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  1. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Oliemy, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was developed to offer a therapeutic solution to patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not candidates for conventional aortic valve replacement. The improvement in transcatheter aortic valve implantation outcomes is still of concern in the areas of stroke, vascular injury, heart block, paravalvular regurgitation and valve durability. Concomitantly, the progress, both technical and in terms of material advances of transcatheter valve systems, as well as in patient selection, renders transcatheter aortic valve implantation an increasingly viable treatment for more and more patients with structural heart disease. PMID:25374670

  2. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Malaisrie, S Chris; Iddriss, Adam; Flaherty, James D; Churyla, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) is a life-threatening condition when left untreated. Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the gold standard treatment for the majority of patients; however, transcatheter aortic valve implantation/replacement (TAVI/TAVR) has emerged as the preferred treatment for high-risk or inoperable patients. The concept of transcatheter heart valves originated in the 1960s and has evolved into the current Edwards Sapien and Medtronic CoreValve platforms available for clinical use. Complications following TAVI, including cerebrovascular events, perivalvular regurgitation, vascular injury, and heart block have decreased with experience and evolving technology, such that ongoing trials studying TAVI in lower risk patients have become tenable. The multidisciplinary team involving the cardiac surgeon and cardiologist plays an essential role in patient selection, procedural conduct, and perioperative care. PMID:27021619

  3. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Hans Henrik Møller

    2012-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was introduced experimentally in 1989, based on a newly developed heart valve prosthesis - the stentvalve. The valve was invented by a Danish cardiologist named Henning Rud Andersen. The new valve was revolutionary. It was foldable and could be inserted via a catheter through an artery in the groin, without the need for heart lung machine. This allowed for a new valve implantation technique, much less invasive than conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Surgical aortic valve replacement is safe and improves symptoms along with survival. However, up to 1/3 of patients with aortic valve stenosis cannot complete the procedure due to frailty. The catheter technique was hoped to provide a new treatment option for these patients. The first human case was in 2002, but more widespread clinical use did not begin until 2006-2010. Today, in 2011, more than 40,000 valves have been implanted worldwide. Initially, because of the experimental character of the procedure, TAVI was reserved for patients who could not undergo SAVR due to high risk. The results in this group of patients were promising. The procedural safety was acceptable, and the patients experienced significant improvements in their symptoms. Three of the papers in this PhD-thesis are based on the outcome of TAVI at Skejby Hospital, in this high-risk population [I, II and IV]. Along with other international publications, they support TAVI as being superior to standard medical treatment, despite a high risk of prosthetic regurgitation. These results only apply to high-risk patients, who cannot undergo SAVR. The main purpose of this PhD study has been to investigate the quality of TAVI compared to SAVR, in order to define the indications for this new procedure. The article attached [V] describes a prospective clinical randomised controlled trial, between TAVI to SAVR in surgically amenable patients over 75 years of age with isolated aortic valve stenosis

  4. Aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Werner, Nikos; Sinning, Jan-Malte

    2014-01-01

    Paravalvular aortic regurgitation (AR) negatively affects prognosis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). As transcatheter heart valves (THV) are anchored using a certain degree of oversizing at the level of the aortic annulus, incomplete stent frame expansion because of heavily annular calcifications, suboptimal placement of the prosthesis, and/or annulus-prosthesis size-mismatch can contribute to paravalvular AR with subsequent increased mortality risk. Echocardiography is essential to differentiate between transvalvular and paravalvular AR and to further elucidate the etiology of AR during the procedure. However, because echocardiographic quantification of AR in TAVR patients remains challenging, especially in the implantation situation, a multimodal approach to the evaluation of AR with use of hemodynamic measurements and imaging modalities is useful to precisely quantify the severity of AR immediately after valve deployment. "Next-generation" THVs are already on the market and first results show that paravalvular AR related to design modifications (eg, paravalvular space-fillers, full repositionability) are rarely seen in these valve types.  PMID:24632758

  5. Minimally Invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR)

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Watch a Broward Health surgeon perform a minimally invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2016 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. First direct aortic retrievable transcatheter aortic valve implantation in humans.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Jaya; Glover, Chris; Labinaz, Marino; Ruel, Marc

    2014-11-01

    We describe 2 cases in which transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed with a Portico prosthesis (St Jude Medical, St Paul, MN) through a direct aortic approach. In 1 of the cases, prosthesis retrieval was needed during the procedure and was essential to the successful outcome. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of direct aortic Portico prosthesis implantation, and it highlights the significance of the retrievable nature of this device. PMID:25442452

  7. Transcatheter aortic valve insertion (TAVI): a review

    PubMed Central

    Morgan-Hughes, G; Roobottom, C

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of transcatheter aortic valve insertion (TAVI) has transformed the care provided for patients with severe aortic stenosis. The uptake of this procedure is increasing rapidly, and clinicians from all disciplines are likely to increasingly encounter patients being assessed for or having undergone this intervention. Successful TAVI heavily relies on careful and comprehensive imaging assessment, before, during and after the procedure, using a range of modalities. This review outlines the background and development of TAVI, describes the nature of the procedure and considers the contribution of imaging techniques, both to successful intervention and to potential complications. PMID:24258463

  8. Advances in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Kleiman, Neal S.; Reardon, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is becoming widely used for the treatment of symptomatic severe aortic stenosis in patients with high surgical risk. Data from The PARTNER Trial (Placement of AoRtic TraNscathetER Valves) and the Medtronic CoreValve® U.S. Pivotal Investigational Device Exemption trial indicate that survival for extreme-risk patients is superior to best medical therapy and equivalent or superior to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), although long-term durability remains unknown. Paravalvular leak remains higher in TAVR than SAVR, as does permanent pacemaker implantation in self-expanding valves. New-generation valves are addressing these issues, especially for paravalvular leak. There is strong evidence that TAVR is appropriate for both extreme-risk and high-risk patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis, and the continued development of new valves are making implantation more reliable. This review discusses the studies supporting the use of TAVR and explores current advances in the field. PMID:27127560

  9. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation today and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Wenaweser, Peter; Praz, Fabien; Stortecky, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in Western industrial countries (including Switzerland) with a prevalence of about 5% in the population aged 75 and over. If left untreated, symptomatic patients have a rate of death of more than 50% within 2 years. As a result of age and elevated surgical risk, an important proportion of elderly patients are not referred to surgery. Thus, the introduction of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in 2002 has initiated a paradigm shift in the treatment of patients with symptomatic, severe aortic stenosis. The early technical and procedural success of this minimal invasive treatment in high-risk patients has promoted further innovation and development of transcatheter heart valve (THV) systems during the last 13 years. Downsizing of the delivery catheters along with technical improvements aiming to reduce postprocedural paravalvular regurgitation have resulted in a significant reduction in mortality. As a consequence, TAVI is nowadays established as safe and effective treatment for selected inoperable and high-risk patients. Ongoing studies are investigating the outcome of intermediate risk patients allocated to either surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) or TAVI. Despite these advancements, some specific areas of concern still require attention and need further investigations including conduction disturbances, valve degeneration and antithrombotic management. Although the off-label use of TAVI devices in the mitral, tricuspid or pulmonary position has recently developed, important limitations still apply and careful patient selection remains crucial. This review aims to summarise the available clinical evidence of transcatheter aortic valve treatment during the last 13 years and to provide a glimpse of future technologies. PMID:26999727

  10. The Effects of Positioning of Transcatheter Aortic Valve on Fluid Dynamics of the Aortic Root

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jimmy L; Kheradvar, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a novel treatment for severe aortic valve stenosis. Due to the recent use of this technology and the procedural variability, there is very little data that quantifies the hemodynamic consequences of variations in valve placement. Changes in aortic wall stresses and fluid retention in the sinuses of Valsalva can have a significant effect on the clinical response a patient has to the procedure. By comprehensively characterizing complex flow in the sinuses of Valsalva using Digital Particle Image Velocimetry and an advanced heart flow simulator, various positions of a deployed transcatheter valve with respect to a bioprosthetic aortic valve (valve-in-valve) were tested in vitro. Displacements of the transcatheter valve were axial and directed below the simulated native valve annulus. It was determined that for both blood residence time and aortic Reynolds stresses, it is optimal to have the annulus of the transcatheter valve deployed as close to the aortic valve annulus as possible. PMID:25010918

  11. Mitral and aortic regurgitation following transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Szymański, Piotr; Hryniewiecki, Tomasz; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Sorysz, Danuta; Kochman, Janusz; Jastrzębski, Jan; Kukulski, Tomasz; Zembala, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyse the impact of postprocedural mitral regurgitation (MR), in an interaction with aortic regurgitation (AR), on mortality following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Methods To assess the interaction between MR and AR, we compared the survival rate of patients (i) without both significant MR and AR versus (ii) those with either significant MR or significant AR versus (iii) with significant MR and AR, all postprocedure. 381 participants of the Polish Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Registry (166 males (43.6%) and 215 females (56.4%), age 78.8±7.4 years) were analysed. Follow-up was 94.1±96.5 days. Results Inhospital and midterm mortality were 6.6% and 10.2%, respectively. Significant MR and AR were present in 16% and 8.1% patients, including 3.1% patients with both significant MR and AR. Patients with significant versus insignificant AR differed with respect to mortality (log rank p=0.009). This difference was not apparent in a subgroup of patients without significant MR (log rank p=0.80). In a subgroup of patients without significant AR, there were no significant differences in mortality between individuals with versus without significant MR (log rank p=0.44). Significant MR and AR had a significant impact on mortality only when associated with each other (log rank p<0.0001). At multivariate Cox regression modelling concomitant significant MR and AR were independently associated with mortality (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.54 to 5.71, p=0.002). Conclusions Significant MR or AR postprocedure, when isolated, had no impact on survival. Combined MR and AR had a significant impact on a patient's prognosis. PMID:26908096

  12. Futility, Benefit, and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Lindman, Brian R.; Alexander, Karen P.; O'Gara, Patrick T.; Afilalo, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a transformative innovation that provides treatment for high or prohibitive surgical risk patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) who were previously either not referred for or denied operative intervention. Trials have demonstrated improvements in survival and symptoms after TAVR compared to medical therapy, however there remains a sizable group of patients who die or lack improvement in quality of life soon after TAVR. This raises important questions about the need to identify and acknowledge the possibility of futility in some patients considered for TAVR. In this very elderly population, a number of factors in addition to traditional risk stratification need to be considered including multimorbidity, disability, frailty, and cognition in order to assess the anticipated benefit of TAVR. Consideration by a multidisciplinary heart valve team with broad areas of expertise is critical for assessing likely benefit from TAVR. Moreover, these complicated decisions should take place with clear communication around desired health outcomes on behalf of the patient and provider. The decision that treatment with TAVR is futile should include alternative plans to optimize the patient's health state or, in some cases, discussions related to end of life care. We review issues to be considered when making and communicating these difficult decisions. PMID:24954571

  13. [The research progress of transcatheter aortic valve replacement].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Maobo; Shi, Xinli; Jia, Jianxiong; Miao, Jingjing; Liu, Wei; Nie, Feilong

    2014-09-01

    During the past years transcatheter aortic valve replacement has evolved to a promising technique for the treatment of the patients who suffered from severe aortic stenosis, the progress and basic consideration on clinical study have been summarized in the article. PMID:25597083

  14. New frontiers in aortic therapy: focus on current trials and devices in transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Gutsche, Jacob T; Patel, Prakash A; Walsh, Elizabeth K; Sophocles, Aris; Chern, Sy-Yeu S; Jones, David B; Anwaruddin, Saif; Desai, Nimesh D; Weiss, Stuart J; Augoustides, John G T

    2015-04-01

    The first decade of clinical experience with transcatheter aortic valve replacement since 2002 saw the development of 2 main valve systems, namely the Edwards Sapien balloon-expandable valve series and the Medtronic self-expanding CoreValve. These 2 valve platforms now have achieved commercial approval and application worldwide in patients with severe aortic stenosis whose perioperative risk for surgical intervention is high or extreme. In the second decade of transcatheter aortic valve replacement, clinical experience and refinements in valve design have resulted in clinical drift towards lower patient risk cohorts. There are currently 2 major trials, PARTNER II and SURTAVI, that are both evaluating the role of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in intermediate-risk patient cohorts. The results from these landmark trials may usher in a new clinical paradigm for transcatheter aortic valve replacement in its second decade. PMID:25572322

  15. Recently patented transcatheter aortic valves in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Neragi-Miandoab, Siyamek; Skripochnik, Edvard; Salemi, Arash; Girardi, Leonard

    2013-12-01

    The most widely used heart valve worldwide is the Edwards Sapien, which currently has 60% of the worldwide transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) market. The CoreValve is next in line in popularity, encompassing 35% of the worldwide TAVI market. Although these two valves dominate the TAVI market, a number of newer transcatheter valves have been introduced and others are in early clinical evaluation. The new valves are designed to reduce catheter delivery diameter, improve ease of positioning and sealing, and facilitate repositioning or removal. The most recent transcatheter valves for transapical use include Acurate TA (Symetis), Engager (Medtronic), and JenaValve the Portico (St Jude), Sadra Lotus Medical (Boston Scientific), and the Direct Flow Medical. These new inventions may introduce more effective treatment options for high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Improvements in transcatheter valves and the developing variability among them may allow for more tailored approaches with respect to patient's anatomy, while giving operators the opportunity to choose devices they feel more comfortable with. Moreover, introducing new devices to the market will create a competitive environment among producers that will reduce high prices and expand availability. The present review article includes a discussion of recent patents related to Transcatheter Aortic Valves. PMID:24279506

  16. Pioneering transcatheter aortic valve Implant (Inovare®) via transfemoral.

    PubMed

    Pontes, José Carlos Dorsa Vieira; Duarte, João Jackson; Silva, Augusto Daige da; Dias, Amaury Mont'Serrat Ávila Souza; Benfatti, Ricardo Adala; Gardenal, Neimar; Benfatti, Amanda Ferreira Carli; Gomes, Jandir Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    We present a patient with severe aortic valvular bioprosthesis dysfunction implanted for 11 years, presenting with acute pulmonary edema due to severe valvular insufficiency with severe systolic dysfunction (EF <30%) and comorbid conditions that amounted operative risk (STS score > 10). We carried out the transcatheter aortic valve implantation (Inovare® - Braile Biomedica), which was implemented successfully by transfemoral access and good patient outcomes. PMID:23288191

  17. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzi, Freidoon; MacCarthy, Philip

    2016-03-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is one of the most significant technological advances in cardiovascular medicine. It offers a safe alternative in high risk cardiac patients with proven durability, economical viability and survival advantage. Current trials may expand its application in intermediate or low risk groups. PMID:26961440

  18. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in the Elderly: Who to Refer?

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Matthew; Green, Philip

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, experience with transcatheter aortic valve implantation has led to improved outcomes in elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) who may not have previously been considered for intervention. These patients are often frail with significant comorbid conditions. As the prevalence of AS increases, there is a need for improved assessment parameters to determine the patients most likely to benefit from this novel procedure. This review discusses the diagnostic criteria for severe AS and the trials available to aid in the decision to refer for aortic valve procedures in the elderly. PMID:25216621

  19. Recent advances in aortic valve disease: highlights from a bicuspid aortic valve to transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Augoustides, John G T; Wolfe, Yanika; Walsh, Elizabeth K; Szeto, Wilson Y

    2009-08-01

    There have been major advances in the management of aortic valve disease. Because bicuspid aortic valve is common and predicts an increased risk of adverse aortic events, these patients merit aortic surveillance and consideration for ascending aortic replacement when its diameter exceeds 4.0 cm. Serial quantitative echocardiographic analysis, as compared with traditional clinical markers, can result in better timing of surgical intervention for aortic regurgitation. Furthermore, echocardiographic analysis of aortic regurgitation can classify the mechanism based on cusp mobility to guide aortic valve repair. In aortic root replacement, aortic valve preservation with reimplantation is a mainstream surgical option in Marfan syndrome to offer freedom from valve-related anticoagulation. Prosthetic aortic root replacement has further alternatives with the introduction of the aortic neosinus design and acceptable clinical outcomes with the porcine xenograft. Because aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) may adversely affect patient outcome, its perioperative prevention is important. Furthermore, significant functional mitral regurgitation in association with aortic stenosis often resolves after aortic valve replacement. Echocardiographic assessment of the aortic valve must include valve area because the transaortic pressure gradient may be low in severe stenosis. Aortic valve replacement with partial sternotomy is safe and offers a reasonable less invasive alternative. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement, whether transfemoral or transapical, has revolutionized aortic valve replacement; it remains a major theme in the specialty for 2009 and beyond. PMID:19497768

  20. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Experience with SAPIEN 3.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Y; Tamburino, C; Barbanti, M

    2015-06-01

    Based on randomized trials with first generation devices, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVI) has been included into the treatment strategy for high-risk and inoperable patients with severe aortic stenosis. Procedural complications remain a concern with TAVI, including stroke, vascular complications, paravalvular leak (PVL) and conduction disturbances. Addressing these limitations will support TAVI use in lower risk populations. This review discussed features and most recent clinical evidence of the new balloon-expandable THV (SAPIEN 3, Edwards Lifescience, Irvine, CA, USA). PMID:25900559

  1. Role of Echocardiography Before Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI).

    PubMed

    Badiani, Sveeta; Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev; Lloyd, Guy

    2016-04-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common primary valve disorder in the elderly with an increasing prevalence; transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an accepted alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) in the high risk or inoperable patient. Appropriate selection of patients for TAVI is crucial and requires a multidisciplinary approach including cardiothoracic surgeons, interventional cardiologists, anaesthetists, imaging experts and specialist nurses. Multimodality imaging including echocardiography, CT and MRI plays a pivotal role in the selection and planning process; however, echocardiography remains the primary imaging modality used for patient selection, intra-procedural guidance, post-procedural assessment and long-term follow-up. The contribution that contemporary transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography make to the selection and planning of TAVI is described in this article. PMID:26960423

  2. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: from fantasy to reality

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Increased life expectancy has led to the presentation of more complicated patients in old age for the replacement of the aortic valve. The emergence of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) was considered as a significant breakthrough in the management of symptomatic, moribund patients suffering from aortic valve stenosis who had been rejected for surgical intervention. A novel technology often has a long journey from the point at which it is created to its every-day-use. It is now obvious that TAVI practice in multiple institutes around the world has gone beyond the evidence. Serious concerns have been raised questioning the current TAVI practice. Analysis of future TAVI use may assist clinicians and healthcare managers to understand and deploy this technology in accordance with the evidence. PMID:24602509

  3. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: a Kidney’s Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Thongprayoon, Charat; Kashani, Kianoush

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has now emerged as a viable treatment option for high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) who are not suitable candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Despite encouraging published outcomes, acute kidney injury (AKI) is common and lowers the survival of patients after TAVR. The pathogenesis of AKI after TAVR is multifactorial including TAVR specific factors such as the use of contrast agents, hypotension during rapid pacing, and embolization; preventive measures may include pre-procedural hydration, limitation of contrast dye exposure, and avoidance of intraprocedural hypotension. In recent years, the number of TAVR performed worldwide has been increasing, as well as published data on renal perspectives of TAVR including AKI, chronic kidney disease, end-stage kidney disease, and kidney transplantation. This review aims to present the current literature on the nephrology aspects of TAVR, ultimately to improve the patients’ quality of care and outcomes. PMID:27069960

  4. Transcatheter wiring of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, P.; Simonetti, G.; Passariello, R.; Stipa, S.; Cavallaro, A.

    1983-04-01

    A new technique of transcatheder wiring of unresectable aortic aneurysm is described that provides simultaneous transcatheder occlusion of both common iliac arteries followed by exillofemoral bypass. The spring coil used for aortic aneurysm wiring was of our own making. The outer portion of a movable core stainless steel guidewire was bent in a coil shape and introduced into the aneurysm through a 7 French Teflon catheder via the right femoral artery. The same catheder was also used for coil embolus occlusion of both iliac arteries.

  5. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a treatment option in the era of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Costopoulos, Charis; Sutaria, Nilesh; Ariff, Ben; Fertleman, Michael; Malik, Iqbal; Mikhail, Ghada W

    2015-05-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the commonest encountered valvular pathology and a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in cases of severe stenosis. Definitive treatment has traditionally been offered in the form of surgical aortic valve replacement in patients with an acceptable surgical risk and more recently with the less invasive transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in those where surgery is not a viable option. Prior to the introduction of TAVI, inoperable patients were treated medically and where appropriate with balloon aortic valvuloplasty, a procedure which although effective only provided short-term relief and was associated with high complication rates especially during its infancy. Here we discuss whether balloon aortic valvuloplasty continues to have a role in contemporary clinical practice in an era where significant advances have been achieved in the fields of surgical aortic valve replacement, TAVI and postoperative care. PMID:25865236

  6. Successful repair of aortic annulus rupture during transcatheter aortic valve replacement using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support.

    PubMed

    Negi, Smita I; Patel, Jay; Patel, Manish; Loyalka, Pranav; Kar, Biswajit; Gregoric, Igor

    2015-09-01

    Aortic annular rupture is a rare and much dreaded complication of transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Device oversizing to prevent post-procedural paravalvular leak is the most commonly identified cause of this complication. However, mechanical stress in a heavily calcified non-compliant vessel can also lead to annular rupture in this older population. We describe a case of aortic annular rupture with involvement of right coronary artery ostium leading to cardiac tamponade and cardiac arrest, successfully managed by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support, open drainage of the pericardial space, pericardial patching of the defect and bypass of the affected vessel with excellent post-procedural results. PMID:23990118

  7. New St. Jude Medical Portico™ transcatheter aortic valve: features and early results.

    PubMed

    Spence, M S; Lyons, K; McVerry, F; Smith, B; Manoharan, G B; Maguire, C; Doherty, R; Anderson, L; Morton, A; Hughes, S; Hoeritzauer, I; Manoharan, G

    2013-06-01

    Patients with symptomatic aortic valve disease who are inoperable or have high surgery-related risks may be treated with transcatheter aortic valve implantation devices. With this method increasingly applied, device innovations are aimed at achieving improved procedural results and therapeutic outcome. This paper describes the innovations implemented in the St. Jude Medical Portico™ system for transcatheter aortic valve implantation, the application of this system and initial clinical experience. PMID:23681129

  8. Myocardial injury associated with transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Keun; Liebetrau, Christoph; van Linden, Arnaud; Blumenstein, Johannes; Gaede, Luise; Hamm, Christian W; Walther, Thomas; Möllmann, Helge

    2016-05-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as an important treatment option for elderly patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis whose risk is too high or prohibitive for conventional surgery. Despite notable progress during the past decade, continuous efforts directed at further improvement of procedural safety and performance are required, especially considering expanding indications for interventional treatment options among lower-risk populations. One issue that needs to be addressed is myocardial damage, which can frequently be observed after TAVI and has been linked to worse prognosis. Yet, knowledge concerning the underlying mechanisms and clinical impact remains scarce, and further investigation in this field is warranted. In this review, we provide a contemporary summary of the types of myocardial injury associated with TAVI, including access-related injury, mechanical trauma and ischemia, the role of myocardial biomarkers, and the impact on left ventricular function, with emphasis on potential mechanisms and clinical implications. PMID:26670909

  9. Replacement of a Dislocated Aortic Prosthesis After Transcatheter Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Mandegar, Mohammad Hossein; Moradi, Bahieh; Roshanali, Farideh

    2016-06-01

    A 77-year-old woman who had severe symptomatic aortic stenosis and was a high risk for conventional surgery underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation by means of the transfemoral approach. The prosthesis migrated and became embolized in the left ventricle after inflation, causing interference with the mitral valve and also partial outflow tract obstruction. The patient was emergently transferred to the operating room. Vertical aortotomy was performed under cardiopulmonary bypass, and the calcified native leaflets were removed. The migrated Edwards SAPIEN XT valve was extracted and subsequently successfully sewn into the annulus after examination for leaflet and stent competence. The hemodynamic performance of the implanted valve was surprisingly more favorable than that of the conventional tissue prosthesis. PMID:27211978

  10. Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Garot, Jerome; Neylon, Antoinette; Sawaya, Fadi J.; Lefèvre, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Progressive dyspnea and hypoxaemia in the subacute phase after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) are uncommon and warrant immediate assessment of valve and prosthesis leaflet function to exclude thrombosis, as well as investigation for other causes related to the procedure, such as left ventricular dysfunction, pulmonary embolism, and respiratory sepsis. In this case, we report the observation of a patient presenting two weeks after TAVI with arterial hypoxaemia in an upright position, relieved by lying flat, and coupled with an intracardiac shunt detected on echocardiography in the absence of pulmonary hypertension, raising the suspicion of Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome (POS). Invasive intracardiac haemodynamic assessment showed a significant right-to-left shunt (Qp/Qs = 0.74), which confirmed the diagnosis, with subsequent closure of the intracardiac defect resulting in immediate relief of symptoms and hypoxaemia. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an interatrial defect and shunt causing Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation, resolved by percutaneous device closure. PMID:27610250

  11. Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Roy, Andrew K; Garot, Jerome; Neylon, Antoinette; Spaziano, Marco; Sawaya, Fadi J; Lefèvre, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Progressive dyspnea and hypoxaemia in the subacute phase after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) are uncommon and warrant immediate assessment of valve and prosthesis leaflet function to exclude thrombosis, as well as investigation for other causes related to the procedure, such as left ventricular dysfunction, pulmonary embolism, and respiratory sepsis. In this case, we report the observation of a patient presenting two weeks after TAVI with arterial hypoxaemia in an upright position, relieved by lying flat, and coupled with an intracardiac shunt detected on echocardiography in the absence of pulmonary hypertension, raising the suspicion of Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome (POS). Invasive intracardiac haemodynamic assessment showed a significant right-to-left shunt (Qp/Qs = 0.74), which confirmed the diagnosis, with subsequent closure of the intracardiac defect resulting in immediate relief of symptoms and hypoxaemia. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an interatrial defect and shunt causing Platypnea-Orthodeoxia Syndrome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation, resolved by percutaneous device closure. PMID:27610250

  12. [Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: An Introduction and Patient Care].

    PubMed

    Lu, Shu-Ju; Wang, Shiao-Pei

    2015-06-01

    Aortic stenosis has a high prevalence among individuals over 75 years of age. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a novel valve-replacement technique for patients with multiple chronic diseases who are at high risk of requiring aortic valve replacement surgery. Most of the time, the indicators of TAVI are detected during an echocardiographic exam. The femoral artery is the primary insertion site. The complications of TAVI include stroke, vascular dissection, bleeding, aortic valve regurgitation, and arrhythmia. In terms of clinical effectiveness, the mortality rate of TAVI is lower than percutaneous ballon valvuloplasty but similar to AVR. The unplanned cardiac-related re-admission rate within 30 days of discharge is lower for TAVI than for AVR. In terms of activity tolerance, TAVI is significantly better than both percutaneous ballon valvuloplasty and AVR. Comprehensive nursing care may reduce the incidence of complications associated with TAVI. Nursing care of TAVI includes explaining and providing instructions regarding TAVI prior to the procedure. After the TAVI procedure and while the patient is in the ICU, remove the endotracheal tube as soon as possible, monitor his / her neuro-cognitive status, monitor for early detection of a stroke event, record urine output to assess renal function, observe bleeding in the puncture site, and evaluate cardiac arrhythmia and pain. While in the general ward, resume early physical activities and educate the patient regarding the risks and the prevention of bleeding. This article provides references for clinical staff responsible to care for post-TAVI surgery patients. PMID:26073960

  13. CoreValve® transcatheter self-expandable aortic bioprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Giuseppe; De Marco, Federico; Martinelli, Luigi; Klugmann, Silvio

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has been designed to treat patients affected by severe symptomatic aortic stenosis considered extremely high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement. The CoreValve® (Medtronic Inc., MN, USA) is a multilevel self-expanding and fully radiopaque nitinol frame with a diamond cell configuration that holds a trileaflet porcine pericardial tissue valve and anchors the device in the native anatomy. CoreValve was the first percutaneous valve to be granted the CE mark for transfemoral implantation in May 2007 and the CoreValve US Pivotal Trial is actively underway. The CoreValve is available in four sizes (23, 26, 29 and 31 mm) to serve a broad range of patients' annulus from 18 to 29 mm. All the valves fit into an 18-Fr size catheter. Currently, more than 35,000 patients have been treated in more than 60 countries worldwide from the femoral artery, the axillary artery and, more recently, from a direct aortic approach, with excellent results up to 4-year follow-up. PMID:23278219

  14. Retrograde Transcatheter Closure of Mitral Paravalvular Leak through a Mechanical Aortic Valve Prosthesis: 2 Successful Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Daxin; Pan, Wenzhi; Guan, Lihua; Qian, Juying

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis has been considered a contraindication to retrograde percutaneous closure of mitral paravalvular leaks, because passing a catheter through the mechanical aortic valve can affect the function of a mechanical valve and thereby lead to severe hemodynamic deterioration. We report what we believe are the first 2 cases of retrograde transcatheter closure of mitral paravalvular leaks through a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis without transseptal or transapical puncture. Our experience shows that retrograde transcatheter closure of mitral paravalvular leaks in this manner can be an optional approach for transcatheter closure of such leaks, especially when a transapical or transseptal puncture approach is not feasible. This technique might also be applied to other transcatheter procedures in which there is a need to pass a catheter through a mechanical aortic valve prosthesis. PMID:27127428

  15. AKI after Transcatheter or Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Srivali, Narat; Harrison, Andrew M; Gunderson, Tina M; Kittanamongkolchai, Wonngarm; Greason, Kevin L; Kashani, Kianoush B

    2016-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis who are at high risk of perioperative mortality. Previous studies showed increased risk of postoperative AKI with TAVR, but it is unclear whether differences in patient risk profiles confounded the results. To conduct a propensity-matched study, we identified all adult patients undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis at Mayo Clinic Hospital in Rochester, Minnesota from January 1, 2008 to June 30, 2014. Using propensity score matching on the basis of clinical characteristics and preoperative variables, we compared the postoperative incidence of AKI, defined by Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes guidelines, and major adverse kidney events in patients treated with TAVR with that in patients treated with SAVR. Major adverse kidney events were the composite of in-hospital mortality, use of RRT, and persistent elevated serum creatinine ≥200% from baseline at hospital discharge. Of 1563 eligible patients, 195 matched pairs (390 patients) were created. In the matched cohort, baseline characteristics, including Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk score and eGFR, were comparable between the two groups. Furthermore, no significant differences existed between the TAVR and SAVR groups in postoperative AKI (24.1% versus 29.7%; P=0.21), major adverse kidney events (2.1% versus 1.5%; P=0.70), or mortality >6 months after surgery (6.0% versus 8.3%; P=0.51). Thus, TAVR did not affect postoperative AKI risk. Because it is less invasive than SAVR, TAVR may be preferred in high-risk individuals. PMID:26487562

  16. Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting and Transaortic Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Dellis, Sophia L; Akujuo, Adanna C; Bennett, Edward V; Britton, Lewis W

    2016-07-01

    We sought to demonstrate the effectiveness of off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting and transcatheter aortic valve replacement in two patients with porcelain aortas and lesions that could not be optimally treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Patients with aortic stenosis and coronary artery disease who are too high-risk for conventional surgical aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting due to comorbidities and porcelain aorta, and who do not have the appropriate anatomy for percutaneous coronary intervention should be considered for concomitant transcatheter aortic valve replacement and off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12762 (J Card Surg 2016;31:435-438). PMID:27196956

  17. Feature identification for image-guided transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Pencilla; Rajchl, Martin; McLeod, A. Jonathan; Chu, Michael W.; Peters, Terry M.

    2012-02-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a less invasive alternative to open-heart surgery, and is critically dependent on imaging for accurate placement of the new valve. Augmented image-guidance for TAVI can be provided by registering together intra-operative transesophageal echo (TEE) ultrasound and a model derived from pre-operative CT. Automatic contour delineation on TEE images of the aortic root is required for real-time registration. This study develops an algorithm to automatically extract contours on simultaneous cross-plane short-axis and long-axis (XPlane) TEE views, and register these features to a 3D pre-operative model. A continuous max-flow approach is used to segment the aortic root, followed by analysis of curvature to select appropriate contours for use in registration. Results demonstrate a mean contour boundary distance error of 1.3 and 2.8mm for the short and long-axis views respectively, and a mean target registration error of 5.9mm. Real-time image guidance has the potential to increase accuracy and reduce complications in TAVI.

  18. Embolic Protection Devices in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Steinvil, Arie; Benson, Richard T; Waksman, Ron

    2016-03-01

    The initially reported periprocedural neurological events rates associated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement raised concerns that ultimately led to the development and to the clinical research of novel embolic protection devices. Although the reduction of clinical stroke is a desired goal, the current research design of embolic protection devices focuses on surrogate markers of the clinical disease, primarily on silent central nervous system lesions observed in postprocedural diffuse-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and cognitive function testing. As the mere presence of particulate debris in brain matter may not correlate with the extent of brain injury, cognitive function, or quality of life, the clinical significance of embolic protection devices has yet to be determined, and interpretation of study results with regard to real-life clinical use should be viewed accordingly. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the updated ongoing clinical research on embolic protection devices and present its major caveats. PMID:26951618

  19. The Anesthetic Management of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Guarracino, Fabio; Baldassarri, Rubia

    2016-06-01

    An increasing number of patients with a high risk for surgery because of advanced age and associated comorbidities that significantly increase the perioperative risk successfully undergo transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). TAVI is commonly performed under general or local anesthesia or local anesthesia plus mild sedation to achieve a conscious sedation. The anesthetic regimen generally depends on the patient's clinical profile and the procedural technical characteristics, but the center's experience and internal organization likely play an important role in anesthetic decision making. The large variation in anesthetic management among various centers and countries likely depends on the different composition of the operating team and institutional organization. Therefore, a tight interaction among the various members of the TAVI team, including the cardiac anesthetist, provides the proper anesthetic management using the chosen procedural technique. PMID:26403787

  20. The power of disruptive technological innovation: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Berlin, David B; Davidson, Michael J; Schoen, Frederick J

    2015-11-01

    We sought to evaluate the principles of disruptive innovation, defined as technology innovation that fundamentally shifts performance and utility metrics, as applied to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). In particular, we considered implantation procedure, device design, cost, and patient population. Generally cheaper and lower performing, classical disruptive innovations are first commercialized in insignificant markets, promise lower margins, and often parasitize existing usage, representing unattractive investments for established market participants. However, despite presently high unit cost, TAVI is less invasive, treats a "new," generally high risk, patient population, and is generally done by a multidisciplinary integrated heart team. Moreover, at least in the short-term TAVI has not been lower-performing than open surgical aortic valve replacement in high-risk patients. We conclude that TAVI extends the paradigm of disruptive innovation and represents an attractive commercial opportunity space. Moreover, should the long-term performance and durability of TAVI approach that of conventional prostheses, TAVI will be an increasingly attractive commercial opportunity. PMID:25545639

  1. Periprocedural considerations of transcatheter aortic valve implantation for anesthesiologists

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Ata Hassani; Pourafkari, Leili; Nader, Nader D

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is rapidly gaining popularity as a viable option in the management of patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) and high risk for open surgical intervention. TAVR soon expanding its indications from "high-risk" group of patients to those with "intermediate-risk". As an anesthesiologist; understanding the procedure and the challenges inherent to it is of utmost importance, in order to implement optimal care for this generally frail population undergoing a rather novel procedure. Cardiac anesthesiologists generally play a pivotal role in the perioperative care of the patients, and therefore they should be fully familiar with the circumstances occurring surrounding the procedure. Along with increasing experience and technical developments for TAVR, the procedure time becomes shorter. Due to this improvement in the procedure time, more and more anesthesiologists feel comfortable in using monitored anesthesia care with moderate sedation for patients undergoing TAVR. A number of complications could arise during the procedure needing rapid diagnoses and occasionally conversion to general anesthesia. This review focuses on the periprocedural anesthetic considerations for TAVR. PMID:27489596

  2. How to perform transcaval access and closure for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Lederman, Robert J; Babaliaros, Vasilis C; Greenbaum, Adam B

    2015-12-01

    Transcaval, or caval-aortic, access is a promising approach for fully percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation in patients without good conventional access options. This tutorial review provides step-by-step guidance to planning and executing the procedure, along with approaches to remedy complications. PMID:26356244

  3. How to Perform Transcaval Access and Closure for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lederman, Robert J.; Babaliaros, Vasilis C.; Greenbaum, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    Transcaval, or caval-aortic, access is a promising approach for fully percutaneous trans-catheter aortic valve implantation in patients without good conventional access options. This tutorial review provides step-by-step guidance to planning and executing the procedure, along with approaches to remedy complications. PMID:26356244

  4. Salvage Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Prior to "Bridge" Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Peter; Fearon, William F; Raleigh, Lindsay A; Burdon, Grayson; Rao, Vidya; Boyd, Jack H; Yeung, Alan C; Miller, David Craig; Fischbein, Michael P

    2016-06-01

    We describe a patient who presented in profound cardiogenic shock due to bioprosthetic aortic valve stenosis requiring salvage Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation followed by a "bridge" valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve replacement. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12750 (J Card Surg 2016;31:403-405). PMID:27109017

  5. Combined Retrograde/Antegrade Approach to Transcatheter Closure of an Aortic Paravalvular Leak

    PubMed Central

    Damluji, Abdulla A.; Kaynak, Husnu E.

    2015-01-01

    New interventional techniques have made transcatheter closure of aortic paravalvular leaks a viable therapeutic option to treat the sequelae of these defects, including congestive heart failure and hemolysis. We report the transcatheter closure of an aortic paravalvular leak via a combined retrograde/antegrade approach. This was necessary because of difficulty in crossing the defect with a sheath from the retrograde approach. This technique might be useful in application to other difficult structural heart interventions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a treated paravalvular leak around a Mitroflow® Aortic Pericardial Heart Valve. PMID:26504437

  6. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement: current application and future directions.

    PubMed

    Fassa, Amir-Ali; Himbert, Dominique; Vahanian, Alec

    2013-04-01

    During the last decade, the rapid evolution of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has revolutionized the treatment of severe aortic stenosis. Since the PARTNER A and B trials, this technique has become the treatment of reference for inoperable patients, and an attractive alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement in those at high risk for surgery. Large multicenter registries conducted since 2007, mainly in Europe, confirmed the excellent hemodynamic performances of the 2 percutaneous valves currently available on the market, the Edwards SAPIEN, and the Medtronic CoreValve, as well as their benefits in terms of symptom relief and survival. The whole process of TAVR, from patient selection to post-procedural care and result evaluation, should be conducted by a dedicated multidisciplinary "heart team," within centers with expertise in valve disease. Though currently limited to those deemed at high risk for surgery or inoperable, indications for TAVR will likely be extended to a broader spectrum of patients, in particular those with surgical bioprosthetic failure or at intermediate risk for surgery. Beforehand, it will be essential to obtain more extensive data on the durability of percutaneous prostheses, since the available follow-up is seldom longer than 5 years, and in order to further decrease the rate of complications, mainly stroke, paravalvular regurgitation, and access site complications. Furthermore, the use of the transfemoral route will undoubtedly increase because of the miniaturization of the devices, at the expense of other approaches. Above all, multidisciplinary approach, excellent imaging, and careful evaluation will remain key to the success of this technique. PMID:23420448

  7. Acute kidney injury after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: incidence, predictors and impact on mortality.

    PubMed

    Elhmidi, Yacine; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Krane, Markus; Mazzitelli, Domenico; Lange, Rüdiger; Piazza, Nicolo

    2014-02-01

    There is a paucity of data describing acute kidney injury (AKI) following transcatheter aortic valve implantation and its impact on mortality remains unknown. We therefore evaluate the incidence, predictors and impact of AKI following transcatheter aortic valve implantation. We searched MEDLINE for studies from 2008 to 2013, evaluating AKI after transcatheter aortic valve implantation. All studies were compared according to the incidence, predictors and impact of AKI following transcatheter aortic valve implantation. AKI was diagnosed according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium definition using the RIFLE criteria. Thirteen studies with more than 1900 patients were included. AKI occurred in 8.3-57% of the patients. The following factors were associated with AKI: blood transfusion; transapical access; preoperative creatinine concentration; peripheral vascular disease; hypertension; and procedural bleeding events. The 30-day mortality rate in patients with AKI ranged from 13.3% to 44.4% and was 2-6-fold higher than in patients without AKI. The amount of contrast agent used was not associated with the occurrence of AKI. AKI is a common complication, with an incidence of 8.3-57% following transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Patients with AKI had higher 30-day and late mortality rates. However, AKI was related to the amount of contrast volume used in only one study. PMID:24556191

  8. Usefulness of Predilation Before Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Pagnesi, Matteo; Jabbour, Richard J; Latib, Azeem; Kawamoto, Hiroyoshi; Tanaka, Akihito; Regazzoli, Damiano; Mangieri, Antonio; Montalto, Claudio; Ancona, Marco B; Giannini, Francesco; Chieffo, Alaide; Montorfano, Matteo; Monaco, Fabrizio; Castiglioni, Alessandro; Alfieri, Ottavio; Colombo, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Balloon predilation is historically considered a requirement before performing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). As the procedure has evolved, it has been questioned whether it is actually needed, but data are lacking on mid-term outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of balloon predilation before TAVI. A total of 517 patients who underwent transfemoral TAVI from November 2007 to October 2015 were analyzed. The devices implanted included the Medtronic CoreValve (n = 216), Medtronic Evolut R (n = 30), Edwards SAPIEN XT (n = 210), and Edwards SAPIEN 3 (n = 61). Patients were divided into 2 groups depending on whether pre-implantation balloon aortic valvuloplasty (pre-BAV) was performed (n = 326) or not (n = 191). Major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) were primarily evaluated. Propensity score matching was used to adjust for differences in baseline characteristics and potential confounders (n = 113 pairs). In the overall cohort, patients without pre-BAV had a significantly higher MACCE rate at 30 days, driven by a higher incidence of stroke (0.3% pre-BAV vs 3.7% no-pre-BAV, p <0.01). MACCE and mortality at 1 year were, however, similar in both groups. Independent predictors of MACCE at 1 year included serum creatinine, NYHA class 3 to 4, logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation, and postdilation. Of note, the postdilation rate was higher in the no-pre-BAV group (21.5% pre-BAV vs 35.6% no-pre-BAV, p <0.001). After propensity score matching, there were no differences in MACCE between the 2 groups. In conclusion, this study showed that, in selected patients and with specific transcatheter valves, TAVI without pre-BAV appears to be associated with similar mid-term outcomes compared with TAVI with pre-BAV, but it may increase the need for postdilation. PMID:27184169

  9. Platelet reactivity in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Orvin, Katia; Eisen, Alon; Perl, Leor; Zemer-Wassercug, Noa; Codner, Pablo; Assali, Abid; Vaknin-Assa, Hana; Lev, Eli I; Kornowski, Ran

    2016-07-01

    Thromboembolic events, primarily stroke, might complicate transcatheter aortic-valve implantation (TAVI) procedures in 3-5 % of cases. Thus, it is common to administer aspirin and clopidogrel pharmacotherapy for 3-6 months following TAVI in order to prevent those events. The biologic response to the dual anti platelet treatment (DAPT) is heterogeneous, e.g. low response, known as high on treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) may be associated with adverse thromboembolic events. Little is known about the prevalence of HTPR among patients undergoing TAVI. To assess the variability in response and rates of residual platelet reactivity in patients undergoing TAVI. We examined platelet reactivity in response to clopidogrel and aspirin in 40 consecutive patients (mean age 81.7 ± 6.5 years, 66.7 % women) who underwent successful TAVI using the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay and the multiple electrode aggregometry assay (Multiplate analyzer) in response to adenosine diphosphate and arachidonic acid respectively, at different time points before and following TAVI. Before TAVI, the majority of patients were on antiplatelet therapy (68.5 % aspirin, 12.5 % clopidogrel, 12.5 % DAPT). Following the procedure all patients were on DAPT or clopidogrel and warfarin. Among analyzed patients, 41 % had HTPR for clopidogrel and 12.5 % for aspirin at baseline, which did not significantly change 1-month following the procedure (p = 0.81 and p  = 0.33, respectively). In conclusion, patients undergoing TAVI for severe aortic stenosis and treated with DAPT have high rates of residual platelet reactivity during the peri-procedural period and up to 1-month thereafter. These findings may have clinical implications for the anti-platelet management of TAVI patients. PMID:26695072

  10. Sedation or general anesthesia for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).

    PubMed

    Mayr, N Patrick; Michel, Jonathan; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Tassani, Peter; Martin, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is nowadays a routine therapy for elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) and high perioperative risk. With growing experience, further development of the devices, and the expansion to "intermediate-risk" patients, there is increasing interest in performing this procedure under conscious sedation (TAVI-S) rather than the previously favoured approach of general anesthesia (TAVI-GA). The proposed benefits of TAVI-S include; reduced procedure time, shorter intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay, reduced need for intraprocedural vasopressor support, and the potential to perform the procedure without the direct presence of an anesthetist for cost-saving reasons. To date, no randomized trial data exists. We reviewed 13 non-randomized studies/registries reporting data from 6,718 patients undergoing TAVI (3,227 performed under sedation). Patient selection, study methods, and endpoints have differed considerably between published studies. Reported rates of in-hospital and longer-term mortality are similar for both groups. Up to 17% of patients undergoing TAVI-S require conversion to general anesthesia during the procedure, primarily due to vascular complications, and urgent intubation is frequently associated with hemodynamic instability. Procedure related factors, including hypotension, may compound preexisting age-specific renal impairment and enhance the risk of acute kidney injury. Hypotonia of the hypopharyngeal muscles in elderly patients, intraprocedural hypercarbia, and certain anesthetic drugs, may increase the aspiration risk in sedated patients. General anesthesia and conscious sedation have both been used successfully to treat patients with severe AS undergoing TAVI with similar reported short and long-term mortality outcomes. The authors believe that the significant incidence of complications and unplanned conversion to general anesthesia during TAVI-S mandates the start-to-finish presence

  11. Sex Differences in Aortic Stenosis and Outcome Following Surgical and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Laura E; Fairbairn, Timothy A; Plein, Sven; Greenwood, John P

    2015-12-01

    Aortic stenosis is the commonest valve defect in the developed world and is associated with a high mortality once symptomatic. There is a difference in the way that male and female hearts remodel in the face of chronic pressure overload: women develop a concentrically hypertrophied, small cavity left ventricle (LV), whereas men are more prone to the development of eccentric hypertrophy. At a cellular level, there is an increase in collagen and metalloproteinase gene expression in males suggesting a different regulation of extracellular volume composition according to sex. Male hearts with aortic stenosis appear to have more fibrosis than their female comparators. The trigger for this appears to be in part related to estrogen receptor signaling, but other factors such as renin-angiotensin activation, nitric oxide, and circulating noradrenaline levels may also be implicated. Treatment options include surgical valve replacement (SAVR) and more recently transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Female sex may be a risk factor for adverse outcome following SAVR and conversely appears to confer a survival advantage when undergoing TAVR. Whether the lower mortality seen following TAVR in women compared with men (despite their increased age and frailty) reflects their longer life expectancy, smaller annular size (and less post-TAVR aortic regurgitation), more favorable LV reverse remodeling, or more likely, a combination of these factors remains to be established. PMID:26653869

  12. Perioperative conduction disturbances after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Ghadimi, Kamrouz; Patel, Prakash A; Gutsche, Jacob T; Sophocles, Aris; Anwaruddin, Saif; Szeto, Wilson Y; Augoustides, John G T

    2013-12-01

    Cardiac conduction disturbances after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) are common and important. The risk factors and outcome effects of atrial fibrillation after TAVR recently have been appreciated. The paucity of clinical trials has resulted in the absence of clinical guidelines for the management of this important arrhythmia in this high-risk patient population. Given this evidence gap and clinical necessity, it is likely that clinical trials in the near future will be designed and implemented to address these issues. Prompt recognition and proper management of atrioventricular block remain essential in the management of patients undergoing TAVR, because heart block of all types is common and may require permanent pacemaker implantation. The current evidence base has described the incidence, risk factors, and current outcomes of this conduction disturbance in detail. As the practice of TAVR evolves and novel valve prostheses are developed, a focus on minimizing damage to the cardiac conductive system remains paramount. It remains to be seen how the next generation of TAVR prostheses will affect the incidence, risk factors, and clinical outcomes of associated conduction disturbances. PMID:24103715

  13. Left Main Coronary Artery Obstruction by Dislodged Native-Valve Calculus after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Durmaz, Tahir; Keles, Telat; Aslan, Abdullah Nabi; Erdogan, Kemal Esref; Sari, Cenk; Bilen, Emine; Akcay, Murat; Bozkurt, Engin

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement can be an effective, reliable treatment for severe aortic stenosis in surgically high-risk or ineligible patients. However, various sequelae like coronary artery obstruction can occur, not only in the long term, but also immediately after the procedure. We present the case of a 78-year-old woman whose left main coronary artery became obstructed with calculus 2 hours after the transfemoral implantation of an Edwards Sapien XT aortic valve. Despite percutaneous coronary intervention in that artery, the patient died. This case reminds us that early recognition of acute coronary obstruction and prompt intervention are crucial in patients with aortic stenosis who have undergone transcatheter aortic valve replacement. PMID:25120396

  14. Use of the Rigid Table Mount System During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With the Direct Aortic Approach.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Ikki; Abe, Kohei; Hiraiwa, Nobuhiko; Nakaoka, Mikihiko; Mitsuhashi, Hirotsugu; Komiyama, Nobuyuki

    2016-09-01

    Although the direct aortic approach is one option in performing transcatheter aortic valve replacement, it is essential to keep a sheath manually in the same position during the procedure. Holding the sheath by hand is not ideal because of the relatively high dose of radiation to the person who holds the sheath. We here describe a unique way to keep the sheath firm with a table mount system. PMID:27549564

  15. State-of-the-art aortic imaging: Part II - applications in transcatheter aortic valve replacement and endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Rengier, Fabian; Geisbüsch, Philipp; Schoenhagen, Paul; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Vosshenrich, Rolf; Karmonik, Christof; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Partovi, Sasan

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) as well as thoracic and abdominal endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR and EVAR) rely on accurate pre- and postprocedural imaging. This review article discusses the application of imaging, including preprocedural assessment and measurements as well as postprocedural imaging of complications. Furthermore, the exciting perspective of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based on cross-sectional imaging is presented. TAVR is a minimally invasive alternative for treatment of aortic valve stenosis in patients with high age and multiple comorbidities who cannot undergo traditional open surgical repair. Given the lack of direct visualization during the procedure, pre- and peri-procedural imaging forms an essential part of the intervention. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the imaging modality of choice for preprocedural planning. Routine postprocedural follow-up is performed by echocardiography to confirm treatment success and detect complications. EVAR and TEVAR are minimally invasive alternatives to open surgical repair of aortic pathologies. CTA constitutes the preferred imaging modality for both preoperative planning and postoperative follow-up including detection of endoleaks. Magnetic resonance imaging is an excellent alternative to CT for postoperative follow-up, and is especially beneficial for younger patients given the lack of radiation. Ultrasound is applied in screening and postoperative follow-up of abdominal aortic aneurysms, but cross-sectional imaging is required once abnormalities are detected. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound may be as sensitive as CTA in detecting endoleaks. PMID:24429327

  16. In-Graft Endovascular Stenting Repair for Supravalvular Stenosis From Aortic Rupture After Balloon-Expanding Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Nobuyuki; Scholtz, Werner; Haas, Nikolaus; Ensminger, Stephan; Gummert, Jan; Börgermann, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    An 81-year-old man with high-grade aortic valve stenosis and status post-coronary artery bypass grafting and supracoronary replacement of the ascending aorta was referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. He was in New York Heart Association class III and had dyspnea. After appropriate screening, we implanted a 29-mm SAPIEN XT valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA USA) through a transapical approach because of severe peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Postinterventional aortography revealed correct positioning and function of the valve and free coronary ostia but contrast extravasation in the vicinity of the interposed vascular prosthesis, resulting in severe luminal narrowing. We chose to manage the stenosis with an endovascular stent. After stenting, extravascular compression was markedly reduced, and the pressure gradient disappeared. The patient was discharged home on the 20th postoperative day. Three months later, computed tomography depicted correct positioning of both grafts. The patient's general health is good, and he is now in New York Heart Association class II. This case illustrates a complication of transcatheter aortic valve implantation specific for patients with an ascending aortic graft. Although stenting may be a good solution, as depicted by this case, self-expanding transcatheter aortic valves should be preferred in patients with ascending aortic grafts to avoid the described complication. PMID:26355692

  17. Baseline platelet indices and bleeding after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Huczek, Zenon; Kochman, Janusz; Kowara, Michal Krzysztof; Wilimski, Radoslaw; Scislo, Piotr; Scibisz, Anna; Rymuza, Bartosz; Andrzejewska, Renata; Stanecka, Paulina; Filipiak, Krzysztof J; Opolski, Grzegorz

    2015-07-01

    Bleeding complications are frequent and independently predict mortality after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). It has been demonstrated that certain platelet parameters are indicative of platelet reactivity. We sought to determine the possible correlation between simple platelet indices and bleeding complications in patients undergoing TAVI. Platelet indices--platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width and plateletcrit--were measured in 110 consecutive patients on the day preceding TAVI. In-hospital bleeding events after TAVI were assessed according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 classification as any bleeding, major and life-threatening bleeding (MLTB) and need for transfusion. By receiver-operating characteristic analysis, only MPV was able to distinguish between patients with and without any bleeding [area under the curve (AUC) 0.629, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.531-0.719, P = 0.0342], MLTB (AUC 0.730, 95% CI 0.637-0.811, P = 0.0004) and need for transfusion (AUC 0.660, 95% CI 0.563-0.747, P = 0.0045). By multivariate logistic regression, high MPV (>10.6) and low platelet distribution width (<14.8) were associated with increased risk of any bleeding [odds ratio (OR) 4.08, 95% CI 1.66-10.07, P = 0.0022; and OR 3.82, 95% CI 1.41-10.36, P = 0.0084, respectively] and MLTB (OR 10.76, 95% CI 3.05-38, P = 0.0002; and OR 8.46, 95% CI 1.69-42.17, P = 0.0092, respectively). Additionally, high MPV independently correlated with the need for transfusion (OR 4.11, 95% CI 1.71-9.86, P = 0.0016). Larger and less heterogenic platelets may be associated with increased risk of short-term bleeding complications after TAVI. PMID:25811449

  18. New-onset atrial fibrillation after surgical aortic valve replacement and transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Troels Højsgaard; Thygesen, Julie Bjerre; Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Søndergaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and, more recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) have been shown to be the only treatments that can improve the natural cause of severe aortic valve stenosis. However, after SAVR and TAVI, the incidence of new-onset atrial fibrillation (NOAF) is 31%-64% and 4%-32%, respectively. NOAF is independently associated with adverse events such as stroke, death, and increased length of hospital stay. Increasing the knowledge of predisposing factors, optimal postprocedural monitoring, and prophylactic antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic therapy may reduce the risk of complications secondary to NOAF. PMID:25589700

  19. Calcium Resection to Relieve Left Main Coronary Obstruction in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Tang, Gilbert H L; Ahmad, Hasan; Cohen, Martin; Undemir, Cenap; Lansman, Steven L

    2016-05-01

    Coronary obstruction during transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a rare yet life-threatening complication. Emergent resection of the obstructing calcium is a quick and simple method to restore coronary perfusion in TAVR over emergency CABG. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12752 (J Card Surg 2016;31:315-317). PMID:27075945

  20. Combined venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and transcatheter aortic valve implantation for the treatment of acute aortic prosthesis dysfunction in a high-risk patient.

    PubMed

    Pergolini, Amedeo; Zampi, Giordano; Tinti, Maria Denitza; Polizzi, Vincenzo; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Pontillo, Daniele; Musumeci, Francesco; Luzi, Giampaolo

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a patient with acute bioprosthesis dysfunction in cardiogenic shock, in whom hemodynamic support was provided by venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and successfully treated by transcatheter aortic valve implantation. PMID:27402446

  1. Transcatheter Aortic and Mitral Valve Implantation (TAMVI) in Native Rheumatic Valves.

    PubMed

    Akujuo, Adanna C; Dellis, Sophia L; Britton, Lewis W; Bennett, Edward V

    2015-11-01

    A 68-year-old female with moderate to severe aortic stenosis and severe mitral stenosis, deemed too high risk for surgery (STS mortality risk = 12.3%) with a porcelain aorta, was successfully treated with a transcatheter aortic and mitral valve implantation (TAMVI) via a transapical approach. A 23 mm Sapien valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) was placed in the aortic position and a 29 mm inverted Sapien valve (Edwards Lifesciences) in the mitral position. PMID:26347492

  2. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a young heart transplant recipient crossing the traditional boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Terp, Kim Allan; Mathiassen, Ole Norling; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Andersen, Henning Rud; Poulsen, Steen Hvitfeldt

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an established therapeutic alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in high-risk or inoperable patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. Hitherto, TAVI is not recommended in young and low-intermediate risk patients. However, TAVI may also serve as an alternative to SAVR in selected young patients, e.g., patients who have previously undergone multiple cardiac surgery procedures. We report a case of trans-femoral TAVI in a 25-year-old heart transplant (HTx) recipient with prior surgery for congenital heart disease. PMID:27621906

  3. Transcatheter ACURATE-TA Aortic Valve Implantation in a Patient With a Previous Mechanical Mitral Valve.

    PubMed

    Bagur, Rodrigo; Kiaii, Bob; Teefy, Patrick J; Diamantouros, Pantelis; Harle, Christopher; Goela, Aashish; Chan, Ian; Chu, Michael W A

    2015-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in the presence of a mechanical mitral valve (MMV) prosthesis is still challenging because of the rigid mitral frame within the aortomitral curtain. Moreover, low-lying coronary ostia represent a hazardous problem of coronary obstruction, especially in narrow or porcelain aortic roots. The present case demonstrates the successful management of 2 challenging anatomical issues, the rigid cage of the MMV and the low-lying left main coronary ostium (LMCO), with the implantation of the ACURATE-TA bioprosthesis (Symetis SA, Ecublens, Switzerland). It also highlights the importance of having multiple TAVI devices in order to choose the ideal transcatheter aortic bioprosthesis to fit the unique anatomical presentation of the patient. PMID:26522576

  4. Echocardiographic Imaging of Procedural Complications During Balloon-Expandable Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Rebecca T.; Kodali, Susheel; Tuzcu, E. Murat; Leon, Martin B.; Kapadia, Samir; Gopal, Deepika; Lerakis, Stamatios; Lindman, Brian R.; Wang, Zuyue; Webb, John; Thourani, Vinod H.; Douglas, Pamela S.

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) using a balloon-expandable valve is an accepted alternative to surgical replacement for severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis in high risk or inoperable patients. Intraprocedural transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) offers real-time imaging guidance throughout the procedure and allows for rapid and accurate assessment of complications and procedural results. The value of intraprocedural TEE for TAVR will likely increase in the future as this procedure is performed in lower surgical risk patients, who also have lower risk for general anesthesia, but a greater expectation of optimal results with lower morbidity and mortality. This imaging compendium from the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves) trials is intended to be a comprehensive compilation of intraprocedural complications imaged by intraprocedural TEE and diagnostic tools to anticipate and/or prevent their occurrence. PMID:25772835

  5. Frailty Status and Outcomes After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Huded, Chetan P; Huded, Jill M; Friedman, Julie L; Benck, Lillian R; Lindquist, Lee A; Holly, Thomas A; Sweis, Ranya N; Ricciardi, Mark J; Malaisrie, S Chris; Davidson, Charles J; Flaherty, James D

    2016-06-15

    Frailty is a syndrome of older adults associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We aimed to assess the impact of frailty status on outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). We reviewed all 191 patients who underwent a modified Fried frailty assessment before TAVI between February 2012 and September 2015 at a single academic medical center, and we assessed the impact of preoperative frailty status on morbidity, mortality, and health care utilization after TAVI. Frailty, pre-frailty, and nonfrailty were present in 33% (n = 64), 37% (n = 70), and 30% (n = 57) of patients, respectively. Slowness (75% vs 54%, p = 0.003) and low physical activity (55% vs 31%, p = 0.001) were more common in women than men. With increasing frailty status, the proportion of women increased (35% nonfrail, 44% pre-frail, and 66% frail, p = 0.002) and stature decreased (1.68 ± 0.11 m nonfrail, 1.66 ± 0.11 m pre-frail, 1.62 ± 0.12 m frail, p = 0.028). There was no difference in post-TAVI 30-day mortality, stroke, major vascular injury, major or life-threatening bleeding, respiratory failure, mean hospital length of stay, 30-day hospital re-admission, or overall survival between groups. The rate of discharge to a rehabilitation facility increased with increasing frailty status (14% nonfrail, 22% pre-frail, and 39% frail, p = 0.005). Frailty was independently associated with discharge to a rehabilitation facility (odds ratio 4.80, 95% confidence interval 1.66 to 13.85, p = 0.004). In conclusion, the safety of TAVI is not affected by frailty status, but patients with frailty are less likely to be discharged directly home after TAVI. PMID:27156828

  6. Changing strategy for aortic stenosis with coronary artery disease by transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Junjiro

    2013-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is combined with aortic stenosis (AS) in 40-50 % of patients with typical angina. Recently, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has changed the guideline for AS in patients with high comorbidity. At the same time more than 60 % of isolated CABG has been performed without cardiopulmonary bypass in Japan. CABG is recommended and should be considered in patients with primary indication for AVR and luminal stenosis >70 % in major coronary arteries and the left internal thoracic artery (LITA) by guidelines. AVR is indicated for severe AS undergoing CABG. It is generally accepted to perform AVR for moderate AS at the time of CABG by valve guidelines. However, prophylactic AVR for moderate AS associated with CABG may increase the early operative risk and expose the patients to postoperative long-term valve related complications. AVR after previous CABG poses potential risk for mortality and morbidity. The presence of patent ITA is a significant risk of its injury and difficulty of myocardial protection during aortic cross-clamping. Therefore, at present, for severe AS previous CABG with patent ITA should be one of the definite indications of TAVI. Rationale of TAVI in patients with severe AS and CAD has not been clearly delineated. The safety of TAVI irrespective of the extent and anatomy of CAD is still controversial. PCI is not appropriate before TAVI in high-risk patients with CAD. In the near future hybrid TAVI will be realistic considering least operative mortality and morbidity in high-risk patients. PMID:23546769

  7. First Human Case of Retrograde Transcatheter Implantation of an Aortic Valve Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, David; Condado, José A.; Besso, José; Vélez, Manuel; Burger, Bruno; Bibbo, Salvatore; Cedeno, Douglas; Acquatella, Harry; Mejia, Carlos; Induni, Eduardo; Fish, R. David

    2005-01-01

    The transcatheter route is an emerging approach to treating valvular disease in high-risk patients. The 1st clinical antegrade transcatheter placement of an aortic valve prosthesis was reported in 2002. We describe the first retrograde transcatheter implantation of a new aortic valve prosthesis, in a 62-year-old man with inoperable calcific aortic stenosis and multiple severe comorbidities. Via the right femoral artery, a Cook introducer was advanced into the abdominal aorta. The aortic valve was crossed with a straight wire, and a pigtail catheter was advanced into the left ventricle to obtain pressure-gradient and anatomic measurements. An 18-mm valvuloplasty balloon was then used to predilate the aortic valve. Initial attempts to position the prosthetic valve caused a transient cardiac arrest. Implantation was achieved by superimposing the right coronary angiogram onto fluoroscopic landmarks in the same radiographic plane. A balloon-expandable frame was used to deliver the valve. After device implantation, the transvalvular gradient was <5 mmHg. The cardiac output increased from 1 to 5 L/min, and urine production increased to 200 mL/h. The patient was extubated on the 2nd postimplant day. Twelve hours later, he had to be reintubated because of respiratory distress and high pulmonary pressures. His condition deteriorated, and he died of biventricular failure and refractory hypotension on day 5. Despite the severe hypotension, valve function was satisfactory on echo-Doppler evaluation. In our patient, retrograde transcatheter implantation of a prosthetic aortic valve yielded excellent hemodynamic results and paved the way for further use of this technique in selected high-risk patients. PMID:16392228

  8. Transfemoral Valve-in-Valve Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) in a Patient With Previous Endovascular Aortic Repair (EVAR).

    PubMed

    Ruparelia, Neil; Panoulas, Vasileios F; Frame, Angela; Nathan, Anthony W; Ariff, Ben; Jaffer, Usman; Sutaria, Nilesh; Chukwuemeka, Andrew; Mikhail, Ghada W; Malik, Iqbal S

    2016-07-01

    A 90-year-old man presented with increasing exertional breathlessness. He had previous implantation of a Perimount bioprosthetic aortic valve (Edwards Lifesciences) and coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Due to severe transvalvular bioprosthetic regurgitation with preserved left ventricular dimensions and ejection fraction, the heart team decided on valve-in- valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation via the transfemoral route in view of the patient's prohibitively high surgical and anesthetic risk. The patient had an uncomplicated recovery and was symptomatically much improved at 3-month follow-up. PMID:27342209

  9. Quantification of biomechanical interaction of transcatheter aortic valve stent deployed in porcine and ovine hearts.

    PubMed

    Mummert, Joseph; Sirois, Eric; Sun, Wei

    2013-03-01

    Success of the deployment and function in transcatheter aortic valve replacement is heavily reliant on the tissue-stent interaction. The present study quantified important tissue-stent contact variables of self-expanding transcatheter aortic valve stents when deployed into ovine and porcine aortic roots, such as the stent radial expansion force, stent pullout force, the annulus deformation response and the coefficient of friction on the tissue-stent contact interface. Braided Nitinol stents were developed, tested to determine stent crimped diameter vs. stent radial force from a stent crimp experiment, and deployed in vitro to quantify stent pullout, aortic annulus deformation, and the coefficient of friction between the stent and the aortic tissue from an aortic root-stent interaction experiment. The results indicated that when crimped at body temperature from 26 mm to 19, 21 and 23 mm stent radial forces were approximately 30-40% higher than those crimped at room temperature. Coefficients of friction leveled to approximately 0.10 ± 0.01 as stent wire diameter increased and annulus size decreased from 23 to 19 mm. Regardless of aortic annulus size and species tested, it appeared that a minimum of about 2.5 mm in annular dilatation, caused by about 60 N of radial force from stent expansion, was needed to anchor the stent against a pullout into the left ventricle. The study of the contact biomechanics in animal aortic tissues may help us better understand characteristics of tissue-stent interactions and quantify the baseline responses of non-calcified aortic tissues. PMID:23161165

  10. Delirium after transcatheter aortic valve implantation via the femoral or apical route.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V; Katznelson, R; Horlick, E; Osten, M; Styra, R; Cusimano, R J; Carroll, J; Djaiani, G

    2016-08-01

    We thought that delirium might be less frequent after transcatheter aortic valve implantation via the femoral artery compared with via the cardiac apex. We reviewed 210 patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation between January 2009 and October 2014. The proportion (95% CI) of patients who suffered delirium in the 3 days after valve implantation were: 10 (3-16%) in 105 patients who had transfemoral implantation; and 35 (25-45%) in 105 patients who had transapical implantation, p = 0.0001. The variables that independently associated with postoperative delirium were age, male sex and the transapical approach. The median (IQR [range]) hospital stay was 7 (5-13 [2-41]) days and 10 (7-15 [2-64]) days, respectively, p = 0.004. Future trials should focus on different peri-operative management strategies to reduce delirium rates after transcatheter aortic valve implantation, particularly in older men having implantations via the cardiac apex. PMID:27353560

  11. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Lower Surgical Risk Patients: Review of Major Trials and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Saji, Mike; Lim, D Scott

    2016-10-01

    Following the first successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in 2002, TAVR has globally evolved to become a standard procedure in high-risk patients. Surgical aortic valve replacement in non-high-risk patients remains the gold standard for treatment of severe aortic stenosis. However, a paradigm shift appears to be occurring in the direction of treating lower-risk patients, and several studies have suggested its impact on clinical outcomes. In this review, we highlight the current status of TAVR in intermediate-risk patients and review major trials including Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER (PARTNER) 2A randomized intermediate-risk trial using SAPIEN XT (Edwards Lifesciences Corp, Irvine, CA) recently presented with excellent outcomes and the lowest major complications rate at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session in Chicago. Clinical trials in low-risk patients using SAPIEN 3 and CoreValve Evolut R have just been launched, and they are going to be important milestones in the TAVR field. PMID:27600519

  12. Valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation: the new playground for prosthesis-patient mismatch.

    PubMed

    Faerber, Gloria; Schleger, Simone; Diab, Mahmoud; Breuer, Martin; Figulla, Hans R; Eichinger, Walter B; Doenst, Torsten

    2014-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an established procedure for patients with aortic valve stenosis and significant comorbidities. One option offered by this technique is the implantation of a transcatheter valve inside a surgically implanted bioprosthesis. Many reports address the feasibility but also the pitfalls of these valve-in-valve (VIV) procedures. Review articles provide tables listing which valve sizes are appropriate based on the size of the initially implanted bioprosthesis. However, we previously argued that the hemodynamic performance of a prosthetic tissue valve is in large part a result of the dimensions of the bioprosthesis in relation to the patient's aortic outflow dimensions. Thus, the decision if a VIV TAVI procedure is likely to be associated with a favorable hemodynamic result cannot safely be made by looking at premade sizing tables that do not include patient dimensions and do not inquire about the primary cause for bioprosthetic valve stenosis. Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) may therefore be more frequent than expected after conventional aortic valve replacement. Importantly, it may be masked by a potentially flawed method assessing its relevance. Such PPM may therefore impact significantly on hemodynamic outcome after VIV TAVI. Fifteen percent of currently published VIV procedures show only a minimal reduction of pressure gradients. We will address potential pitfalls in the current determination of PPM, outline the missing links for reliable determination of PPM, and present a simplified algorithm to guide decision making for VIV TAVI. PMID:24612128

  13. Preferential short cut or alternative route: the transaxillary access for transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Deuschl, Florian; Conradi, Lenard; Lubos, Edith; Schirmer, Johannes; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Blankenberg, Stefan; Treede, Hendrik; Schäfer, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has gained widespread acceptance as a treatment option for patients at high risk for conventional aortic valve replacement. The most commonly used access site for TAVI is the common femoral artery. Yet, in a significant number of patients the transfemoral access is not suitable due to peripheral vascular disease of the lower extremity. In these cases the transaxillary approach can serve as an alternative implantation route. By considering the anatomical requirements and providing an adequate endovascular “safety-net” during the procedure the transaxillary TAVI approach results in excellent procedural and clinical outcome. However, whether the transaxillary access for TAVI is superior to other non-transfemoral approaches (e.g., transapical or direct aortic) needs to be studied in the future in a prospective randomized trial. PMID:26543600

  14. Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Disc Valve Prosthesis Implantation: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sochman, Jan

    2000-09-15

    Purpose: Over the past 30 years there have been experimental efforts at catheter-based management of aortic valve regurgitation with the idea of extending treatment to nonsurgical candidates. A new catheter-based aortic valve design is described.Methods: The new catheter-delivered valve consists of a stent-based valve cage with locking mechanism and a prosthetic flexible tilting valve disc. The valve cage is delivered first followed by deployment and locking of the disc. In acute experiments, valve implantation was done in four dogs.Results: Valve implantation was successful in all four animals. The implanted valve functioned well for the duration of the experiments (up to 3 hr).Conclusion: The study showed the implantation feasibility and short-term function of the tested catheter-based aortic disc valve. Further experimental studies are warranted.

  15. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation as a Procedural Rescue Strategy for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Cardiac Complications.

    PubMed

    Banjac, Igor; Petrovic, Marija; Akay, Mehmet H; Janowiak, Lisa M; Radovancevic, Rajko; Nathan, Sriram; Patel, Manish; Loyalka, Pranav; Kar, Biswajit; Gregoric, Igor D

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications during or after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) are associated with extremely high mortality, but extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can be used as procedural rescue option to improve outcomes when patients experience respiratory or cardiac arrest. From 2012 to 2014, 230 patients underwent TAVR and 10 patients (4.3%) required emergent venous-arterial ECMO support. Mean age was 83 years, median Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score was 15, and mean aortic gradient was 45 mm Hg. Median left ventricular ejection fraction was 35%. Access for most ECMOs was femoral; two patients required central arterial and femoral venous access. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was initiated in response to hemodynamic collapse due to perforation of left ventricle (n = 2), aortic root rupture (n = 1), moderate-to-severe aortic insufficiency (n = 1), left main impingement (n = 1), valve embolization (n = 1), severe hypotension and cardiac arrest after prolonged rapid pacing sequence (n = 1), ventricular fibrillation (n = 2), and ventricular tachycardia (n = 1). Median time of ECMO support was 87 minutes. There were three hospital deaths. Post-TAVR mean aortic gradient was 8 mm Hg and median hospital stay was 19 days. Additional procedures included valve-in-valve placement (n = 1), percutaneous coronary intervention (n = 1), surgical LV repair (n = 2), surgical valve replacement (n = 1), aortic root rupture repair, and coronary bypass grafting (n = 1). Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is rescue therapy for hemodynamic instable patients who develop TAVR-related cardiac complications. PMID:26309098

  16. MRI evaluation prior to Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI): When to acquire and how to interpret.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Abhishek; Hobbs, Susan K; Ling, Fred S; Chaturvedi, Apeksha; Knight, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) is increasingly being used in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are not candidates for surgery. ECG-gated CT angiography (CTA) plays an important role in the preoperative planning for these devices. As the number of patients undergoing these procedures increases, a subset of patients is being recognized who have contraindications to iodinated contrast medium, either due to a prior severe allergic type reaction or poor renal function. Another subgroup of patients with low flow and low gradient aortic stenosis is being recognized that are usually assessed for severity of aortic stenosis by stress echocardiography. There are contraindications to stress echocardiography and some of these patients may not be able to undergo this test. Non-contrast MRI can be a useful emerging modality for evaluating these patients. In this article, we discuss the emerging indications of non-contrast MRI in preoperative assessment for TAVI and describe the commonly used MRI sequences. A comparison of the most important measurements obtained for TAVI assessment on CTA and MRI from same subjects is included. Teaching Points • MRI can be used for preoperative assessment of aortic annulus. • MRI is an alternate to CTA when iodinated contrast is contraindicated. • Measurements obtained by non-contrast MRI are similar to contrast enhanced CTA. • MRI can be used to assess severity of aortic stenosis. PMID:26911969

  17. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation versus reoperative conventional aortic valve replacement: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Zhao, Dong-Fang; Wang, Nelson; Huo, Ya Ruth; Di Eusanio, Marco; Yan, Tristan D

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter valve-in-valve (VIV) implantation for degenerated aortic bioprostheses has emerged as a promising alternative to redo conventional aortic valve replacement (cAVR). However there are concerns surrounding the efficacy and safety of VIV. This systematic review aims to compare the outcomes and safety of transcatheter VIV implantation with redoes cAVR. Six databases were systematically searched. A total of 18 relevant studies (823 patients) were included. Pooled analysis demonstrated VIV achieved significant improvements in mean gradient (38 mmHg preoperatively to 15.2 mmHg postoperatively, P<0.001) and peak gradient (59.2 to 23.2 mmHg, P=0.0003). These improvements were similar to the outcomes achieved by cAVR. The incidence of moderate paravalvular leaks (PVL) were significantly higher for VIV compared to cAVR (3.3% vs. 0.4%, P=0.022). In terms of morbidity, VIV had a significantly lower incidence of stroke and bleeding compared to redo cAVR (1.9% vs. 8.8%, P=0.002 & 6.9% vs. 9.1%, P=0.014, respectively). Perioperative mortality rates were similar for VIV (7.9%) and redo cAVR (6.1%, P=0.35). In conclusion, transcatheter VIV implantation achieves similar haemodynamic outcomes, with lower risk of strokes and bleeding but higher PVL rates compared to redo cAVR. Future randomized studies and prospective registries are essential to compare the effectiveness of transcatheter VIV with cAVR, and clarify the rates of PVLs. PMID:26904259

  18. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation versus reoperative conventional aortic valve replacement: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dong-Fang; Wang, Nelson; Huo, Ya Ruth; Di Eusanio, Marco; Yan, Tristan D.

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter valve-in-valve (VIV) implantation for degenerated aortic bioprostheses has emerged as a promising alternative to redo conventional aortic valve replacement (cAVR). However there are concerns surrounding the efficacy and safety of VIV. This systematic review aims to compare the outcomes and safety of transcatheter VIV implantation with redoes cAVR. Six databases were systematically searched. A total of 18 relevant studies (823 patients) were included. Pooled analysis demonstrated VIV achieved significant improvements in mean gradient (38 mmHg preoperatively to 15.2 mmHg postoperatively, P<0.001) and peak gradient (59.2 to 23.2 mmHg, P=0.0003). These improvements were similar to the outcomes achieved by cAVR. The incidence of moderate paravalvular leaks (PVL) were significantly higher for VIV compared to cAVR (3.3% vs. 0.4%, P=0.022). In terms of morbidity, VIV had a significantly lower incidence of stroke and bleeding compared to redo cAVR (1.9% vs. 8.8%, P=0.002 & 6.9% vs. 9.1%, P=0.014, respectively). Perioperative mortality rates were similar for VIV (7.9%) and redo cAVR (6.1%, P=0.35). In conclusion, transcatheter VIV implantation achieves similar haemodynamic outcomes, with lower risk of strokes and bleeding but higher PVL rates compared to redo cAVR. Future randomized studies and prospective registries are essential to compare the effectiveness of transcatheter VIV with cAVR, and clarify the rates of PVLs. PMID:26904259

  19. Transition to palliative care when transcatheter aortic valve implantation is not an option: opportunities and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Lauck, Sandra B.; Gibson, Jennifer A.; Baumbusch, Jennifer; Carroll, Sandra L.; Achtem, Leslie; Kimel, Gil; Nordquist, Cindy; Cheung, Anson; Boone, Robert H.; Ye, Jian; Wood, David A.; Webb, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is the recommended treatment for most patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis at high surgical risk. However, TAVI may be clinically futile for patients who have multiple comorbidities and excessive frailty. This group benefits from transition to palliative care to maximize quality of life, improve symptoms, and ensure continuity of health services. We discuss the clinical determination of utility and futility, explore the current evidence guiding the integration of palliative care in procedure-focused cardiac programs, and outline recommendations for TAVI programs. Recent findings The determination of futility of treatment in elderly patients with aortic stenosis is challenging. There is a paucity of research available to guide best practices when TAVI is not an option. Opportunities exist to build on the evidence gained in the management of end of life and heart failure. TAVI programs and primary care providers can facilitate improved communication and processes of care to provide decision support and transition to palliative care. Summary The increased availability of transcatheter options for the management of valvular heart disease will increase the assessment of people with life-limiting conditions for whom treatment may not be an option. It is pivotal to bridge cardiac innovation and palliation to optimize patient outcomes. PMID:26716394

  20. What is the best approach in a patient with a failed aortic bioprosthetic valve: transcatheter aortic valve replacement or redo aortic valve replacement?

    PubMed

    Tourmousoglou, Christos; Rao, Vivek; Lalos, Spiros; Dougenis, Dimitrios

    2015-06-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve replacement (viv-TAVR) or redo aortic valve replacement (rAVR) is the best strategy in a patient with a degenerative bioprosthetic aortic valve. Altogether, 162 papers were found using the reported search, of which 12 represented the best evidence to answer the question. The authors, journal, date, country of publication, patient group, study type, outcomes and results of papers are tabulated. The results of the studies provided interesting results. All the studies are retrospective. Four papers reported the results of redo aortic valve replacement in patients with failed aortic bioprosthetic valve, six papers demonstrated their results with transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve replacement for the same indication and two papers reported their propensity-matched analysis of outcomes between viv-TAVR and rAVR in patients with previous cardiac surgery. Thirty-day mortality for rAVR was 2.3-15.5% and 0-17% for viv-TAVR. For rAVR, survival rate at 30 days was 83.6%, 76.1% at 1 year, 70.8% at 3 years, at 51.3-66% at 5 years, 61% at 8 years and 61.5% at 10 years. For viv-TAVR, the overall Kaplan-Meier survival rate at 1 year was 83.2%. After viv-TAVR at 1 year, 86.2% of surviving patients were at New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I/II. The complications after rAVR were stroke (4.6-5.8%), reoperation for bleeding (6.9-9.7%), low-cardiac output syndrome (9.9%) whereas complications after viv-TAVR at 30 days were major stroke (1.7%), aortic regurgitation of at least moderate degree (25%), new permanent pacemaker implantation rate (0-11%), ostial coronary obstruction (2%), need for implantation of a second device (5.7%) and major vascular complications (9.2%). It is noteworthy to mention that there is a valve-in-valve application that provides information to surgeons for choosing the correct size of the TAVR valve

  1. Nursing leadership of the transcatheter aortic valve implantation Heart Team: Supporting innovation, excellence, and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Lauck, Sandra B; McGladrey, Janis; Lawlor, Cindy; Webb, John G

    2016-05-01

    Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) is an innovative and resource-intensive treatment of valvular heart disease. Growing evidence and excellent outcomes are contributing to increased patient demand. The Heart Team is foundational to TAVI programs to manage the complexities of case selection and other aspects of care. The competencies and expertise of nurses are well suited to provide administrative and clinical leadership within the TAVI Heart Team to promote efficient, effective, and sustainable program development. The contributions of nursing administrative and clinical leaders exemplify the leadership roles that nurses can assume in healthcare innovation. PMID:27060802

  2. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement in a patient with an anomalous origin of the right coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Weich, Hellmuth; Ackermann, Christelle; Viljoen, Hofmeyr; van Wyk, Jacques; Mabin, Thomas; Doubell, Anton F

    2011-12-01

    We describe the first case of implantation of a transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in a patient with an anomalous origin of the right coronary artery, coursing in between the aorta and pulmonary truncus to the right. After assessment of the risk of compression of the anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the left coronary sinus (ARCA), the procedure was performed without complication. A brief discussion of the pathophysiology of ARCA is provided and the implications for TAVI as well as our recommendations are offered. PMID:22114037

  3. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for failing surgical aortic bioprosthetic valve: from concept to clinical application and evaluation (part 1).

    PubMed

    Piazza, Nicolo; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Brockmann, Gernot; Hendrick, Ruge; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Opitz, Anke; Mazzitelli, Domenico; Tassani-Prell, Peter; Schreiber, Christian; Lange, Rüdiger

    2011-07-01

    With an aging population, improvement in life expectancy, and significant increase in the use of bioprosthetic valves, structural valve deterioration will become more and more prevalent. The operative mortality for an elective redo aortic valve surgery is reported to range from 2% to 7%, but this percentage can increase to more than 30% in high-risk and nonelective patients. Because transcatheter aortic valve (TAV)-in-surgical aortic valve (SAV) implantation represents a minimally invasive alternative to conventional redo surgery, it may prove to be safer and just as effective as redo surgery. Of course, prospective comparisons with a large number of patients and long-term follow-up are required to confirm these potential advantages. It is axiomatic that knowledge of the basic construction and dimensions, radiographic identification, and potential failure modes of SAV bioprostheses is fundamental in understanding key principles involved in TAV-in-SAV implantation. The goals of this paper are: 1) to review the classification, physical characteristics, and potential failure modes of surgical bioprosthetic aortic valves; and 2) to discuss patient selection and procedural techniques relevant to TAV-in-SAV implantation. PMID:21777879

  4. Transcatheter, valve-in-valve transapical aortic and mitral valve implantation, in a high risk patient with aortic and mitral prosthetic valve stenoses

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Harish; DeValeria, Patrick A.; Sweeney, John P.; Mookaram, Farouk

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter valve implantation continues to grow worldwide and has been used principally for the nonsurgical management of native aortic valvular disease-as a potentially less invasive method of valve replacement in high-risk and inoperable patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Given the burden of valvular heart disease in the general population and the increasing numbers of patients who have had previous valve operations, we are now seeing a growing number of high-risk patients presenting with prosthetic valve stenosis, who are not potential surgical candidates. For this high-risk subset transcatheter valve delivery may be the only option. Here, we present an inoperable patient with severe, prosthetic valve aortic and mitral stenosis who was successfully treated with a trans catheter based approach, with a valve-in-valve implantation procedure of both aortic and mitral valves. PMID:25849702

  5. Recurrent angina from chronic coronary obstruction following transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Kabach, Mohamad; Alrifai, Abdulah; Furlan, Stefanie; Alahdab, Fares

    2016-01-01

    Severe aortic stenosis and coronary artery disease often coexist. Coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) can be challenging in patients with prior transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Depending on the type and position of the implanted valve, the procedure can be challenging or even unfeasible due to interference of diagnostic catheters and valve parts. The correct positioning of the TAVI prosthesis during TAVI was identified as an important factor with regard to the feasibility of subsequent CA or PCI. TAVI has been also associated with vascular, cerebrovascular and conduction complication. One is rare but life-threatening complication, coronary ostial obstruction. Coronary ostial obstruction can develop, especially if a safety check of more than 10 mm of coronary ostial height is not taken into consideration during TAVI. This complication can cause recurrent episodes of angina and can severely worsen the patient's cardiac systolic function. PMID:27390671

  6. Acquired Aorto-Right Ventricular Fistula following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Shakoor, Muhammad Tariq; Islam, Ashequl M; Ayub, Samia

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) techniques are rapidly evolving, and results of published trials suggest that TAVR is emerging as the standard of care in certain patient subsets and a viable alternative to surgery in others. As TAVR is a relatively new procedure and continues to gain its acceptance, rare procedural complications will continue to appear. Our case is about an 89-year-old male with extensive past medical history who presented with progressive exertional dyspnea and angina secondary to severe aortic stenosis. Patient got TAVR and his postoperative course was complicated by complete heart block, aorto-RV fistula, and ventricular septal defect (VSD) formation as a complication of TAVR. To the best of our knowledge, this is the third reported case of aorto-RV fistula following TAVR as a procedural complication but the first one to show three complications all together in one patient. PMID:25883809

  7. Recent Advances in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: Novel Devices and Potential Shortcomings

    PubMed Central

    Blumenstein, J.; Liebetrau, C.; Linden, A. Van; Moellmann, H.; Walther, T.; Kempfert, J.

    2013-01-01

    During the past years transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has evolved to a standard technique for the treatment of high risk patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis. Worldwide the number of TAVI procedures is increasing exponentially. In this context both the transapical antegrade (TA) and the transfemoral retrograde (TF) approach are predominantly used and can be considered as safe and reproducible access sites for TAVI interventions. As a new technology TAVI is in a constant progress regarding the development of new devices. While in the first years only the Edwards SAPIEN™ and the Medtronic CoreValve™ prostheses were commercial available, recently additional devices obtained CE-mark approval and others have entered initial clinical trials. In addition to enhance the treatment options in general, the main driving factor to further develop new device iterations is to solve the drawbacks of the current TAVI systems: paravalvular leaks, occurrence of AV-blocks and the lack of full repositionability. PMID:24313644

  8. Recurrent angina from chronic coronary obstruction following transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Kabach, Mohamad; Alrifai, Abdulah; Furlan, Stefanie; Alahdab, Fares

    2016-01-01

    Severe aortic stenosis and coronary artery disease often coexist. Coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) can be challenging in patients with prior transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Depending on the type and position of the implanted valve, the procedure can be challenging or even unfeasible due to interference of diagnostic catheters and valve parts. The correct positioning of the TAVI prosthesis during TAVI was identified as an important factor with regard to the feasibility of subsequent CA or PCI. TAVI has been also associated with vascular, cerebrovascular and conduction complication. One is rare but life-threatening complication, coronary ostial obstruction. Coronary ostial obstruction can develop, especially if a safety check of more than 10 mm of coronary ostial height is not taken into consideration during TAVI. This complication can cause recurrent episodes of angina and can severely worsen the patient's cardiac systolic function. PMID:27390671

  9. Thrombembolic occlusion of crural arteries following transcatheter aortic valve implantation--successful endovascular recanalization using a thrombus aspiration device.

    PubMed

    Malyar, Nasser M; Kaleschke, Gerrit; Reinecke, Holger

    2012-05-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an increasingly used alternative to conventional surgical valve replacement in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (AS) and high operative risk. We here describe a case of a TAVI performed in local anesthesia causing intraprocedural thromboembolic occlusion of non-stenotic crural arteries and its immediate successful therapeutic management by means of endovascular recanalization using a thrombus aspiration device. PMID:22565625

  10. Transcatheter Closure of Iatrogenic VSDs after Aortic Valve Replacement Surgery: 2 Case Reports and a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    We report 2 new cases of transcatheter closure of iatrogenic ventricular septal defects after aortic valve replacement surgery, together with our finding, in a literature review, of 9 additional patients who had undergone this procedure from 2004 through 2013. In all 11 cases, transcatheter device closure was indicated for a substantial intracardiac shunt with symptomatic heart failure, and such a device was successfully deployed across the iatrogenic ventricular septal defect, with clinical improvement. Our review suggests that transcatheter closure of iatrogenic ventricular septal defects in patients with previous aortic valve replacement surgery is a safe and effective treatment option, providing anatomic defect closure and relief of symptoms in the short-to-medium term. PMID:27547145

  11. Transcatheter Closure of Iatrogenic VSDs after Aortic Valve Replacement Surgery: 2 Case Reports and a Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Taleyratne, John D S; Henderson, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    We report 2 new cases of transcatheter closure of iatrogenic ventricular septal defects after aortic valve replacement surgery, together with our finding, in a literature review, of 9 additional patients who had undergone this procedure from 2004 through 2013. In all 11 cases, transcatheter device closure was indicated for a substantial intracardiac shunt with symptomatic heart failure, and such a device was successfully deployed across the iatrogenic ventricular septal defect, with clinical improvement. Our review suggests that transcatheter closure of iatrogenic ventricular septal defects in patients with previous aortic valve replacement surgery is a safe and effective treatment option, providing anatomic defect closure and relief of symptoms in the short-to-medium term. PMID:27547145

  12. Percutaneous transfemoral closure of a pseudoaneurysm at the left ventricular apical access site for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Ashkan; Beaver, Thomas M; Fudge, James C

    2015-02-01

    This case report illustrates a left ventricular pseudoaneurysm that developed at the transapical access site for transcatheter aortic valve implantation and was successfully excluded percutaneously through a femoral approach using an Amplatzer muscular VSD occluder (St. Jude Medical). We also discuss various currently available devices and technical pearls for percutaneous closure of left ventricular pseudoaneurysms. PMID:25661768

  13. Biomedical Impact in Implantable Devices-The Transcatheter Aortic Valve as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiou, Alexandros; Saatsakis, George

    2015-09-01

    Objective: To update of the scientific community about the biomedical engineering involvement in the implantable devices chain. Moreover the transcatheter Aortic Valve (TAV) replacement, in the field of cardiac surgery, will be analyzed as an example of contemporary implantable technology. Methods: A detailed literature review regarding biomedical engineers participating in the implantable medical product chain, starting from the design of the product till the final implantation technique. Results: The scientific role of biomedical engineers has clearly been established. Certain parts of the product chain are implemented almost exclusively by experienced biomedical engineers such as the transcatheter aortic valve device. The successful professional should have a multidisciplinary knowledge, including medicine, in order to pursue the challenges for such intuitive technology. This clearly indicates that biomedical engineers are among the most appropriate scientists to accomplish such tasks. Conclusions: The biomedical engineering involvement in medical implantable devices has been widely accepted by the scientific community, worldwide. Its important contribution, starting from the design and extended to the development, clinical trials, scientific support, education of other scientists (surgeons, cardiologists, technicians etc.), and even to sales, makes biomedical engineers a valuable player in the scientific arena. Notably, the sector of implantable devices is constantly raising, as emerging technologies continuously set up new targets.

  14. Conduction disturbances after transcatheter aortic valve implantation procedures – predictors and management

    PubMed Central

    Reguła, Rafał; Bujak, Kamil; Chodór, Piotr; Długaszek, Michał; Gąsior, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become a safe and efficient alternative to cardiac surgery in patients with severe aortic stenosis. In many countries the number of performed TAVI procedures equals the number of surgical implantations. Indications for TAVI are becoming more liberal, allowing a wider spectrum of patients to benefit from the advantages of transcatheter therapy. Due to its invasive nature, TAVI is associated with some complications such as conduction disturbances. Although these disturbances are usually not lethal, they have a great influence on patients’ state and long term-survival. The most relevant and common are His’ bundle branch blocks, atrioventricular blocks, and need for permanent pacemaker implantation. With the frequency at 10% to even 50%, conduction abnormalities are among the most important TAVI-related adverse events. Risk factors for conduction disturbances include age, anatomy of the heart, periprocedural factors, type of implanted valve, and comorbidities. Severity of occurring complications varies; therefore selection of a proper treatment approach is required. Considered as the most effective management, permanent pacemaker implantation turned out to negatively influence both recovery and survival. Moreover, there is no expert consensus on use of resynchronization therapy after TAVI. In this paper, the authors present a comprehensive analysis of the most common conduction disturbances accompanying TAVI, factors related to their occurrence, and treatment approach. PMID:27625682

  15. Conduction disturbances after transcatheter aortic valve implantation procedures - predictors and management.

    PubMed

    Wilczek, Krzysztof; Reguła, Rafał; Bujak, Kamil; Chodór, Piotr; Długaszek, Michał; Gąsior, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become a safe and efficient alternative to cardiac surgery in patients with severe aortic stenosis. In many countries the number of performed TAVI procedures equals the number of surgical implantations. Indications for TAVI are becoming more liberal, allowing a wider spectrum of patients to benefit from the advantages of transcatheter therapy. Due to its invasive nature, TAVI is associated with some complications such as conduction disturbances. Although these disturbances are usually not lethal, they have a great influence on patients' state and long term-survival. The most relevant and common are His' bundle branch blocks, atrioventricular blocks, and need for permanent pacemaker implantation. With the frequency at 10% to even 50%, conduction abnormalities are among the most important TAVI-related adverse events. Risk factors for conduction disturbances include age, anatomy of the heart, periprocedural factors, type of implanted valve, and comorbidities. Severity of occurring complications varies; therefore selection of a proper treatment approach is required. Considered as the most effective management, permanent pacemaker implantation turned out to negatively influence both recovery and survival. Moreover, there is no expert consensus on use of resynchronization therapy after TAVI. In this paper, the authors present a comprehensive analysis of the most common conduction disturbances accompanying TAVI, factors related to their occurrence, and treatment approach. PMID:27625682

  16. Percutaneous Aortic Balloon Valvuloplasty and Intracardiac Adrenaline in Electromechanical Dissociation as Bridge to Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Chaara, Jawad; Meier, Pascal; Ellenberger, Christophe; Gasche, Yvan; Bendjelid, Karim; Noble, Stephane; Roffi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This report describes an emergent balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) procedure performed under cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a 79-year-old man with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (mean gradient 78 mm Hg, valve area 0.71 cm2, and left ventricular ejection fraction 40%) awaiting surgery and who was admitted for heart failure rapidly evolving to cardiogenic shock and multiorgan failure. Decision was made to perform emergent BAV. After crossing the valve with a 6 French catheter, the patient developed an electromechanical dissociation confirmed at transesophageal echocardiography and cardiac arrest. Manual chest compressions were initiated along with the application of high doses of intravenous adrenaline, and BAV was performed under ongoing resuscitation. Despite BAV, transoesophageal echocardiography demonstrated no cardiac activity. At this point, it was decided to advance a pigtail catheter over the wire already in place in the left ventricle and to inject intracardiac adrenaline (1 mg, followed by 5 mg). Left ventricular contraction progressively resumed and, in the absence of aortic regurgitation, an intraaortic balloon pump was inserted. The patient could be weaned from intraaortic balloon pump and vasopressors on day 1, extubated on day 6, and recovered from multiorgan failure. In the absence of neurologic deficits, he underwent uneventful transcatheter aortic valve implantation on day 12 and was discharged to a cardiac rehabilitation program on day 30. At 3-month follow-up, he reported dyspnea NYHA class II as the only symptom. This case shows that severe aortic stenosis leading to electromechanical dissociation may be treated by emergent BAV and intracardiac administration of high-dose adrenaline. Intracardiac adrenaline may be considered in case of refractory electromechanical dissociation occurring in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. PMID:26131825

  17. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient with bicuspid aortic stenosis and a borderline-sized annulus.

    PubMed

    Colkesen, Yucel; Baykan, Oytun; Dagdelen, Sinan; Cayli, Murat

    2015-11-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is currently considered an exclusion criterion for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The risk of adverse aortic events such as incomplete sealing, severe paravalvular regurgitation or dislocation due to elliptic shape and asymmetric calcifications in annulus are higher in TAVI. In this case report, we detailed a case of successful trans-femoral TAVI in a 51-year old male with BAV and its management without in-hospital and 30-day complications. The challenge in this case was the patient's anatomy with a 27-mm annulus for balloon expandable device. The applied strategy was balloon sizing and overdilating the 29-mm stented valve with additional volume that obviated re-ballooning. Trans-femoral TAVI was performed uneventfully under fluoroscopic and transoesophageal echocardiography guidance. A multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) evaluation at 1 month did not show device dislodgement or any other complications. Evidence for evaluation post-TAVI is not sufficient in BAV. We believe patients with BAV should undergo a comprehensive assessment after TAVI including MDCT evaluation. PMID:26265070

  18. Transcatheter Aortic Valve-in-Valve Replacement Instead of a 4th Sternotomy in a 21-Year-Old Woman with Aortic Homograft Failure

    PubMed Central

    Díez, José G.; Schechter, Michael; Dougherty, Kathryn G.; Preventza, Ourania

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a well-established method for replacing native aortic valves; however, it was conceived for elderly patients with aortic valve stenosis, and the lack of data on long-term durability has led practitioners to restrict the use of TAVR to patients who have short life expectancies. Here, we describe the case of a 21-year-old woman who had undergone 3 previous open aortic valve replacements and who presented with symptoms of recurrent valvular failure. Transthoracic echocardiograms and computed tomographic angiograms revealed a degenerating aortic root homograft with substantial calcification, moderate-to-severe aortic valve stenosis, and severe aortic valve regurgitation. Open surgical valve replacement posed substantial risk to our patient, so we decided to perform valve-in-valve TAVR with use of the Edwards Sapien XT Transcatheter Heart Valve. The patient's pulmonary artery pressure, valvular regurgitation, and symptoms improved substantially thereafter. We found that valve-in-valve TAVR into a failing aortic root homograft was less invasive than repeat surgical valve replacement in this young patient who had congenital vascular anomalies and a complex surgical history. PMID:27547146

  19. Transcatheter valve implantation can alter fluid flow fields in aortic sinuses and ascending aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2012-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valves (TAVs) are valve replacements used to treat aortic stenosis. Currently, these have been used in elderly patients at high-risk for open-heart procedures. Since these devices are implanted under fluoroscopic guidance, the implantation position of the valve can vary with respect to the native aortic valve annulus. The current study characterizes the altered hemodynamics in the aortic sinus and ascending aorta under different implantation (high and low) and cardiac output (2.5 and 5.0 L/min) conditions. Two commonly used TAV designs are studied using 2-D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). 200 phase locked images are obtained at every 25ms in the cardiac cycle, and the resulting vector fields are ensemble averaged. High implantation of the TAV with respect to the annulus causes weaker sinus washout and weaker sinus vortex formation. Additionally, the longer TAV leaflets can also result in a weaker sinus vortex. The level of turbulent fluctuations in the ascending aorta did not appear to be affected by axial positioning of the valve, but varied with cardiac output. The results of this study indicates that TAV positioning is important to be considered clinically, since this can affect coronary perfusion and potential flow stagnation near the valve.

  20. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance for the assessment of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Before trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), assessment of cardiac function and accurate measurement of the aortic root are key to determine the correct size and type of the prosthesis. The aim of this study was to compare cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE) for the assessment of aortic valve measurements and left ventricular function in high-risk elderly patients submitted to TAVI. Methods Consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis and contraindications for surgical aortic valve replacement were screened from April 2009 to January 2011 and imaged with TTE and CMR. Results Patients who underwent both TTE and CMR (n = 49) had a mean age of 80.8 ± 4.8 years and a mean logistic EuroSCORE of 14.9 ± 9.3%. There was a good correlation between TTE and CMR in terms of annulus size (R2 = 0.48, p < 0.001), left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) diameter (R2 = 0.62, p < 0.001) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (R2 = 0.47, p < 0.001) and a moderate correlation in terms of aortic valve area (AVA) (R2 = 0.24, p < 0.001). CMR generally tended to report larger values than TTE for all measurements. The Bland-Altman test indicated that the 95% limits of agreement between TTE and CMR ranged from -5.6 mm to + 1.0 mm for annulus size, from -0.45 mm to + 0.25 mm for LVOT, from -0.45 mm2 to + 0.25 mm2 for AVA and from -29.2% to 13.2% for LVEF. Conclusions In elderly patients candidates to TAVI, CMR represents a viable complement to transthoracic echocardiography. PMID:22202669

  1. Percutaneous endoscopic transapical aortic valve implantation: three experimental transcatheter models.

    PubMed

    Chu, Michael W A; Falk, Volkmar; Mohr, Friedrich W; Walther, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    We sought to demonstrate the feasibility of an endoscopic approach to transapical aortic valve implantation (AVI), avoiding the morbidity of a thoracotomy incision. Using an experimental pig model, we performed three different approaches to transapical AVI, using a standard minithoracotomy (n=4), a robotic approach using the da Vinci telemanipulator (n=4) and an endoscopic approach using a port and camera access (n=4). The feasibility of the different techniques, exposure of the left ventricular apex, postoperative blood loss and total operative time were evaluated. Left ventricular apical exposure, 'purse-string' suture control and 33-F introducer access were successfully performed and confirmed videoscopically, fluoroscopically and at a post mortem in all 12 animals. The haemodynamics were stable in all animals. Mean intraoperative and postoperative (two-hour) blood losses were 88 and 65 ml with minithoracotomy, and 228 and 138 ml with the robotic and 130 and 43 ml with the endoscopic technique (P=0.26, P=0.14, respectively). There was no significant change in perioperative haematocrit (P=0.53). The mean total operative times were 1.4, 3.9 and 1.1 h (P=0.06), respectively. Percutaneous endoscopic and robotic transapical AVI are both feasible and can be performed in a timely manner with reasonable perioperative blood loss. Future research will focus on identifying optimal candidates for surgery based upon preoperative thoracic imaging. PMID:21700598

  2. Meta-Analysis of the Effectiveness and Safety of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Without Balloon Predilation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yan-Biao; Meng, Yang; Zhao, Zhen-Gang; Zuo, Zhi-Liang; Li, Yi-Jian; Xiong, Tian-Yuan; Cao, Jia-Yu; Xu, Yuan-Ning; Feng, Yuan; Chen, Mao

    2016-05-15

    Evidence regarding the safety and feasibility of transcatheter aortic valve implantation without balloon predilation (BP) is scarce. A literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and major conference proceedings was performed from January 2002 to July 2015. There were 18 studies incorporating 2,443 patients included in the present study. No differences were observed in the baseline characteristics between patients without BP (no-BP) and with BP. Compared with BP, no-BP had a shorter procedure time (no-BP vs BP, 124.2 vs 138.8 minutes, p = 0.008), used less-contrast medium (no-BP vs BP, 126.3 vs 156.3 ml, p = 0.0005) and had a higher success rate (odds ratio [OR] 2.24, 95% CI 1.40 to -3.58). In addition, no-BP was associated with lower incidences of permanent pacemaker implantation (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.3 to 0.67), grade 2 or greater paravalvular leakage (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.83), and stroke (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.32 to 1.0). Furthermore, no-BP was associated with a 0.6-fold decreased risk for 30-day all-cause mortality (OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.92). However, the difference in the risk for permanent pacemaker implantation, grade 2, or higher aortic regurgitation, stroke was noted to be significant only in the subgroup of the CoreValve-dominating studies. In conclusion, no-BP before transcatheter aortic valve implantation was not only safe and feasible but was also associated with fewer complications and short-term mortality in selected patients especially using self-expandable valve. PMID:27026641

  3. Impact of Different Iterations of Devices and Degree of Aortic Valve Calcium on Paravalvular Regurgitation After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Kong, William K F; van Rosendael, Philippe J; van der Kley, Frank; de Weger, Arend; Kamperidis, Vasileios; Regeer, Madelien V; Marsan, Nina Ajmone; Bax, Jeroen J; Delgado, Victoria

    2016-08-15

    The iterations of the SAPIEN prosthesis might impact the incidence and grade of paravalvular regurgitation (PVR). The aim of this study was to assess the impact of iterations of balloon-expandable valves (SAPIEN, SAPIEN XT, and SAPIEN 3) and degree of aortic valve calcification (AVC) on the severity of PVR after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Comprehensive echocardiographic examinations and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) were performed in 272 patients (127 men, 81 ± 7 years old, logistic EuroScore of 21 ± 13%) who underwent TAVI with 23- and 26-mm balloon-expandable valves. The degree of AVC was assessed with MDCT. PVR grade was assessed with echocardiography. The cover index was calculated as (prosthesis area - MDCT annulus area)/prosthesis area. SAPIEN, SAPIEN XT, and SAPIEN 3 prostheses were implanted in 103 patients (38%), 105 patients (38.5%), and 64 patients (23.5%), respectively. Significant PVR (≥moderate) occurred in 14%, 10%, and 0% of patients receiving the SAPIEN, SAPIEN XT, and SAPIEN 3, respectively (p = 0.010). Across the groups, the aortic annulus size, degree of calcification, and cover index were comparable. Larger burden of AVC was independently associated with significant PVR (odds ratio 3.48, p = 0.006) after adjusting for age, body surface area, gender, aortic annulus area, cover index, and prosthesis iteration. SAPIEN 3 was associated with lower frequency of significant PVR (odds ratio 0.31, p = 0.002). In conclusion, the incidence of significant PVR significantly decreased over time with improvement in valve design. SAPIEN 3 was associated with less significant PVR after TAVI independently of the AVC burden. PMID:27328953

  4. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: First Applications and Short Term Outcomes in Our Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Mehmet; Ince, Ilker; Ahiskalioglu, Ali; Dogan, Nazim; Colak, Abdurrahim; Sevimli, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to evaluate the first applications and short term outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in our clinic, which is a new technology for the patients with high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Materials and Methods: Between January 2010 and December 2012, twenty five patients (16 males, 9 females; mean age 74.04±8.86 years) diagnosed with severe aortic stenosis, who were at high risk for surgery (EuroSCORE II: 5.58±4.20) and underwent TAVI in our clinic, were evaluated. The demographic and clinical characteristics of patients, anaesthetic management, complications during pre- and post-operative periods and the mortality rate in the first 30 days and six months were recorded. Results: Edwards SAPIEN Valve prostheses were implanted by transfemoral approach (percutaneously in 10 patients and surgically in 15 patients) in all patients. The TAVI procedure was performed under general anaesthesia. The success rate of the TAVI procedure was 100%. Three patients had limited dissection of the femoral artery; however, intervention was not needed due to good distal perfusion rate. Permanent pacemaker was implanted to four patients because of long-term atrioventricular blockage. After the procedure, all patients were transferred to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and all patients were extubated in the ICU. The mean mechanical ventilation duration (minutes) was 166.20±39.32, the mean critical care unit stay (day) was 5.64±2.99 and the mean hospital stay (day) was 11.92±5.54. Acute renal failure was observed in one patient and stroke was observed in two patients on the first postoperative day. The mortality rate in the first 30 days and 6 months was found to be 4% and 16%, respectively. Conclusion: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a great option for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at high risk for SAVR. In our institute, procedural success and short term outcomes for patients

  5. An in vitro evaluation of the impact of eccentric deployment on transcatheter aortic valve hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Gunning, Paul S; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; McNamara, Laoise M; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-06-01

    Patients with aortic stenosis present with calcium deposits on the native aortic valve, which can result in non-concentric expansion of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) stents. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether eccentric deployment of TAVRs lead to turbulent blood flow and blood cell damage. Particle Image Velocimetry was used to quantitatively characterize fluid velocity fields, shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy downstream of TAVRs deployed in circular and eccentric orifices representative of deployed TAVRs in vivo. Effective orifice area (EOA) and mean transvalvular pressure gradient (TVG) values did not differ substantially in circular and eccentric deployed valves, with only a minor decrease in EOA observed in the eccentric valve (2.0 cm(2) for circular, 1.9 cm(2) for eccentric). Eccentric deployed TAVR lead to asymmetric systolic jet formation, with increased shear stresses (circular = 97 N/m(2) vs. eccentric = 119 N/m(2)) and regions of turbulence intensity (circular = 180 N/m(2) vs. eccentric = 230 N/m(2)) downstream that was not present in the circular deployed TAVR. The results of this study indicate that eccentric deployment of TAVRs can lead to altered flow characteristics and may potentially increase the hemolytic potential of the valve, which were not captured through hemodynamic evaluation alone. PMID:24719050

  6. [10 years of transcatheter aortic valve implantation: an overview of the clinical applicability and findings].

    PubMed

    de Ronde-Tillmans, Marjo J A G; Lenzen, Mattie J; Abawi, Masieh; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M D A; Zijlstra, Felix; De Jaegere, Peter P T

    2014-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is a common heart valve disorder in adults. Its prevalence increases with age and is therefore especially seen in older patients. Thirty to forty per cent of patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis are not referred for surgical valve replacement because of high age, their medical history or comorbidities. In 2002, the first transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was carried out in an inoperable patient. Since 2012, TAVI has been included in international guidelines for heart valve diseases as a treatment strategy in symptomatic patients at a high risk of complications and a life expectancy of more than one year. Decision-making about which treatment is preferable takes a multidisciplinary approach. Important complications of TAVI are bleeding, renal function disorder, stroke, conduction abnormalities, valve insufficiency and death. TAVI procedures are carried out in the Netherlands only in cardiac centres in which specific expertise is present in the areas of structural cardiovascular disease. Scientific research is important for further developments and improvements. PMID:25308222

  7. Combined elective percutaneous coronary intervention and transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Pasic, Miralem; Dreysse, Stephan; Unbehaun, Axel; Buz, Semih; Drews, Thorsten; Klein, Christoph; D'Ancona, Giuseppe; Hetzer, Roland

    2012-01-01

    There is no established strategy of how and when to treat coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Simultaneous, single-stage treatment of both pathologies is a possible solution. We report our initial results of simultaneously performed transapical TAVI and elective percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) in high-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Between April 2008 and July 2011, a total of 419 patients underwent transapical TAVI. Combined elective PCI and TAVI were performed in 46 (11%) patients. Only the most significant coronary lesion or lesions were treated. Technical success of the combined approach was 100%. The mean count of implanted stents per patient was 1.6 ± 1.0 (range, 1–5 stents). The 30-day mortality rates in the PCI and TAVI group was 4.3%. Survival at 12, 24 and 36 months of the PCI and TAVI group 87.1 ± 5.5, 69.7 ± 10.3 and 69.7 ± 10.3%, respectively. The results showed that the single-stage approach with combined elective PCI and TAVI is feasible and safe. It has become our primary choice for treatment of high-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis and CAD. PMID:22232234

  8. Quality of Care for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: Development of Canadian Cardiovascular Society Quality Indicators.

    PubMed

    Asgar, Anita W; Lauck, Sandra; Ko, Dennis; Alqoofi, Faisal; Cohen, Eric; Forsey, Anne; Lambert, Laurie J; Oakes, Garth H; Pelletier, Marc; Webb, John G

    2016-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a relatively new procedure to treat aortic stenosis in patients at high surgical risk, and it is becoming increasingly available in Canada. Variation exists in the clinical care, program coordination, evaluation, and funding across provinces and centres. As a part of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) quality initiative, the TAVI Quality Indicator (QI) Working Group was established in 2014 to develop a set of indicators to measure quality of care for Canadians undergoing TAVI for aortic stenosis. The TAVI QI Working Group is composed of expert clinical and government agency representatives. The group developed consensus agreements for the selection of the first iteration of measurable structure, process, and outcome indicators reflective of the quality of care for patients undergoing TAVI. The objectives of the project are to develop quality indicators with the eventual goal of standardizing TAVI quality reports across Canada and to support local and national quality assurance, as well as engage multiple stakeholders to build a national strategy for the evaluation of quality of care. PMID:26948037

  9. In the era of the valve-in-valve: is transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in sutureless valves feasible?

    PubMed Central

    Saia, Francesco; Pellicciari, Giovanni; Phan, Kevin; Ferlito, Marinella; Dall’Ara, Gianni; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Marzocchi, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Sutureless aortic valve implantation has emerged as an innovative alternative for treatment of aortic stenosis. By avoiding the placement of sutures, this approach aims to improve surgical outcomes by facilitating less traumatic minimally invasive approaches and reducing cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass duration. However, the absence of sutures may have detrimental effects after sutureless interventions, including paravalvular leakages, valve dislocation, and stent-infolding. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation (A-ViV) is emerging as a valuable procedure in patients with dysfunctioning biological aortic valves who are deemed inoperable with conventional surgery. Here we present the first-in-man case of trans-femoral implant of a balloon expandable aortic valve in a leaking sutureless self-expandable valve. PMID:25870827

  10. In the era of the valve-in-valve: is transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in sutureless valves feasible?

    PubMed

    Di Eusanio, Marco; Saia, Francesco; Pellicciari, Giovanni; Phan, Kevin; Ferlito, Marinella; Dall'Ara, Gianni; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Marzocchi, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Sutureless aortic valve implantation has emerged as an innovative alternative for treatment of aortic stenosis. By avoiding the placement of sutures, this approach aims to improve surgical outcomes by facilitating less traumatic minimally invasive approaches and reducing cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass duration. However, the absence of sutures may have detrimental effects after sutureless interventions, including paravalvular leakages, valve dislocation, and stent-infolding. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation (A-ViV) is emerging as a valuable procedure in patients with dysfunctioning biological aortic valves who are deemed inoperable with conventional surgery. Here we present the first-in-man case of trans-femoral implant of a balloon expandable aortic valve in a leaking sutureless self-expandable valve. PMID:25870827

  11. Catheter tracking via online learning for dynamic motion compensation in transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Zheng, Yefeng; John, Matthias; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic overlay of 3D models onto 2D X-ray images has important applications in image guided interventions. In this paper, we present a novel catheter tracking for motion compensation in the Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI). To address such challenges as catheter shape and appearance changes, occlusions, and distractions from cluttered backgrounds, we present an adaptive linear discriminant learning method to build a measurement model online to distinguish catheters from background. An analytic solution is developed to effectively and efficiently update the discriminant model and to minimize the classification errors between the tracking object and backgrounds. The online learned discriminant model is further combined with an offline learned detector and robust template matching in a Bayesian tracking framework. Quantitative evaluations demonstrate the advantages of this method over current state-of-the-art tracking methods in tracking catheters for clinical applications. PMID:23286027

  12. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Assisted with Microcatheter: A New Method to Avoid Coronary Artery Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang; Chu, Guo-Jun; Wang, Fei-Yu; Zhu, Yu-Feng; Zhang, Ben; Zhao, Xian-Xian; Qin, Yong-Wen; Ge, Jun-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lack of fluoroscopic landmarks can make valve deployment more difficult in patients with absent aortic valve (AV) calcification. The goal of this article was to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of transcatheter implantation of a valved stent into the AV position of a goat, assisted with a microcatheter which provides accurate positioning of coronary artery ostia to help valved stent deployment. Methods: The subjects were 10 healthy goats in this study. A microcatheter was introduced into the distal site of right coronary artery (RCA) through femoral artery sheath. A minimal thoracic surgery approach was used to access the apex of the heart. The apex of the left ventricle was punctured; a delivery catheter equipped with the valved stent was introduced over a stiff guidewire into the aorta arch. We could accurately locate the RCA ostia through the microcatheter placed in the RCA under fluoroscopy. After correct valve position was confirmed, the valved stent was implanted after rapid inflation of the balloon. The immediate outcome of the function of the valved stents was evaluated after implantation. Results: All ten devices were successfully implanted into the AV position of the goats. Immediate observation after the procedure showed that the valved stents were in the desired position after implantation by angiography, echocardiogram. No obstruction of coronary artery ostia occurred, and no moderate to severe aortic regurgitation was observed. Conclusions: When the procedure of transcatheter implantation of a balloon-expandable valved stent into the AV position of goats is assisted with microcatheter positioning coronary artery ostia, the success rate of operation can be increased in those with noncalcified AV. PMID:25758265

  13. Markov model for selection of aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve implantation (without replacement) in high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    Gada, Hemal; Kapadia, Samir R; Tuzcu, E Murat; Svensson, Lars G; Marwick, Thomas H

    2012-05-01

    Comparisons between transcatheter aortic valve implantation without replacement (TAVI) and tissue aortic valve replacement (AVR) in clinical trials might not reflect the outcomes in standard clinical practice. This could have important implications for the relative cost-effectiveness of these alternatives for management of severe aortic stenosis in high-risk patients for whom surgery is an option. The mean and variance of risks, transition probabilities, utilities, and cost of TAVI, AVR, and medical management derived from observational studies were entered into a Markov model that examined the progression of patients between relevant health states. The outcomes and cost were derived from 10,000 simulations. Sensitivity analyses were based on variations in the likelihood of mortality, stroke, and other commonly observed outcomes. Both TAVI and AVR were cost-effective compared to medical management. In the reference case (age 80 years, the perioperative TAVI and AVR mortality was 6.9% vs 9.8%, and annual mortality was 21% vs 24%), the utility of TAVI was greater than that of AVR (1.78 vs 1.72 quality-adjusted life years) and the lifetime cost of TAVI exceeded that of AVR ($59,503 vs $56,339). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $52,773/quality-adjusted life years. Threshold analyses showed that variation in the probabilities of perioperative and annual mortality after AVR and after TAVI and annual stroke after TAVI were important determinants of the favored strategy. Sensitivity analyses defined the thresholds at which TAVI or AVR was the preferred strategy with regard to health outcomes and cost. In conclusion, TAVI satisfies current metrics of cost-effectiveness relative to AVR and might provide net health benefits at acceptable cost for selected high-risk patients among whom AVR is the current procedure of choice. PMID:22335853

  14. Drivers of healthcare costs associated with the episode of care for surgical aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Wijeysundera, Harindra C; Li, Lindsay; Braga, Vevien; Pazhaniappan, Nandhaa; Pardhan, Anar M; Lian, Dana; Leeksma, Aric; Peterson, Ben; Cohen, Eric A; Forsey, Anne; Kingsbury, Kori J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is generally more expensive than surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) due to the high cost of the device. Our objective was to understand the patient and procedural drivers of cumulative healthcare costs during the index hospitalisation for these procedures. Design All patients undergoing TAVI, isolated SAVR or combined SAVR+coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) at 7 hospitals in Ontario, Canada were identified during the fiscal year 2012–2013. Data were obtained from a prospective registry. Cumulative healthcare costs during the episode of care were determined using microcosting. To identify drivers of healthcare costs, multivariable hierarchical generalised linear models with a logarithmic link and γ distribution were developed for TAVI, SAVR and SAVR+CABG separately. Results Our cohort consisted of 1310 patients with aortic stenosis, of whom 585 underwent isolated SAVR, 518 had SAVR+CABG and 207 underwent TAVI. The median costs for the index hospitalisation for isolated SAVR were $21 811 (IQR $18 148–$30 498), while those for SAVR+CABG were $27 256 (IQR $21 741–$39 000), compared with $42 742 (IQR $37 295–$56 196) for TAVI. For SAVR, the major patient-level drivers of costs were age >75 years, renal dysfunction and active endocarditis. For TAVI, chronic lung disease was a major patient-level driver. Procedural drivers of cost for TAVI included a non-transfemoral approach. A prolonged intensive care unit stay was associated with increased costs for all procedures. Conclusions We found wide variation in healthcare costs for SAVR compared with TAVI, with different patient-level drivers as well as potentially modifiable procedural factors. These highlight areas of further study to optimise healthcare delivery. PMID:27621832

  15. Transcatheter versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients with Diabetes and Severe Aortic Stenosis at High Risk for Surgery: An Analysis of the PARTNER Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lindman, Brian R.; Pibarot, Philippe; Arnold, Suzanne V.; Suri, Rakesh; McAndrew, Thomas C.; Maniar, Hersh S.; Zajarias, Alan; Kodali, Susheel; Kirtane, Ajay J.; Thourani, Vinod H.; Tuzcu, E. Murat; Svensson, Lars G.; Waksman, Ron; Smith, Craig R.; Leon, Martin B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether a less invasive approach to aortic valve replacement (AVR) improves clinical outcomes in diabetic patients with aortic stenosis (AS). Background Diabetes is associated with increased morbidity and mortality after surgical AVR for AS. Methods Among treated patients with severe symptomatic AS at high-risk for surgery in the PARTNER trial, we examined outcomes stratified by diabetes status of patients randomly assigned to transcatheter or surgical AVR. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality at 1 year. Results Among 657 patients enrolled in PARTNER who underwent treatment, there were 275 patients with diabetes (145 transcatheter, 130 surgical). There was a significant interaction between diabetes and treatment group for 1-year all-cause mortality (p=0.048). Among diabetic patients, all-cause mortality at 1 year was 18.0% in the transcatheter group and 27.4% in the surgical group (HR 0.60; 95% CI, 0.36–0.99; p=0.04). Results were consistent among patients treated via transfemoral or transapical routes. In contrast, among non-diabetic patients, there was no significant difference in all-cause mortality at 1 year (p=0.48). Among diabetic patients, the 1-year rates of stroke were similar between treatment groups (3.5% transcatheter vs. 3.5% surgery, p=0.88), but the rates of renal failure requiring dialysis >30 days were lower in the transcatheter group (0% vs. 6.1%, p=0.003). Conclusions Among patients with diabetes and severe symptomatic AS at high-risk for surgery, this post-hoc stratified analysis of the PARTNER trial suggests there is a survival benefit, no increase in stroke, and less renal failure from treatment with transcatheter compared to surgical AVR. PMID:24291272

  16. Transcatheter versus surgical aortic valve replacement in intermediate risk patients: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Misenheimer, Jacob A.; Jones, Wesley; Bahekar, Amol; Caughey, Melissa; Ramm, Cassandra J.; Caranasos, Thomas G.; Yeung, Michael; Vavalle, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been approved in patients with high or prohibited surgical risk for surgery for treatment of severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. Prospective studies examining the benefits of TAVR in intermediate risk patients are ongoing. Other smaller studies including lower risk patients have been conducted, but further meta-analysis of these studies is required to draw more broad comparisons. Methods A Medline search was conducted using standard methodology to search for clinical trials and observational studies including intermediate risk patients. We limited our meta-analysis to studies matching patient populations by propensity scores or randomization and examined clinical outcomes between TAVR and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Results Analysis of the TAVR and SAVR cohorts revealed no significant differences in the outcomes of 30-day [OR (95% CI): 0.85 (0.57, 1.26)] or 1-year mortality [OR (95% CI): 0.96 (0.75, 1.23)]. A trend towards benefit with TAVR was noted in terms of neurological events and myocardial infarction (MI) without statistical significance. A statistically significant decrease in risk of post-procedural acute renal failure in the TAVR group [OR (95% CI): 0.52 (0.27, 0.99)] was observed, but so was a significantly higher rate of pacemaker implantations for the TAVR group [OR (95% CI): 6.51 (3.23, 13.12)]. Conclusions We conclude that in intermediate risk patients undergoing aortic valve replacement, the risk of mortality, neurological outcomes, and MI do not appear to be significantly different between TAVR and SAVR. However, there appears to be a significant reduction in risk of acute renal failure at the expense of an increased risk of requiring a permanent pacemaker in low and intermediate risk patients undergoing TAVR compared to SAVR. PMID:27280087

  17. Left ventricular reverse remodeling after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In patients with severe aortic stenosis, left ventricular hypertrophy is associated with increased myocardial stiffness and dysfunction linked to cardiac morbidity and mortality. We aimed at systematically investigating the degree of left ventricular mass regression and changes in left ventricular function six months after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods Left ventricular mass indexed to body surface area (LVMi), end diastolic volume indexed to body surface area (LVEDVi), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and stroke volume (SV) were investigated by CMR before and six months after TAVI in patients with severe aortic stenosis and contraindications for surgical aortic valve replacement. Results Twenty-sevent patients had paired CMR at baseline and at 6-month follow-up (N=27), with a mean age of 80.7±5.2 years. LVMi decreased from 84.5±25.2 g/m2 at baseline to 69.4±18.4 g/m2 at six months follow-up (P<0.001). LVEDVi (87.2±30.1 ml /m2vs 86.4±22.3 ml/m2; P=0.84), LVEF (61.5±14.5% vs 65.1±7.2%, P=0.08) and SV (89.2±22 ml vs 94.7±26.5 ml; P=0.25) did not change significantly. Conclusions Based on CMR, significant left ventricular reverse remodeling occurs six months after TAVI. PMID:23692630

  18. Red cell distribution width in anemic patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Hellhammer, Katharina; Zeus, Tobias; Verde, Pablo E; Veulemanns, Verena; Kahlstadt, Lisa; Wolff, Georg; Erkens, Ralf; Westenfeld, Ralf; Navarese, Eliano P; Merx, Marc W; Rassaf, Tienush; Kelm, Malte

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the impact of red blood cell distribution width on outcome in anemic patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). METHODS: In a retrospective single center cohort study we determined the impact of baseline red cell distribution width (RDW) and anemia on outcome in 376 patients with aortic stenosis undergoing TAVI. All patients were discussed in the institutional heart team and declined for surgical aortic valve replacement due to high operative risk. Collected data included patient characteristics, imaging findings, periprocedural in hospital data, laboratory results and follow up data. Blood samples for hematology and biochemistry analysis were taken from every patient before and at fixed intervals up to 72 h after TAVI including blood count and creatinine. Descriptive statistics were used for patient’s characteristics. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used for time to event outcomes. A recursive partitioning regression and classification was used to investigate the association between potential risk factors and outcome variables. RESULTS: Mean age in our study population was 81 ± 6.1 years. Anemia was prevalent in 63.6% (n = 239) of our patients. Age and creatinine were identified as risk factors for anemia. In our study population, anemia per se did influence 30-d mortality but did not predict longterm mortality. In contrast, a RDW > 14% showed to be highly predictable for a reduced short- and longterm survival in patients with aortic valve disease after TAVI procedure. CONCLUSION: Age and kidney function determine the degree of anemia. The anisocytosis of red blood cells in anemic patients supplements prognostic information in addition to that derived from the WHO-based definition of anemia. PMID:26981217

  19. Transaortic transcatheter aortic valve replacement through a right minithoracotomy with the balloon-expandable Sapien 3 valve.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Enrico; Muller, Olivier; Demertzis, Stefanos; Moccetti, Marco; Moccetti, Tiziano; Pedrazzini, Giovanni; Eeckhout, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Transaortic transcatheter aortic valve replacement performed through a right anterolateral minithoracotomy at the second intercostal space is a safe and standardized minimally invasive procedure carrying important clinical advantages for the patient, in particular, no damage to the ventricular apex, preservation of the diseased peripheral arteries and no cross of the aortic arch with the delivery system, meaning a lower risk of calcium dislodgement and neurological complications. Using the third-generation, balloon-expandable Edwards Sapien™ 3 transcatheter heart valve and the Certitude™ delivery system, the transaortic procedure is easily performed under fluoroscopic and echocardiographic guidance. Compared with the transapical procedure, the transaortic technique requires an inversely mounted stent valve and follows the standard guidelines for valve positioning and deployment under rapid pacing. The transaortic approach through a right anterolateral minithoracotomy at the second intercostal space combines the positive aspects of both transfemoral and transapical valve replacements without the risks of either procedure (left ventricular, coronary and peripheral vascular injuries). PMID:27401072

  20. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation options for treating severe aortic stenosis in the elderly: the nurse's role in postoperative monitoring and treatment.

    PubMed

    Panos, Angela M; George, Elisabeth L

    2014-01-01

    Severe calcific aortic stenosis (AS) is a progressive cardiac disease that predominantly affects elderly adults. The hallmark symptoms of AS include exertional dyspnea, angina, and syncope. Adults of advanced age do not usually seek treatment for symptoms until their quality of life is greatly diminished. The 2 standard treatments for severe AS are open aortic valve replacement and percutaneous valvuloplasty. As adults age, their comorbid medical conditions often make them too high of a surgical risk for traditional aortic valve replacement, and percutaneous valvuloplasty, although less invasive, often produces only temporary relief of AS symptoms. To provide severe AS patients with alternative less risky treatment options in their later years, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices were developed. Through this overview of the disease progression of AS and the different TAVI devices and the insertion procedures, a better understanding of the initial postoperative nursing care associated with postoperative TAVI patient management will be achieved. PMID:24496250

  1. Recently patented and widely used valves for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Neragi-Miandoab, Siyamek; Skripochnik, Edvard; Michler, Robert E

    2012-12-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is a serious condition in the aging US and European populations. Management of a stenotic valve is crucial as it can become symptomatic quickly leading to ventricular deterioration and overall poor quality of life. Considering that AS is a disease of the elderly patient population, surgical intervention may not be well tolerated by some patients. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as an alternative approach for patients who are unsuitable surgical candidates. Since the first balloon-expandable Edwards SAPIEN valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) was implanted by Dr. Cribier, many other valves have been introduced into clinical practice. Self-expanding valves such as the CoreValve ReValving system (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) for retrograde implantation and Symetis TX for antegrade and transapical implantation are the most frequently used self-expanding valves. The SAPIEN valve, on the other hand can be implanted both antegrade as well as retrograde. Overall, the most widely used valves are the Edwards SAPIEN and the CoreValve, which have been implanted in more than 40,000 patients worldwide. The Symetis valve has shown promising results in small series in Europe and may be introduced to the US market in the near future. This manuscript will review these 3 recently patented valves and discuss some of the clinical results that are available. PMID:23095028

  2. TAVI or No TAVI: identifying patients unlikely to benefit from transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Puri, Rishi; Iung, Bernard; Cohen, David J; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2016-07-21

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has spawned the evolution of novel catheter-based therapies for a variety of cardiovascular conditions. Newer device iterations are delivering lower peri- and early post-procedural complication rates in patients with aortic stenosis, who were otherwise deemed too high risk for conventional surgical valve replacement. Yet beyond the post-procedural period, a considerable portion of current TAVI recipients fail to derive a benefit from TAVI, either dying or displaying a lack of clinical and functional improvement. Considerable interest now lies in better identifying factors likely to predict futility post-TAVI. Implicit in this are the critical roles of frailty, disability, and a multimorbidity patient assessment. In this review, we outline the roles that a variety of medical comorbidities play in determining futile post-TAVI outcomes, including the critical role of frailty underlying the identification of patients unlikely to benefit from TAVI. We discuss various TAVI risk scores, and further propose that by combining such scores along with frailty parameters and the presence of specific organ failure, a more accurate and holistic assessment of potential TAVI-related futility could be achieved. PMID:26819226

  3. Consecutive transcatheter valve-in-valve implantations: the first in the aortic position, the second in the mitral position, in a patient with failing aortic and mitral bioprostheses

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Alison; Davies, Simon; Rosendahl, Ulrich; Moat, Neil

    2014-01-01

    A 69-year-old man with a failing aortic valve homograft and failing mitral valve xenograft was admitted with an inability to complete full sentences and pulmonary oedema with right ventricular overload. Severe aortic and mitral regurgitation, severe biventricular impairment and pulmonary hypertension were confirmed on transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography. An urgent transfemoral valve-in-valve transcatheter valve implantation (TAVI) was performed within the aortic valve homograft with full resolution of aortic regurgitation. Three months later, a semielective trans-apical valve-in-valve procedure was performed in the mitral position, under cardiopulmonary bypass, with full resolution of mitral regurgitation. His exercise tolerance increased from 5 yards to half a mile. This case report summarises a staged double valve-in-valve procedure in a patient who had three previous sternotomies and who had severe heart failure due to failing aortic and mitral bioprostheses. We report two different delivery approaches, using two different transcatheter devices, and describe valve-in-valve techniques, including cardiopulmonary bypass, in the catheter laboratory. PMID:25053698

  4. Limitations and difficulties of echocardiographic short-axis assessment of paravalvular leakage after corevalve transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Geleijnse, Marcel L; Di Martino, Luigi F M; Vletter, Wim B; Ren, Ben; Galema, Tjebbe W; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M; de Jaegere, Peter P T; Soliman, Osama I I

    2016-01-01

    To make assessment of paravalvular aortic leakage (PVL) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) more uniform the second Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC) recently updated the echocardiographic criteria for mild, moderate and severe PVL. In the VARC recommendation the assessment of the circumferential extent of PVL in the short-axis view is considered critical. In this paper we will discuss our observational data on the limitations and difficulties of this particular view, that may potentially result in overestimation or underestimation of PVL severity. PMID:27600600

  5. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation and Morbidity and Mortality-Related Factors: a 5-Year Experience in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Souza, André Luiz Silveira; Salgado, Constantino González; Mourilhe-Rocha, Ricardo; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Lima, Luciana Cristina Lima Correia; de Mattos, Nelson Durval Ferreira Gomes; Rabischoffsky, Arnaldo; Fagundes, Francisco Eduardo Sampaio; Colafranceschi, Alexandre Siciliano; Carvalho, Luiz Antonio Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has become an option for high-surgical-risk patients with aortic valve disease. Objective To evaluate the in-hospital and one-year follow-up outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Methods Prospective cohort study of transcatheter aortic valve implantation cases from July 2009 to February 2015. Analysis of clinical and procedural variables, correlating them with in-hospital and one-year mortality. Results A total of 136 patients with a mean age of 83 years (80-87) underwent heart valve implantation; of these, 49% were women, 131 (96.3%) had aortic stenosis, one (0.7%) had aortic regurgitation and four (2.9%) had prosthetic valve dysfunction. NYHA functional class was III or IV in 129 cases (94.8%). The baseline orifice area was 0.67 ± 0.17 cm2 and the mean left ventricular-aortic pressure gradient was 47.3±18.2 mmHg, with an STS score of 9.3% (4.8%-22.3%). The prostheses implanted were self-expanding in 97% of cases. Perioperative mortality was 1.5%; 30-day mortality, 5.9%; in-hospital mortality, 8.1%; and one-year mortality, 15.5%. Blood transfusion (relative risk of 54; p = 0.0003) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (relative risk of 5.3; p = 0.036) were predictive of in-hospital mortality. Peak C-reactive protein (relative risk of 1.8; p = 0.013) and blood transfusion (relative risk of 8.3; p = 0.0009) were predictive of 1-year mortality. At 30 days, 97% of patients were in NYHA functional class I/II; at one year, this figure reached 96%. Conclusion Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed with a high success rate and low mortality. Blood transfusion was associated with higher in-hospital and one-year mortality. Peak C-reactive protein was associated with one-year mortality. PMID:27192383

  6. Immediate and Intermediate Outcome After Transapical Versus Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Biancari, Fausto; Rosato, Stefano; D'Errigo, Paola; Ranucci, Marco; Onorati, Francesco; Barbanti, Marco; Santini, Francesco; Tamburino, Corrado; Santoro, Gennaro; Grossi, Claudio; Covello, Remo Daniel; Ventura, Martina; Fusco, Danilo; Seccareccia, Fulvia

    2016-01-15

    A few studies recently reported controversial results with transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TF-TAVR) versus transapical transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TA-TAVR), often without adequate adjusted analysis for baseline differences. Data on patients who underwent TF-TAVR and TA-TAVR from the Observational Study of Effectiveness of avR-tavI procedures for severe Aortic stenosis Treatment study were analyzed with propensity score 1-to-1 matching. From a cohort of 1,654 patients (1,419 patients underwent TF-TAVR and 235 patients underwent TA-TAVR), propensity score matching resulted in 199 pairs of patients with similar operative risk (EuroSCORE II: TF-TAVR 8.1 ± 7.1% vs TA-TAVR, 8.4 ± 7.3%, p = 0.713). Thirty-day mortality was 8.0% after TA-TAVR and 4.0% after TF-TAVR (p = 0.102). Postoperative rates of stroke (TA-TAVR, 2.0% vs TF-TAVR 1.0%, p = 0.414), cardiac tamponade (TA-TAVR, 4.1% vs TF-TAVR 1.5%, p = 0.131), permanent pacemaker implantation (TA-TAVR, 8.7% vs TF-TAVR 13.3%, p = 0.414), and infection (TA-TAVR, 6.7% vs TF-TAVR 3.6%, p = 0.180) were similar in the study groups but with an overall trend in favor of TF-TAVR. Higher rates of major vascular damage (7.2% vs 1.0%, p = 0.003) and moderate-to-severe paravalvular regurgitation (7.8% vs 5.2%, p = 0.008) were observed after TF-TAVR. On the contrary, TA-TAVR was associated with higher rates of red blood cell transfusion (50.0% vs 30.4%, p = 0.0002) and acute kidney injury (stages 1 to 3: 44.4% vs 21.9%, p <0.0001) compared with TF-TAVR. Three-year survival rate was 69.1% after TF-TAVR and 57.0% after TA-TAVR (p = 0.006), whereas freedom from major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events was 61.9% after TF-TAVR and 50.4% after TA-TAVR (p = 0.011). In conclusion, TF-TAVR seems to be associated with significantly higher early and intermediate survival compared with TA-TAVR. The transfemoral approach, whenever feasible, should be considered the route of choice for TAVR. PMID

  7. Comparative survival after transapical, direct aortic, and subclavian transcatheter aortic valve implantation (data from the UK TAVI registry).

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Georg M; Baxter, Paul D; Malkin, Christopher J; Scott, D Julian A; Moat, Neil E; Hildick-Smith, David; Cunningham, David; MacCarthy, Philip A; Trivedi, Uday; de Belder, Mark A; Ludman, Peter F; Blackman, Daniel J

    2015-11-15

    Many patients have iliofemoral vessel anatomy unsuitable for conventional transfemoral (TF) transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Safe and practical alternatives to the TF approach are, therefore, needed. This study compared outcomes of alternative nonfemoral routes, transapical (TA), direct aortic (DA), and subclavian (SC), with standard femoral access. In this retrospective study, data from 3,962 patients in the UK TAVI registry were analyzed. All patients who received TAVI through a femoral, subclavian, TA, or DA approach were eligible for inclusion. The primary outcome measure was survival up to 2 years. Median Logistic EuroSCORE was similar for SC, DA, and TA but significantly lower in the TF cohort (22.1% vs 20.3% vs 21.2% vs 17.0%, respectively, p <0.0001). Estimated 1-year survival rate was similar for TF (84.6 ± 0.7%) and SC (80.5 ± 3%, p = 0.27) but significantly worse for TA (74.7 ± 1.6%, p <0.001) and DA (75.2 ± 3.3%, p <0.001). A Cox proportional hazard model was used to analyze survival up to 2 years. Survival in the SC group was not significantly different from the TF group (hazard ratio [HR] 1.22, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.88 to 1.70, p = 0.24). In contrast, survival in the TA (HR 1.74, 95% CI 1.43 to 2.11; p <0.001) and DA (HR 1.55, 95% CI 1.13 to 2.14; p <0.01) cohorts was significantly reduced compared with TF. In conclusion, TA and DA TAVI were associated with similar survival, both significantly worse than with the TF route. In contrast, subclavian access was not significantly different from TF and may represent the safest nonfemoral access route for TAVI. PMID:26409640

  8. Comparison of Results of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Patients With Versus Without Active Cancer.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yusuke; Kozuma, Ken; Hioki, Hirofumi; Kawashima, Hideyuki; Nara, Yugo; Kataoka, Akihisa; Shirai, Shinichi; Tada, Norio; Araki, Motoharu; Takagi, Kensuke; Yamanaka, Futoshi; Yamamoto, Masanori; Hayashida, Kentaro

    2016-08-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate postprocedural and midterm outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in patients with aortic stenosis and active cancer. From October 2013 to August 2015, a total of 749 patients undergoing TAVI using the Edwards Sapien XT prosthesis (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, California) were prospectively included in the OCEAN-TAVI registry from 8 Japanese centers. A total of 47 patients (44.7% men; median age 83 years) had active cancer. The transfemoral approach was implemented in 85.1% of patients in the cancer group and 78.1% in the noncancer group (p = 0.22). The occurrence of major vascular complication (4.3% vs 7.5%, p = 0.24), life-threatening bleeding (2.1% vs 7.1%, p = 0.15), and major bleeding (8.5% vs 13%, p = 0.38) was similar between the cancer and noncancer groups. No significant differences were observed regarding device success (100% vs 96.2%, p = 0.17) or 30-day survival (95.7% vs 97.3%, p = 0.38). No difference in midterm survival was found between the patients with cancer and without cancer (log-rank, p = 0.42), regardless of advanced or limited cancer (log-rank, p = 0.68). In a multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression analysis, cancer metastasis was one of the most significant predictors of late mortality (hazard ratio 4.73, 95% CI 1.12 to 20.0; p = 0.035). In conclusion, patients with cancer with severe aortic stenosis who underwent TAVI had similar acute outcomes and midterm survival rates compared with patients without cancer. Cancer metastasis was associated with increased mortality after TAVI. PMID:27324159

  9. Incidence, Causes, and Impact of In-Hospital Infections After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Tirado-Conte, Gabriela; Freitas-Ferraz, Afonso B; Nombela-Franco, Luis; Jimenez-Quevedo, Pilar; Biagioni, Corina; Cuadrado, Ana; Nuñez-Gil, Ivan; Salinas, Pablo; Gonzalo, Nieves; Ferrera, Carlos; Vivas, David; Higueras, Javier; Viana-Tejedor, Ana; Perez-Vizcayno, Maria Jose; Vilacosta, Isidre; Escaned, Javier; Fernandez-Ortiz, Antonio; Macaya, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    In-hospital infections (IHI) are one of the most common and serious problems after invasive procedures. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an increasingly used alternative to surgery in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence, origin, risk factors, and clinical outcomes of IHI after TAVI. A total of 303 consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis who underwent transfemoral TAVI were included and followed during a median time of 21 months. We examined the occurrence, types, origin, and timing of infections during hospital stay as well as short- and long-term clinical outcomes according to the occurrence of IHI. A total of 51 patients (17%; 62 infectious episodes) experienced IHI after TAVI. Respiratory and urinary tract infections were the most frequent type of infections (44% and 34%, respectively), followed by surgical site infection (8%) and bloodstream infection (5%). Positive cultures were obtained in 74% of the samples, of which 65% were gram-negative bacilli. Modifiable factors such as bleeding (p = 0.005) and length of coronary care unit stay (p <0.001) were independently associated with an increased infection risk. Patients with IHI had a longer hospital stay (14 vs 6 days, p <0.001), an increased mortality (hazard ratio 2.48, 95% CI 1.45 to 4.23) and readmission rate (hazard ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.27 to 3.14) during the follow-up. In conclusion, IHI is a frequent complication after TAVI with a significant impact on short- and long-term clinical outcomes. The most important risk factors associated with the development of this complication were modifiable periprocedural aspects. These results underline the importance to implement specific preventive strategies to reduce in-hospital-acquired infections after TAVI. PMID:27296559

  10. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Women Versus Men (from the US CoreValve Trials).

    PubMed

    Forrest, John K; Adams, David H; Popma, Jeffrey J; Reardon, Michael J; Deeb, G Michael; Yakubov, Steven J; Hermiller, James B; Huang, Jian; Skelding, Kimberly A; Lansky, Alexandra

    2016-08-01

    Treatment for severe symptomatic aortic stenosis has changed significantly in recent years due to advances in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Recent studies with the CoreValve prosthesis have demonstrated superior results compared with surgical aortic valve replacement in patients at increased risk for surgery, but there are limited data on gender-related differences in patient characteristics and outcomes with this device. We compared baseline characteristics and clinical outcomes in women and men undergoing TAVR with the CoreValve prosthesis. A total of 3,687 patients (1,708 women and 1,979 men) were included. At baseline, women tended to be slightly older and to have increased frailty, but they had fewer cardiac co-morbidities, higher left ventricular systolic function, less coronary artery disease, and fewer previous strokes. All-cause mortality was 5.9% for women and 5.8% for men at 30 days (p = 0.87) and 24.1% and 21.3%, respectively, at 1 year (p = 0.08). The incidence of stroke was 5.7% in women and 4.0% in men at 30 days (p = 0.02) and 9.3% and 7.7%, respectively, at 1 year (p = 0.05). Women had a higher incidence of bleeding, including more life-threatening bleeds, and a greater incidence of major vascular complications than men at 30 days. Device success was achieved in 86.9% of women and 86.1% of men (p = 0.50). In conclusion, although there were significant baseline differences and procedure-related complications between women and men undergoing TAVR with the CoreValve prosthesis, this analysis found no significant difference in 30-day or 1-year mortality. PMID:27346591

  11. Technical Approach Determines Inflammatory Response after Surgical and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Erdoes, Gabor; Lippuner, Christoph; Kocsis, Istvan; Schiff, Marcel; Stucki, Monika; Carrel, Thierry; Windecker, Stephan; Eberle, Balthasar; Stueber, Frank; Book, Malte

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the periprocedural inflammatory response in patients with isolated aortic valve stenosis undergoing surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with different technical approaches. Material and Methods Patients were prospectively allocated to one of the following treatments: SAVR using conventional extracorporeal circulation (CECC, n = 47) or minimized extracorporeal circulation (MECC, n = 15), or TAVI using either transapical (TA, n = 15) or transfemoral (TF, n = 24) access. Exclusion criteria included infection, pre-procedural immunosuppressive or antibiotic drug therapy and emergency indications. We investigated interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-10, human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR), white blood cell count, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and soluble L-selectin (sCD62L) levels before the procedure and at 4, 24, and 48 h after aortic valve replacement. Data are presented for group interaction (p-values for inter-group comparison) as determined by the Greenhouse-Geisser correction. Results SAVR on CECC was associated with the highest levels of IL-8 and hs-CRP (p<0.017, and 0.007, respectively). SAVR on MECC showed the highest descent in levels of HLA-DR and sCD62L (both p<0.001) in the perioperative period. TA-TAVI showed increased intraprocedural concentration and the highest peak of IL-6 (p = 0.017). Significantly smaller changes in the inflammatory markers were observed in TF-TAVI. Conclusion Surgical and interventional approaches to aortic valve replacement result in inflammatory modulation which differs according to the invasiveness of the procedure. As expected, extracorporeal circulation is associated with the most marked pro-inflammatory activation, whereas TF-TAVI emerges as the approach with the most attenuated inflammatory response. Factors such as the pre-treatment patient condition and the extent of myocardial injury also significantly affect inflammatory biomarker patterns

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With a Self-Expanding Prosthesis Versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Matthew R.; Lei, Yang; Wang, Kaijun; Chinnakondepalli, Khaja; Vilain, Katherine A.; Magnuson, Elizabeth A.; Galper, Benjamin Z.; Meduri, Christopher U.; Arnold, Suzanne V.; Baron, Suzanne J.; Reardon, Michael J.; Adams, David H.; Popma, Jeffrey J.; Cohen, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Prior studies of the cost-effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) have been based primarily on a single balloon-expandable system. Objectives The goal of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of TAVR with a self-expanding prosthesis compared with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk. Methods We performed a formal economic analysis on the basis of individual, patient-level data from the CoreValve U.S. High Risk pivotal trial. Empirical data regarding survival and quality of life (QOL) over 2 years, and medical resource use and hospital costs through 12 months were used to project life expectancy, quality-adjusted life expectancy, and lifetime medical costs in order to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness of TAVR versus SAVR from a U.S. perspective. Results Relative to SAVR, TAVR reduced initial length of stay an average of 4.4 days, decreased the need for rehabilitation services at discharge, and resulted in superior 1-month QOL. Index admission and projected lifetime costs were higher with TAVR than with SAVR (differences $11,260 and $17,849 per patient, respectively), whereas TAVR was projected to provide a lifetime gain of 0.32 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs; 0.41 life-years [LYs]) with 3% discounting. Lifetime incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were $55,090 per QALY gained and $43,114 per LY gained. Sensitivity analyses indicated that a reduction in the initial cost of TAVR by ~$1,650 would lead to an ICER <$50,000/QALY gained. Conclusions In a high-risk clinical trial population, TAVR with a self-expanding prosthesis provided meaningful clinical benefits compared with SAVR, with incremental costs considered acceptable by current U.S. standards. With expected modest reductions in the cost of index TAVR admissions, the value of TAVR compared with SAVR in this patient population would become high. PMID:26764063

  13. Midregional Proadrenomedullin Improves Risk Stratification beyond Surgical Risk Scores in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Schuetz, Philipp; Huber, Andreas; Müller, Beat; Maisano, Francesco; Taramasso, Maurizio; Moarof, Igal; Obeid, Slayman; Stähli, Barbara E.; Cahenzly, Martin; Binder, Ronald K.; Liebetrau, Christoph; Möllmann, Helge; Kim, Won-Keun; Hamm, Christian; Lüscher, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Conventional surgical risk scores lack accuracy in risk stratification of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Elevated levels of midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) levels are associated with adverse outcome not only in patients with manifest chronic disease states, but also in the general population. Objectives We investigated the predictive value of MR-proADM for mortality in an unselected contemporary TAVR population. Methods We prospectively included 153 patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis who underwent TAVR from September 2013 to August 2014. This population was compared to an external validation cohort of 205 patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing TAVR. The primary endpoint was all cause mortality. Results During a median follow-up of 258 days, 17 out of 153 patients who underwent TAVR died (11%). Patients with MR-proADM levels above the 75th percentile (≥ 1.3 nmol/l) had higher mortality (31% vs. 4%, HR 8.9, 95% CI 3.0–26.0, P < 0.01), whereas patients with EuroSCORE II scores above the 75th percentile (> 6.8) only showed a trend towards higher mortality (18% vs. 9%, HR 2.1, 95% CI 0.8–5.6, P = 0.13). The Harrell’s C-statistic was 0.58 (95% CI 0.45–0.82) for the EuroSCORE II, and consideration of baseline MR-proADM levels significantly improved discrimination (AUC = 0.84, 95% CI 0.71–0.92, P = 0.01). In bivariate analysis adjusted for EuroSCORE II, MR-proADM levels ≥1.3 nmol/l persisted as an independent predictor of mortality (HR 9.9, 95% CI (3.1–31.3), P <0.01) and improved the model’s net reclassification index (0.89, 95% CI (0.28–1.59). These results were confirmed in the independent validation cohort. Conclusions Our study identified MR-proADM as a novel predictor of mortality in patients undergoing TAVR. In the future, MR-proADM should be added to the commonly used EuroSCORE II for better risk stratification of patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis. PMID

  14. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in very elderly patients: immediate results and medium term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Isaac; Muñoz-García, Antonio J; López-Otero, Diego; Avanzas, Pablo; Jimenez-Navarro, Manuel F; Cid-Alvarez, Belén; del Valle, Raquel; Alonso-Briales, Juan H; Ocaranza-Sanchez, Raimundo; Hernández, José M; Trillo-Nouche, Ramiro; Morís, César

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate immediate transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) results and medium-term follow-up in very elderly patients with severe and symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). Methods This multicenter, observational and prospective study was carried out in three hospitals. We included consecutive very elderly (> 85 years) patients with severe AS treated by TAVI. The primary endpoint was to evaluate death rates from any cause at two years. Results The study included 160 consecutive patients with a mean age of 87 ± 2.1 years (range from 85 to 94 years) and a mean logistic EuroSCORE of 18.8% ± 11.2% with 57 (35.6%) patients scoring ≥ 20%. Procedural success rate was 97.5%, with 25 (15.6%) patients experiencing acute complications with major bleeding (the most frequent). Global mortality rate during hospitalization was 8.8% (n = 14) and 30-day mortality rate was 10% (n = 16). Median follow up period was 252.24 ± 232.17 days. During the follow-up period, 28 (17.5%) patients died (17 of them due to cardiac causes). The estimated two year overall and cardiac survival rates using the Kaplan-Meier method were 71% and 86.4%, respectively. Cox proportional hazard regression showed that the variable EuroSCORE ≥ 20 was the unique variable associated with overall mortality. Conclusions TAVI is safe and effective in a selected population of very elderly patients. Our findings support the adoption of this new procedure in this complex group of patients. PMID:26345138

  15. Impact of Diabetes Mellitus on Outcomes After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, Yigal; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Chakravarty, Tarun; Mangat, Geeteshwar; Maeno, Yoshio; Kazuno, Yoshio; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawamori, Hiroyuki; Cheng, Wen; Makkar, Raj R

    2016-05-15

    Several clinical variables have been identified as predictors of clinical outcome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Nonetheless, there is limited and contradictive data on the impact of diabetes mellitus (DM) on the prognosis of patients who undergo TAVI. We aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics and the early and midterm outcomes after TAVI according to DM status. From 802 consecutive patients who underwent TAVI, we compared 548 patients with no DM to 254 patients with diabetes (177 orally treated and 77 insulin treated). Patients with DM were younger had higher body mass index and incidence of coronary artery disease and lower incidence of frailty. Device success, 30-day mortality and major complications rates were similar between groups. One-year mortality was 12.1% for patient with DM and 12.2% for patients without DM (p = 0.91). In a multivariable regression analysis including age, body mass index, coronary artery disease and frailty, DM was associated with decreased overall survival. This was driven by increased overall mortality of the insulin-treated DM subgroup (hazard ratio 2.40, 95% CI 1.32 to 4.37; p <0.01). In conclusion, DM does not affect short-term mortality or rates of complications after TAVI. Insulin-treated DM, but not orally treated DM, is independently associated with death at midterm follow-up and therefore aggressive cardiovascular risk factor modification as well as intense glycemic control should be considered for patients with insulin-treated DM with severe aortic stenosis who undergo TAVI. PMID:27015888

  16. Reducing Patient Radiation Dose With Image Noise Reduction Technology in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Procedures.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Michael; Hauptmann, Karl Eugen

    2016-03-01

    X-ray radiation exposure is of great concern for patients undergoing structural heart interventions. In addition, a larger group of medical staff is required and exposed to radiation compared with percutaneous coronary interventions. This study aimed at quantifying radiation dose reduction with implementation of specific image noise reduction technology (NRT) in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) procedures. We retrospectively analyzed 104 consecutive patients with TAVI procedures, 52 patients before and 52 after optimization of x-ray radiation chain, and implementation of NRT. Patients with 1-step TAVI and complex coronary intervention, or complex TAVI procedures, were excluded. Before the procedure, all patients received a multislice computed tomography scan, which was used to size aortic annulus, select the optimal implantation plane, valve type and size, and guide valve implantation using a software tool. Air kerma and kerma-area product were compared in both groups to determine patient radiation dose reduction. Baseline parameters, co-morbidity, or procedural data were comparable between groups. Mean kerma-area product was significantly lower (p <0.001) in the NRT group compared with the standard group (60 ± 39 vs 203 ± 106 Gy × cm(2), p <0.001), which corresponds to a reduction of 70%. Mean air kerma was reduced by 64% (494 ± 360 vs 1,355 ± 657 mGy, p <0.001). In conclusion, using optimized x-ray chain combined with specific image noise reduction technology has the potential to significantly reduce by 2/3 radiation dose in standard TAVI procedures without worsening image quality or prolonging procedure time. PMID:26742472

  17. Dynamic device properties of pulse contour cardiac output during transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Petzoldt, Martin; Riedel, Carsten; Braeunig, Jan; Haas, Sebastian; Goepfert, Matthias S; Treede, Hendrik; Baldus, Stephan; Goetz, Alwin E; Reuter, Daniel A

    2015-06-01

    This prospective single-center study aimed to determine the responsiveness and diagnostic performance of continuous cardiac output (CCO) monitors based on pulse contour analysis compared with invasive mean arterial pressure (MAP) during predefined periods of acute circulatory deterioration in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The ability of calibrated (CCO(CAL)) and self-calibrated (CCO(AUTOCAL)) pulse contour analysis to detect the hemodynamic response to 37 episodes of balloon aortic valvuloplasty enabled by rapid ventricular pacing was quantified in 13 patients undergoing TAVI. A "low" and a "high" cut-off limit were predefined as a 15 or 25 % decrease from baseline respectively. We found no significant differences between CCO(CAL) and MAP regarding mean response time [low cut-off: 8.6 (7.1-10.5) vs. 8.9 (7.3-10.8) s, p = 0.76; high cut-off: 11.4 (9.7-13.5) vs. 12.6 (10.7-14.9) s, p = 0.32] or diagnostic performance [area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC): 0.99 (0.98-1.0) vs. 1.0 (0.99-1.0), p = 0.46]. But CCOCAL had a significantly higher amplitude response [95.0 (88.7-98.8) % decrease from baseline] than MAP [41.2 (30.0-52.9) %, p < 0.001]. CCOAUTOCAL had a significantly lower AUC [0.83 (0.73-0.93), p < 0.001] than MAP. Moreover, CCO(CAL) detected hemodynamic recovery significantly earlier than MAP. In conclusion, CCO(CAL) and MAP provided equivalent responsiveness and diagnostic performance to detect acute circulatory depression, whereas CCO(AUTOCAL) appeared to be less appropriate. In contrast to CCO(CAL) the amplitude response of MAP was poor. Consequently even small response amplitudes of MAP could indicate severe decreases in CO. PMID:25355556

  18. A gender based analysis of predictors of all cause death after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Conrotto, Federico; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Salizzoni, Stefano; Presbitero, Patrizia; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Tamburino, Corrado; Tarantini, Giuseppe; Bedogni, Francesco; Nijhoff, Freek; Gasparetto, Valeria; Napodano, Massimo; Ferrante, Giuseppe; Rossi, Marco Luciano; Stella, Pieter; Brambilla, Nedy; Barbanti, Marco; Giordana, Francesca; Grasso, Costanza; Biondi Zoccai, Giuseppe; Moretti, Claudio; D'Amico, Maurizio; Rinaldi, Mauro; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Marra, Sebastiano

    2014-10-15

    The impact of gender-related pathophysiologic features of severe aortic stenosis on transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) outcomes remains to be determined, as does the consistency of predictors of mortality between the genders. All consecutive patients who underwent TAVI at 6 institutions were enrolled in this study and stratified according to gender. Midterm all-cause mortality was the primary end point, with events at 30 days and at midterm as secondary end points. All events were adjudicated according to Valve Academic Research Consortium definitions. Eight hundred thirty-six patients were enrolled, 464 (55.5%) of whom were female. At midterm follow-up (median 365 days, interquartile range 100 to 516) women had similar rates of all-cause mortality compared with men (18.1% vs 22.6%, p = 0.11) and similar incidence of myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident. Gender did not affect mortality also on multivariate analysis. Among clinical and procedural features, glomerular filtration rate <30 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (hazard ratio [HR] 2.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36 to 4.79) and systolic pulmonary arterial pressure >50 mm Hg (HR 2.26, 95% CI 1.26 to 4.02) independently predicted mortality in women, while insulin-treated diabetes (HR 3.45, 95% CI 1.47 to 8.09), previous stroke (HR 3.42, 95% CI 1.43 to 8.18), and an ejection fraction <30% (HR 3.82, 95% CI 1.41 to 10.37) were related to mortality in men. Postprocedural aortic regurgitation was independently related to midterm mortality in the 2 groups (HR 11.19, 95% CI 3.3 to 37.9). In conclusion, women and men had the same life expectancy after TAVI, but different predictors of adverse events stratified by gender were demonstrated. These findings underline the importance of a gender-tailored clinical risk assessment in TAVI patients. PMID:25159239

  19. Valve-in-Valve-in-Valve Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation to Treat a Degenerated Surgical Bioprosthesis in a Subaortic Position

    PubMed Central

    Nuis, Rutger-Jan; Benitez, Luis M.; Nader, Carlos A.; Perez, Sergio; de Marchena, Eduardo J.; Dager, Antonio E.

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for aortic stenosis has evolved as an alternative treatment for patients who are at high or excessive surgical risk. We report the case of an 84-year-old man with a degenerated surgically implanted valve in a subaortic position (9 mm below the native annulus) who underwent “valve-in-valve” transcatheter aortic valve implantation with use of a Medtronic CoreValve system. We planned to deploy the CoreValve at a conventional depth in the left ventricular outflow tract; we realized that this might result in paravalvular regurgitation, but it would also afford a “deep” landing site for a second valve, if necessary. Ultimately, we implanted a second CoreValve deep in the left ventricular outflow tract to seal a paravalvular leak. The frame of the first valve—positioned at the conventional depth—enabled secure anchoring of the second valve in a deeper position, which in turn effected successful treatment of the failing subaortic surgical prosthesis without paravalvular regurgitation. PMID:23914032

  20. Challenges after the first decade of transcatheter aortic valve replacement: focus on vascular complications, stroke, and paravalvular leak.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Christopher; Sophocles, Aris; Ramakrishna, Harish; Ghadimi, Kamrouz; Patel, Prakash A; Augoustides, John G T

    2013-02-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is entering its second decade. Three major clinical challenges have emerged from the first decade of experience: vascular complications, stroke, and paravalvular leak (PVL). Major vascular complications remain common and independently predict major bleeding, transfusion, renal failure, and mortality. Although women are more prone to vascular complications, overall they have better survival than men. Further predictors of major vascular complications include heavily diseased femoral arteries and operator experience. Strategies to minimize vascular complications include a multimodal approach and sleeker delivery systems. Although cerebral embolism is very common during TAVR, it mostly is asymptomatic. Major stroke independently predicts prolonged recovery and increased mortality. Identified stroke predictors include functional disability, previous stroke, a transapical approach, and atrial fibrillation. Embolic protection devices are in development to mitigate the risk of embolic stroke after TAVR. PVL is common and significantly decreases survival. Undersizing of the valve prosthesis can be minimized with 3-dimensional imaging by computed tomography or echocardiography to describe the elliptic aortic annulus accurately. The formal grading of PVL severity in TAVR is based on its percentage of the circumferential extent of the aortic valve annulus. Further emerging management strategies for PVL include a repositionable valve prosthesis and transcatheter plugging. The first decade of TAVR has ushered in a new paradigm for the multidisciplinary management of valvular heart disease. The second decade likely will build on this wave of initial success with further significant innovations. PMID:23141627

  1. Annular sizing using real-time three-dimensional intracardiac echocardiography-guided trans-catheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rendon, Alejandro; Hamid, Tahir; Kanaganayagam, Gajen; Karunaratne, Devinda; Mahadevan, Vaikom S

    2016-01-01

    Objective Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been established as an alternative therapy for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are unfit for the surgical aortic valve replacements. Pre and periprocedural imaging for the TAVR procedure is the key to procedural success. Currently transesophageal echocardiography (TOE), including real-time three-dimensional (RT-3D) imaging TOE, has been used for peri-interventional monitoring and guidance for TAVR. We describe our initial experience with real-time three-dimensional intracardiac echocardiography (RT-3DICE), imaging technology for the use in the TAVR procedure. Methods We used RT-3DICE using an ACUSON SC2000 2.0v (Siemens Medical Solution), and a 10F AcuNav V catheter (Siemens-Acuson, Inc, Mountain View, California, USA) in addition to preoperative multislice CT (MSCT) in total of five patients undergoing TAVR procedure. Results Aortic annulus and sinus of valsalva diameters were measured using RT-3DICE. Aortic valve measurements obtained using RT-3DICE are comparable to those obtained using MSCT with no significant difference in our patients. Conclusions This small study of five patients shows the safe use of RT-3DICE in TAVR Procedure and may help the procedures performed under local anaesthesia without the need for TOE. PMID:27158522

  2. Hyper-Response to Clopidogrel in Japanese Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yusuke; Kozuma, Ken; Ishikawa, Shuichi; Hosogoe, Naoyoshi; Isshiki, Takaaki

    2016-03-22

    Dual antiplatelet therapy is empirically recommended following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The aims of the present study were to analyze the effect of clopidogrel on platelet function and to determine the relative contribution of each CYP2C19 loss-of-function genotype undergoing TAVI.Thirty-two patients undergoing TAVI and with clopidogrel treatment were studied. All patients were treated with an Edwards SapienXT valve. Platelet reactivity was measured by the VerifyNow P2Y12 point-of-care assay at 7 days and 30 days after the procedure and a cutoff value of 95 PRU was used to identify a hyper-response of platelet reactivity. The Spartan RX(TM) sample-to-result point-of-care DNA testing system was used to identify CYP2C19 loss-of-function genotypes. Hyper-response of platelet reactivity was identified in 11 (34.3%) patients, although 24 (80%) were carriers of at least one CYP2C19 reduced-function allele. The PRU values did not change significantly from 7 days to 30 days after TAVI (136.7 ± 73.4 versus 150.4 ± 83.2, P = 0.13). The incidences of life-threatening bleeding, minor bleeding, and transfusion were significantly higher among the hyper-response of platelet reactivity group (27.3% versus 0%, P = 0.03, 36.4% versus 4.8%, P = 0.04, 81.8% versus 42.9%, P = 0.04, respectively).A hyper-response to clopidogrel was observed in one-third of patients undergoing TAVI and was related to bleeding events, even though 80% of the patients were carriers of the CYP2C19 reduced-function allele. PMID:26973266

  3. Inhospital and Post-discharge Changes in Renal Function After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Blair, John E A; Brummel, Kent; Friedman, Julie L; Atri, Prashant; Sweis, Ranya N; Russell, Hyde; Ricciardi, Mark J; Malaisrie, S Chris; Davidson, Charles J; Flaherty, James D

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of inhospital and post-discharge worsening renal function (WRF) on prognosis after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Severe chronic kidney disease and inhospital WRF are both associated with poor outcomes after TAVR. There are no data available on post-discharge WRF and outcomes. This was a single-center study evaluating all TAVR from June 1, 2008, to June 31, 2014. WRF was defined as an increase in serum creatinine of ≥0.3 mg/dl. Inhospital WRF was measured from day 0 until discharge or day 7 if the hospitalization was >7 days. Post-discharge WRF was measured at 30 days after discharge. Descriptive statistics, Kaplan-Meier time-to-event analysis, and multivariate logistic regression were used. In a series of 208 patients who underwent TAVR, 204 with complete renal function data were used in the inhospital analysis and 168 who returned for the 30-day follow-up were used in the post-discharge analysis. Inhospital WRF was seen in 28%, whereas post-discharge WRF in 12%. Inhospital and post-discharge WRF were associated with lower rates of survival; however, after multivariate analysis, only post-discharge WRF remained a predictor of 1-year mortality (hazard ratio 1.18, p = 0.030 for every 1 mg/dl increase in serum creatinine). In conclusion, the rate of inhospital WRF is higher than the rate of post-discharge WRF after TAVR, and post-discharge WRF is more predictive of mortality than inhospital WRF. PMID:26721656

  4. Usefulness of Psoas Muscle Area to Predict Mortality in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Saji, Mike; Lim, D Scott; Ragosta, Michael; LaPar, Damien J; Downs, Emily; Ghanta, Ravi K; Kern, John A; Dent, John M; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2016-07-15

    Frailty has become high-priority theme in cardiovascular diseases because of aging and increasingly complex nature of patients. Low muscle mass is characteristic of frailty, in which invasive interventions are avoided if possible because of decreased physiological reserve. This study aimed to determine if the psoas muscle area (PMA) could predict mortality and to investigate its utility in patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We retrospectively reviewed 232 consecutive patients who underwent TAVR. Cross-sectional areas of the psoas muscles at the level of fourth lumbar vertebra were measured by computed tomography and normalized to body surface area. Patients were divided into tertiles according to the normalized PMA for each gender (men: tertile 1, 1,708 to 1,178 mm(2)/m(2); tertile 2, 1,176 to 1,011 mm(2)/m(2); and tertile 3, 1,009 to 587 mm(2)/m(2); women: tertile 1, 1,436 to 962 mm(2)/m(2); tertile 2, 952 to 807 mm(2)/m(2); and tertile 3, 806 to 527 mm(2)/m(2)). Smaller normalized PMA was independently correlated with women and higher New York Heart Association classification. After adjustment for multiple confounding factors, the normalized PMA tertile was independently associated with mortality at 6 months (adjusted hazard ratio 1.53, 95% confidence interval 1.06 to 2.21). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that tertile 3 had higher mortality rates than tertile 1 at 6 months (14% and 31%, respectively, p = 0.029). Receiver-operating characteristic analysis showed that normalized PMA provided the increase of C-statistics for predicting mortality for a clinical model and gait speed. In conclusion, PMA is an independent predictor of mortality after TAVR and can complement a clinical model and gait speed. PMID:27236254

  5. Prognostic Usefulness of Acute Kidney Injury After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Arsalan, Mani; Squiers, John J; Farkas, Robert; Worley, Christina; Herbert, Morley; Stewart, Wells; Brinkman, William T; Ungchusri, Ethan; Brown, David L; Mack, Michael J; Holper, Elizabeth M

    2016-04-15

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been associated with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality. Long-term outcomes after TAVR with the Edwards SAPIEN valve in patients who develop AKI postoperatively are currently not well described. We retrospectively reviewed 384 consecutive patients undergoing TAVR at 2 institutions from August 2006 to April 2012. AKI was defined and staged according to Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 criteria. The incidence, multivariate predictors, and association of AKI with 3-year mortality were evaluated. Stage 1 AKI occurred in 24.0% of patients (92 of 384), stage 2 in 5.5% (21 of 384), and stage 3 in 8.1% (31 of 384). The overall operative mortality rate was 7.6%, with a mortality of 3.0% in patients with no kidney injury, 7.6% in stage 1, 23.8% in stage 2, and 32.3% in stage 3. The incidence of new postoperative dialysis was 3.1%. Survival at 3 years for no-AKI/stage 1/stage 2/stage 3 was 59.2 ± 3.3%, 43.4 ± 5.2%, 27.8 ± 10.0%, and 25.4 ± 7.9%, respectively. Logistic regression modeling for the combination of stage 2 or 3 AKI after surgery demonstrated that the last preoperative creatinine (for each 1 mg/dl increase, odds ratio = 3.23, 95% CI 1.83 to 5.69; p <0.001) and dye load (for each 10 ml increase, odds ratio = 1.04, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.08; p = 0.006) were significant predictors for AKI. In conclusion, AKI after TAVR is associated with increased postoperative and 3-year mortality. Significant multivariate predictors are potentially modifiable before the procedure. PMID:26976788

  6. Clinical outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation: from learning curve to proficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lunardi, Mattia; Pesarini, Gabriele; Zivelonghi, Carlo; Piccoli, Anna; Geremia, Giulia; Ariotti, Sara; Rossi, Andrea; Gambaro, Alessia; Gottin, Leonardo; Faggian, Giuseppe; Vassanelli, Corrado; Ribichini, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    Objective The use of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is growing rapidly in countries with a predominantly elderly population, posing a huge challenge to healthcare systems worldwide. The increment of human and economic resource consumption imposes a careful monitoring of clinical outcomes and cost-benefit balance, and this article is aimed at analysing clinical outcomes related to the TAVI learning curve. Methods Outcomes of 177 consecutive transfemoral TAVI procedures performed in 5 years by a single team were analysed by the Cumulative Sum of failures method (CUSUM) according to the clinical events comprised in the Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC-2) safety end point and the VARC-2 definition of device success. Margins for events acceptance were extrapolated from landmark trials that tested both balloon or self-expandable percutaneous valves. Results 30-day and 1-year survival rates were 97.2% and 89.9%, respectively. Achievement of the primary end point (number of cases needed to provide the acceptable margin of the composite end point of any death, stroke, myocardial infarction, life-threatening bleeding, major vascular complications, stage 2–3 acute kidney injury and valve-related dysfunction requiring a repeat procedure) required the performance of 54 cases, while the learning curve to achieve ‘device success’ identified 32 cases to reach the expected proficiency. In this experience, the baseline clinical risk as assessed by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score determined the long-term survival rather than the adverse events related to the learning curve. Conclusions A relatively large number of cases are required to achieve clinical outcomes comparable to those reported in high-volume centres and controlled trials. According to our national workload standards, this represents more than 2 years of continuous activity. PMID:27621826

  7. Impact of clinical and procedural factors upon C reactive protein dynamics following transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Ruparelia, Neil; Panoulas, Vasileios F; Frame, Angela; Ariff, Ben; Sutaria, Nilesh; Fertleman, Michael; Cousins, Jonathan; Anderson, Jon; Bicknell, Colin; Chukwuemeka, Andrew; Sen, Sayan; Malik, Iqbal S; Colombo, Antonio; Mikhail, Ghada W

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of procedural and clinical factors upon C reactive protein (CRP) dynamics following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). METHODS: Two hundred and eight consecutive patients that underwent transfemoral TAVI at two hospitals (Imperial, College Healthcare NHS Trust, Hammersmith Hospital, London, United Kingdom and San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy) were included. Daily venous plasma CRP levels were measured for up to 7 d following the procedure (or up to discharge). Procedural factors and 30-d safety outcomes according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 definition were collected. RESULTS: Following TAVI, CRP significantly increased reaching a peak on day 3 of 87.6 ± 5.5 mg/dL, P < 0.001. Patients who developed clinical signs and symptoms of sepsis had significantly increased levels of CRP (P < 0.001). The presence of diabetes mellitus was associated with a significantly higher peak CRP level at day 3 (78.4 ± 3.2 vs 92.2 ± 4.4, P < 0.001). There was no difference in peak CRP release following balloon-expandable or self-expandable TAVI implantation (94.8 ± 9.1 vs 81.9 ± 6.9, P = 0.34) or if post-dilatation was required (86.9 ± 6.3 vs 96.6 ± 5.3, P = 0.42), however, when pre-TAVI balloon aortic valvuloplasty was performed this resulted in a significant increase in the peak CRP (110.1 ± 8.9 vs 51.6 ± 3.7, P < 0.001). The development of a major vascular complication did result in a significantly increased maximal CRP release (153.7 ± 11.9 vs 83.3 ± 7.4, P = 0.02) and there was a trend toward a higher peak CRP following major/life-threatening bleeding (113.2 ± 9.3 vs 82.7 ± 7.5, P = 0.12) although this did not reach statistical significance. CRP was not found to be a predictor of 30-d mortality on univariate analysis. CONCLUSION: Careful attention should be paid to baseline clinical characteristics and procedural factors when interpreting CRP following TAVI to determine their future management. PMID

  8. Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome after Transcatheter or Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Lindman, Brian R.; Goldstein, Jacob S.; Nassif, Michael E.; Zajarias, Alan; Novak, Eric; Tibrewala, Anjan; Wittenberg, Anna M.; Lawler, Cassandra; Damiano, Ralph J.; Moon, Marc R.; Lawton, Jennifer S.; Lasala, John M.; Maniar, Hersh S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective An inflammatory response after cardiac surgery is associated with worse clinical outcomes, but recent trials to attenuate it have been neutral. We evaluated the association between systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and mortality after transcatheter (TAVR) and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for aortic stenosis (AS) and evaluated whether diabetes influenced this relationship. Methods Patients (n=747) with severe AS treated with TAVR (n=264) or SAVR (n=483) between 1/2008 and 12/2013 were included and 37% had diabetes mellitus. SIRS was defined by 4 criteria 12 to 48 hours after AVR: 1) white blood cell count <4 or >12; 2) heart rate >90; 3) temperature <36 or >38°C; or 4) respiratory rate >20. Severe SIRS was defined as meeting all 4 criteria. The primary endpoint was 6-month all-cause mortality (60 deaths occurred by 6 months). Inverse propensity weighting (IPW) was performed on 44 baseline and procedural variables to minimize confounding. Results Severe SIRS developed in 6% of TAVR patients and 11% of SAVR patients (p=0.02). Six-month mortality tended to be higher in those with severe SIRS (15.5%) versus those without (7.4%) (p=0.07). After adjustment, severe SIRS was associated with higher 6-month mortality (IPW adjusted HR 2.77, 95% CI 2.04–3.76, p<0.001). Moreover, severe SIRS was more strongly associated with increased mortality in diabetic (IPW adjusted HR 4.12, 95% CI 2.69–6.31, p<0.001) than non-diabetic patients (IPW adjusted HR 1.74, 95% CI 1.10–2.73, p=0.02) (interaction p=0.007). The adverse effect of severe SIRS on mortality was similar after TAVR and SAVR. Conclusion Severe SIRS was associated with a higher mortality after SAVR or TAVR. It occurred more commonly after SAVR and had a greater effect on mortality in diabetic patients. These findings may have implications for treatment decisions in patients with AS, may help explain differences in outcomes between different AVR approaches, and identify diabetic

  9. Early- and mid-term outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Data from a single-center registry

    PubMed Central

    Bagienski, Maciej; Dziewierz, Artur; Rzeszutko, Lukasz; Sorysz, Danuta; Trebacz, Jaroslaw; Sobczynski, Robert; Tomala, Marek; Stapor, Maciej; Gackowski, Andrzej; Dudek, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a less invasive treatment option for elderly, high-risk patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) than aortic valve replacement. More importantly, TAVI improves survival and quality of life as compared to medical treatment in inoperable patients. Aim To assess early- and mid-term clinical outcomes after TAVI. Material and methods All consecutive high-risk patients with severe symptomatic AS undergoing TAVI from November 2008 to August 2014 were enrolled. The clinical and procedural characteristics, as well as clinical outcomes including mortality during 12-month follow-up, were assessed. Results A total of 101 consecutive patients underwent TAVI for native aortic valve stenosis (100%). Patients were elderly, with a median age of 81.0 (76.0–84.0) years, 60.4% were female and 83.2% presented with NYHA III/IV. Median baseline EuroSCORE I and STS scores were 14.0 (10.0–22.5)% and 12.0 (5.0–24.0)%, respectively. The main periprocedural and in-hospital complications were minor vascular complications, bleeding requiring blood transfusions, and the need for a permanent pacemaker. In-hospital, 30-day, 6-month and 12-month mortality rates were 6.9%, 10.9%, 15.8% and 17.8%, respectively. Conclusions A mortality rate of < 20% after 12 months seems acceptable given the high-risk population enrolled. PMID:27279871

  10. Standardized endpoint definitions for transcatheter aortic valve implantation clinical trials: a consensus report from the Valve Academic Research Consortium†

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Martin B.; Piazza, Nicolo; Nikolsky, Eugenia; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Cutlip, Donald E.; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Krucoff, Mitchell W.; Mack, Michael; Mehran, Roxana; Miller, Craig; Morel, Marie-angèle; Petersen, John; Popma, Jeffrey J.; Takkenberg, Johanna J.M.; Vahanian, Alec; van Es, Gerrit-Anne; Vranckx, Pascal; Webb, John G.; Windecker, Stephan; Serruys, Patrick W.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To propose standardized consensus definitions for important clinical endpoints in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), investigations in an effort to improve the quality of clinical research and to enable meaningful comparisons between clinical trials. To make these consensus definitions accessible to all stakeholders in TAVI clinical research through a peer reviewed publication, on behalf of the public health. Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation may provide a worthwhile less invasive treatment in many patients with severe aortic stenosis and since its introduction to the medical community in 2002, there has been an explosive growth in procedures. The integration of TAVI into daily clinical practice should be guided by academic activities, which requires a harmonized and structured process for data collection, interpretation, and reporting during well-conducted clinical trials. Methods and results The Valve Academic Research Consortium established an independent collaboration between Academic Research organizations and specialty societies (cardiology and cardiac surgery) in the USA and Europe. Two meetings, in San Francisco, California (September 2009) and in Amsterdam, the Netherlands (December 2009), including key physician experts, and representatives from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and device manufacturers, were focused on creating consistent endpoint definitions and consensus recommendations for implementation in TAVI clinical research programs. Important considerations in developing endpoint definitions included (i) respect for the historical legacy of surgical valve guidelines; (ii) identification of pathophysiological mechanisms associated with clinical events; (iii) emphasis on clinical relevance. Consensus criteria were developed for the following endpoints: mortality, myocardial infarction, stroke, bleeding, acute kidney injury, vascular complications, and prosthetic valve performance. Composite

  11. Performance of Surgical Risk Scores to Predict Mortality after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Leonardo Sinnott; Caramori, Paulo Ricardo Avancini; Nunes Filho, Antonio Carlos Bacelar; Katz, Marcelo; Guaragna, João Carlos Vieira da Costa; Lemos, Pedro; Lima, Valter; Abizaid, Alexandre; Tarasoutchi, Flavio; de Brito Jr, Fabio S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Predicting mortality in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) remains a challenge. Objectives To evaluate the performance of 5 risk scores for cardiac surgery in predicting the 30-day mortality among patients of the Brazilian Registry of TAVI. Methods The Brazilian Multicenter Registry prospectively enrolled 418 patients undergoing TAVI in 18 centers between 2008 and 2013. The 30-day mortality risk was calculated using the following surgical scores: the logistic EuroSCORE I (ESI), EuroSCORE II (ESII), Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score, Ambler score (AS) and Guaragna score (GS). The performance of the risk scores was evaluated in terms of their calibration (Hosmer–Lemeshow test) and discrimination [area under the receiver–operating characteristic curve (AUC)]. Results The mean age was 81.5 ± 7.7 years. The CoreValve (Medtronic) was used in 86.1% of the cohort, and the transfemoral approach was used in 96.2%. The observed 30-day mortality was 9.1%. The 30-day mortality predicted by the scores was as follows: ESI, 20.2 ± 13.8%; ESII, 6.5 ± 13.8%; STS score, 14.7 ± 4.4%; AS, 7.0 ± 3.8%; GS, 17.3 ± 10.8%. Using AUC, none of the tested scores could accurately predict the 30-day mortality. AUC for the scores was as follows: 0.58 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.49 to 0.68, p = 0.09] for ESI; 0.54 (95% CI: 0.44 to 0.64, p = 0.42) for ESII; 0.57 (95% CI: 0.47 to 0.67, p = 0.16) for AS; 0.48 (95% IC: 0.38 to 0.57, p = 0.68) for STS score; and 0.52 (95% CI: 0.42 to 0.62, p = 0.64) for GS. The Hosmer–Lemeshow test indicated acceptable calibration for all scores (p > 0.05). Conclusions In this real world Brazilian registry, the surgical risk scores were inaccurate in predicting mortality after TAVI. Risk models specifically developed for TAVI are required. PMID:26247244

  12. Feasibility and Safety of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Performed Without Intensive Care Unit Admission.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Florence; Iemmi, Anais; Lattuca, Benoit; Macia, Jean-Christophe; Gervasoni, Richard; Roubille, Francois; Gandet, Thomas; Schmutz, Laurent; Akodad, Mariama; Agullo, Audrey; Verges, Marine; Nogue, Erika; Marin, Gregory; Nagot, Nicolas; Rivalland, Francois; Durrleman, Nicolas; Robert, Gabriel; Delseny, Delphine; Albat, Bernard; Cayla, Guillaume

    2016-07-01

    Admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) is a standard of care after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI); however, the improvement of the procedure and the need to minimize the unnecessary use of medical resources call into question this strategy. We evaluated prospectively 177 consecutive patients who underwent TAVI. Low-risk patients, admitted to conventional cardiology units, had stable clinical state, transfemoral access, no right bundle branch block, permanent pacing with a self-expandable valve, and no complication occurring during the procedure. High-risk patients included all the others transferred to ICU. In-hospital events were the primary end point (Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 criteria). The mean age of patients was 83.5 ± 6.5 years, and the mean logistic EuroSCORE was 14.6 ± 9.7%. The balloon-expandable SAPIEN 3 valve was mainly used (n = 148; 83.6%), mostly with transfemoral access (n = 167; 94.4%). Among the 61 patients (34.5%) included in the low-risk group, only 1 (1.6%) had a minor complication (negative predictive value 98.4%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.91 to 0.99). Conversely, 31 patients (26.7%) from the high-risk group had clinical events (positive predictive value 26.7%, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.35), mainly conductive disorders requiring pacemaker (n = 26; 14.7%). In multivariate analysis, right bundle branch block (odds ratio [OR] 14.1, 95% CI 3.5 to 56.3), use of the self-expandable valve without a pacemaker (OR 5.5, 95% CI 2 to 16.3), vitamin K antagonist treatment (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.1 to 12.6), and female gender (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.003 to 6.9) were preprocedural predictive factors of adverse events. In conclusion, our results suggested that TAVI can be performed safely without ICU admission in selected patients. This strategy may optimize efficiency and cost-effectiveness of procedures. PMID:27184173

  13. Considerations and Recommendations for the Introduction of Objective Performance Criteria for Transcatheter Aortic Heart Valve Device Approval.

    PubMed

    Head, Stuart J; Mylotte, Darren; Mack, Michael J; Piazza, Nicolo; van Mieghem, Nicolas M; Leon, Martin B; Kappetein, A Pieter; Holmes, David R

    2016-05-24

    In the United States, new surgical heart valves can be approved on the basis of objective performance criteria (OPC). In contrast, the US Food and Drug Administration traditionally requires stricter criteria for transcatheter heart valve (THV) approval, including randomized, clinical trials. Recent US Food and Drug Administration approval of new-generation THVs based on single-arm studies has generated interest in alternative study approaches for THV device approval. This review evaluates whether THV device approval could follow a pathway analogous to that of surgical heart valves by incorporating OPC and provides several considerations and recommendations. Factors to be taken into account in the construction of OPC include the maturity of THV technology, variability in transcatheter aortic valve replacement practice, end points included as OPC, follow-up terms for specific OPC, patient populations to which these OPC apply, and (statistical) methods for OPC development. We recommend that approval of THV devices in the United States for low- and intermediate-risk patients or for new indications should provisionally rely on data from randomized, clinical trials. However, it is recommended that formal OPC be applied for approval of new-generation THVs for use in high- and extreme-risk patient populations. PMID:27217434

  14. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Versus Surgery in Women at High Risk for Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement (from the CoreValve US High Risk Pivotal Trial).

    PubMed

    Skelding, Kimberly A; Yakubov, Steven J; Kleiman, Neal S; Reardon, Michael J; Adams, David H; Huang, Jian; Forrest, John K; Popma, Jeffrey J

    2016-08-15

    The objective of this study was to compare outcomes in women after surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) versus transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) using a self-expanding prosthesis in patients with severe aortic stenosis who were at high risk for SAVR. Although registries and meta-analyses have suggested that TAVR is of considerable benefit in women, perhaps even more so than in men, a rigorous evaluation of TAVR with a self-expanding valve versus SAVR in women from a randomized trial has not been performed. Patients with severe aortic stenosis were randomized 1:1 to either TAVR or SAVR. Outcomes at 1 year are reported. Treatment was attempted in a total of 353 women (183 TAVR and 170 SAVR). Baseline characteristics and predicted risk of the 2 groups were comparable, although the frequency of diabetes mellitus was lower in patients undergoing TAVR (33.3% vs 45.3%; p = 0.02). TAVR-treated patients experienced a statistically significant 1-year survival advantage compared with SAVR patients (12.7% vs 21.8%; p = 0.03). The composite all-cause mortality or major stroke rate also favored TAVR (14.9% vs 24.2%; p = 0.04). Quality of life, as measured by the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire summary score, for both the TAVR and SAVR groups increased significantly from baseline to 1 year. In conclusion, female TAVR patients had lower 1-year mortality and lower 1-year all-cause mortality or major stroke compared with women undergoing SAVR, with both cohorts experiencing improved quality of life. Further studies specifically in women are warranted to validate these findings. PMID:27381665

  15. The utility of trans-catheter aortic valve replacement after commercialization: does the European experience provide a glimpse into the future use of this technology in the United States?

    PubMed

    Linke, Axel; Walther, Thomas; Schuler, Gerhard

    2010-03-01

    Treatment of aortic stenosis remains challenging in older individuals, as their perioperative mortality for open heart surgery is increased due to comorbidities. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation using the CoreValve ReValving System (Medtronic, Minneapolis, USA) and the Edwards SAPIEN transcatheter heart valve (THV; Edwards Lifescience, Irvine, California, USA) represents an alternative to conventional valve replacement in elderly patients that have a high risk for conventional surgery. This article summarizes the evidence-base from recent clinical trials. The early results of these landmark studies suggest that transcatheter aortic valve implantation with either one of the prosthesis is feasible, safe, improves hemodynamics and, therefore, might be an alternative to conventional aortic valve replacement in very high-risk patients. However, all of the available transcatheter heart valves have certain disadvantages, limiting their use in daily clinical practice. The process of decision making, which valve to use and which access route to choose is illustrated in this article through clinical case scenarios. Additionally, the lessons learned thus far from the European perspective and the potential impact on the future use in the US are discussed. Despite of the progress in this field, we are still lacking an optimal transcatheter heart valve. Once it is available, we can take the plunge to compare transcatheter valve implantation with convention surgery in severe aortic stenosis! PMID:20088019

  16. Pre-emptive positioning of a coronary stent in the left anterior descending artery for left main protection: a prerequisite for transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation for failing stentless bioprostheses?

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Tarun; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Nakamura, Mamoo; Kashif, Mohammad; Kar, Saibal; Cheng, Wen; Makkar, Raj

    2013-10-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve (VIV) implantation in high-risk patients with degenerative surgical bioprosthetic aortic valves is a novel application of transcatheter aortic valve replacement technology. Although transcatheter aortic VIV procedure is clinically effective in most patients, it is a more demanding procedure in terms of the technical aspects of procedural planning. VIV carries a higher risk of coronary occlusion which is associated with a higher rate of in-hospital mortality. We hereby report a technique of pre-emptive left main (LM) protection, by positioning a coronary stent in the proximal left anterior descending artery prior to VIV implantation. The patient treated was considered to be at an increased risk of LM occlusion as a result of the procedure. The technique was performed in anticipation of emergent bailout stenting of the LM. As predicted, the LM occluded during the procedure and LM protection facilitated the safe and effective treatment of an otherwise life-threatening procedure. PMID:23729203

  17. Long-Term Outcomes After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation from a Single High-Volume Center (The Milan Experience).

    PubMed

    Ruparelia, Neil; Latib, Azeem; Buzzatti, Nicola; Giannini, Francesco; Figini, Filippo; Mangieri, Antonio; Regazzoli, Damiano; Stella, Stefano; Sticchi, Alessandro; Kawamoto, Hiroyoshi; Tanaka, Akihito; Agricola, Eustachio; Monaco, Fabrizio; Castiglioni, Alessandro; Ancona, Marco; Cioni, Micaela; Spagnolo, Pietro; Chieffo, Alaide; Montorfano, Matteo; Alfieri, Ottavio; Colombo, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is now the treatment of choice for patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis who are inoperable or with high surgical risk. Data with regards to contemporary clinical practice and long-term outcomes are sparse. To evaluate temporal changes in TAVI practice and explore procedural and long-term clinical outcomes of patients in a contemporary "real-world" population, outcomes of 829 patients treated from November 2007 to May 2015, at the San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, were retrospectively analyzed. Median follow-up was 568 days, with the longest follow-up of 2,677 days. Overall inhospital mortality was 3.5%. During the study period, there was a trend toward treating younger, lower risk patients. Overall mortality rates were 3.5% (30 days), 14% (1 year), 22% (2 years), 29% (3 years), 37% (4 years), 47% (5 years), 53% (6 years), and 72% (7 years). The survival probability at 5 years was significantly higher in patients treated through the transfemoral (TF) route compared to other vascular access sites (log rank p <0.001). Non-TF vascular access and residual paravalvular leak ≥2 (after TAVI) were identified as independent predictors for both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. No patient required further aortic valve intervention for TAVI prosthesis degeneration. In conclusion, there is a trend toward treating younger, lower-risk patients. Non-TF vascular access approach and ≥2 PVL after TAVI were identified as independent predictors for both overall and cardiovascular mortality with no cases of prosthesis degeneration suggesting acceptable durability. PMID:26742477

  18. Left atrial remodelling in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a speckle-tracking prospective, longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    D'Ascenzi, Flavio; Cameli, Matteo; Henein, Michael; Iadanza, Alessandro; Reccia, Rosanna; Lisi, Matteo; Curci, Valeria; Sinicropi, Giuseppe; Torrisi, Andrea; Pierli, Carlo; Mondillo, Sergio

    2013-12-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) results in several left ventricular (LV) disturbances as well as progressive left atrial (LA) enlargement and dysfunction. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) reverses LV remodelling and improves overall systolic function but its effect on LA function remains undetermined. The aim of this prospective, longitudinal study was to investigate the effects of TAVI on LA structure and function. We studied thirty-two patients with severe symptomatic AS who underwent TAVI, using standard and 2-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography before, at 40-day and at 3-month follow-up. Following TAVI, mean transvalvular gradient decreased (p < 0.001). Both LA area index and LA volume index decreased at 40-day follow-up (16.2 ± 6.4 vs. 12.5 ± 2.9 cm2/m2, and 47.3 ± 12.0 vs. 42.8 ± 12.5 mL/m2, respectively, p < 0.05) and values remained unchanged at 3 months. The reduction of LA size was accompanied by a significant increase in global peak atrial longitudinal strain (14.4 ± 3.9 vs. 19.1 ± 4.7%, p < 0.001) and in global peak atrial contraction strain (8.4 ± 2.5 vs. 11.0 ± 4.1%, p < 0.05) at 3-month follow-up. LA stiffness measurements significantly decreased 3 months after TAVI (0.93 ± 0.59 vs. 0.65 ± 0.37, respectively, p < 0.001). Trans-aortic mean gradient change and pre-procedural LA volume were identified as predictors of global peak atrial longitudinal strain increase (β = -0.41, β = -0.35, respectively, p < 0.0001) while pre-procedural LA volume and trans-aortic mean gradient change as predictor of LA volume index reduction 3 months after TAVI (β = -0.37, β = -0.28, respectively, p < 0.0001). TAVI is associated with significant recovery of LA structure and function suggesting a reverse cavity remodelling. Such functional recovery is primarily determined by the severity of pre-procedural valve stenosis. PMID:23852277

  19. The impact of transcatheter aortic valve implantation on left ventricular performance and wall thickness – single-centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Szymański, Piotr; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Zakrzewski, Dariusz; Michałek, Piotr; Orłowska-Baranowska, Ewa; El-Hassan, Kamal; Chmielak, Zbigniew; Witkowski, Adam; Hryniewiecki, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a treatment alternative for the elderly population with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) at high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Aim To assess the impact of TAVI on echocardiographic parameters of left ventricular (LV) performance and wall thickness in patients subjected to the procedure in a single-centre between 2009 and 2013. Material and methods The initial group consisted of 170 consecutive patients with severe AS unsuitable for SAVR. Logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) was 21.73 ±12.42% and mean age was 79.9 ±7.5 years. Results The TAVI was performed in 167 (98.2%) patients. Mean aortic gradient decreased significantly more rapidly after the procedure (from 58.6 ±16.7 mm Hg to 11.9 ±4.9 mm Hg, p < 0.001). The LV ejection fraction (LVEF) significantly increased in both short-term and long-term follow-up (57 ±14% vs. 59 ±13%, p < 0.001 and 56 ±14% vs. 60 ±12%, p < 0.001, respectively). Significant regression of interventricular septum diameter at end-diastole (IVSDD) and end-diastolic posterior wall thickness (EDPWth) was noted in early (15.0 ±2.4 mm vs. 14.5 ±2.3 mm, p < 0.001 and 12.7 ±2.1 mm vs. 12.4 ±1.9 mm, p < 0.028, respectively) and late post-TAVI period (15.1 ±2.5 mm to 14.3 ±2.5 mm, p < 0.001 and 12.8 ±2.0 mm to 12.4 ±1.9 mm, p < 0.007, respectively). Significant paravalvular leak (PL) was noted in 21 (13.1%) patients immediately after TAVI and in 13 (9.6%) patients in follow-up (p < 0.001). Moderate or severe mitral regurgitation (msMR) was seen in 24 (14.9%) patients from the initial group and in 19 (11.8%) patients after TAVI (p < 0.001). Conclusions The TAVI had an immediate beneficial effect on LVEF, LV walls thickness, and the incidence of msMR. The results of the procedure are comparable with those described in other centres. PMID:25848369

  20. One-year results of health-related quality of life among patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Krane, Markus; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Piazza, Nicolo; Muhtarova, Teodora; Elhmidi, Yacine; Mazzitelli, Domenico; Voss, Bernhard; Ruge, Hendrik; Badiu, Catalin C; Kornek, Matthias; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Lange, Rüdiger

    2012-06-15

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) can result in significant improvement in patients' quality of life (QOL) in the short term. At present, however, little is known about the long-term improvements in QOL after TAVI. Thus, our aim was to prospectively assess the 1-year QOL outcome of patients undergoing TAVI. We performed a prospective analysis of 186 patients with symptomatic severe aortic valve stenosis ineligible for conventional aortic valve replacement, who underwent TAVI with either the Medtronic CoreValve or Edwards Sapien device. A total of 106 patients completed the 1-year follow-up protocol. The QOL was measured using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short-form health survey questionnaire at baseline and at 3 months and 1 year of follow-up. At 1 year of follow-up, significant improvements in the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short-form health survey questionnaire scores for physical functioning (baseline 34.6 ± 2.3 vs 1 year of follow-up 45.6 ± 2.7; p <0.001), role physical (20 ± 3.0 vs 34.2 ± 4.4; p <0.001), bodily pain (59.9 ± 3 vs 70 ± 2.7; p <0.01), general health (47.3 ± 1.5 vs 55.2 ± 2.1, p <0.001), vitality (35.9 ± 2 vs 48.5 ± 2; p <0.001), and mental health (62.2 ± 2.2 vs 67.3 ± 1.8; p <0.05) were observed compared to baseline. No significant improvement could be detected for social functioning (75.4 ± 2.5 vs 76.5 ± 2.6; p = 0.79) and role emotional (61.1 ± 4.3 vs 66.5 ± 4.7; p = 0.29). At 1 year of follow-up, the various physical and mental scores were comparable to an age-matched standard population. In conclusion, the present study has demonstrated that TAVI can improve the QOL status of high-surgical risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis that can be maintained for ≤1 year postproceduraly in survivors. Although the mental subscales improved slightly, the mental component summary score failed to reach statistical significance in our study population. PMID:22520622

  1. Comparison of Outcomes of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Patients ≥90 Years Versus <90 Years.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, Yigal; Chakravarty, Tarun; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Kashif, Mohammad; Zadikany, Ronit; Lee, Chin; Matar, George; Cheng, Wen; Makkar, Raj R

    2015-10-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for severe aortic stenosis (AS) is increasingly performed in nonagenarians. There is scarce evidence on the feasibility and safety of balloon-expandable TAVI in this patient population. A total of 734 patients who underwent balloon-expandable TAVI at our institute were included in the study. We compared 136 patients who were aged at least 90 years at the time of TAVI (mean age 92.4 ± 2.4 years) with the remaining 598 younger patients (mean age 79.7 ± 7.8 years). Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 end points were compared between the 2 groups. Diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease (CAD), peripheral artery disease (PAD), and chronic lung disease were significantly less prevalent in patients aged ≥90 years. In contrast, the prevalence of frailty, chronic renal failure, and atrial fibrillation was significantly higher in these patients. Device success was 96% in both groups. All-cause mortality at 30 days and 1 year was 2.9% and 12.5% versus 2.8% and 12.3% in patients aged ≥90 and <90, respectively (p = 0.95 for both). All major complication rates were similar between groups. Nonagenarians had higher rates of minor vascular complications (13.2% vs 7.7%; p = 0.04). In conclusion, performing balloon-expandable TAVI in carefully selected group of nonagenarians is feasible and offers clinical benefit comparable to patients aged <90 years. Advanced age, in the absence of significant co-morbidities, should not deter clinicians from evaluating patients for TAVI for severe AS. PMID:26235927

  2. Effect of B-type natriuretic peptides on long-term outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Koskinas, Konstantinos C; O'Sullivan, Crochan J; Heg, Dik; Praz, Fabien; Stortecky, Stefan; Pilgrim, Thomas; Buellesfeld, Lutz; Jüni, Peter; Windecker, Stephan; Wenaweser, Peter

    2015-11-15

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels are elevated in patients with aortic stenosis (AS) and decrease acutely after replacement of the stenotic valve. The long-term prognostic value of BNP after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and the relative prognostic utility of single versus serial peri-interventional measurements of BNP and N-terminal prohormone BNP (NT-pro-BNP) are unknown. This study sought to determine the impact of BNP levels on long-term outcomes after TAVI and to compare the utility of BNP versus NT-pro-BNP measured before and after intervention. We analyzed 340 patients with severe AS and baseline pre-TAVI assessment of BNP. In 219 patients, BNP and NT-pro-BNP were measured serially before and after intervention. Clinical outcomes over 2 years were recorded. Patients with high baseline BNP (higher tertile ≥591 pg/ml) had increased risk of all-cause mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 3.16, 95% confidence interval 1.84 to 5.42; p <0.001) and cardiovascular death at 2 years (adjusted hazard ratio 3.37, 95% confidence interval 1.78 to 6.39; p <0.001). Outcomes were most unfavorable in patients with persistently high BNP before and after intervention. Comparing the 2 biomarkers, NT-pro-BNP levels measured after TAVI showed the highest prognostic discrimination for 2-year mortality (area under the curve 0.75; p <0.01). Baseline-to-discharge reduction, but not baseline levels of BNP, was related to New York Heart Association functional improvement. In conclusion, high preintervention BNP independently predicts 2-year outcomes after TAVI, particularly when elevated levels persist after the intervention. BNP and NT-pro-BNP and their serial periprocedural changes provide complementary prognostic information for symptomatic improvement and survival. PMID:26428025

  3. Bivalirudin anticoagulation for minimal invasive transapical transcatheter aortic valve replacement in a patient with antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed

    Koster, Andreas; Ensminger, Stephan; Vlachojannis, Marios; Birschmann, Ingvild

    2016-09-01

    The occurrence of lupus anticoagulant is associated with the hazard of developing an antiphospholipid syndrome, a severe prothrombotic condition which may particularly occur after major surgical trauma. This disease requires certain considerations regarding surgical strategy and anticoagulation management. We describe the perioperative management of a patient scheduled for elective aortic valve replacement and diagnosed for having antiphospholipid antibodies. The procedure was successfully performed using a minimally invasive approach via transapical aortic valve replacement and anticoagulation with the nonreversible short-acting direct thrombin Inhibitor bivalirudin. PMID:27555195

  4. Bundle-branch reentry ventricular tachycardia after transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    de la Rosa Riestra, Adriana; Rubio Caballero, José Amador; Freites Estévez, Alfonso; Alonso Belló, Javier; Botas Rodríguez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    An 83-year-old male suffering from severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis received an implant of a biological aortic prosthesis through the femoral artery without complications. Seven days after dischargement he experienced a syncope. The patient was wearing an ECG holter monitor that day, which showed a wide QRS complex tachycardia of 300 beats per minute. The electrophysiological study revealed a bundle-branch reentry ventricular tachycardia as the cause of the syncope. Radio-frequency was applied on the right-bundle branch. Twelve months later, the patient has remained asymptomatic. PMID:27134443

  5. Comparison of Inhospital Outcomes of Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement in Hospitals With and Without Availability of a Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Program (from a Nationally Representative Database).

    PubMed

    Singh, Vikas; Badheka, Apurva O; Patel, Samir V; Patel, Nileshkumar J; Thakkar, Badal; Patel, Nilay; Arora, Shilpkumar; Patel, Nish; Patel, Achint; Savani, Chirag; Ghatak, Abhijit; Panaich, Sidakpal S; Jhamnani, Sunny; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Chothani, Ankit; Sonani, Rajesh; Patel, Aashay; Bhatt, Parth; Dave, Abhishek; Bhimani, Ronak; Mohamad, Tamam; Grines, Cindy; Cleman, Michael; Forrest, John K; Mangi, Abeel

    2015-10-15

    We hypothesized that the availability of a transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) program in hospitals impacts the overall management of patients with aortic valve disease and hence may also improve postprocedural outcomes of conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). The aim of the present study was to compare the inhospital outcomes of SAVR in centers with versus without availability of a TAVI program in an unrestricted large nationwide patient population >50 years of age. SAVRs performed on patients aged >50 years were identified from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) for the years 2011 and 2012 using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure codes. SAVR cases were divided into 2 categories: those performed at hospitals with a TAVI program (SAVR-TAVI) and those without (SAVR-non-TAVI). A total of 9,674 SAVR procedures were identified: 4,526 (46.79%) in the SAVR-TAVI group and 5,148 (53.21%) in SAVR-non-TAVI group. The mean age of the study population was 70.2 ± 0.1 years with majority (53%) of the patients aged >70 years. The mean Charlson's co-morbidity score for patients in SAVR-TAVI group was greater (greater percentage of patients were aged >80 years, had hypertension, congestive heart failure, renal failure, and peripheral arterial disease) than that of patients in SAVR-non-TAVI group (1.6 vs 1.4, p <0.001). The propensity score matching analysis showed a statistically significant lower inhospital mortality (1.25% vs 1.72%, p = 0.001) and complications rate (35.6% vs 37.3%, p = 0.004) in SAVR-TAVI group compared to SAVR-non-TAVI group. The mean length of hospital stay was similar in the 2 groups the cost of hospitalization was higher in the SAVR-TAVI group ($43,894 ± 483 vs $41,032 ± 473, p <0.0001). Having a TAVI program was a significant predictor of reduced mortality and complications rate after SAVR in multivariate analysis. In conclusion, this largest direct

  6. Transcatheter Embolization of Type IA Endoleak after Nellix Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Sealing with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate: Technique in Three Patients.

    PubMed

    Harvey, John Julian; Stefan, Brew; Hill, Andrew; Holden, Andrew H

    2016-02-01

    The successful transcatheter treatment of a type IA endoleak after endovascular aortic aneurysm sealing with the Nellix EndoVascular Aneurysm Sealing system (Endologix Inc, Irvine, California) using proximal covered stent extension and transarterial N-butyl cyanoacrylate sac embolization is described. Three patients were treated using the same technique with a mean interval between the index procedure and reintervention of 9.3 months (range, 3-15 mo). No complications or endoleaks were seen on follow-up imaging. The mean follow-up time after reintervention was 10.3 months (range, 7-13 mo). PMID:26830936

  7. [Early Detection of Iliac Artery Rupture by Sudden Steep Reduction of Regional Saturation of Oxygen at the Ipsilateral Foot during Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation--A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Saito, Shun; Ishii, Hisanari

    2016-02-01

    An 80-year-old woman with severe aortic stenosis was planned to undergo transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) under general anesthesia. Due to severe stenosis of the femoral arteries, the left iliac artery was cut down and a 16 F Edwards SAPIEN Expandable Sheath (eSheath : Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) was inserted into the artery smoothly. After balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV), an artificial valve was tried to deploy but stuck in the middle of eSheath. Suddenly regional saturation of oxygen (rSO2) at the ipsilateral foot decreased steeply without other significant hemodynamic instabilities. At insertion site of eSheath, the left external iliac artery rupture occurred. To our surprise, there was almost no major bleeding because of the artery spasm and suppression of the large bore sheath. eSheath and the stuck valve were taken out together and TAVI was discontinued. The artery was replaced with a graft, and rSO2 of the foot recovered. Her aortic stenosis improved to moderate by balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) according to transthoracic echocardiography. The patient was discharged on foot without complications. To our knowledge, this is a first report of a silent rupture of the iliac artery during TAVI to be detected by sudden decrease of the foot rSO2 and treated with no fatal events. PMID:27017778

  8. Simulation of transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a patient-specific finite element approach.

    PubMed

    Auricchio, F; Conti, M; Morganti, S; Reali, A

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, heart valve failure has been treated adopting open-heart surgical techniques and cardiopulmonary bypass. However, over the last decade, minimally invasive procedures have been developed to avoid high risks associated with conventional open-chest valve replacement techniques. Such a recent and innovative procedure represents an optimal field for conducting investigations through virtual computer-based simulations: in fact, nowadays, computational engineering is widely used to unravel many problems in the biomedical field of cardiovascular mechanics and specifically, minimally invasive procedures. In this study, we investigate a balloon-expandable valve and we propose a novel simulation strategy to reproduce its implantation using computational tools. Focusing on the Edwards SAPIEN valve in particular, we simulate both stent crimping and deployment through balloon inflation. The developed procedure enabled us to obtain the entire prosthetic device virtually implanted in a patient-specific aortic root created by processing medical images; hence, it allows evaluation of postoperative prosthesis performance depending on different factors (e.g. device size and prosthesis placement site). Notably, prosthesis positioning in two different cases (distal and proximal) has been examined in terms of coaptation area, average stress on valve leaflets as well as impact on the aortic root wall. The coaptation area is significantly affected by the positioning strategy (- 24%, moving from the proximal to distal) as well as the stress distribution on both the leaflets (+13.5%, from proximal to distal) and the aortic wall (- 22%, from proximal to distal). No remarkable variations of the stress state on the stent struts have been obtained in the two investigated cases. PMID:23402555

  9. Determinants of image quality of rotational angiography for on-line assessment of frame geometry after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Olivares, Ramón; El Faquir, Nahid; Rahhab, Zouhair; Maugenest, Anne-Marie; Van Mieghem, Nicolas M; Schultz, Carl; Lauritsch, Guenter; de Jaegere, Peter P T

    2016-07-01

    To study the determinants of image quality of rotational angiography using dedicated research prototype software for motion compensation without rapid ventricular pacing after the implantation of four commercially available catheter-based valves. Prospective observational study including 179 consecutive patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) with either the Medtronic CoreValve (MCS), Edward-SAPIEN Valve (ESV), Boston Sadra Lotus (BSL) or Saint-Jude Portico Valve (SJP) in whom rotational angiography (R-angio) with motion compensation 3D image reconstruction was performed. Image quality was evaluated from grade 1 (excellent image quality) to grade 5 (strongly degraded). Distinction was made between good (grades 1, 2) and poor image quality (grades 3-5). Clinical (gender, body mass index, Agatston score, heart rate and rhythm, artifacts), procedural (valve type) and technical variables (isocentricity) were related with the image quality assessment. Image quality was good in 128 (72 %) and poor in 51 (28 %) patients. By univariable analysis only valve type (BSL) and the presence of an artefact negatively affected image quality. By multivariate analysis (in which BMI was forced into the model) BSL valve (Odds 3.5, 95 % CI [1.3-9.6], p = 0.02), presence of an artifact (Odds 2.5, 95 % CI [1.2-5.4], p = 0.02) and BMI (Odds 1.1, 95 % CI [1.0-1.2], p = 0.04) were independent predictors of poor image quality. Rotational angiography with motion compensation 3D image reconstruction using a dedicated research prototype software offers good image quality for the evaluation of frame geometry after TAVI in the majority of patients. Valve type, presence of artifacts and higher BMI negatively affect image quality. PMID:27139459

  10. Impact of severe left ventricular dysfunction on mid-term mortality in elderly patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, Giuseppe; Presbitero, Patrizia; Pagnotta, Paolo; Sonia Petronio, Anna; Brambilla, Nedy; De Marco, Federico; Fiorina, Claudia; Giannini, Cristina; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Klugmann, Silvio; Rossi, Marco L; Ettori, Federica; Bedogni, Francesco; Testa, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether patients with reduced left ventricular function present worse outcome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of baseline severe impairment of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) on mortality after TAVI. Methods Six-hundred-forty-nine patients with aortic stenosis underwent TAVI with the CoreValve system (92.8%) or the Edwards SAPIEN valve system (7.2%). Baseline LVEF was measured by the echocardiographic Simpson method. The impact of LVEF ≤ 30% on mortality was assessed by Cox regression. Results Patients with LVEF ≤ 30% (n = 63), as compared to those with LVEF > 30% (n = 586), had a higher prevalence of NHYA class > 2 (P < 0.001) and presented with a higher Euroscore (P < 0.001). Procedural success was similar in both groups (98.4% vs. 97.2%, P = 1). After a median follow-up of 436 days (25th–75th percentile, 357–737 days), all-cause mortality [23.8% vs. 23.7%, P = 0.87, hazard ratios (HR): 0.96, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.56–1.63] and cardiac mortality (19.1% vs. 17.6%, P = 0.89, HR: 1.04, 95% CI: 0.57–1.90) were similar in patients with LVEF ≤ 30% as compared to those with LVEF > 30%. Thirty-day all-cause mortality was not significantly different between the two groups (11.1% vs. 6.3%, P = 0.14, HR: 1.81, 95% CI: 0.81–4.06). Patients with LVEF ≤ 30% had a trend toward higher risk of 30-day cardiac mortality (11.1% vs. 5.3%; P = 0.06, HR: 2.16, 95% CI: 0.95–4.90), which disappeared after multivariable adjustment (P = 0.22). Conclusions Baseline severe impairment of LVEF is not a predictor of increased short-term and mid-term mortality after TAVI. Selected patients with severe impairment of left ventricular function should not be denied TAVI. PMID:27403137

  11. Improvement of left ventricular longitudinal systolic function after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a speckle-tracking prospective study.

    PubMed

    D'Ascenzi, Flavio; Cameli, Matteo; Iadanza, Alessandro; Lisi, Matteo; Zacà, Valerio; Reccia, Rosanna; Curci, Valeria; Torrisi, Andrea; Sinicropi, Giuseppe; Pierli, Carlo; Mondillo, Sergio

    2013-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is able to determine a significant improvement of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). The variations of LV global longitudinal strain (GLS) have not been yet investigated in TAVI patients with reduced LVEF. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of TAVI on LV function by 2D speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE) in patients with reduced LVEF. Eighteen consecutive patients undergoing TAVI in our centre were prospectively enrolled. Echocardiography was performed pre-procedurally the day of TAVI and at 40-day and 3-month follow-up (FU). The mean age of TAVI patients was 79.75 ± 7.68 years. The mean EuroSCORE was 26.59 ± 14.62%. A significant decrease of mean trans-aortic gradient was observed 40 days after TAVI (51.69 ± 18.82 vs. 9.62 ± 3.28 mmHg, p < 0.0001). LV mass index significantly decreased at 40-day FU (165.72 ± 37.75 vs. 145.52 ± 31.32 g/m(2), p < 0.001) with a further reduction at 3-month FU (136.91 ± 26.91 g/m(2), p < 0.05 in comparison with 40-day FU). The mean pre-procedural LVEF was 45.87 ± 7.95%. LVEF significantly increased at 40-day FU (55.20 ± 5.91%, p < 0.05) and remained stable at 3-month FU (55.58 ± 6.14%). Interestingly, an early improvement of LV GLS was observed at 40-day FU (-11.09 ± 3.40 vs. -14.40 ± 3.68%, p < 0.001) with a slight further increase at 3-month FU (-14.71 ± 3.56%). Our results indicate that significant improvements of LVEF and LV GLS can be observed in patients undergoing TAVI with impaired LVEF. Two-dimensional STE was able to detect the reverse remodeling of LV function, adding further insights into the assessment of LV mid-term recovery after TAVI. PMID:23271458

  12. Local versus general anesthesia for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVR) – systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The hypothesis of this study was that local anesthesia with monitored anesthesia care (MAC) is not harmful in comparison to general anesthesia (GA) for patients undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVR). TAVR is a rapidly spreading treatment option for severe aortic valve stenosis. Traditionally, in most centers, this procedure is done under GA, but more recently procedures with MAC have been reported. Methods This is a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing MAC versus GA in patients undergoing transfemoral TAVR. Trials were identified through a literature search covering publications from 1 January 2005 through 31 January 2013. The main outcomes of interest of this literature meta-analysis were 30-day overall mortality, cardiac-/procedure-related mortality, stroke, myocardial infarction, sepsis, acute kidney injury, procedure time and duration of hospital stay. A random effects model was used to calculate the pooled relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals. Results Seven observational studies and a total of 1,542 patients were included in this analysis. None of the studies were randomized. Compared to GA, MAC was associated with a shorter hospital stay (-3.0 days (-5.0 to -1.0); P = 0.004) and a shorter procedure time (MD -36.3 minutes (-58.0 to -15.0 minutes); P <0.001). Overall 30-day mortality was not significantly different between MAC and GA (RR 0.77 (0.38 to 1.56); P = 0.460), also cardiac- and procedure-related mortality was similar between both groups (RR 0.90 (0.34 to 2.39); P = 0.830). Conclusion These data did not show a significant difference in short-term outcomes for MAC or GA in TAVR. MAC may be associated with reduced procedural time and shorter hospital stay. Now randomized trials are needed for further evaluation of MAC in the setting of TAVR. PMID:24612945

  13. Lethal Aorto-Right Ventricular Defect After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in a Patient With Radiation-Induced Porcelain Aorta: Notes of Caution.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Lionel; Dijos, Marina; Peltan, Julien; Casassus, Frederic; Seguy, Benjamin; Natsumeda, Makoto; Lafitte, Stephane; Labrousse, Louis; Dos Santos, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    A 47-year-old man with severe radiation-induced aortic stenosis was rejected for cardiac surgery because of porcelain aorta. We successfully implanted an Edwards SAPIEN valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA), but the patient was readmitted 3 weeks later for heart failure with a continuous murmur on auscultation. Echocardiography showed a small defect between the aorta and the infundibulum of the right ventricle, which was also confirmed with aortography and computed tomography. Medical therapy was optimized; however, he died unexpectedly a few weeks later. We concluded that irradiated tissues are particularly fragile and require specific attention during transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Furthermore, this case suggests that a more aggressive closure should have been applied. PMID:26342846

  14. Non-invasive determination of transcatheter pressure gradient in stenotic aortic valves: an analytical model.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Motamed, Pouyan K; Maftoon, Nima

    2015-03-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS), in which the opening of the aortic valve is narrowed, is the most common valvular heart disease. Cardiac catheterization is considered the reference standard for definitive evaluation of AS severity, based on instantaneous systolic value of transvalvular pressure gradient (TPG). However, using invasive cardiac catheterization might carry high risks knowing that undergoing multiple cardiac catheterizations for follow-up in patients with AS is common. The objective of this study was to suggest an analytical description of the AS that estimates TPG without a need for high risk invasive data collection. For this purpose, Navier-Stokes equation coupled with the elastic-deformation equation was solved analytically. The estimated TPG resulted from the suggested analytical description was validated against published in vivo and in vitro measurement data. Very good concordances were found between TPG obtained from the analytical formulation and in vivo (maximum root mean square error: 3.8 mmHg) and in vitro (maximum root mean square error: 9.4 mmHg). The analytical description can be integrated to non-invasive imaging modalities to estimate AS severity as an alternative to cardiac catheterization to help preventing its risks in patients with AS. PMID:25682932

  15. Phantom study of an ultrasound guidance system for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    McLeod, A Jonathan; Currie, Maria E; Moore, John T; Bainbridge, Daniel; Kiaii, Bob B; Chu, Michael W A; Peters, Terry M

    2016-06-01

    A guidance system using transesophageal echocardiography and magnetic tracking is presented which avoids the use of nephrotoxic contrast agents and ionizing radiation required for traditional fluoroscopically guided procedures. The aortic valve is identified in tracked biplane transesophageal echocardiography and used to guide stent deployment in a mixed reality environment. Additionally, a transapical delivery tool with intracardiac echocardiography capable of monitoring stent deployment was created. This system resulted in a deployment depth error of 3.4mm in a phantom. This was further improved to 2.3mm with the custom-made delivery tool. In comparison, the variability in deployment depth for traditional fluoroscopic guidance was estimated at 3.4mm. PMID:25595049

  16. Redo aortic valve surgery versus transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation for failing surgical bioprosthetic valves: consecutive patients in a single-center setting

    PubMed Central

    Wottke, Michael; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Krane, Markus; Piazza, Nicolo; Lange, Ruediger; Bleiziffer, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to a considerable rise in bioprosthetic as opposed to mechanical valve implantations, an increase of patients presenting with failing bioprosthetic surgical valves in need of a reoperation is to be expected. Redo surgery may pose a high-risk procedure. Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is an innovative, less-invasive treatment alternative for these patients. However, a comprehensive evaluation of the outcome of consecutive patients after a valve-in-valve TAVI [transcatheter aortic valve-in-surgical aortic valve (TAV-in-SAV)] as compared to a standard reoperation [surgical aortic valve redo-operation (SAV-in-SAV)] has not yet been performed. The goal of this study was to compare postoperative outcomes after TAV-in-SAV and SAV-in-SAV in a single center setting. Methods All SAV-in-SAV and TAV-in-SAV patients from January 2001 to October 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with previous mechanical or transcatheter valves, active endocarditis and concomitant cardiac procedures were excluded. Patient characteristics, preoperative data, post-procedural complications, and 30-day mortality were collected from a designated database. Mean values ± SD were calculated for all continuous variables. Counts and percentages were calculated for categorical variables. The Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to compare categorical variables. Continuous variables were compared using the t-test for independent samples. A 2-sided P value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results A total of 102 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, 50 patients (49%) underwent a transcatheter valve-in-valve procedure, while 52 patients (51%) underwent redo-surgery. Patients in the TAV-in-SAV group were significantly older, had a higher mean logistic EuroSCORE and exhibited a lower mean left ventricular ejection fraction than patients in the SAV-in-SAV group (78.1±6.7 vs. 66.2±13.1, P<0.001; 27.4±18.7 vs. 14.4±10, P<0.001; and 49.8±13

  17. Percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation for degenerated surgical bioprostheses: the first case series in Asia with one-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Chiam, Paul Toon Lim; Ewe, See Hooi; Soon, Jia Lin; Ho, Kay Woon; Sin, Yong Koong; Tan, Swee Yaw; Lim, Soo Teik; Koh, Tian Hai; Chua, Yeow Leng

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become an established therapy for inoperable and high-surgical-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Although TAVI in patients with degenerated surgical aortic bioprostheses (i.e. valve-in-valve TAVI) is increasingly reported in Western studies, such data is lacking in Asian patients. We describe the initial experience of valve-in-valve TAVI in Asia. METHODS Eight patients who underwent valve-in-valve TAVI due to degenerated aortic bioprostheses were enrolled. The mechanism of bioprosthetic valve failure was stenotic, regurgitation or mixed. All procedures were performed via transfemoral arterial access, using the self-expanding CoreValve prosthesis or balloon-expandable SAPIEN XT prosthesis. RESULTS The mean age of the patients was 71.6 ± 13.2 years and five were male. Mean duration to surgical bioprosthesis degeneration was 10.2 ± 4.1 years. Valve-in-valve TAVI was successfully performed in all patients. CoreValve and SAPIEN XT prostheses were used in six and two patients, respectively. There were no deaths, strokes or permanent pacemaker requirement at 30 days, with one noncardiac mortality at one year. All patients experienced New York Heart Association functional class improvement. Post-procedure mean pressure gradients were 20 ± 11 mmHg and 22 ± 8 mmHg at 30 days and one year, respectively. Residual aortic regurgitation (AR) of more than mild severity occurred in one patient at 30 days. At one year, only one patient had mild residual AR. CONCLUSION In our experience of valve-in-valve TAVI, procedural success was achieved in all patients without adverse events at 30 days. Good clinical and haemodynamic outcomes were sustained at one year. PMID:27193081

  18. Total ellipse of the heart valve: the impact of eccentric stent distortion on the regional dynamic deformation of pericardial tissue leaflets of a transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Gunning, Paul S; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit P; McNamara, Laoise M

    2015-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacements (TAVRs) are a percutaneous alternative to surgical aortic valve replacements and are used to treat patients with aortic valve stenosis. This minimally invasive procedure relies on expansion of the TAVR stent to radially displace calcified aortic valve leaflets against the aortic root wall. However, these calcium deposits can impede the expansion of the device causing distortion of the valve stent and pericardial tissue leaflets. The objective of this study was to elucidate the impact of eccentric TAVR stent distortion on the dynamic deformation of the tissue leaflets of the prosthesis in vitro. Dual-camera stereophotogrammetry was used to measure the regional variation in strain in a leaflet of a TAVR deployed in nominal circular and eccentric (eccentricity index = 28%) orifices, representative of deployed TAVRs in vivo. It was observed that (i) eccentric stent distortion caused incorrect coaptation of the leaflets at peak diastole resulting in a 'peel-back' leaflet geometry that was not present in the circular valve and (ii) adverse bending of the leaflet, arising in the eccentric valve at peak diastole, caused significantly higher commissure strains compared with the circular valve in both normotensive and hypertensive pressure conditions (normotension: eccentric = 13.76 ± 2.04% versus circular = 11.77 ± 1.61%, p = 0.0014, hypertension: eccentric = 15.07 ± 1.13% versus circular = 13.56 ± 0.87%, p = 0.0042). This study reveals that eccentric distortion of a TAVR stent can have a considerable impact on dynamic leaflet deformation, inducing deleterious bending of the leaflet and increasing commissures strains, which might expedite leaflet structural failure compared to leaflets in a circular deployed valve. PMID:26674192

  19. Advanced 3-D analysis, client-server systems, and cloud computing-Integration of cardiovascular imaging data into clinical workflows of transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Schoenhagen, Paul; Zimmermann, Mathis; Falkner, Juergen

    2013-06-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis is highly prevalent in the aging populations of industrialized countries and is associated with poor prognosis. Surgical valve replacement has been the only established treatment with documented improvement of long-term outcome. However, many of the older patients with aortic stenosis (AS) are high-risk or ineligible for surgery. For these patients, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a treatment alternative. The TAVR procedure is characterized by a lack of visualization of the operative field. Therefore, pre- and intra-procedural imaging is critical for patient selection, pre-procedural planning, and intra-operative decision-making. Incremental to conventional angiography and 2-D echocardiography, multidetector computed tomography (CT) has assumed an important role before TAVR. The analysis of 3-D CT data requires extensive post-processing during direct interaction with the dataset, using advance analysis software. Organization and storage of the data according to complex clinical workflows and sharing of image information have become a critical part of these novel treatment approaches. Optimally, the data are integrated into a comprehensive image data file accessible to multiple groups of practitioners across the hospital. This creates new challenges for data management requiring a complex IT infrastructure, spanning across multiple locations, but is increasingly achieved with client-server solutions and private cloud technology. This article describes the challenges and opportunities created by the increased amount of patient-specific imaging data in the context of TAVR. PMID:24282750

  20. Advanced 3-D analysis, client-server systems, and cloud computing—Integration of cardiovascular imaging data into clinical workflows of transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Mathis; Falkner, Juergen

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis is highly prevalent in the aging populations of industrialized countries and is associated with poor prognosis. Surgical valve replacement has been the only established treatment with documented improvement of long-term outcome. However, many of the older patients with aortic stenosis (AS) are high-risk or ineligible for surgery. For these patients, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a treatment alternative. The TAVR procedure is characterized by a lack of visualization of the operative field. Therefore, pre- and intra-procedural imaging is critical for patient selection, pre-procedural planning, and intra-operative decision-making. Incremental to conventional angiography and 2-D echocardiography, multidetector computed tomography (CT) has assumed an important role before TAVR. The analysis of 3-D CT data requires extensive post-processing during direct interaction with the dataset, using advance analysis software. Organization and storage of the data according to complex clinical workflows and sharing of image information have become a critical part of these novel treatment approaches. Optimally, the data are integrated into a comprehensive image data file accessible to multiple groups of practitioners across the hospital. This creates new challenges for data management requiring a complex IT infrastructure, spanning across multiple locations, but is increasingly achieved with client-server solutions and private cloud technology. This article describes the challenges and opportunities created by the increased amount of patient-specific imaging data in the context of TAVR. PMID:24282750

  1. Thoracic Malignancies and Pulmonary Nodules in Patients under Evaluation for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI): Incidence, Follow Up and Possible Impact on Treatment Decision

    PubMed Central

    Kaleschke, Gerrit; Schülke, Christoph; Görlich, Dennis; Schliemann, Christoph; Kessler, Torsten; Schulze, Arik Bernard; Buerke, Boris; Kuemmel, Andreas; Thrull, Michael; Wiewrodt, Rainer; Baumgartner, Helmut; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Mohr, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has become the treatment of choice in patients with severe aortic valve stenosis who are not eligible for operative replacement and an alternative for those with high surgical risk. Due to high age and smoking history in a high proportion of TAVI patients, suspicious findings are frequently observed in pre-procedural chest computer tomography (CCT). Methods CCT scans of 484 consecutive patients undergoing TAVI were evaluated for incidentally discovered solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN). Results In the entire study population, SPN ≥ 5 mm were found in 87 patients (18%). These patients were compared to 150 patients who were incidentally collected from the 397 patients without SPN or with SPN < 5 mm (control group). After a median follow-up of 455 days, lung cancer was diagnosed in only two patients. Neither SPN ≥ 5 mm (p = 0.579) nor SPN > 8 mm (p = 0.328) were significant predictors of overall survival. Conclusions Despite the high prevalence of SPNs in this single center TAVI cohort lung cancer incidence at midterm follow-up seems to be low. Thus, aggressive diagnostic approaches for incidentally discovered SPN during TAVI evaluation should not delay the treatment of aortic stenosis. Unless advanced thoracic malignancy is obvious, the well documented reduction of morbidity and mortality by TAVI outweighs potentially harmful delays regarding further diagnostics. Standard guideline-approved procedure for SPN can be safely performed after TAVI. PMID:27171441

  2. Update of transcatheter valve treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xian-bao; Wang, Jian-an

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter valve implantation or repair has been a very promising approach for the treatment of valvular heart diseases since transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was successfully performed in 2002. Great achievements have been made in this field (especially TAVI and transcatheter mitral valve repair—MitraClip system) in recent years. Evidence from clinical trials or registry studies has proved that transcatheter valve treatment for valvular heart diseases is safe and effective in surgical high-risk or inoperable patients. As the evidence accumulates, transcatheter valve treatment might be an alterative surgery for younger patients with surgically low or intermediate risk valvular heart diseases in the near future. In this paper, the updates on transcatheter valve treatment are reviewed. PMID:23897785

  3. Feasibility and outcomes of combined transcatheter aortic valve replacement with other structural heart interventions in a single session: a matched cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Khattab, Ahmed A; Gloekler, Steffen; Sprecher, Beate; Shakir, Samera; Guerios, Ênio; Stortecky, Stefan; O'Sullivan, Crochan J; Nietlispach, Fabian; Moschovitis, Aris; Pilgrim, Thomas; Buellesfeld, Lutz; Wenaweser, Peter; Windecker, Stephan; Meier, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Background Concurrent cardiac diseases are frequent among elderly patients and invite simultaneous treatment to ensure an overall favourable patient outcome. Aim To investigate the feasibility of combined single-session percutaneous cardiac interventions in the era of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Methods This prospective, case–control study included 10 consecutive patients treated with TAVI, left atrial appendage occlusion and percutaneous coronary interventions. Some in addition had patent foramen ovale or atrial septal defect closure in the same session. The patients were matched in a 1:10 manner with TAVI-only cases treated within the same time period at the same institution regarding their baseline factors. The outcome was validated according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC) criteria. Results Procedural time (126±42 vs 83±40 min, p=0.0016), radiation time (34±8 vs 22±12 min, p=0.0001) and contrast dye (397±89 vs 250±105 mL, p<0.0001) were higher in the combined intervention group than in the TAVI-only group. Despite these drawbacks, no difference in the VARC endpoints was evident during the in-hospital period and after 30 days (VARC combined safety endpoint 32% for TAVI only and 20% for combined intervention, p=1.0). Conclusions Transcatheter treatment of combined cardiac diseases is feasible even in a single session in a high-volume centre with experienced operators. PMID:25332781

  4. Using Clinical Decision Support and Dashboard Technology to Improve Heart Team Efficiency and Accuracy in a Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) Program.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Sarah; Wilson, Marisa L; Terhaar, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Heart Team meetings are becoming the model of care for patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantations (TAVI) worldwide. While Heart Teams have potential to improve the quality of patient care, the volume of patient data processed during the meeting is large, variable, and comes from different sources. Thus, consolidation is difficult. Also, meetings impose substantial time constraints on the members and financial pressure on the institution. We describe a clinical decision support system (CDSS) designed to assist the experts in treatment selection decisions in the Heart Team. Development of the algorithms and visualization strategy required a multifaceted approach and end-user involvement. An innovative feature is its ability to utilize algorithms to consolidate data and provide clinically useful information to inform the treatment decision. The data are integrated using algorithms and rule-based alert systems to improve efficiency, accuracy, and usability. Future research should focus on determining if this CDSS improves patient selection and patient outcomes. PMID:27332170

  5. Three-Year Outcomes of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Patients With Varying Levels of Surgical Risk (from the CoreValve ADVANCE Study).

    PubMed

    Barbanti, Marco; Schiltgen, Molly; Verdoliva, Sarah; Bosmans, Johan; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Gerckens, Ulrich; Wenaweser, Peter; Brecker, Stephen; Gulino, Simona; Tamburino, Corrado; Linke, Axel

    2016-03-01

    This study compared 3-year clinical outcomes of patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve implantation with the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score ≤7% to those of patients with a score >7%. Data were drawn from the ADVANCE study, a multinational post-market clinical trial that enrolled real-world patients with severe aortic stenosis treated with the CoreValve bioprosthesis. Events were independently adjudicated using Valve Academic Research Consortium-1 definitions. A total of 996 patients were implanted: STS ≤7% (n = 697, median STS 4.3%, interquartile range 3.1% to 5.4%) and STS >7% (n = 298, median STS 9.7%, interquartile range 8.0% to 12.4%). At 3 years, the STS ≤7% group had lower rates of all-cause mortality (28.6 vs 45.9, p <0.01) and cardiovascular mortality (19.0 vs 30.2, p <0.01) than the STS >7% group. No differences were observed in cerebrovascular accidents, vascular complications, bleeding, or myocardial infarction. In patients with STS ≤7%, mortality at 3 years was higher in those with moderate or severe aortic regurgitation (AR) at discharge than in those with mild or less AR (39.9% vs 22.9%; hazard ratio 1.98; 95% confidence interval 1.37 to 2.86; p <0.01). Conversely, the severity of AR at discharge did not affect 3-year mortality in patients with STS >7% (42.9% vs 44.6%, moderate/severe vs mild/less; hazard ratio 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.62 to 1.75; p = 0.861; p for interaction = 0.047). In conclusion, patients with STS ≤7% had lower rates of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality at 3 years after transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Complication rates were low and stable in both groups, demonstrating the safety of this procedure for patients at various levels of surgical risk. PMID:26762727

  6. Prognostic value of the ratio between prosthesis area and indexed annulus area measured by MultiSlice-CT for transcatheter aortic valve implantation procedures

    PubMed Central

    Debry, Nicolas; Sudre, Arnaud; Elquodeimat, Ibrahim; Delhaye, Cédric; Schurtz, Guillaume; Bical, Antoine; Koussa, Mohamad; Fattouch, Khalil; Modine, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Postprocedural aortic regurgitations following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) procedures remain an issue. Benefit of oversizing strategies to prevent them isn't well established. We compared different level of oversizing in our cohort of consecutive patients to address if severe oversizing compared to normal sizing had an impact on post-procedural outcomes. Methods From January 2010 to August 2013, consecutive patients were referred for TAVI with preoperative Multislice-CT (MSCT) and the procedures were achieved using Edwards Sapien® or Corevalve devices®. Retrospectively, according to pre-procedural MSCT and the valve size, patients were classified into three groups: normal, moderate and severe oversizing; depending on the ratio between the prosthesis area and the annulus area indexed and measured on MSCT. Main endpoint was mid-term mortality and secondary endpoints were the Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC-2) endpoints. Results Two hundred and sixty eight patients had a MSCT and underwent TAVI procedure, with mainly Corevalve®. While all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates were similar in all groups, post-procedural new pacemaker (PM) implantation rate was significantly higher in the severe oversizing group (P = 0.03), while we observed more in-hospital congestive heart-failure (P = 0.02) in the normal sizing group. There was a trend toward more moderate to severe aortic regurgitation (AR) in the normal sizing group (P = 0.07). Conclusions Despite a higher rate of PM implantation, oversizing based on this ratio reduces aortic leak with lower rates of post-procedural complications and a similar mid-term survival. PMID:27582762

  7. Comparison of 1-Year Outcome in Patients With Severe Aorta Stenosis Treated Conservatively or by Aortic Valve Replacement or by Percutaneous Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (Data from a Multicenter Spanish Registry).

    PubMed

    González-Saldivar, Hugo; Rodriguez-Pascual, Carlos; de la Morena, Gonzalo; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Amorós, Carmen; Alonso, Mario Baquero; Dolz, Luis Martínez; Solé, Albert Ariza; Guzmán-Martínez, Gabriela; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Jiménez, Antonio Arribas; Fuentes, María Eugenia; Gay, Laura Galian; Ortiz, Martin Ruiz; Avanzas, Pablo; Abu-Assi, Emad; Ripoll-Vera, Tomás; Díaz-Castro, Oscar; Osinalde, Eduardo P; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel

    2016-07-15

    The factors that influence decision making in severe aortic stenosis (AS) are unknown. Our aim was to assess, in patients with severe AS, the determinants of management and prognosis in a multicenter registry that enrolled all consecutive adults with severe AS during a 1-month period. One-year follow-up was obtained in all patients and included vital status and aortic valve intervention (aortic valve replacement [AVR] and transcatheter aortic valve implantation [TAVI]). A total of 726 patients were included, mean age was 77.3 ± 10.6 years, and 377 were women (51.8%). The most common management was conservative therapy in 468 (64.5%) followed by AVR in 199 (27.4%) and TAVI in 59 (8.1%). The strongest association with aortic valve intervention was patient management in a tertiary hospital with cardiac surgery (odds ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.8 to 4.1, p <0.001). The 2 main reasons to choose conservative management were the absence of significant symptoms (136% to 29.1%) and the presence of co-morbidity (128% to 27.4%). During 1-year follow-up, 132 patients died (18.2%). The main causes of death were heart failure (60% to 45.5%) and noncardiac diseases (46% to 34.9%). One-year survival for patients treated conservatively, with TAVI, and with AVR was 76.3%, 94.9%, and 92.5%, respectively, p <0.001. One-year survival of patients treated conservatively in the absence of significant symptoms was 97.1%. In conclusion, most patients with severe AS are treated conservatively. The outcome in asymptomatic patients managed conservatively was acceptable. Management in tertiary hospitals is associated with valve intervention. One-year survival was similar with both interventional strategies. PMID:27239021

  8. Prosthesis-patient mismatch after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: impact of 2D-transthoracic echocardiography versus 3D-transesophageal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Cristina; Sahlen, Anders; Winter, Reidar; Bäck, Magnus; Rück, Andreas; Settergren, Magnus; Manouras, Aristomenis; Shahgaldi, Kambiz

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the role of 2D-transthoracic echocardiography (2D-TTE) and 3D-transesophageal echocardiography (3D-TEE) in the determination of aortic annulus size prior transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and its' impact on the prevalence of patient prosthesis mismatch (PPM). Echocardiography plays an important role in measuring aortic annulus dimension in patients undergoing TAVI. This has great importance since it determines both eligibility for TAVI and selection of prosthesis type and size, and can be potentially important in preventing an inadequate ratio between the prosthetic valvular orifice and the patient's body surface area, concept known as prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM). A total of 45 patients were studied pre-TAVI: 20 underwent 3D-TEE (men/women 12/8, age 84.8 ± 5.6) and 25 2D-TTE (men/women 9/16, age 84.4 ± 5.4) in order to measure aortic annulus diameter. The presence of PPM was assessed before hospital discharge and after a mean period of 3 months. Moderate PPM was defined as indexed aortic valve area (AVAi) ≤ 0.85 cm(2)/m(2) and severe PPM as AVAi < 0.65 cm(2)/m(2). Immediately post-TAVI, moderate PPM was present in 25 and 28 % of patients worked up using 3D-TEE and 2D-TTE respectively p value = n.s) and severe PPM occurred in 10 % of the patients who underwent 3D-TEE and in 20 % in those with 2D-TTE (p value = n.s). The echocardiographic evaluation 3 months post-TAVI showed 25 % moderate PPM in the 3D-TEE group compared with 24 % in the 2D-TTE group (p value = n.s) and no cases of severe PPM in the 3DTEE group comparing to 20 % in the 2D-TTE group (p = 0.032). Our results indicate a higher incidence of severe PPM in patients who performed 2DTTE compared to those performing 3DTEE prior TAVI. This suggests that the 3D technique should replace the 2DTTE analysis when investigating the aortic annulus diameter in patients undergoing TAVI. PMID:25102782

  9. Mechanisms of Heart Block after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement – Cardiac Anatomy, Clinical Predictors and Mechanical Factors that Contribute to Permanent Pacemaker Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Young Lee, Mark; Chilakamarri Yeshwant, Srinath; Chava, Sreedivya; Lawrence Lustgarten, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a valuable, minimally invasive treatment option in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis at prohibitive or increased risk for conventional surgical replacement. Consequently, patients undergoing TAVR are prone to peri-procedural complications including cardiac conduction disturbances, which is the focus of this review. Atrioventricular conduction disturbances and arrhythmias before, during or after TAVR remain a matter of concern for this high-risk group of patients, as they have important consequences on hospital duration, short- and long-term medical management and finally on decisions of device-based treatment strategies (pacemaker or defibrillator implantation). We discuss the mechanisms of atrioventricular disturbances and characterise predisposing factors. Using validated clinical predictors, we discuss strategies to minimise the likelihood of creating permanent high-grade heart block, and identify factors to expedite the decision to implant a permanent pacemaker when the latter is unavoidable. We also discuss optimal pacing strategies to mitigate the possibility of pacing-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:26835105

  10. How to assess aortic annular size before transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI): the role of echocardiography compared with other imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Cliona; Monaghan, Mark

    2015-05-01

    After reading this article, the reader should be able to: Recognise the complex 3 dimensional anatomy of the aortic annulus. Select appropriate cardiac imaging modalities for measurement of aortic annulus size and distinguish the different measurements which may be made. Describe the advantages & limitations of different imaging modalities with reference to clinical outcomes and complications. PMID:25227703

  11. Comparison of Manual and Automated Preprocedural Segmentation Tools to Predict the Annulus Plane Angulation and C-Arm Positioning for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Kleinebrecht, Laura; Balzer, Jan; Hellhammer, Katharina; Polzin, Amin; Horn, Patrick; Blehm, Alexander; Minol, Jan-Philipp; Kröpil, Patric; Westenfeld, Ralf; Rassaf, Tienush; Lichtenberg, Artur; Kelm, Malte

    2016-01-01

    Background Preprocedural manual multi-slice-CT-segmentation tools (MSCT-ST) define the gold standard for planning transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). They are able to predict the perpendicular line of the aortic annulus (PPL) and to indicate the corresponding C-arm angulation (CAA). Fully automated planning-tools and their clinical relevance have not been systematically evaluated in a real world setting so far. Methods and Results The study population consists of an all-comers cohort of 160 consecutive TAVR patients with a drop out of 35 patients for technical and anatomical reasons. 125 TAVR patients underwent preprocedural analysis by manual (M-MSCT) and fully automated MSCT-ST (A-MSCT). Method-comparison was performed for 105 patients (Cohort A). In Cohort A, CAA was defined for each patient, and accordance within 10° between M-MSCT and A-MSCT was considered adequate for concept-proof (95% in LAO/RAO; 94% in CRAN/CAUD). Intraprocedural CAA was defined by repetitive angiograms without utilizing the preprocedural measurements. In Cohort B, intraprocedural CAA was established with the use of A-MSCT (20 patients). Using preprocedural A-MSCT to indicate the corresponding CAA, the levels of contrast medium (ml) and radiation exposure (cine runs) were reduced in Cohort B compared to Cohort A significantly (23.3±10.3 vs. 35.3 ±21.1 ml, p = 0.02; 1.6±0.7 vs. 2.4±1.4 cine runs; p = 0.02) and trends towards more safety in valve-positioning could be demonstrated. Conclusions A-MSCT-analysis provides precise preprocedural information on CAA for optimal visualization of the aortic annulus compared to the M-MSCT gold standard. Intraprocedural application of this information during TAVR significantly reduces the levels of contrast and radiation exposure. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01805739 PMID:27073910

  12. [Commentary by the German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery on the positions statement by the German Cardiology Society on quality criteria for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)].

    PubMed

    Cremer, Jochen; Heinemann, Markus K; Mohr, Friedrich Wilhelm; Diegeler, Anno; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Niehaus, Heidi; Ensminger, Stephan; Schlensak, Christian; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Rastan, Ardawan; Trummer, Georg; Walther, Thomas; Lange, Rüdiger; Falk, Volkmar; Beckmann, Andreas; Welz, Armin

    2014-12-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement is still considered the first-line treatment for patients suffering from severe aortic valve stenosis. In recent years, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has emerged as an alternative for selected high-risk patients. According to the latest results of the German external quality assurance program, mandatory by law, the initially very high mortality and procedural morbidity have now decreased to approximately 6 and 12%, respectively. Especially in Germany, the number of patients treated by TAVI has increased exponentially. In 2013, a total of 10.602 TAVI procedures were performed. TAVI is claimed to be minimally invasive. This is true concerning the access, but it does not describe the genuine complexity of the procedure, defined by the close neighborhood of the aortic valve to delicate intracardiac structures. Hence, significant numbers of life-threatening complications may occur and have been reported. Owing to the complexity of TAVI, there is a unanimous concordance between cardiologists and cardiac surgeons in the Western world demanding a close heart team approach for patient selection, intervention, handling of complications, and pre- as well as postprocedural care, respectively. The prerequisite is that TAVI should not be performed in centers with no cardiac surgery on site. This is emphasized in all international joint guidelines and expert consensus statements. Today, a small number of patients undergo TAVI procedures in German hospitals without a department of cardiac surgery on site. To be noted, most of these hospitals perform less than 20 cases per year. Recently, the German Cardiac Society (DGK) published a position paper supporting this practice pattern. Contrary to this statement and concerned about the safety of patients treated this way, the German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (DGTHG) still fully endorses the European (ESC/EACTS) and other actual international guidelines and

  13. Is Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation of Living Tissue-Engineered Valves Feasible? An In Vitro Evaluation Utilizing a Decellularized and Reseeded Biohybrid Valve.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Fabian; Lee, Jang-Sun; Akra, Bassil; Hollweck, Trixi; Wintermantel, Erich; Hagl, Christian; Thierfelder, Nikolaus

    2016-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a fast-growing, exciting field of invasive therapy. During the last years many innovations significantly improved this technique. However, the prostheses are still associated with drawbacks. The aim of this study was to create cell-seeded biohybrid aortic valves (BAVs) as an ideal implant by combination of assets of biological and artificial materials. Furthermore, the influence of TAVI procedure on tissue-engineered BAV was investigated. BAV (n=6) were designed with decellularized homograft cusps and polyurethane walls. They were seeded with fibroblasts and endothelial cells isolated from saphenous veins. Consecutively, BAV were conditioned under low pulsatile flow (500 mL/min) for 5 days in a specialized bioreactor. After conditioning, TAVI-simulation was performed. The procedure was concluded with re-perfusion of the BAV for 2 days at an increased pulsatile flow (1100 mL/min). Functionality was assessed by video-documentation. Samples were taken after each processing step and evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), immunohistochemical staining (IHC), and Live/Dead-assays. The designed BAV were fully functioning and displayed physiologic behavior. After cell seeding, static cultivation and first conditioning, confluent cell layers were observed in SEM. Additionally, IHC indicated the presence of endothelial cells and fibroblasts. A significant construction of extracellular matrix was detected after the conditioning phase. However, a large number of lethal cells were observed after crimping by Live/Dead staining. Analysis revealed that the cells while still being present directly after crimping were removed in subsequent perfusion. Extensive regions of damaged cell-layers were detected by SEM-analysis substantiating these findings. Furthermore, increased ICAM expression was detected after re-perfusion as manifestation of inflammatory reaction. The approach to generate biohybrid valves is promising. However

  14. Use of short roll C-arm computed tomography and fully automated 3D analysis tools to guide transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Michael S; Bracken, John; Eshuis, Peter; Chen, S Y James; Fullerton, David; Cleveland, Joseph; Messenger, John C; Carroll, John D

    2016-07-01

    Determination of the coplanar view is a critical component of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). The safety and accuracy of a novel reduced angular range C-arm computed tomography (CACT) approach coupled with a fully automated 3D analysis tool package to predict the coplanar view in TAVR was evaluated. Fifty-seven patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis deemed prohibitive-risk for surgery and who underwent TAVR were enrolled. Patients were randomized 2:1 to CACT vs. angiography (control) in estimating the coplanar view. These approaches to determine the coplanar view were compared quantitatively. Radiation doses needed to determine the coplanar view were recorded for both the CACT and control patients. Use of CACT offered good agreement with the actual angiographic view utilized during TAVR in 34 out of 41 cases in which a CACT scan was performed (83 %). For these 34 cases, the mean angular magnitude difference, taking into account both oblique and cranial/caudal angulation, was 1.3° ± 0.4°, while the maximum difference was 7.3°. There were no significant differences in the mean total radiation dose delivered to patients between the CACT and control groups as measured by either dose area product (207.8 ± 15.2 Gy cm(2) vs. 186.1 ± 25.3 Gy cm(2), P = 0.47) or air kerma (1287.6 ± 117.7 mGy vs. 1098.9 ± 143.8 mGy, P = 0.32). Use of reduced-angular range CACT coupled with fully automated 3D analysis tools is a safe, practical, and feasible method by which to determine the optimal angiographic deployment view for guiding TAVR procedures. PMID:27091735

  15. Mid-term survival after transcatheter aortic valve implantation: Results with respect to the anesthetic management and to the access route (transfemoral versus transapical)

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Caroline; Astarci, Parla; Baele, Philippe; Matta, Amine; Kahn, David; Kefer, Joëlle; Momeni, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Context: Several studies have analyzed the long-term survival after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). However, no previous studies have looked at survival beyond 1-year with respect to the type of anesthesia. Aims: The aim was to evaluate the mid-term survival after TAVI with respect to the type of anesthesia (general anesthesia [GA] vs. local anesthesia ± sedation [LASedation]) or the type of procedure (transfemoral [transfem] vs. transapical TAVI) performed. Settings and Design: Retrospective cohort study. Subjects and Methods: This retrospective study included TAVI's between January 2009 and June 2013. Patients were divided into three groups: transfem TAVI under GA, transfem TAVI under LASedation and transapical TAVI. A total of 176 patients were eligible. The following clinical outcomes were evaluated: (1) Mortality, (2) Major cardiovascular complications, (3) Conduction abnormalities and arrhythmias, (4) Acute kidney injury, (5) Aortic regurgitation, (6) Neurologic events, (7) Vascular complications, (8) Pulmonary complications, (9) Bleeding, (10) Infectious complications, (11) Delirium. Statistical Analysis Used: A Kruskal–Wallis test was performed to test significance between the three groups for quantitative variables. Categorical variables were compared using a Chi-square test. Survival was estimated using Kaplan–Meier method. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between the survival of both transfem TAVI's (P = 0.46). The short-term outcome of the transfem TAVI groups was better than the transapical arm, but their mid-term survival did not show any significant difference (P = 0.69 transapical vs. transfem GA; P = 0.07 transapical vs. transfem LASedation). Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that the type of anesthesia and the access route do not influence mid-term survival after TAVI. PMID:26139739

  16. Impact of age on transcatheter aortic valve implantation outcomes: a comparison of patients aged ≤ 80 years versus patients > 80 years

    PubMed Central

    van der Kley, Frank; van Rosendael, Philippe J; Katsanos, Spyridon; Kamperidis, Vasileios; Marsan, Nina A; Karalis, Ioannis; de Weger, Arend; Palmen, Meindert; Bax, Jeroen J; Schalij, Martin J; Delgado, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the procedural outcomes and the long-term survival of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and compare study results of patients ≤ 80 years and patients > 80 years old. Methods A total of 240 patients treated with TAVI were divided into two groups according to age ≤ 80 years (n = 105; 43.8%) and > 80 years (n = 135; 56.2%). The baseline characteristics and the procedural outcomes were compared between these two groups of patients. Results With the exception of peripheral artery disease and hypercholesterolemia, which were more frequently observed in the older age group, baseline characteristics were comparable between groups. Complication rates did not differ significantly between patients ≤ 80 years and patients > 80 years. There were no differences in 30-day mortality rates between patients aged ≤ 80 years and patients > 80 years old (9.5% vs. 7.4%, respectively; P = 0.557). After a median follow-up of 28 months (interquartile range: 16–42 months), 50 (47.6%) patients aged ≤ 80 years died compared to 57 (42%) deaths in the group of patients > 80 years old (P = 0.404). Conclusion The results of the present single center study showed that age did not significantly impact the outcomes of TAVI. PMID:26918010

  17. Percutaneous Transcatheter One-Step Mechanical Aortic Disc Valve Prosthesis Implantation: A Preliminary Feasibility Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Sochman, Jan Peregrin, Jan H.; Rocek, Miloslav; Timmermans, Hans A.; Pavcnik, Dusan; Roesch, Josef

    2006-02-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility of one-step implantation of a new type of stent-based mechanical aortic disc valve prosthesis (MADVP) above and across the native aortic valve and its short-term function in swine with both functional and dysfunctional native valves. Methods. The MADVP consisted of a folding disc valve made of silicone elastomer attached to either a nitinol Z-stent (Z model) or a nitinol cross-braided stent (SX model). Implantation of 10 MADVPs (6 Z and 4 SX models) was attempted in 10 swine: 4 (2 Z and 2 SX models) with a functional native valve and 6 (4 Z and 2 SX models) with aortic regurgitation induced either by intentional valve injury or by MADVP placement across the native valve. MADVP function was observed for up to 3 hr after implantation. Results. MADVP implantation was successful in 9 swine. One animal died of induced massive regurgitation prior to implantation. Four MADVPs implanted above functioning native valves exhibited good function. In 5 swine with regurgitation, MADVP implantation corrected the induced native valve dysfunction and the device's continuous good function was observed in 4 animals. One MADVP (SX model) placed across native valve gradually migrated into the left ventricle. Conclusion. The tested MADVP can be implanted above and across the native valve in a one-step procedure and can replace the function of the regurgitating native valve. Further technical development and testing are warranted, preferably with a manufactured MADVP.

  18. Prognostic Value of Fat Mass and Skeletal Muscle Mass Determined by Computed Tomography in Patients Who Underwent Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Mok, Michael; Allende, Ricardo; Leipsic, Jonathon; Altisent, Omar Abdul-Jawad; Del Trigo, Maria; Campelo-Parada, Francisco; DeLarochellière, Robert; Dumont, Eric; Doyle, Daniel; Côté, Mélanie; Freeman, Melanie; Webb, John; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2016-03-01

    Body composition (fat mass [FM] and skeletal muscle mass [SMM]) predicts clinical outcomes. In particular, loss of SMM (sarcopenia) is associated with frailty and mortality. There are no data on the prevalence and impact of FM and SMM in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The objective of this study is to determine body composition from pre-TAVI computed tomography (CT) and evaluate its association with clinical outcomes in patients who underwent TAVI. A total of 460 patients (mean age 81 ± 8 years, men: 51%) were included. Pre-TAVI CTs of the aorto-ilio-femoral axis were analyzed for FM and SMM cross-sectional area at the level of the third lumbar vertebrae (L3). Regression equations correlating cross-sectional area at L3 to total body FM and SMM were used to determine prevalence of sarcopenia, obesity, and sarcopenic obesity in patients (64%, 65%, and 46%, respectively). Most TAVI procedures were performed through a transfemoral approach (59%) using a balloon-expandable valve (94%). The 30-day and mid-term (median 12 months [interquartile range 6 to 27]) mortality rates were 6.1% and 29.6%, respectively. FM had no association with clinical outcomes, but sarcopenia predicted cumulative mortality (hazard ratio 1.55, 95% confidence interval 1.02 to 2.36, p = 0.04). In conclusion, body composition analysis from pre-TAVI CT is feasible. Sarcopenia, obesity, and sarcopenic obesity are prevalent in the TAVI population, with sarcopenia predictive of cumulative mortality. PMID:26754122

  19. Incidence, Predictors and Impact of Severe Periprocedural Bleeding According to VARC-2 Criteria on 1-Year Clinical Outcomes in Patients After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Kochman, Janusz; Rymuza, Bartosz; Huczek, Zenon; Kołtowski, Łukasz; Ścisło, Piotr; Wilimski, Radosław; Ścibisz, Anna; Stanecka, Paulina; Filipiak, Krzysztof J; Opolski, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    There are differences in reporting bleeding complications after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), which is a consequence of the lack of consensus for their definition. Furthermore, the amount of data on the impact of peri-procedural bleeding on the mid-term prognosis is still limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence, predictors, and impact of life-threatening and major bleedings as defined by the Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 (VARC-2) in patients after TAVI over the mid-term prognosis.Consecutive patients who underwent TAVI from March 2010 to December 2013 were included. All data were classified according to the VARC-2 criteria. We assessed the incidence and the predictors of serious bleeding events (SBE), defined as life-threatening/disabling (LT/D) or major bleeding, and analyzed their impact on 30-day and 1-year clinical outcome.A total of 129 patients were included (79.1 ± 8.3 years; mean EuroSCORE = 17.8 ± 12.7). The SBE occurred in 25 patients (19.4%), of which 9 (7.0%) had LT/D and 16 (12.4%) had major bleeding. Trans-subclavian (TS) access (OR 4.38, 95% CI 2.13-14.29, P = 0.01) and diabetes (OR 2.93, 95% CI 1.08-7.93, P = 0.03) were identified as independent predictors of SBE. Patients with SBE had higher 30-day mortality (20.0% versus 4.0% P = 0.02) and 1-year mortality (40.0% versus 11.1%, P < 0.002). SBE independently predicted 1-year, all-cause mortality (HR 5.88, 95% CI 1.7319,94, P = 0.005).SBE are frequent after TAVI and are associated with decreased short and mid-term survival. Diabetes and TS access are independent risk factors for SBE. PMID:26673439

  20. The risk of acute kidney injury following transapical versus transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve replacement: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Gillaspie, Erin A.; Greason, Kevin L.; Kashani, Kianoush B.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this systematic review is to examine the literature for the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) based on transapical (TA) versus transfemoral (TF) approaches. Methods A literature search was conducted utilizing Embase, Medline, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and ClinicalTrials.gov from inception through December 2015. Studies that reported relative risk, odds ratio or hazard ratio comparing the AKI risk in patients who underwent TA-TAVR versus TF-TAVR were included. Pooled risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using a random effect, generic inverse variance method. Results Seventeen cohort studies with 5085 patients were enrolled in the analysis to assess the risk of AKI in patients undergoing TA-TAVR versus TF-TAVR. The pooled RR of AKI in patients who underwent TA-TAVR was 2.26 (95% CI 1.79–2.86) when compared with TF-TAVR. When meta-analysis was confined to the studies with adjusted analysis for confounders evaluating the risk of AKI following TAVR, the pooled RR of TA-TAVR was 2.89 (95% CI 2.12–3.94). The risk for moderate to severe AKI [RR 1.02 (95% CI 0.57–1.80)] in patients who underwent TA-TAVR compared with TF-TAVR was not significantly higher. Conclusions Our meta-analysis demonstrates an association between TA-TAVR and a higher risk of AKI. Future studies are required to assess the risks of moderate to severe AKI and mortality following TA-TAVR versus TF-TAVR. PMID:27478597

  1. Impact on Left Ventricular Function and Remodeling and on 1-Year Outcome in Patients With Left Bundle Branch Block After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Carrabba, Nazario; Valenti, Renato; Migliorini, Angela; Marrani, Marco; Cantini, Giulia; Parodi, Guido; Dovellini, Emilio Vincenzo; Antoniucci, David

    2015-07-01

    Conflicting results have been reported about the prognostic impact of left bundle branch block (LBBB) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of LBBB after TAVI on left ventricular (LV) function and remodeling and on 1-year outcomes. Of 101 TAVI patients, 9 were excluded. All complications were evaluated according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 definition. Of 92 patients, 34 developed LBBB without more advanced myocardial damage or inflammation biomarkers in comparison with patients without LBBB. The only predictor of new LBBB was larger baseline LV end-diastolic volume. LBBB plus advanced atrioventricular block was strongly correlated with permanent pacemaker implantation (p <0.0001). Patients with LBBB had a higher rate of permanent pacemaker implantation at 30 days (59% vs 19%, p <0.0001) and less recovery of LV systolic function and a trend toward a lower rate of LV reverse remodeling at 1 year. The development of acute kidney injury and the logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation score were associated with poor outcomes (all-cause mortality and heart failure) (hazard ratio 6.86, 95% confidence interval 2.51 to 18.74, p <0.0001, and hazard ratio 1.04, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.08, p = 0.021, respectively), but not LBBB. In conclusion, after TAVI, 37% of patients developed new LBBB without more advanced myocardial damage or inflammation biomarkers. LBBB was associated with a higher rate of permanent pacemaker implantation, which negatively affected the recovery of LV systolic function. The development of acute kidney injury, rather than LBBB, increases the 1-year risk for mortality and hospitalization for heart failure. PMID:25937352

  2. Severe symptomatic aortic stenosis: medical therapy and transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)—a real-world retrospective cohort analysis of outcomes and cost-effectiveness using national data

    PubMed Central

    Aldalati, Omar; Lacey, Arron; King, William; Anderson, Richard A; Smith, Dave

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Determine the real-world difference between 2 groups of patients with severe aortic stenosis and similar baseline comorbidities: surgical turn down (STD) patients, who were managed medically prior to the availability of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) following formal surgical outpatient assessment, and patients managed with a TAVI implant. Design Retrospective cohort study from real-world data. Setting Electronic patient letters were searched for patients with a diagnosis of severe aortic stenosis and a formal outpatient STD prior to the availability of TAVI (1999–2009). The second group comprised the first 90 cases of TAVI in South Wales (2009 onwards). 2 years prior to and 5 years following TAVI/STD were assessed. Patient data were pseudoanonymised, using the Secure Anonymized Information Linkage (SAIL) databank, and extracted from Office National Statistics (ONS), Patient-Episode Database for Wales (PEDW) and general practitioner databases. Population 90 patients who had undergone TAVI in South Wales, and 65 STD patients who were medically managed. Main outcome measures Survival, hospital admission frequency and length of stay, primary care visits, and cost-effectiveness. Results TAVI patients were significantly older (81.8 vs 79.2), more likely to be male (59.1% vs 49.3%), baseline comorbidities were balanced. Mortality in TAVI versus STD was 28% vs 70% at 1000 days follow-up. There were significantly more hospital admissions per year in the TAVI group prior to TAVI/STD (1.5 (IQR 1.0–2.4) vs 1.0 IQR (0.5–1.5)). Post TAVI/STD, the TAVI group had significantly lower hospital admissions (0.3 (IQR 0.0–1.0) vs 1.2 (IQR 0.7–3.0)) and lengths of stay (0.4 (IQR 0.0–13.8) vs 11.0 (IQR 2.5–28.5), p<0.05). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for TAVI was £10 533 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Conclusions TAVI patients were more likely to survive and avoid hospital admissions compared with the medically

  3. Comparison of two- and three-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of paravalvular regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Altiok, Ertunc; Frick, Michael; Meyer, Christian G; Al Ateah, Ghazi; Napp, Andreas; Kirschfink, Annemarie; Almalla, Mohammad; Lotfi, Shahran; Becker, Michael; Herich, Lena; Lehmacher, Walter; Hoffmann, Rainer

    2014-06-01

    This study evaluated 2-dimensional (2D) transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) using Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 (VARC-2) criteria and 3-dimensional (3D) TTE for assessment of aortic regurgitation (AR) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. In 71 patients, 2D TTE, 3D TTE, and CMR imaging were performed to assess AR severity after TAVI. Using 2D TTE, AR severity was graded according to VARC-2 criteria and regurgitant volume (RVol) was determined. Three-dimensional color Doppler TTE allowed direct planimetry of the vena contracta area of the paravalvular regurgitation jet and calculation of the RVol as product with the velocity-time integral. RVol by CMR imaging was measured by phase-contrast velocity mapping in the ascending aorta. After TAVI, mean RVol determined by CMR imaging was 9.2 ± 9.6 ml/beat and mean regurgitant fraction was 13.3 ± 10.3%. AR was assessed as none or mild in 58 patients (82%) by CMR imaging. Correlation of 3D TTE and CMR imaging on RVol was better than correlation of 2D TTE and CMR imaging (r = 0.895 vs 0.558, p <0.001). There was good agreement between RVol by CMR imaging and by 3D TTE (mean bias = 2.4 ml/beat). Kappa on grading of AR severity was 0.357 between VARC-2 and CMR imaging versus 0.446 between 3D TTE and CMR imaging. Intraobserver variability for analysis of RVol of AR after TAVI was 73.5 ± 52.2% by 2D TTE, 16.7 ± 21.9% by 3D TTE, and 2.2 ± 2.0% by CMR imaging. In conclusion, 2D TTE considering VARC-2 criteria has limitations in the grading of AR severity after TAVI when CMR imaging is used for comparison. Three-dimensional TTE allows quantification of AR with greater accuracy than 2D TTE. Observer variability on RVol after TAVI is considerable using 2D TTE, significantly less using 3D TTE, and very low using CMR imaging. PMID:24837265

  4. The Effect of Tricuspid Regurgitation and the Right Heart on Survival after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Insights from the PARTNER II Inoperable Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Lindman, Brian R.; Maniar, Hersh S.; Jaber, Wael A.; Lerakis, Stamatios; Mack, Michael J.; Suri, Rakesh M.; Thourani, Vinod H.; Babaliaros, Vasilis; Kereiakes, Dean J.; Whisenant, Brian; Miller, D. Craig; Tuzcu, E. Murat; Svensson, Lars G.; Xu, Ke; Doshi, Darshan; Leon, Martin B.; Zajarias, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Background Tricuspid regurgitation (TR) and right ventricular (RV) dysfunction adversely affect outcomes in patients with heart failure or mitral valve disease, but their impact on outcomes in patients with aortic stenosis (AS) treated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has not been well characterized. Methods and Results Among 542 patients with symptomatic AS treated in the PARTNER II trial (inoperable cohort) with a SAPIEN or SAPIEN XT valve via a transfemoral approach, baseline TR severity, right atrial (RA) and RV size, and RV function were evaluated by echocardiography according to established guidelines. One-year mortality was 16.9%, 17.2%, 32.6%, and 61.1% for patients with no/trace (n=167), mild (n=205), moderate (n=117), and severe (n=18) TR, respectively (p<0.001). Increasing severity of RV dysfunction as well as RA and RV enlargement were also associated with increased mortality (p<0.001). After multivariable adjustment, severe TR (HR 3.20, 95% CI 1.50–6.82, p=0.003) and moderate TR (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.02–2.52, p=0.042) remained associated with increased mortality as did RA and RV enlargement, but not RV dysfunction. There was an interaction between TR and mitral regurgitation severity (p=0.04); the increased hazard of death associated with moderate/severe TR only occurred in those with no/trace/mild mitral regurgitation. Conclusions In inoperable patients treated with TAVR, moderate or severe TR and right heart enlargement are independently associated with increased 1-year mortality, however the association between moderate or severe TR and an increased hazard of death was only found in those with minimal MR at baseline. These findings may improve our assessment of anticipated benefit from TAVR and support the need for future studies on TR and the right heart, including whether concomitant treatment of TR in operable but high risk patients with AS is warranted. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique

  5. Incidence and Sequelae of Prosthesis-Patient Mismatch in Transcatheter Vs Surgical Valve Replacement in High-Risk Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis – A PARTNER Trial Cohort A Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pibarot, Philippe; Weissman, Neil J.; Stewart, William J.; Hahn, Rebecca T.; Lindman, Brian R.; McAndrew, Thomas; Kodali, Susheel K.; Mack, Michael J.; Thourani, Vinod H.; Miller, D. Craig; Svensson, Lars G.; Herrmann, Howard C.; Smith, Craig R.; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Webb, John; Lim, Scott; Xu, Ke; Hueter, Irene; Douglas, Pamela S.; Leon, Martin B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Little is known about the incidence of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) and its impact on outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). OBJECTIVES The objectives of this study were: 1) to compare the incidence of PPM in the transcatheter and surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) randomized (RCT) arms of the PARTNER-I trial Cohort A; and 2) to assess the impact of PPM on regression of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and mortality in these 2 arms and in the TAVR nonrandomized continued access (NRCA) Registry cohort. METHODS The PARTNER trial Cohort A randomized patients 1:1 to TAVR or bioprosthetic SAVR. Postoperative PPM was defined as absent if indexed effective orifice area >0.85, moderate ≥0.65 but ≤0.85, or severe <0.65 cm2/m2. LV mass regression and mortality were analyzed using the SAVR-RCT (n = 270), TAVR-RCT (n = 304) and TAVR-NRCA (n = 1637) cohorts. RESULTS Incidence of PPM was 60.0% (severe: 28.1%) in SAVR-RCT versus 46.4% (severe: 19.7%) in TAVR-RCT (p < 0.001) and 43.8% (severe: 13.6%) in TAVR-NRCA. In patients with aortic annulus diameter < 20 mm, severe PPM developed in 33.7% undergoing SAVR compared to 19.0% undergoing TAVR (p = 0.002). PPM was an independent predictor of less LV mass regression at 1 year in SAVR-RCT (p = 0.017) and TAVR-NRCA (p = 0.012) but not in TAVRRCT (p = 0.35). Severe PPM was an independent predictor of 2-year mortality in SAVR-RCT (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.78; p = 0.041) but not in TAVR-RCT (HR: 0.58; p = 0.11). In the TAVRNRCA, severe PPM was not a predictor of 1-year mortality in the whole cohort (HR: 1.05; p = 0.60) but did independently predict mortality in the subset of patients with no post-procedural aortic regurgitation (HR: 1.88; p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS In patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk, PPM is more frequent and more often severe following SAVR than TAVR. Patients with PPM after SAVR have worse survival and less LV mass regression than those without PPM

  6. Using DynaCT for the assessment of ilio-femoral arterial calibre, calcification and tortuosity index in patients selected for trans-catheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Crowhurst, James A; Campbell, Douglas; Raffel, Owen C; Whitby, Mark; Pathmanathan, Pavthrun; Redmond, Stanley; Incani, Alexander; Poon, Karl; James, Christopher; Aroney, Constantine; Clarke, Andrew; Walters, Darren L

    2013-10-01

    Adequate vascular access for femoral trans-catheter aortic valve replacement is fundamental to the success of the procedure. Assessment of vascular calibre, tortuosity and calcification is performed by angiography and multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT). Can DynaCT provide the same information as MSCT? 15 Patients underwent MSCT, angiography and DynaCT. Vessel diameter measurements were taken in three positions of the left and right ilio-femoral arteries. Tortuosity was assessed using an index of the direct distance and the distance taken by the artery between two points. Calcification was assessed in MSCT and DynaCT using a simple scoring system. Concordance correlation coefficient of arterial calibre between angiography and MSCT was 0.96 (95 % CI 0.94-0.97). DynaCT and angiography was 0.94 (95 % CI 0.91-0.96) and Dyna CT and MSCT, 0.95 (95 % CI 0.92-0.97). Bland-Altman tests demonstrate a mean difference between the angiogram and the MSCT of 0.06 mm (+0.97, -1.42), angiogram and DynaCT, 0.13 mm, (+1.00, -0.87), DynaCT and MSCT, 0.2 mm, (+1.15, -0.76). Tortuosity comparisons gave a median tortuosity index for MSCT 1.29 and DynaCT 1.23 (p = 0.472). Calcification comparisons of MSCT and DynaCT using correlation coefficients demonstrate a correlation of 0.245 (p = 0.378). Effective radiation doses were: DynaCT; 3.63 ± 0.65 mSv and angiography; 0.57 ± 0.72 mSv, MSCT; 7.15 ± 2.58 mSv. DynaCT is equal to MSCT and angiography in assessing femoral artery calibre. Like MSCT, it can assess tortuosity and can produce 3D images but is inferior in the assessment of calcification. PMID:23925712

  7. Effect of Varying Definitions of Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury and Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction on One-Year Mortality in Patients Having Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Pyxaras, Stylianos A; Zhang, Yuan; Wolf, Alexander; Schmitz, Thomas; Naber, Christoph K

    2015-08-01

    The prognostic relevance of direct contrast toxicity in patients treated with transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) remains unclear because of the confounding hemodynamic effect of acute left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) impairment on kidney function estimation. In addition, different definitions of contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) may have different prognostic stratification potential. In the present study, 240 consecutive patients who underwent TAVI were prospectively enrolled. CI-AKI was defined (1) according to the postprocedural creatinine increase of ≥0.3 mg/dl or (2) according to the postprocedural decrease of the creatinine clearance of at least 25%. Primary end point of the study was 1-year all-cause mortality. At a mean follow-up of 1.7 ± 1.4 years, all-cause mortality was significantly higher in the CI-AKI patient group, using both CI-AKI definitions (for (1) and (2) p = 0.025 and p <0.001, respectively). In the Cox regression multivariate analysis, CI-AKI was an independent predictor of mortality (hazard ratio 2.244, 95% CI 1.064 to 4.732, p = 0.034), along with LVEF (hazard ratio 0.974, 95% CI 0.946 to 0.993, p = 0.012). Although LVEF and creatinine values at admission were not significantly associated with CI-AKI, their interaction term significantly defined CI-AKI (p = 0.033). The prognostic accuracy of definition (2) was higher (area under the curve 0.704; p <0.001) as with respect to definition (1) (area under the curve 0.602; p = 0.037) for the primary end point of 1-year mortality. In conclusion, in a nonselected patient population who underwent TAVI, CI-AKI was confirmed as an independent predictor of clinical outcome. Only the interaction between LVEF and baseline creatinine values was found to determine CI-AKI. Definition of CI-AKI based to creatinine clearance values had higher prognostic accuracy in comparison with the CI-AKI definition based on creatinine absolute value changes. PMID:26026866

  8. Prognostic Utility of Biomarkers in Predicting of One-Year Outcomes in Patients with Aortic Stenosis Treated with Transcatheter or Surgical Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Parenica, Jiri; Nemec, Petr; Tomandl, Josef; Ondrasek, Jiri; Pavkova-Goldbergova, Monika; Tretina, Martin; Jarkovsky, Jiri; Littnerova, Simona; Poloczek, Martin; Pokorny, Petr; Spinar, Jindrich; Cermakova, Zdenka; Miklik, Roman; Malik, Petr; Pes, Ondrej; Lipkova, Jolana; Tomandlova, Marie; Kala, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the work was to find biomarkers identifying patients at high risk of adverse clinical outcomes after TAVI and SAVR in addition to currently used predictive model (EuroSCORE). Background There is limited data about the role of biomarkers in predicting prognosis, especially when TAVI is available. Methods The multi-biomarker sub-study included 42 consecutive high-risk patients (average age 82.0 years; logistic EuroSCORE 21.0%) allocated to TAVI transfemoral and transapical using the Edwards-Sapien valve (n = 29), or SAVR with the Edwards Perimount bioprosthesis (n = 13). Standardized endpoints were prospectively followed during the 12-month follow-up. Results The clinical outcomes after both TAVI and SAVR were comparable. Malondialdehyde served as the best predictor of a combined endpoint at 1 year with AUC (ROC analysis) = 0.872 for TAVI group, resp. 0.765 (p<0.05) for both TAVI and SAVR groups. Increased levels of MDA, matrix metalloproteinase 2, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP1), ferritin-reducing ability of plasma, homocysteine, cysteine and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine were all predictors of the occurrence of combined safety endpoints at 30 days (AUC 0.750–0.948; p<0.05 for all). The addition of MDA to a currently used clinical model (EuroSCORE) significantly improved prediction of a combined safety endpoint at 30 days and a combined endpoint (0–365 days) by the net reclassification improvement (NRI) and the integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) (p<0.05). Cystatin C, glutathione, cysteinylglycine, asymmetric dimethylarginine, nitrite/nitrate and MMP9 did not prove to be significant. Total of 14.3% died during 1-year follow-up. Conclusion We identified malondialdehyde, a marker of oxidative stress, as the most promising predictor of adverse outcomes during the 30-day and 1-year follow-up in high-risk patients with symptomatic, severe aortic stenosis treated with TAVI. The development of a clinical

  9. Anatomical challenges for transcatheter mitral valve intervention.

    PubMed

    DE Backer, Ole; Luk, Ngai H; Søndergaard, Lars

    2016-06-01

    Following the success of transcatheter aortic and pulmonary valve implantation, there is a large interest in transcatheter mitral valve interventions to treat severe mitral regurgitation (MR). With the exception for the MitraClipTM (Abbott, Abbott Park, IL, USA) edge-to-edge leaflet plication system, most of these transcatheter mitral valve interventions are still in their early clinical or preclinical development phase. Challenges arising from the complex anatomy of the mitral valve and the interplay of the mitral apparatus with the left ventricle (LV) have contributed to a more difficult development process and mixed clinical results with these novel technologies. This review aims to discuss the several anatomical aspects and challenges related to transcatheter mitral valve intervention - the relevant anatomy will be reviewed in relation to specific requirements for device design and procedural aspects of transcatheter mitral valve interventions. To date, experience with these novel therapeutic modalities are still limited and resolution of many challenges are pending. Future studies have to evaluate for whom the transcatheter approach is a feasible and preferred treatment and which patients will benefit from either transcatheter mitral valve repair or replacement. Nevertheless, technological developments are anticipated to drive the transcatheter approach forward into a clinically feasible alternative to surgery for selected patients with severe MR. PMID:27028333

  10. Valve-in-valve implantation with a 23-mm balloon-expandable transcatheter heart valve for the treatment of a 19-mm stentless bioprosthesis severe aortic regurgitation using a strategy of "extreme" underfilling.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Florent; Leipsic, Jonathon; Généreux, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    We report a case of valve-in-valve (ViV) implantation by transfemoral approach with a 23-mm balloon-expandable prosthesis inside a stentless 19-mm acutely degenerated bioprosthesis, using a strategy of "extreme" underfilling. A 74-year-old patient presented to our institution in cardiogenic shock. An initial transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) showed severe central aortic regurgitation (AR) due to a torn leaflet. She was deemed inoperable and considered for urgent transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Given the fairly small true internal diameter, a strategy of 3-cc underfilling of a 23-mm transcatheter heart valve (THV) was planned. However, the final implantation was performed with 5-cc underfilling due to the incapacity to deliver the entire amount of fluid contained in the inflation syringe. TEE guidance confirmed the successful positioning and deployment of the prosthesis, with no AR and a mean gradient of 25 mm Hg. While implantation of a smaller prosthesis (20 mm) was debated during the Heart Team discussion, the risk of valve embolization due to inadequate anchoring inside the stentless prosthesis led to the selection of a 23-mm THV. At 6-month follow-up, the patient was in NYHA class I, with no AR and a mean gradient of 28 mm Hg. We report for the first time the use of in vivo THV with 5-cc underfilling with no acute or short-term structural failure, and the first ViV implantation by transfemoral approach with a 23-mm balloon-expandable prosthesis inside a stentless 19-mm bioprosthesis. The current report presents the challenges related to ViV implantation inside a small stentless bioprosthesis and offers practical ways to overcome them. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24402706

  11. The role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in the assessment of severe aortic stenosis and in post-procedural evaluation following transcatheter aortic valve implantation and surgical aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Tarique Al; Plein, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular disease in the western world with a prevalence expected to double within the next 50 years. International guidelines advocate the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) as an investigative tool, both to guide diagnosis and to direct optimal treatment. CMR is the reference standard for quantifying both left and right ventricular volumes and mass, which is essential to assess the impact of AS upon global cardiac function. Given the ability to image any structure in any plane, CMR offers many other diagnostic strengths including full visualisation of valvular morphology, direct planimetry of orifice area, the quantification of stenotic jets and in particular, accurate quantification of valvular regurgitation. In addition, CMR permits reliable and accurate measurements of the aortic root and arch which can be fundamental to appropriate patient management. There is a growing evidence base to indicate tissue characterisation using CMR provides prognostic information, both in asymptomatic AS patients and those undergoing intervention. Furthermore, a number of current clinical trials will likely raise the importance of CMR in routine patient management. This article will focus on the incremental value of CMR in the assessment of severe AS and the insights it offers following valve replacement. PMID:27429910

  12. The role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in the assessment of severe aortic stenosis and in post-procedural evaluation following transcatheter aortic valve implantation and surgical aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Musa, Tarique Al; Plein, Sven; Greenwood, John P

    2016-06-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular disease in the western world with a prevalence expected to double within the next 50 years. International guidelines advocate the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) as an investigative tool, both to guide diagnosis and to direct optimal treatment. CMR is the reference standard for quantifying both left and right ventricular volumes and mass, which is essential to assess the impact of AS upon global cardiac function. Given the ability to image any structure in any plane, CMR offers many other diagnostic strengths including full visualisation of valvular morphology, direct planimetry of orifice area, the quantification of stenotic jets and in particular, accurate quantification of valvular regurgitation. In addition, CMR permits reliable and accurate measurements of the aortic root and arch which can be fundamental to appropriate patient management. There is a growing evidence base to indicate tissue characterisation using CMR provides prognostic information, both in asymptomatic AS patients and those undergoing intervention. Furthermore, a number of current clinical trials will likely raise the importance of CMR in routine patient management. This article will focus on the incremental value of CMR in the assessment of severe AS and the insights it offers following valve replacement. PMID:27429910

  13. Transcatheter stent implantation for the treatment of abdominal aortic coarctation and right renal artery stenosis in takayasu's arteritis: a case with a 4-year follow up.

    PubMed

    Ghazi, Payam; Haji-Zeinali, Ali-Mohammad; Ghasemi, Masuood; Pour, Manijeh Zargham

    2011-01-01

    We describe a Takayasu arteritis patient who was admitted because of an abdominal aortic stenosis, further complicated by the presence of a stenotic right renal artery located in the area of the aortic stenosis. After treatment of the renal stenosis with a 4 × 15 mm Driver stent, a 16 × 60 self-expandable nitinol stent (OptiMed) was deployed through the stenosis of the abdominal aorta. Even though the right renal artery was initially compromised after stent deployment through the aortic stenosis, the patient was successfully treated with renal artery re-dilation by a balloon passed through open cells of the aortic stent. During follow up, the patient suffered no procedure-related complications. PMID:21478132

  14. Computer Vision Techniques for Transcatheter Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Feng; Roach, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive transcatheter technologies have demonstrated substantial promise for the diagnosis and the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. For example, transcatheter aortic valve implantation is an alternative to aortic valve replacement for the treatment of severe aortic stenosis, and transcatheter atrial fibrillation ablation is widely used for the treatment and the cure of atrial fibrillation. In addition, catheter-based intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography imaging of coronary arteries provides important information about the coronary lumen, wall, and plaque characteristics. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of these cross-sectional image data will be beneficial to the evaluation and the treatment of coronary artery diseases such as atherosclerosis. In all the phases (preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative) during the transcatheter intervention procedure, computer vision techniques (e.g., image segmentation and motion tracking) have been largely applied in the field to accomplish tasks like annulus measurement, valve selection, catheter placement control, and vessel centerline extraction. This provides beneficial guidance for the clinicians in surgical planning, disease diagnosis, and treatment assessment. In this paper, we present a systematical review on these state-of-the-art methods. We aim to give a comprehensive overview for researchers in the area of computer vision on the subject of transcatheter intervention. Research in medical computing is multi-disciplinary due to its nature, and hence, it is important to understand the application domain, clinical background, and imaging modality, so that methods and quantitative measurements derived from analyzing the imaging data are appropriate and meaningful. We thus provide an overview on the background information of the transcatheter intervention procedures, as well as a review of the computer vision techniques and methodologies applied in this area. PMID:27170893

  15. Left Main Percutaneous Coronary Intervention and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in a Young Male with Rheumatic Heart Disease and Porcelain Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Chainani, Vinod; Hanno, Ram; Rengifo-Moreno, Pablo; Martinez-Clark, Pedro; Alfonso, Carlos E.

    2016-01-01

    We highlight the presence of a calcified mass in the left main coronary artery without significant atherosclerosis seen in the other coronary arteries or in the peripheral large arteries. In our view, the calcified character of the obstruction and the calcification of the aortic valve are characteristic of a variant type of coronary artery disease (CAD) not associated with the same risk factors as diffuse coronary atherosclerosis, but, in this case, with rheumatic heart disease. This case report also emphasizes the interventional approach for patients with aortic valve stenosis secondary to rheumatic heart disease. PMID:27418982

  16. Left Main Percutaneous Coronary Intervention and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in a Young Male with Rheumatic Heart Disease and Porcelain Aorta.

    PubMed

    Chainani, Vinod; Perez, Osman; Hanno, Ram; Hourani, Patrick; Rengifo-Moreno, Pablo; Martinez-Clark, Pedro; Alfonso, Carlos E

    2016-01-01

    We highlight the presence of a calcified mass in the left main coronary artery without significant atherosclerosis seen in the other coronary arteries or in the peripheral large arteries. In our view, the calcified character of the obstruction and the calcification of the aortic valve are characteristic of a variant type of coronary artery disease (CAD) not associated with the same risk factors as diffuse coronary atherosclerosis, but, in this case, with rheumatic heart disease. This case report also emphasizes the interventional approach for patients with aortic valve stenosis secondary to rheumatic heart disease. PMID:27418982

  17. Evaluation of the Edwards Lifesciences SAPIEN transcatheter heart valve.

    PubMed

    Minha, Sa'ar; Waksman, Ron

    2014-11-01

    Severe aortic stenosis is a common valvular disease and is associated with both morbidity and mortality. Surgical aortic valve replacement was the only available therapeutic option until technological advances allowed for the development of a transcatheter heart valve system. The first available THV was the Edwards SAPIEN. The merits of this system in terms of safety and efficacy were explored in the pivotal Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER (PARTNER) randomized trial whose results then led to the approval of this device for commercial use in the US. The valve is now indicated for inoperable patients and may be considered an alternative for surgery for high-risk patients. Two successive models, the XT and more recently the S3, were developed with the intent to improve procedural outcomes. In this article, the SAPIEN transcatheter heart valve family is described in terms of technology, scientific data and future directions. PMID:25109297

  18. Aortic angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the aorta or its branches, including: Aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Congenital (present from birth) problems AV ... Abnormal results may be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Aortic regurgitation Aortic stenosis Congenital (present ...

  19. Sutureless aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of aortic stenosis and greater co-morbidities and risk profiles of the contemporary patient population has driven the development of minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) techniques to reduce surgical trauma. Recent technological developments have led to an alternative minimally invasive option which avoids the placement and tying of sutures, known as “sutureless” or rapid deployment aortic valves. Potential advantages for sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) duration, facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, whilst maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low paravalvular leak rates. However, given its recent developments, the majority of evidence regarding sutureless aortic valve replacement (SU-AVR) is limited to observational studies and there is a paucity of adequately-powered randomized studies. Recently, the International Valvular Surgery Study Group (IVSSG) has formulated to conduct the Sutureless Projects, set to be the largest international collaborative group to investigate this technology. This keynote lecture will overview the use, the potential advantages, the caveats, and current evidence of sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve replacement (AVR). PMID:25870807

  20. Successful treatment of pure aortic insufficiency with transapical implantation of the JenaValve.

    PubMed

    Bleiziffer, Sabine; Mazzitelli, Domenico; Nöbauer, Christian; Ried, Thomas; Lange, Rüdiger

    2013-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was predominantly developed for patients with severe calcified aortic stenosis, as most devices are designed to anchor within the native valve calcium. We report on a patient with pure insufficiency of a non-calcified aortic valve, in whom an anatomically oriented catheter valve was implanted successfully. The design of the prosthesis with position feelers engaging the native aortic valve leaflets proved to be suitable for the treatment of pure aortic insufficiency. PMID:23344750

  1. Bicuspid Aortic Stenosis Treated With the Repositionable and Retrievable Lotus Valve.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Julia; Gonska, Birgid; Rodewald, Christoph; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Wöhrle, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for severe aortic stenosis is a well-established and safe therapeutic option. However, data on TAVI in bicuspid aortic valve stenosis are limited and show a higher rate of moderate-severe aortic regurgitation compared with TAVI for tricuspid aortic valve stenosis. We report for the first time, to our knowledge, the use of the mechanically deployed Lotus valve in bicuspid aortic stenosis. In our patient who had severe bicuspid aortic stenosis and was at high surgical risk, the implantation of the repositionable and completely retrievable Lotus valve was a safe and controlled procedure resulting in no relevant aortic regurgitation. PMID:26604121

  2. Modern management of adult coarctation: transcatheter and surgical options.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Heiko; Uebing, Anselm; Shore, Darryl F

    2016-08-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (CoA), a juxtaductal obstructive lesion in the descending aorta and commonly associated with hypoplasia of the aortic arch occurs in 5-8% of patients with congenital heart disease. Since the initial surgical corrections in the 1950, surgical and transcatheter options have constantly evolved. Nowadays, transcatheter options are widely accepted as the initial treatment of choice in adults presenting with native or recurrent CoA. Surgical techniques are mainly reserved for patients with complex aortic arch anatomy such as extended arch hypoplasia or stenosis or para-CoA aneurysm formation. Extended aneurysms can be covered by conformable stents but stent implantation may require preparative vascular surgery. Complex re-CoA my best be treated by an ascending to descending bypass conduit. The following review aims to describe current endovascular and surgical practice pointing out modern developments and their limitations. PMID:27243624

  3. Next-Generation Transcatheter Heart Valves: Current Trials in Europe and the USA

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Nikos; Nickenig, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has proven to be a viable alternative for patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis who are at high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement. At the same time, there is increasing evidence that moderate-to-severe periprosthetic aortic regurgitation after TAVI is associated with dramatically increased mortality and morbidity. The issue of proper positioning of the valve, including the ability to reposition and recapture the device, must be dealt with before the use of TAVI can be extended to younger, healthier patients. The next generation of transcatheter heart valves will most likely address repositionability to facilitate accurate placement with additional features that minimize paravalvular leakage. Upcoming devices promise to improve outcomes and usability of current TAVI systems. PMID:22891121

  4. Transcatheter Valve-in-Valve: A Cautionary Tale.

    PubMed

    Luc, Jessica G Y; Shanks, Miriam; Tyrrell, Benjamin D; Welsh, Robert C; Butler, Craig R; Meyer, Steven R

    2016-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) by valve-in-valve (VIV) implantation is an alternative treatment for high-risk patients with a degenerating aortic bioprosthesis. We present a case of transapical TAVR VIV with a 29-mm Edwards SAPIEN XT (ESV) (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) into a 29-mm Medtronic Freestyle stentless bioprosthesis (Medtronic Inc, Minneapolis, MN) in which unanticipated dilatation of the Freestyle bioprosthesis resulted in intraprocedural embolization of the TAVR valve, necessitating urgent conversion to a conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR). Our experience suggests that TAVR VIV with the 29-mm ESV in the setting of a degenerated 29-mm Freestyle stentless bioprosthesis must be undertaken with caution. PMID:27549545

  5. The development of transcatheter heart valves: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Laske, Tim; Denton, Melissa; Eberhardt, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Although the heart valve market is relatively mature, many patients currently indicated for valve repair or replacement are either undiagnosed, not referred for surgery, or are too sick/unwilling to undergo the required surgery (Table I). To address this unmet clinical need, the medical device industry has undertaken the development of transcatheter heart valves (TCV). These devices are tissue heart valves that can be delivered without open heart surgery and are intended to complement the portfolio of current and future surgical valve products. Several companies have developed novel product designs. Some transcatheter valves are currently available for the aortic and pulmonic positions via European CE mark, and are in clinical trials throughout the United States. PMID:19963953

  6. Computed tomography assessment for transcatheter mitral valve interventions.

    PubMed

    Narang, Akhil; Guerrero, Mayra; Feldman, Ted; Pursnani, Amit

    2016-06-01

    Multidetector cardiac computerized tomography (CT) is a robust advanced imaging modality with high spatial resolution that has emerged as an essential tool for the planning of structural heart and electrophysiology interventions. The most notable example has been its important role in the pre-procedural planning of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), which has developed to the point that commercial software packages are commonly used for this application. More recently several novel approaches and devices have been developed for transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR). Given the greater complexity of mitral valve anatomy, CT has at least an equally important role for preprocedural planning of TMVR. Similar to TAVR assessment, its utility in TMVR is multi-fold, including assessment of valve and adjacent anatomical structures, determination of accurate annulus dimensions for prosthesis sizing, vascular access planning, and prediction of fluoroscopic angles. PMID:27028331

  7. Computer-aided design of the human aortic root.

    PubMed

    Ovcharenko, E A; Klyshnikov, K U; Vlad, A R; Sizova, I N; Kokov, A N; Nushtaev, D V; Yuzhalin, A E; Zhuravleva, I U

    2014-11-01

    The development of computer-based 3D models of the aortic root is one of the most important problems in constructing the prostheses for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. In the current study, we analyzed data from 117 patients with and without aortic valve disease and computed tomography data from 20 patients without aortic valvular diseases in order to estimate the average values of the diameter of the aortic annulus and other aortic root parameters. Based on these data, we developed a 3D model of human aortic root with unique geometry. Furthermore, in this study we show that by applying different material properties to the aortic annulus zone in our model, we can significantly improve the quality of the results of finite element analysis. To summarize, here we present four 3D models of human aortic root with unique geometry based on computational analysis of ECHO and CT data. We suggest that our models can be utilized for the development of better prostheses for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. PMID:25238567

  8. Intraoperative tracking of aortic valve plane.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D L H; Garreau, M; Auffret, V; Le Breton, H; Verhoye, J P; Haigron, P

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to track the aortic valve plane in intra-operative fluoroscopic images in order to optimize and secure Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) procedure. This paper is focused on the issue of aortic valve calcifications tracking in fluoroscopic images. We propose a new method based on the Tracking-Learning-Detection approach, applied to the aortic valve calcifications in order to determine the position of the aortic valve plane in intra-operative TAVI images. This main contribution concerns the improvement of object detection by updating the recursive tracker in which all features are tracked jointly. The approach has been evaluated on four patient databases, providing an absolute mean displacement error less than 10 pixels (≈2mm). Its suitability for the TAVI procedure has been analyzed. PMID:24110703

  9. Aortic insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart valve - aortic regurgitation; Valvular disease - aortic regurgitation; AI - aortic insufficiency ... BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  10. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm: Thoracic aortic aneurysms - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms - these occur in the part of the aorta ...

  11. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm: Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part of the ...

  12. Aortic insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic valve prolapse; Aortic regurgitation ... Any condition that prevents the aortic valve from closing completely can cause this problem. When the valve doesn't close all the way, a small amount of blood comes ...

  13. Transcatheter patch occlusion of perimembranous ventricular septal defects.

    PubMed

    Sideris, Eleftherios B; Macuil, Benjamin; Varvarenko, Victor; Toumanides, Savvas

    2005-06-15

    Sixteen surgical candidates for ventricular septal defect correction were brought to the catheterization laboratory for transcatheter patch occlusion. There were 3 cases of nonrestrictive ventricular septal defects, including 2 with malalignment (tetralogy of Fallot). All patients, except those with tetralogy of Fallot who were cyanotic, had large left-right shunts. They were all corrected through the femoral vein. All defects with the exception of 2 were successfully occluded (12 full occlusions, 2 residual shunts). On follow-up, there were no embolizations, aortic insufficiency, or other complications. The method appears effective and relatively safe, and could challenge the current surgical standard of treatment. PMID:15950588

  14. Transcatheter neoaortic valve replacement utilizing the Melody Valve in hypoplastic left heart syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martin, Mary Hunt; Gruber, Peter J; Gray, Robert G

    2015-03-01

    Percutaneous transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement with the Melody Valve is fast becoming an important adjunct in the treatment of older children and adults with failing right ventricular outflow tract conduits. Recently, the Melody Valve has also been successfully implanted in the tricuspid, mitral, and aortic positions, typically within a failing bioprosthetic valve. We present a patient who underwent Fontan palliation for hypoplastic left heart syndrome variant and subsequently developed severe neoaortic regurgitation, which was successfully treated with a transcatheter neoaortic valve replacement. To our knowledge, this is the first successful use of the Melody Valve in the neoaortic position in a patient with single-ventricle physiology. Successful relief of neoaortic valve regurgitation using replacement with a transcatheter valve may allow avoidance of additional surgery, increase functional longevity of single-ventricle palliation, and postpone the need for orthotopic heart transplantation. PMID:24619505

  15. Anaesthetic management of aortic coarctation in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Walker, E; Malins, A F

    2004-10-01

    We report two cases of aortic coarctation in pregnancy. The first was a 20-year-old nulliparous woman who underwent an aortic coarctation repair when she was 23 weeks old and subsequently developed an aneurysm at the site of initial repair. The second was a 20-year-old nulliparous woman with a severe uncorrected congenital aortic coarctation and upper body hypertension, who became pregnant whilst awaiting transcatheter dilatation of the coarctation. Antenatal care involved a multidisciplinary approach with obstetric, anaesthetic and cardiology input. Both parturients were delivered by elective caesarean section. A cautious, incremental regional anaesthetic technique was used, with no associated maternal or neonatal morbidity. Perioperative management focused on minimising haemodynamic disturbances. The management is discussed, together with the potential maternal and fetal complications of aortic coarctation in pregnancy. PMID:15477059

  16. Mitral Transcatheter Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Maisano, Francesco; Buzzatti, Nicola; Taramasso, Maurizio; Alfieri, Ottavio

    2013-01-01

    Mitral valve regurgitation (MR) is often diagnosed in patients with heart failure and is associated with worsening of symptoms and reduced survival. While surgery remains the gold standard treatment in low-risk patients with degenerative MR, in high-risk patients and in those with functional MR, transcatheter procedures are emerging as an alternative therapeutic option. MitraClip® is the device with which the largest clinical experience has been gained to date, as it offers sustained clinical benefit in selected patients. Further to MitraClip implantation, several additional approaches are developing, to better match with the extreme variability of mitral valve disease. Not only repair is evolving, initial steps towards percutaneous mitral valve implantation have already been undertaken, and initial clinical experience has just started. PMID:23908865

  17. CT Angiography Analysis of Axillary Artery Diameter versus Common Femoral Artery Diameter: Implications for Axillary Approach for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients with Hostile Aortoiliac Segment and Advanced Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tayal, Rajiv; Iftikhar, Humayun; LeSar, Benjamin; Patel, Rahul; Tyagi, Naveen; Cohen, Marc; Wasty, Najam

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The use of the axillary artery as an access site has lost favor in percutaneous intervention due to the success of these procedures from a radial or brachial alternative. However, these distal access points are unable to safely accommodate anything larger than a 7-French sheath. To date no studies exist describing the size of the axillary artery in relation to the common femoral artery in a patient population. We hypothesized that the axillary artery is of comparable size to the CFA in most patients and less frequently diseased. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 110 CT scans of the thoracic and abdominal aorta done at our institution to rule out aortic dissection in which the right axillary artery, right CFA, left axillary artery, and left CFA were visualized. Images were then reconstructed using commercially available TeraRecon software and comparative measurements made of the axillary and femoral arteries. Results. In 96 patients with complete data, the mean sizes of the right and left axillary artery were slightly smaller than the left and right CFA. A direct comparison of the sizes of the axillary artery and CFA in the same patient yielded a mean difference of 1.69 mm ± 1.74. In all patients combined, the mean difference between the axillary artery and CFA was 1.88 mm on the right and 1.68 mm on the left. In 19 patients (19.8%), the axillary artery was of the same caliber as the associated CFA. In 8 of 96 patients (8.3%), the axillary artery was larger compared to the CFA. Conclusions. Although typically smaller, the axillary artery is often of comparable size to the CFA, significantly less frequently calcified or diseased, and in almost all observed cases large enough to accommodate a sheath with up to 18 French. PMID:27110403

  18. CT Angiography Analysis of Axillary Artery Diameter versus Common Femoral Artery Diameter: Implications for Axillary Approach for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients with Hostile Aortoiliac Segment and Advanced Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Tayal, Rajiv; Iftikhar, Humayun; LeSar, Benjamin; Patel, Rahul; Tyagi, Naveen; Cohen, Marc; Wasty, Najam

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The use of the axillary artery as an access site has lost favor in percutaneous intervention due to the success of these procedures from a radial or brachial alternative. However, these distal access points are unable to safely accommodate anything larger than a 7-French sheath. To date no studies exist describing the size of the axillary artery in relation to the common femoral artery in a patient population. We hypothesized that the axillary artery is of comparable size to the CFA in most patients and less frequently diseased. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 110 CT scans of the thoracic and abdominal aorta done at our institution to rule out aortic dissection in which the right axillary artery, right CFA, left axillary artery, and left CFA were visualized. Images were then reconstructed using commercially available TeraRecon software and comparative measurements made of the axillary and femoral arteries. Results. In 96 patients with complete data, the mean sizes of the right and left axillary artery were slightly smaller than the left and right CFA. A direct comparison of the sizes of the axillary artery and CFA in the same patient yielded a mean difference of 1.69 mm ± 1.74. In all patients combined, the mean difference between the axillary artery and CFA was 1.88 mm on the right and 1.68 mm on the left. In 19 patients (19.8%), the axillary artery was of the same caliber as the associated CFA. In 8 of 96 patients (8.3%), the axillary artery was larger compared to the CFA. Conclusions. Although typically smaller, the axillary artery is often of comparable size to the CFA, significantly less frequently calcified or diseased, and in almost all observed cases large enough to accommodate a sheath with up to 18 French. PMID:27110403

  19. Diagnosis and Management of Valvular Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Czarny, Matthew J; Resar, Jon R

    2014-01-01

    Valvular aortic stenosis (AS) is a progressive disease that affects 2% of the population aged 65 years or older. The major cause of valvular AS in adults is calcification and fibrosis of a previously normal tricuspid valve or a congenital bicuspid valve, with rheumatic AS being rare in the United States. Once established, the rate of progression of valvular AS is quite variable and impossible to predict for any particular patient. Symptoms of AS are generally insidious at onset, though development of any of the three cardinal symptoms of angina, syncope, or heart failure portends a poor prognosis. Management of symptomatic AS remains primarily surgical, though transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is becoming an accepted alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for patients at high or prohibitive operative risk. PMID:25368539

  20. Balloon expandable transcatheter heart valves for native mitral valve disease with severe mitral annular calcification.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Mayra; Urena, Marina; Pursnani, Amit; Wang, Dee D; Vahanian, Alec; O'Neill, William; Feldman, Ted; Himbert, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    Patients with mitral annular calcification (MAC) have high surgical risk for mitral valve replacement due to associated comorbidities and technical challenges related to calcium burden, precluding surgery in many patients. Transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) with the compassionate use of balloon expandable aortic transcatheter heart valves has been used in this clinical scenario. The purpose of this review was to summarize the early experience including successes and failures reported. TMVR might evolve into an acceptable alternative for selected patients with severe MAC who are not candidates for conventional mitral valve surgery. However, this field is at a very early stage and the progress will be significantly slower than the development of transcatheter aortic valve replacement due to the complexity of the mitral valve anatomy and its pathology. Optimizing patient selection process by using multimodality imaging tools to accurately measure the mitral valve annulus and evaluate the risk of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is essential to minimize complications. Strategies for treating and preventing left ventricular outflow tract obstruction are being tested. Similarly, carefully selecting candidates avoiding patients at the end of their disease process, might improve the overall outcomes. PMID:27094423

  1. Mitral Valve Surgery: Current Minimally Invasive and Transcatheter Options

    PubMed Central

    Ramlawi, Basel; Gammie, James S.

    2016-01-01

    The mitral valve is a highly complex structure, the competency and function of which relies on the harmonious action of its component parts. Minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS) for mitral valve repair or replacement (MVR/r) has been performed successfully with incremental improvements in techniques over the past decade. These minimally invasive procedures, while attractive to patients and referring physicians, should meet the same high bar for optimal clinical outcomes and long-term durability of valve repair as traditional sternotomy procedures. The majority of MICS MVR/r procedures are performed via a right minithoracotomy approach with direct or camera-assisted visualization, with a minority of centers performing robotic MVR/r. Outcomes with MICS MVR/r have been shown to have similar morbidity and mortality rates as traditional sternotomy MV procedures but with the advantage of reduced transfusions, postoperative atrial fibrillation, and time to recovery. More recently, transcatheter mitral valve repair and replacement (TMVR/r) has become a reality. Percutaneous MV repair technology is currently FDA approved for patients with nonsurgical high-risk degenerative mitral regurgitation. Other TMVR/r technology is at various levels of preclinical and clinical investigation, although these devices are proving to be more challenging compared to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) due to the significantly more complex mitral anatomy and the greater heterogeneity of mitral disease requiring treatment. In this article, we review current techniques for MICS MVR/r and upcoming catheter-based therapies for the mitral valve. PMID:27127558

  2. Comparison of aortic annulus size by transesophageal echocardiography and computed tomography angiography with direct surgical measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanghang; Hanna, Jennifer M; Ganapathi, Asvin; Keenan, Jeffrey E; Hurwitz, Lynne M; Vavalle, John P; Kiefer, Todd L; Wang, Andrew; Harrison, J Kevin; Hughes, G Chad

    2015-06-01

    This study sought to compare the accuracy of 2-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) for noninvasive aortic annular sizing as required for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Direct intraoperative (OR) sizing is the gold standard for aortic annular measurement in surgical aortic valve replacement. Unlike surgical aortic valve replacement, TAVI requires noninvasive assessment of aortic annular dimensions for determining the size of prosthesis to be implanted and controversy exists regarding the best imaging technique for TAVI sizing. Preoperative CTA and OR TEE images of the aortic annulus in 227 patients who underwent proximal aortic surgery with OR annular sizing at the Duke University Medical Center were reviewed. Both imaging techniques were compared with direct OR measurements of aortic annulus diameter using metric sizers as the gold standard. CTA overestimated aortic annulus diameter in 72.2% of cases, with 46.3% >1 TAVI valve-size (>3 mm) overestimations, whereas TEE underestimated aortic annulus diameter in 51.1% of cases, with 16.7% >1 valve-size underestimations. Combining both techniques improved the estimation of aortic annular size. In conclusion, there are limitations to current imaging techniques for noninvasive determination of aortic annular dimensions compared with direct OR sizing. Undersizing by TEE and oversizing by CTA are common and may be related to differences in methods for sizing an elliptical structure. Combining measurements from both techniques would decrease the false exclusion rate for TAVI eligibility because of size mismatch. PMID:25846765

  3. Transcaval Aortic Access for Percutaneous Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Initial Human Experience

    PubMed Central

    Uflacker, Andre; Lim, Scott; Ragosta, Michael; Haskal, Ziv J; Lederman, Robert J.; Kern, John; Upchurch, Gilbert; Huber, Timothy; Angle, John F.; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2015-01-01

    Transcaval aortic access has been used for deployment of transcatheter aortic valves in patients in whom conventional arterial approaches are not feasible. The present report describes its use for thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in a 61-year-old man with a descending thoracic aneurysm. Transcaval access was performed in lieu of a surgical iliac conduit in view of small atherosclerotic pelvic arteries. TEVAR was successfully performed, followed by intervascular tract occlusion with the use of a ventricular septal occluder. Computed tomography 2 d later demonstrated no extravasation. At 1 mo, the aneurysm was free of endoleaks, the aortocaval tract had healed, and the patient had returned to baseline functional status. PMID:26408210

  4. Transcatheter closure of ruptured sinus of valsalva aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Arora, Ramesh; Trehan, Vijay; Rangasetty, Uma Mahesh C; Mukhopadhyay, Saibal; Thakur, Ashish K; Kalra, G S

    2004-02-01

    Percutaneous transcatheter closure of ruptured sinus of valsalva aneurysm was attempted in eight patients between January 1995 and March 2003 as an alternative strategy to surgery as this technique at present is an accepted therapeutic modality for various intracardiac defects. The age range was 14-35 years, all were male, seven in symptomatic class III and one in class IV on medical treatment. Two-dimensional and color Doppler echocardiography revealed rupture of an aneurysm of right coronary sinus into right ventricle in five and noncoronary sinus into right atrium in three and none had associated ventricular septal defect. The echo estimated size of the defect was 7-12 mm. On cardiac catheterization left ventricular end-diastolic pressure ranged from 20 to 40 mmHg and the calculated Qp/Qs ratio was 2-3.5. In all patients the defect was crossed retrogradely from the aortic side and over an arterio-venous wire loop after balloon sizing, devices were successfully deployed by antegrade venous approach (Rashkind umbrella device in two and Amplatzer occluders in six, which included Amplatzer duct occluder in five and Amplatzer septal occluder in one). One patient who had residual shunt developed hemolysis on the next day and was taken up for reintervention. That patient continued to have intermittent hemolysis and was sent for surgical repair. On follow-up (2-96 months), there was no device embolization, infective endocarditis, and aortic regurgitation. One patient died of progressive congestive heart failure while other six are asymptomatic. These data highlight that transcatheter closure is feasible and effective, especially safe with the available Amplatzer devices. Definitely, it has the advantage of obviating open heart surgery but complete occlusion is mandatory to prevent hemolysis and infective endocarditis. PMID:15009772

  5. Percutaneous Implantation of the self-expanding valve Prosthesis a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia severe aortic stenosis and porcelain aorta.

    PubMed

    Sahiner, Levent; Asil, Serkan; Kaya, Ergün Baris; Ozer, Necla; Aytemir, Kudret

    2016-10-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has shown favorable outcomes in patients with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis who are at high surgical risk or inappropriate for open heart surgery. However, concerns exist over treating patients who have porcelain aorta and familial hypercholesterolemia, due to the potential complications of aortic root and aortic annulus. In this case report, we present a patient with familial hypercholesterolemia, symptomatic severe aortic stenosis, previous coronary artery bypass grafting and porcelain aorta, who was successfully treated with TAVI using a CoreValve. PMID:27393846

  6. Aortic valve replacement with sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Paolo; Di Eusanio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common valve disease in the western world. Over the past few years the number of aortic valve replacement (AVR) interventions has increased with outcomes that have been improved despite increasing age of patients and increasing burden of comorbidities. However, despite such excellent results and its well-established position, conventional AVR has undergone great development over the previous two decades. Such progress, by way of less invasive incisions and use of new technologies, including transcatheter aortic valve implantation and sutureless valve prostheses, is intended to reduce the traumatic impact of the surgical procedure, thus fulfilling lower risk patients' expectations on the one hand, and extending the operability toward increasingly high-risk patients on the other. Sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valves are biological, pericardial prostheses that anchor within the aortic annulus with no more than three sutures. The sutureless prostheses, by avoiding the passage and the tying of the sutures, significantly reduce operative times and may improve outcomes. However, there is still a paucity of robust, evidence-based data on the role and performance of sutureless AVR. Therefore, strongest long-term data, randomized studies and registry data are required to adequately assess the durability and long-term outcomes of sutureless aortic valve replacement. PMID:27582765

  7. Aortic valve replacement with sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve prostheses.

    PubMed

    Berretta, Paolo; Di Eusanio, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common valve disease in the western world. Over the past few years the number of aortic valve replacement (AVR) interventions has increased with outcomes that have been improved despite increasing age of patients and increasing burden of comorbidities. However, despite such excellent results and its well-established position, conventional AVR has undergone great development over the previous two decades. Such progress, by way of less invasive incisions and use of new technologies, including transcatheter aortic valve implantation and sutureless valve prostheses, is intended to reduce the traumatic impact of the surgical procedure, thus fulfilling lower risk patients' expectations on the one hand, and extending the operability toward increasingly high-risk patients on the other. Sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valves are biological, pericardial prostheses that anchor within the aortic annulus with no more than three sutures. The sutureless prostheses, by avoiding the passage and the tying of the sutures, significantly reduce operative times and may improve outcomes. However, there is still a paucity of robust, evidence-based data on the role and performance of sutureless AVR. Therefore, strongest long-term data, randomized studies and registry data are required to adequately assess the durability and long-term outcomes of sutureless aortic valve replacement. PMID:27582765

  8. A Retrospective Study of 1526 Cases of Transcatheter Occlusion of Patent Ductus Arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Mei; Liang, Yong-Mei; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Guo, Bao-Jing; Zheng, Ke; Gu, Yan; Lyu, Zhen-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is one of the most common congenital heart diseases and began to get treated by transcatheter occlusion since 1997 in China. Since then, several devices have been invented for occluding PDA. This study aimed to evaluate the technical feasibility, safety, and efficacy of transcatheter occlusion of PDA with different devices. Methods: One thousand five hundred and twenty-six patients (537 boys, 989 girls) with PDA from January 1997 to September 2014 underwent descending aortogram and transcatheter occlusion procedure. We retrospectively analyzed data of these patients, including gender, age, weight, size and morphology of PDA, and devices used in transcatheter occlusion, outcomes, and postoperational complications. Results: Median age and median weight were 4.0 years (range: 0.3–52.0 years old) and 15.3 kg (range: 4.5–91.0 kg), respectively. Mean ductal diameter, aortic ductal diameter, ductal length, and pulmonary artery pressure were 3.50 ± 2.15 mm, 10.08 ± 2.46 mm, 7.49 ± 3.02 mm, and 30.21 ± 17.28 mmHg, respectively. Morphology of PDA assessed by descending aortogram was of type A in 1428 patients, type B in 6 patients, type C in 79 patients, type D in 4 patients, and type E in 9 patients according to the classification of Krichenko. Of all the 1526 patients, 1497 patients underwent transcatheter PDA closure, among which 1492 were successful. Devices used were Amplatzer duct occluder I (ADO I, 1280, 85.8%), Cook detachable coils (116, 7.8%), ADO II (ADO II, 68, 4.6%), muscular VSD occluder (12, 0.8%), and Amplatzer vascular plug (16, 1.0%). Conclusions: Excellent occlusion rates with low complication rates were achieved with all devices regardless of PDA types. With transcatheter occlusion technique and devices developing, more patients with PDA can be treated with transcatheter closure both safely and efficiently. PMID:26315073

  9. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Aortic Aneurysm Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... cause of most deaths from aortic aneurysms. Aortic Aneurysm in the United States Aortic aneurysms were the ...

  10. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis ... aortic aneurysm treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, ...