Science.gov

Sample records for jet edge lidar

  1. Enhancement of the JET edge LIDAR Thomson scattering diagnostic with ultrafast detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kempenaars, M.; Flanagan, J. C.; Walsh, M. J.; Beurskens, M.; Balboa, I.

    2008-10-15

    The edge light detection and ranging (LIDAR) Thomson scattering diagnostic at the Joint European Torus fusion experiment uses a 3 J ruby laser to measure the electron density and temperature profile at the plasma edge. The original system used a 1 GHz digitizer and detectors with response times of {approx_equal}650 ps and effective quantum efficiencies <7%. This system has recently been enhanced with the installation of a new 8 GHz digitizer and four new ultrafast GaAsP microchannel plate photomultiplier tube detectors with response times of <300 ps and effective quantum efficiencies in the range of {approx}13%-20% (averaged over {lambda}=500-700 nm). This upgrade has enabled the spatial resolution to be reduced to {approx}6.3 cm along the laser line of sight for a laser pulse of 300 ps full width at half maximum, which is close to the requirements for the ITER core LIDAR. Performance analysis shows that the new system will have an effective spatial resolution of up to 1 cm in the magnetic midplane via magnetic flux surface mapping.

  2. Enhancement of the JET edge LIDAR Thomson scattering diagnostic with ultrafast detectors.

    PubMed

    Kempenaars, M; Flanagan, J C; Giudicotti, L; Walsh, M J; Beurskens, M; Balboa, I

    2008-10-01

    The edge light detection and ranging (LIDAR) Thomson scattering diagnostic at the Joint European Torus fusion experiment uses a 3 J ruby laser to measure the electron density and temperature profile at the plasma edge. The original system used a 1 GHz digitizer and detectors with response times of approximately 650 ps and effective quantum efficiencies <7%. This system has recently been enhanced with the installation of a new 8 GHz digitizer and four new ultrafast GaAsP microchannel plate photomultiplier tube detectors with response times of <300 ps and effective quantum efficiencies in the range of approximately 13%-20% (averaged over lambda=500-700 nm). This upgrade has enabled the spatial resolution to be reduced to approximately 6.3 cm along the laser line of sight for a laser pulse of 300 ps full width at half maximum, which is close to the requirements for the ITER core LIDAR. Performance analysis shows that the new system will have an effective spatial resolution of up to 1 cm in the magnetic midplane via magnetic flux surface mapping. PMID:19068515

  3. Mapping Forest Edge Using Aerial Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLean, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    Slightly more than 60% of Massachusetts is covered with forest and this land cover type is invaluable for the protection and maintenance of our natural resources and is a carbon sink for the state. However, Massachusetts is currently experiencing a decline in forested lands, primarily due to the expansion of human development (Thompson et al., 2011). Of particular concern is the loss of "core areas" or the areas within forests that are not influenced by other land cover types. These areas are of significant importance to native flora and fauna, since they generally are not subject to invasion by exotic species and are more resilient to the effects of climate change (Campbell et al., 2009). However, the expansion of development has reduced the amount of this core area, but the exact amount is still unknown. Current methods of estimating core area are not particularly precise, since edge, or the area of the forest that is most influenced by other land cover types, is quite variable and situation dependent. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to devise a new method for identifying areas that could qualify as "edge" within the Harvard Forest, in Petersham MA, using new remote sensing techniques. We sampled along eight transects perpendicular to the edge of an abandoned golf course within the Harvard Forest property. Vegetation inventories as well as Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) at different heights within the canopy were used to determine edge depth. These measurements were then compared with small-footprint waveform aerial LiDAR datasets and imagery to model edge depths within Harvard Forest.

  4. Lidar Measurements of Summer Low Level Jet Events over Baltimore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, R.; Weldegaber, M.; Woodman, M.; Seybold, M.; Demoz, B.; McCann, K. J.; Whiteman, D. N.; Hoff, R. M.

    2008-05-01

    Remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols and water vapor, in the lower troposphere, have been carried out at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) by the Atmospheric Lidar Group during summer low level jet events over Maryland for two years and especially during the Water Vapor Variability - Satellite/Sondes (WAVES) campaigns of 2006 and 2007. For lofted layers encountered the aerosol lidar ratio (Sa) was computed to determine the aerosol extinction and subsequently the optical depth. Aerosol stratification and disturbance of nocturnal boundary layer, observed by lidar at UMBC, was confirmed by Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) wind profiler measurements. The vertical and horizontal distribution of the low level jet was identified with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to characterize the nature and possible effects of the incoming low level jet air mass on surface ozone within the boundary layer. Ground measurements from MDE monitoring stations and lidar optical depth are compared to evaluate aerosol loading due to long range transport in the boundary layer.

  5. Edge-Based Registration for Airborne Imagery and LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. C.; Lo, C. Y.

    2012-07-01

    Aerial imagery and LIDAR points are two important data sources for building reconstruction in a geospatial area. Aerial imagery implies building contours with planimetric features; LIDAR data explicitly represent building geometries using three-dimensional discrete point clouds. Data integration may take advantage of merits from two data sources in building reconstruction and change detection. However, heterogeneous data may contain a relative displacement because of different sensors and the capture time. To reduce this displacement, data registration should be an essential step. Therefore, this investigation proposes an edge-based approach to register these two data sets in three parts: (1) data preprocessing; (2) feature detection; and (3) data registration. The first step rasterizes laser point clouds into a pseudo-grid digital surface model (PDSM), which describes the relief with the original elevation information. The second step implements topological analyses to detect image edges and three-dimensional structure lines from the aerial image and PDSM. These detected features provide the initial positions of building shapes for registration. The third part registers these two data sets in Hough space to compensate for the displacement. Because each building may have prominent geometric structures, the proposed scheme transforms these two groups of edges, and estimates the correspondence by the Hough distribution. The following procedure then iteratively compares two groups of Hough patterns, which are from an aerial image and LIDAR data. This iterative procedure stops when the displacement is within a threshold. The test area is located in Taipei City, Taiwan. DMC system captured the aerial image with 18-cm spatial resolution. The LIDAR data were scanned with a 10-point density per square meter using the Leica ALS50 system. This study proposed a 50 cm spatial resolution of PDSM, which is slightly larger than the point spacing. The experiment selected two

  6. Double-Edge Molecular Technique for Doppler Lidar Wind Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flesia, Cristina; Korb, C. Laurence

    1998-01-01

    The double-edge lidar technique for measuring the wind using molecular backscatter is described. Two high spectral resolution edge filters are located in the wings of the Rayleigh-Brillouin profile. This doubles the signal change per unit Doppler shift, the sensitivity, and gives nearly a factor of two improvement in measurement accuracy. The use of a crossover region is described where the sensitivity of a molecular and aerosol-based measurement are equal. This desensitizes the molecular measurement to the effects of aerosol scattering over a frequency range of +/- 100 m/s. We give methods for correcting for short-term frequency jitter and drift using a laser reference frequency measurement and methods for long-term frequency correction using a servo control system. The effects of Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering on the measurement are shown to be significant and are included in the analysis. Simulations for a conical scanning satellite-based lidar at 355 nm show an accuracy of 2-3 m/s for altitudes of 2 to 15 km for a 1 km vertical resolution, a satellite altitude of 400 km and a 200 km x 200 km spatial resolution. Results of ground based wind measurements are presented.

  7. A high-resolution Lidar-Thomson scattering diagnostic for JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajemirokun, H.; Gowers, C.; Nielsen, P.; Salzmann, H.; Hirsch, K.

    1990-10-01

    A LIDAR-Thomson scattering system with better than 5 cm spatial resolution to resolve edge electron temperature and density gradients in H-mode operation in JET is needed. A dynamic range in measurable electron temperature of 0.1-1.5 keV and a minimum detectable electron density of 1019/m3 are required. To achieve these levels of performance, it is planned to use a modified section of the existing JET LIDAR-Thomson scattering system. A new detection system, consisting of a streak camera and an intensifier unit, will be used. Spectral dispersion is to be performed by a three-channel edge filter spectrometer. Recording and digitization of the scattered signal will be performed by a CCD camera read out by a personal computer. The system is described and results of experiments to determine the minimum visible light levels using a commercial streak camera, intensifier unit, and CCD camera and a pulsed laser diode light source are briefly presented. In addition, simulations of expected signal-to-noise ratio performance are discussed.

  8. Wind Lidar Edge Technique Shuttle Demonstration Mission: Anemos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leete, Stephen J.; Bundas, David J.; Martino, Anthony J.; Carnahan, Timothy M.; Zukowski, Barbara J.

    1998-01-01

    A NASA mission is planned to demonstrate the technology for a wind lidar. This will implement the direct detection edge technique. The Anemos instrument will fly on the Space Transportation System (STS), or shuttle, aboard a Hitchhiker bridge. The instrument is being managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center as an in-house build, with science leadership from the GSFC Laboratory for Atmospheres, Mesoscale Atmospheric Processes Branch. During a roughly ten-day mission, the instrument will self calibrate and adjust for launch induced mis-alignments, and perform a campaign of measurements of tropospheric winds. The mission is planned for early 2001. The instrument is being developed under the auspices of NASA's New Millennium Program, in parallel with a comparable mission being managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. That mission, called SPARCLE, will implement the coherent technique. NASA plans to fly the two missions together on the same shuttle flight, to allow synergy of wind measurements and a direct comparison of performance.

  9. Comparison of edge detection techniques for the automatic information extraction of Lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; di, L.; Huang, X.; Li, D.

    2008-05-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in information extraction from Lidar point cloud data. Many automatic edge detection algorithms have been applied to extracting information from Lidar data. Generally they can be divided as three major categories: early vision gradient operators, optimal detectors and operators using parametric fitting models. Lidar point cloud includes the intensity information and the geographic information. Thus, traditional edge detectors used in remote sensed images can take advantage with the coordination information provided by point data. However, derivation of complex terrain features from Lidar data points depends on the intensity properties and topographic relief of each scene. Take road for example, in some urban area, road has the alike intensity as buildings, but the topographic relationship of road is distinct. The edge detector for road in urban area is different from the detector for buildings. Therefore, in Lidar extraction, each kind of scene has its own suitable edge detector. This paper compares application of the different edge detectors from the previous paragraph to various terrain areas, in order to figure out the proper algorithm for respective terrain type. The Canny, EDISON and SUSAN algorithms were applied to data points with the intensity character and topographic relationship of Lidar data. The Lidar data for test are over different terrain areas, such as an urban area with a mass of buildings, a rural area with vegetation, an area with slope, or an area with a bridge, etc. Results using these edge detectors are compared to determine which algorithm is suitable for a specific terrain area. Key words: Edge detector, Extraction, Lidar, Point data

  10. Oscillations of a Turbulent Jet Incident Upon an Edge

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. Lin; D. Rockwell

    2000-09-19

    For the case of a jet originating from a fully turbulent channel flow and impinging upon a sharp edge, the possible onset and nature of coherent oscillations has remained unexplored. In this investigation, high-image-density particle image velocimetry and surface pressure measurements are employed to determine the instantaneous, whole-field characteristics of the turbulent jet-edge interaction in relation to the loading of the edge. It is demonstrated that even in absence of acoustic resonant or fluid-elastic effects, highly coherent, self-sustained oscillations rapidly emerge above the turbulent background. Two clearly identifiable modes of instability are evident. These modes involve large-scale vortices that are phase-locked to the gross undulations of the jet and its interaction with the edge, and small-scale vortices, which are not phase-locked. Time-resolved imaging of instantaneous vorticity and velocity reveals the form, orientation, and strength of the large-scale concentrations of vorticity approaching the edge in relation to rapid agglomeration of small-scale vorticity concentrations. Such vorticity field-edge interactions exhibit rich complexity, relative to the simplified pattern of vortex-edge interaction traditionally employed for the quasi-laminar edgetone. Furthermore, these interactions yield highly nonlinear surface pressure signatures. The origin of this nonlinearity, involving coexistence of multiple frequency components, is interpreted in terms of large- and small-scale vortices embedded in distributed vorticity layers at the edge. Eruption of the surface boundary layer on the edge due to passage of the large-scale vortex does not occur; rather apparent secondary vorticity concentrations are simply due to distension of the oppositely-signed vorticity layer at the tip of the edge. The ensemble-averaged turbulent statistics of the jet quickly take on an identity that is distinct from the statistics of the turbulent boundary layer in the channel

  11. The LIDAR Thomson scattering diagnostic on JET (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzmann, H.; Bundgaard, J.; Gadd, A.; Gowers, C.; Hansen, K. B.; Hirsch, K.; Nielsen, P.; Reed, K.; Schrödter, C.; Weisberg, K.

    1988-08-01

    By combining the time-of-flight or LIDAR principle with a Thomson backscatter diagnostic, spatial profiles of the electron temperature and density are measured in a magnetically confined fusion plasma. This technique was realized for the first time on the JET tokamak. A ruby laser (3-J pulse energy, 300-ps pulse duration, 0.5-Hz repetition rate) together with a 700-MHz bandwidth detection and registration system yields a spatial resolution of about 12 cm. A spectrometer with six channels in the wavelength range 400-800 nm gives a dynamic range of the temperature measurements of 0.3-20 keV. The stray light problem in the backscatter geometry is overcome by spectral discrimination and gating of the photomultipliers. A ruby filter in the spectral channel containing the laser wavelength allows calibration of the vignetting along the line of sight by means of Raman scattering, enabling the measurement of density profiles. The low level of background signal due to the short integration time for a single spatial point yields low statistical errors (ΔTe /Te ≊6%, Δne /ne ≊4% at Te =6 keV, ne =3×1019 m-3 ). Goodness-of-fit tests indicate that the systematic errors are within the same limits. The system is described and examples of measurements are given.

  12. Doppler Lidar Measurements of Tropospheric Wind Profiles Using the Aerosol Double Edge Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Li, Steven X.; Mathur, Savyasachee; Korb, C. Laurence; Chen, Huailin

    2000-01-01

    The development of a ground based direct detection Doppler lidar based on the recently described aerosol double edge technique is reported. A pulsed, injection seeded Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm is used to make range resolved measurements of atmospheric winds in the free troposphere. The wind measurements are determined by measuring the Doppler shift of the laser signal backscattered from atmospheric aerosols. The lidar instrument and double edge method are described and initial tropospheric wind profile measurements are presented. Wind profiles are reported for both day and night operation. The measurements extend to altitudes as high as 14 km and are compared to rawinsonde wind profile data from Dulles airport in Virginia. Vertical resolution of the lidar measurements is 330 m and the rms precision of the measurements is a low as 0.6 m/s.

  13. Double-Edge Molecular Measurement of Lidar Wind Profiles in the VALID Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Flesia, Cristina; Lolli, Simone; Hirt, Christian

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a transportable container based direct detection Doppler lidar based on the double-edge molecular technique. The pulsed solid state system was built at the University of Geneva. It was used to make range resolved measurements of the atmospheric wind field as part of the VALID campaign at the Observatoire de Haute Provence in Provence, France in July 1999. Comparison of our lidar wind measurements, which were analyzed without knowledge of the results of rawinsonde measurements made under the supervision of ESA, show good agreement with these rawinsondes. These are the first Doppler lidar field measurements made with an eyesafe direct detection molecular-based system at 355 nm and serve as a demonstrator for future spaceborne direct detection wind systems such as the Atmospheric Dynamics mission. Winds are an important contributor to sea surface temperature measurements made with the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and also affect the TRMM rainfall estimates.

  14. Edge technique - Theory and application to the lidar measurement of atmospheric wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Gentry, Bruce M.; Weng, Chi Y.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the theory of the edge technique, a powerful method for the detection and measurement of small frequency shifts. It can be employed with a lidar to obtain range-resolved measurements of wind with high accuracy and high vertical resolution. The technique can be applied to measure wind with a lidar by using either the aerosol or molecular backscattered signal. Simulations for a ground-based lidar at 1.06 micron using reasonable instrumental parameters show an accuracy of the vector components of the wind which is better than 0.5 m/s from the ground to an altitude of 20 km for a 100-m vertical resolution and a 100-shot average.

  15. The Prediction of Noise Due to Jet Turbulence Convecting Past Flight Vehicle Trailing Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A. E.

    2014-01-01

    High intensity acoustic radiation occurs when turbulence convects past airframe trailing edges. A mathematical model is developed to predict this acoustic radiation. The model is dependent on the local flow and turbulent statistics above the trailing edge of the flight vehicle airframe. These quantities are dependent on the jet and flight vehicle Mach numbers and jet temperature. A term in the model approximates the turbulent statistics of single-stream heated jet flows and is developed based upon measurement. The developed model is valid for a wide range of jet Mach numbers, jet temperature ratios, and flight vehicle Mach numbers. The model predicts traditional trailing edge noise if the jet is not interacting with the airframe. Predictions of mean-flow quantities and the cross-spectrum of static pressure near the airframe trailing edge are compared with measurement. Finally, predictions of acoustic intensity are compared with measurement and the model is shown to accurately capture the phenomenon.

  16. Double-Edge Molecular Measurement of Lidar Wind Profiles at 355 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flesia, Cristina; Korb, C. Laurence; Hirt, Christian; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We built a direct detection Doppler lidar based on the double-edge molecular technique and made the first molecular based wind measurements using the eyesafe 355 nm wavelength. Three etalon bandpasses are obtained with Step etalons on a single pair of etalon plates. Long-term frequency drift of the laser and the capacitively stabilized etalon is removed by locking the etalon to the laser frequency. We use a low angle design to avoid polarization effects. Wind measurements of 1 to 2 m/s accuracy are obtained to 10 km altitude with 5 mJ of laser energy, a 750s integration, and a 25 cm telescope. Good agreement is obtained between the lidar and rawinsonde measurements.

  17. An automated algorithm for extracting road edges from terrestrial mobile LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; McElhinney, Conor P.; Lewis, Paul; McCarthy, Timothy

    2013-11-01

    Terrestrial mobile laser scanning systems provide rapid and cost effective 3D point cloud data which can be used for extracting features such as the road edge along a route corridor. This information can assist road authorities in carrying out safety risk assessment studies along road networks. The knowledge of the road edge is also a prerequisite for the automatic estimation of most other road features. In this paper, we present an algorithm which has been developed for extracting left and right road edges from terrestrial mobile LiDAR data. The algorithm is based on a novel combination of two modified versions of the parametric active contour or snake model. The parameters involved in the algorithm are selected empirically and are fixed for all the road sections. We have developed a novel way of initialising the snake model based on the navigation information obtained from the mobile mapping vehicle. We tested our algorithm on different types of road sections representing rural, urban and national primary road sections. The successful extraction of road edges from these multiple road section environments validates our algorithm. These findings and knowledge provide valuable insights as well as a prototype road edge extraction tool-set, for both national road authorities and survey companies.

  18. a Fast and Robust Algorithm for Road Edges Extraction from LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Kaijin; Sun, Kai; Ding, Kou; Shu, Zhen

    2016-06-01

    Fast mapping of roads plays an important role in many geospatial applications, such as infrastructure planning, traffic monitoring, and driver assistance. How to extract various road edges fast and robustly is a challenging task. In this paper, we present a fast and robust algorithm for the automatic road edges extraction from terrestrial mobile LiDAR data. The algorithm is based on a key observation: most roads around edges have difference in elevation and road edges with pavement are seen in two different planes. In our algorithm, we firstly extract a rough plane based on RANSAC algorithm, and then multiple refined planes which only contains pavement are extracted from the rough plane. The road edges are extracted based on these refined planes. In practice, there is a serious problem that the rough and refined planes usually extracted badly due to rough roads and different density of point cloud. To eliminate the influence of rough roads, the technology which is similar with the difference of DSM (digital surface model) and DTM (digital terrain model) is used, and we also propose a method which adjust the point clouds to a similar density to eliminate the influence of different density. Experiments show the validities of the proposed method with multiple datasets (e.g. urban road, highway, and some rural road). We use the same parameters through the experiments and our algorithm can achieve real-time processing speeds.

  19. Edge technique lidar for high accuracy, high spatial resolution wind measurement in the Planetary Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Gentry, Bruce M.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of the Army Research Office (ARO) Geosciences Program is to measure the three dimensional wind field in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over a measurement volume with a 50 meter spatial resolution and with measurement accuracies of the order of 20 cm/sec. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate a high vertical resolution lidar experiment using the edge technique for high accuracy measurement of the atmospheric wind field to meet the ARO requirements. This experiment allows the powerful capabilities of the edge technique to be quantitatively evaluated. In the edge technique, a laser is located on the steep slope of a high resolution spectral filter. This produces large changes in measured signal for small Doppler shifts. A differential frequency technique renders the Doppler shift measurement insensitive to both laser and filter frequency jitter and drift. The measurement is also relatively insensitive to the laser spectral width for widths less than the width of the edge filter. Thus, the goal is to develop a system which will yield a substantial improvement in the state of the art of wind profile measurement in terms of both vertical resolution and accuracy and which will provide a unique capability for atmospheric wind studies.

  20. The Effect of Nozzle Trailing Edge Thickness on Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Kinzie, Kevin; Haskin, Henry

    2004-01-01

    The effect of nozzle trailing edge thickness on broadband acoustic radiation and the production of tones is investigated for coannular nozzles. Experiments were performed for a core nozzle trailing edge thickness between 0.38 mm and 3.17 mm. The on-set of discrete tones was found to be predominantly affected by the velocity ratio, the ratio of the fan velocity to the core velocity, although some dependency on trailing edge thickness was also noted. For a core nozzle trailing edge thickness greater than or equal to 0.89 mm, tones were produced for velocity ratios between 0.91 and 1.61. For a constant nozzle trailing edge thickness, the frequency varied almost linearly with the core velocity. The Strouhal number based on the core velocity changed with nozzle trailing edge thickness and varied between 0.16 and 0.2 for the core nozzles used in the experiments. Increases in broadband noise with increasing trailing edge thickness were observed for tone producing and non-tone producing conditions. A variable thickness trailing edge (crenellated) nozzle resulted in no tonal production and a reduction of the broadband trailing edge noise relative to that of the corresponding constant thickness trailing edge.

  1. Detecting the planetary boundary layer height from low-level jet with Doppler lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de A. Moreira, G.; Marques, M. T. A.; Nakaema, W.; Moreira, A. C. de C. A.; Landulfo, E.

    2015-10-01

    The planetary boundary layer (PBL) is an important region of study in the troposphere and one of its more important variable: the PBL height (PBLH) is not easy to detect, mainly in stable conditions due to its complexity. In order to detect the PBLH in stable conditions, in this paper, we apply the low-lev jet (LLJ) method using Doppler lidar measurements, which consists on detecting the LLJ and its maximum velocity height, corresponding to the PBLH. In addition, we analyze this method by comparing and relating it with the variance and bulk Richardson number (BRN) method, ensuring its efficiency.

  2. Interaction of a Liquid Gallium Jet with ISTTOK Edge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, R. B.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Sarakovskis, A.; Pereira, T.; Figueiredo, J.; Carvalho, B.; Soares, A.; Duarte, P.; Varandas, C.; Lielausis, O.; Klyukin, A.; Platacis, E.; Tale, I.

    2008-04-01

    The use of liquid metals as plasma facing components in tokamaks has recently experienced a renewed interest stimulated by their advantages in the development of a fusion reactor. Liquid metals have been proposed to solve problems related to the erosion and neutronic activation of solid walls submitted to high power loads allowing an efficient heat exhaust from fusion devices. Presently the most promising candidate materials are lithium and gallium. However, lithium has a short liquid state range when compared, for example, with gallium that has essentially better thermal properties and lower vapor pressure. To explore further these properties, ISTTOK tokamak is being used to test the interaction of a free flying, fully formed liquid gallium jet with the plasma. The interacting, 2.3 mm diameter, jet is generated by hydrostatic pressure and has a 2.5 m/s flow velocity. The liquid metal injector has been build to allow the positioning of the jet inside the tokamak chamber, within a 13 mm range. This paper presents the first obtained experimental results concerning the liquid gallium jet-plasma interaction. A stable jet has been obtained, which was not noticeably affected by the magnetic field transients. ISTTOK has been successfully operated with the gallium jet without degradation of the discharge or a significant plasma contamination by liquid metal. This observation is supported by spectroscopic measurements showing that gallium radiation is limited to the region around the jet. Furthermore, the power deposited on the jet has been evaluated at different radial locations and the surface temperature increase estimated.

  3. Infrared lidar windshear detection for commercial aircraft and the edge technique, a new method for atmospheric wind measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Targ, Russell; Bowles, Roland L.; Korb, C. L.; Gentry, Bruce M.; Souilhac, Dominique

    1991-01-01

    The edge technique, a new method for measuring small frequency shifts, is described. The technique allows high-accuracy measurement of atmospheric winds (0.2-1 m/s) with a high vertical resolution (10 m) using currently available technology. With the edge technique, a lidar system can be used to obtain range resolved measurements of the wind in the atmosphere from the ground, aircraft, or spaceborne platforms. The edge technique can be used with different lasers over a broad range of wavelengths.

  4. Development flight tests of JetStar LFC leading-edge flight test experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Fischer, Michael C.

    1987-01-01

    The overall objective of the flight tests on the JetStar aircraft was to demonstrate the effectiveness and reliability of laminar flow control under representative flight conditions. One specific objective was to obtain laminar flow on the JetStar leading-edge test articles for the design and off-design conditions. Another specific objective was to obtain operational experience on a Laminar Flow Control (LFC) leading-edge system in a simulated airline service. This included operational experience with cleaning requirements, the effect of clogging, possible foreign object damage, erosion, and the effects of ice particle and cloud encounters. Results are summarized.

  5. On the Existence of Subharmonic Screech in Choked Circular Jets from a Sharp-Edged Orifice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2014-01-01

    Experiments are performed in choked circular hot and cold nitrogen jets issuing from a 2.44 cm diameter sharp-edged orifice at a fully expanded jet Mach number of 1.85 in an effort to investigate the character of screech phenomenon. The stagnation temperature of the cold and the hot jets are 299 K and 319 K respectively. The axial distribution of the centerline Mach number was obtained with a pitot tube, while the screech data (frequency and amplitude) at different axial and radial stations were measured with the aid of microphones. The fundamental screech frequency of the hot jet is slightly increased relative to that of the cold jet. It is concluded that temperature effects on the screech amplitude are manifested with regard to the fundamental and the subharmonic even at relatively small temperature range considered.

  6. LABVIEW graphical user interface for precision multichannel alignment of Raman lidar at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Table Mountain Facility.

    PubMed

    Aspey, R A; McDermid, I S; Leblanc, T; Howe, J W; Walsh, T D

    2008-09-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory operates lidar systems at Table Mountain Facility (TMF), California (34.4 degrees N, 117.7 degrees W) and Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii (19.5 degrees N, 155.6 degrees W) under the framework of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change. To complement these systems a new Raman lidar has been developed at TMF with particular attention given to optimizing water vapor profile measurements up to the tropopause and lower stratosphere. The lidar has been designed for accuracies of 5% up to 12 km in the free troposphere and a detection capability of <5 ppmv. One important feature of the lidar is a precision alignment system using range resolved data from eight Licel transient recorders, allowing fully configurable alignment via a LABVIEW/C++ graphical user interface (GUI). This allows the lidar to be aligned on any channel while simultaneously displaying signals from other channels at configurable altitude/bin combinations. The general lidar instrumental setup and the details of the alignment control system, data acquisition, and GUI alignment software are described. Preliminary validation results using radiosonde and lidar intercomparisons are briefly presented. PMID:19044439

  7. Arc Jet Results on Candidate High Temperature Coatings for NASA's NGLT Refractory Composite Leading Edge Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlhorst, C. W.; Vaughn, W. L.; Lewis, R. K.; Milhoan, J. D.

    2004-01-01

    In 2000, arc jet testing was conducted on thirteen material systems for possible use on the nose leading edge of the Hyper-X program s X-43A Mach 10 vehicle. Six material systems survived 3, 130- second cycles. To support NASA s Next Generation Launch Technology Programs (NGLT) need for passive refractory composite leading edges with multiple reuse capability at temperatures up to 3600 F, these six materials were subjected to an expanded arc jet test program. This expanded arc jet test program included three phases. The purpose of the first phase was to generate emissivity data as a function of temperature. The purpose of the second phase was to determine if the material systems had any thermal cycling durability, and the third phase was to determine whether the materials could survive an arc jet test of one hour duration. Some of the coating systems were found to have very low emissivities, suggesting that they would not be good candidates for leading edges coating. Other coating systems survived both the second and third phases of the test program and showed potential for use as an oxidation protection coating for leading edges. This presentation summarizes the test program results.

  8. Lidar remote sensing of cloud formation caused by low-level jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jia; Felton, Melvin; Lei, Liqiao; McCormick, M. Patrick; Delgado, Ruben; St. Pé, Alexandra

    2016-05-01

    In May 2014, the East Hampton Roads Aerosol Flux campaign was conducted at Hampton University to examine small-scale aerosol transport using aerosol, Raman, and Doppler lidars and rawindsonde launches. We present the results of analyses performed on these high-resolution planetary boundary layer and lower atmospheric measurements, with a focus on the low-level jets (LLJs) that form in this region during spring and summer. We present a detailed case study of a LLJ lasting from evening of 20 May to morning of 21 May using vertical profiles of aerosol backscatter, wind speed and direction, water vapor mixing ratio, temperature, and turbulence structure. We show with higher resolution than in previous studies that enhanced nighttime turbulence triggered by LLJs can cause the aerosol and water vapor content of the boundary layer to be transported vertically and form a well-mixed region containing the cloud condensation nuclei that are necessary for cloud formation.

  9. The Effect of Break Edge Configuration on the Aerodynamics of Anti-Ice Jet Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatar, V.; Yildizay, H.; Aras, H.

    2015-05-01

    One of the components of a turboprop gas turbine engine is the Front Bearing Structure (FBS) which leads air into the compressor. FBS directly encounters with ambient air, as a consequence ice accretion may occur on its static vanes. There are several aerodynamic parameters which should be considered in the design of anti-icing system of FBS, such as diameter, position, exit angle of discharge holes, etc. This research focuses on the effects of break edge configuration over anti-ice jet flow. Break edge operation is a process which is applied to the hole in order to avoid sharp edges which cause high stress concentration. Numerical analyses and flow visualization test have been conducted. Four different break edge configurations were used for this investigation; without break edge, 0.35xD, 74xD, 0.87xD. Three mainstream flow conditions at the inlet of the channel are defined; 10m/s, 20 m/s and 40 m/s. Shear stresses are extracted from numerical analyses near the trailing edge of pressure surface where ice may occur under icing conditions. A specific flow visualization method was used for the experimental study. Vane surface near the trailing edge was dyed and thinner was injected into anti-ice jet flow in order to remove dye from the vane surface. Hence, film effect on the surface could be computed for each testing condition. Thickness of the dye removal area of each case was examined. The results show noticeable effects of break edge operation on jet flow, and the air film effectiveness decreases when mainstream inlet velocity decreases.

  10. Unconfined, melt edge electrospinning from multiple, spontaneous, self-organized polymer jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingqing; Curtis, Colin K.; Muthuraman Thoppey, Nagarajan; Bochinski, Jason R.; Gorga, Russell E.; Clarke, Laura I.

    2014-12-01

    Commercial grade polyethylene is melt electrospun from a thin film of unconfined molten polymer on a heated, electrically-grounded plate. Under the influence of an applied electric field, the melt spontaneously forms fingering perturbations at the plate edge which then evolve into emitting fiber-forming jets. Jet-to-jet spacing (˜5 mm), which is dependent on the applied voltage amplitude, is in agreement with estimates from a simple theoretical treatment. The broad applicability of the approach is verified by spinning a second polymer—polycaprolactone. In both cases, the fabricated fibers are similar in quality to those obtained under needle melt electrospinning; however for this method, there are no nozzles to clog and an enhanced production rate up to 80 mg min-1 is achieved from approximately 20-25 simultaneous parallel jets. The process of jet formation, effective flow rates, cone-jet diameters, as well as limits on jet density and differences with polymer type are compared with theoretical models. This particular approach allows facile, high throughput micro- and nano-fiber formation from a wide variety of thermoplastics and other high viscosity fluids without the use of solvents or the persistent issues of clogging and pumping that hamper traditional methods, resulting in mechanically strong meso-scale fibers highly desirable for industrial applications.

  11. Nocturnal Low-Level-Jet-Dominated Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observed by a Doppler Lidar Over Oklahoma City during JU2003

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yansen; Klipp, Cheryl L.; Garvey, Dennis M.; Ligon, David; Williamson, Chatt C.; Chang, Sam S.; Newsom, Rob K.; Calhoun, Ron

    2007-12-01

    Boundary layer wind data observed by a Doppler lidar and sonic anemometers during the mornings of three intensive observational periods (IOP2, IOP3, and IOP7) of the Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field experiment are analyzed to extract the mean and turbulent characteristics of airflow over Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. A strong nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) dominated the flow in the boundary layer over the measurement domain from midnight to the morning hours. Lidar scans through the LLJ taken after sunrise indicate that the LLJ elevation shows a gradual increase of 25-100 m over the urban area relative to that over the upstream suburban area. The mean wind speed beneath the jet over the urban area is about 10%-15% slower than that over the suburban area. Sonic anemometer observations combined with Doppler lidar observations in the urban and suburban areas are also analyzed to investigate the boundary layer turbulence production in the LLJ-dominated atmospheric boundary layer. The turbulence kinetic energy was higher over the urban domain mainly because of the shear production of building surfaces and building wakes. Direct transport of turbulent momentum flux from the LLJ to the urban street level was very small because of the relatively high elevation of the jet. However, since the LLJ dominated the mean wind in the boundary layer, the turbulence kinetic energy in the urban domain is correlated directly with the LLJ maximum speed and inversely with its height. The results indicate that the jet Richardson number is a reasonably good indicator for turbulent kinetic energy over the urban domain in the LLJ-dominated atmospheric boundary layer.

  12. Infrared lidar windshear detection for commercial aircraft and the edge technique, a new method for atmospheric wind measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Targ, Russell; Bowles, Roland L.; Korg, C. L.; Gentry, Bruce M.; Souilhac, Dominique J.

    1991-05-01

    National attention has focused on the critical problem of detecting and avoiding windshear since the crash on August 2, 1985, of a Lockheed L-1011 at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. As part of The NASA/FAA National Integrated Windshear Program, we have defined a measurable windshear hazard index that can be remotely sensed from an aircraft, to give the pilot information about the wind conditions he will experience at some later time if he continues along the present flight path. Our technology analysis and end-to-end performance simulation, which measured signal-to-noise ratios and resulting wind velocity errors for competing coherent lidar systems, showed that a Ho:YAG lidar at a wavelength of 2.1 μm and a CO2 lidar at 10.6 m can give the pilot information about the line-of-sight component of a windshear threat in a region extending from his present position to 2 to 4 km in front of the aircraft. This constitutes a warning time of 20 to 40 s, even under conditions of moderately heavy precipitation. Using these results, a Coherent Lidar Airborne Shear Sensor (CLASS), using a Q-switched CO2 laser at 10.6 μm, is being designed and developed for flight evaluation in early 1992. The edge technique is a powerful new method for the measurement of small frequency shifts which allows high accuracy measurement of atmospheric winds (0.2 to 1 m/sec) with high vertical resolution (10 meters) using currently available technology.

  13. Bayesian modeling of JET Li-BES for edge electron density profiles using Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Sehyun; Svensson, Jakob; Brix, Mathias; Ghim, Young-Chul; JET Contributors Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    A Bayesian model for the JET lithium beam emission spectroscopy (Li-BES) system has been developed to infer edge electron density profiles. The 26 spatial channels measure emission profiles with ~15 ms temporal resolution and ~1 cm spatial resolution. The lithium I (2p-2s) line radiation in an emission spectrum is calculated using a multi-state model, which expresses collisions between the neutral lithium beam atoms and the plasma particles as a set of differential equations. The emission spectrum is described in the model including photon and electronic noise, spectral line shapes, interference filter curves, and relative calibrations. This spectral modeling gets rid of the need of separate background measurements for calculating the intensity of the line radiation. Gaussian processes are applied to model both emission spectrum and edge electron density profile, and the electron temperature to calculate all the rate coefficients is obtained from the JET high resolution Thomson scattering (HRTS) system. The posterior distributions of the edge electron density profile are explored via the numerical technique and the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) samplings. See the Appendix of F. Romanelli et al., Proceedings of the 25th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference 2014, Saint Petersburg, Russia.

  14. Nonlinear Impact of Edge Localized Modes on Carbon Erosion in the Divertor of the JET Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Kreter, A.; Esser, H. G.; Brezinsek, S.; Kirschner, A.; Philipps, V.; Coad, J. P.; Fundamenski, W.; Widdowson, A.; Pitts, R. A.

    2009-01-30

    The impact of edge localized modes (ELMs) carrying energies of up to 450 kJ on carbon erosion in the JET inner divertor is assessed by means of time resolved measurements using an in situ quartz microbalance diagnostic. The inner target erosion is strongly nonlinearly dependent on the ELM energy: a single 400 kJ ELM produces the same carbon erosion as ten 150 kJ events. The ELM-induced enhanced erosion is attributed to the presence of codeposited carbon-deuterium layers on the inner divertor target, which are thermally decomposed under the impact of ELMs.

  15. Stationary Zonal Flows during the Formation of the Edge Transport Barrier in the JET Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Hillesheim, J.

    2016-01-01

    High spatial resolution Doppler backscattering measurements in JET have enabled new insights into the development of the edge E-r. We observe fine-scale spatial structures in the edge E-r well with a wave number k(r rho i) approximate to 0.4-0.8, consistent with stationary zonal flows, the characteristics of which vary with density. The zonal flow amplitude and wavelength both decrease with local collisionality, such that the zonal flow E x B shear increases. Above the minimum of the L-H transition power threshold dependence on density, the zonal flows are present during L mode and disappear following the H-mode transition, while below the minimum they are reduced below measurable amplitude during L mode, before the L-H transition.

  16. Stationary Zonal Flows during the Formation of the Edge Transport Barrier in the JET Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Hillesheim, J C; Delabie, E; Meyer, H; Maggi, C F; Meneses, L; Poli, E; Jet Contributors

    2016-02-12

    High spatial resolution Doppler backscattering measurements in JET have enabled new insights into the development of the edge Er. We observe fine-scale spatial structures in the edge Er well with a wave number krρi≈0.4-0.8, consistent with stationary zonal flows, the characteristics of which vary with density. The zonal flow amplitude and wavelength both decrease with local collisionality, such that the zonal flow E×B shear increases. Above the minimum of the L-H transition power threshold dependence on density, the zonal flows are present during L mode and disappear following the H-mode transition, while below the minimum they are reduced below measurable amplitude during L mode, before the L-H transition. PMID:26918997

  17. Stationary zonal flows during the formation of the edge transport barrier in the JET tokamak

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hillesheim, J. C.; Meyer, H.; Maggi, C. F.; Meneses, L.; Poli, E.; Delabie, E.

    2016-02-10

    In this study, high spatial resolution Doppler backscattering measurements in JET have enabled new insights into the development of the edge Er. We observe fine-scale spatial structures in the edge Er well with a wave number krρi ≈ 0.4-0.8, consistent with stationary zonal flows, the characteristics of which vary with density. The zonal flow amplitude and wavelength both decrease with local collisionality, such that the zonal flow E x B shear increases. Above the minimum of the L-H transition power threshold dependence on density, the zonal flows are present during L mode and disappear following the H-mode transition, while belowmore » the minimum they are reduced below measurable amplitude during L mode, before the L-H transition.« less

  18. 20 Years Lidar Observations of Clouds at the Edge of Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, J.; Baumgarten, G.; Luebken, F.

    2013-12-01

    The highest clouds in the Earth atmosphere are located around 83 km altitude. They were first documented in 1885 and are called noctilucent clouds (NLC) because of the impressive bluish-white displays they form against the dark night sky. NLC occur during the summer months from mid to high latitudes and are a visible sign of the extreme conditions in the mesopause region. They consist of nano-sized ice particles (mean value 48×1 nm) which are subject to the variability of the ambient atmosphere. Ice formation and growth at these high altitudes is very sensitive to temperature and water vapor content which are hardly to measure directly with high accuracy. Thus NLC can act as tracers for short-term variations and are thought to document long-term atmospheric changes as well. We will report about our NLC time series obtained by laser optical remote sensing at the research station ALOMAR in Northern Norway (69°N, 16°E). The data archive obtained with the Rayleigh/Mie/Raman-lidar covers now 20 summer seasons and is the largest NLC data set acquired by lidar. It shows variabilities of basic cloud parameters like occurrence, altitude and brightness on time scales ranging from minutes to years. Using the capability of all three emitted laser wavelengths we are able to determine ice particle properties like mean and width of the size distribution and number density. This allows investigation of the cloud water content and its variability. Comparing our ground-based measurements on a fixed location to data sets obtained from sun-synchronous satellites shows certain differences. They could at least partly be attributed to the observation conditions like measurement volume, local time, scattering angles etc. We found atmospheric tides to have a significant influence on the NLC properties. Additionally microphysical processes limit the duration within the ice particles can be considered as passive tracers. Long-term data sets are subject to varying instrument sensitivities

  19. Analysis of noise produced by jet impingement near the trailing edge of a flat and a curved plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinzie, D. J., Jr.; Burns, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The sound fields produced by the interaction of a subsonic cold gas jet with the trailing edge of a large flat plate and a curved plate were analyzed. The analyses were performed to obtain a better understanding of the dominant noise source and the mechanism governing the peak sound-pressure-level frequencies of the broadband spectra. An analytical expression incorporating an available theory and experimental data predicts sound field data over an arc of approximately 105 deg measured from the upstream jet axis for the two independent sets of data. The dominant noise as detected on the impingement side of either plate results from the jet impact (eighth power of the velocity dependence) rather than a trailing-edge disturbance (fifth or sixth power of the velocity dependence). Also, the frequency of the peak SPL may be governed by a phenomenon which produces periodic formation and shedding of ring vortices from the nozzle lip.

  20. Edge profile analysis of Joint European Torus (JET) Thomson scattering data: Quantifying the systematic error due to edge localised mode synchronisation.

    PubMed

    Leyland, M J; Beurskens, M N A; Flanagan, J C; Frassinetti, L; Gibson, K J; Kempenaars, M; Maslov, M; Scannell, R

    2016-01-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) high resolution Thomson scattering (HRTS) system measures radial electron temperature and density profiles. One of the key capabilities of this diagnostic is measuring the steep pressure gradient, termed the pedestal, at the edge of JET plasmas. The pedestal is susceptible to limiting instabilities, such as Edge Localised Modes (ELMs), characterised by a periodic collapse of the steep gradient region. A common method to extract the pedestal width, gradient, and height, used on numerous machines, is by performing a modified hyperbolic tangent (mtanh) fit to overlaid profiles selected from the same region of the ELM cycle. This process of overlaying profiles, termed ELM synchronisation, maximises the number of data points defining the pedestal region for a given phase of the ELM cycle. When fitting to HRTS profiles, it is necessary to incorporate the diagnostic radial instrument function, particularly important when considering the pedestal width. A deconvolved fit is determined by a forward convolution method requiring knowledge of only the instrument function and profiles. The systematic error due to the deconvolution technique incorporated into the JET pedestal fitting tool has been documented by Frassinetti et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 013506 (2012)]. This paper seeks to understand and quantify the systematic error introduced to the pedestal width due to ELM synchronisation. Synthetic profiles, generated with error bars and point-to-point variation characteristic of real HRTS profiles, are used to evaluate the deviation from the underlying pedestal width. We find on JET that the ELM synchronisation systematic error is negligible in comparison to the statistical error when assuming ten overlaid profiles (typical for a pre-ELM fit to HRTS profiles). This confirms that fitting a mtanh to ELM synchronised profiles is a robust and practical technique for extracting the pedestal structure. PMID:26827321

  1. Modelling of plasma-edge and plasma-wall interaction physics at JET with the metallic first-wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesen, S.; Groth, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Wischmeier, M.; contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    An overview is given on the recent progress on edge modelling activities for the JET ITER-like wall using the computational tools like the SOLPS or EDGE2D-EIRENE code. The validation process of these codes on JET with its metallic plasma-facing components is an important step towards predictive studies for ITER and DEMO in relevant divertor operational conditions, i.e., for detached, radiating divertors. With increased quantitative credibility in such codes more reliable input to plasma-wall and plasma-material codes can be warranted, which in turn results in more realistic and physically sound estimates of the life-time expectations and performance of a Be first-wall and a W-divertor, the same materials configuration foreseen for ITER. A brief review is given on the recent achievements in the plasma-wall interaction and material migration studies. Finally, a short summary is given on the availability and development of integrated codes to assess the performance of an JET-ILW baseline scenario also in view of the preparation for a JET DT-campaign.

  2. Ion target impact energy during Type I edge localized modes in JET ITER-like Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemaut, C.; Jardin, A.; Horacek, J.; Autricque, A.; Arnoux, G.; Boom, J.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J. W.; De La Luna, E.; Devaux, S.; Eich, T.; Giroud, C.; Harting, D.; Kirschner, A.; Lipschultz, B.; Matthews, G. F.; Moulton, D.; O'Mullane, M.; Stamp, M.

    2015-08-01

    The ITER baseline scenario, with 500 MW of DT fusion power and Q = 10, will rely on a Type I ELMy H-mode, with ΔW = 0.7 MJ mitigated edge localized modes (ELMs). Tungsten (W) is the material now decided for the divertor plasma-facing components from the start of plasma operations. W atoms sputtered from divertor targets during ELMs are expected to be the dominant source under the partially detached divertor conditions required for safe ITER operation. W impurity concentration in the plasma core can dramatically degrade its performance and lead to potentially damaging disruptions. Understanding the physics of plasma-wall interaction during ELMs is important and a primary input for this is the energy of incoming ions during an ELM event. In this paper, coupled Infrared thermography and Langmuir Probe (LP) measurements in JET-ITER-Like-Wall unseeded H-mode experiments with ITER relevant ELM energy drop have been used to estimate the impact energy of deuterium ions (D+) on the divertor target. This analysis gives an ion energy of several keV during ELMs, which makes D+ responsible for most of the W sputtering in unseeded H-mode discharges. These LP measurements were possible because of the low electron temperature (Te) during ELMs which allowed saturation of the ion current. Although at first sight surprising, the observation of low Te at the divertor target during ELMs is consistent with the ‘Free-Streaming’ kinetic model which predicts a near-complete transfer of parallel energy from electrons to ions in order to maintain quasi-neutrality of the ELM filaments while they are transported to the divertor targets.

  3. Assessing Anthropogenic Influence and Edge Effect Influence on Forested Riparian Buffer Spatial Configuration and Structure: An Example Using Lidar Remote Sensing Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasser, L. A.; Chasmer, L. E.

    2012-12-01

    Forested riparian buffers (FRB) perform numerous critical ecosystem services. However, globally, FRB spatial configuration and structure have been modified by anthropogenic development resulting in widespread ecological degradation as seen in the Gulf of Mexico and the Chesapeake Bay. Riparian corridors within developed areas are particularly vulnerable to disturbance given two edges - the naturally occurring stream edge and the matrix edge. Increased edge length predisposes riparian vegetation to "edge effects", characterized by modified physical and environmental conditions at the interface between the forested buffer and the adjacent landuse, or matrix and forest fragment degradation. The magnitude and distance of edge influence may be further influenced by adjacent landuse type and the width of the buffer corridor at any given location. There is a need to quantify riparian buffer spatial configuration and structure over broad geographic extents and within multiple riparian systems in support of ecologically sound management and landuse decisions. This study thus assesses the influence of varying landuse types (agriculture, suburban development and undeveloped) on forested riparian buffer 3-dimensional structure and spatial configuration using high resolution Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data collected within a headwater watershed. Few studies have assessed riparian buffer structure and width contiguously for an entire watershed, an integral component of watershed planning and restoration efforts such as those conducted throughout the Chesapeake Bay. The objectives of the study are to 1) quantify differences in vegetation structure at the stream and matrix influenced riparian buffer edges, compared to the forested interior and 2) assess continuous patterns of changes in vegetation structure throughout the buffer corridor beginning at the matrix edge and ending at the stream within buffers a) of varying width and b) that are adjacent to varying landuse

  4. Active control of Type-I Edge-Localized Modes with n=1 Perturbation Fields in the JET Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Y.; Koslowski, R.; Thomas, P.; Nardon, E.; Alper, B.; Baranov, Y.; Beurskens, M.; Bigi, M.; Crombe, K.; de la Luna, E.; De Vries, P.; Fundamenski, W.; Rachlew, Elisabeth G; Zimmermann, O.

    2007-06-01

    Type-I edge-localized modes (ELMs) have been mitigated at the JET tokamak using a static external n=1 perturbation field generated by four error field correction coils located far from the plasma. During the application of the n=1 field the ELM frequency increased by a factor of 4 and the amplitude of the D signal decreased. The energy loss per ELM normalized to the total stored energy, W/W, dropped to values below 2%. Transport analyses shows no or only a moderate (up to 20%) degradation of energy confinement time during the ELM mitigation phase.

  5. Prediction of jet impingement cooling scheme characteristics (airfoil leading edge application)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, A.; Saabas, H. J.; Messeh, W. Abdel

    1993-02-01

    A control volume, finite difference method based on the work of Rhie in conjunction with a high Reynolds k-epsilon model and a two layer turbulence model was used to predict the heat transfer coefficients underneath an impinging circular jet in the absence of cross flow. The numerical results are compared to experimental measurements for two different impingement height to jet diameter ratios: H/D = 2, and H/D = 10. The comparisons indicate that, although both the k-epsilon and the two layer turbulence models are adequate in the prediction of the flow field, the two layer model resulted in heat transfer predictions that were closer to experimental observations. It was also observed that the predicted heat transfer coefficients for the case of H/D = 2 were sensitive to the assumed jet exit turbulence levels, whereas they were not for H/D = 10. This information is useful to the designer of cooled turbine components.

  6. Identifying low-dimensional dynamics in type-I edge-localised-mode processes in JET plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon, F. A.; Chapman, S. C.; Nicol, R. M.; Dendy, R. O.; Webster, A. J.; Alper, B. [EURATOM Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2013-04-15

    Edge localised mode (ELM) measurements from reproducibly similar plasmas in the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak, which differ only in their gas puffing rate, are analysed in terms of the pattern in the sequence of inter-ELM time intervals. It is found that the category of ELM defined empirically as type I-typically more regular, less frequent, and having larger amplitude than other ELM types-embraces substantially different ELMing processes. By quantifying the structure in the sequence of inter-ELM time intervals using delay time plots, we reveal transitions between distinct phase space dynamics, implying transitions between distinct underlying physical processes. The control parameter for these transitions between these different ELMing processes is the gas puffing rate.

  7. Modelling of ELM-averaged power exhaust on JET using the EDGE2D code with variable transport coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirnev, G.; Fundamenski, W.; Corrigan, G.

    2007-06-01

    The scrape-off layer (SOL) of the JET tokamak has been modelled using a two-dimensional plasma/neutral code, EDGE2D/NIMBUS, with variable transport coefficients, chosen according to nine candidate theories for radial heat transport in the SOL. Comparison of the radial power width on the outer divertor plates, λq, predicted by modelling and measured experimentally in L-mode and ELM-averaged H-mode at JET is presented. Transport coefficients based on classical and neo-classical ion conduction are found to offer the best agreement with experimentally measured λq magnitude and scaling with target power, upstream density and toroidal field. These results reinforce the findings of an earlier study, based on a simplified model of the SOL (Chankin 1997 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 39 1059), and support the earlier estimate of the power width at the entrance of the outer divertor volume in ITER, λq ap 4 mm mapped to the outer mid-plane (Fundamenski et al 2004 Nucl. Fusion 44 20).

  8. Direct evidence of stationary zonal flows and critical gradient behavior for Er during formation of the edge pedestal in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillesheim, Jon

    2015-11-01

    High spatial resolution measurements with Doppler backscattering in JET have provided new insights into the development of the edge radial electric field during pedestal formation. The characteristics of Er have been studied as a function of density at 2.5 MA plasma current and 3 T toroidal magnetic field. We observe fine-scale spatial structure in the edge Er well prior to the LH transition, consistent with stationary zonal flows. Zonal flows are a fundamental mechanism for the saturation of turbulence and this is the first direct evidence of stationary zonal flows in a tokamak. The radial wavelength of the zonal flows systematically decreases with density. The zonal flows are clearest in Ohmic conditions, weaker in L-mode, and absent in H-mode. Measurements also show that after neutral beam heating is applied, the edge Er builds up at a constant gradient into the core during L-mode, at radii where Er is mainly due to toroidal velocity. The local stability of velocity shear driven turbulence, such as the parallel velocity gradient mode, will be assessed with gyrokinetic simulations. This critical Er shear persists across the LH transition into H-mode. Surprisingly, a reduction in the apparent magnitude of the Er well depth is observed directly following the LH transition at high densities. Establishing the physics basis for the LH transition is important for projecting scalings to ITER and these observations challenge existing models based on increased Er shear or strong zonal flows as the trigger for the transition. This work has been carried out within the framework of the EUROfusion Consortium and has received funding from the Euratom research and training programme 2014-2018 under grant agreement No 633053. The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the European Commission.

  9. Experimental investigation of cross-over jets in a rib-roughened trailing-edge cooling channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Fei

    Increasing the rotor inlet temperature can dramatically increase the efficiency and power output of the gas turbine engine. However, the melting point of turbine blade material limits the realistic upper bound of the rotor inlet temperature. As a result, the development of high temperature turbine blade material and advanced turbine blade cooling technology determines the future of turbine blade engine. Adding impingement jet holes and rib turbulators in the inner cooling channel of the gas turbine blades are two effective ways to enhance the cooling effects. The purpose of this study is to figure out the influence of different combinations of jet holes and rib turbulators on the heat transfer efficiency. A tabletop scale test model is used in the study to simulate the cooling cavity of trailing edge and its feed channel in a real gas turbine blade. The Dimensional Analysis Theory is used in the study to eliminate the influence of scaling. Two different crossover slots are tested with 5 different rib arrangements, and each of the test geometries is tested for 6 jet Reynolds numbers ranging from 10,000 to 36,000. The two different crossover slots are the crossover slots with 0 and 5 degree tilt angles. The four different rib arrangements are ribs with 0 degree, 45 degree, 90 degree and 135 degree angles of attack with respect to the flow direction. Furthermore, a smooth test section (no ribs) was also tested. The steady state liquid crystal thermography is used to quantify the heat transfer performance of the target areas. The variation of Nusselt number versus Reynolds number is plotted for each of the 10 geometries. Also, the variation of Nusselt number versus Reynolds number are compared for different rib angles of attack with the same crossover slot tilt angle, and between different crossover slots tilt angles with the same rib angle. The results show that, the area-weighted average Nusselt number increases monotonically with the Reynolds number; the target

  10. Relationship of edge localized mode burst times with divertor flux loop signal phase in JET

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.; Todd, T. N.; Webster, A. J.; Morris, J.; Watkins, N. W.; Calderon, F. A.

    2014-06-15

    A phase relationship is identified between sequential edge localized modes (ELMs) occurrence times in a set of H-mode tokamak plasmas to the voltage measured in full flux azimuthal loops in the divertor region. We focus on plasmas in the Joint European Torus where a steady H-mode is sustained over several seconds, during which ELMs are observed in the Be II emission at the divertor. The ELMs analysed arise from intrinsic ELMing, in that there is no deliberate intent to control the ELMing process by external means. We use ELM timings derived from the Be II signal to perform direct time domain analysis of the full flux loop VLD2 and VLD3 signals, which provide a high cadence global measurement proportional to the voltage induced by changes in poloidal magnetic flux. Specifically, we examine how the time interval between pairs of successive ELMs is linked to the time-evolving phase of the full flux loop signals. Each ELM produces a clear early pulse in the full flux loop signals, whose peak time is used to condition our analysis. The arrival time of the following ELM, relative to this pulse, is found to fall into one of two categories: (i) prompt ELMs, which are directly paced by the initial response seen in the flux loop signals; and (ii) all other ELMs, which occur after the initial response of the full flux loop signals has decayed in amplitude. The times at which ELMs in category (ii) occur, relative to the first ELM of the pair, are clustered at times when the instantaneous phase of the full flux loop signal is close to its value at the time of the first ELM.

  11. The global build-up to intrinsic edge localized mode bursts seen in divertor full flux loops in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.; Todd, T. N.; Watkins, N. W.; Calderon, F. A.; Morris, J.

    2015-07-01

    A global signature of the build-up to an intrinsic edge localized mode (ELM) is found in the temporal analytic phase of signals measured in full flux azimuthal loops in the divertor region of JET. Toroidally integrating, full flux loop signals provide a global measurement proportional to the voltage induced by changes in poloidal magnetic flux; they are electromagnetically induced by the dynamics of spatially integrated current density. We perform direct time-domain analysis of the high time-resolution full flux loop signals VLD2 and VLD3. We analyze plasmas where a steady H-mode is sustained over several seconds during which all the observed ELMs are intrinsic; there is no deliberate intent to pace the ELMing process by external means. ELM occurrence times are determined from the Be II emission at the divertor. We previously [Chapman et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 062302 (2014); Chapman et al., in 41st EPS Conference on Plasma Physics, Europhysics Conference Abstracts (European Physical Society, 2014), Vol. 38F, ISBN 2-914771-90-8] found that the occurrence times of intrinsic ELMs correlate with specific temporal analytic phases of the VLD2 and VLD3 signals. Here, we investigate how the VLD2 and VLD3 temporal analytic phases vary with time in advance of the ELM occurrence time. We identify a build-up to the ELM in which the VLD2 and VLD3 signals progressively align to the temporal analytic phase at which ELMs preferentially occur, on a ˜ 2 - 5 ms timescale. At the same time, the VLD2 and VLD3 signals become temporally phase synchronized with each other, consistent with the emergence of coherent global dynamics in the integrated current density. In a plasma that remains close to a global magnetic equilibrium, this can reflect bulk displacement or motion of the plasma. This build-up signature to an intrinsic ELM can be extracted from a time interval of data that does not extend beyond the ELM occurrence time, so that these full flux loop signals could assist in ELM

  12. Remote sensing of temperature and concentration profiles of a gas jet by coupling infrared emission spectroscopy and LIDAR for characterization of aircraft engine exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offret, J.-P.; Lebedinsky, J.; Navello, L.; Pina, V.; Serio, B.; Bailly, Y.; Hervé, P.

    2015-05-01

    Temperature data play an important role in the combustion chamber since it determines both the efficiency and the rate of pollutants emission of engines. Air pollution problem concerns the emissions of gases such as CO, CO2, NO, NO2, SO2 and also aerosols, soot and volatile organic compounds. Flame combustion occurs in hostile environments where temperature and concentration profiles are often not easy to measure. In this study, a temperature and CO2 concentration profiles optical measurement method, suitable for combustion analysis, is discussed and presented. The proposed optical metrology method presents numerous advantages when compared to intrusive methods. The experimental setup comprises a passive radiative emission measurement method combined with an active laser-measurement method. The passive method is based on the use of gas emission spectroscopy. The experimental spectrometer device is coupled with an active method. The active method is used to investigate and correct complex flame profiles. This method similar to a LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) device is based on the measurement of Rayleigh scattering of a short laser pulse recorded using a high-speed streak camera. The whole experimental system of this new method is presented. Results obtained on a small-scale turbojet are shown and discussed in order to illustrate the potentials deliver by the sophisticated method. Both temperature and concentration profiles of the gas jet are presented and discussed.

  13. Phoenix Lidar Operation Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation

    This is an animation of the Canadian-built meteorological station's lidar, which was successfully activated on Sol 2. The animation shows how the lidar is activated by first opening its dust cover, then emitting rapid pulses of light (resembling a brilliant green laser) into the Martian atmosphere. Some of the light then bounces off particles in the atmosphere, and is reflected back down to the lidar's telescope. This allows the lidar to detect dust, clouds and fog.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. NDSC and JPL stratospheric lidars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDermid, I. Stuart

    1995-01-01

    The Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change is an international cooperation providing a set of high-quality, remote-sensing instruments at observing stations around the globe. A brief description of the NDSC and its goals is presented. Lidar has been selected as the NDSC instrument for measurements of stratospheric profiles of ozone, temperature, and aerosol. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed and implemented two stratospheric lidar systems for NDSC. These are located at Table Mountain, California, and at Mauna Loa, Hawaii. These systems, which utilize differential absorption lidar, Rayleigh lidar, raman lidar, and backscatter lidar, to measure ozone, temperature, and aerosol profiles in the stratosphere are briefly described. Examples of results obtained for both long-term and individual profiles are presented.

  15. Interpretation of radiative divertor studies with impurity seeding in type-I ELMy H-mode plasmas in JET-ILW using EDGE2D-EIRENE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaervinen, A. E.; Groth, M.; Airila, M.; Belo, P.; Beurskens, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Clever, M.; Corrigan, G.; Devaux, S.; Drewelow, P.; Eich, T.; Giroud, C.; Harting, D.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Lawson, K.; Lipschultz, B.; Maddison, G.; Maggi, C.; Makkonen, T.; Marchetto, C.; Marsen, S.; Matthews, G. F.; Meigs, A. G.; Moulton, D.; Stamp, M. F.; Wiesen, S.; Wischmeier, M.

    2015-08-01

    Nitrogen seeded JET-ILW H-mode plasmas have been investigated with EDGE2D-EIRENE. The simulations reproduce the experimentally observed factor of 10 reduction in the outer target power deposition when the normalized divertor radiation, Praddiv/PSOL, increases from the unseeded levels of 15% up to the 50% levels required for detachment. At these radiation levels, nitrogen is predicted dominate the total radiation with a contribution of 85%, consistent with previous measurements in JET-C. Due to the low radiative potential of nitrogen at the electron temperatures above 100 eV, more than 80% of the radiation is predicted to occur in the scrape-off layer, making nitrogen a suitable divertor radiator for typical JET divertor conditions with Te around 30 eV. The simulations reproduce the experimentally observed particle flux reduction at the low-field side target without the need for strong recombination. This is due to strong impurity radiation reducing the power levels entering the deuterium ionization front.

  16. Detection of Subsurface Material Separation in Shuttle Orbiter Slip-Side Joggle Region of the Wing Leading Edge using Infrared Imaging Data from Arc Jet Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Walker, Sandra P.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine whether infrared imaging (IR) surface temperature data obtained during arc-jet tests of Space Shuttle Orbiter s reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) wing leading edge panel slip-side joggle region could be used to detect presence of subsurface material separation, and if so, to determine when separation occurs during the simulated entry profile. Recent thermostructural studies have indicated thermally induced interlaminar normal stress concentrations at the substrate/coating interface in the curved joggle region can result in local subsurface material separation, with the separation predicted to occur during approach to peak heating during reentry. The present study was an attempt to determine experimentally when subsurface material separations occur. A simplified thermal model of a flat RCC panel with subsurface material separation was developed and used to infer general surface temperature trends due to the presence of subsurface material separation. IR data from previously conducted arc-jet tests on three test specimens were analyzed: one without subsurface material separation either pre or post test, one with pre test separation, and one with separation developing during test. The simplified thermal model trend predictions along with comparison of experimental IR data of the three test specimens were used to successfully infer material separation from the arc-jet test data. Furthermore, for the test specimen that had developed subsurface material separation during the arc-jet tests, the initiation of separation appeared to occur during the ramp up to the peak heating condition, where test specimen temperature went from 2500 to 2800 F.

  17. Wind tunnel investigation of effects of variations in Reynolds number and leading-edge treatment on the aerodynamic characteristics of an externally blown jet-flap configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlett, L. P.; Smith, C. C., Jr.; Megrail, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in a full-scale tunnel to determine the effects of variations in Reynolds number and leading-edge treatment on the aerodynamic characteristics of an externally blown jet-flap transport configuration. The model had a double-slotted trailing-edge flap and was powered by four high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Tests were performed by using each of three leading-edge devices (a 30-percent-chord flap and 15- and 25-percent-chord slats) at Reynolds numbers from 0.47 x one million to 1.36 x one million thrust coefficients up to 3.5. The use of a 25-percent-chord slat was found to be more effective than a 15-percent-chord slat or a 30-percent-chord flap in extending the stall angle of attack and in minimizing the loss of lift after the stall. The large slat was also effective in reducing the rolling moments that occurred when the engine-out wing stalled first.

  18. Oceanic Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, K. L. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    Instrument concepts which measure ocean temperature, chlorophyll, sediment and Gelbstoffe concentrations in three dimensions on a quantitative, quasi-synoptic basis were considered. Coastal zone color scanner chlorophyll imagery, laser stimulated Raman temperaure and fluorescence spectroscopy, existing airborne Lidar and laser fluorosensing instruments, and their accuracies in quantifying concentrations of chlorophyll, suspended sediments and Gelbstoffe are presented. Lidar applications to phytoplankton dynamics and photochemistry, Lidar radiative transfer and signal interpretation, and Lidar technology are discussed.

  19. Large-Scale Wind-Tunnel Tests and Evaluation of the Low-Speed Performance of a 35 deg Sweptback Wing Jet Transport Model Equipped with a Blowing Boundary-Layer-Control Flap and Leading-Edge Slat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, David H.; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi

    1960-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation was conducted to determine the effect of trailing-edge flaps with blowing-type boundary-layer control and leading-edge slats on the low-speed performance of a large-scale jet transport model with four engines and a 35 deg. sweptback wing of aspect ratio 7. Two spanwise extents and several deflections of the trailing-edge flap were tested. Results were obtained with a normal leading-edge and with full-span leading-edge slats. Three-component longitudinal force and moment data and boundary-layer-control flow requirements are presented. The test results are analyzed in terms of possible improvements in low-speed performance. The effect on performance of the source of boundary-layer-control air flow is considered in the analysis.

  20. Lidar Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wollpert.

    2009-04-01

    This report provides an overview of the LiDAR acquisition methodology employed by Woolpert on the 2009 USDA - Savannah River LiDAR Site Project. LiDAR system parameters and flight and equipment information is also included. The LiDAR data acquisition was executed in ten sessions from February 21 through final reflights on March 2, 2009; using two Leica ALS50-II 150kHz Multi-pulse enabled LiDAR Systems. Specific details about the ALS50-II systems are included in Section 4 of this report.

  1. CFD Analysis of the Aerodynamics of a Business-Jet Airfoil with Leading-Edge Ice Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, X.; Zhu, B.; Shih, T. I.-P.; Addy, H. E.; Choo, Y. K.

    2004-01-01

    For rime ice - where the ice buildup has only rough and jagged surfaces but no protruding horns - this study shows two dimensional CFD analysis based on the one-equation Spalart-Almaras (S-A) turbulence model to predict accurately the lift, drag, and pressure coefficients up to near the stall angle. For glaze ice - where the ice buildup has two or more protruding horns near the airfoil's leading edge - CFD predictions were much less satisfactory because of the large separated region produced by the horns even at zero angle of attack. This CFD study, based on the WIND and the Fluent codes, assesses the following turbulence models by comparing predictions with available experimental data: S-A, standard k-epsilon, shear-stress transport, v(exp 2)-f, and differential Reynolds stress.

  2. Comparison of multialkali and GaAs photocathode detectors for Joint European Torus edge light detection and ranging Thomson scattering profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kempenaars, M.; Nielsen, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Gowers, C.; Beurskens, M.

    2004-10-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak has two light detection and ranging (LIDAR) Thomson scattering systems, one for the core and one dedicated to the edge T{sub e} and n{sub e} profiles. The LIDAR scheme is unique to JET and is envisaged for use on ITER. The system's spatial resolution is defined by the convolution product of its components: laser pulse duration, detector response time, and digitizer speed. The original multialkali photocathode microchannel plate photomultipliers dictated the response time, resulting in a 12 cm spatial resolution along the line of sight. In the edge LIDAR system, this is improved by aligning the line of sight with the flux surfaces, thus improving the effective spatial resolution to 2 cm depending on the plasma configuration. To meet demands for better edge gradient resolution, an upgrade to higher quantum efficiency detectors was proposed. Four GaAs photocathode detectors have been procured, two of which surpass expectations. These detectors are shown to have a more than two times higher effective quantum efficiency and their response time is at least twice as fast as the multialkali detectors. Combined with a fast digitizer this improves the spatial resolution by a factor of two, down to one centimeter effective, depending on plasma configuration.

  3. Validation of Saharan Dust Layer Characteristics with Lidar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karyampudi, V. Mohan; Palm, Steve; Reagan, John; Grant, W. B.; Pierce, Harold; Browell, E. V.; Melfi, S. H.

    1998-01-01

    Lidar backscattering profiles available from the LITE data set have been used to estimate the optical depths of the Saharan dust layer over West Africa and E. Atlantic regions, in the context of validating the 3-D conceptual model of the Saharan dust plume proposed by Karyampudi and Carlson. The aerosol extinction profiles and optical depths were retrieved from LITE using the Fernald et al. (1972) method. An extinction-to-backscattering ratio, S(sub a), of 25 was selected for optical depth calculations. The spatial analysis of total column and Saharan dust layer optical depths show higher optical depths over W. Africa that decrease westward over E. Atlantic. The higher optical depths over W. Africa, in general, are associated with heavy dust being raised from the surface in dust source regions. Rapid depletion of these heavy dust particles, perhaps due to sedimentation, appear to decrease the dust loading within the dust layer as the plume leaves the west African continent. Higher optical depths are generally confined to the southern edge of the dust layer, where the middle level jet appears to transport the heavy dust concentrations that tend to mix downward from vertical mixing associated with the strong vertical shears underneath the middle jet. Thus, LITE measurements although, in general, validate the Saharan dust plume conceptual model, show maximum values of optical depths near the southern edge of the dust plume over the E. Atlantic region instead of near the center of the dust plume as described in the conceptual model.

  4. Mobile incoherent Doppler lidar using fiber-based lidar receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dongdong; Sun, Dongsong; Shu, Zhifeng; Shangguan, Mingjia; Gao, Yuanyuan; Dou, Xiankang

    2014-09-01

    A mobile incoherent Doppler lidar was developed at the University of Science and Technology of China. The lidar consists of three subsystems. All subsystems are designed based on the well-proven double-edge technique, operate at 354.7 nm, and use Fabry-Perot etalons as frequency discriminators. The whole system is designed for wind measurement from 15- to 60-km height. In order to make the lidar receiver more compact and stable and to reduce interference between optical paths inside the receiver box, fiber splitters are introduced into the lidar receivers as a substitute for normally used discrete components. According to the stability of the splitter, the wind error dominated by the splitting ratio would be <0.49 m/s. To reduce luminance heterogeneity's influence on the splitter performance, an integrating sphere is used in the system. Multiple measurements of transmission curves have a maximum mean squared error of 9.674E-5. A typical result of wind profile is also given to help demonstrate the reliability of the lidar and the fiber-based receiver.

  5. Mid-altitude wind measurements with mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar incorporating system-level optical frequency control method.

    PubMed

    Xia, Haiyun; Dou, Xiankang; Sun, Dongsong; Shu, Zhifeng; Xue, Xianghui; Han, Yan; Hu, Dongdong; Han, Yuli; Cheng, Tingdi

    2012-07-01

    A mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar based on double-edge technique is developed for mid-altitude wind observation. To reduce the systematic error, a system-level optical frequency control method is proposed and demonstrated. The emission of the seed laser at 1064 nm is used to synchronize the FPI in the optical frequency domain. A servo loop stabilizing the frequency of the seed laser is formed by measuring the absolute frequency of the second harmonic against an iodine absorption line. And, the third harmonic is used for Rayleigh lidar detection. The frequency stability is 1.6 MHz at 1064 nm over 2 minutes. A locking accuracy of 0.3 MHz at 1064 nm is realized. In comparison experiments, wind profiles from the lidar, radiosonde and European Center for Medium range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) analysis show good agreement from 8 km to 25 km. Wind observation over two months is carried out in Urumqi (42.1°N, 87.1°E), northwest of China, demonstrating the stability and robustness of the system. For the first time, quasi-zero wind layer and dynamic evolution of high-altitude tropospheric jet are observed based on Rayleigh Doppler lidar in Asia. PMID:22772226

  6. Lidar postcards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schreppel, Heather A.; Cimitile, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program develops and uses specialized technology to build high-resolution topographic and habitat maps. High-resolution maps of topography, bathymetry, and habitat describe important features affected by coastal-management decisions. The mapped information serves as a baseline for evaluating resources and tracking the effectiveness of resource- and conservation-management decisions. These data products are critical to researchers, decision makers, resource managers, planners, and the public. To learn more about Lidar (light detection and ranging) technology visit: http://ngom.usgs.gov/dsp/.

  7. Weather Station's Lidar in Action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of the Canadian-built Phoenix lidar in operation (with the cover open) was acquired at the Phoenix landing site on Sol 3. The Surface Stereo Imager (right) acquired this image at 11:40:12 local solar time. The camera pointing was elevation minus 47.2987 degrees and azimuth 225.325 degrees.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  8. Lidar Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    1995-01-01

    A brief description of enhancements made to the NASA MSFC coherent lidar model is provided. Notable improvements are the addition of routines to automatically determine the 3 dB misalignment loss angle and the backscatter value at which the probability of a good estimate (for a maximum likelihood estimator) falls to 50%. The ability to automatically generate energy/aperture parametrization (EAP) plots which include the effects of angular misalignment has been added. These EAP plots make it very easy to see that for any practical system where there is some degree of misalignment then there is an optimum telescope diameter for which the laser pulse energy required to achieve a particular sensitivity is minimized. Increasing the telescope diameter above this will result in a reduction of sensitivity. These parameterizations also clearly show that the alignment tolerances at shorter wavelengths are much stricter than those at longer wavelengths. A brief outline of the NASA MSFC AEOLUS program is given and a summary of the lidar designs considered during the program is presented. A discussion of some of the design trades is performed both in the text and in a conference publication attached as an appendix.

  9. Noise reduction tests of large-scale-model externally blown flap using trailing-edge blowing and partial flap slot covering. [jet aircraft noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinzie, D. J., Jr.; Burns, R. J.; Wagner, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Noise data were obtained with a large-scale cold-flow model of a two-flap, under-the-wing, externally blown flap proposed for use on future STOL aircraft. The noise suppression effectiveness of locating a slot conical nozzle at the trailing edge of the second flap and of applying partial covers to the slots between the wing and flaps was evaluated. Overall-sound-pressure-level reductions of 5 db occurred below the wing in the flyover plane. Existing models of several noise sources were applied to the test results. The resulting analytical relation compares favorably with the test data. The noise source mechanisms were analyzed and are discussed.

  10. Short-channel polymer field-effect-transistor fabrication using spin-coating-induced edge template and ink-jet printing

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.P.; Chu, D.P.; Newsome, C.J.; Russell, D.M.; Kugler, T.; Ishida, M.; Shimoda, T.

    2005-12-05

    A method to fabricate polymer field-effect transistors with submicron channel lengths is described. A thin polymer film is spin coated on a prepatterned resist with a low resolution to create a thickness contrast in the overcoated polymer layer. After plasma and solvent etching, a submicron-sized line structure, which templates the contour of the prepattern, is obtained. A further lift-off process is applied to define source-drain electrodes of transistors. With a combination of ink-jet printing, transistors with channel length down to 400 nm have been fabricated by this method. We show that drive current density increases as expected, while the on/off current ratio 10{sup 6} is achieved.

  11. Sahelian dust lifting in the inter-tropical discontinuity region: Lidar observations and mesoscale modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bou Karam, D.; Flamant, C.; Tulet, P.; Chaboureau, J.; Dabas, A.; Chong, M.; Reitebuch, O.

    2007-12-01

    Airbone lidar observations acquired with the LEANDRE 2 system during 3 flights of the SAFIRE Falcon 20 in the framework of the AMMA Special Observing Period (SOP) 2a1 (July 2006) over western Niger, revealed the existence of desert dust uptakes in the region of the inter-tropical discontinuity (ITD) in the morning hours. Complementary observations provided by dropsondes released from the same platform as well as airborne wind measurements made from another platform (the DLR Falcon 20, flying in coordination with the SAFIRE Falcon 20) evidenced that the lifting was associated with the leading edge of the monsoon low level jet, and to be transported southward by the harmattan, above the monsoon layer. A 10-day numerical simulation, using the mesoscale model Meso-NH (including the dust emission box Dust Entrainment And Deposition model), was conducted to assess the representativity of the observed phenomenon as well as the mechanisms associated with the Sahelian dust emissions. The Meso-NH simulation (initialized by and nudged with ECMWF analyses) was carried out on a 2000 km x 2000 km domain (20-km horizontal resolution) centered at 20°N and 7°E, that included the Falcons flight track, as well as numerous AMMA-related ground-based measurement sites (Tamanrasset, Agadez, Niamey/Banizoumbou, etc..) for validation purposes. In the simulation, large dust uptakes associated with the leading edge of the monsoon flow, with a dust concentration reaching 2000μg/m3, and to be transported southward by the harmattan, above the monsoon layer, were well reproduced. On the other hand, the simulation suggested the existence of dust emissions associated with the harmattan flow which were not observed by airborne lidar measurements. The reason for the discrepancy between the model results and the lidar observations is investigated.

  12. Lidar base specification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heidemann, Hans Karl.

    2012-01-01

    Lidar is a fast evolving technology, and much has changed in the industry since the final draft of the “Lidar Base Specification Version 1.0” was written. Lidar data have improved in accuracy and spatial resolution, geospatial accuracy standards have been revised by the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS), industry standard file formats have been expanded, additional applications for lidar have become accepted, and the need for interoperable data across collections has been realized. This revision to the “Lidar Base Specification Version 1.0” publication addresses those changes and provides continued guidance towards a nationally consistent lidar dataset.

  13. Twin Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Bozak, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Many subsonic and supersonic vehicles in the current fleet have multiple engines mounted near one another. Some future vehicle concepts may use innovative propulsion systems such as distributed propulsion which will result in multiple jets mounted in close proximity. Engine configurations with multiple jets have the ability to exploit jet-by-jet shielding which may significantly reduce noise. Jet-by-jet shielding is the ability of one jet to shield noise that is emitted by another jet. The sensitivity of jet-by-jet shielding to jet spacing and simulated flight stream Mach number are not well understood. The current experiment investigates the impact of jet spacing, jet operating condition, and flight stream Mach number on the noise radiated from subsonic and supersonic twin jets.

  14. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to assess the importance of trailing edge noise as a helicopter main rotor broadband noise source. The noise mechanism was isolated by testing a rotor blade segment in an open jet acoustic wind tunnel at close to full scale Reynolds numbers. Boundary layer data and acoustic data were used to develop scaling laws and assess a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Conclusions from the isolated blade study were analytically transformed to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a generalized rotor noise prediction. Trailing edge noise was found to contribute significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies.

  15. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1981-10-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to assess the importance of trailing edge noise as a helicopter main rotor broadband noise source. The noise mechanism was isolated by testing a rotor blade segment in an open jet acoustic wind tunnel at close to full scale Reynolds numbers. Boundary layer data and acoustic data were used to develop scaling laws and assess a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Conclusions from the isolated blade study were analytically transformed to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a generalized rotor noise prediction. Trailing edge noise was found to contribute significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies.

  16. Canopy wake measurements using multiple scanning wind LiDARs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markfort, Corey D.; Carbajo Fuertes, Fernando; Valerio Iungo, Giacomo; Stefan, Heinz; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    Canopy wakes have been shown, in controlled wind tunnel experiments, to significantly affect the fluxes of momentum, heat and other scalars at the land and water surface over distances of ~O(1 km), see Markfort et al. (EFM, 2013). However, there are currently no measurements of the velocity field downwind of a full-scale forest canopy. Point-based anemometer measurements of wake turbulence provide limited insight into the extent and details of the wake structure, whereas scanning Doppler wind LiDARs can provide information on how the wake evolves in space and varies over time. For the first time, we present measurements of the velocity field in the wake of a tall patch of forest canopy. The patch consists of two uniform rows of 35-meter tall deciduous, plane trees, which border either side of the Allée de Dorigny, near the EPFL campus. The canopy is approximately 250 m long, and it is 35 m wide, along the direction of the wind. A challenge faced while making field measurements is that the wind rarely intersects a canopy normal to the edge. The resulting wake flow may be deflected relative to the mean inflow. Using multiple LiDARs, we measure the evolution of the wake due to an oblique wind blowing over the canopy. One LiDAR is positioned directly downwind of the canopy to measure the flow along the mean wind direction and the other is positioned near the canopy to evaluate the transversal component of the wind and how it varies with downwind distance from the canopy. Preliminary results show that the open trunk space near the base of the canopy results in a surface jet that can be detected just downwind of the canopy and farther downwind dissipates as it mixes with the wake flow above. A time-varying recirculation zone can be detected by the periodic reversal of the velocity vector near the surface, downwind of the canopy. The implications of canopy wakes for measurement and modeling of surface fluxes will be discussed.

  17. Canopy wake measurements using multiple scanning wind LiDARs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markfort, C. D.; Carbajo Fuertes, F.; Iungo, V.; Stefan, H. G.; Porte-Agel, F.

    2014-12-01

    Canopy wakes have been shown, in controlled wind tunnel experiments, to significantly affect the fluxes of momentum, heat and other scalars at the land and water surface over distances of ˜O(1 km), see Markfort et al. (EFM, 2013). However, there are currently no measurements of the velocity field downwind of a full-scale forest canopy. Point-based anemometer measurements of wake turbulence provide limited insight into the extent and details of the wake structure, whereas scanning Doppler wind LiDARs can provide information on how the wake evolves in space and varies over time. For the first time, we present measurements of the velocity field in the wake of a tall patch of forest canopy. The patch consists of two uniform rows of 40-meter tall deciduous, plane trees, which border either side of the Allée de Dorigny, near the EPFL campus. The canopy is approximately 250 m long, and it is approximately 40 m wide, along the direction of the wind. A challenge faced while making field measurements is that the wind rarely intersects a canopy normal to the edge. The resulting wake flow may be deflected relative to the mean inflow. Using multiple LiDARs, we measure the evolution of the wake due to an oblique wind blowing over the canopy. One LiDAR is positioned directly downwind of the canopy to measure the flow along the mean wind direction and the other is positioned near the canopy to evaluate the transversal component of the wind and how it varies with downwind distance from the canopy. Preliminary results show that the open trunk space near the base of the canopy results in a surface jet that can be detected just downwind of the canopy and farther downwind dissipates as it mixes with the wake flow above. A time-varying recirculation zone can be detected by the periodic reversal of the velocity near the surface, downwind of the canopy. The implications of canopy wakes for measurement and modeling of surface fluxes will be discussed.

  18. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  19. Laser Remote Sensing and Lidar Measurements for Planetary Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, G. D.

    2003-01-01

    Laser Remote Sensing and lidar have been used for earth remote sensing for a number of years however the inefficiency of laser devices has limited their application to planetary sensing where power is at a premium. The potential availability of a large amount of power for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) opens up the potential to implement laser remote sensing for planetary bodies. Lidars have been and can be used to map terrain, measure atmospheric and surface parameters including velocity and composition. In this paper we will provide an overview of the lidar capabilities at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and address the types of lidar measurements that could be relevant to JIMO science investigations.

  20. Advances in Direct Detection Doppler Lidar Technology and Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we will describe the ground based Doppler lidar system which is mounted in a modified delivery van to allow field deployment and operations. The system includes an aerosol double edge receiver optimized for aerosol backscatter Doppler measurements at 1064 nm and a molecular double edge receiver which operates at 355 nm. The lidar system will be described including details of the injection seeded diode pumped laser transmitter and the piezoelectrically tunable high spectral resolution Fabry Perot etalon which is used to measure the Doppler shift. Examples of tropospheric wind profiles obtained with the system will also be presented to demonstrate its capabilities.

  1. Lidar Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Matthew J.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The laser radar, or lidar (for light detection and ranging) is an important tool for atmospheric studies. Lidar provides a unique and powerful method for unobtrusively profiling aerosols, wind, water vapor, temperature, and other atmospheric parameters. This brief overview of lidar remote sensing is focused on atmospheric applications involving pulsed lasers. The level of technical detail is aimed at the educated non-lidar expert and references are provided for further investigation of specific topics. The article is divided into three main sections. The first describes atmospheric scattering processes and the physics behind laser-atmosphere interactions. The second section highlights some of the primary lidar applications, with brief descriptions of each measurement capability. The third section describes the practical aspects of lidar operation, including the governing equation and operational considerations.

  2. Airborne oceanographic lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The characteristics of an Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) are given. The AOL system is described and its potential for various measurement applications including bathymetry and fluorosensing is discussed.

  3. Lidar Calibration Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Freudenthaler, Volker; Nicolae, Doina; Mona, Lucia; Belegante, Livio; D'Amico, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the newly established Lidar Calibration Centre, a distributed infrastructure in Europe, whose goal is to offer services for complete characterization and calibration of lidars and ceilometers. Mobile reference lidars, laboratories for testing and characterization of optics and electronics, facilities for inspection and debugging of instruments, as well as for training in good practices are open to users from the scientific community, operational services and private sector. The Lidar Calibration Centre offers support for trans-national access through the EC HORIZON2020 project ACTRIS-2.

  4. Reduction of airfoil trailing edge noise by trailing edge blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, T.; Erbslöh, S.; Carolus, T.

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with airfoil trailing edge noise and its reduction by trailing edge blowing. A Somers S834 airfoil section which originally was designed for small wind turbines is investigated. To mimic realistic Reynolds numbers the boundary layer is tripped on pressure and suction side. The chordwise position of the blowing slot is varied. The acoustic sources, i.e. the unsteady flow quantities in the turbulent boundary layer in the vicinity of the trailing edge, are quantified for the airfoil without and with trailing edge blowing by means of a large eddy simulation and complementary measurements. Eventually the far field airfoil noise is measured by a two-microphone filtering and correlation and a 40 microphone array technique. Both, LES-prediction and measurements showed that a suitable blowing jet on the airfoil suction side is able to reduce significantly the turbulence intensity and the induced surface pressure fluctuations in the trailing edge region. As a consequence, trailing edge noise associated with a spectral hump around 500 Hz could be reduced by 3 dB. For that a jet velocity of 50% of the free field velocity was sufficient. The most favourable slot position was at 90% chord length.

  5. Processing LiDAR Data to Predict Natural Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairweather, Ian; Crabtree, Robert; Hager, Stacey

    2008-01-01

    ELF-Base and ELF-Hazards (wherein 'ELF' signifies 'Extract LiDAR Features' and 'LiDAR' signifies 'light detection and ranging') are developmental software modules for processing remote-sensing LiDAR data to identify past natural hazards (principally, landslides) and predict future ones. ELF-Base processes raw LiDAR data, including LiDAR intensity data that are often ignored in other software, to create digital terrain models (DTMs) and digital feature models (DFMs) with sub-meter accuracy. ELF-Hazards fuses raw LiDAR data, data from multispectral and hyperspectral optical images, and DTMs and DFMs generated by ELF-Base to generate hazard risk maps. Advanced algorithms in these software modules include line-enhancement and edge-detection algorithms, surface-characterization algorithms, and algorithms that implement innovative data-fusion techniques. The line-extraction and edge-detection algorithms enable users to locate such features as faults and landslide headwall scarps. Also implemented in this software are improved methodologies for identification and mapping of past landslide events by use of (1) accurate, ELF-derived surface characterizations and (2) three LiDAR/optical-data-fusion techniques: post-classification data fusion, maximum-likelihood estimation modeling, and hierarchical within-class discrimination. This software is expected to enable faster, more accurate forecasting of natural hazards than has previously been possible.

  6. Lidar profiling by long rectangular-like chopped laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, Dimitar V.; Gurdev, Ljuan L.; Kolarov, Georgi; Vankov, O. I.

    2000-06-01

    A novel, simple method is developed and tested (experimentally and by simulations) for effective, high- resolution retrieving of time-resolved lidar profiles for long rectangular-like laser pulses with arbitrary shapes of their leading and trailing edges. Such pulses are typically created by chopping cw optical radiation. The processing algorithm is based on differentiation and iteration procedures and avoids the use of divisions or deconvolutions that are often responsible for some errors and increases in the noise. Comparisons with pulsed and pseudo-random noise modulation lidar methods are given. The method enables a simplification of the entire lidar hardware. No powerful pulsed supplies, high driving pulsed voltages, complicated optical modulations, etc. are required. It could be very attractive for high-resolution, wide-spectral-band lidar measurements in the atmosphere, ocean, etc., using arbitrary optical emitters, especially for closer distances.

  7. Terrestrial Method for Airborne Lidar Quality Control and Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsubaie, N. M.; Badawy, H. M.; Elhabiby, M. M.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2014-11-01

    Most of LiDAR systems do not provide the end user with the calibration and acquisition procedures that can use to validate the quality of the data acquired by the airborne system. Therefore, this system needs data Quality Control (QC) and assessment procedures to verify the accuracy of the laser footprints and mainly at building edges. This research paper introduces an efficient method for validating the quality of the airborne LiDAR point clouds data using terrestrial laser scanning data integrated with edge detection techniques. This method will be based on detecting the edge of buildings from these two independent systems. Hence, the building edges are extracted from the airborne data using an algorithm that is based on the standard deviation of neighbour point's height from certain threshold with respect to centre points using radius threshold. The algorithm is adaptive to different point densities. The approach is combined with another innovative edge detection technique from terrestrial laser scanning point clouds that is based on the height and point density constraints. Finally, statistical analysis and assessment will be applied to compare these two systems in term of edge detection extraction precision, which will be a priori step for 3D city modelling generated from heterogeneous LiDAR systems

  8. Aerosol characterization with lidar methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Nobuo; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Shimizu, Atsushi; Matsui, Ichiro

    2014-08-01

    Aerosol component analysis methods for characterizing aerosols were developed for various types of lidars including polarization-sensitive Mie scattering lidars, multi-wavelength Raman scattering lidars, and multi-wavelength highspectral- resolution lidars. From the multi-parameter lidar data, the extinction coefficients for four aerosol components can be derived. The microphysical parameters such as single scattering albedo and effective radius can be also estimated from the derived aerosol component distributions.

  9. Edge Bioinformatics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-08-03

    Edge Bioinformatics is a developmental bioinformatics and data management platform which seeks to supply laboratories with bioinformatics pipelines for analyzing data associated with common samples case goals. Edge Bioinformatics enables sequencing as a solution and forward-deployed situations where human-resources, space, bandwidth, and time are limited. The Edge bioinformatics pipeline was designed based on following USE CASES and specific to illumina sequencing reads. 1. Assay performance adjudication (PCR): Analysis of an existing PCR assay in amore » genomic context, and automated design of a new assay to resolve conflicting results; 2. Clinical presentation with extreme symptoms: Characterization of a known pathogen or co-infection with a. Novel emerging disease outbreak or b. Environmental surveillance« less

  10. Edge Bioinformatics

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Chien-Chi

    2015-08-03

    Edge Bioinformatics is a developmental bioinformatics and data management platform which seeks to supply laboratories with bioinformatics pipelines for analyzing data associated with common samples case goals. Edge Bioinformatics enables sequencing as a solution and forward-deployed situations where human-resources, space, bandwidth, and time are limited. The Edge bioinformatics pipeline was designed based on following USE CASES and specific to illumina sequencing reads. 1. Assay performance adjudication (PCR): Analysis of an existing PCR assay in a genomic context, and automated design of a new assay to resolve conflicting results; 2. Clinical presentation with extreme symptoms: Characterization of a known pathogen or co-infection with a. Novel emerging disease outbreak or b. Environmental surveillance

  11. Combining OPAC and lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolae, Doina; Talianu, Camelia; Radu, Cristian; Stefan, Sabina

    2007-10-01

    The properties of aerosol particles are highly variable, both in time and space. This refers to the number density, the microphysical properties (size distribution, refractive index, effective radius), and to the height distribution. In most cases the actual properties are not known. Using lidar data together with models can help improve the knowledge regarding the particulate atmospheric constituents which affect local radiative forcing, the radiation balance of the earth, and thus climate. This paper presents an attempt to integrate elastic backscatter lidar data in OPAC software package in order to find the most realistic aerosol vertical distribution and their optical and microphysical characteristics. The necessity to reduce the variability of naturally occurring aerosols to typical cases, but without neglecting possible fluctuations, is achieved in OPAC by the use of a dataset of typical internally mixed aerosol components. In addition, any mixtures of the basic components can be used to calculate the overall optical parameters. Experimental or modeled meteorological profiles (temperature, pressure, relative humidity) in complementary to experimental lidar data are used to calculate the solutions of lidar equation that fits, in an iterative manner, to the output of the model. Two type of uncertainties are diminished in this way: first, the modeled profiles of lidar ratio are used in lidar data processing instead of a constant value; second, aerosol height profiles are no longer being assumed in the model, but directly measured. This procedure was applied to synthetic lidar signals in order to test its advantages and limitation.

  12. Reducing Coal Dust With Water Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangal, M. D.; Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Jets also cool and clean cutting equipment. Modular pick-and-bucket miner suffers from disadvantage: Creates large quantities of potentially explosive coal dust. Dust clogs drive chain and other parts and must be removed by hand. Picks and bucket lips become overheated by friction and be resharpened or replaced frequently. Addition of oscillating and rotating water jets to pick-and-bucket machine keeps down dust, cools cutting edges, and flushes machine. Rotating jets wash dust away from drive chain. Oscillating jets cool cutting surfaces. Both types of jet wet airborne coal dust; it precipitates.

  13. Entrainment by the jet in HH 47

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.; Morse, Jon A.; Hartigan, P.; Curiel, S.; Heathcote, Steve

    1994-01-01

    Fabry-Perot images of the HH 47 optical jet show that the velocity decreases from the center toward the edges which is interpreted as evidence for entrainment. Those images can be used to investigate the rate of entrainment required to account for the observed luminosity. Entrainment along the jet can account for only small fractions of the jet mass and the molecular outflow seen in CO. We compare the density, excitation, and velocity structure of the jet with the predictions of viscous entrainment models and models of entrainment by expulsion of jet material by internal shocks, and find that either type of model can explain the general features.

  14. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Here, collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet taggingmore » variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  15. Fuzzy jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets. To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets, are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  16. Space Lidar and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    With advances in lasers and electro-optic technology, lidar is becoming an established technique for remote sensing of the Earth and planets from space. Some of the earliest space-based lidar measurements were made in the early 1970s from lunar orbit using the laser altimeter on the Apollo 15 mission. Space lidar instruments in active use today include the MOLA instrument aboard the Mars Global Surveyor mission and the Near Laser Rangefinder on the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) Mission. This talk will review laser remote sensing techniques, critical technologies, and some results from past and present NASA missions. It will also review near term plans for NASA's ICESat and Picasso missions and summarize some concepts for lidar on future missions.

  17. Aerosol lidar ``M4``

    SciTech Connect

    Shelevoy, C.D.; Andreev, Y.M. |

    1994-12-31

    Small carrying aerosol lidar in which is used small copper vapor laser ``Malachite`` as source of sounding optical pulses is described. The advantages of metal vapor laser and photon counting mode in acquisition system of lidar gave ability to get record results: when lidar has dimensions (1 x .6 x .3 m) and weight (65 kg), it provides the sounding of air industrial pollutions at up to 20 km range in scanning sector 90{degree}. Power feed is less than 800 Wt. Lidar can be disposed as stationary so on the car, helicopter, light plane. Results of location of smoke tails and city smog in situ experiments are cited. Showed advantages of work of acquisition system in photon counting mode when dynamic range of a signal is up to six orders.

  18. Sweeping Jet Optimization Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti; Andino, Marlyn; Lin, John C.; Edelman, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Progress on experimental efforts to optimize sweeping jet actuators for active flow control (AFC) applications with large adverse pressure gradients is reported. Three sweeping jet actuator configurations, with the same orifice size but di?erent internal geometries, were installed on the flap shoulder of an unswept, NACA 0015 semi-span wing to investigate how the output produced by a sweeping jet interacts with the separated flow and the mechanisms by which the flow separation is controlled. For this experiment, the flow separation was generated by deflecting the wing's 30% chord trailing edge flap to produce an adverse pressure gradient. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the three actuator configurations. The actuator with the largest jet deflection angle, at the pressure ratios investigated, was the most efficient at controlling flow separation on the flap of the model. Oil flow visualization studies revealed that the flow field controlled by the sweeping jets was more three-dimensional than expected. The results presented also show that the actuator spacing was appropriate for the pressure ratios examined.

  19. Volcanic ash plume identification using polarization lidar: Augustine eruption, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhu, Jiang; Webley, Peter W.; Dean, K.; Cobb, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    During mid January to early February 2006, a series of explosive eruptions occurred at the Augustine volcanic island off the southern coast of Alaska. By early February a plume of volcanic ash was transported northward into the interior of Alaska. Satellite imagery and Puff volcanic ash transport model predictions confirm that the aerosol plume passed over a polarization lidar (0.694 mm wavelength) site at the Arctic Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. For the first time, lidar linear depolarization ratios of 0.10 – 0.15 were measured in a fresh tropospheric volcanic plume, demonstrating that the nonspherical glass and mineral particles typical of volcanic eruptions generate strong laser depolarization. Thus, polarization lidars can identify the volcanic ash plumes that pose a threat to jet air traffic from the ground, aircraft, or potentially from Earth orbit.

  20. Zenith Movie showing Phoenix's Lidar Beam (Animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation

    A laser beam from the Canadian-built lidar instrument on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander can be seen in this contrast-enhanced sequence of 10 images taken by Phoenix's Surface Stereo Imager on July 26, 2008, during early Martian morning hours of the mission's 61st Martian day after landing.

    The view is almost straight up and includes about 1.5 kilometer (about 1 mile) of the length of the beam. The camera, from its position close to the lidar on the lander deck, took the images through a green filter centered on light with wavelength 532 nanometers, the same wavelength of the laser beam. The movie has been artificially colored to to approximately match the color that would be seen looking through this filter on Mars. Contrast is enhanced to make the beam more visible.

    The lidar beam can be seen extending from the lower right to the upper right, near the zenith, as it reflects off particles suspended in the atmosphere. Particles that scatter the beam directly into the camera can be seen to produce brief sparkles of light. In the background, dust can be seen drifting across the sky pushed by winds aloft.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  1. Space-Based Lidar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli

    2012-01-01

    An overview of space-based lidar systems is presented. from the first laser altimeter on APOLLO 15 mission in 1971 to the Mercury Laser Altimeter on MESSENGER mission currently in orbit, and those currently under development. Lidar, which stands for Light Detection And Ranging, is a powerful tool in remote sensing from space. Compared to radars, lidars operate at a much shorter wavelength with a much narrower beam and much smaller transmitter and receiver. Compared to passive remote sensing instruments. lidars carry their own light sources and can continue measuring day and night. and over polar regions. There are mainly two types of lidars depending on the types of measurements. lidars that are designed to measure the distance and properties of hard targets are often called laser rangers or laser altimeters. They are used to obtain the surface elevation and global shape of a planet from the laser pulse time-of-night and the spacecraft orbit position. lidars that are designed to measure the backscattering and absorption of a volume scatter, such as clouds and aerosols, are often just called lidars and categorized by their measurements. such as cloud and aerosol lidar, wind lidar, CO2 lidar, and so on. The advantages of space-based lidar systems over ground based lidars are the abilities of global coverage and continuous measurements.

  2. Lidar observations of run-up (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    List, K. M.; Raubenheimer, B.; Elgar, S.

    2010-12-01

    The time dependent position of the run-up (the intersection of the shoreward edge of the water and the beach face), the maximum run-up, and the run-up duration measured with a terrestrial lidar will be compared with predictions of a ballistic model including friction (Holland and Puleo, J. Geophys. Res., 106(C3), 2001). Cross-shore water surface profiles were obtained on July 12, 2010, at South Beach, Martha’s Vineyard, MA at about 5.07 Hz with a lidar mounted on a 2-m tall frame situated approximately 5 m landward of the maximum run-up. The beach profile was estimated from lidar measurements during run-down (when the beach was uncovered by water). Wave heights, periods, and directions in 11-m water depth were 1.3 m, 7 s, and less than 5° relative to shore normal. Initial run-up velocity was estimated from the shoreward movement of the 3 run-up locations (spanning approximately 3 m in the cross-shore) immediately following the wave collapse. The foreshore slope was estimated from the beach profile between the wave collapse and the maximum run-up. The run-up edge thickness was estimated as the average of the water depth 1 m landward of the location of the run-up edge after the wave has collapsed and the depth 1 m seaward of the run-up edge at the time of maximum run-up. The friction factor used in the ballistic model was estimated as 0.005 by fitting the model predictions to the motion of a single run-up. For the 6 run-up events examined, the model predicted the maximum run-up and the run-up duration within about 20% of the observations. Interactions between the onshore propagating wave and the run-down from a prior wave sometimes caused discrepancies between the observed run-up position and the model predictions. The observations suggest that lidar may be a useful method to obtain high-frequency measurements of run-up water surfaces and bed level changes. Funded by ONR, NSF, and NSSEFF.

  3. Cosmic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Blandford, R.D.; Begelman, M.C.; Rees, M.J.

    1982-05-01

    Observations with radio telescopes have revealed that the center of many galaxies is a place of violent activity. This activity is often manifested in the production of cosmic jets. Each jet is a narrow stream of plasma that appears to squirt out of the center of a galaxy emitting radiowaves as it does so. New techniques in radio astronomy have shown how common jets are in the universe. These jets take on many different forms. The discovery of radio jets has helped in the understanding of the double structure of the majority of extragalactic radio sources. The morphology of some jets and explanations of how jets are fueled are discussed. There are many difficulties plaguing the investigation of jets. Some of these difficulties are (1) it is not known how much power the jets are radiating, (2) it is hard to tell whether a jet delieated by radio emission is identical to the region where ionized gas is flowing, and (3) what makes them. (SC)

  4. NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991 Data from the 1991 NASA Langley Airborne Lidar flights following the eruption of Pinatubo in July ... and Osborn [1992a, 1992b]. Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  5. NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992 An airborne Nd:YAG (532 nm) lidar was operated by the NASA Langley Research Center about a year following the June 1991 eruption of ... Osborn [1992a, 1992b].  Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  6. OASIS 1.0: Very Large-Aperture High-Power Lidar for Exploring Geospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X.; Smith, J. A.; Chen, C.; Zhao, J.; Yu, Z.; Gardner, C. S.

    2015-12-01

    A new initiative, namely OASIS (the Observatory for Atmosphere Space Interaction Studies), has called for a very large-aperture high-power (VLAHP) lidar as its first step forward to acquire the unprecedented measurement capabilities for exploring the space-atmosphere interaction region (SAIR). Currently, there exists a serious observational gap of the Earth's neutral atmosphere above 100 km. Information on neutral winds and temperatures and on the plasma-neutral coupling in the SAIR, especially between 100 and 200 km, is either sparse or nonexistent. Fully exploring the SAIR requires measurements of the neutral atmosphere to complement radar observations of the plasma. Lidar measurements of neutral winds, temperatures and species can enable these explorations. Many of these topics will be addressed with the VLAHP lidar. Discoveries of thermospheric neutral Fe, Na and K layers up to nearly 200 km at McMurdo, Antarctica and other locations on Earth, have opened a new door to observing the neutral thermosphere with ground-based instruments. These neutral metal layers provide the tracers for resonance Doppler lidars to directly measure the neutral temperatures and winds in the thermosphere, thus enabling the VLAHP lidar dream! Because the thermospheric densities of these metal atoms are many times smaller than the layer peak densities near 90 km, high power-aperture product lidars, like the VLAHP lidar, are required to derive scientifically useful measurements. Furthermore, several key technical challenges for VLAHP lidar have been largely resolved in the last a few years through the successful development of Fe and Na Doppler lidars at Boulder. By combining Rayleigh and Raman with resonance lidar techniques and strategically operating the VLAHP lidar next to incoherent scatter radar and other complementary instruments, the VLAHP lidar will enable new cutting-edge exploration of the geospace. These new concepts and progresses will be introduced in this paper.

  7. Lidar performance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    1994-01-01

    Section 1 details the theory used to build the lidar model, provides results of using the model to evaluate AEOLUS design instrument designs, and provides snapshots of the visual appearance of the coded model. Appendix A contains a Fortran program to calculate various forms of the refractive index structure function. This program was used to determine the refractive index structure function used in the main lidar simulation code. Appendix B contains a memo on the optimization of the lidar telescope geometry for a line-scan geometry. Appendix C contains the code for the main lidar simulation and brief instruction on running the code. Appendix D contains a Fortran code to calculate the maximum permissible exposure for the eye from the ANSI Z136.1-1992 eye safety standards. Appendix E contains a paper on the eye safety analysis of a space-based coherent lidar presented at the 7th Coherent Laser Radar Applications and Technology Conference, Paris, France, 19-23 July 1993.

  8. Edge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildreth, E. C.

    1985-09-01

    For both biological systems and machines, vision begins with a large and unwieldly array of measurements of the amount of light reflected from surfaces in the environment. The goal of vision is to recover physical properties of objects in the scene such as the location of object boundaries and the structure, color and texture of object surfaces, from the two-dimensional image that is projected onto the eye or camera. This goal is not achieved in a single step: vision proceeds in stages, with each stage producing increasingly more useful descriptions of the image and then the scene. The first clues about the physical properties of the scene are provided by the changes of intensity in the image. The importance of intensity changes and edges in early visual processing has led to extensive research on their detection, description and use, both in computer and biological vision systems. This article reviews some of the theory that underlies the detection of edges, and the methods used to carry out this analysis.

  9. Water Jetting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Hi-Tech Inc., a company which manufactures water jetting equipment, needed a high pressure rotating swivel, but found that available hardware for the system was unsatisfactory. They were assisted by Marshall, which had developed water jetting technology to clean the Space Shuttles. The result was a completely automatic water jetting system which cuts rock and granite and removes concrete. Labor costs have been reduced; dust is suppressed and production has been increased.

  10. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  11. Project HyBuJET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsay, Tom; Collet, Bill; Igar, Karyn; Kendall, Dewayne; Miklosovic, Dave; Reuss, Robyn; Ringer, Mark; Scheidt, Tony

    1990-01-01

    A conceptual Hypersonic Business Jet (HyBuJet) was examined. The main areas of concentration include: aerodynamics, propulsion, stability and control, mission profile, and atmospheric heating. In order to optimize for cruise conditions, a waverider configuration was chosen for the high lift drag ratio and low wave drag. The leading edge and lower surface of a waverider was mapped out from a known flow field and optimized for cruising at Mach 6 and at high altitudes. The shockwave generated by a waverider remains attached along the entire leading edge, allowing for a larger compression along the lower surface. Three turbofan ramjets were chosen as the propulsion of the aircraft due to the combination of good subsonic performance along with high speed propulsive capabilities. A combination of liquid silicon convective cooling for the leading edges with a highly radiative outer skin material was chosen to reduce the atmospheric heating to acceptable level.

  12. High resolution Doppler lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abreu, Vincent J.; Hays, Paul B.; Barnes, John E.

    1989-01-01

    A high resolution lidar system was implemented to measure winds in the lower atmosphere. The wind speed along the line of sight was determined by measuring the Doppler shift of the aerosol backscattered laser signal. The system in its present configuration is stable, and behaves as indicated by theoretical simulations. This system was built to demonstrate the capabilities of the detector system as a prototype for a spaceborne lidar. The detector system investigated consisted of a plane Fabry-Perot etalon, and a 12-ring anode detector. This system is generically similar to the Fabry-Perot interferometer developed for passive wind measurements on board the Dynamics Explorer satellite. That this detector system performs well in a lidar configuration was demonstrated.

  13. Micro pulse lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D.

    1993-01-01

    An eye safe, compact, solid state lidar for profiling atmospheric cloud and aerosol scattering has been demonstrated. The transmitter of the micropulse lidar is a diode pumped micro-J pulse energy, high repetition rate Nd:YLF laser. Eye safety is obtained through beam expansion. The receiver employs a photon counting solid state Geiger mode avalanche photodiode detector. Data acquisition is by a single card multichannel scaler. Daytime background induced quantum noise is controlled by a narrow receiver field-of-view and a narrow bandwidth temperature controlled interference filter. Dynamic range of the signal is limited by optical geometric signal compression. Signal simulations and initial atmospheric measurements indicate that systems built on the micropulse lidar concept are capable of detecting and profiling all significant cloud and aerosol scattering through the troposphere and into the stratosphere. The intended applications are scientific studies and environmental monitoring which require full time, unattended measurements of the cloud and aerosol height structure.

  14. Supersonic Jet Mixing Enhancement due to Natural and Induced Screech

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.; Raman, G.

    1999-01-01

    Outline of presentation are: (1) Review of experimental apparatus. (2) Effect of natural screech of jet mixing; converging nozzle, underexpanded jet and converging-diverging nozzle, design pressure.(3) Effect of induced screech on jet mixing: produced by paddles in shear layers, similar to edge tones, and converging-diverging nozzle, design pressure. (4) Effect of paddles on near-field jet noise. and (5) Concluding remarks.

  15. Wind Profiles Obtained with a Molecular Direct Detection Doppler Lidar During IHOP-2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Chen, Huai-Lin; Li, Steven X.; Mathur, Savyasachee; Dobler, Jeremy; Hasselbrack, William; Comer, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    The Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds (GLOW) is a mobile direct detection Doppler lidar system which uses the double edge technique to measure the Doppler shift of the molecular backscattered laser signal at a wavelength of 355 nm. In the spring of 2002 GLOW was deployed to the western Oklahoma profiling site (36 deg 33.500 min. N, 100 deg. 36.371 min. W) to participate in the International H2O Project (IHOP). During the IHOP campaign over 240 hours of wind profiles were obtained with the GLOW lidar in support of a variety of scientific investigations.

  16. Micropulse Lidar (MPL) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, A; Flynn, C

    2006-05-01

    The micropulse lidar (MPL) is a ground-based optical remote sensing system designed primarily to determine the altitude of clouds overhead. The physical principle is the same as for radar. Pulses of energy are transmitted into the atmosphere; the energy scattered back to the transceiver is collected and measured as a time-resolved signal. From the time delay between each outgoing transmitted pulse and the backscattered signal, the distance to the scatterer is infered. Besides real-time detection of clouds, post-processing of the lidar return can also characterize the extent and properties of aerosol or other particle-laden regions.

  17. Modeling Lidar Multiple Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kaori; Okamoto, Hajime; Ishimoto, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    A practical model to simulate multiply scattered lidar returns from inhomogeneous cloud layers are developed based on Backward Monte Carlo (BMC) simulations. The estimated time delay of the backscattered intensities returning from different vertical grids by the developed model agreed well with that directly obtained from BMC calculations. The method was applied to the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite data to improve the synergetic retrieval of cloud microphysics with CloudSat radar data at optically thick cloud grids. Preliminary results for retrieving mass fraction of co-existing cloud particles and drizzle size particles within lowlevel clouds are demonstrated.

  18. Unconditional jetting.

    PubMed

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M

    2008-08-01

    Capillary jetting of a fluid dispersed into another immiscible phase is usually limited by a critical capillary number, a function of the Reynolds number and the fluid property ratios. Critical conditions are set when the minimum spreading velocity of small perturbations v_{-};{*} along the jet (marginal stability velocity) is zero. Here we identify and describe parametric regions of high technological relevance, where v_{-};{*}>0 and the jet flow is always supercritical independently of the dispersed liquid flow rate; within these relatively broad regions, the jet does not undergo the usual dripping-jetting transition, so that either the jet can be made arbitrarily thin (yielding droplets of any imaginably small size), or the issuing flow rate can be made arbitrarily small. In this work, we provide illustrative analytical studies of asymptotic cases for both negligible and dominant inertia forces. In this latter case, requiring a nonzero jet surface velocity, axisymmetric perturbation waves "surf" downstream for all given wave numbers, while the liquid bulk can remain static. In the former case (implying small Reynolds flow) we found that the jet profile small slope is limited by a critical value; different published experiments support our predictions. PMID:18850933

  19. More Macrospicule Jets in On-Disk Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    We examine the magnetic structure and dynamics of multiple jets found in coronal holes close to or on disk center. All data are from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We report on observations of about ten jets in an equatorial coronal hole spanning 2011 February 27 and 28. We show the evolution of these jets in AIA 193 A, examine the magnetic field configuration and flux changes in the jet area, and discuss the probable trigger mechanism of these events. We reported on another jet in this same coronal hole on 2011 February 27, (is) approximately 13:04 UT (Adams et al 2014, ApJ, 783: 11). That jet is a previously-unrecognized variety of blowout jet, in which the base-edge bright point is a miniature filament-eruption flare arcade made by internal reconnection of the legs of the erupting field. In contrast, in the presently-accepted 'standard' picture for blowout jets, the base-edge bright point is made by interchange reconnection of initially-closed erupting jet-base field with ambient open field. This poster presents further evidence of the production of the base-edge bright point in blowout jets by internal reconnection. Our observations suggest that most of the bigger and brighter EUV jets in coronal holes are blowout jets of the new-found variety.

  20. Numerical simulation of the edge tone phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, N. S.; Liu, B. L.; Ofarrell, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Time accurate Navier-Stokes computations were performed to study a class 2 (acoustic) whistle, the edge tone, and to gain knowledge of the vortex-acoustic coupling mechanisms driving production of these tones. Results were obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations for laminar compressible air flow of a two dimensional jet issuing from a slit interacting with a wedge. Cases considered were determined by varying the distance from the slit to the wedge. Flow speed was kept constant at 1,750 cm/s as was the slit thickness of 0.1 cm, corresponding to conditions in the experiments of Brown. The analytical computations revealed edge tones to be present in four harmonic stages of jet flow instability over the wedge as the jet length was varied from 0.3 to 1.6 cm. Excellent agreement was obtained in all four edge tone stage cases between the present computational results and the experimentally obtained frequencies and flow visualization results of Brown. Specific edge tone generation phenomena and further confirmation of certain theories and empirical formulas concerning these phenomena were brought to light in this analytical simulation of edge tones.

  1. YAG aerosol lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, R.

    1988-01-01

    The Global Atmospheric Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) Mission, using the NASA DC-8 aircraft platform, is designed to provide the magnitude and statistical distribution of atmospheric backscatter cross section at lidar operating wavelengths. This is a fundamental parameter required for the Doppler lidar proposed to be used on a spacecraft platform for global wind field measurements. The prime measurements will be made by a CO2 lidar instrument in the 9 to 10 micron range. These measurements will be complemented with the Goddard YAG Aerosol Lidar (YAL) data in two wavelengths, 0.532 and 1.06 micron, in the visible and near-infrared. The YAL, is being designed to utilize as much existing hardware, as feasible, to minimize cost and reduce implementation time. The laser, energy monitor, telescope and detector package will be mounted on an optical breadboard. The optical breadboard is mounted through isolation mounts between two low boy racks. The detector package will utilize a photomultiplier tube for the 0.532 micron channel and a silicon avalanche photo detector (APD) for the 1.06 micron channel.

  2. Water vapor lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellingson, R.; Mcilrath, T.; Schwemmer, G.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility was studied of measuring atmospheric water vapor by means of a tunable lidar operated from the space shuttle. The specific method evaluated was differential absorption, a two-color method in which the atmospheric path of interest is traversed by two laser pulses. Results are reported.

  3. The Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    6 April 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the edge (running diagonally from the lower left to the upper right) of a trough, which is part of a large pit crater complex in Noachis Terra. This type of trough forms through the collapse of surface materials into the subsurface, and often begins as a series of individual pit craters. Over time, continued collapse increases the diameter of individual pits until finally, adjacent pits merge to form a trough such as the one captured in this image. The deep shadowed area is caused in part by an overhang; layered rock beneath this overhang is less resistant to erosion, and thus has retreated tens of meters backward, beneath the overhang. A person could walk up inside this 'cave' formed by the overhanging layered material.

    Location near: 47.0oS, 355.7oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  4. Asymmetric morphology of the propagating jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardee, Philip E.; Norman, Michael L.

    1990-12-01

    Simulations of slab jets propagating in constant atmospheres are reported for a range of jet velocities and Mach numbers. At early times, the jet maintains approximate axisymmetry within a backflowing cocoon. When the jet has penetrated farther into the external medium, the symmetry is broken by sideways oscillation and the leading edge of the jet moves about within a growing lobe. The oscillation results from nonlinear resonant amplification of the initial perturbation by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Finally, the jet flaps chaotically within the growing lobe. The flapping is driven by turbulent vortices in the lobe. The basic picture of Scheuer's (1982) 'dentist's drill' model of the physical processes underlying asymmetric morphologies in radio galaxies is confirmed. The fluid motions in the lobe are found to govern the location of the drill bit. The morphology is time-dependent on relatively short time scales.

  5. Unified EDGE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-06-18

    UEDGE is an interactive suite of physics packages using the Python or BASIS scripting systems. The plasma is described by time-dependent 2D plasma fluid equations that include equations for density, velocity, ion temperature, electron temperature, electrostatic potential, and gas density in the edge region of a magnetic fusion energy confinement device. Slab, cylindrical, and toroidal geometries are allowed, and closed and open magnetic field-line regions are included. Classical transport is assumed along magnetic field lines,more » and anomalous transport is assumed across field lines. Multi-charge state impurities can be included with the corresponding line-radiation energy loss. Although UEDGE is written in Fortran, for efficient execution and analysis of results, it utilizes either Python or BASIS scripting shells. Python is easily available for many platforms (http://www.Python.org/). The features and availability of BASIS are described in “Basis Manual Set” by P.F. Dubois, Z.C. Motteler, et al., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory report UCRL-MA-1 18541, June, 2002 and http://basis.llnl.gov. BASIS has been reviewed and released by LLNL for unlimited distribution. The Python version utilizes PYBASIS scripts developed by D.P. Grote, LLNL. The Python version also uses MPPL code and MAC Perl script, available from the public-domain BASIS source above. The Forthon version of UEDGE uses the same source files, but utilizes Forthon to produce a Python-compatible source. Forthon has been developed by D.P. Grote at LBL (see http://hifweb.lbl.gov/Forthon/ and Grote et al. in the references below), and it is freely available. The graphics can be performed by any package importable to Python, such as PYGIST.« less

  6. Unified EDGE

    SciTech Connect

    2007-06-18

    UEDGE is an interactive suite of physics packages using the Python or BASIS scripting systems. The plasma is described by time-dependent 2D plasma fluid equations that include equations for density, velocity, ion temperature, electron temperature, electrostatic potential, and gas density in the edge region of a magnetic fusion energy confinement device. Slab, cylindrical, and toroidal geometries are allowed, and closed and open magnetic field-line regions are included. Classical transport is assumed along magnetic field lines, and anomalous transport is assumed across field lines. Multi-charge state impurities can be included with the corresponding line-radiation energy loss. Although UEDGE is written in Fortran, for efficient execution and analysis of results, it utilizes either Python or BASIS scripting shells. Python is easily available for many platforms (http://www.Python.org/). The features and availability of BASIS are described in “Basis Manual Set” by P.F. Dubois, Z.C. Motteler, et al., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory report UCRL-MA-1 18541, June, 2002 and http://basis.llnl.gov. BASIS has been reviewed and released by LLNL for unlimited distribution. The Python version utilizes PYBASIS scripts developed by D.P. Grote, LLNL. The Python version also uses MPPL code and MAC Perl script, available from the public-domain BASIS source above. The Forthon version of UEDGE uses the same source files, but utilizes Forthon to produce a Python-compatible source. Forthon has been developed by D.P. Grote at LBL (see http://hifweb.lbl.gov/Forthon/ and Grote et al. in the references below), and it is freely available. The graphics can be performed by any package importable to Python, such as PYGIST.

  7. Impingement cooling with film coolant extraction in the airfoil leading edge regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liguo; Li, Zhaohui

    An extensive experimental study is conducted to determine the heat transfer characteristics of arrays of air jets impinging on perforated target surfaces in turbine blade leading edge regions by six large-scale models. The relations of pressure loss and Nusselt number to jet Reynolds number are obtained in a wide range of parameter combinations of interest in cooled airfoil practice for various models, respectively. These parameter combinations are covered in a test matrix, including combinations of variations in jet Reynolds number, airfoil leading edge curvature radius-to-diameter ratio, jet pitch-to-diameter ratio, and jet impingement gap-to-diameter ratio.

  8. Remote sensing of multi-level wind fields with high-energy airborne scanning coherent Doppler lidar.

    PubMed

    Rothermel, J; Olivier, L; Banta, R; Hardesty, R M; Howell, J; Cutten, D; Johnson, S; Menzies, R; Tratt, D M

    1998-01-19

    The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory have developed and flown a scanning, 1 Joule per pulse, CO2 coherent Doppler lidar capable of mapping a three-dimensional volume of atmospheric winds and aerosol backscatter in the planetary boundary layer, free troposphere, and lower stratosphere. Applications include the study of severe and non-severe atmospheric flows, intercomparisons with other sensors, and the simulation of prospective satellite Doppler lidar wind profilers. Examples of wind measurements are given for the marine boundary layer and near the coastline of the western United States. PMID:19377577

  9. Remote Sensing of Multi-Level Wind Fields with High-Energy Airborne Scanning Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Olivier, Lisa D.; Banta, Robert M.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Howell, James N.; Cutten, Dean R.; Johnson, Steven C.; Menzies, Robert T.; Tratt, David M.

    1997-01-01

    The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory have developed and flown a scanning, 1 Joule per pulse, CO2 coherent Doppler lidar capable of mapping a three-dimensional volume of atmospheric winds and aerosol backscatter in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. Applications include the study of severe and non-severe atmospheric flows, intercomparisons with other sensors, and the simulation of prospective satellite Doppler lidar wind profilers. Examples of wind measurements are given for the marine boundary layer and near the coastline of the western United States.

  10. Emerging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  11. Lidar measurements of Mount St. Helens effluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.

    1982-01-01

    Lidar measurements of the worldwide movement of stratospheric aerosols produced by the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens are described. Ground-based and airborne measurements show that the layers below 20 km produced by this eruption moved in an easterly direction while those above 20 km moved in a westerly direction. The effluent at jet stream altitudes of 10 to 12 km circled the globe in about 16 days and the effluent at 23 km (the highest altitude recorded) circled the globe in about 56 days. Mass calculations, using backscatter-to-mass conversion models, indicate that approximately half a million metric tons of new stratospheric material were produced by this eruption. Even though this represents a 200% increase in Northern Hemispheric aerosol, no significant long-term atmospheric temperature change should occur.

  12. Studying Taklamakan aerosol properties with lidar (STAPL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottle, Paul; Mueller, Detlef; Shin, Dong-Ho; Zhang, Xiao Xiao; Feng, Guanglong; McKendry, Ian; Strawbridge, Kevin

    2013-10-01

    By now, the global impacts of atmospheric dust have been well-established. Nevertheless, relevant properties such as size distribution, depolarization ratio, and even single-scattering albedo have been shown to vary substantially between dust producing regions and are also strongly dependant on the conditions under which the dust is emitted. Even greater variations have been documented during the process of long-range transport. With continued improvement of detection technologies, research focus is increasingly turning to refinement of our knowledge of these properties of dust in order to better account for the presence of dust in models and data analysis. The purpose of this study is to use a combination of lidar data and models to directly observe the changing properties of dust layers as they are transported from their origin in the Taklamakan Desert of western China. With the co-operation of the Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, a portable micropulse lidar system was installed at Aksu National Field on the northern edge of the Tarim Basin in late April 2013, during the Spring dust storm season. Over six days, data were collected on the optical properties of dust emissions passing over this location. The measurements of this lidar have shown the dust over Aksu on these days to have a significantly higher depolarization ratio than has been previously reported for the region. Model results show this dust was then transported across the region at least as far as Korea and Japan. Models from the Naval Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) show that during transport the dust layers became intermixed with sulfate emissions from industrial sources in China as well as smoke from wildfires burning in south-east Asia and Siberia. The multi-wavelength raman-elastic lidar located in Gwangju South Korea was used to observe the vertical structure of the layers as well as optical properties such as colour ratio, depolarization ratio and extinction

  13. Lidar instruments proposed for Eos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.

    1990-01-01

    Lidar, an acronym for light detection and ranging, represents a class of instruments that utilize lasers to send probe beams into the atmosphere or onto the surface of the Earth and detect the backscattered return in order to measure properties of the atmosphere or surface. The associated technology has matured to the point where two lidar facilities, Geodynamics Laser Ranging System (GLRS), and Laser Atmospheric Wind Sensor (LAWS) were accepted for Phase 2 studies for Eos. A third lidar facility Laser Atmospheric Sounder and Altimeter (LASA), with the lidar experiment EAGLE (Eos Atmospheric Global Lidar Experiment) was proposed for Eos. The generic lidar system has a number of components. They include controlling electronics, laser transmitters, collimating optics, a receiving telescope, spectral filters, detectors, signal chain electronics, and a data system. Lidar systems that measure atmospheric constituents or meteorological parameters record the signal versus time as the beam propagates through the atmosphere. The backscatter arises from molecular (Rayleigh) and aerosol (Mie) scattering, while attenuation arises from molecular and aerosol scattering and absorption. Lidar systems that measure distance to the Earth's surface or retroreflectors in a ranging mode record signals with high temporal resolution over a short time period. The overall characteristics and measurements objectives of the three lidar systems proposed for Eos are given.

  14. Advanced Photodetectors for Space Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Krainak, Michael A.; Abshire, James B.

    2014-01-01

    The detector in a space lidar plays a key role in the instrument characteristics and performance, especially in direct detection lidar. The sensitivity of the detector is usually the limiting factor when determining the laser power and the receiver aperture size, which in turn determines the instrument complexity and cost. The availability of a suitable detector is often a deciding factor in the choice of lidar wavelengths. A direct detection lidar can achieve the highest receiver performance, or the quantum limit, when its detector can detect signals at the single photon

  15. Investigation of Space Based Solid State Coherent Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the work performed over the period of October 1, 1997 through March 31, 2001. Under this contract, UAH/CAO participated in defining and designing the SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment (SPARCLE) mission, and developed the instrument's optical subsystem. This work was performed in collaborative fashion with NASA/MSFC engineers at both UAH/CAO and NASA/MSFC facilities. Earlier work by the UAH/CAO had produced a preliminary top-level system design for the Shuttle lidar instrument meeting the proposed mission performance requirements and the Space Shuttle Hitchhiker canister volume constraints. The UAH/CAO system design efforts had concentrated on the optical and mechanical designs of the instrument. The instrument electronics were also addressed, and the major electronic components and their interfaces defined. The instrument design concept was mainly based on the state of the transmitter and local oscillator laser development at NASA Langley Research Center and Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and utilized several lidar-related technologies that were either developed or evaluated by the NASA/MSFC and UAH/CAO scientists. UAH/CAO has developed a comprehensive coherent lidar numerical model capable of analyzing the performance of different instrument and mission concepts. This model uses the instrument configuration, atmospheric conditions and current velocity estimation theory to provide prediction of instrument performance during different phases of operation. This model can also optimize the design parameters of the instrument.

  16. Chaotic mixing across oceanic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.; Jones, C.K.; Haller, G.; Pratt, L. |

    1996-06-01

    The perspective of geometric dynamical systems is used to study the transport of fluid across oceanic jets. We study the mixing associated with the simplest analytical models for jets, namely, neutral modes superimposed on a base mean flow, where the base flow and the neutral modes are approximately potential vorticity conserving. The base jet plus a single neutral mode is an integrable flow in the appropriate moving frame, and heteroclinic orbits act as impenetrable boundaries separating different regions of phase space. Superimposing more than one neutral mode results in the breakup of these heteroclinic orbits and associated chaotic mixing. Using a cusped jet model we study the case where the perturbation is periodic in time. We present numerical simulations of the Poincar{acute e} map along with calculations of the Melnikov integral which characterizes the exchange rate across such boundaries. The analytical and numerical results show that these models explain mixing along the edges of the jet, but do not appear to explain mixing across the body of the jet. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Landslides Mapped from LIDAR Imagery, Kitsap County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenna, Jonathan P.; Lidke, David J.; Coe, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Landslides are a recurring problem on hillslopes throughout the Puget Lowland, Washington, but can be difficult to identify in the densely forested terrain. However, digital terrain models of the bare-earth surface derived from LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) data express topographic details sufficiently well to identify landslides. Landslides and escarpments were mapped using LIDAR imagery and field checked (when permissible and accessible) throughout Kitsap County. We relied almost entirely on derivatives of LIDAR data for our mapping, including topographic-contour, slope, and hill-shaded relief maps. Each mapped landslide was assigned a level of 'high' or 'moderate' confidence based on the LIDAR characteristics and on field observations. A total of 231 landslides were identified representing 0.8 percent of the land area of Kitsap County. Shallow debris topples along the coastal bluffs and large (>10,000 m2) landslide complexes are the most common types of landslides. The smallest deposit mapped covers an area of 252 m2, while the largest covers 0.5 km2. Previous mapping efforts that relied solely on field and photogrammetric methods identified only 57 percent of the landslides mapped by LIDAR (61 percent high confidence and 39 percent moderate confidence), although nine landslides previously identified were not mapped during this study. The remaining 43 percent identified using LIDAR have 13 percent high confidence and 87 percent moderate confidence. Coastal areas are especially susceptible to landsliding; 67 percent of the landslide area that we mapped lies within 500 meters of the present coastline. The remaining 33 percent are located along drainages farther inland. The LIDAR data we used for mapping have some limitations including (1) rounding of the interface area between low slope surfaces and vertical faces (that is, along the edges of steep escarpments) which results in scarps being mapped too far headward (one or two meters), (2) incorrect laser

  18. Flash Lidar Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergkoetter, M. D.; Ruppert, L.; Weimer, C. S.; Ramond, T.; Lefsky, M. A.; Burke, I. C.; Hu, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Late last year, a prototype Flash LIDAR instrument flew on a series of airborne tests to demonstrate its potential for improved vegetation measurements. The prototype is a precursor to the Electronically Steerable Flash LIDAR (ESFL) currently under development at Ball Aerospace and Technology Corp. with funding from the NASA Earth Science Technology Office. ESFL may soon significantly expand our ability to measure vegetation and forests and better understand the extent of their role in global climate change and the carbon cycle - all critical science questions relating to the upcoming NASA DESDynI and ESA BIOMASS missions. In order to more efficiently exploit data returned from the experimental Flash Lidar system and plan for data exploitation from future flights, Ball funded a graduate student project (through the Ball Summer Intern Program, summer 2009) to develop and implement algorithms for post-processing of the 3-Dimensional Flash Lidar data. This effort included developing autonomous algorithms to resample the data to a uniform rectangular grid, geolocation of the data, and visual display of large swaths of data. The resampling, geolocation, surface hit detection, and aggregation of frame data are implemented with new MATLAB code, and the efficient visual display is achieved with free commercial viewing software. These efforts directly support additional tests flights planned as early as October 2009, including possible flights over Niwot Ridge, CO, for which there is ICESat data, and a sea-level coastal area in California to test the effect of higher altitude (above ground level) on the divergence of the beams and the beam spot sizes.

  19. LIDAR Thomson scattering for advanced tokamaks. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A.W.; Lerche, R.A.; Nilson, D.G.

    1996-03-18

    The LIDAR Thomson Scattering for Advanced Tokamaks project made a valuable contribution by combining LLNL expertise from the MFE Program: tokamak design and diagnostics, and the ICF Program and Physics Dept.: short-pulse lasers and fast streak cameras. This multidisciplinary group evaluated issues involved in achieving a factor of 20 higher high spatial resolution (to as small as 2-3 mm) from the present state of the art in LIDAR Thomson scattering, and developed conceptual designs to apply LIDAR Thomson scattering to three tokamaks: Upgraded divertor measurements in the existing DIII-D tokamak; Both core and divertor LIDAR Thomson scattering in the proposed (now cancelled) TPX; and core, edge, and divertor LIDAR Thomson scattering on the presently planned International Tokamak Experimental Reactor, ITER. Other issues were evaluated in addition to the time response required for a few millimeter spatial resolution. These include the optimum wavelength, 100 Hz operation of the laser and detectors, minimizing stray light - always the Achilles heel of Thomson scattering, and time dispersion in optics that could prevent good spatial resolution. Innovative features of our work included: custom short pulsed laser concepts to meet specific requirements, use of a prism spectrometer to maintain a constant optical path length for high temporal and spatial resolution, the concept of a laser focus outside the plasma to ionize gas and form an external fiducial to use in locating the plasma edge as well as to spread the laser energy over a large enough area of the inner wall to avoid laser ablation of wall material, an improved concept for cleaning windows between shots by means of laser ablation, and the identification of a new physics issue - nonlinear effects near a laser focus which could perturb the plasma density and temperature that are to be measured.

  20. Crossflow Mixing of Noncircular Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liscinsky, D. S.; True, B.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted of the isothermal mixing of a turbulent jet injected perpendicular to a uniform crossflow through several different types of sharp-edged orifices. Jet penetration and mixing was studied using planar Mie scattering to measure time-averaged mixture fraction distributions of circular, square, elliptical, and rectangular orifices of equal geometric area injected into a constant velocity crossflow. Hot-wire anemometry was also used to measure streamwise turbulence intensity distributions at several downstream planes. Mixing effectiveness was determined using (1) a spatial unmixedness parameter based on the variance of the mean jet concentration distributions and (2) by direct comparison of the planar distributions of concentration and of turbulence intensity. No significant difference in mixing performance was observed for the six configurations based on comparison of the mean properties.

  1. Analyses of Technology for Solid State Coherent Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin

    1997-01-01

    Over past few years, considerable advances have been made in the areas of the diode-pumped, eye-safe, solid state lasers and room temperature, wide bandwidth, semiconductor detectors operating in the near-infrared region. These advances have created new possibilities for the development of reliable and compact coherent lidar systems for a wide range of applications. This research effort is aimed at further developing solid state coherent lidar technology for remote sensing of atmospheric processes such as wind, turbulence and aerosol concentration. The work performed by the UAH personnel under this Delivery Order concentrated on design and analyses of laboratory experiments and measurements, and development of advanced lidar optical subsystems in support of solid state laser radar remote sensing systems which are to be designed, deployed, and used to measure atmospheric processes and constituents. Under this delivery order, a lidar breadboard system was designed and analyzed by considering the major aircraft and space operational requirements. The lidar optical system was analyzed in detail using SYNOPSIS and Code V optical design packages. The lidar optical system include a wedge scanner and the compact telescope designed by the UAH personnel. The other major optical components included in the design and analyses were: polarizing beam splitter, routing mirrors, wave plates, signal beam derotator, and lag angle compensator. This lidar system is to be used for demonstrating all the critical technologies for the development of a reliable and low-cost space-based instrument capable of measuring global wind fields. A number of laboratory experiments and measurements were performed at the NASA/MSFC Detector Characterization Facility, previously developed by the UAH personnel. These laboratory measurements include the characterization of a 2-micron InGaAs detectors suitable for use in coherent lidars and characterization of Holographic Optical Element Scanners. UAH

  2. LIDAR Thomson scattering for ITER core plasma revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowers, C.; Nielsen, P.; Salzmann, H.

    2016-02-01

    The authors have become aware that the development of the hitherto planned time-of-flight Thomson scattering system for the ITER core plasma is not proceeding and that conventional Thomson scattering set-ups are being discussed as an alternative. In this paper, we want to point out the advantages of LIDAR and show how criticized details of the original design can be improved. We present a design of the front optics, which in neutronics terms closely resembles a layout already previously accepted. The presented design does not require Raman scattering calibration for the density measurement. Comparison with the JET Core LIDAR system and simulations at higher temperatures both show that with the new design the specified accuracy can be met with a 1-2 J laser. Current laser and detector technology is reviewed. A strategy for how to proceed is presented.

  3. Supersonic gas jets for laser-plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, K.; Veisz, L.

    2012-05-01

    We present an in-depth analysis of De Laval nozzles, which are ideal for gas jet generation in a wide variety of experiments. Scaling behavior of parameters especially relevant to laser-plasma experiments as jet collimation, sharpness of the jet edges and Mach number of the resulting jet is studied and several scaling laws are given. Special attention is paid to the problem of the generation of microscopic supersonic jets with diameters as small as 150 μm. In this regime, boundary layers dominate the flow formation and have to be included in the analysis.

  4. Modeling the performance of direct-detection Doppler lidar systems including cloud and solar background variability.

    PubMed

    McGill, M J; Hart, W D; McKay, J A; Spinhirne, J D

    1999-10-20

    Previous modeling of the performance of spaceborne direct-detection Doppler lidar systems assumed extremely idealized atmospheric models. Here we develop a technique for modeling the performance of these systems in a more realistic atmosphere, based on actual airborne lidar observations. The resulting atmospheric model contains cloud and aerosol variability that is absent in other simulations of spaceborne Doppler lidar instruments. To produce a realistic simulation of daytime performance, we include solar radiance values that are based on actual measurements and are allowed to vary as the viewing scene changes. Simulations are performed for two types of direct-detection Doppler lidar system: the double-edge and the multichannel techniques. Both systems were optimized to measure winds from Rayleigh backscatter at 355 nm. Simulations show that the measurement uncertainty during daytime is degraded by only approximately 10-20% compared with nighttime performance, provided that a proper solar filter is included in the instrument design. PMID:18324169

  5. Synthetic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, Ivana M.

    2003-01-01

    Current investigation of synthetic jets and synthetic jets in cross-flow examined the effects of orifice geometry and dimensions, momentum-flux ratio, cluster of orifices, pitch and yaw angles as well as streamwise development of the flow field. This comprehensive study provided much needed experimental information related to the various control strategies. The results of the current investigation on isolated and clustered synthetic jets with and without cross-flow will be further analyzed and documented in detail. Presentations at national conferences and publication of peer- reviewed journal articles are also expected. Projected publications will present both the mean and turbulent properties of the flow field, comparisons made with the data available in an open literature, as well as recommendations for the future work.

  6. Automatic Weather Station (AWS) Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rall, Jonathan A. R.; Campbell, James; Abshire, James B.; Spinhirne, James D.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A ground based, autonomous, low power atmospheric lidar instrument is being developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. We report on the design and anticipated performance of the proposed instrument and show data from two prototype lidar instruments previously deployed to Antarctica.

  7. FLASH LIDAR Based Relative Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brazzel, Jack; Clark, Fred; Milenkovic, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Relative navigation remains the most challenging part of spacecraft rendezvous and docking. In recent years, flash LIDARs, have been increasingly selected as the go-to sensors for proximity operations and docking. Flash LIDARS are generally lighter and require less power that scanning Lidars. Flash LIDARs do not have moving parts, and they are capable of tracking multiple targets as well as generating a 3D map of a given target. However, there are some significant drawbacks of Flash Lidars that must be resolved if their use is to be of long-term significance. Overcoming the challenges of Flash LIDARs for navigation-namely, low technology readiness level, lack of historical performance data, target identification, existence of false positives, and performance of vision processing algorithms as intermediaries between the raw sensor data and the Kalman filter-requires a world-class testing facility, such as the Lockheed Martin Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC). Ground-based testing is a critical step for maturing the next-generation flash LIDAR-based spacecraft relative navigation. This paper will focus on the tests of an integrated relative navigation system conducted at the SOSC in January 2014. The intent of the tests was to characterize and then improve the performance of relative navigation, while addressing many of the flash LIDAR challenges mentioned above. A section on navigation performance and future recommendation completes the discussion.

  8. Plasma confinement at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, I.; JET Contributors

    2016-01-01

    Operation with a Be/W wall at JET (JET-ILW) has an impact on scenario development and energy confinement with respect to the carbon wall (JET-C). The main differences observed were (1) strong accumulation of W in the plasma core and (2) the need to mitigate the divertor target temperature to avoid W sputtering by Be and other low Z impurities and (3) a decrease of plasma energy confinement. A major difference is observed on the pedestal pressure, namely a reduction of the pedestal temperature which, due to profile stiffness the plasma core temperature is also reduced leading to a degradation of the global confinement. This effect is more pronounced in low β N scenarios. At high β N, the impact of the wall on the plasma energy confinement is mitigated by the weaker plasma energy degradation with power relative to the IPB98(y, 2) scaling calculated empirically for a CFC first wall. The smaller tolerable impurity concentration for tungsten (<10-5) compared to that of carbon requires the use of electron heating methods to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core region as well as gas puffing to avoid W entering the plasma core by ELM flushing and reduction of the W source by decreasing the target temperature. W source and the target temperature can also be controlled by impurity seeding. Nitrogen and Neon have been used and with both gases the reduction of the W source and the target temperature is observed. Whilst more experiments with Neon are necessary to assess its impact on energy confinement, a partial increase of plasma energy confinement is observed with Nitrogen, through the increase of edge temperature. The challenge for scenario development at JET is to extend the pulse length curtailed by its transient behavior (W accumulation or MHD), but more importantly by the divertor target temperature limits. Re-optimisation of the scenarios to mitigate the effect of the change of wall materials maintaining high global energy confinement similar to JET-C is

  9. Full-waveform data for building roof step edge localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słota, Małgorzata

    2015-08-01

    Airborne laser scanning data perfectly represent flat or gently sloped areas; to date, however, accurate breakline detection is the main drawback of this technique. This issue becomes particularly important in the case of modeling buildings, where accuracy higher than the footprint size is often required. This article covers several issues related to full-waveform data registered on building step edges. First, the full-waveform data simulator was developed and presented in this paper. Second, this article provides a full description of the changes in echo amplitude, echo width and returned power caused by the presence of edges within the laser footprint. Additionally, two important properties of step edge echoes, peak shift and echo asymmetry, were noted and described. It was shown that these properties lead to incorrect echo positioning along the laser center line and can significantly reduce the edge points' accuracy. For these reasons and because all points are aligned with the center of the beam, regardless of the actual target position within the beam footprint, we can state that step edge points require geometric corrections. This article presents a novel algorithm for the refinement of step edge points. The main distinguishing advantage of the developed algorithm is the fact that none of the additional data, such as emitted signal parameters, beam divergence, approximate edge geometry or scanning settings, are required. The proposed algorithm works only on georeferenced profiles of reflected laser energy. Another major advantage is the simplicity of the calculation, allowing for very efficient data processing. Additionally, the developed method of point correction allows for the accurate determination of points lying on edges and edge point densification. For this reason, fully automatic localization of building roof step edges based on LiDAR full-waveform data with higher accuracy than the size of the lidar footprint is feasible.

  10. Hydrologic enforcement of lidar DEMs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppenga, Sandra K.; Worstell, Bruce B.; Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Brock, John C.; Evans, Gayla A.; Heidemann, H. Karl

    2014-01-01

    Hydrologic-enforcement (hydro-enforcement) of light detection and ranging (lidar)-derived digital elevation models (DEMs) modifies the elevations of artificial impediments (such as road fills or railroad grades) to simulate how man-made drainage structures such as culverts or bridges allow continuous downslope flow. Lidar-derived DEMs contain an extremely high level of topographic detail; thus, hydro-enforced lidar-derived DEMs are essential to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for complex modeling of riverine flow. The USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) is integrating hydro-enforced lidar-derived DEMs (land elevation) and lidar-derived bathymetry (water depth) to enhance storm surge modeling in vulnerable coastal zones.

  11. Standards - An Important Step for the (Public) Use of Lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althausen, Dietrich; Emeis, Stefan; Flentje, Harald; Guttenberger, Josef; Jäckel, Simon; Lehmann, Volker; Mattis, Ina; Münkel, Christoph; Peters, Gerhard; Ritter, Christoph; Wiegner, Matthias; Wille, Holger

    2016-06-01

    Lidar standards are needed to ensure quality and lidar product control at the interface between lidar manufacturers and lidar users. Meanwhile three lidar standards have been published by German and international standardization organizations. This paper describes the cooperation between the lidar technique inventors, lidar instrument constructors, and lidar product users to establish useful standards. Presently a backscatter lidar standard is elaborated in Germany. Key points of this standard are presented here. Two German standards were already accepted as international standards by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Hence, German and international organizations for the establishment of lidar standards are introduced to encourage a cooperative work on lidar standards by lidar scientists.

  12. An expert lidar data analysis toolset for explosive debris plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieck, Martin; Stephens, John R.; Brumby, Steven B.; Pope, Paul A.; Channell, Ryan A.; Birnbaum, Eva R.

    2006-09-01

    Open-air explosive activities are carried out by a variety of institutions, including government agencies and private organizations. These activities result in debris plumes that contain elements of the explosive package as well as substantial amounts of entrained environmental materials. While Lidar monitoring technology for these situations has been around for years we developed a unique, interactive, post-experiment Lidar Data Analysis Toolset (LIDATO) that allows the expert user to determine the location, backscatter intensity distribution, volume, and boundaries for general debris plumes at any given time. This is true with the exception of the early development and transport of the plume where the plume is typically opaque to the Lidar and only the plume edge facing the Lidar system can be mapped. For this reason we incorporated video coverage using multiple cameras. While the analysis of the video is handled separately we used the resulting plume position data and combined them with the LIDATO results. The data-fusion product refines the separately gained results and increases the data set accuracy in all aspects for the early stages of the explosion.

  13. Aerosol backscatter lidar calibration and data interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, M. J.; Menzies, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    A treatment of the various factors involved in lidar data acquisition and analysis is presented. This treatment highlights sources of fundamental, systematic, modeling, and calibration errors that may affect the accurate interpretation and calibration of lidar aerosol backscatter data. The discussion primarily pertains to ground based, pulsed CO2 lidars that probe the troposphere and are calibrated using large, hard calibration targets. However, a large part of the analysis is relevant to other types of lidar systems such as lidars operating at other wavelengths; continuous wave (CW) lidars; lidars operating in other regions of the atmosphere; lidars measuring nonaerosol elastic or inelastic backscatter; airborne or Earth-orbiting lidar platforms; and lidars employing combinations of the above characteristics.

  14. Making lidar more photogenic: creating band combinations from lidar information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoker, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past five to ten years the use and applicability of light detection and ranging (lidar) technology has increased dramatically. As a result, an almost exponential amount of lidar data is being collected across the country for a wide range of applications, and it is currently the technology of choice for high resolution terrain model creation, 3-dimensional city and infrastructure modeling, forestry and a wide range of scientific applications (Lin and Mills, 2010). The amount of data that is being delivered across the country is impressive. For example, the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Center for Lidar Information Coordination and Knowledge (CLICK), which is a National repository of USGS and partner lidar point cloud datasets (Stoker et al., 2006), currently has 3.5 percent of the United States covered by lidar, and has approximately another 5 percent in the processing queue. The majority of data being collected by the commercial sector are from discrete-return systems, which collect billions of lidar points in an average project. There are also a lot of discussions involving a potential National-scale Lidar effort (Stoker et al., 2008).

  15. Tropospheric Wind Profiles Obtained with the GLOW Molecular Doppler Lidar during the 2002 International H2O Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Chen, Huailin; Li, Steven X.; Mathur, Savy Asachee; Dobler, Jeremy; Hasselbrack, William

    2003-01-01

    The Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds (GLOW) is a mobile direct detection Doppler lidar system hich uses the double edge technique to measure the Doppler shift of the molecular backscattered laser signal at a wavelength of 355 nm. In the spring of 2002 GLOW was deployed to the western Oklahoma profiling site (36 deg 33.500 min N, 100 deg 36.371 min W) to participate in the International H2O Project (MOP). During the MOP campaign over 240 hours of wind profiles were obtained with the GLOW lidar in support of a variety of scientific investigations.

  16. Tropospheric Wind Profiles Obtained with the GLOW Molecular Doppler Lidar during the 2002 International H2O Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Chen, Huai-Lin; Li, Steven X.; Mathur, S.; Dobler, Jeremy; Hasselbrack, William

    2003-01-01

    The Goddard Lidar Observatory for Winds (GLOW) is a mobile direct detection Doppler lidar system which uses the double edge technique to measure the Doppler shift of the molecular backscattered laser signal at a wavelength of 355 nm. In the spring of 2002 GLOW was deployed to the western Oklahoma profiling site (36 deg 33.500 min N, 100 deg 36.371 min W) to participate in the International H2O Project (IHOP). During the IHOP campaign over 240 hours of wind profiles were obtained with the GLOW lidar in support of a variety of scientific investigations.

  17. Airborne Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaps, Wm. S.; Burris, J.

    1996-12-01

    We designed and tested an airborne lidar system using Raman scattering to make simultaneous measurements of methane, water vapor, and temperature in a series of flights on a NASA-operated C-130 aircraft. We present the results for methane detection, which show that the instrument has the requisite sensitivity to atmospheric trace gases. Ultimately these measurements can be used to examine the transport of chemically processed air from within the polar vortex to mid-latitudinal regions and the exchange of stratospheric air between tropical and mid-latitudinal regions.

  18. Airborne Oceanographic Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL), a spatially scanning range-gated device installed on board a NASA C-54 aircraft, is described. The AOL system is capable of measuring topographical relief or water depth (bathymetry) with a range resolution of plus or minus 0.3 m in the vertical dimension. The system may also be used to measure fluorescent spectral signatures from 3500 to 8000 A with a resolution of 100 A. Potential applications of the AOL, including sea state measurements, water transparency assessments, oil spill identification, effluent identification and crop cover assessment are also mentioned.

  19. Eye-Safe Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Laser infrared radar (lidar) undergoing development harmless to human eyes, consists almost entirely of solid-state components, and offers high range resolution. Operates at wavelength of about 2 micrometers. If radiation from such device strikes eye, almost completely absorbed by cornea without causing damage, even if aimed directly at eye. Continuous-wave light from laser oscillator amplified and modulated for transmission from telescope. Small portion of output of oscillator fed to single-mode fiber coupler, where mixed with return pulses. Intended for remote Doppler measurements of winds and differential-absorption measurements of concentrations of gases in atmosphere.

  20. Airborne oceanographic lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Specifications and preliminary design of an Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) system, which is to be constructed for installation and used on a NASA Wallops Flight Center (WFC) C-54 research aircraft, are reported. The AOL system is to provide an airborne facility for use by various government agencies to demonstrate the utility and practicality of hardware of this type in the wide area collection of oceanographic data on an operational basis. System measurement and performance requirements are presented, followed by a description of the conceptual system approach and the considerations attendant to its development. System performance calculations are addressed, and the system specifications and preliminary design are presented and discussed.

  1. Capacitively Stabilized Etalon Technology for Spaceborne Wind Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Steven X.; Gentry, Bruce M.; Korb, C. Laurance; Mathur, Savyasachee; Chen, Huailin

    1998-01-01

    Global monitoring by satellites is important for many types of environmental studies. Among these, the wind field is the single most important atmospheric state variable required for understanding atmospheric motion and predicting weather. Studies indicate that a global determination of the tropospheric wind field to an accuracy of 1-5 m/sec is critical for improved numerical weather forecasting. This measurement could be carried out with a spaceborne lidar system sensing the Doppler shift of a laser signal backscattered from the atmosphere. Over the past four years we have developed a ground-based Edge Technique lidar system and demonstrated wind measurements through the troposphere with high accuracy (1-6 m/s) and high spatial resolution. Recently, we began the design of a shuttle based wind measurement system for technology demonstration as part of the Zephyr program. In this paper, we present the characteristics of the high spectral resolution etalon filter technology for lidar wind measurement with the Edge Technique. In conclusion, a spacecraft motion compensation method has been discussed. We demonstrated experimentally that the etalon can be tuned to compensate for any satellite induced Doppler shift to an accuracy of better than 0.6 m/s over a time period of 2.5 ms.

  2. Algorithms used in the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nagle, David B.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2016-01-01

    The Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS) analyzes Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) data—digitized laser-return waveforms, position, and attitude data—to derive point clouds of target surfaces. A full-waveform airborne lidar system, the EAARL seamlessly and simultaneously collects mixed environment data, including submerged, sub-aerial bare earth, and vegetation-covered topographies.ALPS uses three waveform target-detection algorithms to determine target positions within a given waveform: centroid analysis, leading edge detection, and bottom detection using water-column backscatter modeling. The centroid analysis algorithm detects opaque hard surfaces. The leading edge algorithm detects topography beneath vegetation and shallow, submerged topography. The bottom detection algorithm uses water-column backscatter modeling for deeper submerged topography in turbid water.The report describes slant range calculations and explains how ALPS uses laser range and orientation measurements to project measurement points into the Universal Transverse Mercator coordinate system. Parameters used for coordinate transformations in ALPS are described, as are Interactive Data Language-based methods for gridding EAARL point cloud data to derive digital elevation models. Noise reduction in point clouds through use of a random consensus filter is explained, and detailed pseudocode, mathematical equations, and Yorick source code accompany the report.

  3. Accuracy of Lidar Measurements of the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, M. J.; Menzies, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    Report reviews sources of systematic error in laser radar (lidar) measurements of particles in atmosphere. Report applies particularly to stationary pulsed carbon dioxide lidars of type used to measure backscatter from aerosols in troposphere. Provides information for calibrating such systems accurately and consistently and interpreting their data correctly. Also useful in calibrating mobile and airborne lidars, lidars operating at wavelengths other than those of carbon dioxide lasers, and continuouswave lidars.

  4. Spaceborne lidar investigations of the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.; Ismail, S.

    1984-01-01

    Atmospheric investigations with a spaceborne lidar system are discussed. Measurements of aerosols, O3, and H2O with the NASA/LaRC airborne DIAL system are presented as examples of data obtained from space. The NASA/CNES study of an autonomous differential absorption lidar system is described. This system is a precursor to a spaceborne lidar system. Simulations of spaceborne lidar experiments are reviewed, and laser requirements for a spaceborne lidar system are presented.

  5. Laminar Flow Control Leading Edge Systems in Simulated Airline Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. D.; Maddalon, D. V.; Fisher, D. F.

    1988-01-01

    Achieving laminar flow on the wings of a commercial transport involves difficult problems associated with the wing leading edge. The NASA Leading Edge Flight Test Program has made major progress toward the solution of these problems. The effectiveness and practicality of candidate laminar flow leading edge systems were proven under representative airline service conditions. This was accomplished in a series of simulated airline service flights by modifying a JetStar aircraft with laminar flow leading edge systems and operating it out of three commercial airports in the United States. The aircraft was operated as an airliner would under actual air traffic conditions, in bad weather, and in insect infested environments.

  6. Relating WorldView-2 data to pine plantation lidar metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinder, J. C.; Shamsoddini, A.; Turner, R.

    2013-10-01

    Over last decades, different types of remotely sensed data including lidar, radar and optical data were investigated for forest studies. Undoubtedly, lidar data is one of the promising tools for these purposes; however, the accessibility and cost of this data are the main limitations. In order to overcome these limitations, optical data have been considered for modelling lidar metrics and their use for inferring lidar metrics over areas with no lidar coverage. WorldView-2 (WV-2) data as a high resolution optical data offer 8 bands including four traditional bands, blue, green, red, and infrared, and four new bands including coastal blue, yellow, red edge and a new infrared band whose relationships with lidar metrics were investigated in this study. For this purpose, band reflectance, band ratios, and principal components (PCs) of WV-2 multispectral data along with 23 vegetation indices were extracted. Moreover, the grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) indices of bands, band ratios and PCs were also calculated for different window sizes and orientations. Spectral derivatives and textural attributes of WV-2 were provided for a stepwise multiple-linear regression to model 10 lidar metrics including maximum, mean, variance, 10th, 30th, 60th and 90th height percentiles, standard error of mean, kurtosis and skewness for a Pinus radiata plantation, in NSW, Australia. The results indicated that the textural-based models are significantly more efficient than spectral-based models for predicting lidar metrics. Moreover, the integration of spectral derivatives with textural attributes cannot improve the results derived from textural-based models. The study demonstrates that WV-2 data are efficient for predicting lidar metrics.

  7. A study of marine stratocumulus using lidar and other FIRE aircraft observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Jorgen B.; Lenschow, Donald H.

    1990-01-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) airborne infrared lidar system (NAILS) used in the 1987 First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) off the coast of California is a 10.6 microns wavelength carbon dioxide lidar system constructed by Ron Schwiesow and co-workers at NCAR. The lidar is particularly well suited for detailed observations of cloud shapes; i.e., height of cloud top (when flying above cloud and looking down) and cloud base (when flying below cloud and looking up) along the flight path. A brief summary of the lidar design characteristics is given. The lidar height resolution of plus or minus 3 m allows for the distance between the aircraft and cloud edge to be determined with this accuracy; however, the duration of the emitted pulse is approximately 3 microseconds, which corresponds to a 500 m pulse length. Therefore, variations in backscatter intensities within the clouds can normally not be resolved. Hence the main parameter obtainable from the lidar is distance to cloud; in some cases the cloud depth can also be determined. During FIRE the lidar was operational on 7 of the 10 Electra flights, and data were taken when the distance between cloud and aircraft (minimum range) was at least 500 m. The lidar was usually operated at 8 Hz, which at a flight speed of 100 m s(-1) translates into a horizontal resolution of about 12 m. The backscatter as function of time (equivalent to distance) for each laser pulse is stored in digital form on magnetic tape. Currently, three independent variables are available to the investigators on the FIRE Electra data tapes: lidar range to cloud, strength of return (relative power), and pulse width of return, which is related to penetration depth.

  8. Lidar investigations of atmospheric dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philbrick, C. Russell; Hallen, Hans D.

    2015-09-01

    Ground based lidar techniques using Raleigh and Raman scattering, differential absorption (DIAL), and supercontinuum sources are capable of providing unique signatures to study dynamical processes in the lower atmosphere. The most useful profile signatures of dynamics in the lower atmosphere are available in profiles of time sequences of water vapor and aerosol optical extinction obtained with Raman and DIAL lidars. Water vapor profiles are used to study the scales and motions of daytime convection cells, residual layer bursts into the planetary boundary layer (PBL), variations in height of the PBL layer, cloud formation and dissipation, scale sizes of gravity waves, turbulent eddies, as well as to study the seldom observed phenomena of Brunt-Väisälä oscillations and undular bore waves. Aerosol optical extinction profiles from Raman lidar provide another tracer of dynamics and motion using sequential profiles atmospheric aerosol extinction, where the aerosol distribution is controlled by dynamic, thermodynamic, and photochemical processes. Raman lidar profiles of temperature describe the stability of the lower atmosphere and measure structure features. Rayleigh lidar can provide backscatter profiles of aerosols in the troposphere, and temperature profiles in the stratosphere and mesosphere, where large gravity waves, stratospheric clouds, and noctilucent clouds are observed. Examples of several dynamical features are selected to illustrate interesting processes observed with Raman lidar. Lidar experiments add to our understanding of physical processes that modify atmospheric structure, initiate turbulence and waves, and describe the relationships between energy sources, atmospheric stability parameters, and the observed dynamics.

  9. Automatic Weather Station (AWS) Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rall, Jonathan A.R.; Abshire, James B.; Spinhirne, James D.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An autonomous, low-power atmospheric lidar instrument is being developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This compact, portable lidar will operate continuously in a temperature controlled enclosure, charge its own batteries through a combination of a small rugged wind generator and solar panels, and transmit its data from remote locations to ground stations via satellite. A network of these instruments will be established by co-locating them at remote Automatic Weather Station (AWS) sites in Antarctica under the auspices of the National Science Foundation (NSF). The NSF Office of Polar Programs provides support to place the weather stations in remote areas of Antarctica in support of meteorological research and operations. The AWS meteorological data will directly benefit the analysis of the lidar data while a network of ground based atmospheric lidar will provide knowledge regarding the temporal evolution and spatial extent of Type la polar stratospheric clouds (PSC). These clouds play a crucial role in the annual austral springtime destruction of stratospheric ozone over Antarctica, i.e. the ozone hole. In addition, the lidar will monitor and record the general atmospheric conditions (transmission and backscatter) of the overlying atmosphere which will benefit the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). Prototype lidar instruments have been deployed to the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station (1995-96, 2000) and to an Automated Geophysical Observatory site (AGO 1) in January 1999. We report on data acquired with these instruments, instrument performance, and anticipated performance of the AWS Lidar.

  10. Simulated airline service experience with laminar-flow control leading-edge systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, Dal V.; Fisher, David F.; Jennett, Lisa A.; Fischer, Michael C.

    1987-01-01

    The first JetStar leading edge flight test was made November 30, 1983. The JetStar was flown for more than 3 years. The titanium leading edge test articles today remain in virtually the same condition as they were in on that first flight. No degradation of laminar flow performance has occurred as a result of service. The JetStar simulated airline service flights have demonstrated that effective, practical leading edge systems are available for future commercial transports. Specific conclusions based on the results of the simulated airline service test program are summarized.

  11. High Resolution Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This Grant supported the development of an incoherent lidar system to measure winds and aerosols in the lower atmosphere. During this period the following activities occurred: (1) an active feedback system was developed to improve the laser frequency stability; (2) a detailed forward model of the instrument was developed to take into account many subtle effects, such as detector non-linearity; (3) a non-linear least squares inversion method was developed to recover the Doppler shift and aerosol backscatter without requiring assumptions about the molecular component of the signal; (4) a study was done of the effects of systematic errors due to multiple etalon misalignment. It was discovered that even for small offsets and high aerosol loadings, the wind determination can be biased by as much as 1 m/s. The forward model and inversion process were modified to account for this effect; and (5) the lidar measurements were validated using rawinsonde balloon measurements. The measurements were found to be in agreement within 1-2 m/s.

  12. Scanning holographic lidar telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a unique telescope for lidar using a holographic optical element (HOE) as the primary optic. The HOE diffracts 532 nm laser backscatter making a 43 deg angle with a normal to its surface to a focus located 130 cm along the normal. The field of view scans a circle as the HOE rotates about the normal. The detector assembly and baffling remain stationary, compared to conventional scanning lidars in which the entire telescope and detector assembly require steering, or which use a large flat steerable mirror in front of the telescope to do the pointing. The spectral bandpass of our HOE is 50 nm (FWHM). Light within that bandpass is spectrally dispersed at 0.6 nm/mm in the focal plane. An aperture stop reduces the bandpass of light reaching the detector from one direction to 1 nm while simultaneously reducing the field of view to 1 mrad. Wavelengths outside the 50 nm spectral bandpass pass undiffracted through HOE to be absorbed by a black backing. Thus, the HOE combines three functions into one optic: the scanning mirror, the focusing mirror, and a narrowband filter.

  13. Simulating full-waveform lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Angela M.; Olsen, Richard C.; Borges, Carlos F.

    2010-04-01

    A simple Monte Carlo model of laser propagation through a tree is presented which allows the simulation of fullwaveform LIDAR signatures. The model incorporates a LIDAR system and a 'natural' scene, including an atmosphere, tree and ground surface. The PROSPECT leaf reflectance model is incorporated to determine leaf radiometric properties. Changes in the scene such as varying material reflectance properties, sloped vs. flat ground, and comparisons of tree 'leaf-on' vs. 'leaf-off' conditions have been analyzed. Changes in the LIDAR system have also been studied, including the effects of changing laser wavelength, shape and length of transmitted pulses, and angle of transmission. Results of some of these simulations are presented.

  14. Lidar applications to pollution studies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Fuller, W. H., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of lidar (laser radar) to the measurement of air pollution. Lidar techniques and instrumentation utilizing elastic, Raman, and fluorescence scattering are discussed. Data showing measurements of the mixing of particulate pollutants in the atmosphere are presented. These data include: simultaneous two-wavelength results, isopleths showing the temporal dynamics of particulate mixing, measurements of the top of the earth's mixing layer, and measurements in a valley with restricted circulation and mixing. All measurements are compared with simultaneous radiosonde and/or aircraft-mounted temperature probe support. In addition, a second generation lidar system presently under development is described.

  15. The edges of graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuyun; Xin, John; Ding, Feng

    2013-04-01

    The edge of two dimensional (2D) graphene, as the surface of a three dimensional (3D) crystal, plays a crucial role in the determination of its physical, electronic and chemical properties and thus has been extensively studied recently. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the study of graphene edges, including edge formation energy, edge reconstruction, method of graphene edge synthesis and the recent progress on metal-passivated graphene edges and the role of edges in graphene CVD growth. We expect this review to provide a guideline for readers to gain a clear picture of graphene edges from several aspects, especially the catalyst-passivated graphene edges and their role in graphene CVD growth. PMID:23420074

  16. The edges of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiuyun; Xin, John; Ding, Feng

    2013-03-01

    The edge of two dimensional (2D) graphene, as the surface of a three dimensional (3D) crystal, plays a crucial role in the determination of its physical, electronic and chemical properties and thus has been extensively studied recently. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the study of graphene edges, including edge formation energy, edge reconstruction, method of graphene edge synthesis and the recent progress on metal-passivated graphene edges and the role of edges in graphene CVD growth. We expect this review to provide a guideline for readers to gain a clear picture of graphene edges from several aspects, especially the catalyst-passivated graphene edges and their role in graphene CVD growth.

  17. Direct Detection Doppler Lidar for Spaceborne Wind Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Flesia, Cristina

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol and molecular based versions of the double-edge technique can be used for direct detection Doppler lidar spaceborne wind measurement. The edge technique utilizes the edge of a high spectral resolution filter for high accuracy wind measurement using direct detection lidar. The signal is split between an edge filter channel and a broadband energy monitor channel. The energy monitor channel is used for signal normalization. The edge measurement is made as a differential frequency measurement between the outgoing laser signal and the atmospheric backscattered return for each pulse. As a result the measurement is insensitive to laser and edge filter frequency jitter and drift at a level less than a few parts in 10(exp 10). We have developed double edge versions of the edge technique for aerosol and molecular-based lidar measurement of the wind. Aerosol-based wind measurements have been made at Goddard Space Flight Center and molecular-based wind measurements at the University of Geneva. We have demonstrated atmospheric measurements using these techniques for altitudes from 1 to more than 10 km. Measurement accuracies of better than 1.25 m/s have been obtained with integration times from 5 to 30 seconds. The measurements can be scaled to space and agree, within a factor of two, with satellite-based simulations of performance based on Poisson statistics. The theory of the double edge aerosol technique is described by a generalized formulation which substantially extends the capabilities of the edge technique. It uses two edges with opposite slopes located about the laser frequency at approximately the half-width of each edge filter. This doubles the signal change for a given Doppler shift and yields a factor of 1.6 improvement in the measurement accuracy compared to the single edge technique. The use of two high resolution edge filters substantially reduces the effects of Rayleigh scattering on the measurement, as much as order of magnitude, and allows the signal

  18. Wind Measurements with a 355 nm Molecular Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Chen, Huailin; Li, Steven X.

    2000-01-01

    A Doppler lidar system based on the molecular double edge technique is described. The system is mounted in a modified van to allow deployment in field operations. The lidar operates with a tripled Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm, a 45cm aperture telescope and a matching azimuth-over-elevation scanner to allow full sky access. Validated atmospheric wind profiles have been measured from 1.8 km to 35 km with a 178 m vertical resolution. The range dependent rms deviation of the horizontal wind speed is 0.4 - 6 m/s. The results of wind speed and direction are in good agreement with balloon sonde wind measurements made simultaneously at the same location.

  19. Application of resonance Raman LIDAR for chemical species identification

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.L.; Heglund, D.L.; Ray, M.D.; Harder, D.; Dobert, R.; Leung, K.P.; Wu, M.; Sedlacek, A.

    1997-07-01

    BNL has been developing a remote sensing technique for the detection of atmospheric pollutants based on the phenomenon of resonance Raman LIDAR that has also incorporated a number of new techniques/technologies designed to extend it`s performance envelope. When the excitation frequency approaches an allowed electronic transition of the molecule, an enormous enhancement of the inelastic scattering cross-section can occur, often up to 2 to 4 orders-of-magnitude, and is referred to as resonance Raman (RR), since the excitation frequency is in resonance with an allowed electronic transition. Exploitation of this enhancement along with new techniques such as pattern recognition algorithms to take advantage of the spectral fingerprint and a new laser frequency modulation technique designed to suppress broadband fluorescence, referred to as Frequency modulated Excitation Raman Spectroscopy (FreMERS) and recent developments in liquid edge filter technology, for suppression of the elastic channel, all help increase the overall performance of Raman LIDAR.

  20. Jets in air-jet family

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navia, C. E.; Sawayanagi, K.

    1985-01-01

    The A-jet families on Chacaltaya emulsion chamber experiments were analyzed by the study of jets which are reconstructed by a grouping procedure. It is demonstrated that large-E sub J R sub J events are characterized by small number of jets and two-jet like asymmetric shape, binocular events and the other type. This type has a larger number of jets and more symmetrical shape in the P sub t plane.

  1. First results from the aerosol lidar and backscatter sonde intercomparison campaign STRAIT'1997 at table mountain facility during February-March 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyerle, G.; Gross, M. R.; Haner, D. A.; Kjome, N. T.; McDermid, I. S.; McGee, T. J.; Rosen, J. M.; Schaefer, H. - J.; Schrems, O.

    1998-01-01

    First results of an intercomparison measurement campaign between three aerosol lidar instruments and in-situ backscatter sondes performed at Table Mountain Facility (34.4 deg N, 117.7 deg E, 2280 m asl) in February-March 1997 are presented. During the campaign a total of 414 hours of lidar data were acquired by the Aerosol-Temperature-Lidar (ATL, Goddard Space Flight Center) the Mobile-aerosol-Raman-Lidar (MARL, Alfred Wegener Institute), and the TMF-Aerosol-Lidar (TAL, Jet Propulsion Laboratory), and four backscatter sondes were launched. From the data set altitude profiles of backscatter ratio and volume depolarization of stratospheric background aerosols at altitudes between 15 and 25 km and optically thin high-altitude cirrus clouds at altitudes below 13 km are derived. On the basis of a sulfuric acid aerosol model color ratio profiles obtained from two wavelength lidar data are compared to the corresponding profiles derived from the sonde observations. We find an excellent agreement between the in-situ and ATL lidar data with respect to backscatter and color ratio. Cirrus clouds were present on 16 of 26 nights during the campaign. Lidar observations with 17 minute temporal and 120-300 m spatial resolution indicate high spatial and temporal variability of the cirrus layers. Qualitative agreement is found between concurrent lidar measurements of backscatter ratio and volume depolarization.

  2. Comparison of H-mode plasmas in JET-ILW and JET-C with and without nitrogen seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaervinen, A. E.; Giroud, C.; Groth, M.; Belo, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Beurskens, M.; Corrigan, G.; Devaux, S.; Drewelow, P.; Harting, D.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Lawson, K.; Lipschultz, B.; Maddison, G.; Maggi, C.; Marchetto, C.; Marsen, S.; Matthews, G. F.; Meigs, A. G.; Moulton, D.; Sieglin, B.; Stamp, M. F.; Wiesen, S.; Contributors, JET

    2016-04-01

    In high confinement mode, highly shaped plasmas with edge localized modes in JET, and for heating power of 15-17 MW, the edge fluid code EDGE2D-EIRENE predicts transition to detachment assisted by nitrogen at the low field side (LFS) target when more than 50% of the power crossing the separatrix between ELMs is radiated in the divertor chamber, i.e. ~4 MW. This is observed both in the ITER-like wall (JET-ILW) and in the carbon wall (JET-C) configurations and is consistent with experimental observations within their uncertainty. In these conditions, peak heat fluxes below 1 MW m-2 are measured at the LFS target and predicted for both wall configurations. When the JET-C configuration is replaced with the JET-ILW, a factor of two reduction in the divertor radiated power and 25-50% increase in the peak and total power deposited to the LFS divertor plate is predicted by EDGE2D-EIRENE for unseeded plasmas similar to experimental observations. At the detachment threshold, EDGE2D-EIRENE shows that nitrogen radiates more than 80% of the total divertor radiation in JET-ILW with beryllium contributing less than a few %. With JET-C, nitrogen radiates more than 70% with carbon providing less than 20% of the total radiation. Therefore, the lower intrinsic divertor radiation with JET-ILW is compensated by stronger nitrogen radiation contribution in simulations leading to detachment at similar total divertor radiation fractions. 20-100% higher deuterium molecular fraction in the divertor recycling fluxes is predicted with light JET-C materials when compared to heavy tungsten. EDGE2D-EIRENE simulations indicate that the stronger molecular contribution can reduce the divertor peak power deposition in high recycling conditions by 10-20% due to enhanced power dissipation by molecular interaction.

  3. Marine Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The marine turbine pump pictured is the Jacuzzi 12YJ, a jet propulsion system for pleasure or commercial boating. Its development was aided by a NASA computer program made available by the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) at the University of Georgia. The manufacturer, Jacuzzi Brothers, Incorporated, Little Rock, Arkansas, used COSMIC'S Computer Program for Predicting Turbopump Inducer Loading, which enabled substantial savings in development time and money through reduction of repetitive testing.

  4. Design and Performance of a Miniature Lidar Wind Profiler (MLWP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwell, Donald M., Jr.; Miodek, Mariusz J.

    1998-01-01

    The directional velocity of the wind is one of the most critical components for understanding meteorological and other dynamic atmospheric processes. Altitude-resolved wind velocity measurements, also known as wind profiles or soundings, are especially necessary for providing data for meteorological forecasting and overall global circulation models (GCM's). Wind profiler data are also critical in identifying possible dangerous weather conditions for aviation. Furthermore, a system has yet to be developed for wind profiling from the surface of Mars which could also meet the stringent requirements on size, weight, and power of such a mission. Obviously, a novel wind profiling approach based on small and efficient technology is required to meet these needs. A lidar system based on small and highly efficient semiconductor lasers is now feasible due to recent developments in the laser and detector technologies. The recent development of high detection efficiency (50%), silicon-based photon-counting detectors when combined with high laser pulse repetition rates and long receiver integration times has allowed these transmitter energies to be reduced to the order of microjoules per pulse. Aerosol lidar systems using this technique have been demonstrated for both Q-switched, diode-pumped solid-state laser transmitters (lambda = 523 nm) and semiconductor diode lasers (lambda = 830 nm); however, a wind profiling lidar based on this technique has yet to be developed. We will present an investigation of a semiconductor-laser-based lidar system which uses the "edge-filter" direct detection technique to infer Doppler frequency shifts of signals backscattered from aerosols in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Our investigation will incorporate a novel semiconductor laser design which mitigates the deleterious effects of frequency chirp in pulsed diode lasers, a problem which has limited their use in such systems in the past. Our miniature lidar could be used on a future Mars

  5. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  6. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  7. Large aperture scanning airborne lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J.; Bindschadler, R.; Boers, R.; Bufton, J. L.; Clem, D.; Garvin, J.; Melfi, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    A large aperture scanning airborne lidar facility is being developed to provide important new capabilities for airborne lidar sensor systems. The proposed scanning mechanism allows for a large aperture telescope (25 in. diameter) in front of an elliptical flat (25 x 36 in.) turning mirror positioned at a 45 degree angle with respect to the telescope optical axis. The lidar scanning capability will provide opportunities for acquiring new data sets for atmospheric, earth resources, and oceans communities. This completed facility will also make available the opportunity to acquire simulated EOS lidar data on a near global basis. The design and construction of this unique scanning mechanism presents exciting technological challenges of maintaining the turning mirror optical flatness during scanning while exposed to extreme temperatures, ambient pressures, aircraft vibrations, etc.

  8. VLBA AND CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF JETS IN FRI RADIO GALAXIES: CONSTRAINTS ON JET EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kharb, P.; O'Dea, C. P.; Tilak, A.; Baum, S. A.; Haynes, E.; Noel-Storr, J.; Fallon, C.; Christiansen, K.

    2012-07-20

    We present here the results from new Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations at 1.6 and 5 GHz of 19 galaxies of a complete sample of 21 Uppasala General Catalog (UGC) Fanaroff-Riley type I (FRI) radio galaxies. New Chandra data of two sources, viz., UGC 00408 and UGC 08433, are combined with the Chandra archival data of 13 sources. The 5 GHz observations of 10 'core-jet' sources are polarization-sensitive, while the 1.6 GHz observations constitute second-epoch total intensity observations of nine 'core-only' sources. Polarized emission is detected in the jets of seven sources at 5 GHz, but the cores are essentially unpolarized, except in M87. Polarization is detected at the jet edges in several sources, and the inferred magnetic field is primarily aligned with the jet direction. This could be indicative of magnetic field 'shearing' due to jet-medium interaction, or the presence of helical magnetic fields. The jet peak intensity I{sub {nu}} falls with distance d from the core, following the relation, I{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}d{sup a} , where a is typically {approx} - 1.5. Assuming that adiabatic expansion losses are primarily responsible for the jet intensity 'dimming,' two limiting cases are considered: (1) the jet has a constant speed on parsec scales and is expanding gradually such that the jet radius r{proportional_to}d 0{sup .4}; this expansion is, however, unobservable in the laterally unresolved jets at 5 GHz, and (2) the jet is cylindrical and is accelerating on parsec scales. Accelerating parsec-scale jets are consistent with the phenomenon of 'magnetic driving' in Poynting-flux-dominated jets. While slow jet expansion as predicted by case (1) is indeed observed in a few sources from the literature that are resolved laterally, on scales of tens or hundreds of parsecs, case (2) cannot be ruled out in the present data, provided the jets become conical on scales larger than those probed by VLBA. Chandra observations of 15 UGC FRIs detect X-ray jets in

  9. Airborne lidar imaging of salmon.

    PubMed

    Churnside, James H; Wilson, James J

    2004-02-20

    Lidar images of adult salmon are presented. The lidar system is built around a pulsed green laser and a gated intensified CCD camera. The camera gating is timed to collect light scattered from the turbid water below the fish to produce shadows in the images. Image processing increases the estimated contrast-to-noise ratio from 3.4 in the original image to 16.4 by means of a matched filter. PMID:15008549

  10. Water Measurements using a Raman Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D. N.; Demoz, B.; Wang, Z.; Veselovskii, I.; Evans, K.; DiGirolamo, P.

    2002-01-01

    The research record for the usefulness of Raman Lidar in addressing a broad range of important atmospheric research topics is well established. Raman lidar technology has been used to measure tropospheric aerosols, stratospheric aerosols and cirrus clouds. Arguably the most important measurements offered by Raman lidar for both dynamic and radiative studies, however, is that of water vapor. We will describe large improvements in Raman lidar measurements of water vapor made possible through recent technology upgrades. Furthermore, we will present the use of Raman lidar to study liquid water in the atmosphere and describe current research into the use of Raman lidar measurements to estimate ice water content of cirrus clouds.

  11. Lidar Luminance Quantizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quilligan, Gerard; DeMonthier, Jeffrey; Suarez, George

    2011-01-01

    This innovation addresses challenges in lidar imaging, particularly with the detection scheme and the shapes of the detected signals. Ideally, the echoed pulse widths should be extremely narrow to resolve fine detail at high event rates. However, narrow pulses require wideband detection circuitry with increased power dissipation to minimize thermal noise. Filtering is also required to shape each received signal into a form suitable for processing by a constant fraction discriminator (CFD) followed by a time-to-digital converter (TDC). As the intervals between the echoes decrease, the finite bandwidth of the shaping circuits blends the pulses into an analog signal (luminance) with multiple modes, reducing the ability of the CFD to discriminate individual events

  12. Raman Lidar (RL) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, RK

    2009-03-01

    The Raman lidar at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (SGPRL) is an active, ground-based laser remote sensing instrument that measures height and time resolved profiles of water vapor mixing ratio and several cloud- and aerosol-related quantities. The system is a non-commercial custom-built instrument developed by Sandia National Laboratories specifically for the ARM Program. It is fully computer automated, and will run unattended for many days following a brief (~5-minute) startup period. The self-contained system (requiring only external electrical power) is housed in a climate-controlled 8’x8’x20’ standard shipping container.

  13. Doppler Lidar (DL) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, RK

    2012-02-13

    The Doppler lidar (DL) is an active remote sensing instrument that provides range- and time-resolved measurements of radial velocity and attenuated backscatter. The principle of operation is similar to radar in that pulses of energy are transmitted into the atmosphere; the energy scattered back to the transceiver is collected and measured as a time-resolved signal. From the time delay between each outgoing transmitted pulse and the backscattered signal, the distance to the scatterer is inferred. The radial or line-of-sight velocity of the scatterers is determined from the Doppler frequency shift of the backscattered radiation. The DL uses a heterodyne detection technique in which the return signal is mixed with a reference laser beam (i.e., local oscillator) of known frequency. An onboard signal processing computer then determines the Doppler frequency shift from the spectra of the heterodyne signal. The energy content of the Doppler spectra can also be used to determine attenuated backscatter.

  14. Direct Detection Doppler Lidar for Spaceborne Wind Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Flesia, Cristina

    1999-01-01

    The theory of double edge lidar techniques for measuring the atmospheric wind using aerosol and molecular backscatter is described. Two high spectral resolution filters with opposite slopes are located about the laser frequency for the aerosol based measurement or in the wings of the Rayleigh - Brillouin profile for the molecular measurement. This doubles the signal change per unit Doppler shift and improves the measurement accuracy by nearly a factor of 2 relative to the single edge technique. For the aerosol based measurement, the use of two high resolution edge filters reduces the effects of background, Rayleigh scattering, by as much as an order of magnitude and substantially improves the measurement accuracy. Also, we describe a method that allows the Rayleigh and aerosol components of the signal to be independently determined. A measurement accuracy of 1.2 m/s can be obtained for a signal level of 1000 detected photons which corresponds to signal levels in the boundary layer. For the molecular based measurement, we describe the use of a crossover region where the sensitivity of a molecular and aerosol-based measurement are equal. This desensitizes the molecular measurement to the effects of aerosol scattering and greatly simplifies the measurement. Simulations using a conical scanning spaceborne lidar at 355 nm give an accuracy of 2-3 m/s for altitudes of 2-15 km for a 1 km vertical resolution, a satellite altitude of 400 km, and a 200 km x 200 km spatial.

  15. Observations of entrainment and time variability in the HH 47 jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartigan, Patrick; Morse, Jon A.; Heathcote, Steve; Cecil, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    We present new Fabry-Perot images of the HH 47 jet that show the first clear evidence for entrainment in a jet from a young star. The material in the jet moves faster down the axis of the flow and slower at the edges, similar to viscous flow in a pipe. The higher excitation lines occur along the edges of the jet, as expected if entrainment accelerates and heats the ambient material. We confirm previous observations of multiple bow shocks in this system. Together, time variability and entrainment produce much of the observed shock-excited gas in this object. Our data show that the 'wiggles' along the jet are not caused by jet material tied to a spiraling magnetic field, but instead result from time variability, variable ejection angles, or inhomogeneities in the flow. The gas entrained in the HH 47 jet may be atomic; our results do not provide direct evidence that stellar jets drive molecular outflows.

  16. Lidar data assimilation for improved analyses of volcanic aerosol events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Anne Caroline; Elbern, Hendrik

    2014-05-01

    Observations of hazardous events with release of aerosols are hardly analyzable by today's data assimilation algorithms, without producing an attenuating bias. Skillful forecasts of unexpected aerosol events are essential for human health and to prevent an exposure of infirm persons and aircraft with possibly catastrophic outcome. Typical cases include mineral dust outbreaks, mostly from large desert regions, wild fires, and sea salt uplifts, while the focus aims for volcanic eruptions. In general, numerical chemistry and aerosol transport models cannot simulate such events without manual adjustments. The concept of data assimilation is able to correct the analysis, as long it is operationally implemented in the model system. Though, the tangent-linear approximation, which describes a substantial precondition for today's cutting edge data assimilation algorithms, is not valid during unexpected aerosol events. As part of the European COPERNICUS (earth observation) project MACC II and the national ESKP (Earth System Knowledge Platform) initiative, we developed a module that enables the assimilation of aerosol lidar observations, even during unforeseeable incidences of extreme emissions of particulate matter. Thereby, the influence of the background information has to be reduced adequately. Advanced lidar instruments comprise on the one hand the aspect of radiative transfer within the atmosphere and on the other hand they can deliver a detailed quantification of the detected aerosols. For the assimilation of maximal exploited lidar data, an appropriate lidar observation operator is constructed, compatible with the EURAD-IM (European Air Pollution and Dispersion - Inverse Model) system. The observation operator is able to map the modeled chemical and physical state on lidar attenuated backscatter, transmission, aerosol optical depth, as well as on the extinction and backscatter coefficients. Further, it has the ability to process the observed discrepancies with lidar

  17. Numerical study of delta wing leading edge blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, David; Tavella, Domingo; Roberts, Leonard

    1988-01-01

    Spanwise and tangential leading edge blowing as a means of controlling the position and strength of the leading edge vortices are studied by numerical solution of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. The leading edge jet is simulated by defining a permeable boundary, corresponding to the jet slot, where suitable boundary conditions are implemented. Numerical results are shown to compare favorably with experimental measurements. It is found that the use of spanwise leading edge blowing at moderate angle of attack magnifies the size and strength of the leading edge vortices, and moves the vortex cores outboard and upward. The increase in lift primarily comes from the greater nonlinear vortex lift. However, spanwise blowing causes earlier vortex breakdown, thus decreasing the stall angle. The effects of tangential blowing at low to moderate angles of attack tend to reduce the pressure peaks associated with leading edge vortices and to increase the suction peak around the leading edge, so that the integrated value of the surface pressure remains about the same. Tangential leading edge blowing in post-stall conditions is shown to re-establish vortical flow and delay vortex bursting, thus increasing C sub L sub max and stall angle.

  18. Rotational Raman lidar with a multispectral detector for temperature profiling in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, K.; Yabuki, M.; Tsuda, T.

    2013-12-01

    Temperature profiling in the atmospheric boundary layer is essential for studying atmospheric processes such as dynamics, thermodynamics, and cloud physics. The rotational Raman (RR) lidar has the ability to conduct continuous observation of the spatial distributions of atmospheric temperature. In this study, a combination of the temperature lidar with a multispectral detector is proposed, in order to construct a system that is compact, robust, and easy to align for the detection of RR signals. The multispectral detector enables simultaneous acquisition of multi-channel photon counts and provides spectral and range-resolved data by applying lidar techniques. Conventional temperature lidar detects the ratio of two RR lidar signals of opposite temperature dependence in combination with several edge- and interference-filters. Conversely, the multispectral detector can define the shape of the RR spectrum. Therefore, the proposed system with a multispectral detector detects the variation of the lidar signals by temperature as well as that of the wavelength shift of the emitted laser. It is suggested that this technique can reduce uncertainties in the optical alignment of the polychromator and in the stability of laser wavelength. The statistical temperature-error derived from the proposed method depends on both the spectral resolution and the spectral range of the multispectral detector. The ideal settings for multispectral observation were estimated by the theoretical simulation of the effect of both spectral resolution and spectral range on the accuracy of temperature estimation. Further, we construct the temperature lidar by employing the multispectral detector with the ideal spectral resolution derived from the simulation. In this presentation, we introduce our proposed system and the preliminary results of the temperature observation from RR lidar with a multi spectral detector.

  19. The JENSA Gas Jet Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipps, K. A.

    2014-03-01

    With the construction of next-generation radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities, the study of many rare and unstable isotopes previously unattainable will be made possible. In order to take full advantage of possible measurements with these new isotope beams, improvements in detectors and targets are necessary. The Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) gas jet target is a new and cutting-edge target system, designed to provide a target of light gas, such as hydrogen or helium, that is localized, dense, and pure. In order to accomplish this, the JENSA system involves nearly two dozen vacuum pumps, differential pumping stages, a custom-built industrial compressor, and vacuum chambers designed to incorporate large arrays of both charged-particle and gamma-ray detectors. The JENSA gas jet target was originally constructed and characterized at ORNL, and has now moved to the ReA3 hall at the NSCL. Tests at ORNL show the JENSA system is capable of producing the most dense helium jet target for RIB studies in the world. JENSA will form the main target for the proposed SEparator for CApture Reactions (SECAR), and together the two comprise the equipment necessary to facilitate the studies which form the focus of the U.S. experimental nuclear astrophysics community. Work funded by US DOE Office of Science and the NSF.

  20. Edge-on Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has imaged an unusual edge-on galaxy, revealing remarkable details of its warped dusty disc and showing how colliding galaxies trigger the birth of new stars.

    The image, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), is online at http://heritage.stsci.edu and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc. The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. During observations of the galaxy, the camera passed a milestone, taking its 100,000th image since shuttle astronauts installed it in Hubble in 1993.

    The dust and spiral arms of normal spiral galaxies, like our Milky Way, look flat when seen edge- on. The new image of the galaxy ESO 510-G13 shows an unusual twisted disc structure, first seen in ground-based photographs taken at the European Southern Observatory in Chile. ESO 510-G13 lies in the southern constellation Hydra, some 150 million light-years from Earth. Details of the galaxy's structure are visible because interstellar dust clouds that trace its disc are silhouetted from behind by light from the galaxy's bright, smooth central bulge.

    The strong warping of the disc indicates that ESO 510-G13 has recently collided with a nearby galaxy and is in the process of swallowing it. Gravitational forces distort galaxies as their stars, gas, and dust merge over millions of years. When the disturbances die out, ESO 510-G13 will be a single galaxy.

    The galaxy's outer regions, especially on the right side of the image, show dark dust and bright clouds of blue stars. This indicates that hot, young stars are forming in the twisted disc. Astronomers believe star formation may be triggered when galaxies collide and their interstellar clouds are compressed.

    The Hubble Heritage Team used WFPC2 to observe ESO 510-G13 in April 2001. Pictures obtained through blue, green, and red filters were combined to make this color-composite image, which emphasizes the contrast between the dusty

  1. From Antarctica Lidar Discoveries to Oasis Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xinzhao; Yu, Zhibin; Fong, Weichun; Chen, Cao; Zhao, Jian; Barry, Ian F.; Smith, John A.; Lu, Xian; Huang, Wentao; Gardner, Chester S.

    2016-06-01

    Stunning new science discoveries including neutral thermospheric metal layers in the 100-200 km altitude from McMurdo lidar campaign and other world lidar observations have led to a new initiative in the middle and upper atmosphere science community—the very large-aperture lidar Observatory for Atmosphere Space Interaction Studies (OASIS). These discoveries and the recent technology breakthroughs in Fe and Na Doppler lidars are presented to illustrate the science drivers and technology foundations forming the basis for OASIS.

  2. Tropospheric Wind Profile Measurements with a Direct Detection Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Li, Steven X.; Korb, C. Laurence; Chen, Huailin; Mathur, Savyasachee

    1998-01-01

    Research has established the importance of global tropospheric wind measurements for large scale improvements in numerical weather prediction. In addition, global wind measurements provide data that are fundamental to the understanding and prediction of global climate change. These tasks are closely linked with the goals of the NASA Earth Science Enterprise and Global Climate Change programs. NASA Goddard has been actively involved in the development of direct detection Doppler lidar methods and technologies to meet the wind observing needs of the atmospheric science community. In this paper we describe a recently developed prototype wind lidar system using a direct detection Doppler technique for measuring wind profiles from the surface through the troposphere. This system uses a pulsed ND:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm as the transmitter. The laser pulse is directed to the atmosphere using a 40 cm diameter scan mirror. The portion of the laser energy backscattered from aerosols and molecules is collected by a 40 cm diameter telescope and coupled via fiber optics into the Doppler receiver. Single photon counting APD's are used to detect the atmospheric backscattered signal. The principle element of the receiver is a dual bandpass tunable Fabry Perot etalon which analyzes the Doppler shift of the incoming laser signal using the double edge technique. The double edge technique uses two high resolution optical filters having bandpasses offset relative to one another such that the 'edge' of the first filter's transmission function crosses that of the second at the half power point. The outgoing laser frequency is located approximately at the crossover point. Due to the opposite going slopes of the edges, a Doppler shift in the atmospheric backscattered laser frequency produces a positive change in signal for one filter and a negative change in the second filter. Taking the ratio of the two edge channel signals yields a result which is directly proportional to the

  3. NASA Airborne Lidar 1982-1984 Flights

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar 1982-1984 Flights Data from the 1982 NASA Langley Airborne Lidar flights following the eruption of El Chichon ... continuing to January 1984. Transcribed from the following NASA Tech Reports: McCormick, M. P., and M. T. Osborn, Airborne lidar ...

  4. Airborne UV Lidar for Forest Parameter Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiaoxia; Chazette, Patrick; Totems, Julien

    2016-06-01

    A full-waveform UV lidar performed airborne measurements over several temperate and tropical forests sites. The structural and ecological parameters (canopy height, quadratic mean canopy height and apparent foliage) were extracted from lidar backscattered profiles. The aboveground carbon and leaf area index are also evaluated from lidar measurements.

  5. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roloff, P.

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  6. Transport of mineral dust derived from airborne wind lidar measurements during SALTRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouza, Fernando; Reitebuch, Oliver; Groß, Silke; Rahm, Stephan; Freudenthaler, Volker; Toledano, Carlos; Weinzierl, Bernadett

    2015-04-01

    During the SALTRACE field experiment conducted between the 10 of June and the 15 of July 2013, the transport and properties of Saharan dust were characterized by a 2-µm Doppler wind lidar (DWL) deployed on the DLR Falcon 20 research aircraft. Unlike aerosol lidars, the DLW is able to simultaneously measure wind fields and -by means of an adequate calibration- aerosol optical properties, which is more adequate for aerosol transport studies. The retrieved horizontal and vertical wind speed provide a direct observation of dust long range transport mechanisms across the Atlantic (e.g. by the African easterly jet) from Western Africa to the Caribbean. Vertical wind observations revealed the structure of island induced lee waves in the Cape Verde and Barbados regions. A novel method for the calibration of DWLs based on simultaneous measurements with a ground-based aerosol lidar and sun photometer was developed. After being calibrated, the system is able to retrieve quantitative aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficients, which is usually not obtained from coherent lidars. Results from the validation with a ground-based aerosol lidar in Barbados and the CALIPSO satellite instrument will be discussed.

  7. Corporate Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, Savannah, GA, used a version of a NASA program called WIBCO to design a wing for the Gulfstream IV (G-IV) which will help to reduce transonic drag (created by shock waves that develop as an airplane approaches the speed of sound). The G-IV cruises at 88 percent of the speed of sound, and holds the international record in its class for round-the-world flight. They also used the STANS5 and Profile programs in the design. They will use the NASA program GASP to help determine the gross weight, range, speed, payload and optimum wing area of an intercontinental supersonic business jet being developed in cooperation with Sukhoi Design Bureau, a Soviet organization.

  8. Automatic extraction of building boundaries using aerial LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruisheng; Hu, Yong; Wu, Huayi; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Building extraction is one of the main research topics of the photogrammetry community. This paper presents automatic algorithms for building boundary extractions from aerial LiDAR data. First, segmenting height information generated from LiDAR data, the outer boundaries of aboveground objects are expressed as closed chains of oriented edge pixels. Then, building boundaries are distinguished from nonbuilding ones by evaluating their shapes. The candidate building boundaries are reconstructed as rectangles or regular polygons by applying new algorithms, following the hypothesis verification paradigm. These algorithms include constrained searching in Hough space, enhanced Hough transformation, and the sequential linking technique. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithms successfully extract building boundaries at rates of 97%, 85%, and 92% for three LiDAR datasets with varying scene complexities.

  9. Backscattered signal modulation and emitting module design for a cloud lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Xiaowen; Chen, Zhenyi; Lian, Xu; Jin, Hui; Zhang, Xiaofu

    2014-02-01

    The cloud lidar, with the character of high precision and good stability, is an effective way to detect the cloud height. Pulse diode laser (PLD), as an essential part of the lidar system, needs the triggering pulse. In this paper, the emitting part of the lidar is studied - including the simulation of the backscatter SNR, the choose of the PLD and the design of trigging circuit to drive the 905nm PLD with the consideration of the optical system. A circuit for trigging the laser pulse with adjustable power and pulse width is contrived. Then the software Systemview is used to emulate the design and finally the making of PCB is finished. The results show whatever the parameters of the pulse, namely trigging pulse width, the rising edge, dithering , all these can be qualified to be in use in the practice and enjoys the merits of the low cost and convenience. The emitting module operates well.

  10. Flow and mixing characteristics of an elevated pulsating transverse jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rong F.; Hsu, Ching M.

    2012-01-01

    Flow-evolution processes as well as the penetration, spread, and dispersion characteristics of elevated pulsating transverse jets were studied experimentally in a wind tunnel. Jet pulsations were induced by means of acoustic excitation. Streak pictures of the smoke-flow patterns, illuminated by a laser-light sheet in the median plane, were recorded by a high-speed digital camera. A hot-wire anemometer was used to digitize instantaneous velocities of instabilities in the flow. Penetration height and spread width were obtained through a binary edge identification technique. Tracer-gas concentrations were measured to provide information on jet dispersions and trajectories. Three characteristic flow modes (synchronized flapping jet, transition, and synchronized shear-layer vortices) were identified in the domain of the jet-to-crossflow momentum-flux ratio and the excitation Strouhal number. At low excitation Strouhal numbers, the jet column near the tube exit flapped back-and-forth periodically at the excitation frequency and induced large up-down motions of the deflected jet. The penetration, spread, and dispersion of the jet increased drastically compared with the non-excited jet because the up-down oscillating motions of the deflected jet transformed the axial momentum into oscillating lateral momentum. Forcing the jet into the transition and synchronized shear-layer vortices regimes caused the vortices to appear along the upwind shear layer of the deflected jet. Under these conditions, the penetration, spread, and dispersion of the jet presented insignificant increases because the entrainment effect induced by the shear-layer vortices was not as large as that produced by the jet oscillating motions in the synchronized flapping jet regime.

  11. Lidar sounding of volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorani, Luca; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Angelini, Federico; Borelli, Rodolfo; Del Franco, Mario; Murra, Daniele; Pistilli, Marco; Puiu, Adriana; Santoro, Simone

    2013-10-01

    Accurate knowledge of gas composition in volcanic plumes has high scientific and societal value. On the one hand, it gives information on the geophysical processes taking place inside volcanos; on the other hand, it provides alert on possible eruptions. For this reasons, it has been suggested to monitor volcanic plumes by lidar. In particular, one of the aims of the FP7 ERC project BRIDGE is the measurement of CO2 concentration in volcanic gases by differential absorption lidar. This is a very challenging task due to the harsh environment, the narrowness and weakness of the CO2 absorption lines and the difficulty to procure a suitable laser source. This paper, after a review on remote sensing of volcanic plumes, reports on the current progress of the lidar system.

  12. Shuttle atmospheric lidar research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Shuttle atmospheric lidar program is discussed in relation to an understanding of the processes governing the Earth's atmosphere and in the capacity to evaluate the atmospheric susceptibility to manmade and natural perturbations. Applications of the lidar which are discussed are the determination of the global flow of water vapor and pollutants in the troposphere, improvement of chemical and transport models of the stratosphere and mesosphere, evaluation of radiative models of the atmosphere, investigation of chemistry and transport of thermospheric atomic species, and investigation of magnetospheric aspects of sun/weather relationships. The features of the lidar measurements discussed are the high spatial resolution, control of the source wavelength and intensity, and high measurement specificity.

  13. ESTIMATION OF TROPICAL FOREST STRUCTURE AND BIOMASS FROM FUSION OF RADAR AND LIDAR MEASUREMENTS (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saatchi, S. S.; Dubayah, R.; Clark, D. B.; Chazdon, R.

    2009-12-01

    geometry and pixel locations. Keywords: Amazon, Biomass, Carbon, Forest Structure, Tropical forests, Radar, Polarimetry, Interferometry, Lidar This work is performed partially at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract from National Aeronautic and Space Administration.

  14. Jet inclusive cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Del Duca, V.

    1992-11-01

    Minijet production in jet inclusive cross sections at hadron colliders, with large rapidity intervals between the tagged jets, is evaluated by using the BFKL pomeron. We describe the jet inclusive cross section for an arbitrary number of tagged jets, and show that it behaves like a system of coupled pomerons.

  15. Supersonic gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulov, V. G.

    The papers presented in this volume provide an overview of the current state of research in the gas dynamics of jet flows. In particular, attention is given to free supersonic jets and to the interaction of supersonic jets with one another and with obstacles under stationary and nonstationary flow conditions. Papers are presented on a method for calculating a weakly anisotropic supersonic turbulent jet in a subsonic slipstream; composite supersonic jets; the principal gas-dynamic characteristics of the processes occurring in gas-jet-driven shock-wave generators; and the construction of models for supersonic jet flows. For individual items see A84-16902 to A84-16918

  16. Fatal Penetrating Injuries Sustained by High-pressure Water Jet Unit.

    PubMed

    Radojevic, Nemanja; Radnic, Bojana; Curovic, Ivana

    2015-11-01

    The high-pressure water jet unit is a generator of frequent burst of water jets. The water jet reaches very high speeds and is able to cause wounds similar to those of high-velocity projectiles. In the presented case, unusual fatal injuries sustained by water jet are presented. Operating with the unit, an untrained worker accidentally activated a high-pressure water jet unit, and the extremely high pressure of water liberated the jet unit from his hand and whirled it around him. A jet stream of water ran across his body and caused fatal penetrating injuries in the femoral region. The edges of the wound were mainly sharp with contusion rings on the skin beyond the edges. Exploring the inside of the canals during the autopsy, the left femoral artery and vein were found to be completely transected. The resemblance to a firearm entry wound and the severity of the internal injury make it a noteworthy entity. PMID:26250721

  17. High background photon counting lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lentz, W. J.

    1992-01-01

    Photon counting with lidar returns is usually limited to low light levels, while wide dynamic range is achieved by counting for long times. The broad emission spectrum of inexpensive high-power semiconductor lasers makes receiver filters pass too much background light for traditional photon counting in daylight. Very high speed photon counting is possible, however, at more than 500 MHz which allows the construction of eyesafe lidar operating in the presence of bright clouds. Detector improvements are possible to count to 20 GHz producing a single shot dynamic range of ten decades.

  18. High pressure water jet mining machine

    DOEpatents

    Barker, Clark R.

    1981-05-05

    A high pressure water jet mining machine for the longwall mining of coal is described. The machine is generally in the shape of a plowshare and is advanced in the direction in which the coal is cut. The machine has mounted thereon a plurality of nozzle modules each containing a high pressure water jet nozzle disposed to oscillate in a particular plane. The nozzle modules are oriented to cut in vertical and horizontal planes on the leading edge of the machine and the coal so cut is cleaved off by the wedge-shaped body.

  19. "Waveguidability" of idealized jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manola, Iris; Selten, Frank; Vries, Hylke; Hazeleger, Wilco

    2013-09-01

    It is known that strong zonal jets can act as waveguides for Rossby waves. In this study we use the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis data to analyze the connection between jets and zonal waves at timescales beyond 10 days. Moreover, a barotropic model is used to systematically study the ability of idealized jets to trap Rossby wave energy ("waveguidability") as a function of jet strength, jet width, and jet location. In general, strongest waveguidability is found for narrow, fast jets. In addition, when the stationary wave number is integer, a resonant response is found through constructive interference. In Austral summer, the Southern Hemispheric jet is closest to the idealized jets considered and it is for this season that similar jet-zonal wave relationships are identified in the ECMWF reanalysis data.

  20. Application of the k-epsilon turbulence model to the simulation of a fully pulsed free air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, L. J. W.; Bremhorst, K.

    1993-03-01

    The work describes application of the k-epsilon turbulence model to a fully pulsed air jet. The standard model failed to predict the change in slope of the velocity decay where the jet changes from pulsed to steady jet behavior. A change in one of the constants of the k-epsilon model based on the behavior of the periodic velocity component relative to the intrinsic component yielded satisfactory results. Features of the pulsed jet which were successfully simulated included the flow reversal near the edge of the jet, increased entrainment when compared to steady jets and large radial outflow near the leading edge of the pulse and large radial inflow near the outer edge of the jet for the remainder of the pulse.

  1. Overview of JET results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanelli, F.; Laxåback, M.; JET EFDA Contributors

    2011-09-01

    Since the last IAEA Conference JET has been in operation for one year with a programmatic focus on the qualification of ITER operating scenarios, the consolidation of ITER design choices and preparation for plasma operation with the ITER-like wall presently being installed in JET. Good progress has been achieved, including stationary ELMy H-mode operation at 4.5 MA. The high confinement hybrid scenario has been extended to high triangularity, lower ρ* and to pulse lengths comparable to the resistive time. The steady-state scenario has also been extended to lower ρ* and ν* and optimized to simultaneously achieve, under stationary conditions, ITER-like values of all other relevant normalized parameters. A dedicated helium campaign has allowed key aspects of plasma control and H-mode operation for the ITER non-activated phase to be evaluated. Effective sawtooth control by fast ions has been demonstrated with 3He minority ICRH, a scenario with negligible minority current drive. Edge localized mode (ELM) control studies using external n = 1 and n = 2 perturbation fields have found a resonance effect in ELM frequency for specific q95 values. Complete ELM suppression has, however, not been observed, even with an edge Chirikov parameter larger than 1. Pellet ELM pacing has been demonstrated and the minimum pellet size needed to trigger an ELM has been estimated. For both natural and mitigated ELMs a broadening of the divertor ELM-wetted area with increasing ELM size has been found. In disruption studies with massive gas injection up to 50% of the thermal energy could be radiated before, and 20% during, the thermal quench. Halo currents could be reduced by 60% and, using argon/deuterium and neon/deuterium gas mixtures, runaway electron generation could be avoided. Most objectives of the ITER-like ICRH antenna have been demonstrated; matching with closely packed straps, ELM resilience, scattering matrix arc detection and operation at high power density (6.2 MW m-2) and

  2. Supersonic Leading Edge Receptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslov, Anatoly A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes experimental studies of leading edge boundary layer receptivity for imposed stream disturbances. Studies were conducted in the supersonic T-325 facility at ITAM and include data for both sharp and blunt leading edges. The data are in agreement with existing theory and should provide guidance for the development of more complete theories and numerical computations of this phenomena.

  3. The Edge, Fall 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, 1999

    1999-01-01

    "The Edge" is a Canadian publication for youth. The mandate of the Edge is to support and celebrate all career journeys embraced by youth. This issue contains career profile articles covering three jobs: crane operator, indoor climbing instructor, and product certification tester. Career trends and the state of today's workplace are also…

  4. Variable geometry inlet design for scram jet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinan, Daniel P. (Inventor); Drake, Alan (Inventor); Andreadis, Dean (Inventor); Beckel, Stephen A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to an improved variable geometry inlet for a scram jet engine having at least one combustor module. The variable geometry inlet comprises each combustor module having two sidewalls. Each of the sidewalls has a central portion with a thickness and a tapered profile forward of the central portion. The tapered profile terminates in a sharp leading edge. The variable geometry inlet further comprises each module having a lower wall and a movable cowl flap positioned forward of the lower wall. The movable cowl flap has a leading edge and the leading edges of the sidewalls intersect the leading edge of the cowl flap.

  5. a Data Driven Method for Building Reconstruction from LiDAR Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajadian, M.; Arefi, H.

    2014-10-01

    Airborne laser scanning, commonly referred to as LiDAR, is a superior technology for three-dimensional data acquisition from Earth's surface with high speed and density. Building reconstruction is one of the main applications of LiDAR system which is considered in this study. For a 3D reconstruction of the buildings, the buildings points should be first separated from the other points such as; ground and vegetation. In this paper, a multi-agent strategy has been proposed for simultaneous extraction and segmentation of buildings from LiDAR point clouds. Height values, number of returned pulse, length of triangles, direction of normal vectors, and area are five criteria which have been utilized in this step. Next, the building edge points are detected using a new method named "Grid Erosion". A RANSAC based technique has been employed for edge line extraction. Regularization constraints are performed to achieve the final lines. Finally, by modelling of the roofs and walls, 3D building model is reconstructed. The results indicate that the proposed method could successfully extract the building from LiDAR data and generate the building models automatically. A qualitative and quantitative assessment of the proposed method is then provided.

  6. Interference of Backscatter from Two Droplets in a Focused Continuous Wave CO2 Doppler Lidar Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana

    1999-01-01

    Interference due to the superposition of backscatter, beta, from two micron-sized droplets using a NASA/MSFC cw (continuous wave) CO2 Doppler lidar at 9.1 micrometer wavelength was detected for the first time. The resultant single beta signal from both droplets contained an interference structure with a well-defined periodicity which was accurately measured and compared with cw lidar theory. The agreement between measurements and theory is excellent, indicating that the interference arises because the droplets are moving at different speeds and, therefore, the relative droplet separation is not constant. This gives the superimposed beta signal from both droplets in the lidar beam moving in and out of constructive and destructive interference with a well-defined periodic structure. A measurement of a time-resolved signal pulse with an oscilloscope of the combined from two approx. 14.12 micrometers in diameter silicone oil droplets responding to the Gaussian lidar beam intensity at the lidar beam focus is shown. Full details of this laboratory experimental setup, particle generation method, measurement technique, and the cw lidar can be found elsewhere. The stream of silicone oil droplets resided at a Doppler-shift center frequency of f (sub D) approx. (3.4 plus or minus 0.2) MHz, giving droplet speed v approx.(21.9 plus or minus 1.3) ms (exp. -1). Also shown on a separate channel is the corresponding signature using an amplitude demodulator circuit designed to detect the amplitude envelope of f(sub D) within the pulse profile. beta from simultaneous droplet events show a complete cyclic interference structure of maximum and minimum. The average period T of the complete cycle of interference is 13.02 plus or minus.39 microseconds. Toward the right edge of the profile, the interference disappears because one of the droplets is leaving the lidar beam while the other one remains in the beam, thus, giving beta for a single droplet.

  7. Finnish Meteorological Institute Doppler Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Ewan OConnor

    2015-03-27

    This doppler lidar system provides co-polar and cross polar attenuated backscatter coefficients,signal strength, and doppler velocities in the cloud and in the boundary level, including uncertainties for all parameters. Using the doppler beam swinging DBS technique, and Vertical Azimuthal Display (VAD) this system also provides vertical profiles of horizontal winds.

  8. Conically Scanned Holographic LIDAR Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary

    1993-01-01

    Holographic LIDAR telescope includes holographic disk, rotation of which sweeps collimated, monochromatic beam of light from laser through conical scan. Holographic disk diffracts light scattered back from target volume or area to focal point located at stationary photomultiplier detector. Two conical baffles prevent stray light from reaching detector.

  9. Lidar Detection of Explosives Traces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrovnikov, Sergei M.; Gorlov, Evgeny V.; Zharkov, Victor I.; Panchenko, Yury N.

    2016-06-01

    The possibility of remote detection of traces of explosives using laser fragmentation/laser-induced fluorescence (LF/LIF) is studied. Experimental data on the remote visualization of traces of trinitrotoluene (TNT), hexogen (RDX), trotyl-hexogen (Comp B), octogen (HMX), and tetryl with a scanning lidar detector of traces of nitrogen-containing explosives at a distance of 5 m are presented.

  10. Atmospheric lidar predevelopment program (ATLID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morancais, Didier; Marini, Andrea E.

    1997-09-01

    The Atmospheric Lidar (ATLID) is the backscatter lidar instrument developed for ESA, under the prime contractorship of MATRA MARCONI SPACE France. This kind of lidar has been selected for flight on an ESA Earth Explorer satellite, and will be based on ATLID concept and technologies. It is part of a multi-payload mission, named Earth Radiation, dedicated to the Earth radiative transfer study for climatology. The lidar will provide information on the atmosphere, such as cloud cover, top height of all cloud types and planetary boundary layer, thin cloud extent, optical depth and polarization. The instrument features a pulsed diode-pumped Nd-YAG laser (1.06 micrometers wavelength) together with a one-axis scanning 60 cm lightweight telescope. A technology pre-development program has been performed in order to raise the maturity of the instrument design. Elegant breadboard models have been realised and submitted to environmental tests. The laser transmitter, the laser thermal control subsystem (capillary-pumped two-phase loop), the diode laser power supply, the avalanche photodiode detection chain, the narrow-band filter, the scan mechanism, and the telescope lightweight primary mirror (C-SiC) have been breadboarded in the frame of the programme. The instrument design and performance have also been consolidated with regards to the successful hardware results.

  11. Jet mixing in a reacting cylindrical crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, M. Y.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the mixing of air jets into the hot, fuel-rich products of a gas turbine primary zone. The mixing, as a result, occurs in a reacting environment with chemical conversion and substantial heat release. The geometry is a crossflow confined in a cylindrical duct with side-wall injection of jets issuing from round orifices. A specially designed reactor, operating on propane, presents a uniform mixture without swirl to mixing modules consisting of 8, 9, 10, and 12 holes at a momentum-flux ratio of 57 and a jet-to-mainstream mass-flow ratio of 2.5. Concentrations of O2, CO2, CO, and HC are obtained upstream, downstream, and within the orifice plane. O2 profiles indicate jet penetration while CO2, CO, and HC profiles depict the extent of reaction. Jet penetration is observed to be a function of the number of orifices and is found to affect the mixing in the reacting system. The results demonstrate that one module (the 12-hole) produces near-optimal penetration defined here as a jet penetration closest to the module half-radius, and hence the best uniform mixture at a plane one duct radius from the orifice leading edge.

  12. Development of X-43A Mach 10 Leading Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Glass, David E.; Bruce, Walter E., III; Lindell, Michael C.; Vaughn, Wallace L.; Dirling, R. B., Jr.; Hogenson, P. A.; Nichols, J. M.; Risner, N. W.; Thompson, D. R.

    2005-01-01

    The nose leading edge of the Hyper-X Mach 10 vehicle was orginally anticipated to reach temperatures near 4000 F at the leading-edge stagnation line. A SiC coated carbon/carbon (C/C) leading-edge material will not survive that extreme temperature for even a short duration single flight. To identify a suitable leading edge for the Mach 10 vehicle, arc-jet testing was performed on thirteen leading-edge segments fabricated from different material systems to evaluate their performance in a simulated flight environment. Hf, Zr, Si, and Ir based materials, in most cases as a coating on C/C, were included in the evaluation. Afterwards, MER, Tucson, AZ was selected as the supplier of the flight vehicle leading edges. The nose and the vertical and horizontal tail leading edges were fabricated out of a 3:1 biased high thermal conductivity C/C. The leading edges were coated with a three layer coating comprised of a SiC conversion of the top surface of the C/C, followed by a chemical vapor deposited layer of SiC, followed by a thin chemical vapor deposited layer of HfC. This paper will describe the fabrication of the Mach 10 C/C leading edges and the testing performed to validate performance.

  13. Optical amplifiers for coherent lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fork, Richard

    1996-01-01

    We examine application of optical amplification to coherent lidar for the case of a weak return signal (a number of quanta of the return optical field close to unity). We consider the option that has been explored to date, namely, incorporation of an optical amplifier operated in a linear manner located after reception of the signal and immediately prior to heterodyning and photodetection. We also consider alternative strategies where the coherent interaction, the nonlinear processes, and the amplification are not necessarily constrained to occur in the manner investigated to date. We include the complications that occur because of mechanisms that occur at the level of a few, or one, quantum excitation. Two factors combine in the work to date that limit the value of the approach. These are: (1) the weak signal tends to require operation of the amplifier in the linear regime where the important advantages of nonlinear optical processing are not accessed, (2) the linear optical amplifier has a -3dB noise figure (SN(out)/SN(in)) that necessarily degrades the signal. Some improvement is gained because the gain provided by the optical amplifier can be used to overcome losses in the heterodyned process and photodetection. The result, however, is that introduction of an optical amplifier in a well optimized coherent lidar system results in, at best, a modest improvement in signal to noise. Some improvement may also be realized on incorporating more optical components in a coherent lidar system for purely practical reasons. For example, more compact, lighter weight, components, more robust alignment, or more rapid processing may be gained. We further find that there remain a number of potentially valuable, but unexplored options offered both by the rapidly expanding base of optical technology and the recent investigation of novel nonlinear coherent interference phenomena occurring at the single quantum excitation level. Key findings are: (1) insertion of linear optical

  14. Stretched Inertial Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Seon, Thomas; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Liquid jets often arise as short-lived bursting liquid flows. Cavitation or impact-driven jets, bursting champagne bubbles, shaped-charge jets, ballistospores or drop-on-demand inkjet printing are a few examples where liquid jets are suddenly released. The trademark of all these discharge jets is the property of being stretched, due to the quenching injection. the present theoretical and experimental investigation, the structure of the jet flow field will be unraveled experimentally for a few emblematic occurrences of discharge jets. Though the injection markedly depends on each flow configuration, the jet velocity field will be shown to be systematically and rapidly attracted to the universal stretching flow z/t. The emergence of this inertial attractor actually only relies on simple kinematic ingredients, and as such is fairly generic. The universality of the jet velocity structure will be discussed.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a jet drilling an H I cloud: Shock induced formation of molecular clouds and jet breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Asahina, Yuta; Ogawa, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Kawashima, Tomohisa; Furukawa, Naoko; Enokiya, Rei; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Fukui, Yasuo

    2014-07-01

    The formation mechanism of the jet-aligned CO clouds found by NANTEN CO observations is studied by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations taking into account the cooling of the interstellar medium. Motivated by the association of the CO clouds with the enhancement of H I gas density, we carried out MHD simulations of the propagation of a supersonic jet injected into the dense H I gas. We found that the H I gas compressed by the bow shock ahead of the jet is cooled down by growth of the cooling instability triggered by the density enhancement. As a result, a cold dense sheath is formed around the interface between the jet and the H I gas. The radial speed of the cold, dense gas in the sheath is a few km s{sup –1} almost independent of the jet speed. Molecular clouds can be formed in this region. Since the dense sheath wrapping the jet reflects waves generated in the cocoon, the jet is strongly perturbed by the vortices of the warm gas in the cocoon, which breaks up the jet and forms a secondary shock in the H I-cavity drilled by the jet. The particle acceleration at the shock can be the origin of radio and X-ray filaments observed near the eastern edge of the W50 nebula surrounding the galactic jet source SS433.

  16. Agile robotic edge finishing

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.

    1996-08-01

    Edge finishing processes have seemed like ideal candidates for automation. Most edge finishing processes are unpleasant, dangerous, tedious, expensive, not repeatable and labor intensive. Estimates place the cost of manual edge finishing processes at 12% of the total cost of fabricating precision parts. For small, high precision parts, the cost of hand finishing may be as high as 305 of the total part cost. Up to 50% of this cost could be saved through automation. This cost estimate includes the direct costs of edge finishing: the machining hours required and the 30% scrap and rework rate after manual finishing. Not included in these estimates are the indirect costs resulting from cumulative trauma disorders and retraining costs caused by the high turnover rate for finishing jobs.. Despite the apparent economic advantages, edge finishing has proven difficult to automate except in low precision and/or high volume production environments. Finishing automation systems have not been deployed successfully in Department of Energy defense programs (DOE/DP) production, A few systems have been attempted but have been subsequently abandoned for traditional edge finishing approaches: scraping, grinding, and filing the edges using modified dental tools and hand held power tools. Edge finishing automation has been an elusive but potentially lucrative production enhancement. The amount of time required for reconfiguring workcells for new parts, the time required to reprogram the workcells to finish new parts, and automation equipment to respond to fixturing errors and part tolerances are the most common reasons cited for eliminating automation as an option for DOE/DP edge finishing applications. Existing automated finishing systems have proven to be economically viable only where setup and reprogramming costs are a negligible fraction of overall production costs.

  17. Edge detection: a tutorial review

    SciTech Connect

    Kunt, M.

    1982-01-01

    Major edge detection methods are reviewed from the signal processing and artificial intelligence point of views. In the first class, images are processed first to enhance edges. Then a decision is made to label each picture point as edge or not edge. In the second class edges are viewed as the border-lines of regions whose points share a common property. 21 references.

  18. Evaluation of vegetation fire smoke plume dynamics and aerosol load using UV scanning lidar and fire-atmosphere modelling during the Mediterranean Letia 2010 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy-Cancellieri, V.; Augustin, P.; Filippi, J. B.; Mari, C.; Fourmentin, M.; Bosseur, F.; Morandini, F.; Delbarre, H.

    2013-08-01

    Vegetation fires emit large amount of gases and aerosols which are detrimental to human health. Smoke exposure near and downwind of fires depends on the fire propagation, the atmospheric circulations and the burnt vegetation. A better knowledge of the interaction between wildfire and atmosphere is a primary requirement to investigate fire smoke and particle transport. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the usefulness of an UV scanning lidar to characterize the fire smoke plume and consequently validate fire-atmosphere model simulations. An instrumented burn was conducted in a Mediterranean area typical of ones frequently concern by wildfire with low dense shrubs. Using Lidar measurements positioned near the experimental site, fire smoke plume was thoroughly characterized by its optical properties, edge and dynamics. These parameters were obtained by combining methods based on lidar inversion technique, wavelet edge detection and a backscatter barycenter technique. The smoke plume displacement was determined using a digital video camera coupled with the Lidar. The simulation was performed using a meso-scale atmospheric model in a large eddy simulation configuration (Meso-NH) coupled to a fire propagation physical model (ForeFire) taking into account the effect of wind, slope and fuel properties. A passive numerical scalar tracer was injected in the model at fire location to mimic the smoke plume. The simulated fire smoke plume width remained within the edge smoke plume obtained from lidar measurements. The maximum smoke injection derived from lidar backscatter coefficients and the simulated passive tracer was around 200 m. The vertical position of the simulated plume barycenter was systematically below the barycenter derived from the lidar backscatter coefficients due to the oversimplified properties of the passive tracer compared to real aerosols particles. Simulated speed and horizontal location of the plume compared well with the observations derived from

  19. Evaluation of wildland fire smoke plume dynamics and aerosol load using UV scanning lidar and fire-atmosphere modelling during the Mediterranean Letia 2010 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy-Cancellieri, V.; Augustin, P.; Filippi, J. B.; Mari, C.; Fourmentin, M.; Bosseur, F.; Morandini, F.; Delbarre, H.

    2014-03-01

    Vegetation fires emit large amount of gases and aerosols which are detrimental to human health. Smoke exposure near and downwind of fires depends on the fire propagation, the atmospheric circulations and the burnt vegetation. A better knowledge of the interaction between wildfire and atmosphere is a primary requirement to investigate fire smoke and particle transport. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the usefulness of an UV scanning lidar to characterise the fire smoke plume and consequently validate fire-atmosphere model simulations. An instrumented burn was conducted in a Mediterranean area typical of ones frequently subject to wildfire with low dense shrubs. Using lidar measurements positioned near the experimental site, fire smoke plume was thoroughly characterised by its optical properties, edge and dynamics. These parameters were obtained by combining methods based on lidar inversion technique, wavelet edge detection and a backscatter barycentre technique. The smoke plume displacement was determined using a digital video camera coupled with the lidar. The simulation was performed using a mesoscale atmospheric model in a large eddy simulation configuration (Meso-NH) coupled to a fire propagation physical model (ForeFire), taking into account the effect of wind, slope and fuel properties. A passive numerical scalar tracer was injected in the model at fire location to mimic the smoke plume. The simulated fire smoke plume width remained within the edge smoke plume obtained from lidar measurements. The maximum smoke injection derived from lidar backscatter coefficients and the simulated passive tracer was around 200 m. The vertical position of the simulated plume barycentre was systematically below the barycentre derived from the lidar backscatter coefficients due to the oversimplified properties of the passive tracer compared to real aerosol particles. Simulated speed and horizontal location of the plume compared well with the observations derived from

  20. Remote Sensing of Wind Fields and Aerosol Distribution with Airborne Scanning Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, Dean R.; Johnson, Steven C.; Jazembski, Maurice; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The coherent Doppler laser radar (lidar), when operated from an airborne platform, is a unique tool for the study of atmospheric and surface processes and features. This is especially true for scientific objectives requiring measurements in optically-clear air, where other remote sensing technologies such as Doppler radar are typically at a disadvantage. The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of several US institutions, led by Marshall Space Flight Center, have developed an airborne coherent Doppler lidar capable of mapping the wind field and aerosol structure in three dimensions. The instrument consists of an eye-safe approx. 1 Joule/pulse lidar transceiver, telescope, scanner, inertial measurement unit, and flight computer system to orchestrate all subsystem functions and tasks. The scanner is capable of directing the expanded lidar beam in a variety of ways, in order to extract vertically-resolved wind fields. Horizontal resolution is approx. 1 km; vertical resolution is even finer. Winds are obtained by measuring backscattered, Doppler-shifted laser radiation from naturally-occurring aerosol particles (of order 1 micron diameter). Measurement coverage depends on aerosol spatial distribution and composition. Velocity accuracy has been verified to be approx. 1 meter per second. A variety of applications have been demonstrated during the three flight campaigns conducted during 1995-1998. Examples will be shown during the presentation. In 1995, boundary layer winds over the ocean were mapped with unprecedented resolution. In 1996, unique measurements were made of. flow over the complex terrain of the Aleutian Islands; interaction of the marine boundary layer jet with the California coastal mountain range; a weak dry line in Texas - New Mexico; the angular dependence of sea surface scattering; and in-flight radiometric calibration using the surface of White Sands National Monument. In 1998, the first measurements of eyewall and boundary layer winds within a

  1. Unsteady features of jets in lift and cruise modes for VTOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kibens, V.; Saripalli, K. R.; Wlezien, R. W.; Kegelman, J. T.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were performed to simulate jet plume effects associated with VTOL aircraft in takeoff and cruise modes. A water facility was used to investigate the influence of inclination angle and separation distance on the three-dimensional fountain flowfield generated by two impinging jets operating at a jet Reynolds number of 250,000. Substantial differences in the flow features were observed for different spacings between the jets. Plume effects in cruise mode were simulated by a supersonic unheated jet parallel to a wall. Variation of the distance between the wall and the edge of the plume is shown to have a major controlling effect on the supersonic screech instability.

  2. a Min-Cut Based Filter for Airborne LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ural, Serkan; Shan, Jie

    2016-06-01

    LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) is a routinely employed technology as a 3-D data collection technique for topographic mapping. Conventional workflows for analyzing LiDAR data require the ground to be determined prior to extracting other features of interest. Filtering the terrain points is one of the fundamental processes to acquire higher-level information from unstructured LiDAR point data. There are many ground-filtering algorithms in literature, spanning several broad categories regarding their strategies. Most of the earlier algorithms examine only the local characteristics of the points or grids, such as the slope, and elevation discontinuities. Since considering only the local properties restricts the filtering performance due to the complexity of the terrain and the features, some recent methods utilize global properties of the terrain as well. This paper presents a new ground filtering method, Min-cut Based Filtering (MBF), which takes both local and global properties of the points into account. MBF considers ground filtering as a labeling task. First, an energy function is designed on a graph, where LiDAR points are considered as the nodes on the graph that are connected to each other as well as to two auxiliary nodes representing ground and off-ground labels. The graph is constructed such that the data costs are assigned to the edges connecting the points to the auxiliary nodes, and the smoothness costs to the edges between points. Data and smoothness terms of the energy function are formulated using point elevations and approximate ground information. The data term conducts the likelihood of the points being ground or off-ground while the smoothness term enforces spatial coherence between neighboring points. The energy function is optimized by finding the minimum-cut on the graph via the alpha-expansion algorithm. The resulting graph-cut provides the labeling of the point cloud as ground and off-ground points. Evaluation of the proposed method on

  3. Density and confinement effects on mixing characteristics of an axisymmetrical CO(2) jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doty, J. H.

    1985-03-01

    This thesis studies the effects of jet density and confinement on spreading and entrainment rate of axisymmetrical CO2 jet in air. Four tests were conducted to isolate these effects: heated free jet; isothermal free jet; heated confined jet; and isothermal confined jet. The mass flow rate of CO2 was held constant for all tests at 6 kg/hr. Flow visualization studies were also conducted to corroborate results. It was determined that isokinetic sampling for CO2 concentrations is important for obtaining accurate measurements in the jet shear layer for axial distances less than 10 jet diameters. An increase in velocity at the edge of the jet near the entrance plane was noted for the isothermal studies where the density difference between the jet and the surrounding air was significant. Spreading rate for the jets was determined using half width at half maximum criterion. The heated jet entrained more air than the isothermal jet at the same axial location even though the heated jet had a smaller cross sectional area.

  4. Raman LIDAR Detection of Cloud Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoz, Belay; Starr, David; Whiteman, David; Evans, Keith; Hlavka, Dennis; Peravali, Ravindra

    1999-01-01

    Advantages introduced by Raman lidar systems for cloud base determination during precipitating periods are explored using two case studies of light rain and virga conditions. A combination of the Raman lidar derived profiles of water vapor mixing ratio and aerosol scattering ratio, together with the Raman scattered signals from liquid drops, can minimize or even eliminate some of the problems associated with cloud boundary detection using elastic backscatter lidars.

  5. Ozone Lidar Observations for Air Quality Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lihua; Newchurch, Mike; Kuang, Shi; Burris, John F.; Huang, Guanyu; Pour-Biazar, Arastoo; Koshak, William; Follette-Cook, Melanie B.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; McGee, Thomas J.; Sullivan, John T.; Langford, Andrew O.; Senff, Christoph J.; Alvarez, Raul; Eloranta, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone lidars are well suited to measuring the high spatio-temporal variability of this important trace gas. Furthermore, lidar measurements in conjunction with balloon soundings, aircraft, and satellite observations provide substantial information about a variety of atmospheric chemical and physical processes. Examples of processes elucidated by ozone-lidar measurements are presented, and modeling studies using WRF-Chem, RAQMS, and DALES/LES models illustrate our current understanding and shortcomings of these processes.

  6. NASA Jet Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    The presentation highlights jet-noise research conducted in the Subsonic Fixed Wing, Supersonics, and Environmentally Responsible Aviation Projects in the Fundamental Aeronautics Program at NASA. The research efforts discussed include NASA's updated Aircraft NOise Prediction Program (ANOPP2), acoustic-analogy-based prediction tools, jet-surface-interaction studies, plasma-actuator investigations, N+2 Supersonics Validation studies, rectangular-jet experiments, twin-jet experiments, and Hybrid Wind Body (HWB) activities.

  7. Jets of incipient liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnikov, A. V.; Mazheiko, N. A.; Skripov, V. P.

    2000-05-01

    Jets of incipient water escaping into the atmosphere through a short channel are photographed. In some experiments. complete disintegration of the jet is observed. The relationship of this phenomenon with intense volume incipience is considered. The role of the Coanda effect upon complete opening of the jet is revealed. Measurement results of the recoil force R of the jets of incipient liquids are presented. Cases of negative thrust caused by the Coanda effect are noted. Generalization of experimental data is proposed.

  8. Scalable lidar technique for fire detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utkin, Andrei B.; Piedade, Fernando; Beixiga, Vasco; Mota, Pedro; Lousã, Pedro

    2014-08-01

    Lidar (light detection and ranging) presents better sensitivity than fire surveillance based on imaging. However, the price of conventional lidar equipment is often too high as compared to passive fire detection instruments. We describe possibilities to downscale the technology. First, a conventional lidar, capable of smoke-plume detection up to ~10 km, may be replaced by an industrially manufactured solid-state laser rangefinder. This reduces the detection range to about 5 km, but decreases the purchase price by one order of magnitude. Further downscaling is possible by constructing the lidar smoke sensor on the basis of a low-cost laser diode.

  9. SAR and LIDAR fusion: experiments and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Matthew C.; Zaugg, Evan C.; Bradley, Joshua P.; Bowden, Ryan D.

    2013-05-01

    In recent years ARTEMIS, Inc. has developed a series of compact, versatile Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems which have been operated on a variety of small manned and unmanned aircraft. The multi-frequency-band SlimSAR has demonstrated a variety of capabilities including maritime and littoral target detection, ground moving target indication, polarimetry, interferometry, change detection, and foliage penetration. ARTEMIS also continues to build upon the radar's capabilities through fusion with other sensors, such as electro-optical and infrared camera gimbals and light detection and ranging (LIDAR) devices. In this paper we focus on experiments and applications employing SAR and LIDAR fusion. LIDAR is similar to radar in that it transmits a signal which, after being reflected or scattered by a target area, is recorded by the sensor. The differences are that a LIDAR uses a laser as a transmitter and optical sensors as a receiver, and the wavelengths used exhibit a very different scattering phenomenology than the microwaves used in radar, making SAR and LIDAR good complementary technologies. LIDAR is used in many applications including agriculture, archeology, geo-science, and surveying. Some typical data products include digital elevation maps of a target area and features and shapes extracted from the data. A set of experiments conducted to demonstrate the fusion of SAR and LIDAR data include a LIDAR DEM used in accurately processing the SAR data of a high relief area (mountainous, urban). Also, feature extraction is used in improving geolocation accuracy of the SAR and LIDAR data.

  10. Analysis of Lidar Remote Sensing Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    1999-01-01

    Line of sight velocity and measurement position sensitivity analyses for an orbiting coherent Doppler lidar are developed and applied to two lidars, one with a nadir angle of 30 deg. in a 300 km altitude, 58 deg. inclination orbit and the second for a 45 deg. nadir angle instrument in a 833 km altitude, 89 deg. inclination orbit. The effect of orbit related effects on the backscatter sensitivity of a coherent Doppler lidar is also discussed. Draft performance estimate, error budgets and payload accommodation requirements for the SPARCLE (Space Readiness Coherent Lidar) instrument were also developed and documented.

  11. Inductive and Electrostatic Acceleration in Relativistic Jet-Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Johnny S.T.; Noble, Robert J.; /SLAC

    2005-07-13

    We report on the observation of rapid particle acceleration in numerical simulations of relativistic jet-plasma interactions and discuss the underlying mechanisms. The dynamics of a charge-neutral, narrow, electron-positron jet propagating through an unmagnetized electron-ion plasma was investigated using a three-dimensional, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell computer code. The interaction excited magnetic filamentation as well as electrostatic (longitudinal) plasma instabilities. In some cases, the longitudinal electric fields generated inductively and electrostatically reached the cold plasma wave-breaking limit, and the longitudinal momentum of about half the positrons increased by 50% with a maximum gain exceeding a factor of two. The results are relevant to understanding the micro-physics at the interface region of an astrophysical jet with the interstellar plasma, for example, the edge of a wide jet or the jet-termination point.

  12. Overview of the Jet/Surface Interaction Test (JSIT1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary; Brown, Cliff; Bencic, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This material was presented at the Acoustics Technical Working Group Meeting on April22, 2011. It provides an overview of an experiment called the Jet / Surface Interaction Test which was conducted to expand the database available regarding how a planar surface interacts with a jet to shield and/or enhance the jet noise. This presentation focuses on data obtained during Phase 1 of the test, JSIT1, which was conducted using the Small Hot Jet Acoustic Rig located in the Aeroacoustics Propulsion Lab at NASA GRCduring January and February, 2011. A second phase of the test, JSIT2, is planned for 2012.There were two parts of the phase 1 test. In part 1, known as the shielding surface part of the test, a planar surface was placed between the jet and the microphones. In part 2, the reflecting surface part of the test, the surface was placed on the opposite side of the jet so that the jet noise was free to reflect off the surface toward the microphones. Phased array, pressure sensitive paint, and far field acoustic data obtained during JSIT1 are presented. The phased array data illustrate how the jet noise is blocked by the shielding surface. It also shows that the low frequency scrubbing noise generated when the surface is impacted by the jet comes predominantly from the surface trailing edge. The far field data show the trailing edge noise to be a dipole source. The pressure sensitive paint data show how the pressure distribution on the surface varies as the surface is traversed toward jet.This material was presented at the Acoustics Technical Working Group Meeting on April22, 2011. It provides an overview of an experiment called the Jet/Surface Interaction Test which was conducted to expand the database available regarding how a planar surface interacts with a jet to shield and/or enhance the jet noise. This presentation focuses on data obtained during Phase 1 of the test, JSIT1, which was conducted using the Small Hot Jet Acoustic Rig located in the Aeroacoustics

  13. High Resolution Diagnostics of a Linear Shaped Charge Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.B.; Kuklo, R.M.; Shaw, L.L.; Carter, D.L.; Baum, D.W.

    1999-08-10

    The linear shaped charge is designed to produce a knife blade-like flat jet, which will perforate and sever one side of a modestly hard target from the other. This charge is approximately plane wave initiated and used a water pipe quality circular copper liner. To establish the quality of this jet we report about an experiment using several of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory high-resolution diagnostics previously published in this meeting [1]. Image converter tube camera stereo image pairs were obtained early in the jet formation process. Individual IC images were taken just after the perforation of a thin steel plate. These pictures are augmented with 70 mm format rotating mirror framing images, orthogonal 450 KeV flash radiograph pairs, and arrival time switches (velocity traps) positioned along the length of the jet edge. We have confirmed that linear shaped charges are subject to the same need for high quality copper as any other metal jetting device.

  14. A Parametric Study of Jet Interactions with Rarefied Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional computational techniques, in particular the uncoupled CFD-DSMC of the present study, are available to be applied to problems such as jet interactions with variable density regions ranging from a continuum jet to a rarefied free stream. When the value of the jet to free stream momentum flux ratio approximately greater than 2000 for a sharp leading edge flat plate forward separation vortices induced by the jet interaction are present near the surface. Also as the free stream number density n (infinity) decreases, the extent and magnitude of normalized pressure increases and moves upstream of the nozzle exit. Thus for the flat plate model the effect of decreasing n (infinity) is to change the sign of the moment caused by the jet interaction on the flat plate surface.

  15. Prewhirl Jet Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, S. Y.; Jensen, M.; Jackson, E. D.

    1985-01-01

    Simple accurate model of centrifugal or rocket engine pumps provides information necessary to design inducer backflow deflector, backflow eliminator and prewhirl jet in jet mixing zones. Jet design based on this model shows improvement in inducer suction performance and reduced cavitation damage.

  16. First observations of Gigantic Jets from Monsoon Thunderstorms over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajesh; Maurya, Ajeet; Chanrion, Olivier; Neubert, Torsten; Cummer, Steven; Mlynarczyk, Janusz; Bór, József; Siingh, Devendraa; Cohen, Morris; Kumar, Sushil

    2016-04-01

    Gigantic Jets are electric discharges from thunderstorm cloud tops to the bottom of the ionosphere at ~80 km altitude. After their first discovery in 2001, relatively few observations have been reported. Most of these are from satellites at large distances and a few tens from the ground at higher spatial resolution. Here we report the first Gigantic Jets observed in India from two thunderstorm systems that developed over the land surface from monsoon activity, each storm producing two Gigantic Jets. The jets were recorded by a video camera system at standard video rate (20 ms exposure) at a few hundred km distance. ELF measurements suggest that the jets are of the usual negative polarity and that they develop in less than 40 ms, which is faster than most jets reported in the past. The jets originate from the leading edge of a slowly drifting convective cloud complex close to the highest regions of the clouds and carry ~25 Coulomb of charge to the ionosphere. One jet has a markedly horizontal displacement that we suggest is caused by a combination of close-range cloud electric fields at inception, and longer-range cloud fields at larger distances during full development. The Gigantic Jets are amongst the few that have been observed over land.

  17. Lidar study of K layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jing

    2016-07-01

    A double-laser-beam lidar was successfully developed in 2010 to measure the K layer over Yanqing County, Beijing (40.5°N, 116.2°E). Comprehensive statistical analyses of sporadic K (Ks) layer parameters were conducted using two years of lidar data, and the parameters of the Ks layers and their distribution obtained by the analyses are described. The seasonal distribution of Ks occurrence was obtained, with two maxima observed in January and July, respectively. The seasonal distributions of sporadic E (Es) occurrence over Beijing differ from those of Ks occurrence. However, good correlations between Es and Ks in case by case study were found. We also found that four Ks events with peak altitudes lower than 90 km were associated with large and sharp temperature increases in five comparative examples.

  18. Performance testing of lidar receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, M. Y.

    1986-01-01

    In addition to the considerations about the different types of noise sources, dynamic range, and linearity of a lidar receiver, one requires information about the pulse shape retaining capabilities of the receiver. For this purpose, relatively precise information about the height resolution as well as the recovery time of the receiver, due both to large transients and to fast changes in the received signal, is required. As more and more analog receivers using fast analog to digital converters and transient recorders will be used in the future lidar systems, methods to test these devices are essential. The method proposed for this purpose is shown. Tests were carried out using LCW-10, LT-20, and FTVR-2 as optical parts of the optical pulse generator circuits. A commercial optical receiver, LNOR, and a transient recorder, VK 220-4, were parts of the receiver system.

  19. Automating the Purple Crow Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Shannon; Sica, R. J.; Argall, P. S.

    2016-06-01

    The Purple Crow LiDAR (PCL) was built to measure short and long term coupling between the lower, middle, and upper atmosphere. The initial component of my MSc. project is to automate two key elements of the PCL: the rotating liquid mercury mirror and the Zaber alignment mirror. In addition to the automation of the Zaber alignment mirror, it is also necessary to describe the mirror's movement and positioning errors. Its properties will then be added into the alignment software. Once the alignment software has been completed, we will compare the new alignment method with the previous manual procedure. This is the first among several projects that will culminate in a fully-automated lidar. Eventually, we will be able to work remotely, thereby increasing the amount of data we collect. This paper will describe the motivation for automation, the methods we propose, preliminary results for the Zaber alignment error analysis, and future work.

  20. Lidar observations of wind over Xin Jiang, China: general characteristics and variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yan; Sun, Dong-song; Weng, Ning-quan; Wang, Jian-guo; Dou, Xian-kang; Zhang, Yan-hong; Guan, Jun; Miao, Qingjian; Chen, Xin

    2016-08-01

    The mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar based on a Fabry-Perot etalon is developed for wind measurement. The structure and technical parameters of this lidar system are described in brief. The 1740 wind profiles from 8 to 40 km altitudes by the lidar in Xinjiang, China, were obtained in 2010 and 2011, and were used to analyze the characteristics and variations of wind. The results shown that the wind velocity is within a three-layer structure: westerly jet layer (9-14 km), quasi-zero velocity layer (18-22 km) and gale layer (22-40 km). In August and September, the wind direction is within a three-layer structure: zonal westerly wind layer (5-18 km) where wind direction is west, zonal wind reverse layer (18-22 km) where wind direction is unstable and easterly wind layer (22-40 km) where wind direction is east. In October, wind direction is west (8-40 km). Wind observations by lidar are a realistic offset to the rawins.

  1. Supporting Indonesia's National Forest Monitoring System with LiDAR Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Scientists at Applied GeoSolutions, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Winrock International, and the University of New Hampshire are working with the government of Indonesia to enhance the National Forest Monitoring System in Kalimantan, Indonesia. The establishment of a reliable, transparent, and comprehensive NFMS has been limited by a dearth of relevant data that are accurate, low-cost, and spatially resolved at subnational scales. In this NASA funded project, we are developing, evaluating, and validating several critical components of a NFMS in Kalimantan, Indonesia, focusing on the use of LiDAR and radar imagery for improved carbon stock and forest degradation information. Applied GeoSolutions and the University of New Hampshire have developed an Open Source Software package to process large amounts LiDAR data quickly, easily, and accurately. The Open Source project is called lidar2dems and includes the classification of raw LAS point clouds and the creation of Digital Terrain Models (DTMs), Digital Surface Models (DSMs), and Canopy Height Models (CHMs). Preliminary estimates of forest structure and forest damage from logging from these data sets support the idea that comprehensive, well documented, freely available software for processing LiDAR data can enable countries such as Indonesia to cost effectively monitor their forests with high precision.

  2. Lidar observations of wind over Xin Jiang, China: general characteristics and variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yan; Sun, Dong-song; Weng, Ning-quan; Wang, Jian-guo; Dou, Xian-kang; Zhang, Yan-hong; Guan, Jun; Miao, Qingjian; Chen, Xin

    2016-06-01

    The mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar based on a Fabry-Perot etalon is developed for wind measurement. The structure and technical parameters of this lidar system are described in brief. The 1740 wind profiles from 8 to 40 km altitudes by the lidar in Xinjiang, China, were obtained in 2010 and 2011, and were used to analyze the characteristics and variations of wind. The results shown that the wind velocity is within a three-layer structure: westerly jet layer (9-14 km), quasi-zero velocity layer (18-22 km) and gale layer (22-40 km). In August and September, the wind direction is within a three-layer structure: zonal westerly wind layer (5-18 km) where wind direction is west, zonal wind reverse layer (18-22 km) where wind direction is unstable and easterly wind layer (22-40 km) where wind direction is east. In October, wind direction is west (8-40 km). Wind observations by lidar are a realistic offset to the rawins.

  3. The Edge supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosta, Roxana; Bilbija, Dushan; Deutsch, Marc; Gallant, David; Rose, Don; Shreve, Gene; Smario, David; Suffredini, Brian

    1992-01-01

    As intercontinental business and tourism volumes continue their rapid expansion, the need to reduce travel times becomes increasingly acute. The Edge Supersonic Transport Aircraft is designed to meet this demand by the year 2015. With a maximum range of 5750 nm, a payload of 294 passengers and a cruising speed of M = 2.4, The Edge will cut current international flight durations in half, while maintaining competitive first class, business class, and economy class comfort levels. Moreover, this transport will render a minimal impact upon the environment, and will meet all Federal Aviation Administration Part 36, Stage III noise requirements. The cornerstone of The Edge's superior flight performance is its aerodynamically efficient, dual-configuration design incorporating variable-geometry wingtips. This arrangement combines the benefits of a high aspect ratio wing at takeoff and low cruising speeds with the high performance of an arrow-wing in supersonic cruise. And while the structural weight concerns relating to swinging wingtips are substantial, The Edge looks to ever-advancing material technologies to further increase its viability. Heeding well the lessons of the past, The Edge design holds economic feasibility as its primary focus. Therefore, in addition to its inherently superior aerodynamic performance, The Edge uses a lightweight, largely windowless configuration, relying on a synthetic vision system for outside viewing by both pilot and passengers. Additionally, a fly-by-light flight control system is incorporated to address aircraft supersonic cruise instability. The Edge will be produced at an estimated volume of 400 aircraft and will be offered to airlines in 2015 at $167 million per transport (1992 dollars).

  4. Three-dimension imaging lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    This invention is directed to a 3-dimensional imaging lidar, which utilizes modest power kHz rate lasers, array detectors, photon-counting multi-channel timing receivers, and dual wedge optical scanners with transmitter point-ahead correction to provide contiguous high spatial resolution mapping of surface features including ground, water, man-made objects, vegetation and submerged surfaces from an aircraft or a spacecraft.

  5. Advancement in LIDAR Data Collection: NASA's Experimental Airborne Advanced Research LIDAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riordan, Kevin; Wright, C. Wayne; Noronha, Conan

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research LIDAR (EAARL) is a new developmental LIDAR designed to investigate and advance LIDAR techniques using a adaptive time resolved backscatter information for complex coastal research and monitoring applications. Information derived from such an advanced LIDAR system can potentially improve the ability of resource managers and policy makers to make better informed decisions. While there has been a large amount of research using LIDAR in coastal areas, most are limited in the amount of information captured from each laser pulse. The unique design of the EAARL instrument permits simultaneous acquisition of coastal environments which include subaerial bare earth topography, vegetation biomass, and bare earth beneath vegetated areas.

  6. Large-eddy simulations of a turbulent Coanda jet on a circulation control airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Takafumi; Hahn, Seonghyeon; Shariff, Karim

    2010-12-01

    Large-eddy simulations are performed of a turbulent Coanda jet separating from a rounded trailing edge of a simplified circulation control airfoil model. The freestream Reynolds number based on the airfoil chord is 0.49×106, the jet Reynolds number based on the jet slot height is 4470, and the ratio of the peak jet velocity to the freestream velocity is 3.96. Three different grid resolutions are used to show that their effect is very small on the mean surface pressure distribution, which agrees very well with experiments, as well as on the mean velocity profiles over the Coanda surface. It is observed that the Coanda jet becomes fully turbulent just downstream of the jet exit, accompanied by asymmetric alternating vortex shedding behind a thin (but blunt) jet blade splitting the jet and the external flow. A number of "backward-tilted" hairpin vortices (i.e., the head of each hairpin being located upstream of the legs) are observed around the outer edge of the jet over the Coanda surface. These hairpins create strong upwash between the legs and weak downwash around them, contributing to turbulent mixing of the high-momentum jet below the hairpins and the low-momentum external flow above them. The probability density distribution of velocity fluctuations is shown to be highly asymmetric in this region, consistent with the observation that the hairpin vortices create strong upwash and weak downwash. Turbulent structures inside the jet, its spreading rate, and self-similarity are also discussed.

  7. Camera Edge Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zisk, Stanley H.; Wittels, Norman

    1988-02-01

    Edge location is an important machine vision task. Machine vision systems perform mathematical operations on rectangular arrays of numbers that are intended to faithfully represent the spatial distribution of scene luminance. The numbers are produced by periodic sampling and quantization of the camera's video output. This sequence can cause artifacts to appear in the data with a noise spectrum that is high in power at high spatial frequencies. This is a problem because most edge detection algorithms are preferentially sensitive to the high-frequency content in an image. Solid state cameras can introduce errors because of the spatial periodicity of their sensor elements. This can result in problems when image edges are aligned with camera pixel boundaries: (a) some cameras introduce transients into the video signal while switching between sensor elements; (b) most cameras use analog low-pass filters to minimize sampling artifacts and these introduce video phase delays that shift the locations of edges. The problems compound when the vision system samples asynchronously with the camera's pixel rate. Moire patterns (analogous to beat frequencies) can result. In this paper, we examine and model quantization effects in a machine vision system with particular emphasis on edge detection performance. We also compare our models with experimental measurements.

  8. Narrowband sodium lidar for the measurements of mesopause region temperature and wind.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Fang, Xin; Liu, Wei; Gu, Sheng-Yang; Dou, Xiankang

    2012-08-01

    We report here a narrowband high-spectral resolution sodium temperature/wind lidar recently developed at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) in Hefei, China (31.5 °N, 117 °E). Patterned after the Colorado State University (CSU) narrowband sodium lidar with a dye laser-based transmitter, the USTC sodium temperature/wind lidar was deployed with a number of technical improvements that facilitate automation and ease of operation; these include a home constructed pulsed dye amplifier (PDA), a beam-steering system, a star-tracking program, and an electronic timing control. With the averaged power of ∼1.2 W output from PDA and the receiving telescope diameter of 0.76 m, our lidar system has a power aperture product of ∼0.55 Wm(2) and is comparable to the CSU and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) sodium lidar systems. The uncertainties of typical measurements induced by photon noise and laser locking fluctuation for the temperature and wind with a 2 km vertical and 15 min temporal resolutions under the nighttime clear sky condition are estimated to be ∼1.0 K and ∼1.5 m/s, respectively, at the sodium peak (e.g., 91 km), and 8 K and 10 m/s, respectively, at both sodium layer edges (e.g., 81 km and 105 km). The USTC narrowband sodium lidar has been operated regularly during the night since November 2011. Using the initial data collected, we demonstrate the reliability and suitability of these high resolution and precision datasets for studying the wave perturbations in the mesopause region. PMID:22859028

  9. Advanced Raman water vapor lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Melfi, S. Harvey; Ferrare, Richard A.; Evans, Keith A.; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Staley, O. Glenn; Disilvestre, Raymond W.; Gorin, Inna; Kirks, Kenneth R.; Mamakos, William A.

    1992-01-01

    Water vapor and aerosols are important atmospheric constituents. Knowledge of the structure of water vapor is important in understanding convective development, atmospheric stability, the interaction of the atmosphere with the surface, and energy feedback mechanisms and how they relate to global warming calculations. The Raman Lidar group at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) developed an advanced Raman Lidar for use in measuring water vapor and aerosols in the earth's atmosphere. Drawing on the experience gained through the development and use of our previous Nd:YAG based system, we have developed a completely new lidar system which uses a XeF excimer laser and a large scanning mirror. The additional power of the excimer and the considerably improved optical throughput of the system have resulted in approximately a factor of 25 improvement in system performance for nighttime measurements. Every component of the current system has new design concepts incorporated. The lidar system consists of two mobile trailers; the first (13m x 2.4m) houses the lidar instrument, the other (9.75m x 2.4m) is for system control, realtime data display, and analysis. The laser transmitter is a Lambda Physik LPX 240 iCC operating at 400 Hz with a XeF gas mixture (351 nm). The telescope is a .75m horizontally mounted Dall-Kirkham system which is bore sited with a .8m x 1.1m elliptical flat which has a full 180 degree scan capability - horizon to horizon within a plane perpendicular to the long axis of the trailer. The telescope and scan mirror assembly are mounted on a 3.65m x .9m optical table which deploys out the rear of the trailer through the use of a motor driven slide rail system. The Raman returns from water vapor (403 nm), nitrogen (383 nm) and oxygen (372 nm) are measured in addition to the direct Rayleigh/Mie backscatter (351). The signal from each of these is split at about a 5/95 ratio between two photomultiplier detectors. The 5 percent detector is used for

  10. Improved Abutting Edges For Welding In Keyhole Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwing, Dennis D.; Sanders, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Welds of better quality made, and/or heat input reduced. Improved shapes devised for abutting edges of metal pieces to be joined by plasma arc welding in keyhole mode, in which gas jet maintains molten hole ("keyhole") completely through thickness of weld joint. Edges of metal pieces to be welded together machined to provide required combination gap and shaped, thin sections. Shapes and dimensions chosen to optimize weld in various respects; e.g., to enhance penetration of keyhole or reduce heat input to produce joint of given thickness.

  11. Aeroacoustics of hot jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, K.

    2004-10-01

    A systematic study has been undertaken to quantify the effect of jet temperature on the noise radiated by subsonic jets. Nozzles of different diameters were tested to uncover the effects of Reynolds number. All the tests were carried out at Boeing's Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility, with simultaneous measurement of thrust and noise. It is concluded that the change in spectral shape at high jet temperatures, normally attributed to the contribution from dipoles, is due to Reynolds number effects and not dipoles. This effect has not been identified before. A critical value of the Reynolds number that would need to be maintained to avoid the effects associated with low Reynolds number has been estimated to be {˜}400 000. It is well-known that large-scale structures are the dominant generators of noise in the peak radiation direction for high-speed jets. Experimental evidence is presented that shows the spectral shape at angles close to the jet axis from unheated low subsonic jets to be the same as from heated supersonic jets. A possible mechanism for the observed trend is proposed. When a subsonic jet is heated with the Mach number held constant, there is a broadening of the angular sector in which peak radiation occurs. Furthermore, there is a broadening of the spectral peak. Similar trends have been observed at supersonic Mach numbers. The spectral shapes in the forward quadrant and in the near-normal angles from unheated and heated subsonic jets also conform to the universal shape obtained from supersonic jet data. Just as for unheated jets, the peak frequency at angles close to the jet axis is independent of jet velocity as long as the acoustic Mach number is less than unity. The extensive database generated in the current test programme is intended to provide test cases with high-quality data that could be used for the evaluation of theoretical/semi-theoretical jet noise prediction methodologies.

  12. High Speed Edge Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokop, Norman F (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Analog circuits for detecting edges in pixel arrays are disclosed. A comparator may be configured to receive an all pass signal and a low pass signal for a pixel intensity in an array of pixels. A latch may be configured to receive a counter signal and a latching signal from the comparator. The comparator may be configured to send the latching signal to the latch when the all pass signal is below the low pass signal minus an offset. The latch may be configured to hold a last negative edge location when the latching signal is received from the comparator.

  13. High Speed Edge Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokop, Norman F (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Analog circuits for detecting edges in pixel arrays are disclosed. A comparator may be configured to receive an all pass signal and a low pass signal for a pixel intensity in an array of pixels. A latch may be configured to receive a counter signal and a latching signal from the comparator. The comparator may be configured to send the latching signal to the latch when the all pass signal is below the low pass signal minus an offset. The latch may be configured to hold a last negative edge location when the latching signal is received from the comparator.

  14. New Raman Water Vapor and Temperature Lidar at JPL Table Mountain Facility: Optimization, Validations and Sonde Intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aspey, R. A.; McDermid, I. S.; Leblanc, T.; Walsh, D.; Howe, J.

    2006-01-01

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory currently operates lidar systems at Table Mountain Facility (TMF), California (34.4 deg N, 117.7 deg W at 2300m) and Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO), Hawaii (19.5 deg N, 155.6 deg W at 3400m) under the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, formerly NDSC). To complement existing NDACC lidars at TMF, which acts as a primary site for inter-comparisons, a new water vapor and temperature lidar has begun routine operation with typically 3-4 nightly profiles per week. As water vapor is a key greenhouse gas, and is highly variable on annual and seasonal cycles, accurate long term measurements are necessary for predictions of climate change and to increase our understanding of the atmospheric processes it contributes to. The new TMF lidar has demonstrated high spatial and temporal resolution, with a high degree of optimization being achieved over the past year, although the authors believe further improvement may yet be possible. The lidar has been designed for accuracies of 5% up to 12km in the free troposphere with the capability to measure to the tropopause and lower stratosphere with accuracies of 1 ppm. It is anticipated that the data sets produced will be used for Aura validation and for incorporation into NDACC archives. Validation results for the optimized system are presented with intercomparisons using Vaisala RS92-K radiosondes.

  15. CALIPSO lidar ratio retrieval over the ocean.

    PubMed

    Josset, Damien; Rogers, Raymond; Pelon, Jacques; Hu, Yongxiang; Liu, Zhaoyan; Omar, Ali; Zhai, Peng-Wang

    2011-09-12

    We are demonstrating on a few cases the capability of CALIPSO to retrieve the 532 nm lidar ratio over the ocean when CloudSat surface scattering cross section is used as a constraint. We are presenting the algorithm used and comparisons with the column lidar ratio retrieved by the NASA airborne high spectral resolution lidar. For the three cases presented here, the agreement is fairly good. The average CALIPSO 532 nm column lidar ratio bias is 13.7% relative to HSRL, and the relative standard deviation is 13.6%. Considering the natural variability of aerosol microphysical properties, this level of accuracy is significant since the lidar ratio is a good indicator of aerosol types. We are discussing dependencies of the accuracy of retrieved aerosol lidar ratio on atmospheric aerosol homogeneity, lidar signal to noise ratio, and errors in the optical depth retrievals. We are obtaining the best result (bias 7% and standard deviation around 6%) for a nighttime case with a relatively constant lidar ratio (in the vertical) indicative of homogeneous aerosol type. PMID:21935239

  16. CALIPSO Lidar Ratio Retrieval Over the Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Josset, Damien B.; Rogers, Raymond R.; Pelon, Jacques; Hu, Yongxiang; Liu, Zhaoyan; Omar, Ali H.; Zhai, Peng-Wang

    2011-01-01

    We are demonstrating on a few cases the capability of CALIPSO to retrieve the 532 nm lidar ratio over the ocean when CloudSat surface scattering cross section is used as a constraint. We are presenting the algorithm used and comparisons with the column lidar ratio retrieved by the NASA airborne high spectral resolution lidar. For the three cases presented here, the agreement is fairly good. The average CALIPSO 532 nm column lidar ratio bias is 13.7% relative to HSRL, and the relative standard deviation is 13.6%. Considering the natural variability of aerosol microphysical properties, this level of accuracy is significant since the lidar ratio is a good indicator of aerosol types. We are discussing dependencies of the accuracy of retrieved aerosol lidar ratio on atmospheric aerosol homogeneity, lidar signal to noise ratio, and errors in the optical depth retrievals. We are obtaining the best result (bias 7% and standard deviation around 6%) for a nighttime case with a relatively constant lidar ratio (in the vertical) indicative of homogeneous aerosol type

  17. Application of coherent 10 micron imaging lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, M.L.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Richards, R.K.; Bennett, C.A.

    1997-04-01

    With the continuing progress in mid-IR array detector technology and high bandwidth fan-outs, i.f. electronics, high speed digitizers, and processing capability, true coherent imaging lidar is becoming a reality. In this paper experimental results are described using a 10 micron coherent imaging lidar.

  18. Temperature profiling in the atmosphere using lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshinov, Yuri; Bobrovnikov, Sergey M.; Serikov, Il'ya B.; Althausen, Dietrich; Mattis, Ina; Wandinger, Ulla; Ansmann, Albert

    2001-04-01

    This lecture describes the development of lidar techniques to measure the atmospheric temperature profile. Particular attention is given in the lecture to the technique that uses pure rotational Raman scattering of light by molecular nitrogen and oxygen. At present, this approach to temperature profiling in the atmosphere with lidars has received a new impulse because of recent advances in laser and optoelectronics technologies. The instrumentation aspects that determine the feasibility of one or another lidar technique to measure temperature profiles based on the pure rotational Raman spectrum (PRRS) of N2 and O2 molecules are considered. The primary instrumental problem is isolation of extremely weak Raman-lidar returns within the PRRS of N2 and O2 against the background from the much stronger line of unshifted scattering. Mie + Rayleigh, that simultaneously contributes to lidar returns. Besides, the daytime sky background is the factor that severely hampers daytime lidar measurements especially in the case with Raman lidars. So it is an important task of Raman-lidar technologists to find proper ways to overcome this difficulty that would made it possible the temperature profiling in the atmosphere to be performed whole day round. The approach to achieving this task by use of a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) is discussed in the lecture.

  19. Lidar: A laser technique for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, T. D.; Hickman, G. D.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental airborne lidar systems proved to be useful for shallow water bathymetric measurements, and detection and identification of oil slicks and algae. Dye fluorescence applications using organic dyes was studied. The possibility of remotely inducing dye flourescence by means of pulsed lasers opens up several hydrospheric applications for measuring water currents, water temperature, and salinity. Aerosol measurements by lidar are also discussed.

  20. Theory of laminar viscous jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynenko, O. G.; Korovkin, V. N.; Sokovishin, Iu. A.

    Results of recent theoretical studies of laminar jet flows of a viscous incompressible fluid are reviewed. In particular, attention is given to plane, fan-shaped, axisymmetric, and swirling jet flows; jet flows behind bodies; and slipstream jet flows. The discussion also covers dissipation of mechanical energy in jet flows, jet flows with a zero excess momentum, and asymptotic series expansions in the theory of jet flows.

  1. Airfoil noise reductions through leading edge serrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, S.; Chaitanya, P.; Haeri, S.; Joseph, P.; Kim, J. W.; Polacsek, C.

    2015-02-01

    This paper provides an experimental investigation into the use of leading edge (LE) serrations as a means of reducing the broadband noise generated due to the interaction between the aerofoil's LE and impinging turbulence. Experiments are performed on a flat plate in an open jet wind tunnel. Grids are used to generate isotropic homogeneous turbulence. The leading edge serrations are in the form of sinusoidal profiles of wavelengths, λ, and amplitudes, 2h. The frequency and amplitude characteristics are studied in detail in order to understand the effect of LE serrations on noise reduction characteristics and are compared with straight edge baseline flat plates. Noise reductions are found to be insignificant at low frequencies but significant in the mid frequency range (500 Hz-8 kHz) for all the cases studied. The flat plate results are also compared to the noise reductions obtained on a serrated NACA-65 aerofoil with the same serration profile. Noise reductions are found to be significantly higher for the flat plates with a maximum noise reduction of around 9 dB compared with about 7 dB for the aerofoil. In general, it is observed that the sound power reduction level (ΔPWL) is sensitive to the amplitude, 2h of the LE serrations but less sensitive to the serration wavelength, λ. Thus, this paper sufficiently demonstrates that the LE amplitude acts as a key parameter for enhancing the noise reduction levels in flat plates and aerofoils.

  2. Coherent Lidar Design and Performance Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frehlich, Rod

    1996-01-01

    This final report summarizes the investigative results from the 3 complete years of funding and corresponding publications are listed. The first year saw the verification of beam alignment for coherent Doppler lidar in space by using the surface return. The second year saw the analysis and computerized simulation of using heterodyne efficiency as an absolute measure of performance of coherent Doppler lidar. A new method was proposed to determine the estimation error for Doppler lidar wind measurements without the need for an independent wind measurement. Coherent Doppler lidar signal covariance, including wind shear and turbulence, was derived and calculated for typical atmospheric conditions. The effects of wind turbulence defined by Kolmogorov spatial statistics were investigated theoretically and with simulations. The third year saw the performance of coherent Doppler lidar in the weak signal regime determined by computer simulations using the best velocity estimators. Improved algorithms for extracting the performance of velocity estimators with wind turbulence included were also produced.

  3. Development of the Wuhan lidar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhilin; Liu, Yiping; Hu, Xiong; Zeng, Xizhi

    1998-08-01

    This paper reports new progress of the Wuhan lidar system. At the present time, our lidar works both at nighttime, to measure the sodium layer in menopause region, and at daytime to measure the aerosol in lower atmosphere region. The daytime working lidar system is equipped with a Faraday Anomalous Dispersion Optical Filter (FADOF), working at the Na resonance line (589 nm) and having an ultra-narrow bandwidth of 2 GHz. The daytime system uses this FADOF to obtain the lidar signal from an altitude of 20 km in our primary experiment. We will also report a comparison of the rms velocity measured by MF radar and Na lidar. A 90% confidence in rms velocity has been achieved.

  4. Airborne Lidar Simulator for the Lidar Surface Topography (LIST) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Krainak, Michael A.; Abshire, James B.; Cavanaugh, John; Valett, Susan; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, the National Research Council (NRC) completed its first decadal survey for Earth science at the request of NASA, NOAA, and USGS. The Lidar Surface Topography (LIST) mission is one of fifteen missions recommended by NRC, whose primary objectives are to map global topography and vegetation structure at 5 m spatial resolution, and to acquire global surface height mapping within a few years. NASA Goddard conducted an initial mission concept study for the LIST mission in 2007, and developed the initial measurement requirements for the mission.

  5. Constraints on PSC Particle Microphysics Derived From Lidar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Li; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2001-01-01

    Based on extensive T-matrix computations of light scattering by polydispersions of randomly oriented, rotationally symmetric nonspherical particles, we analyze existing lidar observations of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) and derive several constraints on PSC particle microphysical properties. We show that sharp-edged nonspherical particles (finite circular cylinders) exhibit less variability of lidar backscattering characteristics with particle size and aspect ratio than particles with smooth surfaces (spheroids). For PSC particles significantly smaller than the wavelength, the backscatter color index Alpha and the depolarization color index Beta are essentially shape-independent. Observations for type Ia PSCs can be reproduced by spheroids with aspect ratios larger than 1.2, oblate cylinders with diameter-to-length ratios greater than 1.6, and prolate cylinders with length-to-diameter ratios greater than 1.4. The effective equal-volume-sphere radius for type la PSCs is about 0.8 microns or larger. Type Ib PSCs are likely to be composed of spheres or nearly spherical particles with effective radii smaller than 0.8 microns. Observations for type II PSCs are consistent with large ice crystals (effective radius greater than 1 micron modeled as cylinders or prolate spheroids.

  6. Saturn's Rings Edge-on

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In one of nature's most dramatic examples of 'now-you see-them, now-you-don't', NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured Saturn on May 22, 1995 as the planet's magnificent ring system turned edge-on. This ring-plane crossing occurs approximately every 15 years when the Earth passes through Saturn's ring plane.

    For comparison, the top picture was taken by Hubble on December 1, 1994 and shows the rings in a more familiar configuration for Earth observers.

    The bottom picture was taken shortly before the ring plane crossing. The rings do not disappear completely because the edge of the rings reflects sunlight. The dark band across the middle of Saturn is the shadow of the rings cast on the planet (the Sun is almost 3 degrees above the ring plane.) The bright stripe directly above the ring shadow is caused by sunlight reflected off the rings onto Saturn's atmosphere. Two of Saturn's icy moons are visible as tiny starlike objects in or near the ring plane. They are, from left to right, Tethys (slightly above the ring plane) and Dione.

    This observation will be used to determine the time of ring-plane crossing and the thickness of the main rings and to search for as yet undiscovered satellites. Knowledge of the exact time of ring-plane crossing will lead to an improved determination of the rate at which Saturn 'wobbles' about its axis (polar precession).

    Both pictures were taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. The top image was taken in visible light. Saturn's disk appears different in the bottom image because a narrowband filter (which only lets through light that is not absorbed by methane gas in Saturn's atmosphere) was used to reduce the bright glare of the planet. Though Saturn is approximately 900 million miles away, Hubble can see details as small as 450 miles across.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science

  7. Swords with Blunt Edges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popham, W. James

    2004-01-01

    Many U.S. educators now wonder whether they're teachers or targets. This mentality stems from the specter of their school being sanctioned for failing the state accountability tests mandated under No Child Left Behind (NCLB). According to this author, most of those tests are like blunt-edged swords: They function badly in two directions. While…

  8. Oscillating edge-flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckmaster, J.; Zhang, Yi

    1999-09-01

    It has been known for some years that when a near-limit flame spreads over a liquid pool of fuel, the edge of the flame can oscillate. It is also known that when a near-asphyxiated candle-flame burns in zero gravity, the edge of the (hemispherical) flame can oscillate violently prior to extinction. We propose that these oscillations are nothing more than a manifestation of the large Lewis number instability well known in chemical reactor studies and in combustion studies, one that is exacerbated by heat losses. As evidence of this we examine an edge-flame confined within a fuel-supply boundary and an oxygen-supply boundary, anchored by a discontinuity in data at the fuel-supply boundary. We show that when the Lewis number of the fuel is 2, and the Lewis number of the oxidizer is 1, oscillations of the edge occur when the Damköhler number is reduced below a critical value. During a single oscillation period there is a short premixed propagation stage and a long diffusion stage, behaviour that has been observed in flame spread experiments. Oscillations do not occur when both Lewis numbers are equal to 1.

  9. The Inner Urban Edge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferebee, Ann; Carpenter, Edward K.

    1974-01-01

    In this article, renewal of the inner urban edge is discussed. Norfolk (Virginia) is attempting to blur the difference between old and new neighbor hoods through zoning and architectural controls. Cincinnati (Ohio) is developing an environmentally sound hillside design. Reading (Pennsylvania) is utilizing old railyards for greenbelts of hiking and…

  10. Evaluation of the contribution of LiDAR data and postclassification procedures to object-based classification accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styers, Diane M.; Moskal, L. Monika; Richardson, Jeffrey J.; Halabisky, Meghan A.

    2014-01-01

    Object-based image analysis (OBIA) is becoming an increasingly common method for producing land use/land cover (LULC) classifications in urban areas. In order to produce the most accurate LULC map, LiDAR data and postclassification procedures are often employed, but their relative contributions to accuracy are unclear. We examined the contribution of LiDAR data and postclassification procedures to increase classification accuracies over using imagery alone and assessed sources of error along an ecologically complex urban-to-rural gradient in Olympia, Washington. Overall classification accuracy and user's and producer's accuracies for individual classes were evaluated. The addition of LiDAR data to the OBIA classification resulted in an 8.34% increase in overall accuracy, while manual postclassification to the imagery+LiDAR classification improved accuracy only an additional 1%. Sources of error in this classification were largely due to edge effects, from which multiple different types of errors result.

  11. Evaluation of airborne image data and LIDAR main stem data for monitoring physical resources within the Colorado River ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Philip A.; Rosiek, Mark R.; Galuszka, Donna M.

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated near-infrared LIDAR data acquired over the main-stem channel at four long-term monitoring sites within the Colorado River ecosystem (CRE) to determine the ability of these data to provide reliable indications in changes in water elevation over time. Our results indicate that there is a good correlation between the LIDAR water-surface elevations and ground measurements of water-edge elevation, but there are also inherent errors in the LIDAR data. The elevation errors amount to about 50 cm and therefore temporal changes in water-surface elevation that exceed this value by the majority of data at a particular location can be deemed significant or real. This study also evaluated airborne image data for producing photogrammetric elevation data and for automated mapping of sand bars and debris flows within the CRE. The photogrammetric analyses show that spatial resolutions of ≤ 10 cm are required to produce vertical accuracies

  12. Jet Substructure Without Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP

    2011-08-19

    We present an alternative approach to identifying and characterizing jet substructure. An angular correlation function is introduced that can be used to extract angular and mass scales within a jet without reference to a clustering algorithm. This procedure gives rise to a number of useful jet observables. As an application, we construct a top quark tagging algorithm that is competitive with existing methods. In preparation for the LHC, the past several years have seen extensive work on various aspects of collider searches. With the excellent resolution of the ATLAS and CMS detectors as a catalyst, one area that has undergone significant development is jet substructure physics. The use of jet substructure techniques, which probe the fine-grained details of how energy is distributed in jets, has two broad goals. First, measuring more than just the bulk properties of jets allows for additional probes of QCD. For example, jet substructure measurements can be compared against precision perturbative QCD calculations or used to tune Monte Carlo event generators. Second, jet substructure allows for additional handles in event discrimination. These handles could play an important role at the LHC in discriminating between signal and background events in a wide variety of particle searches. For example, Monte Carlo studies indicate that jet substructure techniques allow for efficient reconstruction of boosted heavy objects such as the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons, the top quark, and the Higgs boson.

  13. HUBBLE VIEWS OF THREE STELLAR JETS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These NASA Hubble Space Telescope views of gaseous jets from three newly forming stars show a new level of detail in the star formation process, and are helping to solve decade-old questions about the secrets of star birth. Jets are a common 'exhaust product' of the dynamics of star formation. They are blasted away from a disk of gas and dust falling onto an embryonic star. [upper left] - This view of a protostellar object called HH-30 reveals an edge-on disk of dust encircling a newly forming star. Light from the forming star illuminates the top and bottom surfaces of the disk, making them visible, while the star itself is hidden behind the densest parts of the disk. The reddish jet emanates from the inner region of the disk, and possibly directly from the star itself. Hubble's detailed view shows, for the first time, that the jet expands for several billion miles from the star, but then stays confined to a narrow beam. The protostar is 450 light-years away in the constellation Taurus. Credit: C. Burrows (STScI and ESA), the WFPC 2 Investigation Definition Team, and NASA [upper right] - This view of a different and more distant jet in object HH-34 shows a remarkable beaded structure. Once thought to be a hydrodynamic effect (similar to shock diamonds in a jet aircraft exhaust), this structure is actually produced by a machine-gun-like blast of 'bullets' of dense gas ejected from the star at speeds of one-half million miles per hour. This structure suggests the star goes through episodic 'fits' of construction where chunks of material fall onto the star from a surrounding disk. The protostar is 1,500 light- years away and in the vicinity of the Orion Nebula, a nearby star birth region. Credit: J. Hester (Arizona State University), the WFPC 2 Investigation Definition Team, and NASA [bottom] - This view of a three trillion mile-long jet called HH-47 reveals a very complicated jet pattern that indicates the star (hidden inside a dust cloud near the left edge of the

  14. Dust-cloud density estimation using a single wavelength lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youmans, Douglas G.; Garner, Richard C.; Petersen, Kent R.

    1994-09-01

    The passage of commercial and military aircraft through invisible fresh volcanic ash clouds has caused damage to many airplanes. On December 15, 1989 all four engines of a KLM Boeing 747 were temporarily extinguished in a flight over Alaska resulting in $DOL80 million for repair. Similar aircraft damage to control systems, FLIR/EO windows, wind screens, radomes, aircraft leading edges, and aircraft data systems were reported in Operation Desert Storm during combat flights through high-explosive and naturally occurring desert dusts. The Defense Nuclear Agency is currently developing a compact and rugged lidar under the Aircraft Sensors Program to detect and estimate the mass density of nuclear-explosion produced dust clouds, high-explosive produced dust clouds, and fresh volcanic dust clouds at horizontal distances of up to 40 km from an aircraft. Given this mass density information, the pilot has an option of avoiding or flying through the upcoming cloud.

  15. Measurement and Study of Lidar Ratio by Using a Raman Lidar in Central China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Gong, Wei; Mao, Feiyue; Pan, Zengxin; Liu, Boming

    2016-01-01

    We comprehensively evaluated particle lidar ratios (i.e., particle extinction to backscatter ratio) at 532 nm over Wuhan in Central China by using a Raman lidar from July 2013 to May 2015. We utilized the Raman lidar data to obtain homogeneous aerosol lidar ratios near the surface through the Raman method during no-rain nights. The lidar ratios were approximately 57 ± 7 sr, 50 ± 5 sr, and 22 ± 4 sr under the three cases with obviously different pollution levels. The haze layer below 1.8 km has a large particle extinction coefficient (from 5.4e-4 m−1 to 1.6e-4 m−1) and particle backscatter coefficient (between 1.1e-05 m−1sr−1 and 1.7e-06 m−1sr−1) in the heavily polluted case. Furthermore, the particle lidar ratios varied according to season, especially between winter (57 ± 13 sr) and summer (33 ± 10 sr). The seasonal variation in lidar ratios at Wuhan suggests that the East Asian monsoon significantly affects the primary aerosol types and aerosol optical properties in this region. The relationships between particle lidar ratios and wind indicate that large lidar ratio values correspond well with weak winds and strong northerly winds, whereas significantly low lidar ratio values are associated with prevailing southwesterly and southerly wind. PMID:27213414

  16. Measurement and Study of Lidar Ratio by Using a Raman Lidar in Central China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Gong, Wei; Mao, Feiyue; Pan, Zengxin; Liu, Boming

    2016-01-01

    We comprehensively evaluated particle lidar ratios (i.e., particle extinction to backscatter ratio) at 532 nm over Wuhan in Central China by using a Raman lidar from July 2013 to May 2015. We utilized the Raman lidar data to obtain homogeneous aerosol lidar ratios near the surface through the Raman method during no-rain nights. The lidar ratios were approximately 57 ± 7 sr, 50 ± 5 sr, and 22 ± 4 sr under the three cases with obviously different pollution levels. The haze layer below 1.8 km has a large particle extinction coefficient (from 5.4e-4 m(-1) to 1.6e-4 m(-1)) and particle backscatter coefficient (between 1.1e-05 m(-1)sr(-1) and 1.7e-06 m(-1)sr(-1)) in the heavily polluted case. Furthermore, the particle lidar ratios varied according to season, especially between winter (57 ± 13 sr) and summer (33 ± 10 sr). The seasonal variation in lidar ratios at Wuhan suggests that the East Asian monsoon significantly affects the primary aerosol types and aerosol optical properties in this region. The relationships between particle lidar ratios and wind indicate that large lidar ratio values correspond well with weak winds and strong northerly winds, whereas significantly low lidar ratio values are associated with prevailing southwesterly and southerly wind. PMID:27213414

  17. Performance Comparison of Sweeping/Steady Jet Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Damian; Mercier, Justin; Noca, Flavio; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    Flow control through the use of steady jet actuators has been used on various aircraft models since the late 1950's. However, the focus of recent studies has shifted towards the use of sweeping jets (fluidic oscillators) rather than steady jet actuators. In this work, experiments using various jet actuator designs were conducted at GALCIT's Lucas Wind Tunnel on a NACA 0012 vertical tail model similar to that of the Boeing 767 vertical stabilizer at Reynolds numbers ranging from 0.5 to 1.2 million. The rudder angle was fixed at 20 degrees. A total of 32 jet actuators were installed along the wingspan perpendicular to the trailing edge and the rudder shoulder of the vertical stabilizer. It is known that these types of flow control prevent separation. However, the goal of this work is to compare different jet designs and evaluate their performance. Parameters such as the number of actuators, their volumetric flow, and the wind tunnel speed were varied. The lift generation capabilities of steady and sweeping jet actuators were then compared. Another set of experiments was conducted to compare a new sweeping jet actuator design with one of the standard versions. Supported by Boeing.

  18. Effect of Compressibility on Contrail Ice Particle Growth in an Engine Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, François; Maglaras, Ephi; Morency, François; Vancassel, Xavier

    2014-06-01

    In order to understand the formation process of condensation trails (contrails), the flow in the near field of an aircraft engine jet is studied by using the three-dimensional Large Eddy Simulation technique. The configuration consists of a hot round jet laden with soot particles. The particles are tracked using the Lagrangian approach, and their growth is calculated by a microphysics water vapour deposition model. A series of simulations are performed at a realistic Reynolds number (Re = 3.2 · 106) for two different jet Mach numbers: quasi-incompressible jet flow (M = 0.2) and compressible jet flow (M = 1). Whatever the Mach number used the ice crystals first appear at the edges of the jet where the hot and moist flow mixes with the cold and dry ambient air. Both the thermal transfers and the mass coupling, which are more significant for the quasi-incompressible jet flow, control the growth process.

  19. Lidar polarization discrimination of bioaerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiaoying; Roy, Gilles; Bernier, Robert

    2010-11-01

    Standoff discrimination of bioaerosols based on lidar measurements of depolarized backscattered light is herein studied. Measurements were performed at four wavelengths (355, 532, 1064, and 1570 nm) over 25 pollens and 2 dusts under controlled environment at a distance of 100 m. Linear polarization measurements were performed. It is shown that discrimination between pollens can be achieved using the linear polarization of at most three of the four wavelengths, and statistical discrimination based on Mahalanobis distance is obtained for most of the 27 cases studied.

  20. High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Eloranta, Ed

    2004-12-01

    The HSRL provided calibrated vertical profiles of optical depth, backscatter cross section and depoloarization at a wavelength of 532 nm. Profiles were acquired at 2.5 second intervals with 7.5 meter resolution. Profiles extended from an altitude of 100 m to 30 km in clear air. The lidar penetrated to a maximum optical depth of ~ 4 under cloudy conditions. Our data contributed directly to the aims of the M-PACE experiment, providing calibrated optical depth and optical backscatter measurements which were not available from any other instrument.

  1. Conically scanned holographic lidar telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An optical scanning device utilizing a source of optical energy such as laser light backscattered from the earth's atmosphere or transmitted outward as in a lidar, a rotating holographic optical element having an axis of rotation perpendicular to the plane of its substrate, and having a stationary focus which may or may not be located on its axis of rotation, with the holographic optical element diffracting the source of optical energy at an angle to its rotation axis enabling a conical scanning area and a motor for supporting and rotating the rotating holographic optical element, is described.

  2. Estimating forest structure at five tropical forested sites using lidar point cloud data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palace, M. W.; Sullivan, F.; Treuhaft, R. N.; Keller, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical forests are fundamental components in the global carbon cycle and are threatened by deforestation and climate change. Because of their importance in carbon dynamics, understanding the structural architecture of these forests is vital. Airborne lidar data provides a unique opportunity to examine not only the height of these forests, which is often used to estimate biomass, but also the crown geometry and vertical profile of the canopy. These structural attributes inform temporal and spatial apsects of carbon dynamics providing insight into the past disturbances and growth of forests. We examined airborne lidar point cloud data from five sites in the Brazilian Amazon collected during the years 2012 to 2014. We generated both digital elevation maps, canopy height models (CHM), and vertical vegetation profiles (VVP) in our analysis. We analyzed the CHM using crown delineation with an iterative maximum finding routine to find the tops of canopies, local maxima to determine edges of crowns, and two parameters that control termination of crown edges. We also ran textural analysis methods on the CHM and VVP. Using multiple linear regression models and boosted regression trees we estimated forest structural parameters including biomass, stem density, basal area, width and depth of crowns and stem size distribution. Structural attributes estimated from lidar point cloud data can improve our understanding of the carbon dynamics of tropical forests on a landscape level and regional level.

  3. Jets from young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, John

    2007-10-01

    Most stars produce spectacular jets during their formation. There are thousands of young stars within 500 pc of the Sun and many power jets. Thus protostellar jets may be the most common type of collimated astrophysical outflow. Shocks powered by outflows excite many emission lines, exhibit a rich variety of structure, and motions with velocities ranging from 50 to over 500 km s-1. Due to their relative proximity, proper motions and structural changes can be observed in less than a year. I review the general properties of protostellar jets, summarize some results from recent narrow-band imaging surveys of entire clouds, discuss irradiated jets, and end with some comments concerning outflows from high-mass young stellar objects. Protostellar outflows are ideal laboratories for the exploration of the jet physics.

  4. Relativistic Jets in Collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiqun; Woosley, S. E.; MacFadyen, A. I.

    2003-04-01

    We examine the propagation of two-dimensional relativistic jets through the stellar progenitor in the collapsar model for gamma-ray bursts. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the jet is collimated by its passage. Moreover, interaction of the jet with the star causes mixing that sporadically decelerates the jet, leading to a highly variable Lorentz factor. The jet that finally emerges has a moderate Lorentz factor, but a very large internal energy loading. In a second series of calculations we follow the emergence of such enegy-loaded jets from the star. For the initial conditions chosen, conversion of the remaining internal energy gives a terminal Lorentz factor of approximately 150. Implications of our calculations for GRB light curves, the luminosity-variability relation, and the GRB-supernova association are discussed.

  5. What ignites optical jets?

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian Jester

    2002-12-23

    The properties of radio galaxies and quasars with and without optical or X-ray jets are compared. The majority of jets from which high-frequency emission has been detected so far (13 with optical emission, 11 with X-rays, 13 with both) are associated with the most powerful radio sources at any given redshift. It is found that optical/X-ray jet sources are more strongly beamed than the average population of extragalactic radio sources. This suggests that the detection or non-detection of optical emission from jets has so far been dominated by surface brightness selection effects, not by jet physics. It implies that optical jets are much more common than is currently appreciated.

  6. Solar Jets as Sources of Outflows, Heating and Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizuka, N.

    2013-05-01

    Recent space solar observations of the Sun, such as Hinode and SDO, have revealed that magnetic reconnection is ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere, ranging from small scale reconnection (observed as nanoflares) to large scale one (observed as long duration flares or giant arcades). Especially recent Hinode observations has found various types of tiny chromospheric jets, such as chromospheric anemone jets, penumbral microjets and light bridge jets from sunspot umbra. It was also found that the corona is full of tiny X-ray jets. Often they are seen as helical spinning jets with Alfvenic waves in the corona. Sometimes they are seen as chromospheric jets with slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves and sometimes as unresolved jet-like events at the footpoint of recurrent outflows and waves at the edge of the active region. There is increasing evidence of magnetic reconnection in these tiny jets and its association with waves. The origin of outflows and waves is one of the issues concerning coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. To answer this question, we had a challenge to reproduce solar jets with laboratory plasma experiment and directly measured outflows and waves. As a result, we could find a propagating wave excited by magnetic reconnection, whose energy flux is 10% of the released magnetic energy. That is enough for solar wind acceleration and locally enough for coronal heating, consistent with numerical MHD simulations of solar jets. Here we would discuss recent observations with Hinode, theories and experimental results related to jets and waves by magnetic reconnection, and discuss possible implication to reconnection physics, coronal heating and solar wind acceleration.

  7. Visualization of supersonic diesel fuel jets using a shadowgraph technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pianthong, Kulachate; Behnia, Masud; Milton, Brian E.

    2001-04-01

    High-speed liquid jets have been widely used to cut or penetrate material. It has been recently conjectured that the characteristics of high-speed fuel jets may also be of benefit to engines requiring direct fuel injection into the combustion chamber. Important factors are combustion efficiency and emission control enhancement for better atomization. Fundamental studies of very high velocity liquid jets are therefore very important. The characteristics and behavior of supersonic liquid jets have been studied with the aid of a shadowgraph technique. The high-speed liquid jet (in the supersonic range) is generated by the use of a vertical, single stage powder gun. The performance of the launcher and its relation to the jet exit velocity, with a range of nozzle shapes, has been examined. This paper presents the visual evidence of supersonic diesel fuel jets (velocity around 2000 m/s) investigated by the shadowgraph method. An Argon jet has been used as a light source. With a rise time of 0.07 microseconds, light duration of 0.2 microseconds and the use of high speed Polaroid film, the shadowgraph method can effectively capture the hypersonic diesel fuel jet and its strong leading edge shock waves. This provides a clearer picture of each stage of the generation of hypersonic diesel fuel jets and makes the study of supersonic diesel fuel jet characteristics and the potential for auto-ignition possible. Also, in the experiment, a pressure relief section has been used to minimize the compressed air or blast wave ahead of the projectile. However, the benefit of using a pressure relief section in the design is not clearly known. To investigate this effect, additional experiments have been performed with the use of the shadowgraph method, showing the projectile leaving and traveling inside the nozzle at a velocity around 1100 m/s.

  8. Superpixel edges for boundary detection

    DOEpatents

    Moya, Mary M.; Koch, Mark W.

    2016-07-12

    Various embodiments presented herein relate to identifying one or more edges in a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image comprising a plurality of superpixels. Superpixels sharing an edge (or boundary) can be identified and one or more properties of the shared superpixels can be compared to determine whether the superpixels form the same or two different features. Where the superpixels form the same feature the edge is identified as an internal edge. Where the superpixels form two different features, the edge is identified as an external edge. Based upon classification of the superpixels, the external edge can be further determined to form part of a roof, wall, etc. The superpixels can be formed from a speckle-reduced SAR image product formed from a registered stack of SAR images, which is further segmented into a plurality of superpixels. The edge identification process is applied to the SAR image comprising the superpixels and edges.

  9. Lidar Remote Sensing for Industry and Environment Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N. (Editor); Itabe, Toshikazu (Editor); Sugimoto, Nobuo (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. Keynote paper: Overview of lidar technology for industrial and environmental monitoring in Japan. 2. lidar technology I: NASA's future active remote sensing mission for earth science. Geometrical detector consideration s in laser sensing application (invited paper). 3. Lidar technology II: High-power femtosecond light strings as novel atmospheric probes (invited paper). Design of a compact high-sensitivity aerosol profiling lidar. 4. Lasers for lidars: High-energy 2 microns laser for multiple lidar applications. New submount requirement of conductively cooled laser diodes for lidar applications. 5. Tropospheric aerosols and clouds I: Lidar monitoring of clouds and aerosols at the facility for atmospheric remote sensing (invited paper). Measurement of asian dust by using multiwavelength lidar. Global monitoring of clouds and aerosols using a network of micropulse lidar systems. 6. Troposphere aerosols and clouds II: Scanning lidar measurements of marine aerosol fields at a coastal site in Hawaii. 7. Tropospheric aerosols and clouds III: Formation of ice cloud from asian dust particles in the upper troposphere. Atmospheric boundary layer observation by ground-based lidar at KMITL, Thailand (13 deg N, 100 deg. E). 8. Boundary layer, urban pollution: Studies of the spatial correlation between urban aerosols and local traffic congestion using a slant angle scanning on the research vessel Mirai. 9. Middle atmosphere: Lidar-observed arctic PSC's over Svalbard (invited paper). Sodium temperature lidar measurements of the mesopause region over Syowa Station. 10. Differential absorption lidar (dIAL) and DOAS: Airborne UV DIAL measurements of ozone and aerosols (invited paper). Measurement of water vapor, surface ozone, and ethylene using differential absorption lidar. 12. Space lidar I: Lightweight lidar telescopes for space applications (invited paper). Coherent lidar development for Doppler wind measurement from the International Space

  10. Swirling jet turbulent mixing and combustion computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubel, A.

    1973-01-01

    Computations are presented describing the mixing and combustion of swirling jets in a coaxial stream. It is demonstrated that the boundary layer equations represent the flow reasonably well until reversed flow is imminent. For the range of parameters investigated indications are that the edge velocity has little effect on the behavior of the flow. Furthermore, confining the flow with a constant pressure wall, or impressing a favorable pressure gradient on the coaxial flow, acts to reduce the severity of the centerline adverse pressure gradient created by the swirl decay. A simple scalar eddy viscosity model, including a potential core formulation, is shown to described the behavior of weak swirling flow in the far region but is only in fair agreement with observations in the near region. The effects of swirl on a burning hydrocarbon jet exhausting into a cold coaxial stream are shown to be intensified by the reduction of the density due to combustion. The enhanced mixing properties of high swirl flow produce rapid diffusion of the burning gases into the cold edge flow causing early cessation of the NO producing reactions. Computations show that doubling the initial jet swirl could reduce the NO production by 25 percent.

  11. Fluidic Chevrons for Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinzie, Kevin; Henderson, Brenda; Whitmire, Julia

    2004-01-01

    Chevron mixing devices are used to reduce noise from commercial separate-flow turbofan engines. Mechanical chevron serrations at the nozzle trailing edge generate axial vorticity that enhances jet plume mixing and consequently reduces far-field noise. Fluidic chevrons generated with air injected near the nozzle trailing edge create a vorticity field similar to that of the mechanical chevrons and allow more flexibility in controlling acoustic and thrust performance than a passive mechanical design. In addition, the design of such a system has the future potential for actively controlling jet noise by pulsing or otherwise optimally distributing the injected air. Scale model jet noise experiments have been performed in the NASA Langley Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel to investigate the fluidic chevron concept. Acoustic data from different fluidic chevron designs are shown. Varying degrees of noise reduction are achieved depending on the injection pattern and injection flow conditions. CFD results were used to select design concepts that displayed axial vorticity growth similar to that associated with mechanical chevrons and qualitatively describe the air injection flow and the impact on acoustic performance.

  12. Investigating the Feedback Path in a Jet-Surface Resonant Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Khairul; Fagan, Amy; Bridges, James; Brown, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    A resonant interaction between an 8:1 aspect ratio rectangular jet and flat-plates, placed parallel to the jet, is addressed in this study. For certain relative locations of the plates, the resonance takes place with accompanying audible tones. Even when the tone is not audible the sound pressure level spectra is often marked by conspicuous peaks. The frequencies of the spectral peaks, as functions of the streamwise length of the plate and its relative location to the jet as well as the jet Mach number, are explored in an effort of understand the flow mechanism. It is demonstrated that the tones are not due to a simple feedback between the plates trailing edge and the nozzle exit; the leading edge also comes into play in determining the frequency. An acoustic feedback path, involving diffraction from the leading edge, appears to explain the frequencies of some of the spectral peaks.

  13. Coastal Applications of the Canopy Biomass Lidar (CBL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paynter, I.; Saenz, E.; Peri, F.; Schaaf, C.; Wang, Z.; Erb, A.; Yang, Y.; Rouhani, S.; Liu, Y.; Yang, X.; Chen, R. F.; Oktay, S.; Gontz, A. M.; Douglas, E. M.; Kim, J.; Sun, Q.; Strahler, A. H.; Li, Z.; van Aardt, J. A.; Kelbe, D.; Romanczyk, P.; Cawse-Nicholson, K.

    2013-12-01

    Airborne discrete and full waveform lidars have increasingly been utilized to augment multispectral and hyperspectral imaging of coastal ecosystems. While these data provide important landscape assessments of the shore and nearshore environment, they often lack the frequency that is really needed to monitor complex vegetative systems such as salt marshes and mangroves and provide rapid evaluations in the aftermath of severe storms. One solution is to augment the sparse airborne and satellite acquisitions with terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) information. However, most institutions with fine resolution discrete or full waveform TLS instruments are unwilling to risk these expensive (and often heavy) lidar in marine or estuarine environments. The Canopy Biomass Lidar (CBL) is an inexpensive, highly portable, fast-scanning, time-of-flight, TLS instrument, originally conceived by the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (KUL) and refined by the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT). Two new CBLs, constructed by the University of Massachusetts Boston (UMB), have been successfully deployed in deciduous and conifer forests at Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) and National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) sites in Massachusetts (Harvard Forest) and California (Sierra National Forest), and in eucalypt forests at long-term and Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) sites in Queensland, Australia. Both the UMB and RIT CBLs have also been deployed in savanna systems at the San Joaquin Rangeland (and NEON site) in California. The UMB CBLs are now being deployed in salt marsh systems in Massachusetts with plans underway to deploy them in mangrove forests later in the year. In particular, they are being used to characterize the water facing edge of saltmarsh at UMB's Nantucket Island field station and remnant salt marshes on the highly urbanized Neponset estuary draining into Boston Harbor. While CBL's 905nm nearIR wavelength is of little use in nearshore inundated

  14. The lift of sharp-leading-edged delta wings with blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavella, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of the lift augmentation due to a thin jet of air issuing from a slot along the leading edge of a delta wing is presented. The problem is treated with an extension of the method of Brown and Michael, representing the separated flow on the lee side of the wing by a pair of concentrated vortices and corresponding feeding sheets. It is assumed that the jet is not affected by Coanda forces. The analysis produces qualitative agreement with experiments.

  15. Properties of gluon jets

    SciTech Connect

    Sugano, K.

    1986-09-01

    The properties of gluon jets are reviewed from an experimental point of view. The measured characteristics are compared to theoretical expectations. Although neither data nor models for the gluon jets are in the mature stage, there are remarkable agreements and also intriguing disagreements between experiment and theory. Since much interesting data have begun to emerge from various experiments and the properties of gluon jets are deeply rooted in the basic structure of non-Abelian gauge theory, the study of gluon jets casts further light on our understanding of QCD. Finally, the future prospects are discussed.

  16. Perspectives on jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, H. S.

    1981-01-01

    Jet noise is a byproduct of turbulence. Until recently turbulence was assumed to be known statistically, and jet noise was computed therefrom. As a result of new findings though on the behavior of vortices and instability waves, a more integrated view of the problem has been accepted lately. After presenting a simple view of jet noise, the paper attempts to resolve the apparent differences between Lighthill's and Lilley's interpretations of mean-flow shear, and examines a number of ad hoc approaches to jet noise suppression.

  17. Interpretation of extragalactic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The nature of extragalatic radio jets is modeled. The basic hypothesis of these models is that extragalatic jets are outflows of matter which can be described within the framework of fluid dynamics and that the outflows are essentially continuous. The discussion is limited to the interpretation of large-scale (i.e., kiloparsec-scale) jets. The central problem is to infer the physical parameters of the jets from observed distributions of total and polarized intensity and angle of polarization as a function of frequency. 60 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Edge detection by nonlinear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Yiu-fai

    1994-07-01

    We demonstrate how the formulation of a nonlinear scale-space filter can be used for edge detection and junction analysis. By casting edge-preserving filtering in terms of maximizing information content subject to an average cost function, the computed cost at each pixel location becomes a local measure of edgeness. This computation depends on a single scale parameter and the given image data. Unlike previous approaches which require careful tuning of the filter kernels for various types of edges, our scheme is general enough to be able to handle different edges, such as lines, step-edges, corners and junctions. Anisotropy in the data is handled automatically by the nonlinear dynamics.

  19. Mapping elevations of tidal wetland restoration sites in San Francisco Bay: Comparing accuracy of aerial lidar with a singlebeam echosounder

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Athearn, N.D.; Takekawa, J.Y.; Jaffe, B.; Hattenbach, B.J.; Foxgrover, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    The southern edge of San Francisco Bay is surrounded by former salt evaporation ponds, where tidal flow has been restricted since the mid to late 1890s. These ponds are now the focus of a large wetland restoration project, and accurate measurement of current pond bathymetry and adjacent mud flats has been critical to restoration planning. Aerial light detection and ranging (lidar) has become a tool for mapping surface elevations, but its accuracy had rarely been assessed for wetland habitats. We used a singlebeam echosounder system we developed for surveying shallow wetlands to map submerged pond bathymetry in January of 2004 and compared those results with aerial lidar surveys in two ponds that were dry in May of 2004. From those data sets, we compared elevations for 5164 (Pond E9, 154 ha) and 2628 (Pond E14, 69 ha) echosounder and lidar points within a 0.375-m radius of each other (0.750-m diameter lidar spot size). We found that mean elevations of the lidar points were lower than the echosounder results by 5 ?? 0.1 cm in Pond E9 and 2 ?? 0.2 cm in Pond E14. Only a few points (5% in Pond E9, 2% in Pond E14) differed by more than 20 cm, and some of these values may be explained by residual water in the ponds during the lidar survey or elevation changes that occurred between surveys. Our results suggest that aerial lidar may be a very accurate and rapid way to assess terrain elevations for wetland restoration projects. ?? 2010 Coastal Education and Research Foundation.

  20. Small-footprint, waveform-resolving lidar estimation of submerged and sub-canopy topography in coastal environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, A.; Brock, J.C.; Wright, C.W.

    2009-01-01

    The experimental advanced airborne research lidar (EAARL) is an airborne lidar instrument designed to map near-shore submerged topography and adjacent land elevations simultaneously. This study evaluated data acquired by the EAARL system in February 2003 and March 2004 along the margins of Tampa Bay, Florida, USA, to map bare-earth elevations under a variety of vegetation types and submerged topography in shallow, turbid water conditions. A spatial filtering algorithm, known as the iterative random consensus filter (IRCF), was used to extract ground elevations from a point cloud of processed last-surface EAARL returns. Filtered data were compared with acoustic and field measurements acquired in shallow submerged (0-2.5 m water depth) and sub-canopy environments. Root mean square elevation errors (RMSEs) ranged from 10-14 cm for submerged topography to 16-20 cm for sub-canopy topography under a variety of vegetation communities. The effect of lidar sampling angles and global positioning system (GPS) satellite configuration on accuracy was investigated. Results show high RMSEs for data acquired during periods of poor satellite configuration and at large sampling angles along the edges of the lidar scan. The results presented in this study confirm the cross-environment capability of a green-wavelength, waveform-resolving lidar system, making it an ideal tool for mapping coastal environments.

  1. Ozone Differential Absorption Lidar Algorithm Intercomparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Sophie; Carswell, Allen I.; Donovan, David P.; Claude, Hans; Steinbrecht, Wolfgang; McDermid, I. Stuart; McGee, Thomas J.; Gross, Michael R.; Nakane, Hideaki; Swart, Daan P. J.; Bergwerff, Hans B.; Uchino, Osamu; von der Gathen, Peter; Neuber, Roland

    1999-10-01

    An intercomparison of ozone differential absorption lidar algorithms was performed in 1996 within the framework of the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Changes (NDSC) lidar working group. The objective of this research was mainly to test the differentiating techniques used by the various lidar teams involved in the NDSC for the calculation of the ozone number density from the lidar signals. The exercise consisted of processing synthetic lidar signals computed from simple Rayleigh scattering and three initial ozone profiles. Two of these profiles contained perturbations in the low and the high stratosphere to test the vertical resolution of the various algorithms. For the unperturbed profiles the results of the simulations show the correct behavior of the lidar processing methods in the low and the middle stratosphere with biases of less than 1% with respect to the initial profile to as high as 30 km in most cases. In the upper stratosphere, significant biases reaching 10% at 45 km for most of the algorithms are obtained. This bias is due to the decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio with altitude, which makes it necessary to increase the number of points of the derivative low-pass filter used for data processing. As a consequence the response of the various retrieval algorithms to perturbations in the ozone profile is much better in the lower stratosphere than in the higher range. These results show the necessity of limiting the vertical smoothing in the ozone lidar retrieval algorithm and questions the ability of current lidar systems to detect long-term ozone trends above 40 km. Otherwise the simulations show in general a correct estimation of the ozone profile random error and, as shown by the tests involving the perturbed ozone profiles, some inconsistency in the estimation of the vertical resolution among the lidar teams involved in this experiment.

  2. Radar and Lidar Radar DEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liskovich, Diana; Simard, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Using radar and lidar data, the aim is to improve 3D rendering of terrain, including digital elevation models (DEM) and estimates of vegetation height and biomass in a variety of forest types and terrains. The 3D mapping of vegetation structure and the analysis are useful to determine the role of forest in climate change (carbon cycle), in providing habitat and as a provider of socio-economic services. This in turn will lead to potential for development of more effective land-use management. The first part of the project was to characterize the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission DEM error with respect to ICESat/GLAS point estimates of elevation. We investigated potential trends with latitude, canopy height, signal to noise ratio (SNR), number of LiDAR waveform peaks, and maximum peak width. Scatter plots were produced for each variable and were fitted with 1st and 2nd degree polynomials. Higher order trends were visually inspected through filtering with a mean and median filter. We also assessed trends in the DEM error variance. Finally, a map showing how DEM error was geographically distributed globally was created.

  3. IIP Update: A Packaged Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Transceiver. Doppler Aerosol WiNd Lidar (DAWN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2006-01-01

    The state-of-the-art 2-micron coherent Doppler wind lidar breadboard at NASA/LaRC will be engineered and compactly packaged consistent with future aircraft flights. The packaged transceiver will be integrated into a coherent Doppler wind lidar system test bed at LaRC. Atmospheric wind measurements will be made to validate the packaged technology. This will greatly advance the coherent part of the hybrid Doppler wind lidar solution to the need for global tropospheric wind measurements.

  4. Cloud detection by lidar extinction calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lentz, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    A new lidar method of measuring cloud ceiling height using the Klett solution to the lidar equation was developed. This simple technique will find cloud ceiling height for clouds that rangefinder-like lidars cannot theoretically detect. In addition, the noise signals that do not correspond to clouds removed by using the convergence of the Klett solution to discriminate between signal changes and broader signal changes due to clouds. Clouds above rain or light fog can be detected without error, and it is possible to discriminate against haze layers by the magnitude of their maximum extinction.

  5. Wind measurement via direct detection lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afek, I.; Sela, N.; Narkiss, N.; Shamai, G.; Tsadka, S.

    2013-10-01

    Wind sensing Lidar is considered a promising technology for high quality wind measurements required for various applications such as hub height wind resource assessment, power curve measurements and advanced, real time, forward looking turbine control. Until recently, the only available Lidar technology was based on coherent Doppler shift detection, whose market acceptance has been slow primarily due to its exuberant price. Direct detection Lidar technology provides an alternative to remote sensing of wind by incorporating high precision measurement, a robust design and an affordable price tag.

  6. What Good is Raman Water Vapor Lidar?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, David

    2011-01-01

    Raman lidar has been used to quantify water vapor in the atmosphere for various scientific studies including mesoscale meteorology and satellite validation. Now the international networks of NDACC and GRUAN have interest in using Raman water vapor lidar for detecting trends in atmospheric water vapor concentrations. What are the data needs for addressing these very different measurement challenges. We will review briefly the scientific needs for water vapor accuracy for each of these three applications and attempt to translate that into performance specifications for Raman lidar in an effort to address the question in the title of "What good is Raman water vapor Iidar."

  7. Mapping watermass boundaries using fluorosensing lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarabun, C. C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An initial application of multispectral LIDAR data from the NASA airborne oceanographic lidar (AOL) to the mapping of watermass boundaries is presented. The approach uses the multispectral lidar data from the fluorosensing mode in a cluster analysis to define water types. Individual data points are classified as to parent water type(s) and then plotted in plan view to show the watermass boundaries and mixing regions. The methodology was applied to the AOL data from the SUPERFLUX overflights. The results are compared to salinity-mapping radar results from the same region.

  8. Lidar system for remote environmental studies.

    PubMed

    Gondal, M A; Mastromarino, J

    2000-10-01

    Light detection and ranging (lidar) system has been developed for remote monitoring of the environment. The system has been tested for measuring the size of clouds and by measurement of differential absorption due to pollutant gases like NO(2) and SO(2) in a cell. The lidar measurements revealed strong scattered signals from clouds situated around 11 km above the earth surface. The lidar data indicates that cloud thickness varied from 0.8 to 3.6 km at various times. PMID:18968100

  9. Airborne and Ground-Based Measurements Using a High-Performance Raman Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Rush, Kurt; Rabenhorst, Scott; Welch, Wayne; Cadirola, Martin; McIntire, Gerry; Russo, Felicita; Adam, Mariana; Venable, Demetrius; Connell, Rasheen; Veselovskii, Igor; Forno, Ricardo; Mielke, Bernd; Stein, Bernhard; Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, Stuart; Voemel, Holger

    2010-01-01

    A high-performance Raman lidar operating in the UV portion of the spectrum has been used to acquire, for the first time using a single lidar, simultaneous airborne profiles of the water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscatter, aerosol extinction, aerosol depolarization and research mode measurements of cloud liquid water, cloud droplet radius, and number density. The Raman Airborne Spectroscopic Lidar (RASL) system was installed in a Beechcraft King Air B200 aircraft and was flown over the mid-Atlantic United States during July August 2007 at altitudes ranging between 5 and 8 km. During these flights, despite suboptimal laser performance and subaperture use of the telescope, all RASL measurement expectations were met, except that of aerosol extinction. Following the Water Vapor Validation Experiment Satellite/Sondes (WAVES_2007) field campaign in the summer of 2007, RASL was installed in a mobile trailer for groundbased use during the Measurements of Humidity and Validation Experiment (MOHAVE-II) field campaign held during October 2007 at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory s Table Mountain Facility in southern California. This ground-based configuration of the lidar hardware is called Atmospheric Lidar for Validation, Interagency Collaboration and Education (ALVICE). During theMOHAVE-II field campaign, during which only nighttime measurements were made, ALVICE demonstrated significant sensitivity to lower-stratospheric water vapor. Numerical simulation and comparisons with a cryogenic frost-point hygrometer are used to demonstrate that a system with the performance characteristics of RASL ALVICE should indeed be able to quantify water vapor well into the lower stratosphere with extended averaging from an elevated location like Table Mountain. The same design considerations that optimize Raman lidar for airborne use on a small research aircraft are, therefore, shown to yield significant dividends in the quantification of lower-stratospheric water vapor. The MOHAVE

  10. Wing Leading Edge Joint Laminar Flow Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Aaron; Westphal, Russell V.; Zuniga, Fanny A.; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Koga, Dennis J.

    1996-01-01

    An F-104G aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center has been equipped with a specially designed and instrumented test fixture to simulate surface imperfections of the type likely to be present near the leading edge on the wings of some laminar flow aircraft. The simulated imperfections consisted of five combinations of spanwise steps and gaps of various sizes. The unswept fixture yielded a pressure distribution similar to that of some laminar flow airfoils. The experiment was conducted at cruise conditions typical for business-jets and light transports: Mach numbers were in the range 0.5-0.8, and unit Reynolds numbers were 1.5-2.5 million per foot. Skin friction measurements indicated that laminar flow was often maintained for some distance downstream of the surface imperfections. Further work is needed to more precisely define transition location and to extend the experiments to swept-wing conditions and a broader range of imperfection geometries.

  11. Edge Localised Modes (ELMs): Experiments and Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, J. W.; Kirk, A.

    2008-05-14

    Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) are periodic disturbances of the plasma periphery occurring in tokamaks with an H-mode edge transport barrier. As a result, a fraction of the plasma energy present in the confined hot edge plasma is transferred to the open field lines in the divertor region, ultimately appearing at the divertor target plates. These events can result in high transient heat loads being deposited on the divertor target plates in large tokamaks, potentially causing damage in devices such as ITER. Consequently it is important to find means to mitigate their effects, either avoiding them or, at least, controlling them. This in turn means it is essential to understand the physics causing ELMs so that appropriate steps can be taken. It is generally agreed that ELMs originate as MHD instability caused by the steep plasma pressure gradients or edge plasma current present in H-mode, the so-called 'peeling-ballooning' model. Normally this is considered to be an ideal MHD instability but resistivity may be involved. Much less clear is the non-linear evolution of these instabilities and the mechanisms by which the confined edge plasma is transferred to the divertor plasma. There is evidence for the non-linear development of 'filamentary' structures predicted by theory, but the reconnection processes by which these are detached from the plasma core remain uncertain. In this paper the experimental and theoretical evidence for the peeling-ballooning model is presented, drawing data from a number of tokamaks, e.g. JET, DIII-D, ASDEX-Upgrade, MAST etc. Some theoretical models for the non-linear evolution of ELMs are discussed; as well as ones related to the 'peeling-ballooning' model, other candidate models for the ELM cycle are mentioned. The consequential heat loads on divertor target plates are discussed. Based on our current understanding of the physics of ELMs, means to avoid them, or mitigate their consequences, are described, e.g. the use of plasma shaping or

  12. On the anomalies in single-jet hover suckdown data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Richard E.; Bellavia, David C.; Wardwell, Douglas A.; Corsiglia, Victor R.

    1991-01-01

    The data from nine different investigations of the suckdown induced in ground effect by a single jet issuing from plates of various sizes and shapes have been examined and compared. The results show that the generally accepted method for estimating suckdown significantly underestimated the suckdown for most of the configurations. The study identified several factors that could contribute to the differences. These include ground board size, plate edge effects, jet flow quality, jet impingement angle, the size of the chamber in which the tests were run, and obstructions in the region above the model. Most of these factors have not been investigated and in many cases items such as the size of the test chamber, jet flow quality, ground board size, etc., have not even been shown in the documents reporting the investigation. A program to investigate the effects of these factors is recommended.

  13. The First Few Parsecs of the Jets in NGC-4261

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Dayton; Wehrle, Ann

    1997-01-01

    We have imaged the nucleus of the nearby radio galaxy NGC 4261 (3C270) with the VLBA at 1.6, 8.4, 22, and 43 GHz. At 8.4 GHz our image reveals a narrow gap in emission just east of the core, which we interpret as absorption by an inner accretion disk seen nearly edge-on. If correct, this interpretation implies that the radio jets are almost perpendicular to our line of sight. Thus, NGC 4261 provides an unusually good opportunity to measure component proper motions in both jet and counterjet, free from most relativistic beaming effects. Observations to do this are underway. This is one of the very few sources in which both jet and counterjet are detectable on parsec scales, and it is also one of the closest "classical" double-lobed radio galaxies. Consequently, NGC 4261 is a good laboratory for testing models of jets in low luminosity radio galaxies.

  14. Depolarization of subalfvenic plasma jet generating field-aligned currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobyanin, D. B.; Gavrilov, B. G.; Podgorny, I. M.

    2004-01-01

    The subalfvenic magnetized plasma jet propagating across the geomagnetic field generates the field-aligned currents in ionospheric plasma. The transverse polarization electric field Ep = - V × B in the jet is reduced due to a leakage of polarization charges through the field-aligned currents (plasma jet depolarization). These phenomena are investigated in the laboratory experiment. It was revealed that the depolarization is accompanied by appearing of the electric field Ea along the plasma velocity vector and creation of an additional pair of the field-aligned currents being generated at the leading and trailing edge of the moving plasma. The value of Ea is comparable with the transverse electric field Ep. The depolarization results in the plasma jet deflection. The possibility of a manifestation of these effects in the NORTH STAR Russian-American active rocket experiment is discussed.

  15. Acoustics of Jet Surface Interaction - Scrubbing Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Concepts envisioned for the future of civil air transport consist of unconventional propulsion systems in the close proximity to the structure or embedded in the airframe. While such integrated systems are intended to shield noise from the community, they also introduce new sources of sound. Sound generation due to interaction of a jet flow past a nearby solid surface is investigated here using the generalized acoustic analogy theory. The analysis applies to the boundary layer noise generated at and near a wall, and excludes the scattered noise component that is produced at the leading or the trailing edge. While compressibility effects are relatively unimportant at very low Mach numbers, frictional heat generation and thermal gradient normal to the surface could play important roles in generation and propagation of sound in high speed jets of practical interest. A general expression is given for the spectral density of the far field sound as governed by the variable density Pridmore-Brown equation. The propagation Green's function is solved numerically for a high aspect-ratio rectangular jet starting with the boundary conditions on the surface and subject to specified mean velocity and temperature profiles between the surface and the observer. It is shown the magnitude of the Green's function decreases with increasing source frequency and/or jet temperature. The phase remains constant for a rigid surface, but varies with source location when subject to an impedance type boundary condition. The Green's function in the absence of the surface, and flight effects are also investigated

  16. Urban 3D GIS From LiDAR and digital aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guoqing; Song, C.; Simmers, J.; Cheng, P.

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents a method, which integrates image knowledge and Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) point cloud data for urban digital terrain model (DTM) and digital building model (DBM) generation. The DBM is an Object-Oriented data structure, in which each building is considered as a building object, i.e., an entity of the building class. The attributes of each building include roof types, polygons of the roof surfaces, height, parameters describing the roof surfaces, and the LiDAR point array within the roof surfaces. Each polygon represents a roof surface of building. This type of data structure is flexible for adding other building attributes in future, such as texture information and wall information. Using image knowledge extracted, we developed a new method of interpolating LiDAR raw data into grid digital surface model (DSM) with considering the steep discontinuities of buildings. In this interpolation method, the LiDAR data points, which are located in the polygon of roof surfaces, first are determined, and then interpolation via planar equation is employed for grid DSM generation. The basic steps of our research are: (1) edge detection by digital image processing algorithms; (2) complete extraction of the building roof edges by digital image processing and human-computer interactive operation; (3) establishment of DBM; (4) generation of DTM by removing surface objects. Finally, we implement the above functions by MS VC++ programming. The outcome of urban 3D DSM, DTM and DBM is exported into urban database for urban 3D GIS.

  17. Jet Lag in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron; Galvez, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Context: Prolonged transmeridian air travel can impart a physical and emotional burden on athletes in jet lag and travel fatigue. Jet lag may negatively affect the performance of athletes. Study Type: Descriptive review. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search for articles relating to jet lag was performed (1990-present), as was a search relating to jet lag and athletes (1983-January, 2012). The results were reviewed for relevance. Eighty-nine sources were included in this descriptive review. Results: Behavioral strategies are recommended over pharmacological strategies when traveling with athletes; pharmacological aides may be used on an individual basis. Strategic sleeping, timed exposure to bright light, and the use of melatonin are encouraged. Conclusions: There is strong evidence that mood and cognition are adversely affected by jet lag. Some measures of individual and team performance are adversely affected as well. PMID:23016089

  18. Description of Jet Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1996-01-01

    In this article we review recent results on the breakup of cylindrical jets of a Newtonian fluid. Capillary forces provide the main driving mechanism and our interest is in the description of the flow as the jet pinches to form drops. The approach is to describe such topological singularities by constructing local (in time and space) similarity solutions from the governing equations. This is described for breakup according to the Euler, Stokes or Navier-Stokes equations. It is found that slender jet theories can be applied when viscosity is present, but for inviscid jets the local shape of the jet at breakup is most likely of a non-slender geometry. Systems of one-dimensional models of the governing equations are solved numerically in order to illustrate these differences.

  19. Multiple jet study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. E.; Kors, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    Test data is presented which allows determination of jet penetration and mixing of multiple cold air jets into a ducted subsonic heated mainstream flow. Jet-to-mainstream momentum flux ratios ranged from 6 to 60. Temperature profile data is presented at various duct locations up to 24 orifice diameters downstream of the plane of jet injection. Except for two configurations, all geometries investigated had a single row of constant diameter orifices located transverse to the main flow direction. Orifice size and spacing between orifices were varied. Both of these were found to have a significant effect on jet penetration and mixing. The best mixing of the hot and cold streams was achieved with duct height.

  20. Jet physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Melese, P.

    1997-05-01

    We present high E{sub T} jet measurements from CDF at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The incfilusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 1800 GeV with {approximately} 5 times more data is compared to the published CDF results, preliminary D0 results, and next-to-leading order QCD predictions. The {summation}E{sub T} cross section is also compared to QCD predictions and the dijet angular distribution is used to place a limit on quark compositeness. The inclusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 630 GeV is compared with that at 1800 GeV to test the QCD predictions for the scaling of jet cross sections with {radical}s. Finally, we present momentum distributions of charged particles in jets and compare them to Modified Leading Log Approximation predictions.

  1. Global Wind Measurement from Orbit Using Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiers, G. D.; Tamppari, L. K.; Mischna, M.

    2014-07-01

    Very few measurements have been made of martian winds yet they create global dust storms, reshape the surface and impact our ability to land precisely. Analyses and concepts for an orbiting Doppler lidar that measures winds globally is presented.

  2. Peculiarities of standardization efforts for lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitkamp, Klaus C. H.; Nikowa, Ljuba A.

    1997-12-01

    Lidar, and in particular, differential absorption and scattering lidar or DIAL have today reached a high degree of maturity. It now appears appropriate that efforts be taken in the direction of standardization of the technique and assurance and control of the quality of its results. To this end the German Commission on Air Pollution of VDI and DIN established a working group whose task was to prepare a set of recommendations for the use and operation of lidar systems. This group now completed, as a first result, a guideline for the use of differential absorption and scattering lidar for gas concentration measurements. Peculiarities associated with such a task are presented, and the contents of the draft of the resulting guideline VDI 4210 Part 1 are discussed.

  3. Requirements for Space-Based Wind Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, Robert M.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Global wind profiles are needed for a wide range of meteorological applications. Since the 1980's, observing system simulation experiments have been conducted in order to evaluate the potential impact of space-based wind profiler data on numerical weather prediction, and to evaluate trade-offs in lidar design. These experiments indicated tremendous potential for satellite lidar observations to improve atmospheric analyses and forecasts. More recent experiments are aimed at assessing the precise requirements for space-based lidar wind profile data and to evaluate the potential for alternative technologies. At the workshop, OSSE methodology, and results from experiments conducted at the DAO to the define requirements for space-based lidar wind will be presented.

  4. Lidar measurements of airborne particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangkun; Philbrick, C. Russell

    2003-03-01

    Raman lidar techniques have been used in remote sensing to measure the aerosol optical extinction in the lower atmosphere, as well as water vapor, temperature and ozone profiles. Knowledge of aerosol optical properties assumes special importance in the wake of studies strongly correlating airborne particulate matter with adverse health effects. Optical extinction depends upon the concentration, composition, and size distribution of the particulate matter. Optical extinction from lidar returns provide information on particle size and density. The influence of relative humidity upon the growth and size of aerosols, particularly the sulfate aerosols along the northeast US region, has been investigated using a Raman lidar during several field measurement campaigns. A particle size distribution model is being developed and verified based on the experimental results. Optical extinction measurements from lidar in the NARSTO-NE-OPS program in Philadelphia PA, during summer of 1999 and 2001, have been analyzed and compared with other measurements such as PM sampling and particle size measurements.

  5. Doppler Lidar Descent Sensor for Planetary Landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amzajerdian, F.; Pierrottet, D. F.; Petway, L. B.; Hines, G. D.; Barnes, B. W.

    2012-06-01

    Future robotic and manned missions to Mars demand accurate knowledge of ground velocity and altitude to ensure soft landing at the designated landing location. To meet this requirement, a prototype Doppler lidar has been developed and demonstrated.

  6. UV fluorescence lidar detection of bioaerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christesen, Steven D.; Merrow, Clifton N.; Desha, Michael S.; Wong, Anna; Wilson, Mark W.; Butler, John C.

    1994-06-01

    A UV fluorescence lidar system for the remote detection of bioaerosols has been built and tested. At the heart of the UV- LIDAR Fluorosensor system are a 200 mJ quadrupled Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm and a 16-inch Cassagrain telescope. Operating on three data collection channels, the UV lidar is capable of real time monitoring of 266 nm elastic backscatter, the total fluorescence between 300 and 400 nm, and the dispersed fluorescence spectrum (using a small spectrograph and gated intensified CCD array). Our goal in this effort was to assess the capabilities of biofluorescence for quantitative detection and discrimination of bioaerosols. To this end, the UV-LIDAR Fluorosensor system was tested against the aerosolized bacterial spore Bacillus subtilus var. niger sp. globiggi (BG) and several likely interferences at several ranges from approximately 600 to 3000 m. Our tests with BG indicate a detection limit of approximately 500 mg/cubic meter at a range of 3000 m.

  7. Parsec-scale jets and tori in seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, A. L.; Wrobel, J. M.; Wilson, A. S.; Ulvestad, J. S.; Norris, R. P.; Mundell, C. G.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Falcke, H.; Colbert, E. J. M.

    2001-01-01

    H. Falcke, T.P. Krichbaum, C.G. Mundell, J.S. Ulvestad, A.S. Wilson, J.M. Wrobel Active galaxies tend to be powerful or weak radio sources, and we still do not understand the underlying cause. Perhaps the engine is the same in both systems and the jet gets disrupted by dense interstellar medium in radio-quiet objects, or else the difference is intrinsic with jet power scaling with black hole spin. To distinguish, one can look for signs of interaction between the jet and the narrow-line region, and to measure the jet speed close to the jet base, before environmental effects become important. We find one-sided parsec-scale jet structures in Mrk 348, Mrk 231, NGC 4151, and NGC 5506 using VLBI, and we measure low jet speeds (typically <= 0.25 c). The one-sidedness probably is not due to Doppler boosting, but rather is probably free-free absorption. Plasma conditions required to produce the absorption are Ne >= 2 × 105 cm-3 assuming a path length of 0.1 pc, typical of that expected at the inner edge of the obscuring torus.

  8. Competing edge networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Mark; Grindrod, Peter

    2012-06-01

    We introduce a model for a pair of nonlinear evolving networks, defined over a common set of vertices, subject to edgewise competition. Each network may grow new edges spontaneously or through triad closure. Both networks inhibit the other's growth and encourage the other's demise. These nonlinear stochastic competition equations yield to a mean field analysis resulting in a nonlinear deterministic system. There may be multiple equilibria; and bifurcations of different types are shown to occur within a reduced parameter space. This situation models competitive communication networks such as BlackBerry Messenger displacing SMS; or instant messaging displacing emails.

  9. The cutting edge.

    PubMed

    Hagland, M; Lumsdon, K; Montague, J; Serb, C

    1995-08-01

    With managed care payment becoming the norm, employers actively pursuing keener benefits management, health care markets evolving at warp speed, and clinical and information technologies spawning new capabilities every day, the cutting edge in health care keeps slicing ever-deeper. With that in mind, we at Hospitals & Health Networks have developed a browser's compendium of some of the leading people, places (organizations and programs) and technologies that are helping move the field forward into the next stage. Each entry is unique; what they all share is an innovative quality that others will emulate. PMID:7627230

  10. Comparative study of middle atmosphere temperature at Rothera with Lidar and SABER, and the effect of the Antarctic Vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, B.; Harvey, L.; Chu, X.; Espy, P. J.; Gardner, C. S.

    2009-12-01

    The data collected by Fe Boltzmann lidar from 2003 to 2005 at Rothera, Antarctica (67.5 S, 68.0 W) are used to generate temperature morphology in stratosphere and mesosphere covering an entire year. Satellite temperatures by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) are compared to the lidar data and show good agreements in general. SABER provides near global coverage on a daily basis but yaws toward the Northern Hemisphere resulting in months when comparisons are not available. The lidar measures the temperature profile over Rothera at high vertical resolution while the vertical resolution of SABER is 2-3 km. Large variability in temperature is observed in austral fall and spring around 60 km. In this work, we explore the extent to which the observed variability is due to sampling inside, at the edge, or outside the Antarctic polar vortex. The edge of the vortex is co-located with very large temperature gradient and daily movement of the vortex likely contributes to a geophysical explanation for large temperature variations. The position of the vortex edge, based on GEOS-5 temperatures and winds, is used to aid in the interpretation of the temperature structure as a function of altitude and time. Results will be shown that indicate notable differences between profiles sampled in the different air mass regions.

  11. Aerosol extinction measurements with CO2-lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagard, Arne; Persson, Rolf

    1992-01-01

    With the aim to develop a model for infrared extinction due to aerosols in slant paths in the lower atmosphere we perform measurements with a CO2-lidar. Earlier measurements with a transmissometer along horizontal paths have been used to develop relations between aerosol extinction and meteorological parameters. With the lidar measurements we hope to develop corresponding relations for altitude profiles of the aerosol extinction in the infrared. An important application is prediction of detection range for infrared imaging systems.

  12. Holographic Optical Elements as Scanning Lidar Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Rallison, Richard D.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Guerra, David V.

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated and developed the use of holographic optical elements (HOE) and holographic transmission gratings for scanning lidar telescopes. By rotating a flat HOE in its own plane with the focal spot on the rotation axis, a very simple and compact conical scanning telescope is possible. We developed and tested transmission and reflection HOES for use with the first three harmonics of Nd:YAG lasers, and designed, built, and tested two lidar systems based on this technology.

  13. Topological number of edge states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Kimura, Taro

    2016-05-01

    We show that the edge states of the four-dimensional class A system can have topological charges, which are characterized by Abelian/non-Abelian monopoles. The edge topological charges are a new feature of relations among theories with different dimensions. From this novel viewpoint, we provide a non-Abelian analog of the TKNN number as an edge topological charge, which is defined by an SU(2) 't Hooft-Polyakov BPS monopole through an equivalence to Nahm construction. Furthermore, putting a constant magnetic field yields an edge monopole in a noncommutative momentum space, where D-brane methods in string theory facilitate study of edge fermions.

  14. KML-Based Access and Visualization of High Resolution LiDAR Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, C. J.; Blair, J. L.; Nandigam, V.; Memon, A.; Baru, C.; Arrowsmith, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    the user as a KML groundoverlay. The KML product enables users to quickly and easily visualize the DEMs in Google Earth. By combining internet-based LiDAR data processing with KML visualization products, users are able to execute computationally intensive data sub-setting, processing and visualization without having local access to computing resources, GIS software, or data processing expertise. Finally, GEON has partnered with the US Geological Survey to generate region-dependant network linked KML visualizations for large volumes of LiDAR derived hillshades of the Northern San Andreas fault system. These data, acquired by the NSF-funded GeoEarthScope project, offer an unprecedented look at active faults in the northern portion of the San Andreas system. Through the region-dependant network linked KML, users can seamlessly access 1 meter hillshades (both 315 and 45 degree sun angles) for the full 1400 square kilometer dataset, without downloading huge volumes of data. This type of data access has great utility for users ranging from earthquake scientists to K-12 educators who wish to introduce cutting edge real world data into their earth science lessons.

  15. Measurements of large scale disturbances in rectangular wall jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    Detailed measurements of the velocity field and wall surface pressure distribution of a tone-generating wall jet were obtained in the Ames 7- by 10-foot Wind Tunnel and anechoeic chamber. The jet issued from a 0.508 cm by 10.16 cm nozzle adjacent to a 3.81 cm wall, with an initially parabolic velocity profile at the exit. The jet was operated at Reynolds numbers, R, of 4910, 7740, and 9410. At R = 4910 and 7740, the flow appeared as a double-rowed vortex array which formed upstream of the edge and convected downstream without change in structure. At R = 9410, apparent vortex pairing occurred at the edge location. These flow characteristics were observed in both velocity field measurements and flow visualization records. The unsteady vorticity field of the jet was computed from phase-averaged hot-wire anemometer measurements of the velocity field. The associated acoustic field was estimated by the method of Green's functions, and was found to be similar to measurements of the sound field. These observations tend to support theoretical predictions that vortex shedding at the edge tends to cancel the effect of acoustic sources in other parts of the flow field.

  16. Effective resolution concepts for lidar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iarlori, M.; Madonna, F.; Rizi, V.; Trickl, T.; Amodeo, A.

    2015-12-01

    Since its establishment in 2000, EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar NETwork) has provided, through its database, quantitative aerosol properties, such as aerosol backscatter and aerosol extinction coefficients, the latter only for stations able to retrieve it independently (from Raman or high-spectral-resolution lidars). These coefficients are stored in terms of vertical profiles, and the EARLINET database also includes the details of the range resolution of the vertical profiles. In fact, the algorithms used in the lidar data analysis often alter the spectral content of the data, mainly acting as low-pass filters to reduce the high-frequency noise. Data filtering is described by the digital signal processing (DSP) theory as a convolution sum: each filtered signal output at a given range is the result of a linear combination of several signal input data samples (relative to different ranges from the lidar receiver), and this could be seen as a loss of range resolution of the output signal. Low-pass filtering always introduces distortions in the lidar profile shape. Thus, both the removal of high frequency, i.e., the removal of details up to a certain spatial extension, and the spatial distortion produce a reduction of the range resolution. This paper discusses the determination of the effective resolution (ERes) of the vertical profiles of aerosol properties retrieved from lidar data. Large attention has been dedicated to providing an assessment of the impact of low-pass filtering on the effective range resolution in the retrieval procedure.

  17. Doppler Lidar for Wind Measurements on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Emmitt, George D.; Yu, Jirong; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron laser transmitter for wind sensing. With support from NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), NASA Langley Research Center has developed a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement. The transmitter portion of the transceiver employs the high-pulse-energy, Ho:Tm:LuLiF, partially conductively cooled laser technology developed at NASA Langley. The transceiver is capable of 250 mJ pulses at 10 Hz. It is very similar to the technology envisioned for coherent Doppler lidar wind measurements from Earth and Mars orbit. The transceiver is coupled to the large optics and data acquisition system in the NASA Langley VALIDAR mobile trailer. The large optics consists of a 15-cm off-axis beam expanding telescope, and a full-hemispheric scanner. Vertical and horizontal vector winds are measured, as well as relative backscatter. The data acquisition system employs frequency domain velocity estimation and pulse accumulation. It permits real-time display of the processed winds and archival of all data. This lidar system was recently deployed at Howard University facility in Beltsville, Mary-land, along with other wind lidar systems. Coherent Doppler wind lidar ground-based wind measurements and comparisons with other sensors will be presented. A simulation and data product for wind measurement at Venus will be presented.

  18. ALE: Astronomical LIDAR for Extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Peter C.; McGraw, J. T.; Gimmestad, G.; Roberts, D.; Stewart, J.; Dawsey, M.; Fitch, J.; Smith, J.; Townsend, A.; Black, B.

    2006-12-01

    The primary impediment to precision all-sky photometry is the scattering or absorption of incoming starlight by the aerosols suspended in, and the molecules of, the Earth's atmosphere. The University of New Mexico (UNM) and the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) are currently developing the Astronomical LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) for Extinction (ALE), which is undergoing final integration and initial calibration at UNM. ALE is based upon a 527nm laser operated at a pulse repetition rate of 1500 pps, and rendered eyesafe by expanding its beam through a 32cm diameter transmitter. The alt-az mounted ALE will operate in multiple modes, including mapping the sky to obtain a quantitative measurement of extinction sources, measuring a monochromatic extinction coefficient by producing Langely plots, and monitoring extinction in the direction in which a telescope is observing. A primary goal is to use the Rayleigh scattered LIDAR return from air above 20km as a quasi-constant illumination source. Air above this altitude is generally free from aerosols and the variations in density are relatively constant over intervals of a few minutes. When measured at several zenith angles, the integrated line-of-sight extinction can be obtained from a simple model fit of these returns. The 69 microjoule exit pulse power and 0.6m aperture receiver will allow ALE to collect approximately one million photons per minute from above 20km, enough to enable measurements of the monochromatic vertical extinction to better than 1% under photometric conditions. Along the way, ALE will also provide a plethora of additional information about the vertical and horizontal distributions of low-lying aerosols, dust or smoke in the free troposphere, and high cirrus, as well as detect the passage of boundary layer atmospheric gravity waves. This project is funded by NSF Grant 0421087.

  19. Study of Fast, Near-Infrared Photodetectors for the ITER Core LIDAR Thomson Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Giudicotti, L.; Beurskens, M.; Kempenaars, M.; Walsh, M. J.

    2008-03-12

    A key component for the ITER core LIDAR Thomson Scattering (TS) diagnostic would be a detector with good sensitivity in the 850-1060 nm near infrared (NIR) spectral region. Covering this spectral region becomes necessary if a Nd:YAG laser system operating at {lambda} = 1.06 {mu}m is used as the laser source, which is a very attractive choice in terms of available energy, repetition rate, reliability and cost. In this paper we review the state of the art of two types of detectors available for the above spectral range: the transferred electron (TE) InGaAs/InP hybrid photodiode and the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As microchannel plate (MCP) image intensifier and we describe the advancements necessary for a possible application in the ITER LIDAR TS. In addition we describe the preliminary characterization of new GaAsP fast MCP photomultipliers (PMTs) suitable for the detection of the visible part of the LIDAR TS spectrum in JET and ITER.

  20. Detection of high altitude aircraft wake vortices using infrared Doppler lidar: An assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estes, Michael J.

    1990-12-01

    The feasibility is studied of air-to-air detection of high altitude aircraft wake vortices at long ranges using infrared Doppler lidar. The purpose of this technique is to detect otherwise stealthy aircraft. Three laser wavelengths were analyzed: 1.064, 2.091, and 9.115 microns. Analysis revealed that the spectral width of the return signal from an aircraft wake presented a good signature for detection. Based on the analysis, a minimum signal-to-noise ratio of 0 db was established. Detection performance was then analyzed using signal-to-noise ratio calculations for backscatter by ambient atmospheric aerosols, jet engine exhaust soot particles, and condensation trail ice particles. Results indicated that atmospheric aerosols alone were not sufficient for detection in clean atmospheric regions. Backscatter enhancement by soot particles did, however, appear to be sufficient for detection out to 80 km. Enhancement by condensed ice particles in wake contrails provided detection well beyond 100 km in range. Interestingly, the shorter wavelength lidars did not perform as well as the 9.115 micron lidar due to degradations from shot noise, wavefront mismatch, refractive turbulence, and atmospheric extinction.

  1. Extensive Sampling of Forest Carbon using High Density Power Line Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, H. M.; Chen, Q.; Dye, D. G.; Hungate, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    unmanaged areas, using high point density lidar collected over transmission line corridors. The lidar metric of quadratic mean height guided our selection of field plots spanning the full range from low to high levels of aboveground biomass across the study region. Before model selection, we minimized two of the major sources of errors in lidar calibration: variance in tree allometry across landscapes and plot edge effects (spatial mismatch between field measurements and lidar points). We tested an assortment of model selection techniques and goodness of fit measures for deriving forest structural metrics of interest. For example, we obtained an R-squared value for aboveground biomass (Mg/ha) of 0.9 using stepwise regression. The forest metrics obtained are being used in the next stage of the project to parameterize biogeochemical models linking terrestrial carbon pools and atmospheric greenhouse gas exchanges.

  2. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  3. Miniature Filament Eruptions and their Reconnections in X-Ray Jets: Evidence for a New Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the onset of approximately10 random X-ray jets observed by Hinode/XRT. Each jet was near the limb in a polar coronal hole, and showed a ``bright point'' in an edge of the base of the jet, as is typical for previously-observed X-ray jets. We examined SDO/AIA EUV images of each of the jets over multiple AIA channels, including 304 Ang, which detects chromospheric emissions, and 171, 193, and 211 Ang, which detect cooler-coronal emissions. We find the jets to result from eruptions of miniature (size less than approximately 10 arcsec) filaments from the bases of the jets. Much of the erupting-filament material forms a chromospheric-temperature jet. In the cool-coronal channels, often the filament appears in absorption and the jet in emission. The jet bright point forms at the location from which the miniature filament is ejected, analogous to the formation of a standard solar flare in the wake of the eruption of a typical larger-scale chromospheric filament. Thus these X-ray jets and their bright points are made by miniature filament eruptions. They are evidently produced the same way as an on-disk coronal jet we observed in Adams et al. (2014); that on-disk jet had no obvious emerging magnetic field in its base. We conclude that, for many jets, the standard idea of X-ray jets forming from reconnection between emerging flux and preexisting coronal field is incorrect. ACS and RLM were supported by funding from NASA/LWS, Hinode, and ISSI.

  4. Flow and mixing characteristics of swirling double-concentric jets subject to acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R. F.; Jufar, S. R.; Hsu, C. M.

    2013-01-01

    Characteristic flow modes, flow evolution processes, jet spread width, turbulence properties, and dispersion characteristics of swirling double-concentric jets were studied experimentally. Jet pulsations were induced by means of acoustic excitation. Streak pictures of smoke flow patterns, illuminated by a laser-light sheet, were recorded by a high-speed digital camera. A hot-wire anemometer was used to digitize instantaneous velocity instabilities in the flow. Jet spread width was obtained through a binary edge identification technique. Tracer-gas concentrations were measured for information on jet dispersions. Two characteristic flow patterns were observed: (1) synchronized vortex rings appeared in the low excitation intensity regime (the excitation intensity less than one) and (2) synchronized puffing turbulent jets appeared in the high excitation intensity regime (the excitation intensity greater than one). In the high excitation intensity regime, the "suction back" phenomenon occurred and therefore induced in-tube mixing. The jet spread width and turbulent fluctuation intensity exhibited particularly large values in the high excitation intensity regime at the excitation Strouhal numbers smaller than 0.85. At the excitation Strouhal numbers >0.85, the high-frequency effect caused significant decay of jet breakup and dispersion—the jet spread width and fluctuation intensity decreased sharply and may, at very high Strouhal numbers, asymptotically approach values almost the same as the values associated with unexcited jets. Exciting the jets at the high excitation intensity regime, the effects of puffing motion and in-tube mixing caused breakup of the jet in the near field and therefore resulted in a small Lagrangian integral time and small length scales of fluctuating eddies. This effect, in turn, caused drastic dispersion of the central jet fluids. It is possible that the excited jets can attain 90 % more improvements than the unexcited jets. We provide a

  5. Flow and mixing characteristics of swirling double-concentric jets subject to acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R. F.; Jufar, S. R.; Hsu, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    Characteristic flow modes, flow evolution processes, jet spread width, turbulence properties, and dispersion characteristics of swirling double-concentric jets were studied experimentally. Jet pulsations were induced by means of acoustic excitation. Streak pictures of smoke flow patterns, illuminated by a laser-light sheet, were recorded by a high-speed digital camera. A hot-wire anemometer was used to digitize instantaneous velocity instabilities in the flow. Jet spread width was obtained through a binary edge identification technique. Tracer-gas concentrations were measured for information on jet dispersions. Two characteristic flow patterns were observed: (1) synchronized vortex rings appeared in the low excitation intensity regime (the excitation intensity less than one) and (2) synchronized puffing turbulent jets appeared in the high excitation intensity regime (the excitation intensity greater than one). In the high excitation intensity regime, the "suction back" phenomenon occurred and therefore induced in-tube mixing. The jet spread width and turbulent fluctuation intensity exhibited particularly large values in the high excitation intensity regime at the excitation Strouhal numbers smaller than 0.85. At the excitation Strouhal numbers >0.85, the high-frequency effect caused significant decay of jet breakup and dispersion—the jet spread width and fluctuation intensity decreased sharply and may, at very high Strouhal numbers, asymptotically approach values almost the same as the values associated with unexcited jets. Exciting the jets at the high excitation intensity regime, the effects of puffing motion and in-tube mixing caused breakup of the jet in the near field and therefore resulted in a small Lagrangian integral time and small length scales of fluctuating eddies. This effect, in turn, caused drastic dispersion of the central jet fluids. It is possible that the excited jets can attain 90 % more improvements than the unexcited jets. We provide a

  6. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  7. A study of flow past an airfoil with a jet issuing from its lower surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krothapalli, A.; Leopold, D.

    1984-01-01

    The aerodynamics of a NACA 0018 airfoil with a rectangular jet of finite aspect ratio exiting from its lower surface at 90 deg to the chord were investigated. The jet was located at 50% of the wing chord. Measurements include static pressures on the airfoil surface, total pressures in the near wake, and local velocity vectors in different planes of the wake. The effects of jet cross flow interaction on the aerodynamics of the airfoil are studied. It is indicated that at all values of momentum coefficients, the jet cross flow interaction produces a strong contra-rotating vortex structure in the near wake. The flow behind the jet forms a closed recirculation region which extends up to a chord length down stream of the trailing edge which results in the flow field to become highly three dimensional. The various aerodynamic force coefficients vary significantly along the span of the wing. The results are compared with a jet flap configuration.

  8. Winter Temperature and Tidal Structures from 2011 to 2014 at McMurdo Station: Observations from Fe Boltzmann Temperature and Rayleigh Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Weichun; Chu, Xinzhao; Lu, Xian; Fuller-Rowell, Timothy J.; Codrescu, Mihail; Richmond, Arthur D.; Yu, Zhibin; Roberts, Brendan; Chen, Cao

    2016-06-01

    McMurdo station (77.8°S, 166.7°E), locating at the poleward edge of the auroral oval, provides great opportunities for researchers to study the interactions among neutral atmosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere. More than four years of valuable data have been collected, leading to several new discoveries from the McMurdo lidar campaign. Presented here are the winter temperature tides and their responses to the magnetospheric sources. Winter temperature structures from the lidar observations are also presented for this high southern latitude.

  9. Pulsed Lidar Performance/Technical Maturity Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gimmestad, Gary G.; West, Leanne L.; Wood, Jack W.; Frehlich, Rod

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the results of investigations performed by the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) under a task entitled 'Pulsed Lidar Performance/Technical Maturity Assessment' funded by the Crew Systems Branch of the Airborne Systems Competency at the NASA Langley Research Center. The investigations included two tasks, 1.1(a) and 1.1(b). The Tasks discussed in this report are in support of the NASA Virtual Airspace Modeling and Simulation (VAMS) program and are designed to evaluate a pulsed lidar that will be required for active wake vortex avoidance solutions. The Coherent Technologies, Inc. (CTI) WindTracer LIDAR is an eye-safe, 2-micron, coherent, pulsed Doppler lidar with wake tracking capability. The actual performance of the WindTracer system was to be quantified. In addition, the sensor performance has been assessed and modeled, and the models have been included in simulation efforts. The WindTracer LIDAR was purchased by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for use in near-term field data collection efforts as part of a joint NASA/FAA wake vortex research program. In the joint research program, a minimum common wake and weather data collection platform will be defined. NASA Langley will use the field data to support wake model development and operational concept investigation in support of the VAMS project, where the ultimate goal is to improve airport capacity and safety. Task 1.1(a), performed by NCAR in Boulder, Colorado to analyze the lidar system to determine its performance and capabilities based on results from simulated lidar data with analytic wake vortex models provided by NASA, which were then compared to the vendor's claims for the operational specifications of the lidar. Task 1.1(a) is described in Section 3, including the vortex model, lidar parameters and simulations, and results for both detection and tracking of wake vortices generated by Boeing 737s and 747s. Task 1

  10. Impact of Fluidic Chevrons on Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Kinzie, Kevin W.; Whitmire, Julia; Abeysinghe, Amal

    2005-01-01

    The impact of alternating fluidic core chevrons on the production of jet noise is investigated. Core nozzles for a representative 1/9th scale, bypass ratio 5 model system were manufactured with slots cut near the trailing edges to allow for air injection into the core and fan streams. The injectors followed an alternating pattern around the nozzle perimeter so that the injection alternated between injection into the core stream and injection into the fan stream. For the takeoff condition and a forward flight Mach number of 0.10, the overall sound pressure levels at the peak jet noise angle decrease with increasing injection pressure. Sound pressure levels increase for observation angles less than 110o at higher injection pressures due to increases in high frequency noise. Greater increases in high frequency noise are observed when the number of injectors increases from 8 to 12. When the forward flight Mach number is increased to 0.28, jet noise reduction (relative to the baseline) is observed at aft angles for increasing injection pressure while significant increases in jet noise are observed at forward observation angles due to substantial acoustic radiation at high frequencies. A comparison between inflow and alternating injectors shows that, for equal mass injection rates, the inflow nozzle produces greater low frequency noise reduction (relative to the baseline) than the alternating injectors at 90o and aft observation angles and a forward flight Mach number of 0.28. Preliminary computational fluid dynamic simulations indicate that the spatial decay rate of the hot potential core flow is less for the inflow nozzle than for the alternating nozzles which indicates that gentle mixing may be preferred over sever mixing when fluidic chevrons are used for jet noise reduction.

  11. Design on the readout electronics for the mobile direct detection Doppler wind LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Wen, Fei; Yao, Yuan; Sang, Zi-ru; Jin, Ge

    2013-12-01

    A readout electronics system is presented for the mobile direct detection Doppler Wind LIDAR (DWL). The structure of the readout electronics is compact to fit the mobile DWL which is fixed on a truck. According to the wind measurement principle of double-edge technique with triple-channel Fabry-Perot etalon, the readout electronics system is designed adjustable for wind speed detection due to the multi-channel technique and reconfiguration of the FPGA. The experimental results indicate that there is good consistency between the readout electronics and the current commercial devices. The detection range of the experiments can cover the troposphere and low stratosphere even in daylight.

  12. Edge remap for solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, James R.; Love, Edward; Robinson, Allen C.; Young, Joseph G.; Ridzal, Denis

    2013-12-01

    We review the edge element formulation for describing the kinematics of hyperelastic solids. This approach is used to frame the problem of remapping the inverse deformation gradient for Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) simulations of solid dynamics. For hyperelastic materials, the stress state is completely determined by the deformation gradient, so remapping this quantity effectively updates the stress state of the material. A method, inspired by the constrained transport remap in electromagnetics, is reviewed, according to which the zero-curl constraint on the inverse deformation gradient is implicitly satisfied. Open issues related to the accuracy of this approach are identified. An optimization-based approach is implemented to enforce positivity of the determinant of the deformation gradient. The efficacy of this approach is illustrated with numerical examples.

  13. Edge-on!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-08-01

    Peering at Uranus's Rings as they Swing Edge-on to Earth for the First Time Since their Discovery in 1977 As Uranus coasts through a brief window of time when its rings are edge-on to Earth - a view of the planet we get only once every 42 years - astronomers peering at the rings with ESO's Very Large Telescope and other space or ground-based telescopes are getting an unprecedented view of the fine dust in the system, free from the glare of the bright rocky rings. They may even find a new moon or two. ESO PR Photo 37/07 ESO PR Photo 37/07 The Uranus System "ESO's VLT took data at the precise moment when the rings were edge-on to Earth," said Imke de Pater, of University of California, Berkeley who coordinated the worldwide campaign. She worked with two team members observing in Chile: Daphne Stam of the Technical University Delft in the Netherlands and Markus Hartung of ESO. The observations were done with NACO, one of the adaptive optics instruments installed at the VLT. With adaptive optics, it is possible to obtain images almost free from the blurring effect of the atmosphere. It is as if the 8.2-m telescope were observing from space. Observations were also done with the Keck telescope in Hawaii, the Hubble Space Telescope, and at the Palomar Observatory. "Using different telescopes around the world allows us to observe as much of the changes during the ring-plane crossing as possible: when Uranus sets as seen from the VLT, it can still be observed by the Keck," emphasised Stam. Uranus orbits the Sun in 84 years. Twice during a Uranian year, the rings appear edge-on to Earth for a brief period. The rings were discovered in 1977, so this is the first time for a Uranus ring-crossing to be observed from Earth. The advantage of observations at a ring-plane crossing is that it becomes possible to look at the rings from the shadowed or dark side. From that vantage point, the normally bright outer rings grow fainter because their centimetre- to metre-sized rocks obscure

  14. Occurrence and characteristics of mutual interference between LIDAR scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gunzung; Eom, Jeongsook; Park, Seonghyeon; Park, Yongwan

    2015-05-01

    The LIDAR scanner is at the heart of object detection of the self-driving car. Mutual interference between LIDAR scanners has not been regarded as a problem because the percentage of vehicles equipped with LIDAR scanners was very rare. With the growing number of autonomous vehicle equipped with LIDAR scanner operated close to each other at the same time, the LIDAR scanner may receive laser pulses from other LIDAR scanners. In this paper, three types of experiments and their results are shown, according to the arrangement of two LIDAR scanners. We will show the probability that any LIDAR scanner will interfere mutually by considering spatial and temporal overlaps. It will present some typical mutual interference scenario and report an analysis of the interference mechanism.

  15. Homologous Jet-driven Coronal Mass Ejections from Solar Active Region 12192

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2016-05-01

    We report observations of homologous coronal jets and their coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed by instruments onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. The homologous jets originated from a location with emerging and canceling magnetic field at the southeastern edge of the giant active region (AR) of 2014 October, NOAA 12192. This AR produced in its interior many non-jet major flare eruptions (X- and M- class) that made no CME. During October 20 to 27, in contrast to the major flare eruptions in the interior, six of the homologous jets from the edge resulted in CMEs. Each jet-driven CME (∼200–300 km s‑1) was slower-moving than most CMEs, with angular widths (20°–50°) comparable to that of the base of a coronal streamer straddling the AR and were of the “streamer-puff” variety, whereby the preexisting streamer was transiently inflated but not destroyed by the passage of the CME. Much of the transition-region-temperature plasma in the CME-producing jets escaped from the Sun, whereas relatively more of the transition-region plasma in non-CME-producing jets fell back to the solar surface. Also, the CME-producing jets tended to be faster and longer-lasting than the non-CME-producing jets. Our observations imply that each jet and CME resulted from reconnection opening of twisted field that erupted from the jet base and that the erupting field did not become a plasmoid as previously envisioned for streamer-puff CMEs, but instead the jet-guiding streamer-base loop was blown out by the loop’s twist from the reconnection.

  16. Dilution jet mixing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Johnson, K.

    1984-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to quantify the mixing of opposed rows of jets (two-sided injection) in a confined cross flow. Results show that jet penetrations for two sided injections are less than that for single-sided injections, but the jet spreading rates are faster for a given momentum ratio and orifice plate. Flow area convergence generally enhances mixing. Mixing characteristics with asymmetric and symmetric convergence are similar. For constant momentum ratio, the optimum S/H(0) with in-line injections is one half the optimum value for single sided injections. For staggered injections, the optimum S/H(0) is twice the optimum value for single-sided injection. The correlations developed predicted the temperature distributions within first order accuracy and provide a useful tool for predicting jet trajectory and temperature profiles in the dilution zone with two-sided injections.

  17. Jet lag prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... your internal clock before you travel. While in flight: DO NOT sleep unless it matches the bedtime ... decrease jet lag. If you will be in flight during the bedtime of your destination, take some ...

  18. Counterflowing Jet Subsystem Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Rebecca; Daso, Endwell; Pritchett, Victor; Wang, Ten-See

    2010-01-01

    A counterflowing jet design (a spacecraft and trans-atmospheric subsystem) employs centrally located, supersonic cold gas jets on the face of the vehicle, ejecting into the oncoming free stream. Depending on the supersonic free-stream conditions and the ejected mass flow rate of the counterflowing jets, the bow shock of the vehicle is moved upstream, further away from the vehicle. This results in an increasing shock standoff distance of the bow shock with a progressively weaker shock. At a critical jet mass flow rate, the bow shock becomes so weak that it is transformed into a series of compression waves spread out in a much wider region, thus significantly modifying the flow that wets the outer surfaces, with an attendant reduction in wave and skin friction drag and aerothermal loads.

  19. Structure of Magnetic Tower Jets in Stratified Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Masanori; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai

    2006-12-01

    Using a new approach to modeling the magnetically dominated outflows from active galactic nuclei, we study the propagation of magnetic tower jets in gravitationally stratified atmospheres (such as a galaxy cluster environment) at large scales (more than tens of kiloparsecs) by performing three-dimensional MHD simulations. We present the detailed analysis of the MHD waves, the cylindrical radial force balance, and the collimation of magnetic tower jets. As magnetic energy is injected into a small central volume over a finite amount of time, the magnetic fields expand down the background density gradient, forming a collimated jet and an expanded ``lobe'' due to the gradually decreasing background density and pressure. Both the jet and lobes are magnetically dominated. In addition, the injection and expansion produce a hydrodynamic shock wave that moves ahead of and encloses the magnetic tower jet. This shock can eventually break the hydrostatic equilibrium in the ambient medium and cause a global gravitational contraction. This contraction produces a strong compression at the head of the magnetic tower front and helps to collimate the jet radially to produce a slender body. At the outer edge of the jet, the magnetic pressure is balanced by the background (modified) gas pressure, without any significant contribution from the hoop stress. On the other hand, along the central axis of the jet, hoop stress is the dominant force in shaping the central collimation of the poloidal current. The system, which possesses a highly wound helical magnetic configuration, never quite reaches a force-free equilibrium state, although the evolution becomes much slower at late stages. The simulations were performed without any initial perturbations, so the overall structures of the jet remain mostly axisymmetric.

  20. Phototransistors Development and their Applications to Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abedin, M. N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Ismail, Syed; Singh, Upendra N.

    2007-01-01

    Custom-designed two-micron phototransistors have been developed using Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE), Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) techniques under Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP). The devices were characterized in the Detector Characterization Laboratory at NASA Langley Research Center. It appears that the performance of LPE- and MBE-grown phototransistors such as responsivity, noise-equivalent-power, and gain, are better than MOCVD-grown devices. Lidar tests have been conducted using LPE and MBE devices under the 2-micrometer CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, Colorado. The main focus of these tests was to examine the phototransistors performances as compared to commercial InGaAs avalanche photodiode by integrating them into the Raman-shifted Eye-safe Aerosol Lidar (REAL) operating at 1.543 micrometers. A simultaneous measurement of the atmospheric backscatter signals using the LPE phototransistors and the commercial APD demonstrated good agreement between these two devices. On the other hand, simultaneous detection of lidar backscatter signals using MBE-grown phototransistor and InGaAs APD, showed a general agreement between these two devices with a lower performance than LPE devices. These custom-built phototransistors were optimized for detection around 2-micrometer wavelength while the lidar tests were performed at 1.543 micrometers. Phototransistor operation at 2-micron will improve the performance of a lidar system operating at that wavelength. Measurements include detecting hard targets (Rocky Mountains), atmospheric structure consisting of cirrus clouds and boundary layer. These phototransistors may have potential for high sensitivity differential absorption lidar measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor at 2.05-micrometers and 1.9-micrometers, respectively.

  1. Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment (HARLIE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.

    1998-01-01

    Scanning holographic lidar receivers are currently in use in two operational lidar systems, PHASERS (Prototype Holographic Atmospheric Scanner for Environmental Remote Sensing) and now HARLIE (Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment). These systems are based on volume phase holograms made in dichromated gelatin (DCG) sandwiched between 2 layers of high quality float glass. They have demonstrated the practical application of this technology to compact scanning lidar systems at 532 and 1064 nm wavelengths, the ability to withstand moderately high laser power and energy loading, sufficient optical quality for most direct detection systems, overall efficiencies rivaling conventional receivers, and the stability to last several years under typical lidar system environments. Their size and weight are approximately half of similar performing scanning systems using reflective optics. The cost of holographic systems will eventually be lower than the reflective optical systems depending on their degree of commercialization. There are a number of applications that require or can greatly benefit from a scanning capability. Several of these are airborne systems, which either use focal plane scanning, as in the Laser Vegetation Imaging System or use primary aperture scanning, as in the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar or the Large Aperture Scanning Airborne Lidar. The latter class requires a large clear aperture opening or window in the aircraft. This type of system can greatly benefit from the use of scanning transmission holograms of the HARLIE type because the clear aperture required is only about 25% larger than the collecting aperture as opposed to 200-300% larger for scan angles of 45 degrees off nadir.

  2. Lidars: a key component of urban biodefense.

    PubMed

    Mayor, Shane D; Benda, Paul; Murata, Christina E; Danzig, Richard J

    2008-03-01

    A biological aerosol attack in a city could infect tens of thousands of people. In the absence of announcements by the attacker or detection by present point detection systems, victims would be unaware of their exposure prior to developing symptoms. Since infections are most effectively countered before the onset of symptoms, detection technologies that provide early awareness of an attack should be given high priority. Current biological point detection (BPD) systems collect environmental air samples and then analyze them in laboratories so as to permit detection within 12-36 hours of an attack. Improvements in the pipeline may reduce this lag time to as little as a few hours. However, BPD systems have inherent weaknesses when used to detect and respond to an aerosol attack. The likelihood of a limited number of BPD systems intercepting an aerosol plume in a vast attack space may be low. Moreover, BPD systems do not provide critical information needed for response, such as the source location, precise time, and geographic reach of an attack. The missing information would invaluably guide prophylaxis distribution, identification of contaminated areas, and criminal apprehension. This article describes how lidars used for real-time observation of aerosol plumes could complement BPD systems by providing fine-scale spatial and temporal information. A lidar system also could be used to corroborate positive BPD system results, to improve reaction to positive results, and/or to provide an independent basis for low-regret protective steps. Lidar systems can resolve key biodefense challenges, and this article describes three compatible concepts of operations. Leveraging lessons from a lidar system now operating at the Pentagon, a test of an expanded lidar network would provide immediate protection for key Washington, DC, assets, demonstrate the synergy of BPD systems and lidars, and provide a test bed for research to improve lidar's shortcomings. PMID:18386972

  3. Jets in hadronic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Paige, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Recent experimental data on the properties of jets in hadronic reactions are reviewed and compared with theoretical expectations. Jets are clearly established as the dominant process for high E/sub T/ events in hadronic reactions. The cross section and the other properties of these events are in qualitative and even semiquantitative agreement with expectations based on perturbative QCD. However, we can not yet make precise tests of QCD, primarily because there are substantial uncertainties in the theoretical calculations. 45 references. (WHK)

  4. Hurricane Wind Field Measurements with Scanning Airborne Doppler Lidar During CAMEX-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, D. R.; Howell, J. N.; Darby, L. S.; Hardesty, R. M.; Traff, D. M.; Menzies, R. T.

    2000-01-01

    During the 1998 Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3), the first hurricane wind field measurements with Doppler lidar were achieved. Wind fields were mapped within the eye, along the eyewall, in the central dense overcast, and in the marine boundary layer encompassing the inflow region. Spatial coverage was determined primarily by cloud distribution and opacity. Within optically-thin cirrus slant range of 20- 25 km was achieved, whereas no propagation was obtained during penetration of dense cloud. Measurements were obtained with the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. MACAWS was developed and operated cooperatively by the atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A pseudo-dual Doppler technique ("co-planar scanning") is used to map the horizontal component of the wind at several vertical levels. Pulses from the laser are directed out the left side of the aircraft in the desired directions using computer-controlled rotating prisms. Upon exiting the aircraft, the beam is completely eyesafe. Aircraft attitude and speed are taken into account during real-time signal processing, resulting in determination of the ground-relative wind to an accuracy of about 1 m/s magnitude and about 10 deg direction. Beam pointing angle errors are about 0.1 deg, equivalent to about 17 m at 10 km. Horizontal resolution is about 1 km (along-track) for typical signal processor and scanner settings; vertical resolution varies with range. Results from CAMEX-3 suggest that scanning Doppler wind lidar can complement airborne Doppler radar by providing wind field measurements in regions that are devoid of hydrometeors. At present MACAWS observations are being assimilated into experimental forecast models and satellite Doppler wind lidar simulations to evaluate the relative impact.

  5. Edge phonons in black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, H. B.; Villegas, C. E. P.; Bahamon, D. A.; Muraca, D.; Castro Neto, A. H.; de Souza, E. A. T.; Rocha, A. R.; Pimenta, M. A.; de Matos, C. J. S.

    2016-07-01

    Black phosphorus has recently emerged as a new layered crystal that, due to its peculiar and anisotropic crystalline and electronic band structures, may have important applications in electronics, optoelectronics and photonics. Despite the fact that the edges of layered crystals host a range of singular properties whose characterization and exploitation are of utmost importance for device development, the edges of black phosphorus remain poorly characterized. In this work, the atomic structure and behaviour of phonons near different black phosphorus edges are experimentally and theoretically studied using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Polarized Raman results show the appearance of new modes at the edges of the sample, and their spectra depend on the atomic structure of the edges (zigzag or armchair). Theoretical simulations confirm that the new modes are due to edge phonon states that are forbidden in the bulk, and originated from the lattice termination rearrangements.

  6. Edge phonons in black phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, H B; Villegas, C E P; Bahamon, D A; Muraca, D; Castro Neto, A H; de Souza, E A T; Rocha, A R; Pimenta, M A; de Matos, C J S

    2016-01-01

    Black phosphorus has recently emerged as a new layered crystal that, due to its peculiar and anisotropic crystalline and electronic band structures, may have important applications in electronics, optoelectronics and photonics. Despite the fact that the edges of layered crystals host a range of singular properties whose characterization and exploitation are of utmost importance for device development, the edges of black phosphorus remain poorly characterized. In this work, the atomic structure and behaviour of phonons near different black phosphorus edges are experimentally and theoretically studied using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Polarized Raman results show the appearance of new modes at the edges of the sample, and their spectra depend on the atomic structure of the edges (zigzag or armchair). Theoretical simulations confirm that the new modes are due to edge phonon states that are forbidden in the bulk, and originated from the lattice termination rearrangements. PMID:27412813

  7. Edge phonons in black phosphorus

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, H. B.; Villegas, C. E. P.; Bahamon, D. A.; Muraca, D.; Castro Neto, A. H.; de Souza, E. A. T.; Rocha, A. R.; Pimenta, M. A.; de Matos, C. J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Black phosphorus has recently emerged as a new layered crystal that, due to its peculiar and anisotropic crystalline and electronic band structures, may have important applications in electronics, optoelectronics and photonics. Despite the fact that the edges of layered crystals host a range of singular properties whose characterization and exploitation are of utmost importance for device development, the edges of black phosphorus remain poorly characterized. In this work, the atomic structure and behaviour of phonons near different black phosphorus edges are experimentally and theoretically studied using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Polarized Raman results show the appearance of new modes at the edges of the sample, and their spectra depend on the atomic structure of the edges (zigzag or armchair). Theoretical simulations confirm that the new modes are due to edge phonon states that are forbidden in the bulk, and originated from the lattice termination rearrangements. PMID:27412813

  8. Lidar quantification of bank erosion in Blue Earth County, Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Kessler, A C; Gupta, S C; Dolliver, H A S; Thoma, D P

    2012-01-01

    Sediment and phosphorus (P) transport from the Minnesota River Basin to Lake Pepin on the upper Mississippi River has garnered much attention in recent years. However, there is lack of data on the extent of sediment and P contributions from riverbanks vis-à-vis uplands and ravines. Using two light detection and ranging (lidar) data sets taken in 2005 and 2009, a study was undertaken to quantify sediment and associated P losses from riverbanks in Blue Earth County, Minnesota. Volume change in river valleys as a result of bank erosion amounted to 1.71 million m over 4 yr. Volume change closely followed the trend: the Blue Earth River > the Minnesota River at the county's northern edge > the Le Sueur River > the Maple River > the Watonwan River > the Big Cobb River > Perch Creek > Little Cobb River. Using fine sediment content (silt + clay) and bulk density of 37 bank samples representing three parent materials, we estimate bank erosion contributions of 48 to 79% of the measured total suspended solids at the mouth of the Blue Earth and the Le Sueur rivers. Corresponding soluble P and total P contributions ranged from 0.13 to 0.20% and 40 to 49%, respectively. Although tall banks (>3 m high) accounted for 33% of the total length and 63% of the total area, they accounted for 75% of the volume change in river valleys. We conclude that multitemporal lidar data sets are useful in estimating bank erosion and associated P contributions over large scales, and for riverbanks that are not readily accessible for conventional surveying equipment. PMID:22218188

  9. Airborne Raman Lidar and its Applications for Atmospheric Process Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhien; Wechsler, Perry J.; Mahon, Nick; Wu, Decheng; Liu, Bo; Burkhart, Matthew; Glover, Brent; Kuestner, William; Welch, Wayne; Thomson, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Although ground-base Raman lidars are widely used for atmospheric observations, the capabilities of airborne Raman lidar is not fully explored. Here we presented two recently developed airborne Raman lidar systems for the studies of atmospheric boundary layer process, aerosols, and clouds. The systems are briefly introduced. Observation examples are presented to illustrate the unique observational capabilities of airborne Raman lidar and their applications for atmospheric process studies.

  10. High-order azimuthal instabilities on a cylindrical liquid jet driven by temporal and spatial perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressler, John L.

    1998-09-01

    A method has been developed to drive a cylindrical liquid jet unstable for deformations with axial wavelengths shorter than the circumference of the jet and azimuthal mode numbers greater than 0. The benefit of this method is that a cylindrical liquid jet can be broken into a spray with an average diameter smaller than the diameter of the initial jet. The higher-order instabilities were created by establishing initial conditions for the jet in space and time at the nozzle. An electromechanical transducer creates the applied temporal initial condition which is a sinusoidally varying velocity perturbation added to the steady velocity of the jet. The amplitude of the velocity perturbation can be as large as the jet's steady velocity and the energy in the applied velocity perturbation drives the instability. The spatial perturbation is created by placing perturbations in the circumference of the nozzle. As the velocity perturbation travels on the jet, its leading edge steepens and the trailing edge broadens in a manner analogous to the steepening of a pressure pulse in a compressible gas. If the driven velocity perturbation is sufficiently large, a shock or jump forms on the leading edge of the velocity pulse and the jet may break up into higher-order modes. A theoretical analysis of the breakup process, based on an adaptation of compressible fluid shock theory, is used to derive a fundamental lower bound on the spray's Sauter mean diameter as a function of the velocity perturbation amplitude. Techniques for approaching the theoretical minimum spray diameter by using the higher-order modes to atomize liquid jets are discussed.

  11. Radiation from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Sol, H.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electron-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the presence of relativistic jets, instabilities such as the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability create collisionless shocks, which are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons in small-scale magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation, a case of diffusive synchrotron radiation, may be important to understand the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  12. Two Dimensional Particle Transport in the Cct Tokamak Edge Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tynan, George Robert

    The physics of particle transport in the CCT tokamak plasma edge is studied experimentally in this dissertation. A full poloidal array of Langmuir probes is used to measure the equilibrium plasma and transport properties of the CCT edge plasma during Ohmic and H-mode discharges. During Ohmic L-mode, the equilibrium plasma density and electron temperature are found to vary on a magnetic flux surface. The equilibrium plasma distribution coincides with the distribution of particle transport. Inside the last closed flux surface, convective processes dominate particle transport. Several large convective cells are observed near the limiter radius. At and beyond the limiter radius, turbulent transport is significant. The turbulence appears to be driven by the convective plasma flows. In Ohmic L-mode-like discharges, plasma transport occurs predominantly through the low-field region of the tokamak with local bad curvature. The convective cells are destroyed at the L-H transition and replaced with a more poloidally symmetric, radially narrow jet of plasma flow at the limiter radius. The jet effectively isolates the plasma core from the scrape -off layer. The turbulence associated with the convective cells is reduced across the edge region. Radial particle transport across the limiter radius is thus inhibited and the global particle confinement is increased. The available data suggest that the residual H-mode particle transport is more poloidally symmetric.

  13. L-H power threshold studies in JET with Be/W and C wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, C. F.; Delabie, E.; Biewer, T. M.; Groth, M.; Hawkes, N. C.; Lehnen, M.; de la Luna, E.; McCormick, K.; Reux, C.; Rimini, F.; Solano, E. R.; Andrew, Y.; Bourdelle, C.; Bobkov, V.; Brix, M.; Calabro, G.; Czarnecka, A.; Flanagan, J.; Lerche, E.; Marsen, S.; Nunes, I.; Van Eester, D.; Stamp, M. F.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2014-02-01

    A comparison of the L-H power threshold (Pthr) in JET with all carbon, JET-C, and beryllium/tungsten wall (the ITER-like choice), JET-ILW, has been carried out in experiments with slow input power ramps and matched plasma shapes, divertor configuration and IP/BT pairs. The low density dependence of the L-H power threshold, namely an increase below a minimum density ne,min, which was first observed in JET with the MkII-GB divertor and C wall and subsequently not observed with the current MkII-HD geometry, is observed again with JET-ILW. At plasma densities above ne,min, Pthr is reduced by ˜30%, and by ˜40% when the radiation from the bulk plasma is subtracted (Psep), with JET-ILW compared to JET-C. At the L-H transition the electron temperature at the edge, where the pedestal later develops, is also lower with JET-ILW, for a given edge density. With JET-ILW the minimum density is found to increase roughly linearly with magnetic field, n_{e,min} \\sim B_{T}^{4/5} , while the power threshold at the minimum density scales as P_{sep,\\min} \\sim B_{T}^{5/2} . The H-mode power threshold in JET-ILW is found to be sensitive both to variations in main plasma shape (Psep decreases with increasing lower triangularity and increases with upper triangularity) and in divertor configuration. When the data are recast in terms of Psep and Zeff or subdivertor neutral pressure a linear correlation is found, pointing to a possible role of Zeff and/or subdivertor neutral pressure in the L-H transition physics. Depending on the chosen divertor configuration, Pthr can be up to a factor of two lower than the ITPA scaling law for densities above ne,min. A shallow edge radial electric field well is observed at the L-H transition. The edge impurity ion poloidal velocity remains low, close to its L-mode values, ⩽5 km s-1 ± 2-3 km s-1, at the L-H transition and throughout the H-mode phase, with no measureable increase within the experimental uncertainties. The edge toroidal rotation

  14. Edge-based image restoration.

    PubMed

    Rareş, Andrei; Reinders, Marcel J T; Biemond, Jan

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a new image inpainting algorithm that relies on explicit edge information. The edge information is used both for the reconstruction of a skeleton image structure in the missing areas, as well as for guiding the interpolation that follows. The structure reconstruction part exploits different properties of the edges, such as the colors of the objects they separate, an estimate of how well one edge continues into another one, and the spatial order of the edges with respect to each other. In order to preserve both sharp and smooth edges, the areas delimited by the recovered structure are interpolated independently, and the process is guided by the direction of the nearby edges. The novelty of our approach lies primarily in exploiting explicitly the constraint enforced by the numerical interpretation of the sequential order of edges, as well as in the pixel filling method which takes into account the proximity and direction of edges. Extensive experiments are carried out in order to validate and compare the algorithm both quantitatively and qualitatively. They show the advantages of our algorithm and its readily application to real world cases. PMID:16238052

  15. Edge conduction in vacuum glazing

    SciTech Connect

    Simko, T.M.; Collins, R.E.; Beck, F.A.; Arasteh, D.

    1995-03-01

    Vacuum glazing is a form of low-conductance double glazing using in internal vacuum between the two glass sheets to eliminate heat transport by gas conduction and convection. An array of small support pillars separates the sheets; fused solder glass forms the edge seal. Heat transfer through the glazing occurs by radiation across the vacuum gap, conduction through the support pillars, and conduction through the bonded edge seal. Edge conduction is problematic because it affects stresses in the edge region, leading to possible failure of the glazing; in addition, excessive heat transfer because of thermal bridging in the edge region can lower overall window thermal performance and decrease resistance to condensation. Infrared thermography was used to analyze the thermal performance of prototype vacuum glazings, and, for comparison, atmospheric pressure superwindows. Research focused on mitigating the edge effects of vacuum glazings through the use of insulating trim, recessed edges, and framing materials. Experimentally validated finite-element and finite-difference modeling tools were used for thermal analysis of prototype vacuum glazing units and complete windows. Experimental measurements of edge conduction using infrared imaging were found to be in good agreement with finite-element modeling results for a given set of conditions. Finite-element modeling validates an analytic model developed for edge conduction.

  16. Applications of KHZ-CW Lidar in Ecological Entomology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmqvist, Elin; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2016-06-01

    The benefits of kHz lidar in ecological entomology are explained. Results from kHz-measurements on insects, carried out with a CW-lidar system, employing the Scheimpflug principle to obtain range resolution, are presented. A method to extract insect events and analyze the large amount of lidar data is also described.

  17. NASA Airborne Lidar 1982-1984 Flights Data and Information

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-08-06

    NASA Airborne Lidar 1982-1984 Flights Data from the 1982 NASA Langley Airborne Lidar flights following the eruption of El Chichon ... continuing to January 1984. Transcribed from the following NASA Tech Reports: McCormick, M. P., and M. T. Osborn, Airborne lidar ...

  18. Lightweight Inexpensive Ozone Lidar Telescope Using a Plastic Fresnel Lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeYoung, Russell J.; Notari, Anthony; Carrion, William; Pliutau, Denis

    2014-01-01

    An inexpensive lightweight ozone lidar telescope was designed, constructed and operated during an ozone lidar field campaign. This report summarizes the design parameters and performance of the plastic Fresnel lens telescope and shows the ozone lidar performance compared to Zemax calculations.

  19. An Empirical Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Model with Temperature and Nozzle Aspect Ratio Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    An empirical model for jet-surface interaction (JSI) noise produced by a round jet near a flat plate is described and the resulting model evaluated. The model covers unheated and hot jet conditions (1 less than or equal to jet total temperature ratio less than or equal to 2.7) in the subsonic range (0.5 less than or equal to M(sub a) less than or equal to 0.9), surface lengths 0.6 less than or equal to (axial distance from jet exit to surface trailing edge (inches)/nozzle exit diameter) less than or equal to 10, and surface standoff distances (0 less than or equal to (radial distance from jet lipline to surface (inches)/axial distance from jet exit to surface trailing edge (inches)) less than or equal to 1) using only second-order polynomials to provide predictable behavior. The JSI noise model is combined with an existing jet mixing noise model to produce exhaust noise predictions. Fit quality metrics and comparisons to between the predicted and experimental data indicate that the model is suitable for many system level studies. A first-order correction to the JSI source model that accounts for the effect of nozzle aspect ratio is also explored. This correction is based on changes to the potential core length and frequency scaling associated with rectangular nozzles up to 8:1 aspect ratio. However, more work is needed to refine these findings into a formal model.

  20. Breakup of metal jets penetrating a volatile liquid. Final report, October 1, 1991--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.P.

    1995-07-01

    In a loss of coolant accident, the core may become uncovered, causing the fuel pins to melt. The molten fuel would pour onto the plenum and collect on the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head. The RPV internal structure includes one or more perforated plates in the lower plenum which would divide the molten fuel into small diameter streams or jets, which would break up as they penetrate the coolant in the lower plenum. The breakup of these jets would occur in two phases, each dominated by a distinct fragmentation mechanism. As a fuel jet first penetrates the coolant, a stagnation flow develops at its leading edge, causing the column to spread radially and eject molten fuel into the coolant. The jet fluid in the column is fragmented by pressure fluctuations due to the jet/ambient fluid relative motion, so that a steady jet is reduced to a field of falling drops below a critical depth called the breakup length. The present work includes analyses yielding simple correlations for jet breakup length and jet leading edge penetration.

  1. Efficient Open Source Lidar for Desktop Users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Jacob P.

    Lidar --- Light Detection and Ranging --- is a remote sensing technology that utilizes a device similar to a rangefinder to determine a distance to a target. A laser pulse is shot at an object and the time it takes for the pulse to return in measured. The distance to the object is easily calculated using the speed property of light. For lidar, this laser is moved (primarily in a rotational movement usually accompanied by a translational movement) and records the distances to objects several thousands of times per second. From this, a 3 dimensional structure can be procured in the form of a point cloud. A point cloud is a collection of 3 dimensional points with at least an x, a y and a z attribute. These 3 attributes represent the position of a single point in 3 dimensional space. Other attributes can be associated with the points that include properties such as the intensity of the return pulse, the color of the target or even the time the point was recorded. Another very useful, post processed attribute is point classification where a point is associated with the type of object the point represents (i.e. ground.). Lidar has gained popularity and advancements in the technology has made its collection easier and cheaper creating larger and denser datasets. The need to handle this data in a more efficiently manner has become a necessity; The processing, visualizing or even simply loading lidar can be computationally intensive due to its very large size. Standard remote sensing and geographical information systems (GIS) software (ENVI, ArcGIS, etc.) was not originally built for optimized point cloud processing and its implementation is an afterthought and therefore inefficient. Newer, more optimized software for point cloud processing (QTModeler, TopoDOT, etc.) usually lack more advanced processing tools, requires higher end computers and are very costly. Existing open source lidar approaches the loading and processing of lidar in an iterative fashion that requires

  2. The Facilitator's Edge: Group Sessions for Edge-ucators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handcock, Helen

    The Facilitator's Edge is a workshop series based on the life/work messages of The Edge magazine. The workshops are deigned to help educators, youth workers, and their career practitioners facilitate conscious career building. This manual consists of five group sessions, each focusing on a different career-building theme. "Megatrends and Making it…

  3. Atmospheric Turbulence Estimates from a Pulsed Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruis, Matthew J.; Delisi, Donald P.; Ahmad, Nash'at N.; Proctor, Fred H.

    2013-01-01

    Estimates of the eddy dissipation rate (EDR) were obtained from measurements made by a coherent pulsed lidar and compared with estimates from mesoscale model simulations and measurements from an in situ sonic anemometer at the Denver International Airport and with EDR estimates from the last observation time of the trailing vortex pair. The estimates of EDR from the lidar were obtained using two different methodologies. The two methodologies show consistent estimates of the vertical profiles. Comparison of EDR derived from the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) mesoscale model with the in situ lidar estimates show good agreement during the daytime convective boundary layer, but the WRF simulations tend to overestimate EDR during the nighttime. The EDR estimates from a sonic anemometer located at 7.3 meters above ground level are approximately one order of magnitude greater than both the WRF and lidar estimates - which are from greater heights - during the daytime convective boundary layer and substantially greater during the nighttime stable boundary layer. The consistency of the EDR estimates from different methods suggests a reasonable ability to predict the temporal evolution of a spatially averaged vertical profile of EDR in an airport terminal area using a mesoscale model during the daytime convective boundary layer. In the stable nighttime boundary layer, there may be added value to EDR estimates provided by in situ lidar measurements.

  4. Calibration Technique for Polarization-Sensitive Lidars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, J. M.; Vaughan, M. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hung, W. H.; Winker, D. M.

    2006-01-01

    Polarization-sensitive lidars have proven to be highly effective in discriminating between spherical and non-spherical particles in the atmosphere. These lidars use a linearly polarized laser and are equipped with a receiver that can separately measure the components of the return signal polarized parallel and perpendicular to the outgoing beam. In this work we describe a technique for calibrating polarization-sensitive lidars that was originally developed at NASA s Langley Research Center (LaRC) and has been used continually over the past fifteen years. The procedure uses a rotatable half-wave plate inserted into the optical path of the lidar receiver to introduce controlled amounts of polarization cross-talk into a sequence of atmospheric backscatter measurements. Solving the resulting system of nonlinear equations generates the system calibration constants (gain ratio, G, and offset angle, theta) required for deriving calibrated measurements of depolarization ratio from the lidar signals. In addition, this procedure also determines the mean depolarization ratio within the region of the atmosphere that is analyzed. Simulations and error propagation studies show the method to be both reliable and well behaved. Operational details of the technique are illustrated using measurements obtained as part of Langley Research Center s participation in the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE).

  5. Technique to separate lidar signal and sunlight.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenbo; Hu, Yongxiang; MacDonnell, David G; Weimer, Carl; Baize, Rosemary R

    2016-06-13

    Sunlight contamination dominates the backscatter noise in space-based lidar measurements during daytime. The background scattered sunlight is highly variable and dependent upon the surface and atmospheric albedo. The scattered sunlight contribution to noise increases over land and snow surfaces where surface albedos are high and thus overwhelm lidar backscatter from optically thin atmospheric constituents like aerosols and thin clouds. In this work, we developed a novel lidar remote sensing concept that potentially can eliminate sunlight induced noise. The new lidar concept requires: (1) a transmitted laser light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM); and (2) a photon sieve (PS) diffractive filter that separates scattered sunlight from laser light backscattered from the atmosphere, ocean and solid surfaces. The method is based on numerical modeling of the focusing of Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) laser beam and plane-wave light by a PS. The model results show that after passing through a PS, laser light that carries the OAM is focused on a ring (called "focal ring" here) on the focal plane of the PS filter, very little energy arrives at the center of the focal plane. However, scattered sunlight, as a plane wave without the OAM, focuses at the center of the focal plane and thus can be effectively blocked or ducted out. We also find that the radius of the "focal ring" increases with the increase of azimuthal mode (L) of LG laser light, thus increasing L can more effectively separate the lidar signal away from the sunlight noise. PMID:27410314

  6. Software Development for an Airborne Wind LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jishan; Li, Zhigang; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Zhishen

    2014-11-01

    Currently, Wind lidar offers an important way to obtain clear air wind field [1]. The principle of the wind lidar is based on the Doppler frequency shift in the air of the laser. The received signal of the lidar is scattered by the air molecular and particles [2]. They are Rayleigh scattering and Mie scattering. Coherent detection technique is an effective method to get the Doppler shift from the scattering in the air. From the Doppler shift we can get the radial wind speed. Generally, the horizontal wind field is that people concerned about. Based on the radial wind speed of more than 3 directions, we can use the VAD technique to retrieve the horizontal wind field. For an airborne lidar, some corrections such as the air plane posture, the air plane velocity must be performed. We developed a set of software for an airborne wind lidar using the MFC visual C++ Programming technology. Functions of the software are raw data decoding, radial wind speed inversion, horizontal wind field retrieve by VAD technique, air plane posture correction, air plane velocity correction, and so on. It also has functions for data display and saves. The results can be saved as picture or numerical values.

  7. Lidar measurements of refractive propagation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philbrick, C. R.; Blood, D. W.

    1995-02-01

    A multi-wavelength Raman lidar has been developed and used to measure the profiles of atmospheric properties in the troposphere under a wide range of geophysical conditions. The instrument measures the two physical properties which contribute to the refractive index at radio frequencies, water vapor concentration profiles from vibrational Raman measurements and neutral density determined from rotational Raman temperature profiles and surface pressure. The LAMP lidar instrument is transportable and has been used to make measurements at several locations in addition to our local Penn State University site, including shipboard measurements between Arctic and Antarctic and in the coastal environment at Point Mugu, CA. Lidar measurements of the atmospheric refractive environment, which are of particular interest, were made during 1993 at Point Mugu, CA, including the period of Project VOCAR (Variability of Coastal Atmospheric Refractivity). Both the lidar and balloon tropospheric measurements have been used for analyses of the propagation conditions by employing th Navy's RPO, IREPS and EREPS PC programs and comparisons have been made with the measured propagation conditions. On the short term (hour-to-hour throughout the day), the lidar derived profiles permit the examination of refractive layer stratification for guided-wave mode propagation.

  8. High-Fidelity Flash Lidar Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Glenn D.; Pierrottet, Diego F.; Amzajerdian, Farzin

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technologies (ALHAT) project is currently developing the critical technologies to safely and precisely navigate and land crew, cargo and robotic spacecraft vehicles on and around planetary bodies. One key element of this project is a high-fidelity Flash Lidar sensor that can generate three-dimensional (3-D) images of the planetary surface. These images are processed with hazard detection and avoidance and hazard relative navigation algorithms, and then are subsequently used by the Guidance, Navigation and Control subsystem to generate an optimal navigation solution. A complex, high-fidelity model of the Flash Lidar was developed in order to evaluate the performance of the sensor and its interaction with the interfacing ALHAT components on vehicles with different configurations and under different flight trajectories. The model contains a parameterized, general approach to Flash Lidar detection and reflects physical attributes such as range and electronic noise sources, and laser pulse temporal and spatial profiles. It also provides the realistic interaction of the laser pulse with terrain features that include varying albedo, boulders, craters slopes and shadows. This paper gives a description of the Flash Lidar model and presents results from the Lidar operating under different scenarios.

  9. High-fidelity flash lidar model development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, Glenn D.; Pierrottet, Diego F.; Amzajerdian, Farzin

    2014-06-01

    NASA's Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technologies (ALHAT) project is currently developing the critical technologies to safely and precisely navigate and land crew, cargo and robotic spacecraft vehicles on and around planetary bodies. One key element of this project is a high-fidelity Flash Lidar sensor that can generate three-dimensional (3-D) images of the planetary surface. These images are processed with hazard detection and avoidance and hazard relative navigation algorithms, and then are subsequently used by the Guidance, Navigation and Control subsystem to generate an optimal navigation solution. A complex, high-fidelity model of the Flash Lidar was developed in order to evaluate the performance of the sensor and its interaction with the interfacing ALHAT components on vehicles with different configurations and under different flight trajectories. The model contains a parameterized, general approach to Flash Lidar detection and reflects physical attributes such as range and electronic noise sources, and laser pulse temporal and spatial profiles. It also provides the realistic interaction of the laser pulse with terrain features that include varying albedo, boulders, craters slopes and shadows. This paper gives a description of the Flash Lidar model and presents results from the Lidar operating under different scenarios.

  10. A PIV Study of Slotted Air Injection for Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    Results from acoustic and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements are presented for single and dual-stream jets with fluidic injection on the core stream. The fluidic injection nozzles delivered air to the jet through slots on the interior of the nozzle at the nozzle trailing edge. The investigations include subsonic and supersonic jet conditions. Reductions in broadband shock noise and low frequency mixing noise were obtained with the introduction of fluidic injection on single stream jets. Fluidic injection was found to eliminate shock cells, increase jet mixing, and reduce turbulent kinetic energy levels near the end of the potential core. For dual-stream subsonic jets, the introduction of fluidic injection reduced low frequency noise in the peak jet noise direction and enhanced jet mixing. For dual-stream jets with supersonic fan streams and subsonic core streams, the introduction of fluidic injection in the core stream impacted the jet shock cell structure but had little effect on mixing between the core and fan streams.

  11. Control of shock-wave boundary layer interaction using steady micro-jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, S. B.; Manisankar, C.; Akshara, P.

    2015-09-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to control the amplitude of shock unsteadiness associated with the interaction induced by a cylindrical protuberance on a flat plate in a Mach 2.18 flow. The control was applied in the form of an array of steady micro air-jets of different configurations with variation in pitch and skew angle of the jets. The effect of air-jet supply pressure on control was also studied. Each of the micro-jet configurations was placed 20 boundary layer thicknesses upstream of the leading edge of the cylinder. The overall interaction is seen to get modified for all control configurations and shows a reduction in both separation- and bow-shock strengths and in triple-point height. A significant reduction in the peak rms value is also observed in the intermittent region of separation for each case. For pitched jets placed in a zig-zag configuration, good control effectiveness is achieved at control pressures similar to the stagnation pressure of the freestream. At higher control pressures, however, their obstruction component increases and if these jets are not spaced sufficiently far apart, the effectiveness of their control begins to drop due to the beginning of spanwise jet-to-jet interaction. On the other hand, pitching or skewing the jets to reduces the obstruction component considerably which at lower control pressures shows lower effectiveness. But at higher control pressure, the effectiveness of these configurations continues to increase unlike the pitched jets.

  12. 3D graph segmentation for target detection in FOPEN LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorter, Nicholas; Locke, Judson; Smith, O'Neil; Keating, Emma; Smith, Philip

    2013-05-01

    A novel use of Felzenszwalb's graph based efficient image segmentation algorithm* is proposed for segmenting 3D volumetric foliage penetrating (FOPEN) Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for automated target detection. The authors propose using an approximate nearest neighbors algorithm to establish neighbors of points in 3D and thus form the graph for segmentation. Following graph formation, the angular difference in the points' estimated normal vectors is proposed for the graph edge weights. Then the LiDAR data is segmented, in 3D, and metrics are calculated from the segments to determine their geometrical characteristics and thus likelihood of being a target. Finally, the bare earth within the scene is automatically identified to avoid confusion of flat bare earth with flat targets. The segmentation, the calculated metrics, and the bare earth all culminate in a target detection system deployed for FOPEN LiDAR. General purpose graphics processing units (GPGPUs) are leveraged to reduce processing times for the approximate nearest neighbors and point normal estimation algorithms such that the application can be run in near real time. Results are presented on several data sets.

  13. a Global Solution to Topological Reconstruction of Building Roof Models from Airborne LIDAR Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jixing; Jiang, Wanshou; Shan, Jie

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a global solution to building roof topological reconstruction from LiDAR point clouds. Starting with segmented roof planes from building LiDAR points, a BSP (binary space partitioning) algorithm is used to partition the bounding box of the building into volumetric cells, whose geometric features and their topology are simultaneously determined. To resolve the inside/outside labelling problem of cells, a global energy function considering surface visibility and spatial regularization between adjacent cells is constructed and minimized via graph cuts. As a result, the cells are labelled as either inside or outside, where the planar surfaces between the inside and outside form the reconstructed building model. Two LiDAR data sets of Yangjiang (China) and Wuhan University (China) are used in the study. Experimental results show that the completeness of reconstructed roof planes is 87.5%. Comparing with existing data-driven approaches, the proposed approach is global. Roof faces and edges as well as their topology can be determined at one time via minimization of an energy function. Besides, this approach is robust to partial absence of roof planes and tends to reconstruct roof models with visibility-consistent surfaces.

  14. An Efficient Method for Automatic Road Extraction Based on Multiple Features from LiDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Hu, X.; Guan, H.; Liu, P.

    2016-06-01

    The road extraction in urban areas is difficult task due to the complicated patterns and many contextual objects. LiDAR data directly provides three dimensional (3D) points with less occlusions and smaller shadows. The elevation information and surface roughness are distinguishing features to separate roads. However, LiDAR data has some disadvantages are not beneficial to object extraction, such as the irregular distribution of point clouds and lack of clear edges of roads. For these problems, this paper proposes an automatic road centerlines extraction method which has three major steps: (1) road center point detection based on multiple feature spatial clustering for separating road points from ground points, (2) local principal component analysis with least squares fitting for extracting the primitives of road centerlines, and (3) hierarchical grouping for connecting primitives into complete roads network. Compared with MTH (consist of Mean shift algorithm, Tensor voting, and Hough transform) proposed in our previous article, this method greatly reduced the computational cost. To evaluate the proposed method, the Vaihingen data set, a benchmark testing data provided by ISPRS for "Urban Classification and 3D Building Reconstruction" project, was selected. The experimental results show that our method achieve the same performance by less time in road extraction using LiDAR data.

  15. A COMPRESSED SENSING METHOD WITH ANALYTICAL RESULTS FOR LIDAR FEATURE CLASSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Josef D

    2011-01-01

    We present an innovative way to autonomously classify LiDAR points into bare earth, building, vegetation, and other categories. One desirable product of LiDAR data is the automatic classification of the points in the scene. Our algorithm automatically classifies scene points using Compressed Sensing Methods via Orthogonal Matching Pursuit algorithms utilizing a generalized K-Means clustering algorithm to extract buildings and foliage from a Digital Surface Models (DSM). This technology reduces manual editing while being cost effective for large scale automated global scene modeling. Quantitative analyses are provided using Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curves to show Probability of Detection and False Alarm of buildings vs. vegetation classification. Histograms are shown with sample size metrics. Our inpainting algorithms then fill the voids where buildings and vegetation were removed, utilizing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques and Partial Differential Equations (PDE) to create an accurate Digital Terrain Model (DTM) [6]. Inpainting preserves building height contour consistency and edge sharpness of identified inpainted regions. Qualitative results illustrate other benefits such as Terrain Inpainting s unique ability to minimize or eliminate undesirable terrain data artifacts. Keywords: Compressed Sensing, Sparsity, Data Dictionary, LiDAR, ROC, K-Means, Clustering, K-SVD, Orthogonal Matching Pursuit

  16. Giant edge state splitting at atomically precise graphene zigzag edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiyong; Talirz, Leopold; Pignedoli, Carlo A.; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Fasel, Roman; Ruffieux, Pascal

    2016-05-01

    Zigzag edges of graphene nanostructures host localized electronic states that are predicted to be spin-polarized. However, these edge states are highly susceptible to edge roughness and interaction with a supporting substrate, complicating the study of their intrinsic electronic and magnetic structure. Here, we focus on atomically precise graphene nanoribbons whose two short zigzag edges host exactly one localized electron each. Using the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope, the graphene nanoribbons are transferred from the metallic growth substrate onto insulating islands of NaCl in order to decouple their electronic structure from the metal. The absence of charge transfer and hybridization with the substrate is confirmed by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy, which reveals a pair of occupied/unoccupied edge states. Their large energy splitting of 1.9 eV is in accordance with ab initio many-body perturbation theory calculations and reflects the dominant role of electron-electron interactions in these localized states.

  17. Edge-edge interactions in stacked graphene nanoplatelets

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz Silva, Eduardo; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio; Jia, Xiaoting; Sumpter, Bobby G; Dresselhaus, M; Meunier, V.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies show the dynamics of small graphene platelets on larger graphene layers. The platelets move nearly freely to eventually lock in at well-defined positions close to the edges of the larger underlying graphene sheet. While such movement is driven by a shallow potential energy surface described by an interplane interaction, the lock-in position occurs by via edge-edge interactions of the platelet and the graphene surface located underneath. Here we quantitatively study this behavior using van der Waals density functional calculations. Local interactions at the open edges are found to dictate stacking configurations that are different from Bernal (AB) stacking. These stacking configurations are known to be otherwise absent in edge-free two-dimensional (2D) graphene. The results explain the experimentally observed platelet dynamics and provide a detailed account of the new electronic properties of these combined systems.

  18. Giant edge state splitting at atomically precise graphene zigzag edges

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiyong; Talirz, Leopold; Pignedoli, Carlo A.; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Fasel, Roman; Ruffieux, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Zigzag edges of graphene nanostructures host localized electronic states that are predicted to be spin-polarized. However, these edge states are highly susceptible to edge roughness and interaction with a supporting substrate, complicating the study of their intrinsic electronic and magnetic structure. Here, we focus on atomically precise graphene nanoribbons whose two short zigzag edges host exactly one localized electron each. Using the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope, the graphene nanoribbons are transferred from the metallic growth substrate onto insulating islands of NaCl in order to decouple their electronic structure from the metal. The absence of charge transfer and hybridization with the substrate is confirmed by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy, which reveals a pair of occupied/unoccupied edge states. Their large energy splitting of 1.9 eV is in accordance with ab initio many-body perturbation theory calculations and reflects the dominant role of electron–electron interactions in these localized states. PMID:27181701

  19. Giant edge state splitting at atomically precise graphene zigzag edges.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiyong; Talirz, Leopold; Pignedoli, Carlo A; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Fasel, Roman; Ruffieux, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Zigzag edges of graphene nanostructures host localized electronic states that are predicted to be spin-polarized. However, these edge states are highly susceptible to edge roughness and interaction with a supporting substrate, complicating the study of their intrinsic electronic and magnetic structure. Here, we focus on atomically precise graphene nanoribbons whose two short zigzag edges host exactly one localized electron each. Using the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope, the graphene nanoribbons are transferred from the metallic growth substrate onto insulating islands of NaCl in order to decouple their electronic structure from the metal. The absence of charge transfer and hybridization with the substrate is confirmed by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy, which reveals a pair of occupied/unoccupied edge states. Their large energy splitting of 1.9 eV is in accordance with ab initio many-body perturbation theory calculations and reflects the dominant role of electron-electron interactions in these localized states. PMID:27181701

  20. Experimental and analytical studies of shielding concepts for point sources and jet noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, R. L. M.

    1983-05-01

    Concepts for jet noise shielding were explored. Model experiments center on solid planar shields, simulating engine-over-wing installations and sugar scoop shields. Tradeoff on effective shielding length is set by interference "edge noise' as the shield trailing edge approaches the spreading jet. In general, shielding attentuation increases steadily with frequency, following low frequency enhancement by edge noise. Although broadband attenuation is typically only several decibels, the reduction of the subjectively weighted perceived noise levels is higher. Calculated ground contours of peak PN dB (perceived noise level) show a substantial contraction due to shielding: this reaches 66% for one of the sugar scoop shields for the 90 PN dB contour. The experiments are complemented by analytical predictions. They are divided into an engineering scheme for jet noise shielding and more rigorous analysis for point source shielding.

  1. Resonant Interaction of a Rectangular Jet with a Flat-Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Fagan, A. F.; Clem, M. M.; Brown, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    A resonant interaction between a large aspect ratio rectangular jet and a flat-plate is addressed in this experimental study. The plate is placed parallel to but away from the direct path of the jet. At high subsonic conditions and for certain relative locations of the plate, the resonance accompanied by an audible tone is encountered. The trends of the tone frequency variation exhibit some similarities to, but also marked differences from, corresponding trends of the well-known edge-tone phenomenon. Under the resonant condition flow visualization indicates a periodic flapping motion of the jet column. Phase-averaged Mach number data obtained near the plate's trailing edge illustrate that the jet cross-section goes through large contortions within the period of the tone. Farther downstream a clear 'axis switching' takes place. These results suggest that the assumption of two-dimensionality should be viewed with caution in any analysis of the flow.

  2. The High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eloranta, E. W.; Roesler, F. L.; Sroga, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    The High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) system was developed for the remote measurement of atmospheric optical properties. Measurements are obtained by the separation of the backscattered signal into aerosol and molecular channels using a high spectral resolution Fabry-Perot optical interferometer to separate the aerosol contributions to backscatter near the laser wavelength from the Doppler-shifted molecular component of the backscatter. The transmitter consists of an optically pumped pulsed dye laser of the oscillator-amplifier design which emits at 467.88 nm, with a bandwidth of less than 0.3 pm. The transmitter and receiver share a common Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, although they do not share the same field stop, but rather two conjugate stops. The HSRL system uses a computer-controlled dual-channel photon-counting data acquisition system providing for stable measurements at very low power levels and an excellent dynamic range. The system has been used to obtain airborne measurements of height profiles of aerosol and molecular backscatter cross sections.

  3. Pulsed Doppler lidar airborne scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimarzio, C. A.; Mcvicker, D. B.; Morrow, C. E.; Negus, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    This report covers the work accomplished during the reporting period on Pulsed Doppler Lidar Airborne Scanner and describes plans for the next reporting period. The objectives during the current phase of the contract are divided into four phases. Phase 1 includes ground testing of the system and analysis of data from the 1981 Severe Storms Test Flights. Phase 2 consists of preflight preparation and planning for the 1983 flight series. The flight test itself will be performed during Phase 3, and Phase 4 consists of post-flight analysis and operation of the system after that flight test. The range profile from five samples taken during Flight 10, around 1700 Z is given. The lowest curve is taken from data collected upwind of Mt. Shasta at about 10,000 feet of altitude, in a clear atmosphere, where no signals were observed. It thus is a good representation of the noise level as a function of range. The next curve was taken downwind of the mountain, and shows evidence of atmospheric returns. There is some question as to whether the data are valid at all ranges, or some ranges are contaminated by the others.

  4. Pulsed Doppler lidar airborne scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimarzio, C. A.; McVicker, D. B.; Morrow, C. E.; Negus, C. C.

    1985-10-01

    This report covers the work accomplished during the reporting period on Pulsed Doppler Lidar Airborne Scanner and describes plans for the next reporting period. The objectives during the current phase of the contract are divided into four phases. Phase 1 includes ground testing of the system and analysis of data from the 1981 Severe Storms Test Flights. Phase 2 consists of preflight preparation and planning for the 1983 flight series. The flight test itself will be performed during Phase 3, and Phase 4 consists of post-flight analysis and operation of the system after that flight test. The range profile from five samples taken during Flight 10, around 1700 Z is given. The lowest curve is taken from data collected upwind of Mt. Shasta at about 10,000 feet of altitude, in a clear atmosphere, where no signals were observed. It thus is a good representation of the noise level as a function of range. The next curve was taken downwind of the mountain, and shows evidence of atmospheric returns. There is some question as to whether the data are valid at all ranges, or some ranges are contaminated by the others.

  5. Dugway test grid lidar project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D. W.; Leonard, D. A.

    1985-05-01

    The primary objective of this project is to design and build a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system to support field tests involving chemical releases at Dugway Proving Grounds. The design goals are to create a system capable of + or - 10% accuracy measurements of agent or simulant concentrations of 0.1 to 500 mg/sub m. The desired spatial resolution is 2 m (radial, with respect to the chemical release point) and 20 m (azimuthal) with simultaneous temporal resolution of 10 sec or less over the entire plume. In addition, system performance should not be degraded significantly by the presence of dust, munitions by-products, obscurants, and other interferents. The current conceptual design calls for a pair of 100 pulse/sec, 100 mJ/pulse CO2 lasers with computer-controlled frequency agility and scanning capability. The receiving optics have not been precisely specified, but will likely be 30 to 40 cm in diameter. Direct detection and digitization of the returned waveforms at 12-bit accuracy or better is also planned. Soft targets (wire screen in an open frame) are being considered for the test grid.

  6. Cleanup of a jet fuel spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesko, Steve

    1996-11-01

    Eaton operates a corporate aircraft hanger facility in Battle Creek, Michigan. Tests showed that two underground storage tanks leaked. Investigation confirmed this release discharged several hundred gallons of Jet A kerosene into the soil and groundwater. The oil moved downward approximately 30 feet and spread laterally onto the water table. Test results showed kerosene in the adsorbed, free and dissolved states. Eaton researched and investigated three clean-up options. They included pump and treat, dig and haul and bioremediation. Jet fuel is composed of readily biodegradable hydrocarbon chains. This fact coupled with the depth to groundwater and geologic setting made bioremediation the low cost and most effective alternative. A recovery well was installed at the leading edge of the dissolved contamination. A pump moved water from this well into a nutrient addition system. Nutrients added included nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium. Additionally, air was sparged into the water. The water was discharged into an infiltration gallery installed when the underground storage tanks were removed. Water circulated between the pump and the infiltration basin in a closed loop fashion. This oxygenated, nutrient rich water actively and aggressively treated the soils between the bottom of the gallery and the top of the groundwater and the groundwater. The system began operating in August of 1993 and reduced jet fuel to below detection levels. In August of 1995 The State of Michigan issued a clean closure declaration to the site.

  7. Validation of Long Range Wind Lidar for Atmospheric Dynamics Studies during inter comparison campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boquet, M.; Cariou, J. P.; Lolli, S.; Sauvage, L.; Parmentier, R.

    2009-09-01

    2009, LEOSPHERE deployed a WLS70 prototype unit at the Howard University Research Campus in Beltsville, Maryland, for the Water Vapor Validation Experiments (WAVES) from the initiative of the NOAA. The presence of numerous wind profilers, lidars and radio soundings was a perfect opportunity to test and improve this new compact and autonomous long range wind Lidar. The WLS70 showed Low Level Jet phenomena which have strong impact on air quality. During these intensive inter comparison campaigns the WLS70 Wind Lidar was validated against Lidars, Radars, Sodars and anemometers. The results show mostly a very good agreement between the instruments. Moreover, the measurements put in evidence both horizontal and vertical wind speed and wind direction vertical profiles and atmosphere structure (PBL height , clouds base) derived from Lidar data with good time resolution (10s/profile), good range resolution (50m from 100m to 2000m), and good velocity resolution (0.2m/s). Enhanced measurement range is now expected through new optical device.

  8. Validation campaigns of a coherent Doppler Wind Lidar for PBL Continuous Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvage, Laurent; Cariou, Jean-Pierre; Boquet, Matthieu; Parmentier, Remy

    2010-05-01

    2009, LEOSPHERE deployed a WLS70 prototype unit at the Howard University Research Campus in Beltsville, Maryland, for the Water Vapor Validation Experiments (WAVES) from the initiative of the NOAA. The presence of numerous wind profilers, lidars and radio soundings was a perfect opportunity to test and improve this new compact and autonomous long range wind Lidar. The WLS70 showed Low Level Jet phenomena which have strong impact on air quality. In July 2009, the WLS70 took its definitive configuration with a new optical device installed on it allowing enhanced measurement range. New measurements were done at PNNL in Richland, Washington, and NASA Langley in Hampton, Virginia. These results are now processed and will bring a further proof on reliability and accuracy. During these intensive inter comparison campaigns the WLS70 Wind Lidar was validated against Lidars, Radars, Sodars and anemometers. The results show mostly a very good agreement between the instruments. Moreover, the measurements put in evidence both horizontal and vertical wind speed and wind direction vertical profiles and atmosphere structure (PBL height , clouds base) derived from Lidar data with good time resolution (10s/profile), good range resolution (50m from 100m to 2000m), and good velocity accuracy.

  9. Comparison of Edge and Internal Transport Barriers in Drift Wave Predictive Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, J.; Crombe, K.; Mantica, P.; Naulin, V.; Tala, T.

    2011-10-03

    We have simulated the formation of an internal transport barrier on JET including a self-consistent treatment of ion and electron temperatures and poloidal and toroidal momentum.Similar simulations of edge transport barriers, including the L-H transition have also been made. However, here only poloidal momentum and the temperatures were simulated. The internal barrier included an anomalous spinup of poloidal momentum similar to that in the experiment. Also the edge barrier was accompanied by a spinup of poloidal momentum. The experimental density (with no barrier) was used and kept fixed for the internal barrier. For the edge barrier the edge density was varied and it turned out that a lower edge density gave a stronger barrier. Electromagnetic and nonlocal effects were important for both types of barriers.

  10. Spectroscopic behavior in whispering-gallery modes by edge formation of printed microdisk lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cong; Li, Jifeng; Ryu, Soichiro; Yoshioka, Hiroaki; Ozawa, Masaaki; Oki, Yuji

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic and rapid spectral shifts of whispering-gallery mode (WGM) from microdisk laser were studied. The microdisks with diameter about 100 μm were fabricated by ink-jet printing of Rhodamine 590 doped polymer. Sharper edge microdisk and rounder edge microdisk were pumped with Q-switched Nd:YAG laser(@532 nm). A spectral shift -3.77×10-3 nm/(μJ·mm-2) was occurred in the case of the rounder edge microdisk, which is smaller than the spectral shift -4.21×10-3 nm/(μJ·mm-2) in the case of the sharper edge microdisk. Expecting the anomalous dispersion and Rhodamine 590 degradation affect, under the same excitation condition, the WGM spatial modification can also led to the shifts. And the modification was caused by interaction between the sharpened-edge and the increased optical gain.

  11. Edge-on View of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    TOP - This is a NASA Hubble Space Telescope snapshot of Saturn with its rings barely visible. Normally, astronomers see Saturn with its rings tilted. Earth was almost in the plane of Saturn's rings, thus the rings appear edge-on.

    In this view, Saturn's largest moon, Titan, is casting a shadow on Saturn. Titan's atmosphere is a dark brown haze. The other moons appear white because of their bright, icy surfaces. Four moons - from left to right, Mimas, Tethys, Janus, and Enceladus - are clustered around the edge of Saturn's rings on the right. Two other moons appear in front of the ring plane. Prometheus is on the right edge; Pandora, on the left. The rings also are casting a shadow on Saturn because the Sun was above the ring plane.

    BOTTOM - This photograph shows Saturn with its rings slightly tilted. The moon called Dione, on the lower right, is casting a long, thin shadow across the whole ring system due to the setting Sun on the ring plane. The moon on the upper left of Saturn is Tethys.

    Astronomers also are studying the unusual appearance of Saturn's rings. The bottom image displays a faint, narrow ring, the F-ring just outside the main ring, which normally is invisible from Earth. Close to the edge of Saturn's disk, the front section of rings seem brighter and more yellow than the back due to the additional lumination by yellowish Saturn.

    The color images were assembled from separate exposures taken August 6 (top) and November 17 (bottom), 1995 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science.

    This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space Telescope Science Institute home page at URL http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/

  12. The EDGE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Stephan S.; Cheng, Edward S.; Cottingham, David A.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Knox, Lloyd; Silverberg, Robert F.; Timbie, Peter T.; Wilson, Grant

    2003-02-01

    EDGE is a Long Duration Balloon (LDB) borne instrument designed to measure the large-scale anisotropy of the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB). The goal is to use this signal as a new observational tool to measure the character of the spatial distribution of galaxies at the largest spatial scales. With a 6\\arcmin\\ beam mapping more than 400 square degrees of sky at 8 frequency bands between 250GHz and 1.5 THz the experiment can determine the variation of galaxy density on spatial scales ranging from >200h-1 Mpc, where dark matter variations are determined directly from Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) anisotropy, to <5h-1 Mpc where the distribution of dark matter and galaxies is determined from galaxy redshift surveys and the underlying dynamics of structure growth is non-linear. The instrument consists of a 1-meter class off-axis telescope and a Frequency Selective Bolometer (FSB) array radiometer. The FSB design provides the compact, multi-chromatic, high sensitivity focal plane needed for this measurement.

  13. Processing and evaluation of riverine waveforms acquired by an experimental bathymetric LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzel, P. J.; Legleiter, C. J.; Nelson, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate mapping of fluvial environments with airborne bathymetric LiDAR is challenged not only by environmental characteristics but also the development and application of software routines to post-process the recorded laser waveforms. During a bathymetric LiDAR survey, the transmission of the green-wavelength laser pulses through the water column is influenced by a number of factors including turbidity, the presence of organic material, and the reflectivity of the streambed. For backscattered laser pulses returned from the river bottom and digitized by the LiDAR detector, post-processing software is needed to interpret and identify distinct inflections in the reflected waveform. Relevant features of this energy signal include the air-water interface, volume reflection from the water column itself, and, ideally, a strong return from the bottom. We discuss our efforts to acquire, analyze, and interpret riverine surveys using the USGS Experimental Advanced Airborne Research LiDAR (EAARL) in a variety of fluvial environments. Initial processing of data collected in the Trinity River, California, using the EAARL Airborne Lidar Processing Software (ALPS) highlighted the difficulty of retrieving a distinct bottom signal in deep pools. Examination of laser waveforms from these pools indicated that weak bottom reflections were often neglected by a trailing edge algorithm used by ALPS to process shallow riverine waveforms. For the Trinity waveforms, this algorithm had a tendency to identify earlier inflections as the bottom, resulting in a shallow bias. Similarly, an EAARL survey along the upper Colorado River, Colorado, also revealed the inadequacy of the trailing edge algorithm for detecting weak bottom reflections. We developed an alternative waveform processing routine by exporting digitized laser waveforms from ALPS, computing the local extrema, and fitting Gaussian curves to the convolved backscatter. Our field data indicate that these techniques improved the

  14. Lidar uncertainty and beam averaging correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giyanani, A.; Bierbooms, W.; van Bussel, G.

    2015-05-01

    Remote sensing of the atmospheric variables with the use of Lidar is a relatively new technology field for wind resource assessment in wind energy. A review of the draft version of an international guideline (CD IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.2) used for wind energy purposes is performed and some extra atmospheric variables are taken into account for proper representation of the site. A measurement campaign with two Leosphere vertical scanning WindCube Lidars and metmast measurements is used for comparison of the uncertainty in wind speed measurements using the CD IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.2. The comparison revealed higher but realistic uncertainties. A simple model for Lidar beam averaging correction is demonstrated for understanding deviation in the measurements. It can be further applied for beam averaging uncertainty calculations in flat and complex terrain.

  15. Raman lidar/AERI PBL Height Product

    DOE Data Explorer

    Ferrare, Richard

    2012-12-14

    Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) heights have been computed using potential temperature profiles derived from Raman lidar and AERI measurements. Raman lidar measurements of the rotational Raman scattering from nitrogen and oxygen are used to derive vertical profiles of potential temperature. AERI measurements of downwelling radiance are used in a physical retrieval approach (Smith et al. 1999, Feltz et al. 1998) to derive profiles of temperature and water vapor. The Raman lidar and AERI potential temperature profiles are merged to create a single potential temperature profile for computing PBL heights. PBL heights were derived from these merged potential temperature profiles using a modified Heffter (1980) technique that was tailored to the SGP site (Della Monache et al., 2004). PBL heights were computed on an hourly basis for the period January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2011. These heights are provided as meters above ground level.

  16. Lidar windshear detection for commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Targ, Russell; Bowles, Roland L.

    1991-01-01

    As part of the NASA/FAA National Integrated Windshear Program, a measurable windshear hazard index that can be remotely sensed from an aircraft is presented. This will provide a pilot information about the wind conditions he will experience at some later time if he continues along the present flight path. The technology analysis and end-to-end performance simulation, which measured S/N and resulting wind velocity errors for competing lidar systems, demonstrated that a Ho:YAG lidar at a wavelength of 2.1 microns and a CO2 lidar at 10.6 microns can give the pilot data about the line-of-sight component of a windshear threat in an area extending from his present position to two to four km in front of the aircraft.

  17. Eye-safe visible wavelength lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooley, T. W.; Reagan, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Recent technological advances on several fronts offer the possibility for relatively low-cost, eye-safe visible-wavelength lidar systems for autonomous aerosol/environmental monitoring applications. Improved silicon photodiodes and avalanche photodiodes that have become available offer high-quantum-efficiency detection at very low dark counts (10 to 1000 count/s) and can be used in a photon counting mode for signal plus background and dark current photoelectron count rates of megahertz. The essential requirements and features of a possible lidar system that capitalizes on technical advances on several fronts are outlined. A baseline lidar system is suggested for monitoring tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols. Sensitivity to wavelength, background radiation, detector characteristics, and other system parameters is discussed for several simulated data sets.

  18. Rock Segmentation through Edge Regrouping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burl, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Rockster is an algorithm that automatically identifies the locations and boundaries of rocks imaged by the rover hazard cameras (hazcams), navigation cameras (navcams), or panoramic cameras (pancams). The software uses edge detection and edge regrouping to identify closed contours that separate the rocks from the background.

  19. Liquid jet impingement normal to a disk in zero gravity. Ph.D. Thesis - Toledo Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labus, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation was conducted to determine the free surface shapes of circular liquid jets impinging normal to sharp-edged disks under both normal and zero gravity conditions. An order of magnitude analysis was conducted indicating regions where viscous forces were not significant when computing free surface shapes. The demarcation between the viscous and inviscid region was found to depend upon the flow Reynolds number and the ratio between the jet and disk radius.

  20. An experimental investigation of delta wing vortex flow with and without external jet blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanski, Kenneth P.; Ng, T. Terry; Nelson, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    A visual and quantitative study of the vortex flow field over a 70-deg delta wing with an external jet blowing parallel to and at the leading edge was conducted. In the experiment, the vortex core was visually marked with TiCl4, and LDA was used to measure the velocity parallel and normal to the wing surface. It is found that jet blowing moved vortex breakdown farther downstream from its natural position and influenced the breakdown characteristics.

  1. Impulsively started incompressible turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Witze, P O

    1980-10-01

    Hot-film anemometer measurements are presented for the centerline velocity of a suddenly started jet of air. The tip penetration of the jet is shown to be proportional to the square-root of time. A theoretical model is developed that assumes the transient jet can be characterized as a spherical vortex interacting with a steady-state jet. The model demonstrates that the ratio of nozzle radius to jet velocity defines a time constant that uniquely characterizes the behavior and similarity of impulsively started incompressible turbulent jets.

  2. A portable lidar using a diode-pumped YAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeuchi, N.; Okumura, H.; Sugita, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Yamaguchi, S.

    1992-01-01

    A Mie lidar system is technically established and is used for monitoring air pollution, stratospheric and boundary layer aerosol distribution, plume dispersion, visibility, and the study of atmospheric structure and cloud physics. However, a lidar system is not widely used because of its cumbersome handling and unwieldy portability. Although the author developed a laser diode lidar system based on RM-CW technique, it has a limit of measurement distance. Here we report the development of an all solid Mie lidar system using a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser and a Si-APD detector. This was constructed as a prototype of a handy lidar system.

  3. Orbital and cloud cover sampling analyses for space lidar missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, G. F.; Robbins, J. L.; Gibson, G. G.

    1985-01-01

    The sampling capabilities of an orbital lidar mission are evaluated. Spatial and temporal sampling data from a lidar spacecraft orbit simulation are combined with global, statistical cloud cover data to yield a quantification of lidar measurement opportunities for both partly cloudy and mostly overcast viewing conditions. The optimum launch time (month and local hour) is determined to maximize lidar measurement opportunities for specified cloud cover conditions. Results indicate that the time of year selected for the lidar mission is very important in maximizing acceptable data return, whereas the effect of launch time of day on mission optimization is generally not as strong as the seasonal effect.

  4. Transmittance ratio constrained retrieval technique for lidar cirrus measurements.

    PubMed

    Su, Jia; McCormick, M Patrick; Liu, Zhaoyan; Lee, Robert B; Leavor, Kevin R; Lei, Liqiao

    2012-05-01

    This letter describes a lidar retrieval technique that uses the transmittance ratio as a constraint to determine an average lidar ratio as well as extinction and backscatter coefficients of transparent cirrus clouds. The cloud transmittance ratio is directly obtained from two adjacent elastic lidar backscatter signals. The technique can be applied to cirrus measurements where neither the molecular scattering dominant signals above and below the cloud layer are found nor cloudfree reference profiles are available. The technique has been tested with simulated lidar signals and applied to backscatter lidar measurements at Hampton University, Hampton, Virginia. PMID:22555749

  5. Ram-jet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cervenko, A. J.; Friedman, R.

    1956-01-01

    The ram jet is basically one of the most dimple types of aircraft engine. It consists only of an inlet diffuser, a combustion system, and an exit nozzle. A typical ram-jet configuration is shown in figure 128. The engine operates on the Brayton cycle, and ideal cycle efficiency depends only on the ratio of engine to ambient pressure. The increased, engine pressures are obtained by ram action alone, and for this reason the ram jet has zero thrust at zero speed. Therefore, ram-jet-powered aircraft must be boosted to flight speeds close to a Mach number of 1.0 before appreciable thrust is generated by the engine. Since pressure increases are obtained by ram action alone, combustor-inlet pressures and temperatures are controlled by the flight speed, the ambient atmospheric condition, and by the efficiency of the inlet diffuser. These pressures and temperatures, as functions of flight speed and altitude, are shown in figure 129 for the NACA standard atmosphere and for practical values of diffuser efficiency. It can be seen that very wide ranges of combustor-inlet temperatures and pressures may be encountered over the ranges of flight velocity and altitude at which ram jets may be operated. Combustor-inlet temperatures from 500 degrees to 1500 degrees R and inlet pressures from 5 to 100 pounds per square inch absolute represent the approximate ranges of interest in current combustor development work. Since the ram jet has no moving parts in the combustor outlet, higher exhaust-gas temperatures than those used in current turbojets are permissible. Therefore, fuel-air ratios equivalent to maximum rates of air specific impulse or heat release can be used, and, for hydrocarbon fuels, this weight ratio is about 0.070. Lower fuel-air ratios down to about 0.015 may also be required to permit efficient cruise operation. This fuel-air-ratio range of 0.015 to 0.070 used in ram jets can be compared with the fuel-air ratios up to 0.025 encountered in current turbojets. Ram-jet

  6. Analysis of Lidar Remote Sensing Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gray D.

    1998-01-01

    An orbiting coherent Doppler lidar for measuring winds is required to provide two basic pieces of data to the user community. The first is the line of sight wind velocity and the second is knowledge of the position at which the measurement was made. In order to obtain this data for targets of interest to the atmospheric community the instrument must also have a level of backscatter sensitivity sufficient to achieve the goal. Sensitivity analyses for the line of sight velocity and position requirements for two lidar instruments, one with a nadir angle of 30 deg. in a 300 km altitude, 58 deg. inclination orbit and the second for a 45 deg. nadir angle instrument in a 833 km altitude , 89 deg. inclination orbit are performed. The issues relating to the backscatter sensitivity of a coherent lidar have been well documented previously and are not discussed here other than to identify a space-specific issue that does not typically need to be considered for ground and aircraft based coherent lidars. Section 2 and appendices A1 and A2 document these sensitivity analyses. This contract was intended to develop requirements for a space shuttle (STS) based coherent lidar however, shortly after the award of this contract NASA MSFC won the SPARCLE program to put a coherent Doppler lidar on STS. Consequently much of the work conducted under this contract has been documented within the development of the SPARCLE project documentation. The relevant portions of the SPARCLE documentation are identified in section 3.0 and included in appendices A3 and A4. Section 4.0 briefly outlines miscellaneous other activities that occurred under this contract.

  7. The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, C.S.; Selleck, C.B.

    1990-08-01

    The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories is developing four areas of technology required for automated deburring, chamfering, and blending of machined edges: (1) the automatic programming of robot trajectories and deburring processes using information derived from a CAD database, (2) the use of machine vision for locating the workpiece coupled with force control to ensure proper tool contact, (3) robotic deburring, blending, and machining of precision chamfered edges, and (4) in-process automated inspection of the formed edge. The Laboratory, its components, integration, and results from edge finishing experiments to date are described here. Also included is a discussion of the issues regarding implementation of the technology in a production environment. 24 refs., 17 figs.

  8. Potential Application of Novel Hyperspectral LIDAR for Monitoring Crops Nitrogen Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shuo; Gong, Wei; Du, Lin; Sun, Jia; Yang, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Precision agriculture has always been the research hotspot around the world. And the optimization of nitrogen fertilization for crops is the core concerns. It is not only to improve the productivity of crops but also to avoid the environmental risks caused by over-fertilization. Therefore, accurate estimation of nitrogen status is crucial for determining an nitrogen recommendation. Remote sensing techniques have been widely used to monitor crops for years, and they could offer estimations for stress status diagnosis through obtaining vertical structure parameters and spectral reflectance properties of crops. As an active remote sensing technology, lidar is particularly attractive for 3-dimensional information at a high point density. It has unique edges in obtaining vertical structure parameters of crops. However, capability of spectral reflectance properties is what the current lidar technology lacks because of single wavelength detection. To solve this problem, the concept of novel hyperspectral lidar (HSL), which combines the advantages of hyperspectal reflectance with high 3-dimensional capability of lidar, was proposed in our study. The design of instrument was described in detail. A broadband laser pulse was emitted and reflectance spectrum with 32 channels could be detected. Furthermore, the experiment was carried out by the novel HSL system to testify the potential application for monitoring nitrogen stress. Rice under different levels of nitrogen fertilization in central China were selected as the object of study, and four levels of nitrogen fertilization (N1-N4) were divided. With the detection of novel lidar system, high precision structure parameters of crops could be provided. Meanwhile, spectral reflectance properties in 32 wavebands were also obtained. The high precision structure parameters could be used to evaluate the stress status of crops. And abundant spectral information in 32 wavebands could improve the capacity of lidar system significantly

  9. The Twin Jet Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    M2-9 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or a bipolar planetary nebula. Another more revealing name might be the 'Twin Jet Nebula.' If the nebula is sliced across the star, each side of it appears much like a pair of exhausts from jet engines. Indeed, because of the nebula's shape and the measured velocity of the gas, in excess of 200 miles per second, astronomers believe that the description as a super-super-sonic jet exhaust is quite apt. This is much the same process that takes place in a jet engine: The burning and expanding gases are deflected by the engine walls through a nozzle to form long, collimated jets of hot air at high speeds. M2-9 is 2,100 light-years away in the constellation Ophiucus. The observation was taken Aug. 2, 1997 by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. In this image, neutral oxygen is shown in red, once-ionized nitrogen in green, and twice-ionized oxygen in blue.

  10. Jet penetration in glass

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Glenn, L.A.; Kusubov, A.

    1991-05-01

    We describe a phenomenological model which accounts for the mechanical response of glass to intense impulsive loading. An important aspect of this response is the dilatancy accompanying fracture. We have also conducted a number of experiments with 38.1-mm diameter precision shaped charges to establish the performance against various targets and to allow evaluation of our model. At 3 charge diameters standoff, the data indicate that both virgin and damaged glass offer better (Bernoulli-scaled) resistance to penetration than either of 4340 steel, or 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. Time-resolved measurements indicate two distinct phases of jet penetration in glass: An initial hydrodynamic phase, and a second phase characterized by a slower penetration velocity. Our calculations show that at early time, a crater is formed around the jet and only the tip of the undisturbed jet interacts with the glass. At late time the glass has collapsed on the jet and degraded penetration continues via a disturbed and fragmented jet.

  11. A Minor-Merger Interpretation for NGC 1097's ``Jets''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higdon, James L.; Wallin, John F.

    2003-03-01

    We have conducted a deep search for neutral hydrogen gas associated with the faint optical ``jets'' of NGC 1097 using the Very Large Array. Measurable H I would have been expected if the jets were tidal in origin given their moderately blue optical and near-infrared colors. The jets are free of H I emission to a limiting surface density (ΣHI) of 0.06 Msolar pc-2 (3 σ) over a 1102 km s-1 velocity range. We also rule out extended H I emission down to 0.02 Msolar pc-2 (3 σ, ΔV=45 km s-1) within a 4' FWHM aperture centered on the right-angle turn in jet R1. We have detected an H I source [MHI=(5.1+/-1.0)×106 Msolar] coincident with a small edge-on spiral or irregular galaxy (NGC 1097B) 12' southwest of NGC 1097, situated between two jets. Two other ~106 Msolar H I point sources in the field are considered marginal detections. Neither are associated with the optical jets. The jets' radio-X-ray spectral energy distribution is most consistent with starlight. However, from their morphology, optical/near-infrared colors, and lack of H I, we argue that the jets are not tidal tails drawn out of NGC 1097's disk or stars stripped from the elliptical companion NGC 1097A. We also reject in situ star formation in ancient radio jets as this requires essentially 100% conversion of gas into stars on large scales. Instead, we conclude that the jets represent the captured remains of a disrupted dwarf galaxy that passed through the inner few kiloparsecs of NGC 1097's disk. We present N-body simulations of such an encounter that reproduce the essential features of NGC 1097's jets: A long and narrow ``X''-shaped morphology centered near the spiral's nucleus, right-angle bends, and no discernible dwarf galaxy remnant. A series of jetlike distributions are formed, with the earliest appearing ~1.4 Gyr after impact. Well-defined X shapes form only when the more massive galaxy has a strong disk component. Ram-pressure stripping of the dwarf's interstellar medium would be expected to occur

  12. Recent improvements of the JET lithium beam diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Brix, M.; Morgan, P.; Stamp, M.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Dunai, D.; Meszaros, B.; Petravich, G.; Refy, D. I.; Szabolics, T.; Zoletnik, S.; Lupelli, I.; Marsen, S.; Melson, T. F.; Silva, C. [EURATOM Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2012-10-15

    A 60 kV neutral lithium diagnostic beam probes the edge plasma of JET for the measurement of electron density profiles. This paper describes recent enhancements of the diagnostic setup, new procedures for calibration and protection measures for the lithium ion gun during massive gas puffs for disruption mitigation. New light splitting optics allow in parallel beam emission measurements with a new double entrance slit CCD spectrometer (spectrally resolved) and a new interference filter avalanche photodiode camera (fast density and fluctuation studies).

  13. B-jets and z + b-jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, Daniel; /Rome U.

    2006-06-01

    The authors present CDF cross-section measurements for the inclusive production of b jets and the production of b jets in association with a Z{sup 0} boson. Both measurements are in reasonable agreement with NLO QCD predictions.

  14. Ghost imaging lidar via sparsity constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chengqiang; Gong, Wenlin; Chen, Mingliang; Li, Enrong; Wang, Hui; Xu, Wendong; Han, Shensheng

    2012-10-01

    For remote sensing, high-resolution imaging techniques are helpful to catch more characteristic information of the target. We extend pseudo-thermal light ghost imaging to the area of remote imaging and propose a ghost imaging lidar system. The experimental results demonstrate that the real-space image of a target at about 1.0 km range with 20 mm resolution is achieved by ghost imaging via sparsity constraints (GISC) technique. The characters of GISC technique compared to the existing lidar systems are also discussed.

  15. Analyses of Coherent Lidar Wind Measurement Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    1996-01-01

    Activities carried out during this reporting period are summarized. Much of the work undertaken involved additions to the space-based coherent lidar model, including the addition of performance as a function of altitude; a receiver design section; the development of a simple orbit model suitable for use in plotting orbits, swath and shot patterns and estimating power availability; and the inclusion of Fascode derived atmospheric extinction. Assistance was also given to NASA MSFC in the design and analysis of lidar instruments, both for the AEOLUS conceptual designs within MSFC (one such analysis is included in an appendix) and of proposed NASA MSFC instruments for the New Millennium Program.

  16. Modulated pulse bathymetric lidar Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Tao; Wang, Yabo; Wang, Rong; Du, Peng; Min, Xia

    2015-10-01

    A typical modulated pulse bathymetric lidar system is investigated by simulation using a modulated pulse lidar simulation system. In the simulation, the return signal is generated by Monte Carlo method with modulated pulse propagation model and processed by mathematical tools like cross-correlation and digital filter. Computer simulation results incorporating the modulation detection scheme reveal a significant suppression of the water backscattering signal and corresponding target contrast enhancement. More simulation experiments are performed with various modulation and reception variables to investigate the effect of them on the bathymetric system performance.

  17. Lidar Measurements of Industrial Benzene Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkhout, A. J. C.; van der Hoff, G. R.; Gast, L. F. L.

    2016-06-01

    The ability to measure benzene concentrations was added to the RIVM mobile DIAL system. In a ten-days campaign, it was used to measure benzene emissions in the Rijnmond, a heavily industrialised area in the South-west of the Netherlands with petrochemical industry, petrochemical products storage and the port of Rotterdam. On two of the ten days, benzene emissions were found. Combined with measurements of wind speed and wind direction, the Lidar measurements indicated the possible origins of these emissions. This makes the Lidar a valuable tool, augmenting the data collected at fixed monitoring stations.

  18. Cloud top remote sensing by airborne lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, J. D.; Hansen, M. Z.; Caudill, L. O.

    1982-01-01

    Observations of cloud top height, backscattering, and signal depolarization have been obtained by a lidar system operating onboard a high-altitude research aircraft. The transmitter for the cloud lidar system is a doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at 5 Hz. The system functions as a fully automated sensor under microprocessor control and operates from a nominal 19-km altitude. Measurements have been acquired over a wide variety of cloud cover in conjunction with passive visible and infrared measurements. Initial observation results are reported

  19. Cloud top remote sensing by airborne lidar.

    PubMed

    Spinhirne, J D; Hansen, M Z; Caudill, L O

    1982-05-01

    Observations of cloud top height, backscattering, and signal depolarization have been obtained by a lidar system operating onboard a high-altitude research aircraft. The transmitter for the cloud lidar system is a doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at 5 Hz. The system functions as a fully automated sensor under microprocessor control and operates from a nominal 19-km altitude. Measurements have been acquired over a wide variety of cloud cover in conjunction with passive visible and infrared measurements. Initial observation results are reported. PMID:20389897

  20. Multiple scattering lidar returns from stratus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutt, D. L.; Bissonnette, L. R.

    1992-01-01

    Multiple scattering lidar returns from stratus clouds were measured using a multi-field-of-view (MFOV) lidar operating at 1.054 microns. The detector consists of four concentric silicon photodiodes which define half-angle fields of view (FOV) of 3.8, 12.5, 25 and 38.5 mrad. The central FOV receives the conventional lidar signal, while the outer FOV's receive only multiply scattered contributions. The ratios of the signals in the outer FOV's to the signal in the central FOV is an indication of the lateral spreading of the scattered component of the laser pulse as it propagates through the cloud. MFOV lidar returns from stratus clouds measured between October 1991 and March 1992 can be divided into two distinct types, those with large multiple scattering ratios and those with small ratios. An example of each type of return is shown. Both measurements were made at an elevation angle of 45 degrees. Clouds with small multiple scattering signals probably have a high concentration of much larger particles on the order of hundreds of micrometers in size. This is a typical size range for suspended ice crystals or precipitations. Stratus clouds often have a high concentration of ice crystals even when there is no precipitation. Large ice crystals would give smaller signals in the outer FOV's because much of the scattered intensity is contained in a narrow diffraction peak with an angular width on the order of milliradians. The result is that for a given extinction, many more orders of scattering are required for the laser pulse to spread out. So far we have not been able to do simulations of MFOV lidar returns from ice crystal clouds because of uncertainties about the phase function of the crystals, particularly the magnitude of the backscatter peak at 180 degrees. On two occasions, MFOV lidar returns measured just prior to snowfall, showed a striking vertical profile. An example is shown. From 900 to 1300m, the multiply scattered signals are negligible compared to the

  1. Coherent lidar technology for global wind profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Current lidar systems are proven sensors for atmospheric wind measurement. Ground-based and airborne continuous wave and pulsed CO2 systems were developed and applied to several wind measuring applications. Analytical and hardware feasibility studies indicte the feasibility of measuring the global wind field from a space splatform. A Global Backscater Experiment is planned by NASA to develop a global model of aerosol backscatter using a CO2 laser. Ground-based aerosol backscatter profiles will also be obtained using a ruby and a pulsed CO2 lidar.

  2. Raman Lidar Retrievals of Mixed Layer Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Clayton, M.; Turner, D. D.; Newsom, R. K.; Goldsmith, J.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate determination of the atmospheric mixing layer (ML) height is important for modeling the transport of aerosols and aerosol precursors and forecasting air quality. Aerosol and water vapor profiles measured by the DOE ARM SGP and the new TWP (Darwin) ground based Raman lidars provide direct measurements of the vertical structure of ML. We have developed automated algorithms to identify sharp gradients in aerosols and water vapor at the top of the ML and have used these algorithms to derive ML heights for extended periods over the last few years. During the afternoon, these ML heights generally compare favorably with ML heights derived from potential temperature profiles derived from coincident radiosondes. However, retrieving ML heights via lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol gradients is problematic in the presence of elevated aerosol and water vapor layers which are often observed, especially at night. Consequently, we take advantage of recent modifications to these lidars that permit continuous temperature profiling, and compute ML heights using potential temperature profiles derived from Raman lidar and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) measurements. The resulting ML heights agree well with ML heights derived from radiosondes and provide a more realistic representation of the diurnal ML behavior. We use the Raman lidar aerosol and water vapor profiles and ML heights to derive the fractions of total column precipitable water vapor and aerosol optical thickness within and above the ML and show how the ML heights and these fractions vary with time of day and season. The SGP Raman lidar measurements show that the fraction of the aerosol optical thickness and precipitable water vapor above the ML increases from 30-60% during the day to 60-80% at night. The Darwin Raman lidar measurements reveal a shallow, moist cloud-topped ML with little diurnal variability during the austral summer and deeper ML with more diurnal variability during

  3. Fog droplet distribution functions for lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Mallow, J.V.

    1982-04-15

    The interpretation of lidar data on fog has been limited by two obstacles: approximations in the form of the Mie scattering cross sections for water droplets, and droplet size distribution functions whose relationship to the experiment has not been clear. This paper develops a method for generating distribution functions from experimental data. These functions are then used with newly available Mie cross sections to obtain backscattering and extinction coefficients for singly scattered ruby laser pulses in fog. The results show what experimental lidar accuracies are needed to uniquely determine fog droplet size distribution.

  4. LIDAR, Point Clouds, and their Archaeological Applications

    SciTech Connect

    White, Devin A

    2013-01-01

    It is common in contemporary archaeological literature, in papers at archaeological conferences, and in grant proposals to see heritage professionals use the term LIDAR to refer to high spatial resolution digital elevation models and the technology used to produce them. The goal of this chapter is to break that association and introduce archaeologists to the world of point clouds, in which LIDAR is only one member of a larger family of techniques to obtain, visualize, and analyze three-dimensional measurements of archaeological features. After describing how point clouds are constructed, there is a brief discussion on the currently available software and analytical techniques designed to make sense of them.

  5. Fluorescence Lidar Monitoring of Historic Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondi, Valentina; Cecchi, Giovanna; Pantani, Luca; Chiari, Roberto

    1998-02-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectra detected with high-spectral-resolution lidar on the facades of the Baptistery and the Cathedral in Parma are presented and discussed. The data show fluorescence features that are due to the stone materials that constitute the coating of the monuments and to photosynthetically active colonizations on their surfaces. This underlines the feasibility of a remote fluorescence analysis of historic facades. The data were also compared with the fluorescence lidar spectra obtained from similar lithotypes, sampled either in historic extraction areas or in sites exploited recently. The results open good prospects for spectral characterization of historic materials and identification of their provenance.

  6. Lidar monitoring of atmospheric ozone and aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudzynski, Stanislaw; Czyzewski, A.; Ernst, Krzysztof; Skubiszak, Wojciech; Stacewicz, Tadeusz; Stelmaszczyk, K.; Szymanski, Artur

    2000-11-01

    The growth of aerosol and ozone concentrations in the troposphere stimulates development of monitoring techniques allowing their detection. DIAL (Differential Absorption Lidar) is one of the most promising methods. It allows the remote measurements of selected pollutants within the range of few kilometers and with spatial resolution of few meters. We introduce the basic principles of the DIAL method and describe shortly our mobile lidar system. We present and comment selected registrations of ozone and aerosol concentration distributions obtained during summer field campaigns of 1997 and 1998.

  7. Oscillatory flow in jet pumps: nonlinear effects and minor losses.

    PubMed

    Petculescu, A; Wilen, L A

    2003-03-01

    A nonresonant, lumped-element technique is used to investigate the behavior of tapered cylindrical flow constrictions (jet pumps) in the nonlinear oscillatory flow regime. The array of samples studied spans a wide range of inlet curvature radii and taper angles. By measuring the rectified steady pressure component developed across a jet pump as well as the acoustic impedance, the minor loss coefficients for flow into and out of the narrow end of the jet pump are determined. These coefficients are found to be relatively insensitive to all but the smallest curvature radii (i.e., sharp edges). For fixed radius of curvature, the inflow minor loss coefficient increases with increasing taper angle while the outflow coefficient remains relatively constant. For all of the samples, the steady flow minor loss coefficients are also measured and compared to their oscillatory flow counterparts. The agreement is good, confirming the so-called Iguchi hypothesis. PMID:12656363

  8. Computer study of a jet flap ASTVOL 'Harrier'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S. B., III; Liperra, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    A study of the costs/benefits trade-off was conducted for an Advanced Supersonic Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (ASTOVL) aircraft incorporating a jet flap. The data used were the theory of jet flaps and high aspect ratio nozzles, experience with a V/STOL aircraft study performed for NASA Ames Research Center in February 1982, and a high performance aircraft-synthesis program (ACSYNT). The methodology was to accurately model the supersonic Harrier V/STOL aircraft design on ACSYNT, and then modify the design by both adding high aspect-ratio nozzles in place of the rear (core-flow) nozzles on the Pegasus-type turbofan engine, and integrating these nozzles on each wing's trailing edge, thus creating a jet flap. The predicted performance advantages (increase in maximum lift coefficient with flap deflection and horizontal thrust recovery) were traded off against the disadvantages (additional weight and thrust loss due to ducting) on two representative missions.

  9. Fluid dynamic aspects of jet noise generation. [noise measurement of jet blast effects from supersonic jet flow in convergent-divergent nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barra, V.; Panunzio, S.

    1976-01-01

    Jet engine noise generation and noise propagation was investigated by studying supersonic nozzle flow of various nozzle configurations in an experimental test facility. The experimental facility was constructed to provide a coaxial axisymmetric jet flow of unheated air. In the test setup, an inner primary flow exhausted from a 7 in. exit diameter convergent--divergent nozzle at Mach 2, while a secondary flow had a 10 in. outside diameter and was sonic at the exit. The large dimensions of the jets permitted probes to be placed inside the jet core without significantly disturbing the flow. Static pressure fluctuations were measured for the flows. The nozzles were designed for shock free (balanced) flow at Mach 2. Data processing techniques and experimental procedures were developed in order to study induced disturbances at the edge of the supersonic flows, and the propagation of those disturbances throughout the flows. Equipment used (specifications are given) to record acoustic levels (far field noise) is described. Results and conclusions are presented and discussed. Diagrams of the jet flow fields are included along with photographs of the test stand.

  10. Scan Line Based Road Marking Extraction from Mobile LiDAR Point Clouds.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li; Liu, Hua; Tan, Junxiang; Li, Zan; Xie, Hong; Chen, Changjun

    2016-01-01

    Mobile Mapping Technology (MMT) is one of the most important 3D spatial data acquisition technologies. The state-of-the-art mobile mapping systems, equipped with laser scanners and named Mobile LiDAR Scanning (MLS) systems, have been widely used in a variety of areas, especially in road mapping and road inventory. With the commercialization of Advanced Driving Assistance Systems (ADASs) and self-driving technology, there will be a great demand for lane-level detailed 3D maps, and MLS is the most promising technology to generate such lane-level detailed 3D maps. Road markings and road edges are necessary information in creating such lane-level detailed 3D maps. This paper proposes a scan line based method to extract road markings from mobile LiDAR point clouds in three steps: (1) preprocessing; (2) road points extraction; (3) road markings extraction and refinement. In preprocessing step, the isolated LiDAR points in the air are removed from the LiDAR point clouds and the point clouds are organized into scan lines. In the road points extraction step, seed road points are first extracted by Height Difference (HD) between trajectory data and road surface, then full road points are extracted from the point clouds by moving least squares line fitting. In the road markings extraction and refinement step, the intensity values of road points in a scan line are first smoothed by a dynamic window median filter to suppress intensity noises, then road markings are extracted by Edge Detection and Edge Constraint (EDEC) method, and the Fake Road Marking Points (FRMPs) are eliminated from the detected road markings by segment and dimensionality feature-based refinement. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by three data samples and the experiment results indicate that road points are well extracted from MLS data and road markings are well extracted from road points by the applied method. A quantitative study shows that the proposed method achieves an average

  11. Scan Line Based Road Marking Extraction from Mobile LiDAR Point Clouds†

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Li; Liu, Hua; Tan, Junxiang; Li, Zan; Xie, Hong; Chen, Changjun

    2016-01-01

    Mobile Mapping Technology (MMT) is one of the most important 3D spatial data acquisition technologies. The state-of-the-art mobile mapping systems, equipped with laser scanners and named Mobile LiDAR Scanning (MLS) systems, have been widely used in a variety of areas, especially in road mapping and road inventory. With the commercialization of Advanced Driving Assistance Systems (ADASs) and self-driving technology, there will be a great demand for lane-level detailed 3D maps, and MLS is the most promising technology to generate such lane-level detailed 3D maps. Road markings and road edges are necessary information in creating such lane-level detailed 3D maps. This paper proposes a scan line based method to extract road markings from mobile LiDAR point clouds in three steps: (1) preprocessing; (2) road points extraction; (3) road markings extraction and refinement. In preprocessing step, the isolated LiDAR points in the air are removed from the LiDAR point clouds and the point clouds are organized into scan lines. In the road points extraction step, seed road points are first extracted by Height Difference (HD) between trajectory data and road surface, then full road points are extracted from the point clouds by moving least squares line fitting. In the road markings extraction and refinement step, the intensity values of road points in a scan line are first smoothed by a dynamic window median filter to suppress intensity noises, then road markings are extracted by Edge Detection and Edge Constraint (EDEC) method, and the Fake Road Marking Points (FRMPs) are eliminated from the detected road markings by segment and dimensionality feature-based refinement. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by three data samples and the experiment results indicate that road points are well extracted from MLS data and road markings are well extracted from road points by the applied method. A quantitative study shows that the proposed method achieves an average

  12. Aeroacoustic Experiments with Twin Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Richard F.; Henderson, Brenda S.

    2012-01-01

    While the noise produced by a single jet is azimuthally symmetric, multiple jets produce azimuthally varying far-field noise. The ability of one jet to shield another reduces the noise radiated in the plane of the jets, while often increasing the noise radiated out of the plane containing the jets. The present study investigates the shielding potential of twin jet configurations over subsonic and over-expanded supersonic jet conditions with simulated forward flight. The experiments were conducted with 2 in. throat diameter nozzles at four jet spacings from 2.6d to 5.5d in center-to-center distance, where d is the nozzle throat diameter. The current study found a maximum of 3 dB reduction in overall sound pressure level relative to two incoherent jets in the peak jet noise direction in the plane containing the jets. However, an increase of 3 dB was found perpendicular to the plane containing the jets. In the sideline direction, shielding is observed for all jet spacings in this study.

  13. Quantification of LiDAR measurement uncertainty through propagation of errors due to sensor sub-systems and terrain morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulden, T.; Hopkinson, C.

    2013-12-01

    The quantification of LiDAR sensor measurement uncertainty is important for evaluating the quality of derived DEM products, compiling risk assessment of management decisions based from LiDAR information, and enhancing LiDAR mission planning capabilities. Current quality assurance estimates of LiDAR measurement uncertainty are limited to post-survey empirical assessments or vendor estimates from commercial literature. Empirical evidence can provide valuable information for the performance of the sensor in validated areas; however, it cannot characterize the spatial distribution of measurement uncertainty throughout the extensive coverage of typical LiDAR surveys. Vendor advertised error estimates are often restricted to strict and optimal survey conditions, resulting in idealized values. Numerical modeling of individual pulse uncertainty provides an alternative method for estimating LiDAR measurement uncertainty. LiDAR measurement uncertainty is theoretically assumed to fall into three distinct categories, 1) sensor sub-system errors, 2) terrain influences, and 3) vegetative influences. This research details the procedures for numerical modeling of measurement uncertainty from the sensor sub-system (GPS, IMU, laser scanner, laser ranger) and terrain influences. Results show that errors tend to increase as the laser scan angle, altitude or laser beam incidence angle increase. An experimental survey over a flat and paved runway site, performed with an Optech ALTM 3100 sensor, showed an increase in modeled vertical errors of 5 cm, at a nadir scan orientation, to 8 cm at scan edges; for an aircraft altitude of 1200 m and half scan angle of 15°. In a survey with the same sensor, at a highly sloped glacial basin site absent of vegetation, modeled vertical errors reached over 2 m. Validation of error models within the glacial environment, over three separate flight lines, respectively showed 100%, 85%, and 75% of elevation residuals fell below error predictions. Future

  14. Micropulse Lidar Cloud Mask Value-Added Product Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaraman, C; Comstock, J

    2011-07-25

    Lidar backscattered signal is a useful tool for identifying vertical cloud structure in the atmosphere in optically thin clouds. Cloud boundaries derived from lidar signals are a necessary input for popular ARM data products, such as the Active Remote Sensing of Clouds (ARSCL) product. An operational cloud boundary algorithm (Wang and Sassen 2001) has been implemented for use with the ARM Micropulse Lidar (MPL) systems. In addition to retrieving cloud boundaries above 500 m, the value-added product (VAP) named Micropulse Lidar Cloud Mask (MPLCMASK) applies lidar-specific corrections (i.e., range-square, background, deadtime, and overlap) as described in Campbell et al. (2002) to the measured backscattered lidar. Depolarization ratio is computed using the methodology developed by Flynn et al. (2007) for polarization-capable MPL systems. The cloud boundaries output from MPLCMASK will be the primary lidar cloud mask for input to the ARSCL product and will be applied to all MPL systems, including historical data sets.

  15. Lidar Inter-Comparison Exercise Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Protat, A; Young, S

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this field campaign was to evaluate the performance of the new Leosphere R-MAN 510 lidar, procured by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, by testing it against the MicroPulse Lidar (MPL) and Raman lidars, at the Darwin Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site. This lidar is an eye-safe (355 nm), turn-key mini Raman lidar, which allows for the detection of aerosols and cloud properties, and the retrieval of particulate extinction profiles. To accomplish this evaluation, the R-MAN 510 lidar has been operated at the Darwin ARM site, next to the MPL, Raman lidar, and Vaisala ceilometer (VCEIL) for three months (from 20 January 2013 to 20 April 2013) in order to collect a sufficient sample size for statistical comparisons.

  16. MATLAB tools for lidar data conversion, visualization, and processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao; Zhou, Kaijing; Yang, Jie; Lu, Yilong

    2011-10-01

    LIDAR (LIght Detection and Ranging) [1] is an optical remote sensing technology that has gained increasing acceptance for topographic mapping. LIDAR technology has higher accuracy than RADAR and has wide applications. The relevant commercial market for LIDAR has developed greatly in the last few years. LAS format is approved to be the standard data format for interchanging LIDAR data among different software developers, manufacturers and end users. LAS data format reduces the data size compared to ASCII data format. However, LAS data file can only be visualized by some expensive commercial software. There are some free tools available, but they are not user-friendly and have less or poor visualization functionality. This makes it difficult for researchers to investigate and use LIDAR data. Therefore, there is a need to develop an efficient and low cost LIDAR data toolbox. For this purpose we have developed a free and efficient Matlab tool for LIDAR data conversion, visualization and processing.

  17. Generation of instability waves at a leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the generation of instability waves downstream of a leading edge by an imposed upstream disturbance. Two cases are considered. The first is concerned with mean flows of the Blasius type wherein the instabilities are represented by Tollmien-Schlichting waves. It is shown that the latter are generated fairly far downstream of the edge and are the result of a wave length reduction process that tunes the free stream disturbances to the Tollmien-Schlichting wave length. The other case is concerned with inflectional, uni-directional, transversely sheared mean flows. Such idealized flows provide a fairly good local representation to the nearly parallel flows in jets. They can support inviscid instabilities of the Kelvin-Helmholtz type. The various mathematically permissible mechanisms that can couple these instabilities to the upstream disturbances are discussed. The results are compared to some acoustic measurements and conclusions are drawn about the generation of the instabilities in these flows.

  18. Experimental study on the use of synthetic jet actuators for lift control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Ricardo Benjamin

    An experimental study on the use of synthetic jet actuators for lift control is conducted. The synthetic jet actuator is placed on the pressure side towards the trailing edge on a NACA 65(2)-415 airfoil representative of the cross section of an Inlet Guide Vane (IGV) in an industrial gas compressor. By redirecting or vectoring the shear layer at the trailing edge, the synthetic jet actuator increases lift and decreases drag on the airfoil without a mechanical device or flap. A compressor map that defines upper and lower bounds on operating velocities and airfoil dimensions, is compared with operating conditions of the low-speed wind tunnel at San Diego State University, to match gas compressor conditions in the wind tunnel. Realistic test conditions can range from Mach=0.12 to Mach= 0.27 and an airfoil chord from c=0.1 m to c=0.3 m. Based on the operating conditions, a final airfoil model is fabricated with a chord of c=0.1m. Several synthetic jet actuator designs are considered. A initial synthetic jet is designed to house a piezoelectric element with a material frequency of 1200 hz in a cavity with a volume of 4.47 cm3, a slot width of 0.25 mm, and a slot depth of 1.5 mm. With these dimensions, the Helmholtz frequency of the design is 1800Hz. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) experiments show that the design has a jet with a peak centerline jet velocity of 26 m/s at 750 Hz. A modified slant face synthetic jet is designed so that the cavity fits flush within the NACA airfoil surface. The slanted synthetic jet has a cavity volume of 4.67 cm3, a slot width of 0.25 mm, and a slot depth of 3.45 mm resulting in a Helmholtz frequency of 1170 hz for this design. PIV experiments show that the jet is redirected along the slant face according to the Coanda effect. A final synthetic jet actuator is directly integrated into the trailing edge of an airfoil with a cavity volume of 4.6 cm3, a slot width of 0.2 mm, and a slot depth of 1.6 mm. The Helmholtz frequency is 1450 Hz and

  19. Airborne Coherent Lidar for Advanced In-Flight Measurements (ACLAIM) Flight Testing of the Lidar Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soreide, David C.; Bogue, Rodney K.; Ehernberger, L. J.; Hannon, Stephen M.; Bowdle, David A.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the ACLAIM program is ultimately to establish the viability of light detection and ranging (lidar) as a forward-looking sensor for turbulence. The goals of this flight test are to: 1) demonstrate that the ACLAIM lidar system operates reliably in a flight test environment, 2) measure the performance of the lidar as a function of the aerosol backscatter coefficient (beta), 3) use the lidar system to measure atmospheric turbulence and compare these measurements to onboard gust measurements, and 4) make measurements of the aerosol backscatter coefficient, its probability distribution and spatial distribution. The scope of this paper is to briefly describe the ACLAIM system and present examples of ACLAIM operation in flight, including comparisons with independent measurements of wind gusts, gust-induced normal acceleration, and the derived eddy dissipation rate.

  20. Renewable jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-04-01

    Novel strategies for sustainable replacement of finite fossil fuels are intensely pursued in fundamental research, applied science and industry. In the case of jet fuels used in gas-turbine engine aircrafts, the production and use of synthetic bio-derived kerosenes are advancing rapidly. Microbial biotechnology could potentially also be used to complement the renewable production of jet fuel, as demonstrated by the production of bioethanol and biodiesel for piston engine vehicles. Engineered microbial biosynthesis of medium chain length alkanes, which constitute the major fraction of petroleum-based jet fuels, was recently demonstrated. Although efficiencies currently are far from that needed for commercial application, this discovery has spurred research towards future production platforms using both fermentative and direct photobiological routes. PMID:24679258

  1. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Flow Measurements Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cliff; Wernet, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Modern aircraft design often puts the engine exhaust in close proximity to the airframe surfaces. Aircraft noise prediction tools must continue to develop in order to meet the challenges these aircraft present. The Jet-Surface Interaction Tests have been conducted to provide a comprehensive quality set of experimental data suitable for development and validation of these exhaust noise prediction methods. Flow measurements have been acquired using streamwise and cross-stream particle image velocimetry (PIV) and fluctuating surface pressure data acquired using flush mounted pressure transducers near the surface trailing edge. These data combined with previously reported far-field and phased array noise measurements represent the first step toward the experimental data base. These flow data are particularly applicable to development of noise prediction methods which rely on computational fluid dynamics to uncover the flow physics. A representative sample of the large flow data set acquired is presented here to show how a surface near a jet affects the turbulent kinetic energy in the plume, the spatial relationship between the jet plume and surface needed to generate surface trailing-edge noise, and differences between heated and unheated jet flows with respect to surfaces.

  2. Small-Scale Filament Eruptions Leading to Solar X-Ray Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Alphonse; Moore, Ronald; Falconer, David

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the onset of ~10 random X-ray jets observed by Hinode/XRT. Each jet was near the limb in a polar coronal hole, and showed a ``bright point'' in an edge of the base of the jet, as is typical for previously-observed X-ray jets. We examined SDO/AIA EUV images of each of the jets over multiple AIA channels, including 304 Å, which detects chromospheric emissions, and 171, 193, and 211 Å, which detect cooler-coronal emissions. We find the jets to result from eruptions of miniature (size <~10 arcsec) filaments from the bases of the jets. Much of the erupting-filament material forms a chromospheric-temperature jet. In the cool-coronal channels, often the filament appears in absorption and the hotter EUV component of the jet appears in emission. The jet bright point forms at the location from which the miniature filament erupts, analogous to the formation of a standard solar flare arcade in the wake of the eruption of a typical larger-scalechromospheric filament. The spire of the jet forms on open field lines that presumably have undergone interchange reconnection with the erupting field that envelops and carries the miniature filament. Thus these X-ray jets and their bright points are made by miniature filament eruptions via ``internal'' and ``external'' reconnection of the erupting field. This is consistent with what we found for the onset of an on-disk coronal jet we examined in Adams et al. (2014). This work was supported by funding from NASA/LWS, Hinode, and ISSI.

  3. JetStar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    In this photo of the C-140 JetStar on the Dryden Ramp, a subscale propeller has been fitted to the upper fuselage of the aircraft. NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility, in co-operation with the Lewis Research Center, investigated the acoustic characteristics of a series of subscale advanced design propellors in the early eighties. These propellors were designed to rotate at a tip speed faster than the speed of sound. They are, in effect, a 'swept back wing' version of a propellor. The tests were conducted on Dryden's C-140 Jetstar, seen here on the ramp at Dryden in Edwards, California. The JetStar was modified with the installation of an air turbine drive system. The drive motor, with a 24 inch test propellor, was mounted in a pylon atop the JetStar. The JetStar was equipped with an array of 28 microphones flush-mounted in the fuselage of the aircraft beneath the propellor. Microphones mounted on the wings and on accompanying chase aircraft provided far-field acoustic data. In the 1960s, the same JetStar was equipped with an electronic variable stability flight control system. Called then a General Purpose Airborne Simulator (GPAS), the aircraft could duplicate the flight characteristics of a wide variety of advanced aircraft and was used for supersonic transport and general aviation research and as a training and support system for Space Shuttle Approach and Landing Tests at Dryden in 1977. In 1985, the JetStar's wings were modified with suction and spray devices in a laminar (smooth) air flow program to study ways of improving the flow of air over the wings of airliners. The program also studied ways of reducing the collection of ice and insects on airliner wings.

  4. Mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar for wind and temperature measurements in the stratosphere and lower mesosphere.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiankang; Han, Yuli; Sun, Dongsong; Xia, Haiyun; Shu, Zhifeng; Zhao, Ruocan; Shangguan, Mingjia; Guo, Jie

    2014-08-25

    A mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar based on the molecular double-edge technique is developed for measuring wind velocity in the middle atmosphere up to 60 km. The lidar uses three lasers with a mean power of 17.5 W at 355 nm each and three 1 m diameter telescopes to receive the backscattered echo: one points to zenith for vertical wind component and temperature measurement; the two others pointing toward east and north are titled at 30° from the zenith for zonal and meridional wind component, respectively. The Doppler shift of the backscattered echo is measured by inter-comparing the signal detected through each of the double-edge channels of a triple Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) tuned to either side of the emitted laser line. The third channel of FPI is used for frequency locking and a locking accuracy of 1.8 MHz RMS (root-mean-square) at 355 nm over 2 hours is realized, corresponding to a systematic error of 0.32 m/s. In this paper, we present detailed technical evolutions on system calibration. To validate the performance of the lidar, comparison experiments was carried out in December 2013, which showed good agreement with radiosondes but notable biases with ECMWF (European Centre for Medium range Weather Forecasts) in the height range of overlapping data. Wind observation over one month performed in Delhi (37.371° N, 97.374° E), northwest of China, demonstrated the stability and robustness of the system. PMID:25322175

  5. Impact of a viscoelastic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuissier, Henri; Néel, Baptiste; Limat, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    A jet of a Newtonian liquid impacting onto a wall at right angle spreads as a thin liquid sheet which preserves the radial symmetry of the jet. We observe that for a viscoelastic jet (solution of polyethylene glycol in water) this symmetry can break: close to the wall, the jet cross-section is faceted and radial steady liquid films (membranes) form, which connect the cross-section vertices to the sheet. The number of membranes increases with increasing viscoelastic relaxation time of the solution, but also with increasing jet velocity and decreasing distance from the jet nozzle to the wall. A mechanism for this surprising destabilization of the jet, which develops perpendicularly to the direction expected for a buckling mechanism, is presented that explains these dependences. The large-scale consequences of the jet destabilization on the sheet spreading and fragmentation, which show through the faceting of hydraulic jumps and suspended (Savart) sheets, will also be discussed.

  6. Jet Shockwaves Produce Gamma Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    Theorists believe that GRB jets produce gamma rays by two processes involving shock waves. Shells of material within the jet move at different speeds and collide, generating internal shock waves th...

  7. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  8. Astrophysical jet experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, C. D.; Loupias, B.; Waugh, J.; Barroso, P.; Bouquet, S.; Brambrink, E.; Dono, S.; Falize, E.; Howe, J.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Kodama, R.; Koenig, M.; Michaut, C.; Myers, S.; Nazarov, W.; Notley, M. M.; Oya, A.; Pikuz, S.; Rabec le Gloahec, M.; Sakawa, Y.; Spindloe, C.; Streeter, M.; Wilson, L. A.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, three different experimental configurations designed to study jet propagation physics are presented. Each configuration uses a different target design: conical dimples in solid surfaces, hollow cones filled with foam and angled thin foils. When irradiated with a laser, these targets result in the launching of a plasma jet, the properties of which can be controlled by judicious choices of the target and laser parameters. Experimental results from these targets are shown, and the physics which may be studied with each of these targets is briefly discussed.

  9. Particle backscatter, extinction, and lidar ratio profiling with Raman lidar in south and north China

    SciTech Connect

    Tesche, Matthias; Ansmann, Albert; Mueller, Detlef; Althausen, Dietrich; Engelmann, Ronny; Hu Min; Zhang Yuanghang

    2007-09-01

    Aerosol Raman lidar observations of profiles of the particle extinction and backscatter coefficients and the respective extinction-to-backscatter ratio (lidar ratio) were performed under highly polluted conditions in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) in southern China in October 2004 and at Beijing during a clear period with moderately polluted to background aerosol conditions in January 2005. The anthropogenic haze in the PRD is characterized by volume light-extinction coefficients of particles ranging from approximately 200 to800 Mm-1 and lidar ratios mostly between 40 and 55 sr (average of47{+-}6 sr). Almost clean air masses were observed throughout the measurements of the Beijing campaign. These air masses originated from arid desert-steppe-like regions (greater Gobi area).Extinction values usually varied between 100 and300 Mm-1, and the lidar ratios were considerably lower (compared with PRD values) with values mostly from 30 to 45 sr (average of38{+-}7 sr). Gobi dust partly influenced the observations. Unexpectedly low lidar ratios of approximately 25 sr were found for a case of background aerosol with a low optical depth of 0.05. The low lidar ratios are consistent with Mie-scattering calculations applied to ground-based observations of particle size distributions.

  10. Time-Accurate Computations of Isolated Circular Synthetic Jets in Crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, C. L.; Schaeffler, N. W.; Milanovic, I. M.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2007-01-01

    Results from unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computations are described for two different synthetic jet flows issuing into a turbulent boundary layer crossflow through a circular orifice. In one case the jet effect is mostly contained within the boundary layer, while in the other case the jet effect extends beyond the boundary layer edge. Both cases have momentum flux ratios less than 2. Several numerical parameters are investigated, and some lessons learned regarding the CFD methods for computing these types of flow fields are summarized. Results in both cases are compared to experiment.

  11. Time-Accurate Computations of Isolated Circular Synthetic Jets in Crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christoper L.; Schaeffler, Norman W.; Milanovic, I. M.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    2005-01-01

    Results from unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computations are described for two different synthetic jet flows issuing into a turbulent boundary layer crossflow through a circular orifice. In one case the jet effect is mostly contained within the boundary layer, while in the other case the jet effect extends beyond the boundary layer edge. Both cases have momentum flux ratios less than 2. Several numerical parameters are investigated, and some lessons learned regarding the CFD methods for computing these types of flow fields are outlined. Results in both cases are compared to experiment.

  12. On magnetohydrodynamic solitons in jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, B.

    1987-01-01

    Nonlinear solitary wave propagation in a compressible magnetic beam model of an extragalactic radio jet is examined and shown to lead to solitons of the Benjamin-Ono type. A number of similarities between such magnetic beam models of jets and models of solar photospheric flux tubes are pointed out and exploited. A single soliton has the appearance of a symmetric bulge on the jet which propagates faster than the jet's flow.

  13. Laminar flow control leading edge glove flight test article development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, W. E.; Mcnay, D. E.; Thelander, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A laminar flow control (LFC) flight test article was designed and fabricated to fit into the right leading edge of a JetStar aircraft. The article was designed to attach to the front spar and fill in approx. 70 inches of the leading edge that are normally occupied by the large slipper fuel tank. The outer contour of the test article was constrained to align with an external fairing aft of the front spar which provided a surface pressure distribution over the test region representative of an LFC airfoil. LFC is achieved by applying suction through a finely perforated surface, which removes a small fraction of the boundary layer. The LFC test article has a retractable high lift shield to protect the laminar surface from contamination by airborne debris during takeoff and low altitude operation. The shield is designed to intercept insects and other particles that could otherwise impact the leading edge. Because the shield will intercept freezing rain and ice, a oozing glycol ice protection system is installed on the shield leading edge. In addition to the shield, a liquid freezing point depressant can be sprayed on the back of the shield.

  14. Stabilization and dynamics of edge flames in narrow channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieri, Joanna A.

    The dynamics of edge flames in narrow channels is studied, first within the context of a reactive diffusive (or constant density) model and then in a variable density model which allows for the consideration of thermal expansion effects. Fuel and oxidizer, separated upstream by a thin plate of finite length, flow into a channel with a prescribed upstream velocity. At the end of the plate, the fuel and oxidizer mix and, when ignited, an edge flame is sustained at some distance from the tip of the plate. Typically, the flame, which is stabilized by heat conduction back to the cold plate, has a tribrachial structure. It consists of a leading edge, made up of lean and rich premixed segments, and an attached diffusion flame trailing behind. The flame can also have a hook-like shape, when one of the premixed branches is missing. This often happens for conditions away from stoichiometry and when the mass diffusivities of the fuel and oxidizer are unequal. Earlier work has determined the behavior of an edge flame in a mixing layer that develops downstream of a splitter plate with no boundaries in the lateral direction. This is relevant to the stabilization and liftoff of jet diffusion flames. The confined case has other possible applications, such as flames in mini-combustor systems, that have been recently tested experimentally. The objective in this work is to determine the effect that confinement has on the edge standoff distance, on the flame shape and on the flame stability. In particular, we examine the influence of channel width, wall temperature, and the effects of differential diffusion. We determine conditions under which the edge flame is stabilized near the tip of the splitter plate, is held near the tip but oscillates back and forth, or is blown-off. We consider a wide range of channel widths and boundary conditions at the walls.

  15. Numerical modeling of normal turbulent plane jet impingement on solid wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, C.-Y.; Maxwell, W. H. C.

    1984-10-01

    Attention is given to a numerical turbulence model for the impingement of a well developed normal plane jet on a solid wall, by means of which it is possible to express different jet impingement geometries in terms of different boundary conditions. Examples of these jets include those issuing from VTOL aircraft, chemical combustors, etc. The two-equation, turbulent kinetic energy-turbulent dissipation rate model is combined with the continuity equation and the transport equation of vorticity, using an iterative finite difference technique in the computations. Peak levels of turbulent kinetic energy occur not only in the impingement zone, but also in the intermingling zone between the edges of the free jet and the wall jet.

  16. Numerical modeling of normal turbulent plane jet impingement on solid wall

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, C.Y.; Maxwell, W.H.C.

    1984-10-01

    Attention is given to a numerical turbulence model for the impingement of a well developed normal plane jet on a solid wall, by means of which it is possible to express different jet impingement geometries in terms of different boundary conditions. Examples of these jets include those issuing from VTOL aircraft, chemical combustors, etc. The two-equation, turbulent kinetic energy-turbulent dissipation rate model is combined with the continuity equation and the transport equation of vorticity, using an iterative finite difference technique in the computations. Peak levels of turbulent kinetic energy occur not only in the impingement zone, but also in the intermingling zone between the edges of the free jet and the wall jet. 20 references.

  17. Instability of a confined jet impinging on a water/air free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, G.; Climent, E.; Maurel, A.

    2002-09-01

    Self-sustained oscillations in sinuous mode occur when a water jet impinges from below on a water/air free surface. Confined jet instability is experimentally investigated by image processing and velocity measurements. Despite small deformations of the surface, dynamic response of the jet provides unusual behaviour with comparable configurations (hole-tone, jet edge ...). The central feature is a bounded evolution of the oscillation frequency. Modal transitions are observed when physical parameters are varied. Each frequency jump is related to wavelength modification of the spatial pattern. Atypical evolution of the predominant length scale has to be connected to strong coupling with the weak deformations induced by the impinging jet on the free surface.

  18. HST observations of 3C 66B - A double-stranded optical jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macchetto, F.; Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Blades, J. C.; Boksenberg, A.

    1991-01-01

    The central region of the synchrotron jet in 3C 66B imaged with ultrahigh spatial resolution by the Faint Object Camera on the HST is discussed. A close correspondence between the general characteristics of the smoothed optical image and the radio map is observed, implying that the young and old relativistic particles occupy similar regions to within about 130 pc. Focus is placed on the double-stranded filamentary nature of the jet, and it is speculated that this could reflect edge-brightening effects due to enhanced radiation from a skinlike structure surrounding the jet. It is noted that the similarity of optical and radio morphologies points to the fact that localized particle acceleration occurs along the jet; however, the filamentary structure and a low filling factor of radiation agree with a model in which the electrons are accelerated within the nucleus and are transported along the jet in a channel having low magnetic field.

  19. Effects of external boundary layer flow on jet noise in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarohia, V.; Massier, P. F.

    1976-01-01

    The effects on jet flow of the external boundary layer flow emanating from the trailing edge of an engine cowl in flight has been shown to be the main reason for the disparity between predicted and experimental results obtained from flight measurements. Flight simulation experiments indicate that the external boundary layer flow tends to shield the jet flow in flight. This in turn modifies the jet noise source in flight and consequently the radiated noise from aircraft in flight. Close to 90 deg angle to the intake and in the forward quadrant, this study indicates that the far field jet noise and its spectrum scales approximately with the absolute jet velocity instead of the relative velocity as has been assumed in the existing prediction models.

  20. ADVECTION, EDGE, AND OASIS EFFECTS ON SPATIAL MOISTURE AND FLUX FIELDS FROM LIDAR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relatively narrow forest stands such as the riparian Tamarisk bordering the Rio Grande are subject to dry air advection from the adjacent semi-desert environment. The transport of warm dry air into the canopy has a profound effect upon the spatial properties of the moisture field and associated lat...