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Sample records for jet joint european

  1. High resolution Thomson scattering for Joint European Torus (JET)

    SciTech Connect

    Pasqualotto, R.; Nielsen, P.; Gowers, C.; Beurskens, M.; Kempenaars, M.; Carlstrom, T.; Johnson, D.

    2004-10-01

    A Thomson scattering system is being developed for Joint European Torus with 15 mm spatial resolution and a foreseen accuracy for temperature better than 15% at a density of 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}. This resolution is required at the internal transport barrier and edge pedestal and it can not be fully achieved with the present light detection and ranging systems. The laser for this system is Nd:YAG, 5 Joule, 20 Hz. Scattering volumes from R=2.9 m to R=3.9 m are imaged onto 1 mm diameter fibers, with F/25 collection aperture. Two fibers are used per scattering volume. Using optical delay lines, three scattering volumes are combined in each of the 21 filter polychromators. The signals are recorded with transient digitizers, which allow the combined time delayed signals to be resolved. Knowledge of the time delay between signals allows the use of correlation techniques in determining signal levels. The ac output of the amplifier is used, which tolerates a higher level of background signal without affecting dynamic range. The noise resulting from plasma light is determined directly.

  2. Modeling the excitation of global Alfven modes by an external antenna in the Joint European Torus (JET)

    SciTech Connect

    Huysmans, G.T.A.; Kerner, W.; Borba, D.; Holties, H.A.; Goedbloed, J.P.

    1995-05-01

    The active excitation of global Alfven modes using the saddle coils in the Joint European Torus (JET) [{ital Plasma} {ital Physics} {ital and} {ital Controlled} {ital Nuclear} {ital Fusion} {ital Research} 1984, Proceedings of the 10th International Conference, London (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1985), Vol. 1, p. 11] as the external antenna, will provide information on the damping of global modes without the need to drive the modes unstable. For the modeling of the Alfven mode excitation, the toroidal resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code CASTOR (Complex Alfven Spectrum in TORoidal geometry) [18{ital th} {ital EPS} {ital Conference} {ital On} {ital Controlled} {ital Fusion} {ital and} {ital Plasma} {ital Physics}, Berlin, 1991, edited by P. Bachmann and D. C. Robinson (The European Physical Society, Petit-Lancy, 1991), Vol. 15, Part IV, p. 89] has been extended to calculate the response to an external antenna. The excitation of a high-performance, high beta JET discharge is studied numerically. In particular, the influence of a finite pressure is investigated. Weakly damped low-{ital n} global modes do exist in the gaps in the continuous spectrum at high beta. A pressure-driven global mode is found due to the interaction of Alfven and slow modes. Its frequency scales solely with the plasma temperature, not like a pure Alfven mode with a density and magnetic field.

  3. Edge profile analysis of Joint European Torus (JET) Thomson scattering data: Quantifying the systematic error due to edge localised mode synchronisation.

    PubMed

    Leyland, M J; Beurskens, M N A; Flanagan, J C; Frassinetti, L; Gibson, K J; Kempenaars, M; Maslov, M; Scannell, R

    2016-01-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) high resolution Thomson scattering (HRTS) system measures radial electron temperature and density profiles. One of the key capabilities of this diagnostic is measuring the steep pressure gradient, termed the pedestal, at the edge of JET plasmas. The pedestal is susceptible to limiting instabilities, such as Edge Localised Modes (ELMs), characterised by a periodic collapse of the steep gradient region. A common method to extract the pedestal width, gradient, and height, used on numerous machines, is by performing a modified hyperbolic tangent (mtanh) fit to overlaid profiles selected from the same region of the ELM cycle. This process of overlaying profiles, termed ELM synchronisation, maximises the number of data points defining the pedestal region for a given phase of the ELM cycle. When fitting to HRTS profiles, it is necessary to incorporate the diagnostic radial instrument function, particularly important when considering the pedestal width. A deconvolved fit is determined by a forward convolution method requiring knowledge of only the instrument function and profiles. The systematic error due to the deconvolution technique incorporated into the JET pedestal fitting tool has been documented by Frassinetti et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 013506 (2012)]. This paper seeks to understand and quantify the systematic error introduced to the pedestal width due to ELM synchronisation. Synthetic profiles, generated with error bars and point-to-point variation characteristic of real HRTS profiles, are used to evaluate the deviation from the underlying pedestal width. We find on JET that the ELM synchronisation systematic error is negligible in comparison to the statistical error when assuming ten overlaid profiles (typical for a pre-ELM fit to HRTS profiles). This confirms that fitting a mtanh to ELM synchronised profiles is a robust and practical technique for extracting the pedestal structure. PMID:26827321

  4. Lower hybrid current drive in experiments for transport barriers at high {beta}{sub N} of JET (Joint European Torus)

    SciTech Connect

    Cesario, R. C.; Castaldo, C.; De Angelis, R.; Smeulders, P.; Calabro, G.; Pericoli, V.; Ravera, G.

    2007-09-28

    LHCD has been used in JET experiments aimed at producing internal transport barriers (ITBs) in highly triangular plasmas ({delta}{approx_equal}0.4) at high {beta}{sub N} (up to 3) for steady-state application. The LHCD is a potentially valuable tool for (i) modifying the target q-profile, which can help avoid deleterious MHD modes and favour the formation of ITBs, and (ii) contributing to the non-inductive current drive required to prolong such plasma regimes. The q-profile evolution has been simulated during the current ramp-up phase for such a discharge (B{sub 0} = 2.3 T, I{sub P} = 1.5 MA) where 2 MW of LHCD has been coupled. The JETTO code was used taking measured plasma profiles, and the LHCD profile modeled by the LHstar code. The results are in agreement with MSE measurements and indicate the importance of the elevated electron temperature due to LHCD, as well as the driven current. During main heating with 18 MW of NBI and 3 MW of ICRH the bootstrap current density at the edge also becomes large, consistently with the observed reduction of the local turbulence and of the MHD activity. JETTO modelling suggests that the bootstrap current can reduce the magnetic shear (sh) at large radius, potentially affecting the MHD stability and turbulence behaviour in this region. Keywords: lower hybrid current drive (LHCD), bootstrap current, q (safety factor) and shear (sh) profile evolutions.

  5. Risk mitigation for ITER by a prolonged and joint international operation of JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donne, Antonius J.; Cowley, Steve; Jones, Timothy; Litaudon, Xavier; JET Team; CCFE Team

    2015-11-01

    Prolonged operation of the Joint European Torus (JET) in a set-up involving all ITER partners will be beneficial for ITER. Experiments at JET with its ITER-like wall and using a D-T plasma mixture will help to mitigate risks in the ITER research plan. Training of the ITER operators, technicians and engineers at JET will save valuable time when ITER comes into operation. Moreover, the way in which the future ITER experiments will be organized can already be experienced at JET, by imposing a similar organisational structure. This paper will present arguments in favour of an extension of JET and additionally briefly discuss a number of enhancements that will make experiments on JET even more relevant for ITER.

  6. Initial Results from the Lost Alpha Diagnostics on Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, Doug; Cecil, Ed; Ellis, Bob; Fullard, Keith; Hill, Ken; Horton, Alan; Kiptily, Vasily; Pedrick, Les; Reich, Matthias

    2007-07-25

    Two devices have been installed in the Joint European Torus (JET) vacuum vessel near the plasma boundary to investigate the loss of energetic ions and fusion products in general and alpha particles in particular during the upcoming JET experiments. These devices are (i) a set of multichannel thin foil Faraday collectors, and (ii) a well collimated scintillator which is optically connected to a charge-coupled device. Initial results, including the radial energy and poloidal dependence of lost ions from hydrogen and deuterium plasmas during the 2005–06 JET restart campaign, will be presented.

  7. Initial results from the lost alpha diagnostics on Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, Doug; Baeumel, Stefan; Cecil, Ed; Ellis, Bob; Fullard, Keith; Hill, Ken; Horton, Alan; Kiptily, Vasily; Pedrick, Les; Reich, Matthias; Werner, Andreas

    2006-10-15

    Two devices have been installed in the Joint European Torus (JET) vacuum vessel near the plasma boundary to investigate the loss of energetic ions and fusion products in general and alpha particles in particular during the upcoming JET experiments. These devices are (i) a set of multichannel thin foil Faraday collectors and (ii) a well collimated scintillator, which is optically connected to a charge-coupled device. Initial results including the radial energy and poloidal dependence of lost ions from hydrogen and deuterium plasmas during the 2005-06 JET restart campaign will be presented.

  8. Stable ellipticity-induced Alfv{acute e}n eigenmodes in the Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Fasoli, A.; Borba, D.; Jaun, A.

    1997-10-01

    An external antenna excites stable eigenmodes in elongated Ohmically heated plasmas in the Joint European Torus (JET) [P.-H. Rebut, R. J. Bickerton, and B. E. Keen, Nucl. Fusion {bold 25}, 1011 (1985)]. The frequency of the modes (240{minus}290 kHz) falls in the gap in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) continuum that is produced by ellipticity. Some modes are very weakly damped ({gamma}/{omega}{lt}10{sup {minus}3}). {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. PREFACE: Joint European Magnetic Symposia - JEMS 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spałek, Jozef

    2011-07-01

    Conference banner The Joint European Magnetic Symposia JEMS 2010 took place in the complex Auditorium Maximum of the Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Poland, between 23-28 August 2010. It followed the series of the conferences in Grenoble (2001), Dresden (2004), San Sebastian (2006), and Dublin (2008). The next Symposia will be held in 2012 in Parma (Italy). The Symposia cover a broad range of aspects of magnetism and magnetic materials, as well as providing a forum for the magnetism community to discuss new concepts, properties, and developments in all branches of fundamental and applied magnetism. The JEMS 2010 Symposia were organized by the Institute of Physics of Jagiellonian University, in cooperation with AGH University of Science and Technology (Kraków), Cracow University of Technology, Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Kraków, and the Silesian University in Katowice. I thank the Local Committee, and in particular Professor Krzysztof Tomala, for their hard work long before, during, and after the Conference. We dedicate this volume to Professor Henryk Szymczak from the Institute of Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences for his long lasting service to the magnetism community and the organizational effort in bringing this Conference to our community. Thank you Henryk! The Conference contained Plenary Sessions and 16 Symposia, which are listed below. Most of them had two chairpersons (also listed), one from abroad and one from Poland. I believe that a collective chairmanship of the Symposia is very helpful in both their organization, as well as in the reviewing process of the papers submitted to the Conference Proceedings. I would like to cordially thank all the persons listed below, who have contributed enormously to the success of our meeting. The Proceedings comprises 116 invited and contributed papers. I thank the Co-editors for their continuing work long after the Conference. Arrivederci in Parma! Jozef Spa

  10. The Quest for Quality--Towards Joint European Quality Norms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholomeus, Yvonne, Ed.; And Others

    This book contains the following papers about considerations in developing joint European quality norms for vocational guidance: "Joint Quality Norms in Guidance"; "Careers Guidance in the Information Society" (Frans Meijers); "The Changing Nature of Guidance" (J. Chamberlain); "Quality with Policy: Beyond Calimero?" (Saskia den Broeder); "Ethical…

  11. 78 FR 7464 - Large Scale Networking (LSN) ; Joint Engineering Team (JET)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Large Scale Networking (LSN) ; Joint Engineering Team (JET) AGENCY: The Networking and Information...?title=Joint_Engineering_Team_ (JET)#title. SUMMARY: The JET, established in 1997, provides...

  12. Inland Water Quality Assessment--A Joint European Masters Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waara, K. -O.; Petersen, A.; Lanaras, T.; Paulauskas, V.; Kleiven, S.; Crosa, G.; Penttinen, O. -P.; Quesada, A.; Kovats, N.; Galinou-Mitsoudi, S.; Lapinska, M.; Newton, A.; Balode, M.; Hindak, F.; Marsalek, B.

    2006-01-01

    At present, there is a European shortage of personnel qualified to adequately address the comprehensive scientific and regulatory requirements of the Water Framework Directive (WFD). The joint Masters programme described in this paper will provide students with the requisite expert knowledge and skills to progress the implementation of the WFD.…

  13. 78 FR 70076 - Large Scale Networking (LSN)-Joint Engineering Team (JET)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Large Scale Networking (LSN)--Joint Engineering Team (JET) AGENCY: The Networking and Information... the JET Web site at: http://www.nitrd.gov/nitrdgroups/index.php?title=Joint_Engineering_Team_...

  14. 77 FR 58415 - Large Scale Networking (LSN); Joint Engineering Team (JET)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Large Scale Networking (LSN); Joint Engineering Team (JET) AGENCY: The Networking and Information..._Engineering_Team_ (JET). SUMMARY: The JET, established in 1997, provides for information sharing among...

  15. The Joint European Compound Library: boosting precompetitive research.

    PubMed

    Besnard, Jérémy; Jones, Philip S; Hopkins, Andrew L; Pannifer, Andrew D

    2015-02-01

    The Joint European Compound Library (JECL) is a new high-throughput screening collection aimed at driving precompetitive drug discovery and target validation. The JECL has been established with a core of over 321,000 compounds from the proprietary collections of seven pharmaceutical companies and will expand to around 500,000 compounds. Here, we analyse the physicochemical profile and chemical diversity of the core collection, showing that the collection is diverse and has a broad spectrum of predicted biological activity. We also describe a model for sharing compound information from multiple proprietary collections, enabling diversity and quality analysis without disclosing structures. The JECL is available for screening at no cost to European academic laboratories and SMEs through the IMI European Lead Factory (http://www.europeanleadfactory.eu/). PMID:25205347

  16. European Scale Earthquake Data Exchange: ORFEUS-EMSC Joint Initiatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossu, R.; van Eck, T.

    2003-04-01

    The European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC) and the Observatories and Research Facilities for European Seismology (ORFEUS) are both active international organisations with different co-ordinating roles within European seismology. Both are non-governmental non-profit organisations, which have members/participants in more than 30 countries in Europe and its surroundings. Although different, their activities are complementary with ORFEUS focusing on broadband waveform data archiving and dissemination and EMSC focusing on seismological parameter data. The main EMSC activities are the alert system for potentially damaging earthquakes, a real time seismicity web page, the production of the Euro-Med. seismological bulletin, and the creation and maintenance of databases related to seismic hazard. All these activities are based on data contributions from seismological Institutes. The EMSC is also involved in a UNESCO programme to promote seismology and data exchange in the Middle-East and Northern Africa. ORFEUS aims at co-ordinating and promoting digital broadband seismology in Europe. To accomplish this, it operates a Data Centre to archive and distribute high quality digital data for research, co-ordinates four working groups and provides services through the Internet. More recently through an EC-infrastructure project MEREDIAN it has accomplished added co-ordination of data exchange and archiving between large European national data centres and realised the Virtual European Broadband Seismograph Network (VEBSN). To accomplish higher efficiency and better services to the seismological community, ORFEUS and EMSC have been working towards a closer collaboration. Fruits of this collaboration are the joint EC project EMICES, a common Expression of Interest 'NERIES' submitted June 2002 to the EC , integration of the automatic picks from the VEBSN into the EMSC rapid alert system and collaboration on common web page developments. Presently, we collaborate in a

  17. Joint Langley Research Center/Jet Propulsion Laboratory CSI experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neat, Gregory W.; O'Brien, John F.; Lurie, Boris J.; Garnica, Angel; Belvin, W. K.; Sulla, Jeff; Won, John

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a joint Control Structure Interaction (CSI) experiment in which Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) damping devices were incorporated into the Langley Research Center (LaRC) Phase 0 Testbed. The goals of the effort were twofold: (1) test the effectiveness of the JPL structural damping methods in a new structure and (2) assess the feasibility of combining JPL local control methods with the LaRC multiple input multiple output global control methods. Six dampers (2 piezoelectric active members, 4 viscous dampers), placed in three different regions of the structure, produced up to 26 dB attenuation in target modes. The combined control strategy in which the JPL damping methods contributed local control action and the LaRC control scheme provided global control action, produced and overall control scheme with increased stability margins and improved performance. This paper presents an overview of the technologies contributed from the two centers, the strategies used to combine them, and results demonstrating the success of the damping and cooperative control efforts.

  18. Numerical analysis of JET discharges with the European Transport Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalupin, D.; Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Ferreira, J.; Coster, D.; Alves, L. L.; Aniel, Th.; Artaud, J. F.; Basiuk, V.; Bizarro, Joãs P. S.; Coelho, R.; Czarnecka, A.; Huynh, Ph.; Figueiredo, A.; Garcia, J.; Garzotti, L.; Imbeaux, F.; Köchl, F.; Nave, M. F.; Pereverzev, G.; Sauter, O.; Scott, B. D.; Stankiewicz, R.; Strand, P.; contributors, ITM-TF; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-12-01

    The ‘European Transport Simulator’ (ETS) (Coster et al 2010 IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 38 2085-92, Kalupin et al 2011 Proc. 38th EPS Conf. on Plasma Physics (Strasbourg, France, 2011) vol 35G (ECA) P. 4.111) is the new modular package for 1D discharge evolution developed within the EFDA Integrated Tokamak Modelling (ITM) Task Force. It consists of precompiled physics modules combined into a workflow through standardized input/output data structures. Ultimately, the ETS will allow for an entire discharge simulation from the start up until the current termination phase, including controllers and sub-systems. The paper presents the current status of the ETS towards this ultimate goal. It discusses the design of the workflow, the validation and verification of its components on the example of impurity solver and demonstrates a proof-of-principles coupling of a local gyrofluid model for turbulent transport to the ETS. It also presents the first results on the application of the ETS to JET tokamak discharges with the ITER like wall. It studies the correlations of the radiation from impurity to the choice of the sources and transport coefficients.

  19. Resonant-like behaviour during edge-localised mode cycles in the Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, A. J.; Morris, J.; Todd, T. N.; Coad, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Likonen, J.; Rubel, M.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2015-08-15

    A unique sequence of 120 almost identical plasmas in the Joint European Torus (JET) recently provided two orders of magnitude more statistically equivalent data than ever previously available. The purpose was to study movement of eroded plasma-facing material from JET's new Beryllium wall, but it has allowed the statistical detection of otherwise unobservable phenomenon. This includes a sequence of resonant-like waiting times between edge-localised plasma instabilities (ELMs), instabilities that must be mitigated or avoided in large magnetically confined plasmas such as those planned for ITER. Here, we investigate the cause of this phenomenon, using the unprecedented quantity of data to produce a detailed picture of the plasma's behaviour. After combining the data, oscillations are clearly observable in the plasma's vertical position, in edge losses of ions, and in Beryllium II (527 nm) light emissions. The oscillations are unexpected, are not obvious in data from a single pulse alone, and are all clearly correlated with each other. They are likely to be caused by a small vertical oscillation that the plasma control system is not reacting to prevent, but a more complex explanation is possible. The clearly observable but unexpected link between small changes in the plasma's position and changes to edge-plasma transport and stability suggest that these characteristics cannot always be studied in isolation. It also suggests new opportunities for ELM mitigation and control that may exist.

  20. The new phase of the Joint European Torus and prospects for future operation

    SciTech Connect

    Tubbing, B.J.D.; the JET Team

    1995-06-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) [Fusion Technol. {bold 11}, 1 (1987)] restarted operations in its new pumped divertor configuration. The main elements of the new configuration are four divertor coils, an inertially cooled divertor structure, and an internal cryogenic vacuum pump. Two major differences were observed with respect to the ``old`` JET. First, the heat load capability of the divertor is dramatically improved. Second, in the high confinement mode (H mode) the occurrence of edge localized modes (ELMs), is more prevalent. Quasi-steady-state ELMy H modes are now obtained in a wide variety of conditions. In the 1994 experimental campaign maximum plasma currents of 4 MA have been obtained. Steady-state H-mode operation has been obtained for a duration of 20 s. Detached divertor operation was established in Ohmic and L-mode plasmas, but not yet in H mode. In low current discharges a poloidal beta {beta}{sub {ital P}}=2.6 has been obtained in transient. The high {beta}{sub {ital P}} regime has been extended to long pulse ELMy H mode. Preliminary experiments have not shown an effect of magnitude shear reversal on the confinement. Using the new internal saddle coils, powered by high-frequency amplifiers, toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) were excited. The first direct measurements of the damping of TAE modes were carried out.

  1. Resonant-like behaviour during edge-localised mode cycles in the Joint European Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, A. J.; Morris, J.; Todd, T. N.; Brezinsek, S.; Coad, P.; Likonen, J.; Rubel, M.

    2015-08-01

    A unique sequence of 120 almost identical plasmas in the Joint European Torus (JET) recently provided two orders of magnitude more statistically equivalent data than ever previously available. The purpose was to study movement of eroded plasma-facing material from JET's new Beryllium wall, but it has allowed the statistical detection of otherwise unobservable phenomenon. This includes a sequence of resonant-like waiting times between edge-localised plasma instabilities (ELMs), instabilities that must be mitigated or avoided in large magnetically confined plasmas such as those planned for ITER. Here, we investigate the cause of this phenomenon, using the unprecedented quantity of data to produce a detailed picture of the plasma's behaviour. After combining the data, oscillations are clearly observable in the plasma's vertical position, in edge losses of ions, and in Beryllium II (527 nm) light emissions. The oscillations are unexpected, are not obvious in data from a single pulse alone, and are all clearly correlated with each other. They are likely to be caused by a small vertical oscillation that the plasma control system is not reacting to prevent, but a more complex explanation is possible. The clearly observable but unexpected link between small changes in the plasma's position and changes to edge-plasma transport and stability suggest that these characteristics cannot always be studied in isolation. It also suggests new opportunities for ELM mitigation and control that may exist.

  2. Phillips-Tikhonov regularization with a priori information for neutron emission tomographic reconstruction on Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Bielecki, J.; Scholz, M.; Drozdowicz, K.; Giacomelli, L.; Kiptily, V.; Kempenaars, M.; Conroy, S.; Craciunescu, T.; Collaboration: EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB

    2015-09-15

    A method of tomographic reconstruction of the neutron emissivity in the poloidal cross section of the Joint European Torus (JET, Culham, UK) tokamak was developed. Due to very limited data set (two projection angles, 19 lines of sight only) provided by the neutron emission profile monitor (KN3 neutron camera), the reconstruction is an ill-posed inverse problem. The aim of this work consists in making a contribution to the development of reliable plasma tomography reconstruction methods that could be routinely used at JET tokamak. The proposed method is based on Phillips-Tikhonov regularization and incorporates a priori knowledge of the shape of normalized neutron emissivity profile. For the purpose of the optimal selection of the regularization parameters, the shape of normalized neutron emissivity profile is approximated by the shape of normalized electron density profile measured by LIDAR or high resolution Thomson scattering JET diagnostics. In contrast with some previously developed methods of ill-posed plasma tomography reconstruction problem, the developed algorithms do not include any post-processing of the obtained solution and the physical constrains on the solution are imposed during the regularization process. The accuracy of the method is at first evaluated by several tests with synthetic data based on various plasma neutron emissivity models (phantoms). Then, the method is applied to the neutron emissivity reconstruction for JET D plasma discharge #85100. It is demonstrated that this method shows good performance and reliability and it can be routinely used for plasma neutron emissivity reconstruction on JET.

  3. Phillips-Tikhonov regularization with a priori information for neutron emission tomographic reconstruction on Joint European Torus.

    PubMed

    Bielecki, J; Giacomelli, L; Kiptily, V; Scholz, M; Drozdowicz, K; Conroy, S; Craciunescu, T; Kempenaars, M

    2015-09-01

    A method of tomographic reconstruction of the neutron emissivity in the poloidal cross section of the Joint European Torus (JET, Culham, UK) tokamak was developed. Due to very limited data set (two projection angles, 19 lines of sight only) provided by the neutron emission profile monitor (KN3 neutron camera), the reconstruction is an ill-posed inverse problem. The aim of this work consists in making a contribution to the development of reliable plasma tomography reconstruction methods that could be routinely used at JET tokamak. The proposed method is based on Phillips-Tikhonov regularization and incorporates a priori knowledge of the shape of normalized neutron emissivity profile. For the purpose of the optimal selection of the regularization parameters, the shape of normalized neutron emissivity profile is approximated by the shape of normalized electron density profile measured by LIDAR or high resolution Thomson scattering JET diagnostics. In contrast with some previously developed methods of ill-posed plasma tomography reconstruction problem, the developed algorithms do not include any post-processing of the obtained solution and the physical constrains on the solution are imposed during the regularization process. The accuracy of the method is at first evaluated by several tests with synthetic data based on various plasma neutron emissivity models (phantoms). Then, the method is applied to the neutron emissivity reconstruction for JET D plasma discharge #85100. It is demonstrated that this method shows good performance and reliability and it can be routinely used for plasma neutron emissivity reconstruction on JET. PMID:26429441

  4. Phillips-Tikhonov regularization with a priori information for neutron emission tomographic reconstruction on Joint European Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielecki, J.; Giacomelli, L.; Kiptily, V.; Scholz, M.; Drozdowicz, K.; Conroy, S.; Craciunescu, T.; Kempenaars, M.

    2015-09-01

    A method of tomographic reconstruction of the neutron emissivity in the poloidal cross section of the Joint European Torus (JET, Culham, UK) tokamak was developed. Due to very limited data set (two projection angles, 19 lines of sight only) provided by the neutron emission profile monitor (KN3 neutron camera), the reconstruction is an ill-posed inverse problem. The aim of this work consists in making a contribution to the development of reliable plasma tomography reconstruction methods that could be routinely used at JET tokamak. The proposed method is based on Phillips-Tikhonov regularization and incorporates a priori knowledge of the shape of normalized neutron emissivity profile. For the purpose of the optimal selection of the regularization parameters, the shape of normalized neutron emissivity profile is approximated by the shape of normalized electron density profile measured by LIDAR or high resolution Thomson scattering JET diagnostics. In contrast with some previously developed methods of ill-posed plasma tomography reconstruction problem, the developed algorithms do not include any post-processing of the obtained solution and the physical constrains on the solution are imposed during the regularization process. The accuracy of the method is at first evaluated by several tests with synthetic data based on various plasma neutron emissivity models (phantoms). Then, the method is applied to the neutron emissivity reconstruction for JET D plasma discharge #85100. It is demonstrated that this method shows good performance and reliability and it can be routinely used for plasma neutron emissivity reconstruction on JET.

  5. Interpretation of core localized Alfven eigenmodes in DIII-D and Joint European Torus reversed magnetic shear plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G.J.; Nazikian, R.; Alper, B.

    2006-05-15

    Reversed shear Alfven eigenmodes (RSAE) that were observed in the Joint European Torus (JET) [P. H. Rebut and B. E. Keen, Fusion Technol.11, 13 (1987)] and DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion42, 614 (2002)] are studied with the ideal magnetohydrodynamic code NOVA-K [C. Z. Cheng, Phys. Rep.211, 1 (1992)]. It was found that the frequency behavior of the RSAEs can be described accurately by the NOVA-K code when plasma compressibility effects and toroidal plasma rotation are taken into account. For the mode activity on JET, the calculated drive exceeds the mode damping rate, consistent with experimental observations, while on DIII-D the growth rate from neutral beam ions for modes with high toroidal mode numbers is insufficient to account for the excitation of the modes and a major part of the drive comes from the background plasma.

  6. Bidirectional tornado modes on the Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Sandquist, P.; Sharapov, S. E.; Lisak, M.; Johnson, T.

    2007-12-15

    In discharges on the Joint European Torus [P. H. Rebut and B. E. Keen, Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)] with safety factor q(0)<1 and high-power ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH), monster sawtooth crashes are preceded by frequency sweeping 'tornado modes' in the toroidal Alfven eigenmode frequency range. A suite of equilibrium and spectral magnetohydrodynamical codes is used for explaining the observed evolution of the tornado mode frequency and for identifying temporal evolution of the safety factor inside the q=1 radius just before sawtooth crashes. In some cases, the tornado modes are observed simultaneously with both positive and negative toroidal mode numbers. Hence, a free energy source other than the radial gradient of the energetic ion pressure exciting these modes is sought. The distribution function of the ICRH-accelerated ions is assessed with the SELFO code [J. Hedin et al., Nucl. Fusion 42, 527 (2002)] and energetic particle drive due to the velocity space anisotropy of ICRH-accelerated ions is considered analytically as the possible source for excitation of bidirectional tornado modes.

  7. Fast magnetic fluctuation diagnostics for Alfvén eigenmode and magnetohydrodynamics studies at the Joint European Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeter, R. F.; Fasoli, A. F.; Ali-Arshad, S.; Moret, J. M.

    2000-11-01

    Alfvén eigenmodes and other magnetohydrodynamic phenomena have been studied in tokamak plasmas at the Joint European Torus (JET) using a new eight-channel, 4 s, 1 MHz, 12-bit data acquisition system (KC1F) in conjunction with the JET fast Mirnov magnetic fluctuation pickup coils. To this end, the JET magnetic pickup coils were calibrated in the range 30-460 kHz using a new remote calibration technique which accounts for the presence of the first few LRC circuit resonances. Signal processing software has been developed to implement the calibration via digital filtering. A data analysis program has been written which produces spectrograms of fluctuation amplitude and toroidal mode number versus frequency and time, both interactively and for automatic overnight analyses. Modes with amplitudes δB/B⩾10-8 and toroidal mode numbers |n|<32 are now routinely detected. Since KC1F data are now available for over 4000 JET discharges, a pulse-characterization database has been developed to help select pulses of interest for detailed analysis.

  8. Design of a repeating pneumatic pellet injector for the Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Milora, S.L.; Combs, S.K.; Baylor, L.R.; Sparks, D.O.; Foust, C.R.; Gethers, F.E.

    1987-01-01

    A three-barrel pneumatic pellet injector has been developed for plasma fueling of the Joint European Torus (JET). The versatile device consists of three independent machine-gun-like mechanisms that operate at cryogenic temperatures (14/sup 0/K to 20/sup 0/K). Individual high speed extruders provide a continuous supply of solid deuterium to each gun assembly, where a reciprocating breech-side cutting mechanism forms and chambers cylindrical pellets from the extrusion; deuterium pellets are then accelerated in the gun barrels with controlled amounts of compressed hydrogen gas (pressures up to 100 bars) to velocities less than or equal to 1.5 km/s. The injector features three nominal pellet sizes (2.7 mm, 4.0 mm, and 6.0 mm) and has been tested at repetition rates of 5 Hz, 2.5 Hz, and 1 Hz, respectively. Each gun is capable of operating (individually or simultaneously) at the design repetition rate for 15-second duration pulses (limited only by the capacity of the extruder feed system). A remote, stand-alone control and data acquisition system is used for injector operation. 7 refs.

  9. JERICO: a Joint European Research Infrastructure network for Coastal Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puillat, I.; Sparnocchia, S.; Bozzano, R.; Coppola, L.; Petihakis, G.; Ntoumas, M.; Lefevre, D.; Caballero, A.; Beguery, L.; Testor, P.

    2013-12-01

    of a winter warm flow on the cantabrian slope. Since this eddy is retained in the study area during months, it is expected that during Jul.-Aug. 2013 it will be close to the position observed in the previous figures Fixed platforms allow long term -sensor testing and -measurements. The presented experiment is led by CNRS/OBS-VLFR and consists in the implementation of automatic Dissolved Oxygen (DO) measurements in the mooring operated by CNR/ISMAR in the Corsica Channel (Ligurian Sea). The deployment began in Nov. 2012 and lasted for twelve months. The final purpose of the research is to integrate the DO concentration in the long term time series data in the Ligurian basin to track and evaluate the water mass variability and to estimate the time lag between the eastern and the western part of the Ligurian Sea. The development of high-quality and comprehensive coastal observing systems has only recently moved forward, principally at national and regional level. In this overall context, the JERICO project aims at creating a solid and transparent organization towards an operational service for the continuous and sustainable delivery of high quality environmental data and information products related to the marine environment in European coastal and shelf seas. It promotes joint research initiatives and standardisation as illustrated by TNA experiments.

  10. Tomographic analysis of neutron and gamma pulse shape distributions from liquid scintillation detectors at Joint European Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Gorini, G.; Horton, L.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, D. B.

    2014-02-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D)/Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. Neutrons produced in these plasmas are measured using various types of neutron detectors and spectrometers. Two of these instruments on JET make use of organic liquid scintillator detectors. The neutron emission profile monitor implements 19 liquid scintillation counters to detect the 2.45 MeV neutron emission from D plasmas. A new compact neutron spectrometer is operational at JET since 2010 to measure the neutron energy spectra from both D and DT plasmas. Liquid scintillation detectors are sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation but give light responses of different decay time such that pulse shape discrimination techniques can be applied to identify the neutron contribution of interest from the data. The most common technique consists of integrating the radiation pulse shapes within different ranges of their rising and/or trailing edges. In this article, a step forward in this type of analysis is presented. The method applies a tomographic analysis of the 3-dimensional neutron and gamma pulse shape and pulse height distribution data obtained from liquid scintillation detectors such that n/γ discrimination can be improved to lower energies and additional information can be gained on neutron contributions to the gamma events and vice versa.

  11. Tomographic analysis of neutron and gamma pulse shape distributions from liquid scintillation detectors at Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Gorini, G.; Horton, L.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, D. B.

    2014-02-15

    The Joint European Torus (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D)/Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. Neutrons produced in these plasmas are measured using various types of neutron detectors and spectrometers. Two of these instruments on JET make use of organic liquid scintillator detectors. The neutron emission profile monitor implements 19 liquid scintillation counters to detect the 2.45 MeV neutron emission from D plasmas. A new compact neutron spectrometer is operational at JET since 2010 to measure the neutron energy spectra from both D and DT plasmas. Liquid scintillation detectors are sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation but give light responses of different decay time such that pulse shape discrimination techniques can be applied to identify the neutron contribution of interest from the data. The most common technique consists of integrating the radiation pulse shapes within different ranges of their rising and/or trailing edges. In this article, a step forward in this type of analysis is presented. The method applies a tomographic analysis of the 3-dimensional neutron and gamma pulse shape and pulse height distribution data obtained from liquid scintillation detectors such that n/γ discrimination can be improved to lower energies and additional information can be gained on neutron contributions to the gamma events and vice versa.

  12. Critical temperature gradient length signatures in heat wave propagation across internal transport barriers in the Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Casati, Alessandro; Eester, D. van; Marinoni, A.; Ryter, F.; Salmi, A.; Tala, T.

    2007-09-15

    New results on electron heat wave propagation using ion cyclotron resonance heating power modulation in the Joint European Torus (JET) [P. H. Rebut et al., Nucl. Fusion 25, 1011 (1985)] plasmas characterized by internal transport barriers (ITBs) are presented. The heat wave generated outside the ITB, and traveling across it, always experiences a strong damping in the ITB layer, demonstrating a low level of transport and loss of stiffness. In some cases, however, the heat wave is strongly inflated in the region just outside the ITB, showing features of convective-like behavior. In other cases, a second maximum in the perturbation amplitude is generated close to the ITB foot. Such peculiar types of behavior can be explained on the basis of the existence of a critical temperature gradient length for the onset of turbulent transport. Convective-like features appear close to the threshold (i.e., just outside the ITB foot) when the value of the threshold is sufficiently high, with a good match with the theoretical predictions for the trapped electron mode threshold. The appearance of a second maximum is due to the oscillation of the temperature profile across the threshold in the case of a weak ITB. Simulations with an empirical critical gradient length model and with the theory based GLF23 [R. E. Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas, 4, 2482 (1997)] model are presented. The difference with respect to previous results of cold pulse propagation across JET ITBs is also discussed.

  13. Critical temperature gradient length signatures in heat wave propagation across internal transport barriers in the Joint European Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Alessandro; Mantica, P.; Van Eester, D.; Hawkes, N.; Imbeaux, F.; Joffrin, E.; Marinoni, A.; Ryter, F.; Salmi, A.; Tala, T.; De Vries, P.

    2007-09-01

    New results on electron heat wave propagation using ion cyclotron resonance heating power modulation in the Joint European Torus (JET) [P. H. Rebut et al., Nucl. Fusion 25, 1011 (1985)] plasmas characterized by internal transport barriers (ITBs) are presented. The heat wave generated outside the ITB, and traveling across it, always experiences a strong damping in the ITB layer, demonstrating a low level of transport and loss of stiffness. In some cases, however, the heat wave is strongly inflated in the region just outside the ITB, showing features of convective-like behavior. In other cases, a second maximum in the perturbation amplitude is generated close to the ITB foot. Such peculiar types of behavior can be explained on the basis of the existence of a critical temperature gradient length for the onset of turbulent transport. Convective-like features appear close to the threshold (i.e., just outside the ITB foot) when the value of the threshold is sufficiently high, with a good match with the theoretical predictions for the trapped electron mode threshold. The appearance of a second maximum is due to the oscillation of the temperature profile across the threshold in the case of a weak ITB. Simulations with an empirical critical gradient length model and with the theory based GLF23 [R. E. Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas, 4, 2482 (1997)] model are presented. The difference with respect to previous results of cold pulse propagation across JET ITBs is also discussed.

  14. Outline and Evaluation of a Joint European and Canadian Virtual Mobility: e-Learning Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilliard, Alan

    2006-01-01

    The "virtual mobility" project was created as part of a joint Canadian and European Commission funded project to explore cross-cultural clinical curricular developments in the radiation sciences. The aim of the project was to facilitate student learning of the cross-cultural differences in the delivery of healthcare within the…

  15. Interpretation of core localized Alfvén eigenmodes in DIII-D and Joint European Torus reversed magnetic shear plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, G. J.; Nazikian, R.; Alper, B.; de Baar, M.; Berk, H. L.; Fu, G.-Y.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; McKee, G.; Pinches, S. D.; Rhodes, T. L.; Sharapov, S. E.; Solomon, W. M.; van Zeeland, M. A.; Jet Efda Contributors

    2006-05-01

    Reversed shear Alfvén eigenmodes (RSAE) that were observed in the Joint European Torus (JET) [P. H. Rebut and B. E. Keen, Fusion Technol.11, 13 (1987)] and DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion42, 614 (2002)] are studied with the ideal magnetohydrodynamic code NOVA-K [C. Z. Cheng, Phys. Rep.211, 1 (1992)]. It was found that the frequency behavior of the RSAEs can be described accurately by the NOVA-K code when plasma compressibility effects and toroidal plasma rotation are taken into account. For the mode activity on JET, the calculated drive exceeds the mode damping rate, consistent with experimental observations, while on DIII-D the growth rate from neutral beam ions for modes with high toroidal mode numbers is insufficient to account for the excitation of the modes and a major part of the drive comes from the background plasma.

  16. Genetic Variants Influencing Joint Damage in Mexican Americans and European Americans With Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Arya, Rector; Del Rincon, Inmaculada; Farook, Vidya S; Restrepo, Jose F; Winnier, Diedre A; Fourcaudot, Marcel J; Battafarano, Daniel F; de Almeida, Marcio; Kumar, Satish; Curran, Joanne E; Jenkinson, Christopher P; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Escalante, Agustin

    2015-12-01

    Joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is heritable, but knowledge on specific genetic determinants of joint damage in RA is limited. We have used the Immunochip array to examine whether genetic variants influence variation in joint damage in a cohort of Mexican Americans (MA) and European Americans (EA) with RA. We studied 720 MA and 424 EA patients with RA. Joint damage was quantified using a radiograph of both hands and wrists, scored using Sharp's technique. We conducted association analyses with the transformed Sharp score and the Immunochip single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data using PLINK. In MAs, 15 SNPs from chromosomes 1, 5, 9, 17 and 22 associated with joint damage yielded strong p-values (p < 1 × 10(-4) ). The strongest association with joint damage was observed with rs7216796, an intronic SNP located in the MAP3K14 gene, on chromosome 17 (β ± SE = -0.25 ± 0.05, p = 6.23 × 10(-6) ). In EAs, 28 SNPs from chromosomes 1, 4, 6, 9, and 21 showed associations with joint damage (p-value < 1 × 10(-4) ). The best association was observed on chromosome 9 with rs59902911 (β ± SE = 0.86 ± 0.17, p = 1.01 × 10(-6) ), a synonymous SNP within the CARD9 gene. We also observed suggestive evidence for some loci influencing joint damage in MAs and EAs. We identified two novel independent loci (MAP3K14 and CARD9) strongly associated with joint damage in MAs and EAs and a few shared loci showing suggestive evidence for association. PMID:26498133

  17. The presence of family members during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: European federation of Critical Care Nursing associations, European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care and European Society of Cardiology Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions Joint Position Statement.

    PubMed

    Fulbrook, Paul; Latour, Jos; Albarran, John; de Graaf, Wouter; Lynch, Fiona; Devictor, Denis; Norekvål, Tone

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents the European federation of Critical Care Nursing associations, the European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care, and the European Society of Cardiology Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions Joint Position Statement on The Presence of Family Members During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. PMID:17919981

  18. Simulation Studies of the Role of Reconnection in the ''Current Hole'' Experiments in the Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Breslau; S.C. Jardin; W. Park

    2003-01-21

    Injection of lower-hybrid current drive into the current ramp-up phase of the Joint European Torus (JET) plasma discharges has been observed to produce an annular current distribution with a core region of essentially zero current density [Hawkes, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 115001]. Similar ''current holes'' have been observed in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) Tokamak 60 Upgrade (JT-60U) plasma discharges with off-axis current drive supplied by the bootstrap current [T. Fujita, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 245001]. In both cases, the central current does not go negative although current diffusion calculations indicate that there is sufficient noninductive current drive for this to occur. This is explained by the Multi-level 3-D code (M3D) nonlinear 2-D and 3-D resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations in toroidal geometry, which predict that these plasma discharges undergo n = 0 reconnection events--''axisymmetric sawteeth''--that redistribute th e current to hold its core density near zero. Unlike conventional sawteeth, these events retain the symmetry of the equilibrium, and thus are best viewed as a transient loss of equilibrium caused when an iota = 0 rational surface enters the plasma. If the current-density profile has a central minimum, this surface will enter on axis; otherwise it will enter off-axis. In the first case, the reconnection is limited to a small region around the axis and clamps the core current at zero. In the second case, more typical of the JET experiments, the core current takes on a finite negative value before the iota = 0 surface appears, resulting in discrete periodic axisymmetric sawtooth events with a finite minor radius. Interpretation of the simulation results is given in terms of analytic equilibrium theory, and the relation to conventional sawteeth and to a recent reduced-MHD analysis of this phenomenon in cylindrical geometry [Huysmans, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 245002] is

  19. European Standards and Guidelines in a Nordic Perspective: Joint Nordic Project 2005-2006. ENQA Occasional Papers 11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinther-Jorgensen, Tue, Ed.; Hansen, Signe Ploug, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents the results of the joint 2005-06 project of the Nordic Quality Assurance Network in Higher Education (NOQA). The project focused on the European standards and guidelines for quality assurance agencies, examining them in a Nordic perspective. The project aimed at interpreting and clarifying the European standards and guidelines…

  20. Experiences with new European standards for calculation of flanged joints including necessary gasket factors

    SciTech Connect

    Bartonicek, J.; Kockelmann, H.; Schoeckle, F.

    1996-12-01

    The correct function of a flanged joint in a given construction (flanges, bolts) and with given loads (pressure, temperature, additional forces) depends on the following: (1) choice of the gasket for the operation environment; (2) determination of the gasket stress for assembly conditions; and (3) gasket stress in operation, i.e., the conditions when leakage has to be minimized. For the correct choice of a gasket it is necessary to have gasket factors available, as given by DIN 28090 (Sept. 95) together with the test procedures. These gasket factors determine the tightening characteristics as well as the deformation capability of the gaskets. Furthermore, these gasket factors must be available for use in calculations. On the basis of calculations a stress analysis (i.e. a limitation of the stresses in flanges and bolts) must be possible as well as the determination of the bolt forces for the assembly state and of the gasket stress for operating conditions. This is one of the goals of the standard pr DIN EN 1591. The paper first introduces the actual European standards. Calculations are reviewed using test data from special test rigs and from real flanged joints. The calculations were made according to DIN 2505 (initial German standard for flanged joints) and pr DIN EN 1591. Additionally, 2D and 3D Finite Element analysis calculations were performed.

  1. Integrated simulations of saturated neoclassical tearing modes in DIII-D, Joint European Torus, and ITER plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, Federico D.; Bateman, Glenn; Kritz, Arnold H.

    2006-06-15

    A revised version of the ISLAND module [C. N. Nguyen et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 3604 (2004)] is used in the BALDUR code [C. E. Singer et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 49, 275 (1988)] to carry out integrated modeling simulations of DIII-D [J. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)], Joint European Torus (JET) [P. H. Rebut et al., Nucl. Fusion 25, 1011 (1985)], and ITER [R. Aymar et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 44, 519 (2002)] tokamak discharges in order to investigate the adverse effects of multiple saturated magnetic islands driven by neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs). Simulations are carried out with a predictive model for the temperature and density pedestal at the edge of the high confinement mode (H-mode) plasma and with core transport described using the Multi-Mode model. The ISLAND module, which is used to compute magnetic island widths, includes the effects of an arbitrary aspect ratio and plasma cross sectional shape, the effect of the neoclassical bootstrap current, and the effect of the distortion in the shape of each magnetic island caused by the radial variation of the perturbed magnetic field. Radial transport is enhanced across the width of each magnetic island within the BALDUR integrated modeling simulations in order to produce a self-consistent local flattening of the plasma profiles. It is found that the main consequence of the NTM magnetic islands is a decrease in the central plasma temperature and total energy. For the DIII-D and JET discharges, it is found that inclusion of the NTMs typically results in a decrease in total energy of the order of 15%. In simulations of ITER, it is found that the saturated magnetic island widths normalized by the plasma minor radius, for the lowest order individual tearing modes, are approximately 24% for the 2/1 mode and 12% for the 3/2 mode. As a result, the ratio of ITER fusion power to heating power (fusion Q) is reduced from Q=10.6 in simulations with no NTM islands to Q=2.6 in simulations with fully saturated

  2. Design and construction of a fast ion loss Faraday cup array diagnostic for Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Baeumel, S.; Cecil, F.E.; Kiptily, V.; Ellis, R.; Pedrick, L.; Werner, A.

    2004-10-01

    A thin foil Faraday cup array is being built to measure the loss of 3.5 MeV alpha particles and MeV ion cyclotron heating tail ions on Joint European Torus. It will consist of nine detectors spread over five different poloidal locations and three radial positions. They will measure the poloidal distribution and radial scrape off of the losses. The detectors will be comprised of four layers of thin (2.5 {mu}m) Ni foil, giving some resolution of the lost particle energy distribution as different ranges of energies will stop in different layers of the detector. One detector will utilize eight thinner (1.0 {mu}m) foils to obtain a better-resolved energy distribution. These detectors will accept particles incident up to 45 deg. from the normal to the foils.

  3. Fast particles-wave interaction in the Alfven frequency range on the Joint European Torus tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Fasoli, A.; Borba, D.; Association EURATOM Breizman, B.; Gormezano, C.; Heeter, R. F.; Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 ; Juan, A.; Mantsinen, M.; Sharapov, S.; Testa, D.

    2000-05-01

    Wave-particle interaction phenomena in the Alfven Eigenmode (AE) frequency range are investigated at the Joint European Torus [P. H. Rebut and B. E. Keen, Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)] using active and passive diagnostic methods. Fast particles are generated by neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron resonance heating, and fusion reactions. External antennas are used to excite stable AEs and measure fast particle drive and damping separately. Comparisons with numerical calculations lead to an identification of the different damping mechanisms. The use of the active AE diagnostic system to generate control signals based on the proximity to marginal stability limits for AE and low-frequency magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes is explored. Signatures of the different nonlinear regimes of fast particle driven AE instabilities predicted by theory are found in the measured spectra. The diagnostic use of AE measurements to get information both on the plasma bulk and the fast particle distribution is assessed. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Comparison of multialkali and GaAs photocathode detectors for Joint European Torus edge light detection and ranging Thomson scattering profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kempenaars, M.; Nielsen, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Gowers, C.; Beurskens, M.

    2004-10-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak has two light detection and ranging (LIDAR) Thomson scattering systems, one for the core and one dedicated to the edge T{sub e} and n{sub e} profiles. The LIDAR scheme is unique to JET and is envisaged for use on ITER. The system's spatial resolution is defined by the convolution product of its components: laser pulse duration, detector response time, and digitizer speed. The original multialkali photocathode microchannel plate photomultipliers dictated the response time, resulting in a 12 cm spatial resolution along the line of sight. In the edge LIDAR system, this is improved by aligning the line of sight with the flux surfaces, thus improving the effective spatial resolution to 2 cm depending on the plasma configuration. To meet demands for better edge gradient resolution, an upgrade to higher quantum efficiency detectors was proposed. Four GaAs photocathode detectors have been procured, two of which surpass expectations. These detectors are shown to have a more than two times higher effective quantum efficiency and their response time is at least twice as fast as the multialkali detectors. Combined with a fast digitizer this improves the spatial resolution by a factor of two, down to one centimeter effective, depending on plasma configuration.

  5. Influence of Welding With Two-Jet Gas Shielding On the Shaping of a Welding Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinakhov, D. A.; Chinakhova, E. D.; Grichin, S. V.; Gotovschik, Y. M.

    2016-04-01

    The author considers gas-dynamic influence upon microhardness and weld configuration of single-pass welds from steel 30HGSA when welding with consumable electrode under double-jet shielding. The relations to the chosen controlled welding parameters (Q, L, I) are developed and the controlling influence of the gas-dynamic affect of dynamic shield gas jet over formation of welds from alloy-treated steel 30HGSA is determined.

  6. Sting jets in severe northern European wind storms: a case study of Windstorm Gudrun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Laura; Gray, Suzanne; Clark, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Extratropical cyclones often produce strong surface winds, mostly associated with low-level jets along the warm and cold fronts. Some severe extratropical cyclones have been found to produce an additional area of localised strong, and potentially very damaging, surface winds during a certain part of their development. These strong winds are associated with air that originates within the cloud head, exiting at the tip of the cloud head and descending rapidly from there to the surface. This rapidly descending air associated with the strong surface winds is known as a sting jet. The aim of this project is to determine the mechanisms that lead to sting jets and develop diagnostics for predicting their formation and development. In previous work mesoscale slantwise circulations have been found in the cloud heads of sting jet storms; these have been speculated to be due to the release of conditional symmetric instability (CSI). Here we present an analysis of the windstorm known as "Gudrun", which passed over the UK and northern Europe in January 2005. A sting jet has been identified in this case, and the relationship between this sting jet feature and the release of CSI has been examined using two diagnostics for CSI: SCAPE (slantwise convective available potential energy) and a diagnostic based on moist potential vorticity (MPV). SCAPE exists near the tip of the cloud head and decreases during the time leading up to and during the sting jet's descent, indicating that CSI is being released during this time. This is further supported by a corresponding decrease in the MPV-based CSI diagnostic during the same period.

  7. Introduction to the special issue on the 2011 Joint IEEE International Frequency Control Symposium and European Frequency and Time Forum.

    PubMed

    Burt, Eric; Gill, Patrick

    2012-03-01

    The 8 invited and 17 contributed papers in this special issue focus on the following topical areas covered at the 2011 Joint IEEE International Frequency Control Symposium and European Frequency and Time Forum, held in San Francisco, California: 1) Materials and Resonators; 2) Oscillators, Synthesizers, and Noise; 3) Microwave Frequency Standards; 4) Sensors and Transducers; 5) Timekeeping and Time and Frequency Transfer; and 6) Optical Frequency Standards. PMID:22481765

  8. The joint effect of jet and stellar wind on GRB afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Li-jun; Dai, Zi-gao; Huang, Yong-feng; Lu, Tan

    2001-04-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with long durations originate from collapse of massive stars, and this is the present popular idea about the mechanism of energy source of GRBs. Massive stars are unavoidably surrounded by stellar winds. It is also commonly believed that jets exist in GRBs. On the basis of these two viewpoints, the authors performed detailed calculations of the evolution of jets in the stellar wind environment. Because in the transition from relativistic to non-relativistic phase there are serious problems in the traditional formulae for the description of jets, some revised formulae are used. Finally, the authors' results on the evolution in the stellar wind environment are compared with those in the homogeneous medium environment, and with the results of Livio and Waxman. The following conclusions are drawn: (1) In the stellar wind environment, even for calculations up to 10 9s, the flux density does not show any clear tendency of levelling off. (2) In the vicinity of γ = 1/θ 0 there is no break in the light curve. (Here θ 0 is the initial half aperture angle.) (3) When the shock wave changes from a relativistic to a non-relativistic phase, there is a break in the light curve. (4) In comparison with the homogeneous medium, the flux density in the stellar wind environment is comparatively small.

  9. Mechanism of Radial Redistribution of Energetic Trapped Ions Due to m=2/n=1 Internal Reconnection in Joint European Torus Shear Optimized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    N.N. Gorelenkov; A. Gondhalekar; A.A. Korotkov; S.E. Sharapov; D. Testa; and Contributors to the EFDA-JET Workprogramme

    2002-01-18

    Internal radial redistribution of MeV energy ICRF-driven hydrogen minority ions was inferred from neutral particle analyzer measurements during large amplitude MHD activity leading to internal reconnection in Shear Optimized plasmas in the Joint European Torus (JET). A theory is developed for energetic ion redistribution during a reconnection driven by an m=2/n=1 internal kink mode. Plasma motion during reconnection generates an electric field which can change the energy and radial position of the energetic ions. The magnitude of ion energy change depends on the value of the safety factor at the plasma core from which the energetic ions are redistributed. A relation is found for corresponding change in canonical momentum. P(subscript phi), which leads to radial displacement of the ions. The model yields distinctive new features of energetic ion redistribution under such conditions. Predicted characteristics of ion redistribution are compared with the NPA measurements, and good correlation is found. Sometimes fast ions were transported to the plasma edge due to interaction with a long-lived magnetic island which developed after the reconnection and had chirping frequency in the laboratory frame. Convection of resonant ions trapped in a radially moving phase-space island is modeled to understand the physics of such events.

  10. Policy Goals of European Integration and Competitiveness in Academic Collaborations: An Examination of Joint Master's and Erasmus Mundus Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papatsiba, Vassiliki

    2014-01-01

    This study examines policy goals pertaining to joint Master's in Europe as presented in Bologna-related and Erasmus Mundus (EM) policy texts. The profile of joint programmes has risen in the aftermath of the Bologna Process (BP), together with the launch of the EU EM. Despite a European policy tradition of cooperation in higher education…

  11. Self-perceived weather sensitivity and joint pain in older people with osteoarthritis in six European countries: results from the European Project on OSteoArthritis (EPOSA)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background People with osteoarthritis (OA) frequently report that their joint pain is influenced by weather conditions. This study aimed to examine whether there are differences in perceived joint pain between older people with OA who reported to be weather-sensitive versus those who did not in six European countries with different climates and to identify characteristics of older persons with OA that are most predictive of perceived weather sensitivity. Methods Baseline data from the European Project on OSteoArthritis (EPOSA) were used. ACR classification criteria were used to determine OA. Participants with OA were asked about their perception of weather as influencing their pain. Using a two-week follow-up pain calendar, average self-reported joint pain was assessed (range: 0 (no pain)-10 (greatest pain intensity)). Linear regression analyses, logistic regression analyses and an independent t-test were used. Analyses were adjusted for several confounders. Results The majority of participants with OA (67.2%) perceived the weather as affecting their pain. Weather-sensitive participants reported more pain than non-weather-sensitive participants (M = 4.1, SD = 2.4 versus M = 3.1, SD = 2.4; p < 0.001). After adjusting for several confounding factors, the association between self-perceived weather sensitivity and joint pain remained present (B = 0.37, p = 0.03). Logistic regression analyses revealed that women and more anxious people were more likely to report weather sensitivity. Older people with OA from Southern Europe were more likely to indicate themselves as weather-sensitive persons than those from Northern Europe. Conclusions Weather (in)stability may have a greater impact on joint structures and pain perception in people from Southern Europe. The results emphasize the importance of considering weather sensitivity in daily life of older people with OA and may help to identify weather-sensitive older people with OA. PMID:24597710

  12. Fusion alpha-particle diagnostics for DT experiments on the joint European torus

    SciTech Connect

    Kiptily, V. G.; Beaumont, P.; Syme, D. B.; Cecil, F. E.; Riva, M.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Craciunescu, T.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Curuia, M.; Soare, S.; Darrow, D.; Fernandes, A. M.; Pereira, R. C.; Sousa, J.; Gorini,; Nocente, M.; and others

    2014-08-21

    JET equipped with ITER-like wall (a beryllium wall and a tungsten divertor) can provide auxiliary heating with power up to 35MW, producing a significant population of α-particles in DT operation. The direct measurements of alphas are very difficult and α-particle studies require a significant development of dedicated diagnostics. JET now has an excellent set of confined and lost fast particle diagnostics for measuring the α-particle source and its evolution in space and time, α-particle energy distribution, and α-particle losses. This paper describes how the above mentioned JET diagnostic systems could be used for α-particle measurements, and what options exist for keeping the essential α-particle diagnostics functioning well in the presence of intense DT neutron flux. Also, α-particle diagnostics for ITER are discussed.

  13. Interaction of Nocturnal Low-Level Jets with Urban Geometries as seen in Joint URBAN 2003 Data

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, J K

    2005-07-13

    The nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) is a well-documented phenomenon world-wide, especially in the southern Great Plains of the United States (Bonner 1968, Whiteman et al. 1997, Banta et al., 2002) where it contributes to severe weather. In the canonical rural case, the nocturnal LLJ forms as the release of daytime convective turbulent stresses allow nighttime winds above a stable boundary layer to accelerate to supergeostrophic wind speeds. In situations with surface winds of less than 5 m/s, wind speeds at altitudes of 100m due to the nocturnal LLJ can be greater than 20 m/s. The turbulence generated by this wind shear can induce nocturnal mixing events and control surface-atmosphere exchange, thereby affecting atmospheric transport and dispersion. The Joint URBAN 2003 urban dispersion dataset, collected in Oklahoma City in July, 2003, includes several occurrences of strong LLJs, thereby providing a unique opportunity to document how the LLJ interacts with the complexity of urban geometries and to explore the significance of LLJs for transport and dispersion in urban environments. Based on this dataset, we will answer the following questions: (1) How often do LLJs occur during the experiment? (2) How does the increase in surface roughness represented by the city center, as compared to the rural environment, affect the altitude and speed of the jet, based on data from upwind and downwind wind profiles? (3) How often do LLJs contribute to nocturnal mixing events within the Oklahoma City urban area, as observed in profiles of turbulence quantities at an 80m pseudo-tower located 750m downwind of Oklahoma City center? (4) Can the effect of these LLJ-induced mixing events be identified in the dispersion datasets?

  14. Effect of the Silver Content of SnAgCu Solder on the Interfacial Reaction and on the Reliability of Angle Joints Fabricated by Laser-Jet Soldering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hongjun; Ma, Yuyou; Li, Mingyu; Wang, Chunqing

    2015-02-01

    The silver content of lead-free solders affects their microstructure, the interfacial reaction, and the performance of the joints in reliability tests. In this study, Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu (wt.%, SAC305) and Sn1.0Ag0.5Cu (wt.%, SAC105) solder balls of diameter 55 μm were reflowed on gold surface pads by laser-jet soldering. It was found that four types of layered intermetallic compound (IMC) were formed at the interfaces; these were Au5Sn/AuSn, AuSn, AuSn2, and AuSn4 from the pad side to the solder matrix. The Au5Sn/AuSn eutectic region, thickness 400 nm, formed because of the high cooling rate induced by the laser-jet soldering. During high-temperature storage tests, the silver became segregated at the interfaces between the Au-Sn IMC and the solder matrix, resulting in inhibition of IMC growth in SAC305 joints, the shear strengths of which were higher than those of SAC105 joints. In mechanical drop tests, however, percentage failure of the SAC305 joints was twice that of the SAC105 joints.

  15. Joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Obesity and the European Society of Hypertension: obesity and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Jens; Toplak, Hermann; Grassi, Guido; Yumuk, Volkan; Kotsis, Vasilios; Engeli, Stefan; Cuspidi, Cesare; Nilsson, Peter M; Finer, Nick; Doehner, Wolfram

    2016-09-01

    Obese individuals are more likely to develop heart failure. Yet, once heart failure is established, the impact of overweight and obesity on prognosis and survival is unclear. The purpose of this joint scientific statement of the European Association for the Study of Obesity and the European Society of Hypertension is to provide an overview on the current scientific literature on obesity and heart failure in terms of prognosis, mechanisms, and clinical management implications. Moreover, the document identifies open questions that ought to be addressed. The need for more tailored weight management recommendations in heart failure will be emphasized and, in line with the emerging evidence, aims to distinguish between primary disease and secondary outcome prevention. In the primary prevention of heart failure, it appears prudent advising obese individuals to lose or achieve a healthy body weight, especially in those with risk factors such as hypertension or type 2 diabetes. However, there is no evidence from clinical trials to guide weight management in overweight or obese patients with established heart failure. Prospective clinical trials are strongly encouraged. PMID:27488547

  16. Metrology for Radiological Early Warning Networks in Europe ("METROERM")-A Joint European Metrology Research Project.

    PubMed

    Neumaier, Stefan; Dombrowski, Harald; Kessler, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    As a consequence of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986, all European countries have installed automatic dosimetry network stations as well as air sampling systems for the monitoring of airborne radioactivity. In Europe, at present, almost 5,000 stations measure dose rate values in nearly real time. In addition, a few hundred air samplers are operated. Most of them need extended accumulation times with no real-time capability. National dose rate data are provided to the European Commission (EC) via the EUropean Radiological Data Exchange Platform (EURDEP). In case of a nuclear emergency with transboundary implications, the EC may issue momentous recommendations to EU member states based on the radiological data collected by EURDEP. These recommendations may affect millions of people and could have severe economic and sociological consequences. Therefore, the reliability of the EURDEP data is of key importance. Unfortunately, the dose rate and activity concentration data are not harmonized between the different networks. Therefore, within the framework of the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP), 16 European institutions formed the consortium MetroERM with the aim to improve the metrological foundation of measurements and to introduce a pan-European harmonization for the collation and evaluation of radiological data in early warning network systems. In addition, a new generation of detector systems based on spectrometers capable of providing both reliable dose rate values as well as nuclide specific information in real time are in development. The MetroERM project and its first results will be presented and discussed in this article. PMID:27356052

  17. THE JOINT EUROPEAN-UNITED STATES NDEA INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDY, MANNHEIM-HEIDELBERG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VAN TESLAAR, A.P.

    THE EUROPEAN COORDINATOR AND RESIDENT CO-DIRECTOR OF THE MANNHEIM-HEIDELBERG BRANCH OF THE SUMMER 1966 LANGUAGE INSTITUTE IN FRANCE AND GERMANY PREPARED THIS EVALUATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL VENTURE. DESIGNED TO ANALYZE THE INNOVATIONAL ASPECTS OF THE 1966 INSTITUTE WITH THE IDEA OF STRENGTHENING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THIS AND SIMILAR PROGRAMS, THE…

  18. 1st Joint European Conference on Therapeutic Targets and Medicinal Chemistry (TTMC 2015).

    PubMed

    Le Borgne, Marc; Haidar, Samer; Duval, Olivier; Wünsch, Bernhard; Jose, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The European Conference on Therapeutic Targets and Medicinal Chemistry is a new two-day meeting on drug discovery that is focused on therapeutic targets and the use of tools to explore all fields of drug discovery and drug design such as molecular modelling, bioorganic chemistry, NMR studies, fragment screening, in vitro assays, in vivo assays, structure activity relationships, autodisplay. Abstracts of keynote lectures, plenary lectures, junior lectures, flash presentations, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report. PMID:26712767

  19. 1st Joint European Conference on Therapeutic Targets and Medicinal Chemistry (TTMC 2015)

    PubMed Central

    Le Borgne, Marc; Haidar, Samer; Duval, Olivier; Wünsch, Bernhard; Jose, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The European Conference on Therapeutic Targets and Medicinal Chemistry is a new two-day meeting on drug discovery that is focused on therapeutic targets and the use of tools to explore all fields of drug discovery and drug design such as molecular modelling, bioorganic chemistry, NMR studies, fragment screening, in vitro assays, in vivo assays, structure activity relationships, autodisplay. Abstracts of keynote lectures, plenary lectures, junior lectures, flash presentations, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report. PMID:26712767

  20. Influence of plasma diagnostics and constraints on the quality of equilibrium reconstructions on Joint European Torus.

    PubMed

    Gelfusa, M; Murari, A; Lupelli, I; Hawkes, N; Gaudio, P; Baruzzo, M; Brix, M; Craciunescu, T; Drozdov, V; Meigs, A; Peluso, E; Romanelli, M; Schmuck, S; Sieglin, B

    2013-10-01

    One of the main approaches to thermonuclear fusion relies on confining high temperature plasmas with properly shaped magnetic fields. The determination of the magnetic topology is, therefore, essential for controlling the experiments and for achieving the required performance. In Tokamaks, the reconstruction of the fields is typically formulated as a free boundary equilibrium problem, described by the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal geometry and axisymmetric configurations. Unfortunately, this results in mathematically very ill posed problems and, therefore, the quality of the equilibrium reconstructions depends sensitively on the measurements used as inputs and on the imposed constraints. In this paper, it is shown how the different diagnostics (Magnetics Measurements, Polarimetry and Motional Stark Effect), together with the edge current density and plasma pressure constraints, can have a significant impact on the quality of the equilibrium on JET. Results show that both the Polarimetry and Motional Stark Effect internal diagnostics are crucial in order to obtain reasonable safety factor profiles. The impact of the edge current density constraint is significant when the plasma is in the H-mode of confinement. In this plasma scenario the strike point positions and the plasma last closed flux surface can change even by centimetres, depending on the edge constraints, with a significant impact on the remapping of the equilibrium-dependent diagnostics and of pedestal physics studies. On the other hand and quite counter intuitively, the pressure constraint can severely affect the quality of the magnetic reconstructions in the core. These trends have been verified with several JET discharges and consistent results have been found. An interpretation of these results, as interplay between degrees of freedom and available measurements, is provided. The systematic analysis described in the paper emphasizes the importance of having sufficient diagnostic inputs and of

  1. Influence of plasma diagnostics and constraints on the quality of equilibrium reconstructions on Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfusa, M.; Gaudio, P.; Peluso, E.; Murari, A.; Baruzzo, M.; Lupelli, I.; Hawkes, N.; Brix, M.; Drozdov, V.; Meigs, A.; Romanelli, M.; Schmuck, S.; Sieglin, B.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2013-10-15

    One of the main approaches to thermonuclear fusion relies on confining high temperature plasmas with properly shaped magnetic fields. The determination of the magnetic topology is, therefore, essential for controlling the experiments and for achieving the required performance. In Tokamaks, the reconstruction of the fields is typically formulated as a free boundary equilibrium problem, described by the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal geometry and axisymmetric configurations. Unfortunately, this results in mathematically very ill posed problems and, therefore, the quality of the equilibrium reconstructions depends sensitively on the measurements used as inputs and on the imposed constraints. In this paper, it is shown how the different diagnostics (Magnetics Measurements, Polarimetry and Motional Stark Effect), together with the edge current density and plasma pressure constraints, can have a significant impact on the quality of the equilibrium on JET. Results show that both the Polarimetry and Motional Stark Effect internal diagnostics are crucial in order to obtain reasonable safety factor profiles. The impact of the edge current density constraint is significant when the plasma is in the H-mode of confinement. In this plasma scenario the strike point positions and the plasma last closed flux surface can change even by centimetres, depending on the edge constraints, with a significant impact on the remapping of the equilibrium-dependent diagnostics and of pedestal physics studies. On the other hand and quite counter intuitively, the pressure constraint can severely affect the quality of the magnetic reconstructions in the core. These trends have been verified with several JET discharges and consistent results have been found. An interpretation of these results, as interplay between degrees of freedom and available measurements, is provided. The systematic analysis described in the paper emphasizes the importance of having sufficient diagnostic inputs and of

  2. Joint United States-European Union Theoretical and Practical Course on Molecular Approaches for In Situ Biogradation

    SciTech Connect

    Suflita, Joseph M.; Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-08-14

    The Joint United States - European Union Theoretical and Practical Course on Molecular Approaches for in situ Biodegradation was held May 24 through June 7 at The University of Oklahoma. Twenty-four graduate and postgraduate students from both the United States and the European Union attended the course. Nine states and ten European countries were represented. Students were assigned living quarters and laboratory partners to maximize interactions between US and EU participants as well as to mix people with different technical backgrounds together. The students used the latest methods in molecular biology to characterize beneficial microorganisms and genes involved in the biodegradation of pollutants at a nearby landfill as well as an active hydrocarbon-producing site, part of which is undergoing bioremediation. Seminars by distinguished scientists were organized to expose the students to the breadth of the environmental field, including field assay and engineering applications, laboratory scale bioreactors, microbiology, genetics, regulation, pathway analysis, design of recombinant bacteria, and application of the associated techniques to the field. Lectures were given by various OU faculty on the principles behind the techniques to be used in the laboratory. These lectures included troubleshooting hints and encouraged questions and comments from the audience. The laboratory experiments covered chemical, microbiological, and molecular genetic analyses of soils; bioavailability of contaminants; enrichment cultures; gene probing; PCR amplification of known genes and gene families; identification of microbes based traditional and nontraditional approaches, nutritional capabilities, and 16S rRNA sequence; mRNA detection; and enzyme assays. Field trips were made to the USGS landfill field sampling site, and to the Tall Grass Prairie Preserve, a Nature Conservancy site which also featured long-term studies of bioremediation of crude oil and brine spills by one of the

  3. Workshop report on the 2nd Joint ENCCA/EuroSARC European bone sarcoma network meeting: integration of clinical trials with tumour biology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This is the report of the 2nd Joint ENCCA/EuroSARC European Bone Sarcoma Network Meeting held in Leiden, The Netherlands, on 26-27 September 2013, bringing together preclinical and clinical investigators on bone sarcoma. The purpose of this workshop was to present the achievements of biological research and clinical trials in bone sarcomas and to stimulate crosstalk.

  4. Bayesian modelling of the emission spectrum of the Joint European Torus Lithium Beam Emission Spectroscopy system.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Sehyun; Svensson, J; Brix, M; Ghim, Y-C

    2016-02-01

    A Bayesian model of the emission spectrum of the JET lithium beam has been developed to infer the intensity of the Li I (2p-2s) line radiation and associated uncertainties. The detected spectrum for each channel of the lithium beam emission spectroscopy system is here modelled by a single Li line modified by an instrumental function, Bremsstrahlung background, instrumental offset, and interference filter curve. Both the instrumental function and the interference filter curve are modelled with non-parametric Gaussian processes. All free parameters of the model, the intensities of the Li line, Bremsstrahlung background, and instrumental offset, are inferred using Bayesian probability theory with a Gaussian likelihood for photon statistics and electronic background noise. The prior distributions of the free parameters are chosen as Gaussians. Given these assumptions, the intensity of the Li line and corresponding uncertainties are analytically available using a Bayesian linear inversion technique. The proposed approach makes it possible to extract the intensity of Li line without doing a separate background subtraction through modulation of the Li beam. PMID:26931843

  5. Interaction of Nocturnal Low-Level Jets with Urban Geometries as seen in Joint URBAN 2003 Data

    SciTech Connect

    K.Lundquist, J; D.Mirocha, J

    2006-09-06

    As accurate modeling of atmospheric flows in urban environments requires sophisticated representation of complex urban geometries, much work has been devoted to treatment of the urban surface. However, the importance of the larger-scale flow impinging upon the urban complex to the flow, transport and dispersion within it and downwind has received less attention. Building-resolving computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are commonly employed to investigate interactions between the flow and three-dimensional structures comprising the urban environment, however such models are typically forced with simplified boundary conditions that fail to include important regional-scale phenomena that can strongly influence the flow within the urban complex and downwind. This paper investigates the interaction of an important and frequently occurring regional-scale phenomenon, the nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ), with urban-scale turbulence and dispersion in Oklahoma City using data from the Joint URBAN 2003 (JU2003) field experiment. Two simulations of nocturnal tracer release experiments from JU2003 using Lawrence Livermore National laboratory's FEM3MP CFD model yield differing levels of agreement with the observations in wind speed, turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and concentration profiles in the urban wake, approximately 750m downwind of the central business district. Profiles of several observed turbulence parameters at this location indicate characteristics of both bottom-up and top-down boundary layers during each of the experiments. These data are consistent with turbulence production due to at least two sources, the complex flow structures of the urban area and the region of strong vertical wind shear occurring beneath the LLJs present each night. While strong LLJs occurred each night, their structures varied considerably, resulting in significant differences in the magnitudes of the turbulence parameters observed during the two experiments. As FEM3MP was forced only

  6. Joint European Torus results with both fast and lower-hybrid wave consequences for future devices

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquinot, J.; Bures, M. ); the JET Team

    1992-07-01

    Heating and current drive studies were performed during the JET (Phys Fluids B {bold 3}, 2209 (1991)) 1990/91 operation using two large systems capable of generating either fast waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) or slow waves at a frequency above the lower-hybrid resonance (LH). The maximum wave power coupled to the torus reached 22 MW for ICRH and 2.4 MW for LH. The results obtained in plasma heating experiments qualify ICRH as a prime candidate for heating reactor grade plasmas. A centrally localized deposition profile in the cyclotron damping regime was demonstrated in a wide range of plasma density resulting in (i) record value {ital n}{sub {ital d}} {tau}{sub {ital E}} {ital T}{sub {ital i}0} {congruent} 7.8 {times} 10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3} sec keV in thermal'' conditions {ital T}{sub {ital i}} = {ital T}{sub {ital e}} {congruent} 11 keV at high central densities generated by pellet injection; (ii) large normalized confinement 2.5 {le} {tau}{sub {ital E}}/{tau}{sub Goldston}{le}4. The large values of {tau}{sub {ital E}}/{tau}{sub Goldston} are reached in H-mode discharges ({ital I}{le}1.5 MA) with large bootstrap current fraction {ital I}{sub BS}/{ital I} {le} 0.7 {plus minus} 0.2; (iii) the highest to date D--{sup 3}He fusion power (140 kW) generated with 10--14 MW of ICRH in the L-mode regime at the {sup 3}He cyclotron frequency. All specific impurity generations have been reduced to negligible levels by proper antenna design and the generic difficulty of wave--plasma coupling has been greatly reduced using feedback loops controlling in real time the antenna circuits and the plasma position.

  7. "Waveguidability" of idealized jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manola, Iris; Selten, Frank; Vries, Hylke; Hazeleger, Wilco

    2013-09-01

    It is known that strong zonal jets can act as waveguides for Rossby waves. In this study we use the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis data to analyze the connection between jets and zonal waves at timescales beyond 10 days. Moreover, a barotropic model is used to systematically study the ability of idealized jets to trap Rossby wave energy ("waveguidability") as a function of jet strength, jet width, and jet location. In general, strongest waveguidability is found for narrow, fast jets. In addition, when the stationary wave number is integer, a resonant response is found through constructive interference. In Austral summer, the Southern Hemispheric jet is closest to the idealized jets considered and it is for this season that similar jet-zonal wave relationships are identified in the ECMWF reanalysis data.

  8. Processes and properties of edge-localised instabilities in 2T 2MA plasmas in the Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, A. J. Webster, S. J.

    2014-11-15

    During July 2012, 150 almost identical H-mode plasmas were consecutively created in the Joint European Torus, providing a combined total of approximately 8 minutes of steady-state plasma with 15 000 Edge Localised Modes (ELMs). In principle, each of those 15 000 ELMs are statistically equivalent. Here, the changes in edge density and plasma energy associated with those ELMs are explored, using the spikes in Beryllium II (527 nm) radiation as an indicator for the onset of an ELM. Clearly different timescales are observed during the ELM process. Edge temperature falls over a 2 ms timescale, edge density and pressure fall over a 5 ms timescale, and there is an additional 10 ms timescale that is consistent with a resistive relaxation of the plasma's edge. The statistical properties of the energy and density losses due to the ELMs are explored. For these plasmas the ELM energy (δE) is found to be approximately independent of the time between ELMs, despite the average ELM energy (〈δE〉) and average ELM frequency (f) being consistent with the scaling of 〈δE〉∝1/f. Instead, beyond the first 0.02 s of waiting time between ELMs, the energy losses due to individual ELMs are found to be statistically the same. Surprisingly no correlation is found between the energies of consecutive ELMs either. A weak link is found between the density drop and the ELM waiting time. Consequences of these results for ELM control and modelling are discussed.

  9. GlobCorine- A Joint EEA-ESA Project for Operational Land Cover and Land Use Mapping at Pan-European Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bontemps, S.; Defourny, P.; Van Bogaert, E.; Weber, J. L.; Arino, O.

    2010-12-01

    Regular and global land cover mapping contributes to evaluating the impact of human activities on the environment. Jointly supported by the European Space Agency and the European Environmental Agency, the GlobCorine project builds on the GlobCover findings and aims at making the full use of the MERIS time series for frequent land cover monitoring. The GlobCover automated classification approach has been tuned to the pan-European continent and adjusted towards a classification compatible with the Corine typology. The GlobCorine 2005 land cover map has been achieved, validated and made available to a broad- level stakeholder community from the ESA website. A first version of the GlobCorine 2009 map has also been produced, demonstrating the possibility for an operational production of frequent and updated global land cover maps.

  10. Neutron streaming along ducts and labyrinths at the JET biological shielding: Effect of concrete composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilopoulou, T.; Stamatelatos, I. E.; Batistoni, P.; Conroy, S.; Obryk, B.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, D. B.

    2015-11-01

    Experiments and Monte Carlo simulations were performed at the Joint European Torus (JET) in order to validate the computational tools and methods applied for neutron streaming calculations through penetrations in the JET Hall biological shielding. In the present work the sensitivity of the simulations on the hydrogen and boron content in concrete shielding was investigated. MCNP code was used to simulate neutron streaming along the JET Hall personnel entrance labyrinth for deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium plasma sources for different concrete wall compositions. Neutron fluence and ambient dose equivalent along the labyrinth were calculated. Simulation results for the "as built" JET concrete composition were compared against measurements performed using thermoluminescence detectors. This study contributes to the optimization of the radiation shielding of JET and, furthermore, provides information from JET experience that may assist in optimizing and validating the radiation shielding design methodology used in its successor fusion devices ITER and DEMO.

  11. European missile aerodynamics and developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoriou, G.

    1980-04-01

    The joint development of new generation missiles by many European countries not only minimizes the costs and the technological risks for each individual country, but also increases the degree of weapons systems standardization within NATO. Focal points of research in recent years include: (1) jet influence on the dispersion of artillery rockets; (2) problems associated with the vertical launch of missiles; and (3) air intakes of ramjets. These areas are examined with respect to their significance in missile design. Some characteristic theoretical and measurement results are given.

  12. A new sawtooth control mechanism relying on toroidally propagating ion cyclotron resonance frequency waves: Theory and Joint European Torus tokamak experimental evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, J. P.; Coda, S.; Chapman, I. T.; Lennholm, M.

    2010-05-15

    The sawtooth control mechanism in plasmas employing toroidally propagating ion cyclotron resonance waves is extended. The asymmetrically distributed energetic passing ions are shown to modify the ideal internal kink mode when the position of the minority ion cyclotron resonance resides within a narrow region close to the q=1 surface. An analytical treatment of the internal kink mode in the presence of model distribution function with parallel velocity asymmetry is developed. The fast ion mechanism explains the strong sensitivity of sawteeth to resonance position, and moreover is consistent with dedicated Joint European Torus [F. Romanelli, Nucl. Fusion 49, 104006 (2009)] experiments which controlled sawteeth despite negligible current drive.

  13. Single crystal diamond detector measurements of deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium neutrons in Joint European Torus fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzaniga, C. Gorini, G.; Nocente, M.; Sundén, E. Andersson; Binda, F.; Ericsson, G.; Croci, G.; Grosso, G.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M.; Giacomelli, L.; Rebai, M.; Griesmayer, E.; Kaveney, G.; Syme, B.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2014-04-15

    First simultaneous measurements of deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium neutrons from deuterium plasmas using a Single crystal Diamond Detector are presented in this paper. The measurements were performed at JET with a dedicated electronic chain that combined high count rate capabilities and high energy resolution. The deposited energy spectrum from DD neutrons was successfully reproduced by means of Monte Carlo calculations of the detector response function and simulations of neutron emission from the plasma, including background contributions. The reported results are of relevance for the development of compact neutron detectors with spectroscopy capabilities for installation in camera systems of present and future high power fusion experiments.

  14. Single crystal diamond detector measurements of deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium neutrons in Joint European Torus fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Sundén, E. Andersson; Binda, F.; Croci, G.; Ericsson, G.; Giacomelli, L.; Gorini, G.; Griesmayer, E.; Grosso, G.; Kaveney, G.; Nocente, M.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Rebai, M.; Syme, B.; Tardocchi, M.

    2014-04-01

    First simultaneous measurements of deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium neutrons from deuterium plasmas using a Single crystal Diamond Detector are presented in this paper. The measurements were performed at JET with a dedicated electronic chain that combined high count rate capabilities and high energy resolution. The deposited energy spectrum from DD neutrons was successfully reproduced by means of Monte Carlo calculations of the detector response function and simulations of neutron emission from the plasma, including background contributions. The reported results are of relevance for the development of compact neutron detectors with spectroscopy capabilities for installation in camera systems of present and future high power fusion experiments.

  15. The ENCCA-WP7/EuroSarc/EEC/PROVABES/EURAMOS 3rd European Bone Sarcoma Networking Meeting/Joint Workshop of EU Bone Sarcoma Translational Research Networks; Vienna, Austria, September 24-25, 2015. Workshop Report.

    PubMed

    Kager, Leo; Whelan, Jeremy; Dirksen, Uta; Hassan, Bass; Anninga, Jakob; Bennister, Lindsey; Bovée, Judith V M G; Brennan, Bernadette; Broto, Javier M; Brugières, Laurence; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Copland, Christopher; Dutour, Aurélie; Fagioli, Franca; Ferrari, Stefano; Fiocco, Marta; Fleuren, Emmy; Gaspar, Nathalie; Gelderblom, Hans; Gerrand, Craig; Gerß, Joachim; Gonzato, Ornella; van der Graaf, Winette; Hecker-Nolting, Stefanie; Herrero-Martín, David; Klco-Brosius, Stephanie; Kovar, Heinrich; Ladenstein, Ruth; Lancia, Carlo; LeDeley, Marie-Cecile; McCabe, Martin G; Metzler, Markus; Myklebost, Ola; Nathrath, Michaela; Picci, Piero; Potratz, Jenny; Redini, Françoise; Richter, Günther H S; Reinke, Denise; Rutkowski, Piotr; Scotlandi, Katia; Strauss, Sandra; Thomas, David; Tirado, Oscar M; Tirode, Franck; Vassal, Gilles; Bielack, Stefan S

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the 3rd Joint ENCCA-WP7, EuroSarc, EEC, PROVABES, and EURAMOS European Bone Sarcoma Network Meeting, which was held at the Children's Cancer Research Institute in Vienna, Austria on September 24-25, 2015. The joint bone sarcoma network meetings bring together European bone sarcoma researchers to present and discuss current knowledge on bone sarcoma biology, genetics, immunology, as well as results from preclinical investigations and clinical trials, to generate novel hypotheses for collaborative biological and clinical investigations. The ultimate goal is to further improve therapy and outcome in patients with bone sarcomas. PMID:27315524

  16. Reporting nuclear cardiology: a joint position paper by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) and the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI).

    PubMed

    Trägårdh, Elin; Hesse, Birger; Knuuti, Juhani; Flotats, Albert; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Kitsiou, Anastasia; Hacker, Marcus; Verberne, Hein J; Edenbrandt, Lars; Delgado, Victoria; Donal, Erwan; Edvardsen, Thor; Galderisi, Maurizio; Habib, Gilbert; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Nieman, Koen; Rosenhek, Raphael; Agostini, Denis; Gimelli, Alessia; Lindner, Oliver; Slart, Riemert; Ubleis, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    The report of an imaging procedure is a critical component of an examination, being the final and often the only communication from the interpreting physician to the referring or treating physician. Very limited evidence and few recommendations or guidelines on reporting imaging studies are available; therefore, an European position statement on how to report nuclear cardiology might be useful. The current paper combines the limited existing evidence with expert consensus, previously published recommendations as well as current clinical practices. For all the applications discussed in this paper (myocardial perfusion, viability, innervation, and function as acquired by single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography or hybrid imaging), headings cover laboratory and patient demographics, clinical indication, tracer administration and image acquisition, findings, and conclusion of the report. The statement also discusses recommended terminology in nuclear cardiology, image display, and preliminary reports. It is hoped that this statement may lead to more attention to create well-written and standardized nuclear cardiology reports and eventually lead to improved clinical outcome. PMID:25618478

  17. Water and health in Europe. A joint report from the European Environment Agency and the WHO Regional Office for Europe.

    PubMed

    2002-01-01

    Shortage of water may be most urgent health problem currently facing some European countries. Climate change is predicted to influence water availability, especially in coastal areas. The extend of provision of piped drinking-water supplies to households varies across Europe and between urban and rural populations. The utilization of water for irrigation and for industry exerts pressure on water resources. Changes in populaton distribution and density are key factors influencing the quality of water resources. Outbreaks of waterborne diseases continue to occur across Europe, and minor supply problems are encountered in all countries. Inadequate sewerage systems are a significant threat to public health. Numerous chemicals are found throughout the aquatic environment. Eutrophication is a major threat to European surface waters. Considerate evidence has accrued linking the quality of bathing water with minor illnesses. Additional efforts are required to sustain the European Region's water resources and to provide safe water. Partnerships and cooperation are needed between the environment and health sectors at al levels of government to disseminate technology, to improve management and to provide financial and institutional support to ensure access to safe water and sanitation for all. PMID:12353489

  18. Clinical trials update from the joint European Society and World Congress of Cardiology meeting: PEP-CHF, ACCLAIM and the HHH study.

    PubMed

    Cleland, John G F; Coletta, Alison P; Clark, Andrew L

    2006-10-01

    This article provides information and a commentary on trials relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of heart failure, presented at the joint European Society and World Congress of Cardiology meeting held in Barcelona in September 2006. All reports should be considered as preliminary data, as analyses may change in the final publication. The PEP-CHF study suggests that perindopril improves symptoms and functional capacity and may reduce heart failure hospitalisations in patients with diastolic heart failure. Although immune modulation therapy failed to reduce the incidence of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular hospitalisations in the ACCLAIM study, the observed differences in outcome in some heart failure patients warrants further investigation. The HHH study failed to show a beneficial effect of telemonitoring over usual care in patients with heart failure but potentially important country interactions were observed. PMID:17045839

  19. Deuterium beam acceleration with 3rd harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating in Joint European Torus: Sawtooth stabilization and Alfvén eigenmodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassner, T.; Schoepf, K.; Sharapov, S. E.; Kiptily, V. G.; Pinches, S. D.; Hellesen, C.; Eriksson, J.; JET-EFDA contributors

    2012-03-01

    Experiments on accelerating NBI-produced deuterium (D) beam ions from their injection energy of ˜110 keV up to the MeV energy range with 3rd harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating were performed on the Joint European Torus [P. H. Rebut and B. E. Keen, Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)]. A renewed set of nuclear diagnostics was used for analysing fast D ions during sawtooth stabilization, monster sawtooth crashes, and during excitation of Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) residing inside the q = 1 radius. The measurements and modeling of the fast ions with the nonlinear HAGIS code [S. D. Pinches et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 111, 133 (1998)] show that monster sawtooth crashes are strongly facilitated by the AE-induced re-distribution of the fast D ions from inside the q = 1 radius to the plasma edge.

  20. Regional climate modeling on European scales: A joint standard evaluation of the EURO-CORDEX RCM ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlarski, Sven; Keuler, Klaus; Bossing Christensen, Ole; Colette, Augustin; Déqué, Michel; Gobiet, Andreas; Goergen, Klaus; Jacob, Daniela; Lüthi, Daniel; van Meijgaard, Erik; Nikulin, Grigory; Schär, Christoph; Teichmann, Claas; Vautard, Robert; Warrach-Sagi, Kirsten; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2014-05-01

    EURO-CORDEX is an international climate downscaling initiative that aims to provide high-resolution climate scenarios for Europe. Here an evaluation of the ERA-Interim-driven EURO-CORDEX regional climate model (RCM) ensemble is presented. The study documents the performance of the individual models in representing the basic spatio-temporal patterns of the European climate for the period 1989-2008. Model evaluation focuses on near-surface air temperature and precipitation, and uses the E-OBS dataset as observational reference. The ensemble consists of 17 simulations carried out by seven different models at grid resolutions of 12 km (nine experiments) and 50 km (eight experiments). Several performance metrics computed from monthly and seasonal mean values are used to assess model performance over eight sub-domains of the European continent. Results are compared to those for the ERA40-driven ENSEMBLES simulations. The analysis confirms the ability of RCMs to capture the basic features of the European climate, including its variability in space and time. But it also identifies non-negligible deficiencies of the simulations for selected metrics, regions and seasons. Seasonally and regionally averaged temperature biases are mostly smaller than 1.5 °C, while precipitation biases are typically located in the +/- 40% range. Some bias characteristics, such as a predominant cold and wet bias in most seasons and over most parts of Europe and a warm and dry summer bias over southern and south-eastern Europe reflect common model biases. For seasonal mean quantities averaged over large European sub-domains, no clear benefit of an increased spatial resolution (12 km vs. 50 km) can be identified. The bias ranges of the EURO-CORDEX ensemble mostly correspond to those of the ENSEMBLES simulations, but some improvements in model performance can be identified (e.g., a less pronounced southern European warm summer bias). The temperature bias spread across different configurations of

  1. Regional climate modeling on European scales: a joint standard evaluation of the EURO-CORDEX RCM ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlarski, S.; Keuler, K.; Christensen, O. B.; Colette, A.; Déqué, M.; Gobiet, A.; Goergen, K.; Jacob, D.; Lüthi, D.; van Meijgaard, E.; Nikulin, G.; Schär, C.; Teichmann, C.; Vautard, R.; Warrach-Sagi, K.; Wulfmeyer, V.

    2014-07-01

    EURO-CORDEX is an international climate downscaling initiative that aims to provide high-resolution climate scenarios for Europe. Here an evaluation of the ERA-Interim-driven EURO-CORDEX regional climate model (RCM) ensemble is presented. The study documents the performance of the individual models in representing the basic spatiotemporal patterns of the European climate for the period 1989-2008. Model evaluation focuses on near-surface air temperature and precipitation, and uses the E-OBS data set as observational reference. The ensemble consists of 17 simulations carried out by seven different models at grid resolutions of 12 km (nine experiments) and 50 km (eight experiments). Several performance metrics computed from monthly and seasonal mean values are used to assess model performance over eight subdomains of the European continent. Results are compared to those for the ERA40-driven ENSEMBLES simulations. The analysis confirms the ability of RCMs to capture the basic features of the European climate, including its variability in space and time. But it also identifies nonnegligible deficiencies of the simulations for selected metrics, regions and seasons. Seasonally and regionally averaged temperature biases are mostly smaller than 1.5 °C, while precipitation biases are typically located in the ±40% range. Some bias characteristics, such as a predominant cold and wet bias in most seasons and over most parts of Europe and a warm and dry summer bias over southern and southeastern Europe reflect common model biases. For seasonal mean quantities averaged over large European subdomains, no clear benefit of an increased spatial resolution (12 vs. 50 km) can be identified. The bias ranges of the EURO-CORDEX ensemble mostly correspond to those of the ENSEMBLES simulations, but some improvements in model performance can be identified (e.g., a less pronounced southern European warm summer bias). The temperature bias spread across different configurations of one

  2. Regional climate modeling on European scales: a joint standard evaluation of the EURO-CORDEX RCM ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlarski, S.; Keuler, K.; Christensen, O. B.; Colette, A.; Déqué, M.; Gobiet, A.; Goergen, K.; Jacob, D.; Lüthi, D.; van Meijgaard, E.; Nikulin, G.; Schär, C.; Teichmann, C.; Vautard, R.; Warrach-Sagi, K.; Wulfmeyer, V.

    2014-01-01

    EURO-CORDEX is an international climate downscaling initiative that aims to provide high-resolution climate scenarios for Europe. Here an evaluation of the ERA-Interim-driven EURO-CORDEX regional climate model (RCM) ensemble is presented. The study documents the performance of the individual models in representing the basic spatio-temporal patterns of the European climate for the period 1989-2008. Model evaluation focuses on near-surface air temperature and precipitation, and uses the E-OBS dataset as observational reference. The ensemble consists of 17 simulations carried out by seven different models at grid resolutions of 12 km (nine experiments) and 50 km (eight experiments). Several performance metrics computed from monthly and seasonal mean values are used to assess model performance over eight sub-domains of the European continent. Results are compared to those for the ERA40-driven ENSEMBLES simulations. The analysis confirms the ability of RCMs to capture the basic features of the European climate, including its variability in space and time. But it also identifies non-negligible deficiencies of the simulations for selected metrics, regions and seasons. Seasonally and regionally averaged temperature biases are mostly smaller than 1.5 °C, while precipitation biases are typically located in the ±40% range. Some bias characteristics, such as a predominant cold and wet bias in most seasons and over most parts of Europe and a warm and dry summer bias over southern and south-eastern Europe reflect common model biases. For seasonal mean quantities averaged over large European sub-domains, no clear benefit of an increased spatial resolution (12 km vs. 50 km) can be identified. The bias ranges of the EURO-CORDEX ensemble mostly correspond to those of the ENSEMBLES simulations, but some improvements in model performance can be identified (e.g., a less pronounced southern European warm summer bias). The temperature bias spread across different configurations of one

  3. Analysis of the orbit of the joint Soviet/European X-ray astronomy mission `Spectrum-X`

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdaway, R.; Spalding, G. H.

    A combined USSR and East/West European program for X-ray astronomic observations is presented. The Spectrum-X mission, scheduled for launch in 1993 on a Proton ELV will carry two prime instruments on board: a high-resolution medium energy X-ray telescope and a medium-resolution medium-energy X-ray telescope. Other instruments on board the satellite will permit the study of EUV, X-ray, and gamma-ray sources from the optical waveband up to energies of 10 MeV.

  4. Design of a High Power Prototype for the new JET-EP ICRF antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, R. H.; Baity, F. W.; Jones, G. H.; Nelson, B. E.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Swain, D. W.; Hosea, J. C.; Loesser, G. D.; Wilson, J. R.; Durodie, F.; Beaumont, B.; Lamalle, P. U.; Walton, R.

    2001-10-01

    A high power prototype (HPP) of a new ICRF antenna for JET ("JET-EP antenna") is being designed and constructed in a collaborative effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, and the European Fusion Development Agreement-Joint European Torus. The JET-EP launcher is designed for 8 MW input power ( 9 MW/m^2) at 30-55 MHz. Current straps are arranged in a 4 poloidal by 2 toroidal array, minimizing voltage. A modified resonant double loop (RDL) matching circuit uses internal capacitors, and passively accommodates rapidly changing plasma loads. The HPP, consisting of one antenna quadrant, will be tested at ORNL in vaccum at >= 33kV pk, 920A rms capacitor voltage and current. Innovative features to be tested include the modified RDL circuit, flanges which allow capacitor replacement without antenna removal, a low characteristic impedance vacuum feed line, and integral matching transformer.

  5. Neutron emission profiles and energy spectra measurements at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Belli, F.; Gorini, G.; Horton, L.; Joffrin, E.; Lerche, E.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Riva, M.; Syme, B.; JET EFDA Contributors

    2014-08-01

    The Joint European Toras (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world. It is devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D) or Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. JET has been upgraded over the years and recently it has also become a test facility of the components designed for ITER, the next step fusion machine under construction in Cadarache (France). JET makes use of many different diagnostics to measure the physical quantities of interest in plasma experiments. Concerning D or DT plasmas neutron production, various types of detectors are implemented to provide information upon the neutron total yield, emission profile and energy spectrum. The neutron emission profile emitted from the JET plasma poloidal section is reconstructed using the neutron camera (KN3). In 2010 KN3 was equipped with a new digital data acquisition system capable of high rate neutron measurements (<0.5 MCps). A similar instrument will be implemented on ITER and it is currently in its design phase. Various types of neutron spectrometers with different view lines are also operational on JET. One of them is a new compact spectrometer (KM12) based on organic liquid scintillating material which was installed in 2010 and implements a similar digital data acquisition system as for KN3. This article illustrates the measurement results of KN3 neutron emission profiles and KM 12 neutron energy spectra from the latest JET D experimental campaign C31.

  6. Neutron emission profiles and energy spectra measurements at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Belli, F.; Riva, M.; Gorini, G.; Horton, L.; Joffrin, E.; Lerche, E.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, B.; Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2014-08-21

    The Joint European Toras (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world. It is devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D) or Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. JET has been upgraded over the years and recently it has also become a test facility of the components designed for ITER, the next step fusion machine under construction in Cadarache (France). JET makes use of many different diagnostics to measure the physical quantities of interest in plasma experiments. Concerning D or DT plasmas neutron production, various types of detectors are implemented to provide information upon the neutron total yield, emission profile and energy spectrum. The neutron emission profile emitted from the JET plasma poloidal section is reconstructed using the neutron camera (KN3). In 2010 KN3 was equipped with a new digital data acquisition system capable of high rate neutron measurements (<0.5 MCps). A similar instrument will be implemented on ITER and it is currently in its design phase. Various types of neutron spectrometers with different view lines are also operational on JET. One of them is a new compact spectrometer (KM12) based on organic liquid scintillating material which was installed in 2010 and implements a similar digital data acquisition system as for KN3. This article illustrates the measurement results of KN3 neutron emission profiles and KM 12 neutron energy spectra from the latest JET D experimental campaign C31.

  7. Progress in marine science supported by European joint coastal observation systems: The JERICO-RI research infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puillat, I.; Farcy, P.; Durand, D.; Karlson, B.; Petihakis, G.; Seppälä, J.; Sparnocchia, S.

    2016-10-01

    Coastal systems are of the most productive ones although they are the most impacted by direct pressures from human activities. These ecosystems exhibit a high level of complexity with many different and interconnected processes operating at various spatial and temporal scales and providing a range of ecosystem services. Coastal observations are tremendous importance in order to understand those complex marine processes. Moreover, they support the use and further development of coastal ocean numerical models, including physical models and coupled physical-biogeochemical models. Coastal data have also many applications in the domain of coastal engineering such as for instance in the design of a coastal structure, or in the prevention of extreme events (e.g. flooding). As a consequence, the number of marine observing systems has quickly increased around European coastal seas, under the pressure of both monitoring requirements and marine research. Present demands for such observing systems include reliable, high-quality and comprehensive observations of key environmental parameters, automated platforms and sensors systems for continuous observations, as well as autonomy over long time periods. In-situ data collected can be combined with remote sensing and/or models to detect, understand and/or forecast the most crucial coastal processes over extensive areas within the various marine environments.

  8. Jet pump with labyrinth seal

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, L.L.; Kudirka, A.A.

    1981-08-25

    In a jet pump for a nuclear reactor a slip joint is provided between the mixer and diffuser sections thereof to facilitate jet pump maintenance and to allow thermal expansion. To limit leakage flow through the slip joint to a rate below that which causes unacceptable flow induced vibration of the pump, there is provided a labyrinth seal for the slip joint in the form of a series of flow expansion chambers formed by a series of spaced grooves in the annulus of the slip joint.

  9. Twin Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Bozak, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Many subsonic and supersonic vehicles in the current fleet have multiple engines mounted near one another. Some future vehicle concepts may use innovative propulsion systems such as distributed propulsion which will result in multiple jets mounted in close proximity. Engine configurations with multiple jets have the ability to exploit jet-by-jet shielding which may significantly reduce noise. Jet-by-jet shielding is the ability of one jet to shield noise that is emitted by another jet. The sensitivity of jet-by-jet shielding to jet spacing and simulated flight stream Mach number are not well understood. The current experiment investigates the impact of jet spacing, jet operating condition, and flight stream Mach number on the noise radiated from subsonic and supersonic twin jets.

  10. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  11. The Joint Effects of ADH1B Variants and Childhood Adversity on Alcohol-Related Phenotypes in African-American and European-American Women and Men

    PubMed Central

    Sartor, Carolyn E.; Wang, Zuoheng; Xu, Ke; Kranzler, Henry R.; Gelernter, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Background The ADH1B gene has consistently been implicated in problem drinking, but rarely incorporated into gene by environment investigations of alcohol phenotypes. This study examined the joint effects of variation in ADH1B and childhood adversity – a well-documented risk factor for alcohol problems and moderator of genetic liability to psychiatric outcomes – on maximum drinks consumed in a 24-hour period (maxdrinks) and alcohol use disorder (AUD) symptoms. Methods Data were drawn from 2,617 African-American (AA) and 1,436 European-American (EA) participants (42% female) in a multisite genetic study of substance dependence. We tested the most significant ADH1B SNPs for alcohol dependence from a genomewide association study with this sample, ADH1B-rs1229984 (Arg48His) and ADH1B-rs2066702 (Arg370Cys), in EA and AA subsamples, respectively. Results Ordinal regression analyses conducted separately by sex and population revealed significant main effects for childhood adversity both for alcohol phenotypes in AA women and men and for maxdrinks in EA women. A significant rs1229984 by childhood adversity interaction was observed for AUD symptoms in EA men. Unexposed His-allele carriers reported a mean of 3.6 AUD criteria, but adversity-exposed His-allele carriers endorsed approximately the same number (6.3) as those without the protective allele (6.3 and 7.0 for adversity-exposed and adversity-unexposed groups, respectively). Conclusions Results suggest that under conditions of childhood adversity, the His allele does not exert its protective effects in EA men (OR=0.57, CI:0.32–1.01; p=0.056). Findings highlight the robust risk effect conferred by childhood adversity and the importance of considering population and sex in genetically informative investigations of its association with alcohol outcomes. PMID:25410943

  12. Perturbative studies of toroidal momentum transport using neutral beam injection modulation in the Joint European Torus: Experimental results, analysis methodology, and first principles modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mantica, P.; Ferreira, J. S.; Salmi, A.; Strintzi, D.; Weiland, J.; Brix, M.; Giroud, C.; Corrigan, G.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Tardini, G.

    2010-09-15

    Perturbative experiments have been carried out in the Joint European Torus [Fusion Sci. Technol. 53(4) (2008)] in order to identify the diffusive and convective components of toroidal momentum transport. The torque source was modulated either by modulating tangential neutral beam power or by modulating in antiphase tangential and normal beams to produce a torque perturbation in the absence of a power perturbation. The resulting periodic perturbation in the toroidal rotation velocity was modeled using time-dependent transport simulations in order to extract empirical profiles of momentum diffusivity and pinch. Details of the experimental technique, data analysis, and modeling are provided. The momentum diffusivity in the core region (0.2<{rho}<0.8) was found to be close to the ion heat diffusivity ({chi}{sub {phi}/{chi}i{approx}}0.7-1.7) and a significant inward momentum convection term, up to 20 m/s, was found, leading to an effective momentum diffusivity significantly lower than the ion heat diffusivity ({chi}{sub {phi}}{sup eff}/{chi}{sub i}{sup eff{approx}}0.4). These results have significant implications on the prediction of toroidal rotation velocities in future tokamaks and are qualitatively consistent with recent developments in momentum transport theory. Detailed quantitative comparisons with the theoretical predictions of the linear gyrokinetic code GKW [A. G. Peeters et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 180, 2650 (2009)] and of the quasilinear fluid Weiland model [J. Weiland, Collective Modes in Inhomogeneous Plasmas (IOP, Bristol, 2000)] are presented for two analyzed discharges.

  13. JET x-ray pulse-height analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasini, D.; Gill, R. D.; Holm, J.; van der Goot, E.; Weller, A.

    1988-05-01

    The pulse-height-analysis (PHA) system installed on the Joint European Torus (JET) measures the plasma soft x-ray emission (2-30 keV) with an energy resolution of 450 eV and a time resolution of 200 ms. This diagnostic includes three Si(Li) detectors, equipped with sets of remotely controlled apertures and filters, which view the plasma in the midhorizontal plane of the torus along a single tangential line of sight. Automatic analysis of the spectra yields the central electron temperature, the central concentrations of chlorine, chromium, and nickel, and Zeff. Simulations of the measured spectra using a radiation code provides the basis to construct a consistent picture of the soft x-ray emission in the central region of JET plasmas.

  14. Measurement of the energy content of the JET tokamak plasma with a diamagnetic loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonetti, G.; Christiansen, J. P.; de Kock, L.

    1986-08-01

    An accurate and reliable measurement of poloidal β is essential to assess the performances of Joint European Torus (JET). The diamagnetic loop can measure β values as low as 0.1 in JET discharges with a plasma current larger than 2×106 A. The instrumentation used includes a flux loop rigidly fitted on a toroidal field (TF) coil, a large Rogowski coil measuring the TF busbar current, and a displacement gauge measuring the TF coil expansion. The fluxes to be compensated originate, in order of importance, from the TF current, the eddy current in the vessel, the TF coil expansion, and the stray coupling with the poloidal fields. The TF and eddy currents must be particularly well compensated on JET since the plasma current starts before the toroidal field has reached its plateau value. Comparison between the diamagnetic and other evaluations of β shows a good agreement.

  15. Measurement of the energy content of the JET tokamak plasma with a diamagnetic loop

    SciTech Connect

    Tonetti, G.; Christiansen, J.P.; de Kock, L.

    1986-08-01

    An accurate and reliable measurement of poloidal ..beta.. is essential to assess the performances of Joint European Torus (JET). The diamagnetic loop can measure ..beta.. values as low as 0.1 in JET discharges with a plasma current larger than 2 x 10/sup 6/ A. The instrumentation used includes a flux loop rigidly fitted on a toroidal field (TF) coil, a large Rogowski coil measuring the TF busbar current, and a displacement gauge measuring the TF coil expansion. The fluxes to be compensated originate, in order of importance, from the TF current, the eddy current in the vessel, the TF coil expansion, and the stray coupling with the poloidal fields. The TF and eddy currents must be particularly well compensated on JET since the plasma current starts before the toroidal field has reached its plateau value. Comparison between the diamagnetic and other evaluations of ..beta.. shows a good agreement.

  16. Joint swelling

    MedlinePlus

    Swelling of a joint ... Joint swelling may occur along with joint pain . The swelling may cause the joint to appear larger or abnormally shaped. Joint swelling can cause pain or stiffness. After an ...

  17. Fuzzy jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets. To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets, are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  18. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Here, collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet taggingmore » variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  19. Fast ion energy distribution from third harmonic radio frequency heating measured with a single crystal diamond detector at the Joint European Torus.

    PubMed

    Nocente, M; Cazzaniga, C; Tardocchi, M; Binda, F; Eriksson, J; Giacomelli, L; Muraro, A; Rebai, M; Sharapov, S; Gorini, G

    2015-10-01

    Neutron spectroscopy measurements with a single crystal diamond detector have been carried out at JET, for the first time in an experiment aimed at accelerating deuterons to MeV energies with radio frequency heating at the third harmonic. Data are interpreted by means of the expected response function of the detector and are used to extract parameters of the highly non-Maxwellian distribution function generated in this scenario. A comparison with observations using a time of flight and liquid scintillator neutron spectrometers is also presented. The results demonstrate the capability of diamond detectors to contribute to fast ion physics studies at JET and are of more general relevance in view of the application of such detectors for spectroscopy measurements in the neutron camera of next step tokamak devices. PMID:26520949

  20. Correction of the spectral calibration of the Joint European Torus core light detecting and ranging Thomson scattering diagnostic using ray tracing.

    PubMed

    Hawke, J; Scannell, R; Maslov, M; Migozzi, J B

    2013-10-01

    This work isolated the cause of the observed discrepancy between the electron temperature (T(e)) measurements before and after the JET Core LIDAR Thomson Scattering (TS) diagnostic was upgraded. In the upgrade process, stray light filters positioned just before the detectors were removed from the system. Modelling showed that the shift imposed on the stray light filters transmission functions due to the variations in the incidence angles of the collected photons impacted plasma measurements. To correct for this identified source of error, correction factors were developed using ray tracing models for the calibration and operational states of the diagnostic. The application of these correction factors resulted in an increase in the observed T(e), resulting in the partial if not complete removal of the observed discrepancy in the measured T(e) between the JET core LIDAR TS diagnostic, High Resolution Thomson Scattering, and the Electron Cyclotron Emission diagnostics. PMID:24188274

  1. Correction of the spectral calibration of the Joint European Torus core light detecting and ranging Thomson scattering diagnostic using ray tracing

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, J.; Scannell, R.; Maslov, M.; Migozzi, J. B.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2013-10-15

    This work isolated the cause of the observed discrepancy between the electron temperature (T{sub e}) measurements before and after the JET Core LIDAR Thomson Scattering (TS) diagnostic was upgraded. In the upgrade process, stray light filters positioned just before the detectors were removed from the system. Modelling showed that the shift imposed on the stray light filters transmission functions due to the variations in the incidence angles of the collected photons impacted plasma measurements. To correct for this identified source of error, correction factors were developed using ray tracing models for the calibration and operational states of the diagnostic. The application of these correction factors resulted in an increase in the observed T{sub e}, resulting in the partial if not complete removal of the observed discrepancy in the measured T{sub e} between the JET core LIDAR TS diagnostic, High Resolution Thomson Scattering, and the Electron Cyclotron Emission diagnostics.

  2. Fast ion energy distribution from third harmonic radio frequency heating measured with a single crystal diamond detector at the Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Nocente, M.; Rebai, M.; Gorini, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Giacomelli, L.; Muraro, A.; Binda, F.; Eriksson, J.; Sharapov, S.; Collaboration:

    2015-10-15

    Neutron spectroscopy measurements with a single crystal diamond detector have been carried out at JET, for the first time in an experiment aimed at accelerating deuterons to MeV energies with radio frequency heating at the third harmonic. Data are interpreted by means of the expected response function of the detector and are used to extract parameters of the highly non-Maxwellian distribution function generated in this scenario. A comparison with observations using a time of flight and liquid scintillator neutron spectrometers is also presented. The results demonstrate the capability of diamond detectors to contribute to fast ion physics studies at JET and are of more general relevance in view of the application of such detectors for spectroscopy measurements in the neutron camera of next step tokamak devices.

  3. The aeroacoustics of supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Philip J.; McLaughlin, Dennis K.

    1995-01-01

    This research project was a joint experimental/computational study of noise in supersonic jets. The experiments were performed in a low to moderate Reynolds number anechoic supersonic jet facility. Computations have focused on the modeling of the effect of an external shroud on the generation and radiation of jet noise. This report summarizes the results of the research program in the form of the Masters and Doctoral theses of those students who obtained their degrees with the assistance of this research grant. In addition, the presentations and publications made by the principal investigators and the research students is appended.

  4. 21 CFR 26.73 - Joint Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Joint Committee. 26.73 Section 26.73 Food and...Frameworkâ Provisions § 26.73 Joint Committee. (a) A Joint Committee consisting of representatives of the United States and the European Community (EC) will be established. The Joint Committee shall...

  5. 21 CFR 26.73 - Joint Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Joint Committee. 26.73 Section 26.73 Food and...Frameworkâ Provisions § 26.73 Joint Committee. (a) A Joint Committee consisting of representatives of the United States and the European Community (EC) will be established. The Joint Committee shall...

  6. 21 CFR 26.73 - Joint Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Joint Committee. 26.73 Section 26.73 Food and...Frameworkâ Provisions § 26.73 Joint Committee. (a) A Joint Committee consisting of representatives of the United States and the European Community (EC) will be established. The Joint Committee shall...

  7. 21 CFR 26.73 - Joint Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Joint Committee. 26.73 Section 26.73 Food and...Frameworkâ Provisions § 26.73 Joint Committee. (a) A Joint Committee consisting of representatives of the United States and the European Community (EC) will be established. The Joint Committee shall...

  8. 21 CFR 26.73 - Joint Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Joint Committee. 26.73 Section 26.73 Food and...Frameworkâ Provisions § 26.73 Joint Committee. (a) A Joint Committee consisting of representatives of the United States and the European Community (EC) will be established. The Joint Committee shall...

  9. Cosmic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Blandford, R.D.; Begelman, M.C.; Rees, M.J.

    1982-05-01

    Observations with radio telescopes have revealed that the center of many galaxies is a place of violent activity. This activity is often manifested in the production of cosmic jets. Each jet is a narrow stream of plasma that appears to squirt out of the center of a galaxy emitting radiowaves as it does so. New techniques in radio astronomy have shown how common jets are in the universe. These jets take on many different forms. The discovery of radio jets has helped in the understanding of the double structure of the majority of extragalactic radio sources. The morphology of some jets and explanations of how jets are fueled are discussed. There are many difficulties plaguing the investigation of jets. Some of these difficulties are (1) it is not known how much power the jets are radiating, (2) it is hard to tell whether a jet delieated by radio emission is identical to the region where ionized gas is flowing, and (3) what makes them. (SC)

  10. Microturbulence and Flow Shear in High-performance JET ITB Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny; A. Andre; A. Bicoulet; C. Challis; G.D. Conway; W. Dorland; D.R. Ernst; T.S. Hahm; T.C. Hender; D. McCune; G. Rewoldt; S.E. Sharapov

    2001-12-05

    The transport, flow shear, and linear growth rates of microturbulence are studied for a Joint European Torus (JET) plasma with high central q in which an internal transport barrier (ITB) forms and grows to a large radius. The linear microturbulence growth rates of the fastest growing (most unstable) toroidal modes with high toroidal mode number are calculated using the GS2 and FULL gyrokinetic codes. These linear growth rates, gamma (subscript lin) are large, but the flow-shearing rates, gamma (subscript ExB) (dominated by the toroidal rotation contribution) are also comparably large when and where the ITB exists.

  11. Water Jetting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Hi-Tech Inc., a company which manufactures water jetting equipment, needed a high pressure rotating swivel, but found that available hardware for the system was unsatisfactory. They were assisted by Marshall, which had developed water jetting technology to clean the Space Shuttles. The result was a completely automatic water jetting system which cuts rock and granite and removes concrete. Labor costs have been reduced; dust is suppressed and production has been increased.

  12. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  13. Use of a plane jet for flow-induced noise reduction of tandem rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, Zhao; Xi-xiang, Yang; Patrick, N. Okolo; Wei-hua, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Unsteady wake from upstream components of landing gear impinging on downstream components could be a strong noise source. The use of a plane jet is proposed to reduce this flow-induced noise. Tandem rods with different gap widths were utilized as the test body. Both acoustic and aerodynamic tests were conducted in order to validate this technique. Acoustic test results proved that overall noise emission from tandem rods could be lowered and tonal noise could be removed with use of the plane jet. However, when the plane jet was turned on, in some frequency range it could be the subsequent main contributor instead of tandem rods to total noise emission whilst in some frequency range rods could still be the main contributor. Moreover, aerodynamic tests fundamentally studied explanations for the noise reduction. Specifically, not only impinging speed to rods but speed and turbulence level to the top edge of the rear rod could be diminished by the upstream plane jet. Consequently, the vortex shedding induced by the rear rod was reduced, which was confirmed by the speed, Reynolds stress as well as the velocity fluctuation spectral measured in its wake. This study confirmed the potential use of a plane jet towards landing gear noise reduction. Project partially supported by the European Union FP7 CleanSky Joint Technology Initiative “ALLEGRA” (Grant No. 308225).

  14. Long Term Tritium Trapping in TFTR and JET

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; C.A. Gentile; K.M. Young; J.P. Coad; J.T. Hogan; R.-D. Penzhorn; and N. Bekris

    2001-07-24

    Tritium retention in TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] and JET [Joint European Torus] shows striking similarities and contrasts. In TFTR, 5 g of tritium were injected into circular plasmas over a 3.5 year period, mostly by neutral-beam injection. In JET, 35 g were injected into divertor plasmas over a 6 month campaign, mostly by gas puffing. In TFTR, the bumper limiter provided a large source of eroded carbon and a major part of tritium was co-deposited on the limiter and vessel wall. Only a small area of the co-deposit flaked off. In JET, the wall is a net erosion area, and co-deposition occurs principally in shadowed parts of the inner divertor, with heavy flaking. In both machines, the initial tritium retention, after a change from deuterium [D] to tritium [T] gas puffing, is high and is due to isotope exchange with deuterium on plasma-facing surfaces (dynamic inventory). The contribution of co-deposition is lower but cumulative, and is revealed by including periods of D fueling that reversed the T/D isotope exchange. Ion beam analysis of flakes from TFTR showed an atomic D/C ratio of 0.13 on the plasma facing surface, 0.25 on the back surface and 0.11 in the bulk. Data from a JET divertor tile showed a larger D/C ratio with 46% C, 30% D, 20% H and 4% O. Deuterium, tritium, and beryllium profiles have been measured and show a thin less than 50 micron co-deposited layer. Flakes retrieved from the JET vacuum vessel exhibited a high tritium release rate of 2e10 Bq/month/g. BBQ modeling of the effect of lithium on retention in TFTR showed overlapping lithium and tritium implantation and a 1.3x increase in local T retention.

  15. Unconditional jetting.

    PubMed

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M

    2008-08-01

    Capillary jetting of a fluid dispersed into another immiscible phase is usually limited by a critical capillary number, a function of the Reynolds number and the fluid property ratios. Critical conditions are set when the minimum spreading velocity of small perturbations v_{-};{*} along the jet (marginal stability velocity) is zero. Here we identify and describe parametric regions of high technological relevance, where v_{-};{*}>0 and the jet flow is always supercritical independently of the dispersed liquid flow rate; within these relatively broad regions, the jet does not undergo the usual dripping-jetting transition, so that either the jet can be made arbitrarily thin (yielding droplets of any imaginably small size), or the issuing flow rate can be made arbitrarily small. In this work, we provide illustrative analytical studies of asymptotic cases for both negligible and dominant inertia forces. In this latter case, requiring a nonzero jet surface velocity, axisymmetric perturbation waves "surf" downstream for all given wave numbers, while the liquid bulk can remain static. In the former case (implying small Reynolds flow) we found that the jet profile small slope is limited by a critical value; different published experiments support our predictions. PMID:18850933

  16. Plasma jet takes off.

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, L

    1999-01-01

    Thanks to a series of joint research projects by Los Alamos National Laboratory, Beta Squared of Allen, Texas, and the University of California at Los Angeles, there is now a more environmentally sound method for cleaning semiconductor chips that may also be effective in cleaning up chemical, bacterial, and nuclear contaminants. The Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet uses a type of ionized gas called plasma to clean up contaminants by binding to them and lifting them away. In contrast to the corrosive acids and chemical solvents traditionally used to clean semiconductor chips, the jet oxidizes contaminants, producing only benign gaseous by-products such as oxygen and carbon dioxide. The new technology is also easy to transport, cleans thoroughly and quickly, and presents no hazards to its operators. PMID:10417375

  17. The European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, M.; Bousson, S.; Calaga, R.; Danared, H.; Devanz, G.; Duperrier, R.; Eguia, J.; Eshraqi, M.; Gammino, S.; Hahn, H.; Jansson, A.; Oyon, C.; Pape-Møller, S.; Peggs, S.; Ponton, A.; Rathsman, K.; Ruber, R.; Satogata, T.; Trahern, G.

    2011-12-01

    In 2003 the joint European effort to design a European Spallation Source (ESS) resulted in a set of reports, and in May 2009 Lund was agreed to be the ESS site. The ESS Scandinavia office has since then worked on setting all the necessary legal and organizational matters in place so that the Design Update and construction can be started in January 2011, in collaboration with European partners. The Design Update phase is expected to end in 2012, to be followed by a construction phase, with first neutrons expected in 2018-2019.

  18. Comparison of Theory with Rotation Measurements in JET ICRH Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny; C.S. Chang; C. Giroud; R.J. Goldston; D. McCune; J. Ongena; F.W. Perkins; R.B. White; K.-D. Zastrow; and contributors to the EFDA-JET work programme

    2001-06-27

    Plasma rotation appears to improve plasma performance by increasing the E x B flow shearing rate, thus decreasing radial correlations in the microturbulence. Also, plasma rotation can increase the stability to resistive MHD modes. In the Joint European Torus (JET), toroidal rotation rates omega (subscript ''tor'') with high Mach numbers are generally measured in NBI-heated plasmas (since the neutral beams aim in the co-plasma current direction). They are considerably lower with only ICRH (and Ohmic) heating, but still surprisingly large considering that ICRH appears to inject relatively small amounts of angular momentum. Either the applied torques are larger than naively expected, or the anomalous transport of angular momentum is smaller than expected. Since ICRH is one of the main candidates for heating next-step tokamaks, and for creating burning plasmas in future tokamak reactors, this paper attempts to understand ICRH-induced plasma rotation.

  19. European Music Year 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexanderson, Thomas; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Articles concerning music are included in this newsletter dedicated to cultural venture to be jointly carried out by the Council of Europe and the European communities. Many events will mark Music Year 1985, including concerts, dance performances, operas, publications, recordings, festivals, exhibitions, competitions, and conferences on musical…

  20. Upgrading jet turbine technology

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1995-12-01

    This article describes a joint government/industry program that is developing a new breed of turbine components, including bearings, blades, and seals, to double the propulsion capacity of both military and commercial jet engines. Although the tensions of the Cold War have receded with the demise of the Soviet Union, the US continually seeks to improve the operational readiness of its weapon systems. The challenge facing the Pentagon today is maintaining US technological superiority in the face of post-Cold War budget cuts. A model program for doing so is the joint government/industry Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology program, or IHPTET (pronounced ip-tet). The goal of the IHPTET program is to develop technologies that will double the propulsion capability of military turbine engines by the turn of the century.

  1. Emerging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  2. Interaction of co-propagating jets in the presence of an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Michael; Doyle, Hugo; Brambrink, Erik; Crowston, Robert; Drake, R. Paul; Kuranz, Carolyn; Lamb, Don; Koenig, Michel; Kozlowski, Pawel; Marques, Jean-Raphael; Meinecke, Jena; Pelka, Alexander; Ravasio, Alessandra; Reville, Brian; Tzeferacos, Petros; Woosley, Nigel; Gregori, Gianluca; Acsel Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    We observed the interaction of two co-propagating jets in 1 mbar of argon gas in the presence of an external magnetic field at the LULI laser facility. The jets were created by irradiating a 100 μm aluminum foil with two 1.5 ns laser pulses separated by 5 mm, each containing 500 J of 527 nm light. Optical interferometry and schlieren imaging were used to observe the flow of the interacting jets. Additionally, an induction coil was fielded to measure the magnetic field 3 cm from the initiation of the flows. Measurements were made with and without a 0.5 T external magnetic field. Preliminary results and analysis will be presented. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Research Council under the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) / ERC grant agreement no. 256973. and by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-NA0001840.

  3. Joint BioEnergy Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Keasling, Jay; Simmons, Blake; Tartaglino, Virginia; Baidoo, Edward; Kothari, Ankita

    2015-06-15

    The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Research Center dedicated to developing advanced biofuels—liquid fuels derived from the solar energy stored in plant biomass that can replace gasoline, diesel and jet fuels.

  4. Jet noise analysis by Gabor spectrogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qiang

    2006-04-01

    A research was conducted to determine the functions of a set of nozzle pairs. The aeroacoustical performance of these pairs can be used to analyze the deformation of structure and change of jet condition. The jet noise signal was measured by a microphone placed in the radiation field of jet flow. In addition to some traditional methods used for analyzing noise both in time and frequency domain, Gabor spectrogram is adopted to obtain the joint time-frequency pattern of the jet noise under different jet conditions from nozzles with different structures. The jet noise from three nozzle pairs worked under two types of working conditions is treated by Gabor spectrogram. One condition is both nozzles in the nozzle pair keep their structure at a fixed chamber pressure, while another condition is one of these two nozzles' throat size decreases during the jet procedure under a fixed chamber pressure. Gabor spectrograms with different orders for the jet noise under the second condition are obtained and compared. Then a rational order is selected in analyzing the jet noise. Results are presented in this paper. The Gabor spectrogram patterns of these two conditions are with marked difference. The noise keeps its frequency peak during the whole jet procedure in the first condition. But there is a frequency peak shift in the second condition at a certain size of throat. The distribution of frequency peak along with the decrease of throat presents two states. This would be helpful for nozzle structure recognition.

  5. The second European interdisciplinary Ewing sarcoma research summit – A joint effort to deconstructing the multiple layers of a complex disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite multimodal treatment, long term outcome for patients with Ewing sarcoma is still poor. The second “European interdisciplinary Ewing sarcoma research summit” assembled a large group of scientific experts in the field to discuss their latest unpublished findings on the way to the identification of novel therapeutic targets and strategies. Ewing sarcoma is characterized by a quiet genome with presence of an EWSR1-ETS gene rearrangement as the only and defining genetic aberration. RNA-sequencing of recently described Ewing-like sarcomas with variant translocations identified them as biologically distinct diseases. Various presentations adressed mechanisms of EWS-ETS fusion protein activities with a focus on EWS-FLI1. Data were presented shedding light on the molecular underpinnings of genetic permissiveness to this disease uncovering interaction of EWS-FLI1 with recently discovered susceptibility loci. Epigenetic context as a consequence of the interaction between the oncoprotein, cell type, developmental stage, and tissue microenvironment emerged as dominant theme in the discussion of the molecular pathogenesis and inter- and intra-tumor heterogeneity of Ewing sarcoma, and the difficulty to generate animal models faithfully recapitulating the human disease. The problem of preclinical development of biologically targeted therapeutics was discussed and promising perspectives were offered from the study of novel in vitro models. Finally, it was concluded that in order to facilitate rapid pre-clinical and clinical development of novel therapies in Ewing sarcoma, the community needs a platform to maintain knowledge of unpublished results, systems and models used in drug testing and to continue the open dialogue initiated at the first two Ewing sarcoma summits. PMID:26802024

  6. The second European interdisciplinary Ewing sarcoma research summit--A joint effort to deconstructing the multiple layers of a complex disease.

    PubMed

    Kovar, Heinrich; Amatruda, James; Brunet, Erika; Burdach, Stefan; Cidre-Aranaz, Florencia; de Alava, Enrique; Dirksen, Uta; van der Ent, Wietske; Grohar, Patrick; Grünewald, Thomas G P; Helman, Lee; Houghton, Peter; Iljin, Kristiina; Korsching, Eberhard; Ladanyi, Marc; Lawlor, Elizabeth; Lessnick, Stephen; Ludwig, Joseph; Meltzer, Paul; Metzler, Markus; Mora, Jaume; Moriggl, Richard; Nakamura, Takuro; Papamarkou, Theodore; Radic Sarikas, Branka; Rédini, Francoise; Richter, Guenther H S; Rossig, Claudia; Schadler, Keri; Schäfer, Beat W; Scotlandi, Katia; Sheffield, Nathan C; Shelat, Anang; Snaar-Jagalska, Ewa; Sorensen, Poul; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Stewart, Elizabeth; Sweet-Cordero, Alejandro; Szuhai, Karoly; Tirado, Oscar M; Tirode, Franck; Toretsky, Jeffrey; Tsafou, Kalliopi; Üren, Aykut; Zinovyev, Andrei; Delattre, Olivier

    2016-02-23

    Despite multimodal treatment, long term outcome for patients with Ewing sarcoma is still poor. The second "European interdisciplinary Ewing sarcoma research summit" assembled a large group of scientific experts in the field to discuss their latest unpublished findings on the way to the identification of novel therapeutic targets and strategies. Ewing sarcoma is characterized by a quiet genome with presence of an EWSR1-ETS gene rearrangement as the only and defining genetic aberration. RNA-sequencing of recently described Ewing-like sarcomas with variant translocations identified them as biologically distinct diseases. Various presentations adressed mechanisms of EWS-ETS fusion protein activities with a focus on EWS-FLI1. Data were presented shedding light on the molecular underpinnings of genetic permissiveness to this disease uncovering interaction of EWS-FLI1 with recently discovered susceptibility loci. Epigenetic context as a consequence of the interaction between the oncoprotein, cell type, developmental stage, and tissue microenvironment emerged as dominant theme in the discussion of the molecular pathogenesis and inter- and intra-tumor heterogeneity of Ewing sarcoma, and the difficulty to generate animal models faithfully recapitulating the human disease. The problem of preclinical development of biologically targeted therapeutics was discussed and promising perspectives were offered from the study of novel in vitro models. Finally, it was concluded that in order to facilitate rapid pre-clinical and clinical development of novel therapies in Ewing sarcoma, the community needs a platform to maintain knowledge of unpublished results, systems and models used in drug testing and to continue the open dialogue initiated at the first two Ewing sarcoma summits. PMID:26802024

  7. Evaluation of reconstruction errors and identification of artefacts for JET gamma and neutron tomography.

    PubMed

    Craciunescu, Teddy; Murari, Andrea; Kiptily, Vasily; Lupelli, Ivan; Fernandes, Ana; Sharapov, Sergei; Tiseanu, Ion; Zoita, Vasile

    2016-01-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) neutron profile monitor ensures 2D coverage of the gamma and neutron emissive region that enables tomographic reconstruction. Due to the availability of only two projection angles and to the coarse sampling, tomographic inversion is a limited data set problem. Several techniques have been developed for tomographic reconstruction of the 2-D gamma and neutron emissivity on JET, but the problem of evaluating the errors associated with the reconstructed emissivity profile is still open. The reconstruction technique based on the maximum likelihood principle, that proved already to be a powerful tool for JET tomography, has been used to develop a method for the numerical evaluation of the statistical properties of the uncertainties in gamma and neutron emissivity reconstructions. The image covariance calculation takes into account the additional techniques introduced in the reconstruction process for tackling with the limited data set (projection resampling, smoothness regularization depending on magnetic field). The method has been validated by numerically simulations and applied to JET data. Different sources of artefacts that may significantly influence the quality of reconstructions and the accuracy of variance calculation have been identified. PMID:26827316

  8. High Rate Measurements of the Neutron Camera and Broadband Neutron Spectrometer at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Belli, F.; Gorini, G.; Joffrin, E.; Kiptily, V.; Lerche, E.; Murari, A.; Plyusnin, V. V.; Popovichev, S.; Reux, C.; Riva, M.; Syme, D. B.

    The Joint European Torus (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world. JET has been upgraded over the years and recently it has also become a test facility of the components designed for ITER, the next step fusion machine under construction in Cadarache (France). At JET, the neutron emission profile of Deuterium (D) or Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas is reconstructed using the neutron camera (KN3). In 2010 KN3 was equipped with a new digital data acquisition system (DAQ) based on Field Programmable Gated Array (FPGA). According to specifications, the DAQ is capable of high rate measurements up to 0.5 MCps. A new compact broadband spectrometer (KM12) based on BC501A organic liquid scintillating material was also installed in the same year and implements a similar DAQ as for KN3. This article illustrates the observations on the DAQ high count rate performance of both KN3 and KM12 in the latest JET D plasma experiments related to hybrid scenario and runaway electrons. For the latter, >1 MCps event rate was achieved with consequences on the behavior of the FPGA and on the reliability of the measurements.

  9. Evaluation of reconstruction errors and identification of artefacts for JET gamma and neutron tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craciunescu, Teddy; Murari, Andrea; Kiptily, Vasily; Lupelli, Ivan; Fernandes, Ana; Sharapov, Sergei; Tiseanu, Ion; Zoita, Vasile

    2016-01-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) neutron profile monitor ensures 2D coverage of the gamma and neutron emissive region that enables tomographic reconstruction. Due to the availability of only two projection angles and to the coarse sampling, tomographic inversion is a limited data set problem. Several techniques have been developed for tomographic reconstruction of the 2-D gamma and neutron emissivity on JET, but the problem of evaluating the errors associated with the reconstructed emissivity profile is still open. The reconstruction technique based on the maximum likelihood principle, that proved already to be a powerful tool for JET tomography, has been used to develop a method for the numerical evaluation of the statistical properties of the uncertainties in gamma and neutron emissivity reconstructions. The image covariance calculation takes into account the additional techniques introduced in the reconstruction process for tackling with the limited data set (projection resampling, smoothness regularization depending on magnetic field). The method has been validated by numerically simulations and applied to JET data. Different sources of artefacts that may significantly influence the quality of reconstructions and the accuracy of variance calculation have been identified.

  10. European Initiatives in Postgraduate Education in Gerontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rijsselt, Rene J. T.; Parkatti, Terttu; Troisi, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes three innovative European initiatives in postgraduate education in gerontology. The first is the European Masters Program in Gerontology (EuMaG), developed as an interdisciplinary joint program, supported and delivered by 22 European universities. Second, the Nordplus initiative to increase mobility of students and staff in…

  11. Synthetic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, Ivana M.

    2003-01-01

    Current investigation of synthetic jets and synthetic jets in cross-flow examined the effects of orifice geometry and dimensions, momentum-flux ratio, cluster of orifices, pitch and yaw angles as well as streamwise development of the flow field. This comprehensive study provided much needed experimental information related to the various control strategies. The results of the current investigation on isolated and clustered synthetic jets with and without cross-flow will be further analyzed and documented in detail. Presentations at national conferences and publication of peer- reviewed journal articles are also expected. Projected publications will present both the mean and turbulent properties of the flow field, comparisons made with the data available in an open literature, as well as recommendations for the future work.

  12. The joint in vitro action of polymyxin B and miconazole against pathogens associated with canine otitis externa from three European countries

    PubMed Central

    Pietschmann, Silvia; Meyer, Michael; Voget, Michael; Cieslicki, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Canine otitis externa, an inflammation of the external ear canal, can be maintained and worsened by bacterial or fungal infections. For topical treatment, combinations of anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial ingredients are mainly used. Hypothesis/Objectives This study was conducted to elucidate the in vitro activity of polymyxin B and miconazole against clinical bacterial isolates from three European countries, to investigate possible differences in sensitivity and to assess drug interactions. Animals Seventeen strains of Escherichia coli, 24 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 24 strains of Proteus mirabilis and 25 strains of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from dogs with diagnosed otitis externa had been isolated in Germany, France and Italy. Methods Drug activities were evaluated by minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration. The potentiation of polymyxin B plus miconazole was calculated using the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI). An FICI ≤0.5 defined synergy. Furthermore, geographical variations in the FICI and MIC were assessed by statistical analysis. Results Bacterial susceptibilities were comparable in different European countries, because there were no significant MIC and FICI variations (P > 0.05). As a single agent, polymyxin B had bactericidal activity against most E. coli and P. aeruginosa strains and, in higher concentrations, against S. pseudintermedius strains. Miconazole was bactericidal against all Staphylococcus strains. Synergy was demonstrated against strains of E. coli and P. aeruginosa (FICI = 0.25 and 0.50, respectively), whereas overall there was no interaction against S. pseudintermedius strains (FICI = 1.25). Proteus mirabilis strains were not inhibited by each of the drugs individually or by their combination. Conclusions and clinical importance In vitro synergy of polymyxin B and miconazole against E. coli and P. aeruginosa isolates indicates a rationale

  13. Benchmarking of Monte Carlo based shutdown dose rate calculations for applications to JET.

    PubMed

    Petrizzi, L; Batistoni, P; Fischer, U; Loughlin, M; Pereslavtsev, P; Villari, R

    2005-01-01

    The calculation of dose rates after shutdown is an important issue for operating nuclear reactors. A validated computational tool is needed for reliable dose rate calculations. In fusion reactors neutrons induce high levels of radioactivity and presumably high doses. The complex geometries of the devices require the use of sophisticated geometry modelling and computational tools for transport calculations. Simple rule of thumb laws do not always apply well. Two computational procedures have been developed recently and applied to fusion machines. Comparisons between the two methods showed some inherent discrepancies when applied to calculation for the ITER while good agreement was found for a 14 MeV point source neutron benchmark experiment. Further benchmarks were considered necessary to investigate in more detail the reasons for the different results in different cases. In this frame the application to the Joint European Torus JET machine has been considered as a useful benchmark exercise. In a first calculational benchmark with a representative D-T irradiation history of JET the two methods differed by no more than 25%. In another, more realistic benchmark exercise, which is the subject of this paper, the real irradiation history of D-T and D-D campaigns conducted at JET in 1997-98 were used to calculate the shut-down doses at different locations, irradiation and decay times. Experimental dose data recorded at JET for the same conditions offer the possibility to check the prediction capability of the calculations and thus show the applicability (and the constraints) of the procedures and data to the rather complex shutdown dose rate analysis of real fusion devices. Calculation results obtained by the two methods are reported below, comparison with experimental results give discrepancies ranging between 2 and 10. The reasons of that can be ascribed to the high uncertainty on the experimental data and the unsatisfactory JET model used in the calculation. A new

  14. Hypermobile joints

    MedlinePlus

    ... too far. In children with hypermobility syndrome, those ligaments are loose or weak. This may lead to: Arthritis, which may develop over time Dislocated joints, which is a separation of two bones where they meet at a joint Sprains and strains Children with hypermobile joints also often have flat ...

  15. Joint Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    A joint is where two or more bones come together, like the knee, hip, elbow, or shoulder. Joints can be damaged by many types of injuries or diseases, including Arthritis - inflammation of a joint. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling. Over time, ...

  16. Jets in air-jet family

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navia, C. E.; Sawayanagi, K.

    1985-01-01

    The A-jet families on Chacaltaya emulsion chamber experiments were analyzed by the study of jets which are reconstructed by a grouping procedure. It is demonstrated that large-E sub J R sub J events are characterized by small number of jets and two-jet like asymmetric shape, binocular events and the other type. This type has a larger number of jets and more symmetrical shape in the P sub t plane.

  17. Marine Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The marine turbine pump pictured is the Jacuzzi 12YJ, a jet propulsion system for pleasure or commercial boating. Its development was aided by a NASA computer program made available by the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) at the University of Georgia. The manufacturer, Jacuzzi Brothers, Incorporated, Little Rock, Arkansas, used COSMIC'S Computer Program for Predicting Turbopump Inducer Loading, which enabled substantial savings in development time and money through reduction of repetitive testing.

  18. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  19. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  20. Responses of Raptorial Birds to Low Level Military Jets and Sonic Booms: Results of the 1980-1981 Joint U.S. Air Force-U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    Summary: For this study, we gathered several kinds of data to determine the likely effects of low level jets and sonic booms on nesting Peregrine Falcons and other raptors. We directly observed responses to worst case stimulus loads: responses to extremely frequent and extremely nearby jet aircraft were often minimal, seldom significant and never associated with reproductive failure. Likewise, responses to real and simulated sonic booms were often minimal and never productivity limiting. In addition to directly observing behavioral responses, in 1981 we invited jet passes at four Prairie Falcon eyries during courtship and incubation when the adults were most likely to abandon, on an ad libitum basis. All four eyries fledged young. Nesting success and site reoccupancy rates were high for all eyries. In tests of two relatively naive captive Peregrine Falcons, we failed to detect significantly negative responses. Typically the birds either quickly resumed feeding or other activities within a few seconds following a pass or boom. The female falcon repeatedly made hunting forays as jets swept overhead. From heart rate (HR) data taken via a telemetering egg during incubation at a wild Prairie Falcon eyrie, we determined that stimulus induced HR alterations were comparable to rate changes of the birds settling to incubate following flight. No significant long term responses were identified. The falcons successfully fledged two young even with the more disruptive activities associated with entering the eyrie three times to position and recover the telemetering eggs. Significantly, birds ofprey of several genera commonly nest in the supersonic military operations areas in southern Arizona. In addition, raptor eyries are frequently found at locations where low level jet traffic naturally concentrates. For example, Prairie Falcon Site 11 is directly on the approach path to strafing and bombing targets. Prairie Falcon Site 1 is in a narrow canyon through which A-10 aircraft

  1. Ceramic joints

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Bradley J.; Patten, Jr., Donald O.

    1991-01-01

    Butt joints between materials having different coefficients of thermal expansion are prepared having a reduced probability of failure of stress facture. This is accomplished by narrowing/tapering the material having the lower coefficient of thermal expansion in a direction away from the joint interface and not joining the narrow-tapered surface to the material having the higher coefficient of thermal expansion.

  2. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roloff, P.

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  3. Temporomandibular Joint, Closed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oral Health > The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Main Content Title: The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Description: The temporomandibular joint connects the lower ...

  4. Corporate Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, Savannah, GA, used a version of a NASA program called WIBCO to design a wing for the Gulfstream IV (G-IV) which will help to reduce transonic drag (created by shock waves that develop as an airplane approaches the speed of sound). The G-IV cruises at 88 percent of the speed of sound, and holds the international record in its class for round-the-world flight. They also used the STANS5 and Profile programs in the design. They will use the NASA program GASP to help determine the gross weight, range, speed, payload and optimum wing area of an intercontinental supersonic business jet being developed in cooperation with Sukhoi Design Bureau, a Soviet organization.

  5. European Industrial Doctorates: Marie Curie Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Commission, 2012

    2012-01-01

    European industrial doctorates are joint doctoral training projects funded by the European Union (EU) and open to all research fields. The project brings together an academic participant (university, research institution, etc.) and a company. They have to be established in two different EU Member States or associated countries. Associated partners…

  6. Jet inclusive cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Del Duca, V.

    1992-11-01

    Minijet production in jet inclusive cross sections at hadron colliders, with large rapidity intervals between the tagged jets, is evaluated by using the BFKL pomeron. We describe the jet inclusive cross section for an arbitrary number of tagged jets, and show that it behaves like a system of coupled pomerons.

  7. Supersonic gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulov, V. G.

    The papers presented in this volume provide an overview of the current state of research in the gas dynamics of jet flows. In particular, attention is given to free supersonic jets and to the interaction of supersonic jets with one another and with obstacles under stationary and nonstationary flow conditions. Papers are presented on a method for calculating a weakly anisotropic supersonic turbulent jet in a subsonic slipstream; composite supersonic jets; the principal gas-dynamic characteristics of the processes occurring in gas-jet-driven shock-wave generators; and the construction of models for supersonic jet flows. For individual items see A84-16902 to A84-16918

  8. Compliant joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eklund, Wayne D. (Inventor); Kerley, James J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A compliant joint is provided for prosthetic and robotic devices which permits rotation in three different planes. The joint provides for the controlled use of cable under motion. Perpendicular outer mounting frames are joined by swaged cables that interlock at a center block. Ball bearings allow for the free rotation of the second mounting frame relative to the first mounting frame within a predetermined angular rotation that is controlled by two stop devices. The cables allow for compliance at the stops and the cables allow for compliance in six degrees of freedom enabling the duplication or simulation of the rotational movement and flexibility of a natural hip or knee joint, as well as the simulation of a joint designed for a specific robotic component for predetermined design parameters.

  9. Joint pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... or conditions. It may be linked to arthritis , bursitis , and muscle pain . No matter what causes it, ... Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus Bursitis Chondromalacia patellae Crystals in the joint: gout (especially ...

  10. Joint Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... ankles and toes. Other types of arthritis include gout or pseudogout. Sometimes, there is a mechanical problem ... for more information on osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and gout. How Common are Joint Problems? Osteoarthritis, which affects ...

  11. Biotechnology for the Environment, A Report on the Joint United States - European Union Celebration of a Decade of Environmental Biotechnology Exchange Activities for Early Career Scientists, Project ID: 0011751

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph M. Suflita

    2006-09-30

    The joint EU-US Task Force on Environmental Biotechnology held a workshop entitled, 'A Celebration of a Decade of Environmental Biotechnology Exchange Activities' on October 17, 2005 in Brussels, Belgium. This was a fitting venue since Brussels was where the EU-US transatlantic initiative originated. The workshop brought together former trainees who are currently active in the field of environmental biotechnology in order to (1) assess the impact of the past training activities; (2) to promote further collaborations; and (3) to highlight working group and task force activities in this field. Presentations by the early career scientists filled the meeting day (see Appendix I and II for meeting agenda and abstract book, respectively). Task Force members chaired the various sessions. An additional poster session provided an opportunity for more intensive scientific exchange. The day culminated with a formal dinner and gathering of all participants. Agencies supporting the activities included DOE, USDA and NSF. Funds received from the DOE were exhausted and USDA and NSF allowed the Task Force to use unexpended monies (via no cost extensions) to facilitate future fellowship exchange activities. Over the past ten years, there has been a high level of sensitivity for working collaboratively with European colleagues. This philosophy simply pervades each and every activity of the EU-US Task Force. Realistically, this means that there is a careful balance between the US and EU participation in all functions. The Brussels 'Celebration' workshop was no exception. The organizers anticipated funding more former U.S. trainees than actually attended the workshop and raised the necessary funds to accomplish this goal. However, the number of U.S. attendees needed to be tempered since the financial resources for our EU counterparts proved more difficult to obtain. In order to maintain the scholarly and political balance on the program of events, fewer U.S. attendees were invited

  12. Stretched Inertial Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Seon, Thomas; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Liquid jets often arise as short-lived bursting liquid flows. Cavitation or impact-driven jets, bursting champagne bubbles, shaped-charge jets, ballistospores or drop-on-demand inkjet printing are a few examples where liquid jets are suddenly released. The trademark of all these discharge jets is the property of being stretched, due to the quenching injection. the present theoretical and experimental investigation, the structure of the jet flow field will be unraveled experimentally for a few emblematic occurrences of discharge jets. Though the injection markedly depends on each flow configuration, the jet velocity field will be shown to be systematically and rapidly attracted to the universal stretching flow z/t. The emergence of this inertial attractor actually only relies on simple kinematic ingredients, and as such is fairly generic. The universality of the jet velocity structure will be discussed.

  13. Vectoring of parallel synthetic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Tim; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram; Gomit, Guillaume

    2015-11-01

    A pair of parallel synthetic jets can be vectored by applying a phase difference between the two driving signals. The resulting jet can be merged or bifurcated and either vectored towards the actuator leading in phase or the actuator lagging in phase. In the present study, the influence of phase difference and Strouhal number on the vectoring behaviour is examined experimentally. Phase-locked vorticity fields, measured using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), are used to track vortex pairs. The physical mechanisms that explain the diversity in vectoring behaviour are observed based on the vortex trajectories. For a fixed phase difference, the vectoring behaviour is shown to be primarily influenced by pinch-off time of vortex rings generated by the synthetic jets. Beyond a certain formation number, the pinch-off timescale becomes invariant. In this region, the vectoring behaviour is determined by the distance between subsequent vortex rings. We acknowledge the financial support from the European Research Council (ERC grant agreement no. 277472).

  14. European Mistletoe

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov Key References American mistletoe. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Web site. Accessed at www.naturaldatabase.com on July 7, 2009. European mistletoe. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Web site. Accessed at www.naturaldatabase.com on July ...

  15. Joint lubrication.

    PubMed

    McCutchen, C W

    1983-01-01

    The fine-pored, easily compressed articular cartilage provides animal joints with self-pressurized hydrostatic (weeping) lubrication. The solid skeletons of the cartilages press against each other, but so lightly that their rubbing is lubricated successfully by synovial fluid--a boundary lubricant too weak to lubricate ordinary bearings. PMID:6317095

  16. European Community.

    PubMed

    1987-05-01

    The European Community was established in 1951 to reconcile France and Germany after World War II and to make possible the eventual federation of Europe. By 1986, there were 12 member countries: France, Italy, Belgium, the Federal Republic of Germany, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Denmark, Ireland, the United Kingdom, Greece, Spain, and Portugal. Principal areas of concern are internal and external trade, agriculture, monetary coordination, fisheries, common industrial and commercial policies, assistance, science and research, and common social and regional policies. The European Community has a budget of US$34.035 billion/year, funded by customs duties and 1.4% of each member's value-added tax. The treaties establishing the European Community call for members to form a common market, a common customs tariff, and common agricultural, transport, economic, and nuclear policies. Major European Community institutions include the Commission, Council of Ministers, European Parliament, Court of Justice, and Economic and Social Committee. The Community is the world's largest trading unit, accounting for 15% of world trade. The 2 main goals of the Community's industrial policy are to create an open internal market and to promote technological innovation in order to improve international competitiveness. The European Community aims to contribute to the economic and social development of Third World countries as well. PMID:12177941

  17. Two-axis hydraulic joint for high speed, heavy lift robotic operations

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, M.R.; Robinett, R.D.; Phelan, J.R.; VanZuiden, D.M.

    1994-04-01

    A hydraulically driven universal joint was developed for a heavy lift, high speed nuclear waste remediation application. Each axis is driven by a simple hydraulic cylinder controlled by a jet pipe servovalve. Servovalve behavior is controlled by a force feedback control system, which damps the hydraulic resonance. A prototype single joint robot was built and tested. A two joint robot is under construction.

  18. Jets of incipient liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnikov, A. V.; Mazheiko, N. A.; Skripov, V. P.

    2000-05-01

    Jets of incipient water escaping into the atmosphere through a short channel are photographed. In some experiments. complete disintegration of the jet is observed. The relationship of this phenomenon with intense volume incipience is considered. The role of the Coanda effect upon complete opening of the jet is revealed. Measurement results of the recoil force R of the jets of incipient liquids are presented. Cases of negative thrust caused by the Coanda effect are noted. Generalization of experimental data is proposed.

  19. NASA Jet Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    The presentation highlights jet-noise research conducted in the Subsonic Fixed Wing, Supersonics, and Environmentally Responsible Aviation Projects in the Fundamental Aeronautics Program at NASA. The research efforts discussed include NASA's updated Aircraft NOise Prediction Program (ANOPP2), acoustic-analogy-based prediction tools, jet-surface-interaction studies, plasma-actuator investigations, N+2 Supersonics Validation studies, rectangular-jet experiments, twin-jet experiments, and Hybrid Wind Body (HWB) activities.

  20. Prewhirl Jet Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, S. Y.; Jensen, M.; Jackson, E. D.

    1985-01-01

    Simple accurate model of centrifugal or rocket engine pumps provides information necessary to design inducer backflow deflector, backflow eliminator and prewhirl jet in jet mixing zones. Jet design based on this model shows improvement in inducer suction performance and reduced cavitation damage.

  1. Joint assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A joint assembly is provided which includes a drive assembly and a swivel mechanism. The drive assembly features a motor operatively associated with a plurality of drive shafts for driving auxiliary elements, and a plurality of swivel shafts for pivoting the drive assembly. The swivel mechanism engages the swivel shafts and has a fixable element that may be attached to a foundation. The swivel mechanism is adapted to cooperate with the swivel shafts to pivot the drive assembly with at least two degrees of freedom relative to the foundation. The joint assembly allows for all components to remain encased in a tight, compact, and sealed package, making it ideal for space, exploratory, and commercial applications.

  2. Analysis of laser-produces jets from locally heated targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Holger; Robinson, Alex

    2015-11-01

    Recent simulations showed that it might be possible to produce a jet by locally heating a foil target with a high intensity laser, so as to produce a single blast wave which then drives jet formation. In contrast to many earlier experimental setups, the jets in this configuration are formed by a two stage process similar to that thought to be responsible for jets from young stellar objects. As the blast wave expands into the ambient medium it creates an inverse conical density structure. This inverse cone focuses the flow into a conically converging flow which then turns into a narrow jet. The realisation of this two step process in an experiment could make it possible to study the formation of stellar jets in the laboratory. We present new results investigating the criteria that lead to the creation of the inverse conical structure and the subsequent jet formation. The localised heating necessary for driving the jet is achieved by guiding the electrons in self generated magnetic fields at resistivity gradients. We present simulations demonstrating the geometries that lead to the localised heating suitable for jet formation. This work is funded by the European Research Council, grant STRUCMAGFAST (ERC-StG-2012).

  3. Vessel thermal map real-time system for the JET tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, D.; Felton, R.; Jachmich, S.; Lomas, P.; McCullen, P.; Neto, A.; Valcárcel, D. F.; Arnoux, G.; Card, P.; Devaux, S.; Goodyear, A.; Kinna, D.; Stephen, A.; Zastrow, K.-D.

    2012-05-01

    The installation of international thermonuclear experimental reactor-relevant materials for the plasma facing components (PFCs) in the Joint European Torus (JET) is expected to have a strong impact on the operation and protection of the experiment. In particular, the use of all-beryllium tiles, which deteriorate at a substantially lower temperature than the formerly installed carbon fiber composite tiles, imposes strict thermal restrictions on the PFCs during operation. Prompt and precise responses are therefore required whenever anomalous temperatures are detected. The new vessel thermal map real-time application collects the temperature measurements provided by dedicated pyrometers and infrared cameras, groups them according to spatial location and probable offending heat source, and raises alarms that will trigger appropriate protective responses. In the context of the JET global scheme for the protection of the new wall, the system is required to run on a 10 ms cycle communicating with other systems through the real-time data network. In order to meet these requirements a commercial off-the-shelf solution has been adopted based on standard x86 multicore technology. Linux and the multithreaded application real-time executor (MARTe) software framework were respectively the operating system of choice and the real-time framework used to build the application. This paper presents an overview of the system with particular technical focus on the configuration of its real-time capability and the benefits of the modular development approach and advanced tools provided by the MARTe framework.

  4. Tritium Removal from JET and TFTR Tiles by a Scanning Laser

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; N. Bekris; J.P. Coad; C.A. Gentile; M. Glugla

    2002-05-30

    Fast and efficient tritium removal is needed for future D-T machines with carbon plasma-facing components. A novel method for tritium release has been demonstrated on co-deposited layers on tiles retrieved from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and from the Joint European Torus (JET). A scanning continuous wave neodymium laser beam was focused to =100 W/mm2 and scanned at high speed over the co-deposits, heating them to temperatures =2000 C for about 10 ms in either air or argon atmospheres. Fiber optic coupling between the laser and scanner was implemented. Up to 87% of the co-deposited tritium was thermally desorbed from the JET and TFTR samples. This technique appears to be a promising in-situ method for tritium removal in a next-step D-T device as it avoids oxidation, the associated de-conditioning of the plasma-facing surfaces, and the expense of processing large quantities of tritium oxide.

  5. Identifying low-dimensional dynamics in type-I edge-localised-mode processes in JET plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon, F. A.; Chapman, S. C.; Nicol, R. M.; Dendy, R. O.; Webster, A. J.; Alper, B. [EURATOM Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2013-04-15

    Edge localised mode (ELM) measurements from reproducibly similar plasmas in the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak, which differ only in their gas puffing rate, are analysed in terms of the pattern in the sequence of inter-ELM time intervals. It is found that the category of ELM defined empirically as type I-typically more regular, less frequent, and having larger amplitude than other ELM types-embraces substantially different ELMing processes. By quantifying the structure in the sequence of inter-ELM time intervals using delay time plots, we reveal transitions between distinct phase space dynamics, implying transitions between distinct underlying physical processes. The control parameter for these transitions between these different ELMing processes is the gas puffing rate.

  6. Aeroacoustics of hot jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, K.

    2004-10-01

    A systematic study has been undertaken to quantify the effect of jet temperature on the noise radiated by subsonic jets. Nozzles of different diameters were tested to uncover the effects of Reynolds number. All the tests were carried out at Boeing's Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility, with simultaneous measurement of thrust and noise. It is concluded that the change in spectral shape at high jet temperatures, normally attributed to the contribution from dipoles, is due to Reynolds number effects and not dipoles. This effect has not been identified before. A critical value of the Reynolds number that would need to be maintained to avoid the effects associated with low Reynolds number has been estimated to be {˜}400 000. It is well-known that large-scale structures are the dominant generators of noise in the peak radiation direction for high-speed jets. Experimental evidence is presented that shows the spectral shape at angles close to the jet axis from unheated low subsonic jets to be the same as from heated supersonic jets. A possible mechanism for the observed trend is proposed. When a subsonic jet is heated with the Mach number held constant, there is a broadening of the angular sector in which peak radiation occurs. Furthermore, there is a broadening of the spectral peak. Similar trends have been observed at supersonic Mach numbers. The spectral shapes in the forward quadrant and in the near-normal angles from unheated and heated subsonic jets also conform to the universal shape obtained from supersonic jet data. Just as for unheated jets, the peak frequency at angles close to the jet axis is independent of jet velocity as long as the acoustic Mach number is less than unity. The extensive database generated in the current test programme is intended to provide test cases with high-quality data that could be used for the evaluation of theoretical/semi-theoretical jet noise prediction methodologies.

  7. Superfast Cosmic Jet "Hits the Wall"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-01-01

    A superfast jet of subatomic particles presumably powered by the gravitational energy of a black hole has collided with nearby material, been slowed dramatically and released much of its energy in the collision, radio astronomers report. The astronomers used the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope to observe the jet's motion. This is the first time such a collision has been seen within our own Milky Way Galaxy, and the collision may shed new light on the physics of cosmic jets. Robert Hjellming, Michael Rupen and Frank Ghigo of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO); Amy Mioduszewski of the Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe; Don Smith of MIT's Space Research Lab; Alan Harmon of Marshall Space Flight Center, and Elizabeth Waltman of the Naval Research Laboratory reported their findings today at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Austin, TX. The cosmic jet comes from an object called XTE J1748-288, at least 30,000 light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius, near the center of the Milky Way. XTE J1748-288, discovered on June 4, 1998, by Don Smith, using the RXTE satellite, is a "black hole candidate," probably consisting of a black hole drawing material from a companion star and accelerating jets of material outward in the process. A series of VLA images showed a "blob" of material in the jet moving at an apparent speed at least 50 percent greater than that of light. This is only the third such "superluminal" jet seen in our own Galaxy. The apparent faster-than-light motion is an illusion created by geometric effects when jets move at nearly the speed of light and are aligned so that their motion is somewhat toward Earth. The two other Milky Way objects whose jets show such rapid motion are dubbed "microquasars," because their behavior mimics that of quasars -- much larger objects seen at the cores of very distant galaxies. A series of VLA images showed material ejected as a jet from the core of XTE J1748

  8. Theory of laminar viscous jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynenko, O. G.; Korovkin, V. N.; Sokovishin, Iu. A.

    Results of recent theoretical studies of laminar jet flows of a viscous incompressible fluid are reviewed. In particular, attention is given to plane, fan-shaped, axisymmetric, and swirling jet flows; jet flows behind bodies; and slipstream jet flows. The discussion also covers dissipation of mechanical energy in jet flows, jet flows with a zero excess momentum, and asymptotic series expansions in the theory of jet flows.

  9. Jet Reconstruction and Spectroscopy at Hadron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellettini, Giorgio

    2011-11-01

    . Jet spectroscopy, as difficult as it might be, is a vital field of research. We should not give up, not at all. This is why we started this series of workshops. We would like on one hand to document in a comprehensive frame the progress being made in calibrating the jet energy and improving the jet energy resolution, and at the same time to show that the effort is being rewarded with significant scientific findings. Since this can be achieved only with a joint effort of experimentalists and theorists, theory contributions are, and will be, solicited and most welcome. I trust that our work will be fruitful to the entire HEP community. Giorgio Bellettini Physics Department and INFN, Pisa References [1] Aaltonen T et al 2009 The CDF Collaboration Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 091803 [2] Aaltonen T et al 2011 The CDF Collaboration Phys. Rev. Lett. 106 171801

  10. Jet Substructure Without Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP

    2011-08-19

    We present an alternative approach to identifying and characterizing jet substructure. An angular correlation function is introduced that can be used to extract angular and mass scales within a jet without reference to a clustering algorithm. This procedure gives rise to a number of useful jet observables. As an application, we construct a top quark tagging algorithm that is competitive with existing methods. In preparation for the LHC, the past several years have seen extensive work on various aspects of collider searches. With the excellent resolution of the ATLAS and CMS detectors as a catalyst, one area that has undergone significant development is jet substructure physics. The use of jet substructure techniques, which probe the fine-grained details of how energy is distributed in jets, has two broad goals. First, measuring more than just the bulk properties of jets allows for additional probes of QCD. For example, jet substructure measurements can be compared against precision perturbative QCD calculations or used to tune Monte Carlo event generators. Second, jet substructure allows for additional handles in event discrimination. These handles could play an important role at the LHC in discriminating between signal and background events in a wide variety of particle searches. For example, Monte Carlo studies indicate that jet substructure techniques allow for efficient reconstruction of boosted heavy objects such as the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons, the top quark, and the Higgs boson.

  11. Jets from young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, John

    2007-10-01

    Most stars produce spectacular jets during their formation. There are thousands of young stars within 500 pc of the Sun and many power jets. Thus protostellar jets may be the most common type of collimated astrophysical outflow. Shocks powered by outflows excite many emission lines, exhibit a rich variety of structure, and motions with velocities ranging from 50 to over 500 km s-1. Due to their relative proximity, proper motions and structural changes can be observed in less than a year. I review the general properties of protostellar jets, summarize some results from recent narrow-band imaging surveys of entire clouds, discuss irradiated jets, and end with some comments concerning outflows from high-mass young stellar objects. Protostellar outflows are ideal laboratories for the exploration of the jet physics.

  12. Relativistic Jets in Collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiqun; Woosley, S. E.; MacFadyen, A. I.

    2003-04-01

    We examine the propagation of two-dimensional relativistic jets through the stellar progenitor in the collapsar model for gamma-ray bursts. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the jet is collimated by its passage. Moreover, interaction of the jet with the star causes mixing that sporadically decelerates the jet, leading to a highly variable Lorentz factor. The jet that finally emerges has a moderate Lorentz factor, but a very large internal energy loading. In a second series of calculations we follow the emergence of such enegy-loaded jets from the star. For the initial conditions chosen, conversion of the remaining internal energy gives a terminal Lorentz factor of approximately 150. Implications of our calculations for GRB light curves, the luminosity-variability relation, and the GRB-supernova association are discussed.

  13. What ignites optical jets?

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian Jester

    2002-12-23

    The properties of radio galaxies and quasars with and without optical or X-ray jets are compared. The majority of jets from which high-frequency emission has been detected so far (13 with optical emission, 11 with X-rays, 13 with both) are associated with the most powerful radio sources at any given redshift. It is found that optical/X-ray jet sources are more strongly beamed than the average population of extragalactic radio sources. This suggests that the detection or non-detection of optical emission from jets has so far been dominated by surface brightness selection effects, not by jet physics. It implies that optical jets are much more common than is currently appreciated.

  14. Effects of sawtooth crashes on beam ions and fusion product tritons in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, F. B.; Adams, J. M.; Bond, D. S.; Hone, M. A.; Howarth, P. J. A.; Jarvis, O. N.; Loughlin, M. J.; Sadler, G. J.; Van Belle, P.; Watkins, N.

    1994-05-01

    The JET neutron emission profile monitor is used to measure the 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV neutron emission line integrals before and after sawtooth crashes in high d-d neutron yield, hot ion H mode plasmas in the Joint European Torus (JET). Deuterium-deuterium (d-d) fusion produces 2.5 MeV neutrons and 1 MeV tritons (t) at nearly equal rates from its two reaction channels. A plasma current of 3 MA is sufficiently high to contain most of the fusion product tritons, which have birth orbit gyroradii and velocity space distributions similar to those of the 3.5 MeV or particles from d-t fusion. By examining neutron emission line integrals and tomographically deduced local emissivity profiles, an upper limit of 10% can be placed on the net fraction of fusion product tritons which are displaced from the plasma axis by those sawtooth crashes studied. This is a much smaller net fraction than that typically observed, 35-55%, for displaced injected neutral beam deuterium ions. A study of the response of beam injected deuterium ions to a sawtooth crash shows that the change in their axial density depends on the precrash spatial width of the neutron emissivity profile. The fusion product tritons, which have a large precrash spatial width, respond weakly to a crash. This weak response is consistent with the behaviour of the analogous d-d beam thermal neutrons when extrapolated to the corresponding emissivity spatial width. The implication of these observations is that beam ions and 3.5 MeV alpha particles in JET may be relatively resilient to sawtooth clashes, when the spatial width of their density is sufficiently large

  15. Transition and mixing in axisymmetric jets and vortex rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. A., Jr.; Cantwell, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    A class of impulsively started, axisymmetric, laminar jets produced by a time dependent joint source of momentum are considered. These jets are different flows, each initially at rest in an unbounded fluid. The study is conducted at three levels of detail. First, a generalized set of analytic creeping flow solutions are derived with a method of flow classification. Second, from this set, three specific creeping flow solutions are studied in detail: the vortex ring, the round jet, and the ramp jet. This study involves derivation of vorticity, stream function, entrainment diagrams, and evolution of time lines through computer animation. From entrainment diagrams, critical points are derived and analyzed. The flow geometry is dictated by the properties and location of critical points which undergo bifurcation and topological transformation (a form of transition) with changing Reynolds number. Transition Reynolds numbers were calculated. A state space trajectory was derived describing the topological behavior of these critical points. This state space derivation yielded three states of motion which are universal for all axisymmetric jets. Third, the axisymmetric round jet is solved numerically using the unsteady laminar Navier Stokes equations. These equations were shown to be self similar for the round jet. Numerical calculations were performed up to a Reynolds number of 30 for a 60x60 point mesh. Animations generated from numerical solution showed each of the three states of motion for the round jet, including the Re = 30 case.

  16. Interpretation of extragalactic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The nature of extragalatic radio jets is modeled. The basic hypothesis of these models is that extragalatic jets are outflows of matter which can be described within the framework of fluid dynamics and that the outflows are essentially continuous. The discussion is limited to the interpretation of large-scale (i.e., kiloparsec-scale) jets. The central problem is to infer the physical parameters of the jets from observed distributions of total and polarized intensity and angle of polarization as a function of frequency. 60 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Properties of gluon jets

    SciTech Connect

    Sugano, K.

    1986-09-01

    The properties of gluon jets are reviewed from an experimental point of view. The measured characteristics are compared to theoretical expectations. Although neither data nor models for the gluon jets are in the mature stage, there are remarkable agreements and also intriguing disagreements between experiment and theory. Since much interesting data have begun to emerge from various experiments and the properties of gluon jets are deeply rooted in the basic structure of non-Abelian gauge theory, the study of gluon jets casts further light on our understanding of QCD. Finally, the future prospects are discussed.

  18. Perspectives on jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, H. S.

    1981-01-01

    Jet noise is a byproduct of turbulence. Until recently turbulence was assumed to be known statistically, and jet noise was computed therefrom. As a result of new findings though on the behavior of vortices and instability waves, a more integrated view of the problem has been accepted lately. After presenting a simple view of jet noise, the paper attempts to resolve the apparent differences between Lighthill's and Lilley's interpretations of mean-flow shear, and examines a number of ad hoc approaches to jet noise suppression.

  19. Production of bio-jet fuel from microalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmoraghy, Marian

    The increase in petroleum-based aviation fuel consumption, the decrease in petroleum resources, the fluctuation of the crude oil price, the increase in greenhouse gas emission and the need for energy security are motivating the development of an alternate jet fuel. Bio-jet fuel has to be a drop in fuel, technically and economically feasible, environmentally friendly, greener than jet fuel, produced locally and low gallon per Btu. Bic jet fuel has been produced by blending petro-based jet fuel with microalgae biodiesel (Fatty Acid Methyl Ester, or simply FAME). Indoor microalgae growth, lipids extraction and transetrification to biodiesel are energy and fresh water intensive and time consuming. In addition, the quality of the biodiesel product and the physical properties of the bio-jet fuel blends are unknown. This work addressed these challenges. Minimizing the energy requirements and making microalgae growth process greener were accomplished by replacing fluorescent lights with light emitting diodes (LEDs). Reducing fresh water footprint in algae growth was accomplished by waste water use. Microalgae biodiesel production time was reduced using the one-step (in-situ transestrification) process. Yields up to 56.82 mg FAME/g dry algae were obtained. Predicted physical properties of in-situ FAME satisfied European and American standards confirming its quality. Lipid triggering by nitrogen deprivation was accomplished in order to increase the FAME production. Bio-jet fuel freezing points and heating values were measured for different jet fuel to biodiesel blend ratios.

  20. Insulin pump risks and benefits: a clinical appraisal of pump safety standards, adverse event reporting, and research needs: a joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Technology Working Group.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Fleming, G Alexander; Petrie, John R; Holl, Reinhard W; Bergenstal, Richard M; Peters, Anne L

    2015-04-01

    Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is an important and evolving form of insulin delivery, which is mainly used for people with type 1 diabetes. However, even with modern insulin pumps, errors of insulin infusion can occur due to pump failure, insulin infusion set (IIS) blockage, infusion site problems, insulin stability issues, user error, or a combination of these. Users are therefore exposed to significant and potentially fatal hazards: interruption of insulin infusion can result in hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis; conversely, delivery of excessive insulin can cause severe hypoglycemia. Nevertheless, the available evidence on the safety and efficacy of CSII remains limited. The European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have therefore joined forces to review the systems in place for evaluating the safety of pumps from a clinical perspective. We found that useful information held by the manufacturing companies is not currently shared in a sufficiently transparent manner. Public availability of adverse event (AE) reports on the US Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is potentially a rich source of safety information but is insufficiently utilized due to the current configuration of the system; the comparable database in Europe (European Databank on Medical Devices [EUDAMED]) is not publicly accessible. Many AEs appear to be attributable to human factors and/or user error, but the extent to which manufacturing companies are required by regulators to consider the interactions of users with the technical features of their products is limited. The clinical studies required by regulators prior to marketing are small and over-reliant on bench testing in relation to "predicate" products. Once a pump is available on the market, insufficient data are made publicly available on its long-term use in a real

  1. Insulin pump risks and benefits: a clinical appraisal of pump safety standards, adverse event reporting and research needs. A joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Technology Working Group.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Fleming, G Alexander; Petrie, John R; Holl, Reinhard W; Bergenstal, Richard M; Peters, Anne L

    2015-05-01

    Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is an important and evolving form of insulin delivery, which is mainly used for people with type 1 diabetes. However, even with modern insulin pumps, errors of insulin infusion can occur due to pump failure, insulin infusion set (IIS) blockage, infusion site problems, insulin stability issues, user error or a combination of these. Users are therefore exposed to significant and potentially fatal hazards: interruption of insulin infusion can result in hyperglycaemia and ketoacidosis; conversely, delivery of excessive insulin can cause severe hypoglycaemia. Nevertheless, the available evidence on the safety and efficacy of CSII remains limited. The European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and American Diabetes Association (ADA) have therefore joined forces to review the systems in place for evaluating the safety of pumps from a clinical perspective. We found that useful information held by the manufacturing companies is not currently shared in a sufficiently transparent manner. Public availability of adverse event (AE) reports on the US Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is potentially a rich source of safety information but is insufficiently utilised due to the current configuration of the system; the comparable database in Europe (European Databank on Medical Devices, EUDAMED) is not publicly accessible. Many AEs appear to be attributable to human factors and/or user error, but the extent to which manufacturing companies are required by regulators to consider the interactions of users with the technical features of their products is limited. The clinical studies required by regulators prior to marketing are small and over-reliant on bench testing in relation to 'predicate' products. Once a pump is available on the market, insufficient data are made publicly available on its long-term use in a real

  2. Experimental and numerical study of pulsating transversal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfeld, M. A.; Fedorova, N. N.; Fedorchenko, I. A.; Pozdnyakov, G. A.; Timofeev, K. Yu.; Zhakharova, Yu. V.

    2015-06-01

    Paper presents results of joint experimental and numerical investigation of pulsating jet penetration into still air and supersonic flow. Goal of the study is to investigate two-dimensional (2D) Hartmann generator (HG) properties and clear up its possibilities in providing better mixing between air and secondary (injected) gases.

  3. The American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy, and the Asian Australasian Federation of Pain Societies Joint Committee recommendations for education and training in ultrasound-guided interventional pain procedures.

    PubMed

    Narouze, Samer N; Provenzano, David; Peng, Philip; Eichenberger, Urs; Lee, Sang Chul; Nicholls, Barry; Moriggl, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in pain medicine for interventional axial, nonaxial, and musculoskeletal pain procedures is rapidly evolving and growing. Because of the lack of specialty-specific guidelines for ultrasonography in pain medicine, an international collaborative effort consisting of members of the Special Interest Group on Ultrasonography in Pain Medicine from the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy, and the Asian Australasian Federation of Pain Societies developed the following recommendations for education and training in ultrasound-guided interventional pain procedures. The purpose of these recommendations is to define the required skills for performing ultrasound-guided pain procedures, the processes for appropriate education, and training and quality improvement. Training algorithms are outlined for practice- and fellowship-based pathways. The previously published American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine and European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy education and teaching recommendations for ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia served as a foundation for the pain medicine recommendations. Although the decision to grant ultrasound privileges occurs at the institutional level, the committee recommends that the training guidelines outlined in this document serve as the foundation for educational training and the advancement of the practice of ultrasonography in pain medicine. PMID:23080347

  4. IR diagnostics of embedded jets: velocity resolved observations of the HH34 and HH1 jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Lopez, R.; Nisini, B.; Giannini, T.; Eislöffel, J.; Bacciotti, F.; Podio, L.

    2008-09-01

    observed instead, with ne increasing with velocity. In both jets the mass flux is carried mainly by the high-velocity gas: lower limits on the mass flux of 3-8 × 10-8~M⊙ yr-1 have been found for HH34 and HH1, from the luminosity of the [Fe II] 1.644~μm line. A comparison between the position velocity diagrams and derived electron densities with models for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) jet launching mechanisms has been performed for HH34. While the kinematical characteristics of the line emission at the jet base can be, at least qualitatively, reproduced by both X-winds and disc-wind models, none of these models can explain the extent of the LVC and the velocity dependence of electron density that we observe. It is possible that the LVC in HH34 represents gas not directly ejected in the jet but instead denser ambient gas entrained by the high-velocity collimated jet. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile (ESO programmes 0.74.C-0286(A)).

  5. Jet physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Melese, P.

    1997-05-01

    We present high E{sub T} jet measurements from CDF at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The incfilusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 1800 GeV with {approximately} 5 times more data is compared to the published CDF results, preliminary D0 results, and next-to-leading order QCD predictions. The {summation}E{sub T} cross section is also compared to QCD predictions and the dijet angular distribution is used to place a limit on quark compositeness. The inclusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 630 GeV is compared with that at 1800 GeV to test the QCD predictions for the scaling of jet cross sections with {radical}s. Finally, we present momentum distributions of charged particles in jets and compare them to Modified Leading Log Approximation predictions.

  6. Description of Jet Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1996-01-01

    In this article we review recent results on the breakup of cylindrical jets of a Newtonian fluid. Capillary forces provide the main driving mechanism and our interest is in the description of the flow as the jet pinches to form drops. The approach is to describe such topological singularities by constructing local (in time and space) similarity solutions from the governing equations. This is described for breakup according to the Euler, Stokes or Navier-Stokes equations. It is found that slender jet theories can be applied when viscosity is present, but for inviscid jets the local shape of the jet at breakup is most likely of a non-slender geometry. Systems of one-dimensional models of the governing equations are solved numerically in order to illustrate these differences.

  7. Jet Lag in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron; Galvez, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Context: Prolonged transmeridian air travel can impart a physical and emotional burden on athletes in jet lag and travel fatigue. Jet lag may negatively affect the performance of athletes. Study Type: Descriptive review. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search for articles relating to jet lag was performed (1990-present), as was a search relating to jet lag and athletes (1983-January, 2012). The results were reviewed for relevance. Eighty-nine sources were included in this descriptive review. Results: Behavioral strategies are recommended over pharmacological strategies when traveling with athletes; pharmacological aides may be used on an individual basis. Strategic sleeping, timed exposure to bright light, and the use of melatonin are encouraged. Conclusions: There is strong evidence that mood and cognition are adversely affected by jet lag. Some measures of individual and team performance are adversely affected as well. PMID:23016089

  8. Multiple jet study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. E.; Kors, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    Test data is presented which allows determination of jet penetration and mixing of multiple cold air jets into a ducted subsonic heated mainstream flow. Jet-to-mainstream momentum flux ratios ranged from 6 to 60. Temperature profile data is presented at various duct locations up to 24 orifice diameters downstream of the plane of jet injection. Except for two configurations, all geometries investigated had a single row of constant diameter orifices located transverse to the main flow direction. Orifice size and spacing between orifices were varied. Both of these were found to have a significant effect on jet penetration and mixing. The best mixing of the hot and cold streams was achieved with duct height.

  9. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA. PMID:25741184

  10. Joint instability and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA. PMID:25741184

  11. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  12. Reframing European Doctoral Training for the New ERA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repeckaite, Daiva

    2016-01-01

    In 2014 the institutionalization of European higher education and training, as well as research and innovation, policy entered a new phase: a number of financial instruments were simplified and merged. The Erasmus Mundus programme, wherein consortia of European and overseas universities built joint master's or doctoral degrees, was split into two…

  13. Jets and Bombs: Characterizing IRIS Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, Donald; Innes, Davina

    2014-06-01

    For almost two decades, SUMER has provided an unique perspective on explosive events in the lower solar atmosphere. One of the hallmark observations during this tenure is the identification of quiet sun bi-directional jets in the lower transition region. We investigate these events through two distinct avenues of study: a MHD model for reconnection and the new datasets of the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). Based on forward modeling optically thin spectral profiles, we find the spectral signatures of reconnection can vary dramatically based on viewing angle and altitude. We look to the IRIS data to provide a more complete context of the chromospheric and coronal environment during these dynamic events. During a joint IRIS-SUMER observing campaign, we observed spectra of multiple jets, a small C flare, and an Ellerman bomb event. We discuss the questions that arise from the inspection of these new data.

  14. Spacesuit mobility knee joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Pressure suit mobility joints are for use in interconnecting adjacent segments of an hermetically sealed spacesuit in which low torques, low leakage and a high degree of reliability are required. Each of the joints is a special purpose joint characterized by substantially constant volume and low torque characteristics and includes linkages which restrain the joint from longitudinal distension and includes a flexible, substantially impermeable diaphragm of tubular configuration spanning the distance between pivotally supported annuli. The diaphragms of selected joints include rolling convolutions for balancing the joints, while various joints include wedge-shaped sections which enhance the range of motion for the joints.

  15. Spacesuit mobility joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Joints for use in interconnecting adjacent segments of an hermetically sealed spacesuit which have low torques, low leakage and a high degree of reliability are described. Each of the joints is a special purpose joint characterized by substantially constant volume and low torque characteristics. Linkages which restrain the joint from longitudinal distension and a flexible, substantially impermeable diaphragm of tubular configuration spanning the distance between pivotally supported annuli are featured. The diaphragms of selected joints include rolling convolutions for balancing the joints, while various joints include wedge-shaped sections which enhance the range of motion for the joints.

  16. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  17. Local Physics Basis of Confinement Degradation in JET ELMy H-Mode Plasmas and Implications for Tokamak Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.V.; Alper, B.; Borba, D.; Cordey, J.G.; Ernst, D.R.; Gowers, C.

    2001-02-02

    First results of gyrokinetic analysis of JET [Joint European Torus] ELMy [Edge Localized Modes] H-mode [high-confinement modes] plasmas are presented. ELMy H-mode plasmas form the basis of conservative performance predictions for tokamak reactors of the size of ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor]. Relatively high performance for long duration has been achieved and the scaling appears to be favorable. It will be necessary to sustain low Z(subscript eff) and high density for high fusion yield. This paper studies the degradation in confinement and increase in the anomalous heat transport observed in two JET plasmas: one with an intense gas puff and the other with a spontaneous transition between Type I to III ELMs at the heating power threshold. Linear gyrokinetic analysis gives the growth rate, gamma(subscript lin) of the fastest growing modes. The flow-shearing rate omega(subscript ExB) and gamma(subscript lin) are large near the top of the pedestal. Their ratio decreases approximately when the confinement degrades and the transport increases. This suggests that tokamak reactors may require intense toroidal or poloidal torque input to maintain sufficiently high |gamma(subscript ExB)|/gamma(subscript lin) near the top of the pedestal for high confinement.

  18. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  19. Public-private collaboration in clinical research during pregnancy, lactation, and childhood: joint position statement of the Early Nutrition Academy and the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Koletzko, Berthold; Benninga, Marc A; Godfrey, Keith M; Hornnes, Peter J; Kolaček, Sanja; Koletzko, Sibylle; Lentze, Michael J; Mader, Silke; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; Oepkes, Dick; Oddy, Wendy H; Phillips, Alan; Rzehak, Peter; Socha, Piotr; Szajewska, Hania; Symonds, Michael E; Taminiau, Jan; Thapar, Nikhil; Troncone, Riccardo; Vandenplas, Yvan; Veereman, Gigi

    2014-04-01

    This position statement summarises a view of academia regarding standards for clinical research in collaboration with commercial enterprises, focussing on trials in pregnant women, breast-feeding women, and children. It is based on a review of the available literature and an expert workshop cosponsored by the Early Nutrition Academy and the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition. Clinical research collaborations between academic investigators and commercial enterprises are encouraged by universities, public funding agencies, and governmental organisations. One reason is a pressing need to obtain evidence on the effects, safety, and benefits of drugs and other commercial products and services. The credibility and value of results obtained through public-private research collaborations have, however, been questioned because many examples of inappropriate research practice have become known. Clinical research in pregnant and breast-feeding women, and in infants and children, raises sensitive scientific, ethical, and societal questions and requires the application of particularly high standards. Here we provide recommendations for the conduct of public-private research collaborations in these populations. In the interest of all stakeholders, these recommendations should contribute to more reliable, credible, and acceptable results of commercially sponsored trials and to reducing the existing credibility gap. PMID:24399212

  20. Studies of jet cross-sections and production properties with the ATLAS and CMS detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjos, Nuno

    2016-07-01

    Several characteristics of jet production in pp collisions have been measured by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations at the LHC. Measurements of event shapes and multi-jet production probe the dynamics of QCD in the soft regime and can constrain parton shower and hadronisation models. Measurements of multi-jet systems with a veto on additional jets probe QCD radiation effects. Double-differential cross-sections for threeand four-jet final states are measured at different centre-of-mass energies of pp collisions and are compared to expectations based on NLO QCD calculations. The distribution of the jet charge has been measured in di-jet events and compared to predictions from different hadronisation models and tunes. Jet-jet energy correlations are sensitive to the strong coupling constant. These measurements constitute precision tests of QCD in a new energy regime. Work supported by the Beatriu de Pinós program managed by Agència de Gestió d'Ajuts Universitaris i de Recerca with the support of the Secretaria d'Universitats i Recerca of the Departament d'Economia i Coneixement of the Generalitat de Catalunya, and the Cofund program of the Marie Curie Actions of the 7th R&D Framework Program of the European Union. Work partially supported by MINECO under grants SEV-2012-0234, FPA2013-48308, and FPA2012-38713, which include FEDER funds from the European Union.

  1. Counterflowing Jet Subsystem Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Rebecca; Daso, Endwell; Pritchett, Victor; Wang, Ten-See

    2010-01-01

    A counterflowing jet design (a spacecraft and trans-atmospheric subsystem) employs centrally located, supersonic cold gas jets on the face of the vehicle, ejecting into the oncoming free stream. Depending on the supersonic free-stream conditions and the ejected mass flow rate of the counterflowing jets, the bow shock of the vehicle is moved upstream, further away from the vehicle. This results in an increasing shock standoff distance of the bow shock with a progressively weaker shock. At a critical jet mass flow rate, the bow shock becomes so weak that it is transformed into a series of compression waves spread out in a much wider region, thus significantly modifying the flow that wets the outer surfaces, with an attendant reduction in wave and skin friction drag and aerothermal loads.

  2. Dilution jet mixing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Johnson, K.

    1984-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to quantify the mixing of opposed rows of jets (two-sided injection) in a confined cross flow. Results show that jet penetrations for two sided injections are less than that for single-sided injections, but the jet spreading rates are faster for a given momentum ratio and orifice plate. Flow area convergence generally enhances mixing. Mixing characteristics with asymmetric and symmetric convergence are similar. For constant momentum ratio, the optimum S/H(0) with in-line injections is one half the optimum value for single sided injections. For staggered injections, the optimum S/H(0) is twice the optimum value for single-sided injection. The correlations developed predicted the temperature distributions within first order accuracy and provide a useful tool for predicting jet trajectory and temperature profiles in the dilution zone with two-sided injections.

  3. Jet lag prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... your internal clock before you travel. While in flight: DO NOT sleep unless it matches the bedtime ... decrease jet lag. If you will be in flight during the bedtime of your destination, take some ...

  4. Joint fluid Gram stain

    MedlinePlus

    Gram stain of joint fluid ... A sample of joint fluid is needed. The fluid sample is sent to a lab where a small drop is placed in a ... on how to prepare for the removal of joint fluid, see joint fluid aspiration .

  5. European Biospheric Network Takes Off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovkin, Victor; Reick, Christian; van Bodegom, Peter

    2010-04-01

    Opening Symposium of the TERRABITES Network; Hamburg, Germany, 9-11 February 2010; The huge amount of recently acquired information about the functioning of the terrestrial biosphere and the ever increasing spatial resolution of Earth system models call for a new level of integrating efforts among biosphere modelers, developers of ecological theory, and data-gathering communities. Responding to this call, a new European network, Terrestrial Biosphere in the Earth System (TERRABITES), held its opening symposium in Germany. The meeting was organized jointly with another recently founded European network, Advancing the Integrated Monitoring of Trace Gas Exchange Between Biosphere and Atmosphere (ABBA). Almost 100 scientific contributions covered the latest advances in modeling ecophysiological and biogeochemical processes; analyses of model constraints set by measurements of water and carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes, including carbon isotopes; and new perspectives in using remote sensing data for evaluation of global terrestrial biosphere models.

  6. Jets in hadronic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Paige, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Recent experimental data on the properties of jets in hadronic reactions are reviewed and compared with theoretical expectations. Jets are clearly established as the dominant process for high E/sub T/ events in hadronic reactions. The cross section and the other properties of these events are in qualitative and even semiquantitative agreement with expectations based on perturbative QCD. However, we can not yet make precise tests of QCD, primarily because there are substantial uncertainties in the theoretical calculations. 45 references. (WHK)

  7. 78 FR 78923 - Comparability Determination for the European Union: Certain Entity-Level Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ...The following is the analysis and determination of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (``Commission'') regarding certain parts of a joint request by the European Commission (``EC'') and the European Securities and Markets Authority (``ESMA'') that the Commission determine that laws and regulations applicable in the European Union (``EU'') provide a sufficient basis for an affirmative......

  8. Radiation from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Sol, H.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electron-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the presence of relativistic jets, instabilities such as the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability create collisionless shocks, which are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons in small-scale magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation, a case of diffusive synchrotron radiation, may be important to understand the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  9. Simulation of the great plains low-level jet and associated clouds by general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, S.J.; Bian, X.; Corsetti, L.

    1996-07-01

    The low-level jet frequently observed in the Great Plains of the United States forms preferentially at night and apparently influences the timing of the thunderstorms in the region. The authors have found that both the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts general circulation model and the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model simulate the low-level jet rather well, although the spatial distribution of the jet frequency simulated by the two GCM`s differ considerably. Sensitivity experiments have demonstrated that the simulated low-level jet is surprisingly robust, with similar simulations at much coarser horizontal and vertical resolutions. However, both GCM`s fail to simulate the observed relationship between clouds and the low-level jet. The pronounced nocturnal maximum in thunderstorm frequency associated with the low-level jet is not simulated well by either GCM, with only weak evidence of a nocturnal maximum in the Great Plains. 36 refs., 20 figs.

  10. Processed Movie of Zonal Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This movie is a manipulated sequence showing motions in Jupiter's atmosphere over the course of five days beginning Oct. 1, 2000, as seen by a camera on NASA's Cassini spacecraft, using a blue filter.

    Beginning with seven images taken at uneven time intervals, this sequence was made by using information on wind speeds derived from actual Jupiter images to create evenly spaced time steps throughout. The final result is a smooth movie sequence consisting of both real and false frames.

    The view is of the opposite side of the planet from Jupiter's Great Red Spot. The region shown reaches from 50 degrees north to 50 degrees south of Jupiter's equator, and extends 100 degrees east-to-west, about one-quarter of Jupiter's circumference. The smallest features are about 500 kilometers (about 300 miles) across.

    Towards the end of the sequence, a shadow appears from one of Jupiter's moons, Europa.

    The movie shows the remains of a historic merger that began several years ago, when three white oval storms that had existed for 60 years merged into two, then one. The resulting oval is visible in the lower left portion of the movie.

    The movie also shows zonal jets that circle the planet on constant latitudes. Winds seen moving toward the left (westward) correspond to features that are rotating a little slower than Jupiter's magnetic field, and winds moving the opposite direction correspond to features that are rotating a little faster than the magnetic field. Since Jupiter has no solid surface, the rotation of the magnetic field is the point of reference for the rotation of the planet.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  11. An arc control and protection system for the JET lower hybrid antenna based on an imaging system.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, J; Mailloux, J; Kirov, K; Kinna, D; Stamp, M; Devaux, S; Arnoux, G; Edwards, J S; Stephen, A V; McCullen, P; Hogben, C

    2014-11-01

    Arcs are the potentially most dangerous events related to Lower Hybrid (LH) antenna operation. If left uncontrolled they can produce damage and cause plasma disruption by impurity influx. To address this issue an arc real time control and protection imaging system for the Joint European Torus (JET) LH antenna has been implemented. The LH system is one of the additional heating systems at JET. It comprises 24 microwave generators (klystrons, operating at 3.7 GHz) providing up to 5 MW of heating and current drive to the JET plasma. This is done through an antenna composed of an array of waveguides facing the plasma. The protection system presented here is based primarily on an imaging arc detection and real time control system. It has adapted the ITER like wall hotspot protection system using an identical CCD camera and real time image processing unit. A filter has been installed to avoid saturation and spurious system triggers caused by ionization light. The antenna is divided in 24 Regions Of Interest (ROIs) each one corresponding to one klystron. If an arc precursor is detected in a ROI, power is reduced locally with subsequent potential damage and plasma disruption avoided. The power is subsequently reinstated if, during a defined interval of time, arcing is confirmed not to be present by image analysis. This system was successfully commissioned during the restart phase and beginning of the 2013 scientific campaign. Since its installation and commissioning, arcs and related phenomena have been prevented. In this contribution we briefly describe the camera, image processing, and real time control systems. Most importantly, we demonstrate that an LH antenna arc protection system based on CCD camera imaging systems works. Examples of both controlled and uncontrolled LH arc events and their consequences are shown. PMID:25430371

  12. An arc control and protection system for the JET lower hybrid antenna based on an imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, J.; Mailloux, J.; Kirov, K.; Kinna, D.; Stamp, M.; Devaux, S.; Arnoux, G.; Edwards, J. S.; Stephen, A. V.; McCullen, P.; Hogben, C.

    2014-11-01

    Arcs are the potentially most dangerous events related to Lower Hybrid (LH) antenna operation. If left uncontrolled they can produce damage and cause plasma disruption by impurity influx. To address this issue an arc real time control and protection imaging system for the Joint European Torus (JET) LH antenna has been implemented. The LH system is one of the additional heating systems at JET. It comprises 24 microwave generators (klystrons, operating at 3.7 GHz) providing up to 5 MW of heating and current drive to the JET plasma. This is done through an antenna composed of an array of waveguides facing the plasma. The protection system presented here is based primarily on an imaging arc detection and real time control system. It has adapted the ITER like wall hotspot protection system using an identical CCD camera and real time image processing unit. A filter has been installed to avoid saturation and spurious system triggers caused by ionization light. The antenna is divided in 24 Regions Of Interest (ROIs) each one corresponding to one klystron. If an arc precursor is detected in a ROI, power is reduced locally with subsequent potential damage and plasma disruption avoided. The power is subsequently reinstated if, during a defined interval of time, arcing is confirmed not to be present by image analysis. This system was successfully commissioned during the restart phase and beginning of the 2013 scientific campaign. Since its installation and commissioning, arcs and related phenomena have been prevented. In this contribution we briefly describe the camera, image processing, and real time control systems. Most importantly, we demonstrate that an LH antenna arc protection system based on CCD camera imaging systems works. Examples of both controlled and uncontrolled LH arc events and their consequences are shown.

  13. An arc control and protection system for the JET lower hybrid antenna based on an imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Figueiredo, J.

    2014-11-15

    Arcs are the potentially most dangerous events related to Lower Hybrid (LH) antenna operation. If left uncontrolled they can produce damage and cause plasma disruption by impurity influx. To address this issue an arc real time control and protection imaging system for the Joint European Torus (JET) LH antenna has been implemented. The LH system is one of the additional heating systems at JET. It comprises 24 microwave generators (klystrons, operating at 3.7 GHz) providing up to 5 MW of heating and current drive to the JET plasma. This is done through an antenna composed of an array of waveguides facing the plasma. The protection system presented here is based primarily on an imaging arc detection and real time control system. It has adapted the ITER like wall hotspot protection system using an identical CCD camera and real time image processing unit. A filter has been installed to avoid saturation and spurious system triggers caused by ionization light. The antenna is divided in 24 Regions Of Interest (ROIs) each one corresponding to one klystron. If an arc precursor is detected in a ROI, power is reduced locally with subsequent potential damage and plasma disruption avoided. The power is subsequently reinstated if, during a defined interval of time, arcing is confirmed not to be present by image analysis. This system was successfully commissioned during the restart phase and beginning of the 2013 scientific campaign. Since its installation and commissioning, arcs and related phenomena have been prevented. In this contribution we briefly describe the camera, image processing, and real time control systems. Most importantly, we demonstrate that an LH antenna arc protection system based on CCD camera imaging systems works. Examples of both controlled and uncontrolled LH arc events and their consequences are shown.

  14. Butt Joint Tool Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N

    2007-12-06

    ITER Central Solenoid uses butt joints for connecting the pancakes in the CS module. The principles of the butt joining of the CICC were developed by the JAPT during CSMC project. The difference between the CSMC butt joint and the CS butt joint is that the CS butt joint is an in-line joint, while the CSMC is a double joint through a hairpin jumper. The CS butt joint has to carry the hoop load. The straight length of the joint is only 320 mm, and the vacuum chamber around the joint has to have a split in the clamp shell. These requirements are challenging. Fig.1 presents a CSMC joint, and Fig.2 shows a CS butt joint. The butt joint procedure was verified and demonstrated. The tool is capable of achieving all specified parameters. The vacuum in the end was a little higher than the target, which is not critical and readily correctable. We consider, tentatively that the procedure is established. Unexpectedly, we discover significant temperature nonuniformity in the joint cross section, which is not formally a violation of the specs, but is a point of concern. All testing parameters are recorded for QA purposes. We plan to modify the butt joining tool to improve its convenience of operation and provide all features necessary for production of butt joints by qualified personnel.

  15. Impulsively started incompressible turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Witze, P O

    1980-10-01

    Hot-film anemometer measurements are presented for the centerline velocity of a suddenly started jet of air. The tip penetration of the jet is shown to be proportional to the square-root of time. A theoretical model is developed that assumes the transient jet can be characterized as a spherical vortex interacting with a steady-state jet. The model demonstrates that the ratio of nozzle radius to jet velocity defines a time constant that uniquely characterizes the behavior and similarity of impulsively started incompressible turbulent jets.

  16. Two Jets from the Protostellar System L1551 IRS 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridlund, C. V. Malcolm; Liseau, René

    1998-05-01

    Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based observations of the jet emanating from the young stellar object L1551 IRS 5 clearly show a structure with two components, one of which terminates in a working surface only 1500 AU from the originating sources. This particular jet is found to be less dense than the ambient medium. Its Mach disk is found to be very small, only ~45 AU. We show that this jet cannot be the driver of the large-scale molecular outflow in L1551 for two reasons: (1) the jet fails to provide the necessary momentum by at least a factor of 100, and, (2) having a dynamic age ~3 orders of magnitude less than that of the outflow, this jet has no causal relationship with the molecular flow. The morphology and velocity field of the two components are consistent with them being separate entities, and we suggest that there are in fact two jets, each possibly originating from a different young stellar object. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated jointly on the island of La Palma by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, and based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  17. Ram-jet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cervenko, A. J.; Friedman, R.

    1956-01-01

    The ram jet is basically one of the most dimple types of aircraft engine. It consists only of an inlet diffuser, a combustion system, and an exit nozzle. A typical ram-jet configuration is shown in figure 128. The engine operates on the Brayton cycle, and ideal cycle efficiency depends only on the ratio of engine to ambient pressure. The increased, engine pressures are obtained by ram action alone, and for this reason the ram jet has zero thrust at zero speed. Therefore, ram-jet-powered aircraft must be boosted to flight speeds close to a Mach number of 1.0 before appreciable thrust is generated by the engine. Since pressure increases are obtained by ram action alone, combustor-inlet pressures and temperatures are controlled by the flight speed, the ambient atmospheric condition, and by the efficiency of the inlet diffuser. These pressures and temperatures, as functions of flight speed and altitude, are shown in figure 129 for the NACA standard atmosphere and for practical values of diffuser efficiency. It can be seen that very wide ranges of combustor-inlet temperatures and pressures may be encountered over the ranges of flight velocity and altitude at which ram jets may be operated. Combustor-inlet temperatures from 500 degrees to 1500 degrees R and inlet pressures from 5 to 100 pounds per square inch absolute represent the approximate ranges of interest in current combustor development work. Since the ram jet has no moving parts in the combustor outlet, higher exhaust-gas temperatures than those used in current turbojets are permissible. Therefore, fuel-air ratios equivalent to maximum rates of air specific impulse or heat release can be used, and, for hydrocarbon fuels, this weight ratio is about 0.070. Lower fuel-air ratios down to about 0.015 may also be required to permit efficient cruise operation. This fuel-air-ratio range of 0.015 to 0.070 used in ram jets can be compared with the fuel-air ratios up to 0.025 encountered in current turbojets. Ram-jet

  18. The Twin Jet Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    M2-9 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or a bipolar planetary nebula. Another more revealing name might be the 'Twin Jet Nebula.' If the nebula is sliced across the star, each side of it appears much like a pair of exhausts from jet engines. Indeed, because of the nebula's shape and the measured velocity of the gas, in excess of 200 miles per second, astronomers believe that the description as a super-super-sonic jet exhaust is quite apt. This is much the same process that takes place in a jet engine: The burning and expanding gases are deflected by the engine walls through a nozzle to form long, collimated jets of hot air at high speeds. M2-9 is 2,100 light-years away in the constellation Ophiucus. The observation was taken Aug. 2, 1997 by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. In this image, neutral oxygen is shown in red, once-ionized nitrogen in green, and twice-ionized oxygen in blue.

  19. Sweeping Jet Optimization Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti; Andino, Marlyn; Lin, John C.; Edelman, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Progress on experimental efforts to optimize sweeping jet actuators for active flow control (AFC) applications with large adverse pressure gradients is reported. Three sweeping jet actuator configurations, with the same orifice size but di?erent internal geometries, were installed on the flap shoulder of an unswept, NACA 0015 semi-span wing to investigate how the output produced by a sweeping jet interacts with the separated flow and the mechanisms by which the flow separation is controlled. For this experiment, the flow separation was generated by deflecting the wing's 30% chord trailing edge flap to produce an adverse pressure gradient. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the three actuator configurations. The actuator with the largest jet deflection angle, at the pressure ratios investigated, was the most efficient at controlling flow separation on the flap of the model. Oil flow visualization studies revealed that the flow field controlled by the sweeping jets was more three-dimensional than expected. The results presented also show that the actuator spacing was appropriate for the pressure ratios examined.

  20. Jet penetration in glass

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Glenn, L.A.; Kusubov, A.

    1991-05-01

    We describe a phenomenological model which accounts for the mechanical response of glass to intense impulsive loading. An important aspect of this response is the dilatancy accompanying fracture. We have also conducted a number of experiments with 38.1-mm diameter precision shaped charges to establish the performance against various targets and to allow evaluation of our model. At 3 charge diameters standoff, the data indicate that both virgin and damaged glass offer better (Bernoulli-scaled) resistance to penetration than either of 4340 steel, or 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. Time-resolved measurements indicate two distinct phases of jet penetration in glass: An initial hydrodynamic phase, and a second phase characterized by a slower penetration velocity. Our calculations show that at early time, a crater is formed around the jet and only the tip of the undisturbed jet interacts with the glass. At late time the glass has collapsed on the jet and degraded penetration continues via a disturbed and fragmented jet.

  1. B-jets and z + b-jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, Daniel; /Rome U.

    2006-06-01

    The authors present CDF cross-section measurements for the inclusive production of b jets and the production of b jets in association with a Z{sup 0} boson. Both measurements are in reasonable agreement with NLO QCD predictions.

  2. An overview of the comprehensive First Mirror Test in JET with ITER-like wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, D.; Rubel, M.; Widdowson, A.; Petersson, P.; Likonen, J.; Marot, L.; Alves, E.; Garcia-Carrasco, A.; Pintsuk, G.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2014-04-01

    The First Mirror Test in Joint European Torus (JET) with the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-like wall was performed with polycrystalline molybdenum mirrors. Two major types of experiments were done. Using a reciprocating probe system in the main chamber, a short-term exposure was made during a 0.3 h plasma operation in 71 discharges. The impact on reflectivity was negligible. In a long-term experiment lasting 19 h with 13 h of X-point plasma, 20 Mo mirrors were exposed, including four coated with a 1 μm-thick Rh layer. Optical performance of all mirrors exposed in the divertor was degraded by up to 80% because of beryllium, carbon and tungsten co-deposits on surfaces. Total reflectivity of most Mo mirrors facing plasma in the main chamber was only slightly affected in the spectral range 400-1600 nm, while the Rh-coated mirror lost its high original reflectivity by 30%, thus decreasing to the level typical of molybdenum surfaces. Specular reflectivity was decreased most strongly in the 250-400 nm UV range. Surface measurements with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and depth profiling with secondary ion mass spectrometry and heavy-ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) revealed that the very surface region on both types of mirrors had been modified by neutrals, resulting eventually in the composition change: Be, C, D at the level below 1 × 1016 cm-2 mixed with traces of Ni, Fe in the layer 10-30 nm thick. On several exposed mirrors, the original matrix material (Mo) remained as the major constituent of the modified layer. The data obtained in two major phases of the JET operation with carbon and full metal walls are compared. The implications of these results for first mirrors and their maintenance in a reactor-class device are discussed.

  3. Aeroacoustic Experiments with Twin Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Richard F.; Henderson, Brenda S.

    2012-01-01

    While the noise produced by a single jet is azimuthally symmetric, multiple jets produce azimuthally varying far-field noise. The ability of one jet to shield another reduces the noise radiated in the plane of the jets, while often increasing the noise radiated out of the plane containing the jets. The present study investigates the shielding potential of twin jet configurations over subsonic and over-expanded supersonic jet conditions with simulated forward flight. The experiments were conducted with 2 in. throat diameter nozzles at four jet spacings from 2.6d to 5.5d in center-to-center distance, where d is the nozzle throat diameter. The current study found a maximum of 3 dB reduction in overall sound pressure level relative to two incoherent jets in the peak jet noise direction in the plane containing the jets. However, an increase of 3 dB was found perpendicular to the plane containing the jets. In the sideline direction, shielding is observed for all jet spacings in this study.

  4. Defence electro-optics: European perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartikainen, Jari

    2011-11-01

    In 2009 the United States invested in defence R&T 3,6 times and in defence research and development 6,8 times as much as all member states of the European Defence Agency (EDA) combined while the ratio in the total defence expenditure was 2,6 in the US' favour. The European lack of investments in defence research and development has a negative impact on the competitiveness of European defence industry and on the European non-dependence. In addition, the efficiency of investment is reduced due to duplication of work in different member states. The Lisbon Treaty tasks EDA to support defence technology research, and coordinate and plan joint research activities and the study of technical solutions meeting future operational needs. This paper gives an overview how EDA meets the challenge of improving the efficiency of European defence R&T investment with an emphasis on electro-optics and describes shortly the ways that governmental and industrial partners can participate in the EDA cooperation. Examples of joint R&T projects addressing electro-optics are presented.

  5. Renewable jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-04-01

    Novel strategies for sustainable replacement of finite fossil fuels are intensely pursued in fundamental research, applied science and industry. In the case of jet fuels used in gas-turbine engine aircrafts, the production and use of synthetic bio-derived kerosenes are advancing rapidly. Microbial biotechnology could potentially also be used to complement the renewable production of jet fuel, as demonstrated by the production of bioethanol and biodiesel for piston engine vehicles. Engineered microbial biosynthesis of medium chain length alkanes, which constitute the major fraction of petroleum-based jet fuels, was recently demonstrated. Although efficiencies currently are far from that needed for commercial application, this discovery has spurred research towards future production platforms using both fermentative and direct photobiological routes. PMID:24679258

  6. Future Jet Technologies, Part C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal-Or, Benjamin

    2013-06-01

    This updated, PART C REVIEW, covers the dangerous global spread of JS-stealth, drone technology [1-91], canard-free, stealth, new agile drones and the highly debated, 480 billion F-35 International Program as reported on March 13, 2013 to the U.S. Congress [92]. Due to serious design issues, spiraling high costs and years in delays, alternatives are analyzed here, depicted and proposed, mainly from the propulsion-design point of view. These include fleets of low-cost, stealth, jet-steered-drones mixed with non-stealthy, low-cost, ready-to-be-delivered, U.S. or European or Russian fighter aircraft. Can a few F-35s win against large fleets of stealth agile drones? To understand the dangers and critical issues involved, the author's own, past classified information is partly disclosed, while resorting to images in Figs. 2(a) and 2(b) taken from his book [2] and from Wikipedia, the "Free Encyclopedia", in all other images.

  7. JetStar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    In this photo of the C-140 JetStar on the Dryden Ramp, a subscale propeller has been fitted to the upper fuselage of the aircraft. NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility, in co-operation with the Lewis Research Center, investigated the acoustic characteristics of a series of subscale advanced design propellors in the early eighties. These propellors were designed to rotate at a tip speed faster than the speed of sound. They are, in effect, a 'swept back wing' version of a propellor. The tests were conducted on Dryden's C-140 Jetstar, seen here on the ramp at Dryden in Edwards, California. The JetStar was modified with the installation of an air turbine drive system. The drive motor, with a 24 inch test propellor, was mounted in a pylon atop the JetStar. The JetStar was equipped with an array of 28 microphones flush-mounted in the fuselage of the aircraft beneath the propellor. Microphones mounted on the wings and on accompanying chase aircraft provided far-field acoustic data. In the 1960s, the same JetStar was equipped with an electronic variable stability flight control system. Called then a General Purpose Airborne Simulator (GPAS), the aircraft could duplicate the flight characteristics of a wide variety of advanced aircraft and was used for supersonic transport and general aviation research and as a training and support system for Space Shuttle Approach and Landing Tests at Dryden in 1977. In 1985, the JetStar's wings were modified with suction and spray devices in a laminar (smooth) air flow program to study ways of improving the flow of air over the wings of airliners. The program also studied ways of reducing the collection of ice and insects on airliner wings.

  8. Impact of a viscoelastic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuissier, Henri; Néel, Baptiste; Limat, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    A jet of a Newtonian liquid impacting onto a wall at right angle spreads as a thin liquid sheet which preserves the radial symmetry of the jet. We observe that for a viscoelastic jet (solution of polyethylene glycol in water) this symmetry can break: close to the wall, the jet cross-section is faceted and radial steady liquid films (membranes) form, which connect the cross-section vertices to the sheet. The number of membranes increases with increasing viscoelastic relaxation time of the solution, but also with increasing jet velocity and decreasing distance from the jet nozzle to the wall. A mechanism for this surprising destabilization of the jet, which develops perpendicularly to the direction expected for a buckling mechanism, is presented that explains these dependences. The large-scale consequences of the jet destabilization on the sheet spreading and fragmentation, which show through the faceting of hydraulic jumps and suspended (Savart) sheets, will also be discussed.

  9. Jet Shockwaves Produce Gamma Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    Theorists believe that GRB jets produce gamma rays by two processes involving shock waves. Shells of material within the jet move at different speeds and collide, generating internal shock waves th...

  10. Hip joint replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100006.htm Hip joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 5 out of 5 Overview The hip joint is made up of two major parts: the ...

  11. Hip joint injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007633.htm Hip joint injection To use the sharing features on this ... injection is a shot of medicine into the hip joint. The medicine helps relieve pain and inflammation. It ...

  12. Hip joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002975.htm Hip joint replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hip joint replacement is surgery to replace all or part ...

  13. Metatarsal phalangeal joint arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shonka, T E

    1991-01-01

    An overview of metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) arthroscopy is presented. Indications, technique, and perioperative management are discussed. The author believes it is the operative treatment of choice for various pathology encountered in this joint. PMID:2002183

  14. Culture - joint fluid

    MedlinePlus

    Joint fluid culture ... fungi, or viruses grow. This is called a culture. If these germs are detected, other tests may ... is no special preparation needed for the lab culture. How to prepare for the removal of joint ...

  15. Knee joint replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100088.htm Knee joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... of 4 Overview The knee is a complex joint. It contains the distal end of the femur ( ...

  16. Knee joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002974.htm Knee joint replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Knee joint replacement is a surgery to replace a knee ...

  17. Large displacement spherical joint

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of spherical joints has a very large accessible full cone angle, a property which is beneficial for a wide range of applications. Despite the large cone angles, these joints move freely without singularities.

  18. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  19. Sacroiliac joint pain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000610.htm Sacroiliac joint pain - aftercare To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a term used to describe the ...

  20. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  1. Astrophysical jet experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, C. D.; Loupias, B.; Waugh, J.; Barroso, P.; Bouquet, S.; Brambrink, E.; Dono, S.; Falize, E.; Howe, J.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Kodama, R.; Koenig, M.; Michaut, C.; Myers, S.; Nazarov, W.; Notley, M. M.; Oya, A.; Pikuz, S.; Rabec le Gloahec, M.; Sakawa, Y.; Spindloe, C.; Streeter, M.; Wilson, L. A.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, three different experimental configurations designed to study jet propagation physics are presented. Each configuration uses a different target design: conical dimples in solid surfaces, hollow cones filled with foam and angled thin foils. When irradiated with a laser, these targets result in the launching of a plasma jet, the properties of which can be controlled by judicious choices of the target and laser parameters. Experimental results from these targets are shown, and the physics which may be studied with each of these targets is briefly discussed.

  2. On magnetohydrodynamic solitons in jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, B.

    1987-01-01

    Nonlinear solitary wave propagation in a compressible magnetic beam model of an extragalactic radio jet is examined and shown to lead to solitons of the Benjamin-Ono type. A number of similarities between such magnetic beam models of jets and models of solar photospheric flux tubes are pointed out and exploited. A single soliton has the appearance of a symmetric bulge on the jet which propagates faster than the jet's flow.

  3. The Role of Axisymmetric Reconnection Events in JET Discharges with Extreme Shear Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    B.C. Stratton; J.A. Breslau; R.V. Budny; S.C. Jardin; W. Park; H.R. Strauss; L.E. Zakharov; B. Alper; V. Drozdov; N.C. Hawkes; S. Reyes-Cortes; and Contributors to the EFDA-JET Work Programme

    2001-12-03

    Injection of Lower Hybrid Heating and Current Drive into the current ramp-up phase of Joint European Torus (JET) discharges can produce extremely reversed q-profiles characterized by a core region of very small or zero current density (within Motional Stark Effect diagnostic measurement errors) and q(subscript min) > 1. T(subscript e)-profiles show sawtooth-like collapses and the presence of an internal transport barrier. Accurate equilibrium reconstructions of these discharges are obtained using the ESC code, which was recently extended to allow equilibrium reconstructions in which a free boundary solver determines the plasma boundary and a fixed boundary solver provides the magnetic geometry and current density profile. The core current density does not appear to go negative, although current diffusion calculations indicate that sufficient non-inductive current drive to cause this is present. This is explained by nonlinear resistive MHD simulations in toroidal geometry which predict that these discharges undergo n=0 reconnection events (axisymmetric sawteeth) that redistribute the current to hold the core current density near zero.

  4. Alpha heating and isotopic mass effects in JET plasmas with sawteeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budny, R. V.; contributors, JET

    2016-03-01

    The alpha heating experiment in the Joint European Torus (JET) 1997 DTE1 campaign is re-examined. Several effects correlated with tritium content and thermal hydrogenic isotopic mass  <  A  >  weaken the conclusion that alpha heating was clearly observed. These effects delayed the occurrence of significant sawtooth crashes allowing the electron and ion temperatures T e and T i to achieve higher values. Under otherwise equal circumstances T e and T i were typically higher for discharges with higher  <  A  >, and significant scaling of T i, T e, and total stored energy with  <  A  >  were observed. The higher T i led to increased ion-electron heating rates with magnitudes comparable to those computed for alpha electron heating. Rates of other heating/loss processes also had comparable magnitudes. Simulations of T e assuming the observed scaling of T i are qualitatively consistent with the measured profiles, without invoking alpha heating

  5. Thermal Response of Tritiated Co-deposits from JET and TFTR to Transient Heat Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; N. Bekrisl; J.P. Coad; C.A. Gentile; A. Hassanein; R. Reiswig; S. Willms

    2002-05-30

    High heat flux interactions with plasma-facing components have been studied at microscopic scales. The beam from a continuous wave neodymium laser was scanned at high speed over the surface of graphite and carbon fiber composite tiles that had been retrieved from TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) and JET (Joint European Torus) after D-T plasma operations. The tiles have a surface layer of amorphous hydrogenated carbon that was co-deposited during plasma operations, and laser scanning has released more than 80% of the co-deposited tritium. The temperature rise of the co-deposit was much higher than that of the manufactured material and showed an extended time history. The peak temperature varied dramatically (e.g., 1,436 C compared to >2,300 C), indicating strong variations in the thermal conductivity to the substrate. A digital microscope imaged the co-deposit before, during, and after the interaction with the laser and revealed 100-micron scale hot spots during the interaction. Heat pulse durations of order 100 ms resulted in brittle destruction and material loss from the surface, whilst a duration of =10 ms showed minimal changes to the co-deposit. These results show that reliable predictions for the response of deposition areas to off-normal events such as ELMs (edge-localized modes) and disruptions in next-step devices need to be based on experiments with tokamak generated co-deposits.

  6. Sacroiliac joint imaging.

    PubMed

    Tuite, Michael J

    2008-03-01

    The sacroiliac (SI) joint has several unique anatomical features that make it one of the more challenging joints to image. The joint is difficult to profile well on radiographic views, and therefore the radiographic findings of sacroiliitis are often equivocal. Computed tomography images can usually show the findings of sacroiliitis and osteoarthritis earlier than radiographs. Magnetic resonance imaging performed with proper sequences is excellent for diagnosing even very early sacroiliitis and for following treatment response. The SI joint is often involved in patients with osteoarthritis or one of the inflammatory spondyloarthritides, most notably ankylosing spondylitis. Ankylosing spondylitis often presents with sacroiliitis, which appears as erosions, sclerosis, and joint space narrowing, eventually leading to ankylosis. Several disorders can cause sacroiliitis-like changes of the joint, including hyperparathyroidism and repetitive shear-stress injuries in athletes. The joint can become painful during pregnancy as it widens and develops increased motion, and some postpartum women develop iliac sclerosis adjacent to the joint termed osteitis condensans ilii. Another cause of SI joint pain is a disorder called sacroiliac joint dysfunction, which typically has few abnormal imaging findings. Patients with SI joint dysfunction, as well as sacroiliitis, often get relief from image-guided SI joint therapeutic injections. PMID:18382946

  7. Joint Enrollment Report, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Iowa Department of Education collects information on joint enrollment in Iowa's 15 community colleges. Jointly enrolled students are high school students enrolled in community college credit coursework. Most jointly enrolled students enroll through Senior Year Plus (SYP) programs such as Postsecondary Enrollment Options (PSEO) and concurrent…

  8. Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Crossbracing Joint Detail - Dunlapsville Covered Bridge, Spanning East Fork Whitewater River, Dunlapsville, Union County, IN

  9. Air admixture to exhaust jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanger, Eugen

    1953-01-01

    The problem of thrust increase by air admixture to exhaust jets of rockets, turbojet, ram- and pulse-jet engines is investigated theoretically. The optimum ratio of mixing chamber pressure to ambient pressure and speed range for thrust increase due to air admixture is determined for each type of jet engine.

  10. European Flood Awareness System - now operational

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alionte Eklund, Cristina.; Hazlinger, Michal; Sprokkereef, Eric; Garcia Padilla, Mercedes; Garcia, Rafael J.; Thielen, Jutta; Salamon, Peter; Pappenberger, Florian

    2013-04-01

    The European Commission's Communication "Towards a Stronger European Union Disaster Response" adopted and endorsed by the Council in 2010, underpins the importance of strengthening concerted actions for natural disasters including floods, which are amongst the costliest natural disasters in the EU. The European Flood Awareness System (EFAS) contributes in the case of major flood events. to better protection of the European Citizen, the environment, property and cultural heritage. The disastrous floods in Elbe and Danube rivers in 2002 confronted the European Commission with non-coherent flood warning information from different sources and of variable quality, complicating planning and organisation of aid. Thus, the Commission initiated the development of a European Flood Awareness System (EFAS) which is now going operational. EFAS has been developed and tested at the Joint Research Centre, the Commission's in house science service, in close collaboration with the National hydrological and meteorological services, European Civil Protection through the Monitoring and Information Centre (MIC) and other research institutes. EFAS provides Pan-European overview maps of flood probabilities up to 10 days in advance as well as detailed forecasts at stations where the National services are providing real time data. More than 30 hydrological services and civil protection services in Europe are part of the EFAS network. Since 2011, EFAS is part of the COPERNICUS Emergency Management Service, (EMS) and is now an operational service since 2012. The Operational EFAS is being executed by several consortia dealing with different operational aspects: • EFAS Hydrological data collection centre —REDIAM and ELIMCO- will be collecting historic and realtime discharge and water levels data in support to EFAS • EFAS Meteorological data collection centre —outsourced but running onsite of JRC Ispra. Will be collecting historic and realtime meteorological data in support to EFAS