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1

The use of laterally vectored thrust to counter thrust asymmetry in a tactical jet aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A nonlinear, six degree-of-freedom flight simulator for a twin engine tactical jet was built on a hybrid computer to investigate lateral vectoring of the remaining thrust component for the case of a single engine failure at low dynamic pressures. Aircraft control was provided by an automatic controller rather than a pilot, and thrust vector control was provided by an open-loop controller that deflected a vane (located on the periphery of each exhaust jet and normally streamlined for noninterference with the flow). Lateral thrust vectoring decreased peak values of lateral control deflections, eliminated the requirement for steady-state lateral aerodynamic control deflections, and decreased the amount of altitude lost for a single engine failure.

1983-01-01

2

An Experimental/Modeling Study of Jet Attachment during Counterflow Thrust Vectoring  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent studies have shown the applicability of vectoring rectangular jets using asymmetrically applied counterflow in the presence of a short collar. This novel concept has applications in the aerospace industry where counterflow can be used to vector the thrust of a jet's exhaust, shortening take-off and landing distances and enhancing in-flight maneuverability of the aircraft. Counterflow thrust vectoring, 'CFTV' is desirable due to its fast time response, low thrust loss, and absence of moving parts. However, implementation of a CFTV system is only possible if bistable jet attachment can be prevented. This can be achieved by properly designing the geometry of the collar. An analytical model is developed herein to predict the conditions under which a two-dimensional jet will attach to an offset curved wall. Results from this model are then compared with experiment; for various jet exit Mach numbers, collar offset distances, and radii of curvature. Their excellent correlation permits use of the model as a tool for designing a CFTV system.

Strykowski, Paul J.

1997-01-01

3

Analysis of stratified and closely spaced jets exhausting into a crossflow. [aerodynamic characteristics of lift-jet, vectored thrust, and lift fan V/STOL aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Procedures have been developed for determining the flow field about jets with velocity stratification exhausting into a crossflow. Jets with three different types of exit velocity stratification have been considered: (1) jets with a relatively high velocity core; (2) jets with a relatively low velocity core; and (3) jets originating from a vaned nozzle. The procedure developed for a jet originating from a high velocity core nozzle is to construct an equivalent nozzle having the same mass flow and thrust but having a uniform exit velocity profile. Calculations of the jet centerline and induced surface static pressures have been shown to be in good agreement with test data for a high velocity core nozzle. The equivalent ideal nozzle has also been shown to be a good representation for jets with a relatively low velocity core and for jets originating from a vaned nozzle in evaluating jet-induced flow fields. For the singular case of a low velocity core nozzle, namely a nozzle with a dead air core, and for the vaned nozzle, an alternative procedure has been developed. The internal mixing which takes place in the jet core has been properly accounted for in the equations of motion governing the jet development. Calculations of jet centerlines and induced surface static pressures show good agreement with test data these nozzles.

Ziegler, H.; Woller, P. T.

1973-01-01

4

Design and evaluation of thrust vectored nozzles using a multicomponent thrust stand  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Future aircraft with the capability of short takeoff and landing, and improved maneuverability especially in the post-stall flight regime will incorporate exhaust nozzles which can be thrust vectored. In order to conduct thrust vector research in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Cal Poly, a program was planned with two objectives; design and construct a multicomponent thrust stand for the specific purpose of measuring nozzle thrust vectors; and to provide quality low moisture air to the thrust stand for cold flow nozzle tests. The design and fabrication of the six-component thrust stand was completed. Detailed evaluation tests of the thrust stand will continue upon the receipt of one signal conditioning option (-702) for the Fluke Data Acquisition System. Preliminary design of thrust nozzles with air supply plenums were completed. The air supply was analyzed with regard to head loss. Initial flow visualization tests were conducted using dual water jets.

Carpenter, Thomas W.; Blattner, Ernest W.; Stagner, Robert E.; Contreras, Juanita; Lencioni, Dennis; Mcintosh, Greg

1990-01-01

5

A flight evaluation of a vectored thrust jet V/STOL airplane during simulated instrument approaches using the Kestrel (XV-6A) airplane  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An in-flight investigation was made to determine the terminal-area operating problems of a vectored-thrust-jet vertical and short take-off landing (V/STOL) airplane under simulated instrument conditions. Handling-qualities data pertinent to the terminal-area approach and landing task are presented in the text, and additional documentation is included in the appendixes. Problems dealing with the cruise letdown to localizer capture, conversion to powered-lift flight, precise control of the glide slope, approach velocity or deceleration schedule, hover, and landing are discussed.

Morello, S. A.; Person, L. H., Jr.; Shanks, R. E.; Culpepper, R. G.

1972-01-01

6

Aerodynamics of thrust vectoring by Navier-Stokes solutions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Induced aerodynamics from thrust vectoring are investigated by a computational fluid dynamic method. A thin-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code with multiblock capability is used. Jet properties are specified on the nozzle exit plane to simulate the jet momentum. Results for a rectangular jet in a cross flow are compared with data to verify the code. Further verification of the calculation is made by comparing the numerical results with transonic data for a wing-body combination. Additional calculations were performed to elucidate the following thrust vectoring effects: the thrust vectoring effect on shock and expansion waves, induced effects on nearby surfaces, and the thrust vectoring effect on the leading edge vortex.

Tseng, Jing-Biau; Lan, C. Edward

1991-01-01

7

Investigations of Thrust Vector Control for High-Alpha Pitchover.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Historically, thrust vector control (TVC) system investigations at the Naval Weapons Center have touched on a wide variety of technologies. Emphasis in this paper is on two technologies, the movable-nozzle and the jet-vane TVC, whose performance capabilit...

A. O. Danielson R. B. Dillinger

1989-01-01

8

Jet-Engine Exhaust Nozzle With Thrust-Directing Flaps  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Convergent/divergent jet-engine exhaust nozzle has cruciform divergent passage containing flaps that move to deflect flow of exhaust in either or both planes perpendicular to main fore-and-aft axis of undeflected flow. Prototype of thrust-vector-control nozzles installed in advanced, high-performance airplanes to provide large pitching (usually, vertical) and yawing (usually, horizontal) attitude-control forces independent of attitude-control forces produced by usual aerodynamic control surfaces.

Wing, David J.

1996-01-01

9

Electromechanical actuation for thrust vector control applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

At present, actuation systems for the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) for launch vehicles are hydraulic systems. The Advanced Launch System (ALS), a joint initiative between NASA and the Air Force, is a launch vehicle that is designed to be cost effective, highly reliable and operationally efficient with a goal of reducing the cost per pound to orbit. As part of

Mary Ellen Roth

1990-01-01

10

Thrust Vectoring for Lateral-Directional Stability.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The advantages and disadvantages of using thrust vectoring for lateral-directional control and the effects of reducing the tail size of a single-engine aircraft were investigated. The aerodynamic characteristics of the F-16 aircraft were generated by usin...

L. R. Peron T. Carpenter

1992-01-01

11

Thrust vectoring for lateral-directional stability  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The advantages and disadvantages of using thrust vectoring for lateral-directional control and the effects of reducing the tail size of a single-engine aircraft were investigated. The aerodynamic characteristics of the F-16 aircraft were generated by using the Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System II panel code. The resulting lateral-directional linear perturbation analysis of a modified F-16 aircraft with various tail sizes and yaw vectoring was performed at several speeds and altitudes to determine the stability and control trends for the aircraft compared to these trends for a baseline aircraft. A study of the paddle-type turning vane thrust vectoring control system as used on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle is also presented.

Peron, Lee R.; Carpenter, Thomas

1992-01-01

12

Computational Study of Fluidic Thrust Vectoring using Separation Control in a Nozzle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A computational investigation of a two- dimensional nozzle was completed to assess the use of fluidic injection to manipulate flow separation and cause thrust vectoring of the primary jet thrust. The nozzle was designed with a recessed cavity to enhance the throat shifting method of fluidic thrust vectoring. The structured-grid, computational fluid dynamics code PAB3D was used to guide the design and analyze over 60 configurations. Nozzle design variables included cavity convergence angle, cavity length, fluidic injection angle, upstream minimum height, aft deck angle, and aft deck shape. All simulations were computed with a static freestream Mach number of 0.05. a nozzle pressure ratio of 3.858, and a fluidic injection flow rate equal to 6 percent of the primary flow rate. Results indicate that the recessed cavity enhances the throat shifting method of fluidic thrust vectoring and allows for greater thrust-vector angles without compromising thrust efficiency.

Deere, Karen; Berrier, Bobby L.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Johnson, Stuart K.

2003-01-01

13

Nozzle Thrust Optimization While Reducing Jet Noise  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Bluebell nozzle design concept is proposed for jet noise reduction with minimal thrust loss or even thrust augmentation. A Bluebell nozzle has a sinusoidal lip line edge (chevrons) and a sinusoidal cross section shape with linear amplitude increasing downstream in the divergent nozzle part (corrugations). The experimental tests of several Bluebell nozzle designs have shown nose reduction relative to a convergent-divergent round nozzle with design exhaust number M(e) = 1.5. The best design provides an acoustic benefit near 4dB with about 1 percent thrust augmentation. For subsonic flow ((M(e)= 0.6)), the tests indicated that the present method for design of Bluebell nozzles gives less acoustic benefit and in most cases jet noise increased. The proposed designs incorporate analytical theory and 2D and 3D numerical simulations. Full Navier-Stokes and Euler solvers were utilized. Boundary layer effects were used. Several different designs were accounted for in the Euler applications.

Seiner, J. M.; Gilinsky, M. M.

1995-01-01

14

Normal stress measurement by means of a jet thrust apparatus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Apparatus is described which enables the normal stress-shear rate behaviour of a viscoelastic liquid to be obtained from observations of the thrust of a jet of the liquid issuing from a capillary tube (or slot). Two types of apparatus are mentioned. In one type the jet thrust is obtained from the impact force on a boat which the jet

D. R. Oliver; W. C. MacSporran

1969-01-01

15

Flexible joints for thrust vector control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Flexible joints have been used to achieve thrust vector control over a wide range of sizes of nozzles and have been demonstrated successfully in bench tests and static firings, and are operational on two motors. From these many joints the problems of flexible joints have been defined as establishment of the movable nozzle envelope, definition of the actuation power requirements, definition of the mechanical properties of joint materials, adhesive bonding, test methods, and quality control. These data and problem solutions are contained in a large number of reports. Data relating to joint configuration, design requirements, materials selection, joint design, structural analysis, manufacture, and testing are summarized.

Woodberry, R. F. H.

1975-01-01

16

A review of thrust-vectoring schemes for fighter applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents a review of thrust vectoring schemes for advanced fighter applications. Results are presented from wind tunnel and system integration studies on thrust vectoring nozzle concepts. Vectoring data are presented from wind tunnel tests of axisymmetric C-D (convergent-divergent) and nonaxisymmetric wedge, C-D, single ramp and USB (upper-surface blowing) nozzle concepts. Results from recent airframe/nozzle integration studies on the impact of thrust vectoring on weight, cooling and performance characteristics are discussed. This review indicates that the aircraft designer has, at his disposal, a wide range of thrust vectoring schemes which offer potential for added or improved aircraft capability.

Berrier, B. L.; Re, R. J.

1978-01-01

17

Thrust Vector Control for Nuclear Thermal Rockets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Future space missions may use Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) stages for human and cargo missions to Mars and other destinations. The vehicles are likely to require engine thrust vector control (TVC) to maintain desired flight trajectories. This paper explores requirements and concepts for TVC systems for representative NTR missions. Requirements for TVC systems were derived using 6 degree-of-freedom models of NTR vehicles. Various flight scenarios were evaluated to determine vehicle attitude control needs and to determine the applicability of TVC. Outputs from the models yielded key characteristics including engine gimbal angles, gimbal rates and gimbal actuator power. Additional factors such as engine thrust variability and engine thrust alignment errors were examined for impacts to gimbal requirements. Various technologies are surveyed for TVC systems for the NTR applications. A key factor in technology selection is the unique radiation environment present in NTR stages. Other considerations including mission duration and thermal environments influence the selection of optimal TVC technologies. Candidate technologies are compared to see which technologies, or combinations of technologies best fit the requirements for selected NTR missions. Representative TVC systems are proposed and key properties such as mass and power requirements are defined. The outputs from this effort can be used to refine NTR system sizing models, providing higher fidelity definition for TVC systems for future studies.

Ensworth, Clinton B. F.

2013-01-01

18

Thrust vector control using electric actuation  

SciTech Connect

Presently, gimbaling of launch vehicle engines for thrust vector control is generally accomplished using a hydraulic system. In the case of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters and main engines, these systems are powered by hydrazine auxiliary power units. Use of electromechanical actuators would provide significant advantages in cost and maintenance. However, present energy source technologies such as batteries are heavy to the point of causing significant weight penalties. Utilizing capacitor technology developed by the Auburn University Space Power Institute in collaboration with the Auburn CCDS, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Auburn are developing EMA system components with emphasis on high discharge rate energy sources compatible with space shuttle type thrust vector control requirements. Testing has been done at MSFC as part of EMA system tests with loads up to 66000 newtons for pulse times of several seconds. Results show such an approach to be feasible providing a potential for reduced weight and operations costs for new launch vehicles. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

Bechtel, R.T.; Hall, D.K. [Marshall Space Flight Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama 35812 (United States)

1995-01-25

19

Hot gas thrust vector control motor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A hot gas thrust vector control (HGTVC) motor developed in the framework of a Foreign Weapon Evaluation program is discussed. Two HGTVC versions were evaluated on the two nozzles of the program, normal injection with a blunt pintle and 10 deg upstream injection with a tapered pintle. The HGTVC system was tested on a modified ORBUS-1 motor which is based on two technologies, namely, a composite chamber polar boss (CPB) and a two-piece C-C nozzle which threads to the CPB and receives two HGVs embedded into its exit cone, 180 deg apart. It is concluded that the composite polar bosses and C-C nozzles performed successfully in both firings.

Berdoyes, Michel; Ellis, Russell A.

1992-07-01

20

A Computational Study of a New Dual Throat Fluidic Thrust Vectoring Nozzle Concept  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A computational investigation of a two-dimensional nozzle was completed to assess the use of fluidic injection to manipulate flow separation and cause thrust vectoring of the primary jet thrust. The nozzle was designed with a recessed cavity to enhance the throat shifting method of fluidic thrust vectoring. Several design cycles with the structured-grid, computational fluid dynamics code PAB3D and with experiments in the NASA Langley Research Center Jet Exit Test Facility have been completed to guide the nozzle design and analyze performance. This paper presents computational results on potential design improvements for best experimental configuration tested to date. Nozzle design variables included cavity divergence angle, cavity convergence angle and upstream throat height. Pulsed fluidic injection was also investigated for its ability to decrease mass flow requirements. Internal nozzle performance (wind-off conditions) and thrust vector angles were computed for several configurations over a range of nozzle pressure ratios from 2 to 7, with the fluidic injection flow rate equal to 3 percent of the primary flow rate. Computational results indicate that increasing cavity divergence angle beyond 10 is detrimental to thrust vectoring efficiency, while increasing cavity convergence angle from 20 to 30 improves thrust vectoring efficiency at nozzle pressure ratios greater than 2, albeit at the expense of discharge coefficient. Pulsed injection was no more efficient than steady injection for the Dual Throat Nozzle concept.

Deere, Karen A.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Johnson, Stuart K.

2005-01-01

21

Static investigation of two fluidic thrust-vectoring concepts on a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A static investigation was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel of two thrust-vectoring concepts which utilize fluidic mechanisms for deflecting the jet of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle. One concept involved using the Coanda effect to turn a sheet of injected secondary air along a curved sidewall flap and, through entrainment, draw the primary jet in the same direction to produce yaw thrust vectoring. The other concept involved deflecting the primary jet to produce pitch thrust vectoring by injecting secondary air through a transverse slot in the divergent flap, creating an oblique shock in the divergent channel. Utilizing the Coanda effect to produce yaw thrust vectoring was largely unsuccessful. Small vector angles were produced at low primary nozzle pressure ratios, probably because the momentum of the primary jet was low. Significant pitch thrust vector angles were produced by injecting secondary flow through a slot in the divergent flap. Thrust vector angle decreased with increasing nozzle pressure ratio but moderate levels were maintained at the highest nozzle pressure ratio tested. Thrust performance generally increased at low nozzle pressure ratios and decreased near the design pressure ratio with the addition of secondary flow.

Wing, David J.

1994-01-01

22

Electromechanical actuation for thrust vector control applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The advanced launch system (ALS), is a launch vehicle that is designed to be cost-effective, highly reliable, and operationally efficient with a goal of reducing the cost per pound to orbit. An electromechanical actuation (EMA) system is being developed as an attractive alternative to the hydraulic systems. The controller will integrate 20 kHz resonant link power management and distribution (PMAD) technology and pulse population modulation (PPM) techniques to implement field-oriented vector control (FOVC) of a new advanced induction motor. The driver and the FOVC will be microprocessor controlled. For increased system reliability, a built-in test (BITE) capability will be included. This involves introducing testability into the design of a system such that testing is calibrated and exercised during the design, manufacturing, maintenance, and prelaunch activities. An actuator will be integrated with the motor controller for performance testing of the EMA thrust vector control (TVC) system. The EMA system and work proposed for the future are discussed.

Roth, Mary Ellen

1990-01-01

23

High efficiency thrust vector control allocation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The design of control mixing algorithms for launch vehicles with multiple vectoring engines yields competing objectives for which no straightforward solution approach exists. The designer seeks to optimally allocate the effector degrees of freedom such that maneuvering capability is maximized subject to constraints on available control authority. In the present application, such algorithms are generally restricted to linear transformations so as to minimize adverse control-structure interaction and maintain compatibility with industry-standard methods for control gain design and stability analysis. Based on the application of the theory of ellipsoids, a complete, scalable, and extensible framework is developed to effect rapid analysis of launch vehicle capability. Furthermore, a control allocation scheme is proposed that simultaneously balances attainment of the maximum maneuvering capability with rejection of internal loads and performance losses resulting from thrust vectoring in the null region of the admissible controls. This novel approach leverages an optimal parametrization of the weighted least squares generalized inverse and exploits the analytic properties of the constraint geometry so as to enable recovery of more than ninety percent of the theoretical capability while maintaining linearity over the majority of the attainable set.

Orr, Jeb S.

24

Jet propulsion with special reference to thrust augmenters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation of the possibility of using thrust augmented jets as prime movers was carried out. The augmentation was to be effected by allowing the jet to mix with the surrounding air in the presence of bodies which deflect the air set in motion by the jet.

Schubauer, G B

1933-01-01

25

Static performance investigation of a skewed-throat multiaxis thrust-vectoring nozzle concept  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The static performance of a jet exhaust nozzle which achieves multiaxis thrust vectoring by physically skewing the geometric throat has been characterized in the static test facility of the 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. The nozzle has an asymmetric internal geometry defined by four surfaces: a convergent-divergent upper surface with its ridge perpendicular to the nozzle centerline, a convergent-divergent lower surface with its ridge skewed relative to the nozzle centerline, an outwardly deflected sidewall, and a straight sidewall. The primary goal of the concept is to provide efficient yaw thrust vectoring by forcing the sonic plane (nozzle throat) to form at a yaw angle defined by the skewed ridge of the lower surface contour. A secondary goal is to provide multiaxis thrust vectoring by combining the skewed-throat yaw-vectoring concept with upper and lower pitch flap deflections. The geometric parameters varied in this investigation included lower surface ridge skew angle, nozzle expansion ratio (divergence angle), aspect ratio, pitch flap deflection angle, and sidewall deflection angle. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2 to a high of 11.5 for some configurations. The results of the investigation indicate that efficient, substantial multiaxis thrust vectoring was achieved by the skewed-throat nozzle concept. However, certain control surface deflections destabilized the internal flow field, which resulted in substantial shifts in the position and orientation of the sonic plane and had an adverse effect on thrust-vectoring and weight flow characteristics. By increasing the expansion ratio, the location of the sonic plane was stabilized. The asymmetric design resulted in interdependent pitch and yaw thrust vectoring as well as nonzero thrust-vector angles with undeflected control surfaces. By skewing the ridges of both the upper and lower surface contours, the interdependency between pitch and yaw thrust vectoring may be eliminated and the location of the sonic plane may be further stabilized.

Wing, David J.

1994-01-01

26

Experimental Study of an Axisymmetric Dual Throat Fluidic Thrust Vectoring Nozzle for Supersonic Aircraft Application  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An axisymmetric version of the Dual Throat Nozzle concept with a variable expansion ratio has been studied to determine the impacts on thrust vectoring and nozzle performance. The nozzle design, applicable to a supersonic aircraft, was guided using the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics code, PAB3D. The axisymmetric Dual Throat Nozzle concept was tested statically in the Jet Exit Test Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. The nozzle geometric design variables included circumferential span of injection, cavity length, cavity convergence angle, and nozzle expansion ratio for conditions corresponding to take-off and landing, mid climb and cruise. Internal nozzle performance and thrust vectoring performance was determined for nozzle pressure ratios up to 10 with secondary injection rates up to 10 percent of the primary flow rate. The 60 degree span of injection generally performed better than the 90 degree span of injection using an equivalent injection area and number of holes, in agreement with computational results. For injection rates less than 7 percent, thrust vector angle for the 60 degree span of injection was 1.5 to 2 degrees higher than the 90 degree span of injection. Decreasing cavity length improved thrust ratio and discharge coefficient, but decreased thrust vector angle and thrust vectoring efficiency. Increasing cavity convergence angle from 20 to 30 degrees increased thrust vector angle by 1 degree over the range of injection rates tested, but adversely affected system thrust ratio and discharge coefficient. The dual throat nozzle concept generated the best thrust vectoring performance with an expansion ratio of 1.0 (a cavity in between two equal minimum areas). The variable expansion ratio geometry did not provide the expected improvements in discharge coefficient and system thrust ratio throughout the flight envelope of typical a supersonic aircraft. At mid-climb and cruise conditions, the variable geometry design compromised thrust vector angle achieved, but some thrust vector control would be available, potentially for aircraft trim. The fixed area, expansion ratio of 1.0, Dual Throat Nozzle provided the best overall compromise for thrust vectoring and nozzle internal performance over the range of NPR tested compared to the variable geometry Dual Throat Nozzle.

Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Deere, Karen A.; Mason, Mary L.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Johnson, Stuart K.

2007-01-01

27

Static performance of a cruciform nozzle with multiaxis thrust-vectoring and reverse-thrust capabilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A multiaxis thrust vectoring nozzle designed to have equal flow turning capability in pitch and yaw was conceived and experimentally tested for internal, static performance. The cruciform-shaped convergent-divergent nozzle turned the flow for thrust vectoring by deflecting the divergent surfaces of the nozzle, called flaps. Methods for eliminating physical interference between pitch and yaw flaps at the larger multiaxis deflection angles was studied. These methods included restricting the pitch flaps from the path of the yaw flaps and shifting the flow path at the throat off the nozzle centerline to permit larger pitch-flap deflections without interfering with the operation of the yaw flaps. Two flap widths were tested at both dry and afterburning settings. Vertical and reverse thrust configurations at dry power were also tested. Comparison with two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles showed lower but still competitive thrust performance and thrust vectoring capability.

Wing, David J.; Asbury, Scott C.

1992-01-01

28

Design Enhancements of the Two-Dimensional, Dual Throat Fluidic Thrust Vectoring Nozzle Concept  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Dual Throat Nozzle fluidic thrust vectoring technique that achieves higher thrust-vectoring efficiencies than other fluidic techniques, without sacrificing thrust efficiency has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The nozzle concept was designed with the aid of the structured-grid, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computational fluidic dynamics code PAB3D. This new concept combines the thrust efficiency of sonic-plane skewing with increased thrust-vectoring efficiencies obtained by maximizing pressure differentials in a separated cavity located downstream of the nozzle throat. By injecting secondary flow asymmetrically at the upstream minimum area, a new aerodynamic minimum area is formed downstream of the geometric minimum and the sonic line is skewed, thus vectoring the exhaust flow. The nozzle was tested in the NASA Langley Research Center Jet Exit Test Facility. Internal nozzle performance characteristics were defined for nozzle pressure ratios up to 10, with a range of secondary injection flow rates up to 10 percent of the primary flow rate. Most of the data included in this paper shows the effect of secondary injection rate at a nozzle pressure ratio of 4. The effects of modifying cavity divergence angle, convergence angle and cavity shape on internal nozzle performance were investigated, as were effects of injection geometry, hole or slot. In agreement with computationally predicted data, experimental data verified that decreasing cavity divergence angle had a negative impact and increasing cavity convergence angle had a positive impact on thrust vector angle and thrust efficiency. A curved cavity apex provided improved thrust ratios at some injection rates. However, overall nozzle performance suffered with no secondary injection. Injection holes were more efficient than the injection slot over the range of injection rates, but the slot generated larger thrust vector angles for injection rates less than 4 percent of the primary flow rate.

Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Deere, Karen A.; Mason, Mary L.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Johnson, Stuart K.

2006-01-01

29

Electromechanical actuation for thrust vector control applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

At present, actuation systems for the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) for launch vehicles are hydraulic systems. The Advanced Launch System (ALS), a joint initiative between NASA and the Air Force, is a launch vehicle that is designed to be cost effective, highly reliable and operationally efficient with a goal of reducing the cost per pound to orbit. As part of this initiative, an electromechanical actuation system is being developed as an attractive alternative to the hydraulic systems used today. NASA-Lewis is developing and demonstrating an Induction Motor Controller Actuation System with a 40 hp peak rating. The controller will integrate 20 kHz resonant link Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) technology and Pulse Population Modulation (PPM) techniques to implement Field Oriented Vector Control (FOVC) of a new advanced induction motor. Through PPM, multiphase variable frequency, variable voltage waveforms can be synthesized from the 20 kHz source. FOVC shows that varying both the voltage and frequency and their ratio (V/F), permits independent control of both torque and speed while operating at maximum efficiency at any point on the torque-speed curve. The driver and the FOVC will be microprocessor controlled. For increased system reliability, a Built-in Test (BITE) capability will be included. This involves introducing testability into the design of a system such that testing is calibrated and exercised during the design, manufacturing, maintenance and prelaunch activities. An actuator will be integrated with the motor controller for performance testing of the EMA TVC system. The design and fabrication of the motor controller is being done by General Dynamics Space Systems Division. The University of Wisconsin-Madison will assist in the design of the advanced induction motor and in the implementation of the FOVC theory. A 75 hp electronically controlled dynamometer will be used to test the motor controller in all four quadrants of operation using flight type control algorithms. Integrated testing of the controller and actuator will be conducted at a facility yet to be named. The EMA system described above is discussed in detail.

Roth, Mary Ellen

1990-01-01

30

Ground test of the D shaped vented thrust vectoring nozzle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Static ground tests of a large scale lift/cruise thrust vectoring nozzle were conducted to establish: (1) vectoring performance 'in' and 'out' of ground effect; (2) thrust spoilage capability; (3) compatibility of the nozzle with a turbotip fan; and (4) the nozzle structural temperature distribution. Vectoring performance of a short coupled, vented nozzle design on a large scale, (60%) basis was compared with small scale (4.5%) test nozzle results. The test nozzle was a "boilerplate" model of the MCAIR "D" vented nozzle configured for operation with the LF336/J85 turbotip lift fan system. Calibration of the LF336/J85 test fan with a simple convergent nozzle was performed with four different nozzle exit areas to establish reference thrust, nozzle pressure ratio, and nozzle corrected flow characteristics for comparison with the thrust vectoring nozzle data. Thrust vectoring tests with the 'D' vented nozzle were conducted over the range of vector angles between 0 and 117 deg for several different nozzle exit areas.

Esker, D. W.

1976-01-01

31

Acoustically shielded exhaust system for high thrust jet engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A flade exhaust nozzle for a high thrust jet engine is configured to form an acoustic shield around the core engine exhaust flowstream while supplementing engine thrust during all flight conditions, particularly during takeoff. The flade airflow is converted from an annular 360.degree. flowstream to an arcuate flowstream extending around the lower half of the core engine exhaust flowstream so as to suppress exhaust noise directed at the surrounding community.

Carey, John P. (Inventor); Lee, Robert (Inventor); Majjigi, Rudramuni K. (Inventor)

1995-01-01

32

Aerodynamic flow-vectoring of a planar jet in a co-flowing stream  

Microsoft Academic Search

The vectoring of an incompressible, two-dimensional jet in a co-flowing stream is investigated by means of direct numerical simulation. The control input used to stimulate jet vectoring is accomplished through distributed suction from blunt-faced lips at the exit of the jet. The thrust vector methodology is based on suppression of global instabilities in the wake-shear layers formed between the co-flow

David W. Lim; Larry G. Redekopp

2002-01-01

33

Thrust Vectoring on the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Investigations into a multiaxis thrust-vectoring system have been conducted on an F-18 configuration. These investigations include ground-based scale-model tests, ground-based full-scale testing, and flight testing. This thrust-vectoring system has been tested on the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The system provides thrust vectoring in pitch and yaw axes. Ground-based subscale test data have been gathered as background to the flight phase of the program. Tests investigated aerodynamic interaction and vane control effectiveness. The ground-based full-scale data were gathered from static engine runs with image analysis to determine relative thrust-vectoring effectiveness. Flight tests have been conducted at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. Parameter identification input techniques have been developed. Individual vanes were not directly controlled because of a mixer-predictor function built into the flight control laws. Combined effects of the vanes have been measured in flight and compared to combined effects of the vanes as predicted by the cold-jet test data. Very good agreement has been found in the linearized effectiveness derivatives.

Bowers, Albion H.; Pahle, Joseph W.

1996-01-01

34

Parametric study of a simultaneous pitch/yaw thrust vectoring single expansion ramp nozzle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the course of the last eleven years, the concept of thrust vectoring has emerged as a promising method of enhancing aircraft control capabilities in post-stall flight incursions during combat. In order to study the application of simultaneous pitch and yaw vectoring to single expansion ramp nozzles, a static test was conducted in the NASA-Langley 16 foot transonic tunnel. This investigation was based on internal performance data provided by force, mass flow and internal pressure measurements at nozzle pressure ratios up to 8. The internal performance characteristics of the nozzle were studied for several combinations of six different parameters: yaw vectoring angle, pitch vectoring angle, upper ramp cutout, sidewall hinge location, hinge inclination angle and sidewall containment. Results indicated a 2-to- 3-percent decrease in resultant thrust ratio with vectoring in either pitch or yaw. Losses were mostly associated with the turning of supersonic flow. Resultant thrust ratios were also decreased by sideways expansion of the jet. The effects of cutback corners in the upper ramp and lower flap on performance were small. Maximum resultant yaw vector angles, about half of the flap angle, were achieved for the configuration with the most forward hinge location.

Schirmer, Alberto W.; Capone, Francis J.

1989-01-01

35

Design of an ion thruster movable grid thrust vectoring system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several reasons justify the development of an ion propulsion system thrust vectoring system. Spacecraft launched to date have used ion thrusters mounted on gimbals to control the thrust vector within a range of about ±5°. Such devices have large mass and dimensions, hence the need exists for a more compact system, preferably mounted within the thruster itself. Since the 1970s several thrust vectoring systems have been developed, with the translatable accelerator grid electrode being considered the most promising. Laboratory models of this system have already been built and successfully tested, but there is still room for improvement in their mechanical design. This work aims to investigate possibilities of refining the design of such movable grid thrust vectoring systems. Two grid suspension designs and three types of actuators were evaluated. The actuators examined were a micro electromechanical system, a NanoMuscle shape memory alloy actuator and a piezoelectric driver. Criteria used for choosing the best system included mechanical simplicity (use of the fewest mechanical parts), accuracy, power consumption and behaviour in space conditions. Designs of systems using these actuators are proposed. In addition, a mission to Mercury using the system with piezoelectric drivers has been modelled and its performance presented.

Kural, Aleksander; Leveque, Nicolas; Welch, Chris; Wolanski, Piotr

2004-08-01

36

Static internal performance of a two-dimensional convergent nozzle with thrust-vectoring capability up to 60 deg  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation was conducted at wind-off conditions in the static-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the internal performance characteristics of a two-dimensional convergent nozzle with a thrust-vectoring capability up to 60 deg. Vectoring was accomplished by a downward rotation of a hinged upper convergent flap and a corresponding rotation of a center-pivoted lower convergent flap. The effects of geometric thrust-vector angle and upper-rotating-flap geometry on internal nozzle performance characteristics were investigated. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.0 (jet off) to approximately 5.0.

Leavitt, L. D.

1985-01-01

37

CFD evaluation of an advanced thrust vector control concept  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A potential concept that can offer an alternate method for thrust vector control of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster is the use of a cylindrical probe that is inserted (on demand) through the wall of the rocket nozzle. This Probe Thrust Vector Control (PTVC) concept is an alternate to that of a gimbaled nozzle or a Liquid Injection Thrust Vector (LITVC) system. The viability of the PTVC concept can be assessed either experimentally and/or with the use of CFD. A purely experimental assessment can be time consuming and expensive, whereas a CFD assessment can be very time- and cost-effective. Two key requirements of the proposed concept are PTVC vectoring performance and the active cooling requirements for the probe to maintain its thermal and structural integrity. An active thermal cooling method is the injection of coolant around the pheriphery of the probe. How much coolant is required and how this coolant distributes itself in the flow field is of major concern. The objective of the work reported here is the use of CFD to answer these question and in the design of test hardware to substantiate the results of the CFD predictions.

Tiarn, Weihnurng; Cavalleri, Robert

1990-01-01

38

Static internal performance of single-expansion-ramp nozzles with thrust-vectoring capability up to 60 deg  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation has been conducted at static conditions (wind off) in the static-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The effects of geometric thrust-vector angle, sidewall containment, ramp curvature, lower-flap lip angle, and ramp length on the internal performance of nonaxisymmetric single-expansion-ramp nozzles were investigated. Geometric thrust-vector angle was varied from -20 deg. to 60 deg., and nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.0 (jet off) to approximately 10.0.

Berrier, B. L.; Leavitt, L. D.

1984-01-01

39

On the outgassing and jet thrust of snowball comets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The characteristics of free molecular and fluid flows from a kilometric-sized snowball sublimating in solar radiation are discussed. The net back-thrust is more than 50% lower than hypothesized by Whipple (1977) and reconcilable with derived nongravitational forces only if mean comet densities are low (under 0.7 g/cu cm). The densities on the sunward face are high enough to ensure collisional subsonic flow, but the density and pressure on the shaded side for probable comet rotation rates are much lower. Models with approximately radial outgassing are invalid; instead, a pressure-driven flow to the shaded side, where condensation partially compensates for radiative heat losses is postulated. The reduced net jet-thrust from such sublimation-condensation flows implies still lower limits on comet masses and densities.

Wallis, M. K.; MacPherson, A. K.

1981-05-01

40

Effect of thrust vectoring and wing maneuver devices on transonic aeropropulsive characteristics of a supersonic fighter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The aeropropulsive characteristics of an advanced fighter designed for supersonic cruise were determined in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The objectives of this investigation were to evaluate the interactive effects of thrust vectoring and wing maneuver devices on lift and drag and to determine trim characteristics. The wing maneuver devices consisted of a drooped leading edge and a trailing-edge flap. Thrust vectoring was accomplished with two dimensional (nonaxisymmetric) convergent-divergent nozzles located below the wing in two single-engine podded nacelles. A canard was utilized for trim. Thrust vector angles of 0 deg, 15 deg, and 30 deg were tested in combination with a drooped wing leading edge and with wing trailing-edge flap deflections up to 30 deg. This investigation was conducted at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.20, at angles of attack from 0 deg to 20 deg, and at nozzle pressure ratios from about 1 (jet off) to 10. Reynolds number based on mean aerodynamic chord varied from 9.24 x 10 to the 6th to 10.56 x 10 to the 6th.

Capone, F. J.; Reubush, D. E.

1983-01-01

41

Aerodynamic flow-vectoring of a planar jet in a co-flowing stream  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The vectoring of an incompressible, two-dimensional jet in a co-flowing stream is investigated by means of direct numerical simulation. The control input used to stimulate jet vectoring is accomplished through distributed suction from blunt-faced lips at the exit of the jet. The thrust vector methodology is based on suppression of global instabilities in the wake-shear layers formed between the co-flow and the jet. Once a critical suction volume flux needed to suppress these global instabilities is exceeded, local flow control can be realized through varying the distribution of suction across the base of the jet lips. It is found that the critical suction flux scales primarily with the ambient co-flow, not with the jet speed, and that lift-to-thrust ratios exceeding 15% can be realized. The effects of jet Reynolds number, jet-to- ambient velocity ratio, boundary-layer thickness, and geometric parameters on various performance characteristics are examined. It is also shown that the asymmetric flow control approach used for vectoring the jet can also be implemented in a symmetric configuration to enhance jet spreading. Significant increases in jet spreading can be realized when the symmetrically applied suction flux is sufficient to stimulate the sinuous mode of instability of the jet such that energetic apping motion ensues.

Lim, David W.; Redekopp, Larry G.

2002-01-01

42

Design of high power electromechanical actuator for thrust vector control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA-Marshall has undertaken the development of electromechanical actuators (EMAs) for thrust vector control (TVC) augmentation system implementation. The TVC EMA presented has as its major components two three-phase brushless dc motors, a two-pass gear-reduction system, and a roller screw for rotary-to-linear motion conversion. System control is furnished by a solid-state electronic controller and power supply; a pair of resolvers deliver position feedback to the controller, such that precise positioning is achieved. Peformance comparisons have been conducted between the EMA and comparable-performance hydraulic systems applicable to TVCs.

Cowan, J. R.; Myers, W. N.

1991-01-01

43

Supercirculation effects induced by vectoring a partial-span rectangular jet. [for fighter aircraft maneuverability  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Thrust-induced supercirculation effects from thrust vectoring have indicated a potential for not only increasing maneuverability of fighter aircraft but also as a means of improving cruise performance. The current study investigated a partial-span rectangular jet-exhaust nozzle located at the wing trailing edge that acts similar to a jet flap by increasing lift due to supercirculation. This paper summarizes experimental studies including the effects of nozzle deflection angle, wing camber, and nozzle shape and exit location on lift, drag and load distributions. The results indicate that significant increases in thrust-induced lift along with substantial decreases in drag are possible.

Capone, F. J.

1974-01-01

44

Attitude control of a spinning rocket via thrust vectoring  

SciTech Connect

Two controllers are developed to provide attitude control of a spinning rocket that has a thrust vectoring capability. The first controller has a single-input/single-output design that ignores the gyroscopic coupling between the control channels. The second controller has a multi-input/multi-output structure that is specifically intended to account for the gyroscopic coupling effects. A performance comparison between the two approached is conducted for a range of roll rates. Each controller is tested for the ability to track step commands, and for the amount of coupling impurity. Both controllers are developed via a linear-quadratic-regulator synthesis procedure, which is motivated by the multi-input/multi-output nature of second controller. Time responses and a singular value analysis are used to evaluate controller performance. This paper describes the development and comparison of two controllers that are designed to provide attitude control of a spinning rocket that is equipped with thrust vector control. 12 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

White, J.E.

1990-12-19

45

Design and test of electromechanical actuators for thrust vector control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

New control mechanisms technologies are currently being explored to provide alternatives to hydraulic thrust vector control (TVC) actuation systems. For many years engineers have been encouraging the investigation of electromechanical actuators (EMA) to take the place of hydraulics for spacecraft control/gimballing systems. The rationale is to deliver a lighter, cleaner, safer, more easily maintained, as well as energy efficient space vehicle. In light of this continued concern to improve the TVC system, the Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is involved in a program to develop electromechanical actuators for the purpose of testing and TVC system implementation. Through this effort, an electromechanical thrust vector control actuator has been designed and assembled. The design consists of the following major components: Two three-phase brushless dc motors, a two pass gear reduction system, and a roller screw, which converts rotational input into linear output. System control is provided by a solid-state electronic controller and power supply. A pair of resolvers and associated electronics deliver position feedback to the controller such that precise positioning is achieved. Testing and evaluation is currently in progress. Goals focus on performance comparisons between EMA's and similar hydraulic systems.

Cowan, J. R.; Weir, Rae Ann

1993-01-01

46

Multiaxis Thrust-Vectoring Characteristics of a Model Representative of the F-18 High-Alpha Research Vehicle at Angles of Attack From 0 deg to 70 deg  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the multiaxis thrust-vectoring characteristics of the F-18 High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). A wingtip supported, partially metric, 0.10-scale jet-effects model of an F-18 prototype aircraft was modified with hardware to simulate the thrust-vectoring control system of the HARV. Testing was conducted at free-stream Mach numbers ranging from 0.30 to 0.70, at angles of attack from O' to 70', and at nozzle pressure ratios from 1.0 to approximately 5.0. Results indicate that the thrust-vectoring control system of the HARV can successfully generate multiaxis thrust-vectoring forces and moments. During vectoring, resultant thrust vector angles were always less than the corresponding geometric vane deflection angle and were accompanied by large thrust losses. Significant external flow effects that were dependent on Mach number and angle of attack were noted during vectoring operation. Comparisons of the aerodynamic and propulsive control capabilities of the HARV configuration indicate that substantial gains in controllability are provided by the multiaxis thrust-vectoring control system.

Asbury, Scott C.; Capone, Francis J.

1995-01-01

47

Pressure distribution on a vectored-thrust V/STOL fighter in the transition-speed range. [wind tunnel tests to measure pressure distribution on body and wing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted in the Langley V/STOL tunnel with a vectored-thrust V/STOL fighter configuration to obtain detailed pressure measurements on the body and on the wing in the transition-speed range. The vectored-thrust jet exhaust induced a region of negative pressure coefficients on the lower surface of the wing and on the bottom of the fuselage. The location of the jet exhaust relative to the wing was a major factor in determining the extent of the region of negative pressure coefficients.

Mineck, R. E.; Margason, R. J.

1974-01-01

48

Space transportation system solid rocket booster thrust vector control system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Solid Rocket Booster, Thrust Vector Control (TVC) system was designed in accordance with the following requirements: self-contained power supply, fail-safe operation, 20 flight uses after exposure to seawater landings, optimized cost, and component interchangeability. Trade studies were performed which led to the selection of a recirculating hydraulic system powered by Auxiliary Power Units (APU) which drive the hydraulic actuators and gimbal the solid rocket motor nozzle. Other approaches for the system design were studied in arriving at the recirculating hydraulic system powered by an APU. These systems must withstand the imposed environment and be usable for a minimum of 20 Space Transportation System flights with a minimum of refurbishment. The TVC system has completed the major portion of qualification and verification tests and is prepared to be cleared for the first Shuttle flight (STS-1). Substantiation data will include analytical and test data.

Verble, A. J., Jr.; Mccool, A. A.; Potter, J. H.

1979-01-01

49

Variation of pitching moment with engine thrust for a twin-engine commercial jet aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Flight tests were made to determine the effect of engine net thrust on airplane pitching moment for a twin-engine commercial jet transport in the approach, climbout and descent, and cruise configurations. The results indicate that for all the conditions analyzed, the pitching moment due to thrust is somewhat higher than that estimated from the product of net thrust and its moment arm (perpendicular distance from thrust axis to the airplane center of gravity). The differences are attributed to additional moments produced by nacelle normal force, jet-induced downwash, and interaction between wing flow and engine nacelle flow.

Shanks, R. E.

1977-01-01

50

PAB3D Simulations of a Nozzle with Fluidic Injection for Yaw Thrust-Vector Control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental and computational study was conducted on an exhaust nozzle with fluidic injection for yaw thrust-vector control. The nozzle concept was tested experimentally in the NASA Langley Jet Exit Test Facility (JETF) at nozzle pressure ratios up to 4 and secondary fluidic injection flow rates up to 15 percent of the primary flow rate. Although many injection-port geometries and two nozzle planforms (symmetric and asymmetric) were tested experimentally, this paper focuses on the computational results of the more successful asymmetric planform with a slot injection port. This nozzle concept was simulated with the Navier-Stokes flow solver, PAB3D, invoking the Shih, Zhu, and Lumley algebraic Reynolds stress turbulence model (ASM) at nozzle pressure ratios (NPRs) of 2,3, and 4 with secondary to primary injection flow rates (w(sub s)/w(sub p)) of 0, 2, 7 and 10 percent.

Deere, Karen A.

1998-01-01

51

Selected Performance Measurements of the F-15 Active Axisymmetric Thrust-Vectoring Nozzle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Flight tests recently completed at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center evaluated performance of a hydromechanically vectored axisymmetric nozzle onboard the F-15 ACTIVE. A flight-test technique whereby strain gages installed onto engine mounts provided for the direct measurement of thrust and vector forces has proven to be extremely valuable. Flow turning and thrust efficiency, as well as nozzle static pressure distributions were measured and analyzed. This report presents results from testing at an altitude of 30,000 ft and a speed of Mach 0.9. Flow turning and thrust efficiency were found to be significantly different than predicted, and moreover, varied substantially with power setting and pitch vector angle. Results of an in-flight comparison of the direct thrust measurement technique and an engine simulation fell within the expected uncertainty bands. Overall nozzle performance at this flight condition demonstrated the F100-PW-229 thrust-vectoring nozzles to be highly capable and efficient.

Orme, John S.; Sims, Robert L.

1998-01-01

52

Selected Performance Measurements of the F-15 ACTIVE Axisymmetric Thrust-Vectoring Nozzle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Flight tests recently completed at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center evaluated performance of a hydromechanically vectored axisymmetric nozzle onboard the F-15 ACTIVE. A flight-test technique whereby strain gages installed onto engine mounts provided for the direct measurement of thrust and vector forces has proven to be extremely valuable. Flow turning and thrust efficiency, as well as nozzle static pressure distributions were measured and analyzed. This report presents results from testing at an altitude of 30,000 ft and a speed of Mach 0.9. Flow turning and thrust efficiency were found to be significantly different than predicted, and moreover, varied substantially with power setting and pitch vector angle. Results of an in-flight comparison of the direct thrust measurement technique and an engine simulation fell within the expected uncertainty bands. Overall nozzle performance at this flight condition demonstrated the F100-PW-229 thrust-vectoring nozzles to be highly capable and efficient.

Orme, John S.; Sims, Robert L.

1999-01-01

53

An experimental investigation of thrust vectoring two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles installed in a twin-engine fighter model at high angles of attack  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine thrust vectoring capability of subscale 2-D convergent-divergent exhaust nozzles installed on a twin engine general research fighter model. Pitch thrust vectoring was accomplished by downward rotation of nozzle upper and lower flaps. The effects of nozzle sidewall cutback were studied for both unvectored and pitch vectored nozzles. A single cutback sidewall was employed for yaw thrust vectoring. This investigation was conducted at Mach numbers ranging from 0 to 1.20 and at angles of attack from -2 to 35 deg. High pressure air was used to simulate jet exhaust and provide values of nozzle pressure ratio up to 9.

Capone, Francis J.; Mason, Mary L.; Leavitt, Laurence D.

1990-01-01

54

Computational Study of an Axisymmetric Dual Throat Fluidic Thrust Vectoring Nozzle for a Supersonic Aircraft Application  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A computational investigation of an axisymmetric Dual Throat Nozzle concept has been conducted. This fluidic thrust-vectoring nozzle was designed with a recessed cavity to enhance the throat shifting technique for improved thrust vectoring. The structured-grid, unsteady Reynolds- Averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver PAB3D was used to guide the nozzle design and analyze performance. Nozzle design variables included extent of circumferential injection, cavity divergence angle, cavity length, and cavity convergence angle. Internal nozzle performance (wind-off conditions) and thrust vector angles were computed for several configurations over a range of nozzle pressure ratios from 1.89 to 10, with the fluidic injection flow rate equal to zero and up to 4 percent of the primary flow rate. The effect of a variable expansion ratio on nozzle performance over a range of freestream Mach numbers up to 2 was investigated. Results indicated that a 60 circumferential injection was a good compromise between large thrust vector angles and efficient internal nozzle performance. A cavity divergence angle greater than 10 was detrimental to thrust vector angle. Shortening the cavity length improved internal nozzle performance with a small penalty to thrust vector angle. Contrary to expectations, a variable expansion ratio did not improve thrust efficiency at the flight conditions investigated.

Deere, Karen A.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Johnson, Stuart K.

2007-01-01

55

An Experimental Investigation of Unsteady Thrust Augmentation Using a Speaker-Driven Jet  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental investigation is described in which a simple speaker-driven jet was used as a pulsed thrust source (driver) for an ejector configuration. The objectives of the investigation were twofold: first, to add to the experimental body of evidence showing that an unsteady thrust source, combined with a properly sized ejector generally yields higher thrust augmentation values than a similarly sized, steady driver of equivalent thrust. Second, to identify characteristics of the unsteady driver that may be useful for sizing ejectors, and predicting what thrust augmentation values may be achieved. The speaker-driven jet provided a convenient source for the investigation because it is entirely unsteady (having no mean component) and because relevant parameters such as frequency, time-averaged thrust, and diameter are easily variable. The experimental setup will be described, as will the various measurements made. These include both thrust and Digital Particle Imaging Velocimetry of the driver. It will be shown that thrust augmentation values as high as 1.8 were obtained, that the diameter of the best ejector scaled with the dimensions of the emitted vortex, and that the so-called Formation Number serves as a useful dimensionless number by which to characterize the jet and predict performance.

Paxson, Daniel E.; Wernet, Mark P.; John, Wentworth T.

2004-01-01

56

Static internal performance of single expansion-ramp nozzles with thrust vectoring and reversing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effects of geometric design parameters on the internal performance of nonaxisymmetric single expansion-ramp nozzles were investigated at nozzle pressure ratios up to approximately 10. Forward-flight (cruise), vectored-thrust, and reversed-thrust nozzle operating modes were investigated.

Re, R. J.; Berrier, B. L.

1982-01-01

57

Decoupling control of thrust and attractive force of a LIM using a space vector control inverter  

Microsoft Academic Search

A control method for magnetic levitation vehicles using linear induction motors which can generate both thrust and attractive force, is described. By selecting voltage vectors of PWM inverters appropriately, control with decoupling of the thrust and attractive force is achieved. Levitation control is accomplished by detecting the gap length and controlling the attractive force of each linear induction motor. Ultrasonic

Isao Takahashi; Yuji Ide

1993-01-01

58

Static Investigation of a Multiaxis Thrust-Vectoring Nozzle With Variable Internal Contouring Ability  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The thrust efficiency and vectoring performance of a convergent-divergent nozzle were investigated at static conditions in the model preparation area of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The diamond-shaped nozzle was capable of varying the internal contour of each quadrant individually by using cam mechanisms and retractable drawers to produce pitch and yaw thrust vectoring. Pitch thrust vectoring was achieved by either retracting the lower drawers to incline the throat or varying the internal flow-path contours to incline the throat. Yaw thrust vectoring was achieved by reducing flow area left of the nozzle centerline and increasing flow area right of the nozzle centerline; a skewed throat deflected the flow in the lateral direction.

Wing, David J.; Mills, Charles T. L.; Mason, Mary L.

1997-01-01

59

Implicit time-marching solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for thrust reversing and thrust vectoring nozzle flows  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An implicit finite volume method is investigated for the solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for flows within thrust reversing and thrust vectoring nozzles. Thrust reversing nozzles typically have sharp corners, and the rapid expansion and large turning angles near these corners are shown to cause unacceptable time step restrictions when conventional approximate factorization methods are used. In this investigation these limitations are overcome by using second-order upwind differencing and line Gauss-Siedel relaxation. This method is implemented with a zonal mesh so that flows through complex nozzle geometries may be efficiently calculated. Results are presented for five nozzle configurations including two with time varying geometries. Three cases are compared with available experimental data and the results are generally acceptable.

Imlay, S. T.

1986-01-01

60

Investigation of advanced thrust vectoring exhaust systems for high speed propulsive lift  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper presents the results of a wind tunnel investigation conducted at the NASA-Langley research center to determine thrust vectoring/induced lift characteristics of advanced exhaust nozzle concepts installed on a supersonic tactical airplane model. Specific test objectives include: (1) basic aerodynamics of a wing body configuration, (2) investigation of induced lift effects, (3) evaluation of static and forward speed performance, and (4) the effectiveness of a canard surface to trim thrust vectoring/induced lift forces and moments.

Hutchison, R. A.; Petit, J. E.; Capone, F. J.; Whittaker, R. W.

1980-01-01

61

Switching-based fault-tolerant control for an F-16 aircraft with thrust vectoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thrust vectoring technique enables aircraft to perform various maneuvers not available to conventional-engined planes. This paper presents an application of switching control concepts to fault-tolerant control design for an F-16 aircraft model augmented with thrust vectoring. Two controllers are synthesized using a switching logic, and they are switched on a fault parameter. During normal flight conditions, the F-16 aircraft relies

Bei Lu; Fen Wu

2009-01-01

62

Design of thrust vectoring exhaust nozzles for real-time applications using neural networks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Thrust vectoring continues to be an important issue in military aircraft system designs. A recently developed concept of vectoring aircraft thrust makes use of flexible exhaust nozzles. Subtle modifications in the nozzle wall contours produce a non-uniform flow field containing a complex pattern of shock and expansion waves. The end result, due to the asymmetric velocity and pressure distributions, is vectored thrust. Specification of the nozzle contours required for a desired thrust vector angle (an inverse design problem) has been achieved with genetic algorithms. This approach is computationally intensive and prevents the nozzles from being designed in real-time, which is necessary for an operational aircraft system. An investigation was conducted into using genetic algorithms to train a neural network in an attempt to obtain, in real-time, two-dimensional nozzle contours. Results show that genetic algorithm trained neural networks provide a viable, real-time alternative for designing thrust vectoring nozzles contours. Thrust vector angles up to 20 deg were obtained within an average error of 0.0914 deg. The error surfaces encountered were highly degenerate and thus the robustness of genetic algorithms was well suited for minimizing global errors.

Prasanth, Ravi K.; Markin, Robert E.; Whitaker, Kevin W.

1991-01-01

63

Static performance of nonaxisymmetric nozzles with yaw thrust-vectoring vanes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A static test was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16 ft Transonic Tunnel to evaluate the effects of post exit vane vectoring on nonaxisymmetric nozzles. Three baseline nozzles were tested: an unvectored two dimensional convergent nozzle, an unvectored two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle, and a pitch vectored two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle. Each nozzle geometry was tested with 3 exit aspect ratios (exit width divided by exit height) of 1.5, 2.5 and 4.0. Two post exit yaw vanes were externally mounted on the nozzle sidewalls at the nozzle exit to generate yaw thrust vectoring. Vane deflection angle (0, -20 and -30 deg), vane planform and vane curvature were varied during the test. Results indicate that the post exit vane concept produced resultant yaw vector angles which were always smaller than the geometric yaw vector angle. Losses in resultant thrust ratio increased with the magnitude of resultant yaw vector angle. The widest post exit vane produced the largest degree of flow turning, but vane curvature had little effect on thrust vectoring. Pitch vectoring was independent of yaw vectoring, indicating that multiaxis thrust vectoring is feasible for the nozzle concepts tested.

Mason, Mary L.; Berrier, Bobby L.

1988-01-01

64

Analysis of Thrust Vectoring Capabilities for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A strategy to mitigate the impact of the trajectory design of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) on the attitude control design is described in this paper. This paper shows how the thrust vectoring control torques, i.e. the torques required to steer the vehicle, depend on various parameters (thrust magnitude, thrust pod articulation angles, and thrust moment arms). Rather than using the entire reaction control system (RCS) system to steer the spacecraft, we investigate the potential utilization of only thrust vectoring of the main ion engines for the required attitude control to follow the representative trajectory. This study has identified some segments of the representative trajectory where the required control torque may exceed the designed ion engine capability, and how the proposed mitigation strategy succeeds in reducing the attitude control torques to within the existing capability.

Quadrelli, Marco B .; Gromov, Konstantin; Murray, Emmanuell

2005-01-01

65

Static Thrust and Vectoring Performance of a Spherical Convergent Flap Nozzle with a Nonrectangular Divergent Duct  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The static internal performance of a multiaxis-thrust-vectoring, spherical convergent flap (SCF) nozzle with a non-rectangular divergent duct was obtained in the model preparation area of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. Duct cross sections of hexagonal and bowtie shapes were tested. Additional geometric parameters included throat area (power setting), pitch flap deflection angle, and yaw gimbal angle. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2 to 12 for dry power configurations and from 2 to 6 for afterburning power configurations. Approximately a 1-percent loss in thrust efficiency from SCF nozzles with a rectangular divergent duct was incurred as a result of internal oblique shocks in the flow field. The internal oblique shocks were the result of cross flow generated by the vee-shaped geometric throat. The hexagonal and bowtie nozzles had mirror-imaged flow fields and therefore similar thrust performance. Thrust vectoring was not hampered by the three-dimensional internal geometry of the nozzles. Flow visualization indicates pitch thrust-vector angles larger than 10' may be achievable with minimal adverse effect on or a possible gain in resultant thrust efficiency as compared with the performance at a pitch thrust-vector angle of 10 deg.

Wing, David J.

1998-01-01

66

Traceable Calibration of the 3 axis Thrust Vector in the mN range  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The possibility of measuring the three force components i.e. the main axial component and the two orthogonal radial components, generated by an electric propulsion system is important for two reasons. Firstly, to assess the impact of spacecraft/propulsion system integration issues, for example to verify the alignment of the thrust vector with the spacecraft centre-of-mass for spacecraft stability. Secondly, to operate the thruster properly during flight, for example to determine the thrust vector relative to the mechanical axis of the thruster. Furthermore, a three-axis measurement capability will be useful for the experimental performance verification of the next generation of vectored electric propulsion devices, especially regarding the many unresolved issues connected with indirect thrust measurement using electrostatic probes. The capability to monitor thrust vector drift in real time and with significant bandwidth is also important. Thus enabling vector drift during thruster warm-up, to be measured, and the response of vectored thrusters to change in vector demand can be assessed. In this paper we describe the design, construction and testing of an instrument proof of concept. The instrument was designed to accommodate a dummy thruster mass of 0.5 kg and operate in the 0 to 10 mN range. The directional resolution that has been demonstrated is better than 0.05 ° in both axes when operating at full thrust.

Hughes, B.; Oldfield, S.

2004-10-01

67

Investigation of the Longitudinal Characteristics of a Large-Scale Jet Transport Model Equipped with Controllable Thrust Reversers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation was conducted to determine the effect of thrust control by means of controllable thrust reversers on the longitudinal characteristics of a large-scale airplane model with a 35' sweptback wing of aspect ratio of 7 and four pylon-mounted jet engines equipped with target-type thrust reversers designed to provide thrust control ranging from full forward thrust to full reverse thrust. The thrust control in landing-approach configurations formed the major portion of the study. Results were obtained with both leading- and trailing-edge high-lift devices.

Hickey, David H.; Tolhurst, William H., Jr.; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi

1961-01-01

68

Spreading characteristics and thrust of jets from asymmetric nozzles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The spreading characteristics of jets from several asymmetric nozzles are studied in comparison to those of an axisymmetric jet, over the Mach number (M(sub J)) range of 0.3 to 1.96. The effect of tabs in two cases, the axisymmetric nozzle fitted with four tabs and a rectangular nozzle fitted with two large tabs, is also included in the comparison. Compared to the axisymmetric jet, the asymmetric jets spread only slightly faster at subsonic conditions, while at supersonic conditions, when screech occurs, they spread much faster. Screech profoundly increases the spreading of all jets. The effect varies in the different stages of screech, and the corresponding unsteady flowfield characteristics are documented via phase-averaged measurement of the fluctuating total pressure. An organization and intensification of the azimuthal vortical structures under the screeching condition is believed to be responsible for the increased spreading. Curiously, the jet from a 'lobed mixer' nozzle spreads much less at supersonic conditions compared to all other cases. This is due to the absence of screech with this nozzle. Jet spreading for the two tab configurations, on the other hand, is significantly more than any of the no-tab cases. This is true in the subsonic regime, as well as in the supersonic regime in spite of the fact that screech is essentially eliminated by the tabs. The dynamics of the streamwise vortex pairs produced by the tabs cause the most efficient jet spreading thus far observed in the study.

Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

1995-01-01

69

Thrust-induced effects on subsonic longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a vectored-engine-over-wing configuration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation was conducted in the Langley 4 by 7 Meter Tunnel of the thrust induced effects on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a vectored-engine-over-wing fighter aircraft. The investigation was conducted at Mach numbers from 0.14 to 0.17 over an angle-of-attack range from -2 deg to 26 deg. The major model variables were the spanwise blowing nozzle sweep angle and main nozzle vector angle along with trailing edge, flap deflections. The overall thrust coefficient (main and spanwise nozzles) was varied from 0 (jet off) to 2.0. The results indicate that the thrust-induced effects from the main nozzle alone were small and mainly due to boundary-layer control affecting a small area behind the nozzle. When the spanwise blowing nozzles were included, the induced effects were larger than the main nozzle alone and were due to both boundary layer control and induced circulation lift. No leading edge vortex effects were evident.

Quinto, P. F.; Paulson, J. W., Jr.

1983-01-01

70

On INM's Use of Corrected Net Thrust for the Prediction of Jet Aircraft Noise  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Federal Aviation Administration s (FAA) Integrated Noise Model (INM) employs a prediction methodology that relies on corrected net thrust as the sole correlating parameter between aircraft and engine operating states and aircraft noise. Thus aircraft noise measured for one set of atmospheric and aircraft operating conditions is assumed to be applicable to all other conditions as long as the corrected net thrust remains constant. This hypothesis is investigated under two primary assumptions: (1) the sound field generated by the aircraft is dominated by jet noise, and (2) the sound field generated by the jet flow is adequately described by Lighthill s theory of noise generated by turbulence.

McAninch, Gerry L.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

2011-01-01

71

Experimental and Computational Investigation of Multiple Injection Ports in a Convergent-Divergent Nozzle for Fluidic Thrust Vectoring  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A computational and experimental study was conducted to investigate the effects of multiple injection ports in a two-dimensional, convergent-divergent nozzle, for fluidic thrust vectoring. The concept of multiple injection ports was conceived to enhance the thrust vectoring capability of a convergent-divergent nozzle over that of a single injection port without increasing the secondary mass flow rate requirements. The experimental study was conducted at static conditions in the Jet Exit Test Facility of the 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel Complex at NASA Langley Research Center. Internal nozzle performance was obtained at nozzle pressure ratios up to 10 with secondary nozzle pressure ratios up to 1 for five configurations. The computational study was conducted using the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics code PAB3D with two-equation turbulence closure and linear Reynolds stress modeling. Internal nozzle performance was predicted for nozzle pressure ratios up to 10 with a secondary nozzle pressure ratio of 0.7 for two configurations. Results from the experimental study indicate a benefit to multiple injection ports in a convergent-divergent nozzle. In general, increasing the number of injection ports from one to two increased the pitch thrust vectoring capability without any thrust performance penalties at nozzle pressure ratios less than 4 with high secondary pressure ratios. Results from the computational study are in excellent agreement with experimental results and validates PAB3D as a tool for predicting internal nozzle performance of a two dimensional, convergent-divergent nozzle with multiple injection ports.

Waithe, Kenrick A.; Deere, Karen A.

2003-01-01

72

Thrust Vectoring of a Continuous Rotating Detonation Engine by Changing the Local Injection Pressure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The thrust vectoring ability of a continuous rotating detonation engine is numerically investigated, which is realized via increasing local injection stagnation pressure of half of the simulation domain compared to the other half. Under the homogeneous injection condition, both the flow-field structure and the detonation wave propagation process are analyzed. Due to the same injection condition along the inlet boundary, the outlines of fresh gas zones at different moments are similar to each other. The main flow-field features under thrust vectoring cases are similar to that under the baseline condition. However, due to the heterogeneous injection system, both the height of the fresh gas zone and the pressure value of the fresh gas in the high injection pressure zone are larger than that in the low injection pressure zone. Thus the average pressure in half of the engine is larger than that in the other half and the thrust vectoring adjustment is realized.

Liu, Shi-Jie; Lin, Zhi-Yong; Sun, Ming-Bo; Liu, Wei-Dong

2011-09-01

73

Mixing and Noise Benefit Versus Thrust Penalty in Supersonic Jets Using Impingement Tones  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper reports the results of an experimental investigation on the effect of impingement tones generated by obstacles of various geometries on the spreading of a supersonic jet flow. A rectangular supersonic jet was produced using a convergent-divergent nozzle that was operated near its design point (with shocks minimized). The immersion of obstacles in the flow produced an intense impingement tone which then propagated upstream (as feedback) to the jet lip and excited the antisymmetric hydrodynamic mode in the jet, thus setting up a resonant self-sustaining loop. The violent flapping motion of the jet due to excitation of the antisymmetric mode, combined with the unsteady wakes of the obstacles, produced large changes in jet mixing. It was possible to control the frequency and amplitude of the impingement tone excitation by varying the nozzle-to-obstacle distance and the obstacle immersion. By proper shaping of the obstacles it was possible to reduce the thrust penalty significantly.

Raman, Ganesh; Rice, Edward J.

1994-01-01

74

Control of Ducted Fan Flying Object Using Thrust Vectoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, R/C helicopter is used in fields of aerial photography and aerial investigation. But helicopter rotor blades are not covered, and the thrust is generated by high rotational speed. Thus R/C helicopter has a high risk of damage. In this study, we developed a new flying object using ducted fans instead of rotor blades. At first, PD control was employed for pitch and roll attitude control, but it caused steady state error. Moreover, PI-D control was used instead of PD control, and it reduced the steady state error. We succeeded to achieve stable hovering by 3-axes (roll, pitch and yaw axis) attitude control.

Miwa, Masafumi; Shigematsu, Yuki; Yamashita, Takashi

75

Developmental Testing of Electric Thrust Vector Control Systems for Manned Launch Vehicle Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes recent developmental testing to verify the integration of a developmental electromechanical actuator (EMA) with high rate lithium ion batteries and a cross platform extensible controller. Testing was performed at the Thrust Vector Control Research, Development and Qualification Laboratory at the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center. Electric Thrust Vector Control (ETVC) systems like the EMA may significantly reduce recurring launch costs and complexity compared to heritage systems. Electric actuator mechanisms and control requirements across dissimilar platforms are also discussed with a focus on the similarities leveraged and differences overcome by the cross platform extensible common controller architecture.

Bates, Lisa B.; Young, David T.

2012-01-01

76

Modeling and Thrust Optimization of a Bio-Inspired Pulsatile Jet Thruster  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new type of thruster technology offers promising low speed maneuvering capabilities for underwater vehicles. Similar to the natural locomotion of squid and jellyfish the thruster successively forces fluid jets in and out of a small internal cavity. We investigate several properties of squid and jellyfish locomotion to drive the thruster design including actuation of nozzle geometry and vortex ring thrust augmentation. The thrusters are compact with no extruding components to negatively impact the vehicle's drag. These devices have thrust rise-times orders of magnitude faster than those reported for typical propeller thrusters, making them an attractive option for high accuracy underwater vehicle maneuvering. The dynamics of starting jet circulation, impulse, and kinetic energy are derived in terms of kinematics at the entrance boundary of a semi-infinite domain, specifically identifying the effect of a non-parallel incoming flow. A model for pressure at the nozzle is derived without the typical reliance on a predetermined potential function, making it a powerful tool for modeling any jet flow. Jets are created from multiple nozzle configurations to validate these models, and velocity and vorticity fields are determined using DPIV techniques. A converging starting jet resulted in circulation 90--100%, impulse 70--75%, and energy 105--135% larger than a parallel starting jet with identical volume flux and piston velocity, depending on the stroke ratio. The new model is a much better predictor of the jet properties than the standard 1D slug model. A simplified thrust model, was derived to describe the high frequency thruster characteristics. This model accurately predicts the average thrust, measured directly, for stroke ratios up to a critical value where the leading vortex ring separates from the remainder of the shear flow. A new model predicting the vortex ring pinch-off process is developed based on characteristic centerline velocities. The vortex ring pinch-off is coincides with this velocity criterion, for all cases tested. Piston velocity program and nozzle radius are optimized with respect to average thrust, and a quantity similar to propulsive efficiency. The average thrust is maximized by a critical nozzle radius. An approximate linear time-invariant (LTI) model of the thruster vehicle system was derived which categorizes maneuvers into different characteristic regimes. Initial thruster testing showed that open and closed loop frequency response were sufficiently approximated by the LTI model, and that the thruster is ideally suited for small scale high accuracy maneuvers.

Krieg, Michael W.

77

Fluidic Thrust Vector Control for the Stabilization of Man/Ejection Seat Systems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A 2-axis, hydrofluidic thrust vector control (TVC) system was designed to improve the total trajectory of an ejection seat system during adverse conditions from 0 to 600 knots air speed. A nonlinear model of the seat was derived and linearized to determin...

R. B. Beale

1975-01-01

78

Simple Dynamic Engine Model for Use in a Real-Time Aircraft Simulation with Thrust Vectoring.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A simple dynamic engine model was developed at the NASA Ames Research Center, Dryden Flight Research Facility, for use in thrust vectoring control law development and real-time aircraft simulation. The simple dynamic engine model of the F404-GE-400 engine...

S. A. Johnson

1990-01-01

79

Aeroservoelastic Modeling and Validation of a Thrust-Vectoring F/A-18 Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An F/A-18 aircraft was modified to perform flight research at high angles of attack (AOA) using thrust vectoring and advanced control law concepts for agility and performance enhancement and to provide a testbed for the computational fluid dynamics community. Aeroservoelastic (ASE) characteristics had changed considerably from the baseline F/A-18 aircraft because of structural and flight control system amendments, so analyses and flight tests were performed to verify structural stability at high AOA. Detailed actuator models that consider the physical, electrical, and mechanical elements of actuation and its installation on the airframe were employed in the analysis to accurately model the coupled dynamics of the airframe, actuators, and control surfaces. This report describes the ASE modeling procedure, ground test validation, flight test clearance, and test data analysis for the reconfigured F/A-18 aircraft. Multivariable ASE stability margins are calculated from flight data and compared to analytical margins. Because this thrust-vectoring configuration uses exhaust vanes to vector the thrust, the modeling issues are nearly identical for modem multi-axis nozzle configurations. This report correlates analysis results with flight test data and makes observations concerning the application of the linear predictions to thrust-vectoring and high-AOA flight.

Brenner, Martin J.

1996-01-01

80

Research on the Measurement of Thrust Vector for a Liquid-Propellant Rocket Motor Based on Piezoelectric Quartz  

Microsoft Academic Search

In spaceflight, the orbit\\/attitude control rocket which mainly works in pulse ignition has important effect on spacecraft control. It is necessary to study the performance of thrust vector generated by rocket in order to improve the control precision and extend working life of spacecraft. A piezoelectric measurement system for thrust vector measurement is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The postulate

Jun Zhang; Baoyuan Sun; Zongjin Ren; Yue Liu

2009-01-01

81

Multiaxis Thrust Vectoring Using Axisymmetric Nozzles and Postexit Vanes on an F/A-18 Configuration Vehicle.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A ground-based investigation was conducted on an operational system of multiaxis thrust vectoring using postexit vanes around an axisymmetric nozzle. This thrust vectoring system will be tested on the NASA F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) aircraf...

A. H. Bowers G. K. Noffz S. B. Grafton M. L. Mason L. R. Peron

1991-01-01

82

Thrust shock vector control of an axisymmetric conical supersonic nozzle via secondary transverse gas injection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Transverse secondary gas injection into the supersonic flow of an axisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle is investigated to describe the effects of the fluidic thrust vectoring within the framework of a small satellite launcher. Cold-flow dry-air experiments are performed in a supersonic wind tunnel using two identical supersonic conical nozzles with the different transverse injection port positions. The complex three-dimensional flow field generated by the supersonic cross-flows in these test nozzles was examined. Valuable experimental data were confronted and compared with the results obtained from the numerical simulations. Different nozzle models are numerically simulated under experimental conditions and then further investigated to determine which parameters significantly affect thrust vectoring. Effects which characterize the nozzle and thrust vectoring performances are established. The results indicate that with moderate secondary to primary mass flow rate ratios, ranging around 5 %, it is possible to achieve pertinent vector side forces. It is also revealed that injector positioning and geometry have a strong effect on the shock vector control system and nozzle performances.

Zmijanovic, V.; Lago, V.; Sellam, M.; Chpoun, A.

2014-01-01

83

Fluidic scale model multi-plane thrust vector control test results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental investigation has been conducted at the NASA Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel Static Test Facility to determine the concept feasibility of using fluidics to achieve multiplane thrust vector control in a 2D convergent-divergent (2D-CD) fixed aperture nozzle. Pitch thrust vector control is achieved by injection of flow through a slot in the divergent flap into the primary nozzle flow stream. Yaw vector control results from secondary air delivered tangentially to vertical Coanda flaps. These flaps are offset laterally and aligned parallel to the primary nozzle side walls. All tests were conducted at static (no external flow) conditions. Flow visualization was conducted using a paint flow technique and Focus Schlieren. Significant levels of pitch deflection angles (19 deg) were achieved at low pressure ratios and practical levels (14 deg) resulted at typical intermediate power settings. The ability of the Coanda surface blowing concept to produce yaw deflection was limited to NPR not greater than 4.

Chiarelli, Charles; Johnsen, Raymond K.; Shieh, Chih F.; Wing, David J.

1993-01-01

84

Vista/F-16 Multi-Axis Thrust Vectoring (MATV) control law design and evaluation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For the Multi-Axis Thrust Vectoring (MATV) program, a new control law was developed using multi-axis thrust vectoring to augment the aircraft's aerodynamic control power to provide maneuverability above the normal F-16 angle of attack limit. The control law architecture was developed using Lockheed Fort Worth's offline and piloted simulation capabilities. The final flight control laws were used in flight test to demonstrate tactical benefits gained by using thrust vectoring in air-to-air combat. Differences between the simulator aerodynamics data base and the actual aircraft aerodynamics led to significantly different lateral-directional flying qualities during the flight test program than those identified during piloted simulation. A 'dial-a-gain' flight test control law update was performed in the middle of the flight test program. This approach allowed for inflight optimization of the aircraft's flying qualities. While this approach is not preferred over updating the simulator aerodynamic data base and then updating the control laws, the final selected gain set did provide adequate lateral-directional flying qualities over the MATV flight envelope. The resulting handling qualities and the departure resistance of the aircraft allowed the 422nd_squadron pilots to focus entirely on evaluating the aircraft's tactical utility.

Zwerneman, W. D.; Eller, B. G.

1994-01-01

85

Dryden/Edwards 1994 Thrust-Vectoring Aircraft Fleet - F-18 HARV, X-31, F-16 MATV  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The three thrust-vectoring aircraft at Edwards, California, each capable of flying at extreme angles of attack, cruise over the California desert in formation during flight in March 1994. They are, from left, NASA's F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), flown by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center; the X-31, flown by the X-31 International Test Organization (ITO) at Dryden; and the Air Force F-16 Multi-Axis Thrust Vectoring (MATV) aircraft. All three aircraft were flown in different programs and were developed independently. The NASA F-18 HARV was a testbed to produce aerodynamic data at high angles of attack to validate computer codes and wind tunnel research. The X-31 was used to study thrust vectoring to enhance close-in air combat maneuvering, while the F-16 MATV was a demonstration of how thrust vectoring could be applied to operational aircraft.

1994-01-01

86

Static Investigation of a Two-Dimensional Convergent-Divergent Exhaust Nozzle with Multiaxis Thrust-Vectoring Capability.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An investigation was conducted in the Static Test Facility of the NASA Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the internal performance of two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles designed to have simultaneous pitch and yaw thrust vectoring capa...

J. G. Taylor

1990-01-01

87

Support Vector Novelty Detection Applied to Jet Engine Vibration Spectra  

Microsoft Academic Search

A system has been developed to extract diagnostic information from jet engine carcass vibration data. Support Vector Machines applied to nov- elty detection provide a measure of how unusual the shape of a vibra- tion signature is, by learning a representation of normality. We descri be a novel method for Support Vector Machines of including information from a second class

Paul Hayton; Bernhard Schölkopf; Lionel Tarassenko; Paul Anuzis

2000-01-01

88

An investigation of corner separation within a thrust augmenter having Coanda jets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of separation in corners of thrust augmentor wings having Coanda jets was investigated using hot film surface sensors and pressure transducers. Separation on the test augmentor began at a corner very close to the augmentor exit and then rapidly proceeded upstream. Measurements of the pressure fields in the corner region indicated that a modified form of the Stratford criterion could be used to predict the onset of separation. Testing was conducted over a range of nozzle pressure ratios, aspect ratios, diffuser angles, and designs of the boundary layer and Coanda nozzles.

Seiler, M. R.

1979-01-01

89

Linear Test Bed. Volume 2: Test Bed No. 2. [linear aerospike test bed for thrust vector control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Test bed No. 2 consists of 10 combustors welded in banks of 5 to 2 symmetrical tubular nozzle assemblies, an upper stationary thrust frame, a lower thrust frame which can be hinged, a power package, a triaxial combustion wave ignition system, a pneumatic control system, pneumatically actuated propellant valves, a purge and drain system, and an electrical control system. The power package consists of the Mark 29-F fuel turbopump, the Mark 29-0 oxidizer turbopump, a gas generator assembly, and propellant ducting. The system, designated as a linear aerospike system, was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept and to explore technology related to thrust vector control, thrust vector optimization, improved sequencing and control, and advanced ignition systems. The propellants are liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen. The system was designed to operate at 1200-psia chamber pressure at an engine mixture ratio of 5.5. With 10 combustors, the sea level thrust is 95,000 pounds.

1974-01-01

90

Static internal performance of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle with thrust vectoring  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A parametric investigation of the static internal performance of multifunction two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles has been made in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. All nozzles had a constant throat area and aspect ratio. The effects of upper and lower flap angles, divergent flap length, throat approach angle, sidewall containment, and throat geometry were determined. All nozzles were tested at a thrust vector angle that varied from 5.60 tp 23.00 deg. The nozzle pressure ratio was varied up to 10 for all configurations.

Bare, E. Ann; Reubush, David E.

1987-01-01

91

Vector Boson + Jets with BLACKHAT and SHERPA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We review recent NLO QCD results for W, Z+3-jet production at hadron colliders, computed using BLACKHAT and SHERPA. We also include some new results for Z+3-jet production at the LHC at 7 TeV. We report new progress towards the NLO cross section for W+4-jet production. In particular, we show that the virtual matrix elements produced by BLACKHAT are numerically stable. We also show that with an improved integrator and tree-level matrix elements from BLACKHAT, SHERPA produces well-behaved real-emission contributions. As an illustration, we present the real-emission contributions - including dipole-subtraction terms - to the p distribution of the fourth jet, for a single subprocess with the maximum number of gluons.

Berger, C. F.; Bern, Z.; Dixon, L. J.; Febres Cordero, F.; Forde, D.; Gleisberg, T.; Ita, H.; Kosower, D. A.; Maître, D.

2010-08-01

92

Periodic Excitation for Jet Vectoring and Enhanced Spreading  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effects of periodic excitation on the evolution of a turbulent jet were studied experimentally. A short, wide-angle diffuser was attached to the jet exit and excitation was introduced at the junction between the jet exit and the diffuser inlet. The introduction of high amplitude periodic excitation at the jet exit enhances the mixing and promotes attachment of the jet shear-layer to the diffuser wall. Vectoring is achieved by applying the excitation over a fraction of the circumference of the circular jet, enhancing its spreading rate on the excited side and its tendency to reattach to that side. Static deflection studies demonstrate that the presence of the wide-angle diffuser increases the effectiveness of the added periodic momentum due to a favorable interaction between the excitation, the jet shear-layer and the diffuser wall. This point was further demonstrated by the evolution of a wave packet that was excited in the jet shear-layer. Strong amplification of the wave packet was measured with a diffuser attached to the jet exit. The turbulent jet responds quickly (10-20 msec) to step changes in the level of the excitation input. The response scales with the jet exit velocity and is independent of the Reynolds number. Jet deflection angles were found to be highly sensitive to the relative direction between the excitation and the jet flow and less sensitive to the excitation frequency. The higher jet deflection angles were obtained for a diffuser length of about two diameters and for diffusers with half-angles greater than 15 degrees.

Pack, LaTunia G.; Seifert, Avi

1999-01-01

93

Performance of twin two-dimensional wedge nozzles including thrust vectoring and reversing effects at speeds up to Mach 2.20  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Transonic tunnel and supersonic pressure tunnel tests were reformed to determine the performance characteristics of twin nonaxisymmetric or two-dimensional nozzles with fixed shrouds and variable-geometry wedges. The effects of thrust vectoring, reversing, and installation of various tails were also studied. The investigation was conducted statically and at flight speeds up to a Mach number of 2.20. The total pressure ratio of the simulated jet exhaust was varied up to approximately 26 depending on Mach number. The Reynolds number per meter varied up to 13.20 x 1 million. An analytical study was made to determine the effect on calculated wave drag by varying the mathematical model used to simulate nozzle jet-exhaust plume.

Capone, F. J.; Maiden, D. L.

1977-01-01

94

The effects on propulsion-induced aerodynamic forces of vectoring a partial-span rectangular jet at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 1.20  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel to determine the induced lift characteristics of a vectored thrust concept in which a rectangular jet exhaust nozzle was located in the fuselage at the wing trailing edge. The effects of nozzle deflection angles of 0 deg to 45 deg were studied at Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.2, at angles of attack up to 14 deg, and with thrust coefficients up to 0.35. Separate force balances were used to determine total aerodynamic and thrust forces as well as thrust forces which allowed a direct measurement of jet turning angle at forward speeds. Wing pressure loading and flow characteristics using oil flow techniques were also studied.

Capone, F. J.

1975-01-01

95

Design and evaluation of single and dual flow thrust vector nozzles with post exit vanes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Thrust Vectored Research project required that a 1/24 scale model of the F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle, (HARV), propulsion system be constructed on the university campus. This propulsion system was designed for cold flow testing on a multicomponent test rig. Forces and moments were measured to study nozzle performance parameters. The flow visualization technique of color Schlieren photography was performed to investigate the flow phenomena at the nozzle exit. The flow interactions that were identified consisted of vane nozzleing between the outer and lower vanes and vane tip interference. The thrust vectoring system consisted of three asymmetrically spaced vanes installed circumferentially on a maximum afterburner nozzle. The performance of the nozzle was investigated with the outer and lower vanes equally deflected, (-10 deg is less than delta(sub v) is less than 25 deg), and with the upper vane fully retracted, (delta(sub v) equals -10 deg). The nozzle pressure ratio ranged from 4 to 6. The results indicated that a vane nozzleing effect developed at nozzle pressure ratios of 4 and 6 when the outer and lower vanes were deflected far enough into the flow field such that the increase in vane area accelerated the flow past the vanes causing distorted shock waves. This accelerated flow was a result of a pressure differential existing between the inside surface of the vane and the ambient pressure. The stagnation pressure that developed along the inside surface of the vane accelerated the flow past the vanes causing it to equalize with ambient pressure, thus providing distorted shock waves. A tip interference was present at the trailing edge of the upper vane as a result of low nozzle pressure, NPR 4, with high vane deflection, delta(sub v) equals 25 degrees, and also with a high nozzle pressure, NPR 6, and low vane deflections, delta(sub v) equals 15 degrees.

Carpenter, Thomas W.; Vaccarezza, Stephen E.; Dobbins, Sean

1992-01-01

96

Design and development of the quad redundant servoactuator for the space shuttle solid rocket booster thrust vector control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design and theory of operation of the servoactuator used for thrust vector control of the space shuttle solid rocket booster is described accompanied by highlights from the development and qualification test programs. Specific details are presented concerning major anomalies that occurred during the test programs and the corrective courses of action pursued.

Lominick, J. M.

1980-01-01

97

Noise generated by a flight weight, air flow control valve in a vertical takeoff and landing aircraft thrust vectoring system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tests were conducted in the NASA Lewis Research Center's Powered Lift Facility to experimentally evaluate the noise generated by a flight weight, 12 in. butterfly valve installed in a proposed vertical takeoff and landing thrust vectoring system. Fluctuating pressure measurements were made in the circular duct upstream and downstream of the valve. This data report presents the results of these

Ronald G. Huff

1989-01-01

98

Classifier based on support vector machine for JET plasma configurations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The last flux surface can be used to identify the plasma configuration of discharges. For automated recognition of JET configurations, a learning system based on support vector machines has been developed. Each configuration is described by 12 geometrical parameters. A multiclass system has been developed by means of the one-versus-the-rest approach. Results with eight simultaneous classes (plasma configurations) show a success rate close to 100%.

Dormido-Canto, S.; Farias, G.; Vega, J.; Dormido, R.; Sánchez, J.; Duro, N.; Vargas, H.; Murari, A.; Jet-Efda Contributors

2008-10-01

99

Results of solar electric thrust vector control system design, development and tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Efforts to develop and test a thrust vector control system TVCS for a solar-energy-powered ion engine array are described. The results of solar electric propulsion system technology (SEPST) III real-time tests of present versions of TVCS hardware in combination with computer-simulated attitude dynamics of a solar electric multi-mission spacecraft (SEMMS) Phase A-type spacecraft configuration are summarized. Work on an improved solar electric TVCS, based on the use of a state estimator, is described. SEPST III tests of TVCS hardware have generally proved successful and dynamic response of the system is close to predictions. It appears that, if TVCS electronic hardware can be effectively replaced by control computer software, a significant advantage in control capability and flexibility can be gained in future developmental testing, with practical implications for flight systems as well. Finally, it is concluded from computer simulations that TVCS stabilization using rate estimation promises a substantial performance improvement over the present design.

Fleischer, G. E.

1973-01-01

100

Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Assessment of the ascent thrust vector control actuator subsystem FMEA/CIL  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA effort first completed an analysis of the Ascent Thrust Vector Control Actuator (ATVD) hardware, generating draft failure modes and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The IOA results were then compared to the NASA FMEA/CIL baseline with proposed Post 51-L updates included. A resolution of each discrepancy from the comparison is provided through additional analysis as required. This report documents the results of that comparison for the Orbiter ATVC hardware. The IOA product for the ATVC actuator analysis consisted of 25 failure mode worksheets that resulted in 16 potential critical items being identified. Comparison was made to the NASA baseline which consisted of 21 FMEAs and 13 CIL items. This comparison produced agreement on all CIL items. Based on the Pre 51-L baseline, all non-CIL FMEAs were also in agreement.

Wilson, R. E.

1988-01-01

101

Computational Issues Associated with Temporally Deforming Geometries Such as Thrust Vectoring Nozzles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the past decade, computational simulation of fluid flow around complex configurations has progressed significantly and many notable successes have been reported, however, unsteady time-dependent solutions are not easily obtainable. The present effort involves unsteady time dependent simulation of temporally deforming geometries. Grid generation for a complex configuration can be a time consuming process and temporally varying geometries necessitate the regeneration of such grids for every time step. Traditional grid generation techniques have been tried and demonstrated to be inadequate to such simulations. Non-Uniform Rational B-splines (NURBS) based techniques provide a compact and accurate representation of the geometry. This definition can be coupled with a distribution mesh for a user defined spacing. The present method greatly reduces cpu requirements for time dependent remeshing, facilitating the simulation of more complex unsteady problems. A thrust vectoring nozzle has been chosen to demonstrate the capability as it is of current interest in the aerospace industry for better maneuverability of fighter aircraft in close combat and in post stall regimes. This current effort is the first step towards multidisciplinary design optimization which involves coupling the aerodynamic heat transfer and structural analysis techniques. Applications include simulation of temporally deforming bodies and aeroelastic problems.

Boyalakuntla, Kishore; Soni, Bharat K.; Thornburg, Hugh J.; Yu, Robert

1996-01-01

102

Preliminary Investigation on Battery Sizing Investigation for Thrust Vector Control on Ares I and Ares V Launch Vehicles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation into the merits of battery powered Electro Hydrostatic Actuation (EHA) for Thrust Vector Control (TVC) of the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicles is described. A top level trade study was conducted to ascertain the technical merits of lithium-ion (Li-ion) and thermal battery performance to determine the preferred choice of an energy storage system chemistry that provides high power discharge capability for a relatively short duration.

Miller, Thomas B.

2011-01-01

103

Thrust-vector control of a three-axis stabilized upper-stage rocket with fuel slosh dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper studies the thrust vector control problem for an upper-stage rocket with fuel slosh dynamics. The dynamics of a three-axis stabilized spacecraft with a single partially-filled fuel tank are formulated and the sloshing propellant is modeled as a multi-mass–spring system, where the oscillation frequencies of the mass–spring elements represent the prominent sloshing modes. The equations of motion are expressed in terms of the three-dimensional spacecraft translational velocity vector, the attitude, the angular velocity, and the internal coordinates representing the slosh modes. A Lyapunov-based nonlinear feedback control law is proposed to control the translational velocity vector and the attitude of the spacecraft, while attenuating the sloshing modes characterizing the internal dynamics. A simulation example is included to illustrate the effectiveness of the control law.

Rubio Hervas, Jaime; Reyhanoglu, Mahmut

2014-05-01

104

Large-Scale Wind-Tunnel Tests of Exhaust Ingestion Due to Thrust Reversal on a Four-Engine Jet Transport during Ground Roll  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Wind-tunnel tests have been conducted on a large-scale model of a swept-wing jet transport type airplane to study the factors affecting exhaust gas ingestion into the engine inlets when thrust reversal is used during ground roll. The model was equipped with four small jet engines mounted in nacelles beneath the wing. The tests included studies of both cascade and target type reversers. The data obtained included the free-stream velocity at the occurrence of exhaust gas ingestion in the outboard engine and the increment of drag due to thrust reversal for various modifications of thrust reverser configuration. Motion picture films of smoke flow studies were also obtained to supplement the data. The results show that the free-stream velocity at which ingestion occurred in the outboard engines could be reduced considerably, by simple modifications to the reversers, without reducing the effective drag due to reversed thrust.

Tolhurst, William H., Jr.; Hickey, David H.; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi

1961-01-01

105

Vector Boson plus Jets background to the early MET plus jets search  

SciTech Connect

Searches in the large missing transverse momentum (MET) plus jets final state topology have great potential for discovery of new physics involving dark matter candidates during early LHC running. Standard Model processes that produce the same observable signature constitute the background to such searches. One of the main backgrounds is expected to come from higher-order QCD radiation in single vector boson production, which is difficult to model with Monte Carlo simulations. A strategy to estimate this background using data driven methods with various control samples is presented for early searches with the CMS detector.

D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria [University of California, Santa Barbara (United States)

2010-02-10

106

Optimal trajectories for spacecraft with low electric-jet thrust in mission to asteroid Apophis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is considered the problem of space flights to the asteroid Apophis. We analyze the flight scheme, which includes the geocentric stage, when a spacecraft with a high-thrust engine is accelerated; the heliocentric stage, in which the spacecraft moves using a low-thrust engine; and, finally, the deceleration stage, when the spacecraft becomes an artificial satellite orbiting the asteroid. We solve the problem of optimal control for the ideal and piecewise-constant low thrust, as well as determine the optimal value and direction of the hyperbolic velocity at "infinity" achieved by the spacecraft when it leaves the Earth sphere of influence. There is defined the set of space trajectories for a wide range of start dates and various flight durations using a complex method of optimization. We estimate the final mass of the spacecraft and the mass of the payload that can be delivered to the asteroid using the Soyuz-Fregat launcher.

Ivashkin, V. V.; Krylov, I. V.

2012-07-01

107

Locomotion by blowing into the sail of a sailboat---from a basic physics question to thrust reversal of jet aeroplanes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The old physics question of whether it is possible to achieve locomotion of a sailboat if there is no wind at all by just blowing into the sail of the boat is discussed with respect to a modern everyday-life technological application, the thrust reversal of jet aeroplanes. This connection of basic physics with technology offers a new approach for studying

Michael Vollmer; Klaus-Peter Möllmann; Frank Arnold

2007-01-01

108

Engine inlet distortion in a 9.2 percent scale vectored thrust STOVL model in ground effect  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Advanced Short Takeoff/Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft which can operate from remote locations, damaged runways, and small air capable ships are being pursued for deployment around the turn of the century. To achieve this goal, NASA Lewis Research Center, McDonnell Douglas Aircraft, and DARPA defined a cooperative program for testing in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot low speed wind tunnel (LSWT) to establish a database for hot gas ingestion, one of the technologies critical to STOVL. Results are presented which show the engine inlet distortions (both temperature and pressure) in a 9.2 percent scale vectored thrust STOVL model in ground effects. Results are shown for the forward nozzle splay angles of 0 degrees, -6 degrees, and 18 degrees. The model support system had 4 degrees of freedom, heated high pressure air for nozzle flow, and a suction system exhaust for inlet flow. The headwind (freestream) velocity was varied from 8 to 23 knots.

Johns, Albert L.; Neiner, George; Flood, J. D.; Amuedo, K. C.; Strock, T. W.

1989-01-01

109

Noise generated by a flight weight, air flow control valve in a vertical takeoff and landing aircraft thrust vectoring system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tests were conducted in the NASA Lewis Research Center's Powered Lift Facility to experimentally evaluate the noise generated by a flight weight, 12 in. butterfly valve installed in a proposed vertical takeoff and landing thrust vectoring system. Fluctuating pressure measurements were made in the circular duct upstream and downstream of the valve. This data report presents the results of these tests. The maximum overall sound pressure level is generated in the duct downstream of the valve and reached a value of 180 dB at a valve pressure ratio of 2.8. At the higher valve pressure ratios the spectra downstream of the valve is broad banded with its maximum at 1000 Hz.

Huff, Ronald G.

1989-01-01

110

Flight-Determined Subsonic Longitudinal Stability and Control Derivatives of the F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) with Thrust Vectoring  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The subsonic longitudinal stability and control derivatives of the F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) are extracted from dynamic flight data using a maximum likelihood parameter identification technique. The technique uses the linearized aircraft equations of motion in their continuous/discrete form and accounts for state and measurement noise as well as thrust-vectoring effects. State noise is used to model the uncommanded forcing function caused by unsteady aerodynamics over the aircraft, particularly at high angles of attack. Thrust vectoring was implemented using electrohydraulically-actuated nozzle postexit vanes and a specialized research flight control system. During maneuvers, a control system feature provided independent aerodynamic control surface inputs and independent thrust-vectoring vane inputs, thereby eliminating correlations between the aircraft states and controls. Substantial variations in control excitation and dynamic response were exhibited for maneuvers conducted at different angles of attack. Opposing vane interactions caused most thrust-vectoring inputs to experience some exhaust plume interference and thus reduced effectiveness. The estimated stability and control derivatives are plotted, and a discussion relates them to predicted values and maneuver quality.

Iliff, Kenneth W.; Wang, Kon-Sheng Charles

1997-01-01

111

Advanced solid rocket motor nozzle thrust vector control flexseal development status  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The advanced solid rocket motor (ASRM) flexseal development status is reviewed focusing on design goals and requirements, design configuration, analysis activities, and verification tests. It is concluded that the ASRM flexseal incorporates flight-proven materials in an innovative design configuration. Variable thickness shims and efficient packaging of the flexseal make it possible to achieve a significant weight reduction. A flexseal insulator design derived from strategic solid rocket motor experience will provide the necessary bearing thermal protection while minimizing vectoring torque variability.

Prins, William S.; Meyer, Scott A.; Cox, Paul D.

1992-07-01

112

A review of thrust-vectoring in support of a V/STOL non-moving mechanical propulsion system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The advantages associated to Vertical Short-Take-Off and Landing (V/STOL) have been demonstrated since the early days of aviation, with the initial technolology being based on airships and later on helicopters and planes. Its operational advantages are enormous, being it in the field of military, humanitarian and rescue operations, or even in general aviation. Helicopters have limits in their maximum horizontal speed and classic V/STOL airplanes have problems associated with their large weight, due to the implementation of moving elements, when based on tilting rotors or turbojet vector mechanical oriented nozzles. A new alternative is proposed within the European Union Project ACHEON (Aerial Coanda High Efficiency Orienting-jet Nozzle). The project introduces a novel scheme to orient the jet that is free of moving elements. This is based on a Coanda effect nozzle supported in two fluid streams, also incorporating boundary layer plasma actuators to achieve larger deflection angles. Herein we introduce a state-of-the-art review of the concepts that have been proposed in the framework of jet orienting propulsion systems. This review allows to demonstrate the advantages of the new concept in comparison to competing technologies in use at present day, or of competing technologies under development worldwide.

Páscoa, José C.; Dumas, Antonio; Trancossi, Michele; Stewart, Paul; Vucinic, Dean

2013-09-01

113

Pressure measurements of impinging jet with asymmetric nozzle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For modern aircraft, impinging surfaces are commonly used as a device for obtaining vector thrust from engine exhaust. The nature of dynamic loading is important to understand for design purposes. In this study, the frequency, mode, and level of pressure fluctuations generated by an elliptic jet are examined. The elliptic jet is used because it has several operational advantages over a circular jet.

Ho, Chih-Ming

1988-01-01

114

A Method for Integrating Thrust-Vectoring and Actuated Forebody Strakes with Conventional Aerodynamic Controls on a High-Performance Fighter Airplane  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method, called pseudo controls, of integrating several airplane controls to achieve cooperative operation is presented. The method eliminates conflicting control motions, minimizes the number of feedback control gains, and reduces the complication of feedback gain schedules. The method is applied to the lateral/directional controls of a modified high-performance airplane. The airplane has a conventional set of aerodynamic controls, an experimental set of thrust-vectoring controls, and an experimental set of actuated forebody strakes. The experimental controls give the airplane additional control power for enhanced stability and maneuvering capabilities while flying over an expanded envelope, especially at high angles of attack. The flight controls are scheduled to generate independent body-axis control moments. These control moments are coordinated to produce stability-axis angular accelerations. Inertial coupling moments are compensated. Thrust-vectoring controls are engaged according to their effectiveness relative to that of the aerodynamic controls. Vane-relief logic removes steady and slowly varying commands from the thrust-vectoring controls to alleviate heating of the thrust turning devices. The actuated forebody strakes are engaged at high angles of attack. This report presents the forward-loop elements of a flight control system that positions the flight controls according to the desired stability-axis accelerations. This report does not include the generation of the required angular acceleration commands by means of pilot controls or the feedback of sensed airplane motions.

Lallman, Frederick J.; Davidson, John B.; Murphy, Patrick C.

1998-01-01

115

Static thrust-vectoring performance of nonaxisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzles with post-exit yaw vanes. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ., Aug. 1988  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A static (wind-off) test was conducted in the Static Test Facility of the 16-ft transonic tunnel to determine the performance and turning effectiveness of post-exit yaw vanes installed on two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles. One nozzle design that was previously tested was used as a baseline, simulating dry power and afterburning power nozzles at both 0 and 20 degree pitch vectoring conditions. Vanes were installed on these four nozzle configurations to study the effects of vane deflection angle, longitudinal and lateral location, size, and camber. All vanes were hinged at the nozzle sidewall exit, and in addition, some were also hinged at the vane quarter chord (double-hinged). The vane concepts tested generally produced yaw thrust vectoring angles much less than the geometric vane angles, for (up to 8 percent) resultant thrust losses. When the nozzles were pitch vectored, yawing effectiveness decreased as the vanes were moved downstream. Thrust penalties and yawing effectiveness both decreased rapidly as the vanes were moved outboard (laterally). Vane length and height changes increased yawing effectiveness and thrust ratio losses, while using vane camber, and double-hinged vanes increased resultant yaw angles by 50 to 100 percent.

Foley, Robert J.; Pendergraft, Odis C., Jr.

1991-01-01

116

Vector thrust induced lift effects for several ejector exhaust locations on a V/STOL wind tunnel model at forward speed  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results and analysis of aerodynamic force data obtained from a small scale model of a V/STOL research vehicle in a low speed wind tunnel are presented. The analysis of the data includes the evaluation of aerodynamic-propulsive lift performance when operating twin ejector nozzles with thrust deflected. Three different types of thrust deflector systems were examined: 90 deg downward deflected nozzle, 90 deg slotted nozzle with boundary layer control, and an externally blown flap configuration. Several nozzle locations were tested, including over and underwing positions. The interference lift of the nacelle and model due to jet exhaust thrust is compared and results show that 90 deg turned nozzles located over the wing (near the trailing edge) produce the largest interference lift increment for an untrimmed aircraft, and that the slotted nozzle located under the wing near the trailing edge (in conjunction with a BLC flap) gives a comparable interference lift in the trimmed condition. The externally blown flap nozzle produced the least interference lift and significantly less total lift due to jet thrust effects.

Sharon, A. D.

1975-01-01

117

Vector Boson Jets with BlackHat and Sherpa  

SciTech Connect

We review recent NLO QCD results for W, Z + 3-jet production at hadron colliders, computing using BlackHat and SHERPA, and including also some new results for Z + 3-jet production for the LHC at 7 TeV. We report new progress towards the NLO cross section for W + 4-jet production. In particular, we show that the virtual matrix elements produced by BlackHat are numerically stable. We also show that with an improved integrator and tree-level matrix elements from BlackHat, SHERPA produces well-behaved real-emission contributions. As an illustration, we present the real-emission contributions - including dipole-subtraction terms - to the p{sub T} distribution of the fourth jet, for a single subprocess with the maximum number of gluons.

Berger, C.F.; /MIT, LNS; Bern, Z.; /UCLA; Dixon, Lance J.; /SLAC; Cordero, F.Febres; /Simon Bolivar U.; Forde, D.; /CERN /NIKHEF, Amsterdam; Gleisberg, T.; /SLAC; Ita, H.; /UCLA; Kosower, D.A.; /Saclay, SPhT; Maitre, D.; /Durham U.

2010-08-25

118

Locomotion by blowing into the sail of a sailboat—from a basic physics question to thrust reversal of jet aeroplanes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The old physics question of whether it is possible to achieve locomotion of a sailboat if there is no wind at all by just blowing into the sail of the boat is discussed with respect to a modern everyday-life technological application, the thrust reversal of jet aeroplanes. This connection of basic physics with technology offers a new approach for studying problems dealing with conservation of momentum.

Vollmer, Michael; Möllmann, Klaus-Peter; Arnold, Frank

2007-07-01

119

Solving Optimization Problems for the Flight Trajectories of a Spacecraft with a High-Thrust Jet Engine in Pulse Formulation for an Arbitrary Gravitational Field in a Vacuum  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mathematically well-posed technique is suggested to obtain first-order necessary conditions of local optimality for the problems of optimization to be solved in a pulse formulation for flight trajectories of a spacecraft with a high-thrust jet engine (HTJE) in an arbitrary gravitational field in vacuum. The technique is based on the Lagrange principle of derestriction for conditional extremum problems in

I. S. Grigoriev; K. G. Grigoriev

2002-01-01

120

A static investigation of a simultaneous pitch and yaw thrust vectoring 2-D C-D nozzle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation has been conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the internal performance and flow-turning capability of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle. Thrust vectoring in the pitch plane was provided by rotation of the divergent flaps. The exhaust stream was turned in the yaw direction by deflection of yaw flaps hinged at the end of the nozzle sidewalls. The yaw flap hinge location was varied along the divergent region of the nozzle at four locations including the exit plane and the throat plane. The three hinge locations upstream of the nozzle exit plane required the downstream corners of both upper and lower divergent flaps to be cut off to eliminate interference when the yaw flaps were deflected. Three different lengths of yaw flaps were tested at several angles of deflection. The nozzle simulated a dry power setting with an expansion ratio typical of subsonic cruise and was tested at nozzle pressure ratios from 2.0 to 7.0.

Taylor, John G.

1988-01-01

121

Using jet mass to discover vector quarks at the CERN LHC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We illustrate the utility of jet-mass distributions as probes of new physics at the LHC, focusing on a heavy vector-quark doublet that mixes with the top as a concrete example. For 1 TeV vector-quark masses, we find that signals with greater than 5? significance can be achieved after 100fb-1. More generally, jet-mass distributions have the potential to provide signals for heavy states that produce highly boosted weak gauge bosons and/or top quarks.

Skiba, Witold; Tucker-Smith, David

2007-06-01

122

Design of Supersonic Coanda Jet Nozzles.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The thrust vectoring of supersonic Coanda jets was improved by designing a nozzle to skew the initial jet velocity profile. A new nozzle design procedure, based on the method of characteristics, was developed to design a nozzle which produces a specified ...

P. M. Bevilaqua J. D. Lee

1987-01-01

123

Jets and Vector Bosons in Heavy Ion Collisions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reviews experimental results on jets and electroweak boson (photon,Wand Z) production in heavy-ion collisions, from the CMS and ATLAS detectors, using data collected during 2011 PbPb run and pp data collected at an equivalent energy. By comparing the two collision systems, the energy loss of the partons propagating through the medium produced in PbPb collisions can be studied. Its characterization is done using dijet events and isolated photon-jet pairs. Since the electroweak gauge bosons do not participate in the strong interaction, and are thus unmodified by the nuclear medium, they serve as clean probes of the initial state in the collision.

de la Cruz, Begoña

2013-11-01

124

Aerodynamic flow vectoring of a wake using asymmetric synthetic jet actuation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reports an experimental investigation on the wake of a blunt-based, flat plate subjected to aerodynamic flow vectoring using asymmetric synthetic jet actuation. Wake vectoring was achieved using a synthetic jet placed at the model base 2.5 mm from the upper corner. The wake Reynolds number based on the plate thickness was 7,200. The synthetic jet actuation frequency was selected to be about 75 % the vortex shedding frequency of the natural wake. At this actuation frequency, the synthetic jet delivered a periodic flow with a momentum coefficient, C ?, of up to 62 %. Simultaneous measurements of the streamwise and transverse components of the velocity were performed using particle image velocimetry (PIV) in the near wake. The results suggested that for significant wake vectoring, vortex shedding must be suppressed first. Under the flow conditions cited above, C ? values in the range of 10-20 % were required. The wake vectoring angle seemed to asymptote to a constant value of about 30° at downstream distances, x/ h, larger than 4 for C ? values ranging between 24 and 64 %. The phase-averaged vorticity contours and the phase-averaged normal lift force showed that most of the wake vectoring is produced during the suction phase of the actuation, while the blowing phase was mostly responsible for vortex shedding suppression.

Ben Chiekh, Maher; Ferchichi, Mohsen; Béra, Jean-Christophe

2012-12-01

125

Design Specification for a Thrust-Vectoring, Actuated-Nose-Strake Flight Control Law for the High-Alpha Research Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Specifications for a flight control law are delineated in sufficient detail to support coding the control law in flight software. This control law was designed for implementation and flight test on the High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), which is an F/A-18 aircraft modified to include an experimental multi-axis thrust-vectoring system and actuated nose strakes for enhanced rolling (ANSER). The control law, known as the HARV ANSER Control Law, was designed to utilize a blend of conventional aerodynamic control effectors, thrust vectoring, and actuated nose strakes to provide increased agility and good handling qualities throughout the HARV flight envelope, including angles of attack up to 70 degrees.

Bacon, Barton J.; Carzoo, Susan W.; Davidson, John B.; Hoffler, Keith D.; Lallman, Frederick J.; Messina, Michael D.; Murphy, Patrick C.; Ostroff, Aaron J.; Proffitt, Melissa S.; Yeager, Jessie C.; Foster, John V.; Bundick, W. Thomas; Connelly, Patrick J.; Kelly, John W.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Thomas, Michael; Wichman, Keith D.; Wilson, R. Joseph

1996-01-01

126

Preliminary performance of a vertical-attitude takeoff and landing, supersonic cruise aircraft concept having thrust vectoring integrated into the flight control system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A performance study was made of a vertical attitude takeoff and landing (VATOL), supersonic cruise aircraft concept having thrust vectoring integrated into the flight control system. Those characteristics considered were aerodynamics, weight, balance, and performance. Preliminary results indicate that high levels of supersonic aerodynamic performance can be achieved. Further, with the assumption of an advanced (1985 technology readiness) low bypass ratio turbofan engine and advanced structures, excellent mission performance capability is indicated.

Robins, A. W.; Beissner, F. L., Jr.; Domack, C. S.; Swanson, E. E.

1985-01-01

127

Thrust and mass flow characteristics of four 36 inch diameter tip turbine fan thrust vectoring systems in and out of ground effect  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The calibration tests carried out on the propulsion system components of a 70 percent scale, powered model of a NASA 3-fan V/STOL aircraft configuration are described. The three X3/6B/T58 turbotip fan units used in the large scale powered model were tested on an isolated basis over a range of ground heights from H/D of 1.02 to infinity. A higher pressure ratio LF336/J85 fan unit was tested over a range of ground heights from 1.55 to infinity. The results of the test program demonstrated that: (1) the thrust and mass flow performance of the X376B/T58 nose lift unit is essentially constant for H/D variations down to 1.55; at H/D 1.02 back pressurization of the fan exit occurs and is accompanied by an increase in thrust of five percent; (2) a change in nose fan exit hub shape from flat plate to hemispherical produces no significant difference in louvered lift nozzle performance for height variations from H/D = 1.02 to infinity; (3) operation of the nose lift nozzle at the higher fan pressure ratio generated by the LF336/J85 fan system causes no significant change in ground proximity performance down to an H/D of 1.55, the lowest height tested with this unit; and (4) the performance of the left and right X376B/T58 lift/cruise units in the vertical lift mode remains unchanged, within plus or minus two percent for the range of ground heights from H/D = 1.02 to infinity.

Esker, D. W.; Roddiger, H. A.

1979-01-01

128

Design of supersonic Coanda jet nozzles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The thrust vectoring of supersonic Coanda jets was improved by designing a nozzle to skew the initial jet velocity profile. A new nozzle design procedure, based on the method of characteristics, was developed to design a nozzle which produces a specified exit velocity profile. The thrust vectoring of a simple convergent nozzle, a convergent-divergent nozzle, and a nozzle which produces a skewed velocity profile matched to the curvature of the Coanda surface were expermentially compared over a range of pressure ratios from 1.5 to 3.5. Elimination of the expansion shocks with the C-D nozzle is shown to greatly improve the thrust vectoring; elimination of turning shocks with the skewed profile nozzle further improves the vectoring.

Bevilaqua, Paul M.; Lee, John D.

1987-01-01

129

Evaluation of dual flow thrust vectored nozzles with exhaust stream impingement. MS Thesis Final Technical Report, Oct. 1990 - Jul. 1991  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The main objective of this project was to predict the expansion wave/oblique shock wave structure in an under-expanded jet expanding from a convergent nozzle. The shock structure was predicted by combining the calculated curvature of the free pressure boundary with principles and governing equations relating to oblique shock wave and expansion wave interaction. The procedure was then continued until the shock pattern repeated itself. A mathematical model was then formulated and written in FORTRAN to calculate the oblique shock/expansion wave structure within the jet. In order to study shock waves in expanding jets, Schlieren photography, a form of flow visualization, was employed. Thirty-six Schlieren photographs of jets from both a straight and 15 degree nozzle were taken. An iterative procedure was developed to calculate the shock structure within the jet and predict the non-dimensional values of Prandtl primary wavelength (w/rn), distance to Mach Disc (Ld) and Mach Disc radius (rd). These values were then compared to measurements taken from Schlieren photographs and experimental results. The results agreed closely to measurements from Schlieren photographs and previously obtained data. This method provides excellent results for pressure ratios below that at which a Mach Disc first forms. Calculated values of non-dimensional distance to the Mach Disc (Ld) agreed closely to values measured from Schlieren photographs and published data. The calculated values of non-dimensional Mach Disc radius (rd), however, deviated from published data by as much as 25 percent at certain pressure ratios.

Carpenter, Thomas W.

1991-01-01

130

Support vector machine-based feature extractor for L/H transitions in JET.  

PubMed

Support vector machines (SVM) are machine learning tools originally developed in the field of artificial intelligence to perform both classification and regression. In this paper, we show how SVM can be used to determine the most relevant quantities to characterize the confinement transition from low to high confinement regimes in tokamak plasmas. A set of 27 signals is used as starting point. The signals are discarded one by one until an optimal number of relevant waveforms is reached, which is the best tradeoff between keeping a limited number of quantities and not loosing essential information. The method has been applied to a database of 749 JET discharges and an additional database of 150 JET discharges has been used to test the results obtained. PMID:21061485

González, S; Vega, J; Murari, A; Pereira, A; Ramírez, J M; Dormido-Canto, S

2010-10-01

131

Support vector machine-based feature extractor for L/H transitions in JET  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Support vector machines (SVM) are machine learning tools originally developed in the field of artificial intelligence to perform both classification and regression. In this paper, we show how SVM can be used to determine the most relevant quantities to characterize the confinement transition from low to high confinement regimes in tokamak plasmas. A set of 27 signals is used as starting point. The signals are discarded one by one until an optimal number of relevant waveforms is reached, which is the best tradeoff between keeping a limited number of quantities and not loosing essential information. The method has been applied to a database of 749 JET discharges and an additional database of 150 JET discharges has been used to test the results obtained.

González, S.; Vega, J.; Murari, A.; Pereira, A.; Ramírez, J. M.; Dormido-Canto, S.; Jet-Efda Contributors

2010-10-01

132

Support vector machine-based feature extractor for L/H transitions in JET  

SciTech Connect

Support vector machines (SVM) are machine learning tools originally developed in the field of artificial intelligence to perform both classification and regression. In this paper, we show how SVM can be used to determine the most relevant quantities to characterize the confinement transition from low to high confinement regimes in tokamak plasmas. A set of 27 signals is used as starting point. The signals are discarded one by one until an optimal number of relevant waveforms is reached, which is the best tradeoff between keeping a limited number of quantities and not loosing essential information. The method has been applied to a database of 749 JET discharges and an additional database of 150 JET discharges has been used to test the results obtained.

Gonzalez, S.; Vega, J.; Pereira, A. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM ENEA per la Fusione, Padova 4-35127 (Italy); Ramirez, J. M.; Dormido-Canto, S. [Departamento de Informatica y Automatica, UNED, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

2010-10-15

133

Simulated NNLO for high- p T observables in vector boson + jets production at the LHC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a study of higher-order QCD corrections beyond NLO to processes with an electroweak vector boson, W or Z, in association with jets. We focus on the regions of high transverse momenta of commonly used differential distributions. We employ the LoopSim method to merge NLO samples of different multiplicity obtained from mcfm and from blackhat+ sherpa in order to compute the dominant part of the NNLO corrections for high- p T observables. We find that these corrections are indeed substantial for a number of experimentally relevant observables. For other observables, they lead to significant reduction of scale uncertainties.

Maître, Daniel; Sapeta, Sebastian

2013-12-01

134

Study on the characteristics of supersonic Coanda jet  

Microsoft Academic Search

Techniques using Coanda effect have been applied to the fluid control devices. In this field, experimental studies were so\\u000a far performed for the spiral jet obtained by the Coanda jet issuing from a conical cylinder with an annular slit, thrust vectoring\\u000a of supersonic Coanda jets and so on. It is important from the viewpoints of effective applications to investigate the

Shigeru Matsuo; Toshiaki Setoguchi; Takemasa Kudo; Shen Yu

1998-01-01

135

The scaling of model test results to predict intake hot gas reingestion for STOVL aircraft with augmented vectored thrust engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The difficulties of modeling the complex recirculating flow fields produced by multiple jet STOVL aircraft close to the ground have led to extensive use of experimental model tests to predict intake Hot Gas Reingestion (HGR). Model test results reliability is dependent on a satisfactory set of scaling rules which must be validated by fully comparable full scale tests. Scaling rules devised in the U.K. in the mid 60's gave good model/full scale agreement for the BAe P1127 aircraft. Until recently no opportunity has occurred to check the applicability of the rules to the high energy exhaust of current ASTOVL aircraft projects. Such an opportunity has arisen following tests on a Tethered Harrier. Comparison of this full scale data and results from tests on a model configuration approximating to the full scale aircraft geometry has shown discrepancies between HGR levels. These discrepancies although probably due to geometry and other model/scale differences indicate some reexamination of the scaling rules is needed. Therefore the scaling rules are reviewed, further scaling studies planned are described and potential areas for further work are suggested.

Penrose, C. J.

1987-01-01

136

A static investigation of yaw vectoring concepts on two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The flow-turning capability and nozzle internal performance of yaw-vectoring nozzle geometries were tested in the NASA Langley 16-ft Transonic wind tunnel. The concept was investigated as a means of enhancing fighter jet performance. Five two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles were equipped for yaw-vectoring and examined. The configurations included a translating left sidewall, left and right sidewall flaps downstream of the nozzle throat, left sidewall flaps or port located upstream of the nozzle throat, and a powered rudder. Trials were also run with 20 deg of pitch thrust vectoring added. The feasibility of providing yaw-thrust vectoring was demonstrated, with the largest yaw vector angles being obtained with sidewall flaps downstream of the nozzle primary throat. It was concluded that yaw vector designs that scoop or capture internal nozzle flow provide the largest yaw-vector capability, but decrease the thrust the most.

Berrier, B. L.; Mason, M. L.

1983-01-01

137

Thrust bearing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A gas lubricated thrust bearing is described which employs relatively rigid inwardly cantilevered spokes carrying a relatively resilient annular member or annulus. This annulus acts as a beam on which are mounted bearing pads. The resilience of the beam mount causes the pads to accept the load and, with proper design, responds to a rotating thrust-transmitting collar by creating a gas film between the pads and the thrust collar. The bearing may be arranged for load equalization thereby avoiding the necessity of gimbal mounts or the like for the bearing. It may also be arranged to respond to rotation in one or both directions.

Anderson, W. J. (inventor)

1976-01-01

138

Jet shapes with the broadening axis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Broadening is a classic jet observable that probes the transverse momentum structure of jets. Traditionally, broadening has been measured with respect to the thrust axis, which is aligned along the (hemisphere) jet momentum to minimize the vector sum of transverse momentum within a jet. In this paper, we advocate measuring broadening with respect to the "broadening axis", which is the direction that minimizes the scalar sum of transverse momentum within a jet. This approach eliminates many of the calculational complexities arising from recoil of the leading parton, and observables like the jet angularities become recoil-free when measured using the broadening axis. We derive a simple factorization theorem for broadening-axis observables which smoothly interpolates between the thrust-like and broadening-like regimes. We argue that the same factorization theorem holds for two-point energy correlation functions as well as for jet shapes based on a "winner-take-all axis". Using kinked broadening axes, we calculate event-wide angularities in e + e - collisions with next-to-leading logarithmic resummation. Defining jet regions using the broadening axis, we also calculate the global logarithms for angularities within a single jet. We find good agreement comparing our calculations both to showering Monte Carlo programs and to automated resummation tools. We give a brief historical perspective on the broadening axis and suggest ways that broadening-axis observables could be used in future jet substructure studies at the Large Hadron Collider.

Larkoski, Andrew J.; Neill, Duff; Thaler, Jesse

2014-04-01

139

Thrust Characterization for Vortex Ring Thrusters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Synthetic jets are zero net mass pulsatile jets that are commonly used in flow control applications in air. In these cases the natural resonant frequency of the actuators plays an important role. In this work we will present thrust characterization of vortex ring thrusters (VRTs) in liquid (equivalent of synthetic jets in liquid medium). VRTs design are motivated by pulsatile

Mike Krieg; Kamran Mohseni

2007-01-01

140

May the Force Be With You: Thrust  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, students will study how propellers and jet turbines generate thrust. This lesson focuses on Isaac Newton's 3rd Law of Motion, which states that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

141

Pulsed Ejector Thrust Amplification Tested and Modeled  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There is currently much interest in pulsed detonation engines for aeronautical propulsion. This, in turn, has sparked renewed interest in pulsed ejectors to increase the thrust of such engines, since previous, though limited, research had indicated that pulsed ejectors could double the thrust in a short device. An experiment has been run at the NASA Glenn Research Center, using a shrouded Hartmann-Sprenger tube as a source of pulsed flow, to measure the thrust augmentation of a statistically designed set of ejectors. A Hartmann- Sprenger tube directs the flow from a supersonic nozzle (Mach 2 in the present experiment) into a closed tube. Under appropriate conditions, an oscillation is set up in which the jet flow alternately fills the tube and then spills around flow emerging from the tube. The tube length determines the frequency of oscillation. By shrouding the tube, the flow was directed out of the shroud as an axial stream. The set of ejectors comprised three different ejector lengths, three ejector diameters, and three nose radii. The thrust of the jet alone, and then of the jet plus ejector, was measured using a thrust plate. The arrangement is shown in this photograph. Thrust augmentation is defined as the thrust of the jet with an ejector divided by the thrust of the jet alone. The experiments exhibited an optimum ejector diameter and length for maximizing the thrust augmentation, but little dependence on nose radius. Different frequencies were produced by changing the length of the Hartmann-Sprenger tube, and the experiment was run at a total of four frequencies. Additional measurements showed that the major feature of the pulsed jet was a starting vortex ring. The size of the vortex ring depended on the frequency, as did the optimum ejector diameter.

Wilson, Jack

2004-01-01

142

Support vector machine classification on a biased training set: Multi-jet background rejection at hadron colliders  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes an innovative way to optimize a multivariate classifier, a Support Vector Machine algorithm, on a problem characterized by a biased training sample. This is possible thanks to the feedback of a signal-background template fit performed on a validation sample and included both in the optimization process and in the input variable selection. The procedure is applied to a real case of interest at hadron collider experiments: the reduction and the estimate of the multi-jet background in the W?e? plus jets data sample collected by the CDF experiment. The training samples, partially derived from data and partially from simulation, are described in detail together with the input variables exploited for the classification. At present, the reached performance is better than any other prescription applied to the same final state at hadron collider experiments.

Sforza, Federico; Lippi, Vittorio

2013-09-01

143

Jets.  

PubMed

This is a discussion of concentrated large-scale flows in planetary atmospheres and oceans, argued from the viewpoint of basic geophysical fluid dynamics. We give several elementary examples in which these flows form jets on rotating spheres. Jet formation occurs under a variety of circumstances: when flows driven by external stress have a rigid boundary which can balance the Coriolis force, and at which further concentration can be caused by the beta effect; when there are singular lines like the line of vanishing windstress or windstress-curl, or the Equator; when compact sources of momentum, heat or mass radiate jet-like beta plumes along latitude circles; when random external stirring of the fluid becomes organized by the beta effect into jets; when internal instability of the mass field generates zonal flow which then is concentrated into jets; when bottom topographic obstacles radiate jets, and when frontogenesis leads to shallow jet formation. Essential to the process of jet formation in stratified fluids is the baroclinic life cycle described in geostrophic turbulence studies; there, conversion from potential to kinetic energy generates eddy motions, and these convert to quasibarotropic motions which then radiate and induce jet-like large-scale circulation. Ideas of potential vorticity stirring by eddies generalize the notion of Rossby-wave radiation, showing how jets embedded in an ambient potential vorticity gradient (typically due to the spherical geometry of the rotating planet) gain eastward momentum while promoting broader, weaker westward circulation. Homogenization of potential vorticity is an important limit point, which many geophysical circulations achieve. This well-mixed state is found in subdomains of the terrestrial midlatitude oceans, the high-latitude circumpolar ocean, and episodically in the middle atmosphere. Homogenization expels potential vorticity gradients vertically to the top and bottom of the fluid, and sideways to the edges of flow domains or gyres; in both these ways is jet formation enhanced. PMID:12780108

Rhines, Peter B.

1994-06-01

144

vectors  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The word vector comes from the Latin term vehere, to carry. In Biology, a vector is an agent which carries disease, such as a mosquito carrying infected blood from one patient to the next. In physics, a vector is a quantity which has both a magnitude and a direction associated with it. The most commonly used example of vectors in everyday life is velocity. When you drive your car, your speedometer tells you the speed of your car, but it doesn't tell you where you are going. The combination of both where you are going and how fast you are going there is your car's velocity.

Joiner, David; The Shodor Education Foundation, Inc.

145

Air admixture to exhaust jets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The problem of thrust increase by air admixture to exhaust jets of rockets, turbojet, ram- and pulse-jet engines is investigated theoretically. The optimum ratio of mixing chamber pressure to ambient pressure and speed range for thrust increase due to air admixture is determined for each type of jet engine.

Sanger, Eugen

1953-01-01

146

Study of an under-expanded sonic impinging jet array  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The under-expanded impinging jet is used in various situations, such as the launch of a rocket, the takeoff and landing of a vertical/short take off and landing aircraft, jet engine exhaust impingement, or the thrust vector control system of a solid rocket motor. It is also of considerable interest to study the fluid dynamics of jet impingement on a surface with respect to heat transfer. Past investigations of sonic or supersonic impinging jets were limited to only a single jet and were primarily concentrated on fluid mechanics phenomena. No results exist in the literature for an under-expanded sonic impinging jet array. The present study is focused on the fluid dynamics for an array of under-expanded sonic impinging jets with the ultimate objective being to study the understanding of the interaction between impinging jets and the effect of jet-to-jet spacing (s/d), jet-to-plate spacing (z/d), and the degree of under-expansion (P0/Pa). Schlieren videography was applied to study the variation of structures that dominate the supersonic impinging flow, such as the intercepting shock, reflected shock, normal disk, stand-off-plate shock, and stagnation bubble. A high frequency transducer was used to measure the pressure field of the fluid flow near the impingement surface. Test configurations included non-dimensional jet-to-plate heights from 1 to 10, non-dimensional jet-to-jet spacing of 2 and 4, and pressure ratios from 3.3 to 12.9. Jets with orifice diameter of 12.7 and 25.4 mm were used. The fluid dynamics of an under-expanded sonic jet array differ largely from a single jet at s/d = 2. Midway between jets and near each stagnation bubble region, the jet array shows higher values in surface pressure due to the jet interaction. Both a single jet and a jet array have the linear dependence between z/d for the location of the shock cell and transition from supersonic wall jet to subsonic wall jet. However, the jet array show the location of the shock cell is changing over a slightly wider range of z/d and an earlier transition from a supersonic wall jet to subsonic wall jet. With an increase in s/d, the jet interaction becomes less noticeable and similar to a single jet. For z/d = 7, a remarkably interesting flow phenomenon exists at P 0 = 12.24 atm or greater, representing the repeatedly inward and outward diffusion. Schlieren images look like an intense explosion and the surface pressure distribution midway between jets shows an abrupt decrease.

Lee, Joon Ho

147

Differential 3-Jet Cross Section in E exp + E exp - -Annihilation and Comparison with 2sup(Nd)-Order Predictions of QCD and Abelian Vector Theory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Differential 3-jet cross sections have been measured in e exp + e exp - -annihilation at an average c.m. energy of 33.8 GeV and were compared to 1st and 2nd-order predictions of QCD and of a QED-like Abelian vector theory. QCD provides a good description ...

W. Bartel D. Cords G. Dietrich P. Dittmann R. Eichler

1982-01-01

148

Multibody system applications and simulations at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The historical development of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) of generic computer programs for solving the H-M-H equations of motion of point-connected sets of rigid bodies in a topological tree is traced, as well as the application of these programs and the multibody modelling approach to the design of spacecraft control systems. These include thrust vector control and science instrument

G. E. Fleischer

1978-01-01

149

Thrust bearing for turbocharger  

Microsoft Academic Search

A thrust bearing is described for sustaining the thrust load of the rotor shaft of a turbocharger, the thrust bearing having a first and second opposed side surface, comprising: A first groove formed in the first side surface of the thrust bearing for holding lubricating oil supplied to the bearing; at least one first oil passage extending from the groove

T. Tamura; N. Shibata; T. Kawakami

1987-01-01

150

Simulations of the linear plasma synthetic jet actuator utilizing a modified Suzen-Huang model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The linear plasma synthetic jet actuator (L-PSJA) is a unique form of flow control device which harnesses the interaction of induced flows from two linear plasma actuators to form an upward jet. Since each injection can be manipulated in intensity, the synthetic jet has thrust vectoring properties. Our study simulates the L-PSJA by utilizing a modified Suzen-Huang (S-H) model that accounts for drift and diffusive properties in the surface charge. The results of the present model show that the centreline velocity is closer to the experimental values found in literature as compared to the default form of S-H modelling. Thrust vectoring simulations were also performed to demonstrate the feasibility of flow directional variation in the L-PSJA.

Ibrahim, I. H.; Skote, M.

2012-11-01

151

Deciphering cumulative fault slip vectors from fold scarps: relationships between long-term and co-seismic deformation at the piedmont of the Taiwan fold-and-thrust belt  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We document the 30-ka cumulative slip history and long-term slip vector azimuth on the Northern Chelungpu fault based on a series of fault-bend folded alluvial terraces and draw quantitative relationships between geological structure, deformation observed from the geomorphology, and coseismic displacements during the 1999 Mw=7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake. In our study area, three main terrace levels show progressive folding by kink-band migration in relation to the underlying fault geometry, forming a main N-S fold scarp up to ~193 m high and secondary E-W scarps. Detailed analysis using 5-m resolution DEM allows us to characterize the scarp morphology and quantify the deformation parameters, namely terrace heights, fold scarp relief, and fold limb width and slope angle. The 3D deformation of the highest terrace, OSL-dated at 30.2 ± 4.0 ka, enables to simultaneously determine amplitude and azimuth of the long-term slip vector based on scarp relief. The long-term slip vector, oriented N338° ± 6°, is found to parallel the Chi-Chi coseismic displacements in this area. Cumulative slip and dating results yield a constant slip rate of 17.7 ± 2.2 mm/a in the direction N338° ± 6°, which represents ~16% of total shortening across the mountain belt. Late Quaternary shortening rates observed at four sites vary along-strike in similar proportion to Chi-Chi coseismic displacements. Together with the colinearity of long-term and coseismic slip vectors at our study site, this suggests that Chi-Chi earthquake is a characteristic earthquake for the Chelungpu thrust with recurrence interval ~440 years. We also discuss implications for the regional and long-term distribution of shortening in the central Western Foothills.

Le Beon, Maryline; Suppe, John; Jaiswal, Manoj; Chen, Yue-Gau; Ustaszewski, Michaela

2014-05-01

152

Lifting Surface Theory for Thrust Augmenting Ejectors.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The circulation theory of airfoil lift has been applied to predict the static performance of thrust augmenting ejectors. The ejector shroud is considered to be 'flying' in the velocity field induced by the entrainment of the primary jets, so that the thru...

P. M. Bevilaqua

1982-01-01

153

Aerospike Thrust Chamber Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An existing, but damaged, 25,000-pound thrust, flightweight, oxygen/hydrogen aerospike rocket thrust chamber was disassembled and partially repaired. A description is presented of the aerospike chamber configuration and of the damage it had suffered. Tech...

J. Campbell S. M. Cobb

1976-01-01

154

Effects of nozzle exit location and shape propulsion-induced aerodynamic characteristics due to vectoring twin nozzles at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 1.2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel to determine the induced lift characteristics of a vectored-thrust concept in which jet-exhaust nozzles were located in the fuselage at or near the wing trailing edge. The effects of moving twin rectangular nozzles rearward from the wing trailing edge and of round nozzles at the trailing edge only were studied at Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.2, angles of attack up to 14 deg, and thrust coefficients up to 0.35. Nozzle deflection angle varied from 0 deg to 45 deg. Separate force balances were used to determine both total aerodynamic and thrust forces and thrust forces alone which allowed for a direct measurement of jet turning angle at forward speeds. The Reynolds number per meter varied from 8.20 x 1 million to 13.12 x 1 million.

Capone, F. J.

1976-01-01

155

Jets of incipient liquids  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Jets of incipient water escaping into the atmosphere through a short channel are photographed. In some experiments. complete disintegration of the jet is observed. The relationship of this phenomenon with intense volume incipience is considered. The role of the Coanda effect upon complete opening of the jet is revealed. Measurement results of the recoil force R of the jets of incipient liquids are presented. Cases of negative thrust caused by the Coanda effect are noted. Generalization of experimental data is proposed.

Reshetnikov, A. V.; Mazheiko, N. A.; Skripov, V. P.

2000-05-01

156

A Jet-diffuser ejector for a V/STOL fighter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A single ejector equipped with only one vector control jet and a diffuser flap was installed close to the leading edge of the strake of a one-fifth scale, semi-span model of the aircraft, without wing, canard, or tail surface. Tests of the system at a nozzle pressure ratio of 1.24 indicated a thrust augmentation of 1.92 and a thrust in the flight direction of about 12% of the total thrust under static conditions. An ejector stall occured at a ratio of tunnel dynamic pressure to nozzle gage pressure of about 0.008. Ejector stall speed can be delayed by using a boundary layer control jet at the front inlet lip of the ejector.

Alperin, M.; Wu, J. J.

1981-01-01

157

Flight-Determined, Subsonic, Lateral-Directional Stability and Control Derivatives of the Thrust-Vectoring F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV), and Comparisons to the Basic F-18 and Predicted Derivatives  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The subsonic, lateral-directional, stability and control derivatives of the thrust-vectoring F-1 8 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV) are extracted from flight data using a maximum likelihood parameter identification technique. State noise is accounted for in the identification formulation and is used to model the uncommanded forcing functions caused by unsteady aerodynamics. Preprogrammed maneuvers provided independent control surface inputs, eliminating problems of identifiability related to correlations between the aircraft controls and states. The HARV derivatives are plotted as functions of angles of attack between 10deg and 70deg and compared to flight estimates from the basic F-18 aircraft and to predictions from ground and wind tunnel tests. Unlike maneuvers of the basic F-18 aircraft, the HARV maneuvers were very precise and repeatable, resulting in tightly clustered estimates with small uncertainty levels. Significant differences were found between flight and prediction; however, some of these differences may be attributed to differences in the range of sideslip or input amplitude over which a given derivative was evaluated, and to differences between the HARV external configuration and that of the basic F-18 aircraft, upon which most of the prediction was based. Some HARV derivative fairings have been adjusted using basic F-18 derivatives (with low uncertainties) to help account for differences in variable ranges and the lack of HARV maneuvers at certain angles of attack.

Iliff, Kenneth W.; Wang, Kon-Sheng Charles

1999-01-01

158

Manipulating thrust wakes: A parallel with biomimetic propulsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an experiment to investigate the role of shed vortices in thrust production. Using two different mechanisms, harmonic acoustic forcing and vortex trapping, a dry-air jet was manipulated to give the wake a typical propulsive-like pattern as observed behind swimmers or flyers. Our results show that even in a thrust production configuration, wakes with asymmetric roll-up of vortices are always associated to performance loss. By contrast, cases involving symmetric modes show thrust enhancement, as reported in very recent studies on pulsed jet propulsion.

Raspa, V.; Gaubert, C.; Thiria, B.

2012-02-01

159

Thrust Augmentation with Mixer/Ejector Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Older commercial aircraft often exceed FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) sideline noise regulations. The major problem is the jet noise associated with the high exhaust velocities of the low bypass ratio engines on such aircraft. Mixer/ejector exhaust systems can provide a simple means of reducing the jet noise on these aircraft by mixing cool ambient air with the high velocity engine gases before they are exhausted to ambient. This paper presents new information on thrust performance predictions, and thrust augmentation capabilities of mixer/ejectors. Results are presented from the recent development program of the patented Alternating Lobe Mixer Ejector Concept (ALMEC) suppressor system for the Gulfstream GII, GIIB and GIII aircraft. Mixer/ejector performance procedures are presented which include classical control volume analyses, compound compressible flow theory, lobed nozzle loss correlations and state of the art computational fluid dynamic predictions. The mixer/ejector thrust predictions are compared to subscale wind tunnel test model data and actual aircraft flight test measurements. The results demonstrate that a properly designed mixer/ejector noise suppressor can increase effective engine bypass ratio and generate large thrust gains at takeoff conditions with little or no thrust loss at cruise conditions. The cruise performance obtained for such noise suppressor systems is shown to be a strong function of installation effects on the aircraft.

Presz, Walter M., Jr.; Reynolds, Gary; Hunter, Craig

2002-01-01

160

Measuring axial pump thrust  

DOEpatents

An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices. 1 fig.

Suchoza, B.P.; Becse, I.

1988-11-08

161

Measured pressure distributions inside nonaxisymmetric nozzles with partially deployed thrust reversers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at static conditions to measure the pressure distributions inside a nonaxisymmetric nozzle with simultaneous partial thrust reversing (50-percent deployment) and thrust vectoring of the primary (forward-thrust) nozzle flow. Geometric forward-thrust-vector angles of 0 and 15 deg. were tested. Test data were obtained at static conditions while nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2.0 to 4.0. Results indicate that, unlike the 0 deg. vector angle nozzle, a complicated, asymmetric exhaust flow pattern exists in the primary-flow exhaust duct of the 15 deg. vectored nozzle.

Green, Robert S.; Carson, George T., Jr.

1987-01-01

162

PPT Thrust Stand  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A torsional-type thrust stand has been designed and built to test Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPT's) in both single shot and repetitive operating modes. Using this stand, momentum per pulse was determined strictly as a function of thrust stand deflection, spring constant, and natural frequency. No empirical corrections were required. The accuracy of the method was verified using a swinging impact pendulum. Momentum transfer data between the thrust stand and the pendulum were consistent to within 1%. Following initial calibrations, the stand was used to test a Lincoln Experimental Satellite (LES-8/9) thruster. The LES-8/9 system had a mass of approximately 7.5 kg, with a nominal thrust to weight ratio of 1.3 x 10(exp -5). A total of 34 single shot thruster pulses were individually measured. The average impulse bit per pulse was 266 microN-s, which was slightly less than the value of 300 microN-s published in previous reports on this device. Repetitive pulse measurements were performed similar to ordinary steady-state thrust measurements. The thruster was operated for 30 minutes at a repetition rate of 132 pulses per minute and yielded an average thrust of 573 microN. Using average thrust, the average impulse bit per pulse was estimated to be 260 microN-s, which was in agreement with the single shot data. Zero drift during the repetitive pulse test was found to be approximately 1% of the measured thrust.

Haag, Thomas W.

1995-01-01

163

Static Performance of Six Innovative Thrust Reverser Concepts for Subsonic Transport Applications: Summary of the NASA Langley Innovative Thrust Reverser Test Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Langley Configuration Aerodynamics Branch has conducted an experimental investigation to study the static performance of innovative thrust reverser concepts applicable to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Testing was conducted on a conventional separate-flow exhaust system configuration, a conventional cascade thrust reverser configuration, and six innovative thrust reverser configurations. The innovative thrust reverser configurations consisted of a cascade thrust reverser with porous fan-duct blocker, a blockerless thrust reverser, two core-mounted target thrust reversers, a multi-door crocodile thrust reverser, and a wing-mounted thrust reverser. Each of the innovative thrust reverser concepts offer potential weight savings and/or design simplifications over a conventional cascade thrust reverser design. Testing was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0. All tests were conducted with no external flow and cold, high-pressure air was used to simulate core and fan exhaust flows. Results show that the innovative thrust reverser concepts achieved thrust reverser performance levels which, when taking into account the potential for system simplification and reduced weight, may make them competitive with, or potentially more cost effective than current state-of-the-art thrust reverser systems.

Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

2000-01-01

164

Strawkets and Thrust  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students investigate the effect that thrust has on rocket flight. Students will make two paper rockets that they can launch themselves by blowing through a straw. These "strawkets" will differ in diameter, such that students will understand that a rocket with a smaller exit nozzle will provide a larger thrust. Students have the opportunity to compare the distances traveled by their two strawkets after predicting where they will land. Since each student will have a slightly different rocket and launching technique, they will observe which factors contribute to a strawket's thrust and performance.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

165

Ion thrusting system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An ion thrusting system is disclosed comprising an ionization membrane having at least one area through which a gas is passed, and which ionizes the gas molecules passing therethrough to form ions and electrons, and an accelerator element which accelerates the ions to form thrust. In some variations, a potential is applied to the ionization membrane may be reversed to thrust ions in an opposite direction. The ionization membrane may also include an opening with electrodes that are located closer than a mean free path of the gas being ionized. Methods of manufacture and use are also provided.

Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

2007-01-01

166

Multibody system applications and simulations at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. [emphasizing attitude and science platform articulation control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The historical development of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) of generic computer programs for solving the H-M-H equations of motion of point-connected sets of rigid bodies in a topological tree is traced, as well as the application of these programs and the multibody modelling approach to the design of spacecraft control systems. These include thrust vector control and science instrument articulation on such vehicles as Mariner 9, Mariner 10, Viking Orbiter, and Voyager.

Fleischer, G. E.

1978-01-01

167

Maximum thrust mode evaluation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Measured reductions in acceleration times which resulted from the application of the F-15 performance seeking control (PSC) maximum thrust mode during the dual-engine test phase is presented as a function of power setting and flight condition. Data were collected at altitudes of 30,000 and 45,000 feet at military and maximum afterburning power settings. The time savings for the supersonic acceleration is less than at subsonic Mach numbers because of the increased modeling and control complexity. In addition, the propulsion system was designed to be optimized at the mid supersonic Mach number range. Recall that even though the engine is at maximum afterburner, PSC does not trim the afterburner for the maximum thrust mode. Subsonically at military power, time to accelerate from Mach 0.6 to 0.95 was cut by between 6 and 8 percent with a single engine application of PSC, and over 14 percent when both engines were optimized. At maximum afterburner, the level of thrust increases were similar in magnitude to the military power results, but because of higher thrust levels at maximum afterburner and higher aircraft drag at supersonic Mach numbers the percentage thrust increase and time to accelerate was less than for the supersonic accelerations. Savings in time to accelerate supersonically at maximum afterburner ranged from 4 to 7 percent. In general, the maximum thrust mode has performed well, demonstrating significant thrust increases at military and maximum afterburner power. Increases of up to 15 percent at typical combat-type flight conditions were identified. Thrust increases of this magnitude could be useful in a combat situation.

Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

1995-01-01

168

Axisymmetric Coanda-assisted vectoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An experimental demonstration of a jet vectoring technique used in our novel spray method called Coanda-assisted Spray Manipulation (CSM) is presented. CSM makes use of the Coanda effect on axisymmetric geometries through the interaction of two jets: a primary jet and a control jet. The primary jet has larger volume flow rate but generally a smaller momentum flux than the control jet. The primary jet flows through the center of a rounded collar. The control jet is parallel to the primary and is adjacent to the convex collar. The Reynolds number range for the primary jet at the exit plane was between 20,000 and 80,000. The flow was in the incompressible Mach number range (Mach < 0.3). The control jet attaches to the convex wall and vectors according to known Coanda effect principles, entraining and vectoring the primary jet, resulting in controllable r - ? directional spraying. Several annular control slots and collar radii were tested over a range of momentum flux ratios to determine the effects of these variables on the vectored jet angle and spreading. Two and Three-component Particle Image Velocimetry systems were used to determine the vectoring angle and the profile of the combined jet in each experiment. The experiments show that the control slot and expansion radius, along with the momentum ratios of the two jets predominantly affected the vectoring angle and profile of the combined jets.

Allen, Dustin; Smith, Barton L.

2009-01-01

169

Out-of-Sequence Thrusts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Out-of-sequence thrusts (OOST) are those thrusts which do not obey the foreland propagating or in-sequence deformation style. They include both isolated thrusts which develop hindward of the thrust front and sequences of break-back thrusts which propagate from the foreland to the hinterland. Two end-members of a series of OOST types are recognized: (1) older in-sequence thrusts which are reactivated along their entire length and (2) completely new thrusts which propagate through already deformed thrust sheets. Between the two end-members are thrusts composed partially of reactivated in-sequence thrust sequences and partially of new, entirely out-of-sequence segments. OOSTs can be initiated for a variety of reasons including: (1) keeping the orogenic wedge at critical taper, (2) break-back sequences from the suture zone in the overriding plate, (3) ramping to overcome a sticking point which inhibits in-sequence thrust propagation, and (4) during simultaneous displacement along two stacked thrusts culminations which bow up segment of the upper thrust may be chopped through to permit continued displacement on the upper thrust. Many different types of thrust behavior including gravity sliding, plucking, and derivation of isolated horses from ramps may mimic some of the characteristics of OOSTs. Consequently, it may be difficult to conclusively prove an OOST origin for a complex thrust geometry.

Morley, C. K.

1988-06-01

170

Thrust stand for low-thrust liquid pulsed rocket engines.  

PubMed

A thrust stand is developed for measuring the pulsed thrust generated by low-thrust liquid pulsed rocket engines. It mainly consists of a thrust dynamometer, a base frame, a connecting frame, and a data acquisition and processing system. The thrust dynamometer assembled with shear mode piezoelectric quartz sensors is developed as the core component of the thrust stand. It adopts integral shell structure. The sensors are inserted into unique double-elastic-half-ring grooves with an interference fit. The thrust is transferred to the sensors by means of static friction forces of fitting surfaces. The sensors could produce an amount of charges which are proportional to the thrust to be measured. The thrust stand is calibrated both statically and dynamically. The in situ static calibration is performed using a standard force sensor. The dynamic calibration is carried out using pendulum-typed steel ball impact technique. Typical thrust pulse is simulated by a trapezoidal impulse force. The results show that the thrust stand has a sensitivity of 25.832 mV/N, a linearity error of 0.24% FSO, and a repeatability error of 0.23% FSO. The first natural frequency of the thrust stand is 1245 Hz. The thrust stand can accurately measure thrust waveform of each firing, which is used for fine control of on-orbit vehicles in the thrust range of 5-20 N with pulse frequency of 50 Hz. PMID:20887003

Xing, Qin; Zhang, Jun; Qian, Min; Jia, Zhen-yuan; Sun, Bao-yuan

2010-09-01

171

Static test of a large scale swivel nozzle thrust deflector  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Experimental results from a swivel nozzle thrust deflector test program are presented. The deflector was installed behind a 36-inch fan with a tip turbine hot gas drive. The maximum nozzle pressure ratio was 1.2. Nozzle thrust and flow coefficients are presented for a range of vectoring angles. The results are also compared to small scale cold flow test results. The comparison suggests a need for accurate simulation of nozzle entry pressure and temperature profiles on model tests.

Federspiel, J. F.

1979-01-01

172

Low thrust monopropellant engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The engine has a conventional body and nozzle configuration. The monopropellant fuel is fed into the thruster with dual injection tubes via an injector shell with dual spray jets. The spray jets are positioned generally opposed to each other. A heater screen pack combination thermally decomposes the fuel after injection into the combustion chamber of the thruster.

Kuenzly, J. D. (inventor)

1981-01-01

173

Thrust Augmentation Study of Cross-Flow Fan for Vertical Take-Off and Landing Aircraft.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) has primarily seen research and development in the two traditional fields, namely the rotary wing and jet propulsion, with each seeking incremental improvements in thrust generation and fuel efficiency, respectively. I...

I. K. Yeo

2012-01-01

174

Environmental Thrust Handbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This handbook was prepared as a tool to assist U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) employees coordinate their resources and efforts to help people improve their environment. Twenty-two projects are outlined as potential environmental thrusts at the community level. It is the role of USDA employees to encourage and assist, in every way possible,…

Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC.

175

An Analytical Investigation of the Impingement Jets on Curved Deflectors.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Numerical solutions are obtained for the cases of straight circular jets impinging on axisymmetric curved surfaces and plane jets impinging symmetrically on two-dimensional curved surfaces. These geometries are representative of some types of thrust rever...

J. W. Tatom J. W. Williamson N. M. Schnurr

1972-01-01

176

A lifting surface theory for thrust augmenting ejectors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The circulation theory of airfoil lift has been applied to calculate the performance of thrust augmenting ejectors. The ejector shroud is considered to be 'flying' in the secondary velocity field induced by the entrainment of the primary jet, so that the augmenting thrust is viewed as analogous to the lift on an airfoil. Vortex lattice methods are utilized to compute the thrust augmentation from the force on the flaps. The augmentation is shown to be a function of the length and shape of the flaps, as well as their position and orientation. Predictions of this new theory are compared with the results of classical methods of calculating the augmentation by integration of the stream thrust.

Bevilaqua, P. M.

1977-01-01

177

Static Performance of a Wing-Mounted Thrust Reverser Concept  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental investigation was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center to study the static aerodynamic performance of a wing-mounted thrust reverser concept applicable to subsonic transport aircraft. This innovative engine powered thrust reverser system is designed to utilize wing-mounted flow deflectors to produce aircraft deceleration forces. Testing was conducted using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0, a supercritical left-hand wing section attached via a pylon, and wing-mounted flow deflectors attached to the wing section. Geometric variations of key design parameters investigated for the wing-mounted thrust reverser concept included flow deflector angle and chord length, deflector edge fences, and the yaw mount angle of the deflector system (normal to the engine centerline or parallel to the wing trailing edge). All tests were conducted with no external flow and high pressure air was used to simulate core and fan engine exhaust flows. Test results indicate that the wing-mounted thrust reverser concept can achieve overall thrust reverser effectiveness levels competitive with (parallel mount), or better than (normal mount) a conventional cascade thrust reverser system. By removing the thrust reverser system from the nacelle, the wing-mounted concept offers the nacelle designer more options for improving nacelle aero dynamics and propulsion-airframe integration, simplifying nacelle structural designs, reducing nacelle weight, and improving engine maintenance access.

Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

1998-01-01

178

Advanced thrust chamber designs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A regeneratively cooled thrust chamber has been designed and fabricated, consisting of an inner TD nickel liner which was spin formed, welded, and machined and an outer shell of electroformed nickel. Coolant channels were produced in the outer surface of the inner liner by the electric discharge machining process before electroforming the shell. Accessory manifolds and piping were attached by welding. Manufacturing processes employed are described.

Dietrich, F. J.; Leach, A. E.

1971-01-01

179

Axisymmetric Coanda-assisted vectoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experimental demonstration of a jet vectoring technique used in our novel spray method called Coanda-assisted Spray Manipulation\\u000a (CSM) is presented. CSM makes use of the Coanda effect on axisymmetric geometries through the interaction of two jets: a primary\\u000a jet and a control jet. The primary jet has larger volume flow rate but generally a smaller momentum flux than the

Dustin Allen; Barton L. Smith

2009-01-01

180

An experimental study of voice-coil driven synthetic jet propulsion for underwater vehicles  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper investigates the thrust and flow structures produced by submerged synthetic jet actuators. Inspired by the propulsion methods of many sea creatures, such as jellyfish, squids, and salps; synthetic jets use vortex rings to create a net thrust. To assess the potential usability of these thrusters for propulsion and maneuvering of small underwater vehicles, a range of synthetic jet

A. M. Polsenberg-Thomas; Joel Burdick; Kamran Mohseni

2005-01-01

181

A simple propulsion system model for the simulation of nonlinear dynamic thrust response  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A simple mathematical jet engine description is presented where the measured transition functions of the engine thrust can be simulated in a quasi-stationary operation as well as in acceleration or deceleration schedules. Because of its simplicity and high fidelity, it is especially suited for representing jet engines in digital simulation programs.

Schaenzer, G.; Krauspe, P.

1983-01-01

182

Study on the characteristics of supersonic Coanda jet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Techniques using Coanda effect have been applied to the fluid control devices. In this field, experimental studies were so far performed for the spiral jet obtained by the Coanda jet issuing from a conical cylinder with an annular slit, thrust vectoring of supersonic Coanda jets and so on. It is important from the viewpoints of effective applications to investigate the characteristics of the supersonic Coanda jet in detail. In the present study, the effects of pressure ratios and nozzle configurations on the characteristics of the supersonic Coanda jet have been investigated experimentally by a schlieren optical method and pressure measurements. Furthermore, Navier-Stokes equations were solved numerically using a 2nd-order TVD finite-volume scheme with a 3rd-order three stage Runge-Kutta method for time integration. k - ? model was used in the computations. The effects of initial conditions on Coanda flow were investigated numerically. As a result, the simulated flow fields were compared with experimental data in good agreement qualitatively.

Matsuo, Shigeru; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kudo, Takemasa; Yu, Shen

1998-09-01

183

Effects of internal yaw-vectoring devices on the static performance of a pitch-vectoring nonaxisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to evaluate the internal performance of a nonaxisymmetric convergent divergent nozzle designed to have simultaneous pitch and yaw thrust vectoring capability. This concept utilized divergent flap deflection for thrust vectoring in the pitch plane and flow-turning deflectors installed within the divergent flaps for yaw thrust vectoring. Modifications consisting of reducing the sidewall length and deflecting the sidewall outboard were investigated as means to increase yaw-vectoring performance. This investigation studied the effects of multiaxis (pitch and yaw) thrust vectoring on nozzle internal performance characteristics. All tests were conducted with no external flow, and nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2.0 to approximately 13.0. The results indicate that this nozzle concept can successfully generate multiaxis thrust vectoring. Deflection of the divergent flaps produced resultant pitch vector angles that, although dependent on nozzle pressure ratio, were nearly equal to the geometric pitch vector angle. Losses in resultant thrust due to pitch vectoring were small or negligible. The yaw deflectors produced resultant yaw vector angles up to 21 degrees that were controllable by varying yaw deflector rotation. However, yaw deflector rotation resulted in significant losses in thrust ratios and, in some cases, nozzle discharge coefficient. Either of the sidewall modifications generally reduced these losses and increased maximum resultant yaw vector angle. During multiaxis (simultaneous pitch and yaw) thrust vectoring, little or no cross coupling between the thrust vectoring processes was observed.

Asbury, Scott C.

1993-01-01

184

Low thrust vehicle concept study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Low thrust chemical (hydrogen-oxygen) propulsion systems configured specifically for low acceleration orbit transfer of large space systems were defined. Results indicate that it is cost effective and least risk to combine the OTV and stowed spacecraft in a single 65 K Shuttle. The study shows that the engine for an optimized low thrust stage (1) does not require very low thrust; (2) 1-3 K thrust range appears optimum; (3) thrust transient is not a concern; (4) throttling probably not worthwhile; and (5) multiple thrusters complicate OTV/LSS design and aggravate LSS loads. Regarding the optimum vehicle for low acceleration missions, the single shuttle launch (LSS and expendable OTV) is most cost effective and least risky. Multiple shuttles increase diameter 20%. The space based radar structure short OTV (which maximizes space available for packaged LSS) favors use of torus tank. Propellant tank pressures/vapor residuals are little affected by engine thrust level or number of burns.

1980-01-01

185

Finite thrust orbital transfers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The finite thrust optimal transfer in the presence of the Earth?s shadow and oblate planet perturbations is a problem of strong interest in modern telecommunication satellite design with plasmic propulsion. The Maximum Principle cannot be used in its standard form to deal with the Earth?s shadow. In this paper, using a regularization of the Hamiltonian which expands the Maximum Principle application domain, we provide for the first time, the necessary conditions in a very general context for the finite thrust optimal transfer with limited power around an oblate planet. The costate in such problems is generally discontinuous. To obtain fast numerical solutions, the averaging of the Hamiltonian is introduced. Two classes of boundary conditions are analyzed and numerically solved: the minimum time and the minimum fuel at a fixed time. These two problems are the basic tools for designing the orbit raising of a satellite after the launcher injection into its separation orbit. Numerical solutions have been calculated for the more important applications of LEO to GEO/MEO missions and the results have been reported and discussed.

Mazzini, Leonardo

2014-07-01

186

Jet Engine Tail Pipe Flow Deflector.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The patent application concerns an apparatus for producing a component of thrust at right angles to the main thrust direction of a jet engine. The apparatus comprises a deflecting device which provides a surface, bounded by side walls normal to the surfac...

J. C. Vaughan

1976-01-01

187

Lateral dampers for thrust bearings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of lateral damping schemes for thrust bearings was examined, ranking their applicability to various engine classes, selecting the best concept for each engine class and performing an in-depth evaluation. Five major engine classes were considered: large transport, military, small general aviation, turboshaft, and non-manrated. Damper concepts developed for evaluation were: curved beam, constrained and unconstrained elastomer, hybrid boost bearing, hydraulic thrust piston, conical squeeze film, and rolling element thrust face.

Hibner, D. H.; Szafir, D. R.

1985-01-01

188

Thrust modeling for hypersonic engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Expressions for the thrust losses of a scramjet engine are developed in terms of irreversible entropy increases and the degree of incomplete combustion. A method is developed which allows the calculation of the lost vehicle thrust due to different loss mechanisms within a given flow-field. This analysis demonstrates clearly the trade-off between mixing enhancement and resultant increased flow losses in scramjet combustors. An engine effectiveness parameter is defined in terms of thrust loss. Exergy and the thrust-potential method are related and compared.

Riggins, D. W.; Mcclinton, C. R.

1995-01-01

189

Controls on thrust belt curvature, Wyoming-Idaho thrust belt  

SciTech Connect

Structural curvature in the northern part of the Wyoming-Idaho thrust belt (WITB) may be the result of either along-strike variations in pre-thrust stratigraphy or a buttress which physically concentrated shortening, or possibly both. Most thrust sheets of the WITB strike northward and were translated eastward, but in the Snake River Range (SRR) (the northernmost range in the WITB), structural strike curves from northward to nearly westward. Structural cross sections of the SRR are generally drawn in a radial pattern creating a volumetric imbalance in regional palinspastic restorations. Stratigraphic separation diagrams of major, through-going thrust faults in the SRR show extensive cut off in upper Paleozoic strata. New measured sections of upper Paleozoic stratigraphy at locations in several major thrust sheets of the WITB and in the foreland, new structural cross sections and mapping, and existing paleomagnetic data are used in a new interpretation of the origin of structural curvature in the WITB. Published paleomagnetic data require counterclockwise rotation of frontal thrust sheets along the northern boundary of the WITB, but no rotation of eastward-translated thrust sheets farther south along most of the WITB. Evidence for both a pre-existing west-trending depositional margin and rotation of frontal thrust sheets suggests that buttressing and modification of structural strike occurred along an oblique ramp where differences in stratigraphic thickness and possible pre-existing fault partitioning of the Paleozoic strata are localized.

Montgomery, J.M. Jr. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1993-04-01

190

A wind tunnel investigation of the wake near the trailing edge of a deflected externally blown flap. [on a jet powered STOL transport aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The model tested was a general research model of a swept-wing, jet-powered STOL transport with externally blown flaps. The model was tested with four engine simulators mounted on pylons under the wing. Tests were conducted in the V/STOL tunnel over an angle of attack range of 0 deg to 16 deg and a thrust coefficient range from 0 to approximately 4 at a Reynolds number of 0.461 x 1 million based on the wing reference chord. The results of this investigation are presented primarily as plots of the individual velocity vectors obtained from the wake survey. These data are used to extend an earlier analysis to isolate the effects of the engine thrust on the behavior of the flow at the flap trailing edge. Results of a comparison with a jet-flap theory are also shown.

Johnson, W. G., Jr.; Kardas, G. E.

1974-01-01

191

Constant Thrust Hybrid Rocket Motor.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The constant thrust hybrid rocket motor of this invention is capable of providing operation for at least 50 seconds over a wide temperature range and with minimal variation in chamber pressure. The constant thrust hybrid rocket motor of this invention inc...

A. L. Holzman

1981-01-01

192

Low-thrust rocket trajectories  

SciTech Connect

The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report.

Keaton, P.W.

1987-03-01

193

Low-thrust rocket trajectories  

SciTech Connect

The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report. 57 refs., 10 figs.

Keaton, P.W.

1986-01-01

194

Micro thrust and heat generator  

DOEpatents

A micro thrust and heat generator has a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator's ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA).

Garcia, Ernest J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01

195

Efficient Optimization of Low-Thrust Spacecraft Trajectories  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A paper describes a computationally efficient method of optimizing trajectories of spacecraft driven by propulsion systems that generate low thrusts and, hence, must be operated for long times. A common goal in trajectory-optimization problems is to find minimum-time, minimum-fuel, or Pareto-optimal trajectories (here, Pareto-optimality signifies that no other solutions are superior with respect to both flight time and fuel consumption). The present method utilizes genetic and simulated-annealing algorithms to search for globally Pareto-optimal solutions. These algorithms are implemented in parallel form to reduce computation time. These algorithms are coupled with either of two traditional trajectory- design approaches called "direct" and "indirect." In the direct approach, thrust control is discretized in either arc time or arc length, and the resulting discrete thrust vectors are optimized. The indirect approach involves the primer-vector theory (introduced in 1963), in which the thrust control problem is transformed into a co-state control problem and the initial values of the co-state vector are optimized. In application to two example orbit-transfer problems, this method was found to generate solutions comparable to those of other state-of-the-art trajectory-optimization methods while requiring much less computation time.

Lee, Seungwon; Fink, Wolfgang; Russell, Ryan; Terrile, Richard; Petropoulos, Anastassios; vonAllmen, Paul

2007-01-01

196

Event shapes and jet rates in electron-positron annihilation at NNLO  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article gives the perturbative NNLO results for the most commonly used event shape variables associated to three-jet events in electron-positron annihilation: Thrust, heavy jet mass, wide jet broadening, total jet broadening, C parameter and the Durham three-to-two jet transition variable. In addition the NNLO results for the jet rates corresponding to the Durham, Geneva, Jade-E0 and Cambridge jet algorithms are presented.

Weinzierl, Stefan

2009-06-01

197

A Simple Model of Pulsed Ejector Thrust Augmentation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A simple model of thrust augmentation from a pulsed source is described. In the model it is assumed that the flow into the ejector is quasi-steady, and can be calculated using potential flow techniques. The velocity of the flow is related to the speed of the starting vortex ring formed by the jet. The vortex ring properties are obtained from the slug model, knowing the jet diameter, speed and slug length. The model, when combined with experimental results, predicts an optimum ejector radius for thrust augmentation. Data on pulsed ejector performance for comparison with the model was obtained using a shrouded Hartmann-Sprenger tube as the pulsed jet source. A statistical experiment, in which ejector length, diameter, and nose radius were independent parameters, was performed at four different frequencies. These frequencies corresponded to four different slug length to diameter ratios, two below cut-off, and two above. Comparison of the model with the experimental data showed reasonable agreement. Maximum pulsed thrust augmentation is shown to occur for a pulsed source with slug length to diameter ratio equal to the cut-off value.

Wilson, Jack; Deloof, Richard L. (Technical Monitor)

2003-01-01

198

Hydrodynamic aspects of thrust generation in gymnotiform swimming  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The primary propulsor in gymnotiform swimmers is a fin running along most of the ventral midline of the fish. The fish propagates traveling waves along this ribbon fin to generate thrust. This unique mode of thrust generation gives these weakly electric fish great maneuverability cluttered spaces. To understand the mechanical basis of gymnotiform propulsion, we investigated the hydrodynamics of a model ribbon-fin of an adult black ghost knifefish using high-resolution numerical experiments. We found that the principal mechanism of thrust generation is a central jet imparting momentum to the fluid with associated vortex rings near the free edge of the fin. The high-fidelity simulations also reveal secondary vortex rings potentially useful in rapid sideways maneuvers. We obtained the scaling of thrust with respect to the traveling wave kinematic parameters. Using a fin-plate model for a fish, we also discuss improvements to Lighthill's inviscid theory for gymnotiform and balistiform modes in terms of thrust magnitude, viscous drag on the body, and momentum enhancement.

Shirgaonkar, Anup A.; Curet, Oscar M.; Patankar, Neelesh A.; Maciver, Malcolm A.

2008-11-01

199

Coanda Inlet/Jet Flap Diffuser Ejector.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The combination of a Coanda inlet and jet flap diffusion, for the achievement of high performance, low volume, thrust augmentation, has been investigated in a two-dimesnional experiment. The use of jet flap diffusion provides a mechanism for the achieveme...

M. Alperin

1972-01-01

200

Low thrust optimal orbital transfers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For many optimal transfer problems it is reasonable to expect that the minimum time solution is also the minimum fuel solution. However, if one allows the propulsion system to be turned off and back on, it is clear that these two solutions may differ. In general, high thrust transfers resemble the well known impulsive transfers where the burn arcs are of very short duration. The low and medium thrust transfers differ in that their thrust acceleration levels yield longer burn arcs and thus will require more revolutions. In this research, we considered two approaches for solving this problem: a powered flight guidance algorithm previously developed for higher thrust transfers was modified and an 'averaging technique' was investigated.

Cobb, Shannon S.

1994-01-01

201

In-flight thrust determination  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The major aspects of processes that may be used for the determination of in-flight thrust are reviewed. Basic definitions are presented as well as analytical and ground-test methods for gathering data and calculating the thrust of the propulsion system during the flight development program of the aircraft. Test analysis examples include a single-exhaust turbofan, an intermediate-cowl turbofan, and a mixed-flow afterburning turbofan.

Abernethy, Robert B.; Adams, Gary R.; Ascough, John C.; Baer-Riedhart, Jennifer L.; Balkcom, George H.; Biesiadny, Thomas

1986-01-01

202

Deep space communications technology thrusts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper discusses the technology thrusts that are currently being developed for deep space missions as well as the expected dividends of these thrusts during the 1990's and beyond. Particular attention is given to Ka-band (32 GHz) development, channel coding, source coding, and optical communications. The ongoing development described here attempts to meet the telecommunications demands of future missions by stressing cooperative developments between ground networks and flight projects in order to optimize NASA's overall investment in solar system investment.

Yuen, Joseph H.

1992-01-01

203

Prediction of thrusting sequences in accretionary wedges  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main objective is to determine the three stages of the life of a thrust in an accretionary wedge which are the onset of thrusting along its ramp, the development with the construction of the relief, and the arrest because of the onset of another thrusting event. A simple kinematics is proposed for the geometry of the developing thrust fold

N. Cubas; Y. M. Leroy; B. Maillot

2008-01-01

204

Transverse jet injection into a supersonic turbulent cross-flow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Jet injection into a supersonic cross-flow is a challenging fluid dynamics problem in the field of aerospace engineering which has applications as part of a rocket thrust vector control system for noise control in cavities and fuel injection in scramjet combustion chambers. Several experimental and theoretical/numerical works have been conducted to explore this flow; however, there is a dearth of literature detailing the instantaneous flow which is vital to improve the efficiency of the mixing of fluids. In this paper, a sonic jet in a Mach 1.6 free-stream is studied using a finite volume Godunov type implicit large eddy simulations technique, which employs fifth-order accurate MUSCL (Monotone Upstream-centered Schemes for Conservation Laws) scheme with modified variable extrapolation and a three-stage second-order strong-stability-preserving Runge-Kutta scheme for temporal advancement. A digital filter based turbulent inflow data generation method is implemented in order to capture the physics of the supersonic turbulent boundary layer. This paper details the averaged and instantaneous flow features including vortex structures downstream of the jet injection, along with the jet penetration, jet mixing, pressure distributions, turbulent kinetic energy, and Reynolds stresses in the downstream flow. It demonstrates that Kelvin-Helmholtz type instabilities in the upper jet shear layer are primarily responsible for mixing of the two fluids. The results are compared to experimental data and recently performed classical large eddy simulations (LES) with the same initial conditions in order to demonstrate the accuracy of the numerical methods and utility of the inflow generation method. Results here show equivalent accuracy for 1/45th of the computational resources used in the classical LES study.

Rana, Z. A.; Thornber, B.; Drikakis, D.

2011-04-01

205

Uncertainty of in-flight thrust determination  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Methods for estimating the measurement error or uncertainty of in-flight thrust determination in aircraft employing conventional turbofan/turbojet engines are reviewed. While the term 'in-flight thrust determination' is used synonymously with 'in-flight thrust measurement', in-flight thrust is not directly measured but is determined or calculated using mathematical modeling relationships between in-flight thrust and various direct measurements of physical quantities. The in-flight thrust determination process incorporates both ground testing and flight testing. The present text is divided into the following categories: measurement uncertainty methodoogy and in-flight thrust measurent processes.

Abernethy, Robert B.; Adams, Gary R.; Steurer, John W.; Ascough, John C.; Baer-Riedhart, Jennifer L.; Balkcom, George H.; Biesiadny, Thomas

1986-01-01

206

Parameters Governing Separation Control with Sweeping Jet Actuators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Parameters governing separation control with sweeping jet actuators over a deflected flap are investigated experimentally on a generic "Multiple Flap Airfoil" (MFA). The model enables an extensive variation of geometric and aerodynamic parameters to aid the scaling of this novel flow control method to full-size applications. Sweeping jets exit from discrete, millimeter-scale nozzles distributed along the span and oscillate from side-to-side. The sweeping frequency is almost linearly dependent on the supplied flowrate per actuator. The measured thrust exerted by a row of actuators agrees well with vectored momentum calculations. Frequency and thrust measurements suggest that the jet velocity is limited to subsonic speeds and that any additional increase in flowrate causes internal choking of the flow. Neither the flowrate nor the momentum input is found to be a sole parameter governing the lift for varying distance between adjacent actuators. However, the product of the mass flow coefficient and the square root of the momentum coefficient collapses the lift onto a single curve regardless of the actuator spacing. Contrary to other actuation methods, separation control with sweeping jets does not exhibit any hysteresis with either momentum input or flap deflection. A comparison between sweeping and non-sweeping jets illustrates the superior control authority provided by sweeping jets. Surface flow visualization on the flap suggests the formation of counter-rotating pairs of streamwise vortices caused by the interaction of neighboring jets. The actuation intensity required to attach the flow increases with increasing downstream distance from the main element's trailing edge and increasing flap deflection. No obvious dependence of the ideal actuation location on actuator spacing, flap deflection, angle of attack, or actuation intensity is found within the tested range. Comparisons between experimental and numerical results reveal that the inviscid flow solution appears to be a suitable predictor for the effectively and efficiently obtainable lift of a given airfoil configuration. The flap size affects the achievable lift, the accompanying drag, and the required flap deflection and actuation intensity. By controlling separation, the range of achievable lift coefficients is doubled without significant penalty in drag even when considering a safety margin for the maximum applicable incidence.

Woszidlo, Rene

207

Energy Dependence of Jet Measures in E exp + E exp - Annihilation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The jet character of the hadronic final states produced in e exp + e exp - annihilations is studied in terms of jet measures such as thrust, sphericity, jet opening angle and jet masses, in the energy range 7.7 to 31.6 GeV. All distributions and averages ...

C. Berger H. Genzel R. Grigull W. Lackas E. Raupach

1981-01-01

208

The deflection of a jet by confining surfaces  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Thrust vectoring can be provided by the turning of a jet exhaust by the presence of confining surfaces. This approach is analogous to the upper surface blowing (USB) concept. Mean velocities, velocity autocorrelations, and pressure-velocity correlations are measured. From the autocorrelation curves, the Taylor microscales and the integral length scales are calculated. Convection velocities are calculated from the velocity space-time correlations. Two different confining surfaces (one flat, one with large curvature) are placed adjacent to the lip of a circular nozzle, and the resultant effects on the flow field are determined. In addition, two velocity ratios (exit plane velocity to ambient stream velocity) are examined. The velocity measurements were made with a laser Doppler velocimeter in conjunction with a phase locked-loop processor. Pressure measurements were made using a 1/8th inch condensor type microphone.

Catalano, G. D.; Morton, J. B.; Humphris, R. R.

1981-01-01

209

Finite-thrust optimization of interplanetary transfers of space vehicle with bimodal nuclear thermal propulsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion is one of the leading promising technologies for primary space propulsion for manned exploration of the solar system due to its high specific impulse capability and sufficiently high thrust-to-weight ratio. Another benefit of NTR is its possible bimodal design, when nuclear reactor is used for generation of a jet thrust in a high-thrust mode and (with an appropriate power conversion system) as a source of electric power to supply the payload and the electric engines in a low-thrust mode. The model of the NTR thrust control was developed considering high-thrust NTR as a propulsion system of limited power and exhaust velocity. For the proposed model the control of the thrust value is accomplished by the regulation of reactor thermal power and propellant mass flow rate. The problem of joint optimization of the combination of high- and low-thrust arcs and the parameters of bimodal NTR (BNTR) propulsion system is considered for the interplanetary transfers. The interplanetary trajectory of the space vehicle is formed by the high-thrust NTR burns, which define planet-centric maneuvers and by the low-thrust heliocentric arcs where the nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) is used. The high-thrust arcs are analyzed using finite-thrust approach. The motion of the corresponding dynamical system is realized in three phase spaces concerning the departure planet-centric maneuver by means of high-thrust NTR propulsion, the low-thrust NEP heliocentric maneuver and the approach high-thrust NTR planet-centric maneuver. The phase coordinates are related at the time instants of the change of the phase spaces due to the relations between the space vehicle masses. The optimal control analysis is performed using Pontryagin's maximum principle. The numerical results are analyzed for Earth-Mars "sprint" transfer. The optimal values of the parameters that define the masses of NTR and NEP subsystems have been evaluated. It is shown that the low-thrust NEP subsystem with Brayton cycle power conversion system is preferable in comparison with NEP subsystem with thermoemission power conversion system.

Kharytonov, Oleksii M.; Kiforenko, Boris M.

2011-08-01

210

Teach Engineering: May the Force Be With You: Thrust  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson is the third of a four-part unit for Grades 5-8 on the key forces in flight: lift, weight, thrust, and drag. In this lesson students will study how propellers and jet turbines generate thrust. It focuses on Newton's Third Law of Motion, which states that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. The lesson includes objectives, warm-up questions, background information for teachers, assessment questions, classroom activity, and web-based reference material. TeachEngineering is a Pathway project of the National Science Digital Library. It provides a large collection of teacher-tested, research-based content for K-12 teachers to connect real-world experiences with curricular content.

2011-10-10

211

Thrust Steering of a Gridded Ion Engine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In any spacecraft installation of an ion propulsion system it is likely that there will be a need to alter the position of the thrust vector with respect to the centre of the vehicle, in order to minimise attitude and orbital perturbations during operation. Of most importance is the need to correct for the movements of the centre of mass of the spacecraft during operation. These movements are caused by the consumption of propellant, by the deployment and rotation of solar arrays, and by the varying radiation flux from the sun. As an example of the seriousness of this problem, the consumption due to this cause for an Intelsat VII class satellite with a lifetime of 15 years would be 26kg for an excursion of the centre of mass of just 1cm. As a consequence, large gimbal systems (approximately 10kg) are employed. Whilst these devices can perform perfectly well, they do represent a considerable mass overhead, amplify launch vibrations to the thrusters, as well as occupying a large volume, and presenting large cost (0.8Meuro) and additional reliability concerns. Consequently a method for providing direct vectoring of the ion beam has been developed using the technique of relative grid translation.

Jameson, P.

2004-10-01

212

Pulsed Electric Propulsion Thrust Stand Calibration Method  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The evaluation of the performance of any propulsion device requires the accurate measurement of thrust. While chemical rocket thrust is typically measured using a load cell, the low thrust levels associated with electric propulsion (EP) systems necessitate the use of much more sensitive measurement techniques. The design and development of electric propulsion thrust stands that employ a conventional hanging pendulum arm connected to a balance mechanism consisting of a secondary arm and variable linkage have been reported in recent publications by Polzin et al. These works focused on performing steady-state thrust measurements and employed a static analysis of the thrust stand response. In the present work, we present a calibration method and data that will permit pulsed thrust measurements using the Variable Amplitude Hanging Pendulum with Extended Range (VAHPER) thrust stand. Pulsed thrust measurements are challenging in general because the pulsed thrust (impulse bit) occurs over a short timescale (typically 1 micros to 1 millisecond) and cannot be resolved directly. Consequently, the imparted impulse bit must be inferred through observation of the change in thrust stand motion effected by the pulse. Pulsed thrust measurements have typically only consisted of single-shot operation. In the present work, we discuss repetition-rate pulsed thruster operation and describe a method to perform these measurements. The thrust stand response can be modeled as a spring-mass-damper system with a repetitive delta forcing function to represent the impulsive action of the thruster.

Wong, Andrea R.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Pearson, J. Boise

2011-01-01

213

Viscid/inviscid interaction analysis of thrust augmenting ejectors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method was developed for calculating the static performance of thrust augmenting ejectors by matching a viscous solution for the flow through the ejector to an inviscid solution for the flow outside the ejector. A two dimensional analysis utilizing a turbulence kinetic energy model is used to calculate the rate of entrainment by the jets. Vortex panel methods are then used with the requirement that the ejector shroud must be a streamline of the flow induced by the jets to determine the strength of circulation generated around the shroud. In effect, the ejector shroud is considered to be flying in the velocity field of the jets. The solution is converged by iterating between the rate of entrainment and the strength of the circulation. This approach offers the advantage of including external influences on the flow through the ejector. Comparisons with data are presented for an ejector having a single central nozzle and Coanda jet on the walls. The accuracy of the matched solution is found to be especially sensitive to the jet flap effect of the flow just downstream of the ejector exit.

Bevilacqua, P. M.; Dejoode, A. D.

1979-01-01

214

Twin Jet  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many subsonic and supersonic vehicles in the current fleet have multiple engines mounted near one another. Some future vehicle concepts may use innovative propulsion systems such as distributed propulsion which will result in multiple jets mounted in close proximity. Engine configurations with multiple jets have the ability to exploit jet-by-jet shielding which may significantly reduce noise. Jet-by-jet shielding is the ability of one jet to shield noise that is emitted by another jet. The sensitivity of jet-by-jet shielding to jet spacing and simulated flight stream Mach number are not well understood. The current experiment investigates the impact of jet spacing, jet operating condition, and flight stream Mach number on the noise radiated from subsonic and supersonic twin jets.

Henderson, Brenda; Bozak, Rick

2010-01-01

215

Ewing Bank thrust: structural and sedimentological aspects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Compressional features observed as thrust faults occur in the Gulf of Mexico's upper slope area. A compressional feature manifested as a thrust can be seen in the Ewing Bank area in Block 988. This toe structure is initiated by upslope tensional forces via a type of large-scale slump. Wells that penetrate this thrust given no direct indications of repeat sections;

1989-01-01

216

Omni-axis secondary injection thrust vector control system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The concept, development, design study and preliminary analysis and layout of the required digital logic scheme to be used for injection valve control are presented. An application and optimization study of an Omni-Axis Secondary Injection Control System applicable to the proposed Space Shuttle Pressure Fed Engine is reported. Technical definition and analysis control procedures and test routines, as well as a supporting set of drawing sketches and reference manual, are enclosed.

Kirkley, D. J.

1973-01-01

217

Development and test of electromechanical actuators for thrust vector control  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A road map of milestones toward the goal of a full scale Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor/Flight Support Motor (RSRM/FSM) hot fire test is discussed. These milestones include: component feasibility, full power system demonstration, SSME hot fire tests, and RSRM hot fire tests. The participation of the Marshall Space Flight Center is emphasized.

Weir, Rae A.; Cowan, John R.

1993-06-01

218

Development and test of electromechanical actuators for thrust vector control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A road map of milestones toward the goal of a full scale Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor/Flight Support Motor (RSRM/FSM) hot fire test is discussed. These milestones include: component feasibility, full power system demonstration, SSME hot fire tests, and RSRM hot fire tests. The participation of the Marshall Space Flight Center is emphasized.

Weir, Rae A.; Cowan, John R.

1993-01-01

219

Translation Optics for 30 cm Ion Engine Thrust Vector Control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data were obtained from a 30 cm xenon ion thruster in which the accelerator grid was translated in the radial plane. The thruster was operated at three different throttle power levels, and the accelerator grid was incrementally translated in the X, Y, and azimuthal directions. Plume data was obtained downstream from the thruster using a Faraday probe mounted to a positioning system. Successive probe sweeps revealed variations in the plume direction. Thruster perveance, electron backstreaming limit, accelerator current, and plume deflection angle were taken at each power level, and for each accelerator grid position. Results showed that the thruster plume could easily be deflected up to six degrees without a prohibitive increase in accelerator impingement current. Results were similar in both X and Y direction.

Haag, Thomas

2002-01-01

220

Low thrust orbit determination program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Logical flow and guidelines are provided for the construction of a low thrust orbit determination computer program. The program, tentatively called FRACAS (filter response analysis for continuously accelerating spacecraft), is capable of generating a reference low thrust trajectory, performing a linear covariance analysis of guidance and navigation processes, and analyzing trajectory nonlinearities in Monte Carlo fashion. The choice of trajectory, guidance and navigation models has been made after extensive literature surveys and investigation of previous software. A key part of program design relied upon experience gained in developing and using Martin Marietta Aerospace programs: TOPSEP (Targeting/Optimization for Solar Electric Propulsion), GODSEP (Guidance and Orbit Determination for SEP) and SIMSEP (Simulation of SEP).

Hong, P. E.; Shults, G. L.; Huling, K. R.; Ratliff, C. W.

1972-01-01

221

Jet Substructure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Jet physics is a rich and rapidly evolving field, with many applications to physics in and beyond the Standard Model. These notes, based on lectures delivered at the June 2012 Theoretical Advanced Study Institute, provide an introduction to jets at the Large Hadron Collider. Topics covered include sequential jet algorithms, jet shapes, jet grooming, and boosted Higgs and top tagging.

Shelton, J.

2013-08-01

222

Investigation of Acoustic Interactions in Jet Thrust Augmenting Ejectors.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The performance of a constant area rectangular ejector with varying mixing length was investigated to determine the aeroacoustics interaction effects. The rectangular ejector investigation was conducted in two phases. The phase one investigation involved ...

J. R. Campbell K. D. Korkan H. Viets

1981-01-01

223

Transient aerodynamic forces on a fighter model during simulated approach and landing with thrust reversers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Previous wind tunnel tests of fighter configurations have shown that thrust reverser jets can induce large, unsteady aerodynamic forces and moments during operation in ground proximity. This is a concern for STOL configurations using partial reversing to spoil the thrust while keeping the engine output near military (MIL) power during landing approach. A novel test technique to simulate approach and landing was developed under a cooperative Northrop/NASA/USAF program. The NASA LaRC Vortex Research Facility was used for the experiments in which a 7-percent F-18 model was moved horizontally at speeds of up to 100 feet per second over a ramp simulating an aircraft to ground rate of closure similar to a no-flare STOL approach and landing. This paper presents an analysis of data showing the effect of reverser jet orientation and jet dynamic pressure ratio on the transient forces for different angles of attack, and flap and horizontal tail deflection. It was found, for reverser jets acting parallel to the plane of symmetry, that the jets interacted strongly with the ground, starting approximately half a span above the ground board. Unsteady rolling moment transients, large enough to cause the probable upset of an aircraft, and strong normal force and pitching moment transients were measured. For jets directed 40 degrees outboard, the transients were similar to the jet-off case, implying only minor interaction.

Humphreys, A. P.; Paulson, J. W., Jr.; Kemmerly, G. T.

1988-01-01

224

Jet shielding of jet noise  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

1986-01-01

225

Ultra-high bypass ratio jet noise  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The jet noise from a 1/15 scale model of a Pratt and Whitney Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP) was measured in the United Technology Research Center anechoic research tunnel (ART) under a range of operating conditions. Conditions were chosen to match engine operating conditions. Data were obtained at static conditions and at wind tunnel Mach numbers of 0.2, 0.27, and 0.35 to simulate inflight effects on jet noise. Due to a temperature dependence of the secondary nozzle area, the model nozzle secondary to primary area ratio varied from 7.12 at 100 percent thrust to 7.39 at 30 percent thrust. The bypass ratio varied from 10.2 to 11.8 respectively. Comparison of the data with predictions using the current Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Jet Noise Prediction Method showed that the current prediction method overpredicted the ADP jet noise by 6 decibels. The data suggest that a simple method of subtracting 6 decibels from the SAE Coaxial Jet Noise Prediction for the merged and secondary flow source components would result in good agreement between predicted and measured levels. The simulated jet noise flight effects with wind tunnel Mach numbers up to 0.35 produced jet noise inflight noise reductions up to 12 decibels. The reductions in jet noise levels were across the entire jet noise spectra, suggesting that the inflight effects affected all source noise components.

Low, John K. C.

1994-10-01

226

A computational model for three-dimensional incompressible wall jets with large cross flow  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A computational model for the flow field of three dimensional incompressible wall jets prototypic of thrust augmenting ejectors with large cross flow is presented. The formulation employs boundary layer equations in an orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system. Simulation of laminar as well as turbulen wall jets is reported. Quantification of jet spreading, jet growth, nominal separation, and jet shrink effects due to corss flow are discussed.

Murphy, W. D.; Shankar, V.; Malmuth, N. D.

1979-01-01

227

A numerical model for coupling between atomization and spray dynamics in liquid rocket thrust chambers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes a novel method of coupling the atomization and spray combustion processes encountered in coaxial injection elements of liquid rocket engine thrust chambers. This method is based on the Jet-Embedding technique in which the liquid jet core equations and the gas phase equations are solved separately. The liquid and gas phase solutions, however, are coupled through the boundary conditions at the interface between the phases. The computational grid for the gas phase calculations are adapted to the shape of the liquid jet core. The axial variation of droplet sizes are calculated using a stability analysis appropriate for the atomization regime of liquid jet breakup. The predictions of this method have been validated with experimental data on low speed water jets. Using this method, calculations are performed for the SSME fuel preburner single injector flow field. The results obtained are in good agreement with the predictions of the volume-of-fluid method.

Giridharan, M. G.; Lee, J. G.; Krishnan, A.; Przekwas, A. J.; Gross, Klaus

1992-01-01

228

Dynamic control of biologically inspired pulsatile jet propulsion thrusters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inspired by the propulsion techniques employed by squid and other cephalopod, a new type of thruster was designed which utilized pulsatile jet propulsion to generate controlling forces. The thrust production from this jet actuator was characterized in a static environment and seen to be well approximated by a simple fluid slug model. A linear transfer function model was derived to

Michael Krieg; Kamran Mohseni

2009-01-01

229

Scaled Lunar Module Jet Erosion Experiments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental research program was conducted on the erosion of particulate surfaces by a jet exhaust. These experiments were scaled to represent the lunar module (LM) during landing. A conical cold-gas nozzle simulating the lunar module nozzle was utilized. The investigation was conducted within a large vacuum chamber by using gravel or glass beads as a simulated soil. The effects of thrust, descent speed, nozzle terminal height, particle size on crater size, and visibility during jet erosion were determined.

Land, Norman S.; Scholl, Harland F.

1966-01-01

230

Tests of a D vented thrust deflecting nozzle behind a simulated turbofan engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A D vented thrust deflecting nozzle applicable to subsonic V/STOL aircraft was tested behind a simulated turbofan engine in the verticle thrust stand. Nozzle thrust, fan operating characteristics, nozzle entrance conditions, and static pressures were measured. Nozzle performance was measured for variations in exit area and thrust deflection angle. Six core nozzle configurations, the effect of core exit axial location, mismatched core and fan stream nozzle pressure ratios, and yaw vane presence were evaluated. Core nozzle configuration affected performance at normal and engine out operating conditions. Highest vectored nozzle performance resulted for a given exit area when core and fan stream pressure were equal. Its is concluded that high nozzle performance can be maintained at both normal and engine out conditions through control of the nozzle entrance Mach number with a variable exit area.

Watson, T. L.

1982-01-01

231

Low Thrust Orbital Maneuvers Using Ion Propulsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Low-thrust maneuver options, such as electric propulsion, offer specific challenges within mission-level Modeling, Simulation, and Analysis (MS&A) tools. This project seeks to transition techniques for simulating low-thrust maneuvers from detailed engineering level simulations such as AGI's Satellite ToolKit (STK) Astrogator to mission level simulations such as the System Effectiveness Analysis Simulation (SEAS). Our project goals are as follows: A) Assess different low-thrust options to achieve various orbital changes; B) Compare such approaches to more conventional, high-thrust profiles; C) Compare computational cost and accuracy of various approaches to calculate and simulate low-thrust maneuvers; D) Recommend methods for implementing low-thrust maneuvers in high-level mission simulations; E) prototype recommended solutions.

Ramesh, Eric

2011-10-01

232

Lateral dampers for thrust bearings. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The development of lateral damping schemes for thrust bearings was examined, ranking their applicability to various engine classes, selecting the best concept for each engine class and performing an in-depth evaluation. Five major engine classes were considered: large transport, military, small general aviation, turboshaft, and non-manrated. Damper concepts developed for evaluation were: curved beam, constrained and unconstrained elastomer, hybrid boost bearing, hydraulic thrust piston, conical squeeze film, and rolling element thrust face.

Hibner, D.H.; Szafir, D.R.

1985-08-01

233

Jet noise from ultrahigh bypass turbofan engines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Modern commercial jet transport aircraft are powered by turbofan engines. Thrust from a turbofan engine is derived in part from the exhaust of a ducted fan, which may or may not be mixed with the core exhaust before exiting the nacelle. The historical trend has been toward ever higher bypass ratios (BPRs). The BPR is the ratio of air mass

Joe W. Posey; Thomas D. Norum; Martha C. Brown; Thonse R. S. Bhat

2002-01-01

234

Jet interaction at supersonic cross flow conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The thrust produced by lateral jet systems has been successfully used for several years to control the flight trajectory, i.e., the maneuverability of spacecraft in the high atmosphere and in orbit. Recently this technology has also been applied to projectiles and rockets flying in the low atmosphere from sea level up to more than 10 km. At ISL, investigations have

F. Seiler; P. Gnemmi; H. Ende; M. Schwenzer; R. Meuer

2003-01-01

235

Physclips: Vectors  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website provides an introduction to vectors. It includes topics such as magnitude and direction, components, unit vectors, vectors in three dimensions, vector addition and subtraction, and scalar and vector products. Animations, still images, graphs, and diagrams are used to illustrate important concepts. This tutorial is part of the PhysClips collection of web-based resources on introductory mechanics, electricity, and magnetism.

Wolfe, Joe

2009-01-20

236

Ejector Noise Suppression with Auxiliary Jet Injection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental program to reduce aircraft jet turbulence noise investigated the interaction of small auxiliary jets with a larger main jet. Significant reductions in the far field jet noise were obtained over a range of auxiliary jet pressures and flow rates when used in conjunction with an acoustically lined ejector. While the concept is similar to that of conventional ejector suppressors that use mechanical mixing devices, the present approach should improve thrust and lead to lower weight and less complex noise suppression systems since no hardware needs to be located in the main jet flow. A variety of auxiliary jet and ejector configurations and operating conditions were studied. The best conditions tested produced peak to peak noise reductions ranging from 11 to 16 dB, depending on measurement angle, for auxiliary jet mass flows that were 6.6% of the main jet flow with ejectors that were 8 times the main jet diameter in length. Much larger reductions in noise were found at the original peak frequencies of the unsuppressed jet over a range of far field measurement angles.

Berman, Charles H.; Andersen, Otto P., Jr.

1997-01-01

237

Lateral variation in geometry of thrust planes and its significance, as studied in the Shumar allochthon, Lesser Himalayas, eastern Bhutan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The features mapped indicate a SSE-striking displacement vector for the Shumar thrust of eastern Bhutan. Sections parallel to this direction show that the frontal “flat” segment of the thrust plane, along with the subthrust and the hanging-wall rocks, has been folded into a synform. A longitudinal section, however, shows a cuspate-lobate shape (broad concave-upward curves meeting along sharp crests) of

Sumit Kumar Ray

1995-01-01

238

Lightweight Chambers for Thrust Assemblies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has successfully applied new materials and fabrication techniques to create actively cooled thrust chambers that operate 200-400 degrees hotter and weigh 50% lighter than conventional designs. In some vehicles, thrust assemblies account for as much as 20% of the engine weight. So, reducing the weight of these components and increasing their operating range will benefit many engines and vehicle designs, including Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) concepts. Obviously, copper and steel alloys have been used successfully for many years in the chamber components of thrust assemblies. Yet, by replacing the steel alloys with Polymer Matrix Composite (PMC) and/or Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) materials, design weights can be drastically reduced. In addition, replacing the traditional copper alloys with a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) or an advanced copper alloy (Cu-8Cr-4Nb, also known as GRCop-84) significantly increases allowable operating temperatures. Several small MMC and PMC demonstration chambers have recently been fabricated with promising results. Each of these designs included GRCop-84 for the cooled chamber liner. These units successfully verified that designs over 50% lighter are feasible. New fabrication processes, including advanced casting technology and a low cost vacuum plasma spray (VPS) process, were also demonstrated with these units. Hot-fire testing at MSFC is currently being conducted on the chambers to verify increased operating temperatures available with the GRCop-84 liner. Unique CMC chamber liners were also successfully fabricated and prepared for hot-fire testing. Yet, early results indicate these CMC liners need significantly more development in order to use them in required chamber designs. Based on the successful efforts with the MMC and PMC concepts, two full size "lightweight" chambers are currently being designed and fabricated for hot-fire testing at MSFC in 2001. These "full size" chambers will be similar in size to those used on the X33 engine (RS2200). One will be fabricated with a MMC structural jacket, while the other uses a PMC jacket. Each will be designed for thrust levels of 15,000 pounds in an oxygen/hydrogen environment with liquid hydrogen coolant. Both chambers will use GRCop-84 for its channel wall liner. Each unit is expected to be at least 60% lighter than a conventional design with traditional materials. Hot-fire testing on the full size units in late 2001 will directly compare performance results between a conventional chamber design and these "lightweight" alternatives. The technology developed and demonstrated by this effort will not only benefit next generation RLV programs, but it can be applied to other existing and future engine programs, as well. Efforts were sponsored by the Advanced Space Transportation Program for RLV Focused Technologies. The task team was led by MSFC with additional members from NASA-Glenn Research Center and the Rocketdyne Division of The Boeing Company. Specific materials development and fabrication processes were provided by Aerojet, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Composite Optics, Inc., Hyper-Therm, Ceramic Composites, Inc., MSE Technology Applications, and Plasma Processes, Inc.

Elam, Sandra K.; Lee, Jonathan; Holmes, Richard; Zimmerman, Frank; Effinger, Mike; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

239

Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber Assembly  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A thrust chamber assembly for liquid fueled rocket engines and the method of making it wherein a two-piece mandrel wrapped with a silica tape saturated with a phenolic resin, the tape extending along the mandrel and covering the combustion chamber portion of the mandrel to the throat portion. The phenolic in the tape is cured and the end of the wrap is machined. The remainder of the mandrel is wrapped with a third silica tape. The resin in the third tape is cured and the assembly is machined. The entire assembly is then wrapped with a tow of graphite fibers wetted with an epoxy resin and, after the epoxy resin is cured, the graphite is machined to final dimensions.

Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor); Counts, Richard H. (Inventor); Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Lackey, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Peters, Warren (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael D. (Inventor); Sparks, David L. (Inventor); Lawrence, Timothy W. (Inventor)

2001-01-01

240

Low thrust chemical rocket technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A technology program aimed at improving the performance of low thrust chemical rockets for spacecraft onboard applications is reviewed. Navier-Stokes analyses of low Reynolds number rocket flows have been compared with local flow property measurements obtained using Rayleigh and Raman diagnostics in a 100 N gaseous hydrogen/gaseous oxygen rocket. It is indicated that computational domain should include the near injector flow and that the shear layer combustion model needs improvement. The system analyses and technical efforts intended to develop a technology base for higher performance propellants are presented. A LOX/hydrazine engine is demonstrated to have a 95 percent theoretical c-star which translates into a projected vacuum specific impulse of 345 seconds at an area ratio of 204:1.

Schneider, Steven J.

1992-01-01

241

Experimental investigation of jet-induced loads on a flat plate in hover out-of-ground effect  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Effects of varying jet decay rate on jet-induced loads on a flat plate located in the plane of the jet exit perpendicular to the jet axis were investigated using a small-scale laboratory facility. Jet decay rate has been varied through use of two cylindrical centerbodies having either a flat or hemispherical tip, which were submerged various distances below the flat plate jet exit plane. Increased jet decay rate, caused by the presence of a center-body or plug in the jet nozzle, led to an increased jet-induced lift loss on the flat plate. Jet-induced lift losses reached 1 percent of the jet thrust for the quickest jet decay rates for plate areas equal to 100 times the effective jet exit area. The observed lift loss versus jet decay rate trend agreed well with results of previous investigations.

Kuhlman, J. M.; Warcup, R. W.

1979-01-01

242

Search for 3rd Generation Vector Leptoquarks in the Di-tau Di-jet Channel in Proton Antiproton Collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect

We search for third generation vector leptoquarks (V LQ3) produced in colliding p{bar p} beams operating at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the CDF experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. We use 322 pb{sup -1} of data to search for the V LQ3 signal in the di-tau plus di-jet channel. For the first time, the full matrix element is used in the Monte Carlo simulation of this signal. With no events observed in the signal region, we set a 95% C.L. upper limit on the V LQ3 pair production cross section of {sigma} < 344fb, assuming Yang-Mills couplings and Br(V LQ3 {yields} b{tau}) = 1, and a lower limit on the V LQ3 mass of m{sub V LQ3} > 317 GeV=c{sup 2}. If theoretical uncertainties on the cross section are applied in the least favorable manner the results are {sigma} < 360fb and m{sub V LQ3} > 294 GeV=c{sup 2}. The Minimal coupling V LQ3 result is an upper limit on the cross section of {sigma} < 493fb ({sigma} < 610fb) and the lower limit on the mass is m{sub V LQ3} > 251 GeV=c{sup 2} (m{sub V LQ3} > 223 GeV=c{sup 2}) for the nominal (1{sigma} varied) theoretical expectation.

Forrester, Stanley Scott; /UC, Davis

2006-12-01

243

Thrust production mechanisms in Hollow cathode microthrusters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hollow cathode have recently been investigated at the University of Southampton as potential standalone microthrusters. Thrust measurements suggest that in some cases, hollow cathodes are able to generate specific impulse of over 1000s with xenon. The means by which hollow cathodes are able to generate such high levels of specific impulse is not clearly understood. This paper explores thrust production

A. N. Grubisic; S. B. Gabriel

2010-01-01

244

Thrust bolting: roof bolt support apparatus  

DOEpatents

A method of installing a tensioned roof bolt in a borehole of a rock formation without the aid of a mechanical anchoring device or threaded tensioning threads by applying thrust to the bolt (19) as the bonding material (7') is curing to compress the strata (3) surrounding the borehole (1), and then relieving the thrust when the bonding material (7') has cured.

Tadolini, Stephen C. (Lakewood, CO); Dolinar, Dennis R. (Golden, CO)

1992-01-01

245

The design of linear aerospike thrust cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study was undertaken to establish, quantify, and compare the design and performance of two candidate thrust cell designs for a linear aerospike rocket engine. The two candidate designs were selected based on a qualitative evaluation of a group of possible designs. The preferred design concepts were a two-dimensional planar thrust cell (2D), and a round throat to rectangular exit

T. E. Booth; J. O. Vilja; D. P. Cap; R. J. McGill

1993-01-01

246

Thrust reverser for high bypass turbofan engine  

Microsoft Academic Search

This patent describes a thrust reverser for a gas turbine engine of the type which includes an outer wall spaced from the center body of a core engine to define a bypass duct therebetween. The thrust reverser comprising: circumferentially displaced blocker doors, each of the doors being movable between a normal position generally aligned with the outer wall and a

R. K. Matta; P. K. Bhutiani

1990-01-01

247

Ewing Bank thrust: structural and sedimentological aspects  

SciTech Connect

Compressional features observed as thrust faults occur in the Gulf of Mexico's upper slope area. A compressional feature manifested as a thrust can be seen in the Ewing Bank area in Block 988. This toe structure is initiated by upslope tensional forces via a type of large-scale slump. Wells that penetrate this thrust given no direct indications of repeat sections; however, well correlations tied via paleo and seismic data demonstrate the reverse nature of the fault's throw. The thrust feature can be seen clearly on a set of 3-D migrated extracted lines, which allow enhanced definition and increased confidence in the interpretation. Time slices through the area allow a plan view of the thrust. The Ewing Bank thrust fault zone trends east-west. Paleoreconstruction indicates the main thrust grew through time and suggests salt withdrawal beneath the decollement, which allowed the funneling of sediment. The compressional force apparently originated from the north due to normal faulting located at the front of a salt sheet; another possible origin is a more regional transmission of stress. The top and bottom of the salt sheet is appropriately imaged by 3-D data. By restoring salt thicknesses to depth, the interpreter can better appreciate the area's depositional and thrusting histories.

Huber, W.F.

1989-03-01

248

An experimental study of a three-dimensional thrust augmenting ejector using laser Doppler velocimetry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Flow field measurements were obtained in a three-dimensional thrust augmenting ejector using laser Doppler velocimetry and hot wire anemometry. The primary nozzle, segmented into twelve slots of aspect ratio 3.0, was tested at a pressure ratio of 1.15. Results are presented on the mean velocity, turbulence intensity, and Reynolds stress progressions in the mixing chamber of the constant area ejector. The segmented nozzle was found to produce streamwise vortices that may increase the mixing efficiency of the ejector flow field. Compared to free jet results, the jet development is reduced by the presence of the ejector walls. The resulting thrust augmentation ratio of this ejector was also calculated to be 1.34.

Storms, Bruce Lowell

1989-01-01

249

The design of linear aerospike thrust cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A study was undertaken to establish, quantify, and compare the design and performance of two candidate thrust cell designs for a linear aerospike rocket engine. The two candidate designs were selected based on a qualitative evaluation of a group of possible designs. The preferred design concepts were a two-dimensional planar thrust cell (2D), and a round throat to rectangular exit three dimensional (3D) thrust cell. These designs were defined using optimum nozzle design methods and a computer aided design system with surfacing capabilities. A quantitative aerothermodynamic analysis was performed to evaluate the performance of these two designs. The performance comparison indicated that the optimum two-dimensional thrust cell had slightly higher overall performance than the non-optimum three dimensional design. The results indicate that other factors, such as cooling capability, structural integrity, and fabricability, will be the leading factors in thrust cell configuration selection.

Booth, T. E.; Vilja, J. O.; Cap, D. P.; McGill, R. J.

1993-06-01

250

Measurements of scramjet thrust in shock tunnels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

By using results obtained in tests on supersonic combustion of hydrogen in air, the conditions governing model size and operating pressure levels for shock tunnel experiments on models of flight vehicles with scramjet propulsion are established. It is seen that large models are required. The development of the stress wave force balance is then described, and its use as a method of measuring thrust/drag on such models is discussed. Test results on a simple, fully integrated scramjet model, with intakes, combustion chambers, thrust surfaces and exterior surfaces, using a 13 percent silane 87 percent hydrogen fuel mixture, showed that a steady state with thrust generation could be achieved within the shock tunnel test time, and the thrust could be measured. Results are presented for a range of stagnation enthalpies, and show that the scramjet model produces net positive thrust at velocities up to 2.4 km/sec.

Stalker, R. J.; Simmons, J. M.; Paull, A.; Mee, D. J.

1995-01-01

251

Aeropropulsive characteristics of twin nonaxisymmetric vectoring nozzles installed with forward-swept and aft-swept wings. [in the Langley 16 Foot Transonic Tunnel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16 Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the aeropropulsive characteristics of a single expansion ramp nozzle (SERN) and a two dimensional convergent divergent nozzle (2-D C-D) installed with both an aft swept and a forward swept wing. The SERN was tested in both an upright and an inverted position. The effects of thrust vectoring at nozzle vector angles from -5 deg to 20 deg were studied. This investigation was conducted at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 1.20 and angles of attack from -2.0 deg to 16 deg. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.0 (jet off) to about 9.0. Reynolds number based on the wing mean geometric chord varied from about 3 million to 4.8 million, depending upon free stream number.

Capone, F. J.

1981-01-01

252

Low thrust chemical rocket technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An on-going technology program to improve the performance of low thrust chemical rockets for spacecraft on-board propulsion applications is reviewed. Improved performance and lifetime is sought by the development of new predictive tools to understand the combustion and flow physics, introduction of high temperature materials and improved component designs to optimize performance, and use of higher performance propellants. Improved predictive technology is sought through the comparison of both local and global predictions with experimental data. Predictions are based on both the RPLUS Navier-Stokes code with finite rate kinetics and the JANNAF methodology. Data were obtained with laser-based diagnostics along with global performance measurements. Results indicate that the modeling of the injector and the combustion process needs improvement in these codes and flow visualization with a technique such as 2-D laser induced fluorescence (LIF) would aid in resolving issues of flow symmetry and shear layer combustion processes. High temperature material fabrication processes are under development and small rockets are being designed, fabricated, and tested using these new materials. Rhenium coated with iridium for oxidation protection was produced by the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process and enabled an 800 K increase in rocket operating temperature. Performance gains with this material in rockets using Earth storable propellants (nitrogen tetroxide and monomethylhydrazine or hydrazine) were obtained through component redesign to eliminate fuel film cooling and its associated combustion inefficiency while managing head end thermal soakback. Material interdiffusion and oxidation characteristics indicated that the requisite lifetimes of tens of hours were available for thruster applications. Rockets were designed, fabricated, and tested with thrusts of 22, 62, 440 and 550 N. Performance improvements of 10 to 20 seconds specific impulse were demonstrated. Higher performance propellants were evaluated: Space storable propellants, including liquid oxygen (LOX) as the oxidizer with nitrogen hydrides or hydrocarbon as fuels. Specifically, a LOX/hydrazine engine was designed, fabricated, and shown to have a 95 pct theoretical c-star which translates into a projected vacuum specific impulse of 345 seconds at an area ratio of 204:1. Further performance improvment can be obtained by the use of LOX/hydrogen propellants, especially for manned spacecraft applications, and specific designs must be developed and advanced through flight qualification.

Schneider, Steven J.

1992-01-01

253

Extending acoustic data measured with small-scale supersonic model jets to practical aircraft exhaust jets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable geometry nozzles to provide optimum thrust in different operating conditions within the flight envelope. However, the acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full-scale measurements and the lack of details about the exact geometry of these nozzles. Thus the present effort at The Pennsylvania

Ching-Wen Kuo

2010-01-01

254

Mixing, Noise and Thrust Benefits Using Corrugated Designs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This project was conducted as a support for effective research, training and teaching of Hampton University students in Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics. Basically, this work is organized and implemented by the new Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Laboratory (FM & AL) which was established at Hampton University in the School of Engineering and Technology (E & T) in 1996. In addition, FM & AL in cooperation with NASA LaRC jointly conducts research with the Central AeroHydrodynamics Institute (TSAGI, Moscow) in Russia under a 2 year Civilian Research and Development Foundation (CRDF). This project is also conducted under control of NASA HQ. For fulfillment of the current project, several researchers were involved as was shown in the proposal to NASA in 1996. This work is the development and support for projects solve problems with the goal of reducing jet noise and increasing nozzle thrust.

White, Samuel G.; Gilinsky, Mikhail M.

1998-01-01

255

Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber Assembly  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A thrust chamber assembly for liquid fueled rocket engines and the method of making it wherein a two-piece mandrel having the configuration of an assembly having a combustion chamber portion connected to a nozzle portion through a throat portion is wrapped with a silica tape saturated with a phenolic resin, the tape extending along the mandrel and covering the combustion chamber portion of the mandrel to the throat portion. The width of the tape is positioned at an angle of 30 to 50 deg. to the axis of the mandrel such that one edge of the tape contacts the mandrel while the other edge is spaced from the mandrel. The phenolic in the tape is cured and the end of the wrap is machined to provide a frusto-conical surface extending at an angle of 15 to 30 deg. with respect to the axis of the mandrel for starting a second wrap on the mandrel to cover the throat portion. The remainder of the mandrel is wrapped with a third silica tape having its width positioned at a angle of 5 to 20 deg. from the axis of the mandrel. The resin in the third tape is cured and the assembly is machined to provide a smooth outer surface. The entire assembly is then wrapped with a tow of graphite fibers wetted with an epoxy resin and, after the epoxy resin is cured, the graphite is machined to final dimensions.

Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor); Counts, Richard H. (Inventor); Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Lackey, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Peters, Warren (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael (Inventor); Sparks, David L. (Inventor); Lawrence, Timothy W. (Inventor)

2001-01-01

256

Collar nut and thrust ring  

SciTech Connect

A collar nut comprises a hollow cylinder having fine interior threads at one end for threadably engaging a pump mechanical seal assembly and an inwardly depending flange at the other end. The flange has an enlarged portion with a groove for receiving an O-ring for sealing against the intrusion of pumpage from the exterior. The enlarged portion engages a thrust ring about the pump shaft for crushing a hard O-ring, such as a graphite O-ring. The hard O-ring seals the interior of the mechanical seal assembly and pump housing against the loss of lubricants or leakage of pumpage. The fine threads of the hollow cylinder provide the mechanical advantage for crushing the hard O-ring evenly and easily with a hand tool from the side of the collar nut rather than by tightening a plurality of bolts from the end and streamlines the exterior surface of the mechanical seal. The collar nut avoids the spatial requirements of bolt heads at the end of a seal and associated bolt head turbulence.

Lowery, G.B.

1991-08-13

257

Fragmentation with a cut on thrust: Predictions for B factories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When high-energy single-hadron production takes place inside an identified jet, there are important correlations between the fragmentation and phase-space cuts. For example, when one-hadron yields are measured in on-resonance B-factory data, a cut on the thrust event shape T is required to remove the large b-quark contribution. This leads to a dijet final-state restriction for the light-quark fragmentation process. Here, we complete our analysis of unpolarized fragmentation of (light) quarks and gluons to a light hadron h with energy fraction z in e+e-?dijet+h at the center-of-mass energy Q=10.58GeV. In addition to the next-to-next-to-leading order resummation of the logarithms of 1-T, we include the next-to-leading order nonsingular O(1-T) contribution to the cross section, the resummation of threshold logarithms of 1-z, and the leading nonperturbative contribution to the soft function. Our results for the correlations between fragmentation and the thrust cut are presented in a way that can be directly tested against B-factory data. These correlations are also observed in Pythia but are surprisingly smaller at next-to-leading order.

Jain, Ambar; Procura, Massimiliano; Shotwell, Brian; Waalewijn, Wouter J.

2013-04-01

258

Scramjet thrust measurement in a shock tunnel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This note reports tests in a shock tunnel in which a fully integrated scramjet configuration produced net thrust. The experiments not only showed that impulse facilities can be used for assessing thrust performance, but also were a demonstration of the application of a new technique to the measurement of thrust on scramjet configurations in shock tunnels. These two developments are of significance because scramjets are expected to operate at speeds well in excess of 2 km/sec, and shock tunnels offer a means of generating high Mach number flows at such speeds.

Paull, A.; Stalker, R. J.; Mee, D. J.

1995-01-01

259

Scramjet thrust measurement in a shock tunnel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This note reports tests in a shock tunnel in which a fully integrated scamjet configuration produced net thrust. The experiments not only showed that impluse facilities can be used for assessing thrust performance, but also were a demonstration of the application of a new technique to the measurement of thrust on scramjet configurations in shock tunnels. These two developments are of significance because scramjets are expected to operate at speeds well in excess of 2 km/s, and shock tunnels offer a means of generating high Mach number flows at such speeds.

Paull, A.; Stalker, R. J.; Mee, D. J.

1995-01-01

260

Shock tunnel measurement of the interaction amplification factor for a hot gas side jet in a supersonic cross flow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An efficient method for the steering of bodies flying at high Mach numbers is the lateral jet control. Compared to fins, no drag is induced when the jet is inactive and there is no risk of aerothermal problems. Additionally, conventional fins are quite inefficient at high altitudes due to the low stagnation pressures. A disadvantage of the lateral control jet, however, is the complex flow pattern that is formed around the active jet. In front of the lateral jet, a bow shock in conjunction with a separation shock is formed. Behind the jet, a wake with a low-pressure zone exists (Fig. 1). In addition to the jet thrust, an aerodynamic force resulting from the flow interactions around the jet is acting on the body, which makes an accurate side force prediction very difficult. It is common to define an interaction amplification factor that takes into account both types of forces: the jet thrust as well as the interaction force.

Havermann, M.; Ende, H.; Seiler, F.; Schwenzer, M.

261

Effects of an in-flight thrust reverser on the stability and control characteristics of a single-engine fighter airplane model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The changes in thrust minus drag performance as well as longitudinal and directional stability and control characteristics of a single-engine jet aircraft attributable to an in-flight thrust reverser of the blocker-deflector door type were investigated in a 16-foot transonic wind tunnel. The longitudinal and directional stability data are presented. Test conditions simulated landing approach conditions as well as high speed maneuvering such as may be required for combat or steep descent from high altitude.

Mercer, C. E.; Maiden, D. L.

1972-01-01

262

Three dimensional thrust chamber life prediction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study was performed to analytically determine the cyclic thermomechanical behavior and fatigue life of three configurations of a Plug Nozzle Thrust Chamber. This thrust chamber is a test model which represents the current trend in nozzle design calling for high performance coupled with weight and volume limitations as well as extended life for reusability. The study involved the use of different materials and material combinations to evaluate their application to the problem of low-cycle fatigue in the thrust chamber. The thermal and structural analyses were carried out on a three-dimensional basis. Results are presented which show plots of continuous temperature histories and temperature distributions at selected times during the operating cycle of the thrust chamber. Computed structural data show critical regions for low-cycle fatigue and the histories of strain within the regions for each operation cycle.

Armstrong, W. H.; Brogren, E. W.

1976-01-01

263

Low-thrust chemical rocket engine study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analytical study evaluating thrust chamber cooling engine cycles and preliminary engine design for low thrust chemical rocket engines for orbit transfer vehicles is described. Oxygen/hydrogen, oxygen/methane, and oxygen/RP-1 engines with thrust levels from 444.8 N to 13345 N, and chamber pressures from 13.8 N/sq cm to 689.5 N/sq cm were evaluated. The physical and thermodynamic properties of the propellant theoretical performance data, and transport properties are documented. The thrust chamber cooling limits for regenerative/radiation and film/radiation cooling are defined and parametric heat transfer data presented. A conceptual evaluation of a number of engine cycles was performed and a 2224.1 N oxygen/hydrogen engine cycle configuration and a 2224.1 N oxygen/methane configuration chosen for preliminary engine design. Updated parametric engine data, engine design drawings, and an assessment of technology required are presented.

Shoji, J. M.

1981-01-01

264

Combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing is disclosed that allows for both radial and thrust axes control of an associated shaft. The combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing comprises a rotor and a stator. The rotor comprises a shaft, and first and second rotor pairs each having respective rotor elements. The stator comprises first and second stator elements and a magnet-sensor disk. In one embodiment, each stator element has a plurality of split-poles and a corresponding plurality of radial force coils and, in another embodiment, each stator element does not require thrust force coils, and radial force coils are replaced by double the plurality of coils serving as an outer member of each split-pole half.

Blumenstock, Kenneth A. (Inventor)

2002-01-01

265

The NASA low thrust propulsion program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA OAST Propulsion, Power, and Energy Division supports a low thrust propulsion program aimed at providing high performance options for a broad range of near-term and far-term mission and vehicles. Low thrust propulsion has a major impact on the mission performance of essentially all spacecraft and vehicles. On-orbit lifetimes, payloads, and trip times are significantly impacted by low thrust propulsion performance and integration features for Earth-to-orbit (ETO) vehicles, Earth-orbit and planetary spacecraft, and large platforms in Earth orbit. Major emphases are on low thrust chemical propulsion, both storables and hydrogen/oxygen; low-power (auxiliary) electric arcjects and resistojets; and high-power (primary) electric propulsion, including ion, magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD), and electrodeless concepts. The major recent accomplishments of the program are presented and their impacts discussed.

Stone, James R.; Bennett, Gary L.

1989-01-01

266

Solar Electric Propulsion Thrust Subsystem Development.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Solar Electric Propulsion System developed under this program was designed to demonstrate all the thrust subsystem functions needed on an unmanned planetary vehicle. The demonstration included operation of the basic elements, power matching input and ...

T. D. Masek

1973-01-01

267

Thrust Generation Mechanism on Wing Heaving Motion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A numerical study of two-dimensional viscous flow past airfoils with sinusoidal heaving motion is presented. Thrust is divided into viscous force and pressure force and we aim to discover how both components contribute to thrust generation. Airfoils with different shapes are considered. Modeling of ellipse airfoil with 1% thickness shows that viscous force produces thrust while pressure force can be ignored. When the thickness of airfoil increases, pressure force can no longer be ignored and becomes an important part of thrust generation. The results also show that the fluid dynamics in unsteady flow is very different from that of steady condition and the fluid dynamics is closely associated with the vortex structures.

Wen, M. H.; Hu, W. R.; Liu, H.

2011-09-01

268

Shedding light on hydroelectric thrust bearing problems  

SciTech Connect

Why did thrust bearing failures, so rare in hydro plants built in the first decades of this century, increase greatly during and after World War II Engineers have found that modern manufacturing techniques created problems as well as solutions. Two primary reasons for failure are a too smooth surface finish, and an oil film force that causes the split runner in the thrust bearings to slip, which results in fretting.

Baudry, R.A.; Rielly, D.H. (ElectroMechanical Engineering Associates, Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

1991-07-01

269

GSFC Technology Thrusts and Partnership Opportunities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the technology thrusts and the opportunities to partner in developing software in support of the technological advances at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). There are thrusts in development of end-to-end software systems for mission data systems in areas of flight software, ground data systems, flight dynamic systems and science data systems. The required technical expertise is reviewed, and the supported missions are shown for the various areas given.

Le Moigne, Jacqueline

2010-01-01

270

Multiphysics Nuclear Thermal Rocket Thrust Chamber Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of this effort is t o develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical thrust chamber design and analysis. The current task scope is to perform multidimensional, multiphysics analysis of thrust performance and heat transfer analysis for a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine including thrust chamber and nozzle. The multiphysics aspects of the model include: real fluid dynamics, chemical reactivity, turbulent flow, and conjugate heat transfer. The model will be designed to identify thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments in all flow paths and materials. This model would then be used to perform non- nuclear reproduction of the flow element failures demonstrated in the Rover/NERVA testing, investigate performance of specific configurations and assess potential issues and enhancements. A two-pronged approach will be employed in this effort: a detailed analysis of a multi-channel, flow-element, and global modeling of the entire thrust chamber assembly with a porosity modeling technique. It is expected that the detailed analysis of a single flow element would provide detailed fluid, thermal, and hydrogen environments for stress analysis, while the global thrust chamber assembly analysis would promote understanding of the effects of hydrogen dissociation and heat transfer on thrust performance. These modeling activities will be validated as much as possible by testing performed by other related efforts.

Wang, Ten-See

2005-01-01

271

NLO Jet Physics with BlackHat  

SciTech Connect

We present several results obtained using the BLACKHAT next-to-leading order QCD program library, in conjunction with SHERPA. In particular, we present distributions for vector boson plus 1,2,3-jet production at the Tevatron and at the asymptotic running energy of the Large Hadron Collider, including new Z + 3-jet distributions. The Z + 2-jet predictions for the second-jet P{sub T} distribution are compared to CDF data. We present the jet-emission probability at NLO in W + 2-jet events at the LHC, where the tagging jets are taken to be the ones furthest apart in pseudorapidity. We analyze further the large left-handed W{sup {+-}} polarization, identified in our previous study, for W bosons produced at high P{sub T} at the LHC.

Berger, C.F.; /MIT, LNS; Bern, Z.; /UCLA; Dixon, L.J.; /SLAC; Cordero, F.Febres; /Simon Bolivar U.; Forde, D.; /CERN /NIKHEF, Amsterdam; Gleisberg, T.; /SLAC; Ita, H.; /UCLA; Kosower, D.A.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Maitre, D.; /Durham U.

2010-02-15

272

Vector Voyage!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students will use vector analysis to understand the concept of dead reckoning. Students will use vectors to plot their course based on a time and speed. They will then correct the positions with vectors representing winds and currents.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

273

Vector Voyage!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students will use vector analysis to understand the concept of dead reckoning. Students will use vectors to plot their course based on a time and speed. They will then correct the positions with vectors representing winds and currents.

White, Jeff; Lippis, Matt; Axelrad, Penny; Yowell, Janet; Zarske, Malinda S.

2004-01-01

274

A thrust balance for low power hollow cathode thrusters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A hanging thrust balance has been designed, manufactured and tested at the University of Southampton. The current design allows for direct steady thrust measurements ranging from 0.1 to 3 mN but this can be easily extended to measure thrust in a different range. Moreover the chosen balance design and the thrust measurement procedure allow for the cancellation of thermal drifts. The thrust balance was tested with a T6 hollow cathode thruster providing measurements with an uncertainty of about 9.7%. The thrust data were compared to those obtained with another direct thrust balance and they are in quantitative agreement—the maximum difference being only 6%.

Frollani, D.; Coletti, M.; Gabriel, S. B.

2014-06-01

275

A Experimental Study of the Velocity Field of a Transverse Jet Injected Into a Supersonic Crossflow.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The design of a supersonic combustor which uses transverse jet injection into a supersonic flow (TJISF) as a means of fuel injection and mixing requires a fundamental understanding of these flows. Such knowledge may also serve studies of the thrust vector control of rocket nozzles, the cooling of nozzle walls, and jet reaction force prediction. The present investigation is a quantitative, experimental study of a single, sonic, underexpanded, transverse jet injected into a Mach 1.6 crossflow. The motivation for this research program is to improve the fundamental understanding of the fluid dynamic mechanisms and mixing processes in this flow. Schlieren/shadowgraph photography, surface flow visualization, and two-component, frequency pre-shifted laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) data have been obtained. Four LDV optical arrangements have been used to measure all three mean velocity components, five of the six kinematic Reynolds stresses, and the turbulent kinetic energy. The LDV system is equipped with a computer-controlled traverse system and has been used to provide velocity measurements at over 4,000 locations throughout the TJISF flowfield. The study focuses on the transverse, midline plane and two crossflow planes. The majority of the measurements in these planes has been made in the high gradient regions of the jet plume. Measurements of the mean and turbulent velocity fields helped resolve important issues in the study of the TJISF flowfield. These issues include the size and orientation of the recirculation regions upstream and downstream of the jet (including the horseshoe vortex just upstream of the jet); the structure and strength of the bow shock, barrel shock, and Mach disk; the structure, strength, and development of the kidney-shaped, counter-rotating vortex pair; the growth of the annular shear layer between the jet plume and the crossflow; the growth of the boundary layer beneath the jet plume; the Reynolds stress fields of the flow; the production of turbulent kinetic energy; and the degree of anisotropy of the turbulent stresses in this flow. In addition, the present study provides validation data for analytical and numerical predictions of the TJISF flowfield.

Santiago, Juan Gabriel

276

Gravitomagnetic jets  

SciTech Connect

We present a family of dynamic rotating cylindrically symmetric Ricci-flat gravitational fields whose geodesic motions have the structure of gravitomagnetic jets. These correspond to helical motions of free test particles up and down parallel to the axis of cylindrical symmetry and are reminiscent of the motion of test charges in a magnetic field. The speed of a test particle in a gravitomagnetic jet asymptotically approaches the speed of light. Moreover, numerical evidence suggests that jets are attractors. The possible implications of our results for the role of gravitomagnetism in the formation of astrophysical jets are briefly discussed.

Chicone, C.; Mashhoon, B. [Department of Mathematics and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States)

2011-03-15

277

Flow visualization and interpretation of visualization data for deflected thrust V/STOL nozzles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Flow visualization studies were made for four deflected thrust nozzle models at subsonic speeds. Based on topological rules and the assumption that observed streaks constitute continuous vector fields, available visualization pictures are interpreted and flow patterns on interior surfaces of the nozzles are synthesized. In particular, three dimensional flow structure and separations are discussed. From the synthesized patterns, the overall features of the flow field in a given nozzle can be approximately perceived.

Kao, H. C.; Burstadt, P. L.; Johns, A. L.

1984-01-01

278

The Three Jet Process in Virtual Photon-Photon Annihilation.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three jet production in quantum chromodynamics is studied through the processes gamma^ *gamma^* to q| qg and g^* g^* to q| qg with respect to the jet broadening parameter called the transverse momentum perpendicular to the transverse thrust axis, developed by Ellis and Webber. The helicity amplitude methods developed by Farrar and Neri are used to derive the amplitudes for the Feynman diagrams of these three jet processes in lowest order in the coupling for each combination of photon and gluon polarizations and fermion chiralities. The transverse momentum perpendicular to the transverse thrust axis is then numerically determined by running the encoded formula through the VEGAS Monte Carlo integration routine. Results indicate the jet broadening remains rather flat with increasing photon virtuality. In the appendices, calculations towards the one loop correction for gammagamma^* to q| qg are given.

Ladinsky, Glenn A.

279

Business Jets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Learjet Inc.'s Learjet 31 and Learjet 55C both feature NASA developed winglets, nearly vertical extensions of the wing designed to reduce fuel consumption and generally improve airplane's performance. Winglets are lifting surfaces designed to operate in the vortex or air whirlpool that occurs at an airplanes wingtip. This complex flow of air creates air drag; the winglets job is to reduce the strength of the vortex and thereby substantially reduce drag, additionally the winglet generates its own lift producing forward thrust in the manner of a sailboat's sail. Combination of reduced drag and additional thrust adds up to improvement in fuel efficiency.

1988-01-01

280

Optimal low-thrust, Earth-Moon trajectories  

Microsoft Academic Search

A variety of optimal trajectories from a circular low-Earth parking orbit to a circular low-lunar parking orbit are computed for a range of low-thrust spacecraft. The problem is studied in the context of the classical restricted three-body problem. Minimum-fuel, planar trajectories with a fixed thrust-coast-thrust engine sequence are computed for both a 'high-end' low-thrust spacecraft and 'moderate' low-thrust nuclear electric

Craig Allen Kluever

1993-01-01

281

Tubular copper thrust chamber design study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of copper tubular thrust chambers is particularly important in high performance expander cycle space engines. Tubular chambers have more surface area than flat wall chambers, and this extra surface area provides enhanced heat transfer for additional energy to power the cycle. This paper was divided into two sections: (1) a thermal analysis and sensitivity study; and (2) a preliminary design of a selected thrust chamber configuration. The thermal analysis consisted of a statistical optimization to determine the optimum tube geometry, tube booking, thrust chamber geometry, and cooling routing to achieve the maximum upper limit chamber pressure for a 25,000 pound thrust engine. The preliminary design effort produced a layout drawing of a tubular thrust chamber that is three inches shorter than the Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) milled channel chamber but is predicted to provide a five percent increase in heat transfer. Testing this chamber in the AETB would confirm the inherent advantages of tubular chamber construction and heat transfer.

Masters, A. I.; Galler, D. E.

1992-01-01

282

Thrust Stand for Electric Propulsion Performance Evaluation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An electric propulsion thrust stand capable of supporting thrusters with total mass of up to 125 kg and 1 mN to 1 N thrust levels has been developed and tested. The mechanical design features a conventional hanging pendulum arm attached to a balance mechanism that transforms horizontal motion into amplified vertical motion, with accommodation for variable displacement sensitivity. Unlike conventional hanging pendulum thrust stands, the deflection is independent of the length of the pendulum arm, and no reference structure is required at the end of the pendulum. Displacement is measured using a non-contact, optical linear gap displacement transducer. Mechanical oscillations are attenuated using a passive, eddy current damper. An on-board microprocessor-based level control system, which includes a two axis accelerometer and two linear-displacement stepper motors, continuously maintains the level of the balance mechanism - counteracting mechanical %era drift during thruster testing. A thermal control system, which includes heat exchange panels, thermocouples, and a programmable recirculating water chiller, continuously adjusts to varying thermal loads to maintain the balance mechanism temperature, to counteract thermal drifts. An in-situ calibration rig allows for steady state calibration both prior to and during thruster testing. Thrust measurements were carried out on a well-characterized 1 kW Hall thruster; the thrust stand was shown to produce repeatable results consistent with previously published performance data.

Markusic, T. E.; Jones, J. E.; Cox, M. D.

2004-01-01

283

The computational design of a water jet propulsion spherical underwater vehicle  

Microsoft Academic Search

Underwater vehicles have become an important tool to develop oceans. The design of the shape, hardware circuit and software of a water jet propulsion spherical underwater vehicle was introduced, and the characteristics of water jet pump were presented. The design of the thruster and computation of the thrust was proposed, too. A desired movement result was achieved by the designed

Shuxiang Guo; Juan Du; Xiufen Ye; Rui Yan; Hongtao Gao

2011-01-01

284

Jet noise suppressor nozzle development for augmentor wing jet STOL research aircraft (C-8A Buffalo)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Noise and performance test results are presented for a full-scale advanced design rectangular array lobe jet suppressor nozzle (plain wall and corrugated). Flight design and installation considerations are also discussed. Noise data are presented in terms of peak PNLT (perceived noise level, tone corrected) suppression relative to the existing airplane and one-third octave-band spectra. Nozzle performance is presented in terms of velocity coefficient. Estimates of the hot thrust available during emergency (engine out) with the suppressor nozzle installed are compared with the current thrust levels produced by the round convergent nozzles.

Harkonen, D. L.; Marks, C. C.; Okeefe, J. V.

1974-01-01

285

Diffractive jets  

SciTech Connect

The properties of particle clusters produced in the processes of single and double diffraction dissociation of protons at high energies are reviewed. These clusters appear as jets close to the direction of the dissociating protons and are referred to as diffractive or forward jets. (GHT)

Goulianos, K.

1982-01-01

286

A flight investigation of the stability, control, and handling qualities of an augmented jet flap STOL airplane  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The stability, control, and handling qualities of an augmented jet flap STOL airplane are presented. The airplane is an extensively modified de Havilland Buffalo military transport. The modified airplane has two fan-jet engines which provide vectorable thrust and compressed air for the augmentor jet flap and Boundary-Layer Control (BLC). The augmentor and BLC air is cross ducted to minimize asymmetric moments produced when one engine is inoperative. The modifications incorporated in the airplane include a Stability Augmentation System (SAS), a powered elevator, and a powered lateral control system. The test gross weight of the airplane was between 165,000 and 209,000 N (37,000 and 47,000 lb). Stability, control, and handling qualities are presented for the airspeed range of 40 to 180 knots. The lateral-directional handling qualities are considered satisfactory for the normal operating range of 65 to 160 knots airspeed when the SAS is functioning. With the SAS inoperative, poor turn coordination and spiral instability are primary deficiencies contributing to marginal handling qualities in the landing approach. The powered elevator control system enhanced the controllability in pitch, particularly in the landing flare and stall recovery.

Vomaske, R. F.; Innis, R. C.; Swan, B. E.; Grossmith, S. W.

1978-01-01

287

Status of Low Thrust Work at JSC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High performance low thrust (solar electric, nuclear electric, variable specific impulse magnetoplasma rocket) propulsion offers a significant benefit to NASA missions beyond low Earth orbit. As NASA (e.g., Prometheus Project) endeavors to develop these propulsion systems and associated power supplies, it becomes necessary to develop a refined trajectory design capability that will allow engineers to develop future robotic and human mission designs that take advantage of this new technology. This ongoing work addresses development of a trajectory design and optimization tool for assessing low thrust (and other types) trajectories. This work targets to advance the state of the art, enable future NASA missions, enable science drivers, and enhance education. This presentation provides a summary of the low thrust-related JSC activities under the ISP program and specifically, provides a look at a new release of a multi-gravity, multispacecraft trajectory optimization tool (Copernicus) along with analysis performed using this tool over the past year.

Condon, Gerald L.

2004-01-01

288

Study of orientation of three-jet events in Z0 hadronic decays using the DELPHI detector  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study of the orientation of three-jet events from e+e- --> Z0 --> multi-hadrons is presented, in particular the polar angle distributions of the thrust axis and of the normal to the three-jet plane, and the azimuthal correlations between the hadron plane and the one defined by the beam and thrust axes. The data are compared with results at lower

P. Abreu; W. Adam; F. Adami; T. Adami; T. Adye; T. Akesson; G. D. Alekseev; P. Allen; S. Almehed; F. Alted; S. J. Alvsvaag; U. Amaldi; E. Anassontzis; P. Antilogus; W.-D. Apel; R. J. Apsimon; B. Åsman; P. Astier; J.-E. Augustin; A. Augustinus; P. Baillon; P. Bambade; F. Barao; G. Barbiellini; D. Y. Bardin; A. Baroncelli; O. Barring; W. Bartl; M. Battaglia; M Baubillier; K.-H. Becks; C. J. Beeston; M. Begalli; P. Beilliere; Yu. Belokopytov; K. Belous; P. Beltran; D. Benedic; J. M. Benlloch; M. Berggren; D. Bertrand; S. Biagi; F. Bianchi; J. H. Bibby; M. S. Bilenky; P. Billoir; J. Bjarne; D. Bloch; S. Blyth; P. N. Bogolubov; T. Bolognese; M. Bonapart; M. Bonesini; W. Bonivento; P. S. L. Booth; M. Bonatav; P. Borgeaud; H. Borner; C. Bosio; O. Botner; B. Bouquet; M. Bozzo; S. Braibant; P. Branchini; K. D. Brand; R. A. Brenner; C. Bricman; R. C. A. Brown; N. Brummer; J.-M. Brunet; L. Bugge; T. Buran; H. Burmeister; J. A. M. A. Buytaert; M. Caccia; M. Calvi; A. J. Camacho Rozas; J.-E. Campagne; A. Campion; T. Camporesi; V. Canale; F. Cao; L. Carroll; C. Caso; E. Castelli; M. V. Castillo Gimenez; A. Cattai; F. R. Cavallo; L. Cerrito; M. Chapkin; P. Charpentier; P. Checchia; G. A. Chelkov; L. Chevalier; P. Chliapnikov; V. Chorowicz; R. Cirio; M. P. Clara; P. Collins; J. L. Contreras; R. Contri; G. Cosme; F. Couchot; H. B. Crawley; D. Crennell; G. Crosetti; N. Crosland; M. Crozon; J. Cuevas Maestro; S. Czellar; S. Dagoret; E. Dahl-Jensen; B. Dalmagne; M. Dam; G. Damgaard; G. Darbo; E. Daubie; P. D. Dauncey; M. Davenport; P. David; A. de Angelis; M. de Beer; H. de Boeck; W. de Boer; C. de Clercq; M. D. M. de Fez Laso; N. de Groot; C. de La Vaissiere; B. de Lotto; C. Defoix; D. Delikaris; S. Delorme; P. Delpierre; N. Demaria; A. Demin; J. Derkaoui; L. di Ciaccio; H. Dijkstra; F. Djama; J. Dolbeau; M. Donszelmann; K. Doroba; M. Dracos; J. Drees; M. Dris; W. Dulinski; R. Dzhelyadin; L.-O. Eek; P. A.-M. Eerola; T. Ekelof; G. Ekspong; A. Elliot Peisert; J.-P. Engel; V. Falaleev; D. Fassouliotis; M. Fernandez Alonso; A Filippas-Tassos; T. A. Filippas; A. Firestone; H. Foeth; E. Fokitis; P. Folegati; F. Fontanelli; H. Forsbach; B. Franek; K. E. Fransson; P. Frenkiel; D. C. Fries; A. G. Frodesen; R. Fruhwirth; F. Fulda-Quenzer; K. Furnival; H. Furstenau; J. Fuster; J. M. Gago; G. Galeazzi; D. Gamba; C. Garcia; J. Garcia; U. Gasparini; P. Gavillet; E. N. Gazis; J.-P. Gerber; P. Giacomelli; K.-W. Glitza; R. Gokieli; V. M. Golovatyuk; J. J. Gomez Y Cadenas; A. Goobar; G. Gopal; M. Gorski; V. Gracco; A. Grant; F. Grard; E. Graziani; M.-H. Gros; G. Grosdidier; B. Grossetete; J. Guy; F. Hahn; M. Hahn; S. Haider; Z. Hajduk; A. Hakansson; A. Hallgren; K. Hamacher; G. Hamel de Monchenault; F. J. Harris; B. W. Heck; I. Herbst; J. J. Hernandez; P. Herquet; H. Herr; I. Hietanen; E. Higon; H. J. Hilke; S. D. Hodgson; T. Hofmokl; R. Holmes; S.-O. Holmgren; D. Holthuizen; P. F. Honore; J. E. Hooper; M. Houlden; J. Hrubec; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; D. Husson; B. D. Hyams; P. Ioannou; D. Isenhower; P.-S. Iversen; J. N. Jackson; P. Jalocha; G. Jarlskog; P. Jarry; B. Jean-Marie; E. K. Johansson; D. Johnson; M. Jonker; L. Jonsson; P. Juillot; G. Kalkanis; G Kantardjian; F. Kapusta; S. Katsanevas; E. C. Katsoufis; R. Keranen; J. Kesteman; B. A. Khomenko; N N Khovanskii; B J King; N. J. Kjaer; H. Klein; W. Klempt; G. Kliutchnikov; A. Klovning; P M Kluit; J. H. Koehne; B. Koene; P. Kokkinias; M. Kopf; M. Koratzinos; K. Korcyl; A. V. Korytov; B. Korzen; C. Kourkoumelis; T. Kreuzberger; J. Krolikowski; J. Krstic; U. Kruener-Marquis; W. Krupinski; W. Kucewicz; K. Kurvinen; C Lambropoulos; J. W. Lamsa; L. Lanceri; V. Lapin; J.-P. Laugier; R. Lauhakangas; G. Leder; F. Ledroit; J. Lemonne; G. Lenzen; V. Lepeltier; A. Letessier-Selvon; D. Liko; E Lillethun; J. Lindgren; A. Lipniacka; I. Lippi; R. Llosa; B. Loerstad; M. Lokajicek; J. G. Loken; M. A. Lopez Aguera; A. Lopez-Fernandez; M. Los; D. Loukas; A. Lounis; J. J. Lozano; R. Lucock; P. Lutz; L. Lyons; G. Maehlum; J. Maillard; A. Maltezos; S. Maltezos; F. Mandl; J. Marco; M. Margoni; J.-C. Marin; A. Markou; S. Marti; L. Mathis; F. Matorras; C. Matteuzzi; G. Matthiae; M L McCubbin; M. Mazzucato; M. Mc Cubbin; R. Mc Kay; R. Mc Nulty; E. Menichetti; C. Meroni; W. T. Meyer; M. Michelotto; W. A. Mitaroff; G. V. Mitselmakher; U. Mjoernmark; T. Moa; R. Moeller; K. Moenig; M. R. Monge; P. Morettini; H. Mueller; H. Muller; W. J. Murray; G. Myatt; F. Naraghi; U. Nau-Korzen; F. L. Navarria; P. Negri; B. S. Nielsen; B. Nijjhar; V. Nikolaenko; V. Obraztsov; A. G. Olshevski; R. Orava; A. Ostankov; A. Ouraou; R. Pain; H. Palka; T. Papadopoulou; L. Pape; A. Passeri; M. Pegoraro; V. Perevozchikov; M. Pernicka; A. Perrotta; F. Pierre; M. Pimenta; O. Pingot; A. Pinsent; M. E. Pol; G. Polok; P. Poropat; P. Privitera; A. Pullia; J. Pyyhtia; D. Radojicic

1992-01-01

289

Oil-Free Turbomachinery Research Enhanced by Thrust Bearing Test Capability  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Glenn Research Center s Oil-Free Turbomachinery research team is developing aircraft turbine engines that will not require an oil lubrication system. Oil systems are required today to lubricate rolling-element bearings used by the turbine and fan shafts. For the Oil-Free Turbomachinery concept, researchers combined the most advanced foil (air) bearings from industry with NASA-developed high-temperature solid lubricant technology. In 1999, the world s first Oil-Free turbocharger was demonstrated using these technologies. Now we are working with industry to demonstrate Oil-Free turbomachinery technology in a small business jet engine, the EJ-22 produced by Williams International and developed during Glenn s recently concluded General Aviation Propulsion (GAP) program. Eliminating the oil system in this engine will make it simpler, lighter (approximately 15 percent), more reliable, and less costly to purchase and maintain. Propulsion gas turbines will place high demands on foil air bearings, especially the thrust bearings. Up until now, the Oil-Free Turbomachinery research team only had the capability to test radial, journal bearings. This research has resulted in major improvements in the bearings performance, but journal bearings are cylindrical, and can only support radial shaft loads. To counteract axial thrust loads, thrust foil bearings, which are disk shaped, are required. Since relatively little research has been conducted on thrust foil air bearings, their performance lags behind that of journal bearings.

Bauman, Steven W.

2003-01-01

290

Test plan pressure fed thrust chamber technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerojet is developing the technology for the design of a reliable, low cost, efficient, and lightweight LOX/RP-1 pressure fed engine. This technology program is a direct result of Aerojet's liquid rocket booster (LRB) study and previous NASA studies that identified liquid engines using high bulk density hydrocarbon fuels as very attractive for a space transportation system (STS). Previous large thrust LOX/RP-1 engine development programs were characterized by costly development problems due to combustion instability damage. The combustion stability solution was typically obtained through trial and error methods of minimizing instability damage by degrading engine performance. The approach to this program was to utilize existing and newly developed combustion analysis models and design methodology to create a thrust chamber design with features having the potential of producing reliable and efficient operation. This process resulted in an engine design with a unique high thrust-per-element OFO triplet injector utilizing a low cost modular approach. Cost efficient ablative materials are baselined for the injector face and chamber. Technology demonstration will be accomplished through a hot fire test program using appropriately sized subscale hardware. This subscale testing will provide a data base to supplement the current industry data bank and to anchor and validate the applied analysis models and design methodology. Once anchored and validated, these analysis models and design methodology can be applied with greatly increased confidence to design and characterize a large scale pressure fed LOX/RP-1 thrust chamber. The objective of this test program is to generate a data base that can be used to anchor and validate existing analysis models and design methodologies and to provide early concept demonstration of a low cost, efficient LOX/RP-1 thrust chamber. Test conditions and hardware instrumentation were defined to provide data sufficient to characterize combustion stability, performance, and thermal operation over a wide thrust chamber throttling range.

Dunn, Glenn

1990-01-01

291

SEP thrust subsystem performance sensitivity analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is a two-part report on solar electric propulsion (SEP) performance sensitivity analysis. The first part describes the preliminary analysis of the SEP thrust system performance for an Encke rendezvous mission. A detailed description of thrust subsystem hardware tolerances on mission performance is included together with nominal spacecraft parameters based on these tolerances. The second part describes the method of analysis and graphical techniques used in generating the data for Part 1. Included is a description of both the trajectory program used and the additional software developed for this analysis. Part 2 also includes a comprehensive description of the use of the graphical techniques employed in this performance analysis.

Atkins, K. L.; Sauer, C. G., Jr.; Kerrisk, D. J.

1973-01-01

292

In-flight thrust determination on a real-time basis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A real time computer program was implemented on a F-15 jet fighter to monitor in-flight engine performance of a Digital Electronic Engine Controlled (DEES) F-100 engine. The application of two gas generator methods to calculate in-flight thrust real time is described. A comparison was made between the actual results and those predicted by an engine model simulation. The percent difference between the two methods was compared to the predicted uncertainty based on instrumentation and model uncertainty and agreed closely with the results found during altitude facility testing. Data was obtained from acceleration runs of various altitudes at maximum power settings with and without afterburner. Real time in-flight thrust measurement was a major advancement to flight test productivity and was accomplished with no loss in accuracy over previous post flight methods.

Ray, R. J.; Carpenter, T.; Sandlin, T.

1984-01-01

293

Detonation of CHO working substances in a laser jet engine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laser-induced ablation of materials (including polymers and a variety of polycrystalline substances with a CHO chemical composition) is studied theoretically and experimentally. Based on experimental data, a parametric physicochemical model of detonation of these materials is put forward with the aim to estimate the efficiency of laser thrust formation in jet engines.

A. A. Ageichik; E. V. Repina; Yu. A. Rezunkov; A. L. Safronov

2009-01-01

294

Detonation of CHO working substances in a laser jet engine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laser-induced ablation of materials (including polymers and a variety of polycrystalline substances with a CHO chemical composition)\\u000a is studied theoretically and experimentally. Based on experimental data, a parametric physicochemical model of detonation\\u000a of these materials is put forward with the aim to estimate the efficiency of laser thrust formation in jet engines.

A. A. Ageichik; E. V. Repina; Yu. A. Rezunkov; A. L. Safronov

2009-01-01

295

Jet Spreading Increase by Passive Control and Associated Performance Penalty  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper reviews the effects of 'screech', 'asymmetric nozzle shaping', 'tabs' and 'overexpansion' on the spreading of free jets. Corresponding thrust penalty for the tabs and overexpanded condition are also evaluated. The asymmetric shapes include rectangular ones with varying aspect ratio. Tabs investigated are triangular shaped 'delta-tabs' placed at the exit of a convergent circular nozzle. The effect of overexpansion is examined with circular convergent-divergent (C-D) nozzles. Tabs and overexpansion are found to yield the largest increase in jet spreading. Each, however, involves a performance penalty, i.e., a loss in thrust coefficient. Variation of the size of four delta-tabs show that there exists an optimum size for which the gain in jet spreading is the maximum per unit loss in thrust coefficient. With the C-D nozzles, the minimum in thrust coefficient is expected near the beginning of the overexpanded regime based on idealized flow calculations. The maximum increase in jet spreading, however, is found to occur at higher pressure ratios well into the overexpanded regime. The optimum benefit with the overexpanded flow, in terms of gain in spreading for unit penalty, is found to be comparable to the optimum tab case.

Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

1999-01-01

296

Aeropropulsive characteristics of nonaxisymmetric-nozzle thrust reversers at Mach numbers from 0 to 1.20  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the performance of nonaxisymmetric-nozzle thrust reversers installed on a generic twin-engine fighter aircraft model. Test data were obtained at static conditions and at Mach numbers from 0.15 to 1.20 with jet exhaust simulated by high pressure air. Results showed that reverse-thrust levels of greater than 50 percent at static conditions and greater than 30 percent at in-flight conditions could be achieved. Internal reverser-port passage length was found to be very important in improving reverser performance. Increasing the reverser-port passage length improved reverse-thrust performance by as much as 28 percent at static conditions and by as much as 17 percent at Mach 1.20.

Carson, G. T., Jr.; Capone, F. J.; Mason, M. L.

1984-01-01

297

Emergency Flight Control Using Only Engine Thrust and Lateral Center-of-Gravity Offset: A First Look  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Normally, the damage that results in a total loss of the primary flight controls of a jet transport airplane, including all engines on one side, would be catastrophic. In response, NASA Dryden has conceived an emergency flight control system that uses only the thrust of a wing-mounted engine along with a lateral center-of-gravity (CGY) offset from fuel transfer. Initial analysis and simulation studies indicate that such a system works, and recent high-fidelity simulation tests on the MD-11 and B-747 suggest that the system provides enough control for a survivable landing. This paper discusses principles of flight control using only a wing engine thrust and CGY offset, along with the amount of CGY offset capability of some transport airplanes. The paper also presents simulation results of the throttle-only control capability and closed-loop control of ground track using computer-controlled thrust.

Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Burken, John; Maine, Trindel A.; Bull, John

1997-01-01

298

Unified Approach to Thrust Restraint Design  

Microsoft Academic Search

The design of thrust blocks for water pipelines and sewer force mains vary from one pipe material or standard to another just like the design of pipe wall thickness. This creates tremendous confusion among consulting engineers and owners of projects. The designers and the owners have to look up Design Manual M9 for concrete pipe, Design Manual M11 for welded

Jey K. Jeyapalan; Sri K. Rajah

2007-01-01

299

Thrust chamber thermal barrier coating techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methods for applying thermal barrier coatings to the hot-gas side wall of rocket thrust chambers in order to significantly reduce the heat transfer in high heat flux regions was the focus of technology efforts for many years. This paper describes a successful technique developed by the Lewis Research Center that starts with the coating of a mandrel and then builds

Quentmeyer

1988-01-01

300

Take-off and propeller thrust  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As a result of previous reports, it was endeavored to obtain, along with the truest possible comprehension of the course of thrust, a complete, simple and clear formula for the whole take-off distance up to a certain altitude, which shall give the correct relative weight to all the factors.

Schrenk, Martin

1933-01-01

301

Thrust reverser for high bypass turbofan engine  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a thrust reverser for a gas turbine engine of the type which includes an outer wall spaced from the center body of a core engine to define a bypass duct therebetween. The thrust reverser comprising: circumferentially displaced blocker doors, each of the doors being movable between a normal position generally aligned with the outer wall and a thrust reversing position extending transversely of the bypass duct for blocking the exhaust of air through the bypass duct and directing the air through an opening in the outer wall for thrust reversal; each of the blocker doors being of lightweight construction and including a pit in the inner surface thereof in the normal position; means for covering the pit during normal flow of air through the bypass duct to reduce the pressure drop in the bypass duct and to reduce noise. The covering means including a pit cover hingedly mounted at one end thereof on the blocker door and means of biasing the pit cover away from the blocker door to a position providing smooth flow of air through the bypass duct during normal operation.

Matta, R.K.; Bhutiani, P.K.

1990-05-08

302

Shedding light on hydroelectric thrust bearing problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Why did thrust bearing failures, so rare in hydro plants built in the first decades of this century, increase greatly during and after World War II Engineers have found that modern manufacturing techniques created problems as well as solutions. Two primary reasons for failure are a too smooth surface finish, and an oil film force that causes the split runner

R. A. Baudry; D. H. Rielly

1991-01-01

303

Thrust Stand for Electric Propulsion Performance Evaluation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An electric propulsion thrust stand capable of supporting testing of thrusters having a total mass of up to 125 kg and producing thrust levels between 100 microN to 1 N has been developed and tested. The design features a conventional hanging pendulum arm attached to a balance mechanism that converts horizontal deflections produced by the operating thruster into amplified vertical motion of a secondary arm. The level of amplification is changed through adjustment of the location of one of the pivot points linking the system. Response of the system depends on the relative magnitudes of the restoring moments applied by the displaced thruster mass and the twisting torsional pivots connecting the members of the balance mechanism. Displacement is measured using a non-contact, optical linear gap displacement transducer and balance oscillatory motion is attenuated using a passive, eddy-current damper. The thrust stand employs an automated leveling and thermal control system. Pools of liquid gallium are used to deliver power to the thruster without using solid wire connections, which can exert undesirable time-varying forces on the balance. These systems serve to eliminate sources of zero-drift that can occur as the stand thermally or mechanically shifts during the course of an experiment. An in-situ calibration rig allows for steady-state calibration before, during and after thruster operation. Thrust measurements were carried out on a cylindrical Hall thruster that produces mN-level thrust. The measurements were very repeatable, producing results that compare favorably with previously published performance data, but with considerably smaller uncertainty.

Polzin, Kurt A.; Markusic, Thomas E.; Stanojev, Boris J.; Dehoyos, Amado; Spaun, Benjamin

2006-01-01

304

Thrust faults and back thrust in Madison range of southwestern Montana foreland  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the Rocky Mountain foreland of southwestern Montana, a zone of Late Cretaceous thrust faults, named the Hilgard fault system, extends along the west side of the Madison Range from Hebgen Lake northward for about 50 mi (80 km). The thrust faults are steep at their leading edges but flatten westward beneath the associated plates, where they commonly dip 25°⁻³°sup

Tysdal

1986-01-01

305

Contemporaneous thrusting and large-scale rotation in the western Sicilian fold and thrust belt"  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the western Sicilian fold and thrust belt, large clockwise rotations of allochthons occurred during late Cenozoic contraction of part of the southern Tethyan margin. The magnitude of rotation decreases stepwise from over 120° in the upper sheets, lying on the north coast of Sicily, to no appreciable rotation in the frontal portion of the belt flanking the southern coast of the island. The allochthons are composed of imbricate thrust sheets derived primarily from individual basin and platform assemblages of the old Tethyan margin. Paleomagnetic and structural data indicate that the rotation of the allochthons was accommodated by coherent torsional displacements on relatively low-angle detachment surfaces. Timing relations for the imbrication history of the Sicilian fold and thrust belt are derived from stratigraphic overlap and local involvement of sediments deposited in a series of foreland and piggyback basins. The locus of deposition within successive foreland basins first migrated easterly then southerly during progressive deformation in the orogen. Imbrication began in the early Miocene (Burdigalian-Langhian) and continued at least through the early Pleistocene and appears to be continuing today. Rotation is related to thrusting and accompanies a 70° change in the tectonic transport direction from easterly to southerly. Easterly striking, right-oblique transpressional faults and associated northeasterly trending folds postdate thrust sheet rotation in the interior of the thrust belt and were active contemporaneously with south-directed thrusting in the foreland region. Pleistocene and possibly older (late Pliocene?) extension strongly modified the older thrust morphology along the Tyrrhenian coast of northwestern Sicily, with the development of down-to-the-north listric normal faults. The extensional structures apparently are related to the opening and subsequent deformation of the Tyrrhenian Sea to the north.

Oldow, J. S.; Channell, J. E. T.; Catalano, R.; D'Argenio, B.

1990-08-01

306

Static thrust improvement of a linear proportional solenoid  

SciTech Connect

A linear proportional solenoid (LPS) is an actuator for a proportional control valve used in hydraulic pressure-control devices. The LPS thrust must be constant over a specified displacement range, and must be proportional to the current. This paper describes simulations of the thrust-displacement characteristics of LPSes as determined by FEM, conducted with the aim of improving the LPM thrust. In model P, where high flux-density permendur was used in the LPS stator and mover, the maximum thrust increased from 27 to 40 N. The range of constant thrust, however, decreased from 1.0 to 0.5 mm. In model S, where permendur was used in the stator and mover, and the salient pole of the stator in the LPS was modified, the range of constant thrust was the same as in the present model. Moreover, the static thrust in the range of constant thrust increased from 27 to 38 N.

Yamada, H.; Kihara, S.; Yamaguchi, M. [Shinshu Univ., Ueda, Nagano (Japan); Nakagawa, H.; Hagiwara, K.

1994-11-01

307

A control-volume method for analysis of unsteady thrust augmenting ejector flows  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method for predicting transient thrust augmenting ejector characteristics is presented. The analysis blends classic self-similar turbulent jet descriptions with a control volume mixing region discretization to solicit transient effects in a new way. Division of the ejector into an inlet, diffuser, and mixing region corresponds with the assumption of viscous-dominated phenomenon in the latter. Inlet and diffuser analyses are simplified by a quasi-steady analysis, justified by the assumptions that pressure is the forcing function in those regions. Details of the theoretical foundation, the solution algorithm, and sample calculations are given.

Drummond, Colin K.

1988-01-01

308

Cloning vector  

DOEpatents

A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site. 2 figures.

Guilfoyle, R.A.; Smith, L.M.

1994-12-27

309

Nature of thrusting along western flank of Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The northern portion of the Bighorn Mountains is characterized by opposed mountain-front thrusts, of which the southwest direction is dominant. Blind basement thrusts along the northeastern flank do not pierce the folded Paleozoic cover; whereas on the western flank, southwest-directed thrust segments expose Precambrian rocks along a 24-km (14-mi) extent. Field studies on the western flank show evidence of four major southwest-directed thrust segments delineated by tear-fault boundaries, which include from northwest to southeast: (1) the Five Springs thrust, a low-angle, out-of-the-syncline fault mainly involving the sedimentary sequence; (2) the Bear Creek thrust, a continuation of the Five Springs out-of-the-syncline fault; (3) the South Beaver Creek thrust, which juxtaposes Precambrian rocks against a tectonically thinned, overturned anticlinal limb of Mississippian through Jurassic rocks and which is inward from an out-of-the-syncline thrust involving little displacement of Jurassic formations; and (4) a mountain-front reentrant that coincides with the zone where the South Beaver Creek thrust continues beneath Paleozoic cover, causing the upper flexure of a double monocline. The central portion of the Bighorn Mountains is thrust eastward, whereas the northern portion is thrust southwestward with much less displacement. The segmented association of southwest-directed basement thrusts along the western flank of the northern Bighorns is indicative of the major transport direction for that portion of the Bighorn uplift.

Noggle, K.S.

1986-08-01

310

Summary of scale-model thrust-reverser investigation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation was undertaken to determine the characteristics of several basic types of thrust-reverser. Models of three types, target, tailpipe cascade, and ring cascade, were tested with unheated air. The effects of design variables on reverse-thrust performance, reversed-flow boundaries, and thrust modulation characteristics were determined.

Povolny, John H; Steffen, Fred W; Mcardle, Jack G

1957-01-01

311

Static Thrust Improvement of a Linear Proportional Solenoid  

Microsoft Academic Search

A linear proportional solenoid (LPS) is an actuator for a proportional control valve used in hydraulic pressure-control devices. The LPS thrust must be constant over a specified displacement range, and must be proportional to the current. This paper describes simulations of the thrust-displacement characteristics of LPSes as determined by FEM, conducted with the aim of improving the LPM thrust. In

H. Yamada; S. Kihara; M. Yamaguchi; H. Nakagawa; K. Hagiwara

1994-01-01

312

Relationship between Biomechanical Characteristics of Spinal Manipulation and Neural Responses in an Animal Model: Effect of Linear Control of Thrust Displacement versus Force, Thrust Amplitude, Thrust Duration, and Thrust Rate  

PubMed Central

High velocity low amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM) is used frequently to treat musculoskeletal complaints. Little is known about the intervention's biomechanical characteristics that determine its clinical benefit. Using an animal preparation, we determined how neural activity from lumbar muscle spindles during a lumbar HVLA-SM is affected by the type of thrust control and by the thrust's amplitude, duration, and rate. A mechanical device was used to apply a linear increase in thrust displacement or force and to control thrust duration. Under displacement control, neural responses during the HVLA-SM increased in a fashion graded with thrust amplitude. Under force control neural responses were similar regardless of the thrust amplitude. Decreasing thrust durations at all thrust amplitudes except the smallest thrust displacement had an overall significant effect on increasing muscle spindle activity during the HVLA-SMs. Under force control, spindle responses specifically and significantly increased between thrust durations of 75 and 150?ms suggesting the presence of a threshold value. Thrust velocities greater than 20–30?mm/s and thrust rates greater than 300?N/s tended to maximize the spindle responses. This study provides a basis for considering biomechanical characteristics of an HVLA-SM that should be measured and reported in clinical efficacy studies to help define effective clinical dosages.

Reed, William R.; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Long, Cynthia R.; Kawchuk, Gregory N.; Pickar, Joel G.

2013-01-01

313

Effects of Various Arrangements of Slotted and Round Jet Exits on the Lift and Pitching-Moment Characteristics of a Rectangular-Base Model at Zero Forward Speed  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation was made to determine some of the effects of various arrangements of slotted and round jet exits on the lift and pitching-moment characteristics of a rectangular-base model at zero forward speed. Jet-exit slots near the perimeter of the model usually gave larger lift-thrust ratios than slots nearer the center line when the model was near the ground, but away from the ground perimeter jets forming almost a closed jet curtain induced negative pressures on the bottom of the model and resulted in less lift than that obtained with more centrally located jets or jets with large gaps in the jet curtain. Most models with jet slots symmetrical about the pitch axis gave approximately zero pitching moments through the range of ground-board distances, but under some conditions unstable flow direction caused positive or negative pitching moments to occur. With wings attached to the models, the lift close to the ground was 10 to 20 percent less than the lift away from the ground for various configurations. The round jets gave poorer lift-thrust ratios than the slotted jets in the region of ground effect. Out of the region of ground effect the round jets gave the greatest lift-thrust ratio per unit of weight rate of flow of air, for equal jet-exit areas, and the thinnest slotted jet gave the least.

Vogler, Raymond D.

1961-01-01

314

Tailless Vectored Fighters Theory. Laboratory and Flight Tests, Including Vectorable Inlets/Nozzles and Tailless Flying Models vs. Pilot's Tolerances Affecting Maximum Post-Stall Vectoring Agility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Presenting the major problems confronting the development, tests and validation of Post-stall (PST) Thrust-Vectored Fighters (TVF), this project is based on the development of an integrated laboratory-flight testing methodology of PST-F-15-TVF/RPVs, inclu...

B. Gal-Or

1991-01-01

315

LOX cooled thrust chamber technology developments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental LOX heat-transfer study and a LOX-cooled thrust-chamber demonstration program are summarized. Heat transfer to supercritical oxygen was investigated at 17 to 34.5 MPa (2460 to 5000 psia), and heat fluxes up to 90 MW/sq m (55 Btu/sq in.-sec). Experimental data obtained previously were correlated along with these recent data, and a design equation was derived which correlates 95% of the data within + or - 30%. Liquid-oxygen-cooled thrust chambers have been designed using this correlation and are currently being fabricated. A test program is planned for evaluating the LOX-cooled design concept using NASA test facilities. The purpose of these tests is to verify the LOX cooling correlation in a high-pressure liquid rocket engine and to determine the effects of a LOX coolant leak.

Spencer, R. G.; Rousar, D. C.; Price, H. G.

1978-01-01

316

NATURAL BARRIERS TARGETED THRUST FY 2004 PROJECTS  

SciTech Connect

This booklet contains project descriptions of work performed by the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), Office of Science and Technology and International's (OST&I) Natural Barriers Targeted Thrust during Fiscal Year (FY) 2004. The Natural Barriers Targeted Thrust is part of OST&I's Science and Technology Program which supports the OCRWM mission to manage and dispose of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a manner that protects health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. In general, the projects described will continue beyond FY 2004 assuming that the technical work remains relevant to the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository and sufficient funding is made available to the Science and Technology Program.

NA

2005-07-27

317

MATERIALS PERFORMANCE TARGETED THRUST FY 2004 PROJECTS  

SciTech Connect

The Yucca Mountain site was recommended by the President to be a geological repository for commercial spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The multi-barrier approach was adopted for assessing and predicting system behavior, including both natural barriers and engineered barriers. A major component of the long-term strategy for safe disposal of nuclear waste is first to completely isolate the radionuclides in waste packages for long times and then to greatly retard the egress and transport of radionuclides from penetrated packages. The goal of the Materials Performance Targeted Thrust program is to further enhance the understanding of the role of engineered barriers in waste isolation. In addition, the Thrust will explore technical enhancements and seek to offer improvements in materials costs and reliability.

DOE

2005-09-13

318

High temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A high temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft (20) is provided herein. The high temperature thrust chamber comprises a hollow body member (12) having an outer surface and an internal surface (16) defining the high temperature chamber (10). The body member (12) is made substantially of rhenium. An alloy (18) consisting of iridium and at least alloying metal selected of the group consisting of rhodium, platinum and palladium is deposited on at least a portion of the internal surface (16) of the body member (12). The iridium and the alloying metal are electrodeposited onto the body member (12). A HIP cycle is performed upon the body member (12) to cause the coating of iridium and the alloying metal to form the alloy (18) which protects the body member (12) from oxidation.

Chazen, Melvin L. (Inventor); Mueller, Thomas J. (Inventor); Kruse, William D. (Inventor)

1998-01-01

319

Advanced tube-bundle rocket thrust chamber  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An advanced rocket thrust chamber for future space application is described along with an improved method of fabrication. Potential benefits of the concept are improved cyclic life, reusability, and performance. Performance improvements are anticipated because of the enhanced heat transfer into the coolant which will enable higher chamber pressure in expander cycle engines. Cyclic life, reusability and reliability improvements are anticipated because of the enhanced structural compliance inherent in the construction. The method of construction involves the forming of the combustion chamber with a tube-bundle of high conductivity copper or copper alloy tubes, and the bonding of these tubes by an electroforming operation. Further, the method of fabrication reduces chamber complexity by incorporating manifolds, jackets, and structural stiffeners while having the potential for thrust chamber cost and weight reduction.

Kazaroff, John M.; Pavli, Albert J.

1990-01-01

320

Thrust production by a mechanical swimming lamprey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To develop a comprehensive model of lamprey locomotion, we use a robotic lamprey to investigate the formation of the wake structure, the shedding vorticity from the body, and the relationship between thrust production and pressure on the surface of the robot. The robot mimics the motion of living lamprey in steady swimming by using a programmable microcomputer to actuate 13 servomotors that produce a traveling wave along the length of the lamprey body. The amplitude of the phase-averaged surface pressure distribution along the centerline of the robot increases toward the tail, which is consistent with previous momentum balance experiments. This indicates that thrust is produced mainly at the tail. The phase relationship between the pressure signal and the vortex shedding from the tail is also examined, showing a clear connection between the location of vortex structures and the fluctuations of the pressure signal.

Leftwich, M. C.; Smits, A. J.

2011-05-01

321

Pulsed thrust propellant reorientation - Concept and modeling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of pulsed thrust to optimize the propellant reorientation process is proposed. The ECLIPSE code is used to study the performance of pulsed reorientation in small-scale and full-scale propellant tanks. A dimensional analysis of the process is performed and the resulting dimensionless groups are used to present and correlate the computational predictions of reorientation performance. Based on the results obtained from this study, it is concluded that pulsed thrust reorientation seems to be a feasible technique for optimizing the propellant reorientation process across a wide range of spacecraft, for a variety of missions, for the entire duration of a mission, and with a minimum of hardware design and qualification.

Hochstein, John I.; Patag, Alfredo E.; Korakianitis, T. P.; Chato, David J.

1992-01-01

322

Lightweight Chambers for Thrust Cell Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Traditional metals like steel and copper alloys have been used for many years to fabricate injector and chamber components of thruster assemblies. While the materials perform well, reducing engine weights would help existing and future vehicles gain performance and payload capability. It may now be possible to reduce current thruster weights up to 50% by applying composite materials. In this task, these materials are being applied to an existing thrust cell design to demonstrate new fabrication processes and potential weight savings. Two ceramic matrix composite (CMC) designs, three polymer matrix composite (PMC) designs, and two metal matrix composite (MMC) designs are being fabricated as small chamber demonstration units. In addition, a new alloy of copper, chrome, and niobium (Cu-8Cr-4Nb) is being investigated for thrust chamber liners since it offers higher strength and increased cycle life over traditional alloys. This new alloy is being used for the liner in each MMC and PMC demonstration unit. During June-August of 2000, hot-fire testing of each unit is planned to validate designs in an oxygen/hydrogen environment at chamber pressures around 850 psi. Although the weight savings using CMC materials is expected to be high, they have proven to be much harder to incorporate into chamber designs based on current fabrication efforts. However, the PMC & MMC concepts using the Cu-8Cr-4Nb liner are nearly complete and ready for testing. Additional efforts intend to use the PMC & MMC materials to fabricate a full size thrust chamber (60K lb(sub f) thrust class). The fabrication of this full size unit is expected to be complete by October 2000, followed by hot-fire testing in November-December 2000.

Elam, S.; Effinger, M.; Holmes, R.; Lee, J.; Jaskowiak, M.

2000-01-01

323

Thrust measurement of dimethyl ether arcjet thruster  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present paper describes thrust measurement results for an arcjet thruster using Dimethyl ether (DME) as the propellant. DME is an ether compound and can be stored as a liquid due to its relatively low freezing point and preferable vapor pressure. The thruster successfully produced high-voltage mode at DME mass flow rates above 30mg\\/s, whereas it yielded low-voltage mode below

Akira Kakami; Shinji Beppu; Muneyuki Maiguma; Takeshi Tachibana

2011-01-01

324

Development of sputtered techniques for thrust chambers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Techniques and materials were developed and evaluated for the fabrication and coating of advanced, long life, regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. Materials were analyzed as fillers for sputter application of OFHC copper as a closeout layer to channeled inner structures; of the materials evaluated, aluminum was found to provide the highest bond strength and to be the most desirable for chamber fabrication. The structures and properties were investigated of thick sputtered OFHC copper, 0.15 Zr-Cu, Al2O3,-Cu, and SiC-Cu. Layered structures of OFHC copper and 0.15 Zr-Cu were investigated as means of improving chamber inner wall fatigue life. The evaluation of sputtered Ti-5Al-2.5Sn, NASA IIb-11, aluminum and Al2O3-Al alloys as high strength chamber outer jackets was performed. Techniques for refurbishing degraded thrust chambers with OFHC copper and coating thrust chambers with protective ZrO2 and graded ZrO2-copper thermal barrier coatings were developed.

Mullaly, J. R.; Hecht, R. J.; Schmid, T. E.; Torrey, C. T.

1975-01-01

325

An Experimental Investigation of an Exhaust-gas-to-air Heat Exchanger for Use on Jet-stack-equipped Engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tests were made to determine the loss in exhaust-jet thrust and engine power resulting from the insertion of an exhaust-gas-to-air heat exchanger in a jet-type exhaust stack of an aircraft engine. The thermal performance of the heat exchanger was also determined.

Stalder, Jackson R; Spies, Ray J , Jr

1948-01-01

326

Synthetic Jets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Current investigation of synthetic jets and synthetic jets in cross-flow examined the effects of orifice geometry and dimensions, momentum-flux ratio, cluster of orifices, pitch and yaw angles as well as streamwise development of the flow field. This comprehensive study provided much needed experimental information related to the various control strategies. The results of the current investigation on isolated and clustered synthetic jets with and without cross-flow will be further analyzed and documented in detail. Presentations at national conferences and publication of peer- reviewed journal articles are also expected. Projected publications will present both the mean and turbulent properties of the flow field, comparisons made with the data available in an open literature, as well as recommendations for the future work.

Milanovic, Ivana M.

2003-01-01

327

A New Paradigm for Flow Analyses and a Novel Technique to Enhance the Thrust from Scarfed Nozzles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new flow analysis paradigm and a novel technique to enhance scarfed nozzle thrust are presented. The new paradigm, the space-time Conservation Element and Solution Element (CESE) method, a truly unsteady and genuinely multi-dimensional flow solver that provides accurate solutions for Euler and Navier-Stokes flows, is well suited for next generation flow analyses.In this study, the space-time CESE method was applied to solve scarfed nozzles flow-fields. Nozzle scarfing is frequently used for vectoring control of a space propulsion sub-system; it reduces nozzle weight and length and lowers nozzle thrust. A novel technique to enhance scarfed nozzles' thrust is discussed and investigated. Results of 2D and 3D flow analyses are presented.

Chang, I-Shih; Chang, Sin-Chung; Glick, Robert L.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Glick, Mailyn P.

2008-01-01

328

Stability of a thermal plasma jet  

SciTech Connect

The stability of a slab model of a jet moving in an external plasma is investigated, assuming the configuration to be characterized by a general heat-loss function. Numerical results are obtained for the growth rates of unstable modes, both for symmetric and asymmetric perturbations for equal parallel magnetic fields along or transverse to the propagation vector in the wide and slender jet approximations. Special configurations of an incompressible jet moving past a thermal plasma and also of a thermal plasma moving past an incompressible static plasma are also considered. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Singh, A.P.; Talwar, S.P. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)] [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

1996-02-01

329

Aeroacoustics of Three-Stream Jets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results from acoustic measurements of noise radiated from a heated, three-stream, co-annular exhaust system operated at subsonic conditions are presented. The experiments were conducted for a range of core, bypass, and tertiary stream temperatures and pressures. The nozzle system had a fan-to-core area ratio of 2.92 and a tertiary-to-core area ratio of 0.96. The impact of introducing a third stream on the radiated noise for third-stream velocities below that of the bypass stream was to reduce high frequency noise levels at broadside and peak jet-noise angles. Mid-frequency noise radiation at aft observation angles was impacted by the conditions of the third stream. The core velocity had the greatest impact on peak noise levels and the bypass-to-core mass flow ratio had a slight impact on levels in the peak jet-noise direction. The third-stream jet conditions had no impact on peak noise levels. Introduction of a third jet stream in the presence of a simulated forward-flight stream limits the impact of the third stream on radiated noise. For equivalent ideal thrust conditions, two-stream and three-stream jets can produce similar acoustic spectra although high-frequency noise levels tend to be lower for the three-stream jet.

Henderson, Brenda S.

2012-01-01

330

Jet measurements at D0 using a KT algorithm  

SciTech Connect

D0 has implemented and calibrated a k{perpendicular} jet algorithm for the first time in a p{bar p} collider. We present two results based on 1992-1996 data which were recently published: the subjet multiplicity in quark and gluon jets and the central inclusive jet cross section. The measured ratio between subjet multiplicities in gluon and quark jets is consistent with theoretical predictions and previous experimental values. NLO pQCD predictions of the k{perpendicular} inclusive jet cross section agree with the D0 measurement, although marginally in the low p{sub T} range. We also present a preliminary measurement of thrust cross sections, which indicates the need to include higher than {alpha}{sub s}{sup 3} terms and resumation in the theoretical calculations.

V.Daniel Elvira

2002-10-03

331

The Zagros hinterland fold-and-thrust belt in-sequence thrusting, Iran  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The collision of the Iranian microcontinent with the Afro-Arabian continent resulted in the deformation of the Zagros orogenic belt. The foreland of this belt in the Persian Gulf and Arabian platform has been investigated for its petroleum and gas resource potentials, but the Zagros hinterland is poorly investigated and our knowledge about its deformation is much less than other parts of this orogen. Therefore, this work presents a new geological map, stratigraphic column and two detailed geological cross sections. This study indicates the presence of a hinterland fold-and-thrust belt on northeastern side of the Zagros orogenic core that consists of in-sequence thrusting and basement involvement in this important part of the Zagros hinterland. The in-sequence thrusting resulted in first- and second-order duplex systems, Mode I fault-bend folding, fault-propagation folding and asymmetric detachment folding which indicate close relationships between folding and thrusting. Study of fault-bend folds shows that layer-parallel simple shear has the same role in the southeastern and northwestern parts of the study area (?e = 23.4 ± 9.1°). A major lateral ramp in the basement beneath the Talaee plain with about one kilometer of vertical offset formed parallel to the SW movement direction and perpendicular to the major folding and thrusting.

Sarkarinejad, Khalil; Ghanbarian, Mohammad Ali

2014-05-01

332

$W/Z$ + jets results from CDF  

SciTech Connect

The CDF Collaboration has a comprehensive program of studying the production of vector bosons, W and Z, in association with energetic jets. Excellent understanding of the standard model W/Z+jets and W/Z+c,b-jets processes is of paramount importance for the top quark physics and for the Higgs boson and many new physics searches. We review the latest CDF results on Z-boson production in association with inclusive and b-quark jets, study of the p{sub T} balance in Z+jet events, and a measurement of the W+charm production cross section. The results are based on 4-5 fb{sup -1} of data and compared to various Monte Carlo and next-to-leading order perturbative QCD predictions.

Camarda, Stefano; /Barcelona, IFAE

2010-01-01

333

Jet-diffuser ejector - Attached nozzle design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Attached primary nozzles were developed to replace the detached nozzles of jet-diffuser ejectors. Slotted primary nozzles located at the inlet lip and injecting fluid normal to the thrust axis, and rotating the fluid into the thrust direction using the Coanda Effect were investigated. Experiments indicated excessive skin friction or momentum cancellation due to impingement of opposing jets resulted in performance degradation. This indicated a desirability for location and orientation of the injection point at positions removed from the immediate vicinity of the inlet surface, and at an acute angle with respect to the thrust axis. Various nozzle designs were tested over a range of positions and orientations. The problems of aircraft integration of the ejector, and internal and external nozzle losses were also considered and a geometry for the attached nozzles was selected. The effect of leaks, protrusions, and asymmetries in the ejector surfaces was examined. The results indicated a relative insensitivity to all surface irregularities, except for large protrusions at the throat of the ejector.

Alperin, M.; Wu, J. J.

1980-01-01

334

Extended performance solar electric propulsion thrust system study. Volume 2: Baseline thrust system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Several thrust system design concepts were evaluated and compared using the specifications of the most advanced 30- cm engineering model thruster as the technology base. Emphasis was placed on relatively high-power missions (60 to 100 kW) such as a Halley's comet rendezvous. The extensions in thruster performance required for the Halley's comet mission were defined and alternative thrust system concepts were designed in sufficient detail for comparing mass, efficiency, reliability, structure, and thermal characteristics. Confirmation testing and analysis of thruster and power-processing components were performed, and the feasibility of satisfying extended performance requirements was verified. A baseline design was selected from the alternatives considered, and the design analysis and documentation were refined. The baseline thrust system design features modular construction, conventional power processing, and a concentractor solar array concept and is designed to interface with the space shuttle.

Poeschel, R. L.; Hawthorne, E. I.

1977-01-01

335

Gas Jets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A brief summary of the contents of this paper is presented here. In part I the differential equations of the problem of a gas flow in two dimensions is derived and the particular integrals by which the problem on jets is solved are given. Use is made of the same independent variables as Molenbroek used, but it is found to be more suitable to consider other functions. The stream function and velocity potential corresponding to the problem are given in the form of series. The investigation on the convergence of these series in connection with certain properties of the functions entering them forms the subject of part II. In part III the problem of the outflow of a gas from an infinite vessel with plane walls is solved. In part IV the impact of a gas jet on a plate is considered and the limiting case where the jet expands to infinity changing into a gas flow is taken up in more detail. This also solved the equivalent problem of the resistance of a gaseous medium to the motion of a plate. Finally, in part V, an approximate method is presented that permits a simpler solution of the problem of jet flows in the case where the velocities of the gas (velocities of the particles in the gas) are not very large.

Chaplygin, S.

1944-01-01

336

Gas Jets.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A brief summary of the contents of this paper is presented here. In part I the differential equations of the problem of a gas flow in two dimensions is derived and the particular integrals by which the problem on jets is solved are given. Use is made of t...

S. Chaplygin

2003-01-01

337

Navigational Vectors  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a high school instructional unit that features nine lessons relating to vectors. Users build understanding of vector properties as they learn airplane navigation. Problem-based learning activities include reading real-time weather maps, tracking airplanes flying in U.S. skies, calculating vector components, analyzing effects of wind velocity, and completing training similar to a private pilot certification program. The unit culminates with a pilot flight test. Participants also have access to help from experts at the Polaris Career Center. Comprehensive teacher guides, student guides , reference materials, and assessments are included. This resource was developed by the Center for Innovation in Science and Engineering Education (CIESE). Participation is cost-free with teacher registration.

2008-12-10

338

Vector carpets  

SciTech Connect

Previous papers have described a general method for visualizing vector fields that involves drawing many small ``glyphs`` to represent the field. This paper shows how to improve the speed of the algorithm by utilizing hardware support for line drawing and extends the technique from regular to unstructured grids. The new approach can be used to visualize vector fields at arbitrary surfaces within regular and unstructured grids. Applications of the algorithm include interactive visualization of transient electromagnetic fields and visualization of velocity fields in fluid flow problems.

Dovey, D.

1995-03-22

339

Low-thrust chemical rocket engine study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Engine data and information are presented to perform system studies on cargo orbit-transfer vehicles which would deliver large space structures to geosynchronous equatorial orbit. Low-thrust engine performance, weight, and envelope parametric data were established, preliminary design information was generated, and technologies for liquid rocket engines were identified. Two major engine design drivers were considered in the study: cooling and engine cycle options. Both film-cooled and regeneratively cooled engines were evaluated. The propellant combinations studied were hydrogen/oxygen, methane/oxygen, and kerosene/oxygen.

Mellish, J. A.

1981-01-01

340

Thrust Augmentation of a Turbojet Engine at Simulated Flight Conditions by Introduction of a Water-Alcohol Mixture into the Compressor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An investigation was conducted at simulated high-altitude flight conditions to evaluate the use of compressor evaporative cooling as a means of turbojet-engine thrust augmentation. Comparison of the performance of the engine with water-alcohol injection at the compressor inlet, at the sixth stage of the compressor, and at the sixth and ninth stages was made. From consideration of the thrust increases achieved, the interstage injection of the coolant was considered more desirable preferred over the combined sixth- and ninth-stage injection because of its relative simplicity. A maximum augmented net-thrust ratio of 1.106 and a maximum augmented jet-thrust ratio of 1.062 were obtained at an augmented liquid ratio of 2.98 and an engine-inlet temperature of 80 F. At lower inlet temperatures (-40 to 40 F), the maximum augmented net-thrust ratios ranged from 1.040 to 1.076 and the maximum augmented jet-thrust ratios ranged from 1.027 to 1.048, depending upon the inlet temperature. The relatively small increase in performance at the lower inlet-air temperatures can be partially attributed to the inadequate evaporation of the water-alcohol mixture, but the more significant limitation was believed to be caused by the negative influence of the liquid coolant on engine- component performance. In general, it is concluded that the effectiveness of the injection of a coolant into the compressor as a means of thrust augmentation is considerably influenced by the design characteristics of the components of the engine being used.

Useller, James W.; Auble, Carmon M.; Harvey, Ray W., Sr.

1952-01-01

341

Turbulent Jets?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the last few years we have fielded numerous supersonic jet experiments on the NOVA and OMEGA lasers and Sandia's pulsed-power Z-machine in a collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Atomic Weapons Establishment, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory. These experiments are being conducted to help validate our radiation-hydrodynamic codes, especially the newly developing ASC codes. One of the outstanding questions is whether these types of jets should turn turbulent given their high Reynolds number. Recently we have modified our experiments to have more Kelvin-Helmholtz shear, run much later in time and therefore have a better chance of going turbulent. In order to diagnose these large (several mm) jets at very late times ( 1000 ns) we are developing point-projection imaging on both the OMEGA laser, the Sandia Z-Machine, and ultimately at NIF. Since these jets have similar Euler numbers to jets theorized to be produced in supernovae explosions, we are also collaborating with the astrophysics community to help in the validation of their new codes. This poster will present a review of the laser and pulsed-power experiments and a comparison of the data to simulations by the codes from the various laboratories. We will show results of simulations wherein these jets turn highly 3-dimensional and show characteristics of turbulence. With the new data, we hope to be able to validate the sub-grid-scale turbulent mix models (e. g. BHR) that are being incorporated into our codes.*This work is performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48, the Laboratory for Laser Energetics under Contract No. DE-FC03-92SF19460, Sandia National Laboratories under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000, the Office of Naval Research, and the NASA Astrophysical Theory Grant.

Wilde, B. H.; Rosen, P. A.; Foster, J. M.; Perry, T. S.; Steinkamp, M. J.; Robey, H. F.; Khokhlov, A. M.; Gittings, M. L.; Coker, R. F.; Keiter, P. A.; Knauer, J. P.; Drake, R. P.; Remington, B. A.; Bennett, G. R.; Sinars, D. B.; Campbell, R. B.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

2003-10-01

342

Noise from Supersonic Coaxial Jets. Part 2; Normal Velocity Profile  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Instability waves have been established as noise generators in supersonic jets. Recent analysis of these slowly diverging jets has shown that these instability waves radiate noise to the far field when the waves have components with phase velocities that are supersonic relative to the ambient speed of sound. This instability wave noise generation model has been applied to supersonic jets with a single shear layer and is now applied to supersonic coaxial jets with two initial shear layers. In this paper the case of coaxial jets with normal velocity profiles is considered, where the inner jet stream velocity is higher than the outer jet stream velocity. To provide mean flow profiles at all axial locations, a numerical scheme is used to calculate the mean flow properties. Calculations are made for the stability characteristics in the coaxial jet shear layers and the noise radiated from the instability waves for different operating conditions with the same total thrust, mass flow and exit area as a single reference jet. The effects of changes in the velocity ratio, the density ratio and the area ratio are each considered independently.

Dahl, M. D.; Morris, P. J.

1997-01-01

343

K (transverse) jet algorithms in hadron colliders: The D0 experience  

SciTech Connect

D0 has implemented and studied a k{sub {perpendicular}} jet algorithm for the first time in a hadron collider. The authors have submitted two physics results for publication: the subjet multiplicity in quark and gluon jets and the central inclusive jet cross section measurements. A third result, a measurement of thrust distributions in jet events, is underway. A combination of measurements using several types of algorithms and samples taken at different center-of-mass energies is desirable to understand and distinguish with higher accuracy between instrumentation and physics effects.

V. Daniel Elvira

2002-12-05

344

Design and analysis of thrust active magnetic bearing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper deals with the design and analysis of thrust active magnetic bearing (AMB). Using the analytical solutions for thrust, resistance, and inductance obtained from equivalent magnetic circuits method, we determine initial design parameters such as the size of magnetic circuit, coil diameter, and the number of turns by investigating the variation of thrust according to design parameters. Then, using nonlinear finite element analysis, a detailed design considering saturation is performed in order to meet required thrust under restricted conditions. Finally, by confirming that the design result is shown in good agreement with experimental results, the validity of design procedures for thrust AMB used in this paper is proved. In particular, the dynamic test results of the thrust AMB are also given to confirm the validity of the design.

Jang, Seok-Myeong; Lee, Un-Ho; Choi, Jang-Young; Hong, Jung-Pyo

2008-04-01

345

Emergency Control Aircraft System Using Thrust Modulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A digital longitudinal Aircraft Propulsion Control (APC system of a multiengine aircraft is provided by engine thrust modulation in response to comparing an input flightpath angle signal (gamma)c from a pilot thumbwheel. or an ILS system with a sensed flightpath angle y to produce an error signal (gamma)e that is then integrated (with reasonable limits) to generate a drift correction signal to be added to the error signal (gamma)e after first subtracting a lowpass filtered velocity signal Vel(sub f) for phugoid damping. The output error signal is multiplied by a constant to produce an aircraft thrust control signal ATC of suitable amplitude to drive a throttle servo for all engines. each of which includes its own full-authority digital engine control (FADEC) computer. An alternative APC system omits sensed flightpath angle feedback and instead controls the flightpath angle by feedback of the lowpass filtered velocity signal Vel(sub f) which also inherently provides phugoid damping. The feature of drift compensation is retained.

Burken, John J. (Inventor); Burcham, Frank W., Jr. (Inventor)

2000-01-01

346

OMV/VTE variable thrust engine analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of the present work is to develop a predictive CFD based analytical tool for the variable thrust engine (VTE) in the orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV). This objective is being accomplished within the framework of the Los Alamos KIVA computer code for chemically reactive flows with sprays. For the OMV application, the main structure of KIVA is to be retained while reformulating many of the phenomenological submodels, enhancing some of the numerics, and adding more features. The analytical model consists of the general conservation equations for two phase reactive flows and of submodels for turbulence, chemical reactions, and bipropellant sprays. Tailoring this model to the OMV engine brings about the added complexities of combustion and flow processes that occur in a liquid hypergolic propellant rocket chamber. This report exposes the foundation upon which the analytical tool is being constructed and developed. Results from a cursory computational exercise involving the simulation of the flow and combustion processes in a hypothetical N2H4/N2O4 rocket engine thrust chamber is presented and discussed.

Larosillere, Louis; Litchford, Ron; Jeng, San-Mou

1989-01-01

347

OMV/VTE variable thrust engine analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of the present work is to develop a predictive CFD based analytical tool for the Variable Thrust Engine (VTE) in the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV). This objective is being accomplished within the framework of the Los Alamos KIVA computer code for chemically reactive flows with sprays. For the OMV application, the main structure of KIVA is to be retained while reformulating many of the phenomenological submodels, enhancing some of the numerics, and adding more features. The analytical model consists of the general conservation equations for two-phase reactive flows and of submodels for turbulence, chemical reactions, and bipropellant sprays. Tailoring this model to the OMV engine brings about the added complexities of combustion and flow processes that occur in a liquid hypergolic propellant rocket chamber. This report exposes the foundation upon which the analytical tool is being constructed and developed. Results from a cursory computational exercise involving the simulation of the flow and combustion processes in a hypothetical N2H4/N204 rocket engine thrust chamber is presented and discussed.

Larosillere, L.; Litchford, R.; Jeng, S. M.

1995-01-01

348

Rocket thrust chamber thermal barrier coatings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A research program was conducted to generate data and develop analytical techniques to predict the performance and reliability of ceramic thermal barrier coatings in high heat flux environments. A finite element model was used to analyze the thermomechanical behavior of coating systems in rocket thrust chambers. Candidate coating systems (using a copper substrate, NiCrAlY bond coat and ZrO2.8Y2O3 ceramic overcoat) were selected for detailed study based on photomicrographic evaluations of experimental test specimens. The effects of plasma spray application parameters on the material properties of these coatings were measured and the effects on coating performance evaluated using the finite element model. Coating design curves which define acceptable operating envelopes for seleted coating systems were constructed based on temperature and strain limitations. Spray gun power levels was found to have the most significant effect on coating structure. Three coating systems were selected for study using different power levels. Thermal conductivity, strain tolerance, density, and residual stress were measured for these coatings. Analyses indicated that extremely thin coatings ( 0.02 mm) are required to accommodate the high heat flux of a rocket thrust chamber and ensure structural integrity.

Batakis, A. P.; Vogan, J. W.

1985-01-01

349

Marine Jet  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The marine turbine pump pictured is the Jacuzzi 12YJ, a jet propulsion system for pleasure or commercial boating. Its development was aided by a NASA computer program made available by the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) at the University of Georgia. The manufacturer, Jacuzzi Brothers, Incorporated, Little Rock, Arkansas, used COSMIC'S Computer Program for Predicting Turbopump Inducer Loading, which enabled substantial savings in development time and money through reduction of repetitive testing.

1978-01-01

350

Real-time b-jet identification in ATLAS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are interesting physics processes studied at the ATLAS detector at the LHC, whose signatures contain quark jets, but no charged lepton: top quark pair production where both quarks decay hadronically, Higgs boson produced in vector boson fusion and decaying to a bottom quark pair, or supersymmetric signatures with no charged lepton. Data for these processes can only be collected using jet-based triggers. As LHC instantaneous luminosity increases, jet transverse-energy thresholds need to be raised, lowering the signal acceptance for a wide range of signatures. However, the need to raise jet thresholds can be made less pressing if jets originating from bottom quarks are identified as such (b-tagging) already at the trigger stage if at least one jet originates from a bottom quark. ATLAS started using b-jet real-time identification in 2011, increased their performance in 2012 and plans to use even more advanced taggers in 2015.

Buzatu, A.; Atlas Collaboration

2014-06-01

351

Nature of thrusting along western flank of Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The northern portion of the Bighorn Mountains is characterized by opposed mountain-front thrusts, of which the southwest direction is dominant. Blind basement thrusts along the northeastern flank do not pierce the folded Paleozoic cover; whereas on the western flank, southwest-directed thrust segments expose Precambrian rocks along a 24-km (14-mi) extent. Field studies on the western flank show evidence of four

Noggle

1986-01-01

352

Numerical Simulation of a Pintle Variable Thrust Rocket Engine  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The most prominent feature of variable thrust rocket engine were a large scale changes in working conditions and the adaptive\\u000a control of the thrust. With proper design and manufacturing pintle injector, high performance and inherent combustion stability\\u000a could be typically delivered. So, the pintle injector became perfect select of variable thrust engine. With the support of\\u000a powerful calculational ability of

Chun-guo Yue; Xin-Long Chang; Shu-jun Yang; You-hong Zhang

353

Design and test of a magnetic thrust bearing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A magnetic thrust bearing can be employed to take thrust loads in rotating machinery. The design and construction of a prototype magnetic thrust bearing for a high load per weight application is described. The theory for the bearing is developed. Fixtures were designed and the bearing was tested for load capacity using a universal testing machine. Various shims were employed to have known gap thicknesses. A comparison of the theory and measured results is presented.

Allaire, P. E.; Mikula, A.; Banerjee, B.; Lewis, D. W.; Imlach, J.

1993-01-01

354

Supersonic Coaxial Jets: Noise Predictions and Measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The noise from perfectly expanded coaxial jets was measured in an anechoic chamber for different operating conditions with the same total thrust, mass flow, and exit area. The shape of the measured noise spectrum at different angles to the jet axis was found to agree with spectral shapes for single, axisymmetric jets. Based on these spectra, the sound was characterized as being generated by large turbulent structures or fine-scale turbulence. Modeling the large scale structures as instability waves, a stability analysis was conducted for the coaxial jets to identify the growing and decaying instability waves in each shear layer and predict their noise radiation pattern outside the jet. When compared to measured directivity, the analysis identified the region downstream of the outer potential core, where the two shear layers were merging, as the source of the peak radiated noise where instability waves, with their origin in the inner shear layer, reach their maximum amplitude. Numerical computations were also performed using a linearized Euler equation solver. Those results were compared to both the results from the instability wave analysis and to measured data.

Dahl, Milo D.; Papamoschou, Dimitri; Hixon, Ray

1998-01-01

355

Measurement of Z \\/ ? ? + jet + X angular distributions in p p ¯ collisions at s = 1.96 TeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the first measurements at a hadron collider of differential cross sections for Z\\/??+jet+X production in ??(Z,jet), |?y(Z,jet)| and |yboost(Z+jet)|. Vector boson production in association with jets is an excellent probe of QCD and constitutes the main background to many small cross section processes, such as associated Higgs production. These measurements are crucial tests of the predictions of perturbative

V. M. Abazov; B. Abbott; M. Abolins; B. S. Acharya; M. Adams; T. Adams; E. Aguilo; M. Ahsan; G. D. Alexeev; G. Alkhazov; A. Alton; G. Alverson; G. A. Alves; L. S. Ancu; M. S. Anzelc; M. Aoki; Y. Arnoud; M. Arov; M. Arthaud; A. Askew; B. Åsman; O. Atramentov; C. Avila; J. BackusMayes; F. Badaud; L. Bagby; B. Baldin; D. V. Bandurin; S. Banerjee; E. Barberis; A.-F. Barfuss; P. Bargassa; P. Baringer; J. Barreto; J. F. Bartlett; U. Bassler; D. Bauer; S. Beale; A. Bean; M. Begalli; M. Begel; C. Belanger-Champagne; L. Bellantoni; A. Bellavance; J. A. Benitez; S. B. Beri; G. Bernardi; R. Bernhard; I. Bertram; M. Besançon; R. Beuselinck; V. A. Bezzubov; P. C. Bhat; V. Bhatnagar; G. Blazey; S. Blessing; K. Bloom; A. Boehnlein; D. Boline; T. A. Bolton; E. E. Boos; G. Borissov; T. Bose; A. Brandt; R. Brock; G. Brooijmans; A. Bross; D. Brown; X. B. Bu; D. Buchholz; M. Buehler; V. Buescher; V. Bunichev; S. Burdin; T. H. Burnett; C. P. Buszello; P. Calfayan; B. Calpas; S. Calvet; J. Cammin; M. A. Carrasco-Lizarraga; E. Carrera; W. Carvalho; B. C. K. Casey; H. Castilla-Valdez; S. Chakrabarti; D. Chakraborty; K. M. Chan; A. Chandra; E. Cheu; D. K. Cho; S. W. Cho; S. Choi; B. Choudhary; T. Christoudias; S. Cihangir; D. Claes; J. Clutter; M. Cooke; W. E. Cooper; M. Corcoran; F. Couderc; M.-C. Cousinou; D. Cutts; M. ?wiok; A. Das; G. Davies; K. De; S. J. de Jong; E. De La Cruz-Burelo; K. DeVaughan; F. Déliot; M. Demarteau; R. Demina; D. Denisov; S. P. Denisov; S. Desai; H. T. Diehl; M. Diesburg; A. Dominguez; T. Dorland; A. Dubey; L. V. Dudko; L. Duflot; D. Duggan; A. Duperrin; S. Dutt; A. Dyshkant; M. Eads; D. Edmunds; J. Ellison; V. D. Elvira; Y. Enari; S. Eno; M. Escalier; H. Evans; A. Evdokimov; V. N. Evdokimov; G. Facini; A. V. Ferapontov; T. Ferbel; F. Fiedler; F. Filthaut; W. Fisher; H. E. Fisk; M. Fortner; H. Fox; S. Fu; S. Fuess; T. Gadfort; C. F. Galea; A. Garcia-Bellido; V. Gavrilov; P. Gay; W. Geist; W. Geng; C. E. Gerber; Y. Gershtein; D. Gillberg; G. Ginther; B. Gómez; A. Goussiou; P. D. Grannis; S. Greder; H. Greenlee; Z. D. Greenwood; E. M. Gregores; G. Grenier; Ph. Gris; J.-F. Grivaz; A. Grohsjean; S. Grünendahl; M. W. Grünewald; F. Guo; J. Guo; G. Gutierrez; P. Gutierrez; A. Haas; P. Haefner; S. Hagopian; J. Haley; I. Hall; R. E. Hall; L. Han; K. Harder; A. Harel; J. M. Hauptman; J. Hays; T. Hebbeker; D. Hedin; J. G. Hegeman; A. P. Heinson; U. Heintz; C. Hensel; I. Heredia-De La Cruz; K. Herner; G. Hesketh; M. D. Hildreth; R. Hirosky; T. Hoang; J. D. Hobbs; B. Hoeneisen; M. Hohlfeld; S. Hossain; P. Houben; Y. Hu; Z. Hubacek; N. Huske; V. Hynek; I. Iashvili; R. Illingworth; A. S. Ito; S. Jabeen; M. Jaffré; S. Jain; K. Jakobs; D. Jamin; R. Jesik; K. Johns; C. Johnson; M. Johnson; D. Johnston; A. Jonckheere; P. Jonsson; A. Juste; E. Kajfasz; D. Karmanov; P. A. Kasper; I. Katsanos; V. Kaushik; R. Kehoe; S. Kermiche; N. Khalatyan; A. Khanov; A. Kharchilava; Y. N. Kharzheev; D. Khatidze; M. H. Kirby; M. Kirsch; B. Klima; J. M. Kohli; J.-P. Konrath; A. V. Kozelov; J. Kraus; T. Kuhl; A. Kumar; A. Kupco; T. Kur?a; V. A. Kuzmin; J. Kvita; F. Lacroix; D. Lam; S. Lammers; G. Landsberg; P. Lebrun; H. S. Lee; W. M. Lee; A. Leflat; J. Lellouch; L. Li; Q. Z. Li; S. M. Lietti; J. K. Lim; D. Lincoln; J. Linnemann; V. V. Lipaev; R. Lipton; Y. Liu; Z. Liu; A. Lobodenko; M. Lokajicek; P. Love; H. J. Lubatti; R. Luna-Garcia; A. L. Lyon; A. K. A. Maciel; D. Mackin; P. Mättig; R. Magaña-Villalba; P. K. Mal; S. Malik; V. L. Malyshev; Y. Maravin; B. Martin; R. McCarthy; C. L. McGivern; M. M. Meijer; A. Melnitchouk; L. Mendoza; D. Menezes; P. G. Mercadante; M. Merkin; K. W. Merritt; A. Meyer; J. Meyer; N. K. Mondal; R. W. Moore; T. Moulik; G. S. Muanza; M. Mulhearn; O. Mundal; L. Mundim; E. Nagy; M. Naimuddin; M. Narain; H. A. Neal; J. P. Negret; P. Neustroev; H. Nilsen; H. Nogima; S. F. Novaes; T. Nunnemann; G. Obrant; C. Ochando; D. Onoprienko; J. Orduna; N. Oshima; N. Osman; J. Osta; R. Otec; G. J. Otero y Garzón; M. Owen; M. Padilla; P. Padley; M. Pangilinan; N. Parashar; S.-J. Park; J. Parsons; R. Partridge; N. Parua; A. Patwa; B. Penning; M. Perfilov; K. Peters; Y. Peters; P. Pétroff; R. Piegaia; J. Piper; M.-A. Pleier; P. L. M. Podesta-Lerma; V. M. Podstavkov; Y. Pogorelov; M.-E. Pol; P. Polozov; A. V. Popov; M. Prewitt; S. Protopopescu; J. Qian; A. Quadt; B. Quinn; A. Rakitine; M. S. Rangel; K. Ranjan; P. N. Ratoff; P. Renkel; P. Rich; M. Rijssenbeek; I. Ripp-Baudot; F. Rizatdinova; S. Robinson; M. Rominsky; C. Royon; P. Rubinov; R. Ruchti; G. Safronov; G. Sajot; A. Sánchez-Hernández; M. P. Sanders; B. Sanghi; G. Savage; L. Sawyer; T. Scanlon; D. Schaile; R. D. Schamberger; Y. Scheglov; H. Schellman; T. Schliephake; S. Schlobohm; C. Schwanenberger; R. Schwienhorst; J. Sekaric; H. Severini; E. Shabalina; M. Shamim; V. Shary; A. A. Shchukin; R. K. Shivpuri; V. Siccardi; V. Simak

2010-01-01

356

Thrust Enhancement in Hypervelocity Nozzles by Chemical Catalysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the hypersonic flight regime, the air-breathing supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) has been shown to be a viable propulsion system. The current designs of scramjet engines provide performance benefits only up to a Mach number of 14. Performance losses increase rapidly as the Mach number increases. To extend the applicability of scram'jets beyond Mach 14, research is being conducted in the area of inlet and wave drag reduction, skin-friction and heat-transfer reduction, nozzle loss minimization, low-loss mixing, and combustion enhancement. For high Mach number applications, hydrogen is the obvious fuel choice because of its high energy content per unit mass in comparison with conventional fuels. These flight conditions require engines to operate at supersonic internal velocities, high combustor temperatures, and low static pressures. The high static temperature condition enhances the production of radicals such as H and OH, and the low-pressure condition slows the reaction rates, particularly the recombination reactions. High-temperature and low-pressure constraints, in combination with a small residence time, result in a radical-rich exhaust gas mixture exiting the combustor. At high Mach number conditions (due to low residence time), H and OH do not have enough time to recombine ; thus, a significant amount of energy is lost as these high-energy free radical are exhausted. The objective of the present study is to conduct a flowfield analysis for a typical nozzle geometry for NASP-type vehicle to assess for thrust enhancement in hypervelocity nozzles by substituting small amount of phosphine for hydrogen.

Singh, D. J.; Carpenter, Mark H.; Drummond, J. P.

1997-01-01

357

[Lifting-thrusting and rotating manipulations: a comparison on energy input].  

PubMed

Through the energy input model of lifting-thrusting and rotating manipulations, using the theory of energy density, energy flux density and sound intensity level in physics, the average energy flux intensity and frequency distributions of average poynting's vector were calculated respectively within the range of infrasound. According to the distribution table, it was discovered that both of the energy flux density and sound intensity level during the process of acupuncture were high. And it was concluded that the essence of meridians was probably fascial tissues which were rich in elastic fibers and collagenous fibers. The heat-producing needling with reinforcing effect (setting the moutain on fire) which focused on forceful thrusting was held to be the result of the action of same position solitary wave. And the coolness-producing needling with reducing effect (thorough heavenly cool) emphasized on the manipulation of forceful lifting was considered as the action of opposite position solitary wave. The energy input of lifting-thrusting manipulation is comparatively larger than the rotating method, however without significant difference. The speed of manipulations applied is regarded to have greater impact on energy transmission. And the energy produced by rotating manipulation can be better transmitted through meridians. PMID:21355164

Wang, Xi-ming

2011-01-01

358

Some effects of cyclic induced deformation in rocket thrust chambers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A test program to investigate the deformation process observed in the hot gas wall of rocket thrust chambers was conducted using three different liner materials. Five thrust chambers were cycled to failure using hydrogen and oxygen as propellants at a chamber pressure of 4.14 MN/m square (600 psia). The deformation was observed nondestructively at midlife points and destructively after failure occurred. The cyclic life results are presented with an accompanying discussion about the types of failure encountered. Data indicating the deformation of the thrust chamber liner as cycles are accumulated are presented for each of the test thrust chambers.

Hannum, N. P.; Quentmeyer, R. J.

1979-01-01

359

Fault interaction along the Central Andean thrust front: The Las Peñas thrust, Cerro Salinas thrust and the Montecito Anticline  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The region in west-central Argentina between the thin-skinned Precordillera and the thick-skinned Sierras Pampeanas structural domain is among the most active zones of thrust tectonics in the world. We quantify the rates of deformation on the east-vergent Las Peñas thrust (LPT), and the west-vergent Cerro Salinas thrust (CST). The Montecito anticline (MA) is located at their intersection. We mapped three key locations, collected stratigraphic logs from the MA, dated three ashes using U-Pb in zircon and dated 10 terraces using cosmogenic Be-10 depth profiles. Five terrace levels are present where the Rio Las Peñas crosses the LPT, up to 45 m above the modern river. Cosmogenic dating of the uppermost terrace (T1) yields and age of 123.8 +26.5/-12.3 ka. A reconstruction of this surface using a blind thrust rupture scenario indicates 73 +/- 7 m horizontal shortening and 34 +/- 3 m vertical displacement. Shortening across the structure is therefore 0.59 +0.10/-0.13 mm/yr with a vertical uplift rate of 0.27 +0.05/-0.06 mm/a. Previous work indicates higher rates to the south on the order of 2 mm/yr (Schmidt et al., 2011). Lower terraces give ages of 38.0 +11/-6.2 ka (T2) and 1.5 +5.0/-0.6 ka (T4). Three terrace levels are preserved near the center of the CST. The middle surface (T2) is folded across the axis of the structure and yields an age of 112.5 +33/-14.4 ka. Given 22.9 m surface uplift, this indicates a vertical uplift rate of 0.20 +0.05/-0.06 mm/yr, similar to the rate on the LPT. The upper terrace (T1) yields a younger age (97.1 +29.8/-12.4 ka); the T1 and T2 ages overlap within uncertainty, indicating rapid river incision at the time of their formation. An intercalated ash within the Neogene strata gives an age of 16.2 +/- 0.2. Previous work indicates long-term shortening rates of 0.8 mm/yr (Verges et al., 2007) and that the CST initiated after 8.5 Ma. The lowermost unit exposed in the MA is the Los Pozos Fm., with no indication of syn-depositional deformation. An intercalated ash from the top of this formation yields an age of 5.76 +/- 0.09 Ma. Internal unconformities are present within the overlying transitional unit and the Mogotes Fm., indicating deformation post-dates 5.8 Ma in the MA. An ash within the Mogotes Fm. is 1.52 +/- 0.06 Ma. Slip is modeled as 3.5 km reverse slip across an east-dipping dislocation with a 45 degree dip. This suggests horizontal shortening and vertical uplift of 0.42 mm/yr since the onset of deformation. Uplifted terraces near the center of the MA are 4.7 +0.8/-0.3 ka (T2) and 1.9 +3.4/-1.9 ka (T3), 6 and 4.6 m above the modern river, respectively. This suggests recent vertical uplift or incision rates of 1.3-2.4 mm/yr. These data suggest that deformation in the MA is comparable to that at the LPT and CST. Deformation in the MA could be accelerating, but alternatively, river incision could be accelerating due to climate change.

Schoenbohm, L. M.; Costa, C. H.; Brooks, B. A.; Bohon, W.; Gardini, C.; Cisneros, H.

2013-12-01

360

Velocity field measurement of a round jet using quantitative schlieren  

SciTech Connect

This paper utilizes the background oriented schlieren (BOS) technique to measure the velocity field of a variable density round jet. The density field of the jet is computed based on the light deflection created during the passage of light through the understudy jet. The deflection vector estimation was carried out using phase-based optical flow algorithms. The density field is further exploited to extract the axial and radial velocity vectors with the aid of continuity and energy equations. The experiment is conducted at six different jet-exit temperature values. Additional turbulence parameters, such as velocity variance and power spectral density of the vector field, are also computed. Finally, the measured velocity parameters are compared with the hot wire anemometer measurements and their correlation is displayed.

Iffa, Emishaw D.; Aziz, A. Rashid A.; Malik, Aamir S.

2011-02-10

361

Time to reconcile thermal inversion models around thrusts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Inversion of metamorphic thermal isograds is commonly observed around mega-thrusts, particularly in close association with major thrusts in collision belts. However, the processes leading to such thermal inversion still constitute an open issue. Various models have already addressed their possible syn-deformational origin during thrusting. However, because they concentrated on specific contexts and processes, none of these models has achieved a general consensus. Hence, in order to reconcile these different models of syn-deformational thermal inversion, it becomes crucial to find a way allowing to determine the key process controlling the thermal evolution for any thrust zone. Here, we present a dimensional analysis allowing to quantify the relative control of heat diffusion, advection and shear heating on the thermal evolution around thrusts. Our analytical solution invokes parameters that can define any thrust scenario in terms of kinematics, rheological strength and thermal context. Our study focuses mainly on the role of the thrust thickness, h, the shear zone dip angle, ?, the convergence velocity, V, and the effective viscosity, ?, of the shear zone. Our dimensional analysis shows that for typical values applicable to intracontinental thrusts (h = 1-5 km, ? = 15-45°, V = 1-3 cm/yr, ? = 1e19-1e21 Pa.s) heat diffusion as well as advection as well as shear heating can be the dominant process controlling the thermal evolution around thrusts. This result explains the difficulty of finding a unique model for inverted metamorphism. From this, we first validate our dimensional analysis with two-dimensional thermo- kinematical models: for typical values and scenarios applicable to different thrusts, our numerical results show specific thermal evolutions. Then, we apply our first-order coupled analytical-numerical method to natural occurrences of inverted zonation of metamorphic peak temperatures. In this way, our analysis suggests that the inverted metamorphism associated to the Main Central Thrust in the Himalayas, for instance, can be mainly a result of shear heating.

Duprat-Oualid, Sylvia; Yamato, Philippe; Schmalholz, Stefan M.

2014-05-01

362

Small centrifugal pumps for low thrust rockets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents the results of a combined analytical and experimental investigation of low specific speed pumps for potential use as components of propellant feed systems for low thrust rocket engines. Shrouded impellers and open face impellers were tested in volute type and vaned diffuser type pumps. Full- and partial-emission diffusers and full- and partial-admission impellers were tested. Axial and radial loads, head and efficiency versus flow, and cavitation tests were conducted. Predicted performance of two pumps are compared when pumping water and liquid hydrogen. Detailed pressure loss and parasitic power values are presented for two pump configurations. Partial-emission diffusers were found to permit use of larger impeller and diffuser passages with a minimal performance penalty. Normal manufacturing tolerances were found to result in substantial power requirement variation with only a small pressure rise change. Impeller wear ring leakage was found to reduce pump pressure rise to an increasing degree as the pump flowrate was decreased.

Gulbrandsen, N. C.; Furst, R. B.; Burgess, R. M.; Scheer, D. D.

1985-01-01

363

Thrust Production in a Mechanical Swimming Lamprey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To develop a comprehensive model of lamprey locomotion, we use a robotic lamprey as a means of investigating the surface pressure and wake structure during swimming. A programmable microcomputer actuates 11 servomotors that produce a traveling wave along the length of the lamprey body. The waveform is based on the motion of the American eel (Anguilla rostrata), as described by Tytell and Lauder (2004) and kinematic studies of living lamprey. The amplitude of the phase-averaged surface pressure distribution along the centerline of the robot increases toward the tail, which is consistent with previous momentum balance experiments indicating that thrust is produced mainly at the tail. The phase relationship between the pressure signal and the vortex shedding from the tail is also examined. The project is supported by NIH CNRS Grant 1R01NS054271.

Leftwich, Megan; Smits, Alexander

2008-11-01

364

Initiation system for low thrust motor igniter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A test program was carried out to demonstrate an igniter motor initiation system utilizing the bimetallic material Pyrofuze for a solid propellant rocket with controlled low rate of thrust buildup. The program consisted of a series of vacuum ignition tests using a slab burning window motor that simulated the principal initial ballistic parameters of the full scale igniter motor. A Pyrofuze/pyrotechnic igniter system was demonstrated that uses a relatively low electrical current level for initiation and that eliminates the necessity of a pyrotechnic squib, with its accompanying accidental firing hazards and the typical basket of pyrotechnic pellets. The Pyrofuze ignition system does require an initial constraining of the igniter motor nozzle flow, and at the low initiating electrical current level the ignition delay time of this system was found to be quite sensitive to factors affecting local heat generation or loss rates.

Strand, L. D.; Davis, D. P.; Shafer, J. I.

1972-01-01

365

The effects of profiles on supersonic jet noise  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effect of velocity profiles on supersonic jet noise are studied by using stability calculations made for a shock-free coannular jet, with both the inner and outer flows supersonic. The Mach wave emission process is modeled as the noise generated by the large scale turbulent structures or the instability waves in the mixing region. Both the vortex-sheet and the realistic finite thickness shear layer models are considered. The stability calculations were performed for both inverted and normal velocity profiles. Comparisons are made with the results for an equivalent single jet, based on equal thrust, mass flow rate and exit area to that of the coannular jet. The advantages and disadvantages of these velocity profiles as far as noise radiation is concerned are discussed. It is shown that the Rayleigh's model prediction of the merits and demerits of different velocity profiles are in good agreement with the experimental data.

Tiwari, S. N.; Bhat, T. R. S.

1994-01-01

366

Effects of velocity profile and inclination on dual-jet-induced pressures on a flat plate in a crosswind  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental study was conducted to determine surface pressure distributions on a flat plate with dual subsonic, circular jets exhausting from the surface into a crossflow. The jets were arranged in both side-by-side and tandem configurations and were injected at 90 deg and 60 deg angles to the plate, with jet-to-crossflow velocity ratio of 2.2 and 4. The major objective of the study was to determine the effect of a nonuniform (vs uniform) jet velocity profile, simulating the exhaust of a turbo-fan engine. Nonuniform jets with a high-velocity outer annulus and a low-velocity core induced stronger negative pressure fields than uniform jets with the same mass flow rate. However, nondimensional lift losses (lift loss/jet thrust lift) due to such nonuniform jets were lower than lift losses due to uniform jets. Changing the injection angle from 90 deg to 60 deg resulted in moderate (for tandem jets) to significant (for side-by-side jets) increases in the induced negative pressures, even though the surface area influenced by the jets tended to reduce as the angle decreased. Jets arranged in the side-by-side configuration led to significant jet-induced lift losses exceeding, in some cases, lift losses reported for single jets.

Jakubowski, A. L.; Schetz, J. A.; Moore, C. L.; Joag, R.

1985-01-01

367

Noise from Supersonic Coaxial Jets. Part 3; Inverted Velocity Profile  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The instability wave noise generation model is used to study the instability waves in the two shear layers of an inverted velocity profile, supersonic, coaxial jet and the noise radiated from the dominant wave. The inverted velocity profile jet has a high speed outer stream surrounding a low speed inner stream and the outer shear layer is always larger than the inner shear layer. The jet mean flows are calculated numerically. The operating conditions are chosen to exemplify the effect of the coaxial jet outer shear layer initial spreading rates. Calculations are made for the stability characteristics in the coaxial jet shear layers and the noise radiated from the instability waves for different operating conditions with the same total thrust, mass flow and exit area as a single reference jet. Results for inverted velocity profile jets indicate that relative maximum instability wave amplitudes and far field peak noise levels can be reduced from that of the reference jet by having higher spreading rates for the outer shear layer, low velocity ratios, and outer streams hotter than the inner stream.

Dahl, Milo D.; Morris, Philip J.

1997-01-01

368

A computational study of thrust augmenting ejectors based on a viscous-inviscid approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A viscous-inviscid interaction technique is advocated as both an efficient and accurate means of predicting the performance of two-dimensional thrust augmenting ejectors. The flow field is subdivided into a viscous region that contains the turbulent jet and an inviscid region that contains the ambient fluid drawn into the device. The inviscid region is computed with a higher-order panel method, while an integral method is used for the description of the viscous part. The strong viscous-inviscid interaction present within the ejector is simulated in an iterative process where the two regions influence each other en route to a converged solution. The model is applied to a variety of parametric and optimization studies involving ejectors having either one or two primary jets. The effects of nozzle placement, inlet and diffuser shape, free stream speed, and ejector length are investigated. The inlet shape for single jet ejectors is optimized for various free stream speeds and Reynolds numbers. Optimal nozzle tilt and location are identified for various dual-ejector configurations.

Lund, Thomas S.; Tavella, Domingo A.; Roberts, Leonard

1987-01-01

369

Thrust faults and back thrust in Madison range of southwestern Montana foreland  

SciTech Connect

In the Rocky Mountain foreland of southwestern Montana, a zone of Late Cretaceous thrust faults, named the Hilgard fault system, extends along the west side of the Madison Range from Hebgen Lake northward for about 50 mi (80 km). The thrust faults are steep at their leading edges but flatten westward beneath the associated plates, where they commonly dip 25/sup 0/-30/sup 0/. Structural lows and highs are apparent beneath the Beaver Creek plate, the major thrust sheet of the system, and correlate with salients and reentrants of the plate. The Beaver Creek plate consists primarily of Archean metamorphic rocks, but Phanerozoic strata are preserved along the northern part of the plate's leading edge. Only the forward part of the plate is preserved in the Madison Range because Cenozoic normal faults of the Madison Range fault system dropped much of the plate beneath the Madison Valley on the west. The Kirkwood plate lies east of and beneath the Beaver Creek plate, and contains structures of the eastern part of the Hilgard system. The central segment of the leading edge of the Kirkwood plate is not completely detached from underlying strata. The leading edge of the northern part of the plate, defined by the Cache Creek fault, is flanked on the west by an associated anticline. The southern end of the Cache Creek fault is an eastward-dipping back thrust, which abruptly steepens on the west adjacent to the anticline. Both the fault and the anticline are believed to have formed above a concealed detachment fault. The southern part of the Kirkwood plate displays structures interpreted to represent displacement transfer from the Beaver Creek plate. 9 figures.

Tysdal, R.G.

1986-04-01

370

The 30-centimeter ion thrust subsystem design manual  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The principal characteristics of the 30-centimeter ion propulsion thrust subsystem technology that was developed to satisfy the propulsion needs of future planetary and early orbital missions are described. Functional requirements and descriptions, interface and performance requirements, and physical characteristics of the hardware are described at the thrust subsystem, BIMOD engine system, and component level.

1979-01-01

371

Electronics Engineering Department Thrust Area report FY'84  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the work of the Electronics Engineering Department Thrust Areas for FY'84: diagnostics and microelectronic engineering; signal and control engineering; microwave and pulsed power engineering; computer-aided engineering; engineering modeling and simulation; and systems engineering. For each Thrust Area, an overview and a description of the goals and achievements of each project is provided.

Minichino, C.; Phelps, P.L. (eds.)

1984-01-01

372

Analysis of Thrust and Flow Augmentation of a Coanda Nozzle.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In order to evaluate the performance of a Coanda Nozzle and to determine its thrust and pumping capabilities, a series of tests were conducted on a Coanda Nozzle. The results showed that the nozzle was capable of creating thrust augmentation of about 1.25...

E. L. Victory

1965-01-01

373

Investigation of Flow Turning in a Natural Blockage Thrust Reverser  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experimental and computational low speed tests have been conducted on a 50% scale model of a two- dimensional natural blockage fan flow cascade thrust reverser. The aim of the work is to provide a reference database for future work investigating innovative flow control in fan flow thrust reversers. Results are presented for a reverser with cascade solidity = 1.3. The

R. K. Cooper; E. Benard; S. Raghunathan

374

Heat pipe technology for advanced rocket thrust chambers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The application of heat pipe technology to the design of rocket engine thrust chambers is discussed. Subjects presented are: (1) evaporator wick development, (2) specific heat pipe designs and test results, (3) injector design, fabrication, and cold flow testing, and (4) preliminary thrust chamber design.

Rousar, D. C.

1971-01-01

375

Impact of plasma noise on a direct thrust measurement system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to evaluate the accuracy and sensitivity of a pendulum-type thrust measurement system, a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) and a laser optical displacement sensor have been used simultaneously to determine the displacement resulting from an applied thrust. The LVDT sensor uses an analog interface, whereas the laser sensor uses a digital interface to communicate the displacement readings to the data acquisition equipment. The data collected by both sensors show good agreement for static mass calibrations and validation with a cold gas thruster. However, the data obtained using the LVDT deviate significantly from that of the laser sensor when operating two varieties of plasma thrusters: a radio frequency (RF) driven plasma thruster, and a DC powered plasma thruster. Results establish that even with appropriate shielding and signal filtering the LVDT sensor is subject to plasma noise and radio frequency interactions which result in anomalous thrust readings. Experimental data show that the thrust determined using the LVDT system in a direct current plasma environment and a RF discharge is approximately a factor of three higher than the thrust values obtained using a laser sensor system for the operating conditions investigated. These findings are of significance to the electric propulsion community as LVDT sensors are often utilized in thrust measurement systems and accurate thrust measurement and the reproducibility of thrust data is key to analyzing thruster performance. Methods are proposed to evaluate system susceptibility to plasma noise and an effective filtering scheme presented for DC discharges.

Pottinger, S. J.; Lamprou, D.; Knoll, A. K.; Lappas, V. J.

2012-03-01

376

Real-Time Measurements of Jet Aircraft Engine Exhaust  

Microsoft Academic Search

Particulate-phase exhaust properties from two different types of ground-based jet aircraft engines—high-thrust and turboshaft—were studied with real-time instruments on a portable pallet and additional time-integrated sampling devices. The real-time instruments successfully characterized rapidly changing particulate mass, light absorption, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content. The integrated measurements included particulate-size distributions, PAH, and carbon concentrations for an entire test run (i.e.,

Fred Rogers; Pat Arnott; Barbara Zielinska; John Sagebiel; Kerry E. Kelly; David Wagner; JoAnn S. Lighty; Adel F. Sarofim

2005-01-01

377

Tectonic Significance of Intraoceanic Thrusts in the Nankai Trough  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Nankai Trough is a convergent margin where the Philippine Sea plate is subducting beneath southwest Japan. Because this subduction zone has repeatedly generated great earthquakes with Mw>8, seismic reflection studies have been intensively carried out in the whole Nankai Trough region. However, the role of oceanic crust in plate convergent margins was not well understood. Recently, Tsuji et al. [2009] identified intraoceanic thrusts developed as imbricate structures within the subducting Philippine Sea plate off the Kii Peninsula in central Japan manifesting as strong-amplitude reflections observed in an industry-standard 3D seismic reflection data set. In this study, we use other 2D and 3D seismic reflection data acquired in the whole Nankai Trough region and extract geometries of (1) intraoceanic thrusts, (2) surface of oceanic crust and (3) Moho in order to discuss characteristics of intraoceanic thrusts distributed in the whole Nankai Trough region. We mainly use seismic reflection data acquired by JAMSTEC. Seismic profiles demonstrate that intraoceanic faults are densely distributed eastern side of the Cape Shionomisaki (southern edge of the Kii Peninsula). Large displacements of a few major intraoceanic thrusts elevate the crust surface, and the offset due to cumulative displacements reaches >1 km at the sediment-igneous crust interface. A part of Kashinozaki-Knoll is also uplifted by the thrust displacement. These imbricate intraoceanic thrusts cut through the oceanic crust as a discontinuous thrust plane. The intraoceanic thrusts strike nearly parallel to the trend of the trough axis. However the fault traces are bending at the western termination; the fault planes extend upward from side edges of the underlying intraoceanic thrusts and work as lateral faults. The deformation within oceanic crust may have continued until recently with subduction, because the shallow sediment as well as the seafloor is deformed due to the thrust displacement [Kodaira et al., 2006]. Furthermore, the locations of the intraoceanic thrusts recognized in the seismic data are distributed around the estimated hypocenters of the mainshocks and aftershocks of the 2004 intraplate earthquakes (Mw>7), and their geometry extracted from the 3D seismic data could explain the kind of complex rupture pattern observed during the 2004 events [Tsuji et al., 2009]. These observations demonstrate that the intraoceanic thrusts should be seismogenically active. On the other hand, the intraoceanic thrusts with large displacement are sparsely distributed western side of the Cape Shionomisaki. The variation in thrust density may be related to the state of stress within the oceanic crust; therefore Cape Shionomisaki (Kii peninsula) works as a boundary of stress state. Furthermore, the oceanic crust thickness is changed at the Cape Shionomisaki.

Tsuji, T.; Kodaira, S.; Park, J.; Ashi, J.; Fukao, Y.; Moore, G. F.; Matsuoka, T.

2009-12-01

378

Static thrust recovery of PAR craft on solid surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Power-Augmented-Ram Vehicles belong to a new class of ground-effect machines with hybrid support. Recovered static thrust and static lift on solid surfaces are important amphibious characteristics of this craft. Experimental data for the static thrust recovery and the transition to a hovering mode are obtained in the tests with a vehicle model on two types of ground surface and with variable engine thrust and flap trailing-edge gap. The uphill surface and increased mass of the model demonstrate reductions in thrust recovery. A comparison with a two-dimensional potential-flow theory is presented. The static thrust accumulation, identified in the pre-hovering regime of a model on solid surface, does not significantly benefit the low-speed forward motion.

Matveev, K. I.

2008-08-01

379

Blind duplex structure of the north Urals thrust belt front  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New multichannel seismic-reflection profiles shot across the north Ural thrust front indicate the presence of previously unknown wedge-shaped foreland-verging blind duplex. The structure of this zone shows westward thrusting of the tectonic wedge of the Silurian-Artinskian assemblage into the foreland sedimentary cover. This process caused structural delamination of the basin succession, tilting of frontal molasse monocline above the leading edge of the low-taper allochthonous unit, thrust duplication and tectonic thickening of the wedge. Two distinct structural styles are recognized in the blind thrust. Its frontal zone formed by Artinskian shale has thin-skinned imbrication structure. The eastern internal zone consists of Silurian-Sakmarian carbonate-dominated sequences that have much more coherent thrust and fold deformations. This part of allochthonous unit forms a rigid "core" of the blind duplex. The structural geometry of the study area suggests its tectonic shortening of at least 60 km.

Sobornov, Konstantin O.

1992-06-01

380

Thrust Measurements for a Pulse Detonation Engine Driven Ejector  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of an experimental effort on pulse detonation driven ejectors aimed at probing different aspects of PDE ejector processes, are presented and discussed. The PDE was operated using ethylene as the fuel and an equimolar oxygen/nitrogen mixture as the oxidizer at an equivalence ratio of one. The thrust measurements for the PDE alone are in excellent agreement with experimental and modeling results reported in the literature and serve as a Baseline for the ejector studies. These thrust measurements were then used as a basis for quantifying thrust augmentation for various PDE/ejector setups using constant diameter ejector tubes and various detonation tube/ejector tube overlap distances. The results show that for the geometries studied here, a maximum thrust augmentation of 24% is achieved. The thrust augmentation results are complemented by shadowgraph imaging of the flowfield in the ejector tube inlet area and high frequency pressure transducer measurements along the length of the ejector tube.

Santoro, Robert J.; Pak, Sibtosh; Shehadeh, R.; Saretto, S. R.; Lee, S.-Y.

2005-01-01

381

Exoskeletal Engine Concept: Feasibility Studies for Medium and Small Thrust Engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The exoskeletal engine concept is one in which the shafts and disks are eliminated and are replaced by rotating casings that support the blades in spanwise compression. Omission of the shafts and disks leads to an open channel at the engine centerline. This has immense potential for reduced jet noise and for the accomodation of an alternative form of thruster for use in a combined cycle. The use of ceramic composite materials has the potential for significantly reduced weight as well as higher working temperatures without cooling air. The exoskeletal configuration is also a natural stepping-stone to complete counter-rotating turbomachinery. Ultimately this will lead to reductions in weight, length, parts count and improved efficiency. The feasibility studies are in three parts. Part I-Systems and Component Requirements addressed the mechanical aspects of components from a functionality perspective. This effort laid the groundwork for preliminary design studies. Although important, it is not felt to be particularly original, and has therefore not been included in the current overview. Part 2-Preliminary Design Studies turned to some of the cycle and performance issues inherent in an exoskeletal configuration and some initial attempts at preliminary design of turbomachinery were described. Twin-spoon and single-spool 25.800-lbf-thrust turbofans were used as reference vehicles in a mid-size commercial subsonic category in addition to a single-spool 5,000-lbf-thrust turbofan that represented a general aviation application. The exoskeletal engine, with its open centerline, has tremendous potential for noise suppression and some preliminary analysis was done which began to quantify the benefits. Part 3-Additional Preliminary Design Studies revisited the design of single-spool 25,800-lbf-thrust turbofan configurations, but in addition to the original FPR = 1.6 and BPR = 5.1 reference engine, two additional configurations used FPR = 2.4 and BPR = 3.0 and FPR = 3.2 and BPR = 2.0 were investigated. The single-spool 5,000-lbf-thrust turbofan was refined and the small engine study was extended to include a 2,000-lbf-thrust turbojet. More attention was paid to optimizing the turbomachinery. Turbine cooling flows were eliminated, in keeping with the use of uncooled CMC material in exoskeletal engines. The turbine performance parameters moved much closer to the nominal target values, demonstrating the great benefits to the cycle of uncooled turbines.

Halliwell, Ian

2001-01-01

382

Exoskeletal Engine Concept: Feasibility Studies for Medium and Small Thrust Engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The exoskeletal engine concept is one in which the shafts and disks are eliminated and are replaced by rotating casings that support the blades in spanwise compression. Omission of the shafts and disks leads to an open channel at the engine centerline. This has immense potential for reduced jet noise and for the accommodation of an alternative form of thruster for use in a combined cycle. The use of ceramic composite materials has the potential for significantly reduced weight as well as higher working temperatures without cooling air. The exoskeletal configuration is also a natural stepping-stone to complete counter-rotating turbomachinery. Ultimately this will lead to reductions in weight, length, parts count and improved efficiency. The feasibility studies are in three parts. Part 1: Systems and Component Requirements addressed the mechanical aspects of components from a functionality perspective. This effort laid the groundwork for preliminary design studies. Although important, it is not felt to be particularly original, and has therefore not been included in the current overview. Part 2: Preliminary Design Studies turned to some of the cycle and performance issues inherent in an exoskeletal configuration and some initial attempts at preliminary design of turbomachinery were described. Twin-spoon and single-spool 25,800-lbf-thrust turbofans were used as reference vehicles in a mid-size commercial subsonic category in addition to a single-spool 5,000-lbf-thrust turbofan that represented a general aviation application. The exoskeletal engine, with its open centerline, has tremendous potential for noise suppression and some preliminary analysis was done which began to quantify the benefits. Part 3: Additional Preliminary Design Studies revisited the design of single-spool 25,800-lbf-thrust turbofan configurations, but in addition to the original FPR = 1.6 and BPR = 5.1 reference engine. two additional configurations used FPR = 2.4 and BPR = 3.0 and FPR = 3.2 and BPR = 2.0 were investigated. The single-spool 5.000-lbf-thrust turbofan was refined and the small engine study was extended to include a 2,000-lbf-thrust turbojet. More attention was paid to optimizing the turbomachinery. Turbine cooling flows were eliminated, in keeping with the use of uncooled CMC materials in exoskeletal engines. The turbine performance parameters moved much closer to the nominal target values, demonstrating the great benefits to the cycle of uncooled turbines.

Halliwell, Ian

2001-01-01

383

Inclusive Jets in PHP  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

Roloff, P.

384

From jet to drops via jets  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate the dynamics of the impact of two liquid jets at an angle, paying a particular attention to the atomization process. The drops mean diameter and velocity produced by the break up of the resultant jet for different impacting jets diameters and velocities is documented. We show that the impact conserves the momentum flux and we characterize this continuous

N. Bremond; C. Clanet; E. Villermaux

2002-01-01

385

Numerical hydrodynamic simulations of molecular outflows driven by Hammer jets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Very young protostars eject collimated jets of molecular gas. Although the protostars themselves are hidden, some of their properties are revealed through the jet dynamics. We here model velocity shear, precession, pulsation and spray within dense jets injected into less-dense molecular clouds. We investigate the Hammer Jet, for which extreme velocity variations as well as strong ripping and spray actions are introduced. A three dimensional ZEUS-type hydrodynamics code, extended with molecular physics, is employed. Jet knots, previously shown to be compact in simulations of smoother jets, now appear as prominent bow shocks in H_2 and as bullets in CO emission lines. High proper motions are predicted in the jet. In the lobes we uncover wide tubular low-velocity CO structures with concave bases near the nozzle. Proper motion vectors in the lobes delineate a strong accelerated flow away from the head with some superimposed turbulent-like motions. The leading bow is gradually distorted by the hammer blows and breaks up into mini-bow segments. The H_2 emission line profiles are wide and twin-peaked over much of the leading bow. On comparison with the simulations, we identify observed outflows driven by various dynamical types of jet. Shear is essential to produce the jet bows, spray or precession to widen the outflows and hammer blows to generate knotty jets. We identify the proper motions of maser spots with the pattern speed of density peaks in the inner jet and shell.

Völker, Roland; Smith, Michael D.; Suttner, Gerhard; Yorke, Harold W.

1999-03-01

386

Measurements of the b quark forward-backward asymmetry around the Z $^0$ peak using jet charge and vertex charge  

Microsoft Academic Search

The b quark forward-backward asymmetry has been measured using approximately four million hadronic Z$^0$ decays collected with the OPAL detector at LEP. Both jet charge and vertex charge were used to estimate whether the b quark was produced in the forward or backward thrust hemisphere. The measured values corrected to the hadron-level thrust axis are \\\\[ \\\\begin{array}{llll} A^{\\\\rm b}_{\\\\rm FB}

Gideon Alexander; J Allison; N Altekamp; K A Ametewee; K J Anderson; S Anderson; S Arcelli; S Asai; D A Axen; Georges Azuelos; A H Ball; E Barberio; R J Barlow; R Bartoldus; J Richard Batley; J Bechtluft; C Beeston; T Behnke; A N Bell; K W Bell; G Bella; Stanislaus Cornelius Maria Bentvelsen; P Berlich; Siegfried Bethke; O Biebel; A Biguzzi; S D Bird; Volker Blobel; Ian J Bloodworth; J E Bloomer; M Bobinski; P Bock; H M Bosch; M Boutemeur; B T Bouwens; S Braibant; R M Brown; Helfried J Burckhart; C Burgard; R Bürgin; P Capiluppi; R K Carnegie; A A Carter; J R Carter; C Y Chang; D G Charlton; D Chrisman; P E L Clarke; I Cohen; J E Conboy; O C Cooke; M Cuffiani; S Dado; C Dallapiccola; G M Dallavalle; S De Jong; L A del Pozo; Klaus Desch; M S Dixit; E do Couto e Silva; M Doucet; E Duchovni; G Duckeck; I P Duerdoth; D Eatough; J E G Edwards; P G Estabrooks; H G Evans; M Evans; Franco Luigi Fabbri; M Fanti; P Fath; A A Faust; F Fiedler; M Fierro; H M Fischer; R Folman; D G Fong; M Foucher; A Fürtjes; P Gagnon; A Gaidot; J W Gary; J Gascon; S M Gascon-Shotkin; N I Geddes; C Geich-Gimbel; F X Gentit; T Geralis; G Giacomelli; P Giacomelli; R Giacomelli; V Gibson; W R Gibson; D M Gingrich; D A Glenzinski; J Goldberg; M J Goodrick; W Gorn; C Grandi; E Gross; Jacob Grunhaus; M Gruwé; C Hajdu; G G Hanson; M Hansroul; M Hapke; C K Hargrove; P A Hart; C Hartmann; M Hauschild; C M Hawkes; R Hawkings; Richard J Hemingway; M Herndon; G Herten; R D Heuer; M D Hildreth; J C Hill; S J Hillier; T Hilse; P R Hobson; R James Homer; A K Honma; D Horváth; R Howard; R E Hughes-Jones; D E Hutchcroft; P Igo-Kemenes; D C Imrie; M R Ingram; K Ishii; A Jawahery; P W Jeffreys; H Jeremie; Martin Paul Jimack; A Joly; C R Jones; G Jones; M Jones; R W L Jones; U Jost; P Jovanovic; T R Junk; D A Karlen; K Kawagoe; T Kawamoto; Richard K Keeler; R G Kellogg; B W Kennedy; J Kirk; S Kluth; T Kobayashi; M Kobel; D S Koetke; T P Kokott; M Kolrep; S Komamiya; T Kress; P Krieger; J Von Krogh; P Kyberd; G D Lafferty; H Lafoux; R Lahmann; W P Lai; D Lanske; J Lauber; S R Lautenschlager; J G Layter; D Lazic; A M Lee; E Lefebvre; Daniel Lellouch; J Letts; L Levinson; C Lewis; S L Lloyd; F K Loebinger; G D Long; Michael J Losty; J Ludwig; A Macchiolo; A L MacPherson; A Malik; M Mannelli; S Marcellini; C Markus; A J Martin; J P Martin; G Martínez; T Mashimo; W Matthews; P Mättig; W J McDonald; J A McKenna; E A McKigney; T J McMahon; A I McNab; R A McPherson; F Meijers; S Menke; F S Merritt; H Mes; J Meyer; Aldo Michelini; G Mikenberg; D J Miller; R Mir; W Mohr; A Montanari; T Mori; M Morii; U Müller; K Nagai; I Nakamura; H A Neal; B Nellen; B Nijjhar; R Nisius; S W O'Neale; F G Oakham; F Odorici; H O Ögren; N J Oldershaw; T Omori; M J Oreglia; S Orito; J Pálinkás; G Pásztor; J R Pater; G N Patrick; J Patt; M J Pearce; S Petzold; P Pfeifenschneider; J E Pilcher; James L Pinfold; D E Plane; P R Poffenberger; B Poli; A Posthaus; H Przysiezniak; D L Rees; D Rigby; S Robertson; S A Robins; N L Rodning; J M Roney; A M Rooke; E Ros; A M Rossi; M Rosvick; P Routenburg; Y Rozen; K Runge; O Runólfsson; U Ruppel; D R Rust; R Rylko; K Sachs; E Sarkisyan-Grinbaum; M Sasaki; C Sbarra; A D Schaile; O Schaile; F Scharf; P Scharff-Hansen; P Schenk; B Schmitt; S Schmitt; M Schröder; H C Schultz-Coulon; M Schulz; M Schumacher; P Schütz; W G Scott; T G Shears; B C Shen; C H Shepherd-Themistocleous; P Sherwood; G P Siroli; A Sittler; A Skillman; A Skuja; A M Smith; T J Smith; G A Snow; Randall J Sobie; S Söldner-Rembold; R W Springer; M Sproston; A Stahl; M Steiert; K Stephens; J Steuerer; B Stockhausen; D Strom; P Szymanski; R Tafirout; S D Talbot; S Tanaka; P Taras; S Tarem; M Thiergen; M A Thomson; E Von Törne; S Towers; I Trigger; T Tsukamoto; E Tsur; A S Turcot; M F Turner-Watson; P Utzat; R Van Kooten; G Vasseur; M Verzocchi; P Vikas; M G Vincter; E H Vokurka; F Wäckerle; A Wagner; C P Ward; D R Ward; J J Ward; P M Watkins; A T Watson; N K Watson; P S Wells; N Wermes; J S White; B Wilkens; G W Wilson; J A Wilson; G Wolf; S A Wotton; T R Wyatt; S Yamashita; G Yekutieli; V Zacek; D Zer-Zion

1997-01-01

387

Jet noise from ultrahigh bypass turbofan engines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Modern commercial jet transport aircraft are powered by turbofan engines. Thrust from a turbofan engine is derived in part from the exhaust of a ducted fan, which may or may not be mixed with the core exhaust before exiting the nacelle. The historical trend has been toward ever higher bypass ratios (BPRs). The BPR is the ratio of air mass passing through the fan to that going through the core. The higher BPR engines can be more efficient and quieter. In general, a higher BPR results in lower average exhaust velocities and less jet noise. In order to address a scarcity of noise data for BPRs greater than 6, an extensive database collection effort was undertaken using the Jet Engine Simulator in NASA Langley's Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel. Forward flight simulations of Mach 0.1, 0.2, and 0.28 were used with BPRs of 5, 8, 11, and 14. Data was taken over the entire operating line of the simulated engines along with parametric deviations to provide a complete set of sensitivity measurements. The results will be used to develop an empirical jet noise prediction capability for ultrahigh bypass engines.

Posey, Joe W.; Norum, Thomas D.; Brown, Martha C.; Bhat, Thonse R. S.

2002-05-01

388

Experimental Results of a Small Water-Augmented Air-Jet.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Experimental results from a small static water-augmented air-jet (46 gas horsepower maximum) are presented and correlated with theory. The data consists of thrust measurements as a function of mass-flow ratio for three spray station configurations and two...

A. E. Ford R. K. Muench

1969-01-01

389

Pollution reduction technology program for small jet aircraft engines: Class T1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Small jet aircraft engines (EPA class T1, turbojet and turbofan engines of less than 35.6 kN thrust) were evaluated with the objective of attaining emissions reduction consistent with performance constraints. Configurations employing the technological advances were screened and developed through full scale rig testing. The most promising approaches in full-scale engine testing were evaluated.

Bruce, T. W.; Davis, F. G.; Mongia, H. C.

1977-01-01

390

Nozzle optimization for water jet propulsion with a positive displacement pump  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the water jet propulsion system with a positive displacement (PD) pump, the nozzle, which converts pressure energy into kinetic energy, is one of the key parts exerting great influence on the reactive thrust and the efficiency of the system due to its high working pressure and easily occurring cavitation characteristics. Based on the previous studies of the energy loss and the pressure distribution of different nozzles, a model of water jet reactive thrust, which fully takes the energy loss and the nozzle parameters into consideration, is developed to optimize the nozzle design. Experiments and simulations are carried out to investigate the reactive thrust and the conversion efficiency of cylindrical nozzles, conical nozzles and optimized nozzles. The results show that the optimized nozzles have the largest reactive thrust and the highest energy conversion efficiency under the same inlet conditions. The related methods and conclusions are extended to the study of other applications of the water jet, such as water jet cutting, water mist fire suppression, water injection molding.

Yang, You-sheng; Xie, Ying-chun; Nie, Song-lin

2014-06-01

391

Supersonic gasdispersional jets and jet noise  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper examines the potential for controlling jet noise radiation using methods developed for modifying jet infra-red thermal radiation. The control of jet noise may be possible by properly adding different solid and liquid particles into the jet flow and by using special nozzle shapes to change the jet exhaust flow structure. The numerical methods used to achieve these objectives are outlined in this paper. A combined Lagrangian-Eulerian approach is used to numerically simulate a Jet flow with particle addition. The unsteady behavior of jet impingement is examined. The techniques for grid and boundary condition definition are discussed as related to the accuracy of the calculations. Preliminary comparisons to experimental data are presented.

Gilinsky, M. M.; Seiner, J. M.; Jansen, B. J.; Bhat, T. R. S.

1993-01-01

392

NERVA 400E thrust train dynamic analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The natural frequencies and dynamic responses of the NERVA 400E engine thrust train were determined for nuclear space operations (NSO), and earth-orbital shuttle (EOS) during launch and boost conditions. For NSO, a mini-tank configuration was analyzed with the forward end of the upper truss assumed fixed at the stage/mini-tank interface. For EOS, both a mini-tank and an engine only configuration were analyzed for a specific engine assembly support (EAS) stiffness. For all cases the effect of the shield on dynamic response characteristics was determined by performing parallel analyses with and without the shield. Gimbaling loads were not generated as that effort was scheduled after the termination date. The analysis, while demonstrating the adequacy of the engine design, revealed serious deficiencies in the EAS. Responses at the unsupported ends of the engine are excessive. Responses at the nuclear subsystem interface appear acceptable. It is recommended that additional analysis and design effort be expended upon the EAS to ensure that all engine responses stay within reasonable bounds.

Vronay, D. F.

1972-01-01

393

Cretaceous biostratigraphy in the Wyoming thrust belt.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the Cretaceous section of the thrust belt, fossils are especially useful for dating and correlating repetitive facies of different ages in structurally complex terrain. The biostratigraphic zonation for the region is based on megafossils (chiefly ammonites) , which permit accurate dating and correlation of outcrop sections, and which have been calibrated with the radiometric time scale for the Western Interior. Molluscan and vertebrate zone fossils are difficult to obtain from the subsurface, however, and ammonites are restricted to rocks of marine origin. Palynomorphs (plant microfossils) have proven to be the most valuable fossils in the subsurface because they can be recovered from drill cuttings. Palynomorphs also are found in both marine and nonmarine rocks and can be used for correlation between facies. Stratigraphic ranges of selected Cretaceous marine and nonmarine palynomorphs in previously designated reference sections in Fossil Basin, Wyoming are correlated with the occurrence of ammonites and other zone fossils in the same sections. These correlations can be related to known isotopic ages, and they contribute to the calibration of palynomorph ranges in the Cretaceous of the Western Interior. -from Authors

Nichols, D. J.; Jacobson, S. R.

1982-01-01

394

Evaluation of thrust measurement techniques for dielectric barrier discharge actuators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Despite its popularity in the recent literature, plasma actuators lack a consistent study to identify limitations, and remedy thereof, of various thrust measurement techniques. This paper focuses on comparing two different experimental techniques commonly used to measure the global, plasma-induced thrust. A force balance is used to make a direct measurement of the thrust produced, which is then compared with a control volume analysis on data obtained through particle image velocimetry. The local velocity measured by particle image velocimetry is also validated with a fine-tip pressure probe. For the direct thrust measurements, the effect of varying the actuator plate length upon which the induced flow acts is investigated. The results from these tests show that the length of the actuator plate is most influential at higher voltages with the measured thrust increasing as much as 20 % for a six times reduction in the length of the plate. For the indirect thrust measurement, the influence of the control volume size is analyzed. When the two methods are compared against each other, good agreement is found when the control volume size has a sufficient downstream extent. Also, the discharge length is optically measured using visible light emission. A linear correlation is found between the discharge length and the thrust measurements for the actuator configurations studied. Finally, the energy conversion efficiency curve for a representative actuator is also presented.

Durscher, Ryan; Roy, Subrata

2012-10-01

395

Thrust Stand Characterization of the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Direct thrust measurements have been made on the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion engine using a standard pendulum style thrust stand constructed specifically for this application. Values have been obtained for the full 40-level throttle table, as well as for a few off-nominal operating conditions. Measurements differ from the nominal NASA throttle table 10 (TT10) values by 3.1 percent at most, while at 30 throttle levels (TLs) the difference is less than 2.0 percent. When measurements are compared to TT10 values that have been corrected using ion beam current density and charge state data obtained at The Aerospace Corporation, they differ by 1.2 percent at most, and by 1.0 percent or less at 37 TLs. Thrust correction factors calculated from direct thrust measurements and from The Aerospace Corporation s plume data agree to within measurement error for all but one TL. Thrust due to cold flow and "discharge only" operation has been measured, and analytical expressions are presented which accurately predict thrust based on thermal thrust generation mechanisms.

Diamant, Kevin D.; Pollard, James E.; Crofton, Mark W.; Patterson, Michael J.; Soulas, George C.

2010-01-01

396

Distributed Exhaust Nozzles for Jet Noise Reduction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The main objective of this study is to validate the jet noise reduction potential of a concept associated with distributed exhaust nozzles. Under this concept the propulsive thrust is generated by a larger number of discrete plumes issuing from an array of small or mini-nozzles. The potential of noise reduction of this concept stems from the fact that a large number of small jets will produce very high frequency noise and also, if spaced suitably, they will coalesce at a smaller velocity to produce low amplitude, low frequency noise. This is accomplished through detailed acoustic and fluid measurements along with a Computational Fluidic Dynamic (CFD) solution of the mean (DE) Distributed Exhaust nozzle flowfield performed by Northrop-Grumman. The acoustic performance is quantified in an anechoic chamber. Farfield acoustic data is acquired for a DE nozzle as well as a round nozzle of the same area. Both these types of nozzles are assessed numerically using Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) techniques. The CFD analysis ensures that both nozzles issued the same amount of airflow for a given nozzle pressure ratio. Data at a variety of nozzle pressure ratios are acquired at a range of polar and azimuthal angles. Flow visualization of the DE nozzle is used to assess the fluid dynamics of the small jet interactions. Results show that at high subsonic jet velocities, the DE nozzle shifts its frequency of peak amplitude to a higher frequency relative to a round nozzle of equivalent area (from a S(sub tD) = 0.24 to 1. 3). Furthermore, the DE nozzle shows reduced sound pressure levels (as much as 4 - 8 dB) in the low frequency part of the spectrum (less than S(sub tD) = 0.24 ) compared to the round nozzle. At supersonic jet velocities, the DE nozzle does not exhibit the jet screech and the shock-associated broadband noise is reduced by as much as 12 dB.

Ahuja, K. K.; Gaeta, R. J.; Hellman, B.; Schein, D. B.; Solomon, W. D., Jr.; Huff, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

397

An experimental investigation of two-dimensional thrust augmenting ejectors, part 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The flow-field within a two-dimensional thrust augmenting ejector has been documented experimentally. Results are presented on the mean velocity field and the turbulent correlations by Laser Doppler Velocimeter, surface pressure distribution, surface temperature distribution, and thrust performance for two shroud geometries. The maximum primary nozzle pressure ratio tested was 3.0. The tests were conducted at primary nozzle temperature ratios of 1.0, 1.8 and 2.7. Two ejector characteristic lengths have been identified based on the dynamics of the ejector flow field, i.e., a minimum length L sub m below which no significant mixing occurs, and a critical length L sub c associated with the development of U'V' correlation in the ejector. These characteristic lengths divide the ejector flow field into three distinctive regions: the entrance region where there is no direct interaction between the primary flow and the ejector shroud; the interaction region where there is an increased momentum of induced flow near the shroud surface; and a pipe flow region characterized by an increased skin friction where x is the distance downstream from the ejector inlet. The effect of the coflowing induced flow has been shown to produce inside the ejector a centerline velocity that has increased over the free-jet data.

Bernal, L.; Sarohia, V.

1984-01-01

398

Thrust measurement in a 2-D scramjet nozzle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The two-dimensional thrust nozzle presents a challenging problem. The loading is not axisymmetric as in the case of a cone and the internal flow presents some design difficulties. A two-sting system has been chosen to accomodate the internal flow and achieve some symmetry. The situation is complicated by the fact that with the small ramp angle and the internal pressure on the nozzle walls, loading is predominantly transverse. Yet it is the axial thrust which is to be measured (i.e., the tensile waves propagating in the stings). Although bending stress waves travel at most at only 60% of the speed of the axial stress waves, the system needs to be stiffened against bending. The second sting was originally only used to preserve symmetry. However, the pressures on each thrust surface may be quite different at some conditions, so at this stage the signals from both stings are being averaged as a first order approximation of the net thrust. The expected axial thrust from this nozzle is not large so thin stings are required. In addition, the contact area between nozzle and sting needs to be maximized. The result was that it was decided to twist the stings through 90 deg, without distorting their cross-sectional shape, just aft of the nozzle. Finite element analysis showed that this would not significantly alter the propagation of the axial stress wave in the sting, while the rigidity of the system is greatly increased. A Mach 4 contoured nozzle is used in the experiments. The thrust calculated by integrating the static pressure measurements on the thrust surfaces is compared with the deconvolved strain measurement of the net thrust for the cases of air only and hydrogen fuel injected into air at approximately 9 MJ/kg nozzle supply enthalpy. The gain in thrust due to combustion is visible in this result.

Tuttle, Sean

1995-01-01

399

Powered Descent Guidance with General Thrust-Pointing Constraints  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Powered Descent Guidance (PDG) algorithm and software for generating Mars pinpoint or precision landing guidance profiles has been enhanced to incorporate thrust-pointing constraints. Pointing constraints would typically be needed for onboard sensor and navigation systems that have specific field-of-view requirements to generate valid ground proximity and terrain-relative state measurements. The original PDG algorithm was designed to enforce both control and state constraints, including maximum and minimum thrust bounds, avoidance of the ground or descent within a glide slope cone, and maximum speed limits. The thrust-bound and thrust-pointing constraints within PDG are non-convex, which in general requires nonlinear optimization methods to generate solutions. The short duration of Mars powered descent requires guaranteed PDG convergence to a solution within a finite time; however, nonlinear optimization methods have no guarantees of convergence to the global optimal or convergence within finite computation time. A lossless convexification developed for the original PDG algorithm relaxed the non-convex thrust bound constraints. This relaxation was theoretically proven to provide valid and optimal solutions for the original, non-convex problem within a convex framework. As with the thrust bound constraint, a relaxation of the thrust-pointing constraint also provides a lossless convexification that ensures the enhanced relaxed PDG algorithm remains convex and retains validity for the original nonconvex problem. The enhanced PDG algorithm provides guidance profiles for pinpoint and precision landing that minimize fuel usage, minimize landing error to the target, and ensure satisfaction of all position and control constraints, including thrust bounds and now thrust-pointing constraints.

Carson, John M., III; Acikmese, Behcet; Blackmore, Lars

2013-01-01

400

Jet-driven molecular outflows from class 0 sources: younger and stronger than they seem?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Context: The momentum, age and momentum injection rate (thrust) of molecular outflows are key parameters in theories of star formation. Systematic biases in these quantities as inferred from CO line observations are introduced through simplified calculations. These biases were quantified for radially expanding flows. However, recent studies suggest that the youngest outflows may be better described by jet-driven bowshocks, where additional biases are expected. Aims: We investigate quantitatively the biases in momentum, age, and thrust estimates in the case of young jet-driven molecular outflows, and propose more accurate methods of determining these quantities. Methods: We use long-duration (1500 yr) high resolution numerical simulations in concert with the standard observational methods of inferring the relevant quantities to quantify the systematic biases in these calculations introduced, in particular, by dissociation, erroneous inclusion of transverse momentum, and hidden material at cloud velocity. Jet/ambient density contrasts of 0.1-1 are considered, leading to bow speeds of 60-135 km s-1. Results: When mass-weighted velocities are used, lifetimes are overestimated by typically an order of magnitude. The molecular thrust is then underestimated by similar amounts. Using the maximum velocity in CO profiles gives better results, if empirical corrections for inclination are applied. We propose a new method of calculating the lifetime of an outflow which dramatically improves estimates of age and molecular thrust independent of inclination. Our results are applicable to younger flows which have not broken out of their parent cloud. Conclusions: Published correlations between the molecular flow thrust and the source bolometric luminosity obtained with the maximum CO velocity method should remain valid. However, dissociation at the bow head may cause the observable thrust to underestimate the total flow thrust by a factor of up to 2-4, depending on the bow propagation speed and the magnetic field strength. Detailed evaluation of this effect would greatly help to better constrain the efficiency of the ejection mechanism in protostars.

Downes, T. P.; Cabrit, S.

2007-09-01

401

A Regeneratively-Cooled Thrust Chamber for the Fastrac Engine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document consists of presentation slides about the development of the regeneratively cooled thrust chamber for the Fastrac engine. The Fastrac engine was originally developed to demonstrate low cost design and fabrication methods. It was intended to be used in an expendable booster. The regen thrust chamber enables a more cost efficient test program. Using the low cost design and fabrication methodology designed for the 12K regeneratively cooled chamber, the contractor designed, developed and fabricated a regeneratively cooled thrust chamber for the Fastrac engine.

Brown, Kendall; Sparks, Dave; Woodcock, Gordon; Jim Turner (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

402

Multiphysics Thrust Chamber Modeling for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of this effort is to develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for a solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation. A two-pronged approach is employed in this effort: A detailed thermo-fluid analysis on a multi-channel flow element for mid-section corrosion investigation; and a global modeling of the thrust chamber to understand the effect of heat transfer on thrust performance. Preliminary results on both aspects are presented.

Wang, Ten-See; Cheng, Gary; Chen, Yen-Sen

2006-01-01

403

ALBANIA: Thrust and backthrust systems of external Albanides: Examples  

SciTech Connect

External Albanides have proved as an oil/gas province in a certain limited area. Better understanding of thrusting and backthrusting systems and how both systems work, could improve objectives for exploration beyond actual discoveries. Backthrusting is not seen any more typical for Cenozoic sediments, where buried front of thrust faulted belts are very active. Mesozoic rocks, that are dominated by westward thrust propagation are also affected by backthrusting, thus leaving more space for other units accommodation. New concepts postulated are based on Deep Holes, Seismic Data, Outcrops and Spot Imagery. Among onshore examples, some of them cross existing fields.

Bega, Z.; Janopulli, V. [OEMV Exploration, Tirana (Albania)

1995-08-01

404

Vector Addition Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Vector Addition model allows the user to practice vector addition of two vectors in two dimensions. You are given the magnitude and direction of the two vectors, and your goal is to fill in the nine values in the table (showing the x-component, y-component, and length) of the two vectors, and the resultant vector that is the sum of the first two vectors. The Vector Addition was created using the Easy Java Simulations (EJS) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_bu_vector_addition.jar file will run the program if Java is installed.

Duffy, Andrew

2010-04-25

405

Rapid prototype fabrication processes for high-performance thrust cells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Thrust Cell Technologies Program (Air Force Phillips Laboratory Contract No. F04611-92-C-0050) is currently being performed by Rocketdyne to demonstrate advanced materials and fabrication technologies which can be utilized to produce low-cost, high-performance thrust cells for launch and space transportation rocket engines. Under Phase 2 of the Thrust Cell Technologies Program (TCTP), rapid prototyping and investment casting techniques are being employed to fabricate a 12,000-lbf thrust class combustion chamber for delivery and hot-fire testing at Phillips Lab. The integrated process of investment casting directly from rapid prototype patterns dramatically reduces design-to-delivery cycle time, and greatly enhances design flexibility over conventionally processed cast or machined parts.

Hunt, K.; Chwiedor, T.; Diab, J.; Williams, R.

1994-01-01

406

Development of pneumatic thrust-deflecting powered-lift systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Improvements introduced into the Circulation Control Wing/Upper Surface Blowing (CCW/USB) STOL concept (Harris et al., 1982) are described along with results of the full-scale static ground tests and model-scale wind tunnel investigations. Tests performed on the full-scale pneumatic thrust-deflecting system installed on the NASA QSRA aircraft have demonstrated that, relative to the original baseline configuration, a doubling of incremental thrust deflection due to blowing resulted from improvements that increased the blowing span and momentum, as well as from variations in blowing slot height and geometry of the trailing edge. A CCW/Over the Wing model has been built and tested, which was shown to be equivalent to the CCW/USB system in terms of pneumatic thrust deflection and lift generation, while resolving the problem of cruise thrust loss due to exhaust scrubbing on the wing upper surface.

Englar, R. J.; Nichols, J. H., Jr.; Harris, M. J.; Eppel, J. C.; Shovlin, M. D.

1986-01-01

407

Thrust Characteristics of Water Rocket and Their Improvement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The propulsive characteristics of water rockets are analyzed theoretically and experimentally. The unsteady thrust force acting on a PET bottle and the air pressure inside the bottle are measured simultaneously by the thrust test stand we have developed. The semi-empirical thrust history is obtained utilizing the air pressure history and it is compared with the measured thrust history. The results show qualitative agreement. The observation of the flow inside bottle by a high-speed video camera shows that the air precedes water when it is about to be discharged entirely. We have developed a flow regulator attached to the nozzle cap to reduce the precursor air discharge that is considered as a result of the swirling flow inside the bottle. The experimental results show that the air discharge and the body vibration are suppressed effectively.

Watanabe, Rikio; Tomita, Nobuyuki; Takemae, Toshiaki

408

CISLUNAR Program Manual: A Low-Thrust Trajectory Determination Model.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

CISLUNAR is a stand-alone computer program designed to generate the trajectory of a low-thrust spacecraft travelling in Earth-Moon space. The program allows the creation of functional trajectories dependent on the supplied spacecraft characteristics. The ...

1988-01-01

409

Modular Thrust Subsystem Approaches to Solar Electric Propulsion Module Design.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Three approaches are presented for packaging the elements of a 30 cm ion thruster subsystem into a modular thrust subsystem. The individual modules, when integrated into a conceptual solar electric propulsion module are applicable to a multimission set of...

F. J. Shaker G. R. Sharp J. C. Oglebay J. E. Cake R. J. Zavesky

1976-01-01

410

Low-thrust solar electric propulsion navigation simulation program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An interplanetary low-thrust, solar electric propulsion mission simulation program suitable for navigation studies is presented. The mathematical models for trajectory simulation, error compensation, and tracking motion are described. The languages, input-output procedures, and subroutines are included.

Hagar, H. J.; Eller, T. J.

1973-01-01

411

Anomalous Thrust Production from an RF Test Device Measured on a Low-Thrust Torsion Pendulum  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the eight-day August 2013 test campaign designed to investigate and demonstrate viability of using classical magnetoplasmadynamics to obtain a propulsive momentum transfer via the quantum vacuum virtual plasma. This paper will not address the physics of the quantum vacuum plasma thruster, but instead will describe the test integration, test operations, and the results obtained from the test campaign. Approximately 30-50 micro-Newtons of thrust were recorded from an electric propulsion test article consisting primarily of a radio frequency (RF) resonant cavity excited at approximately 935 megahertz. Testing was performed on a low-thrust torsion pendulum that is capable of detecting force at a single-digit micronewton level, within a stainless steel vacuum chamber with the door closed but at ambient atmospheric pressure. Several different test configurations were used, including two different test articles as well as a reversal of the test article orientation. In addition, the test article was replaced by an RF load to verify that the force was not being generated by effects not associated with the test article. The two test articles were designed by Cannae LLC of Doylestown, Pennsylvania. The torsion pendulum was designed, built, and operated by Eagleworks Laboratories at the NASA Johnson Space Center of Houston, Texas. Approximately six days of test integration were required, followed by two days of test operations, during which, technical issues were discovered and resolved. Integration of the two test articles and their supporting equipment was performed in an iterative fashion between the test bench and the vacuum chamber. In other words, the test article was tested on the bench, then moved to the chamber, then moved back as needed to resolve issues. Manual frequency control was required throughout the test. Thrust was observed on both test articles, even though one of the test articles was designed with the expectation that it would not produce thrust. Specifically, one test article contained internal physical modifications that were designed to produce thrust, while the other did not (with the latter being referred to as the "null" test article). Test data gathered includes torsion pendulum displacement measurements which are used to calculate generated force, still imagery in the visible spectrum to document the physical configuration, still imagery in the infrared spectrum to characterize the thermal environment, and video imagery. Post-test data includes static and animated graphics produced during RF resonant cavity characterization using the COMSOL Multiphysics® software application. Excerpts from all of the above are included and discussed in this paper. Lessons learned from test integration and operations include identification of the need to replace manual control of the resonant cavity target frequency with an automated frequency control capability. Future test plans include the development of an automatic frequency control circuit. Test results indicate that the RF resonant cavity thruster design, which is unique as an electric propulsion device, is producing a force that is not attributable to any classical electromagnetic phenomenon and therefore is potentially demonstrating an interaction with the quantum vacuum virtual plasma. Future test plans include independent verification and validation at other test facilities.

Brady, David; White, Harold G.; March, Paul; Lawrence, James T.; Davies, Frank J.

2014-01-01

412

Static thrust recovery of PAR craft on solid surfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Power-Augmented-Ram Vehicles belong to a new class of ground-effect machines with hybrid support. Recovered static thrust and static lift on solid surfaces are important amphibious characteristics of this craft. Experimental data for the static thrust recovery and the transition to a hovering mode are obtained in the tests with a vehicle model on two types of ground surface and with

K. I. Matveev

2008-01-01

413

Thrust enhancement of the gasdynamic mirror (GDM) fusion propulsion system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The gasdynamic mirror propulsion system is a device that utilizes a magnetic mirror configuration to confine a hot plasma to allow fusion reactions to take place while ejecting a fraction of the energetic charged particles through one end to generate thrust. Because the fusion fuel is generally an isotope of hydrogen, e.g., deuterium or tritium, this propulsion device is capable of producing very large specific impulses (e.g., 200,000 seconds) but at modest thrusts. Since large thrusts are desirable, not only for reducing travel time but also for lifting sizable payloads, we have examined methods by which GDM's thrust could be enhanced. The first consists of utilizing the radiation generated by the plasma, namely bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation, to heat a hydrogen propellant which upon exhausting through a nozzle produces the additional thrust. We asses the performance in this case by using an ideal model that ignores heat transfer considerations of the chamber wall, and one that takes into account heat flow and wall temperature limitations. We find in the case of a DT burning plasma that although thrust enhancement is significant, it was more than offset by the large drop in the specific impulse and a concomitant increase in travel time. The second method consisted of not altering the original GDM operation, but simply increasing the density of the injected plasma to achieve higher thrust. It is shown that the latter approach is more effective since it is compatible with improved performance in that it reduces trip time but at the expense of larger vehicle mass. For a D-He3 burning device the use of hydrogen to enhance thrust appears to be more desirable since the radiated power that goes into heating the hydrogen propellant is quite large.

Kammash, Terry; Lee, Myoung-Jae; Poston, David I.

1997-01-01

414

Recent advances in low-thrust propulsion technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA low-thrust propulsion technology program is aimed at providing high performance options to a broad class of near-term and future missions. Major emphases of the program are on storable and hydrogen/oxygen low-thrust chemical, low-power (auxiliary) electrothermal, and high-power electric propulsion. This paper represents the major accomplishments of the program and discusses their impact.

Stone, James R.

1988-01-01

415

Thrust Performance of an Ideal Pulse Detonation Engine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quasi-steady and two-dimensional unsteady formulations of the problem on the operation cycle of a pulse detonation engine are derived. A formula for the specific impulse is obtained, and the thrust performance of the engine is calculated. It is found that the thrust performance of this engine for flight Mach numbers M ? [0; 3.6] and compression ratios p2\\/p1 ? [1;

V. V. Mitrofanov; S. A. Zhdan

2004-01-01

416

Development of sputtered high temperature coatings for thrust chambers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Adherent insulating coatings were developed for thrust chamber service. The coatings consisted of nickel and a ceramic, and were graded in composition from pure nickel at the thrust chamber wall to pure ceramic at the coating surface. The coatings were deposited by rf sputtering from a target with a reversed composition gradient, which was produced by plasma spraying powder mixtures. The effect of deposition parameters on coating characteristics and adherence is discussed.

Busch, R.; Bayne, M. A.

1976-01-01

417

Low Angle Extensional Faults in a Thrusting/Compressive Regime  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Contractional architecture within the compressive edges of mountain belts is dominated by thrust faulting. Thrust faults of regional extent produce the emplacement of thrust nappes along low angle faults spanning for of kilometres. The erosion, and related removal, of connecting portions of a nappe may isolate remnant portions of the nappe, or klippen. The process results in exotic rock blocks of different sizes resting on the hanging wall of low angle faults. This simple structural architecture may be misinterpreted because as the result of a more complex deformation history. Studying the meaning of exotic rock blocks along a thrust fault of regional extent in the Southern Apennines, Italy, we show that previously interpreted thrust-related klippe are the products of a subsequent deformation stage overprinting the thrust features. A suite of low angle, foreland direct, brittle faults developed during the younger deformation stage were recognised in the studied exotic rock blocks. Low angle faults merge at the basal tectonic contacts of the rock blocks, and truncate thrust-related structures in the footwalls. The low angle faults cut down-section into the footwalls, and appear extensional. The meaning of the low-angle extensional faults is discussed in the framework of the transition tectonics from syn-orogenic contraction to late/post orogenic extension, accompanied in the Southern Apennines by intense uplift. We interpret the extensional tectonic fabrics as the products of a heterogeneous deformation resulting in progressive tilting of weak interfaces. In the structures, gravity sliding processes can induce normal faulting compatible with a thrust regime. The findings has implications for the reconstruction of the history of deformation of a large sector of the Southern Apennines, Italy.

Bucci, F.; Novellino, R.; Adurno, I.; Gueguen, E.; Guzzetti, F.; Cardinali, M.; Tavarnelli, E.; Guglielmi, P.; Prosser, G.

2012-04-01

418

Vectors: Tip to Tail  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson students will learn the characteristics and appropriate use of vectors. They will find the magnitude and direction of vectors, they will add and subtract vectors and use an interactive website to practice what they have learned.

Linamen, Sharon

2012-07-23

419

The Mechanism of the Southern Junggar Cenozoic Thrusts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are three east-west trending thrust-fold belts along the southern flank of the Junggar basin, western segments of each thrust fold belt, which are connected with the north Tianshan Piedmont fault, began forming in the middle Miocene; with the main thrust fold belts beginning forming in the late Miocene, about 10 Ma B.P. The east terminations of the thrust fold belts were formed in the Quaternary. This timing indicates the northward transportation of compressional tectonic dynamics. The initial formation time of the south Junggar thrust fold belt at the northern piedmont of Tianshan Mountains, is about 8 Ma later than that of the Kuqa thrust fold belt, at the southern piedmont of Tianshan Mountains. This suggests that the transportation of compressional tectonic dynamics took a long time through the Tianshan orogenic belt owing to its lower lithospheric strength. This contrasts sharply with the instant transportation of the tectonic dynamics through Tarim basin because of its high lithospheric strength. The spatial alternate occurrence of the delayed transportation and the instant transportation of the compressional tectonic dynamics is the main cause of intra-continental deformation patterns that resulted from the India-Asia continent-continent collision.

LU, Huafu; WANG, Shengli; JIA, Chengzao

420

Thrust Stand for Vertically Oriented Electric Propulsion Performance Evaluation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A variation of a hanging pendulum thrust stand capable of measuring the performance of an electric thruster operating in the vertical orientation is presented. The vertical orientation of the thruster dictates that the thruster must be horizontally offset from the pendulum pivot arm, necessitating the use of a counterweight system to provide a neutrally-stable system. Motion of the pendulum arm is transferred through a balance mechanism to a secondary arm on which deflection is measured. A non-contact light-based transducer is used to measure displacement of the secondary beam. The members experience very little friction, rotating on twisting torsional pivots with oscillatory motion attenuated by a passive, eddy current damper. Displacement is calibrated using an in situ thrust calibration system. Thermal management and self-leveling systems are incorporated to mitigate thermal and mechanical drifts. Gravitational restoring force and torsional spring constants associated with flexure pivots provide restoring moments. An analysis of the design indicates that the thrust measurement range spans roughly four decades, with the stand capable of measuring thrust up to 12 N for a 200 kg thruster and up to approximately 800 mN for a 10 kg thruster. Data obtained from calibration tests performed using a 26.8 lbm simulated thruster indicated a resolution of 1 mN on 100 mN-level thrusts, while those tests conducted on 200 lbm thruster yielded a resolution of roughly 2.5 micro at thrust levels of 0.5 N and greater.

Moeller, Trevor; Polzin, Kurt A.

2010-01-01

421

Development of a Thrust Stand to Meet LISA Mission Requirements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A thrust stand has been built to measure the force-noise produced by electrostatic micro-Newton (muN) thrusters. The LISA mission's Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) requires thrusters that are capable of producing continuous thrust levels between 1-100 muN with a resolution of 0.1 muN. The stationary force-noise produced by these thrusters must not exceed 0.1 muN/dHz in the measurement bandwidth 10(exp -4) to 1 Hz. The LISA Thrust Stand (LTS) is a torsion-balance type thrust stand designed to meet the following requirements: stationary force-noise measurements from l0( -4) to 1 Hz with 0.1 muN/dHz sensitivity, absolute thrust measurements from 1-100 muN with better than 0.1 muN resolution, and dynamic thruster response from to 10 Hz. The LTS employs a unique vertical configuration, autocollimator for angular position measurements, and electrostatic actuators that are used for dynamic pendulum control and null-mode measurements. Force-noise levels are measured indirectly by characterizing the thrust stand as a spring-mass system. The LTS was initially designed to test the indium FEEP thruster developed by the Austrian Research Center in Seibersdorf (ARCS), but can be modified for testing other thrusters of this type.

Willis, William D., III; Zakrzwski, Charles M.; Merkowitz, Stephen M.

2002-01-01

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Superposed fold-thrust events at the Nevada Test Site  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Nevada Test Site (NTS), in southern Nye County, Nevada, straddles significant pre-Tertiary structural and stratigraphic boundaries. Detailed stratigraphy and biostratigraphy of the Upper Paleozoic section delineates the regional trust sheets and constrains their burial histories. The Paleozoic rocks record three phases of contractional deformation, overprinted by strike-slip faulting. These occured in the folloing order: (1) foreland-vergant folding and imbricate thrusting in the footwall of the Belted Range thrust; (2) hinterland-vergent folding and thrusting; and (3) north-vergant folding that we interpret as footwall deformation below a third major thrust system. Sinistral slip, typically accompanied by minor east-west shortening, has occured along a series of north-northeast--north-northwest--striking faults around Yucca Flat. This strike-slip faulting postdates both foreland-vergent and hinterland-vergent deformation, and predates the Cretaceous Climax stock; its age relative to the north-vergent folding and thrusting is unknown. Our new understanding of the geometry of these structures provides new insights into the correlation and interpretation