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Sample records for jet optimised shear

  1. The SISCone jet algorithm optimised for low particle multiplicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, Stefan

    2012-03-01

    The SISCone jet algorithm is a seedless infrared-safe cone jet algorithm. There exists an implementation which is highly optimised for a large number of final state particles. However, in fixed-order perturbative calculations with a small number of final state particles, it turns out that the computer time needed for the jet clustering of this implementation is comparable to the computer time of the matrix elements. This article reports on an implementation of the SISCone algorithm optimised for low particle multiplicities. Program summaryProgram title: siscone_parton Catalogue identifier: AELF_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AELF_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1588 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 41 164 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: All Operating system: All RAM: Negligible for low parton multiplicities. Classification: 11.9 Nature of problem: Clustering of particles into jets. Solution method: Infrared-safe cone algorithm. Restrictions: Hard-coded restriction to 64 final state particles on 64-bit machines, but recommended to be used only for configurations with up to 10 final state particles. Running time: Depending on the number of final state particles, O(μs) for configurations up to 5 final state particles.

  2. Shear layer characteristics of supersonic free and impinging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, T. B.; Kumar, R.

    2015-09-01

    The initial shear layer characteristics of a jet play an important role in the initiation and development of instabilities and hence radiated noise. Particle image velocimetry has been utilized to study the initial shear layer development of supersonic free and impinging jets. Microjet control employed to reduce flow unsteadiness and jet noise appears to affect the development of the shear layer, particularly near the nozzle exit. Velocity field measurements near the nozzle exit show that the initially thin, uncontrolled shear layer develops at a constant rate while microjet control is characterized by a rapid nonlinear thickening that asymptotes downstream. The shear layer linear growth rate with microjet control, in both the free and the impinging jet, is diminished. In addition, the thickened shear layer with control leads to a reduction in azimuthal vorticity for both free and impinging jets. Linear stability theory is used to compute unstable growth rates and convection velocities of the resultant velocity profiles. The results show that while the convection velocity is largely unaffected, the unstable growth rates are significantly reduced over all frequencies with microjet injection. For the case of the impinging jet, microjet control leads to near elimination of the impingement tones and an appreciable reduction in broadband levels. Similarly, for the free jet, significant reduction in overall sound pressure levels in the peak radiation direction is observed.

  3. Turbulence Suppression by ExB Shear in JET Optimized Shear Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Beer; R.V. Budny; C.D. Challis; G. Conway; C. Gomezano; et al

    1999-07-01

    We calculate microinstability growth rates in JET optimized shear plasmas with a comprehensive gyrofluid model, including sheared E x B flows, trapped electrons, and all dominant ion species in realistic magnetic geometry. We find good correlation between E x B shear suppression of microinstabilities and both the formation and collapse of the internal transport barrier.

  4. Turbulence suppression by E x B shear in JET optimized shear pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, M.A.; Budny, R.V.; Challis, C.D.; Conway, G.

    2000-01-06

    The authors calculate microinstability growth rates in JET optimized shear plasmas with a comprehensive gyrofluid model, including sheared E x B flows, trapped electrons, and all dominant ion species in realistic magnetic geometry. They find good correlation between E x B shear suppression of microinstabilities and both the formation and collapse of the internal transport barrier.

  5. The underexpanded jet Mach disk and its associated shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgington-Mitchell, Daniel; Honnery, Damon R.; Soria, Julio

    2014-09-01

    High resolution planar particle image velocimetry is used to measure turbulent quantities in the region downstream of the Mach disk in an axisymmetric underexpanded jet issuing from a convergent nozzle. The internal annular shear layer generated by the slip line emanating from the triple point is shown to persist across multiple shock cells downstream. A triple decomposition based on Proper Orthogonal Decomposition shows that the external helical structure associated with the screech tone generated by the jet exerts a strong influence on velocity fluctuations in the initial region of the annular shear layer. This influence manifests as the external vortices producing oscillatory motion of the Mach disk, and thus a forcing of the internal annular shear layer. The internal shear layer is characterized by a number of azimuthal modes of varying wavenumber and type, including both helical and axisymmetric modes. Finally, the possibility of a previously hypothesized recirculation region behind the Mach disk is investigated, with no evidence found to support its existence.

  6. Cavitation Inception in Immersed Jet Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockett, R. D.; Ndamuso, N.; Price, R.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation inception occurring in immersed jets was investigated in a purpose-built mechanical flow rig. The rig utilized custom-built cylindrical and conical nozzles to direct high-velocity jets of variable concentration n-octane-hexadecane mixtures into a fused silica optically accessible receiver. The fluid pressure upstream and down-stream of the nozzles were manually controlled. The study employed a variety of acrylic and metal nozzles. The results show that the critical upstream pressure to downstream pressure ratio for incipient cavitation decreases with increasing n-octane concentration for the cylindrical nozzles, and increases with increasing n-octane concentration for the conical nozzle.

  7. On the linear stability of sheared and magnetized jets without current sheets - non-relativistic case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinho; Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Lyutikov, Maxim; Komissarov, Serguei S.

    2016-05-01

    In a prior paper (Kim et al. 2015) we considered the linear stability of magnetized jets that carry no net electric current and do not have current sheets. In this paper, in addition to physically well-motivated magnetic field structures, we also include the effects of jet shear. The jets we study have finite thermal pressure in addition to having realistic magnetic field structures and velocity shear. We find that shear has a strongly stabilizing effect on various modes of jet instability. Increasing shear stabilizes the fundamental pinch modes at long wavelengths and short wavelengths. Increasing shear also stabilizes the first reflection pinch modes at short wavelengths. Increasing shear has only a very modest stabilizing effect on the fundamental kink modes at long wavelengths; however, increasing shear does have a strong stabilizing effect on the fundamental kink modes at short wavelengths. The first reflection kink modes are strongly stabilized by increasing shear at shorter wavelengths. Overall, we find that the combined effect of magnetic field and shear stabilizes jets more than shear alone. In addition to the results from a formal linear stability analysis, we present a novel way of visualizing and understanding jet stability. This gives us a deeper understanding of the enhanced stability of sheared, magnetized jets. We also emphasize the value of our numerical approach in understanding the linear stability of jets with realistic structure.

  8. On the linear stability of sheared and magnetized jets without current sheets - non-relativistic case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinho; Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Lyutikov, Maxim; Komissarov, Serguei S.

    2016-09-01

    In a prior paper, we considered the linear stability of magnetized jets that carry no net electric current and do not have current sheets. In this paper, in addition to physically well-motivated magnetic field structures, we also include the effects of jet shear. The jets we study have finite thermal pressure in addition to having realistic magnetic field structures and velocity shear. We find that shear has a strongly stabilizing effect on various modes of jet instability. Increasing shear stabilizes the fundamental pinch modes at long wavelengths and short wavelengths. Increasing shear also stabilizes the first reflection pinch modes at short wavelengths. Increasing shear has only a very modest stabilizing effect on the fundamental kink modes at long wavelengths; however, increasing shear does have a strong stabilizing effect on the fundamental kink modes at short wavelengths. The first reflection kink modes are strongly stabilized by increasing shear at shorter wavelengths. Overall, we find that the combined effect of magnetic field and shear stabilizes jets more than shear alone. In addition to the results from a formal linear stability analysis, we present a novel way of visualizing and understanding jet stability. This gives us a deeper understanding of the enhanced stability of sheared, magnetized jets. We also emphasize the value of our numerical approach in understanding the linear stability of jets with realistic structure.

  9. A Computational and Experimental Investigation of Shear Coaxial Jet Atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Essam A.; Kenny, R. Jeremy; Walker, Nathan B.

    2006-01-01

    The instability and subsequent atomization of a viscous liquid jet emanated into a high-pressure gaseous surrounding is studied both computationally and experimentally. Liquid water issued into nitrogen gas at elevated pressures is used to simulate the flow conditions in a coaxial shear injector element relevant to liquid propellant rocket engines. The theoretical analysis is based on a simplified mathematical formulation of the continuity and momentum equations in their conservative form. Numerical solutions of the governing equations subject to appropriate initial and boundary conditions are obtained via a robust finite difference scheme. The computations yield real-time evolution and subsequent breakup characteristics of the liquid jet. The experimental investigation utilizes a digital imaging technique to measure resultant drop sizes. Data were collected for liquid Reynolds number between 2,500 and 25,000, aerodynamic Weber number range of 50-500 and ambient gas pressures from 150 to 1200 psia. Comparison of the model predictions and experimental data for drop sizes at gas pressures of 150 and 300 psia reveal satisfactory agreement particularly for lower values of investigated Weber number. The present model is intended as a component of a practical tool to facilitate design and optimization of coaxial shear atomizers.

  10. Vertical shears in Saturn's eastward jets at cloud level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Melendo, Enrique; Sánchez-Lavega, Agustín; Rojas, J. F.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Hueso, R.

    2009-06-01

    We have measured the vertical shear of the zonal winds in the cloud-haze upper layer of Saturn using Cassini ISS images obtained in the filters MT2 (753 nm methane absorption band, sensitive to the upper haze) and CB2 (adjacent continuum, sensitive to the lower cloud). Our radiative transfer models indicate that at the eastward jet peaks these filters are sensing clouds at the respective ˜100 mbar and ˜350 mbar levels. We have found a systematic velocity difference between those filters of 15 to 20 m s -1 only in the eastward jets peaks (27° S, 42° S, 55° S and 70° S) which implies a vertical shear of ˜10-20 m s -1 H -1. Our overall results agree with those derived from the thermal-wind relationship using CIRS thermal data [Fletcher, L.N., and 13 colleagues, 2008. Science 319, 79-81] and with previous equatorial measurements [Sánchez-Lavega, A., Hueso, R., Pérez-Hoyos, S., 2007. Icarus 187, 510-519].

  11. Are windshear training aid recommendations appropriate for other than large jet transports? Pilot procedures: Shear models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Information is given in vugraph form on pilot procedures in windshear, typical winds in a downburst, a downburst encounter at takeoff by a large jet transport and a light turboprop twin, and a comparison of pitch algorithms in an approach encounter with downburst shear. It is observed that the light turboprop appears no less tolerant of a downburst encounter than the large jet.

  12. Hourly observations of the jet stream - Wind shear, Richardson number and pilot reports of turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syrett, William J.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of observations of the jet stream made on the basis of over 400 hr of wind and temperature data taken during two prolonged jet stream passages above western and central Pennsylvania during mid-November 1986 and mid-January 1987. Wind profilers are found to be far better suited for the detailed examination of jet stream structure than are weather balloons. The combination of good vertical resolution with not previously obtained temporal resolution reveals structural details not seen before. Development of probability forecasts of turbulence based on wind profiler-derived shear values appears possible. A good correlation between pilot reports and turbulence and wind shear is found.

  13. Experimental investigation of the wall shear stress and the vortex dynamics in a circular impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hassan, Mouhammad; Assoum, Hassan Hassan; Sobolik, Vaclav; Vétel, Jérôme; Abed-Meraim, Kamel; Garon, André; Sakout, Anas

    2012-06-01

    The wall shear stress and the vortex dynamics in a circular impinging jet are investigated experimentally for Re = 1,260 and 2,450. The wall shear stress is obtained at different radial locations from the stagnation point using the polarographic method. The velocity field is given from the time resolved particle image velocimetry (TR-PIV) technique in both the free jet region and near the wall in the impinging region. The distribution of the momentum thickness is also inspected from the jet exit toward the impinged wall. It is found that the wall shear stress is correlated with the large-scale vortex passing. Both the primary vortices and the secondary structures strongly affect the variation of the wall shear stress. The maximum mean wall shear stress is obtained just upstream from the secondary vortex generation where the primary structures impinge the wall. Spectral analysis and cross-correlations between the wall shear stress fluctuations show that the vortex passing influences the wall shear stress at different locations simultaneously. Analysis of cross-correlations between temporal fluctuations of the wall shear stress and the transverse vorticity brings out the role of different vortical structures on the wall shear stress distribution for the two Reynolds numbers.

  14. Hourly wind profiler observations of the jet stream - Wind shear and pilot reports of turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syrett, William J.

    1991-01-01

    Hourly wind profiler observations of the jet stream are reported on the basis of over 400 hr of wind and temperature data taken during two prolonged jet stream passages over western and central Pennsylvania during mid-November 1986 and mid-January 1987. The mean wind speed profile with error bars for the 79 hr that the Crown radar was determined to be 'under' the jet stream is shown. A mean speed of 83 m/s for the period was found. A plot of wind shear for the hours of interest is given. Typically, the shear was at a maximum from 3 to 4 km below the level of maximum wind. Thus, an aircraft would have to fly through potentially rough air to reach the fuel savings and relative smoothness of flight at the jet stream level. A good correlation between pilot reports of turbulence and wind shear was found.

  15. A Study of the Unstable Modes in High Mach Number Gaseous Jets and Shear Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Gene Marcel

    1993-01-01

    Instabilities affecting the propagation of supersonic gaseous jets have been studied using high resolution computer simulations with the Piecewise-Parabolic-Method (PPM). These results are discussed in relation to jets from galactic nuclei. These studies involve a detailed treatment of a single section of a very long jet, approximating the dynamics by using periodic boundary conditions. Shear layer simulations have explored the effects of shear layers on the growth of nonlinear instabilities. Convergence of the numerical approximations has been tested by comparing jet simulations with different grid resolutions. The effects of initial conditions and geometry on the dominant disruptive instabilities have also been explored. Simulations of shear layers with a variety of thicknesses, Mach numbers and densities perturbed by incident sound waves imply that the time for the excited kink modes to grow large in amplitude and disrupt the shear layer is taug = (546 +/- 24) (M/4)^{1.7 } (Apert/0.02) ^{-0.4} delta/c, where M is the jet Mach number, delta is the half-width of the shear layer, and A_ {pert} is the perturbation amplitude. For simulations of periodic jets, the initial velocity perturbations set up zig-zag shock patterns inside the jet. In each case a single zig-zag shock pattern (an odd mode) or a double zig-zag shock pattern (an even mode) grows to dominate the flow. The dominant kink instability responsible for these shock patterns moves approximately at the linear resonance velocity, nu_ {mode} = cextnu_ {relative}/(cjet + c_ {ext}). For high resolution simulations (those with 150 or more computational zones across the jet width), the even mode dominates if the even penetration is higher in amplitude initially than the odd perturbation. For low resolution simulations, the odd mode dominates even for a stronger even mode perturbation. In high resolution simulations the jet boundary rolls up and large amounts of external gas are entrained into the jet. In low

  16. Measurements in the annular shear layer of high subsonic and under-expanded round jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Tong; McGuirk, James J.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental study has been undertaken to document compressibility effects in the annular shear layers of axisymmetric jets. Comparison is made of the measured flow development with the well-documented influence of compressibility in planar mixing layers. High Reynolds number (~106) and high Mach number jets issuing from a convergent nozzle at nozzle pressure ratios (NPRs) from 1.28 to 3.0 were measured using laser Doppler anemometry instrumentation. Detailed radial profile data are reported, particularly within the potential core region, for mean velocity, turbulence rms, and turbulence shear stress. For supercritical NPRs the presence of the pressure waves in the inviscid shock cell region as the jet expanded back to ambient pressure was found to exert a noticeable effect on shear layer location, causing this to shift radially outwards at high supercritical NPR conditions. After a boundary layer to free shear layer transition zone, the turbulence development displayed a short region of similarity before adjustment to near-field merged jet behaviour. Peak turbulence rms reduction due to compressibility was similar to that observed in planar layers with radial rms suppression much stronger than axial. Comparison of the compressibility-modified annular shear layer growth rate with planar shear layer data on the basis of the convective Mach number ( M C) showed notable differences; in the annular shear layer, compressibility effects began at lower M C and displayed a stronger reduction in growth. For high Mach number aerospace propulsion applications involving round jets, the current measurements represent a new data set for the calibration/validation of compressibility-affected turbulence models.

  17. Passive control of wall shear stress and mass transfer generated by submerged lobed impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodjavi, Kodjovi; Montagné, Brice; Meslem, Amina; Byrne, Paul; Serres, Laurent; Sobolik, Vaclav

    2016-05-01

    Particle image velocimetry was used to investigate the flow field in an impinging lobed daisy hemispherical nozzle jet in comparison to its counterpart round jet, at a Reynolds number of 5620 based on the exit velocity and the equivalent diameter D e of the nozzle. The limitations of the PIV technique in the vicinity of the target wall due to the laser scattering were addressed by using the electrodiffusion (ED) technique to determine the wall shear rate distribution. The distribution of the mass transfer coefficient is also obtained using the ED technique. The target wall is placed at a distance H = 2 D e from the plane tangent to the nozzle, at the center of the orifice. The entrainment of ambient fluid in the free jet region, which is larger in the lobed jet compared to the round jet, feeds in turn the wall jet region. The maximum wall shear rate was found significantly higher in the daisy jet, with an excess of 93 % compared to the reference round jet. The maximum mass transfer is 35 % higher in the former compared to the latter. Therefore, the hemispherical daisy nozzle is an excellent candidate in passive strategies to enhance local skin-friction and the subsequent local mass transfer at a constant exit Reynolds number.

  18. Shear-layer acoustic radiation in an excited subsonic jet: experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Vincent; Bailly, Christophe; Juvé, Daniel

    2005-10-01

    The subharmonic acoustic radiation of a tone excited subsonic jet shear-layer has been investigated experimentally. Two jet velocities U=20 mṡs and U=40 mṡs were studied. For U=20 mṡs, the natural boundary-layer at the nozzle exit is laminar. When the perturbation is applied, the fluctuations of the first and the second subharmonics of the excitation frequency are detected in the shear-layer. In addition, the first subharmonic near pressure field along the spreading jet is constituted of two strong maxima of sinusoidal shape. The far-field directivity pattern displays two lobes separated by an extinction angle θ at around 85° from the jet axis. These observations follow the results of Bridges about the vortex pairing noise. On the other hand, for U=40 mṡs, the initial boundary-layer is transitional and only the first subharmonic is observed in the presence of the excitation. The near pressure field is of Gaussian shape in the jet periphery and the acoustic far-field is superdirective as observed by Laufer and Yen. The state of the initial shear-layer seems to be the key feature to distinguish these two different radiation patterns. To cite this article: V. Fleury et al., C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  19. Jet transport performance in thunderstorm wind shear conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, J.; Blick, E. F.; Bensch, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    Several hours of three dimensional wind data were collected in the thunderstorm approach-to-landing environment, using an instrumented Queen Air airplane. These data were used as input to a numerical simulation of aircraft response, concentrating on fixed-stick assumptions, while the aircraft simulated an instrument landing systems approach. Output included airspeed, vertical displacement, pitch angle, and a special approach deterioration parameter. Theory and the results of approximately 1000 simulations indicated that about 20 percent of the cases contained serious wind shear conditions capable of causing a critical deterioration of the approach. In particular, the presence of high energy at the airplane's phugoid frequency was found to have a deleterious effect on approach quality. Oscillations of the horizontal wind at the phugoid frequency were found to have a more serious effect than vertical wind. A simulation of Eastern flight 66, which crashed at JFK in 1975, served to illustrate the points of the research. A concept of a real-time wind shear detector was outlined utilizing these results.

  20. Lear jet boundary layer/shear layer laser propagation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, K.

    1980-01-01

    Optical degradations of aircraft turbulent boundary layers with shear layers generated by aerodynamic fences are analyzed. A collimated 2.5 cm diameter helium-neon laser (0.63 microns) traversed the approximate 5 cm thick natural aircraft boundary layer in double pass via a reflective airfoil. In addition, several flights examined shear layer-induced optical degradation. Flight altitudes ranged from 1.5 to 12 km, while Mach numbers were varied from 0.3 to 0.8. Average line spread function (LSF) and Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) data were obtained by averaging a large number of tilt-removed curves. Fourier transforming the resulting average MTF yields an LSF, thus affording a direct comparison of the two optical measurements. Agreement was good for the aerodynamic fence arrangement, but only fair in the case of a turbulent boundary layer. Values of phase variance inferred from the LSF instrument for a single pass through the random flow and corrected for a large aperture ranged from 0.08 to 0.11 waves (lambda = .63 microns) for the boundary layer. Corresponding values for the fence vary from 0.08 to 0.16 waves. Extrapolation of these values to 10.6 microns suggests negligible degradation for a CO2 laser transmitted through a 5 cm thick, subsonic turbulent boundary layer.

  1. Characteristic modes and evolution processes of shear-layer vortices in an elevated transverse jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rong F.; Lan, Jen

    2005-03-01

    Characteristics and evolution processes of the traveling coherent flow structure in the shear layer of an elevated round jet in crossflow are studied experimentally in an open-loop wind tunnel. Streak pictures of the smoke flow patterns illuminated by the laser-light sheet in the median and horizontal planes are recorded with a high speed digital camera. Time histories of the instantaneous velocity of the vortical flows in the shear layer are digitized by a hot-wire anemometer through a high-speed data acquisition system. By analyzing the streak pictures of the smoke flow visualization, five characteristic flow structures, mixing-layer type vortices, backward-rolling vortices, forward-rolling vortices, swing-induced mushroom vortices, and jet-type vortices, are identified in the shear layer evolving from the up-wind edge of the jet exit. The behaviors and mechanisms of the vortical flow structure in the bent shear layer are prominently distinct in different flow regimes. The frequency characteristics, Strouhal number, power-spectrum density functions, autocorrelation coefficient, as well as the time and length scales of the coherent structure and the Lagrangian integral scales are obtained by processing the measured instantaneous velocity data. The Strouhal number is found to decay exponentially with the increase of the jet-to-crossflow momentum flux ratio. The autocorrelation coefficients provide the information for calculating the statistical time scales of the coherent structure and the integral time scales of turbulence fluctuations. The corresponding length scales of the vortical structure and the integral length scales of turbulence in the shear layer are therefore obtained and discussed.

  2. Microturbulence and Flow Shear in High-performance JET ITB Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny; A. Andre; A. Bicoulet; C. Challis; G.D. Conway; W. Dorland; D.R. Ernst; T.S. Hahm; T.C. Hender; D. McCune; G. Rewoldt; S.E. Sharapov

    2001-12-05

    The transport, flow shear, and linear growth rates of microturbulence are studied for a Joint European Torus (JET) plasma with high central q in which an internal transport barrier (ITB) forms and grows to a large radius. The linear microturbulence growth rates of the fastest growing (most unstable) toroidal modes with high toroidal mode number are calculated using the GS2 and FULL gyrokinetic codes. These linear growth rates, gamma (subscript lin) are large, but the flow-shearing rates, gamma (subscript ExB) (dominated by the toroidal rotation contribution) are also comparably large when and where the ITB exists.

  3. Radiation from accelerated particles in relativistic jets with shocks and shear-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Phil; Dutan, Ioana; Niemiec, Jacek; Medvedev, Mikhail; Meli, Athina; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nordlund, Aake; Trier Frederiksen, Jacob; Sol, Helene; Zhang, Bing; Pohl, Martin; Hartmann, Dieter

    2014-08-01

    We investigated particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic jet propagating into an unmagnetized plasma. Strong magnetic fields generated in the trailing shock contribute to the electron’s transverse deflection and acceleration. Kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KKHI) is also responsible to create strong DC and AC magnetic fields. The velocity shears in core-sheath jets create strong magnetic field perpendicular to the jet. We examine how the Lorentz factors of jets affect the growth rates of KKHI. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in these turbulent magnetic fields in the shocks. We found that the synthetic spectra depend on the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet, its temperature and strength of the generated magnetic fields. We will investigate synthetic spectra from accelerated electrons in strong magnetic fields generated by KKHI. The calculated properties of the emerging radiation provide our understanding of the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets in general, and supernova remnants.

  4. Shear flow control of cold and heated rectangular jets by mechanical tabs. Volume 2: Tabulated data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. H.; Ahuja, K. K.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of mechanical protrusions on the jet mixing characteristics of rectangular nozzles for heated and unheated subsonic and supersonic jet plumes were studied. The characteristics of a rectangular nozzle of aspect ratio 4 without the mechanical protrusions were first investigated. Intrusive probes were used to make the flow measurements. Possible errors introduced by intrusive probes in making shear flow measurements were also examined. Several scaled sizes of mechanical tabs were then tested, configured around the perimeter of the rectangular jet. Both the number and the location of the tabs were varied. From this, the best configuration was selected. This volume contains tabulated data for each of the data runs cited in Volume 1. Baseline characteristics, mixing modifications (subsonic and supersonic, heated and unheated) and miscellaneous charts are included.

  5. On investigating wall shear stress in two-dimensional plane turbulent wall jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdi, Faraz; Johansson, Gunnar; White, Christopher; Naughton, Jonathan

    2012-11-01

    Mehdi & White [Exp Fluids 50:43-51(2011)] presented a full momentum integral based method for determining wall shear stress in zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers. They utilized the boundary conditions at the wall and at the outer edge of the boundary layer. A more generalized expression is presented here that uses just one boundary condition at the wall. The method is mathematically exact and has an advantage of having no explicit streamwise gradient terms. It is successfully applied to two different experimental plane turbulent wall jet datasets for which independent estimates of wall shear stress were known. Complications owing to experimental inaccuracies in determining wall shear stress from the proposed method are also discussed.

  6. Shear flow control of cold and heated rectangular jets by mechanical tabs. Volume 1: Results and discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. H.; Ahuja, K. K.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of mechanical protrusions on the jet mixing characteristics of rectangular nozzles for heated and unheated subsonic and supersonic jet plumes were studied. The characteristics of a rectangular nozzle of aspect ratio 4 without the mechanical protrusions were first investigated. Intrusive probes were used to make the flow measurements. Possible errors introduced by intrusive probes in making shear flow measurements were also examined. Several scaled sizes of mechanical tabs were then tested, configured around the perimeter of the rectangular jet. Both the number and the location of the tabs were varied. From this, the best configuration was selected. The conclusions derived were: (1) intrusive probes can produce significant errors in the measurements of the velocity of jets if they are large in diameter and penetrate beyond the jet center; (2) rectangular jets without tabs, compared to circular jets of the same exit area, provide faster jet mixing; and (3) further mixing enhancement is possible by using mechanical tabs.

  7. Experimental investigation of the wall shear stress in a circular impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hassan, M.; Assoum, H. H.; Martinuzzi, R.; Sobolik, V.; Abed-Meraim, K.; Sakout, A.

    2013-07-01

    The influence of the large-scale vortical structures on the wall shear stress in a circular impinging jet is investigated experimentally for a Reynolds number of 1260. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry and polarographic measurements are performed simultaneously. It is found that the instantaneous wall shear stress is strongly dependent on the vortex dynamics, particularly for different parts of the transverse vortex. The influence of the vortex ring, the secondary and tertiary vortices on the ejection/sweep process near the wall is the main mechanism involved in the wall shear stress variation. In the region of the boundary layer separation, the wall shear stress amplitude increases just upstream of the separation and dramatically decreases in the recirculation zone downstream from the separation. The interaction between primary and secondary structures and their pairing process with the tertiary structure affects the sweep/ejection process near the wall and subsequently the wall shear stress variation. A comparison between the Finite Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) method and the phase average technique is performed. It is shown that both methods describe the flow dynamics in the impinging region of the vortex ring. However, the FTLE method is more suitable for describing the unsteady separation of the boundary layer.

  8. Breakup dynamics and dripping-to-jetting transition in a Newtonian/shear-thinning multiphase microsystem.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yong; Liu, Zhou; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2015-01-01

    The breakup dynamics in non-Newtonian multiphase microsystems is associated with a variety of industrial applications such as food production and biomedical engineering. In this study, we numerically and experimentally characterize the dripping-to-jetting transition under various flow conditions in a Newtonian/shear-thinning multiphase microsystem. Our work can help to predict the formation of undesirable satellite droplets, which is one of the challenges in dispensing non-Newtonian fluids. We also demonstrate the variations in breakup dynamics between shear-thinning and Newtonian fluids under the same flow conditions. For shear-thinning fluids, the droplet size increases when the capillary number is smaller than a critical value, while it decreases when the capillary number is beyond the critical value. The variations highlight the importance of rheological effects in flows with a non-Newtonian fluid. The viscosity of shear-thinning fluids significantly affects the control over the droplet size, therefore necessitating the manipulation of the shear rate through adjusting the flow rate and the dimensions of the nozzle. Consequently, the droplet size can be tuned in a controlled manner. Our findings can guide the design of novel microdevices for generating droplets of shear-thinning fluids with a predetermined droplet size. This enhances the ability to fabricate functional particles using an emulsion-templated approach. Moreover, elastic effects are also investigated experimentally using a model shear-thinning fluid that also exhibits elastic behaviors: droplets are increasingly deformed with increasing elasticity of the continuous phase. The overall understanding in the model multiphase microsystem will facilitate the use of a droplet-based approach for non-Newtonian multiphase applications ranging from energy to biomedical sciences. PMID:25316203

  9. The effect of a shear boundary layer on the stability of a capillary jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganan-Calvo, Alfonso; Montanero, Jose M.; Herrada, Miguel A.

    2014-11-01

    The generic stabilization effect of a shear boundary layer over the free surface of a capillary jet is here studied from analytical (asymptotic), numerical and experimental approaches. In first place, we show the consistency of the proposed asymptotic analysis by a linear stability (numerical) analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations for a finite boundary layer thickness. We show how the convective-to-absolute instability transition departs drastically from the flat velocity profile case as the axial coordinate becomes closer to the origin of the boundary layer development. For large enough axial distances from that origin, Rayleigh's dispersion relation is recovered. A collection of experimental observations is analyzed from the perspective provided by these results. We propose a systematic framework to the dynamics of capillary jets issued from a nozzle, either by direct injection into a quiescent atmosphere or in a co-flow (e.g. gas flow-focused jets), which exhibit peculiarities now definitely attributable in first order to the formation of shear boundary layers. Partial support from the Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, Junta de Extremadura, and Junta de Andalucia (Spain) through Grant Nos. DPI2010-21103, GR10047, P08-TEP-04128, and TEP-7465, respectively, is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Understanding High Recession Rates of Carbon Ablators Seen in Shear Tests in an Arc Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, David M.; Olson, Michael W.; Barnhardt, Michael D.; MacLean, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    High rates of recession in arc jet shear tests of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) inspired a series of tests and analysis on FiberForm (a carbon preform used in the fabrication of PICA). Arc jet tests were performed on FiberForm in both air and pure nitrogen for stagnation and shear configurations. The nitrogen tests showed little or no recession, while the air tests of FiberForm showed recession rates similar to that of PICA (when adjusted for the difference in density). While mechanical erosion can not be ruled out, this is the first step in doing so. Analysis using a carbon oxidation boundary condition within DPLR was used to predict the recession rate of FiberForm. The analysis indicates that much of the anomalous recession behavior seen in shear tests may simply be an artifact of the non-flight like test configuration (copper upstream of the test article) a result of dissimilar enthalpy and oxygen concentration profiles on the copper. Shape change effects were also investigated and shown to be relatively small.

  11. The Applicability of Jet-Shear-Layer Mixing and Effervescent Atomization for Low-NO(x) Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colantonio, R. O.

    1998-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to develop appropriate technologies for a low-NO(x), liquid-fueled combustor. The combustor incorporates an effervescent atomizer used to inject fuel into a premixing duct. Only a fraction of the combustion air is used in the premixing process. This fuel-rich mixture is introduced into the remaining combustion air by a rapid jet-shear-layer mixing process involving radial fuel-air jets impinging on axial air jets in the primary combustion zone. Computational modeling was used as a tool to facilitate a parametric analysis appropriate to the design of an optimum low-NO(x) combustor. A number of combustor configurations were studied to assess the key combustor technologies and to validate the three-dimensional modeling code. The results from the experimental testing and computational analysis indicate a low-NO(x) potential for the jet-shear-layer combustor. Key features found to affect NOx emissions are the primary combustion zone fuel-air ratio, the number of axial and radial jets, the aspect ratio and radial location of the axial air jets, and the radial jet inlet hole diameter. Each of these key parameters exhibits a low-NO(x) point from which an optimized combustor was developed Also demonstrated was the feasibility of utilizing an effervescent atomizer for combustor application. Further developments in the jet-shear-layer mixing scheme and effervescent atomizer design promise even lower NO(x) with high combustion efficiency.

  12. PLIF Imaging of Capsule RCS Jets, Shear Layers, and Simulated Forebody Ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.; Buck, Gregory M.; McCrea, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) has been used to investigate hypersonic flows associated with capsule reentry vehicles. These flows included reaction control system (RCS) jets, shear layer flow, and simulated forebody heatshield ablation. Pitch, roll, and yaw RCS jets were studied. PLIF obtained planar slices in these flowfields. These slices could be viewed individually or they could be combined using computer visualization techniques to reconstruct the three dimensional shape of the flow. The tests described herein were conducted in the 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. Improvements to many facets of the imaging system increased the efficiency and quality of both data acquisition, in addition to increasing the overall robustness of the system.

  13. Experimental Optimisation of the Thermal Performance of Impinging Synthetic Jet Heat Sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marron, Craig; Persoons, Tim

    2014-07-01

    Zero-net-mass flow synthetic jet devices offer a potential solution for energy- efficient cooling of medium power density electronic components. There remains an incomplete understanding of the interaction of these flows with extended surfaces, which prevents the wider implementation of these devices in the field. This study examines the effect of the main operating parameters on the heat transfer rate and electrical power consumption for a synthetic jet cooled heat sink. Three different heat sink geometries are tested. The results find that a modified sink with a 14 × 14 pin array with the central 6 × 6 pins removed provides superior cooling to either a fully pinned sink or flat plate. Furthermore each heat sink is found to have its own optimum jet orifice-to-sink spacing for heat transfer independent of flow conditions. The optimum heat transfer for the modified sink is H = 34 jet diameters. The effect of frequency on heat transfer is also studied. It is shown that heat transfer increases superlinearly with frequency at higher stroke lengths. The orientation of the impingement surface with respect to gravity has no effect on the heat transfer capabilities of the tested device. These tests are the starting point for further investigation into enhanced synthetic jet impingement surfaces. The equivalent axial fan cooled pinned heat sink (Malico Inc. MFP40- 18) has a thermal resistance of 1.93K/W at a fan power consumption of 0.12W. With the modified pinned heat sink, a synthetic jet at Re = 911, L0/D = 10, H/D = 30 provides a thermal resistance of 2.5K/W at the same power consumption.

  14. Refraction of Sound Emitted Near Solid Boundaries from a Sheared Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Loren H.; Oyedrian, Ayo A.; Krejsa, Eugene A.

    1998-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the sound emitted from an arbitrary point within a turbulent flow near solid boundaries. A unidirectional, transversely sheared mean flow is assumed, and the cross-section of the cold jet is of arbitrary shape. The analysis begins with Lilley's formulation of aerodynamic noise and, depending upon the specific model of turbulence used, leads via Fourier analysis to an expression for the spectral density of the intensity of the far-field sound emitted from a unit volume of turbulence. The expressions require solution of a reduced Green's function of Lilley's equation as well as certain moving axis velocity correlations of the turbulence. Integration over the entire flow field is required in order to predict the sound emitted by the complete flow. Calculations are presented for sound emitted from a plugflow jet exiting a semi-infinite flat duct. Polar plots of the far-field directivity show the dependence upon frequency and source position within the duct. Certain model problems are suggested to investigate the effect of duct termination, duct geometry, and mean flow shear upon the far-field sound.

  15. Three-dimensional evolution of magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities in a compressible magnetized jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettarini, Lapo; Landi, Simone; Velli, Marco; Londrillo, Pasquale

    2009-06-01

    The problem of three-dimensional combined magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities of a compressible magnetized jet modeled as a plane neutral/current double vortex sheet in the framework of the resistive magnetohydrodynamics is addressed. The resulting dynamics given by the stream+current sheet interaction is analyzed and the effects of a variable geometry of the basic fields are considered. Depending on the basic asymptotic magnetic field configuration, a selection rule of the linear instability modes can be obtained. Hence, the system follows a two-stage path developing either through a fully three-dimensional dynamics with a rapid evolution of kink modes leading to a final turbulent state, or rather through a driving two-dimensional instability pattern that develops on parallel planes on which a reconnection+coalescence process takes place.

  16. Three-dimensional evolution of magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities in a compressible magnetized jet

    SciTech Connect

    Bettarini, Lapo; Landi, Simone; Velli, Marco; Londrillo, Pasquale

    2009-06-15

    The problem of three-dimensional combined magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities of a compressible magnetized jet modeled as a plane neutral/current double vortex sheet in the framework of the resistive magnetohydrodynamics is addressed. The resulting dynamics given by the stream+current sheet interaction is analyzed and the effects of a variable geometry of the basic fields are considered. Depending on the basic asymptotic magnetic field configuration, a selection rule of the linear instability modes can be obtained. Hence, the system follows a two-stage path developing either through a fully three-dimensional dynamics with a rapid evolution of kink modes leading to a final turbulent state, or rather through a driving two-dimensional instability pattern that develops on parallel planes on which a reconnection+coalescence process takes place.

  17. Fluid Mechanics Optimising Organic Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leivadarou, Evgenia; Dalziel, Stuart

    2015-11-01

    The Vortex Fluidic Device (VFD) is a new ``green'' approach in the synthesis of organic chemicals with many industrial applications in biodiesel generation, cosmetics, protein folding and pharmaceutical production. The VFD is a rapidly rotating tube that can operate with a jet feeding drops of liquid reactants to the base of the tube. The aim of this project is to explain the fluid mechanics of the VFD that influence the rate of reactions. The reaction rate is intimately related to the intense shearing that promotes collision between reactant molecules. In the VFD, the highest shears are found at the bottom of the tube in the Rayleigh and the Ekman layer and at the walls in the Stewardson layers. As a step towards optimising the performance of the VFD we present experiments conducted in order to establish the minimum drop volume and maximum rotation rate for maximum axisymmetric spreading without fingering instability. PhD candidate, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics.

  18. Noise measurements in a free-jet, flight simulation facility - Shear layer refraction and facility-to-flight corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfey, C. L.; Tester, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    The conversion of free-jet facility into equivalent flyover results is discussed. The essential problem is to 'calibrate out' the acoustic influence of the outer free-jet shear layer on the measurement, since this is absent in the flight case. Results are presented which illustrate the differences between current simplified models (vortex-sheet and geometric acoustics), and a more complete model based on the Lilley equation. Finally, the use of geometric acoustics for facility-to-flight data conversion is discussed.

  19. Reversed shear Alfv'en Eigenmodes in the frequency range of the triangularity induced gap on JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, G. J.; Fu, G. Y.; Nazikian, R.; Budny, R. V.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Cheng, C. Z.; Alper, B.; Pinches, S. D.; Rimini, F.; Sharapov, S. E.; de Vries, P.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Zoita, V.

    2007-11-01

    In reversed magnetic shear plasmas a class of Alfv'en eigenmodes (AE) can exist, the Reversed shear Alfv'en eigen modes (RSAE). They are often observed in Tokamaks and are located just above the local maximum of the lower TAE continuum gap at the shear reversal point. Similar maxima exist in the higher order Alfv'en gaps such as the EAE and NAE gap. In this presentation we will show from ideal MHD simulations and analytical theory that modes similar to the RSAE can exist under certain conditions in those higher order gaps. In burning plasmas modes in the AE gaps can be harmful for the confinement of fusion born alpha particles which can get lost before they thermalize thereby reducing the efficiency of a fusion reactor. We will show experimental evidence for RSAEs in the NAE gap in JET discharges. The JET NAE-RSAEs are identified from state of the art MHD simulations with the NOVA code in which the experimentally observed equilibrium parameters were used.

  20. Application of Shear Plate Interferometry to Jet Diffusion Flame Temperature Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDerWege, Brad A.; OBrien, Chris J.; Hochgreb, Simone

    1997-01-01

    The recent ban on the production of bromotrifluoromethane (CF3Br) because of its high stratospheric ozone depletion potential has led to interest in finding alternative agents for fire extinguishing applications. Some of the promising alternatives are fluorinated hydrocarbons. A clear understanding of the effects of CF3Br and alternative chemical suppressants on diffusion flames is therefore necessary in the selection of alternative suppressants for use in normal and microgravity. The flame inhibition effects of halogen compounds have been studied extensively in premixed systems. The effect of addition of halocarbons (carbon-halogen compounds) to diffusion flames has been studied experimentally in coflow configurations and in counterflow gaseous and liquid-pool flames. Halogenated compounds are believed to inhibit combustion by scavenging hydrogen radicals to form the relatively unreactive compound HF, or through a catalytic recombination cycle involving HBr to form H2. Comparisons between halogens show that bromine inhibition is significantly more effective than chlorine or fluorine. Although fluorinated compounds are only slightly more effective inhibitors on a mass basis than nitrogen, they are more effective on a volume basis and are easily stored in liquid form. The objectives of this study are (a) to determine the stability limits of laminar jet diffusion flames with respect to inhibitor concentration in both normal and microgravity, and (b) to investigate the structure of halocarbon-inhibited flames. In the initial phase of this project, visual diagnostics were used to observe the structure and behavior of normal and microgravity flames. The initial observations showed significant changes in the structure of the flames with the addition of halocarbons to the surrounding environment, as discussed below. Furthermore, the study established that the flames are more stable relative to the addition of halocarbons in microgravity than in normal gravity. Visual

  1. Vortex dynamics and wall shear stress behaviour associated with an elliptic jet impinging upon a flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, J.; New, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    Vortical structures and dynamics of a Re h = 2100 elliptic jet impinging upon a flat plate were studied at H/ d h = 1, 2 and 4 jet-to-plate separation distances. Flow investigations were conducted along both its major and minor planes using laser-induced fluorescence and digital particle image velocimetry techniques. Results show that the impingement process along the major plane largely consists of primary jet ring-vortex and wall-separated secondary vortex formations, where they subsequently separate from the flat plate at smaller H/ d h = 1 and 2 separation distances. Key vortex formation locations occur closer to the impingement point as the separation distance increases. Interestingly, braid vortices and rib structures begin to take part in the impingement process at H/ d h = 4 and wave instabilities dominate the flow field. In contrast, significantly more coherent primary and secondary vortices with physically larger vortex core sizes and higher vortex strengths are observed along the minor plane, with no signs of braid vortices and rib structures. Lastly, influences of these different flow dynamics on the major and minor plane instantaneous and mean skin friction coefficient levels are investigated to shed light on the effects of separation distance on the wall shear stress distributions.

  2. The low frequency sound from multipole sources in axisymmetric shear flows, with applications to jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.

    1975-01-01

    A closed-form solution for the sound radiation from multipole sources imbedded in an infinite cylindrical jet with an arbitrary velocity profile is obtained. It is valid in the limit where the wavelength is large compared with the jet radius. Simple formulae for the acoustic pressure field due to convected point sources are also obtained. The results show (in a simple way) how the mean flow affects the radiation pattern from the sources. For convected lateral quadrupoles it causes the exponent of the Doppler factor multiplying the far-field pressure signal to be increased from the value of 3 used by Lighthill to 5.

  3. TRAJECTORIES OF PLUMES AND JETS IN TURBULENT SHEAR FLOW UNDER NEAR-NEUTRAL CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new method of determination of trajectories of plumes and jets using measured vertical profiles of tracer concentration is proposed. odel calculations show that this method can reduce significantly the scatter in the data and eliminate the appearance of an artificial final rise...

  4. Application of jet-shear-layer mixing and effervescent atomization to the development of a low-NO(x) combustor. Ph.D. Thesis - Purdue Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colantonio, Renato Olaf

    1993-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to develop appropriate technologies for a low-NO(x), liquid-fueled combustor. The combustor incorporates an effervescent atomizer used to inject fuel into a premixing duct. Only a fraction of the combustion air is used in the premixing process to avoid autoignition and flashback problems. This fuel-rich mixture is introduced into the remaining combustion air by a rapid jet-shear-layer-mixing process involving radial fuel-air jets impinging on axial air jets in the primary combustion zone. Computational analysis was used to provide a better understanding of the fluid dynamics that occur in jet-shear-layer mixing and to facilitate a parametric analysis appropriate to the design of an optimum low-NO(x) combustor. A number of combustor configurations were studied to assess the key combustor technologies and to validate the modeling code. The results from the experimental testing and computational analysis indicate a low-NO(x) potential for the jet-shear-layer combustor. Key parameters found to affect NO(x) emissions are the primary combustion zone fuel-air ratio, the number of axial and radial jets, the aspect ratio and radial location of the axial air jets, and the radial jet inlet hole diameter. Each of these key parameters exhibits a low-NO(x) point from which an optimized combustor was developed. Using the parametric analysis, NO(x) emissions were reduced by a factor of 3 as compared with the emissions from conventional, liquid-fueled combustors operating at cruise conditions. Further development promises even lower NO(x) with high combustion efficiency.

  5. High-shear, Jet-cooking, and Alkali Treatment of Corn Distillers' Dried Grains to Obtain Products with Enhanced Protein, Oil, and Phenolic Antioxidants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Distillers dried grains (DDG) have potential to be a nutritionally important source of protein, oil, and phenolic antioxidants. DDG was subjected to high-shear and jet-cooking, with or without alkaline pH adjustment and autoclaving. Soluble and insoluble fractions were analyzed for protein, oil, a...

  6. Effects of external intermittency and mean shear on the spectral inertial-range exponent in a turbulent square jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Xu, M.; Pollard, A.; Mi, J.

    2013-05-01

    This study investigates by experiment the dependence of the inertial-range exponent m of the streamwise velocity spectrum on the external intermittency factor γ (≡ the fraction of time the flow is fully turbulent) and the mean shear S in a turbulent square jet. Velocity measurements were made using hot-wire anemometry in the jet at 15 < x/De < 40, where De denotes the exit equivalent diameter, and for an exit Reynolds number of Re = 50 000. The Taylor microscale Reynolds number Rλ varies from about 70 to 450 in the present study. The TERA (turbulent energy recognition algorithm) method proposed by Falco and Gendrich [in Near-Wall Turbulence: 1988 Zoran Zariç Memorial Conference, edited by S. J. Kline and N. H. Afgan (Hemisphere Publishing Corp., Washington, DC, 1990), pp. 911-931] is discussed and applied to estimate the intermittency factor from velocity signals. It is shown that m depends strongly on γ but negligibly on S. More specifically, m varies with γ following m=mt+(lnγ-0.0173)1/2, where mt denotes the spectral exponent found in fully turbulent regions.

  7. Effects of external intermittency and mean shear on the spectral inertial-range exponent in a turbulent square jet.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Xu, M; Pollard, A; Mi, J

    2013-05-01

    This study investigates by experiment the dependence of the inertial-range exponent m of the streamwise velocity spectrum on the external intermittency factor γ (≡ the fraction of time the flow is fully turbulent) and the mean shear S in a turbulent square jet. Velocity measurements were made using hot-wire anemometry in the jet at 15 < x/D(e) < 40, where D(e) denotes the exit equivalent diameter, and for an exit Reynolds number of Re = 50,000. The Taylor microscale Reynolds number R(λ) varies from about 70 to 450 in the present study. The TERA (turbulent energy recognition algorithm) method proposed by Falco and Gendrich [in Near-Wall Turbulence: 1988 Zoran Zariç Memorial Conference, edited by S. J. Kline and N. H. Afgan (Hemisphere Publishing Corp., Washington, DC, 1990), pp. 911-931] is discussed and applied to estimate the intermittency factor from velocity signals. It is shown that m depends strongly on γ but negligibly on S. More specifically, m varies with γ following m=m(t)+(lnγ(-0.0173))(1/2), where m(t) denotes the spectral exponent found in fully turbulent regions. PMID:23767622

  8. Measurements of velocity shear and ion viscosity profile in a magnetohydrodynamic plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, L. A.; Intrator, T.; Sun, X.; Hendryx, J.; Wurden, G. A.; Furno, I.; Lapenta, G.

    2010-10-01

    Time-dependent, two-dimensional profiles of the axial flow velocity, density, electron temperature, and magnetic field components are measured at two axial locations in a screw pinch plasma column of the reconnection scaling experiment. The results show that the ion momentum flux for a given column radius is dissipated by the ion-ion Coulomb scattering viscosity due to a significant radial shear of the axial velocity. By comparing the terms of the magnetohydrodynamic momentum balance equation, radial profile of ion viscosity is determined. Chord-integrated ion temperature measurements performed at several radial locations using Doppler broadening spectroscopy show ion temperature of about 1 eV. Measured ion viscosity agrees within a factor of 2 with the classical Braginskii expectations.

  9. Measurements of velocity shear and ion viscosity profile in a magnetohydrodynamic plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, L. A.; Intrator, T.; Sun, X.; Hendryx, J.; Wurden, G. A.; Furno, I; Lapenta, G.

    2010-10-15

    Time-dependent, two-dimensional profiles of the axial flow velocity, density, electron temperature, and magnetic field components are measured at two axial locations in a screw pinch plasma column of the reconnection scaling experiment. The results show that the ion momentum flux for a given column radius is dissipated by the ion-ion Coulomb scattering viscosity due to a significant radial shear of the axial velocity. By comparing the terms of the magnetohydrodynamic momentum balance equation, radial profile of ion viscosity is determined. Chord-integrated ion temperature measurements performed at several radial locations using Doppler broadening spectroscopy show ion temperature of about 1 eV. Measured ion viscosity agrees within a factor of 2 with the classical Braginskii expectations.

  10. Simulation of a turbulent supersonic underexpanded jet flowing into a submerged space with the help of a shear stress transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, S. A.; Lipnitskii, Yu. M.; Baranov, P. A.; Panasenko, A. V.; Usachov, A. E.

    2012-11-01

    We have calculated the flow of an axisymmetric turbulent supersonic underexpanded jet into a submerged space with the help of the VP2/3 package as part of the generalized pressure correction procedure. The shear stress transfer model modified with account for the curvature of streamlines has been verified on the basis of comparison with V. I. Zapryagaev's data obtained at the S. A. Khristianovich Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The influence of the generated vortex viscosity on the shock-wave structure of the jet, the field of flow parameters, and the turbulence characteristics has been analyzed.

  11. Shear layer structure of a low speed jet. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report, 28 Jun. 1974 - 31 Dec. 1975; [measurements of field pressure and turbulent velocity functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A series of measurements of near field pressures and turbulent velocity fluctuations were made in a low speed jet with a Reynolds number near 50,000 in order to investigate more quantitatively the character and behavior of the large scale structures and their interactions with each other. The near field measurements were modelled according to the vortex pairing hypothesis to deduce the distribution of pairings along the jet axis and the variances about the mean locations. The hodograph plane description of turbulence was explored in some detail, and a complex correlation quantity was synthesized which has useful properties for turbulence in the presence of mean shear.

  12. On the vertical wind shear of Saturn's Equatorial Jet at cloud level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.

    2005-08-01

    With the aim of retrieving the altitude of cloud features used as zonal wind tracers in Saturn's atmosphere, we have reanalyzed three different sets of photometric and calibrated data corresponding to the Voyager epoch 1979-1981 (ground-based in 1979, Voyager 2 PPS and ISS observations in 1981), and we have analyze a new set of Hubble Space Telescope images for 2004. This analysis is put in the perspective of our previous HST study for 1994-2003 (Pérez-Hoyos et al., Icarus, 176, 155. 2005). A common result is found that the individual cloud tracers are embedded within a variable tropospheric haze. According to our models, the Voyager 2 ISS images locate the cloud tracers moving with zonal velocities of 455 to 465 (± 2) m/s at a pressure level of 360 ± 140 mbar. For HST observations, the cloud tracers moving with zonal wind speeds of 280 ± 10 m/s, locate at a pressure level of about 50 ± 10 mbar. All these values are calculated in the latitude 3 deg North. The speed difference, if interpreted as a vertical wind shear (Porco et al., Science, 307, 1226. 2005), requires a change of 90 m/s per scale height, two times greater than that estimated from Cassini CIRS data (Flasar et al., Science, 307, 1247, 2005). We also perform an initial guess on Cassini ISS vertical sounding levels, retrieving values compatible with the HST ones but not with Voyager wind measurements. We conclude that the wind speed velocity differences measured between 1979-81 and 2004 in the upper troposphere cannot be solely explained as a wind shear effect and demand dynamical processes. We discuss the possible action of Rossby waves or an intrinsic circulation change in the ammonia cloud layer and above, following a large period of equatorial storm activity. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by MCYT AYA2003-03216, FEDER, and Grupos UPV 15946/2004. S.P.-H. acknowledges a PhD fellowship from the Spanish MEC and R. H. a post-doc contract from Gobierno Vasco.

  13. The Role of Axisymmetric Reconnection Events in JET Discharges with Extreme Shear Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    B.C. Stratton; J.A. Breslau; R.V. Budny; S.C. Jardin; W. Park; H.R. Strauss; L.E. Zakharov; B. Alper; V. Drozdov; N.C. Hawkes; S. Reyes-Cortes; and Contributors to the EFDA-JET Work Programme

    2001-12-03

    Injection of Lower Hybrid Heating and Current Drive into the current ramp-up phase of Joint European Torus (JET) discharges can produce extremely reversed q-profiles characterized by a core region of very small or zero current density (within Motional Stark Effect diagnostic measurement errors) and q(subscript min) > 1. T(subscript e)-profiles show sawtooth-like collapses and the presence of an internal transport barrier. Accurate equilibrium reconstructions of these discharges are obtained using the ESC code, which was recently extended to allow equilibrium reconstructions in which a free boundary solver determines the plasma boundary and a fixed boundary solver provides the magnetic geometry and current density profile. The core current density does not appear to go negative, although current diffusion calculations indicate that sufficient non-inductive current drive to cause this is present. This is explained by nonlinear resistive MHD simulations in toroidal geometry which predict that these discharges undergo n=0 reconnection events (axisymmetric sawteeth) that redistribute the current to hold the core current density near zero.

  14. Effect of wind turbulence and shear on landing performance of jet transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blick, E. F.; Mccarthy, J.; Bensch, R. R.; Sarabudla, N. R.

    1978-01-01

    Computer simulations of a Boeing 727 class aircraft landing in turbulence were developed by programming the longitudinal aircraft equations of motion into a digital computer with various input values of vertical and horizontal wind speeds. Turbulent wind data was fed to the computer in one-second intervals. The computer computed in one-second intervals the aircraft speed, altitude, horizontal distance traveled, rate-of-descent, pitch attitude, glide path angle (from edge of runway) and elevator angle. All computer runs were made in the 'stick-fixed' mode. The RMS values of altitude and velocity perturbations (from equilibrium) were found to be large when horizontal wind gusts had sinusoidal components at or near the phugoid (long period) frequency. Maximum RMS altitude deviations occurred when the vertical wind had sinusoidal components which were 1/10 to 1/5 of the phugoid frequency. When real wind data (obtained from NCAR Queen Air) were used as input winds good correlations were found to exist between RMS velocity perturbations and both horizontal and vertical wind shears.

  15. On the behavior of a shear-coaxial jet, spanning sub- to supercritical pressures, with and without an externally imposed transverse acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Dustin Wayne

    In the past, liquid rocket engines (LRE) have experienced high-frequency combustion instability, which impose an acoustic field in the combustion chamber. The acoustic field interacts with the fluid jets issuing from the injectors, thus altering the behavior of the jet compared to that of stable operation of the LRE. It is possible that this interaction could be a substantial feed back mechanism driving the combustion instability. In order to understand the problem of combustion instability, it is necessary to understand the interaction of the jet with the acoustic waves. From past combustion instability studies of the liquid oxygen and hydrogen propellant combination in a shear-coaxial injector configuration, a design guideline of outer-to-inner jet velocity ratio greater than about ten was proposed in order to avoid high-frequency acoustic combustion instability problems. However, no satisfactory physical explanation was provided. To promote this understanding, a cold-flow experimental investigation of a shear-coaxial jet interacting with a high-amplitude non-linear acoustic field was undertaken under chamber pressures extending into the supercritical regime. Liquid nitrogen (LN2) flowed from the inner tube of a coaxial injector while gaseous nitrogen (GN2) issued from its annular region. The injector fluids were directed into a chamber pressurized with gaseous nitrogen. The acoustic excitation was provided by an external driver capable of delivering acoustic field amplitudes up to 165 dB. The resonant modes of the chamber governed the two frequencies studied here, with the first two modes being about 3 and 5.2 kHz. High-speed images of the jet were taken with a Phantom CMOS camera. The so-called "dark core" of the jet is among the most salient features in the acquired images, and therefore, was defined and measured. The core length was found to decrease with increasing velocity and momentum flux ratio. Because of the ability of the camera to capture thousands of

  16. Fixed-base simulation study of decoupled longitudinal controls during approach and landing of a medium jet transport in the presence of wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, G. K., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The use of decoupled longitudinal controls during the approach and landing of a typical twin-engine jet transport in the presence of wind shear was studied. The simulation included use of a localizer and flight director to capture and maintain a 3 deg glide slope. The pilot then completed the landing by using visual cues provided below an altitude of 200 m by closed-circuit television and a terrain model. The decoupled controls used constant prefilter and feedback gains to provide steady state decoupling of flight path angle, pitch angle, and forward velocity. The use of the decoupled control system improved pilot performance during the approach and at touchdown in the presence of wind shears. The pilots preferred the decoupled controls and rated the task 1 to 3 increments better on a pilot rating scale, depending on wind conditions, than was the case when conventional controls were used.

  17. On the interaction of a sound pulse with the shear layer of an axisymmetric jet. Part 3: Nonlinear effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Maestrello, L.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The fluctuating field of a jet excited by transient mass injection is simulated numerically. The model is developed by expanding the state vector as a mean state plus a fluctuating state. Nonlinear terms are not neglected, and the effect of nonlinearity was studied. A high order numerical method is used to compute the solution. The results show a significant spectral broadening in the flow field due to the nonlinearity. In addition, large scale structures are broken down into smaller scales.

  18. Numeric and experimental investigation of the sound generating mechanisms of a starting jet in volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesterhenn, Joern; Pena Fernandez, Juan Jose

    2015-04-01

    Every volcanic eruption generates in its very first stage an impulsively starting free jet, and while continuous free jets have been investigated and optimised during the last 60 years, the impulsively started jet is still relatively unexplored. Its sound structure is qualitatively different from the sound generated by a continuously blowing jet. We focus here upon the very first stage of a supersonic free round jet, when the flow is only few diameters long and the vortex ring generated by the sudden expansion interacts with the shock-waves and the shear layer. Direct numerical simulations with more than 2 x 109 grid points are carried out, discretising the compressible Navier-Stokes equations to compute both the fluid flow and the noise radiated by the interaction of the shear layer, the shock-waves and the vortex ring in a compressible free round jet. The first acoustic wave radiated due to the strong expansion at the nozzle in the first stage is also computed. As a result of the mentioned interaction, a sound level of 111[dB] at a distance of 100 diameters from the jet axis has been computed. The acoustic signal of more than 2000 eruptions has been recorded with synchronised microphones at Stromboli and Mount Etna in order to identify the sound generating mechanisms and to compare with the numerical simulations. An interaction between the shear layer, the shock-waves and the vortex ring has been investigated using numerical methods in an impulsively started supersonic free round jet and noise levels of order of the loudest acoustic phenomenon in the continuous jet have been identified and quantified. Numerous short volcanic eruptions were recorded at Stromboli and Etna covering a range of very short to medium length eruptions. Statistical and modal analysis are performed on the different eruptions and compared to the numerical computations to identify the different sound source mechanisms in the signals, which are observed in the computations.

  19. Evaluation of Aortic Stenosis Severity using 4D Flow Jet Shear Layer Detection for the Measurement of Valve Effective Orifice Area

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Julio; Markl, Michael; Schnell, Susanne; Allen, Bradley; Entezari, Pegah; Mahadevia, Riti; Malaisrie, S Chris; Pibarot, Philippe; Carr, James; Barker, Alex J

    2014-01-01

    Aims The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of 4D flow MRI to assess valve effective orifice area (EOA) in patients with aortic stenosis as determined by the jet shear layer detection (JSLD) method. Methods and Results An in-vitro stenosis phantom was used for validation and in-vivo imaging was performed in 10 healthy controls and 40 patients with aortic stenosis. EOA was calculated by the JSLD method using standard 2D phase contrast MRI (PC-MRI) and 4D flow MRI measurements (EOAJSLD-2D and EOAJSLD-4D, respectively). As a reference standard, the continuity equation was used to calculate EOA (EOACE) with the 2D PC-MRI velocity field and compared to the EOAJSLD measurements. The in-vitro results exhibited excellent agreement between flow theory (EOA=0.78 cm2) and experimental measurement (EOAJSLD-4D=0.78±0.01 cm2) for peak velocities ranging from 0.9 to 3.7 m/s. In-vivo results showed good correlation and agreement between EOAJSLD-2D and EOACE (r=0.91, p<0.001; bias: −0.01±0.38cm2; agreement limits: 0.75 to −0.77cm2), and between EOAJSLD-4D and EOACE (r=0.95, p<0.001; bias: −0.09±0.26cm2; limits: 0.43 to −0.62cm2). Conclusion This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring EOAJSLD using 4D flow MRI. The technique allows for optimization of the EOA measurement position by visualizing the 3D vena contracta, and avoids potential sources of EOACE measurement variability. PMID:24865143

  20. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  1. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  2. Numerical simulations of mixing under supercritical pressures of a shear coaxial injector using a high-order method: effect of outer jet temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, H.; Koshi, M.

    2016-07-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) simulation of N2/H2 mixing for a coaxial injector under a supercritical pressure of 10 MPa is conducted using a highorder numerical method. Two outer H2 jets with injection temperatures of approximately 52 and 462 K are applied while an inner N2 jet with an injection temperature of approximately 97 K is applied. The mean and fluctuation properties and instantaneous flow fields are discussed in order to characterize the detailed mixing features for the two injection conditions. A clear dependence of dense-core length on the momentum flux ratio is also demonstrated.

  3. Perspectives on jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, H. S.

    1981-01-01

    Jet noise is a byproduct of turbulence. Until recently turbulence was assumed to be known statistically, and jet noise was computed therefrom. As a result of new findings though on the behavior of vortices and instability waves, a more integrated view of the problem has been accepted lately. After presenting a simple view of jet noise, the paper attempts to resolve the apparent differences between Lighthill's and Lilley's interpretations of mean-flow shear, and examines a number of ad hoc approaches to jet noise suppression.

  4. Optimisation in radiotherapy. II: Programmed and inversion optimisation algorithms.

    PubMed

    Ebert, M

    1997-12-01

    This is the second article in a three part examination of optimisation in radiotherapy. The previous article established the bases of optimisation in radiotherapy, and the formulation of the optimisation problem. This paper outlines several algorithms that have been used in radiotherapy, for searching for the best irradiation strategy within the full set of possible strategies. Two principle classes of algorithm are considered--those associated with mathematical programming which employ specific search techniques, linear programming-type searches or artificial intelligence--and those which seek to perform a numerical inversion of the optimisation problem, finishing with deterministic iterative inversion. PMID:9503694

  5. Coherent motion in excited free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wygnanski, Israel J.; Petersen, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the inviscid instability approach to externally excited turbulent free shear flows at high Reynolds numbers is explored. Attention is given to the cases of a small-deficit plane turbulent wake, a plane turbulent jet, an axisymmetric jet, the nonlinear evolution of instabilities in free shear flows, the concept of the 'preferred mode', vortex pairing in turbulent mixing layers, and experimental results for the control of free turbulent shear layers. The special features often attributed to pairing or to the preferred mode are found to be difficult to comprehend; the concept of feedback requires further substantiation in the case of incompressible flow.

  6. A comparison of global optimisation methods for near-offset VSP inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Steve; MacBeth, Colin

    1998-07-01

    Three global optimisation algorithms are applied to the problem of geophysical inversion. We describe and test the methods of Tabu Search, Genetic Algorithms and Simulated Annealing. These techniques are used to invert observations of shear-wave splitting from near-offset Vertical Seismic Profiles. Each search shows distinct advantages and disadvantages so that no particular algorithm can be clearly recommended. Nonetheless, we can recommend that a global optimisation be followed by a local search.

  7. Twin Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Bozak, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Many subsonic and supersonic vehicles in the current fleet have multiple engines mounted near one another. Some future vehicle concepts may use innovative propulsion systems such as distributed propulsion which will result in multiple jets mounted in close proximity. Engine configurations with multiple jets have the ability to exploit jet-by-jet shielding which may significantly reduce noise. Jet-by-jet shielding is the ability of one jet to shield noise that is emitted by another jet. The sensitivity of jet-by-jet shielding to jet spacing and simulated flight stream Mach number are not well understood. The current experiment investigates the impact of jet spacing, jet operating condition, and flight stream Mach number on the noise radiated from subsonic and supersonic twin jets.

  8. Experiments in axisymmetric supersonic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Cyrille Dennis

    An experimental study of the effects of exit Mach number and density ratio on the development of axisymmetric jets is described in this thesis. Jet exit Mach numbers of 1.41, 2.0, and 3.0, were studied for jets of helium, argon, and nitrogen. The jets exit into a gas at rest (velocity ratio = 0), in order to better isolate the effects of compressibility and density ratio. Density ratios vary from 0.23 to 5.5.In order to generate shock free-jets, unique nozzles were designed and constructed for each gas and Mach number combination. A plating method for the construction of the nozzles was developed to ensure high-accuracy and a good surface finish at a cost significantly less than direct-machining techniques.The spreading rate of the jet for several downstream locations is measured with a pitot probe. Centerline data are used to characterise the length of the potential core of the jet, which correlates well with the relative spreading rates. Limited frequency data is obtained through the use of piezo-resistive pressure probes. This method is promising for flows that are not conducive to hot-wire probes.Spark shadography is used to visualize both the mean and instantaneous flow, with the minimum spark time being 20 nanoseconds. The convection velocity of large-scale disturbances is estimated from the visible Mach-type acoustic waves emanating from the jet.For a wide range of jet Mach and Reynolds numbers, the convection velocity of the large scale disturbances in the potential core region of the jet is approximately 0.8 times the jet velocity, the approximate velocity of the first helical instability mode of the jet.The main objectives of the present work were to investigate the effects of compressibility and density on the initial development of the axisymmetric jet. Although the data are not sufficient to determine if the convective Mach number concept used in 2-d shear layer research will work in the case of an axisymmetric jet, it is clear that the axisymmetric

  9. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  10. Investigation of two plane parallel jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbanna, H.; Gahin, S.; Rashed, M. I. I.

    1983-07-01

    Flow measurements made downstream from two air jets are reported. The exit Re was 20,000 and turbulence was kept to 1 pct. X-wire constant temperature anemometers were employed to measure the mean velocities and the three component turbulent intensities. Data were gathered on the flowfield of both a single jet and from two jets. A velocity profile from two jets was found to be similar to that of a single jet, with the combined jets width spreading linearly downstream as a single jet, but with a slightly lower spread angle. The turbulent velocity fluctuations were, however, dissimilar up to 120 nozzle diameters downstream. Finally, the maximum shear stress was nearly the same with two jets as with one jet.

  11. Analysis of some acoustics-jet flow interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, P. L.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical problems in the interactions between the mean-shear flows and the acoustic field in the planar and circular jets are examined. These problems are basic in understanding the effects of coherent large structure on the generation and complications of sound in a sub-sonic jet. Three problems were investigated: (1) spatial (vs. temporal) normal mode analysis in a planar jets; (2) a slightly divergent, planar jet; and (3) acoustic waves in an axisymmetrical jet.

  12. Comparison with Analytical Solution: Generation and Radiation of Acoustic Waves from a 2-D Shear Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    2000-01-01

    An acoustic source inside of a 2-D jet excites an instability wave in the shear layer resulting in sound radiating away from the shear layer. Solve the linearized Euler equations to predict the sound radiation outside of the jet. The jet static pressure is assumed to be constant. The jet flow is parallel and symmetric about the x-axis. Use a symmetry boundary condition along the x-axis.

  13. Optimisation in general radiography

    PubMed Central

    Martin, CJ

    2007-01-01

    Radiography using film has been an established method for imaging the internal organs of the body for over 100 years. Surveys carried out during the 1980s identified a wide range in patient doses showing that there was scope for dosage reduction in many hospitals. This paper discusses factors that need to be considered in optimising the performance of radiographic equipment. The most important factor is choice of the screen/film combination, and the preparation of automatic exposure control devices to suit its characteristics. Tube potential determines the photon energies in the X-ray beam, with the selection involving a compromise between image contrast and the dose to the patient. Allied to this is the choice of anti-scatter grid, as a high grid ratio effectively removes the larger component of scatter when using higher tube potentials. However, a high grid ratio attenuates the X-ray beam more heavily. Decisions about grids and use of low attenuation components are particularly important for paediatric radiography, which uses lower energy X-ray beams. Another factor which can reduce patient dose is the use of copper filtration to remove more low-energy X-rays. Regular surveys of patient dose and comparisons with diagnostic reference levels that provide a guide representing good practice enable units for which doses are higher to be identified. Causes can then be investigated and changes implemented to address any shortfalls. Application of these methods has led to a gradual reduction in doses in many countries. PMID:21614270

  14. Deriving parameters of a fundamental detachment model for cohesive soils from flume and jet erosion tests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The erosion rate of cohesive soils is commonly quantified using the excess shear stress equation, dependent on two major soil parameters: the critical shear stress and the erodibility coefficient. A submerged jet test (JETJet Erosion Test) is one method that has been developed for measuring thes...

  15. Time accurate simulations of compressible shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Steinberger, Craig J.; Vidoni, Thomas J.; Madnia, Cyrus K.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this research are to employ direct numerical simulation (DNS) to study the phenomenon of mixing (or lack thereof) in compressible free shear flows and to suggest new means of enhancing mixing in such flows. The shear flow configurations under investigation are those of parallel mixing layers and planar jets under both non-reacting and reacting nonpremixed conditions. During the three-years of this research program, several important issues regarding mixing and chemical reactions in compressible shear flows were investigated.

  16. Shock structure in non-circular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Philip J.; Bhat, Thonse R. S.

    1989-01-01

    The shock-cell structure of supersonic jets with non-circular exit geometry is modeled using a linearized analysis. The model takes into account the finite thickness of the jet shear layer using realistic velocity and density profiles. The effects of the shear layer turbulence are included by incorporating eddy-viscosity terms. A finite-difference numerical method is used to solve the steady linearized equations of motion. A body-fitted coordinate system is used to describe the shear layer. The variation of the pressure fluctuation with downstream distance is given for circular jets and for an elliptic jet of aspect ratio 2.0. Comparisons with experimental data are made. Difficulties with the numerical technique are also discussed.

  17. Fuzzy jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets. To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets, are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  18. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Here, collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet taggingmore » variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  19. Launching jets from accretion belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Ron; Soker, Noam

    2016-05-01

    We propose that sub-Keplerian accretion belts around stars might launch jets. The sub-Keplerian inflow does not form a rotationally supported accretion disk, but it rather reaches the accreting object from a wide solid angle. The basic ingredients of the flow are a turbulent region where the accretion belt interacts with the accreting object via a shear layer, and two avoidance regions on the poles where the accretion rate is very low. A dynamo that is developed in the shear layer amplifies magnetic fields to high values. It is likely that the amplified magnetic fields form polar outflows from the avoidance regions. Our speculative belt-launched jets model has implications on a rich variety of astrophysical objects, from the removal of common envelopes to the explosion of core collapse supernovae by jittering jets.

  20. Shear layer excitation, experiment versus theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.; Stahl, B.

    1984-01-01

    The acoustical excitation of shear layers is investigated. Acoustical excitation causes the so-called orderly structures in shear layers and jets. Also, the deviations in the spreading rate between different shear layer experiments are due to the same excitation mechanism. Measurements in the linear interaction region close to the edge from which the shear layer is shed are examined. Two sets of experiments (Houston 1981 and Berlin 1983/84) are discussed. The measurements were carried out with shear layers in air using hot wire anemometers and microphones. The agreement between these measurements and the theory is good. Even details of the fluctuating flow field correspond to theoretical predictions, such as the local occurrence of negative phase speeds.

  1. A Visual Study of Vortex Generator Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Debora A.; Stadnicki, John

    1997-11-01

    A jet which issues from a small hole in a flow surface, pitched and skewed relative to the crossflow, creates a single streamwise vortex which resembles the flow downstream of a half-delta-wing vortex generator. The term ``vortex generator jet'' (VGJ) has been used to describe such a flow. Investigators of jet-generated vortices have recognized their applicability to active control and their flexibility in terms of being activated and deactivated. We have installed a spanwise array of VGJ's in a turbulent boundary layer in the zero-pressure-gradient test section of the 12" × 36" boundary layer wind tunnel at Boston University. The Reynolds number based on jet diameter is in the range 4000 < Re < 10000. Our experimental investigations include flow visualization of a single pitched and skewed jet in crossflow, as well as wall shear stress measurements downstream of the array of jets. To capture still images of a cross-section of the jet flow, a light sheet formed by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser is used to illuminate smoke-tagged jet fluid. The wall shear stress measurements are made using an oil-film interferometry technique. Parameters varied include jet velocity and angles of jet pitch and skew.

  2. Turbulent wall jet in a coflowing stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was undertaken to develop a relatively simple model of a two-dimensional, turbulent wall jet in a coflowing stream. The incompressible jet flow was modeled by using an integral method which includes turbulent shear stress, entrainment, and heat transfer. The method solves the conservation equations for the average jet flow properties and uses the velocity profile suggested by Escudier and Nicoll to obtain detailed characteristics of the jet on a flat plate. The analytical results compare favorably with experimental data for a range of injection velocities, which demonstrates the usefulness of the theory for estimating jet growth, velocity decay, and wall skin friction. The theory, which was applied to a Coanda jet on a circular cylinder, provided estimates of suction pressures aft of the jet exit that were in close agreement with experimental values.

  3. Optimised transdermal delivery of pravastatin.

    PubMed

    Burger, Cornel; Gerber, Minja; du Preez, Jan L; du Plessis, Jeanetta

    2015-12-30

    Wiechers' programme "Formulating for Efficacy" initiated a new strategy to optimise the oil phase of topical formulations in order to achieve optimal transdermal drug delivery. This new approach uses the "Delivery Gap Theory" on any active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) to test if it could enhance transdermal drug delivery. The aim of the study was to formulate six different semi-solid formulations (three creams and three emulgels) with 2% pravastatin as the API in order to investigate the "Delivery Gap Principle", by determining which formulation would deliver pravastatin best to the target-site (system circulation). The three cream- and three emulgel formulations had different polarities, i.e. a formulation with polarity equal to that of the stratum corneum (optimised), a non-polar (lipophilic)- and a polar (hydrophilic)-formulation. Franz cell diffusion studies were executed over 12h and the optimised emulgel (2.578μg/cm(2)) had the highest median amount per area obtained. Tape stripping followed the diffusion studies and in the stratum corneum-epidermis, the hydrophilic emulgel (1.448μg/ml) contained the highest median pravastatin concentration and the epidermis-dermis the optimised emulgel (0.849μg/ml) depicted the highest pravastatin concentration. During this study, it was observed that when both emulgel and cream formulations were compared; the emulgels enhanced the delivery of pravastatin more than the creams. PMID:26505148

  4. Noise from Supersonic Coaxial Jets. Part 3; Inverted Velocity Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Morris, Philip J.

    1997-01-01

    The instability wave noise generation model is used to study the instability waves in the two shear layers of an inverted velocity profile, supersonic, coaxial jet and the noise radiated from the dominant wave. The inverted velocity profile jet has a high speed outer stream surrounding a low speed inner stream and the outer shear layer is always larger than the inner shear layer. The jet mean flows are calculated numerically. The operating conditions are chosen to exemplify the effect of the coaxial jet outer shear layer initial spreading rates. Calculations are made for the stability characteristics in the coaxial jet shear layers and the noise radiated from the instability waves for different operating conditions with the same total thrust, mass flow and exit area as a single reference jet. Results for inverted velocity profile jets indicate that relative maximum instability wave amplitudes and far field peak noise levels can be reduced from that of the reference jet by having higher spreading rates for the outer shear layer, low velocity ratios, and outer streams hotter than the inner stream.

  5. Control of jet flowfield dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibens, V.; Wlezien, R. W.

    1984-02-01

    Passive control of shear layer turbulence was investigated experimentally for low subsonic velocity jets from circular nozzles by studying effects of modifying nozzle exit geometry. Indeterminate origin (I.O.) nozzles used, including slanted, stepped and crenelated exit geometries, were so designated because streamwise location of the nozzle lip varies with azimuthal position, unlike standard nozzles for which the entire termination is at the same streamwise location. Flow visualization and detailed hot-wire measurements were used to observe development and interaction of large-scale turbulent structures in shear layers originating from various sectors of the I.O. nozzles, to determine the influence of instability wave patterns on ensuing flowfield characteristics and to relate observed evolution of three-dimensional large-scale turbulent structures to global properties of the jet flowfield such as velocity profiles and shear layer spreading rates as a function of streamwise distance and azimuthal angle. Results showed pronounced asymmetries in shear layer growth rates, which could be controlled by varying nozzle parameters. The asymmetries were also confirmed by measurements of azimuthal variation of shear layer turbulent energy as well as mean-velocity profiles. Detailed features of energy transfer from the mean flow into successively larger flow structures were traced by spectral mapping techniques and by mapping energy levels contained in subharmonics of the shear-layer instability frequency at various azimuthal flow sectors.

  6. Supersonic Jet Mixing Enhancement due to Natural and Induced Screech

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.; Raman, G.

    1999-01-01

    Outline of presentation are: (1) Review of experimental apparatus. (2) Effect of natural screech of jet mixing; converging nozzle, underexpanded jet and converging-diverging nozzle, design pressure.(3) Effect of induced screech on jet mixing: produced by paddles in shear layers, similar to edge tones, and converging-diverging nozzle, design pressure. (4) Effect of paddles on near-field jet noise. and (5) Concluding remarks.

  7. Cosmic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Blandford, R.D.; Begelman, M.C.; Rees, M.J.

    1982-05-01

    Observations with radio telescopes have revealed that the center of many galaxies is a place of violent activity. This activity is often manifested in the production of cosmic jets. Each jet is a narrow stream of plasma that appears to squirt out of the center of a galaxy emitting radiowaves as it does so. New techniques in radio astronomy have shown how common jets are in the universe. These jets take on many different forms. The discovery of radio jets has helped in the understanding of the double structure of the majority of extragalactic radio sources. The morphology of some jets and explanations of how jets are fueled are discussed. There are many difficulties plaguing the investigation of jets. Some of these difficulties are (1) it is not known how much power the jets are radiating, (2) it is hard to tell whether a jet delieated by radio emission is identical to the region where ionized gas is flowing, and (3) what makes them. (SC)

  8. Flow and mixing characteristics of an elevated pulsating transverse jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rong F.; Hsu, Ching M.

    2012-01-01

    Flow-evolution processes as well as the penetration, spread, and dispersion characteristics of elevated pulsating transverse jets were studied experimentally in a wind tunnel. Jet pulsations were induced by means of acoustic excitation. Streak pictures of the smoke-flow patterns, illuminated by a laser-light sheet in the median plane, were recorded by a high-speed digital camera. A hot-wire anemometer was used to digitize instantaneous velocities of instabilities in the flow. Penetration height and spread width were obtained through a binary edge identification technique. Tracer-gas concentrations were measured to provide information on jet dispersions and trajectories. Three characteristic flow modes (synchronized flapping jet, transition, and synchronized shear-layer vortices) were identified in the domain of the jet-to-crossflow momentum-flux ratio and the excitation Strouhal number. At low excitation Strouhal numbers, the jet column near the tube exit flapped back-and-forth periodically at the excitation frequency and induced large up-down motions of the deflected jet. The penetration, spread, and dispersion of the jet increased drastically compared with the non-excited jet because the up-down oscillating motions of the deflected jet transformed the axial momentum into oscillating lateral momentum. Forcing the jet into the transition and synchronized shear-layer vortices regimes caused the vortices to appear along the upwind shear layer of the deflected jet. Under these conditions, the penetration, spread, and dispersion of the jet presented insignificant increases because the entrainment effect induced by the shear-layer vortices was not as large as that produced by the jet oscillating motions in the synchronized flapping jet regime.

  9. Coupling dynamic of twin supersonic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ching-Wen; Cluts, Jordan; Samimy, Mo

    2015-11-01

    In a supersonic shock-containing jet, the interaction of large-scale structures in the jet's shear layer with the shock waves generates acoustic waves. The waves propagate upstream, excite the jet initial shear layer instability, establish a feedback loop at certain conditions, and generate screech noise. The screech normally contains different modes of various strengths. Similarly, twin-jet plumes contain screech tones. If the dynamics of the two jet plumes are synchronized, the screech amplitude could be significantly amplified. There is a proposed analytical model in the literature for screech synchronization in twin rectangular jets. This model shows that with no phase difference in acoustic waves arriving at neighboring nozzle lips, twin-jet plumes feature a strong coupling with a significant level of screech tones. In this work the maximum nozzle separation distance for sustained screech synchronization and strong coupling is analytically derived. This model is used with our round twin-jet experiments and the predicted coupling level agrees well with the experimental results. Near-field microphone measurements and schlieren visualization along with the analytical model are used to investigate the coupling mechanisms of twin supersonic jets. Supported by ONR.

  10. Water Jetting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Hi-Tech Inc., a company which manufactures water jetting equipment, needed a high pressure rotating swivel, but found that available hardware for the system was unsatisfactory. They were assisted by Marshall, which had developed water jetting technology to clean the Space Shuttles. The result was a completely automatic water jetting system which cuts rock and granite and removes concrete. Labor costs have been reduced; dust is suppressed and production has been increased.

  11. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  12. Plasma confinement at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, I.; JET Contributors

    2016-01-01

    Operation with a Be/W wall at JET (JET-ILW) has an impact on scenario development and energy confinement with respect to the carbon wall (JET-C). The main differences observed were (1) strong accumulation of W in the plasma core and (2) the need to mitigate the divertor target temperature to avoid W sputtering by Be and other low Z impurities and (3) a decrease of plasma energy confinement. A major difference is observed on the pedestal pressure, namely a reduction of the pedestal temperature which, due to profile stiffness the plasma core temperature is also reduced leading to a degradation of the global confinement. This effect is more pronounced in low β N scenarios. At high β N, the impact of the wall on the plasma energy confinement is mitigated by the weaker plasma energy degradation with power relative to the IPB98(y, 2) scaling calculated empirically for a CFC first wall. The smaller tolerable impurity concentration for tungsten (<10-5) compared to that of carbon requires the use of electron heating methods to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core region as well as gas puffing to avoid W entering the plasma core by ELM flushing and reduction of the W source by decreasing the target temperature. W source and the target temperature can also be controlled by impurity seeding. Nitrogen and Neon have been used and with both gases the reduction of the W source and the target temperature is observed. Whilst more experiments with Neon are necessary to assess its impact on energy confinement, a partial increase of plasma energy confinement is observed with Nitrogen, through the increase of edge temperature. The challenge for scenario development at JET is to extend the pulse length curtailed by its transient behavior (W accumulation or MHD), but more importantly by the divertor target temperature limits. Re-optimisation of the scenarios to mitigate the effect of the change of wall materials maintaining high global energy confinement similar to JET-C is

  13. TEM turbulence optimisation in stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proll, J. H. E.; Mynick, H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Lazerson, S. A.; Faber, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of neoclassically optimised stellarators, optimising stellarators for turbulent transport is an important next step. The reduction of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence has been achieved via shaping of the magnetic field, and the reduction of trapped-electron mode (TEM) turbulence is addressed in the present paper. Recent analytical and numerical findings suggest TEMs are stabilised when a large fraction of trapped particles experiences favourable bounce-averaged curvature. This is the case for example in Wendelstein 7-X (Beidler et al 1990 Fusion Technol. 17 148) and other Helias-type stellarators. Using this knowledge, a proxy function was designed to estimate the TEM dynamics, allowing optimal configurations for TEM stability to be determined with the STELLOPT (Spong et al 2001 Nucl. Fusion 41 711) code without extensive turbulence simulations. A first proof-of-principle optimised equilibrium stemming from the TEM-dominated stellarator experiment HSX (Anderson et al 1995 Fusion Technol. 27 273) is presented for which a reduction of the linear growth rates is achieved over a broad range of the operational parameter space. As an important consequence of this property, the turbulent heat flux levels are reduced compared with the initial configuration.

  14. Metallurgical examination of recovered copper jet particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Nikkel, D.J. Jr.; Kershaw, R.P.; Walters, W.P.

    1995-11-30

    A shaped charge (81 mm, 42{degrees}, OFHC copper cone) was fired into a ``soft` recovery bunker to allow metallurgical examination of recovered jet particles and the slug. The initial weight of the copper liner was 245 gm, of which 184 gm was recovered. The number of jet particles recovered was 37 (approximately 63% of the particles formed by the charge). Extensive metallurgical analyses were performed on the recovered slug and jet particles. The microstructural features associated with voids, e.g. dendritic grain growth, clearly indicate that the regions in the vicinity of the centerline of the slug and jet particles were melted. In this work we present calculations of jet temperature as a function of constitutive behavior. In order to predict melt in the center region of the jet we find it necessary to scale flow stress with a pressure dependent shear modulus.

  15. Unconditional jetting.

    PubMed

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M

    2008-08-01

    Capillary jetting of a fluid dispersed into another immiscible phase is usually limited by a critical capillary number, a function of the Reynolds number and the fluid property ratios. Critical conditions are set when the minimum spreading velocity of small perturbations v_{-};{*} along the jet (marginal stability velocity) is zero. Here we identify and describe parametric regions of high technological relevance, where v_{-};{*}>0 and the jet flow is always supercritical independently of the dispersed liquid flow rate; within these relatively broad regions, the jet does not undergo the usual dripping-jetting transition, so that either the jet can be made arbitrarily thin (yielding droplets of any imaginably small size), or the issuing flow rate can be made arbitrarily small. In this work, we provide illustrative analytical studies of asymptotic cases for both negligible and dominant inertia forces. In this latter case, requiring a nonzero jet surface velocity, axisymmetric perturbation waves "surf" downstream for all given wave numbers, while the liquid bulk can remain static. In the former case (implying small Reynolds flow) we found that the jet profile small slope is limited by a critical value; different published experiments support our predictions. PMID:18850933

  16. Robust optimisation of railway crossing geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Chang; Markine, Valeri; Dollevoet, Rolf

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a methodology for improving the crossing (frog) geometry through the robust optimisation approach, wherein the variability of the design parameters within a prescribed tolerance is included in the optimisation problem. Here, the crossing geometry is defined by parameterising the B-spline represented cross-sectional shape and the longitudinal height profile of the nose rail. The dynamic performance of the crossing is evaluated considering the variation of wheel profiles and track alignment. A multipoint approximation method (MAM) is applied in solving the optimisation problem of minimising the contact pressure during the wheel-rail contact and constraining the location of wheel transition at the crossing. To clarify the difference between the robust optimisation and the normal deterministic optimisation approaches, the optimisation problems are solved in both approaches. The results show that the deterministic optimum fails under slight change of the design variables; the robust optimum, however, has improved and robust performance.

  17. Propagation of sound through a sheared flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolley, J. P.; Smith, C. A.; Karamcheti, K.

    1978-01-01

    Sound generated in a moving fluid must propagate through a shear layer in order to be measured by a fixed instrument. These propagation effects were evaluated for noise sources typically associated with single and co-flowing subsonic jets and for subcritical flow over airfoils in such jets. The techniques for describing acoustic propagation fall into two categories: geometric acoustics and wave acoustics. Geometric acoustics is most convenient and accurate for high frequency sound. In the frequency range of interest to the present study (greater than 150 Hz), the geometric acoustics approach was determined to be most useful and practical.

  18. Site-scale variability of streambank fluvial erodibility parameters as measured with a jet erosion test

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The erosion rate of cohesive streambanks is typically modeled using the excess shear stress equation, dependent on two erodibility parameters: critical shear stress and erodibility coefficient. The Jet Erosion Test (JET) has become the most common method for estimating these erodibility parameters ...

  19. Supersonic Jet Noise Reductions Predicted With Increased Jet Spreading Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Morris, Philip J.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, predictions are made of noise radiation from single, supersonic, axisymmetric jets. We examine the effects of changes in operating conditions and the effects of simulated enhanced mixing that would increase the spreading rate of jet shear layer on radiated noise levels. The radiated noise in the downstream direction is dominated by mixing noise and, at higher speeds, it is well described by the instability wave noise radiation model. Further analysis with the model shows a relationship between changes in spreading rate due to enhanced mixing and changes in the far field radiated peak noise levels. The calculations predict that enhanced jet spreading results in a reduction of the radiated peak noise level.

  20. Cooperative investigation of jet flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drubka, R. E.; Nagib, H. M.; Arndt, R. E.; George, W. K.

    1982-06-01

    With the help of a carefully designed and operated laser Doppler velocimeter, data were collected in an axisymmetric jet under controlled laboratory conditions. This data were found to conserve momentum; a problem which plagued most previous measurements. This resulted in near perfect agreement with the predictions of Reynolds stress models of turbulent jets. Far and near field sound measurements for a range of Mach and Reynolds numbers provided clues to the mechanism which lead to enhancing the broad band noise at high Reynolds numbers in presence of pure-tone excitation while suppressing it at low Reynolds numbers. At low Reynolds numbers the excitation leads to augmentation of the coherent large scale structures. At sufficiently high Reynolds number, noise due to the interaction of the wave-like structures with incoherent fine-scale turbulence may be dominant. This may also explain the differences in level of radiated noise from high and low Reynolds number jets. Controlling the jet with pure tone excitation, that enhances the helical mode of its instability, resulted in a suppression of the radiated noise by approximately 8dB. In general we find that a great deal of appreciation of the jet flowfield can be gained by viewing the jet as a nonparallel shear flow which is always susceptible to instabilities. In all cases, the instability of turbulent layers and the role of helical modes and upstream influence appear to be key mechanisms in our findings.

  1. Blowout Jets: Hinode X-Ray Jets that Don't Fit the Standard Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Nearly half of all H-alpha macrospicules in polar coronal holes appear to be miniature filament eruptions. This suggests that there is a large class of X-ray jets in which the jet-base magnetic arcade undergoes a blowout eruption as in a CME, instead of remaining static as in most solar X-ray jets, the standard jets that fit the model advocated by Shibata. Along with a cartoon depicting the standard model, we present a cartoon depicting the signatures expected of blowout jets in coronal X-ray images. From Hinode/XRT movies and STEREO/EUVI snapshots in polar coronal holes, we present examples of (1) X-ray jets that fit the standard model, and (2) X-ray jets that do not fit the standard model but do have features appropriate for blowout jets. These features are (1) a flare arcade inside the jet-base arcade in addition to the small flare arcade (bright point) outside that standard jets have, (2) a filament of cool (T is approximately 80,000K) plasma that erupts from the core of the jetbase arcade, and (3) an extra jet strand that should not be made by the reconnection for standard jets but could be made by reconnection between the ambient unipolar open field and the opposite-polarity leg of the filament-carrying flux-rope core field of the erupting jet-base arcade. We therefore infer that these non-standard jets are blowout jets, jets made by miniature versions of the sheared-core-arcade eruptions that make CMEs

  2. The Role of Macroscopic and Microscopic Jet Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardee, Philip E.

    2013-12-01

    Relativistic jets, be they Poynting flux or kinetic flux dominated, are current driven (CD) and/or Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) velocity shear driven unstable. These macroscopic MHD instabilities may be responsible for some of the observed larger scale twisted jet structures and typically do not disrupt jets on less than kiloparsec scales. Here I review our understanding of the jet properties that will lead to the observed relative stability of astrophysical jets. In addition, I review the progress made on the microscopic scale plasma instabilities in shocks and velocity shears that may lead to magnetic field generation and that does lead to the particle acceleration required to produce the observed emission from radio wavelengths to TeV energies. Finally, I discuss these instabilities in the context of the jet in M87.

  3. An integral turbulent kinetic energy analysis of free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C. E.; Phares, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Mixing of coaxial streams is analyzed by application of integral techniques. An integrated turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) equation is solved simultaneously with the integral equations for the mean flow. Normalized TKE profile shapes are obtained from incompressible jet and shear layer experiments and are assumed to be applicable to all free turbulent flows. The shear stress at the midpoint of the mixing zone is assumed to be directly proportional to the local TKE, and dissipation is treated with a generalization of the model developed for isotropic turbulence. Although the analysis was developed for ducted flows, constant-pressure flows were approximated with the duct much larger than the jet. The axisymmetric flows under consideration were predicted with reasonable accuracy. Fairly good results were also obtained for the fully developed two-dimensional shear layers, which were computed as thin layers at the boundary of a large circular jet.

  4. Development of the mean velocity distribution in rectangular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, G. L.; Swan, D. H.; Deotte, R. E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The mean flowfield of 1 x 2 and 1 x 4 aspect ratio rectangular jets has been measured using a laser Doppler anemometer system. The development of the downstream velocity distribution is analyzed with respect to centerline velocity decay, shear layer growth, axis switching, and velocity profile development. Comparisons are made with axisymmetric, planar, and other rectangular jets.

  5. Emerging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  6. Periodic Excitation for Jet Vectoring and Enhanced Spreading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, LaTunia G.; Seifert, Avi

    1999-01-01

    The effects of periodic excitation on the evolution of a turbulent jet were studied experimentally. A short, wide-angle diffuser was attached to the jet exit and excitation was introduced at the junction between the jet exit and the diffuser inlet. The introduction of high amplitude periodic excitation at the jet exit enhances the mixing and promotes attachment of the jet shear-layer to the diffuser wall. Vectoring is achieved by applying the excitation over a fraction of the circumference of the circular jet, enhancing its spreading rate on the excited side and its tendency to reattach to that side. Static deflection studies demonstrate that the presence of the wide-angle diffuser increases the effectiveness of the added periodic momentum due to a favorable interaction between the excitation, the jet shear-layer and the diffuser wall. This point was further demonstrated by the evolution of a wave packet that was excited in the jet shear-layer. Strong amplification of the wave packet was measured with a diffuser attached to the jet exit. The turbulent jet responds quickly (10-20 msec) to step changes in the level of the excitation input. The response scales with the jet exit velocity and is independent of the Reynolds number. Jet deflection angles were found to be highly sensitive to the relative direction between the excitation and the jet flow and less sensitive to the excitation frequency. The higher jet deflection angles were obtained for a diffuser length of about two diameters and for diffusers with half-angles greater than 15 degrees.

  7. Structure and Mixing Characterization of Variable Density Transverse Jet Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorkyan, Levon

    This dissertation describes an experimental study of the structural and mixing characteristics of transverse jets, or jets in crossfiow (JICF). Hot-wire anemometry, stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV), and acetone planar laser-induced fiuorescence (PLIF) measurements were utilized to illuminate and quantify the wind-ward (upstream) jet shear layer instability characteristics and their relationship to the velocity field evolution, as well as the effect of the overall velocity field on the scalar field distribution and resulting mixing characteristics. Transverse jets of various jet-to-crossfiow momentum flux ratios in the range 41 ≥ J ≥ 2, and jet-to-crossfiow density ratios in the range 1.00 ≥ S ≥ 0.35, were generated using mixtures of helium and nitrogen in the jet fluid. Jets were injected from one of three different injectors explored: a convergent nozzle with circular geometry which was mounted flush with the wind tunnel floor, another convergent nozzle with circular geometry whose exit plane lies above the crossfiow boundary layer, and a flush-mounted straight pipe injector with a circular orifice. Jet Reynolds number was kept constant for the majority of the mixing and structural exploration experiments at Rej = 1900, except when the effect of Reynolds number on cross-sectional jet structure was explored. Previous hot-wire based measurements at UCLA suggest that the upstream jet shear layer transitions from convective instability to absolute instability, giving rise to self-excited nonlinear states, as either the momentum flux ratio is lowered below J ≈10, or the density ratio is lowered below S ≈ 0.45 for the JICF injected from the flush nozzle injector. A similar transition to absolute instability when lowering momentum flux ratio was found in this work for the flush-mounted pipe injector. Cross-sectional PLIF measurements in the present studies suggested clear correspondence between the formation of a symmetric counter-rotating vortex pair

  8. optimised observables in the MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, Farvah; Neshatpour, Siavash; Virto, Javier

    2014-06-01

    We provide a detailed analysis of the impact of the newly measured optimised observables in the decay by the LHCb experiment. The analysis is performed in the MSSM, both in the context of the usual constrained scenarios and in the context of a more general set-up where the SUSY partner masses are independent. We show that the global agreement of the MSSM solutions with the data is still very good. Nevertheless, especially in the constrained scenarios, the limits from are now very strong and are at the same level as the well-known constraints. We describe the implications of the measurements both on the Wilson coefficients and on the SUSY parameters.

  9. Noise from Supersonic Coaxial Jets. Part 2; Normal Velocity Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, M. D.; Morris, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    Instability waves have been established as noise generators in supersonic jets. Recent analysis of these slowly diverging jets has shown that these instability waves radiate noise to the far field when the waves have components with phase velocities that are supersonic relative to the ambient speed of sound. This instability wave noise generation model has been applied to supersonic jets with a single shear layer and is now applied to supersonic coaxial jets with two initial shear layers. In this paper the case of coaxial jets with normal velocity profiles is considered, where the inner jet stream velocity is higher than the outer jet stream velocity. To provide mean flow profiles at all axial locations, a numerical scheme is used to calculate the mean flow properties. Calculations are made for the stability characteristics in the coaxial jet shear layers and the noise radiated from the instability waves for different operating conditions with the same total thrust, mass flow and exit area as a single reference jet. The effects of changes in the velocity ratio, the density ratio and the area ratio are each considered independently.

  10. Optimising code generation with haggies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, T.

    2010-07-01

    This article describes haggies, a program for the generation of optimised programs for the efficient numerical evaluation of mathematical expressions. It uses a multivariate Horner-scheme and Common Subexpression Elimination to reduce the overall number of operations. The package can serve as a back-end for virtually any general purpose computer algebra program. Built-in type inference that allows to deal with non-standard data types in strongly typed languages and a very flexible, pattern-based output specification ensure that haggies can produce code for a large variety of programming languages. We currently use haggies as part of an automated package for the calculation of one-loop scattering amplitudes in quantum field theories. The examples in this articles, however, demonstrate that its use is not restricted to the field of high energy physics. Program summaryProgram title: haggies Catalogue identifier: AEGF_v1_0 Program summary: URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGF_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPL v3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 56 220 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 579 010 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Java, JavaCC Computer: Any system that runs the Java Virtual Machine Operating system: Any system that runs the Java Virtual Machine RAM: Determined by the size of the problem Classification: 4.14, 5, 6.2, 6.5, 11.1 Nature of problem: Generation of optimised programs for the evaluation of possibly large algebraic expressions Solution method: Java implementation Running time: Determined by the size of the problem

  11. An experimental study of sound radiation from a subsonic jet in simulated motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, J. C.; Dixon, N. R.

    1979-01-01

    A free-jet anechoic facility is used for quantitative determination of the effect of motion on the pure jet mixing noise from subsonic jets. The farfield measurements obtained outside the free jet are subjected to amplitude and angle corrections due to free-jet shear layer refraction; in addition, corrections are made to account for the distributed nature of the jet noise source as a function of frequency. The corrected results, which provide the changes in the jet mixing noise as a result of simulated jet motion, are presented for a range of jet velocities with a fixed free-jet velocity. Comparisons are made between the findings obtained and those related to other simulation and flight measurements. The results indicate that the effect of motion is to reduce jet mixing noise at all angles of measurement, and the reduction is broadband with the largest magnitude occurring around the spectral peak.

  12. Reduced shear power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, Scott; Shapiro, Charles; White, Martin J.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /UC, Berkeley

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of ellipticities of background galaxies are sensitive to the reduced shear, the cosmic shear divided by (1-{kappa}) where {kappa} is the projected density field. They compute the difference between shear and reduced shear both analytically and with simulations. The difference becomes more important an smaller scales, and will impact cosmological parameter estimation from upcoming experiments. A simple recipe is presented to carry out the required correction.

  13. Synthetic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, Ivana M.

    2003-01-01

    Current investigation of synthetic jets and synthetic jets in cross-flow examined the effects of orifice geometry and dimensions, momentum-flux ratio, cluster of orifices, pitch and yaw angles as well as streamwise development of the flow field. This comprehensive study provided much needed experimental information related to the various control strategies. The results of the current investigation on isolated and clustered synthetic jets with and without cross-flow will be further analyzed and documented in detail. Presentations at national conferences and publication of peer- reviewed journal articles are also expected. Projected publications will present both the mean and turbulent properties of the flow field, comparisons made with the data available in an open literature, as well as recommendations for the future work.

  14. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  15. The free jet as a simulator of forward velocity effects on jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Tester, B. J.; Tanna, H. K.

    1978-01-01

    A thorough theoretical and experimental study of the effects of the free-jet shear layer on the transmission of sound from a model jet placed within the free jet to the far-field receiver located outside the free-jet flow was conducted. The validity and accuracy of the free-jet flight simulation technique for forward velocity effects on jet noise was evaluated. Transformation charts and a systematic computational procedure for converting measurements from a free-jet simulation to the corresponding results from a wind-tunnel simulation, and, finally, to the flight case were provided. The effects of simulated forward flight on jet mixing noise, internal noise and shock-associated noise from model-scale unheated and heated jets were established experimentally in a free-jet facility. It was illustrated that the existing anomalies between full-scale flight data and model-scale flight simulation data projected to the flight case, could well be due to the contamination of flight data by engine internal noise.

  16. Effects of the Kelvin-Helmholtz surface instability on supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardee, P. E.

    1982-01-01

    An exact numerical calculation is provided for of linear growth and phase velocity of Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable wave modes on a supersonic jet of cylindrical cross section. An expression for the maximally unstable wavenumber of each wave mode is found. Provided a sharp velocity discontinuity exists all wave modes are unstable. A combination of rapid jet expansion and velocity shear across a jet can effectively stabilize all wave modes. The more likely case of slow jet expansion and of velocity shear at the jet surface allows wave modes with maximally unstable wavelength longer than or on the order of the jet radius to grow. The relative energy in different wave modes and effect on the jet is investigated. Energy input into a jet resulting from surface instability is discussed.

  17. Fast ion JET diagnostics: confinement and losses

    SciTech Connect

    Kiptily, V. G.; Pinches, S. D.; Sharapov, S. E.; Syme, D. B.; Cecconello, M.; Darrow, D.; Hill, K.; Goloborod'ko, V.; Yavorskij, V.; Johnson, T.; Murari, A.; Reich, M.; Gorini, G.; Zoita, V.

    2008-03-12

    A study of magnetically confined fast ions in tokamaks plays an important role in burning plasma research. To reach ignition and steady burning of a reactor plasma an adequate confinement of energetic ions produced by NBI heating, accelerated with ICRF and born in fusion reactions is essential to provide efficient heating of the bulk plasma. Thus, investigation of the fast ion behaviour is an immediate task for present-day large machines, such as JET, in order to understand the main mechanisms of slowing down, redistribution and losses, and to develop optimal plasma scenarios. Today's JET has an enhanced suite of fast ion diagnostics both of confined and lost ions that enable to significantly contribute to this important area of research. Fast ion populations of p, d, t, {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He, made with ICRF, NBI, and fusion reactions have been investigated in experiments on JET with sophisticated diagnostics in conventional and shear-reversed plasmas, exploring a wide range of effects. This paper will introduce to the JET fast-ion diagnostic techniques and will give an overview of recent observations. A synergy of the unique diagnostic set was utilised in JET, and studies of the response of fast ions to MHD modes (e.g. tornado modes, sawtooth crashes), fast {sup 3}He-ions behaviour in shear-reversed plasmas are impressive examples of that. Some results on fast ion losses in JET experiments with various levels of the toroidal field ripple will be demonstrated.

  18. Free turbulent shear flows. Volume 2: Summary of data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birch, S. F.

    1973-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on free turbulent shear flows are presented. Objectives of the conference are as follows: (1) collect and process data for a variety of free mixing problems, (2) assess present theoretical capability for predicting mean velocity, concentration, and temperature distributions in free turbulent flows, (3) identify and recommend experimental studies to advance knowledge of free shear flows, and (4) increase understanding of basic turbulent mixing process for application to free shear flows. Examples of specific cases of jet flow are included.

  19. Mx Magnetometry Optimisation in Unshielded Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingleby, Stuart; Griffin, Paul; Arnold, Aidan; Riis, Erling; Hunter, Dominic

    2016-05-01

    Optically pumped magnetometry in unshielded environments is potentially of great advantage in a wide range of surveying and security applications. Optimisation of OPM modulation schemes and feedback in the Mx scheme offers enhanced sensitivity through noise cancellation and decoherence suppression. The work presented demonstrates capability for software-controlled optimisation of OPM performance in ambient fields in the 0 . 5 G range. Effects on magnetometer bandwidth and sensitivity are discussed. Supported by UK National Quantum Technologies Programme.

  20. Momentum balance in wall jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, T. Gunnar; Mehdi, Faraz; Naughton, Jonathan W.

    2012-11-01

    A plane wall jet experiment has been done to study its momentum balance. Two component laser Doppler anemometry was used to simultaneously measure the axial and wall-normal velocity components in 6 axial positions (x/H= 25, 50, 75, 100, 125 and 150) spanning from the wall all the way well into the ambient stagnant area. In this way not only the mean velocity components and Reynolds normal and shear stresses but also all their spatial derivatives were determined. In addition the wall shear stress was measured in all six axial positions using oil film interferometry. From these data all terms in the x-momentum equation, except the pressure term, could be evaluated. Later also the pressure was measured in the same profiles, and thereby also the pressure term was included in the balance. Contrary to common belief it was found that the pressure was not constant in the wall jet. The complete momentum balance is discussed and used to evaluate the roles played by the different contributing terms in different regions of the flow field in an effort to improve on our understanding of the mechanics of wall jets.

  1. Numerical simulations of protostellar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suttner, Gerhard; Smith, Michael D.; Yorke, Harold W.; Zinnecker, Hans

    Molecular jets announce the successful birth of a protostar. We develop here a model for the jets and their environments, adapting a multi-dimensional hydrocode to follow the molecular-atomic transitions of hydrogen. We examine powerful outflows into dense gas. The cocoon which forms around a jet is a very low density cavity of atomic gas. These atoms originate from strong shocks which dissociate the molecules. The rest of the molecules are either within the jet or swept up into very thin layers. Pulsed jets produce wider cavities and molecular layers which can grow onto resolvable jet knots. Three-dimensional simulations produce shocked molecular knots, distorted and multiple bow shocks and arclike structures. Spectroscopic and excitation properties of the hydrogen molecules are calculated. In the infrared, strong emission is seen from shocks within the jet (when pulsed) as well as from discrete regions along the cavity walls. Excitation, as measured by line ratios, is not generally constant. Broad double-peaked, shifted emission lines are predicted. The jet model for protostellar outflows is confronted with the constraints imposed by CO spectroscopic observations. From the three dimensional simulations we calculate line profiles and construct position-velocity diagrams for the (low-J) CO transitions. We find (1) the profiles imply power law variation of integrated brightness with velocity over a wide range of velocities, (2) the velocity field resembles a `Hubble Law' and (3) a hollow-shell structure at low velocities becomes an elongated lobe at high velocities. Deviations from the simple power law dependence of integrated brightness versus velocity occur at high velocities in our simulations. The curve first dips to a shallow minimum and then rises rapidly and peaks sharply. Reanalysis of the NGC 2264G and Cepheus E data confirm these predictions. We identify these two features with a jet-ambient shear layer and the jet itself. A deeper analysis reveals that

  2. Multiple Mode Actuation of a Turbulent Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, LaTunia G.; Seifert, Avi

    2001-01-01

    The effects of multiple mode periodic excitation on the evolution of a circular turbulent jet were studied experimentally. A short, wide-angle diffuser was attached to the jet exit. Streamwise and cross-stream excitations were introduced at the junction between the jet exit and the diffuser inlet on opposing sides of the jet. The introduction of high amplitude, periodic excitation in the streamwise direction enhances the mixing and promotes attachment of the jet shear-layer to the diffuser wall. Cross-stream excitation applied over a fraction of the jet circumference can deflect the jet away from the excitation slot. The two modes of excitation were combined using identical frequencies and varying the relative phase between the two actuators in search of an optimal response. It is shown that, for low and moderate periodic momentum input levels, the jet deflection angles depend strongly on the relative phase between the two actuators. Optimum performance is achieved when the phase difference is pi +/- pi/6. The lower effectiveness of the equal phase excitation is attributed to the generation of an azimuthally symmetric mode that does not produce the required non-axisymmetric vectoring. For high excitation levels, identical phase becomes more effective, while phase sensitivity decreases. An important finding was that with proper phase tuning, two unsteady actuators can be combined to obtain a non-linear response greater than the superposition of the individual effects.

  3. Optimising testing for phospholipid antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Helbert, M; Bodger, S; Cavenagh, J; D'Cruz, D; Thomas, J; MacCallum, P

    2001-01-01

    Aim—To compare anticardiolipin (ACL) and anti-ß2 glycoprotein 1 (ß2gp1) enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and to incorporate these results into a meta-analysis of published data. Method—Three representative commercial ACL ELISAs and an in house ß2gp1 assay were optimised and then assessed on 124 sera from normal donors, patients with infection, or patients with APS. A Medline search was screened for papers meeting defined criteria to conduct a meta-analysis. The performance of the assays used in this study was included. Results—A non-quantitative ACL assay performed at least as well as the anti-ß2gp1 assay in the diagnosis of APS. Meta-analysis confirmed that neither assay is perfect, although the anti-ß2gp1 assay had a higher specificity and lower sensitivity than the ACL assay. Conclusions—The pooled data suggest that the ACL assay is used to investigate thrombosis without overt underlying pathology and that the improved specificity of the anti-ß2gp1 assay is exploited where infection, connective tissue disease, or atheroma are present. Key Words: antiphospholipid syndrome • anticardiolipin antibodies • anti-ß2 glycoprotein 1 • sensitivity PMID:11533076

  4. Optimising costs in WLCG operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alandes Pradillo, María; Dimou, Maria; Flix, Josep; Forti, Alessandra; Sciabà, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    The Worldwide LHC Computing Grid project (WLCG) provides the computing and storage resources required by the LHC collaborations to store, process and analyse the 50 Petabytes of data annually generated by the LHC. The WLCG operations are coordinated by a distributed team of managers and experts and performed by people at all participating sites and from all the experiments. Several improvements in the WLCG infrastructure have been implemented during the first long LHC shutdown to prepare for the increasing needs of the experiments during Run2 and beyond. However, constraints in funding will affect not only the computing resources but also the available effort for operations. This paper presents the results of a detailed investigation on the allocation of the effort in the different areas of WLCG operations, identifies the most important sources of inefficiency and proposes viable strategies for optimising the operational cost, taking into account the current trends in the evolution of the computing infrastructure and the computing models of the experiments.

  5. Modified jet noise source model for twin-jet shielding analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, C. H.; Kim, C.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical method to estimate the influence that a jet of heated flow has on the noise emission from a parallel jet is presented. The shielding jet is modelled as a cylinder of constant cross-section in which the flow speed and temperature are uniform throughout. The jet noise emission is modelled by a point source with directivity imposed. The directivity term consists of: a self-noise term, a shear-noise term, and a convection factor. The self- and shear-noise terms each contain a basic directivity factor multiplying a spectral shape function. The various components are evaluated based on comparison with isothermal jet radiation experimental data. The modified source term is incorporated into the jet shielding model and compared to heated twin jet shielding data. The estimated spectra agree well except further downstream of the nozzle where peak of the noise spectrum estimated by the model lies approximately one octave below the experimental peak. The noise reduction estimated by the model agrees favorably with experiment in the near downstream region. This discrepancy is explained in terms of the shielding mechanism which is dominant far downstream.

  6. Characterization of synthetic jet actuators used for jet noise reduction by flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyak, Alexis; Berger, Zachary; Berry, Matthew; Shea, Patrick; Glauser, Mark

    2013-11-01

    The issue of jet noise introduces various opportunities for advancements in flow control and fluid dynamics. One such method for jet noise reduction involves the use of synthetic jet actuators as shear layer excitation on the flow produced by a fully compressible, turbulent jet. A set of eight zero-net-mass flux actuators are organized around the periphery of the jet in an actuation glove fitting on the nozzle. As some noise reduction has been achieved through the use of this actuation system, further characterization of the system is necessary to fully quantify its capabilities and understand its effect on the flow physics in the shear layer. The synthetic jet actuators are driven by several different frequencies based on the Helmholtz resonance of the cavities, with measurements taken at several locations along the actuator orifice. Velocity profiles are then constructed from the measured response using hot wire anemometry. Such experimental results provide vital insight into the flow field created by the synthetic jet actuator system, allowing for more effective modification to the actuation glove.

  7. Performance studies of energy consumption for single and multiple nozzle systems under impinging air jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etemoglu, Akin Burak; Can, Muhiddin

    2013-08-01

    Impinging air jets of various shapes, sizes and configurations are commonly used in heating, cooling and drying industrial processes. An analytical study has been carried out to optimise the thermal performance of single and multiple nozzle systems using impinging air jets. The optimisation of the nozzle array was given for practical purposes. The results show that within practical limits, a narrower nozzle size results in a greater heat and mass transfer coefficient. An economical analysis of the drying processes is also given for slot nozzles.

  8. VLBA AND CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF JETS IN FRI RADIO GALAXIES: CONSTRAINTS ON JET EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kharb, P.; O'Dea, C. P.; Tilak, A.; Baum, S. A.; Haynes, E.; Noel-Storr, J.; Fallon, C.; Christiansen, K.

    2012-07-20

    We present here the results from new Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations at 1.6 and 5 GHz of 19 galaxies of a complete sample of 21 Uppasala General Catalog (UGC) Fanaroff-Riley type I (FRI) radio galaxies. New Chandra data of two sources, viz., UGC 00408 and UGC 08433, are combined with the Chandra archival data of 13 sources. The 5 GHz observations of 10 'core-jet' sources are polarization-sensitive, while the 1.6 GHz observations constitute second-epoch total intensity observations of nine 'core-only' sources. Polarized emission is detected in the jets of seven sources at 5 GHz, but the cores are essentially unpolarized, except in M87. Polarization is detected at the jet edges in several sources, and the inferred magnetic field is primarily aligned with the jet direction. This could be indicative of magnetic field 'shearing' due to jet-medium interaction, or the presence of helical magnetic fields. The jet peak intensity I{sub {nu}} falls with distance d from the core, following the relation, I{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}d{sup a} , where a is typically {approx} - 1.5. Assuming that adiabatic expansion losses are primarily responsible for the jet intensity 'dimming,' two limiting cases are considered: (1) the jet has a constant speed on parsec scales and is expanding gradually such that the jet radius r{proportional_to}d 0{sup .4}; this expansion is, however, unobservable in the laterally unresolved jets at 5 GHz, and (2) the jet is cylindrical and is accelerating on parsec scales. Accelerating parsec-scale jets are consistent with the phenomenon of 'magnetic driving' in Poynting-flux-dominated jets. While slow jet expansion as predicted by case (1) is indeed observed in a few sources from the literature that are resolved laterally, on scales of tens or hundreds of parsecs, case (2) cannot be ruled out in the present data, provided the jets become conical on scales larger than those probed by VLBA. Chandra observations of 15 UGC FRIs detect X-ray jets in

  9. Refraction and scattering of sound by a shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    The angle and amplitude changes for acoustic waves refracted by a circular open jet shear layer were determined. The generalized refraction theory was assessed experimentally for on axis and off axis acoustic source locations as source frequency varied from 1 kHz to 10 kHz and free stream Mach number varied from 0.1 to 0.4. Angle and amplitude changes across the shear layer show good agreement with theory. Experiments confirm that the refraction theory is independent of shear layer thickness, acoustic source frequency, and source type. A generalized theory is, thus, available for correcting far field noise data acquired in open jet test facilities. The effect of discrete tone scattering by the open jet turbulent shear layer was also studied. Scattering effects were investigated over the same Mach number range as frequency varied from 5 kHz to 15 kHz. Attenuation of discrete tone amplitude and tone broadening were measured as a function of acoustic source position and radiation angle. Scattering was found to be stronger at angles close to the open jet axis than at 90 deg, and becomes stronger as the acoustic source position shifts downstream. A scattering analysis provided an estimate of the onset of discrete tone scattering.

  10. Jets in air-jet family

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navia, C. E.; Sawayanagi, K.

    1985-01-01

    The A-jet families on Chacaltaya emulsion chamber experiments were analyzed by the study of jets which are reconstructed by a grouping procedure. It is demonstrated that large-E sub J R sub J events are characterized by small number of jets and two-jet like asymmetric shape, binocular events and the other type. This type has a larger number of jets and more symmetrical shape in the P sub t plane.

  11. Modelling of LHCD profile control for high performance DT experiments on JET

    SciTech Connect

    Tala, T. J. J.; Heikkinen, J. A.; Karttunen, S. J.; Paettikangas, T. J. H.; Soeldner, F. X.; Parail, V. V.; Baranov, Yu. F.; Taroni, A.

    1999-09-20

    Transport calculations with relevant lower hybrid current drive control have been performed with the JETTO transport code. The heat transport model and various particle transport models reproducing the experimental JET data have been used in JETTO for predictive high performance modelling. Application of 3.5 MW LHCD power provides a slightly inverted or flat q-profile across 70% of the plasma radius whereas, without LHCD the q-profile is monotonic during the flat-top phase. The results predict a fusion power up to 30 MW for the high performance DT plasmas in the optimised shear scenario at B{sub t}=3.4 T and I{sub p}=3.9 MA. Large uncertainties, however, still persist in particular on the particle transport which strongly influences on the modelling calculations. The presence of not well understood MHD instabilities is also likely to reduce the performance. The most optimistic model, still consistent with experimental results, predicts a fusion gain approaching Q=1.

  12. Marine Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The marine turbine pump pictured is the Jacuzzi 12YJ, a jet propulsion system for pleasure or commercial boating. Its development was aided by a NASA computer program made available by the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) at the University of Georgia. The manufacturer, Jacuzzi Brothers, Incorporated, Little Rock, Arkansas, used COSMIC'S Computer Program for Predicting Turbopump Inducer Loading, which enabled substantial savings in development time and money through reduction of repetitive testing.

  13. Shearing stability of lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiba, Y.; Gijyutsu, G.

    1984-01-01

    Shearing stabilities of lubricating oils containing a high mol. wt. polymer as a viscosity index improver were studied by use of ultrasound. The oils were degraded by cavitation and the degradation generally followed first order kinetics with the rate of degradation increasing with the intensity of the ultrasonic irradiation and the cumulative energy applied. The shear stability was mainly affected by the mol. wt. of the polymer additive and could be determined in a short time by mechanical shearing with ultrasound.

  14. Ordered structures and jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, R. A.; Kaplan, R. E.; Laufer, J.

    1974-01-01

    A series of measurements of near field pressures and turbulent velocity fluctuations were made in a jet having a Reynolds number of about 50,000 in order to investigate more quantitatively the character and behavior of the large scale structures, and to ascertain their importance to the jet noise problem. It was found that the process of interaction between vortices can be inhibited by artificially exciting the shear layers with periodic disturbances of certain frequency. The turbulent fluctuation amplitudes measured at four diameters downstream decreased considerably. Finally, it was observed that the passage frequency of the structures decreased with x in a similar manner as the frequency corresponding to the maximum intensity radiation emanating from the same value of x.

  15. TURBULENT SHEAR ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2013-04-10

    We consider particle acceleration by large-scale incompressible turbulence with a length scale larger than the particle mean free path. We derive an ensemble-averaged transport equation of energetic charged particles from an extended transport equation that contains the shear acceleration. The ensemble-averaged transport equation describes particle acceleration by incompressible turbulence (turbulent shear acceleration). We find that for Kolmogorov turbulence, the turbulent shear acceleration becomes important on small scales. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm that the ensemble-averaged transport equation describes the turbulent shear acceleration.

  16. Shear Thinning in Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergm Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Yao, Minwu; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    We measured shear thinning, a viscosity decrease ordinarily associated with complex liquids such as molten plastics or ketchup, near the critical point of xenon. The data span a wide range of dimensionless shear rate: the product of the shear rate and the relaxation time of critical fluctuations was greater than 0.001 and was less than 700. As predicted by theory, shear thinning occurred when this product was greater than 1. The measurements were conducted aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia to avoid the density stratification caused by Earth's gravity.

  17. Shear flexibility for structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stangeland, Maynard L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    This device comprises a flexible sheet member having cross convolutions oriented 45.degree. to the shear vector with spherical reliefs at the convolution junctions. The spherical reliefs are essential to the shear flexibility by interrupting the principal stress lines that act along the ridges of the convolutions. The spherical reliefs provide convolutions in both directions in the plane of the cross-convolution ridges.

  18. Shear flexibility for structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stangeland, Maynard L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    This device comprises a flexible sheet member having cross convolutions oriented 45.degree. to the shear vector with spherical reliefs at the convolution junctions. The spherical reliefs are essential to the shear flexibility by interrupting the principal stress lines that act along the ridges of the convolutions. The spherical reliefs provide convolutions in both directions in the plane of the cross-convolution ridges.

  19. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Claunch, Scott D.; Farrington, Robert B.

    1997-01-01

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

  20. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Claunch, S.D.; Farrington, R.B.

    1997-02-04

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct. 17 figs.

  1. Shear Stress Sensing with Elastic Microfence Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisotto, Alexxandra; Palmieri, Frank L.; Saini, Aditya; Lin, Yi; Thurman, Christopher S; Kim, Jinwook; Kim, Taeyang; Connell, John W.; Zhu, Yong; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Jiang, Xiaoning; Wohl, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, elastic microfences were generated for the purpose of measuring shear forces acting on a wind tunnel model. The microfences were fabricated in a two part process involving laser ablation patterning to generate a template in a polymer film followed by soft lithography with a two-part silicone. Incorporation of a fluorescent dye was demonstrated as a method to enhance contrast between the sensing elements and the substrate. Sensing elements consisted of multiple microfences prepared at different orientations to enable determination of both shear force and directionality. Microfence arrays were integrated into an optical microscope with sub-micrometer resolution. Initial experiments were conducted on a flat plate wind tunnel model. Both image stabilization algorithms and digital image correlation were utilized to determine the amount of fence deflection as a result of airflow. Initial free jet experiments indicated that the microfences could be readily displaced and this displacement was recorded through the microscope.

  2. Vorticity Dynamics in Single and Multiple Swirling Reacting Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Travis; Aguilar, Michael; Emerson, Benjamin; Noble, David; Lieuwen, Tim

    2015-11-01

    This presentation describes an analysis of the unsteady flow structures in two multinozzle swirling jet configurations. This work is motivated by the problem of combustion instabilities in premixed flames, a major concern in the development of modern low NOx combustors. The objective is to compare the unsteady flow structures in these two configurations for two separate geometries and determine how certain parameters, primarily distance between jets, influence the flow dynamics. The analysis aims to differentiate between the flow dynamics of single nozzle and triple nozzle configurations. This study looks at how the vorticity in the shear layers of one reacting swirling jet can affect the dynamics of a nearby similar jet. The distance between the swirling jets is found to have an effect on the flow field in determining where swirling jets merge and on the dynamics upstream of the merging location. Graduate Student, School of Aerospace Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA.

  3. Analysis of ``soft`` recovered shaped charge jet particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Nikkel, D.J. Jr.; Kershaw, R.P.; Walters, W.P.

    1996-04-01

    A shaped charge with an 81 mm diameter, 42{degree} apex angle oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper conical liner was fired into a ``soft`` recovery bunker to allow metallurgical examination of recovered jet particles and the slug. The initial weight of the copper liner was 245 g, of which 184 g was recovered. The number of jet particles recovered was 37 (approximately 63% of the particles formed by the charge). Extensive metallurgical analyses were performed on the recovered slug and jet particles. The microstructural features associated with voids, e.g., dendritic grain growth, clearly indicate that the regions in the vicinity of the centerline of the slug and jet particles were melted. In this work the authors present calculations of jet temperature as a function of constitutive behavior. In order to predict melt in the center region of the jet they find it necessary to scale flow stress with a pressure dependent shear modulus.

  4. Microbursts as an aviation wind shear hazard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T. T.

    1981-01-01

    The downburst-related accidents or near-misses of jet aircraft have been occurring at the rate of once or twice a year since 1975. A microburst with its field comparable to the length of runways can induce a wind shear which endangers landing or liftoff aircraft; the latest near miss landing of a 727 aircraft at Atlanta, Ga. in 1979 indicated that some microbursts are too small to trigger the warning device of the anemometer network at major U.S. airports. The nature of microbursts and their possible detection by Doppler radar are discussed, along with proposed studies of small-scale microbursts.

  5. [Process optimisation: from theory to practical implementation].

    PubMed

    Töpfer, Armin

    2010-01-01

    Today process optimisation is an indispensable approach to mastering the current challenges of modern health care management. The objective is to design business processes free of defects and free of waste as well as their monitoring and controlling with meaningful test statistics. Based on the identification of essential key performance indicators, key success factors and value cash generators two basic approaches to process optimisation, which are well-established and widely used in the industry, are now being implemented in the health care sector as well: Lean Management and Six Sigma. PMID:20951951

  6. Modeling of Turbulent Free Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Dennis A.; DeBonis, James R.; Georgiadis, Nicolas J.

    2013-01-01

    The modeling of turbulent free shear flows is crucial to the simulation of many aerospace applications, yet often receives less attention than the modeling of wall boundary layers. Thus, while turbulence model development in general has proceeded very slowly in the past twenty years, progress for free shear flows has been even more so. This paper highlights some of the fundamental issues in modeling free shear flows for propulsion applications, presents a review of past modeling efforts, and identifies areas where further research is needed. Among the topics discussed are differences between planar and axisymmetric flows, development versus self-similar regions, the effect of compressibility and the evolution of compressibility corrections, the effect of temperature on jets, and the significance of turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers for reacting shear flows. Large eddy simulation greatly reduces the amount of empiricism in the physical modeling, but is sensitive to a number of numerical issues. This paper includes an overview of the importance of numerical scheme, mesh resolution, boundary treatment, sub-grid modeling, and filtering in conducting a successful simulation.

  7. A theory of MHD instability of an inhomogeneous plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonovich, Anatoly S.

    2011-06-01

    A problem of the stability of an inhomogeneous axisymmetric plasma jet in a parallel magnetic field is solved. The jet boundary becomes, under certain conditions, unstable relative to magnetosonic oscillations (Kelvin-Helmholtz instability) in the presence of a shear flow at the jet boundary. Because of its internal inhomogeneity the plasma jet has resonance surfaces, where conversion takes place between various modes of plasma magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations. Propagating in inhomogeneous plasma, fast magnetosonic waves drive the Alfven and slow magnetosonic (SMS) oscillations, tightly localized across the magnetic shells, on the resonance surfaces. MHD oscillation energy is absorbed in the neighbourhood of these resonance surfaces. The resonance surfaces disappear for the eigenmodes of SMS waves propagating in the jet waveguide. The stability of the plasma MHD flow is determined by competition between the mechanisms of shear flow instability on the boundary and wave energy dissipation because of resonant MHD-mode coupling. The problem is solved analytically, in the Wentzel, Kramers, Brillouin (WKB) approximation, for the plasma jet with a boundary in the form of a tangential discontinuity over the radial coordinate. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability develops if plasma flow velocity in the jet exceeds the maximum Alfven speed at the boundary. The stability of the plasma jet with a smooth boundary layer is investigated numerically for the basic modes of MHD oscillations, to which the WKB approximation is inapplicable. A new 'unstable mode of MHD oscillations has been discovered which, unlike the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, exists for any, however weak, plasma flow velocities.

  8. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roloff, P.

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  9. Fighting wind shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A “coherent and sustained program” of improved radar detection of weather, pilot training, and better communication between pilots and air controllers can greatly reduce the risk of wind shear to airplanes landing or taking off, according to a National Research Council (NRC) committee.Wind shear, characterized by winds rapidly changing direction and speed, has caused several serious accidents in recent years; among the most notable is the July 8, 1982, crash of a Pan American World Airlines jetliner at the New Orleans International Airport, which killed 153 persons. Following the accident, Congress directed the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to contract with the NRC to study wind shear.

  10. Analysis of a dusty wall jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Hock-Bin; Roberts, Leonard

    1991-01-01

    An analysis is given for the entrainment of dust into a turbulent radial wall jet. Equations are solved based on incompressible flow of a radial wall jet into which dust is entrained from the wall and transported by turbulent diffusion and convection throughout the flow. It is shown that the resulting concentration of dust particles in the flow depends on the difference between the applied shear stress at the surface and the maximum level of shear stress that the surface can withstand (varies as rho(sub d)a(sub g)D) i.e., the pressure due to the weight of a single layer of dust. The analysis is expected to have application to the downflow that results from helicopter and VTOL aircraft.

  11. Splitting of Forced Elliptic Jets and Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, J.; Carlton, J.; Schwieterman, M.; Davis, E.; Bradley, E.; Linne, M.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the fluid dynamics in the interaction of large scale, three-dimensional vortex structures and transitional diffusion flames in a microgravity environment. The vortex structures are used to provide a known perturbation of the type used in passive and active shear layer control techniques. 'Passive techniques' refers to manipulation of the system geometry to influence the three dimensional dynamics of vortex structures, and 'active' refers to any technique which adds energy (acoustic or kinetic) to the flow to influence the shear layer vortex dynamics. In this work the passive forcing is provided by an elliptic jet cross-section, and the active forcing is incorporated by perturbing the jet velocity using a loudspeaker in the plenum section.

  12. Measurements of turbulent inclined plane dual jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. S.; Lin, Y. F.; Sheu, M. J.

    1993-11-01

    Measurements of mean velocities, flow direction, velocity fluctuations and Reynolds shear stress were made with a split film probe of hot wire anemometer to investigate the interactions created by two air jets issuing from two identical plane inclined nozzles. The reverse flow was detected by using the split film probe and observed by flow visualization. Experimental results with an inclined angle of 9° are presented in the paper. Some experimental results with an inclined angle of 27° are presented to investigate the effect of inclination on the flow field. Mean velocities approach self-preservation in both the converging region and the combining region. Velocity fluctuations and Reynolds shear stress approach self-preservation in the combining region only. The spreads of jet and the square of the decay of maximum mean velocity increase linearly as the distance from the nozzle exit increases.

  13. Visualizing interior and exterior jet aircraft noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moondra, Manmohan S.

    In today's competitive aerospace industry, the quest for quiet has drawn significant attention to both the interior and exterior design of an airplane. Understanding the noise generation mechanisms of a jet aircraft is a crucial first step toward developing the most cost-effective noise and vibrations abatement methods. In this investigation, the Helmholtz Equation Least Squares (HELS) based nearfield acoustic holography will be used to understand noise transmission caused by jet engine and turbulence into the fuselage of a jet aircraft cruising at 30,000 ft. Modern propulsive jet engines produce exterior noise sources with a high amplitude noise field and complicated characteristics, which makes them very difficult to characterize. In particular, there are turbulent eddies that are moving through the jet at high speeds along the jet boundary. These turbulent eddies in the shear layer produce a directional and frequency dependent noise. The original HELS approach assumes a spherical source at the origin and computes the acoustic field based on spherical emission from this source. This assumption of one source at the origin is not sufficient to characterize a complex source like a jet. As such, a modified HELS approach is introduced that will help improve the source characterization as it is not dependent on a single source at the origin but a number of virtual sources throughout the space. Custom microphones are created to take acoustic pressure measurements around the jet engine. These measured acoustic pressures are then taken as input to the modified HELS algorithm to visualize the noise pattern of a subsonic jet engine.

  14. On Optimal Development and Becoming an Optimiser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Ruyter, Doret J.

    2012-01-01

    The article aims to provide a justification for the claim that optimal development and becoming an optimiser are educational ideals that parents should pursue in raising their children. Optimal development is conceptualised as enabling children to grow into flourishing persons, that is persons who have developed (and are still developing) their…

  15. Numerical Study on Cryogenic Coflowing Jets under Transcritical Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Hiroumi; Teramoto, Susumu; Okamoto, Koji; Yamanishi, Nobuhiro

    2012-11-01

    A numerical and experimental study is presented on cryogenic coflowing jets under transcritical conditions for a better understanding of the propellant mixing in supercritical-pressure rocket engines. The major concerns are dominant flow structures in the mixing of cryogenic coflowing jets under transcritical conditions. Experimentally, in advance of detailed numerical simulations, cryogenic nitrogen/gaseous nitrogen coaxial jets were visualized by the backlighting photography technique. It was observed that a dense nitrogen core has a shear-layer instability near the injector exit and eventually breaks up into large lumps which dissolve and fade away downstream. In numerical simulations, LES technique was employed for more detailed discussion on the flow structures. LES of a cryogenic nitrogen/gaseous nitrogen coflowing plane jet was conducted with the same density and velocity ratios of inner/outer jets as the experiments. As observed in the experiments, the shear-layer instability in the inner mixing layers is predominant near the injector exit. After roll-up and paring, the shear-layer instability waves become large-scale vortices. They cause coherent vortex structures which become dominant in the downstream and break the dense core into lumps. Strouhal numbers of the shear-layer instability and the dense lump shedding in the numerical simulations were comparable to those measured in the experiments, respectively.

  16. Corporate Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, Savannah, GA, used a version of a NASA program called WIBCO to design a wing for the Gulfstream IV (G-IV) which will help to reduce transonic drag (created by shock waves that develop as an airplane approaches the speed of sound). The G-IV cruises at 88 percent of the speed of sound, and holds the international record in its class for round-the-world flight. They also used the STANS5 and Profile programs in the design. They will use the NASA program GASP to help determine the gross weight, range, speed, payload and optimum wing area of an intercontinental supersonic business jet being developed in cooperation with Sukhoi Design Bureau, a Soviet organization.

  17. Viscous shear dampers

    SciTech Connect

    Zilahi-Szabo, I.

    1980-10-07

    In a viscous shear damper, the seismic mass is chamfered at all its corners. Thus, the clearances between the seismic mass and its casing are gaps with oppositely widening out sections separated by middle sections of smallest widths.

  18. An efficient and flexible web services-based multidisciplinary design optimisation framework for complex engineering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liansheng; Liu, Jihong

    2012-08-01

    Multidisciplinary design optimisation (MDO) involves multiple disciplines, multiple coupled relationships and multiple processes, which is implemented by different specialists dispersed geographically on heterogeneous platforms with different analysis and optimisation tools. The product design data integration and data sharing among the participants hampers the development and applications of MDO in enterprises seriously. Therefore, a multi-hierarchical integrated product design data model (MH-iPDM) supporting the MDO in the web environment and a web services-based multidisciplinary design optimisation (Web-MDO) framework are proposed in this article. Based on the enabling technologies including web services, ontology, workflow, agent, XML and evidence theory, the proposed framework enables the designers geographically dispersed to work collaboratively in the MDO environment. The ontology-based workflow enables the logical reasoning of MDO to be processed dynamically. The evidence theory-based uncertainty reasoning and analysis supports the quantification, aggregation and analysis of the conflicting epistemic uncertainty from multiple sources, which improves the quality of product. Finally, a proof-of-concept prototype system is developed using J2EE and an example of supersonic business jet is demonstrated to verify the autonomous execution of MDO strategies and the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  19. Jet inclusive cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Del Duca, V.

    1992-11-01

    Minijet production in jet inclusive cross sections at hadron colliders, with large rapidity intervals between the tagged jets, is evaluated by using the BFKL pomeron. We describe the jet inclusive cross section for an arbitrary number of tagged jets, and show that it behaves like a system of coupled pomerons.

  20. Modern developments in shear flow control with swirl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farokhi, Saeed; Taghavi, R.

    1990-01-01

    Passive and active control of swirling turbulent jets is experimentally investigated. Initial swirl distribution is shown to dominate the free jet evolution in the passive mode. Vortex breakdown, a manifestation of high intensity swirl, was achieved at below critical swirl number (S = 0.48) by reducing the vortex core diameter. The response of a swirling turbulent jet to single frequency, plane wave acoustic excitation was shown to depend strongly on the swirl number, excitation Strouhal number, amplitude of the excitation wave, and core turbulence in a low speed cold jet. A 10 percent reduction of the mean centerline velocity at x/D = 9.0 (and a corresponding increase in the shear layer momentum thickness) was achieved by large amplitude internal plane wave acoustic excitation. Helical instability waves of negative azimuthal wave numbers exhibit larger amplification rates than the plane waves in swirling free jets, according to hydrodynamic stability theory. Consequently, an active swirling shear layer control is proposed to include the generation of helical instability waves of arbitrary helicity and the promotion of modal interaction, through multifrequency forcing.

  1. Filament Eruptions, Jets, and Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Robe, Nick; Falconer, David; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Previously, from chromospheric H alpha and coronal X-ray movies of the Sun's polar coronal holes, it was found that nearly all coronal jets (greater than 90%) are one or the other of two roughly equally common different kinds, different in how they erupt: standard jets and blowout jets (Yamauchi et al 2004, Apl, 605, 5ll: Moore et all 2010, Apj, 720, 757). Here, from inspection of SDO/AIA He II 304 A movies of 54 polar x-ray jets observed in Hinode/XRT movies, we report, as Moore et al (2010) anticipated, that (1) most standard x-ray jets (greater than 80%) show no ejected plasma that is cool enough (T is less than or approximately 10(exp 5K) to be seen in the He II 304 A movies; (2) nearly all blownout X-ray jets (greater than 90%) show obvious ejection of such cool plasma; (3) whereas when cool plasma is ejected in standard X-ray jets, it shows no lateral expansion, the cool plasma ejected in blowout X-ray jets shows strong lateral expansion; and (4) in many blowout X-ray jets, the cool plasma ejection displays the erupting-magnetic-rope form of clasic filament eruptions and is thereby seen to be a miniature filament eruption. The XRT movies also showed most blowout X-ray jets to be larger and brighter, and hence to apparently have more energy, than most standard X-ray jets. These observations (1) confirm the dichotomy of coronal jets, (2) agree with the Shibata model for standard jets, and (3) support the conclusion of Moore et al (2010) that in blowout jets the magnetic-arch base of the jet erupts in the manner of the much larger magnetic arcades in which the core field, the field rooted along the arcade's polarity inversion line, is sheared and twisted (sigmoid), often carries a cool-plasma filament, and erupts to blowout the arcade, producing a CME. From Hinode/SOT Ca II movies of the polar limb, Sterling et al (2010, ApJ, 714, L1) found that chromospheric Type-II spicules show a dichotomy of eruption dynamics similar to that found here for the cool

  2. Supersonic gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulov, V. G.

    The papers presented in this volume provide an overview of the current state of research in the gas dynamics of jet flows. In particular, attention is given to free supersonic jets and to the interaction of supersonic jets with one another and with obstacles under stationary and nonstationary flow conditions. Papers are presented on a method for calculating a weakly anisotropic supersonic turbulent jet in a subsonic slipstream; composite supersonic jets; the principal gas-dynamic characteristics of the processes occurring in gas-jet-driven shock-wave generators; and the construction of models for supersonic jet flows. For individual items see A84-16902 to A84-16918

  3. "Waveguidability" of idealized jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manola, Iris; Selten, Frank; Vries, Hylke; Hazeleger, Wilco

    2013-09-01

    It is known that strong zonal jets can act as waveguides for Rossby waves. In this study we use the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis data to analyze the connection between jets and zonal waves at timescales beyond 10 days. Moreover, a barotropic model is used to systematically study the ability of idealized jets to trap Rossby wave energy ("waveguidability") as a function of jet strength, jet width, and jet location. In general, strongest waveguidability is found for narrow, fast jets. In addition, when the stationary wave number is integer, a resonant response is found through constructive interference. In Austral summer, the Southern Hemispheric jet is closest to the idealized jets considered and it is for this season that similar jet-zonal wave relationships are identified in the ECMWF reanalysis data.

  4. Experimental assessment of theory for refraction of sound by a shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.

    1978-01-01

    The refraction angle and amplitude changes associated with sound transmission through a circular, open-jet shear layer were studied in a 0.91 m diameter open jet acoustic research tunnel. Free stream Mach number was varied from 0.1 to 0.4. Good agreement between refraction angle correction theory and experiment was obtained over the test Mach number, frequency and angle measurement range for all on-axis acoustic source locations. For off-axis source positions, good agreement was obtained at a source-to-shear layer separation distance greater than the jet radius. Measureable differences between theory and experiment occurred at a source-to-shear layer separation distance less than one jet radius. A shear layer turbulence scattering experiment was conducted at 90 deg to the open jet axis for the same free stream Mach numbers and axial source locations used in the refraction study. Significant discrete tone spectrum broadening and tone amplitude changes were observed at open jet Mach numbers above 0.2 and at acoustic source frequencies greater than 5 kHz. More severe turbulence scattering was observed for downstream source locations.

  5. Spectra and Diffusion in a Round Turbulent Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrsin, Stanley; Uberoi, Mahinder S

    1951-01-01

    In a round turbulent jet at room temperature, measurement of the shear correlation coefficient as a function of frequency (through band-pass filters) has given a rather direct verification of Kolmogoroff's local-isotropy hypothesis. One-dimensional power spectra of velocity and temperature fluctuations, measured in unheated and heated jets, respectively, have been contrasted. Under the same conditions, the two corresponding transverse correlation functions have been measured and compared. Finally, measurements have been made of the mean thermal wakes behind local (line) heat sources in the unheated turbulent jet, and the order of magnitude of the temperature fluctuations has been determined.

  6. Spectrums and Diffusion in a Round Turbulent Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrsin, Stanley; Uberoi, Mahinder S

    1950-01-01

    In a round turbulent jet at room temperature, measurement of the shear correlation coefficient as a function of frequency (through bandpass filters) has given a rather direct verification of Kolmogoroff's local-isotropy hypothesis. One-dimensional power spectrums of velocity and temperature fluctuations, measured in unheated and heated jets, respectively, have been contrasted. Under the same conditions, the two corresponding transverse correlation functions have been measured and compared. Finally, measurements have been made of the mean thermal wakes behind local (line) heat sources in the unheated turbulent jet, and the order of magnitude of the temperature fluctuations has been determined. (author)

  7. Penetration Characteristics of Air, Carbon Dioxide and Helium Transverse Sonic Jets in Mach 5 Cross Flow

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Erinc; Kontis, Konstantinos; Saravanan, Selvaraj

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation of sonic air, CO2 and Helium transverse jets in Mach 5 cross flow was carried out over a flat plate. The jet to freestream momentum flux ratio, J, was kept the same for all gases. The unsteady flow topology was examined using high speed schlieren visualisation and PIV. Schlieren visualisation provided information regarding oscillating jet shear layer structures and bow shock, Mach disc and barrel shocks. Two-component PIV measurements at the centreline, provided information regarding jet penetration trajectories. Barrel shocks and Mach disc forming the jet boundary were visualised/quantified also jet penetration boundaries were determined. Even though J is kept the same for all gases, the penetration patterns were found to be remarkably different both at the nearfield and the farfield. Air and CO2 jet resulted similar nearfield and farfield penetration pattern whereas Helium jet spread minimal in the nearfield. PMID:25494348

  8. Investigation of the effects of a moving acoustic medium on jet noise measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, J. E., III; Palmer, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    Noise from an unheated sonic jet in the presence of an external flow is measured in a free-jet wind tunnel using microphones located both inside and outside the flow. Comparison of the data is made with results of similar studies. The results are also compared with theoretical predictions of the source strength for jet noise in the presence of flow and of the effects of sound propagation through a shear layer.

  9. Investigating the Dynamics of Canonical Flux Tubes in Jet Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavine, Eric; You, Setthivoine

    2014-10-01

    Highly collimated plasma jets are frequently observed at galactic, stellar, and laboratory scales. Some models suppose these jets are magnetohydrodynamically-driven magnetic flux tubes filled with flowing plasma, but they do not agree on a collimation process. Some evidence supporting a universal MHD pumping mechanism has been obtained from planar electrode experiments with aspect ratios of ~10:1 however, these jets are subject to kink instabilities beyond a certain length and are unable to replicate the remarkable aspect ratios (10-1000:1) seen in astrophysical systems. Other models suppose these jets are flowing Z-pinch plasmas and experiments that use stabilizing shear flows have achieved aspect ratios of ~30:1, but are line tied at both ends. Can both collimation and stabilization mechanisms work together to produce long jets without kink instabilities and only one end tied to the central object? This question is evaluated from the point of view of canonical flux tubes and canonical helicity transport, indicating that jets can become long and collimated due to a combination of strong helical shear flows and conversion of magnetic helicity into kinetic helicity. The MOCHI LabJet experiment is designed to study this in the laboratory. Supported by US DoE Early Career Grant DE-SC0010340.

  10. Converging shear rheometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Hyung M.; Mix, Adam W.; Giacomin, A. Jeffrey

    2014-05-01

    For highly viscous fluids that slip in parallel sliding plate rheometers, we want to use a slightly converging flow to suppress this wall slip. In this work, we first attack the steady shear flow of a highly viscous Newtonian fluid between two gently converging plates with no slip boundaries using the equation of motion in cylindrical coordinates, which yields no analytical solution. Then we treat the same problem using the lubrication approximation in Cartesian coordinates to yield exact, explicit solutions for dimensionless velocity, pressure and shear stress. This work deepens our understanding of a drag flow through a gently converging slit of arbitrary convergence angle. We also employ the corotational Maxwell model to explore the role of viscoelasticity in this converging shear flow. We then compare these analytical solutions to finite element calculations for both Newtonian and corotational Maxwell cases. A worked example for determining the Newtonian viscosity using a converging shear rheometer is also included. With this work, we provide the framework for exploring other constitutive equations or other boundary conditions in future work. Our results can also be used to design the linear bearings used for the parallel sliding plate rheometer (SPR). This work can also be used to evaluate the error in the shear stress that is caused by bearing misalignment and specify the parallelism tolerance for the linear bearings incorporated into a SPR.

  11. Buckling optimisation of sandwich cylindrical panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouhamzeh, M.; Sadighi, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the buckling load optimisation is performed on sandwich cylindrical panels. A finite element program is developed in MATLAB to solve the governing differential equations of the global buckling of the structure. In order to find the optimal solution, the genetic algorithm Toolbox in MATLAB is implemented. Verifications are made for both the buckling finite element code and also the results from the genetic algorithm by comparisons to the results available in literature. Sandwich cylindrical panels are optimised for the buckling strength with isotropic or orthotropic cores with different boundary conditions. Results are presented in terms of stacking sequence of fibers in the face sheets and core to face sheet thickness ratio.

  12. Pre-operative optimisation of lung function

    PubMed Central

    Azhar, Naheed

    2015-01-01

    The anaesthetic management of patients with pre-existing pulmonary disease is a challenging task. It is associated with increased morbidity in the form of post-operative pulmonary complications. Pre-operative optimisation of lung function helps in reducing these complications. Patients are advised to stop smoking for a period of 4–6 weeks. This reduces airway reactivity, improves mucociliary function and decreases carboxy-haemoglobin. The widely used incentive spirometry may be useful only when combined with other respiratory muscle exercises. Volume-based inspiratory devices have the best results. Pharmacotherapy of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease must be optimised before considering the patient for elective surgery. Beta 2 agonists, inhaled corticosteroids and systemic corticosteroids, are the main drugs used for this and several drugs play an adjunctive role in medical therapy. A graded approach has been suggested to manage these patients for elective surgery with an aim to achieve optimal pulmonary function. PMID:26556913

  13. Acoustic Resonator Optimisation for Airborne Particle Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devendran, Citsabehsan; Billson, Duncan R.; Hutchins, David A.; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    Advances in micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology and biomedical research necessitate micro-machined manipulators to capture, handle and position delicate micron-sized particles. To this end, a parallel plate acoustic resonator system has been investigated for the purposes of manipulation and entrapment of micron sized particles in air. Numerical and finite element modelling was performed to optimise the design of the layered acoustic resonator. To obtain an optimised resonator design, careful considerations of the effect of thickness and material properties are required. Furthermore, the effect of acoustic attenuation which is dependent on frequency is also considered within this study, leading to an optimum operational frequency range. Finally, experimental results demonstrated good particle levitation and capture of various particle properties and sizes ranging to as small as 14.8 μm.

  14. Interaction of jet noise with a nearby panel assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGreevy, J. L.; Bayliss, A.; Maestrello, L.

    1995-04-01

    A model of the interaction of the noise from a spreading subsonic jet with a panel-stringer assembly is studied numerically in two dimensions. The radiation resulting from this flow/acoustic/structure coupling is computed and analyzed in both the time and frequency domains. The jet is initially excited by a pulse-like source inserted into the flowfield. The pulse triggers instabilities associated with the inviscid instability of the jet mean flow shear layer. These instabilities in turn generate sound which provides the primary loading for the panels. The resulting structural vibration and radiation depends strongly on panel placement relative to the jet/nozzle configuration. Results are obtained for the panel responses as well as the transmitted and incident pressure. The effect of the panels is to act as a narrow filter, converting the relatively broadband forcing, heavily influenced by jet instabilities, into radiation concentrated in narrow spectral bands.

  15. Density and confinement effects on mixing characteristics of an axisymmetrical CO(2) jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doty, J. H.

    1985-03-01

    This thesis studies the effects of jet density and confinement on spreading and entrainment rate of axisymmetrical CO2 jet in air. Four tests were conducted to isolate these effects: heated free jet; isothermal free jet; heated confined jet; and isothermal confined jet. The mass flow rate of CO2 was held constant for all tests at 6 kg/hr. Flow visualization studies were also conducted to corroborate results. It was determined that isokinetic sampling for CO2 concentrations is important for obtaining accurate measurements in the jet shear layer for axial distances less than 10 jet diameters. An increase in velocity at the edge of the jet near the entrance plane was noted for the isothermal studies where the density difference between the jet and the surrounding air was significant. Spreading rate for the jets was determined using half width at half maximum criterion. The heated jet entrained more air than the isothermal jet at the same axial location even though the heated jet had a smaller cross sectional area.

  16. Optimising a vortex fluidic device for controlling chemical reactivity and selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasmin, Lyzu; Chen, Xianjue; Stubbs, Keith A.; Raston, Colin L.

    2013-07-01

    A vortex fluidic device (VFD) involving a rapidly rotating tube open at one end forms dynamic thin films at high rotational speed for finite sub-millilitre volumes of liquid, with shear within the films depending on the speed and orientation of the tube. Continuous flow operation of the VFD where jet feeds of solutions are directed to the closed end of the tube provide additional tuneable shear from the viscous drag as the liquid whirls along the tube. The versatility of this simple, low cost microfluidic device, which can operate under confined mode or continuous flow is demonstrated in accelerating organic reactions, for model Diels-Alder dimerization of cyclopentadienes, and sequential aldol and Michael addition reactions, in accessing unusual 2,4,6-triarylpyridines. Residence times are controllable for continuous flow processing with the viscous drag dominating the shear for flow rates >0.1 mL/min in a 10 mm diameter tube rotating at >2000 rpm.

  17. Treatment planning optimisation in proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, S E; Burnet, N G; Lomax, A J

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT. The goal of radiotherapy is to achieve uniform target coverage while sparing normal tissue. In proton therapy, the same sources of geometric uncertainty are present as in conventional radiotherapy. However, an important and fundamental difference in proton therapy is that protons have a finite range, highly dependent on the electron density of the material they are traversing, resulting in a steep dose gradient at the distal edge of the Bragg peak. Therefore, an accurate knowledge of the sources and magnitudes of the uncertainties affecting the proton range is essential for producing plans which are robust to these uncertainties. This review describes the current knowledge of the geometric uncertainties and discusses their impact on proton dose plans. The need for patient-specific validation is essential and in cases of complex intensity-modulated proton therapy plans the use of a planning target volume (PTV) may fail to ensure coverage of the target. In cases where a PTV cannot be used, other methods of quantifying plan quality have been investigated. A promising option is to incorporate uncertainties directly into the optimisation algorithm. A further development is the inclusion of robustness into a multicriteria optimisation framework, allowing a multi-objective Pareto optimisation function to balance robustness and conformity. The question remains as to whether adaptive therapy can become an integral part of a proton therapy, to allow re-optimisation during the course of a patient's treatment. The challenge of ensuring that plans are robust to range uncertainties in proton therapy remains, although these methods can provide practical solutions. PMID:23255545

  18. Optimised dipper fine tunes shovel performance

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2005-06-01

    Joint efforts between mine operators, OEMs, and researchers yields unexpected benefits from dippers for shovels for coal, oil, or hardrock mining that can now be tailored to meet site-specific conditions. The article outlines a process being developed by CRCMining and P & H MIning Equipment to optimise the dipper that involves rapid prototyping and scale modelling of the dipper and the mine conditions. Scale models have been successfully field tested. 2 photos.

  19. Recent advances in process assessment and optimisation.

    PubMed

    Van Loey, A; Hendrickx, M; Smout, C; Haentjens, T; Tobback, P

    1996-01-01

    After stating the general principle of food preservation, this paper focuses on currently available methods to evaluate quantitatively the integrated time temperature impact during and/or after a thermal preservation process. In this context, both the physical-mathematical approach and the use of time temperature integrators are briefly reviewed and recent evolutions are indicated. Also new trends with regard to thermal process optimisation are highlighted. PMID:22060643

  20. ATLAS software configuration and build tool optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybkin, Grigory; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    ATLAS software code base is over 6 million lines organised in about 2000 packages. It makes use of some 100 external software packages, is developed by more than 400 developers and used by more than 2500 physicists from over 200 universities and laboratories in 6 continents. To meet the challenge of configuration and building of this software, the Configuration Management Tool (CMT) is used. CMT expects each package to describe its build targets, build and environment setup parameters, dependencies on other packages in a text file called requirements, and each project (group of packages) to describe its policies and dependencies on other projects in a text project file. Based on the effective set of configuration parameters read from the requirements files of dependent packages and project files, CMT commands build the packages, generate the environment for their use, or query the packages. The main focus was on build time performance that was optimised within several approaches: reduction of the number of reads of requirements files that are now read once per package by a CMT build command that generates cached requirements files for subsequent CMT build commands; introduction of more fine-grained build parallelism at package task level, i.e., dependent applications and libraries are compiled in parallel; code optimisation of CMT commands used for build; introduction of package level build parallelism, i. e., parallelise the build of independent packages. By default, CMT launches NUMBER-OF-PROCESSORS build commands in parallel. The other focus was on CMT commands optimisation in general that made them approximately 2 times faster. CMT can generate a cached requirements file for the environment setup command, which is especially useful for deployment on distributed file systems like AFS or CERN VMFS. The use of parallelism, caching and code optimisation significantly-by several times-reduced software build time, environment setup time, increased the efficiency of

  1. Stretched Inertial Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Seon, Thomas; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Liquid jets often arise as short-lived bursting liquid flows. Cavitation or impact-driven jets, bursting champagne bubbles, shaped-charge jets, ballistospores or drop-on-demand inkjet printing are a few examples where liquid jets are suddenly released. The trademark of all these discharge jets is the property of being stretched, due to the quenching injection. the present theoretical and experimental investigation, the structure of the jet flow field will be unraveled experimentally for a few emblematic occurrences of discharge jets. Though the injection markedly depends on each flow configuration, the jet velocity field will be shown to be systematically and rapidly attracted to the universal stretching flow z/t. The emergence of this inertial attractor actually only relies on simple kinematic ingredients, and as such is fairly generic. The universality of the jet velocity structure will be discussed.

  2. A local eddy viscosity model for turbulent shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortwerth, P. J.; Rabe, D. C.; Mcerlean, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    In the model described, the eddy viscosity is assumed to be a fluid property dependent on the state of the fluid locally, namely the local density, turbulent kinetic energy, turbulence scale, and Mach number. An empirical law was found which related eddy viscosity to these properties satisfactorily for free jets. This law is used without modification for a set of test cases in free shear layers, free-jet decay, coaxial mixing, and wakes. The scale of turbulence is taken as a constant at any axial location equal to the width of the shear layer. By utilizing the boundary-layer order-of-magnitude analysis, a coupled set of fluid dynamic equations is formulated, which of necessity includes the equation for the production of turbulent kinetic energy.

  3. Free volume under shear.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Moumita; Vinutha, H A; Sastry, Srikanth; Heussinger, Claus

    2015-10-14

    Using an athermal quasistatic simulation protocol, we study the distribution of free volumes in sheared hard-particle packings close to, but below, the random-close packing threshold. We show that under shear, and independent of volume fraction, the free volumes develop features similar to close-packed systems - particles self-organize in a manner as to mimick the isotropically jammed state. We compare athermally sheared packings with thermalized packings and show that thermalization leads to an erasure of these structural features. The temporal evolution in particular the opening-up and the closing of free-volume patches is associated with the single-particle dynamics, showing a crossover from ballistic to diffusive behavior. PMID:26472384

  4. Active vibration reduction of a flexible structure bonded with optimised piezoelectric pairs using half and quarter chromosomes in genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daraji, A. H.; Hale, J. M.

    2012-08-01

    The optimal placement of sensors and actuators in active vibration control is limited by the number of candidates in the search space. The search space of a small structure discretized to one hundred elements for optimising the location of ten actuators gives 1.73 × 1013 possible solutions, one of which is the global optimum. In this work, a new quarter and half chromosome technique based on symmetry is developed, by which the search space for optimisation of sensor/actuator locations in active vibration control of flexible structures may be greatly reduced. The technique is applied to the optimisation for eight and ten actuators located on a 500×500mm square plate, in which the search space is reduced by up to 99.99%. This technique helps for updating genetic algorithm program by updating natural frequencies and mode shapes in each generation to find the global optimal solution in a greatly reduced number of generations. An isotropic plate with piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs bonded to its surface was investigated using the finite element method and Hamilton's principle based on first order shear deformation theory. The placement and feedback gain of ten and eight sensor/actuator pairs was optimised for a cantilever and clamped-clamped plate to attenuate the first six modes of vibration, using minimization of linear quadratic index as an objective function.

  5. Metal shearing energy absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, R. J.; Wittrock, E. P. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A metal shearing energy absorber is described. The absorber is composed of a flat thin strip of metal which is pulled through a slot in a cutter member of a metal, harder than the metal of the strip. The slot's length, in the direction perpendicular to the pull direction, is less than the strip's width so that as the strip is pulled through the slot, its edges are sheared off, thereby absorbing some of the pulling energy. In one embodiment the cutter member is a flat plate of steel, while in another embodiment the cutter member is U-shaped with the slot at its base.

  6. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, D.S.; Lanham, R.N.

    1984-04-11

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  7. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Lanham, Ronald N.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  8. Infrared lateral shearing interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, O.

    1980-04-01

    Recently IR interferometry has received much attention for its special capabilities of testing IR materials, diamond-turned metal mirrors, deep aspherics, unpolished rough surface optics, and other unconventional optics. A CW CO2 laser is used as a coherent light source at 10.6 microns, and germanium and zinc selenide optics are used for lenses and beam splitters. A pyroelectric vidicon (PEV) detects the modulated interference pattern through a TV monitor and video recorder-player. This paper presents three methods of IR lateral shear interferometry using (1) a germanium plane-parallel plate, (2) a Ronchi ruling, and (3) a double-grating lateral shear interferometer.

  9. Shear wave transmissivity measurement by color Doppler shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Mayuko; Kasahara, Toshihiro; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuminaka, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography is a useful method for evaluating tissue stiffness. We have proposed a novel shear wave imaging method (color Doppler shear wave imaging: CD SWI), which utilizes a signal processing unit in ultrasound color flow imaging in order to detect the shear wave wavefront in real time. Shear wave velocity is adopted to characterize tissue stiffness; however, it is difficult to measure tissue stiffness with high spatial resolution because of the artifact produced by shear wave diffraction. Spatial average processing in the image reconstruction method also degrades the spatial resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel measurement method for the shear wave transmissivity of a tissue boundary. Shear wave wavefront maps are acquired by changing the displacement amplitude of the shear wave and the transmissivity of the shear wave, which gives the difference in shear wave velocity between two mediums separated by the boundary, is measured from the ratio of two threshold voltages required to form the shear wave wavefronts in the two mediums. From this method, a high-resolution shear wave amplitude imaging method that reconstructs a tissue boundary is proposed.

  10. Flow field topology of submerged jets with fractal generated turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cafiero, Gioacchino; Discetti, Stefano; Astarita, Tommaso

    2015-11-01

    Fractal grids (FGs) have been recently an object of numerous investigations due to the interesting capability of generating turbulence at multiple scales, thus paving the way to tune mixing and scalar transport. The flow field topology of a turbulent air jet equipped with a square FG is investigated by means of planar and volumetric particle image velocimetry. The comparison with the well-known features of a round jet without turbulence generators is also presented. The Reynolds number based on the nozzle exit section diameter for all the experiments is set to about 15 000. It is demonstrated that the presence of the grid enhances the entrainment rate and, as a consequence, the scalar transfer of the jet. Moreover, due to the effect of the jet external shear layer on the wake shed by the grid bars, the turbulence production region past the grid is significantly shortened with respect to the documented behavior of fractal grids in free-shear conditions. The organization of the large coherent structures in the FG case is also analyzed and discussed. Differently from the well-known generation of toroidal vortices due to the growth of azimuthal disturbances within the jet shear layer, the fractal grid introduces cross-wise disturbs which produce streamwise vortices; these structures, although characterized by a lower energy content, have a deeper streamwise penetration than the ring vortices, thus enhancing the entrainment process.

  11. Lateral jet injection into typical combustor flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    The experimental problem of lateral jet injection into typical flow fields in the absence of combustion was studied. All flow fields being investigated have no expansion of the crossflow (the test section to swirler diameter ratio D/d = 1), after its passage through an optional swirler (with swirl vane angle phi = 0 (swirler removed), 45, and 70 degree). The lateral jet(s) is(are) located one test-section diameter downstream of the test-section inlet (x/D = 1). The lateral jets have round-sectioned nozzles, each of which has an area of 1/100th of the cross sectional area of the crossflow (A sub j/A sub c = 1/100). Jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios of R = v sub j/u sub o = 2, 4, and 6 were investigated. Helium-bubble low visualization, five-hole pitot probe time-mean velocity measurements, and single-wire time-mean velocity and normal and shear stress turbulence data were obtained in the research program.

  12. Sheared Electroconvective Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Rhokyun; Pham, Van Sang; Lim, Kiang Meng; Han, Jongyoon

    2012-11-01

    Recently, ion concentration polarization (ICP) and related phenomena draw attention from physicists, due to its importance in understanding electrochemical systems. Researchers have been actively studying, but the complexity of this multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon has been limitation for gaining a detailed picture. Here, we consider electroconvective(EC) instability initiated by ICP under pressure-driven flow, a scenario often found in electrochemical desalinations. Combining scaling analysis, experiment, and numerical modeling, we reveal unique behaviors of sheared EC: unidirectional vortex structures, its size selection and vortex propagation. Selected by balancing the external pressure gradient and the electric body force, which generates Hagen-Poiseuille(HP) flow and vortical EC, the dimensionless EC thickness scales as (φ2 /UHP)1/3. The pressure-driven flow(or shear) suppresses unfavorably-directed vortices, and simultaneously pushes favorably-directed vortices with constant speed, which is linearly proportional to the total shear of HP flow. This is the first systematic characterization of sheared EC, which has significant implications on the optimization of electrodialysis and other electrochemical systems.

  13. Magnetic field generation in core-sheath jets via the kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P. E.; Duţan, I.; Niemiec, J.; Medvedev, M.; Mizuno, Y.; Meli, A.; Sol, H.; Zhang, B.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.

    2014-09-20

    We have investigated magnetic field generation in velocity shears via the kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (kKHI) using a relativistic plasma jet core and stationary plasma sheath. Our three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations consider plasma jet cores with Lorentz factors of 1.5, 5, and 15 for both electron-proton and electron-positron plasmas. For electron-proton plasmas, we find generation of strong large-scale DC currents and magnetic fields that extend over the entire shear surface and reach thicknesses of a few tens of electron skin depths. For electron-positron plasmas, we find generation of alternating currents and magnetic fields. Jet and sheath plasmas are accelerated across the shear surface in the strong magnetic fields generated by the kKHI. The mixing of jet and sheath plasmas generates a transverse structure similar to that produced by the Weibel instability.

  14. Measuring the reduced shear

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun

    2011-11-01

    Neglecting the second order corrections in weak lensing measurements can lead to a few percent uncertainties on cosmic shears, and becomes more important for cluster lensing mass reconstructions. Existing methods which claim to measure the reduced shears are not necessarily accurate to the second order when a point spread function (PSF) is present. We show that the method of Zhang (2008) exactly measures the reduced shears at the second order level in the presence of PSF. A simple theorem is provided for further confirming our calculation, and for judging the accuracy of any shear measurement method at the second order based on its properties at the first order. The method of Zhang (2008) is well defined mathematically. It does not require assumptions on the morphologies of galaxies and the PSF. To reach a sub-percent level accuracy, the CCD pixel size is required to be not larger than 1/3 of the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of the PSF, regardless of whether the PSF has a power-law or exponential profile at large distances. Using a large ensemble (∼>10{sup 7}) of mock galaxies of unrestricted morphologies, we study the shear recovery accuracy under different noise conditions. We find that contaminations to the shear signals from the noise of background photons can be removed in a well defined way because they are not correlated with the source shapes. The residual shear measurement errors due to background noise are consistent with zero at the sub-percent level even when the amplitude of such noise reaches about 1/10 of the source flux within the half-light radius of the source. This limit can in principle be extended further with a larger galaxy ensemble in our simulations. On the other hand, the source Poisson noise remains to be a cause of systematic errors. For a sub-percent level accuracy, our method requires the amplitude of the source Poisson noise to be less than 1/80 ∼ 1/100 of the source flux within the half-light radius of the source

  15. Temperature-Corrected Model of Turbulence in Hot Jet Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Pao, S. Paul; Massey, Steven J.; Elmiligui, Alaa

    2007-01-01

    An improved correction has been developed to increase the accuracy with which certain formulations of computational fluid dynamics predict mixing in shear layers of hot jet flows. The CFD formulations in question are those derived from the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations closed by means of a two-equation model of turbulence, known as the k-epsilon model, wherein effects of turbulence are summarized by means of an eddy viscosity. The need for a correction arises because it is well known among specialists in CFD that two-equation turbulence models, which were developed and calibrated for room-temperature, low Mach-number, plane-mixing-layer flows, underpredict mixing in shear layers of hot jet flows. The present correction represents an attempt to account for increased mixing that takes place in jet flows characterized by high gradients of total temperature. This correction also incorporates a commonly accepted, previously developed correction for the effect of compressibility on mixing.

  16. Jets of incipient liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnikov, A. V.; Mazheiko, N. A.; Skripov, V. P.

    2000-05-01

    Jets of incipient water escaping into the atmosphere through a short channel are photographed. In some experiments. complete disintegration of the jet is observed. The relationship of this phenomenon with intense volume incipience is considered. The role of the Coanda effect upon complete opening of the jet is revealed. Measurement results of the recoil force R of the jets of incipient liquids are presented. Cases of negative thrust caused by the Coanda effect are noted. Generalization of experimental data is proposed.

  17. NASA Jet Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    The presentation highlights jet-noise research conducted in the Subsonic Fixed Wing, Supersonics, and Environmentally Responsible Aviation Projects in the Fundamental Aeronautics Program at NASA. The research efforts discussed include NASA's updated Aircraft NOise Prediction Program (ANOPP2), acoustic-analogy-based prediction tools, jet-surface-interaction studies, plasma-actuator investigations, N+2 Supersonics Validation studies, rectangular-jet experiments, twin-jet experiments, and Hybrid Wind Body (HWB) activities.

  18. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent circular jet flows

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S. C.; Sotiropoulos, F.; Sale, M. J.

    2002-07-01

    This report presents a numerical method for carrying out large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent free shear flows and an application of a method to simulate the flow generated by a nozzle discharging into a stagnant reservoir. The objective of the study was to elucidate the complex features of the instantaneous flow field to help interpret the results of recent biological experiments in which live fish were exposed to the jet shear zone. The fish-jet experiments were conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Hydropower Turbine Systems program. The experiments were designed to establish critical thresholds of shear and turbulence-induced loads to guide the development of innovative, fish-friendly hydropower turbine designs.

  19. Behaviour of Lyapunov's function for different strategies of circuit optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemliak, Alexander; Markina, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    The process of analogue circuit optimisation is mathematically defined as a controllable dynamic system. In this context the minimisation of the processor time of designing can be formulated as a problem of time minimisation for transitional process of dynamic system. In order to analyse the properties of such a system, it is proposed to use the concept of Lyapunov function of dynamic system. Using this function and its time derivative, the special functions have been built that allow us to predict the total processor time for circuit optimisation by analysing the initial interval of the optimisation process. Numerical results indicate the possibility of predicting the processor time of different strategies for circuit optimisation.

  20. Improving Vector Evaluated Particle Swarm Optimisation by Incorporating Nondominated Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kian Sheng; Ibrahim, Zuwairie; Buyamin, Salinda; Ahmad, Anita; Naim, Faradila; Ghazali, Kamarul Hawari; Mokhtar, Norrima

    2013-01-01

    The Vector Evaluated Particle Swarm Optimisation algorithm is widely used to solve multiobjective optimisation problems. This algorithm optimises one objective using a swarm of particles where their movements are guided by the best solution found by another swarm. However, the best solution of a swarm is only updated when a newly generated solution has better fitness than the best solution at the objective function optimised by that swarm, yielding poor solutions for the multiobjective optimisation problems. Thus, an improved Vector Evaluated Particle Swarm Optimisation algorithm is introduced by incorporating the nondominated solutions as the guidance for a swarm rather than using the best solution from another swarm. In this paper, the performance of improved Vector Evaluated Particle Swarm Optimisation algorithm is investigated using performance measures such as the number of nondominated solutions found, the generational distance, the spread, and the hypervolume. The results suggest that the improved Vector Evaluated Particle Swarm Optimisation algorithm has impressive performance compared with the conventional Vector Evaluated Particle Swarm Optimisation algorithm. PMID:23737718

  1. Prewhirl Jet Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, S. Y.; Jensen, M.; Jackson, E. D.

    1985-01-01

    Simple accurate model of centrifugal or rocket engine pumps provides information necessary to design inducer backflow deflector, backflow eliminator and prewhirl jet in jet mixing zones. Jet design based on this model shows improvement in inducer suction performance and reduced cavitation damage.

  2. A theoretical study of the application of jet flap circulation control for reduction of rotor vibratory forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piziali, R. A.; Trenka, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a study to investigate the theoretical potential of a jet-flap control system for reducing the vertical and horizontal non-cancelling helicopter rotor blade root shears are presented. A computer simulation describing the jet-flap control rotor system was developed to examine the reduction of each harmonic of the transmitted shears as a function of various rotor and jet parameters, rotor operating conditions and rotor configurations. The computer simulation of the air-loads included the influences of nonuniform inflow and blade elastic motions. (no hub motions were allowed.) The rotor trim and total rotor power (including jet compressor power) were also determined. It was found that all harmonics of the transmitted horizontal and vertical shears could be suppressed simultaneously using a single jet control.

  3. Effect of Gravity on the Near Field Flow Structure of Helium Jet in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Parthasarathy, Ramkumar; Griffin, DeVon

    2002-01-01

    Experiments have shown that a low-density jet injected into a high-density surrounding medium undergoes periodic oscillations in the near field. Although the flow oscillations in these jets at Richardson numbers about unity are attributed to the buoyancy, the direct physical evidence has not been acquired in the experiments. If the instability were indeed caused by buoyancy, the near-field flow structure would undergo drastic changes upon removal of gravity in the microgravity environment. The present study was conducted to investigate this effect by simulating microgravity environment in the 2.2-second drop tower at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The non-intrusive, rainbow schlieren deflectometry technique was used for quantitative measurements of helium concentrations in buoyant and non-buoyant jets. Results in a steady jet show that the radial growth of the jet shear layer in Earth gravity is hindered by the buoyant acceleration. The jet in microgravity was 30 to 70 percent wider than that in Earth gravity. The microgravity jet showed typical growth of a constant density jet shear layer. In case of a self-excited helium jet in Earth gravity, the flow oscillations continued as the jet flow adjusted to microgravity conditions in the drop tower. The flow oscillations were however not present at the end of the drop when steady microgravity conditions were reached.

  4. Genetic algorithms for modelling and optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, John

    2005-12-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) are a heuristic search and optimisation technique inspired by natural evolution. They have been successfully applied to a wide range of real-world problems of significant complexity. This paper is intended as an introduction to GAs aimed at immunologists and mathematicians interested in immunology. We describe how to construct a GA and the main strands of GA theory before speculatively identifying possible applications of GAs to the study of immunology. An illustrative example of using a GA for a medical optimal control problem is provided. The paper also includes a brief account of the related area of artificial immune systems.

  5. An optimisation approach to multiprobe cryosurgery planning.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Giovanni; Avalle, Leopoldo; Brignone, Massimo; Piana, Michele; Caviglia, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    In cryosurgery operations, tumoural cells are killed by means of a freezing procedure realised with the insertion of cryoprobes in the diseased tissue. Cryosurgery planning aims at establishing the best values for operation parameters like number and position of the probes or temperature and duration of the freezing process. Here, we present an application of ant colony optimisation (ACO) to cryosurgery planning, whereby the ACO cost function is computed by numerically solving several direct Stefan problems in biological tissues. The method is validated in the case of a 2D phantom of a prostate cross section. PMID:22224977

  6. Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    The Acoustics Branch is responsible for reducing noise levels for jet and fan components on aircraft engines. To do this, data must be measured and calibrated accurately to ensure validity of test results. This noise reduction is accomplished by modifications to hardware such as jet nozzles, and by the use of other experimental hardware such as fluidic chevrons, elliptic cores, and fluidic shields. To insure validity of data calibration, a variety of software is used. This software adjusts the sound amplitude and frequency to be consistent with data taken on another day. Both the software and the hardware help make noise reduction possible. work properly. These software programs were designed to make corrections for atmosphere, shear, attenuation, electronic, and background noise. All data can be converted to a one-foot lossless condition, using the proper software corrections, making a reading independent of weather and distance. Also, data can be transformed from model scale to full scale for noise predictions of a real flight. Other programs included calculations of Over All Sound Pressure Level (OASPL), Effective Perceived Noise Level (EPNL). OASPL is the integration of sound with respect to frequency, and EPNL is weighted for a human s response to different sound frequencies and integrated with respect to time. With the proper software correction, data taken in the NATR are useful in determining ways to reduce noise. display any difference between two or more data files. Using this program and graphs of the data, the actual and predicted data can be compared. This software was tested on data collected at the Aero Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL) using a variety of window types and overlaps. Similarly, short scripts were written to test each individual program in the software suite for verification. Each graph displays both the original points and the adjusted points connected with lines. During this summer, data points were taken during a live experiment

  7. CAT LIDAR wind shear studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goff, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The studies considered the major meteorological factors producing wind shear, methods to define and classify wind shear in terms significant from an aircraft perturbation standpoint, the significance of sensor location and scan geometry on the detection and measurement of wind shear, and the tradeoffs involved in sensor performance such as range/velocity resolution, update frequency and data averaging interval.

  8. Towards the optimisation and adaptation of dry powder inhalers.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y; Schmalfuß, S; Zellnitz, S; Sommerfeld, M; Urbanetz, N

    2014-08-15

    Pulmonary drug delivery by dry powder inhalers is becoming more and more popular. Such an inhalation device must insure that during the inhalation process the drug powder is detached from the carrier due to fluid flow stresses. The goal of the project is the development of a drug powder detachment model to be used in numerical computations (CFD, computational fluid dynamics) of fluid flow and carrier particle motion through the inhaler and the resulting efficiency of drug delivery. This programme will be the basis for the optimisation of inhaler geometry and dry powder inhaler formulation. For this purpose a multi-scale approach is adopted. First the flow field through the inhaler is numerically calculated with OpenFOAM(®) and the flow stresses experienced by the carrier particles are recorded. This information is used for micro-scale simulations using the Lattice-Boltzmann method where only one carrier particle covered with drug powder is placed in cubic flow domain and exposed to the relevant flow situations, e.g. plug and shear flow with different Reynolds numbers. Therefrom the fluid forces on the drug particles are obtained. In order to allow the determination of the drug particle detachment possibility by lift-off, sliding or rolling, also measurements by AFM (atomic force microscope) were conducted for different carrier particle surface structures. The contact properties, such as van der Waals force, friction coefficient and adhesion surface energy were used to determine, from a force or moment balance (fluid forces versus contact forces), the detachment probability by the three mechanisms as a function of carrier particle Reynolds number. These results will be used for deriving the drug powder detachment model. PMID:24792975

  9. The Breakout Model for Coronal Jets with Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyper, Peter; DeVore, C. Richard; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2016-05-01

    Coronal jets are impulsive, collimated plasma outflows originating low in the solar corona. Many of these events exhibit broad, curtain-like morphologies with helical structure and motions. Recently, Sterling et al. (2015) [doi:10.1038/nature14556] reported that such jets are associated with the eruption of small filaments and, therefore, are miniature versions of corona mass ejections (CMEs). This account differs from the traditional picture of jets, in that internal flare reconnection, rather than interchange reconnection with the external ambient magnetic field, creates the bright loops observed at the jet base. We present 3D simulations, performed with the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS), which demonstrate how the magnetic breakout mechanism generates mini-CME-type jets in a compact bipolar region energized by simple footpoint motions. Our numerical model captures the formation of the strongly sheared pre-jet filament structure, the post-jet flare-like loops and ribbons, and the curtain-like untwisting dynamics observed higher in the corona. We will discuss the significance of our new results for understanding solar EUV and X-ray jets and CMEs in general. NASA supported this research by awards to the NASA Postdoctoral Program (P.F.W.) and the LWS TR&T and H-SR programs (C.R.D. & S.K.A.).

  10. Reductions in Multi-Component Jet Noise by Water Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norum, Thomas D.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed in the NASA Langley Low Speed Aeroacoustics Wind Tunnel to determine the extent of jet exhaust noise reduction that can be obtained using water injection in a hot jet environment. The effects of water parameters such as mass flow rate, injection location, and spray patterns on suppression of dominant noise sources in both subsonic and supersonic jets were determined, and extrapolations to full-scale engine noise reduction were made. Water jets and sprays were injected in to the shear layers of cold and hot circular jets operating at both subsonic and supersonic exhaust conditions. Use of convergent-divergent and convergent nozzles (2.7in. D) allowed for simulations of all major jet noise sources. The experimental results show that water injection clearly disrupts shock noise sources within the jet plume, with large reductions in radiated shock noise. There are smaller reductions in jet mixing noise, resulting in only a small decrease in effective perceived noise level when projections are made to full scale. The fact that the measured noise reduction in the direction upstream of the nozzle was consistently larger than in the noisier downstream direction contributed to keeping effective perceived noise reductions small. Variations in the operation of the water injection system clearly show that injection at the nozzle exit rather than further downstream is required for the largest noise reduction. Noise reduction increased with water pressure as well as with its mass flow, although the type of injector had little effect.

  11. Noise from Supersonic Coaxial Jets. Part 1; Mean Flow Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Morris, Philip J.

    1997-01-01

    Recent theories for supersonic jet noise have used an instability wave noise generation model to predict radiated noise. This model requires a known mean flow that has typically been described by simple analytic functions for single jet mean flows. The mean flow of supersonic coaxial jets is not described easily in terms of analytic functions. To provide these profiles at all axial locations, a numerical scheme is developed to calculate the mean flow properties of a coaxial jet. The Reynolds-averaged, compressible, parabolic boundary layer equations are solved using a mixing length turbulence model. Empirical correlations are developed to account for the effects of velocity and temperature ratios and Mach number on the shear layer spreading. Both normal velocity profile and inverted velocity profile coaxial jets are considered. The mixing length model is modified in each case to obtain reasonable results when the two stream jet merges into a single fully developed jet. The mean flow calculations show both good qualitative and quantitative agreement with measurements in single and coaxial jet flows.

  12. Effect of Turbulence Modeling on an Excited Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.; Hixon, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The flow dynamics in a high-speed jet are dominated by unsteady turbulent flow structures in the plume. Jet excitation seeks to control these flow structures through the natural instabilities present in the initial shear layer of the jet. Understanding and optimizing the excitation input, for jet noise reduction or plume mixing enhancement, requires many trials that may be done experimentally or computationally at a significant cost savings. Numerical simulations, which model various parts of the unsteady dynamics to reduce the computational expense of the simulation, must adequately capture the unsteady flow dynamics in the excited jet for the results are to be used. Four CFD methods are considered for use in an excited jet problem, including two turbulence models with an Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) solver, one Large Eddy Simulation (LES) solver, and one URANS/LES hybrid method. Each method is used to simulate a simplified excited jet and the results are evaluated based on the flow data, computation time, and numerical stability. The knowledge gained about the effect of turbulence modeling and CFD methods from these basic simulations will guide and assist future three-dimensional (3-D) simulations that will be used to understand and optimize a realistic excited jet for a particular application.

  13. Shear-thinning Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Whipped cream and the filling for pumpkin pie are two familiar materials that exhibit the shear-thinning effect seen in a range of industrial applications. It is thick enough to stand on its own atop a piece of pie, yet flows readily when pushed through a tube. This demonstrates the shear-thinning effect that was studied with the Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002. CVX observed the behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The principal investigator was Dr. Robert Berg of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD.

  14. Gelation under shear

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, B.D.; Hanley, H.J.M.; Straty, G.C.; Muzny, C.D.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of dense silica gels, prepared from suspensions of 24 nm colloidal silica particles at several volume fractions {theta} is discussed. Provided that {theta}{approx_lt}0.18, the scattered intensity at small wave vectors q increases as the gelation proceeds, and the structure factor S(q, t {yields} {infinity}) of the gel exhibits apparent power law behavior. Power law behavior is also observed, even for samples with {theta}>0.18, when the gel is formed under an applied shear. Shear also enhances the diffraction maximum corresponding to the inter-particle contact distance of the gel. Difficulties encountered when trying to interpret SANS data from these dense systems are outlined. Results of computer simulations intended to mimic gel formation, including computations of S(q, t), are discussed. Comments on a method to extract a fractal dimension characterizing the gel are included.

  15. PHOTOSPHERIC EMISSION FROM STRATIFIED JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ono, Masaomi; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Mao, Jirong; Yamada, Shoichi; Pe'er, Asaf; Mizuta, Akira; Harikae, Seiji

    2013-11-01

    We explore photospheric emissions from stratified two-component jets, wherein a highly relativistic spine outflow is surrounded by a wider and less relativistic sheath outflow. Thermal photons are injected in regions of high optical depth and propagated until the photons escape at the photosphere. Because of the presence of shear in velocity (Lorentz factor) at the boundary of the spine and sheath region, a fraction of the injected photons are accelerated using a Fermi-like acceleration mechanism such that a high-energy power-law tail is formed in the resultant spectrum. We show, in particular, that if a velocity shear with a considerable variance in the bulk Lorentz factor is present, the high-energy part of observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) photon spectrum can be explained by this photon acceleration mechanism. We also show that the accelerated photons might also account for the origin of the extra-hard power-law component above the bump of the thermal-like peak seen in some peculiar bursts (e.g., GRB 090510, 090902B, 090926A). We demonstrate that time-integrated spectra can also reproduce the low-energy spectrum of GRBs consistently using a multi-temperature effect when time evolution of the outflow is considered. Last, we show that the empirical E{sub p}-L{sub p} relation can be explained by differences in the outflow properties of individual sources.

  16. Photospheric Emission from Stratified Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ono, Masaomi; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Mao, Jirong; Yamada, Shoichi; Pe'er, Asaf; Mizuta, Akira; Harikae, Seiji

    2013-11-01

    We explore photospheric emissions from stratified two-component jets, wherein a highly relativistic spine outflow is surrounded by a wider and less relativistic sheath outflow. Thermal photons are injected in regions of high optical depth and propagated until the photons escape at the photosphere. Because of the presence of shear in velocity (Lorentz factor) at the boundary of the spine and sheath region, a fraction of the injected photons are accelerated using a Fermi-like acceleration mechanism such that a high-energy power-law tail is formed in the resultant spectrum. We show, in particular, that if a velocity shear with a considerable variance in the bulk Lorentz factor is present, the high-energy part of observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) photon spectrum can be explained by this photon acceleration mechanism. We also show that the accelerated photons might also account for the origin of the extra-hard power-law component above the bump of the thermal-like peak seen in some peculiar bursts (e.g., GRB 090510, 090902B, 090926A). We demonstrate that time-integrated spectra can also reproduce the low-energy spectrum of GRBs consistently using a multi-temperature effect when time evolution of the outflow is considered. Last, we show that the empirical E p-L p relation can be explained by differences in the outflow properties of individual sources.

  17. Micromechanics of shear banding

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1992-08-01

    Shear-banding is one of many instabilities observed during the plastic flow of solids. It is a consequence of the dislocation mechanism which makes plastic flow fundamentally inhomogeneous, and is exacerbated by local adiabatic heating. Dislocation lines tend to be clustered on sets of neighboring glide planes because they are heterogeneously generated; especially through the Koehler multiple-cross-glide mechanism. Factors that influence their mobilities also play a role. Strain-hardening decreases the mobilities within shear bands thereby tending to spread (delocalize) them. Strain-softening has the inverse effect. This paper reviews the micro-mechanisms of these phenomena. It will be shown that heat production is also a consequence of the heterogeneous nature of the microscopic flow, and that dislocation dipoles play an important role. They are often not directly observable, but their presence may be inferred from changes in thermal conductivity. It is argued that after deformation at low temperatures dipoles are distributed a la Pareto so there are many more small than large ones. Instability at upper yield point, the shapes of shear-band fronts, and mechanism of heat generation are also considered. It is shown that strain-rate acceleration plays a more important role than strain-rate itself in adiabatic instability.

  18. Aeroacoustics of hot jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, K.

    2004-10-01

    A systematic study has been undertaken to quantify the effect of jet temperature on the noise radiated by subsonic jets. Nozzles of different diameters were tested to uncover the effects of Reynolds number. All the tests were carried out at Boeing's Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility, with simultaneous measurement of thrust and noise. It is concluded that the change in spectral shape at high jet temperatures, normally attributed to the contribution from dipoles, is due to Reynolds number effects and not dipoles. This effect has not been identified before. A critical value of the Reynolds number that would need to be maintained to avoid the effects associated with low Reynolds number has been estimated to be {˜}400 000. It is well-known that large-scale structures are the dominant generators of noise in the peak radiation direction for high-speed jets. Experimental evidence is presented that shows the spectral shape at angles close to the jet axis from unheated low subsonic jets to be the same as from heated supersonic jets. A possible mechanism for the observed trend is proposed. When a subsonic jet is heated with the Mach number held constant, there is a broadening of the angular sector in which peak radiation occurs. Furthermore, there is a broadening of the spectral peak. Similar trends have been observed at supersonic Mach numbers. The spectral shapes in the forward quadrant and in the near-normal angles from unheated and heated subsonic jets also conform to the universal shape obtained from supersonic jet data. Just as for unheated jets, the peak frequency at angles close to the jet axis is independent of jet velocity as long as the acoustic Mach number is less than unity. The extensive database generated in the current test programme is intended to provide test cases with high-quality data that could be used for the evaluation of theoretical/semi-theoretical jet noise prediction methodologies.

  19. Visual parameter optimisation for biomedical image processing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Biomedical image processing methods require users to optimise input parameters to ensure high-quality output. This presents two challenges. First, it is difficult to optimise multiple input parameters for multiple input images. Second, it is difficult to achieve an understanding of underlying algorithms, in particular, relationships between input and output. Results We present a visualisation method that transforms users' ability to understand algorithm behaviour by integrating input and output, and by supporting exploration of their relationships. We discuss its application to a colour deconvolution technique for stained histology images and show how it enabled a domain expert to identify suitable parameter values for the deconvolution of two types of images, and metrics to quantify deconvolution performance. It also enabled a breakthrough in understanding by invalidating an underlying assumption about the algorithm. Conclusions The visualisation method presented here provides analysis capability for multiple inputs and outputs in biomedical image processing that is not supported by previous analysis software. The analysis supported by our method is not feasible with conventional trial-and-error approaches. PMID:26329538

  20. BENCHMARKING OF CT FOR PATIENT EXPOSURE OPTIMISATION.

    PubMed

    Racine, Damien; Ryckx, Nick; Ba, Alexandre; Ott, Julien G; Bochud, François O; Verdun, Francis R

    2016-06-01

    Patient dose optimisation in computed tomography (CT) should be done using clinically relevant tasks when dealing with image quality assessments. In the present work, low-contrast detectability for an average patient morphology was assessed on 56 CT units, using a model observer applied on images acquired with two specific protocols of an anthropomorphic phantom containing spheres. Images were assessed using the channelised Hotelling observer (CHO) with dense difference of Gaussian channels. The results were computed by performing receiver operating characteristics analysis (ROC) and using the area under the ROC curve (AUC) as a figure of merit. The results showed a small disparity at a volume computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) of 15 mGy depending on the CT units for the chosen image quality criterion. For 8-mm targets, AUCs were 0.999 ± 0.018 at 20 Hounsfield units (HU) and 0.927 ± 0.054 at 10 HU. For 5-mm targets, AUCs were 0.947 ± 0.059 and 0.702 ± 0.068 at 20 and 10 HU, respectively. The robustness of the CHO opens the way for CT protocol benchmarking and optimisation processes. PMID:26940439

  1. Efficiency optimisation of proteins on a chip.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-jen; Huang, Hsuan-yu; Hsu, Wei-Yeh; Hsu, Ray-Quen; Chen, Hueih-Min

    2015-10-01

    This study elucidates that the protein reorientation on a chip can be changed by an external electric field (EEF) and optimised for achieving strong effective binding between proteins. Protein A and its binding protein immunoglobulin G (IgG) were used as an example, in addition to an anticancer peptide (CB1a) and its antibody (anti-CB1a). The binding forces (BFs) were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) with EEFs applied at different angles (EEF°). The optimal angle (OA) of the EEF (OAEEF°) corresponding to the maximum binding force (BFmax) was obtained. The results showed that the BFmax values between IgG/Protein A and anti-CB1a/CB1a were 6424.2 ± 195.3 pN (OAEEF° = 45°) and 729.1 ± 33.2 pN (OAEEF° = 22.5°), respectively. Without an EEF, the BF values were only 730.0 ± 113.9 pN and 337.3 ± 35.0 pN, respectively. Based on these observations, we concluded that the efficient optimisation of protein-protein interaction on a chip is essential. This finding is applicable to the industrial fabrication of all protein chips. PMID:26266699

  2. The Prediction of Broadband Shock-Associated Noise from Dualstream and Rectangular Jets Using RANS CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A.; Morris, Philip J.

    2010-01-01

    Supersonic jets operating off-design produce broadband shock-associated noise. Broadband shock-associated noise is characterized by multiple broadband peaks in the far-field and is often the dominant source of noise towards the sideline and upstream direction relative to the jet axis. It is due to large scale coherent turbulence structures in the jet shear layers interacting with the shock cell structure. A broadband shock-associated noise model recently developed by the authors predicts this noise component from solutions to the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations using a two-equation turbulence model. The broadband shock-associated noise model is applied to dualstream and rectangular nozzles operating supersonically, heated, and off-design. The dualstream jet broadband shock-associated noise predictions are conducted for cases when the core jet is supersonic and the fan jet is subsonic, the core jet is subsonic and the fan jet is supersonic, and when both jet streams operate supersonically. Rectangular jet predictions are shown for a convergent-divergent nozzle operating both over- and under-expanded for cold and heated conditions. The original model implementation has been heavily modified to make accurate predictions for the dualstream jets. It is also argued that for over-expanded jets the oblique shock wave attached to the nozzle lip contributes little to broadband shock-associated noise. All predictions are compared with experiments.

  3. Theory of laminar viscous jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynenko, O. G.; Korovkin, V. N.; Sokovishin, Iu. A.

    Results of recent theoretical studies of laminar jet flows of a viscous incompressible fluid are reviewed. In particular, attention is given to plane, fan-shaped, axisymmetric, and swirling jet flows; jet flows behind bodies; and slipstream jet flows. The discussion also covers dissipation of mechanical energy in jet flows, jet flows with a zero excess momentum, and asymptotic series expansions in the theory of jet flows.

  4. Unstable waves of jet flows with density inhomogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Yee T.

    1988-09-01

    The problem to be considered concerns linear unstable waves of axisymmetric jet flows in the presence of density inhomogeneities. Such flow phenomena occur when a jet is discharged into a stratified medium, e.g., pollutants and industrial waste discharged into the environment, cooling water discharged from power plants into rivers and lakes, and flow patterns generated by vehicles moving in the ocean. Investigating the instability characteristics of the flow can mean controlling the flow-patterns, for example, produced by vehicles moving in the ocean. As in the case of two-dimensional shear flows, axisymmetric jet flows may possess amplified waves due to the Kelvin-Helmhholtz mechanism except that the formulation for jet flows is complicated by the absence of the Squire transformation and the consideration of cylindrical geometry.

  5. Boundary element based multiresolution shape optimisation in electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandara, Kosala; Cirak, Fehmi; Of, Günther; Steinbach, Olaf; Zapletal, Jan

    2015-09-01

    We consider the shape optimisation of high-voltage devices subject to electrostatic field equations by combining fast boundary elements with multiresolution subdivision surfaces. The geometry of the domain is described with subdivision surfaces and different resolutions of the same geometry are used for optimisation and analysis. The primal and adjoint problems are discretised with the boundary element method using a sufficiently fine control mesh. For shape optimisation the geometry is updated starting from the coarsest control mesh with increasingly finer control meshes. The multiresolution approach effectively prevents the appearance of non-physical geometry oscillations in the optimised shapes. Moreover, there is no need for mesh regeneration or smoothing during the optimisation due to the absence of a volume mesh. We present several numerical experiments and one industrial application to demonstrate the robustness and versatility of the developed approach.

  6. Jet Substructure Without Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP

    2011-08-19

    We present an alternative approach to identifying and characterizing jet substructure. An angular correlation function is introduced that can be used to extract angular and mass scales within a jet without reference to a clustering algorithm. This procedure gives rise to a number of useful jet observables. As an application, we construct a top quark tagging algorithm that is competitive with existing methods. In preparation for the LHC, the past several years have seen extensive work on various aspects of collider searches. With the excellent resolution of the ATLAS and CMS detectors as a catalyst, one area that has undergone significant development is jet substructure physics. The use of jet substructure techniques, which probe the fine-grained details of how energy is distributed in jets, has two broad goals. First, measuring more than just the bulk properties of jets allows for additional probes of QCD. For example, jet substructure measurements can be compared against precision perturbative QCD calculations or used to tune Monte Carlo event generators. Second, jet substructure allows for additional handles in event discrimination. These handles could play an important role at the LHC in discriminating between signal and background events in a wide variety of particle searches. For example, Monte Carlo studies indicate that jet substructure techniques allow for efficient reconstruction of boosted heavy objects such as the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons, the top quark, and the Higgs boson.

  7. Modeling of Turbulence Generated Noise in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Bridges, James

    2004-01-01

    A numerically calculated Green's function is used to predict jet noise spectrum and its far-field directivity. A linearized form of Lilley's equation governs the non-causal Green s function of interest, with the non-linear terms on the right hand side identified as the source. In this paper, contributions from the so-called self- and shear-noise source terms will be discussed. A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solution yields the required mean flow as well as time- and length scales of a noise-generating turbulent eddy. A non-compact source, with exponential temporal and spatial functions, is used to describe the turbulence velocity correlation tensors. It is shown that while an exact non-causal Green's function accurately predicts the observed shift in the location of the spectrum peak with angle as well as the angularity of sound at moderate Mach numbers, at high subsonic and supersonic acoustic Mach numbers the polar directivity of radiated sound is not entirely captured by this Green's function. Results presented for Mach 0.5 and 0.9 isothermal jets, as well as a Mach 0.8 hot jet conclude that near the peak radiation angle a different source/Green's function convolution integral may be required in order to capture the peak observed directivity of jet noise.

  8. Coiling and Folding of Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Varagnat, Matthieu; McKinley, Gareth

    2007-11-01

    The study of fluid jets impacting on a flat surface has industrial applications in many areas, including processing of foods and consumer goods, bottle filling, and polymer melt processing. Previous studies have focused primarily on purely viscous, Newtonian fluids, which exhibit a number of different dynamical regimes including dripping, steady jetting, folding, and steady coiling. Here we add another dimension to the problem by focusing on mobile (low viscosity) viscoelastic fluids, with the study of two wormlike-micellar fluids, a cetylpyridinum-salicylic acid salt (CPyCl/NaSal) solution, and an industrially relevant shampoo base. We investigate the effects of viscosity and elasticity on the dynamics of axi-symmetric jets. The viscoelasticity of the fluids is systematically controlled by varying the concentration of salt counterions. Experimental methods include shear and extensional rheology measurements to characterize the fluids, and high-speed digital video imaging. In addition to the regimes observed in purely viscous systems, we also find a novel regime in which the elastic jet buckles and folds on itself, and alternates between coiling and folding behavior. We suggest phase diagrams and scaling laws for the coiling and folding frequencies through a systematic exploration of the experimental parameter space (height of fall, imposed flow rate, elasticity of the solution).

  9. Dynamics of A Vortex Pair In Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshkov, K. A.; Soustova, I. A.

    The dynamics (more specifically, stability) of infinite sequences of such vortex pairs that initially have the form of a Karman street in a jet-type shear flow is investigated Such a geometry is most directly related to the wake behind a streamlined cylinder We assume that the characteristic scale of velocity variation in a shear flow is much larger than the sizes of vortex spots. This means that each vortex spot during its evolution is always in a flow with an almost linear velocity distribution and first of all undergoes general drift and weak (primarily elliptic due to its linear profile of the flow veloc- ity) deformation of its shape. In this formulation the problem can be solved using a previously developed perturbation theory for hydrodynamic vortices. It is shown that variations of the parameters of the chess structure and the value of the velocity of the jet are interdependent. For instance, at short times when the jet velocity is relative large , all vortices remain almost on the same line while in the late wake, when the jet slows down, the vortices form the chess structure.. Such vortex sheets were indeed observed in [[ Spedding G. R., Browand F. K., Fincham A. M. Turbulence, similar- ity scaling and vortex geometry in the wake of a towed sphere in a stably stratified fluid. J. Fluid Mech., 1996, v.31410]. Note that possible initial, short-lived large-scale perturbations were not realised under the experimental conditions of. , presumably because of the limited size of the tank. This in itself implies a concentration of flow in horizontal plane. Still, to make a positive conclusion, a more thorough analysis is needed including study of the effect of the vortex sheet onto the jet flow.

  10. Simulation study to evaluate a constant-groundspeed approach method in moderate and severe wind shears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, W. W.

    1979-01-01

    The use of a constant-groundspeed procedure for flying final approaches in moderate and severe wind shear environments was investigated. Performance was compared to results of simulated constant-airspeed approaches in identical wind profiles. The simulation model was a medium twin-jet transport equipped with an autothrottle for maintaining constant groundspeed or constant airspeed. For both moderate and severe wind shears, the constant-groundspeed approach method was shown to provide a way to more safely negotiate the shears while also providing predictable and acceptable touchdown performance. Results showed airspeeds on final approach to be considerably higher using the constant-groundspeed method, which supplied the additional stall margin needed when tail-wind shears were encountered. Throttle movements were noticeably reduced in all wind profiles when constant-groundspeed approaches were flown. Touchdown conditions were practically identical for both approach methods in moderate wind shear.

  11. Global optimisation methods for poroelastic material characterisation using a clamped sample in a Kundt tube setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhuyse, Johan; Deckers, Elke; Jonckheere, Stijn; Pluymers, Bert; Desmet, Wim

    2016-02-01

    The Biot theory is commonly used for the simulation of the vibro-acoustic behaviour of poroelastic materials. However, it relies on a number of material parameters. These can be hard to characterize and require dedicated measurement setups, yielding a time-consuming and costly characterisation. This paper presents a characterisation method which is able to identify all material parameters using only an impedance tube. The method relies on the assumption that the sample is clamped within the tube, that the shear wave is excited and that the acoustic field is no longer one-dimensional. This paper numerically shows the potential of the developed method. It therefore performs a sensitivity analysis of the quantification parameters, i.e. reflection coefficients and relative pressures, and a parameter estimation using global optimisation methods. A 3-step procedure is developed and validated. It is shown that even in the presence of numerically simulated noise this procedure leads to a robust parameter estimation.

  12. Optimisation of full-toroidal continuously variable transmission in conjunction with fixed ratio mechanism using particle swarm optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delkhosh, Mojtaba; Saadat Foumani, Mahmoud

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this research is the optimisation of full-toroidal continuously variable transmission (CVT) in conjunction with the fixed ratio (FR) mechanism, while the optimisation objective is to minimise fuel consumption (FC) of the vehicle in the new European driving cycle. After the dynamic analysis of the power train, a computer model is developed to simulate contact between CVT elements and consequently calculate its efficiency. Then an algorithm is presented to calculate FC of the vehicle in the driving cycle. Then, an optimisation using particle swarm optimisation on the CVT geometry and FR mechanism (which is embedded between CVT and final drive) is carried out to minimise FC. It is found that by utilisation of the optimised CVT; FC will be about 11% and 8% lower, compared with the application of a five-speed manual transmission and conventional CVT, respectively. Finally, effects of the roller tilt angle and oil temperature on the FC are investigated.

  13. Paediatric CT protocol optimisation: a design of experiments to support the modelling and optimisation process.

    PubMed

    Rani, K; Jahnen, A; Noel, A; Wolf, D

    2015-07-01

    In the last decade, several studies have emphasised the need to understand and optimise the computed tomography (CT) procedures in order to reduce the radiation dose applied to paediatric patients. To evaluate the influence of the technical parameters on the radiation dose and the image quality, a statistical model has been developed using the design of experiments (DOE) method that has been successfully used in various fields (industry, biology and finance) applied to CT procedures for the abdomen of paediatric patients. A Box-Behnken DOE was used in this study. Three mathematical models (contrast-to-noise ratio, noise and CTDI vol) depending on three factors (tube current, tube voltage and level of iterative reconstruction) were developed and validated. They will serve as a basis for the development of a CT protocol optimisation model. PMID:25848116

  14. Jets from young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, John

    2007-10-01

    Most stars produce spectacular jets during their formation. There are thousands of young stars within 500 pc of the Sun and many power jets. Thus protostellar jets may be the most common type of collimated astrophysical outflow. Shocks powered by outflows excite many emission lines, exhibit a rich variety of structure, and motions with velocities ranging from 50 to over 500 km s-1. Due to their relative proximity, proper motions and structural changes can be observed in less than a year. I review the general properties of protostellar jets, summarize some results from recent narrow-band imaging surveys of entire clouds, discuss irradiated jets, and end with some comments concerning outflows from high-mass young stellar objects. Protostellar outflows are ideal laboratories for the exploration of the jet physics.

  15. Relativistic Jets in Collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiqun; Woosley, S. E.; MacFadyen, A. I.

    2003-04-01

    We examine the propagation of two-dimensional relativistic jets through the stellar progenitor in the collapsar model for gamma-ray bursts. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the jet is collimated by its passage. Moreover, interaction of the jet with the star causes mixing that sporadically decelerates the jet, leading to a highly variable Lorentz factor. The jet that finally emerges has a moderate Lorentz factor, but a very large internal energy loading. In a second series of calculations we follow the emergence of such enegy-loaded jets from the star. For the initial conditions chosen, conversion of the remaining internal energy gives a terminal Lorentz factor of approximately 150. Implications of our calculations for GRB light curves, the luminosity-variability relation, and the GRB-supernova association are discussed.

  16. What ignites optical jets?

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian Jester

    2002-12-23

    The properties of radio galaxies and quasars with and without optical or X-ray jets are compared. The majority of jets from which high-frequency emission has been detected so far (13 with optical emission, 11 with X-rays, 13 with both) are associated with the most powerful radio sources at any given redshift. It is found that optical/X-ray jet sources are more strongly beamed than the average population of extragalactic radio sources. This suggests that the detection or non-detection of optical emission from jets has so far been dominated by surface brightness selection effects, not by jet physics. It implies that optical jets are much more common than is currently appreciated.

  17. Automatic optimisation of gamma dose rate sensor networks: The DETECT Optimisation Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helle, K. B.; Müller, T. O.; Astrup, P.; Dyve, J. E.

    2014-05-01

    Fast delivery of comprehensive information on the radiological situation is essential for decision-making in nuclear emergencies. Most national radiological agencies in Europe employ gamma dose rate sensor networks to monitor radioactive pollution of the atmosphere. Sensor locations were often chosen using regular grids or according to administrative constraints. Nowadays, however, the choice can be based on more realistic risk assessment, as it is possible to simulate potential radioactive plumes. To support sensor planning, we developed the DETECT Optimisation Tool (DOT) within the scope of the EU FP 7 project DETECT. It evaluates the gamma dose rates that a proposed set of sensors might measure in an emergency and uses this information to optimise the sensor locations. The gamma dose rates are taken from a comprehensive library of simulations of atmospheric radioactive plumes from 64 source locations. These simulations cover the whole European Union, so the DOT allows evaluation and optimisation of sensor networks for all EU countries, as well as evaluation of fencing sensors around possible sources. Users can choose from seven cost functions to evaluate the capability of a given monitoring network for early detection of radioactive plumes or for the creation of dose maps. The DOT is implemented as a stand-alone easy-to-use JAVA-based application with a graphical user interface and an R backend. Users can run evaluations and optimisations, and display, store and download the results. The DOT runs on a server and can be accessed via common web browsers; it can also be installed locally.

  18. Optimising Impact in Astronomy for Development Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Eli

    2015-08-01

    Positive outcomes in the fields of science education and international development are notoriously difficult to achieve. Among the challenges facing projects that use astronomy to improve education and socio-economic development is how to optimise project design in order to achieve the greatest possible benefits. Over the past century, medical scientists along with statisticians and economists have progressed an increasingly sophisticated and scientific approach to designing, testing and improving social intervention and public health education strategies. This talk offers a brief review of the history and current state of `intervention science'. A similar framework is then proposed for astronomy outreach and education projects, with applied examples given of how existing evidence can be used to inform project design, predict and estimate cost-effectiveness, minimise the risk of unintended negative consequences and increase the likelihood of target outcomes being achieved.

  19. Common mode chokes and optimisation aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kut, T.; Lücken, A.; Dickmann, S.; Schulz, D.

    2014-11-01

    Due to the increasing electrification of modern aircraft, as a result of the More Electric Aircraft concept, new strategies and approaches are required to fulfil the strict EMC aircraft standards (DO-160/ED-14-Sec. 20). Common mode chokes are a key component of electromagnetic filters and often oversized because of the unknown impedance of the surrounding power electronic system. This oversizing results in an increase of weight and volume. It has to be avoided as far as possible for mobile applications. In this context, an advanced method is presented to measure these impedances under operating conditions. Furthermore, the different parameters of the inductance design is explained and an optimisation for weight and volume is introduced.

  20. Genetic optimisation of a neural damage locator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, K.; Manson, G.; Hilson, G.; Pierce, S. G.

    2008-01-01

    A critical problem in structural health monitoring (SHM) based on pattern recognition methods is the correct selection of features, i.e. measured and processed data for the diagnosis. Various selection strategies have been applied in the past and one approach that has proved effective is the use of combinatorial optimisation methods. This paper presents a case study based on a scheme for damage location in an aircraft wing. The feature selection algorithm is a Genetic Algorithm and the locator (classifier) is an artificial neural network. A comparison is made with the results obtained when the features are selected on the basis of engineering judgement. The study is seen to raise some issues relating to model complexity and generalisation and these matters are discussed in some detail.

  1. Studies of turbulent round jets through experimentation, simulation, and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keedy, Ryan

    This thesis studies the physics of the turbulent round jet. In particular, it focuses on three different problems that have the turbulent round jet as their base flow. The first part of this thesis examines a compressible turbulent round jet at its sonic condition. We investigate the shearing effect such a jet has when impinging on a solid surface that is perpendicular to the flow direction. We report on experiments to evaluate the jet's ability to remove different types of explosive particles from a glass surface. Theoretical analysis revealed trends and enabled modeling to improve the predictability of particle removal for various jet conditions. The second part of thesis aims at developing a non-intrusive measurement technique for free-shear turbulent flows in nature. Most turbulent jet investigations in the literature, both in the laboratory and in the field, required specialized intrusive instrumentation and/or complex optical setups. There are many situations in naturally-occurring flows where the environment may prove too hostile or remote for existing instrumentation. We have developed a methodology for analyzing video of the exterior of a naturally-occurring flow and calculating the flow velocity. We found that the presence of viscosity gradients affects the velocity analysis. While these effects produce consistent, predictable changes, we became interested in the mechanism by which the viscosity gradients affect the mixing and development of the turbulent round jet. We conducted a stability analysis of the axisymmetric jet when a viscosity gradient is present. Finally, the third problem addressed in this thesis is the growth of liquid droplets by condensation in a turbulent round jet. A vapor-saturated turbulent jet issues into a cold, dry environment. The resulting mixing produces highly inhomogeneous regions of supersaturation, where droplets grow and evaporate. Non-linear interactions between the droplet growth rate and the supersaturation field make

  2. Interpretation of extragalactic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The nature of extragalatic radio jets is modeled. The basic hypothesis of these models is that extragalatic jets are outflows of matter which can be described within the framework of fluid dynamics and that the outflows are essentially continuous. The discussion is limited to the interpretation of large-scale (i.e., kiloparsec-scale) jets. The central problem is to infer the physical parameters of the jets from observed distributions of total and polarized intensity and angle of polarization as a function of frequency. 60 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Properties of gluon jets

    SciTech Connect

    Sugano, K.

    1986-09-01

    The properties of gluon jets are reviewed from an experimental point of view. The measured characteristics are compared to theoretical expectations. Although neither data nor models for the gluon jets are in the mature stage, there are remarkable agreements and also intriguing disagreements between experiment and theory. Since much interesting data have begun to emerge from various experiments and the properties of gluon jets are deeply rooted in the basic structure of non-Abelian gauge theory, the study of gluon jets casts further light on our understanding of QCD. Finally, the future prospects are discussed.

  4. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Quasi-Homologous Solar Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pariat, E.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2010-01-01

    Recent solar observations (e.g., obtained with Hinode and STEREO) have revealed that coronal jets are a more frequent phenomenon than previously believed. This higher frequency results, in part, from the fact that jets exhibit a homologous behavior: successive jets recur at the same location with similar morphological features. We present the results of three-dimensional (31)) numerical simulations of our model for coronal jets. This study demonstrates the ability of the model to generate recurrent 3D untwisting quasi-homologous jets when a stress is constantly applied at the photospheric boundary. The homology results from the property of the 3D null-point system to relax to a state topologically similar to its initial configuration. In addition, we find two distinct regimes of reconnection in the simulations: an impulsive 3D mode involving a helical rotating current sheet that generates the jet, and a quasi-steady mode that occurs in a 2D-like current sheet located along the fan between the sheared spines. We argue that these different regimes can explain the observed link between jets and plumes.

  5. Effect of Free Jet on Refraction and Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Bridges, James E.; Dippold, Vance F., III

    2005-01-01

    This article investigates the role of a free jet on the sound radiated from a jet. In particular, the role of an infinite wind tunnel, which simulates the forward flight condition, is compared to that of a finite wind tunnel. The second configuration is usually used in experiments, where the microphones are located in a static ambient medium far outside the free jet. To study the effect of the free jet on noise, both propagation and source strength need to be addressed. In this work, the exact Green's function in a locally parallel flow is derived for a simulated flight case. Numerical examples are presented that show a reduction in the magnitude of the Green's function in the aft arc and an increase in the forward arc for the simulated flight condition. The effect of finite wind tunnel on refraction is sensitive to the source location and is most pronounced in the aft arc. A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solution (RANS) yields the required mean flow and turbulence scales that are used in the jet mixing noise spectrum calculations. In addition to the sound/flow interaction, the separate effect of source strength and elongation of the noise-generating region of the jet in a forward flight is studied. Comparisons are made with experiments for the static and finite tunnel cases. Finally, the standard free-jet shear corrections that convert the finite wind tunnel measurements to an ideal wind tunnel arrangement are evaluated.

  6. THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF QUASI-HOMOLOGOUS SOLAR JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Pariat, E.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2010-05-10

    Recent solar observations (e.g., obtained with Hinode and STEREO) have revealed that coronal jets are a more frequent phenomenon than previously believed. This higher frequency results, in part, from the fact that jets exhibit a homologous behavior: successive jets recur at the same location with similar morphological features. We present the results of three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations of our model for coronal jets. This study demonstrates the ability of the model to generate recurrent 3D untwisting quasi-homologous jets when a stress is constantly applied at the photospheric boundary. The homology results from the property of the 3D null-point system to relax to a state topologically similar to its initial configuration. In addition, we find two distinct regimes of reconnection in the simulations: an impulsive 3D mode involving a helical rotating current sheet that generates the jet and a quasi-steady mode that occurs in a 2D-like current sheet located along the fan between the sheared spines. We argue that these different regimes can explain the observed link between jets and plumes.

  7. TUBE SHEARING VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Wilner, L.B.

    1960-05-24

    Explosive operated valves can be used to join two or more containers in fluid flow relationship, one such container being a sealed reservoir. The valve is most simply disposed by mounting it on the reservoir so thst a tube extends from the interior of the reservoir through the valve body, terminating at the bottom of the bore in a closed end; other containers may be similarly connected or may be open connected, as desired. The piston of the valve has a cutting edge at its lower end which shears off the closed tube ends and a recess above the cutting edge to provide a flow channel. Intermixing of the fluid being transferred with the explosion gases is prevented by a copper ring at the top of the piston which is force fitted into the bore at the beginning of the stroke. Although designed to avoid backing up of the piston at pressures up to 10,000 psi in the transferred fluid, proper operation is independent of piston position, once the tube ends were sheared.

  8. Coherent structures - Reality and myth. [in turbulent shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, A. K. M. F.

    1983-01-01

    Large-scale coherent structures (CS) in turbulent shear flows are characterized, reviewing recent theoretical and experimental investigations. The use of computers as a research tool and the flow-visualization experimental technique are introduced, CS are defined, the history of their discovery is traced, and their main characteristics are listed. Topics discussed and illustrated include the initial condition of the free shear layer, triple and double decomposition, topological features of CS, detection and eduction of CS, phase alignment via cross correlation, induced versus natural structures, the bursting phenomenon, turbulent spot, streaks, bursting frequency, the axisymmetric mixing layer, vortex pairing in an axisymmetric jet, CS and jet noise, broadband noise amplification via pure-tone excitation, CS interaction in a plane-jet near field, the Taylor hypothesis applied to CS, negative production, and the validity of the Reynolds-number similarity hypothesis. It is found that the coherent Reynolds stress, vorticity, and production are not much greater than the time-averaged values for fully developed flows with significant incoherent turbulence, suggesting that the importance of CS may have been exaggerated in some recent studies.

  9. Strain Rates and Scalar Dissipation Rates in Gaseous Transverse Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Takeshi; Gevorkyan, Levon; Besnard, Andrea; Karagozian, Ann

    2015-11-01

    This experimental study quantifies local strain rates and scalar dissipation rates for the non-reactive gaseous jet in crossflow (JICF) using simultaneous acetone planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging and stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV). Flush nozzle and flush pipe injectors are used to create jets consisting of mixtures of He and N2, with varying exit velocity profiles, jet-to-crossflow momentum flux ratios J, and density ratios S. Strain rates in the vicinity of windward and lee-side jet shear layers are quantified based both on scalar dissipation rates extracted from PLIF measurements within locally 1D layer-like structures and on vector fields extracted from PIV measurements. Strain rates from the simultaneous measurements are in very good qualitative agreement with one another on the jets' windward and lee sides, and are also consistent with flame ignition locations in comparable reactive JICF experiments. Quantitative differences in strain fields are most pronounced at lower J values, corresponding to absolutely unstable shear layers and high local strain fields, although these differences are affected by the PLIF spatial resolution for a range of flow conditions. Extraction of dominant mode structures via POD will also be presented. Supported by NSF grant CBET-1437014 & AFOSR grant FA9550-15-1-0261 (A004376801).

  10. Mass and Momentum Turbulent Transport Experiments with Confined Coaxial Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Bennett, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Downstream mixing of coaxial jets discharging in an expanded duct was studied to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport models currently used in a variety of computational procedures throughout the propulsion community for combustor flow modeling. Flow visualization studies showed four major shear regions occurring; a wake region immediately downstream of the inlet jet inlet duct; a shear region further downstream between the inner and annular jets; a recirculation zone; and a reattachment zone. A combination of turbulent momentum transport rate and two velocity component data were obtained from simultaneous measurements with a two color laser velocimeter (LV) system. Axial, radial and azimuthal velocities and turbulent momentum transport rate measurements in the r-z and r-theta planes were used to determine the mean value, second central moment (or rms fluctuation from mean), skewness and kurtosis for each data set probability density function (p.d.f.). A combination of turbulent mass transport rate, concentration and velocity data were obtained system. Velocity and mass transport in all three directions as well as concentration distributions were used to obtain the mean, second central moments, skewness and kurtosis for each p.d.f. These LV/LIF measurements also exposed the existence of a large region of countergradient turbulent axial mass transport in the region where the annular jet fluid was accelerating the inner jet fluid.