Science.gov

Sample records for jet ii x-ray

  1. Chandra Reveals Twin X-ray Jets in the Powerful FR-II Radio Galaxy 3C353

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, J.; Stawarz, L.; Harris, D.E.; Siemiginowska, A.; Ostrowski, M.; Swain, M.R.; Hardcastle, M.J.; Goodger, J.L.; Iwasawa, K.; Edwards, P.G.

    2008-06-13

    We report X-ray imaging of the powerful FR II radio galaxy 3C 353 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. 3C 353's two 4-inch wide and 2-feet long jets allow us to study in detail the internal structure of the large-scale relativistic outflows at both radio and X-ray photon energies with the sub-arcsecond spatial resolution provided by the VLA and Chandra instruments. In a 90 ks Chandra observation, we have detected X-ray emission from most radio structures in 3C 353, including the nucleus, the jet and the counterjet, the terminal jet regions (hotspots), and one radio lobe. We show that the detection of the X-ray emission associated with the radio knots and counterknots, which is most likely non-thermal in origin, puts several crucial constraints on the X-ray emission mechanisms in powerful large-scale jets of quasars and FR II sources. In particular, we show that this detection is inconsistent with the inverse-Compton model proposed in the literature, and instead implies a synchrotron origin of the X-ray jet photons. We also find that the width of the X-ray counterjet is possibly narrower than that measured in radio bands, that the radio-to-X-ray flux ratio decreases systematically downstream along the jets, and that there are substantial (kpc-scale) offsets between the positions of the X-ray and radio intensity maxima within each knot, whose magnitudes increase away from the nucleus. We discuss all these findings in the wider context of the physics of extragalactic jets, proposing some particular though not definitive solutions or interpretations for each problem. In general, we find that the synchrotron X-ray emission of extragalactic large-scale jets is not only shaped by the global hydrodynamical configuration of the outflows, but is also likely to be very sensitive to the microscopic parameters of the jet plasma. A complete, self-consistent model for the X-ray emission of extragalactic jets still remains elusive.

  2. Chandra Reveals Twin X-ray Jets in the Powerful FR II Radio Galaxy 3C 353

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, Jun

    2008-12-24

    We report X-ray imaging of the powerful FR II radio galaxy 3C 353 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. 3C 353's two 4''-wide and 2'-long jets allow us to study in detail the internal structure of the large-scale relativistic outflows at both radio and X-ray photon energies with the sub-arcsecond spatial resolution provided by the VLA and Chandra instruments. In a 90 ks Chandra observation, we have detected X-ray emission from most radio structures in 3C 353, including the nucleus, the jet and the counterjet, the terminal jet regions (hotspots), and one radio lobe. We show that the detection of the X-ray emission associated with the radio knots and counterknots, which is most likely non-thermal in origin, puts several crucial constraints on the X-ray emission mechanisms in powerful large-scale jets of quasars and FR II sources. In particular, we show that this detection is inconsistent with the inverse-Compton model proposed in the literature, and instead implies a synchrotron origin of the X-ray jet photons. We also find that the width of the X-ray counterjet is possibly narrower than that measured in radio bands, that the radio-to-X-ray flux ratio decreases systematically downstream along the jets, and that there are substantial (kpc-scale) offsets between the positions of the X-ray and radio intensity maxima within each knot, whose magnitudes increase away from the nucleus. We discuss all these findings in the wider context of the physics of extragalactic jets, proposing some particular though not definitive solutions or interpretations for each problem. In general, we find that the synchrotron X-ray emission of extragalactic large-scale jets is not only shaped by the global hydrodynamical configuration of the outflows, but is also likely to be very sensitive to the microscopic parameters of the jet plasma. A complete, self-consistent model for the X-ray emission of extragalactic jets still remains elusive.

  3. SOLAR X-RAY JETS, TYPE-II SPICULES, GRANULE-SIZE EMERGING BIPOLES, AND THE GENESIS OF THE HELIOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Falconer, David A.

    2011-04-10

    From Hinode observations of solar X-ray jets, Type-II spicules, and granule-size emerging bipolar magnetic fields in quiet regions and coronal holes, we advocate a scenario for powering coronal heating and the solar wind. In this scenario, Type-II spicules and Alfven waves are generated by the granule-size emerging bipoles (EBs) in the manner of the generation of X-ray jets by larger magnetic bipoles. From observations and this scenario, we estimate that Type-II spicules and their co-generated Alfven waves carry into the corona an area-average flux of mechanical energy of {approx}7 x 10{sup 5} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. This is enough to power the corona and solar wind in quiet regions and coronal holes, and therefore indicates that the granule-size EBs are the main engines that generate and sustain the entire heliosphere.

  4. AGN jet power, formation of X-ray cavities, and FR I/II dichotomy in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Yutaka; Kawakatu, Nozomu; Shlosman, Isaac

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the ability of jets in active galactic nuclei to break out of the ambient gas with sufficiently large advance velocities. Using observationally estimated jet power, we analyze 28 bright elliptical galaxies in nearby galaxy clusters. Because the gas density profiles in the innermost regions of galaxies have not been resolved so far, we consider two extreme cases for temperature and density profiles. We also follow two types of evolution for the jet cocoons: being driven by the pressure inside the cocoon [Fanaroff-Riley (FR) type I], and being driven by the jet momentum (FR type II). Our main result is that regardless of the assumed form of the density profiles, jets with observed powers of ≲1044 erg s-1 are not powerful enough to evolve as FR II sources. Instead, they evolve as FR I sources and appear to be decelerated below the buoyant velocities of the cocoons when jets were propagating through the central dense regions of the host galaxies. This explains why FR I sources are more frequent than FR II sources in clusters. Furthermore, we predict the sizes of X-ray cavities from the observed jet powers and compare them with the observed ones-they are consistent within a factor of two if the FR I type evolution is realized. Finally, we find that the jets with a power ≳1044 erg s-1 are less affected by the ambient medium, and some of them, but not all, could serve as precursors of the FR II sources.

  5. Magnetic Untwisting in Most Solar X-Ray Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Falconer, David; Robe, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    From 54 X-ray jets observed in the polar coronal holes by Hinode's X-Ray Telescope (XRT) during coverage in movies from Solar Dynamic Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) taken in its He II 304 Å band at a cadence of 12 s, we have established a basic characteristic of solar X-ray jets: untwisting motion in the spire. In this presentation, we show the progression of few of these X-ray jets in XRT images and track their untwisting in AIA He II images. From their structure displayed in their XRT movies, 19 jets were evidently standard jets made by interchange reconnection of the magnetic-arcade base with ambient open field, 32 were evidently blowout jets made by blowout eruption of the base arcade, and 3 were of ambiguous form. As was anticipated from the >10,000 km span of the base arcade in most polar X-ray jets and from the disparity of standard jets and blowout jets in their magnetic production, few of the standard X-ray jets (3 of 19) but nearly all of the blowout X-ray jets (29 of 32) carried enough cool (T is approximately 105 K) plasma to be seen in their He II movies. In the 32 X-ray jets that showed a cool component, the He II movies show 10-100 km/s untwisting motions about the axis of the spire in all 3 standard jets and in 26 of the 29 blowout jets. Evidently, the open magnetic field in nearly all blowout X-ray jets and probably in most standard X-ray jets carries transient twist. This twist apparently relaxes by propagating out along the open field as a torsional wave. High-resolution spectrograms and Dopplergrams have shown that most Type-II spicules have torsional motions of 10-30 km/s. Our observation of similar torsional motion in X-ray jets strengthens the case for Type-II spicules being made in the same way as X-ray jets, by blowout eruption of a twisted magnetic arcade in the spicule base and/or by interchange reconnection of the twisted base arcade with the ambient open field. This work was funded by NASA's Heliophysics Division

  6. Complete multiwavelength evolution of galactic black hole transients during outburst decay. II. Compact jets and X-ray variability properties

    SciTech Connect

    Dinçer, T.; Kalemci, E.; Tomsick, J. A.; Buxton, M. M.; Bailyn, C. D.

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the relation between compact jet emission and X-ray variability properties of all black hole transients with multiwavelength coverage during their outburst decays. We studied the evolution of all power spectral components (including low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations; QPOs), and related this evolution to changes in jet properties tracked by radio and infrared observations. We grouped sources according to their tracks in the radio/X-ray luminosity relation and show that the standards show stronger broadband X-ray variability than outliers at a given X-ray luminosity when the compact jet turns on. This trend is consistent with the internal shock model and can be important for the understanding of the presence of tracks in the radio/X-ray luminosity relation. We also observed that the total and the QPO rms amplitudes increase together during the earlier part of the outburst decay, but after the compact jet turns, either the QPO disappears or its rms amplitude decreases significantly while the total rms amplitudes remain high. We discuss these results with a scenario including a variable corona and a non-variable disk with a mechanism for the QPO separate from the mechanism that creates broad components. Finally, we evaluated the timing predictions of the magnetically dominated accretion flow model that can explain the presence of tracks in the radio/X-ray luminosity relation.

  7. The cool component and the dichotomy, lateral expansion, and axial rotation of solar X-ray jets

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.; Robe, Dominic

    2013-06-01

    We present results from a study of 54 polar X-ray jets that were observed in coronal X-ray movies from the X-ray Telescope on Hinode and had simultaneous coverage in movies of the cooler transition region (T ∼ 10{sup 5} K) taken in the He II 304 Å band of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on Solar Dynamics Observatory. These dual observations verify the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of polar X-ray jets previously found primarily from XRT movies alone. In accord with models of blowout jets and standard jets, the AIA 304 Å movies show a cool (T ∼ 10{sup 5} K) component in nearly all blowout X-ray jets and in a small minority of standard X-ray jets, obvious lateral expansion in blowout X-ray jets but none in standard X-ray jets, and obvious axial rotation in both blowout X-ray jets and standard X-ray jets. In our sample, the number of turns of axial rotation in the cool-component standard X-ray jets is typical of that in the blowout X-ray jets, suggesting that the closed bipolar magnetic field in the jet base has substantial twist not only in all blowout X-ray jets but also in many standard X-ray jets. We point out that our results for the dichotomy, lateral expansion, and axial rotation of X-ray jets add credence to published speculation that type-II spicules are miniature analogs of X-ray jets, are generated by granule-size emerging bipoles, and thereby carry enough energy to power the corona and solar wind.

  8. Chandra enables study of x-ray jets.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Daniel

    2010-04-20

    The exquisite angular resolution of the Chandra x-ray telescope has enabled the detection and study of resolved x-ray jets in a wide variety of astronomical systems. Chandra has detected extended jets in our galaxy from protostars, symbiotic binaries, neutron star pulsars, black hole binaries, extragalactic jets in radio sources, and quasars. The x-ray data play an essential role in deducing the emission mechanism of the jets, in revealing the interaction of jets with the intergalactic or intracluster media, and in studying the energy generation budget of black holes. PMID:20378839

  9. Chandra enables study of x-ray jets

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The exquisite angular resolution of the Chandra x-ray telescope has enabled the detection and study of resolved x-ray jets in a wide variety of astronomical systems. Chandra has detected extended jets in our galaxy from protostars, symbiotic binaries, neutron star pulsars, black hole binaries, extragalactic jets in radio sources, and quasars. The x-ray data play an essential role in deducing the emission mechanism of the jets, in revealing the interaction of jets with the intergalactic or intracluster media, and in studying the energy generation budget of black holes. PMID:20378839

  10. Surprise Discovery of an X-Ray Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Accreting, supermassive black holes that reside at galactic centers can power enormous jets, bright enough to be observed from vast distances away. The recent discovery of such a jet in X-ray wavelengths, without an apparent radio counterpart, has interesting implications for our understanding of how these distant behemoths shine.An Excess of X-RaysQuasar B3 0727+409 was serendipitously discovered to host an X-ray jet when a group of scientists, led by Aurora Simionescu (Institute of Space and Astronautical Sciences of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency), was examining Chandra observations of another object.The Chandra data reveal bright, compact, extended emission from the core of quasar B3 0727+409, with a projected length of ~100 kpc. There also appears to be further X-ray emission at a distance of ~280 kpc, which Simionescu and collaborators speculate may be the terminal hotspot of the jet.The quasar is located at a redshift of z=2.5 which makes this jet one of only a few high-redshift X-ray jets known to date. But what makes it especially intriguing is that, though the authors searched through both recent and archival radio observations of the quasar, the only radio counterpart they could find was a small feature close to the quasar core (which may be a knot in the jet). Unlike what is typical of quasar jets, there was no significant additional radio emission coinciding with the rest of the X-ray jet.Making Jets ShineX-ray-to-radio flux ratio vs. redshift, for X-ray quasar jets detected with Chandra. B3 0727+409 is shown in red (with and without the radio knot). The curves represent inverse-Compton scattering models with different magnetic field strengths. [Simionescu et al. 2016]What does this mean? To answer this, we must consider one of the outstanding questions about quasar jets: what radiation processes dominate their emission? One process possibly contributing to the X-ray emission is inverse-Compton scattering of low-energy cosmic microwave

  11. X-rays from protostellar jets: emission from continuous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonito, R.; Orlando, S.; Peres, G.; Favata, F.; Rosner, R.

    2007-02-01

    Context: Recently X-ray emission from protostellar jets has been detected with both XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites, but the physical mechanism which can give rise to this emission is still unclear. Aims: We performed an extensive exploration of the parameter space for the main parameters influencing the jet/ambient medium interaction. Aims include: 1) to constrain the jet/ambient medium interaction regimes leading to the X-ray emission observed in Herbig-Haro objects in terms of the emission by a shock forming at the interaction front between a continuous supersonic jet and the surrounding medium; 2) to derive detailed predictions to be compared with optical and X-ray observations of protostellar jets; 3) to get insight into the protostellar jet's physical conditions. Methods: We performed a set of two-dimensional hydrodynamic numerical simulations, in cylindrical coordinates, modeling supersonic jets ramming into a uniform ambient medium. The model takes into account the most relevant physical effects, namely thermal conduction and radiative losses. Results: Our model explains the observed X-ray emission from protostellar jets in a natural way. In particular, we find that a protostellar jet that is less dense than the ambient medium well reproduces the observations of the nearest Herbig-Haro object, HH 154, and allows us to make detailed predictions of a possible X-ray source proper motion (v_sh ≈500 km s-1) detectable with Chandra. Furthermore, our results suggest that the simulated protostellar jets which best reproduce the X-rays observations cannot drive molecular outflows.

  12. The Spectacular Radio-near-IR-X-Ray Jet of 3C 111: The X-Ray Emission Mechanism and Jet Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clautice, Devon; Perlman, Eric S.; Georganopoulos, Markos; Lister, Matthew L.; Tombesi, Francesco; Cara, Mihai; Marshall, Herman L.; Hogan, Brandon; Kazanas, Demos

    2016-08-01

    Relativistic jets are the most energetic manifestation of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) phenomenon. AGN jets are observed from the radio through gamma-rays and carry copious amounts of matter and energy from the sub-parsec central regions out to the kiloparsec and often megaparsec scale galaxy and cluster environs. While most spatially resolved jets are seen in the radio, an increasing number have been discovered to emit in the optical/near-IR and/or X-ray bands. Here we discuss a spectacular example of this class, the 3C 111 jet, housed in one of the nearest, double-lobed FR II radio galaxies known. We discuss new, deep Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations that reveal both near-IR and X-ray emission from several components of the 3C 111 jet, as well as both the northern and southern hotspots. Important differences are seen between the morphologies in the radio, X-ray, and near-IR bands. The long (over 100 kpc on each side), straight nature of this jet makes it an excellent prototype for future, deep observations, as it is one of the longest such features seen in the radio, near-IR/optical, and X-ray bands. Several independent lines of evidence, including the X-ray and broadband spectral shape as well as the implied velocity of the approaching hotspot, lead us to strongly disfavor the EC/CMB model and instead favor a two-component synchrotron model to explain the observed X-ray emission for several jet components. Future observations with NuSTAR, HST, and Chandra will allow us to further constrain the emission mechanisms.

  13. Formation and Destruction of Jets in X-ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kylafix, N. D.; Contopoulos, I.; Kazanas, D.; Christodoulou, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    Context. Neutron-star and black-hole X-ray binaries (XRBs) exhibit radio jets, whose properties depend on the X-ray spectral state e.nd history of the source. In particular, black-hole XRBs emit compact, 8teady radio jets when they are in the so-called hard state. These jets become eruptive as the sources move toward the soft state, disappear in the soft state, and then re-appear when the sources return to the hard state. The jets from neutron-star X-ray binaries are typically weaker radio emitters than the black-hole ones at the same X-ray luminosity and in some cases radio emission is detected in the soft state. Aims. Significant phenomenology has been developed to describe the spectral states of neutron-star and black-hole XRBs, and there is general agreement about the type of the accretion disk around the compact object in the various spectral states. We investigate whether the phenomenology describing the X-ray emission on one hand and the jet appearance and disappearance on the other can be put together in a consistent physical picture. Methods. We consider the so-called Poynting-Robertson cosmic battery (PRCB), which has been shown to explain in a natural way the formation of magnetic fields in the disks of AGNs and the ejection of jets. We investigate whether the PRCB can also explain the [ormation, destruction, and variability or jets in XRBs. Results. We find excellent agreement between the conditions under which the PRCB is efficient (i.e., the type of the accretion disk) and the emission or destruction of the r.adio jet. Conclusions. The disk-jet connection in XRBs can be explained in a natural way using the PRCB.

  14. UV and Soft X-ray Polar Coronal Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzycka, D.; Raymond, J. C.; Cranmer, S. R.; Li, J.

    2002-01-01

    Coronal jets are spectacular dynamic events originating from different structures in the solar corona. Jetlike phenomena were observed by various instruments aboard SOHO, and the X--ray jets were discovered by Yohkoh's soft X--ray telescope (SXT). The relation among the different types of jets is still not yet clear. We present ultraviolet spectroscopy of polar coronal jets obtained by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS/SOHO) at heights in the corona ranging from 1.5 Rodot to 2.5 Rodot. The jets appear to originate near flaring ultraviolet bright points within polar coronal holes and were recorded by UVCS as a significant enhancement in the integrated intensities of the strongest coronal emission lines: mainly H I Ly alpha and O VI lambda lambda 1032,1037. A number of the detected jets are correlated with EIT Fe XII 195Å and LASCO C2 white-light events. Our modeling of the jet's observable properties provided estimates of the jet plasma conditions, as well as the initial electron temperature and heating rate required to reproduce the observed O VI ionization state. We discuss possible relationship between the polar ultraviolet and X--ray jets based on the results of coordinated SXT and UVCS observations in December 1996. We compare their properties and consider the magnetic reconnection models, developed for X--ray jets, as a model for UV jet formation. This work is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under grant NAG5--10093 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, and by the ESA PRODEX program (Swiss contribution).

  15. New X-Ray Detector for Caltech Plasma Jet Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Ryan; Bellan, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a process that occurs in plasmas where magnetic field lines break and re-attach to form a different topology having lower energy. Since the magnetic field is changing very fast in the reconnection region, Faraday's Law states that there is a large electric field that accelerates electrons which can then create x-rays. X-rays have been previously observed in the Caltech plasma jet experiment and in similar experiments. We have assembled a new detector consisting of a scintillator that is more than 10 times the volume of the previous one and a light guide that allows the photomultiplier tube to be 2 meters from the experiment so that electrical noise is reduced. The setup has been tested using a weak natural Thorium source and will soon be mounted on the Caltech jet experiment in front of a kapton vacuum window that allows x-rays to pass. Kapton has good transmission above 5 KeV.

  16. A KPC-Scale X-Ray Jet in the BL Lac Source S5 2007+777

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambruna, Rita M.; Donato, Davide; Cheung, C.C.; Tavecchio, F.; Maraschi, L.

    2008-01-01

    X-ray jets in AGN are commonly observed in FRII and FRI radiogalaxies, but rarely in BL Lacs, most probably due to their orientation close to the line of sight and the ensuing foreshortening effects. Only three BL Lacs are known so far to contain a kpc-scale X-ray jet. In this paper, we present the evidence for the existence of a fourth extended X-ray jet in the classical radio-selected source S5 2007+777, which for its hybrid FRI/II radio morphology has been classified as a HYMOR (HYbrid MOrphology Radio source). Our Chandra ACISS observations of this source revealed an X-ray counterpart to the 19"-long radio jet. Interestingly, the X-ray properties of the kpc-scale jet in S5 2007+777 are very similar to those observed in FRII jets. First, the X-ray morphology closely mirrors the radio one, with the X-rays being concentrated in the discrete radio knots. Second, the X-ray continuum of the jet/brightest knot is described by a very hard power law, with photon index gamma(sub x) approximately 1. Third, the optical upper limit from archival HST data implies a concave radio-to-X-ray SED. If the X-ray emission is attributed to IC/CMB with equipartition, strong beaming (delta= 13) is required, implying a very large scale (Mpc) jet. The beaming requirement can be somewhat relaxed assuming a magnetic field lower than equipartition. Alternatively, synchrotron emission from a second population of very high-energy electrons is viable. Comparison to other HYMOR jets detected with Chandra is discussed, as well as general implications for the origin of the FRI/II division.

  17. Spectacular X-ray Jet Points Toward Cosmic Energy Booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-06-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has revealed a spectacular luminous spike of X rays that emanates from the vicinity of a giant black hole in the center of the radio galaxy Pictor A. The spike, or jet, is due to a beam of particles that streaks across hundreds of thousands of light years of intergalactic space toward a brilliant X-ray hot spot that marks its end point. Pictor A Image Press Image and Caption The hot spot is at least 800 thousand light years (8 times the diameter of our Milky Way galaxy) away from where the jet originates. It is thought to represent the advancing head of the jet, which brightens conspicuously where it plows into the tenuous gas of intergalactic space. The jet, powered by the giant black hole, originates from a region of space no bigger than the solar system. "Both the brightness and the spectrum of the X rays are very different from what theory predicts," Professor Andrew Wilson reported today at the 196th national meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Rochester, New York. Wilson, of the University of Maryland, College Park, along with Dr. Patrick Shopbell and Dr. Andrew Young, also of the University of Maryland, are submitting an article on this research to the Astrophysical Journal. "The Chandra observations are telling us that something out there is producing many more high-energy particles than we expected," said Wilson. One possible explanation for the X rays is that shock waves along the side and head of the X-ray jet are accelerating electrons and possibly protons to speeds close to that of light. In the process the electrons are boosted to energies as high as 100 million times their own rest mass energy. These electrons lose their energy rapidly as they produce X rays, so this could be the first direct evidence of this process so far outside a galaxy. The hot spot has been seen with optical and radio telescopes. Radio telescopes have also observed a faint jet. Jets are thought to be produced by the extreme

  18. A disc corona-jet model for the radio/X-ray correlation in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Erlin; Liu, B. F.

    2015-04-01

    The observed tight radio/X-ray correlation in the low spectral state of some black hole X-ray binaries implies the strong coupling of the accretion and jet. The correlation of L_R ∝ L_X^{˜ 0.5-0.7} was well explained by the coupling of a radiatively inefficient accretion flow and a jet. Recently, however, a growing number of sources show more complicated radio/X-ray correlations, e.g. L_R ∝ L_X^{˜ 1.4} for LX/LEdd ≳ 10-3, which is suggested to be explained by the coupling of a radiatively efficient accretion flow and a jet. In this work, we interpret the deviation from the initial radio/X-ray correlation for LX/LEdd ≳ 10-3 with a detailed disc corona-jet model. In this model, the disc and corona are radiatively and dynamically coupled. Assuming a fraction of the matter in the accretion flow, η ≡ dot{M}_jet/dot{M}, is ejected to form the jet, we can calculate the emergent spectrum of the disc corona-jet system. We calculate LR and LX at different dot{M}, adjusting η to fit the observed radio/X-ray correlation of the black hole X-ray transient H1743-322 for LX/LEdd > 10-3. It is found that always the X-ray emission is dominated by the disc corona and the radio emission is dominated by the jet. We noted that the value of η for the deviated radio/X-ray correlation for LX/LEdd > 10-3 is systematically less than that of the case for LX/LEdd < 10-3, which is consistent with the general idea that the jet is often relatively suppressed at the high-luminosity phase in black hole X-ray binaries.

  19. JET x-ray pulse-height analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasini, D.; Gill, R. D.; Holm, J.; van der Goot, E.; Weller, A.

    1988-05-01

    The pulse-height-analysis (PHA) system installed on the Joint European Torus (JET) measures the plasma soft x-ray emission (2-30 keV) with an energy resolution of 450 eV and a time resolution of 200 ms. This diagnostic includes three Si(Li) detectors, equipped with sets of remotely controlled apertures and filters, which view the plasma in the midhorizontal plane of the torus along a single tangential line of sight. Automatic analysis of the spectra yields the central electron temperature, the central concentrations of chlorine, chromium, and nickel, and Zeff. Simulations of the measured spectra using a radiation code provides the basis to construct a consistent picture of the soft x-ray emission in the central region of JET plasmas.

  20. Giant Radio Sources as a Probe of the Cosmological Evolution of the IGM. II. The Observational Constraint on the Model of Radio-Jets Propagation through the X-ray Halo-IGM Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuligowska, E.; Jamrozy, M.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D.; Machalski, J.

    2009-12-01

    Three limited samples of high-redshift radio sources of FRII-type are used to constrain the dynamical model for the jets' propagation through the two-media environment: the X-ray emitting halo with the power-law density profile surrounding the parent galaxy and the much hotter intergalactic medium (IGM) of a constant density. The model, originally developed by Gopal-Krishna and Wiita, is modified adopting modern values of its free parameters taken from recent X-ray measurements with the XMM-Newton and Chandra Observatories. We find that (i) giant-sized radio sources (≍1 Mpc) exist at redshifts up to z≍2, (ii) all newly identified the largest radio sources with 1jets than peculiar environmental conditions (e.g., voids) in the IGM. The extreme powerful jets may testify to a dominant role of the accretion processes onto black holes in earlier cosmological epochs.

  1. Toward Active X-ray Telescopes II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Aldroft, Thomas L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Button, Timothy W.; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Davis, William N.; Doel, Peter; Feldman, Charlotte H.; Freeman, Mark D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Johnson-Wilke, Raegan L.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Lillie, Charles F.; Michette, Alan G.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Sanmartin, Daniel Rodriguez; Saha, Timo T.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan E.; Ulmer, Melville P.; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Willingale, Richard; Zhang, William W.

    2012-01-01

    In the half century since the initial discovery of an astronomical (non-solar) x-ray source, the sensitivity for detection of cosmic x-ray sources has improved by ten orders of magnitude. Largely responsible for this dramatic progress has been the refinement of the (grazing-incidence) focusing x-ray telescope. The future of x-ray astronomy relies upon the development of x-ray telescopes with larger aperture areas (greater than 1 m2) and finer angular resolution (less than 1.). Combined with the special requirements of grazing-incidence optics, the mass and envelope constraints of space-borne telescopes render such advances technologically challenging.requiring precision fabrication, alignment, and assembly of large areas (greater than 100 m2) of lightweight (approximately 1 kg m2 areal density) mirrors. Achieving precise and stable alignment and figure control may entail active (in-space adjustable) x-ray optics. This paper discusses relevant programmatic and technological issues and summarizes progress toward active x-ray telescopes.

  2. Thermal X-ray emission from a baryonic jet: a self-consistent multicolour spectral model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabibullin, I.; Medvedev, P.; Sazonov, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present a publicly available spectral model for thermal X-ray emission from a baryonic jet in an X-ray binary system, inspired by the microquasar SS 433. The jet is assumed to be strongly collimated (half-opening angle Θ ˜ 1°) and mildly relativistic (bulk velocity β = Vb/c ˜ 0.03-0.3). Its X-ray spectrum is found by integrating over thin slices of constant temperature, radiating in optically thin coronal regime. The temperature profile along the jet and corresponding differential emission measure distribution are calculated with full account for gas cooling due to expansion and radiative losses. Since the model predicts both the spectral shape and luminosity of the jet's emission, its normalization is not a free parameter if the source distance is known. We also explore the possibility of using simple X-ray observables (such as flux ratios in different energy bands) to constrain physical parameters of the jet (e.g. gas temperature and density at its base) without broad-band fitting of high-resolution spectra. We demonstrate this approach in application to Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer spectra of SS 433 in its `edge-on' precession phase, when the contribution from non-jet spectral components is expected to be low. Our model provides a reasonable fit to the 1-3 keV data, while some residuals remain at higher energies, which may be partially attributed to a putative reflection component. Besides SS 433, the model might be used for describing jet components in spectra of other Galactic X-ray binary systems (e.g. 4U 1630-47), ULXs (e.g. Holmberg II X-1), and candidate SS 433 analogues like S26 in NGC 7793 and the radio transient in M82.

  3. Linking jet emission and X-ray properties in the peculiar neutron star X-ray binary Circinus X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleri, Paolo; Tudose, Valeriu; Fender, Rob; van der Klis, Michiel; Jonker, Peter G.

    2009-10-01

    We present the results of simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the peculiar Z-type neutron star X-ray binary Cir X-1, observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer satellite and the Australia Telescope Compact Array in 2000 October and 2002 December. We identify typical Z-source behaviour in the power density spectra as well as characteristic Z patterns drawn in an X-ray hardness-intensity diagram. Power spectra typical of bright atoll sources have also been identified at orbital phases after the periastron passage, while orbital phases before the periastron passage are characterized by power spectra that are typical neither of Z nor of atoll sources. We investigate the coupling between the X-ray and the radio properties, focusing on three orbital phases when an enhancement of the radio flux density has been detected, to test the link between the inflow (X-ray) and the outflow (radio jet) to/from the compact object. In two out of three cases, we associate the presence of the radio jet to a spectral transition in the X-rays, although the transition does not precede the radio flare, as detected in other Z sources. An analogous behaviour has recently been found in the black hole candidate GX 339-4. In the third case, the radio light curve shows a similar shape to the X-ray light curve. We discuss our results in the context of jet models, considering also black hole candidates.

  4. Blowout Jets: Hinode X-Ray Jets that Don't Fit the Standard Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Nearly half of all H-alpha macrospicules in polar coronal holes appear to be miniature filament eruptions. This suggests that there is a large class of X-ray jets in which the jet-base magnetic arcade undergoes a blowout eruption as in a CME, instead of remaining static as in most solar X-ray jets, the standard jets that fit the model advocated by Shibata. Along with a cartoon depicting the standard model, we present a cartoon depicting the signatures expected of blowout jets in coronal X-ray images. From Hinode/XRT movies and STEREO/EUVI snapshots in polar coronal holes, we present examples of (1) X-ray jets that fit the standard model, and (2) X-ray jets that do not fit the standard model but do have features appropriate for blowout jets. These features are (1) a flare arcade inside the jet-base arcade in addition to the small flare arcade (bright point) outside that standard jets have, (2) a filament of cool (T is approximately 80,000K) plasma that erupts from the core of the jetbase arcade, and (3) an extra jet strand that should not be made by the reconnection for standard jets but could be made by reconnection between the ambient unipolar open field and the opposite-polarity leg of the filament-carrying flux-rope core field of the erupting jet-base arcade. We therefore infer that these non-standard jets are blowout jets, jets made by miniature versions of the sheared-core-arcade eruptions that make CMEs

  5. Large scale radio/X-ray jets in microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, Stephane; Tzioumis, Anastasios; Fender, Rob; Kaaret, Philip; Orosz, Jerry; Tomsick, John; Loh, Alan

    2014-10-01

    The discovery with ATCA of large scale radio lobes around the microquasar XTE J1550-564 has led to the discovery with Chandra (for the first time) of moving relativistic X-ray jets in a galactic accreting source. The lobes are likely due to the interaction of relativistic plasma with the ISM. This ATCA proposal has allowed similar discovery in H 1743-322, and therefore that it maybe a common occurrence in the Galaxy. Recently, we have witnessed with ATCA the formation of similar lobes in the black hole GX 339-4. We propose to use the Compact Array to continue our search for radio lobes in microquasars that have been active in the past years. The proposed observations are optimized to discover and study (flux evolution, morphology, SED, proper motion, ...) new radio lobes from microquasars. This will have implications not only for the study of jets from Galactic X-ray binaries, but also for our understanding of relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei (AGN).

  6. Determining the X-ray Emission Mechanism for the Large-Scale Quasar Jet of 3C 111

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clautice, Devon; Perlman, Eric S.; Georganopoulos, Markos; Lister, Matthew L.; Tombesi, Francesco; Cara, Mihai; Marshall, Herman L.; Hogan, Brandon Scott; Kazanas, Demos

    2016-04-01

    Relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei (AGN) are powerful phenomena that transport prodigious amounts of energy and mass from the core of a galaxy out to kiloparsec or even megaparsec distances. While most spatially-resolved jets are seen in the radio, an increasing number have been discovered to emit in the optical/near-IR and/or X-ray bands. Here we discuss a spectacular example of this class, the 3C 111 jet, housed in one of the nearest, double-lobed FR II radio galaxies known. The jet itself extends over 100 kpc on each side, making it one of the longest to be seen in the radio, near-IR/optical and X-ray bands. Its length and straight nature makes it ideal for studying jet physics over many kiloparsecs. We discuss new, deep Chandra and HST observations that reveal both near-IR and X-ray emission from several components of the 3C 111 jet, as well as both the approaching and receding hotspots. The near-IR and X-ray emission in the jet is restricted to several knots, and there are important differences between the morphologies seen in the radio, near-IR, and X-ray bands. In several jet regions we detect X-ray maxima significantly upstream of the radio maxima. We analyze the broad-band spectral energy distributions of the jet components and the X-ray spectra of the brightest regions. We compare competing models of emission as they relate to frequency-dependent relativistic beaming. The morphological differences coupled with the X-ray spectral slopes lead us to favor the two-component synchrotron model and disfavor the IC/CMB model.

  7. X-ray supermirrors for BESSY II

    SciTech Connect

    Erko, A.; Schaefers, F.; Vidal, B.; Yakshin, A.; Pietsch, U.; Mahler, W.

    1995-10-01

    X-ray multilayer supermirrors for the energy range up to 20 keV have been theoretically studied and experimentally measured with synchrotron radiation. A multilayer mirror with 50 W/Si bilayers with different thicknesses on the Si substrate has a smooth reflectivity of up to 32% in the whole energy range from 5 to 22 keV at a grazing incidence angle of 0.32{degree} which is considerably larger than using total external reflection. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  8. Large scale radio/X-ray jets in microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, Stephane; Tzioumis, Anastasios; Fender, Rob; Kaaret, Philip; Orosz, Jerry; Tomsick, John

    2012-10-01

    The discovery with ATCA of large scale radio lobes around the microquasar XTE J1550-564 has led to the discovery with Chandra (for the first time) of moving relativistic X-ray jets in a galactic accreting source. The lobes are likely due to the interaction of relativistic plasma with the ISM. This ATCA proposal has allowed similar discovery in H 1743-322, and therefore that it maybe a common occurrence in the Galaxy. Recently, we have witnessed with ATCA the formation of similar lobes in the black hole GX 339-4. We propose to use the Compact Array to continue our search for radio lobes in microquasars that have been active in the past years.

  9. Large scale radio/X-ray jets in microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, Stephane; Tzioumis, Anastasios; Fender, Rob; Kaaret, Philip; Tomsick, John; Orosz, Jerry

    2011-10-01

    The discovery with ATCA of large scale radio lobes around the microquasar XTE J1550-564 has led to the discovery with Chandra (for the first time) of moving relativistic X-ray jets in a galactic accreting source. The lobes are likely due to the interaction of relativistic plasma with the ISM. This ATCA proposal has allowed similar discovery in H 1743-322, and therefore that it maybe a common occurrence in the Galaxy. Recently, we have witnessed with ATCA the formation of similar lobes in the black hole GX 339-4. We propose to use the Compact Array to continue our search for radio lobes in microquasars that have been active in the past years.

  10. Large scale radio/X-ray jets in microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, Stephane; Tzioumis, Anastasios; Fender, Rob; Kaaret, Philip; Orosz, Jerry; Tomsick, John

    2013-10-01

    The discovery with ATCA of large scale radio lobes around the microquasar XTE J1550-564 has led to the discovery with Chandra (for the first time) of moving relativistic X-ray jets in a galactic accreting source. The lobes are likely due to the interaction of relativistic plasma with the ISM. This ATCA proposal has allowed similar discovery in H 1743-322, and therefore that it maybe a common occurrence in the Galaxy. Recently, we have witnessed with ATCA the formation of similar lobes in the black hole GX 339-4. We propose to use the Compact Array to continue our search for radio lobes in microquasars that have been active in the past years.

  11. Large scale radio/X-ray jets in microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, Stephane; Tzioumis, Anastasios; Fender, Rob; Kaaret, Philip; Tomsick, John; Orosz, Jerry

    2011-04-01

    The discovery with ATCA of large scale radio lobes around the microquasar XTE J1550-564 has led to the discovery with Chandra (for the first time) of moving relativistic X-ray jets in a galactic accreting source. The lobes are likely due to the interaction of relativistic plasma with the ISM. This ATCA proposal has allowed similar discovery in H 1743-322, and therefore that it maybe a common occurrence in the Galaxy. Recently, we have witnessed with ATCA the formation of similar lobes in the black hole GX 339-4. We propose to use the Compact Array to continue our search for radio lobes in microquasars that have been active in the past years.

  12. Large scale radio/X-ray jets in microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, Stephane; Tzioumis, Anastasios; Fender, Rob; Kaaret, Philip; Orosz, Jerry; Tomsick, John

    2013-04-01

    The discovery with ATCA of large scale radio lobes around the microquasar XTE J1550-564 has led to the discovery with Chandra (for the first time) of moving relativistic X-ray jets in a galactic accreting source. The lobes are likely due to the interaction of relativistic plasma with the ISM. This ATCA proposal has allowed similar discovery in H 1743-322, and therefore that it maybe a common occurrence in the Galaxy. Recently, we have witnessed with ATCA the formation of similar lobes in the black hole GX 339-4. We propose to use the Compact Array to continue our search for radio lobes in microquasars that have been active in the past years.

  13. Large scale radio/X-ray jets in microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, Stephane; Tzioumis, Anastasios; Fender, Rob; Kaaret, Philip; Tomsick, John; Orosz, Jerry

    2012-04-01

    The discovery with ATCA of large scale radio lobes around the microquasar XTE J1550-564 has led to the discovery with Chandra (for the first time) of moving relativistic X-ray jets in a galactic accreting source. The lobes are likely due to the interaction of relativistic plasma with the ISM. This ATCA proposal has allowed similar discovery in H 1743-322, and therefore that it maybe a common occurrence in the Galaxy. Recently, we have witnessed with ATCA the formation of similar lobes in the black hole GX 339-4. We propose to use the Compact Array to continue our search for radio lobes in microquasars that have been active in the past years.

  14. NSLS-II X-Ray Diagnostics Development

    SciTech Connect

    ILINSKI, P.

    2011-03-28

    NSLS-II x-ray diagnostics will provide continuous online data of electron beam dimensions, which will be used to derive electron beam emittance and energy spread. It will also provide information of electron beam tilt for coupling evaluation. X-ray diagnostics will be based on imaging of bending magnet and three-pole wiggler synchrotron radiation sources. Diagnostics from three-pole wiggler source will be used to derive particles energy spread. Beta and dispersion functions will have to be evaluated for emittance and particles energy spread calculations. Due to small vertical source sizes imaging need to be performed in x-ray energy range. X-ray optics with high numerical aperture, such as compound refractive lens, will be used to achieve required spatial resolution. Optical setups with different magnifications in horizontal and vertical directions fill be employed to deal with large aspect ratio of the source. X-ray diagnostics setup will include x-ray imaging optics, monochromatization, x-ray imaging and recording components.

  15. The 300 Kpc Long X-Ray Jet in PKS 1127-145, Z=1.18 Quasar: Constraining X-Ray Emission Models

    SciTech Connect

    Siemiginowska, Aneta; Stawarz, Lukasz; Cheung, C.C.; Harris, D.E.; Sikora, Marek; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Bechtold, Jill; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.

    2006-11-20

    We present a {approx} 100 ksec Chandra X-ray observation and new VLA radio data of the large scale, 300 kpc long X-ray jet in PKS 1127-145, a radio loud quasar at redshift z=1.18. With this deep X-ray observation we now clearly discern the complex X-ray jet morphology and see substructure within the knots. The X-ray and radio jet intensity profiles are seen to be strikingly different with the radio emission peaking strongly at the two outer knots while the X-ray emission is strongest in the inner jet region. The jet X-ray surface brightness gradually decreases by an order of magnitude going out from the core. The new X-ray data contain sufficient counts to do spectral analysis of the key jet features. The X-ray energy index of the inner jet is relatively flat with {alpha}{sub x} = 0.66 {+-} 0.15 and steep in the outer jet with {alpha}{sub x} = 1.0 {+-} 0.2. We discuss the constraints implied by the new data on the X-ray emission models and conclude that ''one-zone'' models fail and at least a two component model is needed to explain the jet's broad-band emission. We propose that the X-ray emission originates in the jet proper while the bulk of the radio emission comes from a surrounding jet sheath. We also consider intermittent jet activity as a possible cause of the observed jet morphology.

  16. Observations of breakup processes of liquid jets using real-time X-ray radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Char, J. M.; Kuo, K. K.; Hsieh, K. C.

    1988-01-01

    To unravel the liquid-jet breakup process in the nondilute region, a newly developed system of real-time X-ray radiography, an advanced digital image processor, and a high-speed video camera were used. Based upon recorded X-ray images, the inner structure of a liquid jet during breakup was observed. The jet divergence angle, jet breakup length, and fraction distributions along the axial and transverse directions of the liquid jets were determined in the near-injector region. Both wall- and free-jet tests were conducted to study the effect of wall friction on the jet breakup process.

  17. The transmission X-ray microscope at BESSY II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttmann, P.; Niemann, B.; Rehbein, S.; Knöchel, C.; Rudolph, D.; Schmahl, G.

    2003-03-01

    The new transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) at BESSY II is the first one using soft X-rays in the water window region at an undulator beamline. For this, the condenser monochromator has been adapted to the highly collimated X-ray beam of the undulator U41. This is done by using a rotating condenser (RK) which can match the numerical aperture of any micro objective zone plate [1]. The actual setup of the TXM is given in this report. Several beam diagnostic instruments have been incorporated into the beamline and the microscope to adjust the optical elements and to study the behaviour of the complete system. The results of the characterization done so far will be presented as well as first images of applications will be shown.

  18. An X-ray IMAGING SURVEY OF QUASAR JETS: TESTING THE INVERSE COMPTON MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, H. L.; Gelbord, J. M.; Schwartz, D. A.; Worrall, D. M.; Birkinshaw, M.; Murphy, D. W.; Godfrey, L.; Jauncey, D. L.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Perlman, E. S. E-mail: jgelbord@astro.psu.edu E-mail: D. Worrall@bristol.ac.uk E-mail: david.murphy@jpl.nasa.gov E-mail: David.Jauncey@csiro.au E-mail: eperlman@fit.edu

    2011-03-15

    We present results from continued Chandra X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of a flux-limited sample of flat spectrum radio-emitting quasars with jet-like extended structure. X-rays are detected from 24 of the 39 jets observed so far. We compute the distribution of {alpha} {sub rx}, the spectral index between the X-ray and radio bands, showing that it is broad, extending at least from 0.8 to 1.2. While there is a general trend that the radio brightest jets are detected most often, it is clear that predicting the X-ray flux from the radio knot flux densities is risky, so a shallow X-ray survey is the most effective means for finding jets that are X-ray bright. We test the model in which the X-rays result from inverse Compton (IC) scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons by relativistic electrons in the jet moving with a high bulk Lorentz factor nearly along the line of sight. Depending on how the jet magnetic fields vary with z, the observed X-ray to radio flux ratios do not follow the redshift dependence expected from the IC-CMB model. For a subset of our sample with known superluminal motion based on VLBI observations, we estimate the angle of the kiloparsec-scale jet to the line of sight by considering the additional information in the bends observed between parsec- and kiloparsec-scale jets. These angles are sometimes much smaller than estimates based on the IC-CMB model with a Lorentz factor of 15, indicating that these jets may decelerate significantly from parsec scales to kiloparsec scales.

  19. Large-scale X-ray jets from Galactic black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaaret, P.; Corbel, S.; Tomsick, J. A.; Butt, Y.; Fender, R. P.; Lazendic, J.; Miller, J. M.; Orosz, J. A.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Wijnands, Rudy

    2004-06-01

    Observations of jets from stellar-mass sources located in our Galaxy offer a unique opportunity to study the dynamical evolution of relativistic jets on time scales inaccessible for active galactic nuclei jets, with implications for our understanding of the dynamics and energetics of relativistic jets from Galactic x-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei. We review recent observations of X-ray jets from Galactic black hole candidates. Spatially resolved X-ray spectra from SS 433 have provided evidence for re-heating in a hadronic jet and may offer an observational probe of jet collimation. A large-scale jet from the now quiescent transient 4U 1755-33 appears to indicate continual jet formation over a period of 10-30 years. Detection of a jet from XTE J1550-564 has provided the first direct measurement of gradual deceleration of a jet from a black hole and strong evidence for the re-energization of jet particles to energies up to 10 TeV at sites far from the jet origin.

  20. New Chandra observations of the jet in 3C273. 1. Softer X-ray than radio spectra and the X-ray emission mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Jester, Sebastian; Harris, D.E.; Marshall, H.L.; Meisenheimer, K.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2006-05-01

    The jet in 3C273 is a high-power quasar jet with radio, optical and X-ray emission whose size and brightness allow a detailed study of the emission processes acting in it. We present deep Chandra observations of this jet and analyze the spectral properties of the jet emission from radio through X-rays. We find that the X-ray spectra are significantly softer than the radio spectra in all regions of the bright part of the jet except for the first bright ''knot A'', ruling out a model in which the X-ray emission from the entire jet arises from beamed inverse-Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons in a single-zone jet flow. Within two-zone jet models, we find that a synchrotron origin for the jet's X-rays requires fewer additional assumptions than an inverse-Compton model, especially if velocity shear leads to efficient particle acceleration in jet flows.

  1. Small-animal tomography with a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, D. H.; Lundström, U.; Westermark, U.; Takman, P. A. C.; Burvall, A.; Arsenian Henriksson, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2012-03-01

    X-ray tomography of small animals is an important tool for medical research. For high-resolution x-ray imaging of few-cm-thick samples such as, e.g., mice, high-brightness x-ray sources with energies in the few-10-keV range are required. In this paper we perform the first small-animal imaging and tomography experiments using liquid-metal-jet-anode x-ray sources. This type of source shows promise to increase the brightness of microfocus x-ray systems, but present sources are typically optimized for an energy of 9 keV. Here we describe the details of a high-brightness 24-keV electron-impact laboratory microfocus x-ray source based on continuous operation of a heated liquid-In/Ga-jet anode. The source normally operates with 40 W of electron-beam power focused onto the metal jet, producing a 7×7 μm2 FWHM x-ray spot. The peak spectral brightness is 4 × 109 photons / ( s × mm2 × mrad2 × 0.1%BW) at the 24.2 keV In Kα line. We use the new In/Ga source and an existing Ga/In/Sn source for high-resolution imaging and tomography of mice.

  2. Pinpointing the base of the AGN jets through general relativistic X-ray reverberation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmanoulopoulos, D.

    2015-03-01

    Many theoretical models of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) predict that the X-ray corona, lying above the black hole, constitutes the base of the X-ray jet. Thus, by studying the exact geometry of the close black hole environment, we can pinpoint the launching site of the jet. Detection of negative X-ray reverberation time delays (i.e. soft band X-ray variations lagging behind the corresponding hard band X-ray variations) can yield significant information about the geometrical properties of the AGN, such as the location of the X-ray source, as well as the physical properties of the the black hole, such as its mass and spin. In the frame-work of the lamp-post geometry, I present the first systematic X-ray time-lag modelling results of an ensemble of 12 AGN, using a fully general relativistic (GR) ray tracing approach for the estimation of the systems' response functions. By combing these state-of-the art GR response models with statistically innovative fitting routines, I derive the geometrical layout of the close BH environment for each source, unveiling the position of the AGN jet-base.

  3. Miniature Filament Eruptions and their Reconnections in X-Ray Jets: Evidence for a New Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the onset of approximately10 random X-ray jets observed by Hinode/XRT. Each jet was near the limb in a polar coronal hole, and showed a ``bright point'' in an edge of the base of the jet, as is typical for previously-observed X-ray jets. We examined SDO/AIA EUV images of each of the jets over multiple AIA channels, including 304 Ang, which detects chromospheric emissions, and 171, 193, and 211 Ang, which detect cooler-coronal emissions. We find the jets to result from eruptions of miniature (size less than approximately 10 arcsec) filaments from the bases of the jets. Much of the erupting-filament material forms a chromospheric-temperature jet. In the cool-coronal channels, often the filament appears in absorption and the jet in emission. The jet bright point forms at the location from which the miniature filament is ejected, analogous to the formation of a standard solar flare in the wake of the eruption of a typical larger-scale chromospheric filament. Thus these X-ray jets and their bright points are made by miniature filament eruptions. They are evidently produced the same way as an on-disk coronal jet we observed in Adams et al. (2014); that on-disk jet had no obvious emerging magnetic field in its base. We conclude that, for many jets, the standard idea of X-ray jets forming from reconnection between emerging flux and preexisting coronal field is incorrect. ACS and RLM were supported by funding from NASA/LWS, Hinode, and ISSI.

  4. X-ray jets from B2224+65: A Middle-aged Pulsar's New Trick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. Daniel; Johnson, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Pulsars, though typically not aged ones, are believed to be an important source of energetic cosmic rays. Therefore, it may not be too surprising to detect an X-ray jet associated with the middle-aged radio/X-ray pulsar B2224+65, which is well known for its very high proper motion and its trailing ``Guitar Nebula''. Most unexpected, however, is that this jet is offset from its proper motion direction by 118 degree. Furthermore, an X-ray counter jet and a faint X-ray trail associated with the ``Guitar Nebula'' are now identified in the combined data set of three epoch Chandra observations with a total exposure of 200 ks. We are carrying out a detailed measurements of the X-ray spectral variation with time and across the jets and are critically testing scenarios proposed to explain this enigmatic phenomenon. The study should have strong implications for understanding the origin of cosmic rays, as well as similar linear nonthermal X-ray-emitting features that are associated with more distant pulsars, especially pulsar wind nebula candidates in the central 100 pc region of the Galaxy.

  5. Chandra Observations of The X-ray Jets and Central Region in R Aquarii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, E.; Hollis, J. M.; Pedelty, J.; Lyon, R.

    2001-05-01

    The R Aqr symbiotic binary system is understood to contain an M giant and a compact companion in an evolved stellar system of mass ~2-3 Msun. We reported at HEAD 2000 on the discovery of x-ray jets 0.1 LY in extent using Chandra, whereas radio and UV jets have been discovered in past VLA and HST observations. The SW x-ray jet, 3.8 times fainter than the NE component, is a completely new phenomenon, with no known optical, UV nor radio counterpart. The skewed shape of the jets supports earlier observations of jet precession. We report further on the morphology and x-ray spectra of jet and central components. An adaptively smoothed image of low surface brightness outer portions of the jet is presented. An x-ray spectrum analysis is presented with jet temperatures of ~1.6x 106 K. The spectrum of the central region surrounding the star appears to be hot gas at ~2.1*E7 K, plus Fe I Kα emission, with a suggestion of Kα emission from other elements of similar atomic number, whose origin is yet to be explained. We gratefully acknowledge support from NASA under grant #GO0-1062A and for EK from NASA contract # NAS8-39073.

  6. The radio to X-ray spectrum of the M87 jet and nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biretta, J. A.; Stern, C. P.; Harris, D. E.

    1991-01-01

    Einstein Observatory high-resolution imager data are used in conjunction with recent radio and optical observations to examine the morphology of the M87 jet; IR and UV data from the literature are then employed to construct X-ray spectra for the jet and nucleus, allowing the isolation of new features in the X-ray images which are associable with the radio/optical knots B and D. The synchrotron mechanism is suggested to be the originator of the jet X-ray emission, despite its entailment of very high energy electrons with short lifetimes. Optical data for the nucleus are consistent with the presence of an unresolved blue continuum source, implying a spectrum similar to that of the jet except at high RFs.

  7. An H&beta surge and X-ray jet - Magnetic properties and velocity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Wang, J.; Liu, Y.

    2000-09-01

    We described simultaneous observations of a surge in H&beta and an X-ray jet in NOAA 8100 on November 1, 1997. We found that the H&beta surge was spatially coincident with the X-ray jet. They occurred at the site where the pre-existing magnetic flux was ``cancelled" by a newly emerging flux of opposite polarity. At the base of the surge we identified surge-flaring in the H&beta filtergrams, and both blueshifts and redshifts in the H&beta Dopplergrams. The X-ray jet appeared about 2 hours after the first appearance of the surge. The surge consisted of two ejecting threads. Initially, these two components were twisted together, then became untwisted before the appearance of the X-ray jet. This example presents an alternative scenario of plasma ejection. The magnetic reconnection in the lower atmosphere, which was responsible for the H&beta surge, created the twisted surge threads; the X-ray jet likely resulted from a fast reconnection in the upper atmosphere, which took place well after the H&beta surge.

  8. Recollimation boundary layers as X-ray sources in young stellar jets

    SciTech Connect

    Günther, Hans Moritz; Li, Zhi-Yun; Schneider, P. C.

    2014-11-01

    Young stars accrete mass from circumstellar disks and, in many cases, the accretion coincides with a phase of massive outflows, which can be highly collimated. Those jets emit predominantly in the optical and IR wavelength range. However, in several cases, X-ray and UV observations reveal a weak but highly energetic component in those jets. X-rays are observed both from stationary regions close to the star and from knots in the jet several hundred AU from the star. In this article, we show semianalytically that a fast stellar wind that is recollimated by the pressure from a slower, more massive disk wind can have the right properties to power stationary X-ray emission. The size of the shocked regions is compatible with observational constraints. Our calculations support a wind-wind interaction scenario for the high-energy emission near the base of young stellar object jets. For the specific case of DG Tau, a stellar wind with a mass-loss rate of 5 × 10{sup –10} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} and a wind speed of 800 km s{sup –1} reproduces the observed X-ray spectrum. We conclude that a stellar wind recollimation shock is a viable scenario to power stationary X-ray emission close to the jet launching point.

  9. The Outer X-ray and Radio Jets in R Aquarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, E.; Anderson, C.; DePasquale, J.; Korreck, K.; Nichols, J.; Sokoloski, J.; Krauss, M.; Pedelty, J.

    2007-01-01

    The symbiotic star R Aquarii has been known to emit collimated outflow in the form of jets for many years. We report on five years of observations in x-rays and radio using Chandra, VLA and XMM-Newton. We discuss the evolution of the outer thermal jets, including new observations performed in June and October 2005. We see motion of the NE x-ray jet at a projected velocity of about 600 km (sup -1). The SW x-ray jet has almost disappeared between 2000.7 and 2004.0. An XMM grating spectrum of the NE jet confirms the existence of O VII He-like lines, and offers the possibility of doing plasma density diagnostics. We comment on on the physics of cooling in the SW jet and implications for the density of the x-ray emitting gas, the heating mechanism, and mass and kinetic energy in the jets and its implications for the system as a whole. This work was supported by NASA and NSF.

  10. Alternate Search for Jet Breaks in Long GRB X-ray Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmire, Gordon

    2014-09-01

    In the standard fireball models of GRB afterglows, the jet opening angle can be determined from the achromatic jet break by measuring the time at which this break in the light curves occurs. This measure allows us to estimate the energy budget of the GRB explosion. Swift XRT observations have shown that jet breaks are not observed in the first several days or weeks of a typical X-ray afterglow. We have already exploited Chandra's better sensitivity to observe late XRT afterglows and put more stringent constraints on jet break times, and started a program to interpret results with more realistic jet models. We propose to observe 3 more exceptionally bright X-ray afterglows of GRBs from the past year that in absence of jet break would still be detectable in this cycle.

  11. The Swift X-ray Telescope Cluster Survey. II. X-ray spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozzi, P.; Moretti, A.; Tundo, E.; Liu, T.; Rosati, P.; Borgani, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Campana, S.; Fugazza, D.; D'Avanzo, P.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: We present a spectral analysis of a new, flux-limited sample of 72 X-ray selected clusters of galaxies identified with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on board the Swift satellite down to a flux limit of ~10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 (SWXCS). We carry out a detailed X-ray spectral analysis with the twofold aim of measuring redshifts and characterizing the properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) for the majority of the SWXCS sources. Methods: Optical counterparts and spectroscopic or photometric redshifts for some of the sources are obtained with a cross-correlation with the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database. Additional photometric redshifts are computed with a dedicated follow-up program with the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo and a cross-correlation with the SDSS. In addition, we also blindly search for the Hydrogen-like and He-like iron Kα emission line complex in the X-ray spectrum. We detect the iron emission lines in 35% of the sample, and hence obtain a robust measure of the X-ray redshift zX with typical rms error 1-5%. We use zX whenever the optical redshift is not available. Finally, for all the sources with measured redshift, background-subtracted spectra are fitted with a single-temperature mekal model to measure global temperature, X-ray luminosity and iron abundance of the ICM. We perform extensive spectral simulations to accounts for fitting bias, and to assess the robustness of our results. We derive a criterion to select reliable best-fit models and an empirical formula to account for fitting bias. The bias-corrected values are then used to investigate the scaling properties of the X-ray observables. Results: Overall, we are able to characterize the ICM of 46 sources with redshifts (64% of the sample). The sample is mostly constituted by clusters with temperatures between 3 and 10 keV, plus 14 low-mass clusters and groups with temperatures below 3 keV. The redshift distribution peaks around z ~ 0.25 and extends up to z ~ 1, with 60% of the sample at 0.1 < z

  12. Bayesian Multiscale Analysis of X-Ray Jet Features in High Redshift Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeough, Kathryn; Siemiginowska, A.; Kashyap, V.; Stein, N.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray emission of powerful quasar jets may be a result of the inverse Compton (IC) process in which the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photons gain energy by interactions with the jet’s relativistic electrons. However, there is no definite evidence that IC/CMB process is responsible for the observed X-ray emission of large scale jets. A step toward understanding the X-ray emission process is to study the Radio and X-ray morphologies of the jet. We implement a sophisticated Bayesian image analysis program, Low-count Image Reconstruction and Analysis (LIRA) (Esch et al. 2004; Conners & van Dyk 2007), to analyze jet features in 11 Chandra images of high redshift quasars (z ~ 2 - 4.8). Out of the 36 regions where knots are visible in the radio jets, nine showed detectable X-ray emission. We measured the ratios of the X-ray and radio luminosities of the detected features and found that they are consistent with the CMB radiation relationship. We derived a range of the bulk lorentz factor (Γ) for detected jet features under the CMB jet emission model. There is no discernible trend of Γ with redshift within the sample. The efficiency of the X-ray emission between the detected jet feature and the corresponding quasar also shows no correlation with redshift. This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation REU and the Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant no.1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution, and by NASA Contract NAS8-39073 to the Chandra X-ray Center (CXC). This research has made use of data obtained from the Chandra Data Archive and Chandra Source Catalog, and software provided by the CXC in the application packages CIAO, ChIPS, and Sherpa. We thank Teddy Cheung for providing the VLA radio images. Connors, A., & van Dyk, D. A. 2007, Statistical Challenges in Modern Astronomy IV, 371, 101 Esch, D. N., Connors, A., Karovska, M., & van Dyk, D. A. 2004, ApJ, 610, 1213

  13. X-ray grating interferometry with a liquid-metal-jet source

    SciTech Connect

    Thüring, T.; Rutishauser, S.; Stampanoni, M.; Zhou, T.; Lundström, U.; Burvall, A.; Hertz, H. M.; David, C.

    2013-08-26

    A liquid-metal-jet X-ray tube is used in an X-ray phase-contrast microscope based on a Talbot type grating interferometer. With a focal spot size in the range of a few microns and a photon flux of ∼10{sup 12} photons/s×sr, the brightness of such a source is approximately one order of magnitude higher than for a conventional microfocus source. For comparison, a standard microfocus source was used with the same grating interferometer, showing significantly increased visibility for the liquid-metal-jet arrangement. Together with the increased flux, this results in improved signal-to-noise ratio.

  14. The coupling of a disk corona and a jet for the radio/X-ray correlation in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Erlin

    2015-08-01

    We interpret the radio/X-ray correlation of LR ∝ LX1.4 for LX/LEdd >10-3 in black hole X-ray binaries with a detailed disk corona-jet model, in which the accretion flow and the jet are connected by a parameter, ‘η’, describing the fraction of the matter in the accretion flow ejected outward to form the jet. We calculate LR and LX at different mass accretion rates, adjusting η to fit the observed radio/X-ray correlation of the black hole X-ray transient H1743-322 for LX/LEdd > 10-3. It is found that the value of η for this radio/X-ray correlation for LX/LEdd > 10-3, is systematically less than that of the case for LX/LEdd < 10-3, which is consistent with the general idea that the jet is often relatively suppressed at the high luminosity phase in black hole X-ray binaries.

  15. X-ray/UV variability and the origin of soft X-ray excess emission from II Zw 177

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Main

    We study a detailed broad-band X-ray/UV emission from the narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy II Zw 177 based on two XMM-Newton and single Swift/XRT observations. Both XMM-Newton observations show the soft X-ray excess emission below 2 keV when the best-fit 2 - 10 keV power law is extrapolated down to 0.3 keV. We find the blurred reflection from an ionized accretion disc and Comptonized disc emission both describe the observed soft excess well. We find a remarkable trend of decreasing UV flux with increasing soft X-ray excess and power law emission. We suggest that this could be due to that the external edge of corona hide a fraction of accretion disk. Co-Author: Prof. Gulab C. Dewangan (IUCAA), Prof. Ranjeev Misra (IUCAA), Pramod Kumar (Nanded university)

  16. Witnessing the Gradual Slowdown of Powerful Extragalactic Jets: The X-Ray-Optical-Radio Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georganopoulos, Markos; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2004-01-01

    A puzzling feature of the Chandra-detected quasar jets is that their X-ray emission decreases faster along the jet than their radio emission, resulting from an outward-increasing radio-to-X-ray ratio. In some sources this behavior is so extreme that the radio emission peak is located clearly downstream of that of the X-rays. This is a rather unanticipated behavior given that the inverse Compton nature of the X-rays and the synchrotron radio emission are attributed to roughly the same electrons of the jet's nonthermal electron distribution. In this letter we show that this morphological behavior can result from the gradual deceleration of a relativistic flow and that the offsets in peak emission at different wavelengths carry the imprint of this deceleration. This notion is consistent with another recent finding, namely, that the jets feeding the terminal hot spots of powerful radio galaxies and quasars are still relativistic with Lorentz factors GAMMA approximately 2-3. The picture of the kinematics of powerful jets emerging from these considerations is that they remain relativistic as they gradually decelerate from kiloparsec scales to the hot spots, where, in a final collision with the intergalactic medium, they slow down rapidly to the subrelativistic velocities of the hot spot advance speed.

  17. Wind-jet interaction in high-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    Jets in high-mass X-ray binaries can strongly interact with the stellar wind from the donor. The interaction leads, in particular, to formation of recollimation shocks. The shocks can then accelerate electrons in the jet and lead to enhanced emission, observable in the radio and gamma-ray bands. DooSoo, Zdziarski & Heinz (2016) have formulated a condition on the maximum jet power (as a function of the jet velocity and wind rate and velocity) at which such shocks form. This criterion can explain the large difference in the radio and gamma-ray loudness between Cyg X-1 and Cyg X-3. The orbital modulation of radio emission observed in Cyg X-1 and Cyg X-3 allows a measurement of the location of the height along the jet where the bulk of emission at a given frequency occurs. Strong absorption of X-rays in the wind of Cyg X-3 is required to account for properties of the correlation of the radio emission with soft and hard X-rays. That absorption can also account for the unusual spectral and timing X-ray properties of this source.

  18. Chandra X-Ray Imaging and Spectroscopy of the M87 Jet and Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. S.; Yang, Y.

    2002-03-01

    We report X-ray imaging spectroscopy of the jet of M87 at subarcsecond resolution with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The galaxy nucleus and all the knots seen at radio and optical wavelengths, as far from the nucleus as knot C, are detected in the X-ray observations. There is a strong trend for the ratio of X-ray-to-radio, or optical, flux to decline with increasing distance from the nucleus. At least three knots are displaced from their radio/optical counterparts, being tens of parsecs closer to the nucleus at X-ray than at radio or optical wavelengths. The X-ray spectra of the nucleus and knots are well described by power laws absorbed by cold gas, with only the unresolved nucleus exhibiting intrinsic absorption. In view of the similar spectra of the nucleus and jet knots, and the high X-ray flux of the knots closest to the nucleus, we suggest that the X-ray emission coincident with the nucleus may actually originate from the parsec- or subparsec-scale jet rather than the accretion disk. Arguments are given that the X-ray emission process is unlikely to be inverse Compton scattering. Instead, we favor synchrotron radiation. Plotted as νSν, the spectra of the knots generally peak in or just above the optical-near-infrared band. However, the overall spectra of at least three knots cannot be described by simple models in which the spectral index monotonically increases with frequency, as would result from synchrotron losses or a high-energy cut-off to the injected electron spectrum. Instead, these spectra must turn down just above the optical band and then flatten in the X-ray band. In the context of a synchrotron model, this result suggests that either the X-ray-emitting electrons/positrons in these knots represent a separate ``population'' from those that emit the radio and optical radiation or that the magnetic field is highly inhomogeneous. If the former interpretation is correct, our results provide further support for the notion that radio galaxies produce

  19. Small-Scale Filament Eruptions Leading to Solar X-Ray Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Alphonse; Moore, Ronald; Falconer, David

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the onset of ~10 random X-ray jets observed by Hinode/XRT. Each jet was near the limb in a polar coronal hole, and showed a ``bright point'' in an edge of the base of the jet, as is typical for previously-observed X-ray jets. We examined SDO/AIA EUV images of each of the jets over multiple AIA channels, including 304 Å, which detects chromospheric emissions, and 171, 193, and 211 Å, which detect cooler-coronal emissions. We find the jets to result from eruptions of miniature (size <~10 arcsec) filaments from the bases of the jets. Much of the erupting-filament material forms a chromospheric-temperature jet. In the cool-coronal channels, often the filament appears in absorption and the hotter EUV component of the jet appears in emission. The jet bright point forms at the location from which the miniature filament erupts, analogous to the formation of a standard solar flare arcade in the wake of the eruption of a typical larger-scalechromospheric filament. The spire of the jet forms on open field lines that presumably have undergone interchange reconnection with the erupting field that envelops and carries the miniature filament. Thus these X-ray jets and their bright points are made by miniature filament eruptions via ``internal'' and ``external'' reconnection of the erupting field. This is consistent with what we found for the onset of an on-disk coronal jet we examined in Adams et al. (2014). This work was supported by funding from NASA/LWS, Hinode, and ISSI.

  20. X-ray jets from B2224+65: A Middle-aged Pulsar's New Trick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. Daniel

    2014-11-01

    B2224+65 is well known to have a very high proper motion and to be associated with the ``Guitar Nebula'' in the opposite direction of the motion. A jet-like X-ray feature, however, is offset from its proper motion direction by 118 degree. Furthermore, the X-ray luminosity and morphology of the feature changed significantly between three Chandra observations. We are carrying out a detailed measurements of the X-ray spectral variation with time and across the feature and are critically testing scenarios proposed to explain this enigmatic system. The study will also have strong implications for understanding somewhat similar linear nonthermal X-ray-emitting features that have been identified in the central 100 pc region of the Galaxy.

  1. Relativistic baryonic jets from an ultraluminous supersoft X-ray source.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji-Feng; Bai, Yu; Wang, Song; Justham, Stephen; Lu, You-Jun; Gu, Wei-Min; Liu, Qing-Zhong; Di Stefano, Rosanne; Guo, Jin-Cheng; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio; Álvarez, Pedro; Cao, Yi; Kulkarni, Shri

    2015-12-01

    The formation of relativistic jets by an accreting compact object is one of the fundamental mysteries of astrophysics. Although the theory is poorly understood, observations of relativistic jets from systems known as microquasars (compact binary stars) have led to a well established phenomenology. Relativistic jets are not expected to be produced by sources with soft or supersoft X-ray spectra, although two such systems are known to produce relatively low-velocity bipolar outflows. Here we report the optical spectra of an ultraluminous supersoft X-ray source (ULS) in the nearby galaxy M81 (M81 ULS-1; refs 9, 10). Unexpectedly, the spectra show blueshifted, broad Hα emission lines, characteristic of baryonic jets with relativistic speeds. These time-variable emission lines have projected velocities of about 17 per cent of the speed of light, and seem to be similar to those from the prototype microquasar SS 433 (refs 11, 12). Such relativistic jets are not expected to be launched from white dwarfs, and an origin from a black hole or a neutron star is hard to reconcile with the persistence of M81 ULS-1's soft X-rays. Thus the unexpected presence of relativistic jets in a ULS challenges canonical theories of jet formation, but might be explained by a long-speculated, supercritically accreting black hole with optically thick outflows. PMID:26605521

  2. X ray emission from relativistic jets in AGNs and statistical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, Fulvio; Koenigl, Arieh

    1989-11-01

    Calculations of the Compton scattering interaction between an ultrarelativistic jet and a thermal radiation field, in an Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), are presented. This process can be effective in decelerating ultrarelativistic jets that are accelerated by electromagnetic or hydromagnetic forces closer in to the central black hole. A narrow distribution of terminal Lorentz factors gammainfinity, consistent with the values inferred in superluminal radio sources, arises naturally in this model. The hard X-ray component detected in the spectra of 3C273 and several BL Lac objects may be due to the inverse Compton radiation produced in the course of the initial deceleration of their relativistic jets. The requirement that the luminosity of the hard X-ray component must exceed the total power in the associated jet is considered.

  3. Bayesian analysis of X-ray jet features of the high redshift quasar jets observed with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeough, Kathryn; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Kashyap, Vinay; Stein, Nathan; Cheung, Chi C.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray emission of powerful quasar jets may be a result of the inverse Compton (IC) process in which the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photons gain energy by interactions with the jet's relativistic electrons. However, there is no definite evidence that IC/CMB process is responsible for the observed X-ray emission of large scale jets. A step toward understanding the X-ray emission process is to study the Radio and X-ray morphologies of the jet. Results from Chandra X-ray and multi-frequency VLA imaging observations of a sample of 11 high- redshift (z > 2) quasars with kilo-parsec scale radio jets are reported. The sample consists of a set of four z ≥ 3.6 flat-spectrum radio quasars, and seven intermediate redshift (z = 2.1 - 2.9) quasars comprised of four sources with integrated steep radio spectra and three with flat radio spectra.We implement a Bayesian image analysis program, Low-count Image Reconstruction and Analysis (LIRA) , to analyze jet features in the X-ray images of the high redshift quasars. Out of the 36 regions where knots are visible in the radio jets, nine showed detectable X-ray emission. Significant detections are based on the upper bound p-value test based on LIRA simulations. The X-ray and radio properties of this sample combined are examined and compared to lower-redshift samples.This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation REU and the Department of Defense ASSURE programs under NSF Grant no.1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution, and by NASA Contract NAS8-39073 to the Chandra X-ray Center (CXC). This research has made use of data obtained from the Chandra Data Archive and Chandra Source Catalog, and software provided by the CXC in the application packages CIAO, ChIPS, and Sherpa. Work is also supported by the Chandra grant GO4-15099X.

  4. Chandra Observations of the X-Ray Jet of 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambruna, Rita M.; Urry, C. Megan; Tavecchio, F.; Maraschi, L.; Scarpa, R.; Chartas, G.; Muxlow, T.

    2001-03-01

    We report results from Chandra observations of the X-ray jet of 3C 273 during the calibration phase in 2000 January. The zeroth-order images and spectra from two 40 ks exposures with the High-Energy Transmission Grating and Low-Energy Transmission Grating + Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer-S show a complex X-ray structure. The brightest optical knots are detected and resolved in the 0.2-8 keV energy band. The X-ray morphology tracks well the optical. However, while the X-ray brightness decreases along the jet, the outer parts of the jet tend to be increasingly bright with increasing wavelength. The spectral energy distributions of four selected regions can best be explained by the inverse Compton scattering of (beamed) cosmic microwave background photons. The model parameters are compatible with equipartition and a moderate Doppler factor, which is consistent with the one-sidedness of the jet. Alternative models either imply implausible physical conditions and energetics (the synchrotron self-Compton model) or are sufficiently ad hoc to be unconstrained by the present data (synchrotron radiation from a spatially or temporally distinct particle population).

  5. The coupling of a disk corona and a jet for the radio/X-ray correlation in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Erlin

    2016-02-01

    We interpret the radio/X-ray correlation of L R ~ L X ~1.4 for L X/L Edd >~ 10-3 with a detailed disk corona-jet model, in which the accretion flow and the jet are connected by a parameter, η, describing the fraction of the matter in the accretion flow ejected outward to form the jet. We calculate L R and L X at different Ṁ, adjusting η to fit the observed radio/X-ray correlation of the black hole X-ray transient H1743-322 for L X/L Edd > 10-3. It is found that the value of η for this radio/X-ray correlation for L X/L Edd > 10-3, is systematically less than that of the case for L X/L Edd < 10-3, which is consistent with the general idea that the jet is often relatively suppressed at the high luminosity phase in black hole X-ray binaries.

  6. Fibrillar Chromospheric Spicule-Like Counterparts to an EUV and Soft X-Ray Blowout Coronal Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Harra, Louise K.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    We observe an erupting jet feature in a solar polar coronal hole, using data from Hinode/SOT, EIS, and XRT, with supplemental data from STEREO/EUVI. From EUV and soft X-ray (SXR) images we identify the erupting feature as a blowout coronal jet: in SXRs it is a jet with bright base, and in EUV it appears as an eruption of relatively cool (approximately 50,000 K) material of horizontal size scale approximately 30" originating from the base of the SXR jet. In SOT Ca II H images the most pronounced analog is a pair of thin (approximately 1") ejections, at the locations of either of the two legs of the erupting EUV jet. These Ca II features eventually rise beyond 45", leaving the SOT field of view, and have an appearance similar to standard spicules except that they are much taller. They have velocities similar to that of "type II" spicules, approximately 100 kilometers per second, and they appear to have spicule-like substructures splitting off from them with horizontal velocity approximately 50 kilometers per second, similar to the velocities of splitting spicules measured by Sterling et al. (2010). Motions of splitting features and of other substructures suggest that the macroscopic EUV jet is spinning or unwinding as it is ejected. This and earlier work suggests that a sub-population of Ca II type II spicules are the Ca II manifestation of portions of larger-scale erupting magnetic jets. A different sub-population of type II spicules could be blowout jets occurring on a much smaller horizontal size scale than the event we observe here.

  7. X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray excited optical luminescence studies of II-VI semiconducting nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael Wayne

    2010-06-01

    Various II-VI semiconducting nanomaterials such as ZnO-ZnS nanoribbons (NRs), CdSxSe1-x nanostructures, ZnS:Mn NRs, ZnS:Mn,Eu nanoprsims (NPs), ZnO:Mn nanopowders, and ZnO:Co nanopowders were synthesized for study. These materials were characterized by techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, element dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and X-ray diffraction. The electronic and optical properties of these nanomaterials were studied by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) techniques, using tuneable soft X-rays from a synchrotron light source. The complementary nature ofthe XAFS and XEOL techniques give site, element and chemical specific measurements which allow a better understanding of the interplay and role of each element in the system. Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of ZnS powder in a limited oxygen environment resulted in side-by-side biaxial ZnO-ZnS NR heterostructures. The resulting NRs contained distinct wurtzite ZnS and wurtzite ZnO components with widths of 10--100 nm and 20 --500 nm, respectively and a uniform interface region of 5-15 nm. XAFS and XEOL measurements revealed the luminescence of ZnO-ZnS NRs is from the ZnO component. The luminescence of CdSxSe1-x nanostructures is shown to be dependent on the S to Se ratio, with the band-gap emission being tunable between that of pure CdS and CdSe. Excitation of the CdSxSe 1-x nanostructures by X-ray in XEOL has revealed new de-excitation channels which show a defect emission band not seen by laser excitation. CVD of Mn2+ doped ZnS results in nanostructures with luminescence dominated by the yellow Mn2+ emission due to energy transfer from the ZnS host to the Mn dopant sites. The addition of EuCl3 to the reactants in the CVD process results in a change in morphology from NR to NP. Zn1-xMnxO and Zn1-xCOxO nanopowders were prepared by sol-gel methods at dopant concentrations

  8. The pulsar B2224+65 and its jets: a two epoch X-ray analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. P.; Wang, Q. D.

    2010-10-01

    We present an X-ray morphological and spectroscopic study of the pulsar B2224+65 and its apparent jet-like X-ray features based on two epoch Chandra observations. The main X-ray feature, which shows a large directional offset from the ram-pressure confined pulsar wind nebula (Guitar nebula), is broader in apparent width and shows evidence for spectral hardening (at 95 per cent confidence) in the second epoch compared to the first. Furthermore, the sharp leading edge of the feature is found to have a proper motion consistent with that of the pulsar (~180 mas yr-1). The combined data set also provides evidence for the presence of a counter feature, albeit substantially fainter and shorter than the main one. Additional spectral trends along the major and minor axes of the feature are only marginally detected in the two epoch data, including softening counter to the direction of proper motion. Possible explanations for the X-ray features include diffuse energetic particles being confined by an organized ambient magnetic field as well as a simple ballistic jet interpretation; however, the former may have difficulty in explaining observed spectral trends between epochs and along the feature's major axis, whereas the latter may struggle to elucidate its linearity. Given the low counting statistics available in the two epoch observations, it remains difficult to determine a physical production scenario for these enigmatic X-ray emitting features with any certainty.

  9. X-Ray-Diffraction Tests Of Irradiated Electronic Devices: II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, David C.; Lowry, Lynn E.; Barnes, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes research on use of x-ray diffraction to measure stresses in metal conductors of complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits exposed to ionizing radiation. Expanding upon report summarized in "X-Ray-Diffraction Tests Of Irradiated Electronic Devices: I" (NPO-18803), presenting data further suggesting relationship between electrical performances of circuits and stresses and strains in metal conductors.

  10. Structure of the X-Ray Emission from the Jet of 3C 273

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, H. L.; Lee, J. C.; Ogle, P. M.; Drake, J. J.; Fruscione, A.; Grimes, J.; Harris, D.; Kraft, R.; Pease, D.; Schwartz, D.; Siemiginowska, A.; Lavoie, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present images from four Chandra observations of the quasar 3C 273. The zeroth order images from two grating observations using the AXAF CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS-S) detector are used to examine the structure and spectrum of the jet. The jet has at least four distinct features which are not resolved in previous observations. Using jet feature nomenclature based on HST observations, we find that knot Al is very bright in X-rays. We have measured the X-ray spectrum of this X-ray knot for the first time, obtaining a photon index of 1.36 +/- 0.11 and a flux density of 37 +/- 4 nJy at 1 keV. Combining this measurement with lower frequency data shows that a pure synchrotron model can fit the spectrum of knot Al from 4 GHz to 5 keV (over nine decades in energy) without a change of spectral slope. Knot A2 is also detected and is somewhat blended with knot B1 but synchrotron emission is not likely to explain the X-ray emission due to the spectral turnover observed in the optical-UV band. No other knots are clearly detected but there is an indication of weak emission from the eastern portion of knot H3. near the "head," which is radio-bright. There is diffuse flux which extends from 14 arcsec to 20 arcsec which shows curvature that is comparable to the optical flux found by Bahcall, et al.

  11. Evidence for Alfvén waves in solar x-ray jets.

    PubMed

    Cirtain, J W; Golub, L; Lundquist, L; van Ballegooijen, A; Savcheva, A; Shimojo, M; Deluca, E; Tsuneta, S; Sakao, T; Reeves, K; Weber, M; Kano, R; Narukage, N; Shibasaki, K

    2007-12-01

    Coronal magnetic fields are dynamic, and field lines may misalign, reassemble, and release energy by means of magnetic reconnection. Giant releases may generate solar flares and coronal mass ejections and, on a smaller scale, produce x-ray jets. Hinode observations of polar coronal holes reveal that x-ray jets have two distinct velocities: one near the Alfvén speed ( approximately 800 kilometers per second) and another near the sound speed (200 kilometers per second). Many more jets were seen than have been reported previously; we detected an average of 10 events per hour up to these speeds, whereas previous observations documented only a handful per day with lower average speeds of 200 kilometers per second. The x-ray jets are about 2 x 10(3) to 2 x 10(4) kilometers wide and 1 x 10(5) kilometers long and last from 100 to 2500 seconds. The large number of events, coupled with the high velocities of the apparent outflows, indicates that the jets may contribute to the high-speed solar wind. PMID:18063786

  12. A 24 keV liquid-metal-jet x-ray source for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, D. H.; Takman, P. A. C.; Lundstroem, U.; Burvall, A.; Hertz, H. M.

    2011-12-15

    We present a high-brightness 24-keV electron-impact microfocus x-ray source based on continuous operation of a heated liquid-indium/gallium-jet anode. The 30-70 W electron beam is magnetically focused onto the jet, producing a circular 7-13 {mu}m full width half maximum x-ray spot. The measured spectral brightness at the 24.2 keV In K{sub {alpha}} line is 3 x 10{sup 9} photons/(s x mm{sup 2}x mrad{sup 2}x 0.1% BW) at 30 W electron-beam power. The high photon energy compared to existing liquid-metal-jet sources increases the penetration depth and allows imaging of thicker samples. The applicability of the source in the biomedical field is demonstrated by high-resolution imaging of a mammography phantom and a phase-contrast angiography phantom.

  13. EVIDENCE FOR POLAR X-RAY JETS AS SOURCES OF MICROSTREAM PEAKS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Neugebauer, Marcia

    2012-05-01

    It is proposed that the interplanetary manifestations of X-ray jets observed in solar polar coronal holes during periods of low solar activity are the peaks of the so-called microstreams observed in the fast polar solar wind. These microstreams exhibit velocity fluctuations of {+-}35 km s{sup -1}, higher kinetic temperatures, slightly higher proton fluxes, and slightly higher abundances of the low-first-ionization-potential element iron relative to oxygen ions than the average polar wind. Those properties can all be explained if the fast microstreams result from the magnetic reconnection of bright-point loops, which leads to X-ray jets which, in turn, result in solar polar plumes. Because most of the microstream peaks are bounded by discontinuities of solar origin, jets are favored over plumes for the majority of the microstream peaks.

  14. Relativistic 3D precessing jet simulations for the X-ray binary SS433

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monceau-Baroux, Rémi; Porth, Oliver; Meliani, Zakaria; Keppens, Rony

    2014-01-01

    Context. Modern high-resolution radio observations allow us a closer look into the objects that power relativistic jets. This is especially the case for SS433, an X-ray binary that emits a precessing jet that is observed down to the subparsec scale. Aims: We aim to study full 3D dynamics of relativistic jets associated with active galactic nuclei or X-ray binaries (XRB). In particular, we incorporate the precessing motion of a jet into a model for the jet associated with the XRB SS433. Our study of the jet dynamics in this system focuses on the subparsec scales. We investigate the impact of jet precession and the variation of the Lorentz factor of the injected matter on the general 3D jet dynamics and its energy transfer to the surrounding medium. After visualizing and quantifying jet dynamics, we aim to realize synthetic radio mapping of the data, to compare our results with observations. Methods: For our study we used a block-tree adaptive mesh refinement scheme and an inner time-dependent boundary prescription to inject precessing bipolar supersonic jets. Parameters extracted from observations were used. Different 3D jet realizations that match the kinetic flux of the SS433 jet were intercompared, which vary in density contrast and jet beam velocity. We tracked the energy content deposited in different regions of the domain affected by the jet. Our code allows us to follow the adiabatic cooling of a population of relativistic particles injected by the jet. This evolving energy spectrum of accelerated electrons, using a pressure-based proxy for the magnetic field, allowed us to obtain the radio emission from our simulation. Results: We find a higher energy transfer for a precessing jet than for standing jets with otherwise identical parameters as a result of the effectively increased interaction area. We obtain synthetic radio maps for all jets, from which one can see that dynamical flow features are clearly linked with enhanced emission sites. Conclusions: The

  15. X-ray/UV variability and the origin of soft X-ray excess emission from II Zw 177

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Main; Dewangan, Gulab C.; Misra, Ranjeev; Pawar, Pramod K.

    2016-03-01

    We study X-ray and UV emission from the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy II Zw 177 using a 137 ks long and another 13 ks short XMM-Newton observation performed in 2012 and 2001, respectively. Both observations show soft X-ray excess emission contributing 76.9 ± 4.9 per cent in 2012 and 58.8 ± 10.2 per cent in 2001 in the 0.3-2 keV band. We find that both blurred reflection from an ionized disc and Comptonized disc emission describe the observed soft excess well. Time-resolved spectroscopy on scales of ˜20 ks reveals strong correlation between the soft excess and the power-law components. The fractional variability amplitude Fvar derived from EPIC-pn light curves at different energy bands is nearly constant (Fvar ˜ 20 per cent). This is in contrast to other active galactic nuclei where the lack of short term variation in soft X-ray excess emission has been attributed to intense light bending in the framework of the `lamppost' model. Thus, the variations in power-law emission are most likely intrinsic to corona rather than just due to the changes of height of compact corona. The variable UV emission (Fvar ˜ 1 per cent) is uncorrelated to any of the X-ray components on short time-scales suggesting that the UV emission is not dominated by the reprocessed emission. The gradual observed decline in the UV emission in 2012 may be related to the secular decline due to the changes in the accretion rate. In this case, the short term X-ray variability is not due to the changes in the seed photons but intrinsic to the hot corona.

  16. Search for differences in the velocities and directions of the kiloparsec-scale jets of quasars with and without X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butuzova, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    The X-ray emission of the kiloparsec-scale jets of core-dominant quasars is usually interpreted as inverse Compton scattering on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) emission (Sample I). By analogy with the situation on parsec scales, ultrarelativistic motion along a jet oriented at a small angle to the line of sight is usually invoked to explain the X-ray emission while also satisfying the condition of equipartition between the energies associated with the relativistic particles and the magnetic field on kiloparsec scales. This leads to an increase in the energy flux of the CMB radiation in the rest frame of the kiloparsec-scale jets. Consequently, the intensity of the CMB radiation is enhanced to the level required for detectable X-ray emission. This suggests that kiloparsec jets of quasars with similar extents and radio flux densities that are not detected in the X-ray (Sample II) could have subrelativistic speeds and larger angles to the line of sight, due to deceleration and bending of the jet between parsec and kiloparsec scales. This suggests the possible presence of differences in the distributions of the difference between the position angle for the parsec-scale and kiloparsec-scale jets for these two groups of quasars; this is not confirmed by a statistical analysis of the data for Samples I and II. It is deduced that most of the sources considered exhibit bending of their jets by less than about 1.5 times the angle of the parsec-scale jet to the line of sight. This suggests that the X-ray emission is generated by other mechanisms that there is no equipartition.

  17. [C ii] emission from galactic nuclei in the presence of X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, W. D.; Pineda, J. L.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The luminosity of [C ii] is used as a probe of the star formation rate in galaxies, but the correlation breaks down in some active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Models of the [C ii] emission from galactic nuclei do not include the influence of X-rays on the carbon ionization balance, which may be a factor in reducing the [C ii] luminosity. Aims: We aim to determine the properties of the ionized carbon and its distribution among highly ionized states in the interstellar gas in galactic nuclei under the influence of X-ray sources. We calculate the [C ii] luminosity in galactic nuclei under the influence of bright sources of soft X-rays. Methods: We solve the balance equation of the ionization states of carbon as a function of X-ray flux, electron, atomic hydrogen, and molecular hydrogen density. These are input to models of [C ii] emission from the interstellar medium (ISM) in galactic nuclei representing conditions in the Galactic central molecular zone and a higher density AGN model. The behavior of the [C ii] luminosity is calculated as a function of the X-ray luminosity. We also solve the distribution of the ionization states of oxygen and nitrogen in highly ionized regions. Results: We find that the dense warm ionized medium (WIM) and dense photon dominated regions (PDRs) dominate the [C ii] emission when no X-rays are present. The X-rays in galactic nuclei can affect strongly the C+ abundance in the WIM, converting some fraction to C2+ and higher ionization states and thus reducing its [C ii] luminosity. For an X-ray luminosity L(X-ray) ≳ 1043 erg s-1 the [C ii] luminosity can be suppressed by a factor of a few, and for very strong sources, L(X-ray) >1044 erg s-1 such as found for many AGNs, the [C ii] luminosity is significantly depressed. Comparison of the model with several extragalactic sources shows that the [C ii] to far-infrared ratio declines for L(X-ray) ≳ 1043 erg s-1, in reasonable agreement with our model. Conclusions: We conclude that X-rays

  18. Blowout Jets: Evidence from Hinode/XRT for X-Ray Jets Made by Blowout Eruption of the Emerging Bipole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2009-01-01

    Yamauchi et al (2004, ApJ, 605, 511) found that there are two structurally and dynamically distinct types of H macrospicules in polar coronal holes: single-column jet macrospicules and erupting-loop macrospicules. The structure and motion of the single-column jet macrospicules fit the standard Shibata reconnection picture for solar X-ray jets (Shibata et al 1992, PASJ, 44, L173). The form and motion of the erupting-loop macrospicules is reminiscent of the ejective eruption of the sheared-core-field flux rope in the filament-eruption birth of a bubble-type coronal mass ejection (CME). That roughly half of all polar H macrospicules were observed to be erupting-loop macrospicules suggests that there should be a corresponding large class of X-ray jets in which the emerging bipole at the base of the jet undergoes a blowout eruption as in a bubble-type CME, instead of staying closed as in the standard picture for X-ray jets. Along with a cartoon of the standard picture, we present a cartoon depicting the signatures to be expected of a blowout jet in high-resolution coronal X-ray movies such as from Hinode/XRT. From Hinode/XRT movies in polar coronal holes, we show: (1) examples of X-ray jets that fit the standard picture very well, and (2) other examples that do not fit the standard picture but do show signatures appropriate for blowout jets. These signatures are (1) a flare arcade inside the emerging bipole in addition to the flare arcade produced between the emerging bipole and the ambient high-reaching unipolar field by reconnection of these two fields as in the standard picture, and (2) in addition to the jet prong expected from the standard reconnection, a second jet prong or strand, one that could not be produced by the standard reconnection but could be produced by reconnection between the ambient unipolar field and one leg of an erupting core-field flux rope that has blown out the emerging bipole. We therefore infer that these "two pronged" jets are made by

  19. Potential Gamma-Ray Emissions from Low-mass X-Ray Binary Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Fu; Gu, Wei-Min; Liu, Tong; Xue, Li; Lu, Ju-Fu

    2015-06-01

    By proposing a pure leptonic radiation model, we study the potential gamma-ray emissions from the jets of low-mass X-ray binaries. In this model, the relativistic electrons that are accelerated in the jets are responsible for radiative outputs. Nevertheless, jet dynamics are dominated by magnetic and proton-matter kinetic energies. The model involves all kinds of related radiative processes and considers the evolution of relativistic electrons along the jet by numerically solving the kinetic equation. Numerical results show that the spectral energy distributions can extend up to TeV bands, in which synchrotron radiation and synchrotron self-Compton scattering are dominant components. As an example, we apply the model to the low-mass X-ray binary GX 339-4. The results not only can reproduce the currently available observations from GX 339-4, but also predict detectable radiation at GeV and TeV bands by the Fermi and CTA telescopes. Future observations with Fermi and CTA can be used to test our model, which could be employed to distinguish the origin of X-ray emissions.

  20. Jets in black-hole and neutron-star X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kylafis, Nikolaos

    2016-07-01

    Jets have been observed from both neutron-star and black-hole X-ray binaries. There are many similarities between the two and a few differences. I will offer a physical explanation of the formation and destruction of jets from compact objects and I will discuss the similarities and differences in the two types. The basic concept in the physical explanation is the Cosmic Battery, the mechanism that creates the required magnetic field for the jet ejection. The Cosmic Battery operates efficiently in accretion flows consisting of an inner hot flow and an outer thin accretion disk, independently of the nature of the compact object. It is therefore natural to always expect a jet in the right part of a spectral hardness - luminosity diagram and to never expect a jet in the left part. As a consequence, most of the phenomenology of an outburst can be explained with only one parameter, the mass accretion rate.

  1. New View of X-Ray Jet Blasting Through Nearest Radio Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-04-01

    By combining radio and X-ray observations, astronomers have obtained their most detailed view yet of the effects a powerful galactic jet has as it blasts its way through stars and gas on its way out from the centre of a galaxy. New observations of our nearest neighbouring radio galaxy, Centaurus A, (10 million light years away in the southern sky) show intense X-rays in places where the fast-moving jet is apparently running into the gas and stars that make up the galaxy. Because Centaurus A is the nearest radio galaxy, it is a key object for understanding how all other radio galaxies work. Results from the research will be presented at the UK/Ireland National Astronomy Meeting in Dublin by Dr Martin Hardcastle of the University of Bristol. Only a small minority of galaxies have powerful jets of electrically charged particles but, where they are present, they can have profound effects on the galaxies they inhabit. They are believed to come from close to a central massive black hole and in many cases they extend for hundreds of thousands of light years. Astronomers have been aware of radio emission and visible light from such jets for many years, but more recently, scientists using the orbiting observatory Chandra have discovered that X-ray emission from jets is also common. The X-rays come from electrons carrying large amounts of energy - comparable with the energies reached in the accelerators used in particle physics experiments on Earth. The team working on Centaurus A, led by Dr Hardcastle, a Royal Society Research Fellow at the University of Bristol, and Dr Ralph Kraft, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in the USA, observed its jet with both Chandra and the Very Large Array radio telescope in New Mexico. The radio observations, taken between 1991 and 2002, showed that parts of the jet are moving away from the centre of the galaxy at speeds of about half the speed of light. However, the regions of the jet that are emitting the most X-rays were

  2. High contrast Kr gas jetx-ray source for high energy density physics experimentsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugland, N. L.; Neumayer, P.; Döppner, T.; Chung, H.-K.; Constantin, C. G.; Girard, F.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kemp, A.; Niemann, C.

    2008-10-01

    A high contrast 12.6keV Kr Kα source has been demonstrated on the petawatt-class Titan laser facility using strongly clustering Kr gas jet targets. The contrast ratio (Kα to continuum) is 65, with a competitive ultrashort pulse laser to x-ray conversion efficiency of 10-5. Filtered shadowgraphy indicates that the Kr Kα and Kβ x rays are emitted from a roughly 1×2mm2 emission volume, making this source suitable for area backlighting and scattering. Spectral calculations indicate a typical bulk electron temperature of 50-70eV (i.e., mean ionization state 13-16), based on the observed ratio of Kα to Kβ. Kr gas jets provide a debris-free high energy Kα source for time-resolved diagnosis of dense matter.

  3. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements of the capillary fountain jet produced via ultrasonic atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Yohko F.; Douguchi, Junya; Kumagai, Atsushi; Iijima, Takao; Tomida, Yukinobu; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Matsuura, Kazuo

    2006-11-01

    In situ x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for investigating the liquid structure in the ultrasonic fountain jet to consider the mechanism of the "ultrasonic ethanol separation" reported by Sato et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2382 (2001)]. For pure liquids (water and ethanol), it was found that the high frequency ultrasound does not affect the liquid structure microscopically. For the 20mol% ethanol-water mixture, the estimated ethanol mole fraction in the ultrasonic fountain jet by using the position of the main maximum in the x-ray diffraction profile coincided with that in the reservoir. This result suggests that the ethanol separation is not caused by any distorted liquid structure under the ultrasound irradiation and occurs when or after the generation of the liquid droplet mist.

  4. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements of the capillary fountain jet produced via ultrasonic atomization.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yohko F; Douguchi, Junya; Kumagai, Atsushi; Iijima, Takao; Tomida, Yukinobu; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Matsuura, Kazuo

    2006-11-01

    In situ x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for investigating the liquid structure in the ultrasonic fountain jet to consider the mechanism of the "ultrasonic ethanol separation" reported by Sato et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2382 (2001)]. For pure liquids (water and ethanol), it was found that the high frequency ultrasound does not affect the liquid structure microscopically. For the 20 mol % ethanol-water mixture, the estimated ethanol mole fraction in the ultrasonic fountain jet by using the position of the main maximum in the x-ray diffraction profile coincided with that in the reservoir. This result suggests that the ethanol separation is not caused by any distorted liquid structure under the ultrasound irradiation and occurs when or after the generation of the liquid droplet mist. PMID:17100459

  5. Observations of the supernova remnant G54.1+0.3: X-ray spectrum and evidence for an X-ray jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, F. J.; Aschenbach, B.; Song, L. M.

    2001-05-01

    We present analyses of the ROSAT PSPC and the ASCA SIS and GIS observations of the Crab-like supernova remnant (SNR) G54.1+0.3. The spectrum is best fitted by a power law model with a photon index of -1.9+0.2-0.2, absorbed energy flux of 6.8 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 0.7-10 keV band, and a column density of 17.9+2.8-2.5 1021 cm-2. The high absorption column density indicates a distance close to the radius of the galaxy. The 0.7-10.0 keV X-ray luminosity of G54.1+0.3 is 1.4 1035d102 erg s-1, where d10 is the distance in 10 kpc. With an image restoration method, we have deconvolved the X-ray image of the remnant. There is evidence for an X-ray jet pointing to the north-east with a length of about 40arcsec measured from the center of the nebula. Its X-ray luminosity in the 0.1-2.4 keV range is about 2.1 1034d102 erg s-1. The X-ray jet is consistent with the radio extension of G54.1+0.3 to the north-east in both direction and position.

  6. Extended X-Ray Jet in Nearby Galaxy Reveals Energy Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-10-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has made an extraordinary image of Centaurus A, a nearby galaxy noted for its explosive activity. The image shows X-ray jets erupting from the center of the galaxy over a distance of 25,000 light years. Also detected are a group of X-ray sources clustered around the nucleus, which is believed to harbor a supermassive black hole. The X-ray jets and the cluster of sources may be a byproduct of a titanic collision between galaxies several hundred million years ago. "This image is great," said Dr. Ethan Schreier of the Space Telescope Science Institute, "For twenty years we have been trying to understand what produced the X rays seen in the Centaurus A jet. Now we at last know that the X-ray emission is produced by extremely high-energy electrons spiraling around a magnetic field." Schreier explained that the length and shape of the X-ray jet pinned down the source of the radiation. The entire length of the X-ray jet is comparable to the diameter of the Milky Way Galaxy. Other features of the image excite scientists. "Besides the jets, one of the first things I noticed about the image was the new population of sources in the center of the galaxy," said Dr. Christine Jones from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics . "They are grouped in a sphere around the nucleus, which must be telling us something very fundamental about how the galaxy, and the supermassive black hole in the center, were formed." Astronomers have accumulated evidence with optical and infrared telescopes that Centaurus A collided with a small spiral galaxy several hundred million years ago. This collision is believed to have triggered a burst of star formation and supplied gas to fuel the activity of the central black hole. more - According to Dr. Giuseppina Fabbiano, of Harvard-Smithsonian, "The Chandra image is like having a whole new laboratory to work in. Now we can see the main jet, the counter jet, and the extension of the jets beyond the galaxy. It is

  7. A KPC-scale X-ray jet in the BL LAC Source S5 2007+777

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambruna, Rita; Maraschi, Laura; Tavecchio, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    The BL Lac S3 2007++777, a classical radio-selected BL Lac from the sample of Stirkel et al. exhibiting an extended (19") radio jet. was observed with Chandra revealing an X-ray jet with simi1ar morphology. The hard X-ray spectrum and broad band SED is consistent with an IC/CMB origin for the X-ray emission, implying a highly relativistic flow at small angle to the line of sight with an unusually large deprojected length, 300 kpc. A structured jet consisting of a fast spine and slow wall is consistent with the observations.

  8. iShocks: X-ray binary jets with an internal shocks model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, O.; Fender, R. P.; Kaiser, C. R.

    2010-01-01

    In the following paper, we present an internal shocks model, iShocks, for simulating a variety of relativistic jet scenarios; these scenarios can range from a single ejection event to an almost continuous jet, and are highly user configurable. Although the primary focus in the following paper is black hole X-ray binary jets, the model is scale and source independent and could be used for supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei or other flows such as jets from neutron stars. Discrete packets of plasma (or `shells') are used to simulate the jet volume. A two-shell collision gives rise to an internal shock, which acts as an electron re-energization mechanism. Using a pseudo-random distribution of the shell properties, the results show how for the first time it is possible to reproduce a flat/inverted spectrum (associated with compact radio jets) in a conical jet whilst taking the adiabatic energy losses into account. Previous models have shown that electron re-acceleration is essential in order to obtain a flat spectrum from an adiabatic conical jet: multiple internal shocks prove to be efficient in providing this re-energization. We also show how the high-frequency turnover/break in the spectrum is correlated with the jet power, νb ~ L~0.6W, and the flat-spectrum synchrotron flux is correlated with the total jet power, Fν ~ L~1.4W . Both the correlations are in agreement with previous analytical predictions.

  9. X-ray crystal spectrometer upgrade for ITER-like wall experiments at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Shumack, A. E.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Chernyshova, M.; Czarski, T.; Karpinski, L.; Jakubowska, K.; Scholz, M.; Byszuk, A.; Cieszewski, R.; Kasprowicz, G.; Pozniak, K.; Wojenski, A.; Zabolotny, W.; Dominik, W.; Conway, N. J.; Dalley, S.; Tyrrell, S.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Figueiredo, J. [EFDA-CSU, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB; Associação EURATOM and others

    2014-11-15

    The high resolution X-Ray crystal spectrometer at the JET tokamak has been upgraded with the main goal of measuring the tungsten impurity concentration. This is important for understanding impurity accumulation in the plasma after installation of the JET ITER-like wall (main chamber: Be, divertor: W). This contribution provides details of the upgraded spectrometer with a focus on the aspects important for spectral analysis and plasma parameter calculation. In particular, we describe the determination of the spectrometer sensitivity: important for impurity concentration determination.

  10. X-ray crystal spectrometer upgrade for ITER-like wall experiments at JET.

    PubMed

    Shumack, A E; Rzadkiewicz, J; Chernyshova, M; Jakubowska, K; Scholz, M; Byszuk, A; Cieszewski, R; Czarski, T; Dominik, W; Karpinski, L; Kasprowicz, G; Pozniak, K; Wojenski, A; Zabolotny, W; Conway, N J; Dalley, S; Figueiredo, J; Nakano, T; Tyrrell, S; Zastrow, K-D; Zoita, V

    2014-11-01

    The high resolution X-Ray crystal spectrometer at the JET tokamak has been upgraded with the main goal of measuring the tungsten impurity concentration. This is important for understanding impurity accumulation in the plasma after installation of the JET ITER-like wall (main chamber: Be, divertor: W). This contribution provides details of the upgraded spectrometer with a focus on the aspects important for spectral analysis and plasma parameter calculation. In particular, we describe the determination of the spectrometer sensitivity: important for impurity concentration determination. PMID:25430332

  11. The Disk-Jet Connection in Radio-Loud AGN: The X-Ray Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambruna, Rita

    2008-01-01

    Unification schemes assume that radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) contain an accretion disk and a relativistic jet perpendicular to the disk, and an obscuring molecular torus. The jet dominance decreases with larger viewing angles from blazars to Broad-Line and Narrow-Line Radio Galaxies. A fundamental question is how accretion and ejecta are related. The X-rays provide a convenient window to study these issues, as they originate in the innermost nuclear regions and penetrate large obscuring columns. I review the data, using observations by Chandra but also from other currently operating high-energy experiments. Synergy with the upcoming GLAST mission will also be highlighted.

  12. A liquid jet setup for x-ray scattering experiments on complex liquids at free-electron laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, I.; Walther, M.; Lehmkühler, F.; Wochner, P.; Valerio, J.; Mager, R.; Schroer, M. A.; Lee, S.; Roseker, W.; Jain, A.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Hartmann, R.; Huth, M.; Strüder, L.; Sprung, M.; Robert, A.; Fuoss, P. H.; Stephenson, G. B.; Grübel, G.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we describe a setup for x-ray scattering experiments on complex fluids using a liquid jet. The setup supports Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS/WAXS) geometries. The jet is formed by a gas-dynamic virtual nozzle (GDVN) allowing for diameters ranging between 1 μm and 20 μm at a jet length of several hundred μm. To control jet properties such as jet length, diameter, or flow rate, the instrument is equipped with several diagnostic tools. Three microscopes are installed to quantify jet dimensions and stability in situ. The setup has been used at several beamlines performing both SAXS and WAXS experiments. As a typical example we show an experiment on a colloidal dispersion in a liquid jet at the X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser.

  13. A liquid jet setup for x-ray scattering experiments on complex liquids at free-electron laser sources.

    PubMed

    Steinke, I; Walther, M; Lehmkühler, F; Wochner, P; Valerio, J; Mager, R; Schroer, M A; Lee, S; Roseker, W; Jain, A; Sikorski, M; Song, S; Hartmann, R; Huth, M; Strüder, L; Sprung, M; Robert, A; Fuoss, P H; Stephenson, G B; Grübel, G

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we describe a setup for x-ray scattering experiments on complex fluids using a liquid jet. The setup supports Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS/WAXS) geometries. The jet is formed by a gas-dynamic virtual nozzle (GDVN) allowing for diameters ranging between 1 μm and 20 μm at a jet length of several hundred μm. To control jet properties such as jet length, diameter, or flow rate, the instrument is equipped with several diagnostic tools. Three microscopes are installed to quantify jet dimensions and stability in situ. The setup has been used at several beamlines performing both SAXS and WAXS experiments. As a typical example we show an experiment on a colloidal dispersion in a liquid jet at the X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser. PMID:27370468

  14. The Be X-ray Binary Outburst Zoo II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehnel, M.; Kretschmar, P.; Nespoli, E.; Okazaki, A. T.; Schoenherr, G.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Falkner, S.; Brand, T.; Anders, F.; Schwarm, F.-W.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Mueller, S.; Pottschmidt, K.; Fuerst, F.; Grinberg, V.; Wilms, J.

    2015-03-01

    We have continued our recently started systematic study of Be X-ray binary (BeXRB) outbursts. Specifically, we are developing a catalogue of outbursts including their basic properties based on nearly all available X-ray all-sky-monitors. These properties are derived by fitting asymmetric Gaussians to the outburst lightcurves. This model describes most of the outbursts covered by our preliminary catalogue well; only 13% of all datasets show more complex outburst shapes. Analyzing the basic properties, we reveal a strong correlation between the outburst length and the reached peak flux. As an example, we discuss possible models describing the observed correlation in EXO 2030+375.

  15. INFLATING A CHAIN OF X-RAY-DEFICIENT BUBBLES BY A SINGLE JET ACTIVITY EPISODE

    SciTech Connect

    Refaelovich, Michael; Soker, Noam E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.il

    2012-08-10

    We show that a continuous jet with time-independent launching properties can inflate a chain of close and overlapping X-ray deficient bubbles. Using the numerical code PLUTO we run 2.5D (i.e., a spherical coordinate system with cylindrical symmetry) hydrodynamic simulations and study the interaction of the jets with the intracluster medium. A key process is vortex fragmentation due to several mechanisms, including vortex-shedding and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. Our results can account for the structure of two opposite chains of close bubbles as observed in the galaxy cluster Hydra A. Our results imply that the presence of multiple pairs of bubbles does not necessarily imply several jet-launching episodes. This finding might have implications for feedback mechanisms operating by jets.

  16. The Jet Heated X-Ray Filament in the Centaurus A Northern Middle Radio Lobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, R. P.; Forman, W. R.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Birkinshaw, M.; Croston, J. H.; Jones, C.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Worrall, D. M.; Murray, S. S.

    2009-06-01

    We present results from a 40 ks XMM-Newton observation of the X-ray filament coincident with the southeast edge of the Centaurus A Northern Middle Radio Lobe (NML). We find that the X-ray filament consists of five spatially resolved X-ray knots embedded in a continuous diffuse bridge. The spectrum of each knot is well fitted by a thermal model with temperatures ranging from 0.3 to 0.7 keV and subsolar elemental abundances. In four of the five knots, nonthermal models are a poor fit to the spectra, conclusively ruling out synchrotron or IC/CMB mechanisms for their emission. The internal pressures of the knots exceed that of the ambient interstellar medium or the equipartition pressure of the NML by more than an order of magnitude, demonstrating that they must be short lived (~3 × 106 yr). Based on energetic arguments, it is implausible that these knots have been ionized by the beamed flux from the active galactic nucleus of Cen A or that they have been shock heated by supersonic inflation of the NML. In our view, the most viable scenario for the origin of the X-ray knots is that they are the result of cold gas shock heated by a direct interaction with the jet. The most plausible model of the NML is that it is a bubble from a previous nuclear outburst that is being re-energized by the current outburst. The northeast inner lobe and the large-scale jet are lossless channels through which the jet material rapidly travels to the NML in this scenario. We also report the discovery of a large-scale (at least 35 kpc radius) gas halo around Cen A.

  17. X-Ray Emission from Stellar Jets by Collision against High-density Molecular Clouds: an Application to HH 248

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Santiago, J.; Bonito, R.; Orellana, M.; Miceli, M.; Orlando, S.; Ustamujic, S.; Albacete-Colombo, J. F.; de Castro, E.; Gómez de Castro, A. I.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the plausibility of detecting X-ray emission from a stellar jet that impacts a dense molecular cloud, a scenario that may be typical for classical T Tauri stars with jets in dense star-forming complexes. We first model the impact of a jet against a dense cloud using two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations, exploring different configurations of the ambient environment. Then, we compare our results with XMM-Newton observations of the Herbig-Haro object HH 248, where extended X-ray emission aligned with the optical knots is detected at the edge of the nearby IC 434 cloud. Our simulations show that a jet can produce plasma with temperatures up to 107 K, consistent with production of X-ray emission, after impacting a dense cloud. We find that jets denser than the ambient medium but less dense than the cloud produce detectable X-ray emission only at impact with the cloud. From an exploration of the model parameter space, we constrain the physical conditions (jet density and velocity and cloud density) that reproduce the intrinsic luminosity and emission measure of the X-ray source possibly associated with HH 248 well. Thus, we suggest that the extended X-ray source close to HH 248 corresponds to a jet impacting a dense cloud.

  18. FAST X-RAY/IR CROSS-CORRELATIONS AND RELATIVISTIC JET FORMATION IN GRS 1915+105

    SciTech Connect

    Lasso-Cabrera, N. M.; Eikenberry, S. S.

    2013-10-01

    We present cross-correlation analyses of simultaneous X-ray and near-infrared (near-IR) observations of the microquasar GRS 1915+105 during relativistic jet-producing epochs (X-ray class α and β). While previous studies have linked the large amplitude IR flares and X-ray behaviors to jet formation in these states, our new analyses are sensitive to much lower amplitude IR variability, providing more sensitive probes of the jet formation process. The X-ray to IR cross-correlation function (CCF) shows significant correlations that vary in form between the different X-ray states. During low/hard dips in both classes, we find no significant X-ray/IR correlation. During high-variability epochs, we find consistently significant correlations in both α and β classes, but with strong differences in the CCF structure. The high variability α CCF shows strong anti-correlation between X-ray/IR, with the X-ray preceding the IR by ∼13 ± 2 s. The high variability β state shows a time-variable CCF structure, which is statistically significant but without a clearly consistent lag. Our simulated IR light curves, designed to match the observed CCFs, show variably flickering IR emission during the class β high-variability epoch, while class α can be fit by IR flickering with frequencies in the range 0.1-0.3 Hz, strengthening ∼10 s after every X-ray subflare. We interpret these features in the context of the X-ray-emitting accretion disk and IR emission from relativistic jet formation in GRS 1915+105, concluding that the CCF analysis places the origin in a synchrotron-emitting relativistic compact jet at a distance from the compact object of ∼0.02 AU.

  19. Most Distant X-Ray Jet Yet Discovered Provides Clues To Big Bang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-11-01

    The most distant jet ever observed was discovered in an image of a quasar made by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. Extending more than 100,000 light years from the supermassive black hole powering the quasar, the jet of high-energy particles provides astronomers with information about the intensity of the cosmic microwave background radiation 12 billion years ago. The discovery of this jet was a surprise to the astronomers, according to team members. Astronomers had previously known the distant quasar GB1508+5714 to be a powerful X-ray source, but there had been no indication of any complex structure or a jet. "This jet is especially significant because it allows us to probe the cosmic background radiation 1.4 billion years after the Big Bang," said Aneta Siemiginowska of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., lead author of a report on this research in the November 20th Astrophysical Journal Letters. Prior to this discovery, the most distant confirmed X-ray jet corresponded to a time about 3 billion years after the Big Bang. Quasars are thought to be galaxies that harbor an active central supermassive black hole fueled by infalling gas and stars. This accretion process is often observed to be accompanied by the generation of powerful high-energy jets. Radio image of GB1508 Radio Image of GB1508 As the electrons in the jet fly away from the quasar at near the speed of light, they move through the sea of cosmic background radiation left over from the hot early phase of the universe. When a fast-moving electron collides with one of these background photons, it can boost the photon's energy up into the X-ray band. The X-ray brightness of the jet depends on the power in the electron beam and the intensity of the background radiation. "Everyone assumes that the background radiation will change in a predictable way with time, but it is important to have this check on the predictions," said Siemiginowska. "This jet is hopefully just the

  20. The Relation Between Accretion Rate And Jet Power in X-Ray Luminous Elliptical Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Steven W.; Dunn, R.J.H.; Fabian, A.C.; Taylor, G.B.; Reynolds, C.S.; /Maryland U.

    2006-03-10

    Using Chandra X-ray observations of nine nearby, X-ray luminous elliptical galaxies with good optical velocity dispersion measurements, we show that a tight correlation exists between the Bondi accretion rates calculated from the observed gas temperature and density profiles and estimated black hole masses, and the power emerging from these systems in relativistic jets. The jet powers, which are inferred from the energies and timescales required to inflate cavities observed in the surrounding X-ray emitting gas, can be related to the accretion rates using a power law model of the form log (P{sub Bondi}/10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}) = A + B log (P{sub jet}/10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}), with A = 0.62 {+-} 0.15 and B = 0.77 {+-} 0.18. Our results show that a significant fraction of the energy associated with the rest mass of material entering the Bondi accretion radius (2.4{sub -0.7}{sup +1.0} per cent, for P{sub jet} = 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}) eventually emerges in the relativistic jets. Our results have significant implications for studies of accretion, jet formation and galaxy formation. The observed tight correlation suggests that the Bondi formulae provide a reasonable description of the accretion process in these systems, despite the likely presence of magnetic pressure and angular momentum in the accreting gas. The similarity of the P{sub Bondi} and P{sub jet} values argues that a significant fraction of the matter entering the accretion radius flows down to regions close to the black holes, where the jets are presumably formed. The tight correlation between P{sub Bondi} and P{sub jet} also suggests that the accretion flows are approximately stable over timescales of a few million years. Our results show that the black hole ''engines'' at the hearts of large elliptical galaxies and groups feed back sufficient energy to stem cooling and star formation, leading naturally to the observed exponential cut off at the bright end of the galaxy luminosity function.

  1. X-RAY EMISSION FROM TRANSIENT JET MODEL IN BLACK HOLE BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Pe'er, Asaf; Markoff, Sera

    2012-07-10

    While the non-thermal radio through at least near-infrared emission in the hard state in X-ray binaries (XRBs) is known to originate in jets, the source of the non-thermal X-ray component is still uncertain. We introduce a new model for this emission, which takes into account the transient nature of outflows, and show that it can explain the observed properties of the X-ray spectrum. Rapid radiative cooling of the electrons naturally accounts for the break often seen below around 10 keV, and for the canonical spectral slope F{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup -1/2} observed below the break. We derive the constraints set by the data for both synchrotron- and Compton-dominated models. We show that for the synchrotron-dominated case, the jet should be launched at radii comparable to the inner radius of the disk ({approx}few 100 r{sub s} for the 2000 outburst of XTE J1118+480), with typical magnetic field B {approx}> 10{sup 6} G. We discuss the consequences of our results for the possible connection between the inflow and outflow in the hard state of XRBs.

  2. Mass estimation of shaped charge jets from x-ray shadow graph with new calibration curve method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Fumikazu; Kishimura, Hiroaki; Kumakura, Akira; Sakai, Shun

    2015-06-01

    In order to assess the penetration capability of the Al and Cu metal jets against a bumper structure (such as Al plate and/or Al block), we measured the initial formation process of the metal jets generated from conical shaped charge device. The shaped charge device configurations employed in the experimental and numerical investigations have conical aluminum (and cupper) liner and steel casing with PBX explosive charge. The profile and velocity of the jets are measured with flash x-ray and x-ray film system. The mass of the jet tip are estimated from x-ray images by a calibration curve method proposed by our group. Al targets are used to evaluate a penetration performance of the jets. Additionally, we have simulated the initial formation process of the shaped charge jets with Autodyne-2D hydrodynamic code, which proposed important data to compare the experimental one.

  3. Effect of X-ray spot size on liquid jet photoelectron spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Giorgia; Goel, Alok; Kleibert, Armin; Brown, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    A 30 µm pinhole is introduced in the intermediate focus of the SIM beamline at the Swiss Light Source to improve the spot size at the second downstream focus, which is used here for liquid jet X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments. The 30 µm pinhole reduces the beam dimensions from 250 (v) × 100 (h) µm to 75 × 45 µm for a vertical exit slit of 100 µm. The smaller X-ray spot results in a substantial decrease in the gas-phase contribution of the spectra from 40% down to 20% and will help to simplify the interpretation and peak assignments of future experiments. PMID:26524318

  4. Solving the X-ray Origin Problem in Large-scale Jets with Chandra and Fermi Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Eileen

    2014-09-01

    We propose deep ACIS-S observations of five kpc-scale powerful quasar jets, previously detected in short exposures 10-13 years ago, to accurately measure the X-ray flux level and spectral index for individual knots in the resolved jet. We are motivated by our recent results that in two powerful sources, 3C 273 and PKS 1136-135, the X-rays are synchrotron, rather than the widely believed IC emission off the CMB. These two models imply radically different jets and deep Chandra imaging is necessary to distinguish between them with the help of existing Fermi data. The proposed targets have been selected to cover almost 2 orders of magnitude in jet power, which allows us to evaluate the X-ray emission mechanism over a wide range of jet powers.

  5. 32.8-nm X-ray laser produced in a krypton cluster jet

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, E P; Vinokhodov, A Yu

    2013-12-31

    We have interpreted the well-known experimental quantum yield data for a 32.8-nm X-ray laser operating at the 3d{sup 9}4d (J = 0) – 3d{sup 9}4p (J = 1) transition of Kr{sup 8+} with the use of gaseous krypton or a krypton cluster jet. Proceeding from our model we propose a novel scheme for the 32.8-nm laser produced in a krypton cluster jet. The quantum yield is shown to saturate for a plasma length of ∼300 μm, a krypton ion density n{sub Kr} ∼ (4 – 9) × 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}, and an electron temperature Te ∼ 5000 eV. In this case, the energy conversion coefficient amounts to ∼5 × 10{sup -3} of the pump pulse energy. We propose the experimental setup for producing a highefficiency subpicosecond X-ray laser in a krypton cluster jet. (lasers)

  6. Large scale radio/X-ray jets in microquasars (NAPA part)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, Stephane; Tzioumis, Anastasios; Fender, Rob; Kaaret, Philip; Orosz, Jerry; Tomsick, John; Loh, Alan

    2014-10-01

    The discovery with ATCA of large scale radio lobes around the microquasar XTE J1550-564 has led to the discovery with Chandra (for the first time) of moving relativistic X-ray jets in a galactic accreting source. The lobes are likely due to the interaction of relativistic plasma with the ISM. This ATCA proposal has allowed similar discovery in H 1743-322, and therefore that it maybe a common occurrence in the Galaxy. Recently, we have witnessed with ATCA the formation of similar lobes in the black hole GX 339-4. We propose to use the Compact Array to continue our search for radio lobes in microquasars that have been active in the past years. The proposed observations are optimized to discover and study (flux evolution, morphology, SED, proper motion, ...) new radio lobes from microquasars. This will have implications not only for the study of jets from Galactic X-ray binaries, but also for our understanding of relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei (AGN).

  7. Constraining the particle spectrum in blazar jets: importance of the hard X-ray spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Atreyee; Sahayanathan, Sunder; Chitnis, Varsha

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of the spectral curvature in blazar jets can throw light on the underlying particle spectral distribution, and hence, the acceleration and diffusion processes at play. With the advent of NuSTAR and ASTROSAT, and the upcoming ASTRO-H, this curvature can now be measured accurately across the broadband X-ray energies. We will discuss results from our recent works on two HBLs, Mkn421 (Sinha et al, A&A 2015) and 1ES1011+496 (Sinha et al, ApJ submitted), and show how simultaneous measurement at hard and soft X-ray energies can be crucial in understanding the underlying particle spectrum. Detection of lognormality in blazars is beginning to hint at strong disk-jet connections. India's recently launched multiwavelength satellite, the ASTROSAT will provide simultaneous time resolved data between 0.2-80keV, along with measurements at Optical-UV energies. We will discuss prospects from ASTROSAT for studying jet triggering mechanisms in blazars.

  8. Small-scale filament eruptions as the driver of X-ray jets in solar coronal holes.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Alphonse C; Moore, Ronald L; Falconer, David A; Adams, Mitzi

    2015-07-23

    Solar X-ray jets are thought to be made by a burst of reconnection of closed magnetic field at the base of a jet with ambient open field. In the accepted version of the 'emerging-flux' model, such a reconnection occurs at a plasma current sheet between the open field and the emerging closed field, and also forms a localized X-ray brightening that is usually observed at the edge of the jet's base. Here we report high-resolution X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of 20 randomly selected X-ray jets that form in coronal holes at the Sun's poles. In each jet, contrary to the emerging-flux model, a miniature version of the filament eruptions that initiate coronal mass ejections drives the jet-producing reconnection. The X-ray bright point occurs by reconnection of the 'legs' of the minifilament-carrying erupting closed field, analogous to the formation of solar flares in larger-scale eruptions. Previous observations have found that some jets are driven by base-field eruptions, but only one such study, of only one jet, provisionally questioned the emerging-flux model. Our observations support the view that solar filament eruptions are formed by a fundamental explosive magnetic process that occurs on a vast range of scales, from the biggest mass ejections and flare eruptions down to X-ray jets, and perhaps even down to smaller jets that may power coronal heating. A similar scenario has previously been suggested, but was inferred from different observations and based on a different origin of the erupting minifilament. PMID:26147079

  9. Visibility of Hinode/XRT X-Ray Jets at AIA/EUV Wavelengths, a Temperature Indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Bakucz Canario, D.; Moore, R. L.; Falconer, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    X-ray jets have been observed for years using data from the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on the Hinode Satellite. Recently with the launch of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) it has been possible to observe solar jets over a range of EUV of wavelengths using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). In this study, we investigated the appearance of X-ray jets in AIA images at wavelengths of 304, 171, 193, 211, 131, 94, and 335 Å. We selected 20 random X-ray jets from XRT movies of the polar coronal holes and then examined AIA EUV images from the same locations and times to determine the visibility of the jets at the different EUV wavelengths. We found that the jets were almost always visible in the 193 and 211 Å channel images. In the "hottest" EUV channels (94 Å, 335 Å), usually the spire of the jet was not visible, although sometimes a base brightening could be discerned. At other wavelengths (171, 131, and 335), the results were mixed. Based on the response characteristics of AIA (Lemen et al, 2011) to the temperature of the observed radiating solar plasma, our finding that most jets are visible in the 193 and 211 Å channels is consistent with other recent studies that measured jet temperatures of 1.5~2.0 MK (Pucci et al, 2012 & Paraschiv et al, 2015). This work was supported by the NASA LWS and HGI programs.

  10. Simultaneous Femtosecond X-ray Spectroscopy and Diffraction of Photosystem II at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Jan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Gildea, Richard J.; Echols, Nathaniel; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Koroidov, Sergey; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz; DiFiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R.; Miahnahri, Alan; Schafer, Donald W.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Koglin, Jason E.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sellberg, Jonas; Latimer, Matthew J.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Glatzel, Pieter; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Intense femtosecond X-ray pulses produced at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) were used for simultaneous X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of microcrystals of Photosystem II (PS II) at room temperature. This method probes the overall protein structure and the electronic structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of PS II. XRD data are presented from both the dark state (S1) and the first illuminated state (S2) of PS II. Our simultaneous XRD/XES study shows that the PS II crystals are intact during our measurements at the LCLS, not only with respect to the structure of PS II, but also with regard to the electronic structure of the highly radiation sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster, opening new directions for future dynamics studies. PMID:23413188

  11. Probing the Structures of Seyfert Galaxies which Exhibit Jets and Maser Activity Using X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotter, J. T.; Hess, C. J.

    1997-12-01

    We studied three Seyfert galaxies with unusual morphologies through X-ray spectroscopy and plasma modeling, in order to determine the temperatures, elemental abundances, and spatial distributions of the X-ray emitting gas contained therein. NGC 4258 is known to have maser activity in the region surrounding its warped accretion disk, and it also emits jets. NGC 1097 and NGC 1068 exhibit these observational traits, jets and maser activity, respectively. Their unusual geometries and the significant reprocessing of the continuum and jets by the accretion disks make these three galaxies excellent candidates for modeling and spectroscopic interpretation which accounts for thermal instability.

  12. Sub-mm Jet Properties of the X-Ray Binary Swift J1745-26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetarenko, A. J.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Curran, P. A.; Russell, T. D.; Coulson, I. M.; Heinz, S.; Maitra, D.; Markoff, S. B.; Migliari, S.; Petitpas, G. R.; Rupen, M. P.; Rushton, A. P.; Russell, D. M.; Sarazin, C. L.

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of our observations of the early stages of the 2012-2013 outburst of the transient black hole X-ray binary (BHXRB), Swift J1745-26, with the Very Large Array, Submillimeter Array, and James Clerk Maxwell telescope (SCUBA-2). Our data mark the first multiple-band mm and sub-mm observations of a BHXRB. During our observations the system was in the hard accretion state producing a steady, compact jet. The unique combination of radio and mm/sub-mm data allows us to directly measure the spectral indices in and between the radio and mm/sub-mm regimes, including the first mm/sub-mm spectral index measured for a BHXRB. Spectral fitting revealed that both the mm (230 GHz) and sub-mm (350 GHz) measurements are consistent with extrapolations of an inverted power law from contemporaneous radio data (1-30 GHz). This indicates that, as standard jet models predict, a power law extending up to mm/sub-mm frequencies can adequately describe the spectrum, and suggests that the mechanism driving spectral inversion could be responsible for the high mm/sub-mm fluxes (compared to radio fluxes) observed in outbursting BHXRBs. While this power law is also consistent with contemporaneous optical data, the optical data could arise from either jet emission with a jet spectral break frequency of {{ν }break}≳ 1× {{10}14} Hz or the combination of jet emission with a lower jet spectral break frequency of {{ν }break}≳ 2× {{10}11} Hz and accretion disk emission. Our analysis solidifies the importance of the mm/sub-mm regime in bridging the crucial gap between radio and IR frequencies in the jet spectrum, and justifies the need to explore this regime further.

  13. SWIFT Discovery of Gamma-ray Bursts without Jet Break Feature in their X-ray Afterglows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, G.; Yamazaki, R.; Sakamoto, T.; Takahashi, T; Nakazawa, K.; Nakamura, T.; Toma, K.; Hullinger, D.; Tashiro, M.; Parsons, A. M.; Krimm, H. A.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.; Burrows, D. N.; O'Brien, P. T.; Osborne, J. P.; Chincarini, G.; Lamb, D. Q.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze Swift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and X-ray afterglows for three GRBs with spectroscopic redshift determinations - GRB 050401, XRF 050416a, and GRB 050525a. We find that the relation between spectral peak energy and isotropic energy of prompt emissions (the Amati relation) is consistent with that for the bursts observed in pre-Swift era. However, we find that the X-ray afterglow lightcurves, which extend up to 10 - 70 days, show no sign of the jet break that is expected in the standard framework of collimated outflows. We do so by showing that none of the X-ray afterglow lightcurves in our sample satisfies the relation between the spectral and temporal indices that is predicted for the phase after jet break. The jet break time can be predicted by inverting the tight empirical relation between the peak energy of the spectrum and the collimation-corrected energy of the prompt emission (the Ghirlanda relation). We find that there are no temporal breaks within the predicted time intervals in X-ray band. This requires either that the Ghirlanda relation has a larger scatter than previously thought, that the temporal break in X-rays is masked by some additional source of X-ray emission, or that it does not happen because of some unknown reason.

  14. Possible proton synchrotron origin of X-ray and gamma-ray emission in large-scale jet of 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Esha; Gupta, Nayantara

    2014-10-01

    The large-scale jet of quasar 3C 273 has been observed in radio to gamma-ray frequencies. Earlier the X-ray emission from knot A of this jet has been explained with inverse Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background radiations by the shock accelerated relativistic electrons in the jet. More recently it has been shown that this mechanism overproduces the gamma-ray flux at GeV energy and violates the observational results from Fermi LAT. We have considered the synchrotron emission from a broken power-law spectrum of accelerated protons in the jet to explain the observed X-ray to gamma-ray flux from knot A. The two scenarios discussed in our work are (i) magnetic field is high, synchrotron energy loss time of the protons is shorter than their escape time from the knot region and the age of the jet and (ii) their escape time is shorter than their synchrotron energy loss time and the age of the jet. These scenarios can explain the observed photon spectrum well for moderate values of Doppler factor. The required jet luminosity is high ˜1046 erg s-1 in the first scenario and moderate ˜1045 erg s-1 in the second, which makes the second scenario more favourable.

  15. Interpreting the radio/X-ray correlation of black hole X-ray binaries based on the accretion-jet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Fu-Guo; Yuan, Feng

    2016-03-01

    Two types of correlations between the radio and X-ray luminosities (LR and LX) have been found in black hole X-ray binaries. For some sources, they follow the `original' type of correlation which is described by a single power law. Later it was found that some other sources follow a different correlation consisting of three power-law branches, with each branch having different power-law indexes. In this work, we explain these two types of correlation under the coupled accretion-jet model. We attribute the difference between these two types of sources to the different value of viscosity parameter α. One possible reason for different α is the different configuration of magnetic field in the accretion material coming from the companion stars. For the `single power-law' sources, their α is high; so their accretion is always in the mode of advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) for the whole range of X-ray luminosity. For those `hybrid power-law' sources, the value of α is small so their accretion mode changes from an ADAF to a luminous hot accretion flow, and eventually to two-phase accretion as the accretion rate increases. Because the dependence of radiative efficiency on the mass accretion rate is different for these three accretion modes, different power-law indexes in the LR-LX correlation are expected. Constraints on the ratio of the mass-loss rate into the jet and the mass accretion rate in the accretion flow are obtained, which can be tested in future by radiative magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of jet formation.

  16. 1RXS J180408.9-342058: An ultra compact X-ray binary candidate with a transient jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baglio, M. C.; D'Avanzo, P.; Campana, S.; Goldoni, P.; Masetti, N.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Patiño-Álvarez, V.; Chavushyan, V.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We present a detailed near-infrared/optical/UV study of the transient low-mass X-ray binary 1RXS J180408.9-342058 performed during its 2015 outburst, which is aimed at determining the nature of its companion star. Methods: We obtained three optical spectra (R ~ 1000) at the 2.1 m San Pedro Mártir Observatory telescope (México). We performed optical and NIR photometric observations with both the REM telescope and the New Technology Telescope (NTT) in La Silla. We obtained optical and UV observations from the Swift archive. Finally, we performed optical polarimetry of the source using the EFOSC2 instrument mounted on the NTT. Results: The optical spectrum of the source is almost featureless since the hydrogen and He I emissions lines, typically observed in LMXBs, are not detected. Similarly, carbon and oxygen lines are not observed either. We marginally detect the He II 4686 Å emission line, suggesting the presence of helium in the accretion disc. No significant optical polarisation level was observed. Conclusions: The lack of hydrogen and He I emission lines in the spectrum implies that the companion is likely not a main-sequence star. Driven by the tentative detection of the He II 4686 Å emission line, we suggest that the system could harbour a helium white dwarf. If this is the case, 1RXS J180408.9-342058 would be an ultra-compact X-ray binary. By combining an estimate of the mass accretion rate together with evolutionary tracks for a He white dwarf, we obtain a tentative orbital period of ~40 min. We also built the NIR-optical-UV spectral energy distribution (SED) of the source at two different epochs. One SED was gathered when the source was in the soft X-ray state and this SED is consistent with the presence of a single thermal component. The second SED, obtained when the source was in the hard X-ray state, shows a thermal component along with a tail in the NIR, which likely indicates the presence of a (transient) jet. Based on observations made with

  17. Gamma-ray burst flares: X-ray flaring. II

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.

    2014-06-10

    We present a catalog of 498 flaring periods found in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves taken from the online Swift X-Ray Telescope GRB Catalogue. We analyzed 680 individual light curves using a flare detection method developed and used on our UV/optical GRB Flare Catalog. This method makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of fitted GRB light curves and statistically determines the optimal fit to the light curve residuals in an attempt to identify any additional features. These features, which we classify as flares, are identified by iteratively adding additional 'breaks' to the light curve. We find evidence of flaring in 326 of the analyzed light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ∼1.5 flares per GRB. As with the UV/optical, flaring in our sample is generally confined to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be detected to beyond 10{sup 5} s. Only ∼50% of the detected flares follow the 'classical' definition of Δt/t ≤ 0.5, with many of the largest flares exceeding this value.

  18. A jet model for Galactic black-hole X-ray sources: The correlation between cutoff energy and phase lag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, P.; Kylafis, N. D.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Galactic black-hole X-ray binaries emit a compact, optically thick, mildy relativistic radio jet when they are in the hard and hard-intermediate states, that is, typically at the beginning and the end of an X-ray outburst. In a series of papers, we have developed a jet model and have shown through Monte Carlo simulations that our model can explain many observational results. Aims: In this work, we investigate one more constraining relationship between the cutoff energy and the phase lag during the early stages of an X-ray outburst of the black-hole X-ray binary GX 339-4: the cutoff energy decreases while the phase lag increases during the brightening of the hard state. Methods: We performed Monte Carlo simulations of the Compton upscattering of soft accretion-disk photons in the jet and computed the phase lag between soft and hard photons and the cutoff energy of the resulting high-energy power law. Results: We demonstrate that our jet model naturally explains the above correlation, with a minor modification consisting of introducing an acceleration zone at the base of the jet. Conclusions: The observed correlation between the cutoff energy and the phase lag in the black-hole binary GX 339-4 suggests that the lags are produced by the hard component. Here we show that this correlation arises naturally if Comptonization in the jet produces these two quantities.

  19. X-ray emission from cataclysmic variables with accretion disks. I - Hard X-rays. II - EUV/soft X-ray radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, J.; Raymond, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical models explaining the hard-X-ray, soft-X-ray, and EUV emission of accretion-disk cataclysmic variables in terms of the disk boundary layer (DBL) are developed on the basis of a survey of the published observational data. The data are compared with model predictions in graphs for systems with high or low (greater than or less than 10-Pg/s) accretion rates. Good agreement is obtained both at low accretion rates, where an optically thin rarefied hot (Te = 10 to the 8th K) DBL radiates most of its energy as hard X-rays, and at high accretion rates, where an optically thick 100,000-K DBL radiates most of its energy in the EUV and as soft X-rays. Detailed analysis of the old nova V603 Aql suggests that previous models predicting more detections of soft-X-ray/EUV emissions from thick-DBL objects (Ferland et al., 1982) used inappropriate dwarf masses, interstellar column densities, or classical-nova space densities.

  20. Collimated Jet Or Expanding Outflow: Possible Origins of GRBs And X-Ray Flashes

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, Akira; Yamasaki, Tatsuya; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Mineshige, Shin; /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst., Kyoto

    2006-08-10

    transition between the GRBs, X-ray rich GRBs (XRRs) and X-ray Flashes (XRFs) by the same model but with different {epsilon}{sub 0} values.

  1. X-ray and Radio Observations of the Jet--environment Interaction in 3C 123

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Sarah; Evans, D.; Lee, J.

    2007-12-01

    We present a 46.7 ks Chandra observation of the hot intracluster gas associated with the radio galaxy 3C 123, in order to study the energetics of the interaction between the large-scale radio jets emitted from the AGN and the gaseous, X-ray-emitting ICM. We observe large-scale asymmetries in the gas distribution out to 100'' together with smaller scale variations on scales of 20-30''. While gas temperatures on the large scale are well-described by an APEC model with temperature 8 keV, temperatures of the small-scale gaseous regions are described by a similar model with temperature 3 keV. We find that the significant overdensities and underdensities of the intracluster gas on large and small scales are caused by different processes. We calculate the "bubble” enthalpy of a small-scale eastern cavity to be 3 × 1059 ergs per bubble evacuated. We observe a corresponding overdense region which has the same enthalpy in pressure equilibrium with this cavity. We also find that the black hole accretion rate required to evacuate this region is R = 0.05Msunyear-1 per bubble. Our results support the interpretation that there is a large-scale disturbance from equilibrium most likely due to "sloshing” of gas caused by the impact of a subcluster merger, whereas on small scales, the radio outbursts from the AGN have created cavities within the X-ray--emitting gas.

  2. Disc-jet coupling in the Terzan 5 neutron star X-ray binary EXO 1745-248

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetarenko, A. J.; Bahramian, A.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Tremou, E.; Linares, M.; Tudor, V.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Heinke, C. O.; Chomiuk, L.; Strader, J.; Altamirano, D.; Degenaar, N.; Maccarone, T.; Patruno, A.; Sanna, A.; Wijnands, R.

    2016-07-01

    We present the results of Very Large Array, Australia Telescope Compact Array, and Swift X-ray Telescope observations of the 2015 outburst of the transient neutron star X-ray binary (NSXB), EXO 1745-248, located in the globular cluster Terzan 5. Combining (near-) simultaneous radio and X-ray measurements, we measure a correlation between the radio and X-ray luminosities of L_R∝ L_X^β with β =1.68^{+0.10}_{-0.09}, linking the accretion flow (probed by X-ray luminosity) and the compact jet (probed by radio luminosity). While such a relationship has been studied in multiple black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs), this work marks only the third NSXB with such a measurement. Constraints on this relationship in NSXBs are strongly needed, as comparing this correlation between different classes of XB systems is key in understanding the properties that affect the jet production process in accreting objects. Our best-fitting disc-jet coupling index for EXO 1745-248 is consistent with the measured correlation in NSXB 4U 1728-34 (β = 1.5 ± 0.2) but inconsistent with the correlation we fit using the most recent measurements from the literature of NSXB Aql X-1 (β =0.76^{+0.14}_{-0.15}). While a similar disc-jet coupling index appears to hold across multiple BHXBs in the hard accretion state, this does not appear to be the case with the three NSXBs measured so far. Additionally, the normalization of the EXO 1745-248 correlation is lower than the other two NSXBs, making it one of the most radio faint XBs ever detected in the hard state. We also report the detection of a type-I X-ray burst during this outburst, where the decay time-scale is consistent with hydrogen burning.

  3. Nine Years of Observations of Hard X-Rays from Relativistic Jet Objects with BATSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.; Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The observed hard X-ray temporal and spectral characteristics will be displayed for over nine years of BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment) data from the Compton Observatory. These observations were obtained using the Earth occultation technique, a technique that has become increasingly more sensitive and accurate as systematic effects are understood and corrected. The principal objects that are being presented in this study include: GRO J1655-40, GRS 1915+105, Cyg X-3, Cyg X-1, XTE J1550-564, XTE J1859+226, XTE J1748-288, and V4641 Sgr. Light curves and spectral will be presented and discussed in terms of relativistic jet production in these systems.

  4. Shallow Decay of Early X-Ray Afterglows from Inhomogeneous Gamma-Ray Burst Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Kenji; Ioka, Kunihito; Yamazaki, Ryo; Nakamura, Takashi

    2006-04-01

    Almost all the X-ray afterglows of γ-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Swift satellite have a shallow decay phase in their first few thousand seconds. We show that in an inhomogeneous-jet model (multiple-subjet or patchy-shell), the superposition of the afterglows of off-axis subjets (patchy shells) can produce the shallow decay phase. The necessary condition for obtaining the shallow decay phase is that γ-ray-bright subjets (patchy shells) have γ-ray efficiencies higher than previously estimated and that they be surrounded by γ-ray-dim subjets (patchy shells) with low γ-ray efficiency. Our model predicts that events with dim prompt emission will have a conventional afterglow light curve without a shallow decay phase, like GRB 050416A.

  5. Exploring jet-launching conditions for supergiant fast X-ray transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Federico; Aguilera, Deborah N.; Romero, Gustavo E.

    2014-05-01

    Context. In the magneto-centrifugal mechanism for jet formation, accreting neutron stars are assumed to produce relativistic jets only if their surface magnetic field is weak enough (B ~ 108 G). However, the most common manifestation of neutron stars are pulsars, whose magnetic field distribution peaks at B ~ 1012 G. If the neutron star magnetic field has at least this strength at birth, it must decay considerably before jets can be launched in binary systems. Aims: We study the magnetic field evolution of a neutron star that accretes matter from the wind of a high-mass stellar companion so that we can constrain the accretion rate and the impurities in the crust, which are necessary conditions for jet formation. Methods: We solved the induction equation for the diffusion and convection of the neutron star magnetic field confined to the crust, assuming spherical accretion in a simpliflied one-dimensional treatment. We incorporated state-of-the-art microphysics, including consistent thermal evolution profiles, and assumed two different neutron star cooling scenarios based on the superfluidity conditions at the core. Results: We find that in this scenario, magnetic field decay at long timescales is governed mainly by the accretion rate, while the impurity content and thermal evolution of the neutron star play a secondary role. For accretion rates Ṁ ≳ 10-10 M⊙ yr-1, surface magnetic fields can decay up to four orders of magnitude in ~107 yr, which is the timescale imposed by the evolution of the high-mass stellar companion in these systems. Based on these results, we discuss the possibility of transient jet-launching in strong wind-accreting high-mass binary systems like supergiant fast X-ray transients.

  6. X-ray and optical performance of the flight filters for the JET-X telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Christian M.; Watson, D. J.; Wells, Alan A.; Kent, Barry J.; Barbera, Marco; Collura, Alfonso; Bavdaz, Marcos

    1997-10-01

    The optical filters on board the JET-X telescope comprise thin foils of aluminum coated Lexan. During ground calibration of the filters, narrow spectral regions of high UV leakage, with peak levels of up to a few percent, were observed in broad band optical measurements in the 1000 to 10,000 angstrom range. Furthermore, transmission values were typically up to two orders of magnitude higher than calculated for the aluminum thickness. Investigation showed that these effects were attributed to a combination of aluminum oxidation, which reduces the opacity, and the use of a double sided aluminum layer in the filter design which behaves as a Fabry-Perot interference filter. These effects were verified by a multi- layer model of the filter UV response. Recent redesign of the filters for the flight program eliminated the UV leakage by adopting a single aluminum layer configuration, thus eliminating interference effects, and increasing the thickness by 30% to compensate for oxidation levels. The integrated x- ray transmission below 1 keV was found to be only reduced by 3%. In parallel with the production of the new Lexan flight filters, a set of qualification model filters was produced by the Luxel Corporation in the USA. These filters use polyimide as a substrate material which has the advantage that it is optically opaque to wavelengths below 3000 angstroms, unlike Lexan which is transparent. These new filters were found to have superior mechanical strength, being able to survive extended qualification vibration without any visible degradation in performance, and had a higher cosmetic quality and attenuation levels. As a result, these filters have now been included in the JET-X flight program. We report on the optical tests results from both Lexan and polyimide filters along with high resolution x-ray transmission results carried out at the BESSY synchrotron facility in Germany. Results of the mapping of the filter edge structures, global transmission values and

  7. NuSTAR Hard X-Ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region. II. X-Ray Point Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, JaeSub; Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Gotthelf, Eric; Fornasini, Francesca M.; Krivonos, Roman; Bauer, Franz; Perez, Kerstin; Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash; Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Clavel, Maïca; Stern, Daniel; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Alexander, David M.; Aramaki, Tsuguo; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barret, Didier; Barrière, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E.; Canipe, Alicia M.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Desai, Meera A.; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hong, Dooran; Hornstrup, Allan; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason E.; Madsen, Kristen K.; Mao, Peter H.; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Perri, Matteo; Pivovaroff, Michael J.; Puccetti, Simonetta; Rana, Vikram; Westergaard, Niels J.; Zhang, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    We present the first survey results of hard X-ray point sources in the Galactic Center (GC) region by NuSTAR. We have discovered 70 hard (3–79 keV) X-ray point sources in a 0.6 deg{}2 region around Sgr A* with a total exposure of 1.7 Ms, and 7 sources in the Sgr B2 field with 300 ks. We identify clear Chandra counterparts for 58 NuSTAR sources and assign candidate counterparts for the remaining 19. The NuSTAR survey reaches X-ray luminosities of ˜4× and ˜8 × 10{}32 erg s{}-1 at the GC (8 kpc) in the 3–10 and 10–40 keV bands, respectively. The source list includes three persistent luminous X-ray binaries (XBs) and the likely run-away pulsar called the Cannonball. New source-detection significance maps reveal a cluster of hard (>10 keV) X-ray sources near the Sgr A diffuse complex with no clear soft X-ray counterparts. The severe extinction observed in the Chandra spectra indicates that all the NuSTAR sources are in the central bulge or are of extragalactic origin. Spectral analysis of relatively bright NuSTAR sources suggests that magnetic cataclysmic variables constitute a large fraction (>40%–60%). Both spectral analysis and logN–logS distributions of the NuSTAR sources indicate that the X-ray spectra of the NuSTAR sources should have kT > 20 keV on average for a single temperature thermal plasma model or an average photon index of Γ = 1.5–2 for a power-law model. These findings suggest that the GC X-ray source population may contain a larger fraction of XBs with high plasma temperatures than the field population.

  8. NuSTAR Hard X-Ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region. II. X-Ray Point Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, JaeSub; Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Gotthelf, Eric; Fornasini, Francesca M.; Krivonos, Roman; Bauer, Franz; Perez, Kerstin; Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash; Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Clavel, Maïca; Stern, Daniel; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Alexander, David M.; Aramaki, Tsuguo; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barret, Didier; Barrière, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E.; Canipe, Alicia M.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Desai, Meera A.; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hong, Dooran; Hornstrup, Allan; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason E.; Madsen, Kristen K.; Mao, Peter H.; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Perri, Matteo; Pivovaroff, Michael J.; Puccetti, Simonetta; Rana, Vikram; Westergaard, Niels J.; Zhang, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    We present the first survey results of hard X-ray point sources in the Galactic Center (GC) region by NuSTAR. We have discovered 70 hard (3–79 keV) X-ray point sources in a 0.6 deg{}2 region around Sgr A* with a total exposure of 1.7 Ms, and 7 sources in the Sgr B2 field with 300 ks. We identify clear Chandra counterparts for 58 NuSTAR sources and assign candidate counterparts for the remaining 19. The NuSTAR survey reaches X-ray luminosities of ∼4× and ∼8 × 10{}32 erg s{}-1 at the GC (8 kpc) in the 3–10 and 10–40 keV bands, respectively. The source list includes three persistent luminous X-ray binaries (XBs) and the likely run-away pulsar called the Cannonball. New source-detection significance maps reveal a cluster of hard (>10 keV) X-ray sources near the Sgr A diffuse complex with no clear soft X-ray counterparts. The severe extinction observed in the Chandra spectra indicates that all the NuSTAR sources are in the central bulge or are of extragalactic origin. Spectral analysis of relatively bright NuSTAR sources suggests that magnetic cataclysmic variables constitute a large fraction (>40%–60%). Both spectral analysis and logN–logS distributions of the NuSTAR sources indicate that the X-ray spectra of the NuSTAR sources should have kT > 20 keV on average for a single temperature thermal plasma model or an average photon index of Γ = 1.5–2 for a power-law model. These findings suggest that the GC X-ray source population may contain a larger fraction of XBs with high plasma temperatures than the field population.

  9. Serendipitous Discovery of an Extended X-Ray Jet without a Radio Counterpart in a High-redshift Quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simionescu, A.; Stawarz, Ł.; Ichinohe, Y.; Cheung, C. C.; Jamrozy, M.; Siemiginowska, A.; Hagino, K.; Gandhi, P.; Werner, N.

    2016-01-01

    A recent Chandra observation of the nearby galaxy cluster Abell 585 has led to the discovery of an extended X-ray jet associated with the high-redshift background quasar B3 0727+409, a luminous radio source at redshift z = 2.5. This is one of only few examples of high-redshift X-ray jets known to date. It has a clear extension of about 12″, corresponding to a projected length of ∼100 kpc, with a possible hot spot located 35″ from the quasar. The archival high resolution Very Large Array maps surprisingly reveal no extended jet emission, except for one knot about 1.″4 from the quasar. The high X-ray to radio luminosity ratio for this source appears consistent with the \\propto {(1+z)}4 amplification expected from the inverse Compton radiative model. This serendipitous discovery may signal the existence of an entire population of similar systems with bright X-ray and faint radio jets at high redshift, a selection bias that must be accounted for when drawing any conclusions about the redshift evolution of jet properties and indeed about the cosmological evolution of supermassive black holes and active galactic nuclei in general.

  10. Confronting X-Ray Emission Models with theHighest-Redshift Kiloparsec-Scale Jets: The z = 3.89 Jet in Quasar 1745+624

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, C.C.; Stawarz, L.; Siemiginowska, A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2006-06-28

    A newly identified kiloparsec-scale X-ray jet in the high-redshift z=3.89 quasar 1745+624 is studied with multi-frequency Very Large Array, Hubble Space Telescope, and Chandra X-ray imaging data. This is only the third large-scale X-ray jet beyond z > 3 known and is further distinguished as being the most luminous relativistic jet observed at any redshift, exceeding 10{sup 45} erg/s in both the radio and X-ray bands. Apart from the jet's extreme redshift, luminosity, and high inferred equipartition magnetic field (in comparison to local analogues), its basic properties such as X-ray/radio morphology and radio polarization are similar to lower-redshift examples. Its resolved linear structure and the convex broad-band spectral energy distributions of three distinct knots are also a common feature among known powerful X-ray jets at lower-redshift. Relativistically beamed inverse Compton and ''non-standard'' synchrotron models have been considered to account for such excess X-ray emission in other jets; both models are applicable to this high-redshift example but with differing requirements for the underlying jet physical properties, such as velocity, energetics, and electron acceleration processes. One potentially very important distinguishing characteristic between the two models is their strongly diverging predictions for the X-ray/radio emission with increasing redshift. This is considered, though with the limited sample of three z > 3 jets it is apparent that future studies targeted at very high-redshift jets are required for further elucidation of this issue. Finally, from the broad-band jet emission we estimate the jet kinetic power to be no less than 10{sup 46} erg/s, which is about 10% of the Eddington luminosity corresponding to this galaxy's central supermassive black hole mass M{sub BH} {approx}> 10{sup 9} M{sub {circle_dot}} estimated here via the virial relation. The optical luminosity of the quasar core is about ten times over Eddington, hence the

  11. A jet emission model to probe the dynamics of accretion and ejection coupling in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malzac, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Compact jets are probably the most common form of jets in X-ray binaries and Active Galactic Nuclei. They seem to be present in all sources in the so-called hard X-ray spectral state. They are characterised by a nearly flat Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) extending from the radio to the infrared bands. This emission is usually interpreted as partially self absorbed synchrotron emission from relativistic leptons accelerated in the jet. The observed flat spectral shape requires energy dissipation and acceleration of particules over a wide range of distances along the jet. This distributed energy dissipation is likely to be powered by internal shocks caused by fluctuations of the outflow velocity. I will discuss such an internal shock model in the context of black hole binaries. I will show that internal shocks can produce the observed SEDs and also predict a strong, wavelength dependent, variability that resembles the observed one. The assumed velocity fluctuations of the jet must originate in the accretion flow. The model thus predicts a strong connection between the observable properties of the jet in the radio to IR bands, and the variability of the accretion flow as observed in X-rays. If the model is correct, this offers a unique possibility to probe the dynamics of the coupled accretion and ejection processes leading to the formation of compact jets.

  12. X-ray absorption spectroscopic characterization of a cytochrome P450 compound II derivative

    PubMed Central

    Newcomb, Martin; Halgrimson, James A.; Horner, John H.; Wasinger, Erik C.; Chen, Lin X.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2008-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP119, its compound II derivative, and its nitrosyl complex were studied by iron K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The compound II derivative was prepared by reaction of the resting enzyme with peroxynitrite and had a lifetime of ≈10 s at 23°C. The CYP119 nitrosyl complex was prepared by reaction of the enzyme with nitrogen monoxide gas or with a nitrosyl donor and was stable at 23°C for hours. Samples of CYP119 and its derivatives were studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy at temperatures below 140 (K) at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory. The x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra displayed shifts in edge and pre-edge energies consistent with increasing effective positive charge on iron in the series native CYP119 < CYP119 nitrosyl complex < CYP119 compound II derivative. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra were simulated with good fits for k = 12 Å−1 for native CYP119 and k = 13 Å−1 for both the nitrosyl complex and the compound II derivative. The important structural features for the compound II derivative were an iron-oxygen bond length of 1.82 Å and an iron-sulfur bond length of 2.24 Å, both of which indicate an iron-oxygen single bond in a ferryl-hydroxide, FeIVOH, moiety. PMID:18174331

  13. The Infrared Variability of GX17+2 and Low-Mass X-ray Binary Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Bernard J.; Bornak, J.; Harrison, T.; Rupen, M.

    2007-12-01

    GX17+2 is a low-mass X-ray binary. It is also classified as a Z-source since it exhibits a distinctive Z-pattern in its X-ray color-color plot. GX17+2 is located in the direction of the galactic center and is not detectable at optical wavelengths. Its emission varies by over 4 magnitudes in the infrared. A number of explanations have been advanced to explain this variabilty. Based upon KPNO and Smarts IR observations, we suggest that it arises from a sychrotron jet which is periodically visible along our line of sight. This circumstance provides a rather unique opportunity to quantify a number of jet properties such as its opening angle, the sharpness of the jet boundaries, its variability, and the infrared emission uniformity across the jet.

  14. Disc-Jet Coupling in the Terzan 5 Neutron Star X-ray Binary EXO 1745-248

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetarenko, A. J.; Bahramian, A.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Tremou, E.; Linares, M.; Tudor, V.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Heinke, C. O.; Chomiuk, L.; Strader, J.; Altamirano, D.; Degenaar, N.; Maccarone, T.; Patruno, A.; Sanna, A.; Wijnands, R.

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of VLA, ATCA, and Swift XRT observations of the 2015 outburst of the transient neutron star X-ray binary (NSXB), EXO 1745-248, located in the globular cluster Terzan 5. Combining (near-) simultaneous radio and X-ray measurements we measure a correlation between the radio and X-ray luminosities of L_R∝ L_X^β with β =1.68^{+0.10}_{-0.09}, linking the accretion flow (probed by X-ray luminosity) and the compact jet (probed by radio luminosity). While such a relationship has been studied in multiple black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs), this work marks only the third NSXB with such a measurement. Constraints on this relationship in NSXBs are strongly needed, as comparing this correlation between different classes of XB systems is key in understanding the properties that affect the jet production process in accreting objects. Our best fit disc-jet coupling index for EXO 1745-248 is consistent with the measured correlation in NSXB 4U 1728-34 (β = 1.5 ± 0.2) but inconsistent with the correlation we fit using the most recent measurements from the literature of NSXB Aql X-1 (β =0.76^{+0.14}_{-0.15}). While a similar disc-jet coupling index appears to hold across multiple BHXBs in the hard accretion state, this does not appear to be the case with the three NSXBs measured so far. Additionally, the normalization of the EXO 1745-248 correlation is lower than the other two NSXBs, making it one of the most radio faint XBs ever detected in the hard state. We also report the detection of a type-I X-ray burst during this outburst, where the decay timescale is consistent with hydrogen burning.

  15. Room temperature femtosecond X-ray diffraction of photosystem II microcrystals

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Jan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Hellmich, Julia; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Glöckner, Carina; Echols, Nathaniel; Sierra, Raymond G.; Sellberg, Jonas; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Gildea, Richard J.; Glatzel, Pieter; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Latimer, Matthew J.; McQueen, Trevor A.; DiFiore, Dörte; Fry, Alan R.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Miahnahri, Alan; Schafer, Donald W.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Messinger, Johannes; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Zouni, Athina; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the dioxygen on earth is generated by the oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) using light from the sun. This light-driven, four-photon reaction is catalyzed by the Mn4CaO5 cluster located at the lumenal side of PS II. Various X-ray studies have been carried out at cryogenic temperatures to understand the intermediate steps involved in the water oxidation mechanism. However, the necessity for collecting data at room temperature, especially for studying the transient steps during the O–O bond formation, requires the development of new methodologies. In this paper we report room temperature X-ray diffraction data of PS II microcrystals obtained using ultrashort (< 50 fs) 9 keV X-ray pulses from a hard X-ray free electron laser, namely the Linac Coherent Light Source. The results presented here demonstrate that the ”probe before destroy” approach using an X-ray free electron laser works even for the highly-sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster in PS II at room temperature. We show that these data are comparable to those obtained in synchrotron radiation studies as seen by the similarities in the overall structure of the helices, the protein subunits and the location of the various cofactors. This work is, therefore, an important step toward future studies for resolving the structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster without any damage at room temperature, and of the reaction intermediates of PS II during O–O bond formation. PMID:22665786

  16. Final Report on X-ray Yields from OMEGA II Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, K B; May, M J; MacLaren, S A; Coverdale, C A; Davis, J F

    2007-06-20

    We present details about X-ray yields measured with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) diagnostics in soft and moderately hard X-ray bands from laser-driven, doped-aerogel targets shot on 07/14/06 during the OMEGA II test series. Yields accurate to {+-}25% in the 5-15 keV band are measured with Livermore's HENWAY spectrometer. Yields in the sub-keV to 3.2 keV band are measured with LLNL's DANTE diagnostic, the DANTE yields are accurate to 10-15%. SNL ran a PCD-based diagnostic that also measured X-ray yields in the spectral region above 4 keV, and also down to the sub-keV range. The PCD and HENWAY and DANTE numbers are compared. The time histories of the moderately hard (h{nu} > 4 keV) X-ray signals are measured with LLNL's H11 PCD, and from two SNL PCDs with comparable filtration. There is general agreement between the H11 PCD and SNL PCD measured FWHM except for two of the shorter-laser-pulse shots, which is shown not to be due to analysis techniques. The recommended X-ray waveform is that from the SNL PCD p66k10, which was recorded on a fast, high-bandwidth TDS 6804 oscilloscope. X-ray waveforms from target emission in two softer spectral bands are also shown; the X-ray emissions have increasing duration as the spectral content gets softer.

  17. A study of the flaring and quiescent X-ray and UV emission from II Pegasi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tagliaferri, G.; White, N. E.; Doyle, J. G.; Culhane, J. L.; Hassall, B. J. M.; Swank, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted of the rotational modulation of the transition-region UV and coronal X-ray emission for the RS CVn system II Pegasi. The X-ray light curve is dominated by a strong flare detected at orbital phase, where the minimum of the photometric wave occurred. The flare parameters derived show that the flare originates with a height greater than half the stellar radius. The characteristics of the flare are similar to those of a solar two-ribbon flare; a comparison of the midtransition region density with that in the coronal region shows a very steep pressure gradient.

  18. Second Preliminary Report on X-ray Yields from OMEGA II Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, K B; May, M J; MacLaren, S A; Coverdale, C A; Davis, J F

    2006-08-28

    We present details about X-ray yields measured with LLNL and SNL diagnostics in soft and moderately hard X-ray bands from laser-driven, doped-aerogel targets shot on 07/14/06 during the OMEGA II test series. Yields accurate to {+-}25% in the 5-15 keV band are measured with Livermore's HENWAY spectrometer. Yields in the sub-keV to 3.2 keV band are measured with LLNL's DANTE diagnostic, the DANTE yields may be 35-40% too large. SNL ran a PCD-based diagnostic that also measured X-ray yields in the spectral region above 4 keV, and also down to the nearly sub-keV range. The PCD and HENWAY and DANTE numbers are compared. The time histories of the X-ray signals are measured with LLNL's H11 PCD, and from two SNL PCDs with comparable filtering. There is a persistent disagreement between the H11 PCD and SNL PCD measured FWHM, which is shown not to be due to analysis techniques. The recommended X-ray waveform is that from the SNL PCD p66k10, which was recorded on a fast, high-bandwidth TDS 6804 oscilloscope, and which are not plotted here.

  19. Long-term optical variability of high-mass X-ray binaries. II. Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, P.; Nersesian, A.; Zezas, A.; Gkouvelis, L.; Coe, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. High-mass X-ray binaries are bright X-ray sources. The high-energy emission is caused by the accretion of matter from the massive companion onto a neutron star. The accreting material comes from either the strong stellar wind in binaries with supergiant companions or the cirscumstellar disk in Be/X-ray binaries. In either case, the Hα line stands out as the main source of information about the state of the accreting material. Aims: We present the results of our monitoring program to study the long-term variability of the Hα line in high-mass X-ray binaries. Our aim is to characterise the optical variability timescales and study the interaction between the neutron star and the accreting material. Methods: We fitted the Hα line with Gaussian profiles and obtained the line parameters and equivalent width. The peak separation in split profiles was used to determine the disk velocity law and estimate the disk radius. The relative intensity of the two peaks (V/R ratio) allowed us to investigate the distribution of gas particles in the disk. The equivalent width was used to characterise the degree of variability of the systems. We also studied the variability of the Hα line in correlation with the X-ray activity. Results: Our results can be summarised as follows: i) we find that Be/X-ray binaries with narrow orbits are more variable than systems with long orbital periods; ii) we show that a Keplerian distribution of gas particles provides a good description of the disks in Be/X-ray binaries, as it does in classical Be stars; iii) a decrease in the Hα equivalent width is generally observed after major X-ray outbursts; iv) we confirm that the Hα equivalent width correlates with disk radius; v) while systems with supergiant companions display multi-structured profiles, most of the Be/X-ray binaries show, at some epoch, double-peak asymmetric profiles, which indicates that density inhomogeneities is a common property in the disk of Be/X-ray binaries; vi) the

  20. Tin(II) ketoacidoximates: synthesis, X-ray structures and processing to tin(II) oxide.

    PubMed

    Khanderi, Jayaprakash; Davaasuren, Bambar; Alshankiti, Buthainah Ameen; Rothenberger, Alexander

    2015-12-14

    Tin(II) ketoacidoximates of the type [HON=CRCOO]2Sn (R = Me 1, CH2Ph 2) and (MeON=CMeCOO)3Sn](-) NH4(+)·2H2O 3 were synthesized by reacting pyruvate- and hydroxyl- or methoxylamine RONH2 (R = H, Me) with tin(II) chloride dihydrate SnCl2·2H2O. The single crystal X-ray structure reveals that the geometry at the Sn atom is trigonal bipyramidal in 1, 2 and trigonal pyramidal in 3. Inter- or intramolecular hydrogen bonding is observed in 1-3. Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis shows that the decomposition of 1-3 to SnO occurs at ca. 160 °C. The evolved gas analysis during TG indicates complete loss of the oximato ligand in one step for 1 whereas a small organic residue is additionally removed at temperatures >400 °C for 2. Above 140 °C, [HON=C(Me)COO]2Sn (1) decomposes in air to spherical SnO particles of size 10-500 nm. Spin coating of 1 on Si or a glass substrate followed by heating at 200 °C results in a uniform film of SnO. The band gap of the produced SnO film and nanomaterial was determined by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to be in the range of 3.0-3.3 eV. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates surface oxidation of the SnO film to SnO2 in ambient atmosphere. PMID:26528675

  1. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of copper(II), copper(I), and mixed valence systems.

    PubMed

    Rupp, H; Weser, U

    1976-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using copper(II), copper(I) and the mixed valence Cu(II)/Cu(I) compounds was employed as a means of studying electron transfer reactions in copper proteins. The X-ray photoelectron spectra of copper(II) compounds display characteristic satellites of both variable size and resolution. Some of these satellites could be assigned to specific ligand interactions. Unlike electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements of copper(I) compounds allowed the unequivocal assignment of this oxidation state. No satellites at all could be detected in the Cu(I) spectra. Furthermore, established mixed valence Cu(II)/Cu(I) complexes including Cu2SO3-CuSO3-2H2O and Cu4Cl5 (ethylenediamine)2 proved essentially a mixture of distinct portions of Cu(I) and Cu(II). This indicates that both oxidation states of copper survive in such complexes. In contrast, all Cu X-ray photoelectron signals of the more tentatively described mixed valence complexes Na2Cu3S3 and the mineral covellite, CuI4CuII2(S2)2S2, could be attributed exclusively to Cu(I). In view of the known binding of copper with sulfur in many copper proteins, it was of utmost importance to study the copper-sulfur interactions. We have demonstrated the absence of Cu(II) in CuS. This indicates strong metal-induced polarization of sulfur resulting in electron transfer to copper to yield Cu(I). PMID:953045

  2. Population synthesis of accreting white dwarfs - II. X-ray and UV emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hai-Liang; Woods, T. E.; Yungelson, L. R.; Gilfanov, M.; Han, Zhanwen

    2015-11-01

    Accreting white dwarfs (WDs) with non-degenerate companions are expected to emit in soft X-rays and the UV, if accreted H-rich material burns stably. They are an important component of the unresolved emission of elliptical galaxies, and their combined ionizing luminosity may significantly influence the optical line emission from warm interstellar medium (ISM). In an earlier paper, we modelled populations of accreting WDs, first generating WD with main-sequence, Hertzsprung gap and red giant companions with the population synthesis code BSE, and then following their evolution with a grid of evolutionary tracks computed with MESA. Now we use these results to estimate the soft X-ray (0.3-0.7 keV), H- and He II-ionizing luminosities of nuclear burning WDs and the number of supersoft X-ray sources for galaxies with different star formation histories. For the starburst case, these quantities peak at ˜1 Gyr and decline by ˜1-3 orders of magnitude by the age of 10 Gyr. For stellar ages of ˜10 Gyr, predictions of our model are consistent with soft X-ray luminosities observed by Chandra in nearby elliptical galaxies and He II 4686 Å/H β line ratio measured in stacked Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra of retired galaxies, the latter characterizing the strength and hardness of the UV radiation field. However, the soft X-ray luminosity and He II 4686 Å/H β ratio are significantly overpredicted for stellar ages of ≲4-8 Gyr. We discuss various possibilities to resolve this discrepancy and tentatively conclude that it may be resolved by a modification of the typically used criteria of dynamically unstable mass-loss for giant stars.

  3. Emerging pictures on the disk-jet connection from simultaneous multiwavelength observations of black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakoff, Gregory; Russell, David; Markoff, Sera; Miller-Jones, James; Tetarenko, Alexandra; Curran, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Relativistic jets in black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs) are fundamentally linked to accretion onto the central black hole. Since the outbursts of X-ray binaries, stellar mass cousins of AGN, typically last weeks to months, BHXBs are ideal targets for probing the connected physics of accretion disks and jets over entire outbursts. However, this fast evolution requires coordinated multiwavelength monitoring observations to best probe this physics. The relativistic jet is typically best probed at low frequencies (radio, mm/sub-mm, mid-IR, near-IR, optical) with ground-based observatories while the accretion disk is best probed at X-ray frequencies from space-based observatories. Over the last several years stronger coordination among scientific teams and these facilities has enabled a greater number of near-simultaneous or simultaneous observations. In this talk, I use examples from a range of campaigns (e.g., MAXI J1836-194 & V404 Cyg) to discuss the gains that are being made with increasingly simultaneous observations. I highlight how four specific multi-wavelength trends (flux monitoring with high resolution imaging; dynamic nearly simultaneous SEDs; the push to mm/sub-mm frequencies; comparison of high time resolution data) are producing data that are increasingly testing theoretical models of jet production.

  4. A LINK BETWEEN X-RAY EMISSION LINES AND RADIO JETS IN 4U 1630-47?

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, Joseph; Coriat, Mickaël; Fender, Rob; Broderick, Jess W.; Lee, Julia C.; Ponti, Gabriele; Tzioumis, Anastasios K.; Edwards, Philip G.

    2014-03-20

    Recently, Díaz Trigo et al. reported an XMM-Newton detection of relativistically Doppler-shifted emission lines associated with steep-spectrum radio emission in the stellar-mass black hole candidate 4U 1630-47 during its 2012 outburst. They interpreted these lines as indicative of a baryonic jet launched by the accretion disk. Here we present a search for the same lines earlier in the same outburst using high-resolution X-ray spectra from the Chandra HETGS. While our observations (eight months prior to the XMM-Newton campaign) also coincide with detections of steep spectrum radio emission by the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we find no evidence for any relativistic X-ray emission lines. Indeed, despite ∼5 × brighter radio emission, our Chandra spectra allow us to place an upper limit on the flux in the blueshifted Fe XXVI line that is ≳ 20 × weaker than the line observed by Díaz Trigo et al. We explore several scenarios that could explain our differing results, including variations in the geometry of the jet or a mass-loading process or jet baryon content that evolves with the accretion state of the black hole. We also consider the possibility that the radio emission arises in an interaction between a jet and the nearby interstellar medium, in which case the X-ray emission lines might be unrelated to the radio emission.

  5. Energy-dependent Orbital Modulation of X-rays and Constraints on Emission of the Jet in Cyg X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Maitra, Chandreyee; Frankowski, Adam; Skinner, Gerald K.; Misra, Ranjeev

    2012-01-01

    We study orbital modulation of X-rays from Cyg X-3, using data from Swift, INTEGRAL and RXTE. Using the wealth of the presently available data and an improved averaging method, we obtain energy-dependent folded and averaged light curves with unprecedented accuracy. We find that above 5 keV, the modulation depth decreases with the increasing energy, which is consistent with the modulation being caused by both bound-free absorption and Compton scattering in the stellar wind of the donor, with minima corresponding to the highest optical depth, which occurs around the superior conjunction. We find a decrease of the depth below 3 keV, which appears to be due to re-emission of the absorbed continuum by the wind in soft X-ray lines. Based on the shape of the folded light curves, any X-ray contribution from the jet in Cyg X-3, which emits ?-rays detected at energies > 0.1 GeV in soft spectral states, is found to be minor up to 100 keV. This implies the presence of a rather sharp low-energy break in the jet MeV-range spectrum.We also calculate phase-resolved RXTE X-ray spectra, and show the difference between the spectra corresponding to phases around the superior and inferior conjunctions can indeed be accounted for by a combined effect of bound-free absorption in an ionized medium and Compton scattering.

  6. Optical and X-ray properties of CAL 83 - II. An X-ray pulsation at ˜67 s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odendaal, A.; Meintjes, P. J.; Charles, P. A.; Rajoelimanana, A. F.

    2014-01-01

    CAL 83 is the prototypical close binary supersoft X-ray source in the Large Magellanic Cloud, has a 1 d orbital period, and is believed to consist of a white dwarf (WD) primary accreting from an evolved donor. Based on published WD model atmosphere fits to X-ray data, the WD has a mass of ˜1.3 M⊙, just below the Chandrasekhar limit. From a systematic search through archival XMM-Newton data for periodic emission from CAL 83 down to the shortest possible period just above the WD break-up period, we report the discovery of an ˜67 s supersoft X-ray modulation, which we interpret as the rotation period of a highly spun-up WD. Such a short period can be explained within the framework of a high mass accretion history, where accretion disc torques could have spun up the WD over time-scales comparable to the thermal time-scale. The presence of carbon, oxygen and nitrogen in published optical and ultraviolet spectra may suggest CNO cycling in the envelope of a secondary star that is oversized for its inferred mass, suggesting that the secondary star shed a significant fraction of its envelope during a high mass-transfer history, resulting in a highly spun-up WD. The reported 67 s period shows an approximately ±3 s drift from the median value in single runs, which we interpret as a hydrogen burning gas envelope surrounding the WD, with a period not quite synchronized with the WD rotation period.

  7. Guitar with a bow: a jet-like X-ray-emitting feature associated a fast-moving pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. Daniel

    2011-09-01

    The Guitar Nebula is known to be a ram-pressure confined pulsar wind nebula associated with the very fast-moving pulsar B2224+65. Existing observations at two epochs have shown an unexpected 2 arcmin long X-ray-emitting jet-like feature emanating from the pulsar and offset from its proper motion direction by 118 degree. We propose a deep third epoch observation of this system in order to measure the X-ray spectral gradient across the feature as well as to confirm its proper motion, its morphological variation with time, and the presence of a counter jet. We will then critically test scenarios proposed to explain this system, which represents a class of similarly enigmatic objects recently discovered locally and in the central region of our Galaxy.

  8. FRAME DRAGGING, DISK WARPING, JET PRECESSING, AND DIPPED X-RAY LIGHT CURVE OF Sw J1644+57

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Bing; Gao, He E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2013-01-10

    The X-ray transient source Sw J1644+57 recently discovered by Swift is believed to be triggered by tidal disruption of a star by a rapidly spinning supermassive black hole (SMBH). For such events, the outer disk is very likely misaligned with respect to the equatorial plane of the spinning SMBH, since the incoming star before disruption most likely has an inclined orbital plane. The tilted disk is subject to the Lense-Thirring torque, which tends to twist and warp due to the Bardeen-Petterson effect. The inner disk tends to align with the SMBH spin, while the outer region tends to remain in the stellar orbital plane, with a transition zone around the Bardeen-Petterson radius. The relativistic jet launched from the spinning SMBH would undergo precession. The 5-30 day X-ray light curve of Sw J1644+57 shows a quasi-periodic (2.7 day) variation with noticeable narrow dips. We numerically solve a warped disk and propose a jet-precessing model by invoking a Blandford-Znajek jet collimated by a wind launched near the Bardeen-Petterson radius. Through simulations, we show that the narrow dips in the X-ray light curve can be reproduced for a range of geometric configurations. From the data we infer that the inclination angle of the initial stellar orbit is in the range of 10 Degree-Sign -20 Degree-Sign from the SMBH equatorial plane, that the jet should have a moderately high Lorentz factor, and that the inclination angle, jet opening angle, and observer's viewing angle are such that the duty cycle of the line of sight sweeping the jet cone is somewhat less than 0.5.

  9. X-RAY AND GAMMA-RAY POLARIZATION IN LEPTONIC AND HADRONIC JET MODELS OF BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Boettcher, M.

    2013-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the expected X-ray and {gamma}-ray polarization signatures resulting from synchrotron self-Compton emission in leptonic models compared to the polarization signatures from proton synchrotron and cascade synchrotron emission in hadronic models for blazars. Source parameters resulting from detailed spectral-energy-distribution modeling are used to calculate photon-energy-dependent upper limits on the degree of polarization, assuming a perfectly organized mono-directional magnetic field. In low-synchrotron-peaked blazars, hadronic models exhibit substantially higher maximum degrees of X-ray and gamma-ray polarization than leptonic models, which may be within reach of existing X-ray and {gamma}-ray polarimeters. In high-synchrotron-peaked blazars (with electron-synchrotron-dominated X-ray emission), leptonic and hadronic models predict the same degree of X-ray polarization but substantially higher maximum {gamma}-ray polarization in hadronic models than leptonic ones. These predictions are particularly relevant in view of the new generation of balloon-borne X-ray polarimeters (and possibly GEMS, if revived), and the ability of Fermi-LAT to measure {gamma}-ray polarization at <200 MeV. We suggest observational strategies combining optical, X-ray, and {gamma}-ray polarimetry to determine the degree of ordering of the magnetic field and to distinguish between leptonic and hadronic high-energy emissions.

  10. Rapid spectral and timing variability of Be/X-ray binaries during type ;II outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, P.

    2008-10-01

    X-ray colour-colour (CD) and colour-intensity (HID) diagrams are powerful tools that allow investigation of spectral variability without assuming any spectral model. These diagrams have been used extensively for low-mass X-ray binaries and black-hole candidates, but very few applications have been found for high-mass X-ray binaries. We investigated the spectral and timing variability of four accreting X-ray pulsars with Be-type companions during major X-ray outbursts. The aim is to define source states based on the properties (noise components) of the aperiodic variability in correlation with the position in the colour-colour diagram. Different spectral states were defined according to the value of the X-ray colours and flux. Transient Be/X-ray binaries exhibit two branches in their colour-colour and colour-intensity diagrams: i) the horizontal branch corresponds to a low-intensity state and shows the highest fractional rms, similar to the the island state in atolls and horizontal branch in Z sources; ii) the diagonal branch corresponds to a high-intensity state, in which the source stays for about 75% of the total duration of the outburst. Despite the complexity of the power spectra due to the peaks of the pulse period and its harmonics, the aperiodic variability of Be/X-ray binaries can be described with a relatively low number of Lorentzian components. Some of these components can be associated with the same type of noise as seen in low-mass X-ray binaries, although the characteristic frequencies are about one order of magnitude lower. The analysis of the CD/HID and power spectra results in two different types of Be/X. While in 4U 0115+63, KS 1947+300 and EXO 2030+375 the hard colour decreases as the count rate decreases, it increases in V0332+53. The pattern traced by V0332+53 then results in a Z-shaped track, similar to the low-mass Z sources, without the flaring branch. In contrast, the horizontal branch in 4U 0115+63, KS 1947+300 and EXO 2030+375 corresponds

  11. Breakup phenomena of a coaxial jet in the non-dilute region using real-time X-ray radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, F. B.; Kuo, K. K.; Woodward, R. D.; Garner, K. N.

    1990-07-01

    An innovative approach to the investigation of liquid jet breakup processes in the near-injector region has been developed to overcome the experimental difficulties associated with optically opaque, dense sprays. Real-time X-ray radiography (RTR) has been employed to observe the inner structure and breakup phenomena of coaxial jets. In the atomizing regime, droplets much smaller than the exit diameter are formed beginning essentially at the injector exit. Through the use of RTR, the instantaneous contour of the liquid core was visualized. Experimental results consist of controlled-exposure digital video images of the liquid jet breakup process. Time-averaged video images have also been recorded for comparison. A digital image processing system is used to analyze the recorded images by creating radiance level distributions of the jet. A rudimentary method for deducing intact-liquid-core length has been suggested. The technique of real-time X-ray radiography has been shown to be a viable approach to the study of the breakup processes of high-speed liquid jets.

  12. Clumpy tori around type II active galactic nuclei as revealed by X-ray fluorescent lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiren; Liu, Yuan; Li, Xiaobo; Xu, Weiwei; Gou, Lijun; Cheng, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    The reflection spectrum of a torus around an active galactic nucleus (AGN) is characterized by X-ray fluorescent lines, which are most prominent for type II AGNs. A clumpy torus allows photons reflected from the back-side of the torus to leak through the front regions that are free of obscuration. The observed X-ray fluorescent lines are therefore sensitive to the clumpiness of the torus. We analysed a sample of type II AGNs observed with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS), and measured the fluxes for the Si Kα and Fe Kα lines. The measured Fe Kα/Si Kα ratios, spanning a range between 5 and 60, are far smaller than the ratios predicted from simulations of smooth tori, indicating that the tori of the studied sources have clumpy distributions rather than smooth ones. We compared the measured Fe Kα/Si Kα ratios with simulation results of clumpy tori. The Circinus galaxy has a Fe Kα/Si Kα ratio of ˜60, which is close to the simulation results for N = 5, where N is the average number of clumps along the line of sight. The Fe Kα/Si Kα ratios of the other sources are all below the simulation results for N = 2. Overall, this shows that the non-Fe fluorescent lines in the soft X-ray band are a potentially powerful probe of the clumpiness of tori around AGNs.

  13. Performance of water jet cooled silicon monochromators in high power x-ray beams (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Lonny E.; Hart, Michael

    1992-01-01

    We have fabricated and tested water jet cooled silicon (111) and (220) monochromators specially tailored for extended wiggler beam and concentrated undulator beam power loadings. The tests were made at the X25 27 pole, 1.1 T hybrid wiggler beam line1 at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The wiggler-like line-type loading was produced by the direct, unfocused wiggler white beam, in which 300 W of total power in a 60-mm-wide by 5-mm-high [full width at half maximum (FWHM)] cross section were available in the experimental hutch; this represents a typical power density at existing insertion device beam lines. The undulator-like point-type loading was produced by the focused wiggler white beam, generated via reflection of a portion of the direct white beam from a toroidal platinum-coated silicon mirror, resulting in 75 W of total power in a 0.8-mm-wide (FWHM) by 0.45-mm-high (FWHM) cross section in the hutch. This will be a typical power density at next-generation insertion device beam lines. The monochromator design consists of a thin walled silicon box whose bottom is glued to a stainless-steel water manifold; the coolant is delivered through jet tubes directed perpendicular to the underside of the top, diffracting surface of the box.2 Rectangular monochromators with multiple jets were used for the line power loading studies, and cylindrical monochromators with single jets were used for the point power loading studies. Provisions for simple adaptive corrections to compensate for the inevitable beam-induced thermal deformations, consisting of mechanisms to reverse-bend the top surface, and internal heat baffles to frustrate the cooling at the edges of the crystal (to produce an isothermal top surface), were included in the designs. These required approximate matching of the top surface dimensions to the x-ray footprint. To better understand the thermal strain fields, spatial and angular mapping of both fundamental and harmonic Bragg reflections within the

  14. Collective Properties of Neutron-star X-Ray Binary Populations of Galaxies. II. Pre-low-mass X-Ray Binary Properties, Formation Rates, and Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadkamkar, H.; Ghosh, P.

    2014-04-01

    We continue our exploration of the collective properties of neutron-star X-ray binaries in the stellar fields (i.e., outside globular clusters) of normal galaxies. In Paper I of this series, we considered high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). In this paper (Paper II), we consider low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), whose evolutionary scenario is very different from that of HMXBs. We consider the evolution of primordial binaries up to the stage where the neutron star just formed in the supernova explosion of the primary is in a binary with its low-mass, unevolved companion, and this binary has circularized tidally, producing what we call a pre-low-mass X-ray binary (pre-LMXB). We study the constraints on the formation of such pre-LMXBs in detail (since these are low-probability events), and calculate their collective properties and formation rates. To this end, we first consider the changes in the binary parameters in the various steps involved, viz., the common-envelope phase, the supernova, and the tidal evolution. This naturally leads to a clarification of the constraints. We then describe our calculation of the evolution of the distributions of primordial binary parameters into those of pre-LMXB parameters, following the standard evolutionary scenario for individual binaries. We display the latter as both bivariate and monovariate distributions, discuss their essential properties, and indicate the influences of some essential factors on these. Finally, we calculate the formation rate of these pre-LMXBs. The results of this paper will be used in a subsequent one to compute the expected X-ray luminosity function of LMXBs.

  15. X-rays associated with the jet-cloud-interacting radio galaxy 3C 277.3 (Coma A): implications for energy deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, D. M.; Birkinshaw, M.; Young, A. J.

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery with Chandra of X-ray-emitting gas associated with the jet-cloud interaction in the radio galaxy 3C 277.3 (Coma A), a source that falls in the most important power range for radio-mode feedback in the Universe. This hot gas, heated by the jet, dominates the mass of the cloud which is responsible for an extreme projected deflection of the kpc-scale radio jet. Highly absorbed X-ray emission from the nucleus of 3C 277.3 confirms that the jet lies close to the plane of the sky and so has a large intrinsic deflection. We detect group gas on the scale of the radio lobes, and see X-ray cavities coincident with the brightest radio emission, with the lobes embraced by X-ray enhancements that we argue are the result of shocks. The anti-correlation between the locations of X-ray arms and H α-emitting filaments that are believed to have originated from a merger with one or more gas-rich galaxies suggests that shocks advancing around the lobe are inhibited by the dense colder material. Synchrotron X-ray emission is detected from the upstream edge of a second bright radio knot. X-rays are also detected from the location where an undetected counterjet enters the northern radio hotspot. We suggest that these X-rays are synchrotron radiation from a shock in a small-scale sub-structure.

  16. CHANDRA AND HST IMAGING OF THE QUASARS PKS B0106+013 AND 3C 345: INVERSE COMPTON X-RAYS AND MAGNETIZED JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Kharb, P.; Lister, M. L.; Hogan, B. S.; Marshall, H. L.

    2012-04-01

    We present results from deep ({approx}70 ks) Chandra/ACIS observations and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys F475W observations of two highly optically polarized quasars belonging to the MOJAVE blazar sample, viz., PKS B0106+013 and 1641+399 (3C 345). These observations reveal X-ray and optical emissions from the jets in both sources. X-ray emission is detected from the entire length of the 0106+013 radio jet, which shows clear bends or wiggles-the X-ray emission is brightest at the first prominent kiloparsec jet bend. A picture of a helical kiloparsec jet with the first kiloparsec-scale bend representing a jet segment moving close(r) to our line of sight, and getting Doppler boosted at both radio and X-ray frequencies, is consistent with these observations. The X-ray emission from the jet end, however, peaks at about 0.''4 ({approx}3.4 kpc) upstream of the radio hot spot. Optical emission is detected both at the X-ray jet termination peak and at the radio hot spot. The X-ray jet termination peak is found upstream of the radio hot spot by around 0.''2 ({approx}1.3 kpc) in the short projected jet of 3C 345. HST optical emission is seen in an arc-like structure coincident with the bright radio hot spot, which we propose is a sharp (apparent) jet bend instead of a terminal point, that crosses our line of sight and consequently has a higher Doppler beaming factor. A weak radio hot spot is indeed observed less than 1'' downstream of the bright radio hot spot, but has no optical or X-ray counterpart. By making use of the parsec-scale radio and the kiloparsec-scale radio/X-ray data, we derive constraints on the jet Lorentz factors ({Gamma}{sub jet}) and inclination angles ({theta}): for a constant jet speed from parsec to kiloparsec scales, we obtain a {Gamma}{sub jet} of {approx}70 for 0106+013 and {approx}40 for 3C 345. On relaxing this assumption, we derive a {Gamma}{sub jet} of {approx}2.5 for both the sources. Upper limits on {theta} of {approx

  17. The life science X-ray scattering beamline at NSLS-II

    DOE PAGESBeta

    DiFabio, Jonathan; Yang, Lin; Chodankar, Shirish; Pjerov, Sal; Jakoncic, Jean; Lucas, Michael; Krywka, Christina; Graziano, Vito

    2015-09-30

    We report the current development status of the High Brightness X-ray Scattering for Life Sciences (or Life Science X-ray Scattering, LiX) beamline at the NSLS-II facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. This instrument will operate in the x-ray energy range of 2.1-18 keV, provide variable beam sizes from 1 micron to ~0.5 mm, and support user experiments in three scientific areas: (1) high-throughput solution scattering, in-line size exclusion chromatography and flow mixers-based time-resolved solution scattering of biological macro-molecules, (2) diffraction from single- and multi-layered lipid membranes, and (3) scattering-based scanning probe imaging of biological tissues. In order to satisfy the beammore » stability required for these experiments and to switch rapidly between different types of experiments, we have adopted a secondary source with refractive lenses for secondary focusing, a detector system consisting of three Pilatus detectors, and specialized experimental modules that can be quickly exchanged and each dedicated to a defined set of experiments. The construction of this beamline is on schedule for completion in September 2015. User experiments are expected to start in Spring 2016.« less

  18. The life science X-ray scattering beamline at NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    DiFabio, Jonathan; Yang, Lin; Chodankar, Shirish; Pjerov, Sal; Jakoncic, Jean; Lucas, Michael; Krywka, Christina; Graziano, Vito

    2015-09-30

    We report the current development status of the High Brightness X-ray Scattering for Life Sciences (or Life Science X-ray Scattering, LiX) beamline at the NSLS-II facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. This instrument will operate in the x-ray energy range of 2.1-18 keV, provide variable beam sizes from 1 micron to ~0.5 mm, and support user experiments in three scientific areas: (1) high-throughput solution scattering, in-line size exclusion chromatography and flow mixers-based time-resolved solution scattering of biological macro-molecules, (2) diffraction from single- and multi-layered lipid membranes, and (3) scattering-based scanning probe imaging of biological tissues. In order to satisfy the beam stability required for these experiments and to switch rapidly between different types of experiments, we have adopted a secondary source with refractive lenses for secondary focusing, a detector system consisting of three Pilatus detectors, and specialized experimental modules that can be quickly exchanged and each dedicated to a defined set of experiments. The construction of this beamline is on schedule for completion in September 2015. User experiments are expected to start in Spring 2016.

  19. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the glyoxalase II from Leishmania infantum

    SciTech Connect

    Trincão, José; Sousa Silva, Marta; Barata, Lídia; Bonifácio, Cecília; Carvalho, Sandra; Tomás, Ana Maria; Ferreira, António E. N.; Cordeiro, Carlos; Ponces Freire, Ana; Romão, Maria João

    2006-08-01

    A glyoxalase II from L. infantum was cloned, purified and crystallized and its structure was solved by X-ray crystallography. In trypanosomatids, trypanothione replaces glutathione in all glutathione-dependent processes. Of the two enzymes involved in the glyoxalase pathway, glyoxalase I and glyoxalase II, the latter shows absolute specificity towards trypanothione thioester, making this enzyme an excellent model to understand the molecular basis of trypanothione binding. Cloned glyoxalase II from Leishmania infantum was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Crystals belong to space group C222{sub 1} (unit-cell parameters a = 65.6, b = 88.3, c = 85.2 Å) and diffract beyond 2.15 Å using synchrotron radiation. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the human glyoxalase II structure as a search model. These results, together with future detailed kinetic characterization using lactoyltrypanothione, should shed light on the evolutionary selection of trypanothione instead of glutathione by trypano-somatids.

  20. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic and Raman analysis of silk fibroin-Cu(II) films.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Chen, Xin; Dai, Weilin; Shao, Zhengzhong

    2006-06-01

    There is evidence to suggest that Cu(II) is involved in the natural spinning process of a silkworm helping to convert the concentrated silk fibroin (SF) solution (or dope) into tough insoluble threads. To investigate the interaction between SF and Cu(II), a series of regenerated SF (RSF) films with different mass ratios of Cu(II) to SF were prepared. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to study the chemical interaction between Cu(II) and SF in these Cu(II)-RSF films. A significant change in the binding energy of Cu 2p(3/2) demonstrated that the chemical state of Cu(II) in the Cu(II)-RSF films was affected by the interaction between Cu(II) and SF. Moreover, chemical shifts of N 1s and O 1s of SF were also detected, implying that Cu(II) may coordinate with both N and O atoms in the SF. In addition, Raman spectra of the same series of Cu(II)-RSF films recorded the conformation transition of SF that may occur by the coordination of Cu(II) and SF macromolecular chains. PMID:16463361

  1. The Chandra Survey of Extragalactic Sources in the 3CR Catalog: X-ray Emission from Nuclei, Jets, and Hotspots in the Chandra Archival Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, F.; Harris, D. E.; Liuzzo, E.; Orienti, M.; Paladino, R.; Paggi, A.; Tremblay, G. R.; Wilkes, B. J.; Kuraszkiewicz, J.; Baum, S. A.; O'Dea, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    As part of our program to build a complete radio and X-ray database of all Third Cambridge catalog extragalactic radio sources, we present an analysis of 93 sources for which Chandra archival data are available. Most of these sources have already been published. Here we provide a uniform re-analysis and present nuclear X-ray fluxes and X-ray emission associated with radio jet knots and hotspots using both publicly available radio images and new radio images that have been constructed from data available in the Very Large Array archive. For about 1/3 of the sources in the selected sample, a comparison between the Chandra and radio observations was not reported in the literature: we find X-ray detections of 2 new radio jet knots and 17 hotspots. We also report the X-ray detection of extended emission from the intergalactic medium for 15 galaxy clusters.

  2. X-Ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. II. Diagnostic Tools for X-Ray Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, J.; Kallman, T. R.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the emission spectra from accreting sources. We use our new reflection code to compute the reflected spectra from an accretion disk illuminated by X-rays. This set of models covers different values of ionization parameter, solar iron abundance and photon index for the illuminating spectrum. These models also include the most complete and recent atomic data for the inner-shell of the iron and oxygen isonuclear sequences. We concentrate our analysis to the 2 - 10 keV energy region, and in particular to the iron K-shell emission lines. We show the dependency of the equivalent width (EW) of the Fe Ka with the ionization parameter. The maximum value of the EW is approx. 800 eV for models with log Epsilon approx. 1.5, and decreases monotonically as Epsilon increases. For lower values of Epsilon the Fe K(alpha) EW decreases to a minimum near log Epsilon approx. 0.8. We produce simulated CCD observations based on our reflection models. For low ionized, reflection dominated cases, the 2 -10 keV energy region shows a very broad, curving continuum that cannot be represented by a simple power-law. We show that in addition to the Fe K-shell emission, there are other prominent features such as the Si and S L(alpha) lines, a blend of Ar VIII-XI lines, and the Ca x K(alpha) line. In some cases the S xv blends with the He-like Si RRC producing a broad feature that cannot be reproduced by a simple Gaussian profile. This could be used as a signature of reflection.

  3. X-ray structural and spectral study of the cobalt(II) chloride complex with papaverine

    SciTech Connect

    Sabirov, V.Kh.; Struchkov, Yu.T.; Nava, E.U.

    1994-05-01

    A complex of cobalt(II) chloride with papaverine is characterized by x-ray diffraction method (autodiffractometer, 1917 reflections, R = 0.080). Crystals are tetragonal, a = b = 18.393(2) {angstrom}, c = 12.396(4) {angstrom}, Z = 4, space group P{bar 4}/n. The crystal structure is composed of tetrahedral [CoCl{sub 4}]{sup 2-} anions situated in a special position on the {bar 4} axis, cations of the protonated papaverine, and two types of water molecules. The structure exhibits short hydrogen-bond-type contacts C-H...Cl between anions and cations and C-H...O between cations.

  4. Analysis of the optical design of the NSLS-II coherent hard x-ray beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluerasu, Andrei; Chubar, Oleg; Kaznatcheev, Konstantine; Baltser, Jana; Wiegart, Lutz; Evans-Lutterodt, Kenneth; Carlucci-Dayton, Mary; Berman, Lonny

    2011-09-01

    Ultra-low emittance third-generation synchrotron radiation sources such as the NSLS-II offer excellent opportunities for the development of experimental techniques exploiting x-ray coherence. Coherent light scattered by a heterogeneous sample produces a speckle pattern characteristic for the specific arrangement of the scatterers. This may vary over time, and the resultant intensity fluctuations can be measured and analyzed to provide information about the sample dynamics. X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) extends the capability of dynamic light scattering to opaque and turbid samples and extends the measurements of time evolution to nanometer length scales. As a consequence XPCS became crucial in the study of dynamics in systems including, but not being limited to, colloids, polymers, complex fluids, surfaces and interfaces, phase ordering alloys, etc. In this paper we present the conceptual optical design and the theoretical performance of the Coherent Hard X-ray (CHX) beamline at NSLS-II, dedicated to XPCS and other coherent scattering techniques. For the optical design of this beamline, there is a tradeoff between the coherence needed to distinguish individual speckles and the phase acceptance (high intensity) required to measure fast dynamics with an adequate signal-to-noise level. As XPCS is a "photon hungry" technique, the beamline optimization requires maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured intensity-intensity autocorrelation function. The degree of coherence, as measured by a two-slit (Young) experiment, is used to characterize the speckle pattern visibilities. The beamline optimization strategy consists of maximization of the on-sample intensity while keeping the degree of coherence within the 0.1-0.5 range. The resulted design deviates substantially from an ad-hoc modification of a hard x-ray beamline for XPCS measurements. The CHX beamline will permit studies of complex systems and measurements of bulk dynamics down to the

  5. Analysis of the optical design of the NSLS-II Coherent Hard X-ray beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Fluerasu A.; Chubar, O.; Kaznatcheev, K.; Baltser, J.; Wiegart, Lutz; Evans-Lutterodt, K.; Carlucci-Dayton, M.; Berman, L.

    2011-08-21

    Ultra-low emittance third-generation synchrotron radiation sources such as the NSLS-II offer excellent opportunities for the development of experimental techniques exploiting x-ray coherence. Coherent light scattered by a heterogeneous sample produces a speckle pattern characteristic for the specific arrangement of the scatterers. This may vary over time, and the resultant intensity fluctuations can be measured and analyzed to provide information about the sample dynamics. X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) extends the capability of dynamic light scattering to opaque and turbid samples and extends the measurements of time evolution to nanometer length scales. As a consequence XPCS became crucial in the study of dynamics in systems including, but not being limited to, colloids, polymers, complex fluids, surfaces and interfaces, phase ordering alloys, etc. In this paper we present the conceptual optical design and the theoretical performance of the Coherent Hard X-ray (CHX) beamline at NSLS-II, dedicated to XPCS and other coherent scattering techniques. For the optical design of this beamline, there is a tradeoff between the coherence needed to distinguish individual speckles and the phase acceptance (high intensity) required to measure fast dynamics with an adequate signal-to-noise level. As XPCS is a 'photon hungry' technique, the beamline optimization requires maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured intensity-intensity autocorrelation function. The degree of coherence, as measured by a two-slit (Young) experiment, is used to characterize the speckle pattern visibilities. The beamline optimization strategy consists of maximization of the on-sample intensity while keeping the degree of coherence within the 0.1-0.5 range. The resulted design deviates substantially from an ad-hoc modification of a hard x-ray beamline for XPCS measurements. The CHX beamline will permit studies of complex systems and measurements of bulk dynamics down to the

  6. AN EVOLVING COMPACT JET IN THE BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARY MAXI J1836-194

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, D. M.; Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Soria, R.; Slaven-Blair, T.; Curran, P. A.; O'Brien, K.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Lewis, F.; Markoff, S.; Altamirano, D.; Homan, J.; Rupen, M. P.; Dhawan, V.; Belloni, T. M.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Casella, P.; Corbel, S.; Gallo, E.; and others

    2013-05-10

    We report striking changes in the broadband spectrum of the compact jet of the black hole transient MAXI J1836-194 over state transitions during its discovery outburst in 2011. A fading of the optical-infrared (IR) flux occurred as the source entered the hard-intermediate state, followed by a brightening as it returned to the hard state. The optical-IR spectrum was consistent with a power law from optically thin synchrotron emission, except when the X-ray spectrum was softest. By fitting the radio to optical spectra with a broken power law, we constrain the frequency and flux of the optically thick/thin break in the jet synchrotron spectrum. The break gradually shifted to higher frequencies as the source hardened at X-ray energies, from {approx}10{sup 11} to {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} Hz. The radiative jet luminosity integrated over the spectrum appeared to be greatest when the source entered the hard state during the outburst decay (although this is dependent on the high-energy cooling break, which is not seen directly), even though the radio flux was fading at the time. The physical process responsible for suppressing and reactivating the jet (neither of which are instantaneous but occur on timescales of weeks) is uncertain, but could arise from the varying inner accretion disk radius regulating the fraction of accreting matter that is channeled into the jet. This provides an unprecedented insight into the connection between inflow and outflow, and has implications for the conditions required for jets to be produced, and hence their launching process.

  7. An Evolving Compact Jet in the Black Hole X-Ray Binary Maxi J1836-194

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D. M.; Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; O'Brien, K.; Soria, R.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Slaven-Blair, T.; Lewis, F.; Markoff, S.; Homan, J.; Altanirano, D.; Curran, P. A.; Rupen, M. P.; Belloni, T. M.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Casella, P.; Corbel, S.; Dhawan, V.; Fender, R. P.; Gallo, E.; Gandhi, P.; Heinz, S.; Koerding, E. G.; Krimm, H. A.; Maitra, D.

    2013-01-01

    We report striking changes in the broadband spectrum of the compact jet of the black hole transient MAXI J1836-194 over state transitions during its discovery outburst in 2011. A fading of the optical-infrared (IR) flux occurred as the source entered the hard-intermediate state, followed by a brightening as it returned to the hard state. The optical-IR spectrum was consistent with a power law from optically thin synchrotron emission, except when the X-ray spectrum was softest. By fitting the radio to optical spectra with a broken power law, we constrain the frequency and flux of the optically thick/thin break in the jet synchrotron spectrum. The break gradually shifted to higher frequencies as the source hardened at X-ray energies, from approx 10(exp 11) to approx 4 × 10(exp 13) Hz. The radiative jet luminosity integrated over the spectrum appeared to be greatest when the source entered the hard state during the outburst decay (although this is dependent on the high-energy cooling break, which is not seen directly), even though the radio flux was fading at the time. The physical process responsible for suppressing and reactivating the jet (neither of which are instantaneous but occur on timescales of weeks) is uncertain, but could arise from the varying inner accretion disk radius regulating the fraction of accreting matter that is channeled into the jet. This provides an unprecedented insight into the connection between inflow and outflow, and has implications for the conditions required for jets to be produced, and hence their launching process.

  8. Coronal X-ray Emission of II PEG: The BeppoSAX View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliaferri, G.; Covino, S.; Pallavicini, R.; Poretti, E.

    The BeppoSAX observation of II Peg confirms that this is a very active coronal source, with a possible detection of the decay of a strong X-ray flare. The NH value as determined by BeppoSAX is a factor of ten higher than expected. This is now a common result for various coronal sources observed by BeppoSAX, that still remains to be explained. The coronal metal abundance determined for II Peg by BeppoSAX is subsolar (~ 0.3), in line with the results found for many other active stars. It is still an open question if this low metal abundance is in contradiction or not with the photospheric metallicity of II Peg

  9. Apparatus and method for nanoflow liquid jet and serial femtosecond x-ray protein crystallography

    DOEpatents

    Bogan, Michael J.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.

    2016-03-01

    Techniques for nanoflow serial femtosecond x-ray protein crystallography include providing a sample fluid by mixing a plurality of a first target of interest with a carrier fluid and injecting the sample fluid into a vacuum chamber at a rate less than about 4 microliters per minute. In some embodiments, the carrier fluid has a viscosity greater than about 3 centipoise.

  10. X-Raying the MOJAVE Sample of Compact Extragalactic Radio Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadler, M.; Sato, G.; Tueller, J.; Sambruna, R. M.; Markwardt, C. B.; Giommi, P.; Gehrels, N.

    2007-01-01

    The MOJAVE sample is the first large radio-selected, VLBI-monitored AGN sample for which complete X-ray spectral information is being gathered. We report on the status of Swift survey observations which complement the available archival X-ray data at 0.3-10 keV and in the UV with its XRT and UVOT instruments. Many of these 133 radio-brightest AGN in the northern sky are now being observed for the first time at these energies. These and complementary other multiwavelength observations provide a large statistical sample of radio-selected AGN whose spectral energy distributions we measured from radio to gamma-ray wavelengths, available at the beginning of GLAST operations in 2008. Here, we report the X-ray spectral characteristics of 36 of these previously unobserved MOJAVE sources. In addition, the number of MOJAVE sources detected by the BAT instrument in the hard X-ray band is growing: we report the detection of five new blazars with BAT.

  11. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism of Pseudomonas aeruginosa nickel(II) azurin.

    PubMed

    Funk, Tobias; Kennepohl, Pierre; Di Bilio, Angel J; Wehbi, William A; Young, Anthony T; Friedrich, Stephan; Arenholz, Elke; Gray, Harry B; Cramer, Stephen P

    2004-05-12

    We show that X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) can be employed to probe the oxidation states and other electronic structural features of nickel active sites in proteins. As a calibration standard, we have measured XMCD and X-ray absorption (XAS) spectra for the nickel(II) derivative of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin (NiAz). Our analysis of these spectra confirms that the electronic ground state of NiAz is high-spin (S = 1); we also find that the L(3)-centroid energy is 853.1(1) eV, the branching ratio is 0.722(4), and the magnetic moment is 1.9(4) mu(B). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on model NiAz structures establish that orbitals 3d(x2-y2) and 3d(z2) are the two valence holes in the high-spin Ni(II) ground state, and in accord with the experimentally determined orbital magnetic moment, the DFT results also demonstrate that both holes are highly delocalized, with 3d(x2-y2) having much greater ligand character. PMID:15125678

  12. Mapping the Ionization State of Laser-Irradiated Ar Gas Jets With Multi-Wavelength Monochromatic X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kugland, N L; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Schaeffer, D; Glenzer, S H; Niemann, C

    2010-04-08

    Two-dimensional monochromatic images of fast-electron stimulated Ar K{alpha} and He-{alpha} x-ray self-emission have recorded a time-integrated map of the extent of Ar{sup {approx}6+} and Ar{sup 16+} ions, respectively, within a high density (10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} atomic density) Ar plasma. This plasma was produced by irradiating a 2 mm wide clustering Ar gas jet with an ultra-high intensity (10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, 200 fs) Ti:Sapphire laser operating at 800 nm. Spherically bent quartz crystals in the 200 (for K{alpha}) and 201 (for He-{alpha}) planes were used as near-normal incidence reflective x-ray optics. We see that a large (830 {micro}m long) region of plasma emits K{alpha} primarily along the laser axis, while the He-{alpha} emission is confined to smaller hot spot (230 {micro}m long) region that likely corresponds to the focal volume of the f/8 laser beam. X-ray spectra from a Bragg spectrometer operating in the von Hamos geometry, which images in one dimension, indicate that the centroids of the K{alpha} and He-{alpha} emission regions are separated by approximately 330 {micro}m along the laser axis.

  13. AN X-RAY VIEW OF THE JET CYCLE IN THE RADIO-LOUD AGN 3C120

    SciTech Connect

    Lohfink, Anne M.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Tombesi, Francesco; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Marscher, Alan P.; Miller, Eric D.; Nowak, Michael A.; Aller, Hugh; Aller, Margo F.; Miller, Jon M.; Brenneman, Laura W.; Fabian, Andrew C.

    2013-08-01

    We present a study of the central engine in the broad-line radio galaxy 3C120 using a multi-epoch analysis of a deep XMM-Newton observation and two deep Suzaku pointings (in 2012). In order to place our spectral data into the context of the disk-disruption/jet-ejection cycles displayed by this object, we monitor the source in the UV/X-ray bands, and in the radio band. We find three statistically acceptable spectral models: a disk-reflection model, a jet model, and a jet+disk model. Despite being good descriptions of the data, the disk-reflection model violates the radio constraints on the inclination, and the jet model has a fine-tuning problem, requiring a jet contribution exceeding that expected. Thus, we argue for a composite jet+disk model. Within the context of this model, we verify the basic predictions of the jet-cycle paradigm, finding a truncated/refilling disk during the Suzaku observations and a complete disk extending down to the innermost stable circular orbit during the XMM-Newton observation. The idea of a refilling disk is further supported by the detection of the ejection of a new jet knot approximately one month after the Suzaku pointings. We also discover a step-like event in one of the Suzaku pointings in which the soft band lags the hard band. We suggest that we are witnessing the propagation of a disturbance from the disk into the jet on a timescale set by the magnetic field.

  14. The subarcsecond mid-infrared view of local active galactic nuclei - II. The mid-infrared-X-ray correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, D.; Gandhi, P.; Hönig, S. F.; Smette, A.; Duschl, W. J.

    2015-11-01

    We present an updated mid-infrared (MIR) versus X-ray correlation for the local active galactic nuclei (AGN) population based on the high angular resolution 12 and 18μm continuum fluxes from the AGN subarcsecond MIR atlas and 2-10 keV and 14-195 keV data collected from the literature. We isolate a sample of 152 objects with reliable AGN nature and multi-epoch X-ray data and minimal MIR contribution from star formation. Although the sample is not homogeneous or complete, we show that our results are unlikely to be affected by significant biases. The MIR-X-ray correlation is nearly linear and within a factor of 2 independent of the AGN type and the wavebands used. The observed scatter is <0.4 dex. A possible flattening of the correlation slope at the highest luminosities probed (˜1045 erg s-1) towards low MIR luminosities for a given X-ray luminosity is indicated but not significant. Unobscured objects have, on average, an MIR-X-ray ratio that is only ≤0.15 dex higher than that of obscured objects. Objects with intermediate X-ray column densities (22 < log NH < 23) actually show the highest MIR-X-ray ratio on average. Radio-loud objects show a higher mean MIR-X-ray ratio at low luminosities while the ratio is lower than average at high luminosities. This may be explained by synchrotron emission from the jet contributing to the MIR at low luminosities and additional X-ray emission at high luminosities. True Seyfert 2 candidates do not show any deviation from the general behaviour suggesting that they possess a dusty obscurer as in other AGN. Double AGN also do not deviate. Finally, we show that the MIR-X-ray correlation can be used to investigate the AGN nature of uncertain objects. Specifically, we give equations that allow us to determine the intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosities and column densities for objects with complex X-ray properties to within 0.34 dex. These techniques are applied to the uncertain objects of the remaining AGN MIR atlas, demonstrating the

  15. DISCOVERY OF A KILOPARSEC-SCALE X-RAY/RADIO JET IN THE z = 4.72 QUASAR GB 1428+4217

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, C. C.; Stawarz, L.; Siemiginowska, A.; Harris, D. E.; Schwartz, D. A.; Gobeille, D.; Wardle, J. F. C.

    2012-09-01

    We report the discovery of a one-sided 3.''6 (24 kpc, projected) long jet in the high-redshift, z = 4.72, quasar GB 1428+4217 in new Chandra X-ray and Very Large Array (VLA) radio observations. This is the highest redshift kiloparsec-scale X-ray/radio jet known. Analysis of archival very long baseline interferometry 2.3 and 8.6 GHz data reveal a faint one-sided jet extending out to {approx}200 pc and aligned to within {approx}30 Degree-Sign of the Chandra/VLA emission. The 3.''6 distant knot is not detected in an archival Hubble Space Telescope image, and its broadband spectral energy distribution is consistent with an origin from inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons for the X-rays. Assuming also equipartition between the radiating particles and magnetic field, the implied jet Lorentz factor is Almost-Equal-To 5. This is similar to the other two known z {approx} 4 kpc scale X-ray jet cases and smaller than typically inferred in lower-redshift cases. Although there are still but a few such very high redshift quasar X-ray jets known, for an inverse Compton origin, the present data suggest that they are less relativistic on large scales than their lower-redshift counterparts.

  16. Analysis of the Response of CVD Diamond Detectors for UV and sX-Ray Plasma Diagnostics Installed at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiffi, B.; Coffey, I.; Pillon, M.; Osipenko, M.; Prestopino, G.; Ripani, M.; Taiuti, M.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    Diamond detectors are very promising candidates for plasma diagnostics in a harsh environment. In fact, they have several proprieties which make them suitable for magnetic fusion devices: radiation hardness, high thermal conductivity, high resistivity, high carrier mobility and a large bandgap (5.5 eV). The latter makes them insensitive to visible radiation and allows low noise measurements without any cooling. In 2008 two CVD (Chemical Vapour Deposition) single crystal diamond (SCD) detectors were installed at the JET tokamak as extreme UV and soft X-Ray diagnostics [1]. In this work the neutron background in these detectors was measured shielding the UV and soft X-Ray radiation by closing a local vacuum valve. The UV detector was found to be insensitive to the neutron flux, while the soft X Ray detector signal exhibited spikes during the highest neutron rate pulse (neutron rate 1016n/s, which corresponds to a flux of φn ˜105n/cm2s in the detector location). These spikes were found to be due to the (n,p) reaction within the plastic filter in front of the soft X-Ray detector. The UV SCD was also used to perform time of flight (ToF) measurements in laser ablation experiments. ToFs were found to be an order of magnitude higher than expected if only the drift velocity is considered. This discrepancy could be due to a delay between the arrival time of the impurities in the plasma and their emission in an energy range which SCD is sensitive to (Eph >5.5 eV). The delay is found to be comparable with the expected ionization times for edge plasma conditions.

  17. Optical and X-Ray Observations of GRB 060526: A Complex Afterglow Consistent with an Achromatic Jet Break

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, X.; Halpern, J. P.; Morgan, N. D.; Armstrong, E.; Mirabal, N.; Haislip. J. B.; Reichart, D. E.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2007-01-01

    We obtained 98 R-band and 18 B, r', i' images of the optical afterglow of GRB 060526 (z = 3.21) with the MDM 1.3 m, 2.4 m, and the PROMPT telescopes at CTIO over the five nights following the burst trigger. Combining these data with other optical observations reported in GCN and the Swift XRT observations, we compare the optical and X-ray afterglow light curves of GRB 060526. Both the optical and X-ray afterglow light curves show rich features, such as flares and breaks. The densely sampled optical observations provide very good coverage at T > 10(exp 4) s. We observed a break at 2.4 x 10(exp 5) sin the optical afterglow light curve. Compared with the X-ray afterglow light curve, the break is consistent with an achromatic break supporting the beaming models of GRBs. However, the prebreak and postbreak temporal decay slopes are difficult to explain in simple afterglow models. We estimated a jet angle of theta(sub j) approx. 7deg and a prompt emission size of R(sub prompt) approx. 2 x 10(exp 14) cm. In addition, we detected several optical flares with amplitudes of (Delta)m approx. 0.2,0.6, and 0.2 mag. The X-ray afterglows detected by Swift have shown complicated decay patterns. Recently, many well-sampled optical afterglows also show decays with flares and multiple breaks. GRB 060526 provides an additional case of such a complex, well-observed optical afterglow. The accumulated well-sampled afterglows indicate that most of the optical afterglows are complex.

  18. Achieving Vibration Stability of the NSLS-II Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.; Chu, Y. N.; Broadbent, A.; Nazaretski, E.; Margulies, L.; Dyling, O.; Shen, Q.; Fallier, M.

    2010-08-30

    The Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (HXN) Beamline of National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-lI) requires high levels of stability in order to achieve the desired instrument resolution. To ensure that the design of the endstation helps meet the stringent criteria and that natural and cultural vibration is mitigated both passively and actively, a comprehensive study complimentary to the design process has been undertaken. Vibration sources that have the potential to disrupt sensitive experiments such as wind, traffic and NSLS II operating systems have been studied using state of the art simulations and an array of field data. Further, final stage vibration isolation principles have been explored in order to be utilized in supporting endstation instruments. This paper presents results of the various study aspects and their influence on the HXN design optimization.

  19. X-ray spectroscopy of the Mn4Ca cluster in the water-oxidation complex of Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Kenneth; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2014-01-01

    The water-oxidation complex of Photosystem II (PS II) contains a heteronuclear cluster of 4 Mn atoms and a Ca atom. Ligands to the metal cluster involve bridging O atoms, and O and N atoms from amino acid side-chains of the D1 polypeptide of PS II, with likely additional contributions from water and CP43. Although moderate resolution X-ray diffraction-based structures of PS II have been reported recently, and the location of the Mn4Ca cluster has been identified, the structures are not resolved at the atomic level. X-ray absorption (XAS), emission (XES), resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) provide independent and potentially highly accurate sources of structural and oxidation-state information. When combined with polarized X-ray studies of oriented membranes or single-crystals of PS II, a more detailed picture of the cluster and its disposition in PS II is obtained. PMID:15977060

  20. Single crystal artificial diamond detectors for VUV and soft X-rays measurements on JET thermonuclear fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Coffey, I.; Murari, A.; Tartoni, N.; JET-EFDA contributors

    2010-11-01

    Diamond appears to be a promising material for VUV and soft X-ray radiation detection. Its wide band-gap (5.5 eV) results in a very low leakage current (it can operate above room temperature) and its electronic properties (high carrier mobility) allow a fast time response. More importantly, it is optimally suited for harsh environment applications, like those in the JET Tokamak located at the Culham laboratory (UK). Its extreme radiation hardness is well known and another interesting feature, again related to the wide band-gap, is its selective sensitivity to radiation with wavelengths shorter than 225 nm (visible-blind detectors).We report on the performances of two photodetectors based on Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) single crystal diamonds, one optimized for extreme UV detection, the other for soft X-ray radiation detection in the 0.8-8 keV range. These detectors have been fabricated at Roma "Tor Vergata" University using a p-type/intrinsic/metal configuration and they behave like photodiodes allowing operation with no external applied voltage. They have been installed on JET inside a vacuum chamber with a direct horizontal view of JET plasma without any wavelength selection. Their low thickness, low sensitivity to gamma ray and the unbiased operation mode make both detectors ideal for a Tokamak environment. The measurements routinely performed at JET show a low intrinsic dark current (˜0.01 pA) and very high signal to noise ratio (50 dB). Both detectors show a fast response and their signals are acquired using an electronic chain and ADC able to operate at 200 kHz, providing very interesting results for MHD and Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) instability studies on fusion plasmas.

  1. Small-angle x-ray scattering studies of the manganese stabilizing subunit in photosystem II.

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson, B.; Tiede, D. M.; Barry, B. A.; Univ. of Minnesota

    2002-08-29

    Small-angle X-ray scattering studies (SAXS) were used to determine the size, shape, and oligomeric composition of the manganese stabilizing protein (MSP) of photosystem II. This extrinsic protein subunit plays an important role in photosynthetic oxygen evolution. As its name implies, MSP stabilizes the tetranuclear Mn cluster of the water oxidation complex. Removal of MSP lowers activity and decreases the stability of active-site manganese. Reconstitution of MSP reverses these effects. In this study, MSP was extracted from spinach PSII membranes using CaCl{sub 2} or urea. Through the use of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, the molecular weight of MSP was determined to be 26.53 kDa. X-ray scattering results show that both samples display a monodisperse scattering pattern; this pattern is consistent with a homogeneous protein solution. The CaCl{sub 2} extracted and urea extracted MSP samples have radii of gyration of 25.9 {+-} 0.4 and 27.0 {+-} 0.01 {angstrom}, respectively. MSP is shown to be monomeric in solution. This was determined using a cytochrome c standard and the scattering intensity, extrapolated to zero scattering angle, which is proportional to the molecular weight. This SAXS study suggests that, in solution, MSP is a monomeric, elongated prolate ellipsoid with dimensions, 112 x 23 x 23 {angstrom}{sup 3} and an axial ratio of 4.8.

  2. X-Ray Spectroscopy of II Pegasi: Coronal Temperature Structure, Abundances, and Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huenemoerder, David P.; Canizares, Claude R.; Schulz, Norbert S.

    2001-10-01

    We have obtained high-resolution X-ray spectra of the coronally active binary II Pegasi (HD 224085), covering the wavelength range of 1.5-25 Å. For the first half of our 44 ks observation, the source was in a quiescent state with constant X-ray flux, after which it flared, reaching twice the quiescent flux in 12 ks, then decreased. We analyze the emission-line spectrum and continuum during quiescent and flaring states. The differential emission measure derived from lines fluxes shows a hot corona with a continuous distribution in temperature. During the nonflare state, the distribution peaks near logT=7.2, and when flaring, it peaks near 7.6. High-temperature lines are enhanced slightly during the flare, but most of the change occurs in the continuum. Coronal abundance anomalies are apparent, with iron very deficient relative to oxygen and significantly weaker than expected from photospheric measurements, while neon is enhanced relative to oxygen. We find no evidence of appreciable resonant scattering optical depth in line ratios of iron and oxygen. The flare light curve is consistent with solar two-ribbon flare models but with a very long reconnection time constant of about 65 ks. We infer loop lengths of about 0.05 to about 0.25 stellar radii in the flare, if the flare emission originated from a single, low-density loop.

  3. A setup for synchrotron-radiation-induced total reflection X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption near-edge structure recently commissioned at BESSY II BAMline.

    PubMed

    Fittschen, U; Guilherme, A; Böttger, S; Rosenberg, D; Menzel, M; Jansen, W; Busker, M; Gotlib, Z P; Radtke, M; Riesemeier, H; Wobrauschek, P; Streli, C

    2016-05-01

    An automatic sample changer chamber for total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis in TXRF geometry was successfully set up at the BAMline at BESSY II. TXRF and TXRF-XANES are valuable tools for elemental determination and speciation, especially where sample amounts are limited (<1 mg) and concentrations are low (ng ml(-1) to µg ml(-1)). TXRF requires a well defined geometry regarding the reflecting surface of a sample carrier and the synchrotron beam. The newly installed chamber allows for reliable sample positioning, remote sample changing and evacuation of the fluorescence beam path. The chamber was successfully used showing accurate determination of elemental amounts in the certified reference material NIST water 1640. Low limits of detection of less than 100 fg absolute (10 pg ml(-1)) for Ni were found. TXRF-XANES on different Re species was applied. An unknown species of Re was found to be Re in the +7 oxidation state. PMID:27140163

  4. GAMMA-RAY VARIABILITY FROM WIND CLUMPING IN HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARIES WITH JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Owocki, S. P.; Townsend, R. H. D.; Romero, G. E.; Araudo, A. T.

    2009-05-01

    In the subclass of high-mass X-ray binaries known as 'microquasars', relativistic hadrons in the jets launched by the compact object can interact with cold protons from the star's radiatively driven wind, producing pions that then quickly decay into gamma rays. Since the resulting gamma-ray emissivity depends on the target density, the detection of rapid variability in microquasars with Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope and the new generation of Cherenkov imaging arrays could be used to probe the clumped structure of the stellar wind. We show here that the fluctuation in gamma rays can be modeled using a 'porosity length' formalism, usually applied to characterize clumping effects. In particular, for a porosity length defined by h {identical_to} l/f, i.e., as the ratio of the characteristic size l of clumps to their volume filling factor f, we find that the relative fluctuation in gamma-ray emission in a binary with orbital separation a scales as {radical}(h/{pi}a) in the 'thin-jet' limit, and is reduced by a factor 1/{radical}(1 +{phi}a/2l) for a jet with a finite opening angle {phi}. For a thin jet and quite moderate porosity length h {approx} 0.03a, this implies a ca. 10% variation in the gamma-ray emission. Moreover, the illumination of individual large clumps might result in isolated flares, as has been recently observed in some massive gamma-ray binaries.

  5. Formation and propagation of laser-driven plasma jets in an ambient medium studied with X-ray radiography and optical diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Dizière, A.; Pelka, A.; Ravasio, A.; Yurchak, R.; Loupias, B.; Falize, E.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Sakawa, Y.; Morita, T.; Pikuz, S.; Koenig, M.

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, we present experimental results obtained on the LULI2000 laser facility regarding structure and dynamics of astrophysical jets propagating in interstellar medium. The jets, generated by using a cone-shaped target, propagate in a nitrogen gas that mimics the interstellar medium. X-ray radiography as well as optical diagnostics were used to probe both high and low density regions. In this paper, we show how collimation of the jets evolves with the gas density.

  6. Ni(II) complexation to amorphous hydrous ferric oxide: an X-ray absorption spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Axe, Lisa; Boonfueng, Thipnakarin; Tyson, Trevor A; Trivedi, Paras; Pandya, Kaumudi

    2007-10-01

    Ni(II) sorption onto iron oxides and in particular hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) is among the important processes impacting its distribution, mobility, and bioavailability in environment. To develop mechanistic models for Ni, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis has been conducted on Ni(II) sorbed to HFO. Coprecipitation revealed the formation of the metastable alpha-Ni(OH)(2) at a Ni(II) loading of 3.5 x 10(-3) molg(-1). On the other hand, Ni(II) formed inner-sphere mononuclear bidentate complexes along edges of FeO(6) octahedra when sorbed to HFO surfaces with Ni-O distances of 2.05-2.07 A and Ni-Fe distances of 3.07-3.11 A. This surface complex was observed by EXAFS study over 2.8 x 10(-3) to 10(-1) ionic strength, pH from 6 to 7, a Ni(II) loading of 8 x 10(-4) to 8.1 x 10(-3) molg(-1) HFO, and reaction times from 4 hours to 8 months. The short- and long-range structure analyses suggest that the presence of Ni(II) inhibited transformation of the amorphous iron oxide into a more crystalline form. However, Ni(2+) was not observed to substitute for Fe(3+) in the oxide structure. This study systematically addresses Ni(II) adsorption mechanisms to amorphous iron oxide. The experimentally defined surface complexes can be used to constrain surface complexation modeling for improved prediction of metal distribution at the iron oxide/aqueous interface. PMID:17561066

  7. X-ray Dips Followed by Superluminal Ejections as Evidence for An Accretion Disc Feeding the Jet in A Radio Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, Alan P.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Gomez, Jose-Luis; Aller, Margo F.; Terasranta, Harri; Lister, Matthew L.; Stirling, Alastair, M.

    2002-01-01

    Accretion onto black holes is thought to power the relativistic jets and other high-energy phenomena in both active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the "microquasar" binary systems located in our Galaxy. However, until now there has been insufficient multifrequency monitoring to establish a direct observational link between the black hole and the jet in an AGE. This contrasts with the case of microquasars, in which superluminal features appear and propagate down the radio jet shortly after sudden decreases in the X-ray flux. Such an X-ray dip is most likely caused by the disappearance of a section of the inner accretion disc, part of which falls past the event horizon and the remainder of which is injected into the jet. This infusion of energy generates a disturbance that propagates down the jet, creating the appearance of a superluminal bright spot. Here we report the results of three years of intensive monitoring of the X-ray and radio emission of the Seyfert-like radio galaxy 3C 120. As in the case of microquasars, dips in the X-ray emission are followed by ejections of bright superluminal knots in the radio jet. Comparison of the characteristic length and time scales allows us to infer that the rotational states of the black holes in these two objects are different.

  8. Broad-band monitoring tracing the evolution of the jet and disc in the black hole candidate X-ray binary MAXI J1659-152

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, A. J.; Curran, P. A.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Linford, J. D.; Gorosabel, J.; Russell, D. M.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Lundgren, A. A.; Taylor, G. B.; Maitra, D.; Guziy, S.; Belloni, T. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Jonker, P. G.; Kamble, A.; Paragi, Z.; Homan, J.; Kuulkers, E.; Granot, J.; Altamirano, D.; Buxton, M. M.; Castro-Tirado, A.; Fender, R. P.; Garrett, M. A.; Gehrels, N.; Hartmann, D. H.; Kennea, J. A.; Krimm, H. A.; Mangano, V.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Romano, P.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wijnands, R.; Yang, Y. J.

    2013-12-01

    MAXI J1659-152 was discovered on 2010 September 25 as a new X-ray transient, initially identified as a gamma-ray burst, but was later shown to be a new X-ray binary with a black hole as the most likely compact object. Dips in the X-ray light curves have revealed that MAXI J1659-152 is the shortest period black hole candidate identified to date. Here we present the results of a large observing campaign at radio, submillimetre, near-infrared (nIR), optical and ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths. We have combined this very rich data set with the available X-ray observations to compile a broad-band picture of the evolution of this outburst. We have performed broad-band spectral modelling, demonstrating the presence of a spectral break at radio frequencies and a relationship between the radio spectrum and X-ray states. Also, we have determined physical parameters of the accretion disc and put them into context with respect to the other parameters of the binary system. Finally, we have investigated the radio-X-ray and nIR/optical/UV-X-ray correlations up to ˜3 yr after the outburst onset to examine the link between the jet and the accretion disc, and found that there is no significant jet contribution to the nIR emission when the source is in the soft or intermediate X-ray spectral state, consistent with our detection of the jet break at radio frequencies during these states.

  9. X-ray imaging II; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, Aug. 21, 22, 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Larry V.; Bowen, D. Keith

    1986-01-01

    Recent advances in the technology of X-ray imaging are discussed in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include component characteristics, detectors, optics, and applications. Consideration is given to the 1-40-keV photoabsorption cross sections of Fe, Ni, Sn, Ta, Pt, Au, Pb, and U; metal reflectors in the EUV; high-gain microchannel plate detectors for imaging at soft X-ray wavelengths; optics for X-ray astronomy; and the measured performance of a grazing-incidence relay-optics telescope for solar X-ray astronomy.

  10. Removal of diamond-turning signatures on x-ray mandrels and metal optics by fluid-jet polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucamp, A.; Freeman, R.; Morton, R.; Ponudurai, Karthik; Walker, D. D.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes a major advance in the post-treatment of diamond-turned surfaces to remove repetitive micro-structure; a result which could have a major beneficial impact on fabrication of Walter-type X-ray mandrels, and metal mirrors. Diamond-turning is highly deterministic and versatile in producing axially-symmetric forms, and through fast-tool servos, non-axially symmetric, free-form and micro-structured surfaces. However, the fine turning marks left in the metal surface limit performance. In this paper, we describe how fluid-jet polishing under CNC control can be used to eliminate these structures, without significantly degrading the surface roughness or form produced by the prior turning operation.

  11. FERMI RULES OUT THE INVERSE COMPTON/CMB MODEL FOR THE LARGE-SCALE JET X-RAY EMISSION OF 3C 273

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Eileen T.; Georganopoulos, Markos

    2014-01-10

    The X-ray emission mechanism in large-scale jets of powerful radio quasars has been a source of debate in recent years, with two competing interpretations: either the X-rays are of synchrotron origin, arising from a different electron energy distribution than that producing the radio to optical synchrotron component, or they are due to inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons (IC/CMB) by relativistic electrons in a powerful relativistic jet with bulk Lorentz factor Γ ∼ 10-20. These two models imply radically different conditions in the large-scale jet in terms of jet speed, kinetic power, and maximum energy of the particle acceleration mechanism, with important implications for the impact of the jet on the large-scale environment. A large part of the X-ray origin debate has centered on the well-studied source 3C 273. Here we present new observations from Fermi which put an upper limit on the gamma-ray flux from the large-scale jet of 3C 273 that violates at a confidence greater that 99.9% the flux expected from the IC/CMB X-ray model found by extrapolation of the UV to X-ray spectrum of knot A, thus ruling out the IC/CMB interpretation entirely for this source when combined with previous work. Further, this upper limit from Fermi puts a limit on the Doppler beaming factor of at least δ < 9, assuming equipartition fields, and possibly as low as δ < 5, assuming no major deceleration of the jet from knots A through D1.

  12. X-Ray Dose and Spot Size Calculations for the DARHT-II Distributed Target

    SciTech Connect

    McCarrick, J

    2001-04-05

    The baseline DARHT-II converter target consists of foamed tantalum within a solid-density cylindrical tamper. The baseline design has been modified by D. Ho to further optimize the integrated line density of material in the course of multiple beam pulses. LASNEX simulations of the hydrodynamic expansion of the target have been performed by D. Ho (documented elsewhere). The resulting density profiles have been used as inputs in the MCNP radiation transport code to calculate the X-ray dose and spot size assuming a incoming Gaussian electron beam with {sigma} = 0.65mm, and a PIC-generated beam taking into account the ''swept'' spot emerging from the DARHT-II kicker system. A prerequisite to these calculations is the absorption spectrum of air. In order to obtain this, a separate series of MCNP runs was performed for a set of monoenergetic photon sources, tallying the energy deposited in a volume of air. The forced collision feature was used to improve the statistics since the photon mean free path in air is extremely long at the energies of interest. A sample input file is given below. The resulting data for the MCNP DE and DF cards is shown in the beam-pulse input files, one of which is listed below. Note that the DE and DF cards are entered in column format for easy reading.

  13. Segal crystallinity index revisited by the simulation of X-ray diffraction patterns of cotton cellulose IB and cellulose II

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Segal method estimates the amorphous fraction of cellulose IB materials simply based on intensity at 18o 20 in an X-ray diffraction pattern and was extended to cellulose II using 16o 2O intensity. To address the dependency of Segal amorphous intensity on crystal size, cellulose polymorph, and th...

  14. VLA observations of a complete sample of extragalactic X-ray sources. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schild, R.; Zamorani, G.; Gioia, I. M.; Feigelson, E. D.; Maccacaro, T.

    1983-01-01

    A complete sample of 35 X-ray selected sources found with the Einstein Observatory has been observed with the Very Large Array at 6 cm to investigate the relationship between radio and X-ray emission in extragalactic objects. Detections include three active galactic nuclei (AGNs), two clusters or groups of galaxies, two individual galaxies, and two BL Lac objects. The frequency of radio emission in X-ray selected AGNs is compared with that of optically selected quasars using the integral radio-optical luminosity function. The result suggests that the probability for X-ray selected quasars to be radio sources is higher than for those optically selected. No obvious correlation is found in the sample between the richness of X-ray luminosity of the cluster and the presence of a galaxy with radio luminosity at 5 GHz larger than 10 to the 30th ergs/s/Hz.

  15. X-ray studies of quasars with the Einstein Observatory. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamorani, G.; Maccacaro, T.; Henry, J. P.; Tananbaum, H.; Soltan, A.; Liebert, J.; Stocke, J.; Strittmatter, P. A.; Weymann, R. J.; Smith, M. G.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray observations of 107 quasars have been carried out with the Einstein Observatory, and 79 have been detected. A correlation between optical emission and X-ray emission is found; and for radio-loud quasars, the data show a correlation between radio emission and X-ray emission. For a given optical luminosity, the average X-ray emission of radio-loud quasars is about three times higher than that of radio-quiet quasars. The data also suggest that the ratio of X-ray to optical luminosity is decreasing with increasing redshift and/or optical luminosity. The data support the picture in which luminosity evolution, rather than pure density evolution, describes the quasar behavior as a function of redshift.

  16. 100-picosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure of FeII(1,10-phenanthroline)3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tokushi; Nozawa, Shunsuke; Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Tomita, Ayana; Ichikawa, Hirohiko; Chollet, Matthieu; Fujii, Hiroshi; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Koshihara, Shin-ya

    2009-02-01

    Studying photo-induced molecular dynamics in liquid with sub-nanosecond time-resolution and sub-Angstrom spatial resolution gives information for understanding fundamental chemical process in the photo-induced cooperative phenomena of molecular systems and also for developing new materials and devices. Here, we present time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure on the spin-crossover complex FeII tris-(1,10-phenanthroline) dissolved in aqueous solution. We utilized femtosecond laser at 400nm pulse for excitation and 100ps X-ray pulse for probe.

  17. Positions of galactic X-ray sources - At longitudes /l-II/ of 55-320 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dower, R. G.; Bradt, H. V.; Doxsey, R. E.; Jernigan, J. G.; Kulik, J.; Apparao, K. M. V.

    1978-01-01

    Rotating modulation collimeter detectors on the SAS-3 X-ray observatory were used to supply precise (20-40 sec) positional data on 10 galactic X-ray sources in the l super II region between 55 and 320 deg. It is noted that the position for 2S0114+650 has led to the discovery of an optical counterpart. Attention is given to the temperature dependence of the experiments, and it is found that position measurements made at low temperatures are consistent with those obtained at normal (0 C) temperatures. Positions, error radii, and intensities (2-11 keV) are listed for each of the ten sources.

  18. Discovery of the correlation between peak episodic jet power and X-ray peak luminosity of the soft state in black hole transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Yu, W.

    2015-08-01

    Episodic jets are usually observed in the intermediate state of black hole transients during their X-ray outbursts. Here we report the discovery of a strong positive correlation between the peak radio power of the episodic jet Pjet and the corresponding peak X-ray luminosity Lx of the soft state (in Eddington units) in a complete sample of the outbursts of black hole transients observed during the RXTE era of which data are available, which follows the relation log Pjet = (2.2 ± 0.3) + (1.6 ± 0.2) × log Lx. The transient ultraluminous X-ray source in M31 and HLX-1 in EXO 243-49 fall on the relation if they contain stellar-mass black hole and either stellar-mass black hole or intermediate-mass black hole, respectively. Besides, a significant correlation between the peak power of the episodic jet and the rate of increase of the X-ray luminosity dLx/dt during the rising phase of those outbursts is also found, following log Pjet = (2.0 ± 0.4) + (0.7 ± 0.2) × log dLx/dt. In GX 339-4 and H 1743-322 in which data for two outbursts are available, measurements of the peak radio power of the episodic jet and the X-ray peak luminosity (and its rate of change) shows similar positive correlations between outbursts, which demonstrate the dominant role of accretion over black hole spin in generating episodic jet power. On the other hand, no significant difference is seen among the systems with different measured black hole spin in current sample. This implies that the power of the episodic jet is strongly affected by non-stationary accretion instead of black hole spin characterized primarily by the rate of change of the mass accretion rate.

  19. CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. ON THE IMPORTANCE OF PHOTOCHEMISTRY AND X-RAY IONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Catherine; Millar, T. J.; Nomura, Hideko; Aikawa, Yuri

    2012-03-10

    We investigate the impact of photochemistry and X-ray ionization on the molecular composition of, and ionization fraction in, a protoplanetary disk surrounding a typical T Tauri star. We use a sophisticated physical model, which includes a robust treatment of the radiative transfer of UV and X-ray radiation, and calculate the time-dependent chemical structure using a comprehensive chemical network. In previous work, we approximated the photochemistry and X-ray ionization; here, we recalculate the photoreaction rates using the explicit UV wavelength spectrum and wavelength-dependent reaction cross sections. We recalculate the X-ray ionization rate using our explicit elemental composition and X-ray energy spectrum. We find that photochemistry has a larger influence on the molecular composition than X-ray ionization. Observable molecules sensitive to the photorates include OH, HCO{sup +}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH. The only molecule significantly affected by the X-ray ionization is N{sub 2}H{sup +}, indicating that it is safe to adopt existing approximations of the X-ray ionization rate in typical T Tauri star-disk systems. The recalculation of the photorates increases the abundances of neutral molecules in the outer disk, highlighting the importance of taking into account the shape of the UV spectrum in protoplanetary disks. A recalculation of the photoreaction rates also affects the gas-phase chemistry due to the adjustment of the H/H{sub 2} and C{sup +}/C ratios. The disk ionization fraction is not significantly affected by the methods adopted to calculate the photochemistry and X-ray ionization. We determine that there is a probable 'dead zone' where accretion is suppressed, present in a layer, Z/R {approx}< 0.1-0.2, in the disk midplane, within R Almost-Equal-To 200 AU.

  20. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays. II. Faint Sources Detected with XMM-Newton and Chandra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunez, N. E.; Luna, G. J. M.; Pillitteri, I.; Mukai, K.

    2014-01-01

    We report the detection from four symbiotic stars that were not known to be X-ray sources. These four object show a ß-type X-ray spectrum, that is, their spectra can be modeled with an absorbed optically thin thermal emission with temperatures of a few million degrees. Photometric series obtained with the Optical Monitor on board XMM-Newton from V2416 Sgr and NSV 25735 support the proposed scenario where the X-ray emission is produced in a shock-heated region inside the symbiotic nebulae.

  1. Chandra X-ray Observations of Young Clusters. Volume II; Orion Flanking Fields Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Solange V.; Rebull, Luisa; Stauffer, John; Strom, Stephen; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Hearty, Thomas; Kopan, Eugene L.; Pravdo, Steven; Makidon, Russell; Jones, Burton

    2004-01-01

    We present results of Chandra observations of two flanking fields (FFs) in Orion, outside the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). The observations were taken with the ACIS-I camera with an exposure time of about 48 ks each field. We present a catalog of 417 sources, which includes X-ray luminosity, optical and infrared photometry, and X-ray variability information. We have found 91 variable sources, 33 of which have a flarelike light curve and 11 of which have a pattern of a steady increase or decrease over a 10 hr period. The optical and infrared photometry for the stars identified as X-ray sources are consistent with most of these objects being pre-main-sequence stars with ages younger than 10 Myr. We present evidence for an age difference among the X-ray-selected samples of NGC 2264, Orion FFs, and ONC, with NGC 2264 being the oldest and ONC being the youngest.

  2. Novel bimetallic thiocyanate-bridged Cu(II)-Hg(II) compounds-synthesis, X-Ray studies and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Machura, B.; Switlicka, A.; Zwolinski, P.; Mrozinski, J.; Kalinska, B.; Kruszynski, R.

    2013-01-15

    Seven novel heterobimetallic Cu/Hg polymers based on thiocyanate bridges have been synthesised and characterised by means of IR, EPR, magnetic measurements and single crystal X-Ray. Three of them, [Cu(pzH){sub 4}Hg(SCN){sub 4}]{sub n} (1) [Cu(indH){sub 4}Hg(SCN){sub 4}]{sub n} (2) and [Cu(ampy){sub 2}Hg(SCN){sub 4}]{sub n} (3), have one-dimensional coordination structure. Two compounds [Cu(pzH){sub 2}Hg(SCN){sub 4}]{sub n} (4) and [Cu(abzimH)Hg(SCN){sub 4}]{sub n} (5) form two-dimensional nets, whereas the complexes [Cu(pyCN){sub 2}Hg(SCN){sub 4}]{sub n} (6) and [Cu(pyCH(OH)(OMe)){sub 2}Hg(SCN){sub 4}]{sub n} (7) are three-dimensional coordination polymers. The chains of 1 are connected by the intermolecular N-H Bullet Bullet Bullet N hydrogen bonds to the three dimensional net. In 2 the N-H Bullet Bullet Bullet S hydrogen bonds link the polymeric chains to the two dimensional layer extending along crystallographic (0 0 1) plane. The polymeric chains of compound 3 are joined by the intermolecular N-H Bullet Bullet Bullet N and N-H Bullet Bullet Bullet S hydrogen bonds to the three dimensional net. The polymeric layers of 4 are connected by the intermolecular N-H Bullet Bullet Bullet N hydrogen bonds to the three dimensional net. - Graphical abstract: Novel bimetallic thiocyanate-bridged Cu(II)-Hg(II) compound-synthesis,X-Ray studies and magnetic properties. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Novel heterobimetallic Cu/Hg coordination polymers were synthesised. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The multidimensional structures have been proved by single X-ray analysIs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A variation in the crystalline architectures was observed depending on auxiliary ligands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic measurements indicate weak exchange interaction between Cu(II) in the crystal lattices below 10 K.

  3. 5-20 keV laser-induced x-ray generation at 1 kHz from a liquid-jet target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tompkins, R. J.; Mercer, I. P.; Fettweis, M.; Barnett, C. J.; Klug, D. R.; Porter, Lord G.; Clark, I.; Jackson, S.; Matousek, P.; Parker, A. W.; Towrie, M.

    1998-09-01

    We report ultrashort pulse, 1 kHz repetition rate x-ray generation in the 5-20 keV spectral region, induced by the interaction of laser radiation with copper nitrate solution and ethylene glycol liquid-jet targets. The characteristics of the copper nitrate source are relevant for application to time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies as well as for spectroscopic x-ray absorption studies. The x-ray sources were operated uninterrupted for in excess of 5 h with no detectable buildup of debris on the associated optics. The x-ray flux generated by both sources is estimated to be of the order of 106photons s-1 sr-1 in the 5-20 keV region. The spectra have been measured with both a PIN photodiode, and with transmission measurements taken using aluminum filters. We find that the plasma emission has a broadband component attributed to bremsstrahlung emission, with the bulk of the x-ray emission emitted from the chamber lying between 5 and 20 keV for both sources. The copper nitrate emission, however, delivers a dominant emission peak at 9 keV, attributed to the characteristic K emission of copper.

  4. THE NATURE OF THE UV/OPTICAL EMISSION OF THE ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE IN HOLMBERG II

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Lian; Feng Hua; Kaaret, Philip; Grise, Fabien

    2012-05-10

    We report on UV and X-ray spectroscopy and broadband optical observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source in Holmberg II. Fitting various stellar spectral models to the combined, non-simultaneous data set, we find that normal metallicity stellar spectra are ruled out by the data, while low-metallicity, Z = 0.1 Z{sub Sun }, late O-star spectra provide marginally acceptable fits, if we allow for the fact that X-ray ionization from the compact object may reduce or eliminate UV absorption/emission lines from the stellar wind. By contrast, an irradiated disk model fits both UV and optical data with {chi}{sup 2}/dof = 175.9/178, and matches the nebular extinction with a reddening of E(B - V) = 0.05{sup +0.05}{sub -0.04}. These results suggest that the UV/optical flux of Holmberg II X-1 may be dominated by X-ray irradiated disk emission.

  5. BAT AGN spectroscopic survey-II. X-ray emission and high-ionization optical emission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berney, Simon; Koss, Michael; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Ricci, Claudio; Lamperti, Isabella; Schawinski, Kevin; Baloković, Mislav; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Fischer, Travis; Gehrels, Neil; Harrison, Fiona; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ichikawa, Kohei; Mushotzky, Richard; Oh, Kyuseok; Stern, Daniel; Treister, Ezequiel; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the relationship between X-ray and optical line emission in 340 nearby (z ≃ 0.04) AGN selected above 10 keV using Swift BAT. We find a weak correlation between the extinction corrected [O III] and hard X-ray luminosity (L_[O III]^{int} ∝ L_{14-195}) with a large scatter (RPear = 0.64, σ = 0.62 dex) and a similarly large scatter with the intrinsic 2-10 keV to [O III] luminosities (RPear = 0.63, σ = 0.63 dex). Correlations of the hard X-ray fluxes with the fluxes of high-ionization narrow lines ([O III], He II, [Ne III] and [Ne V]) are not significantly better than with the low-ionization lines (H α, [S II]). Factors like obscuration or physical slit size are not found to be a significant part of the large scatter. In contrast, the optical emission lines show much better correlations with each other (σ = 0.3 dex) than with the X-ray flux. The inherent large scatter questions the common usage of narrow emission lines as AGN bolometric luminosity indicators and suggests that other issues such as geometrical differences in the scattering of the ionized gas or long-term AGN variability are important.

  6. Dynamics and plasma properties of an X-ray jet from SUMER, EIS, XRT, and EUVI A & B simultaneous observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madjarska, M. S.

    2011-02-01

    Context. Small-scale transient phenomena in the quiet Sun are believed to play an important role in coronal heating and solar wind generation. One of them, called “X-ray jet”, is the subject of our study. Aims: We intend to investigate the dynamics, evolution, and physical properties of this phenomenon. Methods: We combine multi-instrument observations obtained simultaneously with the SUMER spectrometer onboard SoHO, with EIS and XRT onboard Hinode, and with EUVI/SECCHI onboard the Ahead and Behind STEREO spacecrafts. We derive plasma parameters such as temperatures and densities as well as dynamics by using spectral lines formed in the temperature range from 10 000 K to 12 MK. We also use an image difference technique to investigate the evolution of the complex structure of the studied phenomenon. Results: With the available unique combination of data we were able to establish that the formation of a jet-like event is triggered by not one, but several energy depositions, which are most probably originating from magnetic reconnection. Each energy deposition is followed by the expulsion of pre-existing or newly reconnected loops and/or collimated flow along open magnetic field lines. We derived in great detail the dynamic process of X-ray jet formation and evolution. For the first time we also found spectroscopically a temperature of 12 MK (Fe xxiii 263.76 Å) and density of 4 × 1010 cm-3 in the quiet Sun, obtained from a pair of Fe xii lines with a maximum formation temperature of 1.3 × 106 K, in an energy deposition region. We point out a problem concerning an uncertainty in using the SUMER Mg x 624.9 Å line for coronal diagnostics. We clearly identified two types of up-flow: one collimated up-flow along open magnetic field lines and a plasma cloud formed from the expelled BP loops. We also report a cooler down-flow along closed magnetic field lines. A comparison is made with a model developed by Moreno-Insertis et al. (2008). Figures 10-16 and movie are

  7. The Chandra planetary nebula survey (CHANPLANS). II. X-ray emission from compact planetary nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M.; Kastner, J. H.; Montez, R. Jr.; Balick, B.; Frew, D. J.; De Marco, O.; Parker, Q. A.; Jones, D.; Miszalski, B.; Sahai, R.; Blackman, E.; Frank, A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Guerrero, M. A.; Zijlstra, A.; Bujarrabal, V.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Nordhaus, J.; and others

    2014-10-20

    We present results from the most recent set of observations obtained as part of the Chandra X-ray observatory Planetary Nebula Survey (CHANPLANS), the first comprehensive X-ray survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood (i.e., within ∼1.5 kpc of the Sun). The survey is designed to place constraints on the frequency of appearance and range of X-ray spectral characteristics of X-ray-emitting PN central stars and the evolutionary timescales of wind-shock-heated bubbles within PNe. CHANPLANS began with a combined Cycle 12 and archive Chandra survey of 35 PNe. CHANPLANS continued via a Chandra Cycle 14 Large Program which targeted all (24) remaining known compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.4 pc), young PNe that lie within ∼1.5 kpc. Results from these Cycle 14 observations include first-time X-ray detections of hot bubbles within NGC 1501, 3918, 6153, and 6369, and point sources in HbDs 1, NGC 6337, and Sp 1. The addition of the Cycle 14 results brings the overall CHANPLANS diffuse X-ray detection rate to ∼27% and the point source detection rate to ∼36%. It has become clearer that diffuse X-ray emission is associated with young (≲ 5 × 10{sup 3} yr), and likewise compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.15 pc), PNe with closed structures and high central electron densities (n{sub e} ≳ 1000 cm{sup –3}), and is rarely associated with PNe that show H{sub 2} emission and/or pronounced butterfly structures. Hb 5 is one such exception of a PN with a butterfly structure that hosts diffuse X-ray emission. Additionally, two of the five new diffuse X-ray detections (NGC 1501 and NGC 6369) host [WR]-type central stars, supporting the hypothesis that PNe with central stars of [WR]-type are likely to display diffuse X-ray emission.

  8. Normal incidence X-ray telescope power spectra of X-ray emission from solar active regions. I - Observations. II - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Daniel O.; Martens, Petrus C. H.; Golub, Leon

    1993-01-01

    Fourier analysis is applied to very high resolution image of coronal active regions obtained by the Normal Incidence X-Ray Telescope is used to find a broad isotropic power-law spectrum of the spatial distribution of soft X-ray intensities. Magnetic structures of all sizes are present down to the resolution limit of the instrument. Power spectra for the X-ray intensities of a sample of topologically different active regions are found which fall off with increasing wavenumber as 1/k-cubed. A model is presented that relates the basic features of coronal magnetic fluctuations to the subphotospheric hydrodynamic turbulence that generates them. The model is used to find a theoretical power spectrum for the X-ray intensity which falls off with increasing wavenumber as 1/k-cubed. The implications of a turbulent regime in active regions are discussed.

  9. Ultra-luminous X-Ray Sources in HARO II and the Role of X-Ray Binaries in Feedback in Lyα Emitting Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestwich, A. H.; Jackson, F.; Kaaret, P.; Brorby, M.; Roberts, T. P.; Saar, S. H.; Yukita, M.

    2015-10-01

    Lyman Break Analogs (LBAs) are local proxies of high-redshift Lyman Break Galaxies. Spatially resolved studies of nearby starbursts have shown that Lyman continuum and line emission are absorbed by dust and that the Lyα is resonantly scattered by neutral hydrogen. In order to observe Lyα emission from star-forming regions, some source of feedback is required to blow the neutral gas away from the starburst to prevent scattering and allow the Lyα emission to escape. We show that there are two X-ray point sources embedded in the diffuse emission of the LBA galaxy Haro 11. CXOU J003652.4-333316 (abbreviated to Haro 11 X-1) is an extremely luminous (L{}{{X}}˜ {10}41 erg s-1), spatially compact source with a hard-X-ray spectrum. We suggest that the X-ray emission from Haro 11 X-1 is dominated by a single accretion source. This might be an active galactic nucleus or a source similar to the extreme black hole binary (BHB) M82 X-1. The hard X-ray spectrum indicates that Haro 11 X-1 may be a BHB in a low accretion state. In this case, the very high X-ray luminosity suggests an intermediate mass black hole that could be the seed for formation of a supermassive black hole. Source CXOU J003652.7-33331619.5 (abbreviated Haro 11 X-2) has an X-ray luminosity of {L}{{X}}˜ 5× {10}40 erg s-1 and a soft X-ray spectrum (power-law photon index Γ ˜ 2.2). This strongly suggests that Haro 11 X-2 is an X-ray binary in the ultra luminous state (i.e., an Ultra Luminous X-ray source, ULX). Haro 11 X-2 is coincident with the star-forming knot that is the source of the Lyα emission. The association of a ULX with Lyα emission raises the possibility that strong winds from X-ray binaries play an important role in injecting mechanical power into the interstellar medium, thus blowing away neutral material from the starburst region and allowing the Lyα to escape. We suggest that feedback from X-ray binaries may play a significant role in allowing Lyα emission to escape from galaxies in the

  10. Jet-dominated quiescent state in black hole X-ray binaries: the cases of A0620-00 and XTE J1118+480

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qi-Xiang

    2016-04-01

    The radiative mechanism of black hole X-ray transients (BHXTs) in their quiescent states (defined as the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity ≲ 1034 erg s-1) remains unclear. In this work, we investigate the quasi-simultaneous quiescent state spectrum (including radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet and X-ray) of two BHXTs, A0620-00 and XTE J1118+480. We find that these two sources can be well described by a coupled accretion - jet model. More specifically, most of the emission (radio up to infrared, and the X-ray waveband) comes from the collimated relativistic jet. Emission from hot accretion flow is totally insignificant, and it can only be observed in mid-infrared (the synchrotron peak). Emission from the outer cold disk is only evident in the UV band. These results are consistent with our previous investigation on the quiescent state of V404 Cyg and confirm that the quiescent state is jet-dominated.

  11. High K-alpha X-ray Conversion Efficiency From Extended Source Gas Jet Targets Irradiated by Ultra Short Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kugland, N L; Constantin, C; Collette, A; Dewald, E; Froula, D; Glenzer, S H; Kritcher, A; Neumayer, P; Ross, J S; Niemann, C

    2007-11-01

    The absolute laser conversion efficiency to K{sub {alpha}}-like inner shell x-rays (integrated from K{sub {alpha}} to K{sub {beta}}) is observed to be an order of magnitude higher in argon gas jets than in solid targets due to enhanced emission from higher ionization stages following ultra short pulse laser irradiation. Excluding the higher ionization stages, the conversion efficiency to near-cold K{sub {alpha}} is the same in gas jets as in solid targets. These results demonstrate that gas jet targets are bright, high conversion efficiency, high repetition rate, debris-free multi-keV x-ray sources for spectrally resolved scattering and backlighting of rapidly evolving dense matter.

  12. Feedback from winds and supernovae in massive stellar clusters - II. X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, H.; Pittard, J. M.

    2014-06-01

    The X-ray emission from a simulated massive stellar cluster is investigated. The emission is calculated from a 3D hydrodynamical model which incorporates the mechanical feedback from the stellar winds of three O stars embedded in a giant molecular cloud (GMC) clump containing 3240 M⊙ of molecular material within a 4 pc radius. A simple prescription for the evolution of the stars is used, with the first supernova (SN) explosion at t = 4.4 Myr. We find that the presence of the GMC clump causes short-lived attenuation effects on the X-ray emission of the cluster. However, once most of the material has been ablated away by the winds, the remaining dense clumps do not have a noticeable effect on the attenuation compared with the assumed interstellar medium (ISM) column. We determine the evolution of the cluster X-ray luminosity, LX, and spectra, and generate synthetic images. The intrinsic X-ray luminosity drops from nearly 1034 erg s-1 while the winds are `bottled up', to a near-constant value of 1.7 × 1032 erg s-1 between t = 1 and 4 Myr. LX reduces slightly during each star's red supergiant stage due to the depressurization of the hot gas. However, LX increases to ≈1034 erg s-1 during each star's Wolf-Rayet stage. The X-ray luminosity is enhanced by two to three orders of magnitude to ˜1037 erg s-1 for at least 4600 yr after each SN explosion, at which time the blast wave leaves the grid and the X-ray luminosity drops. The X-ray luminosity of our simulation is generally considerably fainter than predicted from spherically symmetric bubble models, due to the leakage of hot gas material through gaps in the outer shell. This process reduces the pressure within our simulation and thus the X-ray emission. However, the X-ray luminosities and temperatures which we obtain are comparable to similarly powerful massive young clusters.

  13. High Resolution Triple Axis X-Ray Diffraction Analysis of II-VI Semiconductor Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, H. M.; Matyi, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this research program is to develop methods of structural analysis based on high resolution triple axis X-ray diffractometry (HRTXD) and to carry out detailed studies of defect distributions in crystals grown in both microgravity and ground-based environments. HRTXD represents a modification of the widely used double axis X-ray rocking curve method for the characterization of grown-in defects in nearly perfect crystals. In a double axis rocking curve experiment, the sample is illuminated by a monochromatic X-ray beam and the diffracted intensity is recorded by a fixed, wide-open detector. The intensity diffracted by the sample is then monitored as the sample is rotated through the Bragg reflection condition. The breadth of the peak, which is often reported as the full angular width at half the maximum intensity (FWHM), is used as an indicator of the amount of defects in the sample. This work has shown that high resolution triple axis X-ray diffraction is an effective tool for characterizing the defect structure in semiconductor crystals, particularly at high defect densities. Additionally, the technique is complimentary to X-ray topography for defect characterization in crystals.

  14. Application of CO2 Snow Jet Cleaning in Conjunction with Laboratory Based Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmeling, M.; Burnett, D. S.; Allton, J. H.; Rodriquez, M.; Tripa, C. E.; Veryovkin, I. V.

    2013-01-01

    The Genesis mission was the first mission returning solar material to Earth since the Apollo program [1,2]. Unfortunately the return of the space craft on September 8, 2004 resulted in a crash landing, which shattered the samples into small fragments and exposed them to desert soil and other debris. Thus only small fragments of the original collectors are available, each having different degrees of surface contamination. Thorough surface cleaning is required to allow for subsequent analysis of solar wind material embedded within. An initial cleaning procedure was developed in coordination with Johnson Space Center which focused on removing larger sized particulates and a thin film organic contamination acquired during collection in space [3]. However, many of the samples have additional residues and more rigorous and/or innovative cleaning steps might be necessary. These cleaning steps must affect only the surface to avoid leaching and re-distribution of solar wind material from the bulk of the collectors. To aid in development and identification of the most appropriate cleaning procedures each sample has to be thoroughly inspected before and after each cleaning step. Laboratory based total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry lends itself to this task as it is a non-destructive and surface sensitive analytical method permitting analysis of elements from aluminum onward present at and near the surface of a flat substrate [4]. The suitability of TXRF has been demonstrated for several Genesis solar wind samples before and after various cleaning methods including acid treatment, gas cluster ion beam, and CO2 snow jet [5 - 7]. The latter one is non-invasive and did show some promise on one sample [5]. To investigate the feasibility of CO2 snow jet cleaning further, several flown Genesis samples were selected to be characterized before and after CO2 snow application with sample 61052 being discussed below.

  15. A Coordinated X-Ray and Optical Campaign of the Nearest Massive Eclipsing Binary, δ Orionis Aa. II. X-Ray Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, J.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Corcoran, M. F.; Waldron, W.; Nazé, Y.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Lauer, J.; Shenar, T.; Russell, C. M. P.; Richardson, N. D.; Pablo, H.; Evans, N. R.; Hamaguchi, K.; Gull, T.; Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L.; Ignace, R.; Hoffman, Jennifer L.; Hole, K. T.; Lomax, J. R.

    2015-08-01

    We present time-resolved and phase-resolved variability studies of an extensive X-ray high-resolution spectral data set of the δ Ori Aa binary system. The four observations, obtained with Chandra ACIS HETGS, have a total exposure time of ≈ 479 ks and provide nearly complete binary phase coverage. Variability of the total X-ray flux in the range of 5-25 Å is confirmed, with a maximum amplitude of about ±15% within a single ≈ 125 ks observation. Periods of 4.76 and 2.04 days are found in the total X-ray flux, as well as an apparent overall increase in the flux level throughout the nine-day observational campaign. Using 40 ks contiguous spectra derived from the original observations, we investigate the variability of emission line parameters and ratios. Several emission lines are shown to be variable, including S xv, Si xiii, and Ne ix. For the first time, variations of the X-ray emission line widths as a function of the binary phase are found in a binary system, with the smallest widths at ϕ = 0.0 when the secondary δ Ori Aa2 is at the inferior conjunction. Using 3D hydrodynamic modeling of the interacting winds, we relate the emission line width variability to the presence of a wind cavity created by a wind-wind collision, which is effectively void of embedded wind shocks and is carved out of the X-ray-producing primary wind, thus producing phase-locked X-ray variability. Based on data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly operated by Dynacon Inc., the University of Toronto Institute of Aerospace Studies, and the University of British Columbia, with the assistance of the University of Vienna.

  16. Modeling Contamination Migration on the Chandra X-ray Observatory II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Steve; Swartz, Doug; Tice, Neil; Plucinsky, Paul; Grant, Catherine; Marshall, Herman; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    During its first 14 years of operation, the cold (about -60degC) optical blocking filter of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory, has accumulated a growing layer of molecular contamination that attenuates low-energy x rays. Over the past few years, the accumulation rate, spatial distribution, and composition may have changed, perhaps partially related to changes in the operating temperature of the ACIS housing. This evolution of the accumulation of the molecular contamination has motivated further analysis of contamination migration on the Chandra X-ray Observatory, particularly within and near the ACIS cavity. To this end, the current study employs a higher-fidelity geometric model of the ACIS cavity, detailed thermal modeling based upon monitored temperature data, and an accordingly refined model of the molecular transport.

  17. Optimisation of NSLS-II Blade X-ray Beam Position Monitors: from Photoemission type to Diamond Detector

    SciTech Connect

    ILINSKI P.

    2012-07-10

    Optimisation of blade type x-ray beam position monitors (XBPM) was performed for NSLS-II undulator IVU20. Blade material, con and #64257;guration and operation principle was analysed in order to improve XBPM performance. Optimisation is based on calculation of the XBPM signal spatial distribution. Along with standard photoemission type XBPM a Diamond Detector Blades (DDB) were analysed as blades for XBPMs. DDB XBPMs can help to overcome drawbacks of the photoemission blade XBPMs.

  18. Modeling Contamination Migration on the Chandra X-ray Observatory - II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tice, Neil W.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Grant, Catherine E.; Marshall, Herman L.; Vikhlinin, Alexey A.; Tennant, Allyn F.

    2013-01-01

    During its first 14 years of operation, the cold (about -60C) optical blocking filter of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory, has accumulated a growing layer of molecular contamination that attenuates low-energy x rays. Over the past few years, the accumulation rate, spatial distribution, and composition have changed. This evolution has motivated further analysis of contamination migration within and near the ACIS cavity. To this end, the current study employs a higher-fidelity geometric model of the ACIS cavity, detailed thermal modeling based upon temperature data, and a refined model of the molecular transport.

  19. Wind, jet, hybrid corona and hard X-ray flares: Multiwavelength evolution of GRO J1655-40 during the 2005 outburst rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalemci, E.; Begelman, M. C.; Maccarone, T. J.; Dincer, T.; Russell, T. D.; Bailyn, C.; Tomsick, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    We have investigated the complex multiwavelength evolution of GRO J1655-40 during the rise of its 2005 outburst. We detected two hard X-ray flares, the first one during the transition from the soft state to the ultra-soft state, and the second one in the ultra-soft state. The first X-ray flare coincided with an optically thin radio flare. We also observed a hint of increased radio emission during the second X-ray flare. To explain the hard flares without invoking a secondary emission component, we fit the entire dataset with the eqpair model. This single, hybrid Comptonization model sufficiently fits the data even during the hard X-ray flares if we allow reflection fractions greater than unity. In this case, the hard X-ray flares correspond to a Comptonizing corona dominated by non-thermal electrons. The fits also require absorption features in the soft and ultra-soft state which are likely due to a wind. In this work we show that the wind and the optically thin radio flare co-exist. Finally, we have also investigated the radio to optical spectral energy distribution, tracking the radio spectral evolution through the quenching of the compact jet and rise of the optically thin flare, and interpreted all data using state transition models.

  20. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  1. Narrow-line X-Ray-selected Galaxies in the Chandra-COSMOS Field. II. Optically Elusive X-Ray AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pons, E.; Elvis, M.; Civano, F.; Watson, M. G.

    2016-06-01

    In the Chandra-COSMOS (C-COSMOS) survey, we have looked for X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs), which are not detected as such in the optical, the so-called elusive AGNs. A previous study based on XMM-Newton and Sloan Digital Sky Survey observations has found a sample of 31 X-ray AGNs optically misclassified as star-forming (SF) galaxies at z\\lt 0.4, including 17 elusive Sy2s. Using Chandra observations provides a sample of fainter X-ray sources and so, for a given X-ray luminosity, extends to higher redshifts. To study the elusive Sy2s in the C-COSMOS field, we have removed the NLS1s that contaminate the narrow-line sample. Surprisingly, the contribution of NLS1s is much lower in the C-COSMOS sample (less than 10% of the optically misclassified X-ray AGNs) than in Pons & Watson. The optical misclassification of the X-ray AGNs ({L}{{X}}\\gt {10}42 {erg} {{{s}}}-1) can be explained by the intrinsic weakness of these AGNs, in addition to, in some cases, optical dilution by the host galaxies. Interestingly, we found the fraction of elusive Sy2s (narrow emission-line objects) optically misclassified as SF galaxies up to z∼ 1.4 to be 10% ± 3% to 17% ± 4%, compared to the 6% ± 1.5% of the Pons & Watson work (up to z∼ 0.4). This result seems to indicate an evolution with redshift of the number of elusive Sy2s.

  2. A Coordinated X-Ray and Optical Campaign of the Nearest Massive Eclipsing Binary, Delta Orionis Aa. II. X-Ray Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, J.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Corcoran, M. F.; Waldron, W.; Naze, Y.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Lauer, J.; Shenar, T.; Russell, C. M. P.; Hamaguchi, K.; Gull, T.

    2015-01-01

    We present time-resolved and phase-resolved variability studies of an extensive X-ray high-resolution spectral data set of the delta Ori Aa binary system. The four observations, obtained with Chandra ACIS (Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer) HETGS (High Energy Transmission Grating), have a total exposure time approximately equal to 479 kiloseconds and provide nearly complete binary phase coverage. Variability of the total X-ray flux in the range of 5-25 angstroms is confirmed, with a maximum amplitude of about plus or minus15 percent within a single approximately equal to125 kiloseconds observation. Periods of 4.76 and 2.04 days are found in the total X-ray flux, as well as an apparent overall increase in the flux level throughout the nine-day observational campaign. Using 40 kiloseconds contiguous spectra derived from the original observations, we investigate the variability of emission line parameters and ratios. Several emission lines are shown to be variable, including S (sub XV), Si (sub XIII), and Ne (sub IX). For the first time, variations of the X-ray emission line widths as a function of the binary phase are found in a binary system, with the smallest widths at phi = 0.0 when the secondary delta Ori Aa2 is at the inferior conjunction. Using 3D hydrodynamic modeling of the interacting winds, we relate the emission line width variability to the presence of a wind cavity created by a wind-wind collision, which is effectively void of embedded wind shocks and is carved out of the X-ray-producing primary wind, thus producing phase-locked X-ray variability.

  3. X-ray micro-laminography for the ex situ analysis of W-CFC samples retrieved from JET ITER-like wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiseanu, I.; Craciunescu, T.; Lungu, M.; Dobrea, C.; Contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    x-ray micro-laminography was qualified and implemented as a complementary solution for the 3D microstructural analysis of tungsten coated carbon-fibre reinforced carbon (W/CFC) samples retrieved from JET ITER-like wall. As expected, the W layers spatially correlate with the morphology of the CFC substrate. Three main cases were distinguished; (i) tungsten layers coated parallel to PAN fibre bundles tend to have a quasi-continuous, weakly waved surface (waves amplitude <100 μm) (ii) tungsten layers coated onto the relatively porous felt region appear to smoothly follow even the surface of the largest pores of around 250 μm and (iii) samples coated perpendicular to the PAN fibre bundles display frequently and strong crater-like discontinuities of the metal layer. The characteristics dimensions of these gaps range in the order of 300-400 μm both in the coating plane and perpendicular to it. On some craters the bottom W layer is broken and the generated debris can be found even deeper than one mm into the CFC substrate. These W particles, sized of 20-40 μm, are always found in the large gaps located between the fibre bundles perpendicular to the coated surface.

  4. High performance X-ray and neutron microfocusing optics. Phase II final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Hirsch

    2000-01-14

    The use of extremely small diameter x-ray beams at synchrotron radiation facilities has become an important experimental technique for investigators in many other scientific disciplines. While there have been several different optical elements developed for producing such microbeams, this SBIR project was concerned with one particular device: the tapered-monocapillary optic.

  5. The MUSIC of galaxy clusters - II. X-ray global properties and scaling relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biffi, V.; Sembolini, F.; De Petris, M.; Valdarnini, R.; Yepes, G.; Gottlöber, S.

    2014-03-01

    We present the X-ray properties and scaling relations of a large sample of clusters extracted from the Marenostrum MUltidark SImulations of galaxy Clusters (MUSIC) data set. We focus on a sub-sample of 179 clusters at redshift z ˜ 0.11, with 3.2 × 1014 h-1 M⊙ < Mvir < 2 × 1015 h-1 M⊙, complete in mass. We employed the X-ray photon simulator PHOX to obtain synthetic Chandra observations and derive observable-like global properties of the intracluster medium (ICM), as X-ray temperature (TX) and luminosity (LX). TX is found to slightly underestimate the true mass-weighted temperature, although tracing fairly well the cluster total mass. We also study the effects of TX on scaling relations with cluster intrinsic properties: total (M500 and gas Mg,500 mass; integrated Compton parameter (YSZ) of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) thermal effect; YX = Mg,500 TX. We confirm that YX is a very good mass proxy, with a scatter on M500-YX and YSZ-YX lower than 5 per cent. The study of scaling relations among X-ray, intrinsic and SZ properties indicates that simulated MUSIC clusters reasonably resemble the self-similar prediction, especially for correlations involving TX. The observational approach also allows for a more direct comparison with real clusters, from which we find deviations mainly due to the physical description of the ICM, affecting TX and, particularly, LX.

  6. Quasi-periodic Variations in X-Ray Emission and Long-term Radio Observations: Evidence for a Two-component Jet in Sw J1644+57

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiu-Zhou; Lei, Wei-Hua; Wang, Ding-Xiong; Zou, Yuan-Chuan; Zhang, Bing; Gao, He; Huang, Chang-Yin

    2014-06-01

    The continued observations of Sw J1644+57 in X-ray and radio bands accumulated a rich data set to study the relativistic jet launched in this tidal disruption event. The X-ray light curve of Sw J1644+57 from 5-30 days presents two kinds of quasi-periodic variations: a 200 s quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) and a 2.7 day quasi-periodic variation. The latter has been interpreted by a precessing jet launched near the Bardeen-Petterson radius of a warped disk. Here we suggest that the ~200 s QPO could be associated with a second, narrower jet sweeping the observer line-of-sight periodically, which is launched from a spinning black hole in the misaligned direction with respect to the black hole's angular momentum. In addition, we show that this two-component jet model can interpret the radio light curve of the event, especially the re-brightening feature starting ~100 days after the trigger. From the data we infer that inner jet may have a Lorentz factor of Γj ~ 5.5 and a kinetic energy of E k, iso ~ 3.0 × 1052 erg, while the outer jet may have a Lorentz factor of Γj ~ 2.5 and a kinetic energy of E k, iso ~ 3.0 × 1053 erg.

  7. Time resolved, 2-D hard X-ray imaging of relativistic electron-beam target interactions on ETA-II

    SciTech Connect

    Crist, C.E.; Sampayan, S.; Westenskow, G.; Caporaso, G.; Houck, T.; Weir, J.; Trimble, D.; Krogh, M.

    1998-11-01

    Advanced radiographic applications require a constant source size less than 1 mm. To study the time history of a relativistic electron beam as it interacts with a bremsstrahlung converter, one of the diagnostics they use is a multi-frame time-resolved hard x-ray camera. They are performing experiments on the ETA-II accelerator at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to investigate details of the electron beam/converter interactions. The camera they are using contains 6 time-resolved images, each image is a 5 ns frame. By starting each successive frame 10 ns after the previous frame, they create a 6-frame movie from the hard x-rays produced from the interaction of the 50-ns electron beam pulse.

  8. Multitone harmonic-balance simulations of an x-ray transition-edge sensor characterized at BESSY II

    SciTech Connect

    Rostem, K.; Goldie, D. J.; Withington, S.; Hoevers, H. F. C.; Gottardi, L.; Kuur, J. van der

    2010-07-15

    We present multitone harmonic-balance (MTHB) simulations of a Ti-Au x-ray transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter in a 5x5 pixel spectrometer array. The dynamic response of the TES microcalorimeter under simulation has been extremely well characterized at the BESSY II Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Berlin. We compare our simulated results directly with these measurements, and show that the MTHB algorithm is able to simulate to great accuracy the dynamic behavior of the TES, even when saturated by 6 keV photons. In this paper, we provide a detailed account of the MTHB simulations, and discuss the impact of this work on future missions such as the International X-ray Observatory.

  9. Subpicosecond 41.8-nm X-ray laser in the plasma produced by femtosecond laser irradiation of a xenon cluster jet

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, E P

    2012-12-31

    Model calculations are performed of the radiation gain for the 4d5d (J = 0) - 4d5p (J = 1) transition with a wavelength of 41.8 nm in Pd-like xenon ions in the plasma produced by femtosecond laser irradiation of a xenon cluster jet. Conditions for the excitation of an ultrashort-pulse ({approx}1 ps) X-ray laser are discussed. (lasers)

  10. A Coordinated X-Ray and Optical Campaign of the Nearby Massive Binary Sigma Orionis Aa. II; X-Ray Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, J.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Corcoran, M. F.; Waldron, W.; Naze, Y; Pollock, A. M. T.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Lauer, J.; Shenar, T.; Russell, C. M. P.; Richardson, N. D.; Pablo, H.; Evans, N. R.; Hamaguchi, K.; Gull, T.; Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L.; Ignace, R.; Hoffman, Jennifer L.; Hole, K. T.; Lomax, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    We present time-resolved and phase-resolved variability studies of an extensive X-ray high-resolution gratings spectral dataset of the Sigma Ori Aa binary system. The four observations, obtained with Chandra ACIS HETGS, have a total exposure time of approximately 479 kiloseconds and provide nearly complete binary phase coverage. Variability of the total X-ray flux in the range 5-25 angstroms is confirmed, with maximum amplitude of about plus or minus 15 percent within a single approximately 125 kiloseconds observation. Periods of 4.76 days and 2.04 days are found in the total X-ray flux, as well as an apparent overall increase in flux level throughout the 9-day observational campaign. Using 40 kiloseconds contiguous spectra derived from the original observations, we investigate variability of emission line parameters and ratios. Several emission lines are shown to be variable, including S XV, Si XIII, and Ne IX. For the first time, variations of the X-ray emission line widths as a function of the binary phase are found in a binary system, with the smallest widths at phi equals 0.0 when the secondary Aa2 is at inferior conjunction. We use the results of an SPH radiative transfer code model, customized for this project, to relate the presence of a low density cavity in the primary stellar wind embedded shock that is associated with the secondary star to the emission line width variability.

  11. The X-Ray Zurich Environmental Study (X-ZENS). II. X-Ray Observations of the Diffuse Intragroup Medium in Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniati, Francesco; Finoguenov, Alexis; Silverman, John D.; Carollo, Marcella; Cibinel, Anna; Lilly, Simon J.; Schawinski, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of a pilot XMM-Newton and Chandra program aimed at studying the diffuse intragroup medium (IGM) of optically selected nearby groups from the Zurich ENvironmental Study (ZENS) catalog. The groups are in a narrow mass range about {10}13 {M}⊙ , a mass scale at which the interplay between the IGM and the group member galaxies is still largely unprobed. X-ray emission from the IGM is detected in the energy band 0.5-2 keV with flux ≤slant {10}-13 erg s-1 cm-2, which is one order of magnitude fainter than for typical ROSAT groups (RASS). For many groups, we set upper limits on the X-ray luminosity, indicating that the detections are likely probing the upper envelope of the X-ray emitting groups. We find that weighting the group halo mass by the fraction of the total stellar mass locked in the bulge galaxy components might reduce the bias of mass estimates based on the total optical luminosity with respect to the X-ray mass estimates, (consistent with Andreon, at larger mass scales). We measure a stellar mass fraction with a median value of about 1%, with a contribution from the most massive galaxies between 30% and 50%. Optical and X-ray data often give complementary answers concerning the dynamical state of the groups, and are essential for a complete picture of the group system. Extending this pilot program to a larger sample of groups is necessary to unveil any imprint of interaction between member galaxies and IGM in halo potentials of key importance for environmentally driven galactic evolution.

  12. Chandra Phase-Resolved X-ray Spectroscopy of the Crab Pulsar II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Yakovlev, Dimitry G.; Harding, Alice; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Becker, Werner

    2012-01-01

    We present a new study of the X-ray spectral properties of the Crab Pulsar. The superb angular resolution of the Chandra X-ray Observatory enables distinguishing the pulsar from the surrounding nebulosity. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase allows the least-biased measure of interstellar X-ray extinction due primarily to photoelectric absorption and secondarily to scattering by dust grains in the direction of the Crab Nebula. We modify previous findings that the line-of-sight to the Crab is under-abundant in oxygen and provide measurements with improved accuracy and less bias. Using the abundances and cross sections from Wilms, Allen & McCray (2000) we find [O/H] = (5.28+\\-0.28) x 10(exp -4) (4.9 x 10(exp -4) is solar abundance). \\rVe also measure for the first time the impact of scattering of flux out of the image by interstellar grains. \\rYe find T(sub scat) = 0.147+/-0.043. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase also measures the X-ray spectral index even at pulse minimum - albeit with increasing statistical uncertainty. The spectral variations are, by and large, consistent with a sinusoidal variation. The only significant variation from the sinusoid occurs over the same phase range as some rather abrupt behavior in the optical polarization magnitude and position angle. We compare these spectral variations to those observed in Gamma-rays and conclude that our measurements are both a challenge and a guide to future modeling and will thus eventually help us understand pair cascade processes in pulsar magnetospheres. The data were also used to set new. and less biased, upper limits to the surface temperature of the neutron star for different models of the neutron star atmosphere.

  13. The XMM-Large Scale Structure catalogue - II. X-ray sources and associated multiwavelength data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappetti, L.; Clerc, N.; Pacaud, F.; Pierre, M.; Guéguen, A.; Paioro, L.; Polletta, M.; Melnyk, O.; Elyiv, A.; Surdej, J.; Faccioli, L.

    2013-02-01

    We present the final release of the multiwavelength XMM-Large Scale Structure (LSS) data set, covering the full survey area of 11.1 deg2, with X-ray data processed with the latest XMM-LSS pipeline version. The present publication supersedes the catalogue from the first paper in this series, pertaining to the initial 5 deg2. We provide X-ray source lists in the customary energy bands (0.5-2 and 2-10 keV) for a total of 6721 objects in the deep full-exposure catalogue and 5572 in the catalogue limited to 10 ks, above a detection likelihood of 15 in at least one band. We also provide a multiwavelength catalogue, cross-correlating our list with infrared, near-infrared, optical and ultraviolet catalogues. Customary data products, such as X-ray FITS images and thumbnail images from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey and the Spitzer Wide-Area Infrared Extragalactic Survey, are made available, together with our data base in Milan, which can be queried interactively. Also, a static snapshot of the catalogues has been supplied to the Centre de Données astronomiques de Strasbourg (CDS).

  14. Structure of the Mn complex in photosystem II: Insights from x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2002-04-02

    We have used Mn K-edge absorption and Kb emission spectroscopies to determine the oxidation states of the Mn complex in the various S-states. We have started exploring the new technique of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy (RIXS); this technique can be characterized as a Raman process that uses K-edge energies (1s to 4p, {approx}6550 eV) to obtain L-edge-like spectra (2p to 3d, {approx}650 eV). The relevance of these data to the oxidation states and structure of the Mn complex is presented. We have obtained EXAFS data from the S0 and S3 states and observed heterogeneity in the Mn-Mn distances, leading us to conclude that there may be three rather than two di-(mu)-oxo bridged units present per tetranuclear Mn cluster. In addition, we have obtained data using Ca/Sr X-ray spectroscopy that provide evidence for a heteronuclear Mn/Ca cluster. The possibility of three di-(mu)-oxo-bridged Mn Mn moieties and the proximity of Ca is incorporated into developing structural models for the Mn cluster. The involvement of bridging and terminal O ligands of Mn in the mechanism of oxygen evolution is discussed in the context of our X-ray spectroscopy results.

  15. An XMM-Newton Observation of 4U1755-33 in Quiescence: Evidence for a Fossil X-Ray Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, Lorella; White, Nicholas E.

    2003-01-01

    We report an XMM-Newton observation of the Low mass X-ray Binary (LMXB) and black hole candidate 4U1755-33. This source had been a bright persistent source for at least 25 yrs, but in 1995 entered an extended quiescent phase. 4U1755-33 was not detected with an upper limit to the 2-10 keV luminosity of 5 x 10(exp 31) d(sup 2) (sub 4kpc) ergs per second (where d(sub 4kpc) is the distance in units of 4 kpc) - consistent with the luminosity of other black hole candidates in a quiescent state. An unexpected result is the discovery of a narrow 7 arc min long X-ray jet centered on the position of 4Ul755-33. The spectrum of the jet is similar to that of jets observed from other galactic and extragalactic sources, and may have been ejected from 4Ul755-33 when it was bright. Jets are a feature of accreting black holes, and the detection of a fossil jet provides additional evidence supporting the black hole candidacy of 4U1755-33. The spectral properties of three bright serendipitous sources in the field are reported and it is suggested these are background active galactic nuclei sources.

  16. Ligand-field symmetry effects in Fe(II) polypyridyl compounds probed by transient X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hana; Strader, Matthew L.; Hong, Kiryong; Jamula, Lindsey; Kim, Tae Kyu; Groot, Frank M. F. de; McCusker, James K.; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Huse, Nils

    2012-02-28

    Ultrafast excited-state evolution in polypyridyl FeII complexes are of fundamental interest for understanding the origins of the sub-ps spin-state changes that occur upon photoexcitation of this class of compounds as well as for the potential impact such ultrafast dynamics have on incorporation of these compounds in solar energy conversion schemes or switchable optical storage technologies. We have demonstrated that ground-state and, more importantly, ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption methods can offer unique insights into the interplay between electronic and geometric structure that underpin the photo-induced dynamics of this class of compounds. The present contribution examines in greater detail how the symmetry of the ligand field surrounding the metal ion can be probed using these x-ray techniques. In particular, we show that steady-state K-edge spectroscopy of the nearest-neighbour nitrogen atoms reveals the characteristic chemical environment of the respective ligands and suggests an interesting target for future charge-transfer femtosecond and attosecond spectroscopy in the x-ray water window.

  17. A DEEP CHANDRA OBSERVATION OF THE GIANT H II REGION N11. I. X-RAY SOURCES IN THE FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Nazé, Yaël; Wang, Q. Daniel; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert; Oskinova, Lida

    2014-08-01

    A very sensitive X-ray investigation of the giant H II region N11 in the Large Megallanic Cloud was performed using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The 300 ks observation reveals X-ray sources with luminosities down to 10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1}, increasing the number of known point sources in the field by more than a factor of five. Among these detections are 13 massive stars (3 compact groups of massive stars, 9 O stars, and one early B star) with log (L {sub X}/L {sub BOL}) ∼–6.5 to –7, which may suggest that they are highly magnetic or colliding-wind systems. On the other hand, the stacked signal for regions corresponding to undetected O stars yields log (L {sub X}/L {sub BOL}) ∼–7.3, i.e., an emission level comparable to similar Galactic stars despite the lower metallicity. Other point sources coincide with 11 foreground stars, 6 late-B/A stars in N11, and many background objects. This observation also uncovers the extent and detailed spatial properties of the soft, diffuse emission regions, but the presence of some hotter plasma in their spectra suggests contamination by the unresolved stellar population.

  18. Development of X-ray computed tomography inspection facility for the H-II solid rocket boosters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, M.; Fujita, T.; Fukushima, Y.; Shimizu, M.; Itoh, S.; Satoh, A.; Miyamoto, H.

    The National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) initiated the development of an X-ray computed tomography (CT) equipment for the H-II solid rocket boosters (SRBs) in 1987 for the purpose of minimizing inspection time and achieving high cost-effectiveness. The CT facility has been completed in Jan. 1991 in Tanegashima Space Center for the inspection of the SRBs transported from the manufacturer's factory to the launch site. It was first applied to the qualification model SRB from Feb. to Apr. in 1991. Through the CT inspection of the SRB, it has been confirmed that inspection time decreased significantly compared with the X-ray radiography method and that even an unskilled inspector could find various defects. As a result, the establishment of a new reliable inspection method for the SRB has been verified. In this paper, the following are discussed: (1) the defect detectability of the CT equipment using a dummy SRB with various artificial defects, (2) the performance comparison between the CT method and the X-ray radiography method, (3) the reliability of the CT equipment, and (4) the radiation shield design of the nondestructive test building.

  19. The observed growth of massive galaxy clusters - II. X-ray scaling relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantz, A.; Allen, S. W.; Ebeling, H.; Rapetti, D.; Drlica-Wagner, A.

    2010-08-01

    This is the second in a series of papers in which we derive simultaneous constraints on cosmology and X-ray scaling relations using observations of massive, X-ray flux-selected galaxy clusters. The data set consists of 238 clusters with 0.1-2.4keV luminosities >2.5 × 1044h-270ergs-1, and incorporates follow-up observations of 94 of those clusters using the Chandra X-ray Observatory or ROSAT (11 were observed with both). The clusters are drawn from three samples based on the ROSAT All-Sky Survey: the ROSAT Brightest Cluster Sample (78/37 clusters detected/followed-up), the ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-ray sample (126/25) and the bright sub-sample of the Massive Cluster Survey (34/32). Our analysis accounts self-consistently for all selection effects, covariances and systematic uncertainties. Here we describe the reduction of the follow-up X-ray observations, present results on the cluster scaling relations, and discuss their implications. Our constraints on the luminosity-mass and temperature-mass relations, measured within r500, lead to three important results. First, the data support the conclusion that excess heating of the intracluster medium (or a combination of heating and condensation of the coldest gas) has altered its thermodynamic state from that expected in a simple, gravitationally dominated system; however, this excess heat is primarily limited to the central regions of clusters (r < 0.15r500). Secondly, the intrinsic scatter in the centre-excised luminosity-mass relation is remarkably small, being bounded at the <10 per cent level in current data; for the hot, massive clusters under investigation, this scatter is smaller than in either the temperature-mass or YX-mass relations (10-15 per cent). Thirdly, the evolution with redshift of the scaling relations is consistent with the predictions of simple, self-similar models of gravitational collapse, indicating that the mechanism responsible for heating the central regions of clusters was in operation before

  20. redMaPPer II: X-Ray and SZ Performance Benchmarks for the SDSS Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.

    2014-03-01

    We evaluate the performance of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR8 redMaPPer photometric cluster catalog by comparing it to overlapping X-ray- and Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ)-selected catalogs from the literature. We confirm that the redMaPPer photometric redshifts are nearly unbiased (langΔzrang <= 0.005), have low scatter (σ z ≈ 0.006-0.02, depending on redshift), and have a low catastrophic failure rate (≈1%). Both the TX -λ and M gas-λ scaling relations are consistent with a mass scatter of σln M|λ ≈ 25%, albeit with a ≈1% outlier rate due to projection effects (λ is the cluster richness estimated employed by redMaPPer). This failure rate is somewhat lower than that expected for the full cluster sample but is consistent with the additional selection effects introduced by our reliance on X-ray and SZ selected reference cluster samples. Where the redMaPPer DR8 catalog is volume-limited (z <= 0.35), the catalog is 100% complete above TX >~ 3.5 keV, and LX >~ 2 × 1044 erg s-1, decreasing to 90% completeness at LX ≈ 1043 erg s-1. All rich (λ >~ 100), low-redshift (z <~ 0.25) redMaPPer clusters are X-ray-detected in the ROSAT All Sky Survey, and 86% of the clusters are correctly centered. Compared to other SDSS photometric cluster catalogs, redMaPPer has the highest completeness and purity, and the best photometric redshift performance, though some algorithms do achieve comparable performance to redMaPPer in subsets of the above categories and/or in limited redshift ranges. The redMaPPer richness is clearly the one that best correlates with X-ray temperature and gas mass. Most algorithms (including redMaPPer) have very similar centering performance as tested by comparing against X-ray centers, with only one exception which performs worse.

  1. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  2. Initial Assessment of Electron and X-Ray Production and Charge Exchange in the NDCX-II Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    COHEN, R.H.

    2010-02-18

    The purpose of this note is to provide initial assessments of some atomic physics effects for the accelerator section of NDCX-II. There are several effects we address: the production of electrons associated with loss of beam ions to the walls, the production of electrons associated with ionization of background gas, the possibly resultant production of X-rays when these electrons hit bounding surfaces, and charge exchange of beam ions on background gas. The results presented here are based on a number of caveats that will be stated below, which we will attempt to remove in the near future.

  3. Subrelativistic Jets from Black Hole Accretion Vortices. I. The Extreme-Ultraviolet and X-Ray Emission from Radio-quiet Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punsly, Brian

    1999-12-01

    radiation, creating the far-UV and soft X-ray excess that radio-quiet quasars have relative to radio-loud quasars as found in composite spectra of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ROSAT archives, respectively. Furthermore, Compton cooling of the hot outer regions of the corona creates the flat spectral energy distribution of hard X-rays observed in radio-quiet quasars. By the geometry of an X-ray source collaring the base of the jet, if the line of sight passes through the jet (a BAL quasar), X-ray emission is obscured. Thus, soft X-ray emission is suppressed in BAL quasars relative to the rest of the radio-quiet population in the model as observed. Seyfert galaxies do not have disks that are luminous to drive winds from the vortex and hence do not have BALRs in the model consistent with IUE searches.

  4. Multiwavelength modeling the SED of supersoft X-ray sources. II. RS Ophiuchi: From the explosion to the SSS phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skopal, A.

    2015-04-01

    RS Oph is a recurrent symbiotic nova that undergoes nova-like outbursts on a time scale of 20 yr. Its two last eruptions (1985 and 2006) were subject of intensive multiwavelengths observational campaign from the X-rays to the radio. This contribution aims to determine physical parameters and the ionization structure of the nova from its explosion to the first emergence of the supersoft X-rays (day 26) by using the method of multiwavelength modeling the SED. From the very beginning of the eruption, the model SED revealed the presence of both a strong stellar and nebular component of radiation in the spectrum. During the first 4 days, the nova evinced a biconical ionization structure. The ∼8200 K warm and 160-200 R⊙ extended pseudophotosphere encompassed the white dwarf (WD) around its equator to the latitude > 40 ° . The remaining space around the WD's poles was ionized, producing a strong nebular continuum with the emission measure EM ∼ 2.3 ×1062 cm-3 via the fast wind from the WD. The luminosity of the burning WD was highly super-Eddington for the whole investigated period. The wind mass loss at rates of 10-4-10-5M⊙yr-1 and the presence of jets suggest an accretion throughout a disk at a high rate, which can help to sustain the super-Eddington luminosity of the accretor for a long time.

  5. Relationship between the Kinetic Power and Bolometric Luminosity of Jets: Limitation from Black Hole X-Ray Binaries, Active Galactic Nuclei, and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Renyi; Xie, Fu-Guo; Hou, Shujin

    2014-01-01

    The correlation between the kinetic power P jet and intrinsic bolometric luminosity L jet of jets may reveal the underlying jet physics in various black hole systems. Based on the recent work by Nemmen et al., we re-investigate this correlation with additional sources of black hole X-ray binaries (BXBs) in hard/quiescent states and low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs). The new sample includes 29 sets of data from 7 BXBs and 20 LLAGNs, with P jet and L jet being derived from spectral modeling of the quasi-simultaneous multi-band spectra under the accretion jet scenario. Compared to previous works, the range of luminosity is now enlarged to more than 20 decades, i.e., from ~1031 erg s-1 to ~1052 erg s-1, which allows for better constraining of the correlation. One notable result is that the jets in BXBs and LLAGNs almost follow the same P jet-L jet correlation that was obtained from blazars and gamma-ray bursts. The slope indices we derived are 1.03 ± 0.01 for the whole sample, 0.85 ± 0.06 for the BXB subsample, 0.71 ± 0.11 for the LLAGN subsample, and 1.01 ± 0.05 for the LLAGN-blazar subsample, respectively. The correlation index around unit implies the independence of jet efficiency on the luminosity or kinetic power. Our results may further support the hypothesis that similar physical processes exist in the jets of various black hole systems.

  6. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE KINETIC POWER AND BOLOMETRIC LUMINOSITY OF JETS: LIMITATION FROM BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES, ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI, AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Renyi; Hou, Shujin; Xie, Fu-Guo E-mail: fgxie@shao.ac.cn

    2014-01-01

    The correlation between the kinetic power P {sub jet} and intrinsic bolometric luminosity L {sub jet} of jets may reveal the underlying jet physics in various black hole systems. Based on the recent work by Nemmen et al., we re-investigate this correlation with additional sources of black hole X-ray binaries (BXBs) in hard/quiescent states and low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs). The new sample includes 29 sets of data from 7 BXBs and 20 LLAGNs, with P {sub jet} and L {sub jet} being derived from spectral modeling of the quasi-simultaneous multi-band spectra under the accretion jet scenario. Compared to previous works, the range of luminosity is now enlarged to more than 20 decades, i.e., from ∼10{sup 31} erg s{sup –1} to ∼10{sup 52} erg s{sup –1}, which allows for better constraining of the correlation. One notable result is that the jets in BXBs and LLAGNs almost follow the same P {sub jet}-L {sub jet} correlation that was obtained from blazars and gamma-ray bursts. The slope indices we derived are 1.03 ± 0.01 for the whole sample, 0.85 ± 0.06 for the BXB subsample, 0.71 ± 0.11 for the LLAGN subsample, and 1.01 ± 0.05 for the LLAGN-blazar subsample, respectively. The correlation index around unit implies the independence of jet efficiency on the luminosity or kinetic power. Our results may further support the hypothesis that similar physical processes exist in the jets of various black hole systems.

  7. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Images Aortic rupture, chest x-ray Lung cancer, frontal chest x-ray Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray Coal ... cancer - chest x-ray Lung nodule, right middle lobe - chest x-ray Lung mass, right upper lung - ...

  8. A Jet Break in the X-Ray Light Curve of Short GRB 111020A: Implications for Energetics and Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, W.; Berger, E.; Margutti, R.; Zauderer, B. A.; Troja, E.; Czekala, I.; Chornock, R.; Gehrels, N.; Sakamoto, T.; Fox, D. B.; Podsiadlowski, P.

    2012-09-01

    We present broadband observations of the afterglow and environment of the short GRB 111020A. An extensive X-ray light curve from Swift/XRT, XMM-Newton, and Chandra, spanning ~100 s to 10 days after the burst, reveals a significant break at δt ≈ 2 days with pre- and post-break decline rates of α X, 1 ≈ -0.78 and α X, 2 <~ -1.7, respectively. Interpreted as a jet break, we infer a collimated outflow with an opening angle of θ j ≈ 3°-8°. The resulting beaming-corrected γ-ray (10-1000 keV band) and blast-wave kinetic energies are (2-3) × 1048 erg and (0.3-2) × 1049 erg, respectively, with the range depending on the unknown redshift of the burst. We report a radio afterglow limit of <39 μJy (3σ) from Expanded Very Large Array observations that, along with our finding that ν c < ν X , constrains the circumburst density to n 0 ~ 0.01-0.1 cm-3. Optical observations provide an afterglow limit of i >~ 24.4 mag at 18 hr after the burst and reveal a potential host galaxy with i ≈ 24.3 mag. The subarcsecond localization from Chandra provides a precise offset of 0farcs80 ± 0farcs11 (1σ) from this galaxy corresponding to an offset of 5-7 kpc for z = 0.5-1.5. We find a high excess neutral hydrogen column density of (7.5 ± 2.0) × 1021 cm-2 (z = 0). Our observations demonstrate that a growing fraction of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are collimated, which may lead to a true event rate of >~ 100-1000 Gpc-3 yr-1, in good agreement with the NS-NS merger rate of ≈200-3000 Gpc-3 yr-1. This consistency is promising for coincident short GRB-gravitational wave searches in the forthcoming era of Advanced LIGO/VIRGO.

  9. A Jet Break in the X-ray Light Curve of Short GRB 111020A: Implications for Energetics and Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, W.; Berger, E.; Margutti, R.; Zauderer, B. A.; Troja, E.; Czekala, I.; Chornock, R.; Gehrels, N.; Sakamoto, T.; Fox, D. B.; Podsiadlowski, P.

    2012-01-01

    We present broadband observations of the afterglow and environment of the short GRB 111020A. An extensive X-ray light curve from Swift/XRT, XMM-Newton, and Chandra, spanning approx.100 s to 10 days after the burst, reveals a significant break at (delta)t approx. = 2 days with pre- and post-break decline rates of (alpha)X,1 approx. = -0.78 and (alpha)X,2 < or approx. 1.7, respectively. Interpreted as a jet break, we infer a collimated outflow with an opening angle of (theta)j approx. = 3deg - 8deg. The resulting beaming-corrected gamma-ray (10-1000 keV band) and blast-wave kinetic energies are (2-3) x 10(exp 48) erg and (0.3-2) x 10(exp 49) erg, respectively, with the range depending on the unknown redshift of the burst. We report a radio afterglow limit of <39 micro-Jy (3(sigma)) from Expanded Very Large Array observations that, along with our finding that v(sub c) < v(sub X), constrains the circumburst density to n(sub 0) approx.0.01 0.1/cu cm. Optical observations provide an afterglow limit of i > or approx.24.4 mag at 18 hr after the burst and reveal a potential host galaxy with i approx. = 24.3 mag. The subarcsecond localization from Chandra provides a precise offset of 0".80+/-0".11 (1(sigma))from this galaxy corresponding to an offset of 5.7 kpc for z = 0.5-1.5. We find a high excess neutral hydrogen column density of (7.5+/-2.0) x 10(exp 21)/sq cm (z = 0). Our observations demonstrate that a growing fraction of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are collimated, which may lead to a true event rate of > or approx.100-1000 Gpc(sup -3)/yr, in good agreement with the NS-NS merger rate of approx. = 200-3000 Gpc(sup -3)/ yr. This consistency is promising for coincident short GRB-gravitational wave searches in the forthcoming era of Advanced LIGO/VIRGO.

  10. A JET BREAK IN THE X-RAY LIGHT CURVE OF SHORT GRB 111020A: IMPLICATIONS FOR ENERGETICS AND RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, W.; Berger, E.; Margutti, R.; Zauderer, B. A.; Czekala, I.; Chornock, R.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.; Sakamoto, T.; Fox, D. B.; Podsiadlowski, P.

    2012-09-10

    We present broadband observations of the afterglow and environment of the short GRB 111020A. An extensive X-ray light curve from Swift/XRT, XMM-Newton, and Chandra, spanning {approx}100 s to 10 days after the burst, reveals a significant break at {delta}t Almost-Equal-To 2 days with pre- and post-break decline rates of {alpha}{sub X,1} Almost-Equal-To -0.78 and {alpha}{sub X,2} {approx}< -1.7, respectively. Interpreted as a jet break, we infer a collimated outflow with an opening angle of {theta}{sub j} Almost-Equal-To 3 Degree-Sign -8 Degree-Sign . The resulting beaming-corrected {gamma}-ray (10-1000 keV band) and blast-wave kinetic energies are (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 48} erg and (0.3-2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 49} erg, respectively, with the range depending on the unknown redshift of the burst. We report a radio afterglow limit of <39 {mu}Jy (3{sigma}) from Expanded Very Large Array observations that, along with our finding that {nu}{sub c} < {nu}{sub X}, constrains the circumburst density to n{sub 0} {approx} 0.01-0.1 cm{sup -3}. Optical observations provide an afterglow limit of i {approx}> 24.4 mag at 18 hr after the burst and reveal a potential host galaxy with i Almost-Equal-To 24.3 mag. The subarcsecond localization from Chandra provides a precise offset of 0.''80 {+-} 0.''11 (1{sigma}) from this galaxy corresponding to an offset of 5-7 kpc for z 0.5-1.5. We find a high excess neutral hydrogen column density of (7.5 {+-} 2.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} (z = 0). Our observations demonstrate that a growing fraction of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are collimated, which may lead to a true event rate of {approx}> 100-1000 Gpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1}, in good agreement with the NS-NS merger rate of Almost-Equal-To 200-3000 Gpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1}. This consistency is promising for coincident short GRB-gravitational wave searches in the forthcoming era of Advanced LIGO/VIRGO.