01). Pectin did not alter the glucose dependent sodium transport but increased significantly (p less than 0.001) the unstirred layer thickness. These results suggested that, in healthy man, pectin acutely given may impair intestinal absorption by means of an increased unstirred layer resistance. This effect could contribute to the diminished postprandial glycaemia observed in human subjects fed pectin. PMID:6432635

  19. Transition between columnar absorptive cells and goblet cells in the rat jejunal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Kurosumi, K; Shibuichi, I; Tosaka, H

    1981-11-01

    Electron microscopic observation of the jejunal epithelium of rats demonstrated morphological evidence of a transition between columnar absorptive cells and growing goblet cells. The columnar cells in both the villi and crypts have features suggestive of absorptive functions. They are provided with apical invaginations continuous to the intermicrovillous space. Absorbed lipid is observed in small vesicles in the terminal web layer, and chylomicrons derived here from are contained in large vacuoles near the Golgi apparatus. Ferritin particles artificially infused into the gut lumen were absorbed into the vacuoles in the subapical zone of columnar cells of suckling rats. Growing goblet cells situated in the crypt epithelium contain surface invaginations and lysosomes which are the same in structure as those found in absorptive cells nearby. Fat droplets evidently absorbed by the growing goblet cell were observed among immature mucus droplets. Artificially infused ferritin particles were found in vacuoles and lysosomes near the Golgi apparatus of some goblet cells of suckling rats. Some goblet cells on the intestinal villi of suckling rats looked immature and their microvilli and cytoplasmic matrix were clear like those of columnar absorptive cells. The transition between these goblet cells with clear cytoplasm and the mature goblet cells with dark cytoplasm was observed. These morphological evidences indicate that some of columnar cells already differentiated to absorptive cells are capable of transforming into mucus-producing (goblet) cells. It is suggested that not only undifferentiated columnar cells in the crypt base but also considerably differentiated columnar cells with absorptive function can differentiate into goblet cells. PMID:7325782

  20. Effects of hydrochloric acid on duodenal and jejunal mucosal permeability in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Nylander, O.; Kvietys, P.; Granger, D.N. )

    1989-10-01

    The effects of various concentrations of hydrochloric acid (1, 5, 10, and 100 mM) on mucosal permeability and acid disappearance (H+-dis) in duodenum and jejunum were studied in anesthetized rats. Mucosal permeability was assessed by measuring blood-to-lumen clearance of 51Cr-labeled EDTA (ED-Cl). Luminal alkalinization (LA) and H+-dis were determined by backtitration. ED-Cl was stable during saline perfusion and was not affected by changes in intestinal blood flow. Basal ED-Cl was four times higher in duodenum than in jejunum. Mucosal permeability of both duodenum and jejunum was not altered by 1 mM HCl. However, 5 mM HCl induced a 3.3-fold increase (P less than 0.001) in ED-Cl in jejunum but was without effect in duodenum. A 15-fold increase in ED-Cl was obtained in jejunum and a doubling (P less than 0.001) in ED-Cl was observed in duodenum when HCl concentration was increased to 10 mM HCl. One hundred millimolar HCl induced large increases of ED-Cl in both segments. The twofold increase of ED-Cl in response to 10 mM HCl in duodenum was completely reversible, whereas ED-Cl in jejunum was three to four times higher (P less than 0.05) than preacid levels 60 min after cessation of acid perfusion. The net increase in jejunal ED-Cl obtained after acid exposure was closely correlated (r = 0.99) with the net increase in LA, indicating leakage of interstitial fluid into the luminal solution. LA (saline perfusion) and H+-dis (HCl perfusion) were significantly higher in duodenum than in jejunum.

  1. Impairment of jejunal absorption rate of carnosine by glycylglycine in man in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, G C

    1976-01-01

    Using a double-lumen tube jejunal perfusion system in vivo, the mutual effects of carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) and glycylglycine on their respective absorption rates have been studied in six Zambian African adults. Data on the effect of the constituent amino-acids of carnosine on glycylglycine absorption rate have similarly been obtained. The solutions infused in each subject contained (A) carnosine (50 mmol l.-1), (B) carnosine (50 mmol l.-1) and glycylglycine (50 mmol l.-1), (C) glycylglycine (50 mmol l.-1), and (D) glycylglycine (50 mmol l.-1), L-histidine (50 mmol l.-1) and beta-alanine (50 mmol l.-1). Glycylglycine produced a significant impairment in the mean rate of histidine absorption from carnosine (P less than 0-01). However, carnosine did not have a significant effect on the mean rate of glycine absorption from glycylglycine. Mean rate of histidine absorption from solution D was significantly higher than that from solution A (P less than 0-01). Mean rate of glycine absorption from glycylglycine was not significantly different during infusion of solutions B, C, and D. The results are consistent with the concept that carnosine on glycylglycine is probably because the affinity of mechanism; the lack of influence of carnosine on glycylglycine is probably because the affinity of carnosine for the dipeptide uptake mechanism is relatively low. A gross difference has been shown between mean absorption rate of histidine from free L-histidine (solution D) (25-8 mmol h-1) and when it is given in the form of carnosine in the presence of another dipeptide (solution B) (8-7 mmol h-1); that emphasizes the complexity of amino acid and peptide interaction during absorption, which must be important in nutrition. PMID:773786

  2. Temporary Trans-jejunal Hepatic Duct Stenting in Roux-en-y Hepaticojejunostomy for Reconstruction of Iatrogenic Bile Duct Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Sadegh Fazeli, Mohammad; Kazemeini, Ali Reza; Jafarian, Ali; Bashashati, Mohammad; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Bile Duct Injuries (BDI) during cholecystectomy are now being recognized as major health problems. Objectives Herein, we present our experience with handling major BDIs and report long-term outcome of hepaticojejunostomies followed by trans-jejunal hepatic duct stenting performed to reconstruct extra-hepatic biliary tracts. Materials and Methods In this case series, we prospectively collected data of 22 patients, who underwent first time biliary reconstruction through Roux-en-y hepaticojejunostomy followed by hepatic duct stenting using a trans-jejunal bifurcated 6F tube drain. The long-term outcome was assessed and defined as excellent (asymptomatic, normal liver enzymes and bilirubin levels), good (asymptomatic, mild abnormality in liver enzyme and bilirubin levels), poor (symptomatic, abnormal liver enzymes and bilirubin level) and failure (requiring reoperation). Results A total of 22 patients including four males (18.1%) and 18 females (81.8%) were evaluated. The mean age was 42.71 (range: 23 - 74) years. Twelve patients had undergone open cholecystectomy (54.5%) and the rest had a history of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The mean interval between the primary operation and reconstruction was 92.71 days. The mean follow-up period after biliary reconstruction was 42.33 (range: 1 - 96) months. No instance of anastomotic leakage or stenosis, biliary sepsis, thromboembolic event, or respiratory infection was noted in the long-term follow-up. The outcome was excellent in all patients. No case with poor or failure of result was noticed. Conclusions Although a devastating complication iatrogenic major bile duct injuries can be corrected surgically with a high rate of success. Temporary trans-jejunal stenting of the hepatic ducts can help in maintaining the integrity of anastomosis without stenosis or biliary sepsis. PMID:27626003

  3. Central nervous system influence of prostaglandin E2 on jejunal water and electrolyte transport in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Primi, M P; Bueno, L

    1986-12-01

    The effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) vs. i.v. administration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on net fluxes of water, Na+, and K+ through a jejunal Thiry-Vella loop were investigated before or after previous treatment with adrenergic blockers, indomethacin, and 8-(N,N-diethylamino)octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate hydrochloride (TMB8) in conscious dogs. Administered intracerebroventricularly at doses of 20-100 ng/kg, PGE2 significantly reduced (p less than 0.01), in a dose-related manner, the net fluxes of water, Na+, and K+, which were reversed from an absorption to a secretion. Intravenously administered PGE2 at a five times higher dosage failed to significantly alter net water and electrolyte fluxes. Phentolamine (0.2 mg/kg body wt) and tolazoline (2 mg/kg body wt) administered intravenously abolished the secretory effects of centrally administered PGE2 (50 ng/kg). However, 10 times lower dosages of phentolamine and tolazoline administered intracerebroventricularly did not prevent the PGE2-induced secretion of water and electrolytes. Intracerebroventricular administration of indomethacin (10 micrograms/kg body wt) and TMB8 (1 microgram/kg body wt), did not modify the effect of i.c.v.-administered PGE2; however, indomethacin administered intracerebroventricularly alone stimulated water and electrolyte absorption. None of these treatments results in a significant (p greater than 0.05) change in mean transit time through the Thiry-Vella loop. We conclude that centrally administered PGE2 influences jejunal water, Na+, and K+ absorption, through a mechanism related to adrenergic innervation and/or involving at least alpha 2-adrenoceptors. The results also suggest that PGE2 in the central nervous system controls jejunal water and ion transport in the dog. PMID:3464524

  4. Biologics in rotator cuff surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schär, Michael O; Rodeo, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    Pathologies of the rotator cuff are by far the most common cause of shoulder dysfunction and pain. Even though reconstruction of the rotator cuff results in improved clinical outcome scores, including decreased pain, several studies report high failure rates. Orthopaedic research has therefore focused on biologically augmenting the rotator cuff reconstruction and improving tendon–bone healing of the rotator cuff. This biological augmentation has included the application of different platelet concentrates containing growth factors, mesenchymal stem cells, scaffolds and a combination of the above. The present review provides an overview over the biological augmentation options based upon current evidence.

  5. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  6. Rotation Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In aircraft turbine engine research, certain investigations require extremely precise measurement of the position of a rotating part, such as the rotor, a disc-like part of the engine's compressor which revolves around a shaft at extremely high speeds. For example, in studies of airflow velocity within a compressor, researchers need to know-for data correlation the instantaneous position of a given spot on the rotor each time a velocity measurement is made. Earlier methods of measuring rotor shaft angle required a physical connection to the shaft, which limited the velocity of the rotating object.

  7. Claudin-4 undergoes age-dependent change in cellular localization on pig jejunal villous epithelial cells, independent of bacterial colonization.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, J Alex; Kent-Dennis, Coral; Van Kessel, Andrew G; Wilson, Heather L

    2015-01-01

    Newborn piglets are immunologically naïve and must receive passive immunity via colostrum within 24 hours to survive. Mechanisms by which the newborn piglet gut facilitates uptake of colostral cells, antibodies, and proteins may include FcRn and pIgR receptor-mediated endocytosis and paracellular transport between tight junctions (TJs). In the present study, FcRn gene (FCGRT) was minimally expressed in 6-week-old gut and newborn jejunum but it was expressed at significantly higher levels in the ileum of newborn piglets. pIgR was highly expressed in the jejunum and ileum of 6-week-old animals but only minimally in neonatal gut. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that Claudin-5 localized to blood vessel endothelial cells. Claudin-4 was strongly localized to the apical aspect of jejunal epithelial cells for the first 2 days of life after which it was redistributed to the lateral surface between adjacent enterocytes. Claudin-4 was localized to ileal lateral surfaces within 24 hours after birth indicating regional and temporal differences. Tissue from gnotobiotic piglets showed that commensal microbiota did not influence Claudin-4 surface localization on jejunal or ileal enterocytes. Regulation of TJs by Claudin-4 surface localization requires further investigation. Understanding the factors that regulate gut barrier maturation may yield protective strategies against infectious diseases. PMID:25948883

  8. Ectopic Jejunal Variceal Rupture in a Liver Transplant Recipient Successfully Treated With Percutaneous Transhepatic Coil Embolization: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Abe, Satoru; Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Hoshikawa, Mayumi; Shirata, Chikara; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2015-11-01

    Here we present the rupture of ectopic jejunal varices developing in a liver transplant recipient without portal hypertension, which was successfully treated with percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization.A 48-year-old man with massive melena was admitted to our department. He had undergone liver transplantation for hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis 8 months before, and his postoperative course was satisfactory except for an acute cellular rejection. No evidence of bleeding was detected by upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, but dynamic multidetector computed tomography of the whole abdomen revealed an intestinal varix protruding into the lumen of the jejunum with suspected extravasation. There was no evidence of portal venous stenosis or thrombosis. Immediately upon diagnosis of the ruptured ectopic jejunal varix, percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization was performed, achieving complete hemostasis. The portal venous pressure measured during the procedure was within normal limits. He was discharged from the hospital 11 days after embolization and remained in stable condition without re-bleeding 6 months after discharge.This is the first report of an ectopic intestinal variceal rupture in an uneventful liver transplant recipient that was successfully treated with interventional percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization. Clinicians encountering liver transplant recipients with melena should be aware of the possibility of late-onset rupture of ectopic varices, even in those having an uneventful post-transplant course without portal hypertension. PMID:26632745

  9. Comparison of the biochemical changes in the jejunal mucosa of dogs with aerobic and anaerobic bacterial overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Batt, R M; McLean, L

    1987-11-01

    Subcellular biochemical changes in the jejunal mucosa have been compared in dogs with either aerobic or anaerobic bacterial overgrowth to explore relationships between composition of the flora and mucosal damage. Affected animals comprised 17 German shepherd dogs with chronic diarrhea or weight loss, or both. Analysis of duodenal juice demonstrated aerobic overgrowth in 10 cases, most frequently comprising enterococci and Escherichia coli, and obligate anaerobic overgrowth in 7 cases, most frequently including Clostridia spp. Histologic changes were minimal; however, examination of peroral jejunal biopsy specimens by sucrose density gradient centrifugation revealed specific biochemical abnormalities. In the dogs with aerobic overgrowth, there was a selective loss of brush border alkaline phosphatase activity, and gamma-glutamyl transferase activity was increased, whereas activities of disaccharidases and aminopeptidase N were unaltered. In contrast, anaerobic overgrowth was associated with a reduction in brush border density, indicative of a considerable fall in the glycoprotein-to-lipid ratio of the brush border membrane, whereas brush border enzyme activities were unaltered. There was a loss of peroxisomal catalase activity in dogs with aerobic overgrowth, and an indication of mitochondrial disruption in dogs with anaerobic overgrowth, but little evidence for damage to other subcellular organelles. These findings demonstrate that aerobic and anaerobic overgrowth may be associated with distinct but different mucosal abnormalities particularly affecting the brush border membrane. PMID:2888701

  10. Claudin-4 Undergoes Age-Dependent Change in Cellular Localization on Pig Jejunal Villous Epithelial Cells, Independent of Bacterial Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Van Kessel, Andrew G.; Wilson, Heather L.

    2015-01-01

    Newborn piglets are immunologically naïve and must receive passive immunity via colostrum within 24 hours to survive. Mechanisms by which the newborn piglet gut facilitates uptake of colostral cells, antibodies, and proteins may include FcRn and pIgR receptor-mediated endocytosis and paracellular transport between tight junctions (TJs). In the present study, FcRn gene (FCGRT) was minimally expressed in 6-week-old gut and newborn jejunum but it was expressed at significantly higher levels in the ileum of newborn piglets. pIgR was highly expressed in the jejunum and ileum of 6-week-old animals but only minimally in neonatal gut. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that Claudin-5 localized to blood vessel endothelial cells. Claudin-4 was strongly localized to the apical aspect of jejunal epithelial cells for the first 2 days of life after which it was redistributed to the lateral surface between adjacent enterocytes. Claudin-4 was localized to ileal lateral surfaces within 24 hours after birth indicating regional and temporal differences. Tissue from gnotobiotic piglets showed that commensal microbiota did not influence Claudin-4 surface localization on jejunal or ileal enterocytes. Regulation of TJs by Claudin-4 surface localization requires further investigation. Understanding the factors that regulate gut barrier maturation may yield protective strategies against infectious diseases. PMID:25948883

  11. Toxin-associated and other genes in Clostridium perfringens type A isolates from bovine clostridial abomasitis (BCA) and jejunal hemorrhage syndrome (JHS).

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Benjamin J; Nowell, Victoria J; Parreira, Valeria R; Soltes, Glenn; Prescott, John F

    2012-10-01

    This study examined known or possible virulence-associated genes in type A Clostridium perfringens from cases of both bovine clostridial abomasitis (BCA) and jejunal hemorrhage syndrome (JHS) and compared these to isolates from calves that were healthy or had undifferentiated diarrheal illness. A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to genotype the 218 C. perfringens isolates. Isolates were sourced from healthy and diarrheic young and mature cattle (n = 191), from calves with confirmed or suspected BCA (n = 22), and from mature cattle with JHS (n = 5). Of 216 isolates (96%), 208 were positive for the cpa gene and 13% (29/218) were positive for atypical cpb2. Three of 8 (37.5%) confirmed BCA isolates, 2 of 13 (15.4%) suspected BCA isolates, and no JHS isolates tested positive for atypical cpb2. As all isolates were negative for cpb, cpb2, cpe, etx, netB, and tpeL, the results of the present study do not support a role for these genes in BCA or JHS. A subset of unique genes identified in 1 bovine clostridial abomasitis isolate (F262), for which a genome sequence is available, was searched for in 8 BCA isolates by PCR. None of the 10 genes was consistently present in all or even in a majority of BCA isolates. Many of these genes were also variably and inconsistently present in type A isolates from calves that did not have BCA. Although a virulence signature to aid in the diagnosis of BCA caused by C. perfringens type A was not identified, further work may discover a gene or group of genes that would constitute such a signature. PMID:23543949

  12. Toxin-associated and other genes in Clostridium perfringens type A isolates from bovine clostridial abomasitis (BCA) and jejunal hemorrhage syndrome (JHS)

    PubMed Central

    Schlegel, Benjamin J.; Nowell, Victoria J.; Parreira, Valeria R.; Soltes, Glenn; Prescott, John F.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined known or possible virulence-associated genes in type A Clostridium perfringens from cases of both bovine clostridial abomasitis (BCA) and jejunal hemorrhage syndrome (JHS) and compared these to isolates from calves that were healthy or had undifferentiated diarrheal illness. A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to genotype the 218 C. perfringens isolates. Isolates were sourced from healthy and diarrheic young and mature cattle (n = 191), from calves with confirmed or suspected BCA (n = 22), and from mature cattle with JHS (n = 5). Of 216 isolates (96%), 208 were positive for the cpa gene and 13% (29/218) were positive for atypical cpb2. Three of 8 (37.5%) confirmed BCA isolates, 2 of 13 (15.4%) suspected BCA isolates, and no JHS isolates tested positive for atypical cpb2. As all isolates were negative for cpb, cpb2, cpe, etx, netB, and tpeL, the results of the present study do not support a role for these genes in BCA or JHS. A subset of unique genes identified in 1 bovine clostridial abomasitis isolate (F262), for which a genome sequence is available, was searched for in 8 BCA isolates by PCR. None of the 10 genes was consistently present in all or even in a majority of BCA isolates. Many of these genes were also variably and inconsistently present in type A isolates from calves that did not have BCA. Although a virulence signature to aid in the diagnosis of BCA caused by C. perfringens type A was not identified, further work may discover a gene or group of genes that would constitute such a signature. PMID:23543949

  13. Performance, organ zinc concentration, jejunal brush border membrane enzyme activities and mRNA expression in piglets fed with different levels of dietary zinc.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lena; Pieper, Robert; Schunter, Nadine; Vahjen, Wilfried; Zentek, Jürgen

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of dietary zinc on performance, jejunal brush border membrane enzyme activities and mRNA levels of enzymes and two zinc transporters in piglets. A total of 126 piglets were weaned at 26 ±1 days of age and randomly allocated into three groups fed with diets 50, 150 and 2500 mg zinc/kg. Performance was recorded and at weekly intervals, eight piglets per group were killed. The activities of isolated brush border membrane enzymes including lactase, maltase, sucrase, aminopeptidase-N and intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), and the relative transcript abundance of aminopeptidase-N (APN), sucrase-isomaltase (SUC), IAP and the two zinc transporters SLC39A4 (ZIP4) and SLC30A1 (ZnT1) were investigated in the jejunum. Feeding pharmacological zinc levels increased weight gain (p < 0.001) during the first week, but performance was lower (p < 0.05) in the third week. Organ zinc concentrations were increased by high dietary zinc level. The activity of IAP was higher (p < 0.05) with the highest dietary zinc level, no effects were determined for other enzymes. Dietary zinc level had no effect on transcript abundance of digestive enzymes. The mRNA levels decreased (p < 0.001) for ZIP4, and increased for ZnT1 (p < 0.05) with pharmacological zinc levels. In conclusion, pharmacological zinc levels improved performance in the short-term. Intestinal mRNA level of zinc transporters changed with high zinc supply, but this did not prevent zinc accumulation in tissues, suggesting hampered homoeostatic regulation. This might cause impaired performance during longer supply. PMID:23742645

  14. Effects of dietary administering chitosan on growth performance, jejunal morphology, jejunal mucosal sIgA, occludin, claudin-1 and TLR4 expression in weaned piglets challenged by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dingfu; Tang, Zhiru; Yin, Yulong; Zhang, Bin; Hu, Xionggui; Feng, Zemeng; Wang, Jinquan

    2013-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate how chitosan (COS) affects intestinal mucosal barrier function and to further explain mechanisms of COS on growth performance. Thirty piglets, weaned at 21 days of age, were challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli during preliminary trial period. Three groups of Piglets in individual pens were fed a corn-soybean meal diet containing no addition, 50 mg/kg chlortetracycline, or 300 mg/kg COS for 21 days. Jejunal morphology and histology were analyzed under light microscope. The concentrations of occludin proteins were determined by western blot. Immunohistochemistry assays were used to determine secretory immunoglobulin (sIgA) level. Real-time PCR was used to detect Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and Claudin-1 in jejunal mucosa. Feeding COS or chlortetracycline reduced (P<0.05) feed conversion ratio. Villus length, villus length/crypt depth, and goblet cells, were increased (P<0.05), but villus width and crypt depth were decreased (P<0.05) in both COS and chlortetracycline groups. Intraepithelial lymphocytes were higher (P<0.05) in the COS group than both chlortetracycline and control groups. Occludin protein expression was increased (P<0.01) in the COS group, but was decreased (P<0.05) in the chlortetracycline group. Expression of sIgA protein was higher (P<0.05) in the COS group than both control and chlortetracycline groups, however TLR4 mRNA expression was decreased (P<0.05) in both COS and chlortetracycline groups. There was no difference in expression of claudin-1 among the three groups. In conclusion, chitosan and the antibiotic have similar effects in promoting piglet growth and reducing intestinal inflammation, but different effects on intestinal mucosal barrier function. This indicates that chitosan can replace chlortetracycline as a feed additive for piglets. PMID:24007779

  15. Stellar Rotation and Precise Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, D. F.

    Two aspects will be considered. First, I will view the spectroscopic measurement of rotation rates as a differential precision radial velocity: how do we get rotation rates; what are the uncertainties stemming from differential rotation, time variable profiles caused by spots, uncertain limb darkening, and the presence of macroturbulence? What do we even mean by the rotation rate when there is differential rotation? Second, I will discuss the effects of rotation on specifying the precise position of spectral lines, i.e., the classical radial velocity of a star. I will present some thoughts on the effects of having our sharp markers of the Doppler effect degraded by rotation, the meaning of line position when the Doppler effects of rotation and convection interact, and the altered shapes of composite spectrum features with increased rotational smearing.

  16. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy with duodeno-jejunal bypass for morbid obesity in a patient with situs inversus totalis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Atsushi; Seki, Yosuke; Kasama, Kazunori

    2016-08-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy with duodeno-jejunal bypass (LSG/DJB) has been adopted in our center for the treatment of morbidly obese patients with both severe type 2 diabetes mellitus and existing risks factors for gastric cancer. We have successfully performed over 200 LSG/DJB procedures in our institution. Here we report the techniques used to perform LSG/DJB in a morbidly obese patient with situs inversus totalis. The only significant difference in executing LSG/DJB between normal anatomy and situs inversus totalis is changing the surgeon's position and switching the trocar placements during the intraoperative phase. Consequently, there were no significant difference in operative time between normal anatomy cases and the situs inversus totalis case. PMID:27140835

  17. The rotation of comet nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    Spin-vector research on cometary nuclei is reviewed with emphasis on the actual determination of rotation period and spin-axis orientation. The rotation periods of 47 comets are compared with those of 41 asteroids with diameters of not more than 40 km. It is shown that the median periods for the comets is 15.0 hr as compared with 6.8 hr for the asteroids and that the preliminary distribution curve for the logarithms of the comet periods is not Gaussian and is flatter than the corresponding curve for the asteroids. Slow accumulation at low relative velocities is suggested as the cause of the longer comet rotation periods.

  18. Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues currently being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  19. Oral administration recombinant porcine epidermal growth factor enhances the jejunal digestive enzyme genes expression and activity of early-weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Lee, D N; Chuang, Y S; Chiou, H Y; Wu, F Y; Yen, H T; Weng, C F

    2008-08-01

    This study attempted to determine ingested porcine epidermal growth factor (pEGF) on the gastrointestinal tract development of early-weaned piglets. Thirty-two piglets (14-day weaned) were randomly allotted to supplemented with 0 (control), 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 mg pEGF/kg diet. Each treatment consisted of four replicates with two pigs per pen for a 14 days experimental period. Piglets were sacrificed and gastrointestinal tract samples were collected to measure mucosa morphology, mRNA expression and activities of digestive enzymes in the gastrointestinal tract of piglets at the end of the experiment. Diets supplemented with pEGF failed to influence growth performance but tended to increase jejunal mucosa weight (p < 0.09) and protein content (p < 0.07). Piglets supplemental pEGF induced incrementally the gastric pepsin activity (p < 0.05) and stimulated jejunal alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and lactase activities accompanied with the increase of jejunal ALP and maltase mRNA expression. No effect of pEGF on the activities of all enzymes in ileum except the stimulation of ileal aminopeptide N mRNA expression. These results reveal that dietary pEGF supplementation might enhance gene expression and activities of digestive enzymes in the stomach and jejunum of piglets. PMID:18662356

  20. The expression of genes involved in jejunal lipogenesis and lipoprotein synthesis is altered in morbidly obese subjects with insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Repiso, Carolina; Rodriguez-Pacheco, Francisca; Garcia-Arnes, Juan; Valdes, Sergio; Gonzalo, Montserrat; Soriguer, Federico; Moreno-Ruiz, Francisco J; Rodriguez-Cañete, Alberto; Gallego-Perales, Jose L; Alcain-Martinez, Guillermo; Vazquez-Pedreño, Luis; Lopez-Enriquez, Soledad; Garcia-Serrano, Sara; Garrido-Sanchez, Lourdes; Garcia-Fuentes, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    The dyslipidemia associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an important risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, until now little attention has been paid to the role that the intestine might have. The aim of this research was to determine the relation between insulin resistance and intestinal de novo lipogenesis/lipoprotein synthesis in morbidly obese subjects and to study the effect of insulin on these processes. Jejunal mRNA expression of the different genes involved in the intestinal de novo lipogenesis/lipoprotein synthesis was analyzed in three groups of morbidly obese subjects: Group 1 with low insulin resistance (MO-low-IR), group 2 with high insulin resistance (MO-high-IR), and group 3 with T2DM and treatment with metformin (MO-metf-T2DM). In addition, intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from MO-low-IR were incubated with different doses of insulin/glucose. In Group 2 (MO-high-IR), the jejunal mRNA expression levels of apo A-IV, ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), pyruvate dehydrogenase (lipoamide) beta (PDHB), and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) were significantly higher and acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha (ACC1) and fatty-acid synthase lower than in Group 1 (MO-low-IR). In Group 3 (MO-metf-T2DM), only the ACLY and PDHB mRNA expressions were significantly higher than in Group 1 (MO-low-IR). The mRNA expression of most of the genes studied was significantly linked to insulin and glucose levels. The incubation of IEC with different doses of insulin and glucose produced a higher expression of diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2, microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, apo A-IV, SREBP-1c, and ACC1 when both, glucose and insulin, were at a high concentration. However, with only high insulin levels, there were higher apo A-IV, PDHB and SREBP-1c expressions, and a lower ACLY expression. In conclusion, the jejunum of MO-high-IR has a decreased mRNA expression of genes involved in de novo fatty-acid synthesis and an

  1. Interferometric rotation sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, T. M. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An interferometric rotation sensor and control system is provided which includes a compound prism interferometer and an associated direction control system. Light entering the interferometer is split into two paths with the light in the respective paths being reflected an unequal number of times, and then being recombined at an exit aperture in phase differing relationships. Incoming light is deviated from the optical axis of the device by an angle, alpha. The angle causes a similar displacement of the two component images at the exit aperture which results in a fringe pattern. Fringe numbers are directly related to angle alpha. Various control systems of the interferometer are given.

  2. Rotating Apparatus for Isoelectric Focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.

    1986-01-01

    Remixing of separated fractions prevented. Improved isoelectric focusing apparatus helps to prevent electro-osmosis and convection, both of which cause remixing of separated fractions. Fractionating column segmented and rotated about horizontal axis: Only combined effects of both features fully effective in making good separations. Improved apparatus slowly rotated continuously or rocked (at rotational amplitude of at least 180 degrees) about its horizontal axis so average gravitational vector experienced by fluid is zero and convection is therefore suppressed. Electro-osmosis suppressed and convection further suppressed by separating column into disklike compartments along its length with filters. Experiments have shown dimensions of apparatus not critical. Typical compartment and column volumes are 2 and 40 ml, respectively. Rotation speeds lie between 3 and 30 rpm.

  3. Rotator Cuff Tears

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctors because of a rotator cuff problem. A torn rotator cuff will weaken your shoulder. This means ... or more of the rotator cuff tendons is torn, the tendon no longer fully attaches to the ...

  4. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... others can be very painful. Treatment for a torn rotator cuff depends on age, health, how severe ... is, and how long you've had the torn rotator cuff. Treatment for torn rotator cuff includes: ...

  5. Rotator cuff problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... days, such as in painting and carpentry Poor posture over many years Aging Rotator cuff tears TEARS ... also help prevent rotator cuff problems. Practice good posture to keep your rotator cuff tendons and muscles ...

  6. Locomotion gaits of a rotating cylinder pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rees, Wim M.; Novati, Guido; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-11-01

    Using 2D numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations, we demonstrate that a simple pair of rotating cylinders can display a range of locomotion patterns of biological and engineering interest. Steadily counter-rotating the cylinders causes the pair to move akin to a vortex dipole for low rotation rates, but as the rotational velocity is increased the direction of motion reverses. Unsteady rotations lead to different locomotion gaits that resemble jellyfish (for in-phase rotations) and undulating swimmers (for out-of-phase rotations). The small number of parameters for this simple system allows us to systematically map the phase space of these gaits, and allows us to understand the underlying physical mechanisms using a minimal model with implications for biological locomotion and engineered analogs.

  7. Sutureless jejuno-jejunal anastomosis in gastric cancer patients: a comparison with handsewn procedure in a single institute

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The biofragmentable anastomotic ring has been used to this day for various types of anastomosis in the gastrointestinal tract, but it has not yet achieved widespread acceptance among surgeons. The purpose of this retrospective study is to compare surgical outcomes of sutureless with suture method of Roux-and-Y jejunojejunostomy in patients with gastric cancer. Methods Two groups of patients were obtained based on anastomosis technique (sutureless group versus hand sewn group): perioperative outcomes were recorded for every patient. Results The mean time spent to complete a sutureless anastomosis was 11±4 min, whereas the time spent to perform hand sewn anastomosis was 23±7 min. Estimated intraoperative blood loss was 178±32ml in the sutureless group and 182±23ml in the suture-method group with no significant differences. No complications were registered related to enteroanastomosis. Intraoperative mortality was none for both groups. Conclusions The Biofragmentable Anastomotic Ring offers a safe and time-saving method for the jejuno-jejunal anastomosis in gastric cancer surgery, and for this purpose the ring has been approved as a standard method in our clinic. Nevertheless currently there are few studies on upper gastrointestinal sutureless anastomoses and this could be the reason for the low uptake of this device. PMID:23173807

  8. Biochemical changes in the jejunal mucosa of dogs with a naturally occurring enteropathy associated with bacterial overgrowth.

    PubMed Central

    Batt, R M; Carter, M W; Peters, T J

    1984-01-01

    The subcellular biochemical features of a naturally occurring enteropathy in the dog associated with bacterial overgrowth have been examined. Affected animals comprised a group of 10 German Shepherd dogs with raised serum folate and reduced vitamin B12 concentrations, mild steatorrhoea, reduced xylose absorption, and normal exocrine pancreatic function. Culture of duodenal juice showed bacterial overgrowth with mixed flora, most frequently including enterococci and Escherichia coli. Examination of peroral jejunal biopsies revealed predominantly minimal histological but distinct biochemical abnormalities in the mucosa. The specific activity of alkaline phosphatase was decreased, isopycnic density gradient centrifugation showing a marked loss particularly of the brush border component of enzyme activity. In contrast, gamma-glutamyl transferase activity was enhanced in brush border fragments of slightly increased modal density, but there were no changes in the activities of the carbohydrases, zinc-resistant alpha-glucosidase, maltase, sucrase, and lactase or of the peptidase, leucyl-2-naphthylamidase. Activities of lysosomal enzymes were increased and there was evidence for enhanced lysosomal fragility and mitochondrial disruption. The activities and density gradient distributions of marker enzymes for basal-lateral membranes, endoplasmic reticulum and peroxisomes were essentially unaltered. These findings show that bacterial colonisation of the proximal small intestine may be associated with specific alterations in microvillus membrane proteins and provide biochemical evidence for intracellular damage to the enterocytes. PMID:6745719

  9. Enteroscopic Tattooing for Better Intraoperative Localization of a Bleeding Jejunal GIST Facilitates Minimally Invasive Laparoscopically-assisted Surgery.

    PubMed

    Iacob, Razvan; Dimitriu, Anca; Stanciulea, Oana; Herlea, Vlad; Popescu, Irinel; Gheorghe, Cristian

    2016-03-01

    We present the case of a 63-year-old man that was admitted for melena and severe anemia. Upper GI endoscopy and colonoscopy failed to identify the lesion responsible for bleeding, and enteroCT scan was also non-contributive to the diagnosis. Capsule endoscopy indicated possible jejunal bleeding but could not indicate the source of bleeding, recommending anterograde enteroscopy. Single balloon enteroscopy identified a 2 cm submucosal tumour in the distal part of the jejunum, with a macroscopic appearance suggesting a gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST). The tumor location was marked using SPOT tattoo and subsequently easily identified by the surgeon and resected via minimally invasive laparoscopic-assisted approach. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis indicated a low risk GIST. The unusual small size of the GIST as a modality of presentation, with digestive bleeding and anemia and the ability to use VCE/enteroscopy to identify and mark the lesion prior to minimally invasive surgery, represent the particularities of the presented case. PMID:27014761

  10. A very feasible alternative in patients with feeding difficulties from gastrostomy: Jejunal tube advanced through the gastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Karabulut, Ramazan; Turkyilmaz, Zafer; Sonmez, Kaan; Oktar, Suna Ozhan; Kaya, Cem; Kokurcan, Atilla; Oncu, Fatih; Basaklar, Abdullah Can

    2015-01-01

    Background: Our aim is to share our experiences regarding patients who cannot be fed effectively through the gastrostomy tube, but were inserted feeding jejunostomy through the gastrostomy orifice using scopic fluoroscopic techniques utilised by the interventional radiology. Patients and Methods: Between January 2010 and May 2013 the patients that were inserted jejunostomy tube through the gastrostomy orifice using fluoroscopic techniques were retrospectively analysed. Data including primary indication for gastrostomy, sex, concomitant disease and the requirement for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) were all recorded. Results: There were five patients with these criteria. They all received either medical or surgical GERD therapy; nevertheless enteral feeding failed to reach an effective level, they all had vomiting and did not gain any weight. Following conversion, all the patients gained minimum 2 kg in 2-5 months; all the patients tolerated enteral feeding and were discharged in the early period. There were neither procedure related complications such as perforation, bleeding nor sedation related complications. Procedure took no more than 30 min as a whole. There was no need for surgical intervention. However in one patient re-intervention was required due to accidental removal of the catheter. Conclusions: In case of feeding difficulties following the gastrostomy; instead of an invasive surgical intervention; physicians should consider jejunal feeding that is advanced through the gastrostomy, which does not require any anaesthesia. PMID:26168749

  11. Raised number of jejunal IgG2-producing cells in untreated adult coeliac disease compared with food allergy.

    PubMed Central

    Rognum, T O; Kett, K; Fausa, O; Bengtsson, U; Kilander, A; Scott, H; Gaarder, P I; Brandtzaeg, P

    1989-01-01

    The subclass distribution of IgG-producing immunocytes was studied by two colour immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies in jejunal biopsy specimens from 10 adults with untreated coeliac disease, 11 coeliac disease patients on a gluten free diet, and seven patients with established food allergy. Paired immunofluorescence staining was performed with subclass specific murine monoclonal antibodies in combination with polyclonal rabbit antibody reagent to total IgG; the proportion of cells belonging to each subclass could thereby be determined. The ratio of IgG2 immunocytes was significantly higher (p less than 0.05) in untreated coeliac disease patients (median, 35.2%; range, 26.7-65.2%) than in those on a gluten free diet (median, 7.3%; range, 0-31.9%) or those having food allergy (median, 12.5%; range, 0-36.5%). The disparity in the local IgG2 response between patients with untreated coeliac disease and those with food allergy might be due to differences in the nature of the antigenic stimuli, dissimilar genetic 'make-up' of the subjects, or both. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2599444

  12. Effect of glucose on jejunal water and solute absorption in the presence of glycodeoxycholate and oleate in man.

    PubMed

    Brown, B D; Ammon, H V

    1981-08-01

    Jejunal perfusion studies were performed in 12 healthy volunteers to study the effects of 14 and 56 mM glucose on fluid secretion induced by 5 mM glycodeoxycholate on 7 mM oleate. Glucose enhanced water absorption under control conditions and reduced water secretion induced by glycodeoxycholate or oleate (P less than 0.01). As has been observed previously, glycodeoxycholate and oleate inhibited glucose absorption (P less than 0.001) and significant linear relationships existed between net water movement and glucose absorption. Glycodeoxycholate also reduced the absorption of 14 mM arabinose (P less than 0.05) and oleate reduced the absorption of 56 mM mannitol (P less than 0.05). Reduced solute absorption in the presence of glycodeoxycholate and oleate, therefore, cannot be attributed to an effect on active transport alone. The relationships between sodium transport and water absorption varied with the glucose concentration in the perfusion solutions. Similarly, the relationships between glucose absorption and sodium absorption varied with glucose concentration. The data suggest that a significant amount of glucose can be absorbed without concomitant absorption of sodium. The data indicate that glucose absorption can stimulate water absorption directly without the mediation of sodium and that water movement follows glucose at a rate which maintains isotonicity. PMID:7261835

  13. Ex vivo absorption of thymol and thymol-beta-D-glucopyranoside in piglet everted jejunal segments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food-producing animals can be reservoirs of Campylobacter, a leading bacterial cause of human foodborne illness. The natural product thymol can reduce the growth rate, survivability, and ammonia production of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. Thymol-ß-D-glucopyranoside may be used to tr...

  14. Surgical Access to Jejunal Veins for Local Thrombolysis and Stent Placement in Portal Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Schellhammer, Frank; Esch, Jan Schulte am; Hammerschlag, Sascha; Knoefel, Wolfram Trudo; Fuerst, Guenter

    2008-07-15

    Portal vein thrombosis is an infrequent entity, which may cause high morbidity and mortality. We report a case of portal vein thrombosis due to benign stenosis following partial pancreatoduodenectomy with segmental replacement of the portal vein by a Gore-tex graft. Using a surgical access to jenunal veins, local thrombolysis, mechanical fragmentation of thrombus, and stent placement were successfully performed.

  15. DEVICE FOR CONVEYING AND ROTATING OBJECTS

    DOEpatents

    Frantz, C.E.; Roslund, J.

    1958-01-21

    A device is described for conveying cylindrical material with a combined rotary and axial motion. The material rides on a series of balls which are retained in a guide plate and rotated by bearing against a rotating drum. The drum has a series of conical sections or grooves cut in its outer surface on which the balls ride. The grooves and balls match in such a way that all the balls are caused to rotate about an axis at an angle to the drum axis. This skewed rotation of the ball imparts a longitudinal as well as a rotary motion to the cylinders being conveyed.

  16. Effects of different sulphur amino acids and dietary electrolyte balance levels on performance, jejunal morphology, and immunocompetence of broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Nikoofard, V; Mahdavi, A H; Samie, A H; Jahanian, E

    2016-02-01

    As alterations of dietary electrolyte balance (DEB) can influence amino acid metabolism via changes the ions incur in their configurations, performance and immunological responses of broiler chicks might be affected. So, the current study was carried out to investigate the effects of different levels of sulphur amino acids (SAA) and DEB on performance, jejunal morphology and immunocompetence of broiler chicks. A total of 360 1-day-old male Ross 308 broiler chicks were randomly assigned to nine experimental treatments with four replicates of 10 birds each. Experimental treatments consisted of three levels of SAA (100, 110, and 120% of NRC recommendation, provided by methionine supplementation in diets with the same cysteine level) and three levels of DEB (150, 250, and 350 mEq/kg) that were fed during the entire of trial in a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement. Results showed that the relative weights of intestine and abdominal fat were decreased markedly (p < 0.001) with increasing levels of SAA and DEB respectively. Antibody titre against sheep red blood cell was neither individually nor in combination influenced by supplementation of SAA or DEB. Nevertheless, a decrease in DEB level led to a suppression in heterophile (p < 0.05) and an increase in lymphocyte counts (p = 0.06); consequently, heterophile to lymphocyte ratio was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) by decremental levels of DEB. Albumin to globulin ratio was increased after inclusion of at least 10% SAA (p < 0.001) and 150 mEq DEB/kg in the diet (p = 0.11). Although feeding high-DEB level led to a remarkable decrease in villus height (p < 0.01) and goblet cell numbers (p < 0.001), supplementing the highest level of SAA improved the height of jejunal villus. During the entire trial period, average daily feed intake (ADFI) was increased by incremental SAA levels (p < 0.05). However, inclusion of 150 mEq/kg led to not only a remarkable increase (p < 0.0001) in both ADFI and average daily

  17. Effects of sleeve gastrectomy with jejuno-jejunal or jejuno-ileal loop on glycolipid metabolism in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ming-Wei; Liu, Shao-Zhuang; Zhang, Guang-Yong; Zhang, Xiang; Hu, San-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore the effect of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) with jejuno-jejunal or jejuno-ileal loop on glycolipid metabolism in diabetic rats. METHODS Diabetic rats, which were induced by high-fat diet (HFD), nicotinamide and low-dose streptozotocin, underwent sham operations, SG, SG with jejuno-ileal loop (SG-JI) and SG with jejuno-jejunal loop (SG-JJ) followed by postoperative HFD. Then, at the time points of baseline and 2, 12 and 24 wk postoperatively, we determined and compared several variables, including the area under the curve for the results of oral glucose tolerance test (AUCOGTT), serum levels of triglyceride, cholesterol and ghrelin in fasting state, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), body weight, calorie intake, glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and insulin secretions after glucose gavage at dose of 1 g/kg. RESULTS At 2 wk postoperatively, rats that underwent SG, SG-JJ and SG-JI, compared with sham-operated (SHAM) rats, demonstrated lower body weight, calorie intake and ghrelin (P < 0.05 vs SHAM), enhanced secretion of insulin and GLP-1 after glucose gavage (P < 0.05 vs SHAM), improved AUCOGTT, HOMA-IR, fasting serum triglyceride and cholesterol (AUCOGTT: 1616.9 ± 83.2, 837.4 ± 83.7, 874.9 ± 97.2 and 812.6 ± 81.9, P < 0.05 vs SHAM; HOMA-IR: 4.31 ± 0.54, 2.94 ± 0.22, 3.17 ± 0.37 and 3.41 ± 0.22, P < 0.05 vs SHAM; Triglyceride: 2.35 ± 0.17, 1.87 ± 0.23, 1.98 ± 0.30 and 2.04 ± 0.21 mmol/L, P < 0.05 vs SHAM; Cholesterol: 1.84 ± 0.21, 1.53 ± 0.20, 1.52 ± 0.20 and 1.46 ± 0.23 mmol/L). At 12 wk postoperatively, rats receiving SG-JJ and SG-JI had lower body weight, reduced levels of triglyceride and cholesterol and elevated level of GLP-1 compared to those receiving SG (P < 0.05 vs SG). At 24 wk after surgery, compared with SG, the advantage of SG-JJ and SG-JI for glucolipid metabolism was still evident (P < 0.05 vs SG). SG-JI had a better performance in lipid metabolism and GLP-1 secretion of rats than did SG-JJ. CONCLUSION

  18. Neuroimmune connections in jejunal and ileal Peyer's patches at various bovine ages: potential sites for prion neuroinvasion.

    PubMed

    Defaweux, Valérie; Dorban, Gauthier; Antoine, Nadine; Piret, Joëlle; Gabriel, Annick; Jacqmot, Olivier; Falisse-Poirier, Nandini; Flandroy, Sylvain; Zorzi, Danièle; Heinen, Ernst

    2007-07-01

    During preclinical stages of cattle orally infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), the responsible agent is confined to ileal Peyer's patches (IPP), namely in nerve fibers and in lymph follicles, before reaching the peripheral and central nervous systems. No infectivity has been reported in other bovine lymphoid organs, including jejunal Peyer's patches (JPP). To determine the potential sites for prion neuroinvasion in IPP, we analyzed the mucosal innervation and the interface between nerve fibers and follicular dendritic cells (FDC), two dramatic influences on neuroinvasion. Bovine IPP were studied at three ages, viz., newborn calves, calves less than 12 months old, and bovines older than 24 months, and the parameters obtained were compared with those of JPP. No differences in innervation patterns between IPP and JPP were found. The major difference observed was that, in calves of less than 12 months, IPP were the major mucosal-associated lymphoid organ that possessed a large number of follicles with extended FDC networks. Using a panel of antibodies, we showed that PP in 24-month-old bovines were highly innervated at various strategic sites assumed to be involved in the invasion and replication of the BSE pathogen: the suprafollicular dome, T cell area, and germinal centers. In PP in calves of less than 12 months old, no nerve fibers positive for the neurofilament markers NF-L (70 kDa) and NF-H (200 kDa) were observed in contact with FDC. Thus, in view of the proportion of these protein subunits present in neurofilaments, the innervation of the germinal centers can be said to be an age-dependent dynamic process. This variation in innervation might influence the path of neuroinvasion and, thus, the susceptibility of bovines to the BSE agent. PMID:17406903

  19. Effects of yeast cell wall-derived mannan-oligosaccharides on jejunal gene expression in young broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Xiao, R; Power, R F; Mallonee, D; Routt, K; Spangler, L; Pescatore, A J; Cantor, A H; Ao, T; Pierce, J L; Dawson, K A

    2012-07-01

    The use of mannan-oligosaccharides (MOS) as alternatives to antibiotic growth promoters (AGP) has gained in popularity in recent years due to regulatory restrictions of using AGP in food animal production. Benefits of MOS usage include improvement on animal performance, feed efficiency, and gastrointestinal health. The molecular mechanisms of these functions however are not clear. The goal of the current study was to use a transcriptomics approach to investigate the effects of MOS on the intestinal gene expression profile of young broilers and characterize biological gene pathways responsible for the actions of MOS. One hundred and twenty 1-d-old Cobb 500 broiler chicks were randomly divided into 2 groups and were fed either a standard wheat-soybean meal-based (control) diet or the same diet supplemented with 2.2 g/kg of MOS (Bio-Mos, Alltech, Nicholasville, KY) for 3 wk, followed by jejunal gene expression profiling analysis using chicken-specific Affymetrix microarrays. Results indicated that a total of 672 genes were differentially expressed (P < 0.01 and fold change >1.2) in the jejunum by MOS supplementation. Association analysis indicated that differentially expressed genes are involved in diverse biological functions including energy production, cell death, and protein translation. Expression of 77 protein synthesis-related genes was differentially regulated by MOS in the jejunum. Further pathway analysis indicated that 15 genes related to oxidative phosphorylation were upregulated in the jejunum, and expression of genes important in cellular stress response, such as peroxiredoxin 1, superoxide dismutase 1, and thioredoxin, were also increased by MOS. Differential expression of genes associated with cellular immune processes, including lysozyme, lumican, β 2-microglobin, apolipoprotein A-1, and fibronectin 1, were also observed in MOS-fed broilers. In summary, this study systematically identified biological functions and gene pathways that are important in

  20. Effect of Na/sup +/ replacement on transport and metabolism of succinate and glutamine in jejunal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Mallet, R.T.; Jackson, M.J.; Kelleher, J.K.

    1986-03-01

    Novel radioisotope techniques may be applied to the analysis of metabolism and transport in intact cells. In the present study, rat jejunal epithelium was suspended in media containing five concentrations of glutamine between 0 and 5 mM, either Na/sup +/ or N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG/sup +/) as the major cation, and 44 ..mu..M (/sup 14/C)succinate. An increased ratio of steady state /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from (1,4-/sup 14/C)succinate versus (2,3-/sup 14/C)succinate indicates enhanced efflux of TCA cycle intermediates to products other than CO/sub 2/, relative to cycle flux. Glutamine dependent increases in succinate CO/sub 2/ ratios plateaued above 0.5mM glutamine, indicating that entry of glutamine-derived carbon into TCA cycle intermediate pools was saturated above physiological plasma glutamine concentrations. Although /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from succinate tracers was reduced approximately 95% by Na/sup +/ replacement, succinate CO/sub 2/ ratios were not altered, indicating that succinate uptake was significantly reduced in NMDG/sup +/ medium. /sup 14/C-alanine and /sup 14/C-aspartate accumulation increased with increasing glutamine concentrations in a pattern similar to succinate CO/sub 2/ ratios, indicating that these amino acids were net products of glutamine carbon. Incorporation of /sup 14/C into lactate and alanine demonstrated the presence of an enzymatic pathway for conversion of TCA cycle intermediates to pyruvate.

  1. miR-200a regulates Rheb-mediated amelioration of insulin resistance after duodenal–jejunal bypass

    PubMed Central

    Guo, W; Han, H; Wang, Y; Zhang, X; Liu, S; Zhang, G; Hu, S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Duodenal–jejunal bypass (DJB) surgery can induce the rapid and durable remission of diabetes. Recent studies indicate that ameliorated hepatic insulin resistance and improved insulin signaling might contribute to the diabetic control observed after DJB. Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) is reported to have an important role in insulin pathway, and some microRNAs (miRNAs) have been found to regulate Rheb. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of DJB on hepatic insulin resistance and the effects of miRNA-200a, a Rheb-targeting miRNA, on the development of DJB-induced amelioration in hepatic insulin resistance. Subjects: We investigated hepatic insulin signaling change and mapped the hepatic miRNAome involved in a rat model of DJB. We studied the effects of miR-200a on Rheb signaling pathway in buffalo rat liver cell lines. Liver tissues were studied and glucose tolerance tests were conducted in DJB rats injected with lentivirus encoding miR-200a inhibitor and diabetic rats injected with miR-200a mimic. Results: Rheb is a potential target of miR-200a. Transfection with an miR-200a inhibitor increased Rheb protein levels and enhanced the feedback action on insulin receptor substrate-dependent insulin signaling, whereas transfection with an miR-200a mimic produced the opposite effects. A luciferase assay confirmed that miR-200a bind to the 3′UTR (untranslated regions) of Rheb. Global downregulation of miR-200a in DJB rats showed impaired insulin sensitivity whereas upregulation of miR-200a in diabetic rats showed amelioration of diabetes. Conclusions: A novel mechanism was identified, in which miR-200a regulates the Rheb-mediated amelioration of insulin resistance in DJB. The findings suggest miR-200a should be further explored as a potential target for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:27121251

  2. Easy to swallow: detection of an extramural jejunal GIST by video capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kauser, Ricky; Kazemi, Ali; Farah, Katie; Morrissey, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 57-year-old woman with an obscure gastrointestinal bleed who was found to have an extramural gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST), detected by capsule endoscopy, and confirmed by laparoscopically-assisted enteroscopy and resection. Currently, major modalities used for detection of GISTs include double-balloon enteroscopy, capsule endoscopy and CT. Endoscopic measures, including capsule endoscopy, are limited in their ability to detect GISTs with extramural growth, as these typically do not demonstrate obvious luminal abnormalities. This case report illustrates a case in which an extraluminal GIST causing recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding presented as an ulcer, as seen on capsule endoscopy. PMID:26459493

  3. The Maximum Mass of Rotating Strange Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkudlarek, M.; Gondek-Rosiń; ska, D.; Villain, L.; Ansorg, M.

    2012-12-01

    Strange quark stars are considered as a possible alternative to neutron stars as compact objects (e.g. Weber 2003). A hot compact star (a proto-neutron star or a strange star) born in a supernova explosion or a remnant of neutron stars binary merger are expected to rotate differentially and be important sources of gravitational waves. We present results of the first relativistic calculations of differentially rotating strange quark stars for broad ranges of degree of differential rotation and maximum densities. Using a highly accurate, relativistic code we show that rotation may cause a significant increase of maximum allowed mass of strange stars, much larger than in the case of neutron stars with the same degree of differential rotation. Depending on the maximum allowed mass a massive neutron star (strange star) can be temporarily stabilized by differential rotation or collapse to a black hole.

  4. Hydrodynamic interactions between rotating helices.

    PubMed

    Kim, MunJu; Powers, Thomas R

    2004-06-01

    Escherichia coli bacteria use rotating helical flagella to swim. At this scale, viscous effects dominate inertia, and there are significant hydrodynamic interactions between nearby helices. These interactions cause the flagella to bundle during the "runs" of bacterial chemotaxis. Here we use slender-body theory to solve for the flow fields generated by rigid helices rotated by stationary motors. We determine how the hydrodynamic forces and torques depend on phase and phase difference, show that rigid helices driven at constant torque do not synchronize, and solve for the flows. We also use symmetry arguments based on kinematic reversibility to show that for two rigid helices rotating with zero phase difference, there is no time-averaged attractive or repulsive force between the helices. PMID:15244620

  5. Rotational preference in gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Heinen, Thomas; Jeraj, Damian; Vinken, Pia M; Velentzas, Konstantinos

    2012-06-01

    In gymnastics, most skills incorporate rotations about one or more body axes. At present, the question remains open if factors such as lateral preference and/or vestibulo-spinal asymmetry are related to gymnast's rotational preference. Therefore, we sought to explore relationships in gymnast's rotation direction between different gymnastic skills. Furthermore, we sought to explore relationships between rotational preference, lateral preference, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry. In the experiment n = 30 non-experts, n = 30 near-experts and n = 30 experts completed a rotational preference questionnaire, a lateral preference inventory, and the Unterberger-Fukuda Stepping Test. The results revealed, that near-experts and experts more often rotate rightward in the straight jump with a full turn when rotating leftward in the round-off and vice versa. The same relationship was found for experts when relating the rotation preference in the handstand with a full turn to the rotation preference in the straight jump with a full turn. Lateral preference was positively related to rotational preference in non-expert gymnasts, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry was positively related to rotational preference in experts. We suggest, that gymnasts should explore their individual rotational preference by systematically practicing different skills with a different rotation direction, bearing in mind that a clearly developed structure in rotational preference between different skills may be appropriate to develop more complex skills in gymnastics. PMID:23486362

  6. Rotational Preference in Gymnastics

    PubMed Central

    Heinen, Thomas; Jeraj, Damian; Vinken, Pia M.; Velentzas, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    In gymnastics, most skills incorporate rotations about one or more body axes. At present, the question remains open if factors such as lateral preference and/or vestibulo-spinal asymmetry are related to gymnast’s rotational preference. Therefore, we sought to explore relationships in gymnast’s rotation direction between different gymnastic skills. Furthermore, we sought to explore relationships between rotational preference, lateral preference, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry. In the experiment n = 30 non-experts, n = 30 near-experts and n = 30 experts completed a rotational preference questionnaire, a lateral preference inventory, and the Unterberger-Fukuda Stepping Test. The results revealed, that near-experts and experts more often rotate rightward in the straight jump with a full turn when rotating leftward in the round-off and vice versa. The same relationship was found for experts when relating the rotation preference in the handstand with a full turn to the rotation preference in the straight jump with a full turn. Lateral preference was positively related to rotational preference in non-expert gymnasts, and vestibulo-spinal asymmetry was positively related to rotational preference in experts. We suggest, that gymnasts should explore their individual rotational preference by systematically practicing different skills with a different rotation direction, bearing in mind that a clearly developed structure in rotational preference between different skills may be appropriate to develop more complex skills in gymnastics. PMID:23486362

  7. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (159). Jejunal intussusception due to Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Vijay; Chawla, Ashish; Wee, Eric; Peh, Wilfred CG

    2015-01-01

    A 21-year-old woman presented with acute onset of upper abdominal pain. A diagnosis of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) was made based on the clinical picture of perioral pigmentation with imaging findings of transient jejunojejunal intussusceptions and small bowel polyps, and confirmed by characteristic histopathological appearances of Peutz-Jeghers polyps. PJS is a rare hereditary condition characterised by unique hamartomatous polyps, perioral mucocutaneous pigmentations, and increased susceptibility to gastrointestinal and extraintestinal neoplasms. Patients usually present with recurrent abdominal pain due to intussusception caused by polyps. Other modes of presentations include rectal bleeding and melaena. We describe the imaging findings of PJS and provide a brief review of bowel polyposis syndromes. The latter are relatively rare disorders characterised by multiple polyps in the large or small intestine, with associated risk of malignancies and other extraintestinal manifestations. Awareness of the manifestations and early diagnosis of these syndromes is crucial to prevent further complications. PMID:25715854

  8. PLT rotating pumped limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.A.; Budny, R.V.; Corso, V.; Boychuck, J.; Grisham, L.; Heifetz, D.; Hosea, J.; Luyber, S.; Loprest, P.; Manos, D.

    1984-07-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face and the ability to rotate during tokamak discharges has been installed in a PLT pump duct. These features have been selected to handle the unique particle removal and heat load requirements of ICRF heating and lower-hybrid current-drive experiments. The limiter has been conditioned and commissioned in an ion-beam test stand by irradiation with 1 MW power, 200 ms duration beams of 40 keV hydrogen ions. Operation in PLT during ohmic discharges has proven the ability of the limiter to reduce localized heating caused by energetic electron bombardment and to remove about 2% of the ions lost to the PLT walls and limiters.

  9. Intussusception causing postoperative intestinal obstruction following free jejunum transfer in adults: two case reports and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Akira; Watanabe, Masayuki; Shigaki, Hironobu; Okumura, Yasuhiro; Nishida, Koujiro; Mine, Shinji; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Yanaga, Katsuhiko; Sano, Takeshi

    2015-12-01

    Intussusception is a rare cause of postoperative intestinal obstruction in adults. We experienced two cases of bowel obstruction due to the jejuno-jejunal intussusception after harvest of a free jejunum graft for reconstruction after cervical esophagectomy. Bowel obstruction occurred early in the postoperative course, and reoperations were needed in both cases. In both case, the anastomotic site was resected and re-anastomosed in a side-to-side fashion. Recurrence of intussusception has not been observed. In the literature, such a complication has been documented in two case series and a case report. The reported incidence of postoperative intussusception of the case series was 2.8% and 7.4%, respectively. The jejuno-jejunal anastomoses were performed with end-to-end fashion by two layered hand-sewn suture (Albert-Lembert method) in all cases reported. In order to prevent the occurrence of postoperative intussusception, we recommend to harvest a free jejunal graft as far from the Treitz ligament as possible and to avoid reconstruction by an Albert-Lembert end-to-end anastomosis. PMID:26943396

  10. Jejunal water and electrolyte absorption from two proprietary enteral feeds in man: importance of sodium content.

    PubMed

    Spiller, R C; Jones, B J; Silk, D B

    1987-06-01

    Jejunostomy losses of Na+ and water during enteral nutrition after massive intestinal resection may be severe. We have attempted to analyse this practical problem by using an in vivo perfusion technique in healthy volunteers to study Na+, water and nutrient absorption from a short (25 cm) segment of jejunum during perfusion of an isotonic solution of the elemental diet Vivonex. Further solutions made from the amino acid and carbohydrate components of Vivonex were also perfused in part I of the study in order to determine the causes of the marked Na+ and water secretion seen during Vivonex perfusion. Low initial Na+ concentration was found to be the major determinant of net Na+ secretion, initial Na+ concentration correlating significantly with Na+ absorption (r = 0.95, n = 7 p less than 0.001). Water absorption correlated with net absorption of NaCl (r = 0.82, n = 7 p less than 0.01). There was, however, a better correlation with total absorption of NaCl plus amino acids (r = 0.99, n = 7, p less than 0.01). In part II of the study separate isotonic solutions of NaCl, glucose, and the polymeric diet, Ensure were also studied. Net sodium secretion occurred during glucose and Ensure perfusion, as predicted from their low Na+ concentration. Owing to rapid sucrose absorption from Ensure there was substantial luminal disappearance of osmotically active particles and hence marked water absorption, which was accurately predicted using the regression equation for water absorption derived in part I, substituting sucrose absorption for amino acid absorption. We conclude that the marked Na+ and water secretion observed during Vivonex perfusion is not a unique property of this amino acid based diet but is due to its low Na+ content. PMID:3114056

  11. Power Harvesting from Rotation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicone, Carmen; Feng, Z. C.

    2008-01-01

    We show the impossibility of harvesting power from rotational motions by devices attached to the rotating object. The presentation is suitable for students who have studied Lagrangian mechanics. (Contains 2 figures.)

  12. Asymmetric error field interaction with rotating conducting walls

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Brookhart, M. I.; Hegna, C. C.; Forest, C. B.

    2012-07-15

    The interaction of error fields with a system of differentially rotating conducting walls is studied analytically and compared to experimental data. Wall rotation causes eddy currents to persist indefinitely, attenuating and rotating the original error field. Superposition of error fields from external coils and plasma currents are found to break the symmetry in wall rotation direction. The vacuum and plasma eigenmodes are modified by wall rotation, with the error field penetration time decreased and the kink instability stabilized, respectively. Wall rotation is also predicted to reduce error field amplification by the marginally stable plasma.

  13. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  14. Mechanism of rotational relaxation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanyi, J. C.; Woodall, K. B.

    1972-01-01

    A model is presented which describes the characteristic pattern of relaxation of a nonthermal rotational distribution of hydrogen halide, peaked initially at high rotational quantum number J, to a thermal distribution without generating a peak at intermediate J. A method for correcting infrared chemiluminiscence data for modest rotational relaxation is also suggested.

  15. Measurement of intracellular mediators in enterocytes isolated from jejunal biopsy specimens of control and cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hitchin, B W; Dobson, P R; Brown, B L; Hardcastle, J; Hardcastle, P T; Taylor, C J

    1991-01-01

    A method that maximises the yield of viable enterocytes has been developed for the isolation of enterocytes from human jejunal biopsy specimens. These enterocytes have been used to study the values of intracellular free calcium and the rises in adenosine 3'5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) induced by secretagogues in normal and cystic fibrosis cells. Basal intracellular free calcium of cystic fibrosis enterocytes, measured fluorimetrically with fura-2, was within the range of the basal intracellular free calcium of non-cystic fibrosis enterocytes (cystic fibrosis 263 nmol/l; non-cystic fibrosis 287 nmol/l). Changes in intracellular free calcium were observed after exposure to ionomycin: a 100 nmol/l solution induced a 2.5 fold increase in intracellular free calcium in the cystic fibrosis enterocytes and a 2.2 fold increase in the intracellular free calcium concentration of the non-cystic fibrosis enterocytes. Basal cAMP values were not significantly different between cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis enterocytes (cystic fibrosis 575 fmol/100,000 cells; non-cystic fibrosis 716 fmol/100,000 cells, p greater than 0.05) and the enterocyte cAMP value increased in response to stimulation with prostaglandin E2 (7 mumol/l) (cystic fibrosis 2.2 fold increase over basal, p less than 0.05; non-cystic fibrosis 1.9 fold stimulation over basal, p less than 0.05) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (100 nmol/l) (cystic fibrosis 7.1 fold increase over basal, p less than 0.05; non-cystic fibrosis 5.8 fold increase over basal, p less than 0.05). There was no significant difference in the magnitude of the response between cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis enterocytes (p greater than 0.05). These results indicate that the cystic fibrosis defect in the small intestine, as in other affected epithelia, seems to be distal to the production of second messengers. The small intestine is therefore an appropriate model in which to study the biochemical defect in cystic fibrosis

  16. Effect of genistein on basal jejunal chloride secretion in R117H CF mice is sex and route specific

    PubMed Central

    Rayyan, Esa; Polito, Sarah; Leung, Lana; Bhakta, Ashesh; Kang, Jonathan; Willey, Justin; Mansour, Wasim; Drumm, Mitchell L; Al-Nakkash, Layla

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) results from the loss or reduction in function of the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulatory protein) chloride channel. The third most common CFTR mutation seen clinically is R117H. Genistein, a naturally occurring phytoestrogen, is known to stimulate CFTR function in vitro. We aimed to determine whether route of administration of genistein could mediate differential effects in R117H male and female CF mice. Mice were fed (4 weeks) or injected subcutaneously (1 week) with the following: genistein 600 mg/kg diet (600Gd); genistein-free diet (0Gd); genistein injection 600 mg/kg body weight (600Gi); dimethyl sulfoxide control (0Gi). In male R117H mice fed 600Gd, basal short circuit current (Isc) was unchanged. In 600Gd-fed female mice, there was a subgroup that demonstrated a significant increase in basal Isc (53.14±7.92 μA/cm2, n=6, P<0.05) and a subgroup of nonresponders (12.05±6.59 μA/cm2, n=4), compared to 0Gd controls (29.3±6.5 μA/cm2, n=7). In R117H mice injected with 600Gi, basal Isc was unchanged in both male and female mice compared to 0Gi controls. Isc was measured in response to the following: the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (10 μM, bilateral), bumetanide (100 μM, basolateral) to indicate the Cl− secretory component, and acetazolamide (100 μM, bilateral) to indicate the HCO3− secretory component; however, there was no effect of genistein (diet or injection) on any of these parameters. Jejunal morphology (ie, villi length, number of goblet cells per villus, crypt depth, and number of goblet cells per crypt) in R117H mice suggested no genistein-mediated difference among the groups. Serum levels of genistein were significantly elevated, compared to respective controls, by either 600Gd (equally elevated in males and females) or 600Gi (elevated more in females versus males). These data suggest a sex-dependent increase in basal Isc of R117H mice and that the increase is also specific for route of

  17. Progress in geophysical aspects of the rotation of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambeck, K.

    1978-01-01

    The geophysical causes and consequences of the Earth's rotation are reviewed. Specific topics covered include: (1) the motion of the rotation axis in space, precession and nutation; (2) the motion of the rotation axis relative to the Earth, polar motion; and (3) the rate of rotation about this axis, or changes in the length of day. Secular decrease in obliquity and evolution of the Earth-Moon system are also discussed.

  18. SEAL FOR ROTATING SHAFT

    DOEpatents

    Coffman, R.T.

    1957-12-10

    A seal is described for a rotatable shaft that must highly effective when the shaft is not rotating but may be less effective while the shaft is rotating. Weights distributed about a sealing disk secured to the shaft press the sealing disk against a tubular section into which the shiilt extends, and whem the shaft rotates, the centrifugal forces on the weights relieve the pressurc of the sealing disk against the tubular section. This action has the very desirible result of minimizing the wear of the rotating disk due to contact with the tubular section, while affording maximum sealing action when it is needed.

  19. Vibrations Caused By Cracked Turbopump Bearing Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goggin, David G.; Dweck, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    Expansion gives rise to eccentricity. Report presents analysis of dynamic effects caused by cracking of inner race of ball bearing in turbopump. Crack manifested itself via increase in vibrations synchronous with rotation and smaller increase at twice frequency of rotation. Analysis conducted to verify these increases were caused solely by crack and to understand implications for future such cracks.

  20. Rotated balance in humans due to repetitive rotational movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakynthinaki, M. S.; Madera Milla, J.; López Diaz De Durana, A.; Cordente Martínez, C. A.; Rodríguez Romo, G.; Sillero Quintana, M.; Sampedro Molinuevo, J.

    2010-03-01

    We show how asymmetries in the movement patterns during the process of regaining balance after perturbation from quiet stance can be modeled by a set of coupled vector fields for the derivative with respect to time of the angles between the resultant ground reaction forces and the vertical in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions. In our model, which is an adaption of the model of Stirling and Zakynthinaki (2004), the critical curve, defining the set of maximum angles one can lean to and still correct to regain balance, can be rotated and skewed so as to model the effects of a repetitive training of a rotational movement pattern. For the purposes of our study a rotation and a skew matrix is applied to the critical curve of the model. We present here a linear stability analysis of the modified model, as well as a fit of the model to experimental data of two characteristic "asymmetric" elite athletes and to a "symmetric" elite athlete for comparison. The new adapted model has many uses not just in sport but also in rehabilitation, as many work place injuries are caused by excessive repetition of unaligned and rotational movement patterns.

  1. Hematological and serum biochemical parameters of blood in adolescent rats and histomorphological changes in the jejunal epithelium and liver after chronic exposure to cadmium and lead in the case of supplementation with green tea vs black, red or white tea.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewska, Ewa; Winiarska-Mieczan, Anna; Dobrowolski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Rats were used to check whether regular consumption of black, red, or white tea would have a protective effect similar to the action of green tea on the intestine and liver in the case of exposure to Cd and Pb within the limits of human environmental exposure to these elements. Rats at the age of 6 weeks were divided into the control and four groups supplemented with green (GT), black (BT), red (RT), or white (WT) tea extracts. Their diet (except the control) was mixed with 7 mg Cd/kg and 50mg Pb/kg. The experiment lasted 12 weeks. The effects of administration of tea in Cd- and Pb-poisoned rats on plasma biochemical parameters and the jejunal epithelium and liver were determined. The highest body mass was found in the GT group. The highest hemoglobin and Fe concentrations were in the control and GT groups. The highest activity of AST was in groups poisoned with Cd and Pb independently on supplementation. The highest ALT activity was in BT and RT groups with lower content of polifenoles. Pb and Cd disturbed the liver leading to necrosis and fatty degenerative changes, and a loss of normal architecture of the hepatocytes. Rats from the GT group had the highest cell proliferation rate in intestinal glands and the largest absorptive surface. Black, red, and white tea exerted a varied impact on the histological structure and innervation of the small intestine wall as well as on the absorptive function of small intestine mucosa in rats poisoned with Pb and Cd than green tea. On the other hand, taking into account the number of apoptotic cells, the effect of the teas was the same. Moreover, it is clear that long term exposure to Cd and Pb contamination causes toxic effect in the liver. PMID:25837382

  2. Rotating saddle trap as Foucault's pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, Oleg N.; Levi, Mark

    2016-01-01

    One of the many surprising results found in the mechanics of rotating systems is the stabilization of a particle in a rapidly rotating planar saddle potential. Besides the counterintuitive stabilization, an unexpected precessional motion is observed. In this note, we show that this precession is due to a Coriolis-like force caused by the rotation of the potential. To our knowledge, this is the first example where such a force arises in an inertial reference frame. We also propose a simple mechanical demonstration of this effect.

  3. Image Rotation Correction With CORDIC Array Processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyu, Keh-Hwa; Jeng, Bor-Shenn; Jou, I.-Chang; Ting, Pei-Yih

    1988-10-01

    In the document analysis system or the understanding system[1,2], the rotation of the document's image will cause optical character recognition error. Then the document must be scanned and recognized again. This phenomenon will degrade the performance of the automatic document input system. In this paper, we propose a method to estimate the unexpected rotational angle of the image. And we suggest using the pipelined CORDIC array processor architecture to rotate the image back quickly. Thus the performance of the automatic document input system will increase.

  4. Controlled rotation of optically trapped microscopic particles.

    PubMed

    Paterson, L; MacDonald, M P; Arlt, J; Sibbett, W; Bryant, P E; Dholakia, K

    2001-05-01

    We demonstrate controlled rotation of optically trapped objects in a spiral interference pattern. This pattern is generated by interfering an annular shaped laser beam with a reference beam. Objects are trapped in the spiral arms of the pattern. Changing the optical path length causes this pattern, and thus the trapped objects, to rotate. Structures of silica microspheres, microscopic glass rods, and chromosomes are set into rotation at rates in excess of 5 hertz. This technique does not depend on intrinsic properties of the trapped particle and thus offers important applications in optical and biological micromachines. PMID:11340200

  5. Jejunal cavernous lymphangioma

    PubMed Central

    Morris-Stiff, Gareth; Falk, Gavin A; El-Hayek, Kevin; Vargo, John; Bronner, Mary; Vogt, David P

    2011-01-01

    Cavernous lymphangiomas are usually identified in infants and children with the majority of lesions found around the head and neck, trunk or extremities. Tumours affecting the intra-abdominal organs are rare. The authors report a case of small bowel cavernous lymphangioma arising within the jejunum of a 34-year-old woman presenting with dyspnoea and anaemia, and review the existing literature relating to this uncommon tumour. PMID:22696733

  6. CENTRAL ROTATIONS OF MILKY WAY GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fabricius, Maximilian H.; Rukdee, Surangkhana; Saglia, Roberto P.; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Thomas, Jens; Williams, Michael J.; Noyola, Eva; Opitsch, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Most Milky Way globular clusters (GCs) exhibit measurable flattening, even if on a very low level. Both cluster rotation and tidal fields are thought to cause this flattening. Nevertheless, rotation has only been confirmed in a handful of GCs, based mostly on individual radial velocities at large radii. We are conducting a survey of the central kinematics of Galactic GCs using the new Integral Field Unit instrument VIRUS-W. We detect rotation in all 11 GCs that we have observed so far, rendering it likely that a large majority of the Milky Way GCs rotate. We use published catalogs of GCs to derive central ellipticities and position angles. We show that in all cases where the central ellipticity permits an accurate measurement of the position angle, those angles are in excellent agreement with the kinematic position angles that we derive from the VIRUS-W velocity fields. We find an unexpected tight correlation between central rotation and outer ellipticity, indicating that rotation drives flattening for the objects in our sample. We also find a tight correlation between central rotation and published values for the central velocity dispersion, most likely due to rotation impacting the old dispersion measurements.

  7. Effect of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) antagonism on rat jejunal fluid and electrolyte secretion induced by cholera and Escherichia coli enterotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Mourad, F; Nassar, C

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The enteric nervous system is important in the pathophysiology of intestinal fluid secretion induced by cholera toxin (CT), Escherichia coli heat labile (LT), and heat stable (STa) toxins. The neurotransmitters involved are not fully elucidated. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), a potent intestinal secretagogue present in the enteric nervous system, is increased after exposure of the cat intestine to CT. Whether VIP is involved in the pathogenesis of cholera and other toxins in not known.
AIM—To study in vivo the effect of VIP antagonism on jejunal fluid secretion induced by CT, LT, and STa.
METHODS—CT, LT (25 µg), or 0.9% NaCl was instilled in an isolated 25 cm segment of rat jejunum, and the VIP antagonist (VIPa) [4Cl-D-Phe6, Leu17]-VIP (0.2 or 2 µg/kg/min) or 0.9% NaCl was given intravenously. Two hours later, single pass in vivo jejunal perfusion was performed to assess fluid movement. In STa experiments, intravenous VIPa or 0.9% NaCl was given and 30 minutes later the jejunal segment was perfused with a solution containing STa 200 µg/l.
RESULTS—VIPa had no effect on basal intestinal fluid absorption. CT induced net fluid secretion (median −68 µl/min/g dry intestinal weight (interquartile range −80 to −56)) which was dose dependently reversed by VIPa (6.2 (−16 to 34) and 29 (17 to 42); p<0.01). Similarly, LT induced secretion (−63 (−73 to −30)) was attenuated by VIPa (0.2 µg/kg/min) (−15 (−24 to −1); p<0.01) and totally reversed to normal levels by VIPa (2 µg/kg/min) (37 (28-56); p<0.01 compared with LT and not significant compared with normal controls). STa induced secretion (−17 (−19 to −2)) was also reversed by VIPa (12 (9-23) and 14 (0-26); p<0.01).
CONCLUSION—VIP plays an important role in CT, LT, and STa induced intestinal secretion and may be the final putative neurotransmitter in the pathophysiology of these toxins.


Keywords: cholera toxin; Escherichia coli toxins

  8. Global Rotation of Non-Rotating Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, T.

    2001-11-01

    At its 24th General Assembly held at Manchester last year, the IAU has adopted the Celestial Ephemeris Origin (CEO) as a new longitude origin of the celestial coordinate system (Capitaine et al. 2000, IAU 2001). The CEO is the application of Guinot's non-rotating origin (NRO) to the Earth's equator (Guinot 1979, Capitaine et al. 1986, Capitaine 1990). By using the current IAU precession/nutation theory, we integrated the global orbit of CEO. It is a slightly curved zigzag pattern of the amplitude of around 23o moving secularly along the ecliptic. Among its kinematical features, we note that CEO has a large secular component of rotation with respect to the inertial reference frame. The current speed of this global rotation is as large as around -4.15 ''/yr. The negative sign shows that CEO rotates clockwise with respect to the inertial frame when viewed from the north celestial pole. Unfortunately this is a general property of NROs. On the other hand, such secular rotation does not exist for some geometrically-defined longitude origins like K, H, and Σ already discussed in Kovalevsky and McCarthy (1998). We think that the existence of a global secular rotaion means that the CEO, and NROs in general, is not appropriate to be specified as the x-axis of celestial coordinate systems.

  9. Alterations in gut microbiota during remission and recurrence of diabetes after duodenal-jejunal bypass in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ming-Wei; Liu, Shao-Zhuang; Zhang, Guang-Yong; Zhang, Xiang; Liu, Teng; Hu, San-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To observe the alterations in gut microbiota in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced diabetes recurrence after duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB) in rats. METHODS: We assigned HDF- and low-dose streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats into two major groups to receive DJB and sham operation respectively. When the DJB was completed, we used HFD to induce diabetes recurrence. Then, we grouped the DJB-operated rats by blood glucose level into the DJB-remission (DJB-RM) group and the DJB-recurrence (DJB-RC) group. At a sequence of time points after operations, we compared calorie content in the food intake (calorie intake), oral glucose tolerance test, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), concentrations of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), serum insulin, total bile acids (TBAs) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and alterations in colonic microbiota. RESULTS: The relative abundance of Firmicutes in the control (58.06% ± 11.12%; P < 0.05 vs sham; P < 0.05 vs DJB-RC) and DJB-RM (55.58% ± 6.16%; P < 0.05 vs sham; P < 0.05 vs DJB-RC) groups was higher than that in the sham (29.04% ± 1.36%) and DJB-RC (27.44% ± 2.17%) groups; but the relative abundance of Bacteroidetes was lower (control group: 33.46% ± 10.52%, P < 0.05 vs sham 46.88% ± 2.34%, P < 0.05 vs DJB-RC 47.41% ± 5.67%. DJB-RM group: 34.63% ± 3.37%, P < 0.05 vs sham; P < 0.05 vs DJB-RC). Escherichia coli was higher in the sham (15.72% ± 1.67%, P < 0.05 vs control, P < 0.05 vs DJB-RM) and DJB-RC (16.42% ± 3.00%; P < 0.05 vs control; P < 0.05 vs DJB-RM) groups than in the control (3.58% ± 3.67%) and DJB-RM (4.15% ± 2.76%) groups. Improved HOMA-IR (2.82 ± 0.73, P < 0.05 vs DJB-RC 4.23 ± 0.72), increased TBAs (27803.17 ± 4673.42 ng/mL; P < 0.05 vs DJB-RC 18744.00 ± 3047.26 ng/mL) and decreased LPS (0.12 ± 0.04 ng/mL, P < 0.05 vs DJB-RC 0.19 ± 0.03 ng/mL) were observed the in DJB-RM group; however, these improvements were reversed in the DJB-RC group, with the exception of GLP-1 (DJB-RM vs DJB-RC P

  10. Centrifugally activated bearing for high-speed rotating machinery

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    A centrifugally activated bearing is disclosed. The bearing includes an annular member that extends laterally and radially from a central axis. A rotating member that rotates about the central axis relative to the annular member is also included. The rotating member has an interior chamber that surrounds the central axis and in which the annular member is suspended. Furthermore, the interior chamber has a concave shape for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is at rest and for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is rotating. The concave shape is such that while the rotating member is rotating a centrifugal force causes a lubricant to be forced away from the central axis to form a cylindrical surface having an axis collinear with the central axis. This centrifugally displaced lubricant provides restoring forces to counteract lateral displacement during operation.

  11. Centrifugally activated bearing for high-speed rotating machinery

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1994-02-15

    A centrifugally activated bearing is disclosed. The bearing includes an annular member that extends laterally and radially from a central axis. A rotating member that rotates about the central axis relative to the annular member is also included. The rotating member has an interior chamber that surrounds the central axis and in which the annular member is suspended. Furthermore, the interior chamber has a concave shape for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is at rest and for retaining a lubricant therein while the rotating member is rotating. The concave shape is such that while the rotating member is rotating a centrifugal force causes a lubricant to be forced away from the central axis to form a cylindrical surface having an axis collinear with the central axis. This centrifugally displaced lubricant provides restoring forces to counteract lateral displacement during operation. 4 figures.

  12. The spatial rotator.

    PubMed

    Rasmusson, A; Hahn, U; Larsen, J O; Gundersen, H J G; Jensen, E B Vedel; Nyengaard, J R

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a new local volume estimator, the spatial rotator, which is based on measurements on a virtual 3D probe, using computer assisted microscopy. The basic design of the probe builds upon the rotator principle which requires only a few manual intersection markings, thus making the spatial rotator fast to use. Since a 3D probe is involved, it is expected that the spatial rotator will be more efficient than the the nucleator and the planar rotator, which are based on measurements in a single plane. An extensive simulation study shows that the spatial rotator may be more efficient than the traditional local volume estimators. Furthermore, the spatial rotator can be seen as a further development of the Cavalieri estimator, which does not require randomization of sectioning or viewing direction. The tissue may thus be sectioned in any arbitrary direction, making it easy to identify the specific tissue region under study. In order to use the spatial rotator in practice, however, it is necessary to be able to identify intersection points between cell boundaries and test rays in a series of parallel focal planes, also at the peripheral parts of the cell boundaries. In cases where over- and underprojection phenomena are not negligible, they should therefore be corrected for if the spatial rotator is to be applied. If such a correction is not possible, it is needed to avoid these phenomena by using microscopy with increased resolution in the focal plane. PMID:23488880

  13. Rotational effects on impingement cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, A. H.; Kerrebrock, J. L.; Koo, J. J.; Preiser, U. Z.

    The present consideration of rotation effects on heat transfer in a radially exhausted, impingement-cooled turbine blade model gives attention to experimental results for Reynolds and Rossby numbers and blade/coolant temperature ratio values that are representative of small gas turbine engines. On the basis of a model that encompasses the effects of Coriolis force and buoyancy on heat transfer, bouyancy is identified as the cause of an average Nusselt number that is 20-30 percent lower than expected from previous nonrotating data. A heuristic model is proposed which predicts that the impingement jets nearest the blade roots should deflect inward, due to a centripetal force generated by their tangential velocity counter to the blade motion. Potentially serious thermal stresses must be anticipated from rotation effects in the course of blade design.

  14. The A0 blood group genotype modifies the jejunal glycomic binding pattern profile of piglets early associated with a simple or complex microbiota.

    PubMed

    Priori, D; Colombo, M; Koopmans, S-J; Jansman, A J M; van der Meulen, J; Trevisi, P; Bosi, P

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium glycocalyx sugar motif is an important determinant of the bacterial-host interaction and may be affected in pigs by gut microbiota and by blood group genotype. The aim was to study the effect of intestinal association with different microbiota and A0 blood group genotypes on the expressed glycomic pattern in the small intestine. Twelve caesarean-derived pigs previously associated with a simple association (SA) or complex association (CA) microbiota were selected at 26 to 37 d of age. In each subject, different jejunal loops were perfused for 8 h with enterotoxigenic K88 (ETEC), ETEC fimbriae (F4), (LAM), or a saline control. The piglets were genotyped for A0 blood group and the glycomic profile was evaluated by microscopic screening of lectin binding: peanut agglutinin (PNA), which is galactose specific; agglutinin I (UEA), which is fucose specific; lectin II (MALii), which is sialic acid specific; concavalin A, which is mannose specific; soybean agglutinin (SBA), which is -acetyl-galactosamine specific; and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), which is -acetyl-glucosamine specific. A0 pigs had fewer UEA-positive cells, MALii-positive cells ( < 0.001), and SBA-positive cells ( < 0.10) than 00 pigs. Simple association pigs had more SBA positive cells ( < 0.01) than CA pigs. Enterotoxigenic K88-perfused intestinal loops had fewer UEA-positive cells ( < 0.01) and WGA positive cells ( < 0.001) cells and more PNA positive cells (only in SA pigs, < 0.01). No effects of introduction of F4 and LAM in the intestinal lumen were observed. The porcine A0 blood group genotype and the luminal presence of ETEC strongly affected the jejunal mucosa glycomic pattern profile whereas an early oral simple or complex microbial association had limited effects. Pig genetic background has relevance on the cross talk between intestinal epithelium glycocalyx sugar motif and ETEC and, ultimately, on the gut microbial colonization in later life. PMID:27065129

  15. Rotator cuff injuries in adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jennifer M; Arkader, Alexandre; Wells, Lawrence M; Ganley, Theodore J

    2013-03-01

    The cause of rotator cuff injuries in the young athlete has been described as an overuse injury related to internal impingement. Abduction coupled with external rotation is believed to impinge on the rotator cuff, specifically the supraspinatus, and lead to undersurface tears that can progress to full-thickness tears. This impingement is believed to be worsened with increased range of motion and instability in overhead athletes. A retrospective review of seven patients diagnosed with rotator cuff injuries was performed to better understand this shoulder injury pattern. The type of sport played, a history of trauma, diagnosis, treatment method, and outcome were noted. Six patients were male and one was a female. Baseball was the primary sport for four patients, basketball for one, gymnastics for one, and wrestling for one. The following injury patterns were observed: two patients tore their subscapularis tendon, two sustained avulsion fractures of their lesser tuberosity, one tore his rotator interval, one tore his supraspinatus, and one avulsed his greater tuberosity. Only four patients recalled a specific traumatic event. Three patients were treated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, three with miniopen repair, and one was treated with rehabilitation. Six of the seven patients returned to their preinjury level of sport after treatment. Rotator cuff tears are rare in the adolescent age group. The injury patterns suggest that acute trauma likely accounts for many rotator cuff tears and their equivalents in the young patient. Adolescents with rotator cuff tears reliably return to sports after treatment. The possibility of rotator cuff tears in skeletally immature athletes should be considered. The prognosis is very good once this injury is identified and treated. PMID:22668571

  16. Modeling rapidly rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, M.

    2006-06-01

    We review the quest of modeling rapidly rotating stars during the past 40 years and detail the challenges to be taken up by models facing new data from interferometry, seismology, spectroscopy... We then present the progress of the ESTER project aimed at giving a physically self-consistent model for the structure and evolution of rapidly rotating stars.

  17. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  18. CONTROL ROD ROTATING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Baumgarten, A.; Karalis, A.J.

    1961-11-28

    A threaded rotatable shaft is provided which rotates in response to linear movement of a nut, the shaft being surrounded by a pair of bellows members connected to either side of the nut to effectively seal the reactor from leakage and also to store up energy to shut down the reactor in the event of a power failure. (AEC)

  19. THE OLD ROTATION, 2005

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Old Rotation (circa 1896) is the oldest, continuous cotton experiment in the world. Its 13 plots on 1 acre of land on the campus of Auburn University continue to document the long-term effects of crop rotations with and without winter legumes (crimson clover) as a source of nitrogen for cotton,...

  20. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Stephen S; Lo, Ian K Y

    2006-06-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is being performed by an increasing number of orthopaedic surgeons. The principles, techniques, and instrumentation have evolved to the extent that all patterns and sizes of rotator cuff tear, including massive tears, can now be repaired arthroscopically. Achieving a biomechanically stable construct is critical to biologic healing. The ideal repair construct must optimize suture-to-bone fixation, suture-to-tendon fixation, abrasion resistance of suture, suture strength, knot security, loop security, and restoration of the anatomic rotator cuff footprint (the surface area of bone to which the cuff tendons attach). By achieving optimized repair constructs, experienced arthroscopic surgeons are reporting results equal to those of open rotator cuff repair. As surgeons' arthroscopic skill levels increase through attendance at surgical skills courses and greater experience gained in the operating room, there will be an increasing trend toward arthroscopic repair of most rotator cuff pathology. PMID:16757673

  1. Interferometry for rotating sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velle, S.; Mehrabi Pari, S.; Csernai, L. P.

    2016-06-01

    The two particle interferometry method to determine the size of the emitting source after a heavy ion collision is extended. Following the extension of the method to spherical expansion dynamics, here we extend the method to rotating systems. It is shown that rotation of a cylindrically symmetric system leads to modifications, which can be perceived as spatial asymmetry by the "azimuthal HBT" method. We study an exact rotating and expanding solution of the fluid dynamical model of heavy ion reactions. We consider a source that is azimuthally symmetric in space around the axis of rotation, and discuss the features of the resulting two particle correlation function. This shows the azimuthal asymmetry arising from the rotation. We show that this asymmetry leads to results similar to those given by spatially asymmetric sources.

  2. Rotation sensor switch

    DOEpatents

    Sevec, John B.

    1978-01-01

    A protective device to provide a warning if a piece of rotating machinery slows or stops comprises a pair of hinged weights disposed to rotate on a rotating shaft of the equipment. When the equipment is rotating, the weights remain in a plane essentially perpendicular to the shaft and constitute part of an electrical circuit that is open. When the shaft slows or stops, the weights are attracted to a pair of concentric electrically conducting disks disposed in a plane perpendicular to the shaft and parallel to the plane of the weights when rotating. A disk magnet attracts the weights to the electrically conducting plates and maintains the electrical contact at the plates to complete an electrical circuit that can then provide an alarm signal.

  3. Stress field rotation or block rotation: An example from the Lake Mead fault system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ron, Hagai; Nur, Amos; Aydin, Atilla

    1990-01-01

    The Coulomb criterion, as applied by Anderson (1951), has been widely used as the basis for inferring paleostresses from in situ fault slip data, assuming that faults are optimally oriented relative to the tectonic stress direction. Consequently if stress direction is fixed during deformation so must be the faults. Freund (1974) has shown that faults, when arranged in sets, must generally rotate as they slip. Nur et al., (1986) showed how sufficiently large rotations require the development of new sets of faults which are more favorably oriented to the principal direction of stress. This leads to the appearance of multiple fault sets in which older faults are offset by younger ones, both having the same sense of slip. Consequently correct paleostress analysis must include the possible effect of fault and material rotation, in addition to stress field rotation. The combined effects of stress field rotation and material rotation were investigated in the Lake Meade Fault System (LMFS) especially in the Hoover Dam area. Fault inversion results imply an apparent 60 degrees clockwise (CW) rotation of the stress field since mid-Miocene time. In contrast structural data from the rest of the Great Basin suggest only a 30 degrees CW stress field rotation. By incorporating paleomagnetic and seismic evidence, the 30 degrees discrepancy can be neatly resolved. Based on paleomagnetic declination anomalies, it is inferred that slip on NW trending right lateral faults caused a local 30 degrees counter-clockwise (CCW) rotation of blocks and faults in the Lake Mead area. Consequently the inferred 60 degrees CW rotation of the stress field in the LMFS consists of an actual 30 degrees CW rotation of the stress field (as for the entire Great Basin) plus a local 30 degrees CCW material rotation of the LMFS fault blocks.

  4. Stress field rotation or block rotation: An example from the Lake Mead fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, Hagai; Nur, Amos; Aydin, Atilla

    1990-02-01

    The Coulomb criterion, as applied by Anderson (1951), has been widely used as the basis for inferring paleostresses from in situ fault slip data, assuming that faults are optimally oriented relative to the tectonic stress direction. Consequently if stress direction is fixed during deformation so must be the faults. Freund (1974) has shown that faults, when arranged in sets, must generally rotate as they slip. Nur et al., (1986) showed how sufficiently large rotations require the development of new sets of faults which are more favorably oriented to the principal direction of stress. This leads to the appearance of multiple fault sets in which older faults are offset by younger ones, both having the same sense of slip. Consequently correct paleostress analysis must include the possible effect of fault and material rotation, in addition to stress field rotation. The combined effects of stress field rotation and material rotation were investigated in the Lake Meade Fault System (LMFS) especially in the Hoover Dam area. Fault inversion results imply an apparent 60 degrees clockwise (CW) rotation of the stress field since mid-Miocene time. In contrast structural data from the rest of the Great Basin suggest only a 30 degrees CW stress field rotation. By incorporating paleomagnetic and seismic evidence, the 30 degrees discrepancy can be neatly resolved. Based on paleomagnetic declination anomalies, it is inferred that slip on NW trending right lateral faults caused a local 30 degrees counter-clockwise (CCW) rotation of blocks and faults in the Lake Mead area. Consequently the inferred 60 degrees CW rotation of the stress field in the LMFS consists of an actual 30 degrees CW rotation of the stress field (as for the entire Great Basin) plus a local 30 degrees CCW material rotation of the LMFS fault blocks.

  5. ROTATIONAL DOPPLER BEAMING IN ECLIPSING BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Groot, Paul J.

    2012-01-20

    In eclipsing binaries the stellar rotation of the two components will cause a rotational Doppler beaming during eclipse ingress and egress when only part of the eclipsed component is covered. For eclipsing binaries with fast spinning components this photometric analog of the well-known spectroscopic Rossiter-McLaughlin effect can exceed the strength of the orbital effect. Example light curves are shown for a detached double white dwarf binary, a massive O-star binary and a transiting exoplanet case, similar to WASP-33b. Inclusion of the rotational Doppler beaming in eclipsing systems is a prerequisite for deriving the correct stellar parameters from fitting high-quality photometric light curves and can be used to determine stellar obliquities as well as, e.g., an independent measure of the rotational velocity in those systems that may be expected to be fully synchronized.

  6. ROTATING GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchini, P.; Varri, A. L.; Bertin, G.; Zocchi, A.

    2013-07-20

    Internal rotation is thought to play a major role in the dynamics of some globular clusters. However, in only a few cases has internal rotation been studied by the quantitative application of realistic and physically justified global models. Here, we present a dynamical analysis of the photometry and three-dimensional kinematics of {omega} Cen, 47 Tuc, and M15, by means of a recently introduced family of self-consistent axisymmetric rotating models. The three clusters, characterized by different relaxation conditions, show evidence of differential rotation and deviations from sphericity. The combination of line-of-sight velocities and proper motions allows us to determine their internal dynamics, predict their morphology, and estimate their dynamical distance. The well-relaxed cluster 47 Tuc is interpreted very well by our model; internal rotation is found to explain the observed morphology. For M15, we provide a global model in good agreement with the data, including the central behavior of the rotation profile and the shape of the ellipticity profile. For the partially relaxed cluster {omega} Cen, the selected model reproduces the complex three-dimensional kinematics; in particular, the observed anisotropy profile, characterized by a transition from isotropy to weakly radial anisotropy and then to tangential anisotropy in the outer parts. The discrepancy found for the steep central gradient in the observed line-of-sight velocity dispersion profile and for the ellipticity profile is ascribed to the condition of only partial relaxation of this cluster and the interplay between rotation and radial anisotropy.

  7. Rotating reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Glyn O.

    1991-01-01

    Undesired gravitational effects such as convection or sedimentation in a fluid can sometimes be avoided or decreased by the use of a closed chamber uniformly rotated about a horizontal axis. In a previous study, the spiral orbits of a heavy or buoyant particle in a uniformly rotating fluid were determined. The particles move in circles, and spiral in or out under the combined effects of the centrifugal force and centrifugal buoyancy. A optimization problem for the rotation rate of a cylindrical reactor rotated about its axis and containing distributed particles was formulated and solved. Related studies in several areas are addressed. A computer program based on the analysis was upgraded by correcting some minor errors, adding a sophisticated screen-and-printer graphics capability and other output options, and by improving the automation. The design, performance, and analysis of a series of experiments with monodisperse polystyrene latex microspheres in water were supported to test the theory and its limitations. The theory was amply confirmed at high rotation rates. However, at low rotation rates (1 rpm or less) the assumption of uniform solid-body rotation of the fluid became invalid, and there were increasingly strong secondary motions driven by variations in the mean fluid density due to variations in the particle concentration. In these tests the increase in the mean fluid density due to the particles was of order 0.015 percent. To a first approximation, these flows are driven by the buoyancy in a thin crescent-shaped depleted layer on the descending side of the rotating reactor. This buoyancy distribution is balanced by viscosity near the walls, and by the Coriolis force in the interior. A full analysis is beyond the scope of this study. Secondary flows are likely to be stronger for buoyant particles, which spiral in towards the neutral point near the rotation axis under the influence of their centrifugal buoyancy. This is because the depleted layer is

  8. Rotatable seal assembly. [Patent application; rotating targets

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.; Garibaldi, J.L.

    1980-11-12

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  9. Three-dimensional simulation of a rotating supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Kuroda, T.; Takiwaki, T.; Kotake, K.

    2014-05-02

    We investigate the effects of rotation on the evolution of core-collapse supernova explosion using a 15 solar mass progenitor model with a variety of neutrino luminosity and rotational velocity. Stars should have some amount of angular momentum, which would affect stellar evolution and its final explosion. In this paper we focus on the effect of rotation on gravitational collapse of a core, on a core bounce of accreting matter, and on subsequent generation and evolution of a shock wave. We find that the rotation plays a positive role for supernova explosions. More rapidly rotating models present more rapid expansion of the shock front and more energetic explosions. When the rotational speed is moderate, the shock once stalls at about 200 km away from the center similarly to a non-rotating model. Then the rotating progenitor experiences effective neutrino heating especially around an equatorial plane and explodes even with somewhat low neutrino luminosity for which the non-rotating model cannot overcome accreting matter and finally collapses. When the rotational speed is fast, the shock expands to about 300 km immediately after the core bounce and then evolves to move outward without shock stalling. We conclude that this positive effect of rotation to explosions is dominant against some possible negative aspects, for example, lower neutrino luminosity caused by less contraction of the rotating core.

  10. Exciting Molecules Close to the Rotational Quantum Resonance: Anderson Wall and Rotational Bloch Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Floß, Johannes; Averbukh, Ilya Sh

    2016-05-19

    We describe a universal behavior of linear molecules excited by a periodic train of short laser pulses under conditions close to the quantum resonance. The quantum resonance effect causes an unlimited ballistic growth of the angular momentum. We show that a disturbance of the quantum resonance, either by the centrifugal distortion of the rotating molecules or a controlled detuning of the pulse train period from the so-called rotational revival time, eventually halts the growth by causing Anderson localization beyond a critical value of the angular momentum, the Anderson wall. Below the wall, the rotational excitation oscillates with the number of pulses due to a mechanism similar to Bloch oscillations in crystalline solids. We suggest optical experiments capable of observing the rotational Anderson wall and Bloch oscillations at near-ambient conditions with the help of existing laser technology. PMID:26799273

  11. Chaotic rotation of Hyperion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binzel, R. P.; Green, J. R.; Opal, C. B.

    1986-01-01

    Thomas et al. (1984) analyzed 14 Voyager 2 images of Saturn's satellite Hyperion and interpreted them to be consistent with a coherent (nonchaotic) rotation period of 13.1 days. This interpretation was criticized by Peale and Wisdom (1984), who argued that the low sampling frequency of Voyager data does not allow chaotic or nonchaotic rotation to be distinguished. New observations obtained with a higher sampling frequency are reported here which conclusively show that the 13.1 day period found by Thomas et al. was not due to coherent rotation.

  12. Acoustic rotation control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Croonquist, A. P.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A system is described for acoustically controlled rotation of a levitated object, which avoids deformation of a levitated liquid object. Acoustic waves of the same wavelength are directed along perpendicular directions across the object, and with the relative phases of the acoustic waves repeatedly switched so that one wave alternately leads and lags the other by 90 deg. The amount of torque for rotating the object, and the direction of rotation, are controlled by controlling the proportion of time one wave leads the other and selecting which wave leads the other most of the time.

  13. Pumping of water through carbon nanotubes by rotating electric field and rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Peng; Kong, Gao-Pan; Zhang, Xing; He, Guo-Wei

    2013-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate pumping of water through a carbon nanotube by applying the combination of a rotating electric field and a rotating magnetic field. The driving force is a Lorentz force generated from the motion of charges in the magnetic field, and the motion is caused by the rotation of the electric field. We find that there exits a linear relationship between the average pumping velocity v and magnetic field strength B, which can be used to control the flux of the continuous unidirectional water flow. This approach is expected to be used in liquid circulation without a pressure gradient.

  14. Multiple giant diverticula of the jejunum causing intestinal obstruction: report of a case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Multiple diverticulosis of jejunum represents an uncommon pathology of the small bowel. The disease is usually asymptomatic and must be taken into consideration in cases of unexplained malabsorption, anemia, chronic abdominal pain or discomfort. Related complications such as diverticulitis, perforation, bleeding or intestinal obstruction appear in 10-30% of the patients increasing morbidity and mortality rates. We herein report a case of a 55 year-old man presented at the emergency department with acute abdominal pain, vomiting and fever. Preoperative radiological examination followed by laparotomy revealed multiple giant jejunal diverticula causing intestinal obstruction. We also review the literature for this uncommon disease. PMID:21385440

  15. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... cuff are common. They include tendinitis, bursitis, and injuries such as tears. Rotator cuff tendons can become ... cuff depends on age, health, how severe the injury is, and how long you've had the ...

  16. The Rotating Mirror.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses theory of the rotating mirror, its use in measuring the velocity of the electrical signal in wires, and the velocity of light. Concludes with a description of the manometric flame apparatus developed for analyzing sound waves. (SK)

  17. Rotating mobile launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus holds remotely piloted arm that accelerates until launching speed is reached. Then vehicle and counterweight at other end of arm are released simultaneously to avoid structural damage from unbalanced rotating forces.

  18. Rotator cuff repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... already torn from chronic rotator cuff problems. A partial tear may not require surgery. Instead, rest and ... Follow any discharge and self-care instructions you are given. You will be wearing a sling when you leave the hospital. ...

  19. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  20. Rotational rate sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    A rate sensor for angular/rotational acceleration includes a housing defining a fluid cavity essentially completely filled with an electrolyte fluid. Within the housing, such as a toroid, ions in the fluid are swept during movement from an excitation electrode toward one of two output electrodes to provide a signal for directional rotation. One or more ground electrodes within the housing serve to neutralize ions, thus preventing any effect at the other output electrode.

  1. Robot Grasps Rotating Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian H.; Tso, Kam S.; Litwin, Todd E.; Hayati, Samad A.; Bon, Bruce B.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental robotic system semiautomatically grasps rotating object, stops rotation, and pulls object to rest in fixture. Based on combination of advanced techniques for sensing and control, constructed to test concepts for robotic recapture of spinning artificial satellites. Potential terrestrial applications for technology developed with help of system includes tracking and grasping of industrial parts on conveyor belts, tracking of vehicles and animals, and soft grasping of moving objects in general.

  2. Instability in Rotating Machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings contain 45 papers on a wide range of subjects including flow generated instabilities in fluid flow machines, cracked shaft detection, case histories of instability phenomena in compressors, turbines, and pumps, vibration control in turbomachinery (including antiswirl techniques), and the simulation and estimation of destabilizing forces in rotating machines. The symposium was held to serve as an update on the understanding and control of rotating machinery instability problems.

  3. Rotating arc spark plug

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  4. Rotational Spectrum of Sarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. R. Hight; Suenram, R. D.; Samuels, Alan; Jensen, James; Ellzy, Michael W.; Lochner, J. Michael; Zeroka, Daniel

    2001-05-01

    As part of an effort to examine the possibility of using molecular-beam Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy to unambiguously detect and monitor chemical warfare agents, we report the first observation and assignment of the rotational spectrum of the nerve agent Sarin (GB) (Methylphosphonofluoridic acid 1-methyl-ethyl ester, CAS #107-44-8) at frequencies between 10 and 22 GHz. Only one of the two low-energy conformers of this organophosphorus compound (C4H10FO2P) was observed in the rotationally cold (Trot<2 K) molecular beam. The experimental asymmetric-rotor ground-state rotational constants of this conformer are A=2874.0710(9) MHz, B=1168.5776(4) MHz, C=1056.3363(4) MHz (Type A standard uncertainties are given, i.e., 1σ), as obtained from a least-squares analysis of 74 a-, b-, and c-type rotational transitions. Several of the transitions are split into doublets due to the internal rotation of the methyl group attached to the phosphorus. The three-fold-symmetry barrier to internal rotation estimated from these splittings is 677.0(4) cm-1. Ab initio electronic structure calculations using Hartree-Fock, density functional, and Moller-Plesset perturbation theories have also been made. The structure of the lowest-energy conformer determined from a structural optimization at the MP2/6-311G** level of theory is consistent with our experimental findings.

  5. Automated shell theory for rotating structures (ASTROS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. J.; Thomas, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    A computer program for analyzing axisymmetric shells with inertial forces caused by rotation about the shell axis is developed by revising the STARS II shell program. The basic capabilities of the STARS II shell program, such as the treatment of the branched shells, stiffened wall construction, and thermal gradients, are retained.

  6. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOEpatents

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  7. Clinical Examination of the Rotator Cuff

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nitin B.; Wilcox, Reginald; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Higgins, Laurence D.

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are the leading cause of shoulder pain and shoulder-related disability accounting for 4.5 million physician visits in the United States annually. A careful history and structured physical examination are often sufficient for diagnosing rotator cuff disorders. We are not aware of a clinical review article that presents a structured physical examination protocol of the rotator cuff for the interested clinician. To fill this void, we present a physical examination protocol developed on the basis of review of prior literature and our clinical experience from dedicated shoulder practices. Our protocol includes range of motion testing using a goniometer, strength testing using a dynamometer, and select special tests. Among the many tests for rotator cuff disorders that have been described, we chose ones that have been more thoroughly assessed for sensitivity and specificity. This protocol can be used to isolate the specific rotator cuff tendon involved. The protocol can be typically completed in 15 minutes. We also discuss the clinical implications and limitations of the physical examination maneuvers described in our protocol. This protocol is thorough yet time-efficient for a busy clinical practice. It is useful in diagnosis of rotator cuff tears, impingement syndrome, and biceps pathology. PMID:23332909

  8. Rotor instability due to loose rotating part

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muszynska, A.

    1985-01-01

    Loosening of a rotating part from its fixed position on the shaft or a part of the stator which comes loose and begins to turn with the rotor very frequently represents machinery malfunction. The loose part becomes involved in rotative motion mostly due to dry or fluid friction, and thus its motion is very erratic. The loose part can also move axially along the shaft. Detachment of the rotating part causes changes in the rotor balance state. Most often this results in higher unbalance. During steady-state operation the effect of a loose rotating part can manifest itself through heat vibration. It can be diagnosed by observing periodic changes of amplitude and phase of the synchronous response. During start-up (or shutdown) a loose rotating part carrying some amount of unbalance may manifest its dynamic action in the form of subsynchronous vibrations, very similar to those of other instabilities. The objective of this demonstration is to observe the effect of a loose rotating part (fixed, however, in the axial direction) under both steady-state (rotor constant speed) and transient (rotor start-up or shutdown) operation. The dynamic response depends very much on the amount of damping in the system: lubrication of the loose part/shaft surfaces and addition/elimination of aerodynamic drag blades, mounted on the loose disk, significantly change the rotor response.

  9. High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating Cell-Culture Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David A.; Sams, Clarence; Schwarz, Ray P.

    1992-01-01

    Cylindrical rotating cell-culture vessel with thin culture-medium layer of large surface area provides exchange of nutrients and products of metabolism with minimal agitation. Rotation causes averaging of buoyant forces otherwise separating components of different densities. Vessel enables growth of cells in homogeneous distribution with little agitation and little shear stress.

  10. Terrestrial Planets: Volatiles Loss & Speed of Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    There is a close relation between orbiting frequencies of terrestrial planets and intensities of their outgassing [1]. ``Sweeping'' out volatiles of their bodies is provoked and facilitated by body shaking (wave oscillations) caused by movement of celestial bodies in elliptical orbits. Non-round orbits cause inertia-gravity warpings in all spheres of the bodies producing their tectonic granulation. The higher orbiting frequency -- the smaller tectonic granula -- more thorough interior degassing. Sizes of tectonic granulas inversely proportional to orbiting frequencies are: Mars π R/2, Earth π R/4, Venus π R/6, Mercury π R/16. The atmospheric masses increase from Mars through Earth to Venus as ˜ 0. 01 : 1 : 90 (radiogenic/primordial Ar is 3000 : 300 : 1, marking degassing intensity). Mercury in this sequence should have been even more outgassed (˜ 500 times comparative to Venus, having in mind different planetary masses [2]). But now it possesses only very weak atmosphere of noble gases, Na, K -- remnants of past significant outgassing now witnessed by a great amount of small deep structurally controlled pits (craters), lobate scarps caused by strong contraction and slow rotation. The slow rotation is due to loss of angular momentum to the atmosphere now wiped out by the solar wind. The same partitioning of angular momentum occurs at Venus: slowly rotating solid body is wrapped in rapidly rotating massive atmosphere (the solid surface exposes many features of contraction due to subsidence -- vast areas of wrinkle ridges). On the contrary to slow Mercury and Venus, Earth and Mars keep their moderate rotation corresponding to their moderate and mild degassing [3]. Still further from Sun weakly outgassed gas giants rotate very rapidly. Sun itself with slowly rotating photosphere and corresponding supergranula size π R/60 is a strongly outgassed object (some think that Sun lost upto 10% of its original mass). In line with the established regularity between

  11. Rotation Rates of the Giant Planets (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, G.; Helled, R.; Anderson, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    atmospheric motions (Anderson, J.D. and G. Schubert, 2007, Saturn’s gravitational field, internal rotation, and interior structure, Science, 317, 1384-1387 [doi: 10.1126/science.1144835]; Read, P.L., T.E. Dowling, and G. Schubert, Saturn’s rotation period from its atmospheric planetary-wave configuration, 2009, Nature, 460, 608-610 [doi:10.1038/nature08194 Letter]) have inferred planetary rotation periods significantly shorter than the Voyager period, implying Jovian-like atmospheric winds. The inferred shapes (oblateness) of Uranus and Neptune are inconsistent with heretofore accepted planetary rotation rates. Either the shapes or the rotation periods of the icy giants are not well determined. If the magnetic fields of Uranus and Neptune are generated in relatively thin shells (Stanley, S., and J. Bloxham, Convective-region geometry as the cause of Uranus’ and Neptune’s unusual magnetic fields, Nature, 428, 151-153 [doi:10.1038/nature02376] Letter), then the periodicities of the fields might not reflect the rotation of the bulk of the planets.

  12. Rotational master equation for cold laser-driven molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Adelswaerd, A.; Wallentowitz, S.; Vogel, W.

    2003-06-01

    The equations of motion for the molecular rotation are derived for vibrationally cold dimers that are polarized by off-resonant laser light. It is shown that, by eliminating electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom, a quantum master equation for the reduced rotational density operator can be obtained. The coherent rotational dynamics is caused by stimulated Raman transitions, whereas spontaneous Raman transitions lead to decoherence in the motion of the quantized angular momentum. As an example the molecular dynamics for the optical Kerr effect is chosen, revealing decoherence and heating of the molecular rotation.

  13. Jaundice causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver is unable to properly move into the digestive tract. Conditions that can cause jaundice include: Infections of the liver from a virus ( hepatitis A , hepatitis B , hepatitis C , hepatitis D , ...

  14. Rotating Aperture System

    DOEpatents

    Rusnak, Brian; Hall, James M.; Shen, Stewart; Wood, Richard L.

    2005-01-18

    A rotating aperture system includes a low-pressure vacuum pumping stage with apertures for passage of a deuterium beam. A stator assembly includes holes for passage of the beam. The rotor assembly includes a shaft connected to a deuterium gas cell or a crossflow venturi that has a single aperture on each side that together align with holes every rotation. The rotating apertures are synchronized with the firing of the deuterium beam such that the beam fires through a clear aperture and passes into the Xe gas beam stop. Portions of the rotor are lapped into the stator to improve the sealing surfaces, to prevent rapid escape of the deuterium gas from the gas cell.

  15. Rotating ice blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorbolo, Stephane; Adami, Nicolas; Grasp Team

    2014-11-01

    The motion of ice discs released at the surface of a thermalized bath was investigated. As observed in some rare events in the Nature, the discs start spinning spontaneously. The motor of this motion is the cooling of the water close to the ice disc. As the density of water is maximum at 4°C, a downwards flow is generated from the surface of the ice block to the bottom. This flow generates the rotation of the disc. The speed of rotation depends on the mass of the ice disc and on the temperature of the bath. A model has been constructed to study the influence of the temperature of the bath. Finally, ice discs were put on a metallic plate. Again, a spontaneous rotation was observed. FNRS is thanked for financial support.

  16. IO Rotation Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    During its 1979 flyby, Voyager 2 observed Io only from a distance. However, the volcanic activity discovered by Voyager 1 months earlier was readily visible. This sequence of nine color images was collected using the Blue, Green and Orange filters from about 1.2 million kilometers. A 2.5 hour period is covered during which Io rotates 7 degrees.

    Rotating into view over the limb of Io are the plumes of the volcanoes Amirani (top) and Maui (lower). These plumes are very distinct against the black sky because they are being illuminated from behind. Notice that as Io rotates, the proportion of Io which is sunlit decreases greatly. This changing phase angle is because Io is moving between the spacecraft and the Sun.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1985.

  17. Lattice QCD in rotating frames.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata; Hirono, Yuji

    2013-08-23

    We formulate lattice QCD in rotating frames to study the physics of QCD matter under rotation. We construct the lattice QCD action with the rotational metric and apply it to the Monte Carlo simulation. As the first application, we calculate the angular momenta of gluons and quarks in the rotating QCD vacuum. This new framework is useful to analyze various rotation-related phenomena in QCD. PMID:24010426

  18. Rotation of Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissin, Yevgeni; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    The internal rotation of post-main sequence stars is investigated, in response to the convective pumping of angular momentum toward the stellar core, combined with a tight magnetic coupling between core and envelope. The spin evolution is calculated using model stars of initial mass 1, 1.5, and 5 {M}⊙ , taking into account mass loss on the giant branches. We also include the deposition of orbital angular momentum from a sub-stellar companion, as influenced by tidal drag along with the excitation of orbital eccentricity by a fluctuating gravitational quadrupole moment. A range of angular velocity profiles {{Ω }}(r) is considered in the envelope, extending from solid rotation to constant specific angular momentum. We focus on the backreaction of the Coriolis force, and the threshold for dynamo action in the inner envelope. Quantitative agreement with measurements of core rotation in subgiants and post-He core flash stars by Kepler is obtained with a two-layer angular velocity profile: uniform specific angular momentum where the Coriolis parameter {Co}\\equiv {{Ω }}{τ }{con}≲ 1 (here {τ }{con} is the convective time), and {{Ω }}(r)\\propto {r}-1 where {Co}≳ 1. The inner profile is interpreted in terms of a balance between the Coriolis force and angular pressure gradients driven by radially extended convective plumes. Inward angular momentum pumping reduces the surface rotation of subgiants, and the need for a rejuvenated magnetic wind torque. The co-evolution of internal magnetic fields and rotation is considered in Kissin & Thompson, along with the breaking of the rotational coupling between core and envelope due to heavy mass loss.

  19. Rotating flexible drag mill

    DOEpatents

    Pepper, W.B.

    1984-05-09

    A rotating parachute for decelerating objects travelling through atmosphere at subsonic or supersonic deployment speeds includes a circular canopy having a plurality of circumferentially arranged flexible panels projecting radially from a solid central disk. A slot extends radially between adjacent panels to the outer periphery of the canopy. Upon deployment, the solid disk diverts air radially to rapidly inflate the panels into a position of maximum diameter. Air impinging on the panels adjacent the panel slots rotates the parachute during its descent. Centrifugal force flattens the canopy into a constant maximum diameter during terminal descent for maximum drag and deceleration.

  20. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Brent J.; Coomes, Edmund P.

    1988-12-06

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  1. Rotating shielded crane system

    DOEpatents

    Commander, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotating, radiation shielded crane system for use in a high radiation test cell, comprises a radiation shielding wall, a cylindrical ceiling made of radiation shielding material and a rotatable crane disposed above the ceiling. The ceiling rests on an annular ledge intergrally attached to the inner surface of the shielding wall. Removable plugs in the ceiling provide access for the crane from the top of the ceiling into the test cell. A seal is provided at the interface between the inner surface of the shielding wall and the ceiling.

  2. Effect of colchicine on the Golgi apparatus and on GERL of rat jejunal absorptive cells. Ultrastructural localization of thiamine pyrophosphatase and acid phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Pavelka, M; Ellinger, A

    1981-04-01

    Ultrastructural localization of thiamine pyrophosphatase (TTP) and acid phosphatase (AcPase) activity was performed on jejunal absorptive cells of rats pretreated with the antimicrotubular agent colchicine and of control animals. Demonstration of TPP activity showed that most of the dislocated Golgi stacks after colchicine application lacked positively staining cisternae of the mature side. This cytochemical finding is in agreement with the morphologically demonstrable changes of the Golgi stacks resulting in a loss of polarity and give evidence for a colchicine-induced deficiency of the Golgi apparatus. The cytochemical localization of AcPase activity showed deposits of reaction product over lysosomes and GERL and demonstrated a dislocation of GERL occurring concomitantly with the changes of the Golgi apparatus. The antimicrotubular effect of colchicine is well documented; thus the morphological and cytochemical changes of the Golgi apparatus and of GERL might be due to a disturbed microtubular function after application of this agent suggesting an influence of microtubules in the maintenance of the integrity of these organelles. This hypothesis includes the possibility of an involvement of microtubules in formation and differentiation of Golgi stacks and GERL as well as a kind of "skeletal"function being responsible for their characteristic structure and fashion. PMID:6113143

  3. Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis infection of the porcine jejunal Peyer’s patch rapidly induces IL-1β and IL-8 expression

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Kendra A.; Brown, David R.; Murtaugh, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis is an enteric pathogen of swine, producing septicemia, enterocolitis, pneumonia, and hepatitis. The initial molecular events at the site of Salmonella infection are hypothesized to be critical in the initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses; however the acute immune response elicited by porcine intestinal tissues is not well understood. To address this need, we employed explants of jejunal Peyer’s patch (JPP) mucosa from pigs to examine Salmonella-induced immune responses under controlled conditions as well as to overcome limitations of whole animal approaches. JPP explants mounted in Ussing chambers maintained normal histological structure for 2 h and stable short-circuit current and electrical conductance for 2.5 h. After ex vivo luminal exposure to Salmonella serovar Choleraesuis, JPP responded with an increase in mRNA expression of IL-1β and IL-8, but not TNFα. Increased IL-1β and IL-8 expression were dependent on efficient Salmonella adhesion and internalization, whereas mutant Salmonella did not induce inflammatory cytokine expression. Commensal enteric bacteria, present in some experiments, also did not induce inflammatory cytokine expression. These findings indicate that Salmonella uptake by Peyer’s patch is important in the induction of an innate response involving expression of IL-1β and IL-8, and that ex vivo intestinal immune tissue explants provide an intact tissue model that will facilitate investigation of mucosal immunity in swine. PMID:16115691

  4. Management of a Septic Open Abdomen Patient with Spontaneous Jejunal Perforation after Emergent C/S with Confounding Factor of Mild Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yetisir, Fahri; Sarer, Akgün Ebru; Acar, Hasan Zafer; Osmanoglu, Gokhan; Özer, Mehmet; Yaylak, Faik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We report the management of a septic Open Abdomen (OA) patient by the help of negative pressure therapy (NPT) and abdominal reapproximation anchor (ABRA) system in pregnant woman with spontaneous jejunal perforation after emergent cesarean section (C/S) with confounding factor of mild acute pancreatitis (AP). Presentation of Case. A 29-year-old and 34-week pregnant woman with AP underwent C/S. She was arrested after anesthesia induction and responded to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). There were only ash-colored serosanguinous fluid within abdomen during C/S. After C/S, she was transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) with vasopressor support. On postoperative 1st day, she underwent reoperation due to fecal fluid coming near the drainage. Leakage point could not be identified exactly and operation had to be deliberately abbreviated due to hemodynamic instability. NPT was applied. Two days later source control was provided by conversion of enteroatmospheric fistula (EAF) to jejunostomy. ABRA was added and OA was closed. No hernia developed at 10-month follow-up period. Conclusion. NPT application in septic OA patient may gain time to patient until adequate source control could be achieved. Using ABRA in conjunction with NPT increases the fascial closure rate in infected OA patient. PMID:27006853

  5. The Rotational and Gravitational Effect of Earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Richard

    2000-01-01

    The static displacement field generated by an earthquake has the effect of rearranging the Earth's mass distribution and will consequently cause the Earth's rotation and gravitational field to change. Although the coseismic effect of earthquakes on the Earth's rotation and gravitational field have been modeled in the past, no unambiguous observations of this effect have yet been made. However, the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite, which is scheduled to be launched in 2001, will measure time variations of the Earth's gravitational field to high degree and order with unprecedented accuracy. In this presentation, the modeled coseismic effect of earthquakes upon the Earth's gravitational field to degree and order 100 will be computed and compared to the expected accuracy of the GRACE measurements. In addition, the modeled second degree changes, corresponding to changes in the Earth's rotation, will be compared to length-of-day and polar motion excitation observations.

  6. Earth Rotation Dynamics: Review and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    Modem space geodetic measurement of Earth rotation variations, particularly by means of the VLBI technique, has over the years allowed studies of Earth rotation dynamics to advance in ever-increasing precision, accuracy, and temporal resolution. A review will be presented on our understanding of the geophysical and climatic causes, or "excitations", for length-of-day change, polar motion, and nutations. These excitations sources come from mass transports that constantly take place in the Earth system comprised of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, lithosphere, mantle, and the cores. In this sense, together with other space geodetic measurements of time-variable gravity and geocenter motion, Earth rotation variations become a remote-sensing tool for the integral of all mass transports, providing valuable information about the latter on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Future prospects with respect to geophysical studies with even higher accuracy and resolution will be discussed.

  7. Instability of a rotating liquid ring.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sicheng; Tao, Jianjun

    2013-09-01

    It is shown numerically that a rotating inviscid liquid ring has a temporally oscillating state, where the radius of the ring varies periodically because of the competition between the centrifugal force and the centripetal force caused by the surface tension. Stability analysis reveals that an enlarging or shrinking ring is unstable to a varicose-type mode, which is affected by both the radial velocity and the radius ratio between the cross section and the ring. Furthermore, uniform rotation of a ring leads to a traveling unstable mode, whose frequency is determined by a simple sinuous mode, while the surface shape is modulated by the varicose mode and twisted by the rotation-induced Coriolis force. PMID:24125353

  8. Instability of a rotating liquid ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Sicheng; Tao, Jianjun

    2013-09-01

    It is shown numerically that a rotating inviscid liquid ring has a temporally oscillating state, where the radius of the ring varies periodically because of the competition between the centrifugal force and the centripetal force caused by the surface tension. Stability analysis reveals that an enlarging or shrinking ring is unstable to a varicose-type mode, which is affected by both the radial velocity and the radius ratio between the cross section and the ring. Furthermore, uniform rotation of a ring leads to a traveling unstable mode, whose frequency is determined by a simple sinuous mode, while the surface shape is modulated by the varicose mode and twisted by the rotation-induced Coriolis force.

  9. Earth Rotational Variations Excited by Geophysical Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    Modern space geodetic measurement of Earth rotation variations, particularly by means of the VLBI technique, has over the years allowed studies of Earth rotation dynamics to advance in ever-increasing precision, accuracy, and temporal resolution. A review will be presented on our understanding of the geophysical and climatic causes, or "excitations". for length-of-day change, polar motion, and nutations. These excitations sources come from mass transports that constantly take place in the Earth system comprised of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, lithosphere, mantle, and the cores. In this sense, together with other space geodetic measurements of time-variable gravity and geocenter motion, Earth rotation variations become a remote-sensing tool for the integral of all mass transports, providing valuable information about the latter on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Future prospects with respect to geophysical studies with even higher accuracy and resolution will be discussed.

  10. Effect of mold rotation on the bifilar electroslag remelting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiao-fang; Chang, Li-zhong; Wang, Jian-jun

    2015-10-01

    A novel electroslag furnace with a rotating mold was fabricated, and the effects of mold rotational speed on the electroslag remelting process were investigated. The results showed that the chemical element distribution in ingots became uniform and that their compact density increased when the mold rotational speed was increased from 0 to 28 r/min. These results were attributed to a reasonable mold speed, which resulted in a uniform temperature in the slag pool and scattered the metal droplets randomly in the metal pool. However, an excessive rotational speed caused deterioration of the solidification structure. When the mold rotational speeds was increased from 0 to 28 r/min, the size of Al2O3 inclusions in the electroslag ingot decreased from 4.4 to 1.9 μm. But the excessive mold rotational speed would decrease the ability of the electroslag remelting to remove the inclusions. The remelting speed gradually increased, which resulted in reduced power consumption with increasing mold rotational speed. This effect was attributed to accelerated heat exchange between the consumable electrode and the molten slag, which resulted from mold rotation. Nevertheless, when the rotational speed reached 28 r/min, the remelting speed did not change because of limitations of metal heat conduction. Mold rotation also improved the surface quality of the ingots by promoting a uniform temperature distribution in the slag pool.

  11. Tests of Rotating Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Elliott G

    1924-01-01

    Tests were made in the no. 1 wind tunnel at Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory to determine the air forces acting on rotating cylinders with axes perpendicular to the direction of motion. One cylinder had a circular cross-section, the other that of a greek cross.

  12. Rotational waves in geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerus, Artyom; Vikulin, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The rotation model of a geoblock with intrinsic momentum was constructed by A.V. Vikulin and A.G. Ivanchin [9, 10] to describe seismicity within the Pacific Ocean margin. It is based on the idea of a rotational motion of geoblocks as the parts of the rotating body of the Earth that generates rotary deformation waves. The law of the block motion was derived in the form of the sine-Gordon equation (SG) [5, 9]; the dimensionless form of the equation is: δ2θ δ2θ δξ2 - δη2 = sinθ, (1) where θ = β/2, ξ = k0z and η = v0k0t are dimensionless coordinates, z - length of the chain of masses (blocks), t - time, β - turn angle, ν0 - representative velocity of the process, k0 - wave number. Another case analyzed was a chain of nonuniformly rotating blocks, with deviation of force moments from equilibrium positions μ, considering friction forces α along boundaries, which better matched a real-life seismic process. As a result, the authors obtained the law of motion for a block in a chain in the form of the modified SG equation [8]: δ2θ δ2θ δθ- δξ2 - δ η2 = sin θ+ α δη + μδ(ξ)sin θ (2)

  13. Troubleshooting rotating equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.F. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports that equipment problems in a Peruvian refinery illustrate the process engineer's role as a troubleshooter. Examples show that rotating equipment problems can stem from mechanical or process factors and involve both inspection/maintenance specialists and process engineers.

  14. Rotatable stem and lock

    DOEpatents

    Deveney, Joseph E.; Sanderson, Stephen N.

    1984-01-01

    A valve stem and lock include a housing surrounding a valve stem, a solenoid affixed to an interior wall of the housing, an armature affixed to the valve stem and a locking device for coupling the armature to the housing body. When the solenoid is energized, the solenoid moves away from the housing body, permitting rotation of the valve stem.

  15. Rotational clutter metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Salem; Halford, Carl; Moyer, Steve; Gundy, Matthew

    2009-08-01

    A new approach to linear discriminant analysis (LDA), called orthogonal rotational LDA (ORLDA) is presented. Using ORLDA and properly accounting for target size allowed development of a new clutter metric that is based on the Laplacian pyramid (LP) decomposition of clutter images. The new metric achieves correlation exceeding 98% with expert human labeling of clutter levels in a set of 244 infrared images. Our clutter metric is based on the set of weights for the LP levels that best classify images into clutter levels as manually classified by an expert human observer. LDA is applied as a preprocessing step to classification. LDA suffers from a few limitations in this application. Therefore, we propose a new approach to LDA, called ORLDA, using orthonormal geometric rotations. Each rotation brings the LP feature space closer to the LDA solution while retaining orthogonality in the feature space. To understand the effects of target size on clutter, we applied ORLDA at different target sizes. The outputs are easily related because they are functions of orthogonal rotation angles. Finally, we used Bayesian decision theory to learn class boundaries for clutter levels at different target sizes.

  16. Concepts in crop rotations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop rotations have been a part of civilization since the Middle Ages. With colonization of what would become the United States came new crops of tobacco, cotton, and corn, the first two of which would play significant roles in both the economic beginnings and social fabric of the new country, how ...

  17. Anisotropy in rotating drums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povall, Timothy; McBride, Andrew; Govender, Indresan

    2015-11-01

    An anisotropic relationship between the stress and the strain rate has been observed in two-dimensional simulations of rotating drums. The objective of this work is to investigate the structure of the constitutive relation using three-dimensional discrete-element-method simulations of a rotating drum containing identical rigid spheres for a range of rotational speeds. Anisotropy is quantified from the alignment of the stress and strain rate tensors, with the strain rate computed using a least-squares fit. It is shown that in certain regions there is a strong anisotropic relationship, regardless of the speed of rotation. The effective friction coefficient is examined in order to determine the phase space in which the μ (I) rheology is valid. Lastly, a depth-averaged approach through the flowing layer is employed to determine the relationship between the velocity tangential to the equilibrium surface and the height of the flowing layer. A power-law relationship that approaches linear at high speeds is observed. Supported by NRF/DST Scarce Skills (South Africa).

  18. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  19. Rotatable stem and lock

    DOEpatents

    Deveney, J.E.; Sanderson, S.N.

    1981-10-27

    A valve stem and lock is disclosed which includes a housing surrounding a valve stem, a solenoid affixed to an interior wall of the housing, an armature affixed to the valve stem and a locking device for coupling the armature to the housing body. When the solenoid is energized, the solenoid moves away from the housing body, permitting rotation of the valve stem.

  20. Rotating Saddle Paul Trap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueckner, Wolfgang; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a demonstration in which a ball is placed in an unstable position on a saddle shape. The ball becomes stable when it is rotated above some threshold angular velocity. The demonstration is a mechanical analog of confining a particle in a "Paul Trap". (DDR)

  1. Rotating Responsibility Reaps Rewards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Barbara; Schullery, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    Describes a process used for group assignments in a business communication course which holds all group members accountable by using a structure of rotating responsibility. Discusses selecting assignments and implementing the process, noting how this structure requires equivalent advance preparation from all members and provides opportunities for…

  2. Rotationally Actuated Prosthetic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Carden, James R.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand attached to end of remaining part of forearm and to upper arm just above elbow. Pincerlike fingers pushed apart to degree depending on rotation of forearm. Simpler in design, simpler to operate, weighs less, and takes up less space.

  3. Rotational Dynamics with Tracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eadkhong, T.; Rajsadorn, R.; Jannual, P.; Danworaphong, S.

    2012-01-01

    We propose the use of Tracker, freeware for video analysis, to analyse the moment of inertia ("I") of a cylindrical plate. Three experiments are performed to validate the proposed method. The first experiment is dedicated to find the linear coefficient of rotational friction ("b") for our system. By omitting the effect of such friction, we derive…

  4. Wigner rotations in laser cavities.

    PubMed

    Başkal, S; Kim, Y S

    2002-08-01

    The Wigner rotation is important in many branches of physics, chemistry, and engineering sciences. It is a group theoretical effect resulting from two Lorentz boosts. The net effect is one boost followed or preceded by a rotation. While the term "Wigner rotation" is derived from Wigner's little group whose transformations leave the four-momentum of a given particle invariant, it is shown that the Wigner rotation is different from the rotations in the little group. This difference is clearly spelled out, and it is shown to be possible to construct the corresponding Wigner rotation from the little-group rotation. It is shown also that the ABCD matrix for light beams in a laser cavity shares the same mathematics as the little-group rotation, from which the Wigner rotation can be constructed. PMID:12241308

  5. ROTATIONAL SPLITTING OF PULSATION MODES

    SciTech Connect

    Deupree, Robert G.; Beslin, Wilfried

    2010-10-01

    Mode splittings produced by uniform rotation and a particular form of differential rotation are computed for two-dimensional rotating 10 M{sub sun} zero-age main sequence stellar models. The change in the character of the mode splitting is traced as a function of uniform rotation rate, and it is found that only relatively slow rotation rates are required before the mode splitting becomes asymmetric about the azimuthally symmetric (m = 0) mode. Increased rotation produces a progressively altered pattern of the individual modes with respect to each other. Large mode splittings begin to overlap with the mode splittings produced by different radial and latitudinal modes at relatively low rotation rates. The mode-splitting pattern for the differentially rotating stars we model is different than that for uniformly rotating stars, making the mode splitting a possible discriminant of the internal angular momentum distribution if one assumes that the formidable challenge of mode identification can be overcome.

  6. Turbulent flow and heat transfer in rotating channels and tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitiakov, V. Y.; Petropavlovskii, R. R.; Ris, V. V.; Smirnov, E. M.; Smirnov, S. A.

    This document is a reduction of the author's experimental results on turbulent flow characteristics and heat transfer in rotating channels whose axes are parallel to the plane of rotation. Substantial dissimilarities of longitudinal velocity field profile and pulsational characteristics are caused by effects of stabilization and destabilization and secondary flow production. Local heat transfer coefficients vary over the perimeter of the tube section connecting detected flow peculiarities. It is shown that the increase in rotational intensity caused an increase in the relative dissimilarity of the local heat transfer coefficients and increased their mean value.

  7. Adaptation in a rotating artificial gravity environment.

    PubMed

    Lackner, J R; DiZio, P

    1998-11-01

    The centripetal force generated by a rotating space vehicle is a potential source of artificial gravity. Minimizing the cost of such a vehicle dictates using the smallest radius and highest rotation rate possible, but head movements made at high rotation rates generate disorienting, nauseogenic cross-coupled semicircular canal stimulation. Early studies suggested 3 or 4 rpm as the highest rate at which humans could adapt to this vestibular stimulus. These studies neglected the concomitant Coriolis force actions on the head/neck system. We assessed non-vestibular Coriolis effects by measuring arm and leg movements made in the center of a rotating room turning at 10 rpm and found that movement endpoints and trajectories are initially deviated; however, subjects readily adapt with 10-20 additional movements, even without seeing their errors. Equilibrium point theories of motor control errantly predict that Coriolis forces will not cause movement endpoint errors so that subjects will not have to adapt their reaching movements during rotation. Adaptation of movement trajectory acquired during Coriolis force perturbations of one arm transfers to the unexposed arm but there is no intermanual transfer of endpoint adaptation indicating that neuromotor representations of movement endpoint and trajectory are separable and can adapt independently, also contradictory to equilibrium point theories. Touching a surface at the end of reaching movements is required for complete endpoint adaptation in darkness but trajectory adapts completely with or without terminal contact. We have also made the first kinematic measurements of unconstrained head movements during rotation, these movements show rapid adaptation to Coriolis force perturbations. Our results point to methods for achieving full compensation for rotation up to 10 rpm. PMID:9795214

  8. Stellar Rotation Effects in Polarimetric Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that the polarization signal in microlensing events of hot stars is larger than that of main-sequence stars. Most hot stars rotate rapidly around their stellar axes. The stellar rotation creates ellipticity and gravity-darkening effects that break the spherical symmetry of the source's shape and the circular symmetry of the source's surface brightness respectively. Hence, it causes a net polarization signal for the source star. This polarization signal should be considered in polarimetric microlensing of fast rotating stars. For moderately rotating stars, lensing can magnify or even characterize small polarization signals due to the stellar rotation through polarimetric observations. The gravity-darkening effect due to a rotating source star creates asymmetric perturbations in polarimetric and photometric microlensing curves whose maximum occurs when the lens trajectory crosses the projected position of the rotation pole on the sky plane. The stellar ellipticity creates a time shift (i) in the position of the second peak of the polarimetric curves in transit microlensing events and (ii) in the peak position of the polarimetric curves with respect to the photometric peak position in bypass microlensing events. By measuring this time shift via polarimetric observations of microlensing events, we can evaluate the ellipticity of the projected source surface on the sky plane. Given the characterizations of the FOcal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph (FORS2) polarimeter at the Very Large Telescope, the probability of observing this time shift is very small. The more accurate polarimeters of the next generation may well measure these time shifts and evaluate the ellipticity of microlensing source stars.

  9. Adaptation in a rotating artificial gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; DiZio, P.

    1998-01-01

    The centripetal force generated by a rotating space vehicle is a potential source of artificial gravity. Minimizing the cost of such a vehicle dictates using the smallest radius and highest rotation rate possible, but head movements made at high rotation rates generate disorienting, nauseogenic cross-coupled semicircular canal stimulation. Early studies suggested 3 or 4 rpm as the highest rate at which humans could adapt to this vestibular stimulus. These studies neglected the concomitant Coriolis force actions on the head/neck system. We assessed non-vestibular Coriolis effects by measuring arm and leg movements made in the center of a rotating room turning at 10 rpm and found that movement endpoints and trajectories are initially deviated; however, subjects readily adapt with 10-20 additional movements, even without seeing their errors. Equilibrium point theories of motor control errantly predict that Coriolis forces will not cause movement endpoint errors so that subjects will not have to adapt their reaching movements during rotation. Adaptation of movement trajectory acquired during Coriolis force perturbations of one arm transfers to the unexposed arm but there is no intermanual transfer of endpoint adaptation indicating that neuromotor representations of movement endpoint and trajectory are separable and can adapt independently, also contradictory to equilibrium point theories. Touching a surface at the end of reaching movements is required for complete endpoint adaptation in darkness but trajectory adapts completely with or without terminal contact. We have also made the first kinematic measurements of unconstrained head movements during rotation, these movements show rapid adaptation to Coriolis force perturbations. Our results point to methods for achieving full compensation for rotation up to 10 rpm. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  10. COUNTER-ROTATION IN RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Cayatte, V.; Sauty, C.; Vlahakis, N.; Tsinganos, K.; Matsakos, T.; Lima, J. J. G.

    2014-06-10

    Young stellar object observations suggest that some jets rotate in the opposite direction with respect to their disk. In a recent study, Sauty et al. showed that this does not contradict the magnetocentrifugal mechanism that is believed to launch such outflows. Motion signatures that are transverse to the jet axis, in two opposite directions, have recently been measured in M87. One possible interpretation of this motion is that of counter-rotating knots. Here, we extend our previous analytical derivation of counter-rotation to relativistic jets, demonstrating that counter-rotation can indeed take place under rather general conditions. We show that both the magnetic field and a non-negligible enthalpy are necessary at the origin of counter-rotating outflows, and that the effect is associated with a transfer of energy flux from the matter to the electromagnetic field. This can be realized in three cases: if a decreasing enthalpy causes an increase of the Poynting flux, if the flow decelerates, or if strong gradients of the magnetic field are present. An illustration of the involved mechanism is given by an example of a relativistic magnetohydrodynamic jet simulation.

  11. Post-traumatic elbow rotational stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Samuel KK; Faan, Yan Sui; Lui, Paulina WY; Ngai, Wai Kit

    2014-01-01

    Background The elbow is an important but complex structure, with movement in both the sagittal plane in flexion and extension, as well as the rotational plane in forearm supination and pronation. Trauma is a common cause of elbow stiffness, which significantly hampers daily function. There are currently no gold-standard management guidelines for post-traumatic elbow stiffness, and most of the published literature focuses solely on the sagittal plane of motion. Methods This is a retrospective case series reviewing all patients who underwent a surgical release for treatment of post-traumatic elbow stiffness during a 36-month period. Motion range and the shortened version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand scores were serially measured and analyzed. Results The results obtained showed that both the sagittal and rotational range of motion directly influenced upper limb function; however, the relationship between these two motion planes was weak, meaning that both sagittal and rotational motion in the elbow need be addressed individually. Post-traumatic elbow stiffness could be aptly managed by various surgical approaches, including arthroscopic-assisted procedures; these were all effective in increasing both the sagittal and rotational range of motion. More importantly, this gain in range translated to a statistically significant improvement in upper limb function. Conclusions Management of elbow stiffness needs to be tackled in both the sagittal and rotational motion planes.

  12. Position, rotation, and intensity invariant recognizing method

    DOEpatents

    Ochoa, E.; Schils, G.F.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1987-09-15

    A method for recognizing the presence of a particular target in a field of view which is target position, rotation, and intensity invariant includes the preparing of a target-specific invariant filter from a combination of all eigen-modes of a pattern of the particular target. Coherent radiation from the field of view is then imaged into an optical correlator in which the invariant filter is located. The invariant filter is rotated in the frequency plane of the optical correlator in order to produce a constant-amplitude rotational response in a correlation output plane when the particular target is present in the field of view. Any constant response is thus detected in the output plane to determine whether a particular target is present in the field of view. Preferably, a temporal pattern is imaged in the output plane with a optical detector having a plurality of pixels and a correlation coefficient for each pixel is determined by accumulating the intensity and intensity-square of each pixel. The orbiting of the constant response caused by the filter rotation is also preferably eliminated either by the use of two orthogonal mirrors pivoted correspondingly to the rotation of the filter or the attaching of a refracting wedge to the filter to remove the offset angle. Detection is preferably performed of the temporal pattern in the output plane at a plurality of different angles with angular separation sufficient to decorrelate successive frames. 1 fig.

  13. Peritonitis with small bowel perforation caused by a fish bone in a healthy patient.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yonghoon; Kim, Gyuwon; Shim, Chansup; Kim, Dongkeun; Kim, Dongju

    2014-02-14

    Perforation of the gastrointestinal tract by ingested foreign bodies is extremely rare in otherwise healthy patients, accounting for < 1% of cases. Accidentally ingested foreign bodies could cause small bowel perforation through a hernia sac, Meckel's diverticulum, or the appendix, all of which are uncommon. Despite their sharp ends and elongated shape, bowel perforation caused by ingested fish bones is rarely reported, particularly in patients without intestinal disease. We report a case of 57-year-old female who visited the emergency room with periumbilical pain and no history of underlying intestinal disease or intra-abdominal surgery. Abdominal computed tomography and exploratory laparotomy revealed a small bowel micro-perforation with a 2.7-cm fish bone penetrating the jejunal wall. PMID:24587641

  14. Wave-driven Rotation in Supersonically Rotating Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    Supersonic rotation in mirrors may be produced by radio frequency waves. The waves produce coupled diffusion in ion kinetic and potential energy. A population inversion along the diffusion path then produces rotation. Waves may be designed to exploit a natural kinetic energy source or may provide the rotation energy on their own. Centrifugal traps for fusion and isotope separation may benefit from this wave-driven rotation.

  15. System for automatically aligning a support roller system under a rotating body

    DOEpatents

    Singletary, B. Huston

    1983-01-01

    Two support rings on a rotatable drum respectively engage conically tapered nd surfaces of support rollers mounted on pivot universally relative to its axis of rotation and translate therealong. Rotation of the drum on differential conical support roller diameters causes pivotal steering and axial translation of support roller until roller is centered on support rings.

  16. System for automatically aligning a support roller system under a rotating body

    DOEpatents

    Singletary, B.H.

    1982-07-21

    Two support rings on a rotatable drum respectively engage conically tapered end surfaces of support rollers mounted on pivot universally relative to its axis of rotation and translate therealong. Rotation of the drum on differential conical support roller diameters causes pivotal steering and axial translation of support roller until roller is centered on support rings.

  17. Suppressing Permutations or Rigid Planar Rotations: A Remedy against Nonoptimal Varimax Rotations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berge, Jos M. F. ten

    1995-01-01

    In Varimax rotation, permutations and reflections can give rise to the phenomenon that certain pairs of columns are consistently skipped in the iterative process, causing Varimax to terminate at a nonstationary point. This skipping phenomenon is demonstrated, and how to prevent it is described. (SLD)

  18. Solar Internal Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schou, J.; SOE Internal Rotation Team

    With the flood of high quality helioseismic data from the instruments on the SOHO spacecraft (MDI/VIRGO/GOLF) and ground based instruments (eg. GONG and LOWL) we have been able to get increasingly detailed information on the rotation and other large scale flows in the solar interior. In this talk I will discuss some of the highlights of what we have learned so far and what we may expect to learn in the near future. Among the recent advances have been tighter constraints on the tachocline at the bottom of the convection zone, detection of details in the surface rotation rate similar to the torsional oscillations found in the surface Doppler shift and helioseismic evidence for meridional flows. The MDI project is supported by NASA contract NAG5-3077 at Stanford University.

  19. Rotatable seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Logan, Clinton M.; Garibaldi, Jack L.

    1982-01-01

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  20. Muon spin rotation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The bulk of the muon spin rotation research work centered around the development of the muon spin rotation facility at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The collimation system was both designed and fabricated at Virginia State University. This improved collimation system, plus improvements in detectors and electronics enabled the acquisition of spectra free of background out to 15 microseconds. There were two runs at Brookhaven in 1984, one run was devoted primarily to beam development and the other run allowed several successful experiments to be performed. The effect of uniaxial strain on an Fe(Si) crystal at elevated temperature (360K) was measured and the results are incorporated herein. A complete analysis of Fe pulling data taken earlier is included.

  1. A call for rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountain, Gregory

    “Needed: highly motivated geoscientists willing to slow the pace of their research for 1-2 years while managing federal government support of their discipline. Assured: change of perspective; no change in pay. Contact your National Science Foundation Program Director for details.—No, this isn't an NSF job announcement; this is an open letter to members of the Earth science community from a recently “retired” NSF rotator concerned by the small number of researchers interested in a Washington tour. I learned firsthand the extent to which an individual in this position is entrusted with decision-making powers, and as a result, I believe that each of us in the research community should feel responsible for ensuring that highly qualified people serve as rotators.

  2. Rotation of FK Comae

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, S.M. )

    1990-03-01

    V sin i for the rapidly rotating G-type giant FK Com is estimated using high-resolution coude spectra and the Fourier transform approach. The result, V sin i = 159 + or - 4 km/s, agrees well with recent determinations which used direct comparison of FK Com spectra with those of artificially broadened standards. If FK Com does not differ drastically in its internal structure from more normal stars, its angular momentum is a few (perhaps 10) times larger than for single rapidly rotating stars following standard relations for the upper main sequence. It angular momentum is about 3 times smaller than that of the orbital motion in a typical W UMa-type system. 30 refs.

  3. Rotational spectrum of tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, M. Eugenia Cabezas, Carlos Mata, Santiago Alonso, Josè L.

    2014-05-28

    The rotational spectrum of the natural amino acid tryptophan has been observed for the first time using a combination of laser ablation, molecular beams, and Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Independent analysis of the rotational spectra of individual conformers has conducted to a definitive identification of two different conformers of tryptophan, with one of the observed conformers never reported before. The analysis of the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants is of particular significance since it allows discrimination between structures, thus providing structural information on the orientation of the amino group. Both observed conformers are stabilized by an O–H···N hydrogen bond in the side chain and a N–H···π interaction forming a chain that reinforce the strength of hydrogen bonds through cooperative effects.

  4. A Translational Polarization Rotator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.; Wollack, Edward J.; Pisano, Giampaolo; Ackiss, Sheridan; U-Yen, Kongpop; Ng, Ming wah

    2012-01-01

    We explore a free-space polarization modulator in which a variable phase introduction between right- and left-handed circular polarization components is used to rotate the linear polarization of the outgoing beam relative to that of the incoming beam. In this device, the polarization states are separated by a circular polarizer that consists of a quarter-wave plate in combination with a wire grid. A movable mirror is positioned behind and parallel to the circular polarizer. As the polarizer-mirror distance is separated, an incident liear polarization will be rotated through an angle that is proportional to the introduced phase delay. We demonstrate a prototype device that modulates Stokes Q and U over a 20% bandwidth.

  5. Rotation of stress and blocks in the Lake Mead, Nevada, Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, Hagai; Nur, Amos; Aydin, Atilla

    1993-08-01

    The combined effects of stress field rotation and material rotation were found in the Lake Mead, Nevada Fault System (LMFS). Fault inversion results imply an apparent 60 deg clockwise (CW) rotation of the stress field since mid-Miocene time. In contrast, structural data from the Great Basin suggest only a 30 deg CW stress field rotation. By incorporating paleomagnetic declination anomalies, it is inferred that slip on faults caused a local 30 deg counterclockwise rotation of blocks and faults in the Lake Mead area, so that the inferred 60 deg CW rotation of the stress field in the LMFS is actually only 30 deg.

  6. Rotating Vessels for Growing Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cottingham, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Rotating vessels have been proposed as means of growing larger, more nearly uniform protein crystals than would otherwise be possible in the presence of normal Earth gravitation. Heretofore, nonrotating vessels have been used. It is difficult to grow high-quality protein crystals in the terrestrial gravitational field because of convection plumes created by the interaction between gravitation and density gradients in protein-solution depletion layers around growing crystals. The density gradients and the associated convection plumes cause the surfaces of growing crystals to be exposed to nonuniform solution densities, thereby causing the crystals to form in irregular shapes. The microgravitational environment of outer space has been utilized to eliminate gravitation-induced convection, but this approach is generally not favorable because of the high cost and limited availability of space flight. The use of a rotating vessel according to the proposal is intended to ameliorate the effects of gravitation and the resultant convection, relative to the corresponding effects in a non-rotating vessel. The rotation would exert an averaging effect over time, distributing the convective force on the depletion layer. Therefore, the depletion layer would be more nearly uniform and, as a result, the growing crystal would be more nearly perfect. The proposal admits of variations (see figure), including the following: The growing crystal could be rotated about its own central axis or an external axis. The crystal-growth vessel could be of any of various shapes, including cylindrical, hemispherical, conical, and combinations thereof. The crystal-growth vessel could be suspended in a viscous fluid in an outer vessel to isolate the growing crystal from both ambient vibrations and vibrations induced by a mechanism that drives the rotation. The rotation could be coupled to the crystal-growth vessel by viscous or magnetic means. The crystal-growth vessel could be supported within the

  7. Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pate, Brooks

    2014-06-01

    The past decade has seen several major technology advances in electronics operating at microwave frequencies making it possible to develop a new generation of spectrometers for molecular rotational spectroscopy. High-speed digital electronics, both arbitrary waveform generators and digitizers, continue on a Moore's Law-like development cycle that started around 1993 with device bandwidth doubling about every 36 months. These enabling technologies were the key to designing chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectrometers which offer significant sensitivity enhancements for broadband spectrum acquisition in molecular rotational spectroscopy. A special feature of the chirped-pulse spectrometer design is that it is easily implemented at low frequency (below 8 GHz) where Balle-Flygare type spectrometers with Fabry-Perot cavity designs become technologically challenging due to the mirror size requirements. The capabilities of CP-FTMW spectrometers for studies of molecular structure will be illustrated by the collaborative research effort we have been a part of to determine the structures of water clusters - a project which has identified clusters up to the pentadecamer. A second technology trend that impacts molecular rotational spectroscopy is the development of high power, solid state sources in the mm-wave/THz regions. Results from the field of mm-wave chirped-pulse Fourier transform spectroscopy will be described with an emphasis on new problems in chemical dynamics and analytical chemistry that these methods can tackle. The third (and potentially most important) technological trend is the reduction of microwave components to chip level using monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC) - a technology driven by an enormous mass market in communications. Some recent advances in rotational spectrometer designs that incorporate low-cost components will be highlighted. The challenge to the high-resolution spectroscopy community - as posed by Frank De

  8. On rotational conical flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, Carlo

    1952-01-01

    Some general properties of isoenergetic rotational conical fields are determined. For such fields, provided the physical parameters of the fluid flow are known on a conical reference surface, it being understood that they satisfy certain imposed conditions, it is shown how to construct the hodographs in the various meridional semiplanes, as the envelope of either the tangents to the hodographs or of the osculatory circles.

  9. Paleomagnetic Evidence for Significant Rotations Within the Aleutian Island Arc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, D. B.; Krutikov, L.

    2006-12-01

    Present-day motion of the Pacific plate relative to the North American plate changes along the Aleutian arc from normal convergence in the east to transform motion in the west. It was postulated by Geist et al. (Tectonics 7, 327-341, 1988) that strain partitioning could result in tectonic segmentation of the lithosphere, caused by increasing obliquity of plate convergence and characterized by clockwise rotation and westward translation of discrete blocks. Their analysis of the present day morphology and tectonic setting of the western half of the arc suggests the presence of rotated blocks, and implies that the rotation is ongoing. Published high-quality paleomagnetic data from the far western end of the arc show rotations that are compatible with this model. This result is based on rocks of Eocene (Bering and Medny Islands) and Miocene (Shemya Island) age, thus the magnetically observed rotations could have occurred at any time since their origin. New paleomagnetic and geochronologic data from Miocene age volcanic rocks on Amchitka Island also indicate clockwise rotation at some time since the rocks were formed (13.8+/-0.2 Ma). However, two other high-quality paleomagnetic data sets from Eocene/Oligocene aged sediments from the eastern part of the arc (Atka and Umnak Islands) are significantly rotated in the same clockwise sense as the western end. Since plate convergence at these two eastern sites has been roughly normal since mid-Eocene time, strain partitioning related to oblique convergence is unlikely to be the cause of the rotation. Models involving rotation of the entire island arc to explain the similarity in magnitude and sense of the rotations seen in the paleomagnetic data require large relative latitude changes between the two ends of the arc. Though possible, such a model would put serious constraints on scenarios for the tectonic development of the Bering Sea Plate required to accommodate the degree of rotation suggested by the data. The answer may

  10. Generalized Investigation of the Rotation-Activity Relation: Favoring Rotation Period instead of Rossby Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiners, A.; Schüssler, M.; Passegger, V. M.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic activity in Sun-like and low-mass stars causes X-ray coronal emission which is stronger for more rapidly rotating stars. This relation is often interpreted in terms of the Rossby number, i.e., the ratio of rotation period to convective overturn time. We reconsider this interpretation on the basis of the observed X-ray emission and rotation periods of 821 stars with masses below 1.4 M ⊙. A generalized analysis of the relation between X-ray luminosity normalized by bolometric luminosity, L X/L bol, and combinations of rotational period, P, and stellar radius, R, shows that the Rossby formulation does not provide the solution with minimal scatter. Instead, we find that the relation L X/L bolvpropP -2 R -4 optimally describes the non-saturated fraction of the stars. This relation is equivalent to L XvpropP -2, indicating that the rotation period alone determines the total X-ray emission. Since L X is directly related to the magnetic flux at the stellar surface, this means that the surface flux is determined solely by the star's rotation and is independent of other stellar parameters. While a formulation in terms of a Rossby number would be consistent with these results if the convective overturn time scales exactly as L_bol-1/2, our generalized approach emphasizes the need to test a broader range of mechanisms for dynamo action in cool stars.

  11. Rotating Brush Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattime, S. B.; Braun, M. J.; Choy. F. K.; Hendricks, R. C.; Steinetz, B. M.

    2006-01-01

    The proven technology of brush seals has been extended to the mitigation of problems arising from friction and wear at the bristle-rotor interface at high surface speeds. In prototype testing, the brush is mounted on, and free to rotate with the shaft, thus providing a complaint primary seal. A face seal positioned between the backing plate of the brush seal and the housing provides a secondary seal. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the interaction between the brush bristles and the shaft at high surface speeds as well as introduce a numerical model to simulate the bristle behavior. A test facility was constructed to study the effects of centrifugal forces on bristle deflection in a single rotating brush seal. The bristle-rotor interface was observed through a video camera, which utilized a high magnification borescope and a high frequency strobe light source. Rotational speeds of the rotor and the brush seal were measured by a magnetic and optical speed sensor, respectively. Preliminary results with speeds up to 11,000 rpm show no speed differential between the brush seal and rotor, or any instability problems associated with the brush seal. Bristle liftoff from the rotor is successfully captured on video.

  12. Rotational magnetic induction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakic, Adnan; Eskandarnia, Neda; Keong Li, Bing; Weber, Ewald; Wang, Hua; Crozier, Stuart

    2012-02-01

    In magnetic induction tomography (MIT), an array of excitation coils is typically used to apply time-varying magnetic fields to induce eddy currents in the material to be studied. The magnetic fields from the eddy currents are then detected by an array of sensing coils to form an image of passive electromagnetic properties (i.e. conductivity, permittivity and permeability). Increasing the number of transmitters and receivers can provide a better image quality at the expense of a larger and more expensive MIT system. Instead of increasing the number of coils, this study investigates the possibility of rotating a single transmit-receive coil to image the electrical properties of the sample, by emulating an array of 200 transmit-receive coils by time-division multiplexing. Engineering details on the electromechanical design and development of a rotating MIT system are presented. The experimental results indicate that representative images of conductive samples can be obtained at 5 MHz by rotating a single transmit-receive coil.

  13. Bioreactor rotating wall vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells.

  14. Modulation of Porcine β-Defensins 1 and 2 upon Individual and Combined Fusarium Toxin Exposure in a Swine Jejunal Epithelial Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Murphy Lam-Yim; Woo, Chit-Shing Jackson; Turner, Paul C.; El-Nezami, Hani

    2013-01-01

    Defensins are small antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that play an important role in the innate immune system of mammals. Since the effect of mycotoxin contamination of food and feed on the secretion of intestinal AMPs is poorly understood, the aim of this study was to elucidate the individual and combined effects of four common Fusarium toxins, deoxynivalenol (DON), nivalenol (NIV), zearalenone (ZEA), and fumonisin B1 (FB1), on the mRNA expression, protein secretion, and corresponding antimicrobial effects of porcine β-defensins 1 and 2 (pBD-1 and pBD-2) using a porcine jejunal epithelial cell line, IPEC-J2. In general, upregulation of pBD-1 and pBD-2 mRNA expression occurred following exposure to Fusarium toxins, individually and in mixtures (P < 0.05). However, no significant increase in secreted pBD-1 and pBD-2 protein levels was observed, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Supernatants from IPEC-J2 cells exposed to toxins, singly or in combination, however, possessed significantly less antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli than untreated supernatants. When single toxins and two-toxin combinations were assessed, toxicity effects were shown to be nonadditive (including synergism, potentiation, and antagonism), suggesting interactive toxin effects when cells are exposed to mycotoxin combinations. The results show that Fusarium toxins, individually and in mixtures, activate distinct antimicrobial defense mechanisms possessing the potential to alter the intestinal microbiota through diminished antimicrobial effects. Moreover, by evaluating toxin mixtures, this improved understanding of toxin effects will enable more effective risk assessments for common mycotoxin combinations observed in contaminated food and feed. PMID:23354708

  15. Coordinate-Free Rotation Operator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leubner, C.

    1979-01-01

    Suggests the use of a coordinate-free rotation operator for the teaching of rotations in Euclidean three space because of its twofold didactic advantage. Illustrates the potentialities of the coordinate-free rotation operator approach by a number of examples. (Author/GA)

  16. Goniometer-rotation-angle recorder

    SciTech Connect

    Shchagin, A.V.

    1985-12-01

    This paper describes a goniometer-rotation-angle recorder with a discrete drive. The rotation angle in a given plane is recorded by bidirectional sign counter of positive and negative drive-actuation numbers for rotations in positive and negative directions. The maximum capacity of the counter is + or - 9 decimal digits.

  17. Drift waves in rotating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Liu, J.

    1983-09-01

    The stability of the electron drift wave is investigated in the presence of E x B plasma rotation typical of the central cell plasma in tandem mirrors. It is shown that a rotationally-driven drift wave may occur at low azimuthal mode numbers. Conditions for rotational instabilities are derived. Quasilinear formulas are given for the anomalous transport associated with the unstable fluctuations.

  18. On the Product of Rotations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenkler, G.; Trenkler, D.

    2008-01-01

    Using the elementary tools of matrix theory, we show that the product of two rotations in the three-dimensional Euclidean space is a rotation again. For this purpose, three types of rotation matrices are identified which are of simple structure. One of them is the identity matrix, and each of the other two types can be uniquely characterized by…

  19. Rotating plug bearing and seal

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1977-01-01

    A bearing and seal structure for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor vessel. The structure permits lubrication of bearings and seals of the rotating plugs without risk of the lubricant draining into the reactor vessel below. The structure permits lubrication by utilizing a rotating outer race bearing.

  20. Doppler observations of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric equatorial rotation rate using the Doppler effect are made at the Stanford Solar Observatory. These observations show no variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about 1%. The average rotation rate is indistinguishable from that of sunspots and large-scale magnetic field structures.

  1. Doppler observations of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric equatorial rotation rate using the Doppler effect mode at the Sanford Solar Observatory are presented. These observations show no variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about one percent. The average rotation rate is indistinguishable from that of sunspots and large scale magnetic field structures.

  2. Designing safe job rotation schedules using optimization and heuristic search.

    PubMed

    Carnahan, B J; Redfern, M S; Norman, B

    2000-04-01

    Job rotation is one method that is sometimes used to reduce exposure to strenuous materials handling; however, developing effective rotation schedules can be complex in even moderate sized facilities. The purpose of this research is to develop methods of incorporating safety criteria into scheduling algorithms to produce job rotation schedules that reduce the potential for injury. Integer programming and a genetic algorithm were used to construct job rotation schedules. Schedules were comprised of lifting tasks whose potential for causing injury was assessed with the Job Severity Index. Each method was used to design four job rotation schedules that met specified safety criteria in a working environment where the object weight, horizontal distance and repetition rate varied over time. Each rotation was assigned to a specific gender/lifting capacity group. Five versions of the integer programming search method were applied to this problem. Each version generated one job rotation schedule. The genetic algorithm model was able to create a population of 437 feasible solutions to the rotation problem. Utilizing cluster analysis, a rule set was derived from the genetic algorithm generated solutions. These rules provided guidelines for designing safe job rotation schedules without the use of a computer. The advantages and limitations of these approaches in developing administrative controls for the prevention of back injury are discussed. PMID:10801086

  3. Quantum Localization in Laser-Driven Molecular Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averbukh, Ilya

    2016-05-01

    Recently we predicted that several celebrated solid state quantum localization phenomena - Anderson localization, Bloch oscillations, and Tamm-Shockley surface states - may manifest themselves in the rotational dynamics of laser-kicked molecules. In this talk, I will present these new rotational effects in a gas of linear molecules subject to a moderately long periodic train of femtosecond laser pulses. A small detuning of the train period from the rotational revival time causes Anderson localization in the angular momentum space above some critical value of J - the Anderson wall. This wall marks an impenetrable border stopping any further rotational excitation. Below the Anderson wall, the rotational excitation oscillates with the number of pulses due to a mechanism similar to Bloch oscillations in crystalline solids. I will present the results of the first experimental observation of the laser-induced rotational Bloch oscillations in molecular nitrogen at ambient conditions (Stanford & Weizmann, 2015). We will also discuss the prospects of observing the rotational analogues of the Tamm surface states in a similar experimental setup. Our results offer laser-driven molecular rotation as a new platform for studies on the localization phenomena in quantum transport. These effects are important for many processes involving highly excited rotational states, including coherent optical manipulations in molecular mixtures, and propagation of powerful laser pulses in atmosphere.

  4. Observation of dust torus with poloidal rotation in direct current glow discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Manjit Bose, Sayak; Chattopadhyay, P. K. Sharma, Devendra; Ghosh, J.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2015-03-15

    Observation of dust cloud rotation in parallel-plate DC glow discharge plasma is reported here. The experiments are carried out at high pressures (∼130 Pa) with a metallic ring placed on the lower electrode (cathode). The dust cloud rotates poloidally in the vertical plane near the cathode surface. This structure is continuous toroidally. Absence of magnetic field rules out the possibility of E × B induced ion flow as the cause of dust rotation. The dust rotational structures exist even with water cooled cathode. Therefore, temperature gradient driven mechanisms, such as thermophoretic force, thermal creep flow, and free convection cannot be causing the observed dust rotation. Langmuir probe measurement reveals the existence of a sharp density gradient near the location of the rotating dust cloud. The gradient in the density, giving rise to a gradient in the ion drag force, has been identified as the principal cause behind the rotation of dust particles.

  5. Is rotating between static and dynamic work beneficial for our fatigue state?

    PubMed

    Luger, Tessy; Bosch, Tim; Hoozemans, Marco J M; Veeger, DirkJan H E J; de Looze, Michiel P

    2016-06-01

    Shoulder disorders comprise a large part of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Risk factors, such as repetitiveness and monotony, may cause muscle fatigue and be attenuated by task rotation. We investigated rotation between a dynamic box-lifting task and a relatively static pick-and-place task and aimed to determine whether (1) a high rotation frequency leads to less fatigue development than a low rotation frequency, and (2) a self-selected rotation frequency leads to less fatigue development than imposed rotation frequencies. Ten participants performed four one-hour rotation schedules: two low frequency rotation schedules rotating at 30min, one high frequency rotation schedule rotating every sixth minute, and a self-selected rotation schedule. Borg, SOFI and electromyography of Trapezius and Deltoid subparts served as fatigue indicators. We found significant signs of fatigue for most schedules regarding the Borg and SOFI ratings and the M. Trapezius pars Descendens. Task rotation frequency had no significant effect on any of the outcome parameters, whereas the self-selected rotation schedule clearly resulted in less development of perceived fatigue than imposed schedules. In conclusion, we think that freedom of rotation has the greatest potential to attenuate potential development of musculoskeletal disorders and we require due caution with the use and interpretation of EMG indicators of fatigue. PMID:27101392

  6. Ocean tidal effects on Earth rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Richard S.

    2009-12-01

    Tidal forces due to the tide-raising potential deform the solid and fluid regions of the Earth, causing the Earth's inertia tensor to change, and hence causing the Earth's rate of rotation and length-of-day to change. Because both the tide-raising potential and the solid Earth's elastic response to the tidal forces caused by this potential are well-known, accurate models for the effects of the elastic solid body tides on the Earth's rotation are available. However, models for the effect of the ocean tides on the Earth's rotation are more problematic because of the need to model the dynamic response of the oceans to the tidal forces. Hydrodynamic ocean tide models that have recently become available are evaluated here for their ability to account for long-period ocean tidal signals in length-of-day observations. Of the models tested here, the older altimetric data-constrained model of Kantha et al. (1998) is shown to still do the best job of accounting for ocean tidal effects in length-of-day, particularly at the fortnightly tidal frequency. The model currently recommended by the IERS is shown to do the worst job.

  7. Isorotation and differential rotation in a magnetic mirror with imposed E Multiplication-Sign B rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Elton, R. C.; Young, W. C.; Reid, R.; Ellis, R. F.

    2012-07-15

    Doppler spectroscopy of helium impurities in the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment reveals the simultaneous existence of isorotating and differentially rotating magnetic surfaces. Differential rotation occurs at the innermost surfaces and is conjectured to cause plasma voltage oscillations of hundreds of kilohertz by periodically changing the current path inductance. High-speed images show the periodic expulsion of plasma near the mirror ends at the same frequencies. In spite of this, the critical ionization velocity limit is exceeded, with respect to the vacuum field definition, for at least 0.5 ms.

  8. Isorotation and differential rotation in a magnetic mirror with imposed EÖ-B rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Talamás, C. A.; Elton, R. C.; Young, W. C.; Reid, R.; Ellis, R. F.

    2012-07-01

    Doppler spectroscopy of helium impurities in the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment reveals the simultaneous existence of isorotating and differentially rotating magnetic surfaces. Differential rotation occurs at the innermost surfaces and is conjectured to cause plasma voltage oscillations of hundreds of kilohertz by periodically changing the current path inductance. High-speed images show the periodic expulsion of plasma near the mirror ends at the same frequencies. In spite of this, the critical ionization velocity limit is exceeded, with respect to the vacuum field definition, for at least 0.5 ms.

  9. Rotational Doppler effect in x-ray photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yuping; Wang Chuankui; Gel'mukhanov, Faris

    2010-11-15

    The energy of the photoelectron experiences a red or blue Doppler shift when the molecule recedes from the detector or approaches him. This results in a broadening of the photoelectron line due to the translational thermal motion. However, the molecules also have rotational degrees of freedom and we show that the translational Doppler effect has its rotational counterpart. This rotational Doppler effect leads to an additional broadening of the spectral line of the same magnitude as the Doppler broadening caused by translational thermal motion. The rotational Doppler broadening as well as the rotational recoil broadening is sensitive to the molecular orbital from which the photoelectron is ejected. This broadening should be taken into account in analysis of x-ray photoemission spectra of super-high resolution and it can be directly observed using x-ray pump-probe spectroscopy.

  10. Rotational manipulation of single cells and organisms using acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Daniel; Ozcelik, Adem; Bojanala, Nagagireesh; Nama, Nitesh; Upadhyay, Awani; Chen, Yuchao; Hanna-Rose, Wendy; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-01-01

    The precise rotational manipulation of single cells or organisms is invaluable to many applications in biology, chemistry, physics and medicine. In this article, we describe an acoustic-based, on-chip manipulation method that can rotate single microparticles, cells and organisms. To achieve this, we trapped microbubbles within predefined sidewall microcavities inside a microchannel. In an acoustic field, trapped microbubbles were driven into oscillatory motion generating steady microvortices which were utilized to precisely rotate colloids, cells and entire organisms (that is, C. elegans). We have tested the capabilities of our method by analysing reproductive system pathologies and nervous system morphology in C. elegans. Using our device, we revealed the underlying abnormal cell fusion causing defective vulval morphology in mutant worms. Our acoustofluidic rotational manipulation (ARM) technique is an easy-to-use, compact, and biocompatible method, permitting rotation regardless of optical, magnetic or electrical properties of the sample under investigation. PMID:27004764

  11. ELM mitigation via rotating resonant magnetic perturbations on MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, A. J.; Kirk, A.; Cahyna, P.; Chapman, I. T.; Fishpool, G.; Harrison, J. R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Kripner, L.; Peterka, M.

    2015-08-01

    The application of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) produces splitting of the divertor strike point due to the interaction of the RMP field and the plasma field. The application of a rotating RMP field causes the strike point splitting to rotate, distributing the particle and heat flux evenly over the divertor. The RMP coils in MAST have been used to generate a rotating perturbation with a toroidal mode number n = 3. The ELM frequency is doubled with the application of the RMP rotating field, whilst maintaining the H mode. During mitigation, the ELM peak heat flux is seen to be reduced by 50% for a halving in the ELM energy and motion of the strike point, consistent with the rotation of the applied RMP field, is seen using high spatial resolution (1.5 mm at the target) heat flux profiles measured using infrared (IR) thermography.

  12. Rotational manipulation of single cells and organisms using acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Daniel; Ozcelik, Adem; Bojanala, Nagagireesh; Nama, Nitesh; Upadhyay, Awani; Chen, Yuchao; Hanna-Rose, Wendy; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-01-01

    The precise rotational manipulation of single cells or organisms is invaluable to many applications in biology, chemistry, physics and medicine. In this article, we describe an acoustic-based, on-chip manipulation method that can rotate single microparticles, cells and organisms. To achieve this, we trapped microbubbles within predefined sidewall microcavities inside a microchannel. In an acoustic field, trapped microbubbles were driven into oscillatory motion generating steady microvortices which were utilized to precisely rotate colloids, cells and entire organisms (that is, C. elegans). We have tested the capabilities of our method by analysing reproductive system pathologies and nervous system morphology in C. elegans. Using our device, we revealed the underlying abnormal cell fusion causing defective vulval morphology in mutant worms. Our acoustofluidic rotational manipulation (ARM) technique is an easy-to-use, compact, and biocompatible method, permitting rotation regardless of optical, magnetic or electrical properties of the sample under investigation. PMID:27004764

  13. Conformational Slippage Determines Rotational Frequency in Five-Component Nanorotors.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Soumen K; Rana, Anup; Schmittel, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Several five-component nanorotors ROT-3 that rotate at different rates were prepared by adding phenanthrolines of distinct lateral size as brake blocks to the four-component nanorotor ROT-2. The brake blocks interfere with the 180° rotor causing the rotational frequency to drop from 97 kHz to 5 kHz. The effect of the rotating brake blocks on the rotational frequency in ROT-3 is accurately predicted by a nanomechanical model called "conformational slippage". For quantification, the interaction of the brake blocks with the trajectory of the main rotator is gauged based on the number of interfering vs. non-interfering conformations as computed by PM6. PMID:26836349

  14. Estimating extragalactic Faraday rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppermann, N.; Junklewitz, H.; Greiner, M.; Enßlin, T. A.; Akahori, T.; Carretti, E.; Gaensler, B. M.; Goobar, A.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Pratley, L.; Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Stil, J. M.; Vacca, V.

    2015-03-01

    Observations of Faraday rotation for extragalactic sources probe magnetic fields both inside and outside the Milky Way. Building on our earlier estimate of the Galactic contribution, we set out to estimate the extragalactic contributions. We discuss the problems involved; in particular, we point out that taking the difference between the observed values and the Galactic foreground reconstruction is not a good estimate for the extragalactic contributions. We point out a degeneracy between the contributions to the observed values due to extragalactic magnetic fields and observational noise and comment on the dangers of over-interpreting an estimate without taking into account its uncertainty information. To overcome these difficulties, we develop an extended reconstruction algorithm based on the assumption that the observational uncertainties are accurately described for a subset of the data, which can overcome the degeneracy with the extragalactic contributions. We present a probabilistic derivation of the algorithm and demonstrate its performance using a simulation, yielding a high quality reconstruction of the Galactic Faraday rotation foreground, a precise estimate of the typical extragalactic contribution, and a well-defined probabilistic description of the extragalactic contribution for each data point. We then apply this reconstruction technique to a catalog of Faraday rotation observations for extragalactic sources. The analysis is done for several different scenarios, for which we consider the error bars of different subsets of the data to accurately describe the observational uncertainties. By comparing the results, we argue that a split that singles out only data near the Galactic poles is the most robust approach. We find that the dispersion of extragalactic contributions to observed Faraday depths is most likely lower than 7 rad/m2, in agreement with earlier results, and that the extragalactic contribution to an individual data point is poorly

  15. Rotation and Mass Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, S.

    2008-06-01

    Stellar rotation can play an important role in structuring and enhancing the mass loss from massive stars. Initial 1D models focussed on the expected centrifugal enhancement of the line-driven mass flux from the equator of a rotating star, but the review here emphasizes that the loss of centrifugal support away from the stellar surface actually limits the steady mass flux to just the point-star CAK value, with models near critical rotation characterized by a slow, subcritical acceleration. Recent suggestions that such slow outflows might have high enough density to explain disks in Be or B[e] stars are examined in the context of 2D simulations of the ``Wind Compressed Disk'' (WCD) paradigm, together with a review of the tendency for poleward components of the line-driving force to inhibit WCD formation. When one accounts for equatorial gravity darkening, the net tendency is in fact for the relatively bright regions at higher latitude to drive a faster, denser ``bipolar'' outflow. I discuss the potential relevance for the bipolar form of nebulae from LBV stars like η Carinae, but emphasize that, since the large mass loss associated with the eruption of eta Carinae's Homunculus would heavily saturate line-driving, explaining its bipolar form requires development of analogous models for continuum-driven mass loss. I conclude with a discussion of how radiation seems inherently ill-suited to supporting or driving a geometrically thin, but optically thick disk or disk outflow. The disks inferred in Be and B[e] stars may instead be centrifugally ejected, with radiation inducing an ablation flow from the disk surface, and thus perhaps playing a greater role in destroying (rather than creating) an orbiting, circumstellar disk.

  16. ROTATING PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, K.; Hammel, J.E.; Longmire, C.L.; Nagle, D.E.; Ribe, F.L.; Tuck, J.L.

    1961-10-24

    ABS>A method and device are described for obtaining fusion reactions. The basic concept is that of using crossed electric and magnetic fields to induce a plasma rotation in which the ionized particles follow a circumferential drift orbit on wldch a cyclotron mode of motion is superimposed, the net result being a cycloidal motion about the axis of symmetry. The discharge tube has a radial electric field and a longitudinal magnetic field. Mirror machine geometry is utilized. The device avoids reliance on the pinch effect and its associated instability problems. (AEC)

  17. Magnetopause rotational forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnerup, B. U. O.; Ledley, B. G.

    1974-01-01

    Magnetic field data from the Goddard Space Flight Center magnetometer experiment on board Ogo 5 are analyzed by the minimum-variance technique for two magnetopause crossings, believed to provide the best evidence presently available of magnetopause rotational discontinuities. Approximate agreement with predictions from MHD and first-order orbit theory is found, but available low-energy electron data suggest the presence of significant non-MHD effects. The paper also illustrates an improved method for data interval selection, a new magnetopause hodogram representation, and the utility of data simulation.

  18. Optical angular momentum in a rotating frame.

    PubMed

    Speirits, Fiona C; Lavery, Martin P J; Padgett, Miles J; Barnett, Stephen M

    2014-05-15

    It is well established that light carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) can be used to induce a mechanical torque causing an object to spin. We consider the complementary scenario: will an observer spinning relative to the beam axis measure a change in OAM as a result of their rotational velocity? Remarkably, although a linear Doppler shift changes the linear momentum of a photon, the angular Doppler shift induces no change in the angular momentum. Further, we examine the rotational Doppler shift in frequency imparted to the incident light due to the relative motion of the beam with respect to the observer and consider what must happen to the measured wavelength if the speed of light c is to remain constant. We show specifically that the OAM of the incident beam is not affected by the rotating observer and that the measured wavelength is shifted by a factor equal and opposite to that of the frequency shift induced by the rotational Doppler effect. PMID:24978243

  19. Sample rotating turntable kit for infrared spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Eckels, Joel Del; Klunder, Gregory L.

    2008-03-04

    An infrared spectrometer sample rotating turntable kit has a rotatable sample cup containing the sample. The infrared spectrometer has an infrared spectrometer probe for analyzing the sample and the rotatable sample cup is adapted to receive the infrared spectrometer probe. A reflectance standard is located in the rotatable sample cup. A sleeve is positioned proximate the sample cup and adapted to receive the probe. A rotator rotates the rotatable sample cup. A battery is connected to the rotator.

  20. Digital rotation measurement unit

    DOEpatents

    Sanderson, S.N.

    1983-09-30

    A digital rotation indicator is disclosed for monitoring the position of a valve member having a movable actuator. The indicator utilizes mercury switches adapted to move in cooperation with the actuator. Each of the switches produces an output as it changes state when the actuator moves. A direction detection circuit is connected to the switches to produce a first digital signal indicative of the direction of rotation of the actuator. A count pulse generating circuit is also connected to the switches to produce a second digital pulse signal having count pulses corresponding to a change of state of any of the mercury switches. A reset pulse generating circuit is provided to generate a reset pulse each time a count pulse is generated. An up/down counter is connected to receive the first digital pulse signal and the second digital pulse signal and to count the pulses of the second digital pulse signal either up or down depending upon the instantaneous digital value of the first digital signal whereby a running count indicative of the movement of the actuator is maintained.

  1. Rotating drum filter

    DOEpatents

    Anson, Donald

    1990-01-01

    A perforated drum (10) rotates in a coaxial cylindrical housing (18) having three circumferential ports (19,22,23), and an axial outlet (24) at one end. The axis (11) is horizontal. A fibrous filter medium (20) is fed through a port (19) on or near the top of the housing (81) by a distributing mechanism (36) which lays a uniform mat (26) of the desired thickness onto the rotating drum (10). This mat (26) is carried by the drum (10) to a second port (23) through which dirty fluid (13) enters. The fluid (13) passes through the filter (26) and the cleaned stream (16) exits through the open end (15) of the drum (10) and the axial port (24) in the housing (18). The dirty filter material (20) is carried on to a third port (22) near the bottom of the housing (18) and drops into a receiver (31) from which it is continuously removed, cleaned (30), and returned (32) to the charging port (36) at the top. To support the filter mat, the perforated cylinder may carry a series of tines (40), shaped blades (41), or pockets, so that the mat (26) will not fall from the drum (10) prematurely. To minimize risk of mat failure, the fluid inlet port (23) may be located above the horizontal centerline (11).

  2. Ultrasmall polarization rotation measurements via weak value amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima Bernardo, Bertúlio; Azevedo, Sérgio; Rosas, Alexandre

    2014-06-01

    We propose a framework to analyze weak measurements based on an angular version of the von Neumann measurement scheme, where the coupling between the system and the meter causes rotation of the measuring variable. We also discuss an experimental application of this theory in which measurements of weak optical activity and reflection-induced polarization rotation could be amplified in nearly two orders of magnitude. It can shed a new light on a great variety of physical chemistry, molecular biology and nanotechnology studies.

  3. Self-cleaning rotating anode x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Paulikas, A.P.

    1987-06-02

    A self-cleaning rotating anode x-ray source comprising and evacuable housing, a rotatable cylindrical anode within the housing, a source of electrons within the housing which electrons are caused to impinge upon the anode to produce x-rays, and means for ionizing residual particles within the housing and accelerating such ions so as to impinge upon the anode to sputter impurities from the surface thereof. 2 figs.

  4. Self-cleaning rotating anode X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Paulikas, Arvydas P.

    1989-01-01

    A self-cleaning rotating anode x-ray source comprising an evacuable housing, a rotatable cylindrical anode within the housing, a source of electrons within the housing which electrons are caused to impinge upon the anode to produce x-rays, and means for ionizing residual particles within the housing and accelerating such ions so as to impinge upon the anode to sputter impurities from the surface thereof.

  5. Physiotherapy assessment of patients with rotator cuff pathology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pathology of the rotator cuff and sub-acromial bursa are considered to be the main cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction. In the absence of trauma, conservative care, including physiotherapy is the primary treatment. This paper aims to present the key features of a physiotherapy assessment, excluding diagnostic tests for rotator cuff pathology. It describes and explores how assessment can be used to direct management options and develop a treatment plan.

  6. Effects of rotation motions on strong-motion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, H. C.; Wu, F. J.; Lin, C. J.; Huang, H. C.; Liu, C. C.

    2012-10-01

    Rotation motion and its effects on strong-motion data, in most cases, are much smaller than that of translational motion and have been ignored in most analyses of strong-motion data. However, recent observations from near-fault and/or extreme large ground motions suggest that these effects might be underestimated and quantitative analyses seem to be necessary for improving our understating of these effects. Rotation motion-related effects include centrifugal acceleration, the effects of gravity and effects of the rotation frame. Detailed analyses of these effects based on the observed data are unavailable in the literature. In this study, we develop a numerical algorithm for estimating the effects of rotational motion on the strong-motion data using a set of six-component ground motions and apply it to a set of rotation rate-strong motion velocity data. The data were recorded during a magnitude 6.9 earthquake. The peak value of the derived acceleration and rotation rate of this dataset are about 186 cm/s/s and 0.0026 rad/s. Numerical analyses of data gives time histories of these rotational motion-related effects. Our results show that all the rotation angles are less than 0.01°. The maximum centrifugal acceleration, effect from gravity and effect of the rotation frame are about 0.03 and 0.14 cm/s/s, respectively. Both these two effects are much smaller than the peak acceleration 186 cm/s/s. This result might have been expected because our data are not near-field and wave motions are expected to be nearly plane waves. However, it is worth noticing that the centrifugal acceleration is underestimated and a small rotational effect can cause large waveform difference in acceleration data. The waveform difference before and after the correction for rotational motion can reach 16 cm/s/s (about 10 %).

  7. The role of sea ice in slowly rotating aquaplanet simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salameh, Josiane; Popp, Max; Marotzke, Jochem

    2016-04-01

    A large fraction of recently discovered exoplanets are found in close orbit from their star. Their rotation period is expected to be slow due to important tidal forces. Therefore, in order to assess the habitability of slowly rotating planets, it is imperative to understand how slow rotation periods affect the climate. Under different Earth-like configurations, previous studies focused on the special case of synchronous rotation where the orbital and planetary rotation periods are identical. In addition, simulations with non-synchronous rotations did not account for sea ice. Therefore, we turn on the thermodynamics sea-ice model in the state-of-the-art atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM6 coupled to a mixed-layer ocean and investigate the aquaplanet's climate across rotation periods between one and 365 Earth days. Simulations with the sea-ice model turned on show a global-mean surface temperature up to 25 K lower than simulations with the sea-ice model turned off, particularly for rotation periods between 64 and 300 days. For both type of experiments, the climate cools with increasing rotation period. However, when sea ice is included, the significant drop in the global-mean surface temperature is due to sea-ice reaching low latitudes. Then, beyond a 200 days rotation period, sea ice grows over the equatorial region during the nighttime and persists well into the daytime. This causes a high contribution of the sea-ice albedo to the planetary albedo. Our study illustrates, thus, that sea-ice plays a crucial role in shaping the climate on slowly rotating planets.

  8. Rotating Shaft Tilt Angle Measurement Using an Inclinometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jun; Wang, Zhiqian; Shen, Chengwu; Wen, Zhuoman; Liu, Shaojin; Cai, Sheng; Li, Jianrong

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes a novel measurement method to accurately measure the rotating shaft tilt angle of rotating machine for alignment or compensation using a dual-axis inclinometer. A model of the rotating shaft tilt angle measurement is established using a dual-axis inclinometer based on the designed mechanical structure, and the calculation equation between the rotating shaft tilt angle and the inclinometer axes outputs is derived under the condition that the inclinometer axes are perpendicular to the rotating shaft. The reversal measurement method is applied to decrease the effect of inclinometer drifts caused by temperature, to eliminate inclinometer and rotating shaft mechanical error and inclinometer systematic error to attain high measurement accuracy. The uncertainty estimation shows that the accuracy of rotating shaft tilt angle measurement depends mainly on the inclinometer uncertainty and its uncertainty is almost the same as the inclinometer uncertainty in the simulation. The experimental results indicate that measurement time is 4 seconds; the range of rotating shaft tilt angle is 0.002° and its standard deviation is 0.0006° using NS-5/P2 inclinometer, whose precision and resolution are ±0.01° and 0.0005°, respectively.

  9. Toroidal rotation and halo current produced by disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Henry; Sugiyama, Linda; Paccagnella, Roberto; Breslau, Joshua; Jardin, Stephen

    2013-10-01

    In several experiments including JET, it was observed that disruptions were accompanied by toroidal rotation. There is a concern that there may be a resonance between rotating toroidal perturbations and the resonant frequencies of the ITER vacuum vessel, causing enhanced damage. MHD simulations with M3D demonstrate that disruptions produce toroidal rotation. The toroidal velocity can produce several rotations of the sideways force during a disruption. Edge localized modes (ELMs) also produce poloidal and toroidal rotation. A theory of rotation produced by MHD activity will be presented. In the case of ELMs, the theory gives toroidal rotation Alfven Mach number, Mϕ ~10-2βN . This is consistent with a scaling for intrinsic toroidal rotation in H mode tokamaks. It was also discovered on JET that disruptions were accompanied by toroidal variation of the plasma current Iϕ. From ∇ . j = 0 , the toroidal current variation ΔIϕ is proportional to the 3D halo current, ∮Jn Rdl , where Jn is the normal current density at the wall. The 3D halo current is calculated analytically and computationally. A bound on ΔIϕ /Iϕ is found, proportional to the halo current fraction and toroidal peaking factor. Supported by USDOE and ITER.

  10. Galvano-rotational effect induced by electroweak interactions in pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Dvornikov, Maxim

    2015-05-21

    We study electroweakly interacting particles in rotating matter. The existence of the electric current along the axis of the matter rotation is predicted in this system. This new galvano-rotational effect is caused by the parity violating interaction between massless charged particles in the rotating matter. We start with the exact solution of the Dirac equation for a fermion involved in the electroweak interaction in the rotating frame. This equation includes the noninertial effects. Then, using the obtained solution, we derive the induced electric current which turns out to flow along the rotation axis. We study the possibility of the appearance of the galvano-rotational effect in dense matter of compact astrophysical objects. The particular example of neutron and hypothetical quark stars is discussed. It is shown that, using this effect, one can expect the generation of toroidal magnetic fields comparable with poloidal ones in old millisecond pulsars. We also briefly discuss the generation of the magnetic helicity in these stars. Finally we analyze the possibility to apply the galvano-rotational effect for the description of the asymmetric neutrino emission from a neutron star to explain pulsars kicks.

  11. The deconjugation ability of bacteria isolated from the jejunal fluids in the blind loop syndrome with high sup 14 CO sub 2 excretion. Using the breath analysis technique and thin-layer chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Shindo, K.; Yamazaki, R.; Mizuno, T.; Shionoiri, H.; Sugiyama, M. )

    1989-01-01

    Five patients with blind loop syndrome (Billroth II) were examined by measuring {sup 14}CO{sub 2} specific activity of expired breath samples taken at intervals after a meal containing glycine-1-{sup 14}C cholate. The 5 patients tested showed a marked increase of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} specific activity. Furthermore, the ability of deconjugation of bacteria isolated from the jejunal fluids in the efferent loop of these patients was tested by thin-layer chromatography. The bacterial species identified from the samples were as follows: enterococcus, Lactobacillus buchneri, L. bifidus, L. brevis, Eubacterium lentum, Bacteroides vulgaricus, B. filamentosum, Corynebacterium granulosum, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Aerobacter aerogenes. These species of bacteria, except E. coli and A. aerogenes, showed the deconjugation ability by which conjugated bile acids in ox gall was hydrolyzed. Administration of chloramphenicol to the 5 patients reduced {sup 14}CO{sub 2} specific activity significantly. On the other hand, 9 healthy men who were tested showed a flat curve, and 8 of the 9 had no growth of bacteria isolated from the jejunal fluids. The remaining healthy man showed an over growth of E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but the species did not have the ability of deconjugation.

  12. Internal rotation of the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Dziembowski, W. A.; Goode, P. R.; Gough, D. O.; Harvey, J. W.; Leibacher, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The frequency difference between prograde and retrograde sectoral solar oscillations is analyzed to determine the rotation rate of the solar interior, assuming no latitudinal dependence. Much of the solar interior rotates slightly less rapidly than the surface, while the innermost part apparently rotates more rapidly. The resulting solar gravitational quadrupole moment is J2 = (1.7 + or - 0.4) x 10 to the -7th and provides a negligible contribution to current planetary tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity.

  13. Rotating raster generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, C. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A rotating raster generator is provided which enables display of a television raster at any arbitrary roll angle. The generator includes four integrator circuits each of which receives a first voltage input corresponding to the sine or cosine of the desired roll angle and a second input comprising conventional horizontal or vertical sync pulses. The integrator circuits each comprise an operational amplifier and a capacitor connected for producing a ramp output having a rate of change proportional to the roll angle input, an electronic switch responsive to the sync input for resetting the integrator, and a summer that adds the ramp output of the integrator to the roll angle input so as to provide a zero-centered deflection control voltage.

  14. Rotating gravity gradiometer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forward, R. L.

    1982-04-01

    Two rotating gravity gradiometer (RGG) sensors, along with all the external electronics needed to operate them, and the fixtures and special test equipment needed to fill and align the bearings, were assembled in a laboratory, and inspected. The thermal noise threshold of the RGG can be lowered by replacing a damping resistor in the first stage electronics by an active artificial resistor that generates less random voltage noise per unit bandwidth than the Johnson noise from the resistor it replaces. The artificial resistor circuit consists of an operational amplifier, three resistors, and a small DC to DC floating power supply. These are small enough to be retrofitted to the present circuit boards inside the RGG rotor in place of the 3 Megohm resistor. Using the artificial resistor, the thermal noise of the RGG-2 sensor can be lowered from 0.3 Eotvos to 0.15 Eotvos for a 10 sec integration time.

  15. Stimulated rotational Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parazzoli, C. G.; Rafanelli, G. L.; Capps, D. M.; Drutman, C.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of Stimulated Rotational Raman Scattering (SRRS) processes on high energy laser directed energy weapon systems was studied. The program had 3 main objectives; achieving an accurate description of the physical processes involved in SRRS; developing a numerical algorithm to confidently evaluate SRRS-induced losses in the propagation of high energy laser beams in the uplink and downlink segments of the optical trains of various strategic defense system scenarios; and discovering possible methods to eliminate, or at least reduce, the deleterious effects of SRRS on the energy deposition on target. The following topics are discussed: the motivation for the accomplishments of the DOE program; the Semiclassical Theory of Non-Resonant SRRS for Diatomic Homonuclear Molecules; and then the following appendices; Calculation of the Dipole Transition Reduced Matrix Element, Guided Tour of Hughes SRRS Code, Running the Hughes SRRS Code, and Hughes SRRS Code Listing.

  16. The Rapidly Rotating Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures at a continuum of scales, from large to small. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. In the present work, imaging techniques of time-distance helioseismology applied to observational data reveal no long-range order in the convective motion. We conservatively bound the associated velocity magnitudes, as a function of depth and the spherical-harmonic degree l to be 20-100 times weaker than prevailing estimates within the wavenumber band l < 60. The observationally constrained kinetic energy is approximately a thousandth of the theoretical prediction, suggesting the prevalence of an intrinsically different paradigm of turbulence. A fundamental question arises: what mechanism of turbulence transports the heat ux of a solar luminosity outwards? The Sun is seemingly a much faster rotator than previously thought, with advection dominated by Coriolis forces at scales l < 60.

  17. Asteroid Ida Rotation Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This montage of 14 images (the time order is right to left, bottom to top) shows Ida as it appeared in the field of view of Galileo's camera on August 28, 1993. Asteroid Ida rotates once every 4 hours, 39 minutes and clockwise when viewed from above the north pole; these images cover about one Ida 'day.' This sequence has been used to create a 3-D model that shows Ida to be almost croissant shaped. The earliest view (lower right) was taken from a range of 240,000 kilometers (150,000 miles), 5.4 hours before closest approach. The asteroid Ida draws its name from mythology, in which the Greek god Zeus was raised by the nymph Ida.

  18. Rotated Heisenberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fadi; Ye, Jinwu; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2015-03-01

    We show that Rotated Heisenberg (RH) model is a new class of quantum spin models to describe magnetic materials with strong spin-orbit couplings (SOC). We introduce Wilson loops to characterize frustrations and gauge equivalent class. For a special equivalent class, we identify a new spin-orbital entangled commensurate ground state. It supports a novel gapped elementary excitation named as in-commensurate magnons which have two gap minima continuously tuned by the SOC strength. At low temperatures, the in-commensurate magnons lead to dramatic effects in all physical quantities such as density of states, specific heat, magnetization and various spin correlation functions. At high temperatures, the specific heat and transverse spin structure factors depend on the SOC strength explicitly. We argue that one gauge may be realized in current experiments and other gauges may also be realized in near future experiments. Various experimental detections are discussed. This work is supported by NSF-DMR-1161497, NSFC-11174210.

  19. Rotating gravity gradiometer study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forward, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Two rotating gravity gradiometer (RGG) sensors, along with all the external electronics needed to operate them, and the fixtures and special test equipment needed to fill and align the bearings, were assembled in a laboratory, and inspected. The thermal noise threshold of the RGG can be lowered by replacing a damping resistor in the first stage electronics by an active artificial resistor that generates less random voltage noise per unit bandwidth than the Johnson noise from the resistor it replaces. The artificial resistor circuit consists of an operational amplifier, three resistors, and a small DC to DC floating power supply. These are small enough to be retrofitted to the present circuit boards inside the RGG rotor in place of the 3 Megohm resistor. Using the artificial resistor, the thermal noise of the RGG-2 sensor can be lowered from 0.3 Eotvos to 0.15 Eotvos for a 10 sec integration time.

  20. Rotating Gravity Gradiometer Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forward, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The application of a Rotating Gravity Gradiometer (RGG) system on board a Lunar Polar Orbiter (LPO) for the measurement of the Lunar gravity field was investigated. A data collection simulation study shows that a gradiometer will give significantly better gravity data than a doppler tracking system for the altitudes under consideration for the LOP, that the present demonstrated sensitivity of the RGG is adequate for measurement of the Lunar gravity gradient field, and that a single RGG instrument will provide almost as much data for geophysical interpretation as an orthogonal three axis RGG system. An engineering study of the RGG sensor/LPO spacecraft interface characteristics shows that the RGG systems under consideration are compatible with the present models of the LPO spacecraft.

  1. Earth's variable rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hide, Raymond; Dickey, Jean O.

    1991-01-01

    Recent improvements in geodetic data and practical meteorology have advanced research on fluctuations in the earth's rotation. The interpretation of these fluctuations is inextricably linked with studies of the dynamics of the earth-moon system and dynamical processes in the liquid metallic core of the earth (where the geomagnetic field originates), other parts of the earth's interior, and the hydrosphere and atmosphere. Fluctuations in the length of the day occurring on decadal time scales have implications for the topographay of the core-mantle boundary and the electrical, magnetic, ande other properties of the core and lower mantle. Investigations of more rapid fluctuations bear on meteorological studies of interannual, seasonal, and intraseasonal variations in the general circulation of the atmosphere and the response of the oceans to such variations.

  2. Rotation and particle loss in Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. White; F.W. Perkins; X. Garbet; C. Bourdelle; et al

    2000-06-13

    Although plasma heating with ICRF imparts negligible angular momentum to a tokamak plasma, the high energy particles give significant torque to the plasma through diamagnetic effects. This effect has been directly modeled through guiding center simulations. It is found that heating in Tore Supra, with the location of the resonance surface on the high field side of the magnetic axis, can produce negative central rotation of up to 40 km/sec. Particle loss also contributes to negative rotation, but this is not the dominant effect in most discharges. In this work the authors examine the effect of collisions and strong plasma rotation on the loss of high energy particles. Magnetic field strength variation due to discrete toroidal field coils, or ripple, produces two important loss channels in tokamaks. The trapping of particles in local ripple wells produces super banana orbits and, in the case of strong ripple, direct loss orbits leading to the plasma edge. These particles leave the device in the direction of vertical drift, and are characterized by small values of parallel velocity, or pitch. Ripple also causes high energy particles in banana orbits to diffuse stochastically, leading to banana orbits which impact the wall near the outer midplane. Both these loss processes are modified by the magnitude of the collision rate, and by plasma rotation. In Tore Supra the magnitude of the ripple makes ripple trapping a dominant loss mechanism for the background plasma as well as for ICRF produced non Maxwellian high energy tails. The authors have examined the loss as a function of collisionality and rotation using the Hamiltonian guiding center code ORBIT.

  3. Plasma rotation induced by RF

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, V. S.; Chiu, S. C.; Lin-Liu, Y. R. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698; Omelchenko, Y. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698

    1999-09-20

    Plasma rotation has many beneficial effects on tokamak operation including stabilization of MHD and microturbulence to improve the beta limit and confinement. Contrary to present-day tokamaks, neutral beams may not be effective in driving rotation in fusion reactors; hence the investigation of radiofrequency (RF) induced plasma rotation is of great interest and potential importance. This paper reviews the experimental results of RF induced rotation and possible physical mechanisms, suggested by theories, to explain the observations. This subject is only in the infancy of its research and many challenging issues remained to be understood and resolved. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Anomalous biceps origin from the rotator cuff

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Samik; Patel, Vipul R

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the origin of the long head of biceps tendon (LHBT) have been described in literature; however, its clinical significance remains uncertain. We describe in this report, the history, physical examination and the arthroscopic findings in a patient who had an anomalous origin of the LHBT from the rotator cuff, resulting in restriction of range of motion. This anomalous origin of the long head of biceps tendon causing capsular contracture and restriction of movements leading to secondary internal impingement, has not been extensively reported in the literature. Shoulder arthroscopists should be aware that, although, an uncommon clinical condition, the aberrant congenital origin of the LHBT from the rotator cuff can rarely become pathologic in middle age and lead to shoulder dysfunction. In such cases, release of the anomalous band may be required, along with the treatment of other concomitant intraarticular pathologies in the glenohumeral joint. PMID:25593361

  5. Modeling rigid magnetically rotated microswimmers: Rotation axes, bistability, and controllability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkati, Farshad; Fu, Henry Chien

    2014-12-01

    Magnetically actuated microswimmers have recently attracted attention due to many possible biomedical applications. In this study we investigate the dynamics of rigid magnetically rotated microswimmers with permanent magnetic dipoles. Our approach uses a boundary element method to calculate a mobility matrix, accurate for arbitrary geometries, which is then used to identify the steady periodically rotating orbits in a co-rotating body-fixed frame. We evaluate the stability of each of these orbits. We map the magnetoviscous behavior as a function of dimensionless Mason number and as a function of the angle that the magnetic field makes with its rotation axis. We describe the wobbling motion of these swimmers by investigating how the rotation axis changes as a function of experimental parameters. We show that for a given magnetic field strength and rotation frequency, swimmers can have more than one stable periodic orbit with different rotation axes. Finally, we demonstrate that one can improve the controllability of these types of microswimmers by adjusting the relative angle between the magnetic field and its axis of rotation.

  6. Unidirectional rotating coordinate rotation digital computer algorithm based on rotational phase estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chaozhu; Han, Jinan; Yan, Huizhi

    2015-06-01

    The improved coordinate rotation digital computer (CORDIC) algorithm gives high precision and resolution phase rotation, but it has some shortages such as high iterations and big system delay. This paper puts forward unidirectional rotating CORDIC algorithm to solve these problems. First, using under-damping theory, a part of unidirectional phase rotations is carried out. Then, the threshold value of angle is determined based on phase rotation estimation method. Finally, rotation phase estimation completes the rest angle iterations. Furthermore, the paper simulates and implements the numerical control oscillator by Quartus II software and Modelsim software. According to the experimental results, the algorithm reduces iterations and judgment of sign bit, so that it decreases system delay and resource utilization and improves the throughput. We always analyze the error brought by this algorithm. It turned out that the algorithm has a good application prospect in global navigation satellite system and channelized receiver.

  7. Unidirectional rotating coordinate rotation digital computer algorithm based on rotational phase estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chaozhu; Han, Jinan; Yan, Huizhi

    2015-06-01

    The improved coordinate rotation digital computer (CORDIC) algorithm gives high precision and resolution phase rotation, but it has some shortages such as high iterations and big system delay. This paper puts forward unidirectional rotating CORDIC algorithm to solve these problems. First, using under-damping theory, a part of unidirectional phase rotations is carried out. Then, the threshold value of angle is determined based on phase rotation estimation method. Finally, rotation phase estimation completes the rest angle iterations. Furthermore, the paper simulates and implements the numerical control oscillator by Quartus II software and Modelsim software. According to the experimental results, the algorithm reduces iterations and judgment of sign bit, so that it decreases system delay and resource utilization and improves the throughput. We always analyze the error brought by this algorithm. It turned out that the algorithm has a good application prospect in global navigation satellite system and channelized receiver. PMID:26133856

  8. Surface dimpling on rotating work piece using rotation cutting tool

    SciTech Connect

    Bhapkar, Rohit Arun; Larsen, Eric Richard

    2015-03-31

    A combined method of machining and applying a surface texture to a work piece and a tool assembly that is capable of machining and applying a surface texture to a work piece are disclosed. The disclosed method includes machining portions of an outer or inner surface of a work piece. The method also includes rotating the work piece in front of a rotating cutting tool and engaging the outer surface of the work piece with the rotating cutting tool to cut dimples in the outer surface of the work piece. The disclosed tool assembly includes a rotating cutting tool coupled to an end of a rotational machining device, such as a lathe. The same tool assembly can be used to both machine the work piece and apply a surface texture to the work piece without unloading the work piece from the tool assembly.

  9. Counter-rotating accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyda, S.; Lovelace, R. V. E.; Ustyugova, G. V.; Romanova, M. M.; Koldoba, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Counter-rotating discs can arise from the accretion of a counter-rotating gas cloud on to the surface of an existing corotating disc or from the counter-rotating gas moving radially inwards to the outer edge of an existing disc. At the interface, the two components mix to produce gas or plasma with zero net angular momentum which tends to free-fall towards the disc centre. We discuss high-resolution axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations of viscous counter-rotating discs for the cases where the two components are vertically separated and radially separated. The viscosity is described by an isotropic α-viscosity including all terms in the viscous stress tensor. For the vertically separated components, a shear layer forms between them and the middle part of this layer free-falls to the disc centre. The accretion rates are increased by factors of ˜102-104 over that for a conventional disc rotating in one direction with the same viscosity. The vertical width of the shear layer and the accretion rate are strongly dependent on the viscosity and the mass fraction of the counter-rotating gas. In the case of radially separated components where the inner disc corotates and the outer disc rotates in the opposite direction, a gap between the two components opens and closes quasi-periodically. The accretion rates are ≳25 times larger than those for a disc rotating in one direction with the same viscosity.

  10. Spatially homogeneous rotating world models.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozsvath, I.

    1971-01-01

    The mathematical problem encountered when looking for the simplest expanding and rotating model of the universe without the compactness condition for the space sections is formulated. The Lagrangian function is derived for four different rotating universes simultaneously. These models correspond in a certain sense to Godel's (1950) ?symmetric case.'

  11. IAU Poles and Rotation Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    Every three years the IAU/IAG/COSPAR Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements of the Planets and Satellites revises tables giving the directions of the north poles rotation and the prime meridians of the planets, satellites, and asteriods and also tables of their sizes and shapes.

  12. Rotations of the Regular Polyhedra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, MaryClara; Soto-Johnson, Hortensia

    2006-01-01

    The study of the rotational symmetries of the regular polyhedra is important in the classroom for many reasons. Besides giving the students an opportunity to visualize in three dimensions, it is also an opportunity to relate two-dimensional and three-dimensional concepts. For example, rotations in R[superscript 2] require a point and an angle of…

  13. Quartic Rotation Criteria and Algorithms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarkson, Douglas B.; Jennrich, Robert I.

    1988-01-01

    Most of the current analytic rotation criteria for simple structure in factor analysis are summarized and identified as members of a general symmetric family of quartic criteria. A unified development of algorithms for orthogonal and direct oblique rotation using arbitrary criteria from this family is presented. (Author/TJH)

  14. Irrigation on the Old Rotation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Old Rotation (circa 1896) is the oldest, continuous cotton experiment in the world. There are 13 plots on one acre of land on the campus of Auburn University to document the long-term effects of crop rotations with and without winter legumes as a source of N for cotton, corn, soybean, and wheat...

  15. Rotational joint for prosthetic leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. C.; Owens, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Device is installed in standard 30 millimeter tubing used for lower leg prosthetics. Unit allows proper rotation (about 3 degrees) of foot relative to the hip, during normal walking or running. Limited rotational movement with restoring force results in a more natural gait.

  16. Three-Mode Orthomax Rotation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiers, Henk A. L.

    1997-01-01

    Provides a fully flexible approach for orthomax rotation of the core to simple structure with respect to three modes simultaneously. Computationally the approach relies on repeated orthomax rotation applied to supermatrices containing the frontal, lateral, or horizontal slabs, respectively. Exemplary analyses illustrate the procedure. (Author/SLD)

  17. Rotating Stars Can Help Planets Become Habitable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    What characteristics must a terrestrial planet exhibit to have the potential to host life? Orbiting within the habitable zone of its host star is certainly a good start, but theres another important aspect: the planet has to have the right atmosphere. A recent study has determined how host stars can help their planets to lose initial, enormous gaseous envelopes and become more Earth-like.Collecting An EnvelopeWhen a terrestrial planet forms inside a gaseous protoplanetary disk, it can accumulate a significant envelope of hydrogen gas causing the planet to bear more similarity to a mini-Neptune than to Earth. Before the planet can become habitable, it must shed this enormous, primordial hydrogen envelope, so that an appropriate secondary atmosphere can form.So what determines whether a planet can get rid of its protoatmosphere? The dominant process for shedding a hydrogen atmosphere is thermal mass loss: as the planets upper atmosphere is heated by X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from the host star, the envelope evaporates.A Critical DependenceIn a recent study led by Colin Johnstone (University of Vienna), a team of scientists has developed models of this evaporation process for hydrogen planetary atmospheres. In particular, Johnstone and collaborators examine how the host stars initial rotation rate which strongly impacts the stars level of XUV activity affects the degree to which the planets hydrogen atmosphere is evaporated, and the rate at which the evaporation occurs.The authors findings can be illustrated with the example of an Earth-mass planet located in the habitable zone of a solar-mass star. In this case, the authors find four interesting regimes (shown in the plot to the right):Evolution of the hydrogen protoatmosphere of an Earth-mass planet in the habitable zone of a solar-mass star. The four lettered cases describe different initial atmospheric masses. The three curves for each case describe the stellar rotation rate: slow (red

  18. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  19. Rotational chaos in dissipative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casdagli, Martin

    1988-01-01

    An investigation is made into chaotic attractors arising from a quasiperiodic transition to chaos, using a quantity called the rotation interval. The rotation interval describes the short term rotation rates available to the attractor. We present algorithms to calculate it given an appropriate map, differential equation or time series. We find that the rotation interval has a very robust parameter dependence: its endpoints are almost always phase locked. Our numerical ideas are based on the theory of dissipative twist maps, which is reviewed. This theory is also used to prove a theorem about the non-existence of certain strange attractors in nearly conservative systems. Finally, an investigation is made into the relationship between the rotation interval and topological entropy, and the breakup of invariant circles.

  20. Factors affecting rotator cuff healing.

    PubMed

    Mall, Nathan A; Tanaka, Miho J; Choi, Luke S; Paletta, George A

    2014-05-01

    Several studies have noted that increasing age is a significant factor for diminished rotator cuff healing, while biomechanical studies have suggested the reason for this may be an inferior healing environment in older patients. Larger tears and fatty infiltration or atrophy negatively affect rotator cuff healing. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, double-row repairs, performing a concomitant acromioplasty, and the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) do not demonstrate an improvement in structural healing over mini-open rotator cuff repairs, single-row repairs, not performing an acromioplasty, or not using PRP. There is conflicting evidence to support postoperative rehabilitation protocols using early motion over immobilization following rotator cuff repair. PMID:24806015

  1. Identification of a frequency response model of joint rotation.

    PubMed

    Becker, J D; Mote, C D

    1990-02-01

    A second order, linear oscillator transfer function model is fit to the measured transfer function relating the abduction-adduction rotation of the first finger to the applied moment. Nearly constant isometric contractions of the first palmar and dorsal interossei are maintained by the subjects during the measurements. The stiffness and damping components of the identified models increase significantly with increasing isometric contraction when compared to those recorded under relaxed contraction. Muscle fatigue causes the natural frequency, damping ratio and stiffness of the joint rotation to decrease under full isometric contraction, and it causes the natural frequency and stiffness to increase when the muscles are relaxed. PMID:2308296

  2. Generalized investigation of the rotation-activity relation: favoring rotation period instead of Rossby number

    SciTech Connect

    Reiners, A.; Passegger, V. M.; Schüssler, M.

    2014-10-20

    Magnetic activity in Sun-like and low-mass stars causes X-ray coronal emission which is stronger for more rapidly rotating stars. This relation is often interpreted in terms of the Rossby number, i.e., the ratio of rotation period to convective overturn time. We reconsider this interpretation on the basis of the observed X-ray emission and rotation periods of 821 stars with masses below 1.4 M {sub ☉}. A generalized analysis of the relation between X-ray luminosity normalized by bolometric luminosity, L {sub X}/L {sub bol}, and combinations of rotational period, P, and stellar radius, R, shows that the Rossby formulation does not provide the solution with minimal scatter. Instead, we find that the relation L {sub X}/L {sub bol}∝P {sup –2} R {sup –4} optimally describes the non-saturated fraction of the stars. This relation is equivalent to L {sub X}∝P {sup –2}, indicating that the rotation period alone determines the total X-ray emission. Since L {sub X} is directly related to the magnetic flux at the stellar surface, this means that the surface flux is determined solely by the star's rotation and is independent of other stellar parameters. While a formulation in terms of a Rossby number would be consistent with these results if the convective overturn time scales exactly as L{sub bol}{sup −1/2}, our generalized approach emphasizes the need to test a broader range of mechanisms for dynamo action in cool stars.

  3. Diagnosis and management of skin disorders caused by food allergy.

    PubMed

    Atherton, D J

    1984-12-01

    A major aetiologic role for foods has been demonstrated in urticaria, atopic eczema and dermatitis herpetiformis. In some patients with urticaria, whealing occurs within minutes of the ingestion of a particular food. In most, but not necessarily all cases, this appears to be a consequence of IgE-mediated cutaneous mast cell degranulation, i.e. a classical type I hypersensitivity response. In other patients with recurrent urticaria, the whealing may be provoked by foods by a much slower and more insidious reaction. This type of reaction has been established in the case of several common food additives, notably azo dyes, but other foods may be able to cause urticaria in a similar fashion. Foods appear to play an important provocative role in many patients with atopic eczema. The reaction in such cases appears to be slow and insidious, almost always unrecognized by the patient and not detected by skin testing or tests for IgE antibodies. There can be no real doubt that dietary gluten is responsible for most, if not all dermatitis herpetiformis, though this relationship was revealed only by the finding of concurrent and usually asymptomatic jejunal villous atrophy in affected individuals. The mechanisms responsible for the slow food reactions in urticaria, atopic eczema and dermatitis herpetiformis remain largely unknown, but are likely to be different in each case. PMID:6391291

  4. Rotating Bondi Accretion Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Myeong-Gu; Han, Du-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    The characteristics of accretion flow onto a black hole are determined by the physical condition of gas at large radius. When the gas has no angular momentum and is polytropic, the accretion flow becomes the classic Bondi flow. The mass accretion rate in such case is an eigenvalue and uniquely determined by the density and the temperature of the surrounding gas for a given black hole mass. When the gas has angular momentum above some critical value, the angular momentum of the gas should be removed by viscosity to reach the black hole horizon. We study, within the slim disk approximation, rotating polytropic accretion flow with alpha viscosity as an an extension of the Bondi flow. The characteristics of the accretion flow are now determined by the temperature, density, and angular momentum of the gas at the outer boundary. We explore the effects of the viscosity parameter and the outer boundary radius on the physical characteristic of the flow, especially on the mass accretion rate, and compare the result with previous works of Park (2009) and Narayan & Fabian (2011).

  5. Simulating rotational grazing management.

    PubMed

    Cros, M J; Duru, M; Garcia, F; Martin-Clouaire, R

    2001-09-01

    Dairy systems predominantly based on rotational grazing are notoriously hard to manage. In order to ensure profitability, this type of production requires quite good organisation, planning, and operating capability on the part of the farmer. A simulation-based decision support system, called SEPATOU, has been developed for this purpose. At the core of the decision support approach lies an explicit and rigorous modelling of the management strategy that underlies a dairy farmer's decision-making behaviour (real or hypothetical). The SEPATOU system is a discrete-event simulator that reproduces the day-to-day dynamics of the farmer's decision process and the response of the controlled biophysical system for which models of grass growth, animal consumption, and milk production are used. SEPATOU provides the means to evaluate and compare tentative strategies by simulating their application throughout the production season under different hypothetical weather conditions. The relative worth of a strategy can be assessed by analysing the effects on the biophysical system and their variability across the representative range of possible conditions that is considered. The activities to be managed concern the type and amount of conserved feed, where to fertilise and how much, the choice of fields to harvest, and most importantly, which field to graze next. Typically, SEPATOU is designed to be used by extension services and farming system scientists. It is implemented in C++ and is currently undergoing a validation process with the intended users. PMID:11697661

  6. Improved apparatus for predictive diagnosis of rotator cuff disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, Anup; Hall, Brittany N.; Thigpen, Charles A.; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2014-03-01

    Rotator cuff disease impacts over 50% of the population over 60, with reports of incidence being as high as 90% within this population, causing pain and possible loss of function. The rotator cuff is composed of muscles and tendons that work in tandem to support the shoulder. Heavy use of these muscles can lead to rotator cuff tear, with the most common causes is age-related degeneration or sport injuries, both being a function of overuse. Tears ranges in severity from partial thickness tear to total rupture. Diagnostic techniques are based on physical assessment, detailed patient history, and medical imaging; primarily X-ray, MRI and ultrasonography are the chosen modalities for assessment. The final treatment technique and imaging modality; however, is chosen by the clinician is at their discretion. Ultrasound has been shown to have good accuracy for identification and measurement of full-thickness and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. In this study, we report on the progress and improvement of our method of transduction and analysis of in situ measurement of rotator cuff biomechanics. We have improved the ability of the clinician to apply a uniform force to the underlying musculotendentious tissues while simultaneously obtaining the ultrasound image. This measurement protocol combined with region of interest (ROI) based image processing will help in developing a predictive diagnostic model for treatment of rotator cuff disease and help the clinicians choose the best treatment technique.

  7. Rotational polarities of sudden impulses in the magnetotail lobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawano, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Kokubun, S.; Lepping, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    A sudden impulse (SI) is a sudden change in the magnetic field strength which is caused by a change in the solar wind pressure and is observed throughout the magnetosphere. In this report we have examined the rotations of the magnetic field vectors at times of SIs in the magnetotail lobe, by using IMP 6, 7, and 8 magnetometer data. The following properties have been found: (1) at the time of SI the arrowhead of the magnetic vector tends to rotate in one plane; (2) the plane of rotation tends to include the unperturbed magnetic field vector; (3) the plane of rotation tends to be aligned with the radial direction from the magnetotail axis; and (4) the magnetic vectors have a particular rotational polarity: when the plane of rotation is viewed so that the Sun is to the right of the viewed plane and the magnetotail axis is to the bottom, the arrowhead of the vector tends to rotate counterclockwise in this plane. These magnetic vector properties are consistent with those expected when part of an increase in solar wind lateral pressure squeezes the magnetotail axisymmetrically while moving tailward.

  8. Starspots and Stellar Rotation: Stellar Activity with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkowicz, L. M.; Basri, G. S.

    2011-12-01

    While the telescopic study of starspots dates back to Galileos observations of our own Sun, recent space-borne photometric missions (such as MOST, CoRoT, and Kepler) are opening a new window into understanding these ubiquitous manifestations of stellar activity. Because of the intimate link between stellar rotation and the generation of the magnetic field, starspots cause a modulation in the lightcurve at the rate of stellar rotation. To complicate matters, stars rotate differentially, so the stellar rotation rate is not really best characterized by a single value but rather by a range of rotation rates. Through high-precision, long-term photometric monitoring of stars of different spectral types and activity strengths, it is possible to determine stellar rotation rates and differential rotation measures. In addition, modeling these lightcurves can tell us about the properties of stellar spots, such as location, areal coverage, and lifetime. New observations provide precision photometry for a large cohort of stars, ranging from Sun-like to rather different stellar properties, at a spread of ages, making these lightcurves a powerful tool for understanding magnetic activity for stars of all activity levels. Here, I will discuss how Kepler can provide new insight into the continuum of stellar activity and our own Suns place amongst the stars.

  9. Simulations of directed energy thrust on rotating asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griswold, Janelle; Madajian, Jonathan; Johansson, Isabella; Pfau, Krysten; Lubin, Philip; Hughes, Gary B.; Gilkes, Aidan; Meinhold, Peter; Motta, Caio; Brashears, Travis; Zhang, Qicheng

    2015-09-01

    Asteroids that threaten Earth could be deflected from their orbits using directed energy to vaporize the surface, because the ejected plume creates a reaction thrust that alters the asteroid's trajectory. One concern regarding directed energy deflection is the rotation of the asteroid, as this will reduce the average thrust magnitude and modify the thrust direction. Flux levels required to evaporate surface material depend on surface material composition and albedo, thermal, and bulk mechanical properties of the asteroid, and rotation rate. The observed distribution of asteroid rotation rates is used, along with an estimated range of material and mechanical properties, as input to a 3D thermal-physical model to calculate the resultant thrust vector. The model uses a directed energy beam, striking the surface of a rotating sphere with specified material properties, beam profile, and rotation rate. The model calculates thermal changes in the sphere, including vaporization and mass ejection of the target material. The amount of vaporization is used to determine a thrust magnitude that is normal to the surface at each point on the sphere. As the object rotates beneath the beam, vaporization decreases, as the temperature drops and causes both a phase shift and magnitude decrease in the average thrust vector. A surface integral is calculated to determine the thrust vector, at each point in time, producing a 4D analytical model of the expected thrust profile for rotating objects.

  10. General-relativistic rotation laws in rotating fluid bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mach, Patryk; Malec, Edward

    2015-06-01

    We formulate new general-relativistic extensions of Newtonian rotation laws for self-gravitating stationary fluids. They have been used to rederive, in the first post-Newtonian approximation, the well-known geometric dragging of frames. We derive two other general-relativistic weak-field effects within rotating tori: the recently discovered dynamic antidragging and a new effect that measures the deviation from the Keplerian motion and/or the contribution of the fluids self-gravity. One can use the rotation laws to study the uniqueness and the convergence of the post-Newtonian approximations as well as the existence of the post-Newtonian limits.

  11. First experiences with the rotating laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prandtl, L

    1926-01-01

    This report describes experiences with a rotating cylinder to explore the effects of motion and flow upon human sensory organs. One observation was that the variation of the resultant line of gravity (from gravity and centrifugal force) was not felt so strongly as might be expected. The impressions produced by the physical effects on the members of the body, especially the ones caused by the deflecting force (Coriolis force), are exactly what the laws of physics would lead us to expect, although somewhat surprising when observed in one's own body.

  12. The Rotational Excitation Temperature of the 6614 DIB Carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cami, J.; Salama, F.; Jimenez-Vicente, J.; Galazutdinov, G.; Krelowski, J.

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of high spectral resolution observations of the lambda6614 DIB line profile show systematic variations in the positions of the peaks in the substructure of the profile. These variations can only be understood in the framework of rotational contours of large molecules, where the variations are caused by changes in the rotational excitation temperature. We show that the rotational excitation temperature for the DIB carrier is of the order 10-40 K - much lower than the gas kinetic temperature - indicating that for this particular DIB carrier angular momentum buildup is not very efficient. The rotational constant indicates that the carrier of this DIB is smaller than previously assumed:7-22 C atoms, depending on the geometry.

  13. Electric-field-induced rotation of Brownian metal nanowires.

    PubMed

    Arcenegui, Juan J; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Morgan, Hywel; Ramos, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    We describe the physical mechanism responsible for the rotation of Brownian metal nanowires suspended in an electrolyte exposed to a rotating electric field. The electric field interacts with the induced charge in the electrical double layer at the metal-electrolyte interface, causing rotation due to the torque on the induced dipole and to the induced-charge electro-osmotic flow around the particle. Experiments demonstrate that the primary driving mechanism is the former of these two. Our analysis contrasts with previous work describing the electrical manipulation of metallic particles with electric fields, which neglected the electrical double layer. Theoretical values for the rotation speed are calculated and good agreement with experiments is found. PMID:24125362

  14. Successful Expansion of an Underexpanded Stent by Rotational Atherectomy

    PubMed Central

    Vales, Lori; Coppola, John; Kwan, Tak

    2013-01-01

    The current routine use of intracoronary stents in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has significantly reduced rates of restenosis, compared with balloon angioplasty alone. On the contrary, small post-stenting luminal dimensions due to undilatable, heavily calcified plaques have repeatedly been shown to significantly increase the rates of in-stent restenosis. Rotational atherectomy of lesions is an alternative method to facilitate PCI and prevent underexpansion of stents, when balloon angioplasty fails to successfully dilate a lesion. Stentablation, using rotational atherectomy to expand underexpanded stents deployed in heavily calcified plaques, has also been reported. We report a case via the transradial approach of rotational-atherectomy–facilitated PCI of in-stent restenosis of a severely underexpanded stent due to a heavily calcified plaque. We review the literature and suggest rotational atherectomy may have a role in treating a refractory, severely underexpanded stent caused by a heavily calcified plaque through various proposed mechanisms. PMID:24436587

  15. The influence of clinostat rotation on the fertilized amphibian egg.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tremor, J. W.; Souza, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    Study in which unrestrained, fertilized eggs of Rana pipiens and Xenopus laevis were rotated in a plane parallel to the normal gravity vector. In R. pipiens rotation at 1/4 rpm for five days at 18 C produced a significantly increased number of commonly occurring abnormalities. Rotation at 1/15, 1/8, 1, 2, 5 and 10 rpm did not significantly affect normal development. X. laevis eggs reacted similarly. R. pipiens eggs were most sensitive to rotation at 1/4 rpm when exposure was initiated before first cleavage. Mixing of intracellular constituents apparently occurred only at 1/4 rpm in R. pipiens (of the clinostat speeds studied), and may have been the cause of the increased abnormality observed at this rate.

  16. Brownian dipole rotator in alternating electric field.

    PubMed

    Rozenbaum, V M; Vovchenko, O Ye; Korochkova, T Ye

    2008-06-01

    The study addresses the azimuthal jumping motion of an adsorbed polar molecule in a periodic n -well potential under the action of an external alternating electric field. Starting from the perturbation theory of the Pauli equation with respect to the weak field intensity, explicit analytical expressions have been derived for the time dependence of the average dipole moment as well as the frequency dependences of polarizability and the average angular velocity, the three quantities exhibiting conspicuous stochastic resonance. As shown, unidirectional rotation can arise only provided simultaneous modulation of the minima and maxima of the potential by an external alternating field. For a symmetric potential of hindered rotation, the average angular velocity, if calculated by the second-order perturbation theory with respect to the field intensity, has a nonzero value only at n=2 , i.e., when two azimuthal wells specify a selected axis in the system. Particular consideration is given to the effect caused by the asymmetry of the two-well potential on the dielectric loss spectrum and other Brownian motion parameters. When the asymmetric potential in a system of dipole rotators arises from the average local fields induced by an orientational phase transition, the characteristics concerned show certain peculiarities which enable detection of the phase transition and determination of its parameters. PMID:18643221

  17. Brownian dipole rotator in alternating electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenbaum, V. M.; Vovchenko, O. Ye.; Korochkova, T. Ye.

    2008-06-01

    The study addresses the azimuthal jumping motion of an adsorbed polar molecule in a periodic n -well potential under the action of an external alternating electric field. Starting from the perturbation theory of the Pauli equation with respect to the weak field intensity, explicit analytical expressions have been derived for the time dependence of the average dipole moment as well as the frequency dependences of polarizability and the average angular velocity, the three quantities exhibiting conspicuous stochastic resonance. As shown, unidirectional rotation can arise only provided simultaneous modulation of the minima and maxima of the potential by an external alternating field. For a symmetric potential of hindered rotation, the average angular velocity, if calculated by the second-order perturbation theory with respect to the field intensity, has a nonzero value only at n=2 , i.e., when two azimuthal wells specify a selected axis in the system. Particular consideration is given to the effect caused by the asymmetry of the two-well potential on the dielectric loss spectrum and other Brownian motion parameters. When the asymmetric potential in a system of dipole rotators arises from the average local fields induced by an orientational phase transition, the characteristics concerned show certain peculiarities which enable detection of the phase transition and determination of its parameters.

  18. Compact, Precise Inertial Rotation Sensors for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosing, David; Oseas, Jeffrey; Korechoff, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A document describes a concept for an inertial sensor for measuring the rotation of an inertially stable spacecraft around its center of gravity to within 100 microarcseconds or possibly even higher precision. Whereas a current proposal for a spacecraft-rotation sensor of this accuracy requires one spacecraft dimension on the order of ten meters, a sensor according to this proposal could fit within a package smaller than 1 meter and would have less than a tenth of the mass. According to the concept, an inertial mass and an apparatus for monitoring the mass would be placed at some known distance from the center of gravity so that any rotation of the spacecraft would cause relative motion between the mass and the spacecraft. The relative motion would be measured and, once the displacement of the mass exceeded a prescribed range, a precisely monitored restoring force would be applied to return the mass to a predetermined position. Measurements of the relative motion and restoring force would provide information on changes in the attitude of the spacecraft. A history of relative motion and restoring-force measurements could be kept, enabling determination of the cumulative change in attitude during the observation time.

  19. Rotation induced mixing in stellar interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, J.-P.

    2013-12-01

    The standard model of stellar structure is unable to account for various observational facts, such as anomalies in the surface composition, and there is now a broad consensus that some extra mixing must occur in the radiation zones, in addition to the always present convective overshoot or penetration. The search for the causes of this extra mixing started in the late seventies, and it was quickly realized - in particular by Sylvie Vauclair and her co-workers - that some mild turbulence must be present to counteract the effect of gravitational settling and radiative levitation. What could be responsible for this turbulence? One suggestion was the internal gravity waves emitted at the boundary of convection zones, but it is still not established whether these waves will lead to true mixing. However they transport angular momentum, and therefore they generate differential rotation, which may be shear-unstable and thus lead to turbulence. Another way to transport angular momentum and produce an unstable rotation profile is through the large-scale circulation which is induced by the structural adjustments as the star evolves, or by the torques applied to it (due to stellar wind, accretion, tides). These processes participate in what is called the "rotational mixing"; their implementation in stellar evolution codes - again under Sylvie's impulse - has given birth to a new generation of stellar models, which agree much better with the observational constraints, although there is still room for improvement.

  20. Levels and Causes of Stress Among Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Allan J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Medical and dental residents at the University of Rochester Medical Center were surveyed with a brief symptom inventory to measure stress and its causes. Significantly elevated stress showed for rotations in the emergency room, greater frequency of being on call, and reduced sleep. (Author/MLW)

  1. Gravity darkening in rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa Lara, F.; Rieutord, M.

    2011-09-01

    Context. Interpretation of interferometric observations of rapidly rotating stars requires a good model of their surface effective temperature. Until now, laws of the form T_eff∝ g_eff^β have been used, but they are only valid for slowly rotating stars. Aims: We propose a simple model that can describe the latitudinal variations in the flux of rotating stars at any rotation rate. Methods: This model assumes that the energy flux is a divergence-free vector that is antiparallel to the effective gravity. Results: When mass distribution can be described by a Roche model, the latitudinal variations in the effective temperature only depend on a single parameter, namely the ratio of the equatorial velocity to the Keplerian velocity. We validate this model by comparing its predictions to those of the most realistic two-dimensional models of rotating stars issued from the ESTER code. The agreement is very good, as it is with the observations of two rapidly rotating stars, α Aql and α Leo. Conclusions: We suggest that as long as a gray atmosphere can be accepted, the inversion of data on flux distribution coming from interferometric observations of rotating stars uses such a model, which has just one free parameter.

  2. Treatment of lesions of the rotator cuff.

    PubMed

    Saggini, R; Cavezza, T; Di Pancrazio, L; Pisciella, V; Saladino, G; Zuccaro, M C; Bellomo, R G

    2010-01-01

    The impingement syndrome and tendinopathy of the rotator cuff are the most common causes (complaints) of pain and disability of the shoulder. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a specific rehabilitative protocol, integrated with the administration of a nutritional supplement, in the conservative rehabilitative treatment, as well as in post-surgery, of patients with lesions of the rotator cuff. Two groups with syndrome of the rotator cuff were formed to follow different therapeutic courses, in relation to the choice of each subject to undergo the conservative treatment (Arm A) or the surgical one (Arm B). In Arm A the study included the association of therapy with ESWT (shock waves) with the proprioceptive Multi Joint System, for rehabilitating joint movement and muscle strength of the shoulder, and a specific nutritional supplement to reduce the pain and conserve the cartilage tissue. Between February 2009 and June 2009, we enrolled 30 subjects (randomized into three homogenous groups A1, A2, A3), average age 45±10 years, with rotator cuff syndrome with calcification of the shoulder, diagnosed through clinical examination and investigative instruments (X-ray, echography or NMR). In Arm B, from September 2009 to January 2010, we enrolled 50 patients (randomized into two groups, B1 and B2), 24 male (average age 58.4: min 28 and max 78) and 26 females (average age 59.5: min 30 and max 80), who had undergone rotator cuff operations and acromionplasty for non-massive lesions without important gleno-humeral instability, with either open or arthroscopic procedures. The analysis of the results of Arm A highlights that in terms of reducing pain the main benefits were found in Group A1 where the supplement was given. From the analysis of the data of Arm B, in both groups an improvement of the first 4 items evaluated was evident. In Group B1, 84 percent of the patients declared to be satisfied and improved and 16 percent were dissatisfied; in Group B2

  3. Recent VLA Observations of Coronal Faraday Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Fischer, P. D.; Buffo, J. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Proposed mechanisms for coronal heating and acceleration of the fast solar wind, such as Joule heating by coronal currents or dissipation of Alfvén waves, depend on the magnetic field structure and plasma characteristics of the corona within heliocentric distances of 5 solar radii. Faraday rotation observations can provide unique information on the magnetic field in this region of the corona. We report on sensitive full-polarization observations of the radio galaxy 3C228 through the solar corona at heliocentric distances of 4.6 - 5.0 solar radii. The observations were made with the VLA in August of 2011. We performed these observations at 5.0 and 6.1 GHz (each with a bandwidth of 128 MHz), permitting measurements deeper in the corona than previous VLA observations at 1.4 and 1.7 GHz. While the measured Faraday rotation was lower than our a priori expectations, we can understand the magnitude of the observed Faraday rotation in terms of observed properties of the corona on the day of observation. For coronal remote sensing, an advantage of using extended extragalactic radio sources such as 3C228 is that such observations provide multiple lines of sight through the corona. Our data provide two lines of sight (separated by 46″, 33,000 km in the corona), one to a northern hotspot and the other to a southern hotspot with fractional polarizations of 14% and 8% respectively. We detected three periods over the eight-hour observing session during which there appeared to be a difference in the Faraday rotation between these two closely spaced lines of sight. These measurements yield an estimate of 2 - 4 GA for coronal currents. We did not directly detect rotation measure fluctuations. Our data impose upper limits on rotation measure fluctuations caused by coronal waves. The observed upper limits were 3.3 and 6.4 rad/m2 and are comparable to and not inconsistent with some models for Alfvén wave heating. This research was supported at the University of Iowa by grants ATM09

  4. Torsion-rotation intensities in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, John

    Methanol exists in numerous kinds of astronomical objects featuring a wide range of local conditions. The light nature of the molecule coupled with the internal rotation of the methyl group with respect to the hydroxyl group results in a rich, strong spectrum that spans the entire far-infrared region. As a result, any modest size observational window will have a number of strong methanol transitions. This has made it the gas of choice for testing THz receivers and to extract the local physical conditions from observations covering small frequency windows. The latter has caused methanol to be dubbed the Swiss army knife of astrophysics. Methanol has been increasingly used in this capacity and will be used even more for subsequent investigations into the Herschel archive, and with SOFIA and ALMA. Interpreting physical conditions on the basis of a few methanol lines requires that the molecular data, line positions, intensities, and collision rates, be complete, consistent and accurate to a much higher level than previously required for astrophysics. The need for highly reliable data is even more critical for modeling the two classes of widespread maser action and many examples of optical pumping through the torsional bands. Observation of the torsional bands in the infrared will be a unique opportunity to directly connect JWST observations with those of Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA. The theory for the intensities of torsion-rotation transitions in a molecule featuring a single internally rotating methyl group is well developed after 70 years of research. However, other than a recent very preliminary and not completely satisfactory investigation of a few CH3OH torsional bands, this theory has never been experimentally tested for any C3V internal rotor. More alarming is a set of recent intensity calibrated microwave measurements that showed deviations relative to calculations of up to 50% in some ground state rotational transitions commonly used by astronomers to extract

  5. Quantum Rotational Effects in Nanomagnetic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, Michael F.

    Quantum tunneling of the magnetic moment in a nanomagnet must conserve the total angular momentum. For a nanomagnet embedded in a rigid body, reversal of the magnetic moment will cause the body to rotate as a whole. When embedded in an elastic environment, tunneling of the magnetic moment will cause local elastic twists of the crystal structure. In this thesis, I will present a theoretical study of the interplay between magnetization and rotations in a variety of nanomagnetic systems which have some degree of rotational freedom. We investigate the effect of rotational freedom on the tunnel splitting of a nanomagnet which is free to rotate about its easy axis. Calculating the exact instanton of the coupled equations of motion shows that mechanical freedom of the particle renormalizes the easy axis anisotropy, increasing the tunnel splitting. To understand magnetization dynamics in free particles, we study a quantum mechanical model of a tunneling spin embedded in a rigid rotor. The exact energy levels for a symmetric rotor exhibit first and second order quantum phase transitions between states with different values the magnetic moment. A quantum phase diagram is obtained in which the magnetic moment depends strongly on the moments of inertia. An intrinsic contribution to decoherence of current oscillations of a flux qubit must come from the angular momentum it transfers to the surrounding body. Within exactly solvable models of a qubit embedded in a rigid body and an elastic medium, we show that slow decoherence is permitted if the solid is macroscopically large. The spin-boson model is one of the simplest representations of a two-level system interacting with a quantum harmonic oscillator, yet has eluded a closed-form solution. I investigate some possible approaches to understanding its spectrum. The Landau-Zener dynamics of a tunneling spin coupled to a torsional resonator show that for certain parameter ranges the system exhibits multiple Landau-Zener transitions

  6. STELLAR ROTATION PERIODS OF THE KEPLER OBJECTS OF INTEREST: A DEARTH OF CLOSE-IN PLANETS AROUND FAST ROTATORS

    SciTech Connect

    McQuillan, A.; Mazeh, T.; Aigrain, S.

    2013-09-20

    We present a large sample of stellar rotation periods for Kepler Objects of Interest, based on three years of public Kepler data. These were measured by detecting periodic photometric modulation caused by star spots, using an algorithm based on the autocorrelation function of the light curve, developed recently by McQuillan, Aigrain and Mazeh (2013). Of the 1919 main-sequence exoplanet hosts analyzed, robust rotation periods were detected for 737. Comparing the detected stellar periods to the orbital periods of the innermost planet in each system reveals a notable lack of close-in planets around rapid rotators. It appears that only slowly spinning stars with rotation periods longer than 5-10 days host planets on orbits shorter than 2 or 3 days, although the mechanism(s) that lead(s) to this is not clear.

  7. Axial gap rotating electrical machine

    DOEpatents

    None

    2016-02-23

    Direct drive rotating electrical machines with axial air gaps are disclosed. In these machines, a rotor ring and stator ring define an axial air gap between them. Sets of gap-maintaining rolling supports bear between the rotor ring and the stator ring at their peripheries to maintain the axial air gap. Also disclosed are wind turbines using these generators, and structures and methods for mounting direct drive rotating electrical generators to the hubs of wind turbines. In particular, the rotor ring of the generator may be carried directly by the hub of a wind turbine to rotate relative to a shaft without being mounted directly to the shaft.

  8. Orbital, Rotational, and Climatic Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bills, Bruce G. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The report of an international meeting on the topic of Orbital, Rotational, and Climatic Interactions, which was held 9-11 Jul. 1991 at the Johns Hopkins University is presented. The meeting was attended by 22 researchers working on various aspects of orbital and rotational dynamics, paleoclimate data analysis and modeling, solid-Earth deformation studies, and paleomagnetic analyses. The primary objective of the workshop was to arrive at a better understanding of the interactions between the orbital, rotational, and climatic variations of the Earth. This report contains a brief introduction and 14 contributed papers which cover most of the topics discussed at the meeting.

  9. Cell rotation using optoelectronic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuan-Li; Huang, Yuan-Peng; Lu, Yen-Sheng; Hou, Max T; Yeh, J Andrew

    2010-01-01

    A cell rotation method by using optoelectronic tweezers (OET) is reported. The binary image of a typical OET device, whose light and dark sides act as two sets of parallel plates with different ac voltages, was used to create a rotating electric field. Its feasibility for application to electrorotation of cells was demonstrated by rotating Ramos and yeast cells in their pitch axes. The electrorotation by using OET devices is dependent on the medium and cells' electrical properties, the cells' positions, and the OET device's geometrical dimension, as well as the frequency of the electric field. PMID:21267435

  10. Cooling system for rotating machine

    DOEpatents

    Gerstler, William Dwight; El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi; Lokhandwalla, Murtuza; Alexander, James Pellegrino; Quirion, Owen Scott; Palafox, Pepe; Shen, Xiaochun; Salasoo, Lembit

    2011-08-09

    An electrical machine comprising a rotor is presented. The electrical machine includes the rotor disposed on a rotatable shaft and defining a plurality of radial protrusions extending from the shaft up to a periphery of the rotor. The radial protrusions having cavities define a fluid path. A stationary shaft is disposed concentrically within the rotatable shaft wherein an annular space is formed between the stationary and rotatable shaft. A plurality of magnetic segments is disposed on the radial protrusions and the fluid path from within the stationary shaft into the annular space and extending through the cavities within the radial protrusions.

  11. The automated rotating shadowband spectroradiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, L.; Beik, M.A.; Michalsky, J.J.

    1993-11-01

    We are developing a photodiode array rotating shadowband spectroradiometer (RSS) as part of the Instrument Development Program (IDP) of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). This instrument uses the automated rotating shadowband technique to separate and measure the spectrally resolved direct-normal, total horizontal, and diffuse horizontal irradiances in the 360 to 1060 nm wavelength region. It is intended as an instrument for the central facility of each of the cloud and radiation testbed (CART) sites, and will complement the array of multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSR) currently being deployed by ARM and other research programs including TOGA/COARE.

  12. Rotating apparatus for isoelectric focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, Milan (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This disclosure is directed to an isoelectric focusing apparatus, wherein stabilization of the fluid containing the isolated proteins is achieved by carrying out the separation in a rotating cylinder with the separation cavity of the cylinder being segmented by means of filter elements. The filter elements are constituted of a material offering some degree of resistance to fluid convection, but allowing relatively free and unhindered passage of current and transport of proteins. The combined effect of segmentation and rotation has been found to be superior to either segmentation or rotation alone in maintaining the stability of the migrated fractions.

  13. Thermal energy scavenger (rotating wire modules)

    SciTech Connect

    Hochstein, P.A.; Milton, H.W.; Pringle, W.L.

    1980-11-04

    A thermal energy scavenger assembly is is described including a plurality of temperature-sensitive wires made of material which exhibits shape memory due to a thermoelastic, martensitic phase transformation. The wires are placed in tension between fixed and movable plates which are, in turn, supported by a pair of wheels which are rotatably supported by a housing for rotation about a central axis. A pair of upper and lower cams are fixed to the housing and cam followers react with the respective cams. Each cam transmits forces through a pair of hydraulic pistons. One of the pistons is connected to a movable plate to which one end of the wires are connected whereby a stress is applied to the wires to strain the wires during a first phase and whereby the cam responds to the unstraining of the wires during a second phase. A housing defines fluid compartments through which hot and cold fluid passes and flows radially through the wires whereby the wires become unstrained and shorten in length when subjected to the hot fluid for causing a reaction between the cam followers and the cams to effect rotation of the wheels about the central axis of the assembly, which rotation of the wheels is extracted through beveled gearing. The wires are grouped into a plurality of independent modules with each module having a movable plate, a fixed plate and the associated hydraulic pistons and cam follower. The hydraulic pistons and cam follower of a module are disposed at ends of the wires opposite from the ends of the wires at which the same components of the next adjacent modules are disposed so that the cam followers of alternate modules react with one of the cams and the remaining cam followers of the remaining modules react with the other cam. There is also included stress limiting means in the form of coil springs associated with alternate ends of the wires for limiting the stress or strain in the wires.

  14. Effects of Clinostat Rotation on Aurelia Statolith Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangenberg, Dorothy B.; Davis, S.; Ross-Clunis, H., III

    1991-01-01

    Aurelia ephyrae develop eight graviceptors (rhopalia) during their metamorphosis from polyps, which are used for positional orientation with respect to gravity. In three experiments for each speed of 1/15, 1/8, 1/2, 1, and 24 rpm, groups of six polyps were rotated in the horizontal or vertical plane (control) using clinostats. Other controls were kept stationary in the two planes. Ten ephyrae from each group were collected after 5 to 6 days at 27 C in iodine and the number of statoliths per rhopalium were counted. Statistical analyses of statolith numbers revealed that horizontal clinostat rotation at 1/4 and 1/2 rpm caused the formation of significantly fewer statoliths per rhopalium than were found in controls. The finding that these slow rates of rotation reduces statolith numbers suggests that the developing ephyrae were disoriented with respect to gravity at these speeds, causing fewer statocytes to differentiate or to mineralize.

  15. Effects of clinostat rotation on Aurelia statolith synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangenberg, D.; Davis, S.; Ross-Clunis, H., III

    1985-01-01

    Aurelia ephyrae develop eight graviceptors (rhopalia) during their metamorphosis from polyps, which are used for positional orientation with respect to gravity. In three experiments for each speed of 1/15, 1/8, 1/4, 1/2, 1, and 24 rpm, groups of six polyps were rotated in the horizontal or vertical plane (control) using clinostats. Other controls were kept stationary in the two planes. Ten ephyrae from each group were collected after 5-6 days at 27 C in iodine and the number of statoliths per rhopalium were counted. Statistical analyses of statolith numbers revealed that horizontal clinostat rotation at 1/4 and 1/2 rpm caused the formation of significantly fewer statoliths per rhopalium than were found in controls. The finding that these slow rates of rotation reduces statolith numbers suggests that the developing ephyrae were disoriented with respect to gravity at these speeds, causing fewer statocytes to differentiate or to mineralize.

  16. Collapsing thin shells with rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsate, Térence; Rocha, Jorge V.; Santarelli, Raphael

    2014-06-01

    We construct exact solutions describing the motion of rotating thin shells in a fully backreacted five-dimensional rotating black hole spacetime. The radial equation of motion follows from the Darmois-Israel junction conditions, where both interior and exterior geometries are taken to be equal angular momenta Myers-Perry solutions. We show that rotation generates anisotropic pressures and momentum along the shell. Gravitational collapse scenarios including rotation are analyzed and a new class of stationary solutions is introduced. Energy conditions for the anisotropic matter shell are briefly discussed. We find that the weak energy condition is not violated for the collapse scenario where the shell starts at rest from infinity, nor for the new class of stationary solutions in anti-de Sitter. We further prove that the cosmic censorship conjecture is always satisfied in our setup.

  17. High performance rotational vibration isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunderland, Andrew; Blair, David G.; Ju, Li; Golden, Howard; Torres, Francis; Chen, Xu; Lockwood, Ray; Wolfgram, Peter

    2013-10-01

    We present a new rotational vibration isolator with an extremely low resonant frequency of 0.055 ± 0.002 Hz. The isolator consists of two concentric spheres separated by a layer of water and joined by very soft silicone springs. The isolator reduces rotation noise at all frequencies above its resonance which is very important for airborne mineral detection. We show that more than 40 dB of isolation is achieved in a helicopter survey for rotations at frequencies between 2 Hz and 20 Hz. Issues affecting performance such as translation to rotation coupling and temperature are discussed. The isolator contains almost no metal, making it particularly suitable for electromagnetic sensors.

  18. Interpretation of rapidly rotating pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F. . Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik); Glendenning, N.K. )

    1992-08-05

    The minimum possible rotational period of pulsars, which are interpreted as rotating neutron stars, is determined by applying a representative collection of realistic nuclear equations of state. It is found that none of the selected equations of state allows for neutron star rotation at periods below 0.8--0.9 ms. Thus, this work strongly supports the suggestion that if pulsars with shorter rotational periods were found, these are likely to be strange-quark-matter stars. The conclusion that the confined hadronic phase of nucleons and nuclei is only metastable would then be almost inescapable, and the plausible ground-state in that event is the deconfined phase of (3-flavor) strange-quark-matter.

  19. Rotator cuff repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... shoulder and arm bones. The tendons can be torn from overuse or injury. ... Surgery to repair a torn rotator cuff is usually very successful at relieving pain in the shoulder. The procedure is less predictable at returning strength ...

  20. An Exercise in Rotational Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Brother James

    1980-01-01

    Describes an advanced high school physics experiment demonstrating rotational kinematics and dynamics, using simple equipment such as empty coffee cans, inclined planes, meter sticks, and a large 10-second demonstration timer. (CS)

  1. Rotator cuff - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... tendons that attach to the bones of the shoulder joint, allowing the shoulder to move and remain stable. Common rotator cuff ... can help when you feel pain in your shoulder. An ice pack applied to the shoulder 20 ...

  2. Rotation, differential rotation, and gyrochronology of active Kepler stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhold, Timo; Gizon, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Context. In addition to the discovery of hundreds of exoplanets, the high-precision photometry from the CoRoT and Kepler satellites has led to measurements of surface rotation periods for tens of thousands of stars, which can potentially be used to infer stellar ages via gyrochronology. Aims: Our main goal is to derive ages of thousands of field stars using consistent rotation period measurements derived by different methods. Multiple rotation periods are interpreted as surface differential rotation (DR). We study the dependence of DR with rotation period and effective temperature. Methods: We reanalyze a previously studied sample of 24 124 Kepler stars using different approaches based on the Lomb-Scargle periodogram. Each quarter (Q1-Q14) is treated individually using a prewhitening approach. Additionally, the full time series and their different segments are analyzed. Results: For more than 18 500 stars our results are consistent with the rotation periods from McQuillan et al. (2014, ApJS, 211, 24). Of these, more than 12 300 stars show multiple significant peaks, which we interpret as DR. Dependencies of the DR with rotation period and effective temperature could be confirmed, e.g., the relative DR increases with rotation period. Gyrochronology ages between 100 Myr and 10 Gyr were derived for more than 17 000 stars using different gyrochronology relations, most of them with uncertainties dominated by period variations. We find a bimodal age distribution for Teff between 3200-4700 K. The derived ages reveal an empirical activity-age relation using photometric variability as stellar activity proxy. Additionally, we found 1079 stars with extremely stable (mostly short) periods. Half of these periods may be associated with rotation stabilized by non-eclipsing companions, the other half might be due to pulsations. Conclusions: The derived gyrochronology ages are well constrained since more than ~93.0% of the stars seem to be younger than the Sun where calibration is

  3. Rotational evolution of slow-rotator sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzafame, A. C.; Spada, F.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The observed relationship between mass, age and rotation in open clusters shows the progressive development of a slow-rotator sequence among stars possessing a radiative interior and a convective envelope during their pre-main sequence and main-sequence evolution. After 0.6 Gyr, most cluster members of this type have settled on this sequence. Aims: The observed clustering on this sequence suggests that it corresponds to some equilibrium or asymptotic condition that still lacks a complete theoretical interpretation, and which is crucial to our understanding of the stellar angular momentum evolution. Methods: We couple a rotational evolution model, which takes internal differential rotation into account, with classical and new proposals for the wind braking law, and fit models to the data using a Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) method tailored to the problem at hand. We explore to what extent these models are able to reproduce the mass and time dependence of the stellar rotational evolution on the slow-rotator sequence. Results: The description of the evolution of the slow-rotator sequence requires taking the transfer of angular momentum from the radiative core to the convective envelope into account. We find that, in the mass range 0.85-1.10 M⊙, the core-envelope coupling timescale for stars in the slow-rotator sequence scales as M-7.28. Quasi-solid body rotation is achieved only after 1-2 Gyr, depending on stellar mass, which implies that observing small deviations from the Skumanich law (P ∝ √{t}) would require period data of older open clusters than is available to date. The observed evolution in the 0.1-2.5 Gyr age range and in the 0.85-1.10 M⊙ mass range is best reproduced by assuming an empirical mass dependence of the wind angular momentum loss proportional to the convective turnover timescale and to the stellar moment of inertia. Period isochrones based on our MCMC fit provide a tool for inferring stellar ages of solar-like main

  4. Inelastic scattering in atom-diatomic molecule collisions. II - Effect of rotation on vibrational transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    Rotational and vibrational transitions in a diatomic molecule caused by collisions with an atom are analyzed by a semiclassical method for conditions where the rotational transitions can be handled well by the sudden approximation and the vibrational transitions belong to the adiabatic regime. The contribution to the vibrational transition probability from the correction, which takes the finite value of the spacing between rotational energy levels into account, is examined.-

  5. Generation of magnetoacoustic zonal flows by Alfven waves in a rotating plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Lominadze, J. G.; Churikov, A. P.; Erokhin, N. N.; Tsypin, V. S.; Smolyakov, A. I.; Galvao, R. M. O.

    2007-08-15

    Analytical theory of nonlinear generation of magnetoacoustic zonal flows in a rotating plasma is developed. As the primary modes causing such a generation, a totality of the Alfven waves are considered, along with the kinetic, inertial, and rotational. It is shown that in all these cases of the Alfven waves the generation is possible if the double plasma rotation frequency exceeds the zonal flow frequency.

  6. Rotational Mobility of Single Molecules Affects Localization Accuracy in Super-Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Matthew D.; Backlund, Mikael P.; Moerner, W. E.

    2013-01-01

    The asymmetric nature of single-molecule (SM) dipole emission patterns limits the accuracy of position determination in localization-based super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. The degree of mislocalization depends highly on the rotational mobility of SMs; only for SMs rotating within a cone half angle α > 60° can mislocalization errors be bounded to ≤ 10 nm. Simulations demonstrate how low or high rotational mobility can cause resolution degradation or distortion in super-resolution reconstructions. PMID:23360306

  7. Nonaxisymmetric oscillations of differentially rotating relativistic stars

    SciTech Connect

    Passamonti, Andrea; Stavridis, Adamantios; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2008-01-15

    Nonaxisymmetric oscillations of differentially rotating stars are studied using both slow rotation and Cowling approximation. The equilibrium stellar models are relativistic polytropes where differential rotation is described by the relativistic j-constant rotation law. The oscillation spectrum is studied versus three main parameters: the stellar compactness M/R, the degree of differential rotation A, and the number of maximum couplings l{sub max}. It is shown that the rotational splitting of the nonaxisymmetric modes are strongly enhanced by increasing the compactness of the star and the degree of differential rotation. Finally, we investigate the relation between the fundamental quadrupole mode and the corotation band of differentially rotating stars.

  8. Maximising somersault rotation in tumbling.

    PubMed

    King, M A Mark A; Yeadon, M R Maurice R

    2004-04-01

    Performing complex somersaulting skills during the flight phase of tumbling requires the generation of linear and angular momenta during the approach and takeoff phases. This paper investigates how approach characteristics and takeoff technique affect performance with a view to maximising somersault rotation in tumbling. A five-segment planar simulation model, customised to an elite gymnast, was used to produce a simulation which closely matched a recorded performance of a double layout somersault by the elite gymnast. Three optimisations were carried out to maximise somersault rotation with different sets of initial conditions. Using the same initial linear and angular momentum as the double layout somersault and varying the joint torque activation timings allowed a double straight somersault to be performed with 19% more rotation potential than the actual performance. Increasing the approach velocity to a realistic maximum of 7 ms(-1) resulted in a 42% reduction in rotation potential when the activation timings were unchanged but allowed a triple layout somersault to be performed with an increase of 31% in rotation potential when activation timings were re-optimised. Increasing also the initial angular momentum to a realistic maximum resulted in a 4% reduction in rotation potential when the activation timings were unchanged but allowed a triple straight somersault to be performed with a further increase of 9% in rotation potential when activation timings were re-optimised. It is concluded that the limiting factor to maximising somersault rotation is the ability to generate high linear and angular velocities during the approach phase coupled with the ability to adopt consonant activation timings during the takeoff phase. PMID:14996558

  9. Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer (RSS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Kiedron, P; Schlemmer, J; Klassen, M

    2005-01-01

    The rotating shawdowband spectroradiometer (RSS) implements the same automated shadowbanding technique used by the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR), and so it too provides spectrally-resolved, direct-normal, diffuse-horizontal, and total-horizontal irradiances, and can be calibrated in situ via Langley regression. The irradiance spectra are measured simultaneously at all spectral elements (pixels) in 360-nm to 1050-nm range.

  10. Rotation of the planet mercury.

    PubMed

    Jefferys, W H

    1966-04-01

    The equations of motion for the rotation of Mercury are solved for the general case by an asymptotic expansion. The findings of Liu and O'Keefe, obtained by numerical integration of a special case, that it is possible for Mercury's rotation to be locked into a 2:3 resonance with its revolution, are confirmed in detail. The general solution has further applications. PMID:17741632

  11. Relativity on Rotated Graph Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Roberto

    2011-11-01

    We present visual calculations in special relativity using spacetime diagrams drawn on graph paper that has been rotated by 45 degrees. The rotated lines represent lightlike directions in Minkowski spacetime, and the boxes in the grid (called light-clock diamonds) represent ticks of an inertial observer's lightclock. We show that many quantitative results can be read off a spacetime diagram by counting boxes, using a minimal amount of algebra.

  12. The Rotation of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovmassian, H. M.

    2015-09-01

    The method for detection of the galaxy cluster rotation based on the study of distribution of member galaxies with velocities lower and higher than the cluster mean velocity over the cluster image is proposed. The search for rotation is made for flat clusters with a/b > 1.8 and BMI type clusters which are expected to be rotating. For comparison there were studied also round clusters and clusters of NBMI type, the second by brightness galaxy, which does not differ significantly from the cluster cD galaxy. Seventeen out of studied 65 clusters are found to be rotating. It was found that the detection rate is sufficiently high for flat clusters, over 60%, and clusters of BMI type with dominant cD galaxy, ≈ 35% . The obtained results show that clusters were formed from the huge primordial gas clouds and preserved the rotation of the primordial clouds, unless they did not experience mergings with other clusters and groups of galaxies, as a result of which the rotation was prevented.

  13. Long-Period Tidal Variations of the Earth's Rotation Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, S.; Gross, R.; Wahr, J.

    1999-01-01

    Long-period tidal variations of the Earth's rotation rate are caused by the redistribution of mass associated with the respective elastic solid Earth tides, the ocean tide heights, and the anelasticity of the Earth's mantle, and by the relative angular momentum associated with the long-period ocean tide currents.

  14. Fork rotation and DNA precatenation are restricted during DNA replication to prevent chromosomal instability

    PubMed Central

    Schalbetter, Stephanie A.; Mansoubi, Sahar; Chambers, Anna L.; Downs, Jessica A.; Baxter, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Faithful genome duplication and inheritance require the complete resolution of all intertwines within the parental DNA duplex. This is achieved by topoisomerase action ahead of the replication fork or by fork rotation and subsequent resolution of the DNA precatenation formed. Although fork rotation predominates at replication termination, in vitro studies have suggested that it also occurs frequently during elongation. However, the factors that influence fork rotation and how rotation and precatenation may influence other replication-associated processes are unknown. Here we analyze the causes and consequences of fork rotation in budding yeast. We find that fork rotation and precatenation preferentially occur in contexts that inhibit topoisomerase action ahead of the fork, including stable protein–DNA fragile sites and termination. However, generally, fork rotation and precatenation are actively inhibited by Timeless/Tof1 and Tipin/Csm3. In the absence of Tof1/Timeless, excessive fork rotation and precatenation cause extensive DNA damage following DNA replication. With Tof1, damage related to precatenation is focused on the fragile protein–DNA sites where fork rotation is induced. We conclude that although fork rotation and precatenation facilitate unwinding in hard-to-replicate contexts, they intrinsically disrupt normal chromosome duplication and are therefore restricted by Timeless/Tipin. PMID:26240319

  15. Choice of Rotation Rate for the Horizontal Clinostat 1

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, Charles J.

    1970-01-01

    A series of nine rates of rotation of the clinostat were tested to determine optimal and acceptable conditions for simulating weightlessness in plants. Young seedlings of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) developed roots and coleoptiles of equal lengths and with the same orientation angles over a range of rotation rates from 0.25 to 480 minutes per revolution. Rates from 0.25 to 3 minutes per revolution provided for maximal epinastic curvatures of leaves and branches of Coleus blumei Benth. except for a reduced mean curvature of branches at 0.25 minute per revolution, due probably to physical disturbances in their growth. Smaller epinastic curvatures developed in both leaves and branches rotated at 15 minutes per revolution or more slowly. Indoleacetic acid-2-14C was used for measurements of extractable radioactivity in determining the reason for smaller curvatures of Coleus branches and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) leaves at the rotation rate of 60 minutes per revolution than at 1 minute per revolution. The cause was determined to be movement of some auxin from the upper into the lower side of a plagiotropic leaf or branch under the transient influence of gravity during rotation on the slower clinostat. A rotation period of 1 to 3 minutes was found to be acceptable for most plants. PMID:16657466

  16. A study of rotational velocity distribution of Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitko, C.; Janot-Pacheco, E.; Emilio, M.

    2014-10-01

    Classical Be stars are rapid rotators of spectral type late O to early A and luminosity class V-III, which exhibit Balmer emission lines and often a near infrared excess originating in an equatorially concentrated circumstellar envelope, both produced by sporadic mass ejection episodes. The causes of the abnormal mass loss (the so-called Be phenomenon) are as yet unknown. In spite of their high vsin i, rapid rotation alone cannot explain the ejection episodes as most Be stars do not rotate at their critical rotation rates. In this work we present the distribution of vsin i of 261 Be's stars from BeSS (Be Star Spectra) database. We used two techniques, the Fourier method and the FWHM (Full Width at Half Maximum) method. For the analysis we made use of three absorption lines of Helium (4026r A, 4388 Å and 4471 Å). Stars with projected rotational velocities up to 300 km s^{-1} agree with the ones already published in the literature. 84 of our stars do not have the values of rotational velocity published. The majority of our sample are B1/B2 spectral type, whose have the greatest velocities.

  17. Rotational velocities of A-type stars. IV. Evolution of rotational velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorec, J.; Royer, F.

    2012-01-01

    Context. In previous works of this series, we have shown that late B- and early A-type stars have genuine bimodal distributions of rotational velocities and that late A-type stars lack slow rotators. The distributions of the surface angular velocity ratio Ω/Ωcrit (Ωcrit is the critical angular velocity) have peculiar shapes according to spectral type groups, which can be caused by evolutionary properties. Aims: We aim to review the properties of these rotational velocity distributions in some detail as a function of stellar mass and age. Methods: We have gathered vsini for a sample of 2014 B6- to F2-type stars. We have determined the masses and ages for these objects with stellar evolution models. The (Teff,log L/L⊙)-parameters were determined from the uvby-β photometry and the HIPPARCOS parallaxes. Results: The velocity distributions show two regimes that depend on the stellar mass. Stars less massive than 2.5 M⊙ have a unimodal equatorial velocity distribution and show a monotonical acceleration with age on the main sequence (MS). Stars more massive have a bimodal equatorial velocity distribution. Contrarily to theoretical predictions, the equatorial velocities of stars from about 1.7 M⊙ to 3.2 M⊙ undergo a strong acceleration in the first third of the MS evolutionary phase, while in the last third of the MS they evolve roughly as if there were no angular momentum redistribution in the external stellar layers. The studied stars might start in the ZAMS not necessarily as rigid rotators, but with a total angular momentum lower than the critical one of rigid rotators. The stars seem to evolve as differential rotators all the way of their MS life span and the variation of the observed rotational velocities proceeds with characteristic time scales δt ≈ 0.2 tMS, where tMS is the time spent by a star in the MS. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  18. Asteroid Ida - 6 Views Showing Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This composite image shows the asteroid 243 Ida as seen from the Galileo spacecraft during its approach on August 28, 1993. The six views were shuttered through the camera's green filter and show Ida's rotation over a period of about 3 hours 18 minutes. The asteroid makes a complete rotation every 4 hours 38 minutes; therefore, this set of images spans about 3/4 of Ida's rotation period and shows most of Ida's surface. By combining the information in these views with that from the highest resolution images returned from the spacecraft in September 1993, the size and shape of this irregular body can now be determined accurately The asteroid appears to be about 58 kilometers (36 miles) long and about 23 kilometers wide, with a very irregular shape and volume of some 16,000 cubic kilometers. The images are arranged in chronological order from a time 3 hours 51 minutes before closest approach (upper left), through upper right, middle left, middle right lower left and lower right (33 minutes before closest approach). The six images show Ida at the same scale throughout. Ida's rotation axis is roughly vertical in these images, and the rotation causes the right-hand end of Ida to move toward the viewer as time progresses. The first image was taken from a range of about 171,000 km (106,000 miles) and provides an image resolution of about 1,700 meters per pixel (the highest resolution achieved for Ida is about 25 meters per pixel). The second, taken 70 minutes later, is from 119,000 kilometers, followed by 102,000 kilometers, 85,000 kilometers, 50,000 kilometers, and 25,000 kilometers. The features on Ida are less sharp in the earlier views because of the greater distances. Prominent in the middle three views is a deep depression across the short axis of the Asteroid. This feature tends to support the idea that Ida may have originally been formed from two or more separate large objects that collided softly and stuck together. Also visible in the lower left view is an

  19. Fates of Setaria faberi and Abutilon theophrasti seeds in three crop rotation systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed seeds in and on the soil are the primary cause of weed infestations in arable fields. Previous studies have documented reductions in weed seedbanks due to cropping system diversification through extended rotation sequences, but the impacts of different rotation systems on additions to and losse...

  20. The Dosimetric Impact of Prostate Rotations During Electromagnetically Guided External-Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Amro, Hanan; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Mcshan, Daniel L.; Sandler, Howard; Vineberg, Karen; Hadley, Scott; Litzenberg, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of daily rotations and translations of the prostate on dosimetric coverage during radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Real-time tracking data for 26 patients were obtained during RT. Intensity modulated radiation therapy plans meeting RTOG 0126 dosimetric criteria were created with 0-, 2-, 3-, and 5-mm planning target volume (PTV) margins. Daily translations and rotations were used to reconstruct prostate delivered dose from the planned dose. D{sub 95} and V{sub 79} were computed from the delivered dose to evaluate target coverage and the adequacy of PTV margins. Prostate equivalent rotation is a new metric introduced in this study to quantify prostate rotations by accounting for prostate shape and length of rotational lever arm. Results: Large variations in prostate delivered dose were seen among patients. Adequate target coverage was met in 39%, 65%, and 84% of the patients for plans with 2-, 3-, and 5-mm PTV margins, respectively. Although no correlations between prostate delivered dose and daily rotations were seen, the data showed a clear correlation with prostate equivalent rotation. Conclusions: Prostate rotations during RT could cause significant underdosing even if daily translations were managed. These rotations should be managed with rotational tolerances based on prostate equivalent rotations.

  1. Image rotation-elimination based on a retina-like sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Fengmei; Lin, Yabin; Bai, Tingzhu; Wang, Fan

    2015-12-01

    The pixels of a retina-like sensor are arranged in concentric rings, and the output image is given in log-polar coordinates. Thus, additional residual errors will not be produced when the output image is rotated. Therefore, retina-like sensors have obvious advantages and many prospects for applications in the fields of image rotation and rapid image rotation-elimination. In this study, a theory concerning the image rotation of a retina-like sensor is proposed, and a solution based on the theory is presented and realized for eliminating image rotation caused by camera rotation. The camera rotation angle is obtained using a microelectromechanical systems digital accelerometer and gyroscope; only the readout sequence of each row from static random-access memory must be changed to achieve image rotation-elimination. Several image rotation-elimination experiments have been performed which show that the proposed solution is simple, accurate, and rapid. This rapid image rotation-elimination method can be used in fields that require higher image rotation-elimination processing speeds.

  2. The Supine Internal Rotation Test

    PubMed Central

    Moulton, Samuel G.; Cram, Tyler R.; James, Evan W.; Dornan, Grant J.; Kennedy, Nicholas I.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Biomechanical studies have reported that the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) functions as a restraint against excessive tibial internal rotation at higher degrees of knee flexion. Purpose: To investigate the use of a supine internal rotation (IR) test for the diagnosis of grade III PCL injuries. The hypothesis was that internal rotation would be greater in patients with grade III PCL injuries compared with other knee injuries and that the supine IR test would demonstrate excellent diagnostic accuracy. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A consecutive series of 309 patients underwent arthroscopic and/or open knee ligament reconstruction surgery. Seven patients were excluded based on the inability to perform a side-to-side comparison of internal rotation. Tibial internal rotation was assessed bilaterally on 302 patients during examination under anesthesia by a single orthopaedic surgeon measuring tibial tubercle excursion (mm) while applying internal rotation torque. Internal rotation was graded from 0 to 4 at 60°, 75°, 90°, 105°, and 120° of knee flexion. Data were collected and stored prospectively. The optimal threshold for the supine IR test was chosen based on maximization of the Youden index. Diagnostic accuracy parameters were calculated. Multiple logistic regression models were constructed to assess the influence of other knee pathologies on diagnostic accuracy. Results: Examination of the 22 PCL-deficient knees demonstrated an increase in tibial internal rotation at 60°, 75°, 90°, 105°, and 120° of knee flexion. The supine IR test had a sensitivity of 95.5%, a specificity of 97.1%, a positive predictive value of 72.4%, and a negative predictive value of 99.6% for the diagnosis of grade III PCL injuries. Posterolateral corner injury had a significant interaction with the supine IR test, increasing its sensitivity and decreasing its specificity. Conclusion: PCL-deficient knees demonstrated an increase

  3. Synchronizing Rotation Of A Heavy Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratliff, Roger

    1991-01-01

    Drive system rotates large-inertia load at constant low speed. Simple setup of motors, pulleys, and belts provides both torque and synchronism. Induction motor drives two loads: rotating instrument and slightly lagging synchronous motor. Provides ample torque to start and maintain rotation, and synchronous motor ensures rotation synchronized with ac power supply.

  4. ROTATIONAL INSTABILITIES AND CENTRIFUGAL HANGUP

    SciTech Connect

    K. NEW; J. CENTRELLA

    2000-12-01

    One interesting class of gravitational radiation sources includes rapidly rotating astrophysical objects that encounter dynamical instabilities. We have carried out a set of simulations of rotationally induced instabilities in differentially rotating polytropes. An n=1.5 polytrope with the Maclaurin rotation law will encounter the m=2 bar instability at T/{vert_bar}W{vert_bar} {ge} 0.27. Our results indicate that the remnant of this in-stability is a persistent bar-like structure that emits a long-lived gravitational radiation signal. Furthermore, dynamical instability is shown to occur in n=3.33 polytropes with the j-constant rotation law at T/{vert_bar}W{vert_bar} {ge} 0:14. In this case, the dominant mode of instability is m=1. Such instability may allow a centrifugally-hung core to begin collapsing to neutron star densities on a dynamical timescale. If it occurs in a supermassive star, it may produce gravitational radiation detectable by LISA.

  5. Transitions in turbulent rotating convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaei, Hadi; Alards, Kim; Kunnen, Rudie; Toschi, Federico; Clercx, Herman; Fluid Dynamics Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to explore the flow transition from one state to the other in rotating Rayleigh-Bènard convection using Lagrangian acceleration statistics. 3D particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) is employed in a water-filled cylindrical tank of equal height and diameter. The measurements are performed at the center and close to the top plate at a Rayleigh number Ra = 1.28e9 and Prandtl number Pr = 6.7 for different rotation rates. In parallel, direct numerical simulation (DNS) has been performed to provide detailed information on the boundary layers. We report the acceleration pdfs for different rotation rates and show how the transition from weakly to strongly rotating Rayleigh-Bènard affects the acceleration pdfs in the bulk and boundary layers. We observe that the shapes of the acceleration PDFs as well as the isotropy in the cell center are largely unaffected while crossing the transition point. However, acceleration pdfs at the top show a clear change at the transition point. Using acceleration pdfs and DNS data, we show that the transition between turbulent states is actually a boundary layer transition between Prandtl-Blasius type (typical of non-rotating convection) and Ekman type.

  6. Rapidly rotating neutron star progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnov, K. A.; Kuranov, A. G.; Kolesnikov, D. A.; Popov, S. B.; Porayko, N. K.

    2016-08-01

    Rotating proto-neutron stars can be important sources of gravitational waves to be searched for by present-day and future interferometric detectors. It was demonstrated by Imshennik that in extreme cases the rapid rotation of a collapsing stellar core may lead to fission and formation of a binary proto-neutron star which subsequently merges due to gravitational wave emission. In the present paper, we show that such dynamically unstable collapsing stellar cores may be the product of a former merger process of two stellar cores in a common envelope. We applied population synthesis calculations to assess the expected fraction of such rapidly rotating stellar cores which may lead to fission and formation of a pair of proto-neutron stars. We have used the BSE population synthesis code supplemented with a new treatment of stellar core rotation during the evolution via effective core-envelope coupling, characterized by the coupling time, τc. The validity of this approach is checked by direct MESA calculations of the evolution of a rotating 15 M⊙ star. From comparison of the calculated spin distribution of young neutron stars with the observed one, reported by Popov and Turolla, we infer the value τc ≃ 5 × 105 years. We show that merging of stellar cores in common envelopes can lead to collapses with dynamically unstable proto-neutron stars, with their formation rate being ˜0.1 - 1% of the total core collapses, depending on the common envelope efficiency.

  7. Spline screw multiple rotations mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A system for coupling two bodies together and for transmitting torque from one body to another with mechanical timing and sequencing is reported. The mechanical timing and sequencing is handled so that the following criteria are met: (1) the bodies are handled in a safe manner and nothing floats loose in space, (2) electrical connectors are engaged as long as possible so that the internal processes can be monitored throughout by sensors, and (3) electrical and mechanical power and signals are coupled. The first body has a splined driver for providing the input torque. The second body has a threaded drive member capable of rotation and limited translation. The embedded drive member will mate with and fasten to the splined driver. The second body has an embedded bevel gear member capable of rotation and limited translation. This bevel gear member is coaxial with the threaded drive member. A compression spring provides a preload on the rotating threaded member, and a thrust bearing is used for limiting the translation of the bevel gear member so that when the bevel gear member reaches the upward limit of its translation the two bodies are fully coupled and the bevel gear member then rotates due to the input torque transmitted from the splined driver through the threaded drive member to the bevel gear member. An output bevel gear with an attached output drive shaft is embedded in the second body and meshes with the threaded rotating bevel gear member to transmit the input torque to the output drive shaft.

  8. Rotationally Molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Martin; Stevenson, Paige; Scribben, Eric; Baird, Donald; Hulcher, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Rotational molding is a unique process for producing hollow plastic parts. Rotational molding offers advantages of low cost tooling and can produce very large parts with complicated shapes. Products made by rotational molding include water tanks with capacities up to 20,000 gallons, truck bed liners, playground equipment, air ducts, Nylon fuel tanks, pipes, toys, stretchers, kayaks, pallets, and many others. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers are an important class of engineering resins employed in a wide variety of applications. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers resins are composed of semi-rigid, nearly linear polymeric chains resulting in an ordered mesomorphic phase between the crystalline solid and the isotropic liquid. Ordering of the rigid rod-like polymers in the melt phase yields microfibrous, self-reinforcing polymer structures with outstanding mechanical and thermal properties. Rotational molding of liquid crystalline polymer resins results in high strength and high temperature hollow structures useful in a variety of applications. Various fillers and reinforcements can potentially be added to improve properties of the hollow structures. This paper focuses on the process and properties of rotationally molded liquid crystalline polymers.

  9. Rotationally Molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Martin; Scribben, Eric; Baird, Donald; Hulcher, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Rotational molding is a unique process for producing hollow plastic parts. Rotational molding offers low cost tooling and can produce very large parts with complicated shapes. Products made by rotational molding include water tanks with capacities up to 20,000 gallons, truck bed liners, playground equipment, air ducts, Nylon fuel tanks, pipes, toys, stretchers, kayaks, pallets, and many others. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers are an important class of engineering resins employed in a wide variety of applications. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers resins are composed of semirigid, nearly linear polymeric chains resulting in an ordered mesomorphic phase between the crystalline solid and the isotropic liquid. Ordering of the rigid rod-like polymers in the melt phase yields microfibrous, self-reinforcing polymer structures with outstanding mechanical and thermal properties. Rotational molding of liquid crystalline polymer resins results in high strength and high temperature hollow structures useful in a variety of applications. Various fillers and reinforcements can potentially be added to improve properties of the hollow structures. This paper focuses on the process and properties of rotationally molded liquid crystalline polymers. This paper will also highlight the interactions between academia and small businesses in developing new products and processes.

  10. Spline screw multiple rotations mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranish, John M.

    1993-12-01

    A system for coupling two bodies together and for transmitting torque from one body to another with mechanical timing and sequencing is reported. The mechanical timing and sequencing is handled so that the following criteria are met: (1) the bodies are handled in a safe manner and nothing floats loose in space, (2) electrical connectors are engaged as long as possible so that the internal processes can be monitored throughout by sensors, and (3) electrical and mechanical power and signals are coupled. The first body has a splined driver for providing the input torque. The second body has a threaded drive member capable of rotation and limited translation. The embedded drive member will mate with and fasten to the splined driver. The second body has an embedded bevel gear member capable of rotation and limited translation. This bevel gear member is coaxial with the threaded drive member. A compression spring provides a preload on the rotating threaded member, and a thrust bearing is used for limiting the translation of the bevel gear member so that when the bevel gear member reaches the upward limit of its translation the two bodies are fully coupled and the bevel gear member then rotates due to the input torque transmitted from the splined driver through the threaded drive member to the bevel gear member. An output bevel gear with an attached output drive shaft is embedded in the second body and meshes with the threaded rotating bevel gear member to transmit the input torque to the output drive shaft.

  11. Shape of rotating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabach-Clement, Maria E.; Reiris, Martin

    2013-08-01

    We give a thorough description of the shape of rotating axisymmetric stable black-hole (apparent) horizons applicable in dynamical or stationary regimes. It is found that rotation manifests in the widening of their central regions (rotational thickening), limits their global shapes to the extent that stable holes of a given area A and angular momentum J≠0 form a precompact family (rotational stabilization) and enforces their whole geometry to be close to the extreme-Kerr horizon geometry at almost maximal rotational speed (enforced shaping). The results, which are based on the stability inequality, depend only on A and J. In particular they are entirely independent of the surrounding geometry of the space-time and of the presence of matter satisfying the strong energy condition. A complete set of relations between A, J, the length L of the meridians and the length R of the greatest axisymmetric circle, is given. We also provide concrete estimations for the distance between the geometry of horizons and that of the extreme Kerr, in terms only of A and J. Besides its own interest, the work has applications to the Hoop conjecture as formulated by Gibbons in terms of the Birkhoff invariant, to the Bekenstein-Hod entropy bounds and to the study of the compactness of classes of stationary black-hole space-times.

  12. Plasma rotation and rf heating in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    deGrassie, J.S.; Baker, D.R.; Burrell, K.H.

    1999-05-01

    In a variety of discharge conditions on DIII-D it is observed that rf electron heating reduces the toroidal rotation speed and core ion temperature. The rf heating can be with either fast wave or electron cyclotron heating and this effect is insensitive to the details of the launched toroidal wavenumber spectrum. To date all target discharges have rotation first established with co-directed neutral beam injection. A possible cause is enhanced ion momentum and thermal diffusivity due to electron heating effectively creating greater anomalous viscosity. Another is that a counter directed toroidal force is applied to the bulk plasma via rf driven radial current.

  13. Rotational Raman scattering (Ring effect) in satellite backscatter ultraviolet measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebula, Richard P.; Joiner, Joanna; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Hilsenrath, Ernest; McPeters, Richard D.; Park, Hongwoo

    1995-07-01

    A detailed radiative transfer calculation has been carried out to estimate the effects of rotational Raman scattering (RRS) on satellite measurements of backscattered ultraviolet radiation. Raman-scattered light is shifted in frequency from the incident light, which causes filling in of solar Fraunhofer lines in the observed backscattered spectrum (also known as the Ring effect). The magnitude of the rotational Raman scattering filling in is a function of wavelength, solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, surface pressure, and instrument spectral resolution. The filling in predicted by our model is found to be in agreement with observations from the Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Radiometer and the Nimbus-7 Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Radiometer.

  14. Chiral symmetry in rotating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Sham S.

    2015-08-01

    The triaxial rotating system at critical angular momentum I ≥Iband exhibits two enatiomeric (the left- and right-handed) forms. These enatiomers are related to each other through dynamical chiral symmetry. The chiral symmetry in rotating system is defined by an operator χ ˆ =Rˆy (π) T ˆ, which involves the product of two distinct symmetries, namely, continuous and discrete. Therefore, new guidelines are required for testing its commutation with the system Hamiltonian. One of the primary objectives of this study is to lay down these guidelines. Further, the possible impact of chiral symmetry on the geometrical arrangement of angular momentum vectors and investigation of observables unique to nuclear chiral-twins is carried out. In our model, the angular momentum components (J1, J2, J3) occupy three mutually perpendicular axes of triaxial shape and represent a non-planar configuration. At certain threshold energy, the equation of motion in angular momentum develops a second order phase transition and as a result two distinct frames (i.e., the left- and right-handed) are formed. These left- and right-handed states correspond to a double well system and are related to each other through chiral operator. At this critical angular momentum, the centrifugal and Coriolis interactions lower the barrier in the double well system. The tunneling through the double well starts, which subsequently lifts the degeneracy among the rotational states. A detailed analysis of the behavior of rotational energies, spin-staggering, and the electromagnetic transition probabilities of the resulting twin-rotational bands is presented. The ensuing model results exhibit similarities with many observed features of the chiral-twins. An advantage of our formalism is that it is quite simple and it allows us to pinpoint the understanding of physical phenomenon which lead to chiral-twins in rotating systems.

  15. Killing horizons around a uniformly accelerating and rotating particle

    SciTech Connect

    Farhoosh, H.; Zimmerman, R.L.

    1980-08-15

    The structure of the Killing horizon surrounding a uniformly accelerating and rotating particle which is emitting gravitational radiation is investigated. When expressed in terms of a coordinate system which is rigidly fixed to the particle undergoing uniform acceleration, the two inner horizons and ergoregion are similar to the horizons and ergoregion in the Kerr solution. These compact surfaces are distorted by the acceleration, being elongated in the forward direction and contracted in the backward direction. In addition to the two horizons that are similar to the Kerr solution, there is an additional noncompact horizon and an additional ergoregion which are caused by the acceleration. In general, the two ergoregions are disjoint, but as the acceleration parameter is sufficiently increased these ergoregions coalesce. A further increase of the acceleration will cause the two outer horizons to become degenerate and the ergoregion to vanish. An increase in the rotation parameter causes effects similar to those in the Kerr metric.

  16. Killing horizons around a uniformly accelerating and rotating particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhoosh, Hamid; Zimmerman, Robert L.

    1980-08-01

    The structure of the Killing horizon surrounding a uniformly accelerating and rotating particle which is emitting gravitational radiation is investigated. When expressed in terms of a coordinate system which is rigidly fixed to the particle undergoing uniform acceleration, the two inner horizons and ergoregion are similar to the horizons and ergoregion in the Kerr solution. These compact surfaces are distorted by the acceleration, being elongated in the forward direction and contracted in the backward direction. In addition to the two horizons that are similar to the Kerr solution, there is an additional noncompact horizon and an additional ergoregion which are caused by the acceleration. In general, the two ergoregions are disjoint, but as the acceleration parameter is sufficiently increased these ergoregions coalesce. A further increase of the acceleration will cause the two outer horizons to become degenerate and the ergoregion to vanish. An increase in the rotation parameter causes effects similar to those in the Kerr metric.

  17. Rotational wind indicator enhances control of rotated displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, H. A.; Pavel, Misha

    1991-01-01

    Rotation by 108 deg of the spatial mapping between a visual display and a manual input device produces large spatial errors in a discrete aiming task. These errors are not easily corrected by voluntary mental effort, but the central nervous system does adapt gradually to the new mapping. Bernotat (1970) showed that adding true hand position to a 90 deg rotated display improved performance of a compensatory tracking task, but tracking error rose again upon removal of the explicit cue. This suggests that the explicit error signal did not induce changes in the neural mapping, but rather allowed the operator to reduce tracking error using a higher mental strategy. In this report, we describe an explicit visual display enhancement applied to a 108 deg rotated discrete aiming task. A 'wind indicator' corresponding to the effect of the mapping rotation is displayed on the operator-controlled cursor. The human operator is instructed to oppose the virtual force represented by the indicator, as one would do if flying an airplane in a crosswind. This enhancement reduces spatial aiming error in the first 10 minutes of practice by an average of 70 percent when compared to a no enhancement control condition. Moreover, it produces adaptation aftereffect, which is evidence of learning by neural adaptation rather than by mental strategy. Finally, aiming error does not rise upon removal of the explicit cue.

  18. Rotating convection in elliptical geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evonuk, M.

    2014-12-01

    Tidal interactions between hot jupiter planets and their host stars are likely to result in non-spherical geometries. These elliptical instabilities may have interesting effects on interior fluid convective patterns, which in turn influence the nature of the magnetic dynamo within these planets. Simulations of thermal convection in the 2D rotating equatorial plane are conducted to determine to first order the effect of ellipticity on convection for varying density contrasts with differing convective vigor and rotation rate. This survey is conducted in two dimensions in order to simulate a broad range of ellipticities and to maximize the parameter space explored.

  19. Blast waves in rotating media.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossner, L. F.

    1972-01-01

    The model investigated involves a cylindrically symmetric blast wave generated by an infinitely long line explosion in a cold and homogeneous gas rotating rigidly in its self-gravitational field. It is found that within the context of rotation in a gravitational field a blast wave will not adopt the one-zone form familiar from similarity solutions but, rather, a two-zone form. The inner compression zone arises as a response to the presence of the restoring force, which drives a rarefaction wave into the outer compression zone.

  20. Rotation frequency relay for hydrogenerator

    SciTech Connect

    Matveev, V.V.

    1980-09-01

    The rotation frequency relay (RFR) is one of the most critical elements of automatic control system of the hydrogenerators. Accurate fixing of braking, subsynchronous and acceleration angular speeds contribute to operational reliability of many units of mechanical and electrical parts of the hydrogenerator and vise versa. Both experimental and theoretical investigations were performed on hydrogenerators. It was concluded that the rotation frequency relay, where an integrated voltage of the regulator generator is used as reference voltage and the elements of comparison are executed on the operating amplifiers, has a fairly high accuracy and stability of settings, and practically does not require regulation for manufacture and operation.