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Sample records for jen-kun lin editor

  1. New Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    It is an honour and a challenge to take up the editorship of the Messenger at this time of ESO's expanding role in European and worldwide astronomy. In order to mark the change, we have made a few adjustments to the appearance without departing from the overall style that Peter Shaver had evolved during his term as editor. I would like to thank Peter for gen-tly coaching me into the position and Jutta Boxheimer, the technical editor, for the high quality of the layout.

  2. TOAD Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingle, Bradford D.; Shea, Anne L.; Hofler, Alicia S.

    1993-01-01

    Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) computer program (LAR-13755), implements format designed to facilitate transfer of data across communication networks and dissimilar host computer systems. Any data file conforming to TOAD format standard called TOAD file. TOAD Editor is interactive software tool for manipulating contents of TOAD files. Commonly used to extract filtered subsets of data for visualization of results of computation. Also offers such user-oriented features as on-line help, clear English error messages, startup file, macroinstructions defined by user, command history, user variables, UNDO features, and full complement of mathematical statistical, and conversion functions. Companion program, TOAD Gateway (LAR-14484), converts data files from variety of other file formats to that of TOAD. TOAD Editor written in FORTRAN 77.

  3. MPS Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, William S.; Liu, Ning; Francis, Laurie K.; OReilly, Taifun L.; Schrock, Mitchell; Page, Dennis N.; Morris, John R.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Crockett, Thomas M.; Shams, Khawaja S.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, it was time-consuming to hand-edit data and then set up simulation runs to find the effect and impact of the input data on a spacecraft. MPS Editor provides the user the capability to create/edit/update models and sequences, and immediately try them out using what appears to the user as one piece of software. MPS Editor provides an integrated sequencing environment for users. It provides them with software that can be utilized during development as well as actual operations. In addition, it provides them with a single, consistent, user friendly interface. MPS Editor uses the Eclipse Rich Client Platform to provide an environment that can be tailored to specific missions. It provides the capability to create and edit, and includes an Activity Dictionary to build the simulation spacecraft models, build and edit sequences of commands, and model the effects of those commands on the spacecraft. MPS Editor is written in Java using the Eclipse Rich Client Platform. It is currently built with four perspectives: the Activity Dictionary Perspective, the Project Adaptation Perspective, the Sequence Building Perspective, and the Sequence Modeling Perspective. Each perspective performs a given task. If a mission doesn't require that task, the unneeded perspective is not added to that project's delivery. In the Activity Dictionary Perspective, the user builds the project-specific activities, observations, calibrations, etc. Typically, this is used during the development phases of the mission, although it can be used later to make changes and updates to the Project Activity Dictionary. In the Adaptation Perspective, the user creates the spacecraft models such as power, data store, etc. Again, this is typically used during development, but will be used to update or add models of the spacecraft. The Sequence Building Perspective allows the user to create a sequence of activities or commands that go to the spacecraft. It provides a simulation of the activities and

  4. Journal Editors Celebrated at Editors' Evening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, Jeanette

    2014-02-01

    At the Fall Meeting, the premiere social event for AGU's many journal editors is the annual Editors' Evening, an opportunity for members to celebrate and to recognize the efforts of retiring editors. At the event, AGU president Carol Finn welcomed all those in attendance and thanked them for volunteering their time for the benefit of AGU and the wider research community.

  5. DNA Align Editor: DNA Alignment Editor Tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The SNPAlignEditor is a DNA sequence alignment editor that runs on Windows platforms. The purpose of the program is to provide an intuitive, user-friendly tool for manual editing of multiple sequence alignments by providing functions for input, editing, and output of nucleotide sequence alignments....

  6. DNAAlignEditor: DNA alignment editor tool

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Villeda, Hector; Schroeder, Steven; Flint-Garcia, Sherry; Guill, Katherine E; Yamasaki, Masanori; McMullen, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Background With advances in DNA re-sequencing methods and Next-Generation parallel sequencing approaches, there has been a large increase in genomic efforts to define and analyze the sequence variability present among individuals within a species. For very polymorphic species such as maize, this has lead to a need for intuitive, user-friendly software that aids the biologist, often with naïve programming capability, in tracking, editing, displaying, and exporting multiple individual sequence alignments. To fill this need we have developed a novel DNA alignment editor. Results We have generated a nucleotide sequence alignment editor (DNAAlignEditor) that provides an intuitive, user-friendly interface for manual editing of multiple sequence alignments with functions for input, editing, and output of sequence alignments. The color-coding of nucleotide identity and the display of associated quality score aids in the manual alignment editing process. DNAAlignEditor works as a client/server tool having two main components: a relational database that collects the processed alignments and a user interface connected to database through universal data access connectivity drivers. DNAAlignEditor can be used either as a stand-alone application or as a network application with multiple users concurrently connected. Conclusion We anticipate that this software will be of general interest to biologists and population genetics in editing DNA sequence alignments and analyzing natural sequence variation regardless of species, and will be particularly useful for manual alignment editing of sequences in species with high levels of polymorphism. PMID:18366684

  7. New Journal Editors Appointed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, Barbara

    2009-11-01

    New editors have been appointed for Geophysical Research Letters (GRL), Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR)-Solid Earth, Reviews of Geophysics, JGR-Space Physics, Paleoceanography, and Tectonics. At GRL, new editors Noah Diffenbaugh (Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.), Paolo D’Odorico (University of Virginia, Charlottesville), Ruth Harris (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Menlo Park, Calif.), Wolfgang Knorr (University of Bristol, Bristol, UK), Geoffrey Tyndall (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo.), and Michael Wysession (Washington University, St. Louis, Mo.) have joined Editor-in-Chief Eric Calais and other editors Margaret Chen, Fabio Florindo, Anne Müller, Nikolai Ostgaard, Eric Rignot, and Meric Srokosz.

  8. Boerhaave: Author and Editor *

    PubMed Central

    Lindeboom, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The many facets of Herman Boerhaave's life are presented. He was a renowned teacher, physician, author, and editor. Discussed here are his activities as cataloger of the Vossius Collection, author of books on chemistry, botany, and medicine, and as editor of works by Vesalius and early Greek medical writers. Printing and bookselling in Leiden during Boerhaave's era are described. Images PMID:4596962

  9. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffert, Barbara; Heilbrun, Margaret; Kuzyk, Raya; Kim, Ann; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Burns, Ann; Williams, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    From the fall's cascade of great new books, "Library Journal's" editors select their favorites--a dark rendition of Afghan life, a look at the "self-esteem trap," a celebration of Brooklyn activism, and much more.

  10. ISTP CDF Skeleton Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chimiak, Reine; Harris, Bernard; Williams, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    Basic Common Data Format (CDF) tools (e.g., cdfedit) provide no specific support for creating International Solar-Terrestrial Physics/Space Physics Data Facility (ISTP/SPDF) standard files. While it is possible for someone who is familiar with the ISTP/SPDF metadata guidelines to create compliant files using just the basic tools, the process is error-prone and unreasonable for someone without ISTP/SPDF expertise. The key problem is the lack of a tool with specific support for creating files that comply with the ISTP/SPDF guidelines. There are basic CDF tools such as cdfedit and skeletoncdf for creating CDF files, but these have no specific support for creating ISTP/ SPDF compliant files. The SPDF ISTP CDF skeleton editor is a cross-platform, Java-based GUI editor program that allows someone with only a basic understanding of the ISTP/SPDF guidelines to easily create compliant files. The editor is a simple graphical user interface (GUI) application for creating and editing ISTP/SPDF guideline-compliant skeleton CDF files. The SPDF ISTP CDF skeleton editor consists of the following components: A swing-based Java GUI program, JavaHelp-based manual/ tutorial, Image/Icon files, and HTML Web page for distribution. The editor is available as a traditional Java desktop application as well as a Java Network Launching Protocol (JNLP) application. Once started, it functions like a typical Java GUI file editor application for creating/editing application-unique files.

  11. [Brief explanation of shi lin (urolithic stranguria)].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-yuan

    2010-05-01

    Shi lin (urolithic stranguria) is a kind of stranguria, manifested as pain occurred when pissing and sand-like in the urine, developed from the early concept of shi long. This name of disease was appeared firstly in Shen nong ben cao jing (Shennong's Classic of Materia Medica), and then, the disease name of sha lin, sha shi lin and sha lin were derived from it by the Song Dynasty. It was said that the disease with sha (sand-like) was easy to treat, and with shi (stone-like) was difficult to cure. This disease was also happened in the children, and the reasons were the same with ones of the adult. Furthermore, there was a name of disease, xue sha lin, which was a kind of woman disease and had nothing to do with shi lin. PMID:21029715

  12. PANEL LIBRARY AND EDITOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raible, E.

    1994-01-01

    The Panel Library and Editor is a graphical user interface (GUI) builder for the Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation family. The toolkit creates "widgets" which can be manipulated by the user. Its appearance is similar to that of the X-Windows System. The Panel Library is written in C and is used by programmers writing user-friendly mouse-driven applications for the IRIS. GUIs built using the Panel Library consist of "actuators" and "panels." Actuators are buttons, dials, sliders, or other mouse-driven symbols. Panels are groups of actuators that occupy separate windows on the IRIS workstation. The application user can alter variables in the graphics program, or fire off functions with a click on a button. The evolution of data values can be tracked with meters and strip charts, and dialog boxes with text processing can be built. Panels can be stored as icons when not in use. The Panel Editor is a program used to interactively create and test panel library interfaces in a simple and efficient way. The Panel Editor itself uses a panel library interface, so all actions are mouse driven. Extensive context-sensitive on-line help is provided. Programmers can graphically create and test the user interface without writing a single line of code. Once an interface is judged satisfactory, the Panel Editor will dump it out as a file of C code that can be used in an application. The Panel Library (v9.8) and Editor (v1.1) are written in C-Language (63%) and Scheme, a dialect of LISP, (37%) for Silicon Graphics 4D series workstations running IRIX 3.2 or higher. Approximately 10Mb of disk space is required once compiled. 1.5Mb of main memory is required to execute the panel editor. This program is available on a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format for an IRIS, and includes a copy of XScheme, the public-domain Scheme interpreter used by the Panel Editor. The Panel Library Programmer's Manual is included on the distribution media. The Panel Library and

  13. WRR editor Ronald Cummings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-04-01

    It has been nearly a year since Ronald Cummings took over as policy sciences editor of Water Resources Research (WRR), and in that time he has worked to make the journal live up to its role as “an interdisciplinary journal integrating research in the social and natural sciences of water.” Cummings takes the “interdisciplinary” part seriously. “I'd like to see a much broader range of policy issues presented to readers,” he says. “I would hope it would then stimulate interchange between our colleagues concerning evolving issues of the '80s and '90s.”Cummings brings a solid background as a resource economist to his 4-year term as editor, which began last January and runs until December 1987. Cummings succeeds Jared Cohon as policy sciences editor. Stephen J. Burges is the WRR editor for hydrological, physical, chemical, and biological sciences. Now a Professor of Economics and Director of the Program in Natural Resources Economics at the University of New Mexico, Cummings is a past president of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. He has been a consultant in matters of water resources management, forestry management, and energy policy for more than a decade, working on projects in both the United States and Latin America. Since joining the faculty at New Mexico in 1975, he has, among other things, worked with engineers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in developing operation'management models for hot, dry rock geothermal systems.

  14. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilbrun, Margaret; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Kuzyk, Raya; Roncevic, Mirela; Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal's" review editors select fall titles readers won't want to miss--"Waiting on a Train: The Embattled Future of Passenger Rail Service" (James McCommons); "Happy" (Alex Lemon); "Free for All: Joe Papp, the Public, and the Greatest Theater Story Ever Told" (Kenneth Turan & Joseph Papp); "In My Father's Shadow: A Daughter Remembers…

  15. LDAP Browser/Editor

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-07-18

    The LDAP Browser/Editor provides a user-friendly Java-based interface to LDAP databases with tightly integrated browsing and editing capabilities. Entirely written in Java with help of the JFC (Swingset) and JNDI class libraries. It connects to any X.500, LDAP v2 and v3 servers and supports editing of multiple-value attributes.

  16. Editors' Spring Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    While they do not represent the rainbow of reading tastes American public libraries accommodate, Book Review editors are a wildly eclectic bunch. One look at their bedside tables and ereaders would reveal very little crossover. This article highlights an eclectic array of spring offerings ranging from print books to an audiobook to ebook apps. It…

  17. Meet the APS Journal Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-05-01

    The Editors of the APS journals invite you to join them for conversation. The Editors will be available to answer questions, hear your ideas, and discuss any comments about the journals. All are welcome. Light refreshments will be served.

  18. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-03-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Criticisms of hands-on pseudoscience David J Fisher 27 Elderberry Road, Cardiff CF5 3RG, UK Measuring varying fields Don Koks Adelaide University, Australia Relativity at A-level: a comment David Sang 3 Ellasdale Road, Bognor Regis, PO21 2SG, UK

  19. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-11-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents The equivalence of mass and energy Peter Stansbury Head of Physics, Christ Church Grammar School, Claremont, Western Australia 6010 Comment on `A simple experiment to study parabolic surfaces' N Gauthier Department of Physics, The Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario K7K 7B4, Canada

  20. ION Configuration Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgen, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    The configuration of ION (Inter - planetary Overlay Network) network nodes is a manual task that is complex, time-consuming, and error-prone. This program seeks to accelerate this job and produce reliable configurations. The ION Configuration Editor is a model-based smart editor based on Eclipse Modeling Framework technology. An ION network designer uses this Eclipse-based GUI to construct a data model of the complete target network and then generate configurations. The data model is captured in an XML file. Intrinsic editor features aid in achieving model correctness, such as field fill-in, type-checking, lists of valid values, and suitable default values. Additionally, an explicit "validation" feature executes custom rules to catch more subtle model errors. A "survey" feature provides a set of reports providing an overview of the entire network, enabling a quick assessment of the model s completeness and correctness. The "configuration" feature produces the main final result, a complete set of ION configuration files (eight distinct file types) for each ION node in the network.

  1. EDITORIAL: Editor's Farewell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    The completion of Volume 26, 1989, marked the end of my tenure as Editor of Metrologia. My association with the journal, its parent body the Comité International des Poids et Mesures, its host organization the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, the publishers Springer-Verlag and last (but by no means least) the Editorial Board, has been a pleasant one and I trust that the subscribers will have found the product to be generally satisfactory. There have been, it is true, some disappointments along the way and I shall mention two of these while expressing the hope that the new Editor will enjoy a greater success in their regard. First is the question of circulation, which has stayed dangerously low, although the shrinkage has tapered off in the most recent years. Because of the narrow public support, the costs of production are relatively high and this, through a consequently high subscription rate, tends to enshrine the unsatisfactory state of affairs. Modest schemes to broaden the journal's appeal and bring in a wider readership have foundered upon the first step, namely, that of procuring from staff members of the national standards laboratories the hoped-for articles which would discuss the state of the art in delivering the highest-quality measurement services to the public. However, some very interesting and bolder schemes are presently under discussion. I had also hoped to leaven the journal's content a little by regularly appearing articles on the latest developments within the great national laboratories. But, as with technical review articles, it has proven very difficult to find the right authors who can also spare the time, and only a few laboratories have found it possible to collaborate. In taking my leave, it remains for me to thank all the contributors, referees and readers for their support, to express the hope of an ever brighter future for Metrologia and to wish to the new Editor, Dr D A Blackburn, a happy and successful tenure.

  2. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-03-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Comment on `Magnetic and electric field strengths of high voltage power lines and household appliances' José Luis Giordano Dept. de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales y Fluidos, CPSI, Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain Twins paradox S R Carson Norton College, Malton, North Yorkshire, UK On alternative ways of finding the ratio of specific heats of gases Tomas Ficker Physics Department, Technical University of Brno, Czech Republic

  3. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-11-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Narrow-band interference filters for lecture demonstrations A P Ovcharenko, B M Valiyov and V D Yegorenkov Kharkov State University, Ukraine Static electricity and the gas lift chair P Cooke Department of Physics, University of South Australia, Levels Campus, Pooraka, South Australia Relativistic mass Simon Carson Norton College, Langton Road, Norton, Malton, North Yorkshire YO17 9PT, UK Magazine or journal? Philip Britton Head of Physics, Leeds Grammar School, UK

  4. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-09-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Heat and temperature Kevin Carlton Canterbury Christ Church University College, North Holmes Road, Canterbury, Kent CT1 1QU, UK James Bond's shoes J Oliver Linton Head of Physics, Wolverhampton Grammar School, Compton Road, Wolverhampton WV3 9RB, UK Of springs and strings Ronald Newburgh Extension School, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA Clarifying the concept Keith Atkin 14 Cortworth Road, Ecclesall, Sheffield S11 9LP, UK

  5. Letters to the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-01-01

    All the Letters to the Editor in this issue are in the same PostScript or PDF file. Contents Physics and history Arthur I Miller Department of Science & Technology Studies, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK Physics and history: a reply David Miller Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK Cathode rays, the electron and Thomson's discovery John Harris 33 Glentham Road, London SW13 9JD, UK Vectors: swallow them whole! David Wheeler Mahanakorn University of Technology, Bangkok, Thailand

  6. Editors' report, 2012.

    PubMed

    García-Puig, J; Alonso-Vega, G Gaspar; Ríos-Blanco, J J

    2013-01-01

    The editors of Revista Clínica Española (Rev Clin Esp) inform on their editorial activity during the last 12 months: a) objectives and attainments; b) editorial activity; and c) objectives for 2013. In 2012 the most relevant modifications concerning the editorial activity have been: a) revision by the responsible editor of all manuscripts sent to peer review, and b) translation into English of five manuscripts with abstract of each issue. From the first January to the 30th September 2012 we handled 457 manuscripts (50 manuscripts per month) a figure 22.5% higher than in 2011 (40.8 manuscripts per month). We have accepted 27.2% of all manuscripts (originals, 13.0%). We asked for 295 revisions to 241 reviewers and we have received 66.1% of the revisions asked for in less than two weeks (mean time to receive a revision, 11.3 days). The mean time to adopt an editorial decision for all manuscripts («accept»/«reject») has been 23.9 days (31.3 days in 2011; 35.4 in 2010). This figure has been 29.4 days for the original manuscripts (9.5 and 12.3 days less than in 2011 and 2010, respectively). The mean time taken since a manuscript is received to publication has dropped from 203 days in 2010, 168 in 2011 and 115 in 2012 (less than 3 months). The collaboration with the working groups has reported 19 published manuscripts in 2012. We hope that in 2013 both the English version and the digitalization of Rev Clin Esp from 1940 to 1999 (the journal is already digitalized since 2000) will become a reality. The renewal of the actual sections (i.e., clinical conference, an image for a diagnosis) pretends, with the collaboration of all, to make our journal, each day, better. PMID:23261839

  7. Editors in the Electronic Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dye, Robert M., Ed.

    Intended for newspaper writers and editors, this collection of articles includes the following titles and authors: "VDTs, TV Haven't Shocked Editors" by Jay Rogers; "Opinions Vary on Electronics' Effect" by Bob Nordyke; "A Few Kind Words for the Censors" by Hugh A. Mulligan; "Those Awards Have Their Limitations" by Larry Fortner; "Obituaries Are…

  8. Modularized training for technical editors

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, P.W.

    1988-09-08

    This paper outlines the editorial services provided at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), sketches a syllabus of basic training for technical editors, describes the approach being used to develop this cost-effective individualized instruction for editors (experienced or not) new to work at LLNL, and enumerates the advantages of this approach. 8 refs.

  9. HEART handbook for guest editors

    SciTech Connect

    Vittitoe, C.N.

    1991-02-01

    This handbook outlines the basic job of guest editors for the HEART Conference proceedings, published by the DoD Nuclear Information and Analysis Center in the Journal of Radiation Effects, Research and Engineering. Suggestions are offered for procedures to aid the editors, authors, reviewers, and the publisher in assuring that the journal communicates clearly, concisely, and honestly.

  10. Microbial Properties Database Editor Tutorial

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Microbial Properties Database Editor (MPDBE) has been developed to help consolidate microbial-relevant data to populate a microbial database and support a database editor by which an authorized user can modify physico-microbial properties related to microbial indicators and pat...

  11. Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    This last year being an odd numbered year, the pages of Nuclear Fusion saw a large influx of expanded papers from the 2012 Fusion Energy Conference in San Diego. Many papers have focused on the scientific and technical challenges posed by ITER. Contributions are steadily increasing from the new superconducting tokamaks in Asia. The ITER Project continues to move ahead. Construction at the Cadarache site is quite remarkable. Buildings completed include the huge Poloidal Field Coils Winding Facility and the Headquarters building, which has been occupied by the ITER staff. Work is progressing on the Assembly building and the Cryostat Workshop. The base of the tokamak complex is being laid. Besides the construction that is taking place and will take place at the site, components from around the world have to navigate the complex route from Marseilles to the site. A test convoy replicating the dimensions and weights of the most exceptional ITER loads successfully traversed that route in 2013. We are pleased to report that the IAEA and ITER have finalized the agreement for ITER authors to publish papers in Nuclear Fusion . Nuclear Fusion is proud to continue its key role in providing the leading forum for the documentation of scientific progress and exchange of research results internationally toward fusion energy. Refereeing The Nuclear Fusion editorial office appreciates greatly the effort made by our referees to sustain the high quality of the journal. Since January 2005, we have been offering the most active referees over the past year a personal subscription to Nuclear Fusion with electronic access for one year, free of charge. We have excluded our Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in previous years. The following people have been selected: J.M. Canik, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA I.T. Chapman, Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, UK L.-G. Eriksson, Commission of the European Communities, Belgium T. Evans

  12. EDITORIAL: Editor's Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    Since its first issue in 1965 Metrologia has had just three editors, a history of tenure which suggests that those who hold the post find in it sufficient to interest, occupy, challenge and amuse them. I see no reason to doubt that this happy circumstance will continue and look forward to my own period as editor with the intention of retaining, insofar as I am able to interpret them, the best traditions the journal has established so far. As I take up my editorial duties I have become aware that surrounding Metrologia there is a small community of authors, reviewers and readers on whose support the success of the journal entirely depends. It is a community in which the roles change daily with some of its members engaged, even simultaneously, as reader, reviewer and author. I am well aware that the goodwill extended to me as I enter this community is in no small part due the efforts of the outgoing editor, Dr Ralph Hudson, whose easy, engaging and courteous, yet firm, relationship with authors and reviewers emerges clearly from editorial correspondence. I thank him for that he has done and wish him an active and happy retirement. A short foray into the records of Metrologia shows - in the first editorial - that four main kinds of article were originally envisaged: research articles likely to contribute to progress in fundamental scientific measurements, reports of experiments or techniques of particular importance or originality in the area of secondary measurement, articles concerning the decisions of the Comité International des Poids et Mesures, and review articles. No balance was specified but a priority was assigned to articles dealing with fundamental metrology. Of the four categories, the first two represent the core of Metrologia's activity and largely determine its reputation as a publication. For this reason, editorial implementation of the policy set by the CIPM is mainly exercised through the operation of a reviewing system which is intentionally strict

  13. Urinary Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer in Current Opinion Urology (Dan Lin Editor)

    PubMed Central

    Wei, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The field of urology has been beset by several major trends that have affected the early detection of prostate cancer. These stem primarily from a backlash against overdiagnosis due to PSA based screening efforts, and are epitomized by the US Preventative Services Task Force giving PSA-based prostate cancer screening a ‘D’ recommendation. Consequently, the active surveillance strategy for low risk prostate cancer has become commonplace, leading many to ask how best to follow these patients. More importantly, this public outcry has shifted the focus of early detection from an effort to diagnose any and all prostate cancers to an effort to diagnose only ‘high-risk’ cancer. Along with a trend for minimally invasive procedures, these forces have challenged the early detection field to more efficiently identify clinically significant prostate cancers at an early stage while limiting the number of biopsies. Recent Findings With FDA approval, PCA3 has emerged as the first bona-fide urinary biomarker for prostate cancer. Using the same platform, investigators have developed a second urinary test based on TMPRSS2:erg fusion. Recent literature supports use of these biomarkers as a combined panel that improves risk evaluation in the setting of prostate cancer detection. Early work for applying urinary biomarkers for active surveillance are underway. Other biomarkers in the pipeline will require further pre-validation and validation work. Summary Recent literature would support that urinary biomarkers have a clear role to supplement risk evaluation for men undergoing prostate biopsy and for prognostication. PMID:25405933

  14. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulson, Geoff; de Meer, Jan B.

    1997-03-01

    . Their scheme is embedded in an experimental ATM network with the potential for guaranteed QoS. The system features QoS support mechanisms in both the network and the end systems. Of particular interest is reported experience with a dynamic QoS adaptation protocol implemented in the network and based on video scaling techniques and filtering. In summary, this special issue provides an up to date review of approaches to QoS management and their practical realization. Of course, no claim is made as to comprehensiveness, but the chosen papers do serve as a highly representative sample of current directions in QoS research. The editors are very much obliged to all authors, reviewers and publishers. Without their excellent work, and the contribution of their valuable time this special issue would not have been possible.

  15. In vitro expansion of Lin+ and Lin- mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norhaiza, H. Siti; Rohaya, M. A. W.; Zarina, Z. A. Intan; Hisham, Z. A. Shahrul

    2013-11-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are used in the therapy of blood disorders due to the ability of these cells to reconstitute haematopoietic lineage cells when transplanted into myeloablative recipients. However, substantial number of cells is required in order for the reconstitution to take place. Since HSCs present in low frequency, larger number of donor is required to accommodate the demand of transplantable HSCs. Therefore, in vitro expansion of HSCs will have profound impact on clinical purposes. The aim of this study was to expand lineage negative (Lin-) stem cells from human peripheral blood. Total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were fractionated from human blood by density gradient centrifugation. Subsequently, PBMNCs were subjected to magnetic assisted cell sorter (MACS) which depletes lineage positive (Lin+) mononuclear cells expressing lineage positive markers such as CD2, CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD123, and CD235a to obtained Lin- cell population. The ability of Lin+ and Lin- to survive in vitro was explored by culturing both cell populations in complete medium consisting of Alpha-Minimal Essential Medium (AMEM) +10% (v/v) Newborn Calf Serum (NBCS)+ 2% (v/v) pen/strep. In another experiment, Lin+ and Lin- were cultured with complete medium supplemented with 10ng/mL of the following growth factors: stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), 2IU/mL of Erythropoietin (Epo) and 20ng/mL of IL-6. Three samples were monitored in static culture for 22 days. The expansion potential was assessed by the number of total viable cells, counted by trypan blue exclusion assay. It was found that Lin+ mononuclear cells were not able to survive either in normal proliferation medium or proliferation medium supplemented with cytokines. Similarly, Lin- stem cells were not able to survive in proliferation medium however, addition of cytokines into the proliferation medium support Lin

  16. HeLIN Pilot Mentoring Scheme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brice, Anne; Brown, Cathryn; Hickman, Marie; Thorburn, Lis

    2002-01-01

    Describes a pilot mentoring program at the Health Libraries and Information Network (HeLIN) at the University of Oxford that was designed to increase understanding of mentoring for continuing professional and personal development; to investigate existing mentoring schemes; to incorporate a program for accreditation of mentors; and to evaluate the…

  17. From the Editor's Desk

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    One of the admirable aspects of science is that its practitioners accept that advancing the field is an ongoing process. There is always more to be discovered. I view scientific publishing in a similar light. Last month, we instituted several changes to the journal, and I look forward to receiving your feedback. I anticipate some of the changes will be welcomed while others will not. ToxSci relies on the feedback from our readers, authors, and reviewers to assure that we are serving the research community to the highest degree. The editorial staff is dedicated to producing a high-quality journal that features outstanding science like that seen in this issue. In their Forum article, Wu and coworkers describe how increasing dietary diversity can reduce exposure to foodborne toxins. This is an important public health observation that can help mitigate many of the toxic effects described in the pages of the ToxSci. You will also note that we are using a new format for our Letters to the Editor. Rather than appearing at the end of the journal they immediately follow the highlights below. In this issue, the formulation of caroboxyfullerenes is the topic of discussion. I invite you to Look Inside ToxSci for the best original research in the field of toxicology. —Gary W. Miller PMID:25288704

  18. Novel LinA Type 3 δ-Hexachlorocyclohexane Dehydrochlorinase

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Nidhi; Prokop, Zbynek

    2015-01-01

    LinA is the first enzyme of the microbial degradation pathway of a chlorinated insecticide, hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), and mediates the dehydrochlorination of α-, γ-, and δ-HCH. Its two variants, LinA type 1 and LinA type 2, which differ at 10 out of 156 amino acid residues, have been described. Their activities for the metabolism of different HCH isomers differ considerably but overall are high for γ-HCH, moderate for α-HCH, low for δ-HCH, and lacking for β-HCH. Here, we describe the characterization of a new variant of this enzyme, LinA type 3, whose gene was identified from the metagenome of an HCH-contaminated soil sample. Its deduced primary structure in the region spanning amino acid residues 1 to 147 of the protein exhibits 17 and 12 differences from LinA type 1 and LinA type 2, respectively. In addition, the residues GIHFAPS, present at the region spanning residues 148 to 154 in both LinA type 1 and LinA type 2, are deleted in LinA type 3.The activity of LinA type 3 for the metabolism of δ-HCH is several orders of magnitude higher than that of LinA type 1 or LinA type 2 and can be useful for improvement of the metabolism of δ-HCH. PMID:26296732

  19. PREFACE: Scientific and Publishing Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    1.Scientific Editors Section 1: Particle physics Mikhail Skorohvatov - NRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia Section 2: Nuclear physics Mikhail Danilov - ITEP NRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia Section 3: Cosmic rays Arkady Galper - NRNU MEPhI, Moscow, Russia Anatoly Petrukhin - NRNU MEPhI, Moscow, Russia Section 4: Methods of experimental physics Valery Dmitrenko - NRNU MEPhI, Moscow, Russia 2.Publishing Editors Irene Arkhangelskaja - NRNU MEPhI, Moscow, Russia Pavel Buzhan - NRNU MEPhI, Moscow, Russia

  20. LIN-12/Notch Regulates lag-1 and lin-12 Expression during Anchor Cell/Ventral Uterine Precursor Cell Fate Specification

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong Kyun; Choi, Vit Na; Hwang, Byung Joon

    2013-01-01

    During Caenorhabditis elegans gonadal development, a stochastic interaction between the LIN-12/Notch receptor and the LAG-2/Delta ligand initiates cell fate specification of two equivalent pre-anchor cell (AC)/pre-ventral uterine (VU) precursor cells. Both cells express lin-12 and lag-2 before specification, and a small difference in LIN-12 activity leads to the exclusive expression of lin-12 in VUs and lag-2 in the AC through an unknown feedback mechanism. In this Notch signaling process, the cleaved LIN-12/Notch intracellular domain (NICD) binds to the LAG-1/CSL transcriptional repressor, forming a transcriptional activator complex containing LAG-1 and NICD. Here we show that clustered LAG-1 binding sites in lin-12 and lag-1 are involved in regulating lin-12 and lag-1 expression during AC/VU cell fate specification. Both genes are expressed in VU cells, but not the AC, after specification. We also show that lin-12 is necessary for lag-1 expression in VU cells. Interestingly, lin-12 (null) animals express lag-1 in the AC, suggesting that LIN-12 signaling is necessary for the suppression of lag-1 expression in the AC. Ectopic expression of lag-1 cDNA in the AC causes a defect in the vulvaluterine (V-U) connection; therefore, LAG-1 should be eliminated in the AC to form a normal V-U connection at a later developmental stage in wild-type animals. PMID:23483278

  1. Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, Ronald D.

    2013-01-01

    reviewed five manuscripts in the period November 2011 to December 2012 and provided excellent advice to the authors. We have excluded our Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in recent years. The following people have been selected: Marina Becoulet, CEA-Cadarache, France Jiaqui Dong, Southwestern Institute of Physics, China Emiliano Fable, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Ambrogio Fasoli, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland Eric Fredrickson, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, USA Manuel Garcia-Munoz, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Germany William Heidbrink, California University, USA Katsumi Ida, National Inst. For Fusion Science, Japan Peter Stangeby, Toronto University, Canada James Strachan, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, USA Victor Yavorskij, Ukraine National Academy of Sciences, Ukraine In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2012. Our thanks to them!

  2. Weighted Lin-Wang tests for crossing hazards.

    PubMed

    Koziol, James A; Jia, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    Lin and Wang have introduced a quadratic version of the logrank test, appropriate for situations in which the underlying survival distributions may cross. In this note, we generalize the Lin-Wang procedure to incorporate weights and investigate the performance of Lin and Wang's test and weighted versions in various scenarios. We find that weighting does increase statistical power in certain situations; however, none of the procedures was dominant under every scenario. PMID:24795776

  3. Research Review: Magazine Editors and Editing Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolliffe, Lee

    1994-01-01

    Reviews and critiques literature in the subfield of magazine editing research, chiefly biographical studies of individual editors and various types of studies of editorial practices, including surveys, magazine content analyses, and close qualitative examinations of editors' relationships with others. (SR)

  4. SIERRA Editor v. 1.2.1

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-03-24

    The SIERRA Editor is a syntax editor for text-based input decks for the SIERRA modeling and simulations codes. The SIERRA Editor provides color coded syntax, error checking, hyperlink navigation to referenced entities (e.g. functions and materials), and visual verification of mesh entity references (blocks, sidesets, and nodesets). The SIERRA Editor helps modeling and simulation analysts who use the SIERRA codes to produce syntactically correct input decks.

  5. New Editors, Editorial Advisory Board for Eos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    2010-11-01

    Eos has two new editors and, with this issue, a revitalized Editorial Advisory Board. Christina M. S. Cohen, of the California Institute of Technology, is the new editor for space sciences. She succeeds Manuel Grande, who had served since 2006. Carol A. Stein, of the University of Illinois at Chicago, is the new editor for solid Earth. She succeeds John W. Geissman, who has been solid Earth editor since 2001; he will continue through the end of 2010.

  6. Learning To Use a Text Editor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beal, Carole R.; Griffin, Elizabeth A.

    Designed to determine how quickly elementary school children can learn to use a text editor and what editing concepts are difficult for them to master, this study presents preliminary data on children's acquisition of text editor skills and on the kinds of revisions they accomplished with the text editor. Observations were made on a total of 25…

  7. Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2012-04-01

    Whilst travelling to Vienna to hand over the Editorship of Nuclear Fusion to Ron Stambaugh, I jotted down a few ideas to put in a farewell message. Somewhat unsurprisingly, I find them almost identical to the remarks that Chris Schueller made in handing over to me five years ago. Both of us served in this role for five years, which seems like a good timescale to replace presidents and editors alike; just to allow a fresh approach. In addition, since I have been directly involved in ITER, I have found it increasingly difficult, due to time pressure, to give the journal the attention that it deserves. Therefore, I am very pleased that Ron Stambaugh has agreed to take over as Editor. Not only does he bring the experience as a leading figure in the US fusion programme but, in addition, he has all the contacts, worldwide, from his leadership of the ITPA. I am completely assured that the journal is in a highly competent pair of hands. Such a farewell should not lack my heartfelt thanks to all of those who have made being Editor of Nuclear Fusion so enjoyable and stimulating; readership, authors, referees, the Editorial Board and the NF Office alike. I wish Ron all the best for his tenure and have offered such help and support as I am able to give.

  8. Line-Editor Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Peter J.

    1989-01-01

    ZED editing program for DEC VAX computer simple, powerful line editor for text, program source code, and nonbinary data. Excels in processing of text by use of procedure files. Also features versatile search qualifiers, global changes, conditionals, online help, hexadecimal mode, space compression, looping, logical combinations of search strings, journaling, visible control characters, and automatic detabbing. Users of Cambridge implementation devised such ZED procedures as chess games, calculators, and programs for evaluating pi. Written entirely in C.

  9. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2010-02-01

    November 2009 and provided particularly detailed advice to the authors. The other three have been very helpful in 'minority fields'. We have excluded our Board members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in the last four years. Guest Editors' work on papers submitted to their Special Issues is also excluded from consideration. The following people have been selected: Tomonori Takizuka, JAEA-Naka Fusion Institute, Japan Rudolf Neu, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Sibylle Guenter, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Germany Taik-Soo Hahm, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States David R. Mikkelsen, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States Peter C. de Vries, EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, United Kingdom Yasuhiro Suzuki, National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Jerzy Wolowski, Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Poland Tetsuo Tanabe, Kyushu University, Japan Yasuyuki Yagi, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan Congratulations and many, many thanks! The Guest Editors of special editions deserve a special mention for the excellent help that they have given us. They are: Taik-Soo Hahm, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, United States, Special Issue on H-Mode Physics and Transport Barriers Yaroslav Kolesnichenko, Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine, Special Issue on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems Kimitaka Itoh, National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan and Howard R. Wilson, University of York, UK, Special Issue on Plasma Instabilities Bernhard Unterberg, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany, Special Issue on Stochastic Fusion Plasma In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2009. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2009 Nuclear Fusion

  10. RNA-binding protein Lin28 in cancer and immunity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuai; Baltimore, David

    2016-05-28

    The highly conserved RNA-binding protein, Lin28, is involved in many biological processes, including development, reprogramming, pluripotency, and metabolism. Importantly, Lin28 functions as an oncogene, promoting tumor progression and metastasis in various human cancers. Lin28 can regulate gene expression either by directly binding to mRNAs or by blocking microRNA biogenesis, and the underlying mechanisms include Let-7-dependent and Let-7-independent modes of action. Recent evidence shows that Lin28 also plays a fundamental role in immunity. The roles of Lin28 in disease are complex and require characterization of its physiological functions in cancer and immunological contexts. Here we review emerging information on the role of Lin28 in cancer and immunity and the molecular mechanisms it uses. We discuss our present knowledge of the system and highlight remaining mysteries related to the functions of this small RNA-binding protein. This knowledge may lead to Lin28 becoming a diagnostic marker for cancer or immune-related diseases and a possible therapeutic target. PMID:26945970

  11. The Lin28/let-7 axis regulates glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao; Shyh-Chang, Ng; Segrè, Ayellet V; Shinoda, Gen; Shah, Samar P; Einhorn, William S; Takeuchi, Ayumu; Engreitz, Jesse M; Hagan, John P; Kharas, Michael G; Urbach, Achia; Thornton, James E; Triboulet, Robinson; Gregory, Richard I; Altshuler, David; Daley, George Q

    2011-09-30

    The let-7 tumor suppressor microRNAs are known for their regulation of oncogenes, while the RNA-binding proteins Lin28a/b promote malignancy by inhibiting let-7 biogenesis. We have uncovered unexpected roles for the Lin28/let-7 pathway in regulating metabolism. When overexpressed in mice, both Lin28a and LIN28B promote an insulin-sensitized state that resists high-fat-diet induced diabetes. Conversely, muscle-specific loss of Lin28a or overexpression of let-7 results in insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance. These phenomena occur, in part, through the let-7-mediated repression of multiple components of the insulin-PI3K-mTOR pathway, including IGF1R, INSR, and IRS2. In addition, the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, abrogates Lin28a-mediated insulin sensitivity and enhanced glucose uptake. Moreover, let-7 targets are enriched for genes containing SNPs associated with type 2 diabetes and control of fasting glucose in human genome-wide association studies. These data establish the Lin28/let-7 pathway as a central regulator of mammalian glucose metabolism. PMID:21962509

  12. On the low regularity of the Benney-Lin equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wengu; Li, Junfeng

    2008-03-01

    We consider the low regularity of the Benney-Lin equation ut+uux+uxxx+[beta](uxx+uxxxx)+[eta]uxxxxx=0. We established the global well posedness for the initial value problem of Benney-Lin equation in the Sobolev spaces for 0[greater-or-equal, slanted]s>-2, improving the well-posedness result of Biagioni and Linares [H.A. Biaginoi, F. Linares, On the Benney-Lin and Kawahara equation, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 211 (1997) 131-152]. For s<-2 we also prove some ill-posedness issues.

  13. Familiarizing with science editors' associations

    PubMed Central

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri

    2011-01-01

    The number of science editors' associations is growing to resolve a variety of professional problems. The main objective of the associations is to educate their members by facilitating dissemination of information, publishing scholarly journals, books, networking of experts, and regular meetings. There are many science editing associations – general and specialized, traditional, and new. The article presents activities of some of these associations, which include upholding standards of science writing, editing, indexing, research reporting, peer review, editorial independence, and other editorial policies. PMID:22180273

  14. 2011 Editors' Citations for Excellence in Refereeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-12-01

    In the 2 October 2012 issue of Eos, the 2011 Editors' Citations for Excellence in Refereeing were announced (Eos, 93(40), 391-394, doi:10.1029/2012EO400012). The editors' citations recognize this special service to the Union, and these individuals are to be commended for consistently providing constructive and thoughtful reviews. The reviewers listed below were inadvertently omitted from that announcement. They, too, have been cited by editors of AGU journals for excellence in refereeing.

  15. Using Lin's method to solve Bykov's problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, Jürgen; Lamb, Jeroen S. W.; Webster, Kevin N.

    2014-10-01

    We consider nonwandering dynamics near heteroclinic cycles between two hyperbolic equilibria. The constituting heteroclinic connections are assumed to be such that one of them is transverse and isolated. Such heteroclinic cycles are associated with the termination of a branch of homoclinic solutions, and called T-points in this context. We study codimension-two T-points and their unfoldings in Rn. In our consideration we distinguish between cases with real and complex leading eigenvalues of the equilibria. In doing so we establish Lin's method as a unified approach to (re)gain and extend results of Bykov's seminal studies and related works. To a large extent our approach reduces the study to the discussion of intersections of lines and spirals in the plane. Case (RR): Under open conditions on the eigenvalues, there exist open sets in parameter space for which there exist periodic orbits close to the heteroclinic cycle. In addition, there exist two one-parameter families of homoclinic orbits to each of the saddle points p1 and p2.See Theorem 2.1 and Proposition 2.2 for precise statements and Fig. 2 for bifurcation diagrams. Cases (RC) and (CC): At the bifurcation point μ=0 and for each N≥2, there exists an invariant set S0N close to the heteroclinic cycle on which the first return map is topologically conjugated to a full shift on N symbols. For any fixed N≥2, the invariant set SμN persists for |μ| sufficiently small.In addition, there exist infinitely many transversal and non-transversal heteroclinic orbits connecting the saddle points p1 and p2 in a neighbourhood of μ=0, as well as infinitely many one-parameter families of homoclinic orbits to each of the saddle points.For full statements of the results see Theorem 2.3 and Propositions 2.4, 2.5 and Fig. 3 for bifurcation diagrams. The dynamics near T-points has been studied previously by Bykov [6-10], Glendinning and Sparrow [20], Kokubu [27,28] and Labouriau and Rodrigues [30,31,38]. See also the surveys

  16. In vitro expansion of Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood

    SciTech Connect

    Norhaiza, H. Siti; Zarina, Z. A. Intan; Hisham, Z. A. Shahrul; Rohaya, M. A. W.

    2013-11-27

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are used in the therapy of blood disorders due to the ability of these cells to reconstitute haematopoietic lineage cells when transplanted into myeloablative recipients. However, substantial number of cells is required in order for the reconstitution to take place. Since HSCs present in low frequency, larger number of donor is required to accommodate the demand of transplantable HSCs. Therefore, in vitro expansion of HSCs will have profound impact on clinical purposes. The aim of this study was to expand lineage negative (Lin{sup −}) stem cells from human peripheral blood. Total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were fractionated from human blood by density gradient centrifugation. Subsequently, PBMNCs were subjected to magnetic assisted cell sorter (MACS) which depletes lineage positive (Lin{sup +}) mononuclear cells expressing lineage positive markers such as CD2, CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD123, and CD235a to obtained Lin{sup −} cell population. The ability of Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} to survive in vitro was explored by culturing both cell populations in complete medium consisting of Alpha-Minimal Essential Medium (AMEM) +10% (v/v) Newborn Calf Serum (NBCS)+ 2% (v/v) pen/strep. In another experiment, Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} were cultured with complete medium supplemented with 10ng/mL of the following growth factors: stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), 2IU/mL of Erythropoietin (Epo) and 20ng/mL of IL-6. Three samples were monitored in static culture for 22 days. The expansion potential was assessed by the number of total viable cells, counted by trypan blue exclusion assay. It was found that Lin{sup +} mononuclear cells were not able to survive either in normal proliferation medium or proliferation medium supplemented with cytokines. Similarly, Lin{sup −} stem cells were not able to survive in proliferation medium however

  17. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2011-01-01

    As usual, being an even year, the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference took place at Daejeon, Korea. The event was notable not just for the quality of the presentations but also for the spectacular opening ceremony, in the presence of the Prime Minister, Kim Hwang-sik. The Prime Minister affirmed the importance of research into fusion energy research and pledged support for ITER. Such political visibility is good news, of course, but it brings with it the obligation to perform. Fortunately, good performance was much in evidence in the papers presented at the conference, of which a significant proportion contain 'ITER' in the title. Given this importance of ITER and the undertaking by the Nuclear Fusion journal to publish papers associated with Fusion Energy Conference presentations, the Nuclear Fusion Editorial Board has decided to adopt a simplified journal scope that encompasses technology papers more naturally. The scope is available from http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/page/Journal%20information but is reproduced here for clarity: Nuclear Fusion publishes articles making significant advances to the field of controlled thermonuclear fusion. The journal scope includes: the production, heating and confinement of high temperature plasmas; the physical properties of such plasmas; the experimental or theoretical methods of exploring or explaining them; fusion reactor physics; reactor concepts; fusion technologies. The key to scope acceptability is now '....significant advances....' rather than any particular area of controlled thermonuclear fusion research. It is hoped that this will make scope decisions easier for the Nuclear Fusion office, the referees and the Editor.The Nuclear Fusion journal has continued to make an important contribution to the research programme and has maintained its position as the leading journal in the field. This is underlined by the fact that Nuclear Fusion has received an impact factor of 4.270, as listed in ISI's 2009 Science Citation

  18. Lin-28 regulates oogenesis and muscle formation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Stratoulias, Vassilis; Heino, Tapio I; Michon, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the control of stem cell (SC) differentiation is important to comprehend developmental processes as well as to develop clinical applications. Lin28 is a conserved molecule that is involved in SC maintenance and differentiation by regulating let-7 miRNA maturation. However, little is known about the in vivo function of Lin28. Here, we report critical roles for lin-28 during oogenesis. We found that let-7 maturation was increased in lin-28 null mutant fly ovaries. We showed that lin-28 null mutant female flies displayed reduced fecundity, due to defects in egg chamber formation. More specifically, we demonstrated that in mutant ovaries, the egg chambers fuse during early oogenesis resulting in abnormal late egg chambers. We also showed that this phenotype is the combined result of impaired germline SC differentiation and follicle SC differentiation. We suggest a model in which these multiple oogenesis defects result from a misregulation of the ecdysone signaling network, through the fine-tuning of Abrupt and Fasciclin2 expression. Our results give a better understanding of the evolutionarily conserved role of lin-28 on GSC maintenance and differentiation. PMID:24963666

  19. Examining Editor-Author Ethics: Real-World Scenarios from Interviews with Three Journal Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amare, Nicole; Manning, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Those who submit manuscripts to academic journals may benefit from a better understanding of how editors weigh ethics in their interactions with authors. In an attempt to ascertain and to understand editors' ethics, we interviewed 3 current academic journal editors of technical and/or business communication journals. We asked them about the…

  20. ESO Vacancy - Editor (EDG 604)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-09-01

    Assignment: Within the ESO Education and Public Relations Department team, your main tasks and responsibilities will comprise: • Development, update and maintenance of the comprehensive ESO Outreach website in its new look, including preparation of related material (texts, images, etc.) to be displayed; • Design, layout and production of the ESO quarterly journal “The Messenger” (e.g. image selection and processing, technical editing, etc.), in close collaboration with the Messenger editor; • Conception and production of promotional brochures, posters and other EPR products, in close collaboration with the Head of the Education and Public Relations Dept. of ESO Press Releases and various high-level publications, including the ESO Annual Report.

  1. 2010 editors' citations for excellence in refereeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-09-01

    The reviewers listed on these pages have been cited by editors of AGU journals for excellence in refereeing. The editors' citations recognize this special service to the Union. These individuals (photographs provided as available) are to be commended for consistently providing constructive and thoughtful reviews.

  2. 2011 editors' citations for excellence in refereeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anonymous

    2012-10-01

    The reviewers listed below have been cited by editors of AGU journals for excellence in refereeing. The editors' citations recognize this special service to the Union, and these individuals (photographs provided as available) are to be commended for consistently providing constructive and thoughtful reviews.

  3. Letter to Editor - "Reply to RP Heaney"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A letter to the editor was submitted in reply to a letter written to the editor of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition regarding a recent publication (Hunt, CD. and Johnson, LK. Calcium requirements: new estimations for men and women by cross-sectional statistical analyses of calcium balance...

  4. Farewell editorial from the founding editors.

    PubMed

    Izatt, Joseph A; Faris, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The retiring Editor-in-Chief and Deputy Editor provide a brief retrospective of the first six volumes of Biomedical Optics Express, thank the Editorial Board and OSA professional staff, and endorse the new journal leadership and the continued support of the journal by the biomedical optics community. PMID:26819829

  5. Linguistic Prescriptivism in Letters to the Editor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukac, Morana

    2016-01-01

    The public's concern with the fate of the standard language has been well documented in the history of the complaint tradition. The print media have for centuries featured letters to the editor on questions of language use. This study examines a corpus of 258 language-related letters to the editor published in the English-speaking print media. By…

  6. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Plasmaphysik, Germany) V. Philipps (Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany) S. Zweben (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, USA) Y. Hirano (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan) Y. Takase (Tokyo University, Japan) In addition there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2008. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2007 award was Clemente Angioni for the paper entitled `Density response to central electron heating: theoretical investigations and experimental observations in ASDEX Upgrade' (Nucl. Fusion 44 8277-845). The winner of the 2008 Nuclear Fusion award is Todd Evans et al for the paper `Suppression of large edge localized modes with edge resonant magnetic fields in high confinement DIII-D plasmas' (Nucl. Fusion 45 595-607). The awards were presented by the IAEA Deputy Director General, Werner Burkart, and the Chairman of the Board of Editors, Mitsuru Kikuchi, on 16 October 2008 at the 22nd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Geneva, Switzerland. Given the topicality of these papers for the ITER design, it is a matter of pride to the journal that the work should be published in Nuclear Fusion. Reviews Like many who have worked for a long time in the field, I still make use of Nuclear Fusion Reviews that go back 20 or 30 years. It is particularly useful, therefore, that the Board of Editors has been working to re-activate the review programme. The first fruits will appear in this issue, in the form of `A review of zonal flow experiments', by Akihide Fujisawa. The special procedures for Reviews should be noted: most specifically that they should normally be commissioned by the Board of Editors. However, not only is the Board of Editors working on a programme but I am sure that they would be pleased to consider suggestions for review subjects. Letters The reputation of Nuclear

  7. Stepwise enhancement of catalytic performance of haloalkane dehalogenase LinB towards β-hexachlorocyclohexane

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Two haloalkane dehalogenases, LinBUT and LinBMI, each with 296 amino acid residues, exhibit only seven amino acid residue differences between them, but LinBMI’s catalytic performance towards β-hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH) is considerably higher than LinBUT’s. To elucidate the molecular basis governing this difference, intermediate mutants between LinBUT and LinBMI were constructed and kinetically characterized. The activities of LinBUT-based mutants gradually increased by cumulative mutations into LinBUT, and the effects of the individual amino acid substitutions depended on combination with other mutations. These results indicated that LinBUT’s β-HCH degradation activity can be enhanced in a stepwise manner by the accumulation of point mutations. PMID:25401073

  8. Stepwise enhancement of catalytic performance of haloalkane dehalogenase LinB towards β-hexachlorocyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Moriuchi, Ryota; Tanaka, Hiroki; Nikawadori, Yuki; Ishitsuka, Mayuko; Ito, Michihiro; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Tsuda, Masataka; Damborsky, Jiri; Prokop, Zbynek; Nagata, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Two haloalkane dehalogenases, LinBUT and LinBMI, each with 296 amino acid residues, exhibit only seven amino acid residue differences between them, but LinBMI's catalytic performance towards β-hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH) is considerably higher than LinBUT's. To elucidate the molecular basis governing this difference, intermediate mutants between LinBUT and LinBMI were constructed and kinetically characterized. The activities of LinBUT-based mutants gradually increased by cumulative mutations into LinBUT, and the effects of the individual amino acid substitutions depended on combination with other mutations. These results indicated that LinBUT's β-HCH degradation activity can be enhanced in a stepwise manner by the accumulation of point mutations. PMID:25401073

  9. LIN28 Regulates Stem Cell Metabolism and Conversion to Primed Pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Ratanasirintrawoot, Sutheera; Chandrasekaran, Sriram; Wu, Zhaoting; Ficarro, Scott B; Yu, Chunxiao; Ross, Christian A; Cacchiarelli, Davide; Xia, Qing; Seligson, Marc; Shinoda, Gen; Xie, Wen; Cahan, Patrick; Wang, Longfei; Ng, Shyh-Chang; Tintara, Supisara; Trapnell, Cole; Onder, Tamer; Loh, Yuin-Han; Mikkelsen, Tarjei; Sliz, Piotr; Teitell, Michael A; Asara, John M; Marto, Jarrod A; Li, Hu; Collins, James J; Daley, George Q

    2016-07-01

    The RNA-binding proteins LIN28A and LIN28B play critical roles in embryonic development, tumorigenesis, and pluripotency, but their exact functions are poorly understood. Here, we show that, like LIN28A, LIN28B can function effectively with NANOG, OCT4, and SOX2 in reprogramming to pluripotency and that reactivation of both endogenous LIN28A and LIN28B loci are required for maximal reprogramming efficiency. In human fibroblasts, LIN28B is activated early during reprogramming, while LIN28A is activated later during the transition to bona fide induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In murine cells, LIN28A and LIN28B facilitate conversion from naive to primed pluripotency. Proteomic and metabolomic analysis highlighted roles for LIN28 in maintaining the low mitochondrial function associated with primed pluripotency and in regulating one-carbon metabolism, nucleotide metabolism, and histone methylation. LIN28 binds to mRNAs of proteins important for oxidative phosphorylation and modulates protein abundance. Thus, LIN28A and LIN28B play cooperative roles in regulating reprogramming, naive/primed pluripotency, and stem cell metabolism. PMID:27320042

  10. Editor profile: Donald H. Eckhardt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    For Don Eckhardt, editor of AGU's Geodynamics book series, the scope of subjects appropriate for inclusion in the series is wide. “ The forces implied in the term ‘geodynamics’ operate on this planet on all scales and from the surface deep into the interior,” he says. The articles collected in the red volumes are often united, he suggests, by “an emphasis on common techniques as much as by subject matter.”Like the potential range of topics in the geodynamics series, the breadth of Eckhardt's professional responsibilities is large. As director of the Earth Sciences Division at the Air Force Geophysical Laboratory (AFGL) at Hanscom Air Force Base near Bedford, Mass., he oversees research and development in geodesy, gravity, seismology, geology, and dynamical astronomy. He administers more than 50 outside contracts while actively conducting theoretical and applied research of his own. In the past year, he has become well-known for his proposition that geophysical measurements made by an AFGL team demonstrate the existence and magnitude of two previously undetected fundamental forces in the universe, supplementing electromagnetism, the strong and weak nuclear forces, and Newtonian gravity.

  11. Editor's Choice Offered as a Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    2010-06-01

    Editor's Choice is now being offered as a service rather than on a subscription basis. As in the past, articles will be selected by collection editors with assistance from advisory panels. The selected articles will be listed on the AGU Web site (http://www.agu.org/pubs/journals/virtual/editors_choice/); these lists will be accessible to anyone. Those who are interested in reading the articles can access them through a personal or institutional subscription or can purchase them either individually or as part of a MultiChoice packet.

  12. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashinin, Pavel P.

    2013-01-01

    Dear readers, contributors, and members of the world laser physics community. It is a great honour for us to introduce to you our new publishing partner, IOP Publishing, a subsidiary of the Institute of Physics, United Kingdom. IOP Publishing is a world renowned authority in producing journals, magazines, websites and services that enable researchers and research organizations to present their work to a world-wide audience. Laser Physics, the first English-language scientific journal in Russia, was founded in 1990 on the initiative of Alexander M Prokhorov, a pioneer and leader in laser physics research. Professor Prokhorov served as the first Editor-in-Chief of the journal until 2002. We are proud that it is our 23rd year of publishing Laser Physics and our 10th year of publishing Laser Physics Letters. We would like to honour the memory of our friend, late Professor Igor Yevseyev, whose enthusiasm and unwavering dedication to our journals contributed most significantly to their success. It was initially his idea in 2011 to approach IOP with a partnership proposal. We deeply regret that he is no longer with us as we enter this productive alliance. Now, in partnership with IOP, we are turning a new page in providing world-wide access to the cutting-edge research results in our journals, serving our well established global audience. We see new horizons opening for our journals for years to come and hope that our readers share our enthusiasm and aspirations. Please accept our best wishes for all your new scientific endeavors in the exciting field of laser physics.

  13. Sir William Wilde: an enlightened editor.

    PubMed

    O'Doherty, M

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines Sir William Wilde's peculiar genius as editor, his contribution to the Irish Journal of Medical Science in ensuring its endurance and making it a treasure-house of the history of medicine in Ireland. PMID:26969455

  14. Richard Gilbert, Reporter and Assistant City Editor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Larry

    1988-01-01

    Looks at the experiences of Richard Gilbert, reporter and assistant editor for "The Herald Telephone," a daily newspaper in Bloomington, Indiana, and discusses Gilbert's suggested guidelines for high school journalism advisers. (MS)

  15. 2012 Editors' Citations for Excellence in Refereeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    One of the most important services performed for AGU is the conscientious reviewing of submitted papers. Because of the nature of the reviewing process, this service is also one of the least recognized. Every year editors are asked to select the outstanding reviewers from the previous year. The reviewers listed below have been cited by editors of AGU journals and Eos for excellence in refereeing. These individuals are to be commended for consistently providing constructive and thoughtful reviews.

  16. 2013 Editors' Citations for Excellence in Refereeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-06-01

    One of the most important services performed for AGU is the conscientious reviewing of submitted papers. Because of the nature of the reviewing process, this service is also one of the least recognized. Every year editors are asked to select the outstanding reviewers from the previous year. The reviewers listed below have been cited by editors of AGU journals and Eos for excellence in refereeing. These individuals are to be commended for consistently providing constructive and thoughtful reviews.

  17. DeviceEditor visual biological CAD canvas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biological Computer Aided Design (bioCAD) assists the de novo design and selection of existing genetic components to achieve a desired biological activity, as part of an integrated design-build-test cycle. To meet the emerging needs of Synthetic Biology, bioCAD tools must address the increasing prevalence of combinatorial library design, design rule specification, and scar-less multi-part DNA assembly. Results We report the development and deployment of web-based bioCAD software, DeviceEditor, which provides a graphical design environment that mimics the intuitive visual whiteboard design process practiced in biological laboratories. The key innovations of DeviceEditor include visual combinatorial library design, direct integration with scar-less multi-part DNA assembly design automation, and a graphical user interface for the creation and modification of design specification rules. We demonstrate how biological designs are rendered on the DeviceEditor canvas, and we present effective visualizations of genetic component ordering and combinatorial variations within complex designs. Conclusions DeviceEditor liberates researchers from DNA base-pair manipulation, and enables users to create successful prototypes using standardized, functional, and visual abstractions. Open and documented software interfaces support further integration of DeviceEditor with other bioCAD tools and software platforms. DeviceEditor saves researcher time and institutional resources through correct-by-construction design, the automation of tedious tasks, design reuse, and the minimization of DNA assembly costs. PMID:22373390

  18. EDITORIAL: Message from the Editor Message from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Board Members, Guest Editors of special editions and those referees who were already listed in the last years. The following people have been selected: Marina Becoulet, CEA Cadarache, France Russell Doerner, University of California - San Diego, USA Emiliano Fable, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Germany Akihide Fujisawa, Kyushi University, Japan Gerardo Giruzzi, CEA Cadarache, France Grigory Kagan, LANL, USA Morten Lennholm, CCFE, UK Akinobu Matsuyama, NIFS, Japan Peter Stangeby, University of Toronto, Canada Leonid Zakharov, PPPL, USA In addition, there is a group of several hundred referees who have helped us in the past year to maintain the high scientific standard of Nuclear Fusion. At the end of this issue we give the full list of all referees for 2011. Our thanks to them! Authors The winner of the 2011 Nuclear Fusion Award is H. Urano, for the paper 'Dimensionless parameter dependence of H-mode pedestal width using hydrogen and deuterium plasmas in JT-60U' (Nucl. Fusion 48 045008). The award was presented at the Plasma Conference 2011 (Joint meeting of 28th JSPF Annual Meeting, The 29th Symposium on Plasma Processing, and Division of Plasma Physics, 2011 Autumn Meeting of The Physical Society of Japan). This is the sixth year that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has awarded an annual prize to honour exceptional work published in Nuclear Fusion. IOP Publishing has generously made a contribution of $2500 to the award. The Nuclear Fusion Electronic Archive The journal's electronic archive has been online since the beginning of the year. The archive has been a roaring success and has contributed to the nearly 300 000 downloads of journal papers in 2011. The archive can be accessed via http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/page/Archive. It has direct links to 16 landmark papers, from authors such as Artsimovich and Mercier. The Nuclear Fusion office and IOP Publishing Just as the journal depends on the authors and referees, so its success is also

  19. 78 FR 30332 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Lin Zhi International, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Lin Zhi International... that on April 3, 2013, Lin Zhi International, Inc., 670 Almanor Avenue, Sunnyvale, California...

  20. 77 FR 30326 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Lin Zhi International Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Lin Zhi International... that on April 19, 2012, Lin Zhi International Inc., 670 Almanor Avenue, Sunnyvale, California...

  1. Aberrant regulation of the LIN28A/LIN28B and let-7 loop in human malignant tumors and its effects on the hallmarks of cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianzhen; Wang, Guangyu; Hao, Dapeng; Liu, Xi; Wang, Dong; Ning, Ning; Li, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    RNA binding proteins (RBPs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) are two of the most important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, and their aberrant expression contributes to the development of human malignancies. Let-7, one of the most well-known tumor suppressors, is frequently down-regulated in a variety of human cancers. The RBP LIN28A/LIN28B, a direct target of the let-7 family of miRNAs, is an inhibitor of let-7 biogenesis and is frequently up-regulated in cancers. Aberrant regulation of the LIN28A/LIN28B and let-7 loop in human malignant tumors is reportedly involved in cancer development, contributing to cellular proliferation, cell death resistance, angiogenesis, metastasis, metabolism reprogramming, tumor-associated inflammation, genome instability, acquiring immortality and evading immune destruction. In this review, we summarized the mechanisms of LIN28A/LIN28B and let-7 loop aberrant regulation in human cancer and discussed the roles and potential mechanisms of the LIN28A/LIN28B and let-7 loop in regulating the hallmarks of cancer. The crosstalk between LIN28A/LIN28B and let-7 loop and certain oncogenes (such as MYC, RAS, PI3K/AKT, NF-κB and β-catenin) in regulating hallmarks of cancer has also been discussed. PMID:26123544

  2. LIN28B suppresses microRNA let-7b expression to promote CD44+/LIN28B+ human pancreatic cancer stem cell proliferation and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yebo; Zhang, Lei; Cui, Lei; Lou, Wenhui; Wang, Dansong; Lu, Weiqi; Jin, Dayong; Liu, Te

    2015-01-01

    Although the highly proliferative, migratory, and multi-drug resistant phenotype of human pancreatic cancer stem cells (PCSCs) is well characterized, knowledge of their biological mechanisms is limited. We used CD44 and LIN28B as markers to screen, isolate, and enrich CSCs from human primary pancreatic cancer. Using flow cytometry, we identified a human primary pancreatic cancer cell (PCC) subpopulation expressing high levels of both CD44 and LIN28B. CD44+/LIN28B+ PCSCs expressed high levels of stemness marker genes and possessed higher migratory and invasive ability than CD44-/LIN28B- PCCs. CD44+/LIN28B+ PCSCs were more resistant to growth inhibition induced by the chemotherapeutic drugs cisplatin and gemcitabine hydrochloride, and readily established tumors in vivo in a relatively short time. Moreover, microarray analysis revealed significant differences between the cDNA expression patterns of CD44+/LIN28B+ PCSCs and CD44-/LIN28B- PCCs. Following siRNA interference of endogenous LIN28B gene expression in CD44+/LIN28B+ PCSCs, not only was their proliferation decreased, there was also cell cycle arrest due to suppression of cyclin D1 expression following the stimulation of miRNA let-7b expression. In conclusion, CD44+/LIN28B+ cells, which possess CSC characteristics, can be reliably sorted from human primary PCCs and represent a valuable model for studying cancer cell physiology and multi-drug resistance. PMID:26609473

  3. Report of the editors, 2014.

    PubMed

    García Puig, J; Gaspar Alonso-Vega, G; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2015-01-01

    The editors of Revista Clínica Española(Rev Clin Esp) inform on their editorial activity during the last 12 months: (a) Objectives and attainments in 2014, (b) Editorial activity, 2014, and (c) 2013 impact factor. In 2014 we achieved the 5 planned objectives. We have published the 9 programmed issues and 103% of the planned papers according to the usual fixed sections. We emphasize the publication of 29 editorials, 21 of which are signed by prestigious foreign authors. From the first January to the 30th September 2014 we received 421 manuscripts (46.8 manuscripts per month), a slight lower figure to that obtained in 2013 (50.9 manuscripts per month). The acceptance rate of the 404 manuscripts whose editorial process has been concluded was 32.3% (originals, 22.4%). We asked for 315 revisions to 240 reviewers and we received 53.3% revisions in less than two weeks (10.4 days). The mean time to adopt an editorial decision for all manuscripts («accepted»/«rejected») has been 18,3 (less than half than in 2009). For «originals» this figure has dropped from 56,6 days in 2009 to 26.6 days in 2014. The mean time elapsed from manuscript reception to its on-line publication was 103 days. In 2014 the collaboration with the working groups from the Internal Medicine Spanish Foundation (FEMI) has reported 11 published manuscripts. In July 2014 we were informed that the Journal Citation Reports gave Rev Clin Esp an Impact Factor of 1,314 (year 2013). This Impact Factor without self-citations would have been 0.705 (in 2009 the global impact factor was 0,584). With the Editorial Committee farewell we welcome the new editorial team and we sincerely thank the SEMI Steering Committee, our colleagues, journal officers, reviewers, readers and authors that since 2009 have trusted on our editorial work. PMID:25441406

  4. [Report of the editors, 2013].

    PubMed

    García Puig, J; Gaspar Alonso-Vega, G; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2014-01-01

    The editors of Revista Clínica Española(Rev Clin Esp) inform on their editorial activity during the last 12 months: (a) objectives and attainments, (b) editorial activity, and (c) objectives for 2014. In 2013 the most relevant modification concerning the editorial activity has been the translation into English of the 5 manuscripts with abstract contained in each issue (http://www.revclinesp.es/). From the first January to the 30th September 2013 we received 458 manuscripts (50.9 manuscripts per month), a similar figure to that obtained in 2012 (51.1 manuscripts per month). The acceptance rate of the 443 manuscripts whose editorial process has been concluded was 23.7% (originals, 11.8%). We asked for 253 revisions to 186 reviewers and we received 74.4% revisions in less than 2 weeks (10.9 days). The mean time to adopt an editorial decision for all manuscripts («accepted»/«rejected») has been 20,3 (half than in 2009). For «originals» this figure has dropped from 56.6 days in 2009 to 22.5 days in 2013. The mean time elapsed from manuscript reception to its on-line publication was 94.8 days in 2013 (110.5 in 2012 and 155.8 in 2011). In 2013 the collaboration with the working groups from the Internal Medicine Spanish Foundation has reported 17 published manuscripts. In 2013 we were informed that the Journal Citation Reports excluded Rev Clin Esp from its impact factor journal list due to its elevated self-citations. We have taken a number of actions to reduce self-citations and we expect to be a minority in 2014. Some other data concerning the editorial policy are encouraging. In this sense, manuscript citation to Rev Clin Esp published articles has seen a substantial increase from 19% in 2008 to 29% in 2012. We work to achieve the digitalization of Rev Clin Esp from 1940 to 1999 (the journal is already digitalized since 2000). The continuous renewal of the journal sections and the working groups collaboration are necessary elements to make our journal, each day

  5. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2010, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the journal and look ahead to 2011. As many of you are no doubt aware, our impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) is currently 1.317. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization (Thomson ISI) agreeing with my own assessment. Measurement Science and Technology is a journal with a broad scope covering new measurement techniques in all fields of science and engineering. I therefore find it particularly enjoyable to read summaries of recent research in our strong topical review programme as these cover many varied topics of interest. In 2010 several interesting articles by international leaders in their field were published, for example: Single-photon generation and detection, by G S Buller and R J Collins of Heriot-Watt University [1]. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy in life sciences, by Jan Willem Borst and Antonie J W G Visser, from the Microspectroscopy Centre of Wageningen University [2]. Biological and chemical sensors for cancer diagnosis, by Elfriede Simon of Siemens AG [3]. I hope that these articles, and the others published in 2010 and now in 2011, will provide a useful overview for our readers, and be helpful to new researchers. When speaking to young researchers I am particularly aware that having their articles published in a timely fashion is important, and I am pleased that our publication times are highly competitive, with most authors receiving a

  6. Sex-specific regulation of weight and puberty by the Lin28/let-7 axis.

    PubMed

    Corre, Christina; Shinoda, Gen; Zhu, Hao; Cousminer, Diana L; Crossman, Christine; Bellissimo, Christian; Goldenberg, Anna; Daley, George Q; Palmert, Mark R

    2016-03-01

    Growth and pubertal timing differ in boys and girls. Variants in/near LIN28B associate with age at menarche (AAM) in genome-wide association studies and some AAM-related variants associate with growth in a sex-specific manner. Sex-specific growth patterns in response to Lin28b perturbation have been detected in mice, and overexpression of Lin28a has been shown to alter pubertal timing in female mice. To investigate further how Lin28a and Lin28b affect growth and puberty in both males and females, we evaluated Lin28b loss-of-function (LOF) mice and Lin28a gain-of-function (GOF) mice. Because both Lin28a and Lin28b can act via the conserved microRNA let-7, we also examined let-7 GOF mice. As reported previously, Lin28b LOF led to lighter body weights only in male mice while Lin28a GOF yielded heavier mice of both sexes. Let-7 GOF mice weighed less than controls, and males were more affected than females. Timing of puberty was assessed by vaginal opening (VO) and preputial separation (PS). Male Lin28b LOF and male let-7 GOF, but not female, mice displayed alteration of pubertal timing, with later PS than controls. In contrast, both male and female Lin28a GOF mice displayed late onset of puberty. Together, these data point toward a complex system of regulation by Lin28a, Lin28b, and let-7, in which Lin28b and let-7 can impact both puberty and growth in a sex-specific manner, raising the possibility that this pathway may contribute to differential regulation of male and female growth and puberty in humans. PMID:26698568

  7. AGU Publications Volunteers Feted At Elegant Editors' Evening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    The 2012 Fall Meeting Editors' Evening, held at the City Club of San Francisco, was hosted by the Publications Committee and is the premier social event for editors and associate editors attending the Fall Meeting. The evening commenced with a welcome from Carol Finn, incoming AGU president, in which she expressed her thanks to the editors and associate editors for volunteering their time to benefit AGU.

  8. Lin28 promotes the proliferative capacity of neural progenitor cells in brain development

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei; Yang, Si-Lu; Herrlinger, Stephanie; Liang, Chen; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Hansen, Kirk C.; Desai, Ridham; Nagy, Andras; Niswander, Lee; Moss, Eric G.; Chen, Jian-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) have distinct proliferation capacities at different stages of brain development. Lin28 is an RNA-binding protein with two homologs in mice: Lin28a and Lin28b. Here we show that Lin28a/b are enriched in early NPCs and their expression declines during neural differentiation. Lin28a single-knockout mice show reduced NPC proliferation, enhanced cell cycle exit and a smaller brain, whereas mice lacking both Lin28a alleles and one Lin28b allele display similar but more severe phenotypes. Ectopic expression of Lin28a in mice results in increased NPC proliferation, NPC numbers and brain size. Mechanistically, Lin28a physically and functionally interacts with Imp1 (Igf2bp1) and regulates Igf2-mTOR signaling. The function of Lin28a/b in NPCs could be attributed, at least in part, to the regulation of their mRNA targets that encode Igf1r and Hmga2. Thus, Lin28a and Lin28b have overlapping functions in temporally regulating NPC proliferation during early brain development. PMID:25922525

  9. Performance of a prototype atomic clock based on lin parallel lin coherent population trapping resonances in Rb atomic vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailov, Eugeniy E.; Horrom, Travis; Belcher, Nathan; Novikova, Irina

    2010-03-15

    We report on the performance of the first table-top prototype atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances with parallel linearly polarized optical fields (lin parallel lin configuration). Our apparatus uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) tuned to the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb with the current modulation at the {sup 87}Rb hyperfine frequency. We demonstrate cancellation of the first-order light shift by the proper choice of rf modulation power and further improve our prototype clock stability by optimizing the parameters of the microwave lock loop. Operating in these optimal conditions, we measured a short-term fractional frequency stability (Allan deviation) 2x10{sup -11}{tau}{sup -1/2} for observation times 1 s{<=}{tau}{<=}20 s. This value is limited by large VCSEL phase noise and environmental temperature fluctuation. Further improvements in frequency stability should be possible with an apparatus designed as a dedicated lin parallel lin CPT resonance clock with environmental impacts minimized.

  10. Writer/editor and the computer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.R.

    1985-04-01

    When the computer entered the publications process it created almost seismic shocks all along the line of creation from authoring to editing to composing to layout and to printing. Authors and editors of scientific and engineering documents felt the impact in adverse as well as beneficial ways. In the tradiational system, the writer/editor took from an author a manuscript and, using the powers of wordsmithing and the knowledge of the publications process, created a finished document using nothing more sophisticated than a red pencil for the mechanical process. Once the computer entered the scene, the writer/editor had to learn different hardware systems, try to keep up with the software explosion, and fight against a rising fear that a machine was going to take over. Fortunately, an innate flexibility and specialized knowledge of how to get a document into the best form for its specific audience guaranteed the writer/editor's survival, although there is still a long way to go in this transition phase from red pencil to VDT. This paper reviews the experiences of writer/editors in one scientific laboratory, experiences that typify challenges the forward-moving manager of a technical document production system can expect to encounter.

  11. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Marella de Angelis and her colleagues on precision gravimetry using atomic sensors and from Dr Peter Becker on determination of the Avogadro constant via enriched silicon-28. I recommend setting up a free e-mail alert so that you can read them as soon as they are published! As many of you are already aware, our impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has risen again to 1.297. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization (Thomson ISI) agreeing with my own assessment. Of course the publication of high quality articles in the journal is dependent both on you the authors who trust us with the publication of your best work and on our referees and Editorial Board Members who we depend on to maintain the high standards you have grown to expect. I must also thank our referees for their rapid response when asked to review papers for Measurement Science and Technology. On average, authors receive a decision on their article in 45 days. Therefore I would like to end this message by saying thank you again to all those who have contributed to our success in the past year, and wish you all the best for a successful 2009!

  12. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2007, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal this year. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the journal. As many of you are no doubt aware, our latest impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has risen to 1.228. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization agreeing with my own assessment. The popularity of the journal amongst authors and readers has prompted us to introduce a new subject classification for articles, to make it easier for readers to find articles of interest. The eight subject categories are: Measurement theory and practical developments (e.g. precision measurements, metrology, new measurement principles, signal processing techniques, theory of measurement, calibration); Sensors and sensing systems (based on physical, chemical or biological principles; micro- and nano-scale systems; sensors for physical, chemical and biological quantities); Optical and laser based techniques (e.g. fibre optics, interferometry, etc); Fluid mechanics measurements (e.g. fluid flow, velocimetry, particle sizing, etc); Imaging techniques (e.g. tomography, microscopy, holography, THz, etc); Spectroscopy (e.g. optical, acoustic, dielectric, MS, NMR, ESR, IR, UV-VIS, fluorescence, PCS, x-ray, etc); New and improved techniques for materials evaluation (e.g. non-destructive testing and evaluation, structural measurements); Novel instrumentation. We kindly ask you to assign your paper to a category when you send it to the journal. In order to maintain our rapid

  13. Panel Discussion With PR/PRL Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, Martin

    2002-03-01

    Panelists: Peter Adams, Physical Review B Irwin Oppenheim, Physical Review E & Massachsetts Institute of Technology Jack Sandweiss, Physical Review Letters & Yale University Reinhardt Schuhmann, Physical Review Letters The panel will include Editors from Physical Review Letters, Physical Review B, and Physical Review E. They will briefly discuss some current issues facing the journals, such as raising the standards for PRL acceptance and the role of electronic media attachments (e.g., movies) to journal articles. Opinions on these issues from the audience will be solicited. The Editors will also respond to questions and comments from the audience.

  14. EDITORIAL: Letter from the Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2006-12-01

    Dear authors and reviewers of articles for Measurement Science and Technology, I would like to thank all those who have published papers with us in 2006, and special thanks go to those of you who have kindly reviewed articles for the journal this year. I would also like to take this opportunity to update you on some of the developments on the journal this year. As many of you are no doubt aware our impact factor (a measure of the average number of times recent papers are referred to by others) has remained above 1 for the second year in a row. This is often taken as an indication of the quality and relevance of recently published research, and although as readers we develop our own instinct for journals of high quality, it is gratifying as an Editor to see the data from an independent organization agreeing with my own assessment. This year we have welcomed several new faces to our Editorial Board and International Advisory Board. We are delighted to welcome Professor Hirofumi Yamada of the University of Kyoto as a representative from Japan. From China we have been joined by Professor Xuzong Chen of Peking University and Professor Zhiyi Wei of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing. Professor Ivan Marusic from University of Minnesota and Dr Paul Williams of the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder have joined as North American representatives. As usual you will be able to submit your articles through them or direct to the Editorial Office in Bristol, UK. As part of our ongoing initiative to give our authors' work the highest visibility, all articles are freely available online for 30 days from the date of publication, allowing all researchers to read and view the latest research as soon as it is published, and this year there have been many interesting articles to read! As regular readers are aware, Measurement Science and Technology publishes special issues and features, which highlight an area of current interest. This year's topics included

  15. A Dynamic Attitude Measurement System Based on LINS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanzhou; Pan, Quan; Wang, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Juanni; Li, Jiang; Jiang, Xiangjun

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic attitude measurement system (DAMS) is developed based on a laser inertial navigation system (LINS). Three factors of the dynamic attitude measurement error using LINS are analyzed: dynamic error, time synchronization and phase lag. An optimal coning errors compensation algorithm is used to reduce coning errors, and two-axis wobbling verification experiments are presented in the paper. The tests indicate that the attitude accuracy is improved 2-fold by the algorithm. In order to decrease coning errors further, the attitude updating frequency is improved from 200 Hz to 2000 Hz. At the same time, a novel finite impulse response (FIR) filter with three notches is designed to filter the dither frequency of the ring laser gyro (RLG). The comparison tests suggest that the new filter is five times more effective than the old one. The paper indicates that phase-frequency characteristics of FIR filter and first-order holder of navigation computer constitute the main sources of phase lag in LINS. A formula to calculate the LINS attitude phase lag is introduced in the paper. The expressions of dynamic attitude errors induced by phase lag are derived. The paper proposes a novel synchronization mechanism that is able to simultaneously solve the problems of dynamic test synchronization and phase compensation. A single-axis turntable and a laser interferometer are applied to verify the synchronization mechanism. The experiments results show that the theoretically calculated values of phase lag and attitude error induced by phase lag can both match perfectly with testing data. The block diagram of DAMS and physical photos are presented in the paper. The final experiments demonstrate that the real-time attitude measurement accuracy of DAMS can reach up to 20″ (1σ) and the synchronization error is less than 0.2 ms on the condition of three axes wobbling for 10 min. PMID:25177802

  16. A dynamic attitude measurement system based on LINS.

    PubMed

    Li, Hanzhou; Pan, Quan; Wang, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Juanni; Li, Jiang; Jiang, Xiangjun

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic attitude measurement system (DAMS) is developed based on a laser inertial navigation system (LINS). Three factors of the dynamic attitude measurement error using LINS are analyzed: dynamic error, time synchronization and phase lag. An optimal coning errors compensation algorithm is used to reduce coning errors, and two-axis wobbling verification experiments are presented in the paper. The tests indicate that the attitude accuracy is improved 2-fold by the algorithm. In order to decrease coning errors further, the attitude updating frequency is improved from 200 Hz to 2000 Hz. At the same time, a novel finite impulse response (FIR) filter with three notches is designed to filter the dither frequency of the ring laser gyro (RLG). The comparison tests suggest that the new filter is five times more effective than the old one. The paper indicates that phase-frequency characteristics of FIR filter and first-order holder of navigation computer constitute the main sources of phase lag in LINS. A formula to calculate the LINS attitude phase lag is introduced in the paper. The expressions of dynamic attitude errors induced by phase lag are derived. The paper proposes a novel synchronization mechanism that is able to simultaneously solve the problems of dynamic test synchronization and phase compensation. A single-axis turntable and a laser interferometer are applied to verify the synchronization mechanism. The experiments results show that the theoretically calculated values of phase lag and attitude error induced by phase lag can both match perfectly with testing data. The block diagram of DAMS and physical photos are presented in the paper. The final experiments demonstrate that the real-time attitude measurement accuracy of DAMS can reach up to 20″ (1σ) and the synchronization error is less than 0.2 ms on the condition of three axes wobbling for 10 min. PMID:25177802

  17. 2009 Editors' Citations for Excellence in Refereeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-09-01

    The reviewers listed on these pages have been cited by editors of AGU journals for excellence in refereeing. The editors’ citations recognize this special service to the Union. These individuals (photographs provided as available) are commended for consistently providing constructive and thoughtful reviews.

  18. Open Simulation Laboratories [Guest editors' introduction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alexander, Francis J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-09-01

    The introduction for the special issue on open simulation laboratories, the guest editors describe how OSLs will become more common as their potential is better understood and they begin providing access to valuable datasets to much larger segments of the scientific community. Moreover, new analysis tools and ways to do science will inevitably develop as a result.

  19. A Visual Editor in Java for View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansifer, Ryan

    2000-01-01

    In this project we continued the development of a visual editor in the Java programming language to create screens on which to display real-time data. The data comes from the numerous systems monitoring the operation of the space shuttle while on the ground and in space, and from the many tests of subsystems. The data can be displayed on any computer platform running a Java-enabled World Wide Web (WWW) browser and connected to the Internet. Previously a special-purpose program bad been written to display data on emulations of character-based display screens used for many years at NASA. The goal now is to display bit-mapped screens created by a visual editor. We report here on the visual editor that creates the display screens. This project continues the work we bad done previously. Previously we had followed the design of the 'beanbox,' a prototype visual editor created by Sun Microsystems. We abandoned this approach and implemented a prototype using a more direct approach. In addition, our prototype is based on newly released Java 2 graphical user interface (GUI) libraries. The result has been a visually more appealing appearance and a more robust application.

  20. Editors' Ability and Willingness to Work Effectively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Julie

    1978-01-01

    Suggests that student editors know their jobs, set a good example for the staff, have regular staff meetings, make assignments clear, not "hog" good assignments, be available to the staff, help the staff learn to rewrite, attend all staff or editorial board meetings, and accept decisions of the board. (TJ)

  1. Are Editors Out of the Tenure Process?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    University presses have complained for years that tenure committees unfairly expect their editors to be arbiters of what counts as tenure-worthy work. At the same time, the presses have been caught in a business-side squeeze between dwindling sales (and shrinking subsidies) and the ever-greater pressure on scholars to publish. In this article, the…

  2. Women's Page Editors: Self-Perceived Status.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Won; And Others

    The focal points of this study are the role perceptions and the environments of women's page editors from daily and weekly newspapers across the United States. In the role perception areas, equal rights, discrimination, and the role of women in journalism are examined. Salaries, education, college major and minor, and years in the profession are…

  3. Lin28 Enhances Tumorigenesis and is Associated With Advanced Human Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Srinivas R.; Powers, John T.; Einhorn, William; Hoshida, Yujin; Ng, Tony; Toffanin, Sara; O'Sullivan, Maureen; Lu, Jun; Philips, Letha A.; Lockhart, Victoria L.; Shah, Samar P.; Tanwar, Pradeep S.; Mermel, Craig H.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Azam, Mohammad; Teixeira, Jose; Meyerson, Matthew; Hughes, Timothy P.; Llovet, Josep M; Radich, Jerald; Mullighan, Charles G.; Golub, Todd R.; Sorensen, Poul H.; Daley, George Q.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple members of the let-7 family of miRNAs are often repressed in human cancers1,2, thereby promoting oncogenesis by de-repressing the targets K-Ras, c-Myc, and HMGA2 3,4. However, the mechanism by which let-7 miRNAs are coordinately repressed is unclear. The RNA-binding proteins Lin28 and Lin28B block let-7 precursors from being processed to mature miRNAs5–8, suggesting that over-expression of Lin28/Lin28B might promote malignancy via repression of let-7. Here we show that LIN28 and LIN28B are over-expressed in primary human tumors and human cancer cell lines (overall frequency ∼15%), and that over-expression is linked to repression of let-7 family miRNAs and de-repression of let-7 targets. Lin28/Lin28B facilitate cellular transformation in vitro, and over-expression is associated with advanced disease across multiple tumor types. Our work provides a mechanism for the coordinate repression of let-7 miRNAs observed in a subset of human cancers, and associates activation of LIN28/LIN28B with poor clinical prognosis. PMID:19483683

  4. Lin-28 promotes symmetric stem cell division and drives adaptive growth in the adult Drosophila intestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Huan; Luhur, Arthur; Sokol, Nicholas

    2015-10-15

    Stem cells switch between asymmetric and symmetric division to expand in number as tissues grow during development and in response to environmental changes. The stem cell intrinsic proteins controlling this switch are largely unknown, but one candidate is the Lin-28 pluripotency factor. A conserved RNA-binding protein that is downregulated in most animals as they develop from embryos to adults, Lin-28 persists in populations of adult stem cells. Its function in these cells has not been previously characterized. Here, we report that Lin-28 is highly enriched in adult intestinal stem cells in the Drosophila intestine. lin-28 null mutants are homozygous viable but display defects in this population of cells, which fail to undergo a characteristic food-triggered expansion in number and have reduced rates of symmetric division as well as reduced insulin signaling. Immunoprecipitation of Lin-28-bound mRNAs identified Insulin-like Receptor (InR), forced expression of which completely rescues lin-28-associated defects in intestinal stem cell number and division pattern. Furthermore, this stem cell activity of lin-28 is independent of one well-known lin-28 target, the microRNA let-7, which has limited expression in the intestinal epithelium. These results identify Lin-28 as a stem cell intrinsic factor that boosts insulin signaling in intestinal progenitor cells and promotes their symmetric division in response to nutrients, defining a mechanism through which Lin-28 controls the adult stem cell division patterns that underlie tissue homeostasis and regeneration. PMID:26487778

  5. lin-35/Rb cooperates with the SWI/SNF complex to control Caenorhabditis elegans larval development.

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Mingxue; Fay, David S; Han, Min

    2004-01-01

    Null mutations in lin-35, the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of the mammalian Rb protein, cause no obvious morphological defects. Using a genetic approach to identify genes that may function redundantly with lin-35, we have isolated a mutation in the C. elegans psa-1 gene. lin-35; psa-1 double mutants display severe developmental defects leading to early larval arrest and adult sterility. The psa-1 gene has previously been shown to encode a C. elegans homolog of yeast SWI3, a critical component of the SWI/SNF complex, and has been shown to regulate asymmetric cell divisions during C. elegans development. We observed strong genetic interactions between psa-1 and lin-35 as well as a subset of the class B synMuv genes that include lin-37 and lin-9. Loss-of-function mutations in lin-35, lin-37, and lin-9 strongly enhanced the defects of asymmetric T cell division associated with a psa-1 mutation. Our results suggest that LIN-35/Rb and a certain class B synMuv proteins collaborate with the SWI/SNF protein complex to regulate the T cell division as well as other events essential for larval growth. PMID:15280233

  6. OPM Scheme Editor 2: A graphical editor for specifying object-protocol structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, I-Min A.; Markowitz, V.M.; Pang, F.; Ben-Shachar, O.

    1993-07-01

    This document describes an X-window based Schema Editor for the Object-Protocol Model (OPM). OPM is a data model that supports the specification of complex object and protocol classes. objects and protocols are qualified in OPM by attributes that are defined over (associated with) value classes. Connections of object and protocol classes are expressed in OPM via attributes. OPM supports the specification (expansion) of protocols in terms of alternative and sequences of component (sub) protocols. The OPM Schema Editor allows specifying, displaying, modifying, and browsing through OPM schemas. The OPM Schema Editor generates an output file that can be used as input to an OPM schema translation tool that maps OPM schemas into definitions for relational database management systems. The OPM Schema Editor was implemented using C++ and the X11 based Motif toolkit, on Sun SPARCstation under Sun Unix OS 4.1. This document consists of the following parts: (1) A tutorial consisting of seven introductory lessons for the OPM Schema Editor. (2) A reference manual describing all the windows and functions of the OPM Schema Editor. (3) An appendix with an overview of OPM.

  7. MYCN-driven regulatory mechanisms controlling LIN28B in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Beckers, Anneleen; Van Peer, Gert; Carter, Daniel R.; Gartlgruber, Moritz; Herrmann, Carl; Agarwal, Saurabh; Helsmoortel, Hetty H.; Althoff, Kristina; Molenaar, Jan J.; Cheung, Belamy B.; Schulte, Johannes H.; Benoit, Yves; Shohet, Jason M.; Westermann, Frank; Marshall, Glenn M.; Vandesompele, Jo; De Preter, Katleen; Speleman, Frank

    2016-01-01

    LIN28B has been identified as an oncogene in various tumor entities, including neuroblastoma, a childhood cancer that originates from neural crest-derived cells, and is characterized by amplification of the MYCN oncogene. Recently, elevated LIN28B expression levels were shown to contribute to neuroblastoma tumorigenesis via let-7 dependent de-repression of MYCN. However, additional insight in the regulation of LIN28B in neuroblastoma is lacking. Therefore, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of the regulation of LIN28B in neuroblastoma, with a specific focus on the contribution of miRNAs. We show that MYCN regulates LIN28B expression in neuroblastoma tumors via two distinct parallel mechanisms. First, through an unbiased LIN28B-3′UTR reporter screen, we found that miR-26a-5p and miR-26b-5p regulate LIN28B expression. Next, we demonstrated that MYCN indirectly affects the expression of miR-26a-5p, and hence regulates LIN28B, therefor establishing a MYCN-miR-26a-5p-LIN28B regulatory axis. Second, we provide evidence that MYCN regulates LIN28B expression via interaction with the LIN28B promotor, establishing a direct MYCN-LIN28B regulatory axis. We believe that these findings mark LIN28B as an important effector of the MYCN oncogenic phenotype and underlines the importance of MYCN-regulated miRNAs in establishing the MYCN-driven oncogenic process. PMID:26123663

  8. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission: Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur

  9. Editor and Student Views on the Censorship Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raburn, Josephine

    Out of 200 newspaper editors randomly selected from a directory, 64 responded to a questionnaire eliciting their opinions on the subject materials most often censored by groups in the United States. The editors' responses were compared to those of 121 freshmen at Cameron University (Oklahoma). A majority of the editors supported the First…

  10. Science, Politics, and Peer Review: An Editor's Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Describes the controversy that arose over an editor's decision to overrule an ad hoc action editor's acceptance of a journal article and request for additional changes to the manuscript. This controversy played out in various Internet discussion groups. Presents the editor's perspective, highlighting the need to protect the integrity and…

  11. Millard coffin is appointed Eos Tectonophysics editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millard F. Coffin, of the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG), has been named the Tectonophysics Editor of Eos for a term extending through 1998. He succeeds Louise Kellogg of the University of California-Davis.Recently, Coffin completed a term as associate editor for the solid Earth section of the Journal of Geophysical Research, and is looking forward to the move from a monthly to a weekly publication. His goal is are to serve the entire tectonophysics community, encompassing marine, terrestrial, and planetary research, through timely and frequent news items, a vigorous idea and results forum, and occasional review articles. He believes that the communication among field workers, experimentalists, and modelers afforded by Eos will benefit tectonophysicists strongly as well as effectively convey tectonophysics results to a broader audience.

  12. Evolutionary theory in letters to the editor.

    PubMed

    Silva, Eric Orion; Lowe, Clayton Cory

    2015-05-01

    This research note presents the results of a content analysis of 234 letters to the editors that discuss evolutionary theory and were published in American newspapers. We find that letters to the editor both support and hinder the cause of teaching evolutionary theory in American secondary schools. On the one hand, anti-evolutionary theory messages are marginalized in the letters section. This marginalization signals a low level of legitimacy for creationism. It might also contribute to the sense of tension that sustains creationist identities. On the other hand, relatively few letters explicitly note the fact that scientists or the scientific community accept evolution. Interestingly, the obscuration of the scientific community's support for evolutionary theory occurs both in letters supporting and opposing evolutionary theory. PMID:25540333

  13. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-05-01

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission: Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur-self-plagiarism and plagiarism from others' works. Self-plagiarism is the publication of substantially

  14. Four are named Editors of Earth Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eric J. Barron of the Earth System Science Center at The Pennsylvania State University has been named chief editor of the new electronic journal, Earth Interactions. This journal will be co-published by AGU, the American Meteorological Society, and the Association of American Geographers. The three societies jointly agreed on the appointment of Barron. Each of the societies also appointed an editor to the board. George F. Hepner for AAG is from the Department of Geography at the University of Utah, David T. Sandwell for AGU is at the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and Kevin E. Trenberth for AMS is at the Climate and Global Dynamics Division at the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

  15. lin-28 Controls the Succession of Cell Fate Choices via Two Distinct Activities

    PubMed Central

    Vadla, Bhaskar; Kemper, Kevin; Alaimo, Jennifer; Heine, Christian; Moss, Eric G.

    2012-01-01

    lin-28 is a conserved regulator of cell fate succession in animals. In Caenorhabditis elegans, it is a component of the heterochronic gene pathway that governs larval developmental timing, while its vertebrate homologs promote pluripotency and control differentiation in diverse tissues. The RNA binding protein encoded by lin-28 can directly inhibit let-7 microRNA processing by a novel mechanism that is conserved from worms to humans. We found that C. elegans LIN-28 protein can interact with four distinct let-7 family pre-microRNAs, but in vivo inhibits the premature accumulation of only let-7. Surprisingly, however, lin-28 does not require let-7 or its relatives for its characteristic promotion of second larval stage cell fates. In other words, we find that the premature accumulation of mature let-7 does not account for lin-28's precocious phenotype. To explain let-7's role in lin-28 activity, we provide evidence that lin-28 acts in two steps: first, the let-7–independent positive regulation of hbl-1 through its 3′UTR to control L2 stage-specific cell fates; and second, a let-7–dependent step that controls subsequent fates via repression of lin-41. Our evidence also indicates that let-7 functions one stage earlier in C. elegans development than previously thought. Importantly, lin-28's two-step mechanism resembles that of the heterochronic gene lin-14, and the overlap of their activities suggests a clockwork mechanism for developmental timing. Furthermore, this model explains the previous observation that mammalian Lin28 has two genetically separable activities. Thus, lin-28's two-step mechanism may be an essential feature of its evolutionarily conserved role in cell fate succession. PMID:22457637

  16. Targeting ornithine decarboxylase reverses the LIN28/Let-7 axis and inhibits glycolytic metabolism in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lozier, Ann M.; Rich, Maria E.; Grawe, Anissa Pedersen; Peck, Anderson S.; Zhao, Ping; Chang, Anthony Ting-Tung; Bond, Jeffrey P.; Sholler, Giselle Saulnier

    2015-01-01

    LIN28 has emerged as an oncogenic driver in a number of cancers, including neuroblastoma (NB). Overexpression of LIN28 correlates with poor outcome in NB, therefore drugs that impact the LIN28/Let-7 pathway could be beneficial in treating NB patients. The LIN28/Let-7 pathway affects many cellular processes including the regulation of cancer stem cells and glycolytic metabolism. Polyamines, regulated by ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) modulate eIF-5A which is a direct regulator of the LIN28/Let-7 axis. We propose that therapy inhibiting ODC will restore balance to the LIN28/Let-7 axis, suppress glycolytic metabolism, and decrease MYCN protein expression in NB. Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) is an inhibitor of ODC in clinical trials for children with NB. In vitro experiments using NB cell lines, BE(2)-C, SMS-KCNR, and CHLA90 show that DFMO treatment reduced LIN28B and MYCN protein levels and increased Let-7 miRNA and decreased neurosphere formation. Glycolytic metabolic activity decreased with DFMO treatment in vivo. Additionally, sensitivity to DFMO treatment correlated with LIN28B overexpression (BE(2)-C>SMS-KCNR>CHLA90). This is the first study to demonstrate that DFMO treatment restores balance to the LIN28/Let-7 axis and inhibits glycolytic metabolism and neurosphere formation in NB and that PET scans may be a meaningful imaging tool to evaluate the therapeutic effects of DFMO treatment. PMID:25415050

  17. Differences in crystallization of two LinB variants from Sphingobium japonicum UT26.

    PubMed

    Degtjarik, Oksana; Chaloupkova, Radka; Rezacova, Pavlina; Kuty, Michal; Damborsky, Jiri; Kuta Smatanova, Ivana

    2013-03-01

    Haloalkane dehalogenases are microbial enzymes that convert a broad range of halogenated aliphatic compounds to their corresponding alcohols by the hydrolytic mechanism. These enzymes play an important role in the biodegradation of various environmental pollutants. Haloalkane dehalogenase LinB isolated from a soil bacterium Sphingobium japonicum UT26 has a relatively broad substrate specificity and can be applied in bioremediation and biosensing of environmental pollutants. The LinB variants presented here, LinB32 and LinB70, were constructed with the goal of studying the effect of mutations on enzyme functionality. In the case of LinB32 (L117W), the introduced mutation leads to blocking of the main tunnel connecting the deeply buried active site with the surrounding solvent. The other variant, LinB70 (L44I, H107Q), has the second halide-binding site in a position analogous to that in the related haloalkane dehalogenase DbeA from Bradyrhizobium elkanii USDA94. Both LinB variants were successfully crystallized and full data sets were collected for native enzymes as well as their complexes with the substrates 1,2-dibromoethane (LinB32) and 1-bromobutane (LinB70) to resolutions ranging from 1.6 to 2.8 Å. The two mutants crystallize differently from each other, which suggests that the mutations, although deep inside the molecule, can still affect the protein crystallizability. PMID:23519805

  18. New “Editor's choice”: Online journals debut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Stephen

    With all AGU journal articles now published online in advance of the printed journal, AGU members have new options, in terms of how they access the latest research results. An innovative option for those with specific research interests that are covered in several journals is the " Editor's Choice" virtual journal. The first two "Editor's Choice" journals—Biogeosciences and Atmospheric Electricity— debuted in January and are, for a limited time, freely accessible to members on the AGU Web site.An "Editor's Choice" virtual journal is a collection of electronic articles recently published by AGU that have been specially selected for their relevance to a particular topic area. Everett Shock of Washington University St. Louis, is serving as the Collection Editor for "Editor's Choice: Biogeosciences." The "Editor's Choice: Atmospheric Electricity" Collection Editor is Richard E. Orville of Texas A&M University College Station, who is being assisted by advisors David Sentman, University of Alaska, and Vladimir Rakov, University of Florida.

  19. Lin28b is sufficient to drive liver cancer and necessary for its maintenance in murine models

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Liem H.; Robinton, Daisy A.; Seligson, Marc; Wu, Linwei; Li, Lin; Rakheja, Dinesh; Comerford, Sarah; Ramezani, Saleh; Sun, Xiankai; Parikh, Monisha; Yang, Erin; Powers, John T.; Shinoda, Gen; Shah, Samar; Hammer, Robert; Daley, George Q.; Zhu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lin28a/b are RNA-binding proteins that influence stem cell maintenance, metabolism, and oncogenesis. Poorly differentiated, aggressive cancers often overexpress Lin28, but its role in tumor initiation or maintenance has not been definitively addressed. We report that LIN28B overexpression is sufficient to initiate hepatoblastoma and hepatocellular carcinoma in murine models. We also detected Lin28b overexpression in MYC-driven hepatoblastomas, and liver-specific deletion of Lin28a/b reduced tumor burden, extended latency, and prolonged survival. Both intravenous siRNA against Lin28b and conditional Lin28b deletion reduced tumor burden and prolonged survival. Igf2bp proteins are upregulated and Igf2bp3 is required in the context of LIN28B overexpression to promote growth. Thus, multiple murine models demonstrate that Lin28b is both sufficient to initiate liver cancer and necessary for its maintenance. PMID:25117712

  20. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission: Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur

  1. Metabolomics of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) transformation: ratio of LinA to LinB determines metabolic fate of HCH isomers.

    PubMed

    Geueke, Birgit; Garg, Nidhi; Ghosh, Sneha; Fleischmann, Thomas; Holliger, Christof; Lal, Rup; Kohler, Hans-Peter E

    2013-04-01

    Although the production and use of technical hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) and lindane (the purified insecticidal isomer γ-HCH) are prohibited in most countries, residual concentrations still constitute an immense environmental burden. Many studies describe the mineralization of γ-HCH by bacterial strains under aerobic conditions. However, the metabolic fate of the other HCH isomers is not well known. In this study, we investigated the transformation of α-, β-, γ-, δ-, ε-HCH, and a heptachlorocyclohexane isomer in the presence of varying ratios of the two enzymes that initiate γ-HCH degradation, a dehydrochlorinase (LinA) and a haloalkane dehalogenase (LinB). Each substrate yielded a unique metabolic profile that was strongly dependent on the enzyme ratio. Comparison of these results to those of in vivo experiments with different bacterial isolates showed that HCH transformation in the tested strains was highly optimized towards productive metabolism of γ-HCH and that under these conditions other HCH-isomers were metabolized to mixtures of dehydrochlorinated and hydroxylated side-products. In view of these results, bioremediation efforts need very careful planning and toxicities of accumulating metabolites need to be evaluated. PMID:23121161

  2. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur-self-plagiarism and plagiarism from others' works. Self-plagiarism is the publication of substantially similar scientific content

  3. MPS Editor - An Integrated Sequencing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara A.; O'Reilly, Taifun; Schrock, Mitchell; Catchen, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    In today's operations environment, the teams are smaller and need to be more efficient while still ensuring the safety and success of the mission. In addition, teams often begin working on a mission in its early development phases and continue on the team through actual operations. For these reasons the operations teams want to be presented with a software environment that integrates multiple needed software applications as well as providing them with context sensitive editing support for entering commands and sequences of commands. At Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Multi-Mission Planning and Sequencing (MPS) Editor provided by the Multi-Mission Ground Systems and Services (MGSS) supports those operational needs.

  4. Lin28A Binds Active Promoters and Recruits Tet1 to Regulate Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yaxue; Yao, Bing; Shin, Jaehoon; Lin, Li; Kim, Namshik; Song, Qifeng; Liu, Shuang; Su, Yijing; Guo, Junjie U; Huang, Luoxiu; Wan, Jun; Wu, Hao; Qian, Jiang; Cheng, Xiaodong; Zhu, Heng; Ming, Guo-li; Jin, Peng; Song, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    Lin28, a well-known RNA-binding protein, regulates diverse cellular properties. All physiological functions of Lin28A characterized so far have been attributed to its repression of let-7 miRNA biogenesis or modulation of mRNA translational efficiency. Here we show that Lin28A directly binds to a consensus DNA sequence in vitro and in mouse embryonic stem cells in vivo. ChIP-seq and RNA-seq reveal enrichment of Lin28A binding around transcription start sites and a positive correlation between its genomic occupancy and expression of many associated genes. Mechanistically, Lin28A recruits 5-methylcytosine-dioxygenase Tet1 to genomic binding sites to orchestrate 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine dynamics. Either Lin28A or Tet1 knockdown leads to dysregulated DNA methylation and expression of common target genes. These results reveal a surprising role for Lin28A in transcriptional regulation via epigenetic DNA modifications and have implications for understanding mechanisms underlying versatile functions of Lin28A in mammalian systems. PMID:26711009

  5. Clinicopathological Characteristics of Patients with Gastric Cancer according to the Expression of LIN28A

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Hyuk; Lee, Jung Hwa; Lee, Na Keum; Lee, Yong Chan; Lee, Sang Kil

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Although LIN28A is known to potentially play a role in the oncogenesis of various cancers, whether LIN28A expression is a predictor of poor prognosis in patients with gastric cancer has not been fully explored. We sought to evaluate clinicopathological characteristics according to the expression of LIN28A in numerous gastric cancer tissue samples. Methods LIN28A expression was evaluated by immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of a tissue microarray comprising 288 gastric cancer tissues and 288 adjacent normal tissues. Clinicopathological characteristics, including overall survival, were compared according to LIN28A expression. Results The IHC staining score was lower for the cancer tissues than the normal tissues (p<0.001). However, no significant differences were observed in the clinicopathological characteristics between the low and high LIN28A expression groups. In addition, the 5-year overall survival rate did not differ between the two groups: 75.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 69.3% to 81.7%) versus 71.6% (95% CI, 63.3% to 80.9%) for low versus high expression, respectively. Conclusions The expression of LIN28A did not appear to play a distinct role in predicting the clinicopathological characteristics of patients with gastric cancer. In addition, LIN28A expression was not an independently associated factor for overall survival in patients with gastric cancer. PMID:26893371

  6. A Tisket, A Tasket--Out of the Editor's Basket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Kathryn R.

    2001-05-01

    In September 1940, the Journal introduced Out of the Editor's Basket for short items of interest: excerpts from letters, pamphlets, newspapers, and periodicals. By 1950, however, the Editor's Basket had evolved into a bulletin board for descriptions of new products and services, and it now contains almost exclusively press releases about recently marketed items. Now over 60 years old, the Editor's Basket still provides interesting tidbits for the Journal's broad readership.

  7. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-05-01

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission: Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur-self-plagiarism and plagiarism from others' works. Self-plagiarism is the publication of substantially

  8. From the Board of Editors: on Plagiarism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    Dear Colleagues: There has been a significant increase in the number of duplicate submissions and plagiarism cases reported in all major journals, including the journals of the Optical Society of America. Duplicate submissions and plagiarism can take many forms, and all of them are violations of professional ethics, the copyright agreement that an author signs along with the submission of a paper, and OSA's published Author Guidelines. There must be a significant component of new science for a paper to be publishable. The copying of large segments of text from previously published or in-press papers with only minor cosmetic changes is not acceptable and can lead to the rejection of papers. Duplicate submission: Duplicate submission is the most common ethics violation encountered. Duplicate submission is the submission of substantially similar papers to more than one journal. There is a misperception in a small fraction of the scientific community that duplicate submission is acceptable because it sometimes takes a long time to get a paper reviewed and because one of the papers can be withdrawn at any time. This is a clear violation of professional ethics and of the copyright agreement that is signed on submission. Duplicate submission harms the whole community because editors and reviewers waste their time and in the process compound the time it takes to get a paper reviewed for all authors. In cases of duplicate submission, the Editor of the affected OSA journal will consult with the Editor of the other journal involved to determine the proper course of action. Often that action will be the rejection of both papers. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is a serious breach of ethics and is defined as the substantial replication, without attribution, of significant elements of another document already published by the same or other authors. Two types of plagiarism can occur-self-plagiarism and plagiarism from others' works. Self-plagiarism is the publication of substantially

  9. Information Scientists: Between Editors and Data Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouty, M.; Woelfel, F.; Bruneau, C.; Brunet, C.; Claude, H.; Dubois, P.; Eisele, A.; Genova, F.; Lesteven, S.; Neuville, M.; Ochsenbein, F.; Perret, E.; Vannier, P.; Vonflie, P.; Chassagnard, G.

    2010-10-01

    Since the emergence of electronic publications in the early 1990s, astronomy has played a pioneering role in the development and implementation of new capabilities and services. As a data center, the CDS contributed significantly to this evolution: a synergy between data centers and journal editors started in the 1990s with the publication of large tables and data sets in electronic form and contributed to an efficient linking of publications with existing databases like SIMBAD or NED. This collaborative work, carried out in practice by information scientists, illustrates a new role for us who now have to deal with both editor and database requirements. After a short description of the CDS, we present our peculiar responsibilities related to the publication process: ensuring, prior to publication, that the link from selected objects quoted by the authors in their papers to the SIMBAD database is correct and maintained in the long term, that the tables and their complete descriptions are accessible through VizieR, and that the data and bibliography are correctly entered in SIMBAD. The Dictionary of Nomenclature, which plays an important role in these procedures, is briefly presented. Finally, the skills we developed for these activities are shortly discussed.

  10. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidström, Suzanne

    2012-04-01

    When Professor Anders Bárány took over as the Executive Editor of Physica Scripta, in 1986, he talked of his trepidation at having to 'dress himself' in his predecessor's 'editorial coveralls'. At that time, they had been worn by Professor Nils Robert Nilsson, a major figure in the physics community, for almost 20 years. Just one year prior to this, Professor Roger Wäppling had been recruited to the position of Subeditor in conjunction with a decision to expand the number of contributions in the field of condensed matter physics, to turn it into one of the dominant subjects in the broad-based journal. Physica Scripta had already gained a reputation for being a high quality journal with wide coverage of both experimental and theoretical physics. Interestingly, in the mid 1980s, the number of papers submitted had been growing and an impressive 250 submissions per year had been attained, with all of the manuscripts being handled in-house. Not many miles away in the town of Uppsala, a group of English students was stepping off a train on a magnificent snowy day in January to embark on their final year projects. A couple of us enjoyed ourselves so much that we stayed on afterwards as PhD students, thereby encountering the mixed pleasure of studying physics in a second language for the first time. I used to copy the notes down meticulously in Swedish, then try to work backwards with a textbook to improve my language skills. One day, returning from a particularly incomprehensible lecture on solid state physics, I showed my roommates my notes and asked if they could please explain what the lecture had been about: 'I don't know', they replied, 'but this bit is about sheep!' Meanwhile, back at Physica Scripta, the journal continued to flourish: 400 submissions were received in 1996, and the march of progress was well underway. Manuscripts could now be sent in on disks and Physica Scripta was available on the World Wide Web. Roger was appointed to manage the journal and

  11. Bacterial diversity and real-time PCR based assessment of linA and linB gene distribution at hexachlorocyclohexane contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Lal, Devi; Jindal, Swati; Kumari, Hansi; Jit, Simran; Nigam, Aeshna; Sharma, Pooja; Kumari, Kirti; Lal, Rup

    2015-03-01

    The disposal of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) muck has created large number of HCH dumpsites all over the world from where the harmful HCH isomers are leaking into the environment. Bacteria have evolved at such contaminated sites that have the ability to degrade HCH. Degradation of various HCH isomers in bacterial strains is mediated primarily by two genes: linA and linB which encode dehydrochlorinase and haloalkane dehalogenase respectively. In this study we explored one such highly contaminated HCH dumpsite located in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India. To assess the biostimulation potential of the contaminated site, microbial diversity study and real-time PCR based quantification of lin genes was carried out. The soil samples from dumpsite and surrounding areas were found to be highly contaminated with HCH residue levels as high as 1.8 × 10(5)  mg kg(-1). The residues were detected in areas upto 13 km from the dumpsite. Sphingomonads, Chromohalobacter, and Marinobacter were the dominant genera present at the dump-site. Role of Sphingomonads in HCH degradation has been well documented. The highest copy numbers of linA and linB genes as determined using real-time PCR were 6.2 × 10(4) and 5.3 × 10(5), respectively, were found in sample from the dump site. The presence of Sphingomonads, linA, and linB genes from HCH contaminated soil indicates the presence of indigenous bacterial communities capable of HCH degradation. PMID:24002962

  12. Lin28 and let-7: roles and regulation in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Kelly; Hall, Chad; Sato, Keisaku; Lairmore, Terry; Marzioni, Marco; Glaser, Shannon; Meng, Fanyin; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2016-05-15

    The diagnosis and treatment of liver disease remain a major health concern worldwide because of the diverse etiologies of this disease. For this reason, new therapeutic targets are greatly needed to halt the progression of this damaging disease. Upon initiation of liver injury by viral infection, autoimmune disease or toxin, and/or hepatitis, chronic disease may develop, which can progress to cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), cholangiocarcinoma, liver failure, or death. The Lin28/lethal-7 (let-7) molecular switch has emerged as a central regulator of multiorgan injuries and cancer development. Lin28 is a stem cell marker vital to initiation or maintenance of a stem cell phenotype. Lin28 has not been extensively studied in the liver, despite its ability to induce tissue regeneration via reprogramming of oxidative enzymes in other tissues and its involvement with numerous upstream regulators and downstream targets in liver disease. Theoretically, overexpression of Lin28 in certain forms of liver disease could be a potential treatment that aids in liver regeneration. Alternatively, Lin28 has been implicated numerous times in the progression of diverse cancer types and is associated with increased severity of disease. In this case, Lin28 could be a potential inhibitory target to prevent malignant transformation in the liver. This review seeks to characterize the role of Lin28 in liver disease. PMID:27012771

  13. The role of Lin28b in myeloid and mast cell differentiation and mast cell malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leo D.; Rao, Tata Nageswara; Rowe, R. Grant; Nguyen, Phi T.; Sullivan, Jessica L.; Pearson, Daniel S.; Doulatov, Sergei; Wu, Linwei; Lindsley, R. Coleman; Zhu, Hao; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Daley, George Q.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are critical components of the innate immune system and important for host defense, allergy, autoimmunity, tissue regeneration, and tumor progression. Dysregulated mast cell development leads to systemic mastocytosis, a clinically variable but often devastating family of hematologic disorders. Here we report that induced expression of Lin28, a heterochronic gene and pluripotency factor implicated in driving a fetal hematopoietic program, caused mast cell accumulation in adult mice in target organs such as the skin and peritoneal cavity. In vitro assays revealed a skewing of myeloid commitment in LIN28B-expressing hematopoietic progenitors, with increased levels of LIN28B in common myeloid and basophil-mast cell progenitors altering gene expression patterns to favor cell fate choices that enhanced mast cell specification. In addition, LIN28B-induced mast cells appeared phenotypically and functionally immature, and in vitro assays suggested a slowing of mast cell terminal differentiation in the context of LIN28B upregulation. Finally, interrogation of human mast cell leukemia samples revealed upregulation of LIN28B in abnormal mast cells from patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM). This work identifies Lin28 as a novel regulator of innate immune function and a new protein of interest in mast cell disease. PMID:25655194

  14. John F. Dewey—Tectonics Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    ‘I want the journal to acquire a reputation for very rapid, fair, and accurate reviewing,’ asserted John F. Dewey, editor-in-chief of AGU's newest journal, Tectonics. Dewey said that he will rule the bimonthly, which will begin publication in February, ‘with a bit of a rod of iron’ to ensure that Tectonics is ‘where only original and important papers are published.’‘I'm going to be very strict with reviewers,’ Dewey explained in his quick British clip. ‘If the review does not come back to me within 10 days to 2 weeks, I'll review the paper myself. I'm also going to have a system whereby, if a paper needs major surgery after being refereed, it will be rejected. Papers will have to be in virtually publishable condition before they are first submitted,’ he said.

  15. LIN28A Modulates Splicing and Gene Expression Programs in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Bennett, Brian D; Luo, Shujun; Inoue, Kaoru; Grimm, Sara A; Schroth, Gary P; Bushel, Pierre R; Kinyamu, H Karimi; Archer, Trevor K

    2015-09-01

    LIN28 is an evolutionarily conserved RNA-binding protein with critical functions in developmental timing and cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying LIN28's oncogenic properties are yet to be described. RNA-protein immunoprecipitation coupled with genome-wide sequencing (RIP-Seq) analysis revealed significant LIN28 binding within 843 mRNAs in breast cancer cells. Many of the LIN28-bound mRNAs are implicated in the regulation of RNA and cell metabolism. We identify heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1), a protein with multiple roles in mRNA metabolism, as a LIN28-interacting partner. Subsequently, we used a custom computational method to identify differentially spliced gene isoforms in LIN28 and hnRNP A1 small interfering RNA (siRNA)-treated cells. The results reveal that these proteins regulate alternative splicing and steady-state mRNA expression of genes implicated in aspects of breast cancer biology. Notably, cells lacking LIN28 undergo significant isoform switching of the ENAH gene, resulting in a decrease in the expression of the ENAH exon 11a isoform. The expression of ENAH isoform 11a has been shown to be elevated in breast cancers that express HER2. Intriguingly, analysis of publicly available array data from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) reveals that LIN28 expression in the HER2 subtype is significantly different from that in other breast cancer subtypes. Collectively, our data suggest that LIN28 may regulate splicing and gene expression programs that drive breast cancer subtype phenotypes. PMID:26149387

  16. LIN28A Modulates Splicing and Gene Expression Programs in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Bennett, Brian D.; Luo, Shujun; Inoue, Kaoru; Grimm, Sara A.; Schroth, Gary P.; Bushel, Pierre R.

    2015-01-01

    LIN28 is an evolutionarily conserved RNA-binding protein with critical functions in developmental timing and cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying LIN28's oncogenic properties are yet to be described. RNA-protein immunoprecipitation coupled with genome-wide sequencing (RIP-Seq) analysis revealed significant LIN28 binding within 843 mRNAs in breast cancer cells. Many of the LIN28-bound mRNAs are implicated in the regulation of RNA and cell metabolism. We identify heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1), a protein with multiple roles in mRNA metabolism, as a LIN28-interacting partner. Subsequently, we used a custom computational method to identify differentially spliced gene isoforms in LIN28 and hnRNP A1 small interfering RNA (siRNA)-treated cells. The results reveal that these proteins regulate alternative splicing and steady-state mRNA expression of genes implicated in aspects of breast cancer biology. Notably, cells lacking LIN28 undergo significant isoform switching of the ENAH gene, resulting in a decrease in the expression of the ENAH exon 11a isoform. The expression of ENAH isoform 11a has been shown to be elevated in breast cancers that express HER2. Intriguingly, analysis of publicly available array data from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) reveals that LIN28 expression in the HER2 subtype is significantly different from that in other breast cancer subtypes. Collectively, our data suggest that LIN28 may regulate splicing and gene expression programs that drive breast cancer subtype phenotypes. PMID:26149387

  17. Crystal structure of the hexachlorocyclohexane dehydrochlorinase (LinA-type2): mutational analysis, thermostability and enantioselectivity.

    PubMed

    Macwan, Ankit S; Kukshal, Vandna; Srivastava, Nidhi; Javed, Saleem; Kumar, Ashwani; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2012-01-01

    Hexachlorocyclohexane dehydrochlorinase (LinA) mediates dehydrochlorination of γ-HCH to 1, 3, 4, 6-tetrachloro-1,4-cyclohexadiene that constitutes first step of the aerobic degradation pathway. We report the 3.5 Å crystal structure of a thermostable LinA-type2 protein, obtained from a soil metagenome, in the hexagonal space group P6(3)22 with unit cell parameters a = b = 162.5, c = 186.3 Å, respectively. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the co-ordinates of LinA-type1 that exhibits mesophile-like properties. Structural comparison of LinA-type2 and -type1 proteins suggests that thermostability of LinA-type2 might partly arise due to presence of higher number of ionic interactions, along with 4% increase in the intersubunit buried surface area. Mutational analysis involving the differing residues between the -type1 and -type2 proteins, circular dichroism experiments and functional assays suggest that Q20 and G23 are determinants of stability for LinA-type2. It was earlier reported that LinA-type1 exhibits enantioselectivity for the (-) enantiomer of α-HCH. Contrastingly, we identified that -type2 protein prefers the (+) enantiomer of α-HCH. Structural analysis and molecular docking experiments suggest that changed residues K20Q, L96C and A131G, vicinal to the active site are probably responsible for the altered enantioselectivity of LinA-type2. Overall the study has identified features responsible for the thermostability and enantioselectivity of LinA-type2 that can be exploited for the design of variants for specific biotechnological applications. PMID:23209726

  18. The RNA-binding protein LIN28B regulates developmental timing in the mammalian cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Erin J.; Benito-Gonzalez, Ana; Doetzlhofer, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Proper tissue development requires strict coordination of proliferation, growth, and differentiation. Strict coordination is particularly important for the auditory sensory epithelium, where deviations from the normal spatial and temporal pattern of auditory progenitor cell (prosensory cell) proliferation and differentiation result in abnormal cellular organization and, thus, auditory dysfunction. The molecular mechanisms involved in the timing and coordination of auditory prosensory proliferation and differentiation are poorly understood. Here we identify the RNA-binding protein LIN28B as a critical regulator of developmental timing in the murine cochlea. We show that Lin28b and its opposing let-7 miRNAs are differentially expressed in the auditory sensory lineage, with Lin28b being highly expressed in undifferentiated prosensory cells and let-7 miRNAs being highly expressed in their progeny—hair cells (HCs) and supporting cells (SCs). Using recently developed transgenic mouse models for LIN28B and let-7g, we demonstrate that prolonged LIN28B expression delays prosensory cell cycle withdrawal and differentiation, resulting in HC and SC patterning and maturation defects. Surprisingly, let-7g overexpression, although capable of inducing premature prosensory cell cycle exit, failed to induce premature HC differentiation, suggesting that LIN28B’s functional role in the timing of differentiation uses let-7 independent mechanisms. Finally, we demonstrate that overexpression of LIN28B or let-7g can significantly alter the postnatal production of HCs in response to Notch inhibition; LIN28B has a positive effect on HC production, whereas let-7 antagonizes this process. Together, these results implicate a key role for the LIN28B/let-7 axis in regulating postnatal SC plasticity. PMID:26139524

  19. The RNA-binding protein LIN28B regulates developmental timing in the mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Golden, Erin J; Benito-Gonzalez, Ana; Doetzlhofer, Angelika

    2015-07-21

    Proper tissue development requires strict coordination of proliferation, growth, and differentiation. Strict coordination is particularly important for the auditory sensory epithelium, where deviations from the normal spatial and temporal pattern of auditory progenitor cell (prosensory cell) proliferation and differentiation result in abnormal cellular organization and, thus, auditory dysfunction. The molecular mechanisms involved in the timing and coordination of auditory prosensory proliferation and differentiation are poorly understood. Here we identify the RNA-binding protein LIN28B as a critical regulator of developmental timing in the murine cochlea. We show that Lin28b and its opposing let-7 miRNAs are differentially expressed in the auditory sensory lineage, with Lin28b being highly expressed in undifferentiated prosensory cells and let-7 miRNAs being highly expressed in their progeny-hair cells (HCs) and supporting cells (SCs). Using recently developed transgenic mouse models for LIN28B and let-7g, we demonstrate that prolonged LIN28B expression delays prosensory cell cycle withdrawal and differentiation, resulting in HC and SC patterning and maturation defects. Surprisingly, let-7g overexpression, although capable of inducing premature prosensory cell cycle exit, failed to induce premature HC differentiation, suggesting that LIN28B's functional role in the timing of differentiation uses let-7 independent mechanisms. Finally, we demonstrate that overexpression of LIN28B or let-7g can significantly alter the postnatal production of HCs in response to Notch inhibition; LIN28B has a positive effect on HC production, whereas let-7 antagonizes this process. Together, these results implicate a key role for the LIN28B/let-7 axis in regulating postnatal SC plasticity. PMID:26139524

  20. Peer reviews and the role of a journal editor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obtaining peer reviews for manuscripts submitted to scientific journals is becoming increasingly difficult. Changes to the system are necessary, and editors must cultivate and maintain a solid base of reviewers to help evaluate journal submissions. This article outlines some steps editors can and sh...

  1. Technical Writing Style: Preferences of Scientists, Editors, and Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnellan, LaRae M.

    To determine whether scientists and science students would accept a simplified writing style, two studies were conducted. In the first study, respondents--1,089 scientists from agricultural experiment stations, 20 station editors, and 59 editors of scientific journals--answered a questionnaire requesting biographical information and reactions to a…

  2. The RAE and Publications: A Review of Journal Editors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talib, Ameen Ali

    2000-01-01

    Surveyed editors of academic journals about publication issues related to Britain's Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), a process of grading and funding universities based on published research output. Editors were asked about research quality and output, publication practices, academics' willingness to referee manuscripts, and proliferation of…

  3. How Newspaper Editors Reacted to "Post's" Pulitzer Prize Hoax.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Douglas A.

    1982-01-01

    Reports the findings of a nationwide survey of newspaper editors, revealing that most thought that the Janet Cooke hoax had been poorly handled by the "Washington Post." Notes that most of the editors said their newspapers had systems of review for stories coming from anonymous sources. (FL)

  4. Advisers, Editors and Principals Judge First Amendment Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broussard, E. Joseph; Blackmon, C. Robert

    1978-01-01

    A test of the knowledge of 378 high school publications advisers, editors, and principals regarding First Amendment rights revealed that advisers had the most knowledge, followed by editors and then by principals. Characteristics of the most knowledgeable advisers were then identified. (GT)

  5. Journal Editor Perceptions of Universities: Some Empirical Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainardes, Emerson Wagner; Raposo, Mario; Alves, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Out of considerations as to the importance of university relationships with their various stakeholders, the primary objective of this research project was to identify the perceptions of academic journal editors regarding universities. Editors were asked to provide their perceptions on: (a) the relevance of universities to academic publications;…

  6. Editors and author resource centers actively used by attendees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, Barbara

    2012-02-01

    At the 2011 Fall Meeting, as in previous years, the Editors Resource Center located on the second floor of Moscone West was buzzing with activity: editors talking with other editors, collaborating with associate editors, speaking with authors, and meeting with students. In addition, several editors took part in "Meet the Editor" informal sessions, a new feature introduced for the 2011 meeting to strengthen the partnership between authors and editors. The map "Where are you from?" (see photo), outside the Editors Resource Center, drew the attention of many attendees who were eager to place their colored dots on the map. The Author Resource Center, located in the AGU Marketplace, became a hub for AGU veteran authors and potential authors alike. Staff were there to answer both editorial and technical questions, especially the most frequent one: What happens after my paper is accepted? The running slideshow that described all aspects of the AGU publications program sparked a myriad of questions, which AGU staff were happy to answer.

  7. Crystal structure and site-directed mutagenesis analyses of haloalkane dehalogenase LinB from Sphingobium sp. strain MI1205.

    PubMed

    Okai, Masahiko; Ohtsuka, Jun; Imai, Lica Fabiana; Mase, Tomoko; Moriuchi, Ryota; Tsuda, Masataka; Nagata, Koji; Nagata, Yuji; Tanokura, Masaru

    2013-06-01

    The enzymes LinB(UT) and LinB(MI) (LinB from Sphingobium japonicum UT26 and Sphingobium sp. MI1205, respectively) catalyze the hydrolytic dechlorination of β-hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH) and yield different products, 2,3,4,5,6-pentachlorocyclohexanol (PCHL) and 2,3,5,6-tetrachlorocyclohexane-1,4-diol (TCDL), respectively, despite their 98% identity in amino acid sequence. To reveal the structural basis of their different enzymatic properties, we performed site-directed mutagenesis and X-ray crystallographic studies of LinB(MI) and its seven point mutants. The mutation analysis revealed that the seven amino acid residues uniquely found in LinB(MI) were categorized into three groups based on the efficiency of the first-step (from β-HCH to PCHL) and second-step (from PCHL to TCDL) conversions. Crystal structure analyses of wild-type LinB(MI) and its seven point mutants indicated how each mutated residue contributed to the first- and second-step conversions by LinB(MI). The dynamics simulation analyses of wild-type LinB(MI) and LinB(UT) revealed that the entrance of the substrate access tunnel of LinB(UT) was more flexible than that of LinB(MI), which could lead to the different efficiencies of dehalogenation activity between these dehalogenases. PMID:23564170

  8. Crystal Structure and Site-Directed Mutagenesis Analyses of Haloalkane Dehalogenase LinB from Sphingobium sp. Strain MI1205

    PubMed Central

    Okai, Masahiko; Ohtsuka, Jun; Imai, Lica Fabiana; Mase, Tomoko; Moriuchi, Ryota; Tsuda, Masataka; Nagata, Koji; Nagata, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    The enzymes LinBUT and LinBMI (LinB from Sphingobium japonicum UT26 and Sphingobium sp. MI1205, respectively) catalyze the hydrolytic dechlorination of β-hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH) and yield different products, 2,3,4,5,6-pentachlorocyclohexanol (PCHL) and 2,3,5,6-tetrachlorocyclohexane-1,4-diol (TCDL), respectively, despite their 98% identity in amino acid sequence. To reveal the structural basis of their different enzymatic properties, we performed site-directed mutagenesis and X-ray crystallographic studies of LinBMI and its seven point mutants. The mutation analysis revealed that the seven amino acid residues uniquely found in LinBMI were categorized into three groups based on the efficiency of the first-step (from β-HCH to PCHL) and second-step (from PCHL to TCDL) conversions. Crystal structure analyses of wild-type LinBMI and its seven point mutants indicated how each mutated residue contributed to the first- and second-step conversions by LinBMI. The dynamics simulation analyses of wild-type LinBMI and LinBUT revealed that the entrance of the substrate access tunnel of LinBUT was more flexible than that of LinBMI, which could lead to the different efficiencies of dehalogenation activity between these dehalogenases. PMID:23564170

  9. Academic Degradation and the Retreat of the Editors: Academic Irregularities and the Spreading of Academic Corruption from an Editor's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xun, Gong

    2007-01-01

    Against the backdrop of the grave academic crisis in China, editors have become the objects of wooing, favor-currying, connections-seeking, and collusions; they have been targeted for attacks, plots, extortions, and encroachments. Editing and publishing have become avenues for academic irregularities and academic corruption. Editors have the power…

  10. SIMPLE Imaging and Mosaicking PipeLinE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.-H.

    2010-12-01

    The SIMPLE Imaging and Mosaicking PipeLinE (SIMPLE) is an Interactive Data Language based data reduction environment designed for processing optical and near-IR data obtained from wide-field mosaic cameras. It has standard functions for flat fielding, sky subtraction, distortion correction, and photometric and astrometric calibrations. One of the key features of SIMPLE is the ability to correct for image distortion from a set of dithered exposures without relying on any external information (e.g., distortion function of the optics, or an external astrometric catalog). This is achieved by deriving the first-order derivatives of the distortion function directly out of the dithered images. This greatly help to produce accurate astrometry as well as to preserve image sharpness in the mosaicked/stacked image. Although SIMPLE is designed toward a general reduction environment, the current distribution of SIMPLE has two highly optimized packages, one for the Wide-field InfraRed Camera on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and the other for the Multi-Object InfraRed Camera and Spectrograph on the Subaru Telescope. Future SIMPLE distributions will include more optimized reduction packages for different instruments.

  11. Martin Stutzmann: Editor, Teacher, Scientist and Friend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel

    2005-03-01

    On 2 January 1995 Martin Stutzmann became Editor-in-Chief of physica status solidi, replacing Professor E. Gutsche, who had led the journal through the stormy period involving the fall of the Iron Curtain, the unification of Germany and the change in its Eastern part, where physica status solidi was based, from socialism as found in the real world (a German concept) to real world capitalism. In 1995 it was thought that the process had been completed (we should have known better!) and after the retirement of Prof. Gutsche the new owners of physica status solidi (Wiley-VCH) decided that a change in scientific management was desirable to adapt to the new socio-political facts and to insure the scientific continuity of the journal.Martin had moved in 1993 from my department at the Max-Planck-Institute to Munich where he soon displayed a tremendous amount of science man- agement ability during the build-up of the Walter Schottky Institute. The search for a successor as Edi- tor-in-Chief was not easy: the job was not very glamorous after the upheavals which had taken place in the editorial world following the political changes. Somebody in the Editorial Boards must have suggested Martin Stutzmann. I am sure that there was opposition: one usually looks for a well-established person ready to leave his direct involvement in science and take up a new endeavor of a more administrative nature. Nevertheless, the powers that be soon realized that Martin was an excellent, if somewhat unconventional candidate who had enough energy to remain a topnotch scientist and to lead the journal in the difficult times ahead: he was offered the job. In the negotiations that followed, he insisted in getting the administrative structures that would allow him to improve the battered quality of the journal and to continue his scientific productivity. Today we are happy to see that he succeeded in both endeavors. The journal has since grown in size and considerably improved its quality

  12. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidström, Suzanne

    2012-04-01

    When Professor Anders Bárány took over as the Executive Editor of Physica Scripta, in 1986, he talked of his trepidation at having to 'dress himself' in his predecessor's 'editorial coveralls'. At that time, they had been worn by Professor Nils Robert Nilsson, a major figure in the physics community, for almost 20 years. Just one year prior to this, Professor Roger Wäppling had been recruited to the position of Subeditor in conjunction with a decision to expand the number of contributions in the field of condensed matter physics, to turn it into one of the dominant subjects in the broad-based journal. Physica Scripta had already gained a reputation for being a high quality journal with wide coverage of both experimental and theoretical physics. Interestingly, in the mid 1980s, the number of papers submitted had been growing and an impressive 250 submissions per year had been attained, with all of the manuscripts being handled in-house. Not many miles away in the town of Uppsala, a group of English students was stepping off a train on a magnificent snowy day in January to embark on their final year projects. A couple of us enjoyed ourselves so much that we stayed on afterwards as PhD students, thereby encountering the mixed pleasure of studying physics in a second language for the first time. I used to copy the notes down meticulously in Swedish, then try to work backwards with a textbook to improve my language skills. One day, returning from a particularly incomprehensible lecture on solid state physics, I showed my roommates my notes and asked if they could please explain what the lecture had been about: 'I don't know', they replied, 'but this bit is about sheep!' Meanwhile, back at Physica Scripta, the journal continued to flourish: 400 submissions were received in 1996, and the march of progress was well underway. Manuscripts could now be sent in on disks and Physica Scripta was available on the World Wide Web. Roger was appointed to manage the journal and

  13. A role of uridylation pathway for blockade of let-7 microRNA biogenesis by Lin28B

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hiroshi I; Katsura, Akihiro; Miyazono, Kohei

    2015-01-01

    The precise control of microRNA (miRNA) biosynthesis is crucial for gene regulation. Lin28A and Lin28B are selective inhibitors of biogenesis of let-7 miRNAs involved in development and tumorigenesis. Lin28A selectively inhibits let-7 biogenesis through cytoplasmic uridylation of precursor let-7 by TUT4 terminal uridyl transferase and subsequent degradation by Dis3l2 exonuclease. However, a role of this uridylation pathway remains unclear in let-7 blockade by Lin28B, a paralog of Lin28A, while Lin28B is reported to engage a distinct mechanism in the nucleus to suppress let-7. Here we revisit a functional link between Lin28B and the uridylation pathway with a focus on let-7 metabolism in cancer cells. Both Lin28A and Lin28B interacted with Dis3l2 in the cytoplasm, and silencing of Dis3l2 upregulated uridylated pre-let-7 in both Lin28A- and Lin28B-expressing cancer cell lines. In addition, we found that amounts of let-7 precursors influenced intracellular localization of Lin28B. Furthermore, we found that MCPIP1 (Zc3h12a) ribonuclease was also involved in degradation of both non-uridylated and uridylated pre-let-7. Cancer transcriptome analysis showed association of expression levels of Lin28B and uridylation pathway components, TUT4 and Dis3l2, in various human cancer cells and hepatocellular carcinoma. Collectively, these results suggest that cytoplasmic uridylation pathway actively participates in blockade of let-7 biogenesis by Lin28B. PMID:26080928

  14. Role of an adaptor protein Lin-7B in brain development: possible involvement in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Makoto; Matsumoto, Ayumi; Hamada, Nanako; Ito, Hidenori; Miyauchi, Akihiko; Jimbo, Eriko F; Momoi, Mariko Y; Tabata, Hidenori; Yamagata, Takanori; Nagata, Koh-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Using comparative genomic hybridization analysis for an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patient, a 73-Kb duplication at 19q13.33 (nt. 49 562 755-49 635 956) including LIN7B and 5 other genes was detected. We then identified a novel frameshift mutation in LIN7B in another ASD patient. Since LIN7B encodes a scaffold protein essential for neuronal function, we analyzed the role of Lin-7B in the development of cerebral cortex. Acute knockdown of Lin-7B with in utero electroporation caused a delay in neuronal migration during corticogenesis. When Lin-7B was knocked down in cortical neurons in one hemisphere, their axons failed to extend efficiently into the contralateral hemisphere after leaving the corpus callosum. Meanwhile, enhanced expression of Lin-7B had no effects on both cortical neuron migration and axon growth. Notably, silencing of Lin-7B did not affect the proliferation of neuronal progenitors and stem cells. Taken together, Lin-7B was found to play a pivotal role in corticogenesis through the regulation of excitatory neuron migration and interhemispheric axon growth, while further analyses are required to directly link functional defects of Lin-7B to ASD pathophysiology. Lin-7 plays a pivotal role as a scaffold protein in synaptic development and plasticity. Based on genetic analyses we identified mutations in LIN-7B gene in some ASD (autism-spectrum disorder) patients. Functional defects in Lin-7B caused abnormal neuronal migration and interhemispheric axon growth during mouse brain development. Thus, functional deficiency in Lin-7B could be implicated in clinical phenotypes in some ASD patients through bringing about abnormal cortical architecture. PMID:25196215

  15. LinA2, a HCH-converting bacterial enzyme that dehydrohalogenates HBCDs.

    PubMed

    Heeb, Norbert V; Wyss, Simon A; Geueke, Birgit; Fleischmann, Thomas; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Lienemann, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) are lipophilic, polyhalogenated hydrocarbons with comparable stereochemistry. Bacterial evolution in HCH-contaminated soils resulted in the development of several Spingomonadaceae which express a series of HCH-converting enzymes. We showed that LinB, a haloalkane dehalogenase from Sphingobium indicum B90A, also transforms various HBCDs besides HCHs. Here we present evidence that LinA2, another dehalogenase from S. indicum also converts certain HBCDs to pentabromocyclododecenes (PBCDEs). Racemic mixtures of α-, β-, γ-HBCDs, a mixture of them, and δ-HBCD, a meso form, were exposed to LinA2. Substantial conversion of (-)β-HBCD was observed, but all other stereoisomers were not transformed significantly. The enantiomeric excess (EE) of β-HBCDs increased up to 60% in 32 h, whereas EE values of α- and γ-HBCDs were not affected. Substrate conversion and product formation were described with second-order kinetic models. One major (P1β) and possibly two minor (P2β, P3β) metabolites were detected. Respective mass spectra showed the characteristic isotope pattern of PBCDEs, the HBr elimination products of HBCDs. Michaelis-Menten parameters KM=0.47 ± 0.07 μM and vmax=0.17 ± 0.01 μmoll(-1)h(-1) were deduced from exposure data with varying enzyme/substrate ratios. LinA2 is more substrate specific than LinB, the latter converted all tested HBCDs, LinA2 only one. The widespread HCH pollution favored the selection and evolution of bacteria converting these compounds. We found that LinA2 and LinB, two of these HCH-converting enzymes expressed in S. indicum B90A, also dehalogenate HBCDs to lower brominated compounds, indicating that structural similarities of both classes of compounds are recognized at the level of substrate-protein interactions. PMID:24444415

  16. Another Security Improvement over the Lin et al.'s E-voting Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaar, Maryam Rajabzadeh; Mohajeri, Javad; Salmasizadeh, Mahmoud

    In 2003, Lin et al. have proposed an electronic voting scheme which can be utilized in large-scale elections, and claimed it detects double voting. But in this paper, by presenting an attack, we show that voters can successfully vote more than once without being detected. Hence, we propose a new modified scheme based on the Lin et al.'s scheme with the same efficiency to solve this weakness and analyze its security.

  17. Structure and Mechanism of the Lincosamide Antibiotic adenylyltransferase LinB

    SciTech Connect

    Morar, M.; Buhllar, K; Hughes, D; Junop, M; Wright, G

    2009-01-01

    Lincosamides make up an important class of antibiotics used against a wide range of pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Predictably, lincosamide-resistant microorganisms have emerged with antibiotic modification as one of their major resistance strategies. Inactivating enzymes LinB/A catalyze adenylylation of the drug; however, little is known about their mechanistic and structural properties. We determined two X-ray structures of LinB: ternary substrate and binary productbound complexes. Structural and kinetic characterization of LinB, mutagenesis, solvent isotope effect, and product inhibition studies are consistent with a mechanism involving direct in-line nucleotidyl transfer. The characterization of LinB enabled its classification as a member of a nucleotidyltransferase superfamily, along with nucleotide polymerases and aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases, and this relationship offers further support for the LinB mechanism. The LinB structure provides an evolutionary link to ancient nucleotide polymerases and suggests that, like protein kinases and acetyltransferases, these are proto-resistance elements from which drug resistance can evolve.

  18. Assessment of X Chromosome Dosage Compensation in Caenorhabditis elegans by Phenotypic Analysis of lin-14

    PubMed Central

    DeLong, Leslie; Casson, Lawrence P.; Meyer, Barbara J.

    1987-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans compensates for the difference in X chromosome gene dose between males (XO) and hermaphrodites (XX) through a mechanism that equalizes the levels of X-specific mRNA transcripts between the two sexes. We have devised a sensitive and quantitative genetic assay to measure perturbations in X chromosome gene expression caused by mutations that affect this process of dosage compensation. The assay is based on quantitating the precocious alae phenotype caused by a mutation that reduces but does not eliminate the function of the X-linked gene lin-14. We demonstrate that in diploid animals the lin-14 gene is dosage compensated between XO and XX animals. In XXX diploid animals, however, lin-14 expression is not compensated, implying that the normal dosage compensation mechanism in C. elegans lacks the capacity to compensate completely for the additional X chromosome in triplo-X animals. Using the lin-14 assay we compare the effects of mutations in the genes dpy-21, dpy-26, dpy-27, dpy-28, and dpy-22 on X-linked gene expression. Additionally, in the case of dpy-21 we correlate the change in phenotypic expression of lin-14 with a corresponding change in the lin-14 mRNA transcript level. PMID:3428573

  19. Introduction of our new associate editor.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Annick; Gunawardana, Roshaine

    2014-01-01

    Annick Desjardins, MD, FRCPC, speaks to Roshaine Gunawardana, Managing Commissioning Editor: Annick Desjardins is Associate Professor within the Department of Neurology and is the Director of Clinical Research at The Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke. In 2003, Dr Desjardins completed her residency in Adult Neurology at the Universite de Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada. Following a 2-year fellowship in neuro-oncology at The Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke, she joined the Center as faculty, in July 2005. She is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Canada. She has been the Principal Investigator on over 30 therapeutic trials in neuro-oncology, including investigator initiated and international multicenter studies, and has held several Investigational New Drug applications. She has over 80 peer-review publications and six book chapters. She has written invited expert reviews for Hospital Pharmacy Europe, Nature Reviews Neurology, Clinical Care Options and MEDscape CME. She is reviewer for Neuro-Oncology, Cancer, Journal of Neuro-Oncology, Clinical Cancer Research, Expert Review of Anticancer Therapy, Cancer Research, Molecular Cancer Therapeutics and Future Oncology. PMID:25363004

  20. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) is a journal that originated in the UK but is now rightly regarded as one of the pre-eminent international journals for the publication of material coming within its remit. It is 50 years old and its maturity is an outcome of the consistent support of high performing authors, a supportive and professional publishing house, dedicated referees, many vigorous and conscientious editorial boards and the collective input of the 10 previous Editors as listed in his incoming editorial (January 2000 issue) by the retiring Editor, Professor Alun Beddoe. The scientific climate and it associated publication modus operandi in the 1950s was very different from that at the current time and the journal has evolved to reflect this. Hence today the scope of content is somewhat broader, the size of the journal is vastly greater, the whole publication process is slicker and more efficient and a paper in PMB is highly prized by its authors and those who look to quality factors and impact. The quality of the journal still relies on the voluntary labour and expertise of its busy international referees and Board members. For many years I have tried to place my own research material in PMB and encourage my teams to do likewise, not only acknowledging the prestige of the journal but also because of the extraordinarily fast turnaround time of all the processes without any loss of quality. This serves us very well and the publishing team are to be congratulated. Some things seem to change more slowly or not at all, however. The prediction, when I started my research career, that books and journals would be dinosaurs by now has manifestly not come true and, whilst most of us are addicted (and why not?) to the electronic ways of doing things that can be done by more traditional ways, PMB and a packet of reprints from time to time arriving by post still has a reassuring feel despite the fact that the papers have been `on-line' for a while before. An incoming

  1. ESDAPT - APT PROGRAMMING EDITOR AND INTERPRETER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premack, T.

    1994-01-01

    ESDAPT is a graphical programming environment for developing APT (Automatically Programmed Tool) programs for controlling numerically controlled machine tools. ESDAPT has a graphical user interface that provides the user with an APT syntax sensitive text editor and windows for displaying geometry and tool paths. APT geometry statement can also be created using menus and screen picks. ESDAPT interprets APT geometry statements and displays the results in its view windows. Tool paths are generated by batching the APT source to an APT processor (COSMIC P-APT recommended). The tool paths are then displayed in the view windows. Hardcopy output of the view windows is in color PostScript format. ESDAPT is written in C-language, yacc, lex, and XView for use on Sun4 series computers running SunOS. ESDAPT requires 4Mb of disk space, 7Mb of RAM, and MIT's X Window System, Version 11 Release 4, or OpenWindows version 3 for execution. Program documentation in PostScript format and an executable for OpenWindows version 3 are provided on the distribution media. The standard distribution medium for ESDAPT is a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge (Sun QIC-24) in UNIX tar format. This program was developed in 1992.

  2. Team of three JGR-Space Physics editors appointed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Three editors from the United States, Europe, and Asia have been appointed to lead JGR-Space Physics into the new millennium. This new team will recognize and foster the substantial contributions that scientists from the international community make to the journal. Janet Luhmann, a Senior Fellow at the Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, will serve as Senior Editor. Luhmann will play a coordinating role for the regional editors, which will be especially important as the Union moves into electronic publishing and adopts new ways of using the technology to publish research findings.

  3. Retirement of J. Gary Eden as Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadish, Chennupati; Jelinkova, Helena; Fainman, Yeshaiahu; Dawson, Martin; Ermers, Ysabel

    2016-01-01

    After nine years of dedicated service as Editor-in-Chief of Progress in Quantum Electronics (PQE), J. Gary Eden has retired at the end of December 2015. During his term as the Editor-in-Chief, PQE has grown significantly in size and quality and he has given generously of his time in advising authors, referees, editors, and the journal staff. Gary is an exceptional scientist and a generous individual who has given so much to the community. He is always very positive in every situation, and has created positive environment and supported people with utmost enthusiasm.

  4. A Python-based IRAF Task Parameter Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Peña, M. D.

    As part of the development of a new Python-based CL for IRAF tasks by the Science Software Group at STScI, we have developed a GUI-based parameter editor for IRAF tasks using Tkinter. This new parameter editor is intended to provide the equivalent functionality of the IRAF EPAR task, but to make parameter editing easier by using appropriate user interface elements, such as menu choice lists, action buttons, and file browsers. This paper describes the design and functionality of the parameter editor as well as planned enhancements.

  5. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) is a journal that originated in the UK but is now rightly regarded as one of the pre-eminent international journals for the publication of material coming within its remit. It is 50 years old and its maturity is an outcome of the consistent support of high performing authors, a supportive and professional publishing house, dedicated referees, many vigorous and conscientious editorial boards and the collective input of the 10 previous Editors as listed in his incoming editorial (January 2000 issue) by the retiring Editor, Professor Alun Beddoe. The scientific climate and it associated publication modus operandi in the 1950s was very different from that at the current time and the journal has evolved to reflect this. Hence today the scope of content is somewhat broader, the size of the journal is vastly greater, the whole publication process is slicker and more efficient and a paper in PMB is highly prized by its authors and those who look to quality factors and impact. The quality of the journal still relies on the voluntary labour and expertise of its busy international referees and Board members. For many years I have tried to place my own research material in PMB and encourage my teams to do likewise, not only acknowledging the prestige of the journal but also because of the extraordinarily fast turnaround time of all the processes without any loss of quality. This serves us very well and the publishing team are to be congratulated. Some things seem to change more slowly or not at all, however. The prediction, when I started my research career, that books and journals would be dinosaurs by now has manifestly not come true and, whilst most of us are addicted (and why not?) to the electronic ways of doing things that can be done by more traditional ways, PMB and a packet of reprints from time to time arriving by post still has a reassuring feel despite the fact that the papers have been `on-line' for a while before. An incoming

  6. Martin Stutzmann: Editor, Teacher, Scientist and Friend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel

    2005-02-01

    On 2 January 1995 Martin Stutzmann became Editor-in-Chief of physica status solidi, replacing Professor E. Gutsche, who had led the journal through the stormy period involving the fall of the Iron Curtain, the unification of Germany and the change in its Eastern part, where physica status solidi was based, from socialism as found in the real world (a German concept) to real world capitalism. In 1995 it was thought that the process had been completed (we should have known better!) and after the retirement of Prof. Gutsche the new owners of physica status solidi (Wiley-VCH) decided that a change in scientific management was desirable to adapt to the new socio-political facts and to insure the scientific continuity of the journal.Martin had moved in 1993 from my department at the Max-Planck-Institute to Munich where he soon displayed a tremendous amount of science man- agement ability during the build-up of the Walter Schottky Institute. The search for a successor as Edi- tor-in-Chief was not easy: the job was not very glamorous after the upheavals which had taken place in the editorial world following the political changes. Somebody in the Editorial Boards must have suggested Martin Stutzmann. I am sure that there was opposition: one usually looks for a well-established person ready to leave his direct involvement in science and take up a new endeavor of a more administrative nature. Nevertheless, the powers that be soon realized that Martin was an excellent, if somewhat unconventional candidate who had enough energy to remain a topnotch scientist and to lead the journal in the difficult times ahead: he was offered the job. In the negotiations that followed, he insisted in getting the administrative structures that would allow him to improve the battered quality of the journal and to continue his scientific productivity. Today we are happy to see that he succeeded in both endeavors. The journal has since grown in size and considerably improved its quality

  7. Editorial independence and the editor-owner relationship: good editors never die, they just cross the line.

    PubMed

    Lapeña, J F

    2009-12-01

    The concept of editorial freedom or independence is examined in the light of the editor-owner relationship. Like individual and national freedom or independence, it is a rhetorical concept whose realisation flows from internal achievement as much as it depends on external validation. This freedom entails roles and responsibilities embodied in specific codes of practice for editors, such as the guidelines espoused by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Association of Medical Editors. The calling to embody these guidelines makes editing a vocation that demands isolation and distancing, separation and solitude. It involves bracketing one's biases, prejudgments and preconceptions. With such detachment comes real freedom; one that requires a moral fibre and trustworthiness that uphold truth and right, whether in full view of public scrutiny, or in the aloneness of private secrecy. The stereotypical tension between academic and commercial concerns highlights the editor-owner relationship, and bears directly on editorial independence. In practice, journal owners overstep their prerogatives. The absence of clear contracts defining editorial independence and the lack of established mechanisms governing the editor-owner relationship affect many small- to medium-sized journals in developing countries. Even large journals in developed and democratic nations or totalitarian states and societies are not spared. At the end of the day, editorial freedom exists only insofar as it is tolerated, or until editors cross the line. PMID:20087545

  8. Identification of LIN28B-bound mRNAs reveals features of target recognition and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Robin; Munschauer, Mathias; Mastrobuoni, Guido; Mayr, Florian; Heinemann, Udo; Kempa, Stefan; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Landthaler, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The conserved human LIN28 RNA-binding proteins function in development, maintenance of pluripotency and oncogenesis. We used PAR-CLIP and a newly developed variant of this method, iDo-PAR-CLIP, to identify LIN28B targets as well as sites bound by the individual RNA-binding domains of LIN28B in the human transcriptome at nucleotide resolution. The position of target binding sites reflected the known structural relative orientation of individual LIN28B-binding domains, validating iDo-PAR-CLIP. Our data suggest that LIN28B directly interacts with most expressed mRNAs and members of the let-7 microRNA family. The Lin28-binding motif detected in pre-let-7 was enriched in mRNA sequences bound by LIN28B. Upon LIN28B knockdown, cell proliferation and the cell cycle were strongly impaired. Quantitative shotgun proteomics of LIN28B depleted cells revealed significant reduction of protein synthesis from its RNA targets. Computational analyses provided evidence that the strength of protein synthesis reduction correlated with the location of LIN28B binding sites within target transcripts. PMID:23770886

  9. Lin41/Trim71 is essential for mouse development and specifically expressed in postnatal ependymal cells of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, Elisa; Rybak-Wolf, Agnieszka; Rohde, Anna M.; Nguyen, Duong T. T.; Wulczyn, F. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Lin41/Trim71 is a heterochronic gene encoding a member of the Trim-NHL protein family, and is the original, genetically defined target of the microRNA let-7 in C. elegans. Both the LIN41 protein and multiple regulatory microRNA binding sites in the 3′ UTR of the mRNA are highly conserved from nematodes to humans. Functional studies have described essential roles for mouse LIN41 in embryonic stem cells, cellular reprogramming and the timing of embryonic neurogenesis. We have used a new gene trap mouse line deficient in Lin41 to characterize Lin41 expression during embryonic development and in the postnatal central nervous system (CNS). In the embryo, Lin41 is required for embryonic viability and neural tube closure. Nevertheless, neurosphere assays suggest that Lin41 is not required for adult neurogenesis. Instead, we show that Lin41 promoter activity and protein expression in the postnatal CNS is restricted to ependymal cells lining the walls of the four ventricles. We use ependymal cell culture to confirm reestablishment of Lin41 expression during differentiation of ependymal progenitors to post-mitotic cells possessing motile cilia. Our results reveal that terminally differentiated ependymal cells express Lin41, a gene to date associated with self-renewing stem cells. PMID:25883935

  10. Horatio Alger in the Newsroom: Social Origins of American Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Jack R.

    1976-01-01

    Concludes that American newspaper editors of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries came from elite social backgrounds, which is contrary to the rags-to-riches image fostered by previous historians. (RB)

  11. Flagrant Misconduct of Reviewers and Editor: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Kotchoubey, Boris; Bütof, Sarah; Sitaram, Ranganatha

    2015-08-01

    A case of a particularly severe misbehavior in a review process is described. Two reviewers simply copied and pasted their critical comments from their previous reviews without reading the reviewed manuscript. The editor readily accepted the reviewers' opinion and rejected the manuscript. These facts give rise to some general questions about possible factors affecting the ethical behavior of reviewers and editors, as well as possible countermeasures to prevent ethical violations. PMID:25156788

  12. ZED- A LINE EDITOR FOR THE DEC VAX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    The ZED editor for the DEC VAX is a simple, yet powerful line editor for text, program source code, and non-binary data. Line editors can be superior to screen editors in some cases, such as executing complex multiple or conditional commands, or editing via slow modem lines. ZED excels in the area of text processing by using procedure files. For example, such procedures can reformat a file of addresses or remove all comment lines from a FORTRAN program. In addition to command files, ZED also features versatile search qualifiers, global changes, conditionals, on-line help, hexadecimal mode, space compression, looping, logical combinations of search strings, journaling, visible control characters, and automatic detabbing. The ZED editor was originally developed at Cambridge University in London and has been continuously enhanced since 1976. Users of the Cambridge implementation have devised such elaborate ZED procedures as chess games, calculators, and programs for evaluating Pi. This implementation of ZED strives to maintain the characteristics of the Cambridge editor. A complete ZED manual is included on the tape. ZED is written entirely in C for either batch or interactive execution on the DEC VAX under VMS 4.X and requires 80,896 bytes of memory. This program was released in 1988 and updated in 1989.

  13. EzEditor: a versatile sequence alignment editor for both rRNA- and protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoon-Seong; Lee, Kihyun; Park, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Bong-Soo; Cho, Yong-Joon; Ha, Sung-Min; Chun, Jongsik

    2014-02-01

    EzEditor is a Java-based molecular sequence editor allowing manipulation of both DNA and protein sequence alignments for phylogenetic analysis. It has multiple features optimized to connect initial computer-generated multiple alignment and subsequent phylogenetic analysis by providing manual editing with reference to biological information specific to the genes under consideration. It provides various functionalities for editing rRNA alignments using secondary structure information. In addition, it supports simultaneous editing of both DNA sequences and their translated protein sequences for protein-coding genes. EzEditor is, to our knowledge, the first sequence editing software designed for both rRNA- and protein-coding genes with the visualization of biologically relevant information and should be useful in molecular phylogenetic studies. EzEditor is based on Java, can be run on all major computer operating systems and is freely available from http://sw.ezbiocloud.net/ezeditor/. PMID:24425826

  14. νLIN6: An Integrated Mobility Protocol in IPv6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banno, Ayumi; Teraoka, Fumio

    This paper proposes a protocol called νLIN6 which supports both network mobility and host mobility in IPv6. There are several proposals to support network mobility and host mobility. Network Mobility (NEMO) Basic Support Protocol has several problems such as pinball routing, large header overhead due to multiple levels of tunneling, and a single point of failure. Optimized NEMO (ONEMO) and Mobile IP with Address Translation (MAT) are solutions to provide route optimization, but they generate a lot of signaling messages at a handover. In νLIN6, packet relay is required only once regardless of the nested level in network mobility while optimal routing is always provided in host mobility. A fixedsized extension header is used in network mobility while there is no header overhead in host mobility. νLIN6 is more tolerant of network failure and mobility agent failure than NEMO Basic Support Protocol. It also allows ordinary IPv6 nodes to communicate with mobile nodes and nodes in the mobile network. We implemented νLIN6 on NetBSD 2.0 Release. Our measurement results showed νLIN6 can provide host mobility and network mobility with low overhead.

  15. Molecular Basis for Interaction of let-7 MicroRNAs with Lin28

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Yunsun; Chen, Casandra; Gregory, Richard I.; Chou, James J.; Sliz, Piotr

    2012-02-06

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression. Among these, members of the let-7 miRNA family control many cell-fate determination genes to influence pluripotency, differentiation, and transformation. Lin28 is a specific, posttranscriptional inhibitor of let-7 biogenesis. We report crystal structures of mouse Lin28 in complex with sequences from let-7d, let-7-f1, and let-7g precursors. The two folded domains of Lin28 recognize two distinct regions of the RNA and are sufficient for inhibition of let-7 in vivo. We also show by NMR spectroscopy that the linker connecting the two folded domains is flexible, accommodating Lin28 binding to diverse let-7 family members. Protein-RNA complex formation imposes specific conformations on both components that could affect downstream recognition by other processing factors. Our data provide a molecular explanation for Lin28 specificity and a model for how it regulates let-7.

  16. Molecular basis for interaction of let-7 microRNAs with Lin28

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Yunsun; Chen, Casandra; Gregory, Richard I; Chou, James J; Sliz, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression. Among these, members of the let-7 miRNA family control many cell fate determination genes to influence pluripotency, differentiation, and transformation. Lin28 is a specific, post-transcriptional inhibitor of let-7 biogenesis. We report crystal structures of mouse Lin28 in complex with sequences from let-7d, let-7-f1, and let-7g precursors. The two folded domains of Lin28 recognize two distinct regions of the RNA and are sufficient for inhibition of let-7 in vivo. We also show by NMR spectroscopy that the linker connecting the two folded domains is flexible, accommodating Lin28 binding to diverse let-7 family members. Protein-RNA complex formation imposes specific conformations on both components that could affect downstream recognition by other processing factors. Our data provide a molecular explanation for Lin28 specificity and a model for how it regulates let-7. PMID:22078496

  17. Lin28-let7 Modulates Radiosensitivity of Human Cancer Cells With Activation of K-Ras

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jee-Sun.; Kim, Jae-Jin; Byun, Ju-Yeon; Kim, In-Ah

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential of targeting Lin28-let7 microRNA regulatory network for overcoming the radioresistance of cancer cells having activated K-Ras signaling. Methods and Materials: A549 lung carcinoma cells and ASPC1 pancreatic cancer cells possessing K-RAS mutation were transfected with pre-let7a microRNA or Lin28 siRNA, respectively. Clonogenic assay, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and Western analysis were performed. The effects of Lin28 on SQ20B cells having wild-type K-RAS, and a normal fibroblast were also assessed. Results: The overexpression of let-7a decreased expression of K-Ras and radiosensitized A549 cells. Inhibition of Lin28, a repressor of let-7, attenuated K-Ras expression and radiosensitized A549 and ASPC1 cells. Neither SQ20B cells expressing wild-type K-RAS nor HDF, the normal human fibroblasts, were radiosensitized by this approach. Conclusions: The Lin28-let7 regulatory network may be a potentially useful therapeutic target for overcoming the radioresistance of human cancers having activated K-Ras signaling.

  18. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, David

    2012-01-01

    It is a pleasure and an honour for me to be taking over as Editor-in-Chief of Measurement Science and Technology. MST is well known across research communities worldwide as a leading journal in which to publish new techniques and instrumentation. It has gained this enviable position largely because of the excellent guidance of its Editorial Board and dedicated staff at Institute of Physics Publishing over many years. I want to highlight in particular the contribution of the outgoing Editor Peter Hauptmann, and other Editors before him, in making the journal truly international. We thank Peter immensely for all his hard work in leading the journal, having exceptionally served two terms, each of five years. I come into the post of Editor at a very interesting and challenging time for research. The global recession is leading to cuts in research funding in many countries, researchers and their outputs are coming under closer scrutiny than ever before, and more is being expected of them. Journals play a critical role in monitoring and maintaining research standards, but we should be careful not to assume that journal Impact Factor is the sole measure of research quality. Although expediency may sometimes demand it, Impact Factor, as practitioners know, is subject dependent. One of the great things about science and technology for me is its level playing field. The key point is still innovation no matter where the work is done or where it is published. MST has a long pedigree of being the natural home of the highest quality papers from leading researchers wishing to report novel instrumentation and techniques. 2013 will mark the 90th anniversary of MST and we look forward to celebrating in style its sustained success. I recall with pride the first paper I published in Journal of Physics E: Scientific Instruments (as MST was previously titled) back in 1977. The paper reported the design and application of an early fluorescence lifetime spectrometer that I had constructed

  19. GENII-LIN: a new object-oriented interface for the GENII code.

    PubMed

    Sumini, M; Teodori, F; Cantoro, N

    2005-01-01

    GENII-LIN is a new object-oriented interface for GENII, a well-known analysis tool for the health impact evaluation of accidental or chronic release of radionuclides to the environment. GENII-LIN has been developed under the Linux OS, chosen because it is a stable, reliable and open source. The suite codes that constitute the original GENII simulation kernel have been re-implemented and built, using the G77, the Fortran 77 module of the GCC collection. The code modules and the flow of data among them are at present fully controlled by a management interface written in C++, which is the core of the package. GENII-LIN comes with a new graphical user interface (GUI), built using the QT libraries by Trolltech. Through the wizard-like GUI, the user has full control over the code and can easily handle both the input and the output files. PMID:16604707

  20. Mechanism of Dis3l2 substrate recognition in the Lin28-let-7 pathway.

    PubMed

    Faehnle, Christopher R; Walleshauser, Jack; Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2014-10-01

    The pluripotency factor Lin28 inhibits the biogenesis of the let-7 family of mammalian microRNAs. Lin28 is highly expressed in embryonic stem cells and has a fundamental role in regulation of development, glucose metabolism and tissue regeneration. Overexpression of Lin28 is correlated with the onset of numerous cancers, whereas let-7, a tumour suppressor, silences several human oncogenes. Lin28 binds to precursor let-7 (pre-let-7) hairpins, triggering the 3' oligo-uridylation activity of TUT4 and TUT7 (refs 10-12). The oligoU tail added to pre-let-7 serves as a decay signal, as it is rapidly degraded by Dis3l2 (refs 13, 14), a homologue of the catalytic subunit of the RNA exosome. The molecular basis of Lin28-mediated recruitment of TUT4 and TUT7 to pre-let-7 and its subsequent degradation by Dis3l2 is largely unknown. To examine the mechanism of Dis3l2 substrate recognition we determined the structure of mouse Dis3l2 in complex with an oligoU RNA to mimic the uridylated tail of pre-let-7. Three RNA-binding domains form an open funnel on one face of the catalytic domain that allows RNA to navigate a path to the active site different from that of its exosome counterpart. The resulting path reveals an extensive network of uracil-specific interactions spanning the first 12 nucleotides of an oligoU-tailed RNA. We identify three U-specificity zones that explain how Dis3l2 recognizes, binds and processes uridylated pre-let-7 in the final step of the Lin28-let-7 pathway. PMID:25119025

  1. Mechanism of Dis3L2 substrate recognition in the Lin28/let-7 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2014-01-01

    Summary paragraph The pluripotency factor Lin28 inhibits the biogenesis of the let-7 family of mammalian microRNAs1–4. Lin28 is highly expressed in embryonic stem cells and has a fundamental role in regulation of development5, glucose metabolism6 and tissue regeneration7. Alternatively, Lin28 overexpression is correlated with the onset of numerous cancers8, while let-7, a tumor suppressor, silences several human oncogenes5. Lin28 binds to precursor let-7 (pre-let-7) hairpins9, triggering the 3' oligo-uridylation activity of TUT4/710–12. The oligoU tail added to pre-let-7 serves as a decay signal, as it is rapidly degraded by Dis3L213,14, a homolog of the catalytic subunit of the RNA exosome. The molecular basis of Lin28 mediated recruitment of TUT4/7 to pre-let-7 and its subsequent degradation by Dis3L2 is largely unknown. To examine the mechanism of Dis3L2 substrate recognition we determined the structure of mouse Dis3L2 in complex with an oligoU RNA to mimic the uridylated tail of pre-let-7. Three RNA binding domains form an open funnel on one face of the catalytic domain that allows RNA to navigate a path to the active site different from its exosome counterpart. The resulting path reveals an extensive network of uracil-specific interactions spanning the first twelve nucleotides of an oligoU-tailed RNA. We identify three U-specificity zones that explain how Dis3L2 recognizes, binds and processes uridylated pre-let-7 in the final step of the Lin28/let-7 pathway. PMID:25119025

  2. Lin28B Is an Oncofetal Circulating Cancer Stem Cell-Like Marker Associated with Recurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yih-Jyh; Cheng, Pin-Nan; Chang, Yu-Chung; Yen, Chia-Jui; Huang, Hsuan-Pang; Chuang, Yun-Pei; Chang, Ting-Tsung; Lee, Chung-Ta; Chao, Anning; Chou, Cheng-Yang; Chan, Shih-Huang; Chow, Nan-Haw; Ho, Chung-Liang

    2013-01-01

    By using an expressed sequence tag bioinformatic algorithm, we identified that Lin28 homolog B (Lin28B) may have an oncofetal expression pattern which may facilitate detecting cancer cells in adults. It is also reported to be a potential marker for cancer stem cells. Therefore, we sought to verify oncofetal-stemness characters of Lin28B and test its potential as a circulating cancer stem cell-like marker in adult HCC patients. Lin28B mRNA was examined in a panel of fetal tissue, adult tissue and tumors. Lin28B was over-expressed or knocked down in HepG2 cells to evaluate its potential as a stem cell-like marker. RT-qPCR for Lin28B was performed in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with HCC receiving surgery (n=96) and non-HCC controls (n=60) and analyzed its clinical significance. Lin28B showed an oncofetal expression pattern. Its overexpression could upregulate stemness markers (OCT4, Nanog and SOX2) and enhance tumorsphere formation in vitro. Lin28B knockdown had opposite effects. Circulating Lin28B was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in 3 cases (5%) of non-HCC controls and 32 cases (33.3%) of HCC patients. In HCC patients, circulating Lin28B was associated with high tumor grade (P=0.046), large size (P=0.005), high AJCC stage (P=0.044) and BCLC stage (P=0.017). Circulating Lin28B was significantly associated with decreased recurrence-free survival (P<0.001). Circulating Lin28B separated early stage HCC into 2 recurrence-free survival curves (P=0.003). In multivariate analysis, circulating Lin28B was an independent variable associated with early recurrence (P=0.045) and recurrence in early stage HCC (P=0.006). In conclusion, the oncofetal gene Lin28B is a potential oncofetal cancer-stem-cell-like circulating tumor cell marker that correlates with HCC recurrence after hepatectomy. Circulating Lin28B could refine early AJCC stages. Our finding supports the possible use of a TNMC (C for circulating tumor cells) staging system in HCC

  3. Lin28B is an oncofetal circulating cancer stem cell-like marker associated with recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shu-Wen; Tsai, Hung-Wen; Lin, Yih-Jyh; Cheng, Pin-Nan; Chang, Yu-Chung; Yen, Chia-Jui; Huang, Hsuan-Pang; Chuang, Yun-Pei; Chang, Ting-Tsung; Lee, Chung-Ta; Chao, Anning; Chou, Cheng-Yang; Chan, Shih-Huang; Chow, Nan-Haw; Ho, Chung-Liang

    2013-01-01

    By using an expressed sequence tag bioinformatic algorithm, we identified that Lin28 homolog B (Lin28B) may have an oncofetal expression pattern which may facilitate detecting cancer cells in adults. It is also reported to be a potential marker for cancer stem cells. Therefore, we sought to verify oncofetal-stemness characters of Lin28B and test its potential as a circulating cancer stem cell-like marker in adult HCC patients. Lin28B mRNA was examined in a panel of fetal tissue, adult tissue and tumors. Lin28B was over-expressed or knocked down in HepG2 cells to evaluate its potential as a stem cell-like marker. RT-qPCR for Lin28B was performed in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with HCC receiving surgery (n=96) and non-HCC controls (n=60) and analyzed its clinical significance. Lin28B showed an oncofetal expression pattern. Its overexpression could upregulate stemness markers (OCT4, Nanog and SOX2) and enhance tumorsphere formation in vitro. Lin28B knockdown had opposite effects. Circulating Lin28B was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in 3 cases (5%) of non-HCC controls and 32 cases (33.3%) of HCC patients. In HCC patients, circulating Lin28B was associated with high tumor grade (P=0.046), large size (P=0.005), high AJCC stage (P=0.044) and BCLC stage (P=0.017). Circulating Lin28B was significantly associated with decreased recurrence-free survival (P<0.001). Circulating Lin28B separated early stage HCC into 2 recurrence-free survival curves (P=0.003). In multivariate analysis, circulating Lin28B was an independent variable associated with early recurrence (P=0.045) and recurrence in early stage HCC (P=0.006). In conclusion, the oncofetal gene Lin28B is a potential oncofetal cancer-stem-cell-like circulating tumor cell marker that correlates with HCC recurrence after hepatectomy. Circulating Lin28B could refine early AJCC stages. Our finding supports the possible use of a TNMC (C for circulating tumor cells) staging system in HCC

  4. Stepwise assembly of multiple Lin28 proteins on the terminal loop of let-7 miRNA precursors

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Alexandre; Bouvette, Jonathan; Legault, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Lin28 inhibits the biogenesis of let-7 miRNAs through direct interactions with let-7 precursors. Previous studies have described seemingly inconsistent Lin28 binding sites on pre-let-7 RNAs. Here, we reconcile these data by examining the binding mechanism of Lin28 to the terminal loop of pre-let-7g (TL-let-7g) using biochemical and biophysical methods. First, we investigate Lin28 binding to TL-let-7g variants and short RNA fragments and identify three independent binding sites for Lin28 on TL-let-7g. We then determine that Lin28 assembles in a stepwise manner on TL-let-7g to form a stable 1:3 complex. We show that the cold-shock domain (CSD) of Lin28 is responsible for remodelling the terminal loop of TL-let-7g, whereas the NCp7-like domain facilitates the initial binding of Lin28 to TL-let-7g. This stable binding of multiple Lin28 molecules to the terminal loop of pre-let-7g extends to other precursors of the let-7 family, but not to other pre-miRNAs tested. We propose a model for stepwise assembly of the 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 pre-let-7g/Lin28 complexes. Stepwise multimerization of Lin28 on pre-let-7 is required for maximum inhibition of Dicer cleavage for a least one member of the let-7 family and may be important for orchestrating the activity of the several factors that regulate let-7 biogenesis. PMID:24452802

  5. [Professor LIN Guohua's experience of gold implantation at acupoint for rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Pei, Wenya

    2015-12-01

    Based on the pathogenesis and symptom of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), professor LIN Guohua's unique opinion and method for RA in clinical treatment are summarized and analyzed. In the opinion of Professor Lin, RA is considered as "Jinbi" and "Gubi" in TCM, which is caused by deficient root with superficial excess. Based on the symptoms of RA, attention should be focused on lung-kidney diagnosis and treatment, and gold and catgut implantation at acupoint can be mutually combined, which is aimed to provide a special and effective method for clinical treatment of RA. PMID:26964183

  6. Writing filter processes for the SAGA editor, appendix G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirslis, Peter A.

    1985-01-01

    The SAGA editor provides a mechanism by which separate processes can be invoked during an editing session to traverse portions of the parse tree being edited. These processes, termed filter processes, read, analyze, and possibly transform the parse tree, returning the result to the editor. By defining new commands with the editor's user defined command facility, which invoke filter processes, authors of filter can provide complex operations as simple commands. A tree plotter, pretty printer, and Pascal tree transformation program were already written using this facility. The filter processes are introduced, parse tree structure is described and the library interface made available to the programmer. Also discussed is how to compile and run filter processes. Examples are presented to illustrate aspect of each of these areas.

  7. SIRE: A Simple Interactive Rule Editor for NICBES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykat, Alex

    1988-12-01

    To support evolution of domain expertise, and its representation in an expert system knowledge base, a user-friendly rule base editor is mandatory. The Nickel Cadmium Battery Expert System (NICBES), a prototype of an expert system for the Hubble Space Telescope power storage management system, does not provide such an editor. In the following, a description of a Simple Interactive Rule Base Editor (SIRE) for NICBES is described. The SIRE provides a consistent internal representation of the NICBES knowledge base. It supports knowledge presentation and provides a user-friendly and code language independent medium for rule addition and modification. The SIRE is integrated with NICBES via an interface module. This module provides translation of the internal representation to Prolog-type rules (Horn clauses), latter rule assertion, and a simple mechanism for rule selection for its Prolog inference engine.

  8. SIRE: A Simple Interactive Rule Editor for NICBES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bykat, Alex

    1988-01-01

    To support evolution of domain expertise, and its representation in an expert system knowledge base, a user-friendly rule base editor is mandatory. The Nickel Cadmium Battery Expert System (NICBES), a prototype of an expert system for the Hubble Space Telescope power storage management system, does not provide such an editor. In the following, a description of a Simple Interactive Rule Base Editor (SIRE) for NICBES is described. The SIRE provides a consistent internal representation of the NICBES knowledge base. It supports knowledge presentation and provides a user-friendly and code language independent medium for rule addition and modification. The SIRE is integrated with NICBES via an interface module. This module provides translation of the internal representation to Prolog-type rules (Horn clauses), latter rule assertion, and a simple mechanism for rule selection for its Prolog inference engine.

  9. Decreased Lin7b Expression in Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons May Contribute to Impaired Corticostriatal Connectivity in Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Birgit; Kama, Jibrin A.; Kuhn, Alexandre; Thu, Doris; Orlando, Lianna R.; Dunah, Anthone W.; Gokce, Ozgun; Taylor, David M.; Lambeck, Johann; Friedrich, Bernd; Lindenberg, Katrin S.; Faull, Richard L.M.; Weiller, Cornelius; Young, Anne B.; Luthi-Carter, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Motor dysfunction, cognitive impairment and regional cortical atrophy indicate cerebral cortical involvement in Huntington disease (HD). To address the hypothesis that abnormal corticostriatal connectivity arises from polyglutamine-related alterations in cortical gene expression, we isolated layer 5 cortical neurons by laser-capture microdissection and analyzed transcriptome-wide mRNA changes in them. Enrichment of transcription factor mRNAs including foxp2, tbr1, and neuroD6, and neurotransmission- and plasticity-related RNAs including sema5A, pclo, ntrk2, cntn1 and lin7b were observed. Layer 5 motor cortex neurons of transgenic R6/2 HD mice also demonstrated numerous transcriptomic changes, including decreased expression of mRNAs encoding the lin7 homolog b, (lin7b, also known as veli-2 and mals2). Decreases in LIN7B and CNTN1 RNAs were also detected in human HD layer 5 motor cortex neurons. lin7b, a scaffold protein implicated in synaptic plasticity, neurite outgrowth and cellular polarity, was decreased at the protein level in layer 5 cortical neurons in R6/2 mice and human HD brains. Decreases in Lin7b and Lin7a mRNAs were detected in R6/2 cortex as early as 6 weeks of age, suggesting that this is an early pathogenetic event. Thus, decreased cortical LIN7 expression may contribute to abnormal corticostriatal connectivity in HD. PMID:20720508

  10. LIN, a novel type of U-box/WD40 protein, controls early infection by rhizobia in legumes.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Ernö; Oláh, Boglárka; Kaló, Péter; Morales, Monica; Heckmann, Anne B; Borbola, Andrea; Lózsa, Anita; Kontár, Katalin; Middleton, Patrick; Downie, J Allan; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Endre, Gabriella

    2009-11-01

    The formation of a nitrogen-fixing nodule requires the coordinated development of rhizobial colonization and nodule organogenesis. Based on its mutant phenotype, lumpy infections (lin), LIN functions at an early stage of the rhizobial symbiotic process, required for both infection thread growth in root hair cells and the further development of nodule primordia. We show that spontaneous nodulation activated by the calcium- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase is independent of LIN; thus, LIN is not necessary for nodule organogenesis. From this, we infer that LIN predominantly functions during rhizobial colonization and that the abortion of this process in lin mutants leads to a suppression of nodule development. Here, we identify the LIN gene in Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, showing that it codes for a predicted E3 ubiquitin ligase containing a highly conserved U-box and WD40 repeat domains. Ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is a universal mechanism to regulate many biological processes by eliminating rate-limiting enzymes and key components such as transcription factors. We propose that LIN is a regulator of the component(s) of the nodulation factor signal transduction pathway and that its function is required for correct temporal and spatial activity of the target protein(s). PMID:19776163

  11. A complex of LIN-5 and GPR proteins regulates G protein signaling and spindle function in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Dayalan G.; Fisk, Ridgely M.; Xu, Huihong; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2003-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans coiled-coil protein LIN-5 mediates several processes in cell division that depend on spindle forces, including alignment and segregation of chromosomes and positioning of the spindle. Here, we describe two closely related proteins, GPR-1 and GPR-2 (Gprotein regulator), which associate with LIN-5 in vivo and in vitro and depend on LIN-5 for localization to the spindle and cell cortex. GPR-1/GPR-2 contain a GoLoco/GPR motif that mediates interaction with GDP-bound Gαi/o. Inactivation of lin-5, gpr-1/gpr-2, or the Gαi/o genes goa-1 and gpa-16 all cause highly similar chromosome segregation and spindle positioning defects, indicating a positive role for the LIN-5 and GPR proteins in G protein signaling. The lin-5 and gpr-1/gpr-2 genes appear to act downstream of the par polarity genes in the one- and two-cell stages and downstream of the tyrosine kinase-related genes mes-1 and src-1 at the four-cell stage. Together, these results indicate that GPR-1/GPR-2 in association with LIN-5 activate G protein signaling to affect spindle force. Polarity determinants may regulate LIN-5/GPR/Gα locally to create the asymmetric forces that drive spindle movement. Results in C. elegans and other species are consistent with a novel model for receptor-independent activation of Gαi/o signaling. PMID:12730122

  12. Ethics and the psychiatry journal editor: responsibilities and dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, David; D Strous, Rael

    2014-01-01

    An array of potential ethical stumbling blocks awaits the editors of scientific journals. There are issues of particular relevance to mental health journals, and others unique to local journals with a relatively small circulation and low impact factor. The blind review system, conflict of interests, redundant publication, fraud and plagiarism, guest and ghost authorship and ghost writing, advertising, language and stigma, patient consent, and "rigging" the Impact Factor are all issues of importance. It is critical that editors are aware and informed of these important issues, and have an accessible forum for evaluating problems as they arise. PMID:25618285

  13. EDITORIAL: New Editor-in-Chief for Nanotechnology New Editor-in-Chief for Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couzin, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology is proud to announce the appointment of Professor Mark Reed, Yale University, as the new Editor-in-Chief from January 2009. Mark Reed holds the Harold Hodgkinson Chair of Engineering and Applied Science at Yale University. He has made significant contributions in the areas of quantum dots, electronic transport in nanoscale and mesoscopic systems, artificially structured materials and devices, and molecular electronics. Professor Reed has been associated with the journal as an Editorial Board member for a number of years and we are delighted that he has agreed to take on the scientific leadership of the journal in its 20th year. We also take the opportunity to thank Professor Mark Welland, Cambridge University, for his work as Editor-in-Chief since 2001, and for presiding over the re-launch and remarkable growth of the journal since then. Nanotechnology is unique in that it was the first peer-reviewed journal in the area of nanoscience, the first issue appearing in 1990. Since then it has established a distinguished publication record and has become a leading journal covering all aspects of nanoscale science and technology, as well as specializing in in-depth, comprehensive articles not seen in letter format journals. Published weekly and featuring subject sections, the journal is truly multidisciplinary in nature and is an excellent medium to quickly deliver your research results to readers worldwide. Nanotechnology is proud to be offering some of the fastest publication times around (less than three months on average from receipt to online publication). We offer free online access to all published papers for 30 days, ensuring that anyone with access to the internet will be able to read your paper. We were also the first journal to give our authors the opportunity to communicate their research to a wider audience through nanotechweb.org and other IOP websites. See the journal's homepage at www.iop.org/Journals/nano for more details. We are looking

  14. Martin Stutzmann: Editor, Teacher, Scientist and Friend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel

    2005-02-01

    On 2 January 1995 Martin Stutzmann became Editor-in-Chief of physica status solidi, replacing Professor E. Gutsche, who had led the journal through the stormy period involving the fall of the Iron Curtain, the unification of Germany and the change in its Eastern part, where physica status solidi was based, from socialism as found in the real world (a German concept) to real world capitalism. In 1995 it was thought that the process had been completed (we should have known better!) and after the retirement of Prof. Gutsche the new owners of physica status solidi (Wiley-VCH) decided that a change in scientific management was desirable to adapt to the new socio-political facts and to insure the scientific continuity of the journal.Martin had moved in 1993 from my department at the Max-Planck-Institute to Munich where he soon displayed a tremendous amount of science man- agement ability during the build-up of the Walter Schottky Institute. The search for a successor as Edi- tor-in-Chief was not easy: the job was not very glamorous after the upheavals which had taken place in the editorial world following the political changes. Somebody in the Editorial Boards must have suggested Martin Stutzmann. I am sure that there was opposition: one usually looks for a well-established person ready to leave his direct involvement in science and take up a new endeavor of a more administrative nature. Nevertheless, the powers that be soon realized that Martin was an excellent, if somewhat unconventional candidate who had enough energy to remain a topnotch scientist and to lead the journal in the difficult times ahead: he was offered the job. In the negotiations that followed, he insisted in getting the administrative structures that would allow him to improve the battered quality of the journal and to continue his scientific productivity. Today we are happy to see that he succeeded in both endeavors. The journal has since grown in size and considerably improved its quality

  15. Martin Stutzmann: Editor, Teacher, Scientist and Friend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Manuel

    2005-03-01

    On 2 January 1995 Martin Stutzmann became Editor-in-Chief of physica status solidi, replacing Professor E. Gutsche, who had led the journal through the stormy period involving the fall of the Iron Curtain, the unification of Germany and the change in its Eastern part, where physica status solidi was based, from socialism as found in the real world (a German concept) to real world capitalism. In 1995 it was thought that the process had been completed (we should have known better!) and after the retirement of Prof. Gutsche the new owners of physica status solidi (Wiley-VCH) decided that a change in scientific management was desirable to adapt to the new socio-political facts and to insure the scientific continuity of the journal.Martin had moved in 1993 from my department at the Max-Planck-Institute to Munich where he soon displayed a tremendous amount of science man- agement ability during the build-up of the Walter Schottky Institute. The search for a successor as Edi- tor-in-Chief was not easy: the job was not very glamorous after the upheavals which had taken place in the editorial world following the political changes. Somebody in the Editorial Boards must have suggested Martin Stutzmann. I am sure that there was opposition: one usually looks for a well-established person ready to leave his direct involvement in science and take up a new endeavor of a more administrative nature. Nevertheless, the powers that be soon realized that Martin was an excellent, if somewhat unconventional candidate who had enough energy to remain a topnotch scientist and to lead the journal in the difficult times ahead: he was offered the job. In the negotiations that followed, he insisted in getting the administrative structures that would allow him to improve the battered quality of the journal and to continue his scientific productivity. Today we are happy to see that he succeeded in both endeavors. The journal has since grown in size and considerably improved its quality

  16. Announcement: New Editor-In-Chief, Robert C. Kennicutt, Jr.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    1999-06-01

    Effective 1999 July 1, all new manuscripts for Part 1 of The Astrophysical Journal and The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series should be sent to Dr. Robert C. Kennicutt, Jr., Editor-in-Chief The Astrophysical Journal Steward Observatory University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 The other means of contact are telephone, (520) 621-5145 FAX, (520) 621-5153 and e-mail, apj@as.arizona.edu. For express packages please use the street address of 933 North Cherry Avenue. Dr. Kennicutt will be assisted by several of my loyal coworkers, who will move across the street. Manuscripts received before July 1 will be handled by the current editor until most of their problems have been resolved, at which point the remainder will be sent to Dr. Kennicutt's office. Manuscripts for the Letters should, as before, be sent directly to Dr. Alex Dalgarno at the Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA. We are fortunate that a person with as much experience in research and proven good judgment as Dr. Kennicutt is willing to accept this difficult and time-consuming responsibility. He will be only the seventh Managing Editor or Editor-in-Chief that this Journal has had in its 104 years. Please give him the cooperation and help that you have given the current editor. It has been my privilege to work for 28 years with many of the best astrophysicists in the world and to publish their papers. This was done with the help of the AAS Publications Board and AAS officers, the efforts of Peter Boyce and Evan Owens who made the on-line edition of the Journal possible, three Associate Editors, a score of Scientific Editors, a hardworking staff of six in Tucson, up to 25 production controllers and manuscript editors at the University of Chicago Press, and the thousands of astronomers throughout the world who served as referees. The original masthead called this journal ``An International Review of Spectroscopy and Astronomical Physics.'' That subtitle is no longer appropriate because we do not

  17. Announcement: New Editor-In Robert C. Kennicutt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    1999-06-01

    Effective 1999 July 1, all new manuscripts for Part 1 of The Astrophysical Journal and The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series should be sent to Dr. Robert C. Kennicutt, Editor-in-Chief The Astrophysical Journal Steward Observatory University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 The other means of contact are telephone, (520) 621-5145 FAX, (520) 621-5153 and e-mail, apj@as.arizona.edu. For express packages please use the street address of 933 North Cherry Avenue. Dr. Kennicutt will be assisted by several of my loyal coworkers, who will move across the street. Manuscripts received before July 1 will be handled by the current editor until most of their problems have been resolved, at which point the remainder will be sent to Dr. Kennicutt's office. Manuscripts for the Letters should, as before, be sent directly to Dr. Alex Dalgarno at the Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA. We are fortunate that a person with as much experience in research and proven good judgment as Dr. Kennicutt is willing to accept this difficult and time-consuming responsibility. He will be only the seventh Managing Editor or Editor-in-Chief that this Journal has had in its 104 years. Please give him the cooperation and help that you have given the current editor. It has been my privilege to work for 28 years with many of the best astrophysicists in the world and to publish their papers. This was done with the help of the AAS Publications Board and AAS officers, the efforts of Peter Boyce and Evan Owens who made the on-line edition of the Journal possible, three Associate Editors, a score of Scientific Editors, a hardworking staff of six in Tucson, up to 25 production controllers and manuscript editors at the University of Chicago Press, and the thousands of astronomers throughout the world who served as referees. The original masthead called this journal ``An International Review of Spectroscopy and Astronomical Physics.'' That subtitle is no longer appropriate because we do not publish

  18. Announcement: New Editor-in-Chief Robert C. Kennicutt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    1999-05-01

    Effective 1999 July 1, all new manuscripts for Part 1 of The Astrophysical Journal and The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series should be sent to Dr. Robert C. Kennicutt, Editor-in-Chief The Astrophysical Journal Steward Observatory University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 The other means of contact are telephone, (520) 621-5145 FAX, (520) 621-5153 and e-mail, apj@as.arizona.edu. For express packages please use the street address of 933 North Cherry Avenue. Dr. Kennicutt will be assisted by several of my loyal coworkers, who will move across the street. Manuscripts received before July 1 will be handled by the current editor until most of their problems have been resolved, at which point the remainder will be sent to Dr. Kennicutt's office. Manuscripts for the Letters should, as before, be sent directly to Dr. Alex Dalgarno at the Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA. We are fortunate that a person with as much experience in research and proven good judgment as Dr. Kennicutt is willing to accept this difficult and time-consuming responsibility. He will be only the seventh Managing Editor or Editor-in-Chief that this Journal has had in its 104 years. Please give him the cooperation and help that you have given the current editor. It has been my privilege to work for 28 years with many of the best astrophysicists in the world and to publish their papers. This was done with the help of the AAS Publications Board and AAS officers, the efforts of Peter Boyce and Evan Owens who made the on-line edition of the Journal possible, three Associate Editors, a score of Scientific Editors, a hardworking staff of six in Tucson, up to 25 production controllers and manuscript editors at the University of Chicago Press, and the thousands of astronomers throughout the world who served as referees. The original masthead called this journal ``An International Review of Spectroscopy and Astronomical Physics.'' That subtitle is no longer appropriate because we do not publish

  19. The Lin28/let-7 axis is critical for myelination in the peripheral nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Gökbuget, Deniz; Pereira, Jorge A.; Bachofner, Sven; Marchais, Antonin; Ciaudo, Constance; Stoffel, Markus; Schulte, Johannes H.; Suter, Ueli

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are crucial regulators of myelination in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). However, the miRNAs species involved and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We found that let-7 miRNAs are highly abundant during PNS myelination and that their levels are inversely correlated to the expression of lin28 homolog B (Lin28B), an antagonist of let-7 accumulation. Sustained expression of Lin28B and consequently reduced levels of let-7 miRNAs results in a failure of Schwann cell myelination in transgenic mouse models and in cell culture. Subsequent analyses revealed that let-7 miRNAs promote expression of the myelination-driving master transcription factor Krox20 (also known as Egr2) through suppression of myelination inhibitory Notch signalling. We conclude that the Lin28B/let-7 axis acts as a critical driver of PNS myelination, in particular by regulating myelination onset, identifying this pathway also as a potential therapeutic target in demyelinating diseases. PMID:26466203

  20. The Lin28/let-7 axis is critical for myelination in the peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Gökbuget, Deniz; Pereira, Jorge A; Bachofner, Sven; Marchais, Antonin; Ciaudo, Constance; Stoffel, Markus; Schulte, Johannes H; Suter, Ueli

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are crucial regulators of myelination in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). However, the miRNAs species involved and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We found that let-7 miRNAs are highly abundant during PNS myelination and that their levels are inversely correlated to the expression of lin28 homolog B (Lin28B), an antagonist of let-7 accumulation. Sustained expression of Lin28B and consequently reduced levels of let-7 miRNAs results in a failure of Schwann cell myelination in transgenic mouse models and in cell culture. Subsequent analyses revealed that let-7 miRNAs promote expression of the myelination-driving master transcription factor Krox20 (also known as Egr2) through suppression of myelination inhibitory Notch signalling. We conclude that the Lin28B/let-7 axis acts as a critical driver of PNS myelination, in particular by regulating myelination onset, identifying this pathway also as a potential therapeutic target in demyelinating diseases. PMID:26466203

  1. LinAir: A multi-element discrete vortex Weissinger aerodynamic prediction method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durston, Donald A.

    1993-01-01

    LinAir is a vortex lattice aerodynamic prediction method similar to Weissinger's extended lifting-line theory, except that the circulation around a wing is represented by discrete horseshoe vortices, not a continuous distribution of vorticity. The program calculates subsonic longitudinal and lateral/directional aerodynamic forces and moments for arbitrary aircraft geometries. It was originally written by Dr. Ilan Kroo of Stanford University, and subsequently modified by the author to simplify modeling of complex configurations. The Polhamus leading-edge suction analogy was added by the author to extend the range of applicability of LinAir to low aspect ratio (i.e., fighter-type) configurations. A brief discussion of the theory of LinAir is presented, and details on how to run the program are given along with some comparisons with experimental data to validate the code. Example input and output files are given in the appendices to aid in understanding the program and its use. This version of LinAir runs in the VAX/VMS, Cray UNICOS, and Silicon Graphics Iris workstation environments at the time of this writing.

  2. The Value of SCMC in SLA: Comments on Lin, Huang & Liou (2013)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    Meta-analytic methods are often used to determine the effectiveness of certain treatments across studies. However, we are often unaware of how a meta-analysis can provide value to researchers and practitioners. This paper offers a brief commentary on a meta-analysis conducted by Lin, Huang and Liou (2013) in LLT, providing further statistical…

  3. Biotransformation of Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) with LinB--an HCH-converting bacterial enzyme.

    PubMed

    Heeb, Norbert V; Zindel, Daniel; Geueke, Birgit; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Lienemann, Peter

    2012-06-19

    Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) are polyhalogenated hydrocarbons with similar stereochemistry. Both classes of compounds are considered biologically persistent and bioaccumulating pollutants. In 2009, the major HCH stereoisomers came under regulation of the Stockholm convention. Despite their persistence, HCHs are susceptible to bacterial biotransformations. Here we show that LinB, an HCH-converting haloalkane dehalogenase from Sphingobium indicum B90A, is also able to transform HBCDs. Racemic mixtures of α-, β-, and γ-HBCDs were exposed to LinB under various conditions. All stereoisomers were converted, but (-)α-, (+)β-, and (+)γ-HBCDs were transformed faster by LinB than their enantiomers. The enantiomeric excess increased to 8 ± 4%, 27 ± 1%, and 20 ± 2% in 32 h comparable to values of 7.1%, 27.0%, and 22.9% as obtained from respective kinetic models. Initially formed pentabromocyclododecanols (PBCDOHs) were further transformed to tetrabromocyclododecadiols (TBCDDOHs). At least, seven mono- and five dihydroxylated products were distinguished by LC-MS so far. The widespread occurrence of HCHs has led to the evolution of bacterial degradation pathways for such compounds. It remains to be shown if LinB-catalyzed HBCD transformations in vitro can also be observed in vivo, for example, in contaminated soils or in other words if such HBCD biotransformations are important environmental processes. PMID:22578084

  4. An Editor's View of Analytical Chemistry (the Discipline)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Royce W.

    2010-07-01

    The author recounts progress observed in analytical chemistry (the discipline) from the vantage point of a 20-year editor of Analytical Chemistry (the journal). The recounting draws liberally from the journal's monthly editorials. A complete listing of the editorials can be found in Supplemental Material .

  5. Using a Computerized Text-Editor in Freshman Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrard, Lisa

    To determine how useful a computerized text editor would be in helping students to revise their papers, an interactive text manipulation system (Wylbur) was made available to two classes of freshman composition students at the University of California, Los Angeles. Since the course received no advance publicity, students did not know when they…

  6. Most Business Editors Find Journalism Graduates Still Unprepared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardue, Mary Jane

    2014-01-01

    In 2002, a study was published in "Newspaper Research Journal" that explored the preparedness of graduating journalism students to cover business news. In 2012, a follow-up survey of business editors at the nation's daily newspapers was done to see whether progress had been made in the training of journalism students for the…

  7. LACE: A Web-Based, Structured Editor for PDS Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, M.; Keller, R.; Sarram, P.

    2015-06-01

    PDS has moved to XML-based metadata, but many scientists are not familiar with XML and find its structure complicated. For these reasons, we have created LACE, an editor for PDS metadata that hides the complexity of XML from the user.

  8. Publishing in Educational Psychology Journals: Comments from Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nihalani, Priya K.; Mayrath, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    The following paper emphasizes the importance of publishing and learning how to publish in educational psychology journals. We have compiled a set of recommendations based on advice from editors in the field and several other sources on how to publish. Additionally, this paper provides a step-by-step guide that graduate students and junior faculty…

  9. Females' participation in psychopharmacology research as authors, editors, and subjects.

    PubMed

    Poling, Alan; Durgin, Amy; Bradley, Kelly P; Porter, Lindsay K; Van Wagner, Karen; Weeden, Marc; Panos, John J

    2009-04-01

    This study determined the involvement of women as first authors and other authors for every article published in Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, and Psychopharmacology in 1991, 1996, 2001, and 2006. Their involvement as editors also was determined. Women's participation as authors, but not as editors, slightly increased over time. In 2006, 43% of first authors, 38% of other authors, and 24% of editors were women. The gender of subjects was examined for the same years and journals, but could not be determined for 6% and 9% of articles employing nonhuman and human subjects, respectively. In 2006, when subjects' gender could be determined, 77% of articles involving nonhuman subjects used only males, 9% only females, and 14% both males and females. In articles using human subjects in that same year, 17% involved only males, 6% only females, and 77% both males and females. Women researchers clearly make substantial contributions to the psychopharmacology literature, but are nonetheless underrepresented as editors. Findings regarding subjects indicate that there is growing recognition of the importance of gender as a determinant of drug effects, although the vast majority of nonhuman studies continue to involve only male subjects. PMID:19331487

  10. IN DEFENSE OF ECORISK ASSESSMENT (LETTER TO EDITOR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dear Editor: We are writing to convey a more accurate portrayal of the status of ecological ("environmental" in Europe) risk assessment that was presented in the recent article by M. Power and L.S. McCarty (Fallacies in Ecological Risk Assessment Practices," August 1997, pp 370A-...

  11. September 2016 Letter to the Editor-in-Chief.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    Letter to the Editor-in-Chief of JOSPT as follows: "One More Cause of Failure to Validate a CPR: Overfitting" with Author's Response J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):811-812. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0202. PMID:27581182

  12. Metformin may antagonize Lin28 and/or Lin28B activity, thereby boosting let-7 levels and antagonizing cancer progression.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F

    2012-02-01

    Cancer cells with stem cell characteristics are harbored by most tumors, and are characterized by epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) - which promotes invasive growth and metastasis - chemoresistance, and the capacity to reconstitute new tumors. Hence, the control or destruction of cancer stem cells should be a major goal of cancer management. The let-7 family of microRNAs has cancer suppressor activity, and recent evidence suggests that markedly reduced levels of let-7 are not only a typical feature of cancer stem cells, but may be largely responsible for cancer stemness. It is therefore particularly intriguing that metformin, a diabetes drug thought to have potential in the prevention and treatment of cancer, has recently been found to oppose cancer cell stemness, to markedly potentiate chemotherapeutic control of cancer in mouse xenograft models, and to notably boost let-7a levels in cancer stem cells. It is proposed that this latter effect of metformin may reflect AMPK-mediated inhibition of the expression or activity of Lin28/Lin28A, proteins which act post-transcriptionally to decrease the levels of all let-7 family members. The transcription of Lin28B is promoted by NF-kappaB and by Myc; hence, practical measures which antagonize NF-kappaB or Myc activity may complement the utility of metformin for boosting let-7 expression and controlling cancer stemness; salsalate, antioxidants, tyrosine kinase and cox-2 inhibitors, ribavirin, vitamin D, gamma-secretase inhibitors (when available), and parenteral curcumin may have some utility in this regard. Although the impact of histone deacetylase inhibitors on let-7 expression has not been assessed, there is reason to suspect that these drugs might complement let-7's impact on chemoresistance, EMT, and stemness. Multifocal strategies centering on metformin may have considerable potential for reversing cancer stemness and rendering advanced cancers more susceptible to long term control. PMID:22129484

  13. EDITORIAL: Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, Jan Michael

    2011-01-01

    I am very pleased to announce that Professor Paul Corkum will be taking on the position of Editor-in-Chief at Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (J. Phys. B) from the beginning of January 2011. During my term as Editor-in-Chief atomic, molecular and optical science has continued to change rapidly: we have seen ultracold physics widening its original emphasis on Bose-Einstein condensates to the entanglement of light and matter in the most general sense towards a science of information. At the same time attosecond science and interaction of matter with short x-ray pulses develops rapidly. I am very happy that J. Phys. B with Paul Corkum as Editor-in-Chief will play a central role in publishing exciting results from this field. I would like to thank the publishing team at J. Phys. B for their fantastic job, in particular for the quality of the refereeing system the team has been able to maintain while at the same time bringing down the publication times considerably. I thank them all for the help and support they have given me in the role of Editor-in-Chief and wish them the very best for the future. Last and certainly not least I would like to thank you, the authors, referees and readers, for the support of J. Phys. B.

  14. EDITORIAL: Outgoing Editor-in-Chief Outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    I started in 2002 as Editor-in-Chief of a well established journal—MST (Measurement Science and Technology). It was a time when modern means of communication offered new opportunities for the scientific community—for all scientists and engineers whether at universities, in industry or at other institutions—to access better quality information in a shorter time. This development helped us to be more efficient in our daily scientific work and to anticipate new trends faster than before. A flood of information was created by different search engines. A few online journals or journals published in emerging countries with a similar profile to MST appeared on the market. MST had to provide new answers in response to these developments. In 2002 I postulated two requirements to the journal. Firstly, the publisher has to be up to date. My impression over the years has been that IOPP is excellently organized. That has made it easier for the board members and all our reviewers to concentrate on the scientific aspects of our input to the journal. During all my visits to Bristol or my contacts with the IOPP staff I always met very professional and enthusiastic staff members. They have not only supported and encouraged the ideas and initiatives of the Editorial Board members, but they have also worked hard on establishing one of the most effective journal operations in the field of measurement science and technology. Many authors are well aware of this. Thus I am able to declare that the first requirement for a successful journal has been met. Secondly, the scientific level has to be high and the journal should attract readers from all over the world. This task was the responsibility of the Editorial Board members and of myself. Our strategy was on the one hand to ensure continuity in MST but on the other hand to be open to new trends and developments. Examples of these new aspects of the journal are fields like micro- and nanometrology, measurement techniques for

  15. FLAn: A Free Hypermedia Editor to Create Foreign Language Learning Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilickaya, Ferit, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Glossing words is done via special software called multimedia editors. Foreign Language Annotator (FLAn), created by Thibeault (2011), is one of these multimedia editors. FLAn (Foreign Language Annotator), a free hypermedia editor that works on both Macs and PCs, allows instructors to turn static texts into dynamic learning units by attaching…

  16. PREFACE: Introductory remarks from the Editors Introductory remarks from the Editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, E.; Meseguer, A.; Marques, F.

    2012-06-01

    The local organizers of the 4th BIFD (Bifurcations and Instabilities in Fluid Dynamics) Symposium held in Barcelona on 18-21 July 2011 would like to thank the editors of Fluid Dynamics Research for offering us the opportunity of publishing a peer-reviewed special issue of the journal with a selection of the contributions presented at this conference. We thank both the authors and the referees for working with us on the rather tight schedule necessary to release the issue within one year of the date of the conference. We also thank the invited speakers, B Eckhardt, L Tuckerman, and J M Vega, for contributing keynote papers to this special issue. The series of BIFD symposia started as a small workshop in Madeira, Portugal, in 2004 with no more than 20 participants. This number increased rapidly during the second and third symposia held in 2006 (Denmark) and 2009 (United Kingdom), with 40 and 110 participants, respectively. The 4th BIFD symposium has consolidated this event as one of the leading conferences in hydrodynamic stability, with nearly 200 participants from around the world. The main goal of this conference is to bring together scientists and engineers from different disciplines directly or indirectly related to fluid dynamics, bifurcation theory and hydrodynamic stability theory. The conference covered many research areas within the aforementioned fields, ranging from thermal, shear and centrifugal flows to biofluids, films, drops, viscoelastic flows and magnetohydrodynamics. The structure of the conference, with invited plenary talks and focused sessions, helped the participants find their home in the conference and share state-of-the-art knowledge within the field of hydrodynamic instabilities. The financial support from MICINN (Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation, Grant no FIS2009-08065-E) and UPC (Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya) is greatly appreciated. The local organizers would also like to thank ETSAB (Barcelona School of Architecture

  17. Testicular expression of the Lin28/let-7 system: Hormonal regulation and changes during postnatal maturation and after manipulations of puberty

    PubMed Central

    Sangiao-Alvarellos, S.; Manfredi-Lozano, M.; Ruiz-Pino, F.; León, S.; Morales, C.; Cordido, F.; Gaytán, F.; Pinilla, L.; Tena-Sempere, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Lin28/let-7 system, which includes the RNA-binding proteins, Lin28a/Lin28b, and let-7 miRNAs, has emerged as putative regulator of puberty and male gametogenesis; yet, its expression pattern and regulation in postnatal testis remain ill defined. We report herein expression profiles of Lin28 and let-7 members, and related mir-145 and mir-132, in rat testis during postnatal maturation and in models of altered puberty and hormonal deregulation. Neonatal expression of Lin28a and Lin28b was low and rose markedly during the infantile period; yet, expression patterns diverged thereafter, with persistently elevated levels only for Lin28b, which peaked at puberty. Let-7a, let-7b, mir-132 and mir-145 showed profiles opposite to Lin28b. In fact, let-7b and mir-145 were abundant in pachytene spermatocytes, but absent in elongating spermatids, where high expression of Lin28b was previously reported. Perturbation of puberty by neonatal estrogenization reverted the Lin28/let-7 expression ratio; expression changes were also detected in other models of delayed puberty, due to early photoperiod or nutritional manipulations. In addition, hypophysectomy or growth hormone (GH) deficiency revealed regulation of this system by gonadotropins and GH. Our data document the expression profiles of the Lin28/let-7 system in rat testis along postnatal/pubertal maturation, and their perturbation in models of pubertal and hormonal manipulation. PMID:26494358

  18. Manipulation quantique de la lumière par un amplificateur non linéaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symul, T.; Bencheikh, K.; Levenson, J. A.

    2002-06-01

    Nous proposons un dispositif original, appelé Amplificateur Non Linéaire (ANL), permettant la génération et la manipulation d'états quantiques de la lumière. Ce dispositif permet une compression du bruit quantique de la lumière en dessous de la limite quantique standard plus efficace que celle obtenue par interactions non linéaires du second ordre ou du troisième ordre. Il permet également d'inverser les fluctuations quantiques en intensité de la lumière, et de produire des photons jumeaux ayant des corrélations quantiques plus élevées et plus robustes que ceux produits par un amplificateur paramétrique seul.

  19. [Exploring the opium prohibition campaign led by LIN Ze-xu, a medical perspective].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sun-Biao; Wang, Ping

    2013-03-01

    Opium destruction in Humen, a feat of the national hero, LIN Ze-xu turned a new page of modern history of China. In the past researches, the campaign always basically studied under a political historical background. In fact, it was also related closely to medicine. During the reign of the Dao Guang Emperor of the Qing Dynasty, there was always mentioning of the risk of doping opium and its addiction process and mechanism in his serial reports and letters to the imperial government. During this inhibition process, he took measures, such as providing the medicines to conquer the addiction of opium, asking the effective prescriptions for prohibiting opium from physicians and strove to popularize them. As viewed from a medical and historical perspective, the opium prohibition campaign led by LIN Ze-xu still reveals some enlightening significance even for the current society. PMID:24135477

  20. From the desk of the Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, Tom K.

    2015-07-01

    Life Sciences in Space Research had a prominent presence at the International Congress of Radiation Research (ICRR) meeting held in Kyoto, Japan from May 25th-29th, with seven of the eleven editors attending the meeting. A journal booth was also put up at the pre-ICRR satellite meeting on Space Radiation and Heavy Ions in Therapy (SRHITS) held a few days earlier in Osaka. Since the inception of LSSR last year, the editors and publisher have promoted the journal at a number of major conferences including COSPAR 2014 in Moscow, the annual meeting of the Radiation Research Society and the NASA Space Radiation Investigators Meeting. These efforts have increased awareness of the journal among investigators in space life sciences and related fields. The number of monthly downloads of articles from the journal website averages 2000, a respectable number for a brand new journal.

  1. Wysession begins term as Eos Section Editor for Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysession, Michael

    In mid-April, Michael Wysession, an associate professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Washington University, embarked on a 3-year term as section editor of Eos for seismology. Wysession brings to the position a strong background in research and teaching. Below are a few remarks from Wysession.“I recently became the new seismology editor for Eos. I look forward to presenting the many exciting areas of seismological research to the entire geophysical community. I have taught at Washington University since obtaining my Ph.D. at Northwestern University in 1991. My interest in seismology began during my undergraduate years at Brown University (Sc.B., 1984), but my experience as an educator began after I graduated and taught high school math and physics in Staten Island, N.Y.

  2. Development of the LinZI Method for Merging MODIS and Landsat-based Evapotranspiration Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. K.; Senay, G. B.; Bohms, S.; Verdin, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) plays a key role in transporting water and energy in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. Remotely sensed images from Landsat and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are increasingly used for estimating spatial and temporal distribution of ET using different modeling algorithms. Landsat and MODIS have different spectral, spatial, and temporal resolutions thus resulting in ET maps of different visual and analytical qualities. Downscaling is a great way of utilizing the combined benefits of the high temporal resolution of MODIS images and fine spatial resolution of Landsat images. We have evaluated the performance of the output regression with intercept method for data downscaling in the Colorado River basin. Our results showed that application of regression coefficients computed over large areas such as the Colorado River Basin are not able to produce accurate ET maps. Thus we developed the Linear with Zero Intercept (LinZI) method for downscaling MODIS-based monthly ET maps to the Landsat-scale ET maps for the Colorado River Basin. We obtained a high agreement between downscaled monthly ET maps using the LinZI method and the eddy covariance measurements from seven flux sites within the Colorado River Basin. The mean absolute error of the monthly ET ranged from 8 mm to 25 mm, and the coefficient of determination varied from 0.53 to 0.88. Most of the discrepancies between measured and downscaled monthly ET were mainly at two flux sites due to the prevailing flux footprint. Downscaled monthly ET using the LinZI method nicely captured the temporal variation in the sampled land cover classes. We plan to use the LinZI method for estimating ET at finer temporal resolution (such as 8 days) with further evaluation. The proposed downscaling method will be very useful in advancing the application of remotely sensed images in water resources planning and management.

  3. Towards a document structure editor for software requirements analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, Vincent J.; Lekkos, Anthony A.

    1986-01-01

    Of the six or seven phases of the software engineering life cycle, requirements analysis tends to be the least understood and the least formalized. Correspondingly, a scarcity of useful software tools exist which aid in the development of user and system requirements. It is proposed that requirements analysis should culminate in a set of documents similar to those that usually accompany a delivered Software product. The design of a software tool, the Document Structure Editor, which facilitates the development of such documentation.

  4. Response to Niklasson's comment on Lin, et al. (2012) : "the relation between postural movement and bilateral motor integration".

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Kai; Kuo, Bor-Chen; Wu, Huey-Min

    2014-10-01

    In the study of Lin, Wu, Lin, Wu, Wu, Kuo, and Yeung (2012 ), the relationship between the validity of postural movement and bilateral motor integration in terms of sensory integration theory was examined. Postural movement is the ability to use the antigravity postures required for stabilization of the neck, trunk and upper extremities via muscle co-contractions in the neck and upper extremities, and balance. Niklasson's (2013 ) comment argued that postural movement should include primitive reflexes in terms of the general abilities approach. Niklasson (2013 ) focused on the efficacy of the treatment rather than the theoretical frameworks implied in the therapeutic activities. For that purpose Lin, et al. (2012 ) used sensory integration as the theoretical foundation, and the relationship between postural movement and bilateral motor integration was assessed via empirical data. The result of Lin, et al. (2012 ) was offered as a theoretical reference for therapeutic activities. PMID:25310229

  5. Cryptanalysis of the Hwang-Lo-Lin Scheme Based on an ID-Based Cryptosystem and Its Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Haeryong; Chun, Kilsoo; Ahn, Seungho

    Hwang-Lo-Lin proposed a user identification scheme [3] based on the Maurer-Yacobi scheme [6] that is suitable for application to the mobile environment. Hwang-Lo-Lin argued that their scheme is secure against any attack. Against the Hwang-Lo-Lin argument, Liu-Horng-Liu showed that the Hwang-Lo-Lin scheme is insecure against a Liu-Horng-Liu attack mounted by an eavesdrop attacker. However, Liu-Horng-Liu did not propose any improved version of the original identification scheme which is still secure against the Liu-Horng-Liu attack. In this paper, we propose an identification scheme that can solve this problem and a non-interactive public key distribution scheme also.

  6. Structural basis for LIN54 recognition of CHR elements in cell cycle-regulated promoters

    PubMed Central

    Marceau, Aimee H.; Felthousen, Jessica G.; Goetsch, Paul D.; Iness, Audra N.; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Tripathi, Sarvind M.; Strome, Susan; Litovchick, Larisa; Rubin, Seth M.

    2016-01-01

    The MuvB complex recruits transcription factors to activate or repress genes with cell cycle-dependent expression patterns. MuvB contains the DNA-binding protein LIN54, which directs the complex to promoter cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) elements. Here we characterize the DNA-binding properties of LIN54 and describe the structural basis for recognition of a CHR sequence. We biochemically define the CHR consensus as TTYRAA and determine that two tandem cysteine rich regions are required for high-affinity DNA association. A crystal structure of the LIN54 DNA-binding domain in complex with a CHR sequence reveals that sequence specificity is conferred by two tyrosine residues, which insert into the minor groove of the DNA duplex. We demonstrate that this unique tyrosine-mediated DNA binding is necessary for MuvB recruitment to target promoters. Our results suggest a model in which MuvB binds near transcription start sites and plays a role in positioning downstream nucleosomes. PMID:27465258

  7. Statement on Publication Ethics for Editors and Publishers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The digitization and related developments in journal editing and publishing necessitate increasing the awareness of all stakeholders of science communication in the emerging global problems and possible solutions. Journal editors and publishers are frequently encountered with the fast-growing problems of authorship, conflicts of interest, peer review, research misconduct, unethical citations, and inappropriate journal impact metrics. While the number of erroneous and unethical research papers and wasteful, or 'predatory', journals is increasing exponentially, responsible editors are urged to 'clean' the literature by correcting or retracting related articles. Indexers are advised to implement measures for accepting truly influential and ethical journals and delisting sources with predatory publishing practices. Updating knowledge and skills of authors, editors and publishers, developing and endorsing recommendations of global editorial associations, and (re)drafting journal instructions can be viewed as potential tools for improving ethics of academic journals. The aim of this Statement is to increase awareness of all stakeholders of science communication of the emerging ethical issues in journal editing and publishing and initiate a campaign of upgrading and enforcing related journal instructions. PMID:27510376

  8. CMS Configuration Editor: GUI based application for user analysis job

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cosa, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present the user interface and the software architecture of the Configuration Editor for the CMS experiment. The analysis workflow is organized in a modular way integrated within the CMS framework that organizes in a flexible way user analysis code. The Python scripting language is adopted to define the job configuration that drives the analysis workflow. It could be a challenging task for users, especially for newcomers, to develop analysis jobs managing the configuration of many required modules. For this reason a graphical tool has been conceived in order to edit and inspect configuration files. A set of common analysis tools defined in the CMS Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT) can be steered and configured using the Config Editor. A user-defined analysis workflow can be produced starting from a standard configuration file, applying and configuring PAT tools according to the specific user requirements. CMS users can adopt this tool, the Config Editor, to create their analysis visualizing in real time which are the effects of their actions. They can visualize the structure of their configuration, look at the modules included in the workflow, inspect the dependences existing among the modules and check the data flow. They can visualize at which values parameters are set and change them according to what is required by their analysis task. The integration of common tools in the GUI needed to adopt an object-oriented structure in the Python definition of the PAT tools and the definition of a layer of abstraction from which all PAT tools inherit.

  9. Statement on Publication Ethics for Editors and Publishers.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Voronov, Alexander A; Gorin, Sergey V; Koroleva, Anna M; Kitas, George D

    2016-09-01

    The digitization and related developments in journal editing and publishing necessitate increasing the awareness of all stakeholders of science communication in the emerging global problems and possible solutions. Journal editors and publishers are frequently encountered with the fast-growing problems of authorship, conflicts of interest, peer review, research misconduct, unethical citations, and inappropriate journal impact metrics. While the number of erroneous and unethical research papers and wasteful, or 'predatory', journals is increasing exponentially, responsible editors are urged to 'clean' the literature by correcting or retracting related articles. Indexers are advised to implement measures for accepting truly influential and ethical journals and delisting sources with predatory publishing practices. Updating knowledge and skills of authors, editors and publishers, developing and endorsing recommendations of global editorial associations, and (re)drafting journal instructions can be viewed as potential tools for improving ethics of academic journals. The aim of this Statement is to increase awareness of all stakeholders of science communication of the emerging ethical issues in journal editing and publishing and initiate a campaign of upgrading and enforcing related journal instructions. PMID:27510376

  10. EDITORIAL: Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Keith

    2005-01-01

    I am very pleased to announce that Professor Jan-Michael Rost will be taking on the position of Editor-in-Chief at Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (J. Phys. B) from the beginning of January 2005. As Editor-in-Chief I have seen the journal respond to the rapid and exciting developments in atomic, molecular and optical physics of recent years. There will, I am sure, be a great deal of new and important science in our field in the years ahead. I am also sure that Jan-Michael will do a fantastic job in guiding the journal through these times. The publishing team at J. Phys. B is a superbly responsive and effective one that does a great job in publishing the science we do. I want to thank them all for the help and support they have given me in the role of Editor-in-Chief and wish them the very best for the future. Last and certainly not least I would like to thank you, the authors, referees and readers, for making J. Phys. B such a great journal to have been a part of.

  11. A perspective on computer documentation: System developer vs. technical editor

    SciTech Connect

    Carnes, E.T.; Truett, L.F.

    1995-12-31

    Between the computer-knowledgeable {open_quotes}techie{close_quotes} and the technical writer is a chasm created by differences in knowledge bases and skills. Although this gap is widened by misunderstandings and misconceptions of system development roles, it is bridged by mutual need and dual appreciation. Often the editor/writer is {open_quotes}behind{close_quotes} from beginning to end. The writer normally joins the team after the programmers are well into system development and do not want to {open_quotes}waste time{close_quotes} discussing fundamentals. The writer is usually excluded from technical discussions because it is assumed that he/she would not understand anyway. Later in the system development cycle, the writer has no time to polish the documentation before a new version of the software is issued which implies that the documentation must be revised. Nevertheless, the editor/writer`s product is critical for the end-user`s appreciation of the software, a fact which promotes unity to complete the comprehensive package of software and documentation. This paper explores the planks in the bridge that spans the chasm between developers and their fundamental PR agents, the technical editors/writers. This paper defines approaches (e.g., The Circling Theory) and techniques (Bold Thrust!) employed for effective communication -- between software developer and technical writer as well as between the software and the end-user.

  12. High LIN28A Expressing Ovarian Cancer Cells Secrete Exosomes That Induce Invasion and Migration in HEK293 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Enriquez, Vanessa A.; Cleys, Ellane R.; Da Silveira, Juliano C.; Spillman, Monique A.; Winger, Quinton A.; Bouma, Gerrit J.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most aggressive and deadly form of ovarian cancer and is the most lethal gynecological malignancy worldwide; therefore, efforts to elucidate the molecular factors that lead to epithelial ovarian cancer are essential to better understand this disease. Recent studies reveal that tumor cells release cell-secreted vesicles called exosomes and these exosomes can transfer RNAs and miRNAs to distant sites, leading to cell transformation and tumor development. The RNA-binding protein LIN28 is a known marker of stem cells and when expressed in cancer, it is associated with poor tumor outcome. We hypothesized that high LIN28 expressing ovarian cancer cells secrete exosomes that can be taken up by nontumor cells and cause changes in gene expression and cell behavior associated with tumor development. IGROV1 cells were found to contain high LIN28A and secrete exosomes that were taken up by HEK293 cells. Moreover, exposure to these IGROV1 secreted exosomes led to significant increases in genes involved in Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), induced HEK293 cell invasion and migration. These changes were not observed with exosomes secreted by OV420 cells, which contain no detectable amounts of LIN28A or LIN28B. No evidence was found of LIN28A transfer from IGROV1 exosomes to HEK293 cells. PMID:26583126

  13. Novel localisation and possible function of LIN7 and IRSp53 in mitochondria of HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Ilaria; Crespi, Arianna; Fornasari, Diego; Pietrini, Grazia

    2016-08-01

    By means of immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionation experiments, we here demonstrate mitochondrial distribution of LIN7 and IRSp53 in HeLa cells. These peripheral proteins displayed a tight association with mitochondria and coimmunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fractions. In line with a role for LIN7 in the regulation of IRSp53 activity on actin dynamics, the morphology of mitochondria was similarly altered by changing the expression levels of either each protein or both, whereas mitochondrial morphology was preserved in cells overexpressing IRSp53 deleted of its binding domains for LIN7 (IRSp53Δ5) or for actin polymerisation modulators (IRSp53ΔSH3). In particular, the overexpression of full length LIN7 and/or IRSp53 increased the percentage of cells with short mitochondria, while downregulation of the endogenous proteins by shRNAs increased the amount of cells with elongated and perinuclear clustered mitochondria. These mitochondria were only partially resistant to fragmentation induced by dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential (i.e. treatment with sodium azide), whereas mitochondria were fully protected by the fission defective mutant Drp1 K38A. Overexpression of LIN7 or IRSp53 did not prevent the formation of hyperfused mitochondria in cells coexpressing the Drp1 K38A mutant, thus suggesting that LIN7-IRSp53 complex requires functional Drp1 to regulate mitochondrial morphology. PMID:27320196

  14. A Synthetic Lethal Screen Identifies a Role for Lin-44/Wnt in C. elegans Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hartin, Samantha N.; Hudson, Martin L.; Yingling, Curtis; Ackley, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The C. elegans proteins PTP-3/LAR-RPTP and SDN-1/Syndecan are conserved cell adhesion molecules. Loss-of-function (LOF) mutations in either ptp-3 or sdn-1 result in low penetrance embryonic developmental defects. Work from other systems has shown that syndecans can function as ligands for LAR receptors in vivo. We used double mutant analysis to test whether ptp-3 and sdn-1 function in a linear genetic pathway during C. elegans embryogenesis. Results We found animals with LOF in both sdn-1 and ptp-3 exhibited a highly penetrant synthetic lethality (SynLet), with only a small percentage of animals surviving to adulthood. Analysis of the survivors demonstrated that these animals had a synergistic increase in the penetrance of embryonic developmental defects. Together, these data strongly suggested PTP-3 and SDN-1 function in parallel during embryogenesis. We subsequently used RNAi to knockdown ~3,600 genes predicted to encode secreted and/or transmembrane molecules to identify genes that interacted with ptp-3 or sdn-1. We found that the Wnt ligand, lin-44, was SynLet with sdn-1, but not ptp-3. We used 4-dimensional time-lapse analysis to characterize the interaction between lin-44 and sdn-1. We found evidence that loss of lin-44 caused defects in the polarization and migration of endodermal precursors during gastrulation, a previously undescribed role for lin-44 that is strongly enhanced by the loss of sdn-1. Conclusions PTP-3 and SDN-1 function in compensatory pathways during C. elegans embryonic and larval development, as simultaneous loss of both genes has dire consequences for organismal survival. The Wnt ligand lin-44 contributes to the early stages of gastrulation in parallel to sdn-1, but in a genetic pathway with ptp-3. Overall, the SynLet phenotype provides a robust platform to identify ptp-3 and sdn-1 interacting genes, as well as other genes that function in development, yet might be missed in traditional forward genetic screens. PMID:25938228

  15. Gain-of-function mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans lin-1 ETS gene identify a C-terminal regulatory domain phosphorylated by ERK MAP kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, D; Beitel, G J; Clark, S G; Horvitz, H R; Kornfeld, K

    1998-01-01

    Genetic analysis of lin-1 loss-of-function mutations suggests that lin-1 controls multiple cell-fate decisions during Caenorhabditis elegans development and is negatively regulated by a conserved receptor tyrosine kinase-Ras-ERK mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signal transduction pathway. LIN-1 protein contains an ETS domain and presumably regulates transcription. We identified and characterized six gain-of-function mutations that define a new class of lin-1 allele. These lin-1 alleles appeared to be constitutively active and unresponsive to negative regulation. Each allele has a single-base change that affects the predicted C terminus of LIN-1, suggesting this region is required for negative regulation. The C terminus of LIN-1 was a high-affinity substrate for Erk2 in vitro, suggesting that LIN-1 is directly regulated by ERK MAP kinase. Because mpk-1 ERK MAP kinase controls at least one cell-fate decision that does not require lin-1, our results suggest that MPK-1 contributes to the specificity of this receptor tyrosine kinase-Ras-MAP kinase signal transduction pathway by phosphorylating different proteins in different developmental contexts. These lin-1 mutations all affect a four-amino-acid motif, FQFP, that is conserved in vertebrate and Drosophila ETS proteins that are also phosphorylated by ERK MAP kinase. This sequence may be a substrate recognition motif for the ERK subfamily of MAP kinases. PMID:9691039

  16. Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief, Ronald Stambaugh Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief, Ronald Stambaugh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, Ronald

    2012-04-01

    I am very pleased to join the outstanding leadership team for the journal Nuclear Fusion as Scientific Editor. The journal's high position in the field of fusion energy research derives in no small measure from the efforts of the IAEA team in Vienna, the production and marketing of IOP Publishing, the Board of Editors led by its chairman Mitsuru Kikuchi, the Associate Editor for Inertial Confinement Max Tabak and the outgoing Scientific Editor, Paul Thomas. During Paul's five year tenure submissions have grown by over 40%. The usage of the electronic journal has grown year by year with about 300 000 full text downloads of Nuclear Fusion articles in 2011, an impressive figure due in part to the launch of the full 50 year archive. High quality has been maintained while times for peer review and publishing have been reduced and the journal achieved some of the highest impact factors ever (as high as 4.27). The journal has contributed greatly to building the international scientific basis for fusion. I was privileged to serve from 2003 to 2010 as chairman of the Coordinating Committee for the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) which published in Nuclear Fusion the first ITER Physics Basis (1999) and its later update (2007). The scientific basis that has been developed to date for fusion has led to the construction of major facilities to demonstrate the production of power-plant relevant levels of fusion reactions. We look forward to the journal continuing to play a key role in the international effort toward fusion energy as these exciting major facilities and the various approaches to fusion continue to be developed. It is clear that Nuclear Fusion maintains its position in the field because of the perceived high quality of the submissions, the refereeing and the editorial processes, and the availability and utility of the online journal. The creation of the Nuclear Fusion Prize, led by the Board of Editors chairman Mitsuru Kikuchi, for the most outstanding

  17. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, P.

    2004-04-01

    On 1 January, 2004, I assumed the position of Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics. I will start by saying that I will do my best to justify the confidence of the journal management and publishing staff in my abilities. I was fortunate to have been able to work, as an Editorial Board member, with my predecessor, the previous Editor-in-Chief, Professor Allister Ferguson. Allister has provided a high degree of intellectual stewardship for the journal in the last five years. He has made the job appear a worthy challenge for me. I therefore take this opportunity to thank Allister on behalf of the Editorial Board and publishing staff of the journal. Several other factors contributed to my decision to accept this position. The first is the group of people who actually go about the business of publishing. The Senior Publisher, Nicola Gulley (and her predecessor Sophy Le Masurier); the Managing Editor, Jill Membrey; the Publishing Administrators, Nina Blakesley and Sarah Towell; the Production Editor, Katie Gerrard and their office staff form an amazing group and have managed to make the operation of the journal incredibly efficient. An index of this is the speed with which incoming manuscripts are processed. The average time between the receipt of a manuscript and its web publication, if accepted, is 130 days. This is three to five times shorter than for most other journals. A factor that contributes to this success is a responsive pool of referees that the publishing staff have as a valuable resource. Ultimately, the standard bearers of any journal are the referees. Therefore, a grateful `thank you' is due from all of us at J. Phys. D to all our referees, who diligently perform this honourable task. The Associate Editors of the journal, Professors Lawler, Margaritondo and O'Grady, also provide immense scientific leadership. They help in defining new directions for the journal and in the publishing process. Last, but not least, a remarkable asset of

  18. Absence of Functional LIN28B Mutations in a Large Cohort of Patients with Idiopathic Central Precocious Puberty

    PubMed Central

    Silveira-Neto, Acácio P.; Leal, Leticia Ferro; Emerman, Amy B.; Henderson, Katherine D.; Piskounova, Elena; Henderson, Brian E.; Gregory, Richard I.; Gontijo Silveira, Letícia F.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Nguyen, Thutrang T.; Beneduzzi, Daiane; Tusset, Cintia; Reis, Ana Claudia S.; Brito, Vinicius N.; Mendonça, Berenice B.; Palmert, Mark R; Antonini, Sonir R; Latronico, Ana Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Aim To investigate LIN28B gene variants in children with idiopathic central precocious puberty (CPP). Patients and Methods We studied 178 Brazilian children with CPP (171 girls,16.8% familial cases). A large multiethnic group (1599 subjects; MEC cohort) was used as control. DNA analysis and biochemical in vitro studies were performed. Results A heterozygous LIN28B variant, p.H199R, was identified in a girl who developed CPP at 5.2 yrs. This variant was absent in 310 Brazilian control individuals, but it was found in the same allele frequency in women from the MEC cohort, independently of the age of menarche. Functional studies revealed that when ectopically expressed in cells the mutant protein was capable of binding pre-let-7 miRNA and inhibiting let-7 expression to the same extent as wild-type Lin28B protein. Other rare LIN28B variants (p.P173P, c.198+32_33delCT, g.9575731A>C and c.-11C>T) were identified in CPP patients and controls. Therefore, no functional mutation was identified. Conclusion In vitro studies revealed that the rare LIN28B p.H199R variant identified in a girl with CPP does not affect the Lin28B function in the regulation of let-7 expression. Although LIN28B SNPs were associated with normal pubertal timing, rare variations in this gene do not seem to be commonly involved in the molecular pathogenesis of CPP. PMID:22964795

  19. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsch, Kornelius

    2012-01-01

    On 1 January 2012 I will be assuming the position of Editor-in-Chief of the journal Semiconductor Science and Technology (SST). I am flattered by the confidence expressed in my ability to carry out this challenging job and I will try hard to justify this confidence. The previous Editor-in-Chief, Laurens Molenkamp, University of Würzburg, Germany, has worked tirelessly for the last ten years and has done an excellent job for the journal. Everyone at the journal is profoundly grateful for his leadership and for his achievements In 2012 several new members will join the Editorial Board: Professor Deli Wang (University of California, San Diego) with considerable expertise in semiconductor nanowires, Professor Saskia Fischer (Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany) with a background in semiconductor quantum devices, and Professor Erwin Kessels (Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands) with extensive experience in plasma processing of thin films and gate oxides. In particular, I want to express my gratitude to Professor Israel Bar-Joseph (Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel) and Professor Maria Tamargo (The City College of New York, USA), who will leave next year and who have vigorously served the Editorial Board for years. The journal has recently introduced a fast-track option for manuscripts. This option is a high-quality, high-profile outlet for new and important research across all areas of semiconductor research. Authors can expect to receive referee reports in less than 20 days from submission. Once accepted, you can expect the articles to be online within two or three weeks from acceptance and to be published in print in less than a month. Furthermore, all fast-track communications published in 2011 will be free to read for ten years. More detailed information on fast-track publication can be found on the following webpage: http://iopscience.iop.org/0268-1242/page/Fast track communications It is encouraging to see that since the journal introduced pre

  20. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsch, Kornelius

    2012-01-01

    On 1 January 2012 I will be assuming the position of Editor-in-Chief of the journal Semiconductor Science and Technology (SST). I am flattered by the confidence expressed in my ability to carry out this challenging job and I will try hard to justify this confidence. The previous Editor-in-Chief, Laurens Molenkamp, University of Würzburg, Germany, has worked tirelessly for the last ten years and has done an excellent job for the journal. Everyone at the journal is profoundly grateful for his leadership and for his achievements In 2012 several new members will join the Editorial Board: Professor Deli Wang (University of California, San Diego) with considerable expertise in semiconductor nanowires, Professor Saskia Fischer (Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany) with a background in semiconductor quantum devices, and Professor Erwin Kessels (Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands) with extensive experience in plasma processing of thin films and gate oxides. In particular, I want to express my gratitude to Professor Israel Bar-Joseph (Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel) and Professor Maria Tamargo (The City College of New York, USA), who will leave next year and who have vigorously served the Editorial Board for years. The journal has recently introduced a fast-track option for manuscripts. This option is a high-quality, high-profile outlet for new and important research across all areas of semiconductor research. Authors can expect to receive referee reports in less than 20 days from submission. Once accepted, you can expect the articles to be online within two or three weeks from acceptance and to be published in print in less than a month. Furthermore, all fast-track communications published in 2011 will be free to read for ten years. More detailed information on fast-track publication can be found on the following webpage: http://iopscience.iop.org/0268-1242/page/Fast track communications It is encouraging to see that since the journal introduced pre

  1. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim

    2008-02-01

    I am Professor Ephrahim Garcia, an Associate Professor at Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. I have been at Cornell University since 2002, spent four years as a Program Manager at the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency from 1998-2002, and before that seven years at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. I have served on the Editorial Advisory Board of Smart Materials and Structures (SMS) for the last six years. It is a humbling thing to be asked to take up the post of Editor-in-Chief in a field with so many talented researchers. I would like to say a heartfelt thanks to the members of the Editorial Board and IOP Publishing for their confidence in me. Most importantly, I would like to thank Professor Vijay Varadan of the University of Arkansas and Professor Richard Claus of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University for their efforts in launching the journal 16 years ago. They have been stewards, promoters and, especially Vijay, key to the operation and function of SMS for all these years, and our research community is indebted to them. Professors Varadan and Claus have dedicated their careers to the area of smart materials and structures and we are very grateful for their leadership, mentoring and contribution. SMS is a thriving journal offering papers on all technical areas concerned with smart materials, systems and structures from the micro- and nanoscale to the macroscale. The journal is undergoing some major changes, including the recent transferal of papers to IOP Publishing's peer-review management system. With this new system authors can expect fast publication times of around 4 or 5 months from submission, and excellent author service. In this world of ever changing technology, the Editorial Board and I aim to reduce the time to publication for researchers in this exciting area of science and engineering. I am in the process of

  2. The Murine Bladder Supports a Population of Stromal Sca-1+/CD34+/lin- Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Meredith A; Kulkulka, Natalie A; Firmiss, Paula R; Ross, Michael J; Flum, Andrew S; Santos, Grace B Delos; Bowen, Diana K; Dettman, Robert W; Gong, Edward M

    2015-01-01

    Bladder fibrosis is an undesired end point of injury of obstruction and often renders the smooth muscle layer noncompliant. In many cases, the long-term effect of bladder fibrosis is renal failure. Despite our understanding of the progression of this disease, little is known about the cellular mechanisms that lead to a remodeled bladder wall. Resident stem (progenitor) cells have been identified in various organs such as the brain, heart and lung. These cells function normally during organ homeostasis, but become dysregulated after organ injury. Here, we aimed to characterize a mesenchymal progenitor cell population as a first step in understanding its role in bladder fibrosis. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), we identified a Sca-1+/ CD34+/ lin- (PECAM-: CD45-: Ter119-) population in the adult murine bladder. These cells were localized to the stromal layer of the adult bladder and appeared by postnatal day 1. Cultured Sca-1+/ CD34+/ lin- bladder cells self-renewed, formed colonies and spontaneously differentiated into cells expressing smooth muscle genes. These cells differentiated into other mesenchymal lineages (chondrocytes, adipocytes and osteocytes) upon culture in induction medium. Both acute and partial obstruction of the bladder reduced expression of CD34 and changed localization of Sca-1 to the urothelium. Partial obstruction resulted in upregulation of fibrosis genes within the Sca-1+/CD34+/lin- population. Our data indicate a resident, mesenchymal stem cell population in the bladder that is altered by bladder obstruction. These findings provide new information about the cellular changes in the bladder that may be associated with bladder fibrosis. PMID:26540309

  3. The Murine Bladder Supports a Population of Stromal Sca-1+/CD34+/lin- Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lilly, Meredith A.; Kulkulka, Natalie A.; Firmiss, Paula R.; Ross, Michael J.; Flum, Andrew S.; Santos, Grace B. Delos; Bowen, Diana K.; Dettman, Robert W.; Gong, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    Bladder fibrosis is an undesired end point of injury of obstruction and often renders the smooth muscle layer noncompliant. In many cases, the long-term effect of bladder fibrosis is renal failure. Despite our understanding of the progression of this disease, little is known about the cellular mechanisms that lead to a remodeled bladder wall. Resident stem (progenitor) cells have been identified in various organs such as the brain, heart and lung. These cells function normally during organ homeostasis, but become dysregulated after organ injury. Here, we aimed to characterize a mesenchymal progenitor cell population as a first step in understanding its role in bladder fibrosis. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), we identified a Sca-1+/ CD34+/ lin- (PECAM-: CD45-: Ter119-) population in the adult murine bladder. These cells were localized to the stromal layer of the adult bladder and appeared by postnatal day 1. Cultured Sca-1+/ CD34+/ lin- bladder cells self-renewed, formed colonies and spontaneously differentiated into cells expressing smooth muscle genes. These cells differentiated into other mesenchymal lineages (chondrocytes, adipocytes and osteocytes) upon culture in induction medium. Both acute and partial obstruction of the bladder reduced expression of CD34 and changed localization of Sca-1 to the urothelium. Partial obstruction resulted in upregulation of fibrosis genes within the Sca-1+/CD34+/lin- population. Our data indicate a resident, mesenchymal stem cell population in the bladder that is altered by bladder obstruction. These findings provide new information about the cellular changes in the bladder that may be associated with bladder fibrosis. PMID:26540309

  4. The ceilometer inter-comparison campaign CeiLinEx2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattis, Ina; Begbie, Robert; Boyouk, Neda; Bravo-Aranda, Juan Antonio; Brettle, Mike; Cermak, Jan; Drouin, Marc-Antoine; Geiß, Alexander; Görsdorf, Ulrich; Haefele, Alexander; Haeffelin, Martial; Hervo, Maxime; Komínková, Kateřina; Leinweber, Ronny; Müller, Gerhard; Münkel, Christoph; Pattantyús-Ábrahám, Margit; Pönitz, Kornelia; Wagner, Frank; Wiegner, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Ceilometers are well established instruments for the detection of cloud base heights. Since about 2000, modern ceilometer types (mainly CHM15k, CL51, and CL31) are used also for investigations of the top height of the planetary boundary layer and for quantitative retrievals of vertical profiles of backscatter coefficients. In the framework of the European projects E-PROFILE and TOPROF, tools for the exchange of ceilometer data among European meteorological services, as well as calibration and visualization procedures are developed and established. Unfortunately, the national networks are equipped with instruments of different generations and different manufacturers. In order to quantify and reduce those inhomogeneities, the ceilometer inter-comparison experiment CeiLinEx2015 was performed between June and September 2015 at the Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg, Germany. We tested six different instrument types: LD40, CL31, CL51, CHM15k, CHM15kx, and CS135. Each instrument type was represented by two instruments to estimate the instrument-to-instrument variability and the influence of different firmware versions. Two Raman lidars (RAMSES and RALPH), operated by German Meteorological Service (DWD) are used as reference instruments. Further ancillary data are available, e.g., hourly eye observations, four radio soundings per day, and AERONET sun photometer observations. Beside the typical vertically pointing measurement scheme, we performed special measurements with horizontal pointing direction or blocked receiver telescope. During the experiment, we could collect measurements under very different meteorological situations: Several clear nights allow for Rayleigh-Calibration (see Hervo and CeiLinEx2015 team [EGU2016-4785]), a strong event of Sahara dust intrusion can be used to study the behaviour of the instruments in presence of large, non-spherical particles (like volcanic ash). Further investigations focus, e.g., on the detection of very low cloud base

  5. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  6. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  7. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  8. Editorial independence at medical journals owned by professional associations: a survey of editors.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ronald M; Müllner, Marcus

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the degree of editorial independence at a sample of medical journals and the relationship between the journals and their owners. We surveyed the editors of 33 medical journals owned by not-for-profit organizations ("associations"), including 10 journals represented on the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (nine of which are general medical journals) and a random sample of 23 specialist journals with high impact factors that are indexed by the Institute for Scientific Information. The main outcome measures were the authority to hire, fire, and oversee the work of the editor; the editor's tenure and financial compensation; control of the journal's budget; publication of material about the association; and the editor's perceptions about editorial independence and pressure over editorial content. Of the 33 editors, 23 (70%) reported having complete editorial freedom, and the remainder reported a high level of freedom (a score of > or = 8, where 10 equals complete editorial freedom and 1 equals no editorial freedom). Nevertheless, a substantial minority of editors reported having received at least some pressure in recent years over editorial content from the association's leadership (42%), senior staff (30%), or rank-and-file members (39%). The association's board of directors has the authority to hire (48%) or fire (55%) the editor for about half of the journals, and the editor reports to the board for 10 journals (30%). Twenty-three editors (70%) are appointed for a specific term (median term = 5 years). Three-fifths of the journals have no control over their profit, and the majority of journals use the association's legal counsel and/or media relations staff. Stronger safeguards are needed to give editors protection against pressure over editorial content, including written guarantees of editorial freedom and governance structures that support those guarantees. Strong safeguards are also needed because editors

  9. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...

  10. 29 CFR 793.8 - “News editor.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false âNews editor.â 793.8 Section 793.8 Labor Regulations... Exemption § 793.8 “News editor.” A news editor is an employee who gathers, edits and rewrites the news. He may also select and prepare news items for broadcast and present the news on the air. An employee...