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Sample records for jiahu bone flutes

  1. DISCOVERY AND RESEARCH ON JIAHU BONE FLUTES IN WUYANG, CHINA.

    SciTech Connect

    JUZHONG, Z.; HARBOTTLE, G.; XINGHUA, X.; CHANGSUI, W.

    2000-11-01

    The site of Jiahu is located in Jiahu village, Wuyang County, Henan province, on the Western edge of the broad plain of Huanhuaihai. On its north the site borders the Sha River, in the upper reaches of the Huai River; its latitude is 33{degree} 36 minutes North, longitude 113{degree} 40 minutes East, and it is 67.5 meters above sea level. Between 1983 and 1987, the Henan Cultural Relics and Archaeology Institute carried out six campaigns of excavation here, revealing an area of 2400 square meters. Except for the trial excavation in the spring of 1983, Zhang Juzhong has been in charge of all the excavations. In early May 1986, while excavating tomb 78, Zhang Juzhong and Yang Zhenwei first discovered two funerary bone flutes. They soon found other, similar bone flutes in tombs 73, 94 and 121 respectively. Mr. Zhang's attention was instantly focused on these remarkable finds. In the campaign of autumn 1986, one or two more bone flutes were discovered in each of tombs 233,273, 263 and 270. Finally, in the spring of 1987, again one or two bone flutes were found in each of the tombs 282, 363,341,411,344 and 387. Up to the end of excavation in June 1987, altogether 25 bone flutes had been found, of which 17 were complete or almost complete, 6 broken or fragmentary and 2 were half-finished examples. Among the 17 complete bone flutes, there were 14 having seven holes, one five-hole, one six-hole and one eight-hole bone flute. In particular, the bone flute M282:20 was exquisitely made, and complete. Zhang Juzhong, the discoverer of the bone flutes, researcher Pei Mingxiang, the. ex-director of the division, who came to the digging site to see the progress of the work, and their coworkers were all understandably very excited.

  2. Flute Choir Fundamentals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Jon

    2007-01-01

    The flute is one of the more accessible instruments for beginners and is a popular choice for many elementary and middle school students. It is relatively easy to create a decent, usable sound with a flute, and it is more portable than most instruments. While starting a flute choir has a lot of benefits, arranging a band has a lot of challenges.…

  3. 'Neanderthal bone flutes': simply products of Ice Age spotted hyena scavenging activities on cave bear cubs in European cave bear dens.

    PubMed

    Diedrich, Cajus G

    2015-04-01

    Punctured extinct cave bear femora were misidentified in southeastern Europe (Hungary/Slovenia) as 'Palaeolithic bone flutes' and the 'oldest Neanderthal instruments'. These are not instruments, nor human made, but products of the most important cave bear scavengers of Europe, hyenas. Late Middle to Late Pleistocene (Mousterian to Gravettian) Ice Age spotted hyenas of Europe occupied mainly cave entrances as dens (communal/cub raising den types), but went deeper for scavenging into cave bear dens, or used in a few cases branches/diagonal shafts (i.e. prey storage den type). In most of those dens, about 20% of adult to 80% of bear cub remains have large carnivore damage. Hyenas left bones in repeating similar tooth mark and crush damage stages, demonstrating a butchering/bone cracking strategy. The femora of subadult cave bears are intermediate in damage patterns, compared to the adult ones, which were fully crushed to pieces. Hyenas produced round-oval puncture marks in cub femora only by the bone-crushing premolar teeth of both upper and lower jaw. The punctures/tooth impact marks are often present on both sides of the shaft of cave bear cub femora and are simply a result of non-breakage of the slightly calcified shaft compacta. All stages of femur puncturing to crushing are demonstrated herein, especially on a large cave bear population from a German cave bear den. PMID:26064624

  4. Construction practices in pre-Hispanic flutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawcliffe, Susan

    2002-11-01

    The ancient cultures of the Americas were separated by thousands of miles and thousand of years. There was a long history of trade over the miles and the years with many shared cultural ideals and artifacts, as evidenced by their musical instruments. Flutes were the most prevalent instruments found throughout the ancient Americas. Some types are unique to the pre-Hispanic world. Although flutes were constructed from a variety of materials, including bone, cane, seed pods, skulls, it is primarily the ceramic ones that survived, and it is ceramic flutes which form the bulk of this writer's work and research. This paper includes musical demonstrations to show how ancient flutemakers could have manipulated timbre during construction. Clay's plasticity enabled the construction of some instruments, and limited the development of others. Pitch jump flutes, certain Veracruzano whistles, and chamberduct flutes and whistles all share the addition of clay flaps or chambers around the aperture, as do hooded pipes. Some instruments exhibit a seemingly cultural predilection for complex tones that are windy, raspy, or animalistic. Simple adjustments of the airduct promote these timbres. Also included will be samples of the original sounds of ancient flutes.

  5. Improvising on an Indian Flute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Martha Mead

    1984-01-01

    The Indian flute can be used by teachers to supplement classroom study of Indian culture. Indians used it as a personal instrument. Describes how an Indian flute can be made, and suggests improvising bird calls and melodies on it. (CS)

  6. The effects of flute shape and thread profile on the insertion torque and primary stability of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-Wei; Lee, Chia-Ching; Fu, Ping-Yuen; Lin, Shang-Chih

    2012-09-01

    Easy insertion of the implant and stable bone purchase is essential for an ideal dental implantation. At the implant tip, the cutting flutes and conical profile are respectively designed to reduce insertion resistance and facilitate the initial insertion. However, the tapered tip might reduce the self-tapping and bone-purchasing abilities of the flutes and the tip threads. Using sawbone blocks as standard specimens, this study experimentally measures the insertion torque, holding power, and bending strength of eight varieties of implant (4 shapes×2 profiles). The bony contact, interfacial mechanism, and the altered shape of the flutes, at different section planes, are used to explain the experimental results. The results reveal that the bone-implant gaps at the tip region significantly suppress both the self-tapping and bone-purchasing abilities of the flutes and the tip threads. This makes initial insertion of the conical implant easier. However, the conical implant eventually requires a higher insertion torque and holding power, due to tighter bony contact, at the tail threads. The bowl-fluted design has the least flute space to store the squeezed bone chips, so both insertion torque and bending strength are significantly higher. For the conical group, the holding powers of three flute designs are nearly comparable. Overall, the conical implant with bowl flutes is the optimal design, with a lower resistance to initial insertion and higher stability, for final instrumentation. PMID:22041130

  7. The impact of a modified cutting flute implant design on osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Jimbo, R; Tovar, N; Marin, C; Teixeira, H S; Anchieta, R B; Silveira, L M; Janal, M N; Shibli, J A; Coelho, P G

    2014-07-01

    Information concerning the effects of the implant cutting flute design on initial stability and its influence on osseointegration in vivo is limited. This study evaluated the early effects of implants with a specific cutting flute design placed in the sheep mandible. Forty-eight dental implants with two different macro-geometries (24 with a specific cutting flute design - Blossom group; 24 with a self-tapping design - DT group) were inserted into the mandibular bodies of six sheep; the maximum insertion torque was recorded. Samples were retrieved and processed for histomorphometric analysis after 3 and 6 weeks. The mean insertion torque was lower for Blossom implants (P<0.001). No differences in histomorphometric results were observed between the groups. At 3 weeks, P=0.58 for bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and P=0.52 for bone area fraction occupied (BAFO); at 6 weeks, P=0.55 for BIC and P=0.45 for BAFO. While no histomorphometric differences were observed, ground sections showed different healing patterns between the implants, with better peri-implant bone organization around those with the specific cutting flute design (Blossom group). Implants with the modified cutting flute design had a significantly reduced insertion torque compared to the DT implants with a traditional cutting thread, and resulted in a different healing pattern. PMID:24583140

  8. Creating and Maintaining a Good Flute Embouchure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criswell, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Learning to produce a good tone on the flute is easy for some people and incredibly difficult for others. Not every flute student will be successful, but the suggestions offered in this article may make the difference between a positive musical experience and one that turns the student off to playing an instrument forever. Claire-Anne Williams,…

  9. Pits and Flutes on Stimpy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The rock 'Stimpy' is seen in this close-up image taken by the Sojourner rover's left front camera on Sol 70 (September 13). Detailed texture on the rock, such as pits and flutes, are clearly visible.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  10. [Chemical composition analysis of early neolithic pottery unearthed from Xiaohuangshang site, Zhejiang Province and Jiahu site, Henan Province by energy disperse X-ray fluorescence].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian-Qian; Yang, Yu-Zhang; Zhang, Ju-Zhong; Cui, Wei

    2011-11-01

    The major elements in the early neolithic potteries unearthed from Xiaohuangshan site, Zhejiang Province and Jiahu site, Henan Province were determined by energy disperse X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The results show that the chemical compositions of the potteries from these two sites possess obvious regional features respectively. Compared with the specimen from Jiahu site, the potteries from Xiaohuangshan site have the common feature of ancient Chinese southern ceramics with high silicon and low aluminum contents. Simultaneously, the chemical composition of Xiaohuangshan pottery samples nearly unchanged from its early stage to the last stage. This phenomenon indicates that the source of the ceramic raw materials of Xiaohuangshan site was stable, and the continuous improvement of its pottery quality was mainly due to the progress in sintering techniques. However, the chemical composition of Jiahu potteries changed a lot in its three different periods. This change occurred because a large number of admixtures were added to the pottery bodies to improve their operating performances. These results also show that the improvements of pottery making techniques in different Chinese areas may have their own evolution directions respectively for the different geographical environments. PMID:22242535

  11. Entropy and the Magic Flute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morowitz, Harold J.

    1996-10-01

    Harold Morowitz has long been highly regarded both as an eminent scientist and as an accomplished science writer. The essays in The Wine of Life , his first collection, were hailed by C.P. Snow as "some of the wisest, wittiest and best informed I have ever read," and Carl Sagan called them "a delight to read." In later volumes he established a reputation for a wide-ranging intellect, an ability to see unexpected connections and draw striking parallels, and a talent for communicating scientific ideas with optimism and wit. With Entropy and the Magic Flute , Morowitz once again offers an appealing mix of brief reflections on everything from litmus paper to the hippopotamus to the sociology of Palo Alto coffee shops. Many of these pieces are appreciations of scientists that Morowitz holds in high regard, while others focus on health issues, such as America's obsession with cheese toppings. There is also a fascinating piece on the American Type Culture Collection, a zoo or warehouse for microbes that houses some 11,800 strains of bacteria, and over 3,000 specimens of protozoa, algae, plasmids, and oncogenes. Here then are over forty light, graceful essays in which one of our wisest experimental biologists comments on issues of science, technology, society, philosophy, and the arts.

  12. Flute waves in a tandem mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskaya, L.V.

    1984-03-01

    Stability conditions are derived for flute waves in a short tandem mirror stabilized by end cells with a min B. The frequency spectrum of the flute waves is analyzed. Those conditions under which the resonant excitation of waves by ions and electrons must be taken into account are found. When end cells without a min B are added to a central mirror system, the system becomes destabilized as the result of resonant excitation of waves at a frequency near the precession frequency of ions having a finite energy distribution.

  13. Flute vortices in nonuniform magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, M.Y.; Shukla, P.K.; Varma, R.K.

    1985-09-01

    Localized double vortices associated with the flute modes are shown to exist. Special emphasis is given to the effect of the convective variation of the fluid magnetic moment. It is shown that the latter effect considerably modifies the existence regions of the vortices.

  14. A generalized correlation for condensation on vertical fluted surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.B.

    1996-03-01

    A correlation was developed for laminar film condensation on vertical fluted surfaces. The theoretical analysis of Panchal and Bell was used for defining important physical property groups. The experimental data of Combs et al. were used to validate the proposed correlation. The experimental database used in the present study included four flute geometries that could be approximated to cosine type flutes and seven fluids. The resulting correlation can predict the average condensate heat-transfer coefficient within {plus_minus} 20%.

  15. Gage for measuring fluted oil field tubular members

    SciTech Connect

    Case, W.A.; Burt, J.R.

    1987-03-17

    A gage is described for measuring the nominal diameter of an elongated tubular member having circumferentially spaced apart radially outwardly extending flutes and for calibrating the amount of wear to the flutes and predicting the future wear life of the tubular member. The gage comprises: a first gage part including a pair of spaced apart colinear elongated first handlebar halves with a generally semi-circular first half ring positioned between the first handlebar halves. The first half ring includes at least one flute engaging surface which includes stepped arcuate flute engaging portions positioned at radii from the center of the first ring half corresponding to different diameters to be measured; a second gage part including a pair of spaced apart colinear elongated second handlebar halves with a generally semicircular second half ring positioned between the second handlebar halves. The second half ring includes at least one flute engaging surface which includes stepped arcuate flute engaging portions positioned a radii from the center of the second ring half corresponding to different diameters to be measured. The number of flute engaging surfaces of the first and second ring halves is equal to the number of flutes on the tubular member; and a hinge pivotally connecting together one handlebar half of the first gage part to one handlebar half of the second gage part.

  16. Flute-interchange stability in a hot electron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    Several topics in the kinetic stability theory of flute-interchange modes in a hot electron plasma are discussed. The stability analysis of the hot-electron, curvature-driven flute-interchange mode, previously performed in a slab geometry, is extended to a cylindrical plasma. The cold electron concentration necessary for stability differs substantially from previous criteria. The inclusion of a finite temperature background plasma in the stability analysis results in an ion curvature-driven flute-interchange mode which may be stabilized by either hot-electron diamagnetic effects, hot-electron plasma density, or finite (ion) Larmor radius effects.

  17. 25. Detail of cast iron lamp post base with fluted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Detail of cast iron lamp post base with fluted wooded post at top, located at north end of bridge. VIEW NORTHEAST - Chelsea Street Bridge & Draw Tender's House, Spanning Chelsea River, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  18. 52. DETAIL VIEW OF FRONT DOOR (EXTERIOR), FLUTED BUTTRESSES, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. DETAIL VIEW OF FRONT DOOR (EXTERIOR), FLUTED BUTTRESSES, AND PARAPETED GABLE, NORTHWEST SIDE OF CAPTAIN'S GALLEY, LOOKING EAST - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  19. 14. DETAIL VIEW, FLUTED PILASTER AND PANELLED REVEAL IN DOORWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL VIEW, FLUTED PILASTER AND PANELLED REVEAL IN DOORWAY BETWEEN VESTIBULE AND STAIRHALL (NOTE WOOD GRAINING), WITH SCALE - Bowieville, 522 Church Road South, Leeland, Prince George's County, MD

  20. 53. DETAIL VIEW OF FLUTED BUTTRESSES, AND PARAPET, NORTHWEST SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. DETAIL VIEW OF FLUTED BUTTRESSES, AND PARAPET, NORTHWEST SIDE OF CAPTAIN'S GALLEY, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  1. Flute stabilization by a cold line-tied blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Segal, D.; Wickham, M.; Rynn, N.

    1982-09-01

    The curvature-driven flute instability in an axisymmetric mirror was stabilized by an annular line-tied plasma blanket. A significant temperature difference was maintained between core and blanket. Theoretical calculations support the experimental observations.

  2. Feedback effect on flute dynamics in a mirror machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Be'Ery, Ilan; Seemann, Omri

    2015-11-01

    Active feedback techniques may stabilize the flute instability in mirror traps and make them viable candidates for fusion machines. A fast feedback with optical sensors and electrical actuators was implemented in a table-top mirror machine and used to study several aspects of feedback stabilization. For a cold, dense plasma the feedback reduces dramatically the flute amplitude of the first two mode. For higher temperature plasma, a significant increase of plasma density due to feedback stabilization is also demonstrated. The effect of changing feedback gain and phase has some interesting feature such as asymmetry with respect to positive and negative phase shifts and non-monotonic dependence of flute amplitude on feedback gain. These effects are explained using simplified analytic model of the flute and feedback.

  3. Fluid mechanics and heat transfer spirally fluted tubing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larue, J. C.; Libby, P. A.; Yampolsky, J. S.

    1981-08-01

    The objective of this program is to develop both a qualitative and a quantitative understanding of the fluid mechanics and heat transfer mechanisms that underlie the measured performance of the spirally fluted tubes under development at General Atomic. The reason for the interest in the spirally fluted tubes is that results to date have indicated three advantages to this tubing concept: The fabrication technique of rolling flutes on strip and subsequently spiralling and simultaneously welding the strip to form tubing results in low fabrication costs, approximately equal to those of commercially welded tubing. The heat transfer coefficient is increased without a concomitant increase of the friction coefficient on the inside of the tube. In single-phase axial flow of water, the helical flutes continuously induce rotation of the flow both within and without the tube as a result of the effect of curvature. An increase in condensation heat transfer on the outside of the tube is achieved. In a vertical orientation with fluid condensing on the outside of the helically fluted tube, the flutes provide a channel for draining the condensed fluid.

  4. Body vibrational spectra of metal flute models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtgen, Clare M.; Lawson, Dewey T.

    2002-11-01

    For years, flutists have argued over the tonal advantages of using different precious metals for their instruments. Occasionally, scientists have entered the fray and attempted to offer an objective point of view based on experimental measurements. However, their research often involved actual instruments and performers, ignoring variations in wall thickness, craftsmanship, and human consistency. These experiments have been conducted using a variety of methods; all have concluded that wall material has no effect on tone. This paper approaches the question using simple tubular models, excited by a wind source through a fipple mouthpiece. The amplitude and phase of the harmonic components of the body vibrational signal were measured with a stereo cartridge. Results demonstrated the existence of complex patterns of wall vibrations in the vicinity of a tone hole lattice, at frequencies that match significant harmonics of the air column. Additionally, the tube wall was found to expand in a nonuniform or ''elliptical'' manner due to the asymmetry of the tone holes. While this method is somewhat removed from direct musical applications, it can provide an objective, quantitative basis for assessing the source of differences among flutes. [Work financed by two Undergraduate Research Support grants from Duke University.

  5. Evaluation of Analysis Techniques for Fluted-Core Sandwich Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Schultz, Marc R.

    2012-01-01

    Buckling-critical launch-vehicle structures require structural concepts that have high bending stiffness and low mass. Fluted-core, also known as truss-core, sandwich construction is one such concept. In an effort to identify an analysis method appropriate for the preliminary design of fluted-core cylinders, the current paper presents and compares results from several analysis techniques applied to a specific composite fluted-core test article. The analysis techniques are evaluated in terms of their ease of use and for their appropriateness at certain stages throughout a design analysis cycle (DAC). Current analysis techniques that provide accurate determination of the global buckling load are not readily applicable early in the DAC, such as during preliminary design, because they are too costly to run. An analytical approach that neglects transverse-shear deformation is easily applied during preliminary design, but the lack of transverse-shear deformation results in global buckling load predictions that are significantly higher than those from more detailed analysis methods. The current state of the art is either too complex to be applied for preliminary design, or is incapable of the accuracy required to determine global buckling loads for fluted-core cylinders. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an analytical method for calculating global buckling loads of fluted-core cylinders that includes transverse-shear deformations, and that can be easily incorporated in preliminary design.

  6. Flute mode fluctuations in the divertor mirror cell

    SciTech Connect

    Katanuma, I.; Yagi, K.; Nakashima, Y.; Ichimura, M.; Imai, T.

    2010-03-15

    The computer code by reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations were made which can simulate the flute interchange modes (similar to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability) and the instability associated with the presence of nonuniform plasma flows (similar to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability). This code is applied to a model divertor and the GAMMA10 [M. Inutake et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 939 (1985)] with divertor in order to investigate the flute modes in these divertor cells. The linear growth rate of the flute instability determined by the nonlocal linear analysis agrees with that in the linear phase of the simulations. There is a stable nonlinear steady state in both divertor cells, but the nonlinear steady state is different between the model divertor and the GAMMA10 with divertor.

  7. Deconstruction and analysis of multiphonic clusters in the modern flute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barravecchio, Shauna

    The modern flute has been acoustically analyzed in great detail by many, but only from the point of view of traditional playing techniques. Very little research exists to date on more modem, "extended" technique performance. This paper explores the production of multiphonic note clusters as played on the modern flute. Several clusters as notated in James Pellerite's book on flute fingerings are recorded and analyzed for frequency content. Each one is then compared to the expected frequency content based on John Backus' 1978 paper on woodwind multiphonics. Using this information, the fingering configuration of each cluster can be deconstructed and each component pitch explained in terms of the root frequencies, overtone series, and sideband frequencies.

  8. Flute vortices in a plasma with hot particles

    SciTech Connect

    Andrushchenko, Zh.N.; Pavlenko, V.P.; Cheremnykh, O.K.

    1992-01-01

    Flute perturbations in a plasma with {open_quotes}hot{close_quotes} are considered. Steady-state solutions are found which describe localized vortex structures. Two types of vortex solutions are considered: a dipolar vortex and a combination of a dipolar and a monopolar vortex. It is shown that the presence of {open_quotes}hot{close_quotes} particles has an effect on the region in which the vortex solutions exist in velocity space, which can give rise to a change in the particle flux leaving the plasma due to eddy convection. It is shown that the perturbed density profile in flute vortices must be nonmonotonic. 10 refs.

  9. Low-frequency flute instabilities of a bounded plasma column.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rognlien, T. D.

    1973-01-01

    Derivation of exact solutions for unstable waves (called flute waves) which occur in a radially bounded plasma column at frequencies below the ion cyclotron frequency. Both analytical and numerical solutions are presented for the m = 1 and m = 2 azimuthal modes for a variety of radial electric field profiles. It is shown that the behavior of the flute waves can depend sensitively on the radial extent of the plasma column. Moreover, it is found that the m = 1 mode and the m = 2 mode do not respond in the same way to changes in the radial boundary position or in the electric field profile.

  10. Active feedback stabilization of flute instability in a mirror trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Be'Ery, Ilan; Seemann, Omri; Fruchtman, Amnon; Fisher, Amnon; Ron, Amiram

    2013-10-01

    The flute instability in a table-top mirror machine has been stabilized by a feedback system consisting of optical probes, digital signal processor, and needle electrodes. The total response time of the system is 5 μs, which is considerably faster than the typical flute growth time. Simulation and a dynamic model of the plasma's response to the needle actuators were tested against cyclic bias experiments. The plasma density is increased by the stabilization by a factor of two and is limited by other decay processes.

  11. Generalized energy principle for flute perturbations in axisymmetric mirror machines

    SciTech Connect

    Lansky, I.M.; Ryutov, D.D.

    1993-01-20

    Axial symmetry is a very desirable property of the mirror devices both for fusion and neutron source applications. The main obstacle to be circumvented in the development of such systems, is the flute instability of axisymmetric mirrors. In recent years there appeared a number of proposals, devoted to the stabilization of the flute perturbations in the framework of axisymmetric magnetic configurations, which are based on the combining of the MHD unstable central cell with various types of end-cell stabilizers. In the present paper we concentrate ourselves just on this scheme, including long solenoid with a uniform field, conjugated with the end stabilizing anchor, intended to provide MHD stability of the system as a whole. The attractive feature of such a configuration is that it allows to exploit finite larmor radius (FLR) effects for the stabilization of the flute perturbations. As is well known, FLR effects, being strong, stabilize all flute modes, except the one with azimuthal number m = 1, corresponding to the ``rigid`` displacement of the plasma column (the ``global`` mode). Consequently, in the conditions when FLR effects dominate, the anchor has to stabilize the ``global` mode only. Bearing in mind a favorable influence of FLR effects we, however, don`t restrict our paper by discussion of only ``global`` mode stability and consider a general case of an arbitrary azimuthal mode.

  12. Finite Larmor radius flute mode theory with end loss

    SciTech Connect

    Kotelnikov, I.A.; Berk, H.L.

    1993-08-01

    The theory of flute mode stability is developed for a two-energy- component plasma partially terminated by a conducting limiter. The formalism is developed as a preliminary study of the effect of end-loss in open-ended mirror machines where large Larmor radius effects are important.

  13. Theoretical investigation of flute modes in a magnetic quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    This research developed theories and conducted numerical investigations of electrostatic flute modes in a plasma confined in a magnetic quadrupole. Chapter I presents the discussion of relevant background. Chapter II contains a brief discussion of the basic flute-mode operator L{sub 0} for intermediate- and low-frequency regimes. Chapter III develops a simple theory for a flute mode with frequency between the electron and ion bounce frequencies in the uniform density and temperature regions of a magnetic quadrupole. The frequency is predicted to be inversely proportional to the wave number. Chapter IV describes the kinetic approach. Chapter V contains the derivation of an eigenvalue equation for electrostatic waves with frequencies below the ion frequency in the private flux region of a magnetic quadrupole. Chapter VI develops a theory for electrostatic waves with frequency below the ion bounce frequency in the shared flux region of a magnetic quadrupole. Chapter VII contains the derivation of a dispersion equation for flute modes with frequencies between the electron and ion bounce frequencies in a plasma confined to a magnetic quadrupole. Chapter VIII presents a summary of the research described.

  14. Theoretical investigation of flute modes in a magnetic quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop theories and conduct numerical investigations of electrostatic flute modes in a plasma confined in magnetic quadrupole. Chapter I presents the discussion of relevant background. Chapter II contains a brief discussion of the basic flute-mode operator L{sub 0} for intermediate- and low frequency regimes. Chapter III develops a simple theory for a flute mode with frequency between the electron and ion bounce frequencies in the uniform density and temperature regions of a magnetic quadrupole. Chapter IV describes the kinetic approach. Chapter V contains the derivation of an eigenvalue equation for electrostatic waves with frequencies below the ion frequency in the private flux region of a magnetic quadrupole. Chapter VI develops a theory for electrostatic waves with frequency below the ion bounce frequency in the shared flux region of a magnetic quadrupole. Chapter VII contains the derivation of a dispersion equation for flute modes with frequencies between the electron and ion ounce frequencies in a plasma confined to a magnetic quadrupole. Two intermediate-frequency modes are predicted.

  15. Garry Disher's "Bamboo Flute": Negotiating Multiple Aesthetic Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Karen S.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the integration of photographs and text in fictional works specifically regarding Garry Disher's "Bamboo Flute." Introduces the story and explores questions in detail regarding the presentation of its photographs in American publications. Attempts to make the readers become aware of alternative reading strategies that expand schemata and…

  16. Pre-School Children's Encounters with "The Magic Flute"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyland, Berenice; Acker, Aleksandra; Ferris, Jill; Deans, Jan

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a music programme in an Australian early learning centre. Through a repertoire of songs, games and instruments, the children were introduced to music forms, including opera. Mozart's Magic Flute was presented to these children by watching the Metropolitan Opera's latest film performance. Because this opera seized the…

  17. Compression Behavior of Fluted-Core Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Marc R.; Oremont, Leonard; Guzman, J. Carlos; McCarville, Douglas; Rose, Cheryl A.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, fiber-reinforced composites have become more accepted for aerospace applications. Specifically, during NASA s recent efforts to develop new launch vehicles, composite materials were considered and baselined for a number of structures. Because of mass and stiffness requirements, sandwich composites are often selected for many applications. However, there are a number of manufacturing and in-service concerns associated with traditional honeycomb-core sandwich composites that in certain instances may be alleviated through the use of other core materials or construction methods. Fluted-core, which consists of integral angled web members with structural radius fillers spaced between laminate face sheets, is one such construction alternative and is considered herein. Two different fluted-core designs were considered: a subscale design and a full-scale design sized for a heavy-lift-launch-vehicle interstage. In particular, axial compression of fluted-core composites was evaluated with experiments and finite-element analyses (FEA); axial compression is the primary loading condition in dry launch-vehicle barrel sections. Detailed finite-element models were developed to represent all components of the fluted-core construction, and geometrically nonlinear analyses were conducted to predict both buckling and material failures. Good agreement was obtained between test data and analyses, for both local buckling and ultimate material failure. Though the local buckling events are not catastrophic, the resulting deformations contribute to material failures. Consequently, an important observation is that the material failure loads and modes would not be captured by either linear analyses or nonlinear smeared-shell analyses. Compression-after-impact (CAI) performance of fluted core composites was also investigated by experimentally testing samples impacted with 6 ft.-lb. impact energies. It was found that such impacts reduced the ultimate load carrying capability by

  18. Alpha-particle effects on ballooning flute modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Andrushchenko, Z.N.; Bijko, A.Y.; Cheremnykh, O.K. )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper a more accurate dispersion equation for ideal ballooning flute modes in a plasma with alpha particles is obtained. It is shown that circulating and trapped alpha particles generate the eigenbranches of the mode oscillations with frequencies {omega} {approx lt} {omega}{sub *i}, where {omega}{sub *i}, is the ion drift frequency. The relevant growth rates and frequencies are found. It is ascertained that in the frequency range {omega}{sub *i} {lt} {omega} {lt} {bar {omega}{sub Db}}, where {bar {omega}{sub Db}} is the magnetic drift frequency average over a bounce period, trapped alpha particles may generate forced oscillations that influence the ideal ballooning flute mode stability boundary. It is shown that the stability may be improved for certain plasma parameters and trapped alpha-particle pressures.

  19. Feedback effect on flute dynamics in a mirror machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Be'ery, I.; Seemann, O.

    2015-08-01

    The effect of active feedback on flute instability is experimentally studied in a table-top mirror machine. Changing the plasma conditions from mirror-loss dominated to flute-loss dominated, it is demonstrated that while the feedback has no effect on plasma density in the first case, it increases the plasma density by up to 50% in the second case. Measurements of the dependence of instability amplitude on feedback gain show that large gain stimulates high frequency perturbations. The period of these perturbations corresponds to the inherent delay of immersed electrode feedback. Variation of the spatial phase between the input and output of the phase reveals a large asymmetry between positive and negative phase shifts. A simplified model is introduced to explain how a negative phase shift causes positive feedback between the external feedback and the centrifugally driven rotation.

  20. Flute growth rate of plasma jet in mirror machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Be'ery, I.; Seemann, O.; Goldstein, G.; Fisher, A.; Ron, A.

    2014-02-01

    The evolution of flute instability in a cold, high-density hydrogen plasma jet, injected into a mirror machine, is studied. The experiment was designed to minimize the interaction of the plasma with the walls, thus bringing it close to the ideal magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability conditions. The modal growth rate was measured in various settings to demonstrate the effects of the finite Larmor radius, Bohm diffusion, conductive limiter, biased limiter and neutral background gas. In this paper we will demonstrate that lowering the magnetic field increases stability, as does the insertion of a conducting ring. However, if the ring is biased, the stability is reduced due to inhomogeneous coupling between the plasma and the limiter. It was also found that heavy background gas dramatically reduces the flute instability growth rate.

  1. Flute instability in the plasma shell of the earth's magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V.N.; Pokhotelov, O.A.

    1987-12-01

    In the plasma shell of the earth's magnetosphere, the surfaces of constant pressure may not coincide with surfaces of constant specific volume. This circumstance forces a reexamination of the theory for the flute instability, in which the pressure has been assumed to remain constant on surfaces of constant specific volume. The MHD equations for flute waves in a curvilinear magnetic field are used to show that an instability of a new type, with a pressure which does not remain constant on surfaces of constant specific volume, can occur in the plasma shell of the magnetosphere. An expression is derived for the growth rate of this instability. Analysis of the equation also shows that perturbations with wavelengths shorter than the ion Larmor radius are stable by virtue of magnetodrift effects. The growth rates of the flute instabilities are calculated for both a dipole magnetic field and an arbitrary magnetic-field configuration. Growth rates calculated for typical values of the characteristics of the earth's plasma shell are reported.

  2. Self-organized zonal flow in the flute-mode turbulence of a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, Y.; Pavlenko, V.P.

    1988-04-11

    Flute-mode turbulence has a forward spectral cascade unlike the case of drift-wave turbulence. Therefore the linear flute instability may be reduced by this energy cascading toward large wave numbers. As a consequence of three-wave cascade processes derivable from model equations including the effects of density gradient and finite ion Larmor radius the formation of zonal flows in flute mode turbulence is predicted.

  3. Intonation Tendencies of Selected University Flute, Oboe, and Clarinet Players

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, Ray Edward

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the intonation tendencies of flute, oboe, and clarinet players after accounting for the effects of instrument intonation deficiencies. Twenty-seven university students served as subjects in three groups (n = 9 per group). The subjects performed 15 scale tones of their respective instruments during pitch-matching trials involving a common set of sawtooth wave stimulus tones. The research design was a mixed 3 (instrument) x 15 (scale tone) factorial analysis of covariance with a covariate (intonation deficiencies) changing across trials. The dependent variable was a measurement, in cent deviation, of intonation tendencies. The covariate was a measurement of the flat and sharp intonation deficiencies of instrument scale tones. The adjusted means of the dependent variable represented intonation tendencies after statistically controlling for possible effects of the covariate. Significant differences of intonation tendencies occurred between groups due to instrument (p =.01). There were no significant differences due to scale tone selection (p =.28) or the interaction of instrument and scale tone (p =.08). The covariate effect on intonation tendencies was significant (p <.0001) for the interaction but not (p >.05) for between group differences. Based on the results, the following conclusions were formulated. (1) There were significant differences in the intonation tendencies of flute, oboe, and clarinet players. (2) There was no significant difference in intonation tendencies for the different scale tones being performed. Intonation tendencies of flute and clarinet players were sharper than oboe players and the sawtooth wave stimulus tones. Results of the study support speculation concerning apparent pitch differences associated with instrument timbre as a possible factor of intonation.

  4. Flute instability and the associated radial transport in the tandem mirror with a divertor mirror cell

    SciTech Connect

    Katanuma, I.; Yagi, K.; Haraguchi, Y.; Ichioka, N.; Masaki, S.; Ichimura, M.; Imai, T.

    2010-11-15

    The flute instability and the associated radial transport are investigated in the tandem mirror with a divertor mirror cell (the GAMMA10 A-divertor) with help of computer simulation, where GAMMA10 is introduced [Inutake et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 939 (1985)]. The basic equations used in the simulation were derived on the assumption of an axisymmetric magnetic field. So the high plasma pressure in a nonaxisymmetric minimum-B anchor mirror cell, which is important for the flute mode stability, is taken into account by redefining the specific volume of a magnetic field line. It is found that the flute modes are stabilized by the minimum-B magnetic field even with a divertor mirror although its stabilizing effects are weaker than that without the divertor mirror. The flute instability enhances the radial transport by intermittently repeating the growing up and down of the Fourier amplitude of the flute instability in time.

  5. An Efficient Analysis Methodology for Fluted-Core Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oremont, Leonard; Schultz, Marc R.

    2012-01-01

    The primary loading condition in launch-vehicle barrel sections is axial compression, and it is therefore important to understand the compression behavior of any structures, structural concepts, and materials considered in launch-vehicle designs. This understanding will necessarily come from a combination of test and analysis. However, certain potentially beneficial structures and structural concepts do not lend themselves to commonly used simplified analysis methods, and therefore innovative analysis methodologies must be developed if these structures and structural concepts are to be considered. This paper discusses such an analysis technique for the fluted-core sandwich composite structural concept. The presented technique is based on commercially available finite-element codes, and uses shell elements to capture behavior that would normally require solid elements to capture the detailed mechanical response of the structure. The shell thicknesses and offsets using this analysis technique are parameterized, and the parameters are adjusted through a heuristic procedure until this model matches the mechanical behavior of a more detailed shell-and-solid model. Additionally, the detailed shell-and-solid model can be strategically placed in a larger, global shell-only model to capture important local behavior. Comparisons between shell-only models, experiments, and more detailed shell-and-solid models show excellent agreement. The discussed analysis methodology, though only discussed in the context of fluted-core composites, is widely applicable to other concepts.

  6. Suppression of the first flute mode in a long axisymmetric mirror system

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenin, V.V.

    1982-05-01

    The lowest mode of the flute instability of a plasma with ..beta..<<1 in a confinement system with a simple mirror field: the displacement of the plasma as a whole: can be suppressed if the confinement system is connected with another plasma-filled, axisymmetric, annular confinement system, so that there is a sharp maximum in B beyond the outer boundary of the bell-shaped plasma in the annular system. If the simple mirror is so long that all the other flute modes are stabilized by the finite-Larmor-radius effect, the plasma proves stable with respect to flute perturbations.

  7. Tank tests of a model of a flying-boat hull with a fluted bottom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, John R

    1935-01-01

    A 1/5-scale model of a flying-boat hull having flutes in the bottom both forward and aft of the step (NACA model 19) was tested to determine its water performance. The model was also tested after the successive removal of the flutes on the afterbody and forebody. The results from these tests are compared with those from tests of a model of the hull of the Navy PN-8 flying boat and it is concluded that the fluted-bottom model and its modifications are inferior to the model of the PN-8.

  8. FLUTE: A versatile linac-based THz source

    SciTech Connect

    Nasse, M. J.; Schuh, M.; Schwarz, M.; Naknaimueang, S.; Mathis, Y.-L.; Rossmanith, R.; Wesolowski, P.; Huttel, E.; Plech, A.; Schmelling, M.; Mueller, A.-S.

    2013-02-15

    A new compact versatile linear accelerator named FLUTE is currently being designed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. This paper presents the status of this 42 MeV machine. It will be used to generate strong (several 100 MV/m) ultra-short ({approx}1 ps) THz pulses (up to {approx}4-25 THz) for photon science experiments, as well as to conduct a variety of accelerator studies. The latter range from comparing different coherent THz radiation generation schemes to compressing electron bunches and studying the electron beam stability. The bunch charge will cover a wide range ({approx}100 pC-3 nC). Later we plan to also produce ultra-short x-ray pulses from the electron bunches, which, for example, could then be combined for THz pump-x-ray probe experiments.

  9. Flute waves at the ion Larmor radius scales

    SciTech Connect

    Onishchenko, O. G.

    2010-12-14

    The theory of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) is discussed. Modified linear kinetic theory allows us to investigate RTI and flute waves with arbitrary perpendicular spatial scales compared to the ion Larmor radius. It is shown that in the linear limit a Fourier transform of these equations yields the dispersion relation which in the so-called Pade approximation corresponds to results of the kinetic theory. This analysis represents an extension of the previous study of the magnetic RTI obtained in the large wave scale approximation. It is shown that incorporation of the effects associated with wave scales of the order of the ion Larmor radius leads to a broader wave number range of the magnetic RTI.

  10. Global modes of flute instability of a rotating cylindrical plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokina, E. A.

    2009-05-15

    The influence of rotation on the flute instability of a cylindrical gravitating plasma in a straight inhomogeneous magnetic field is studied in the framework of one-fluid magnetohydrodynamics. The dispersion relation and integral expression for the instability growth rate of eigenmodes are derived. It is shown that, in the framework of the given problem, rotation is a destabilizing factor, and the corresponding theorem is proved for the general case. For a linear radial profile of the rotation frequency, the structure of eigenmodes is calculated. The growth rate of these modes is shown to increase with increasing rotation velocity and azimuthal mode number. It is found that plasma rotation in the eigenmode localization region leads to the displacement of perturbation from the rotation region, which results in a decrease in the instability growth rate. The absence of eigenmodes (i.e., exponential instability of the system) for certain profiles of the density and rotation frequency is demonstrated.

  11. FLUTE: a versatile linac-based THz source.

    PubMed

    Nasse, M J; Schuh, M; Naknaimueang, S; Schwarz, M; Plech, A; Mathis, Y-L; Rossmanith, R; Wesolowski, P; Huttel, E; Schmelling, M; Müller, A-S

    2013-02-01

    A new compact versatile linear accelerator named FLUTE is currently being designed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. This paper presents the status of this 42 MeV machine. It will be used to generate strong (several 100 MV/m) ultra-short (~1 ps) THz pulses (up to ~4-25 THz) for photon science experiments, as well as to conduct a variety of accelerator studies. The latter range from comparing different coherent THz radiation generation schemes to compressing electron bunches and studying the electron beam stability. The bunch charge will cover a wide range (~100 pC-3 nC). Later we plan to also produce ultra-short x-ray pulses from the electron bunches, which, for example, could then be combined for THz pump-x-ray probe experiments. PMID:23464187

  12. FLUTE: A versatile linac-based THz source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasse, M. J.; Schuh, M.; Naknaimueang, S.; Schwarz, M.; Plech, A.; Mathis, Y.-L.; Rossmanith, R.; Wesolowski, P.; Huttel, E.; Schmelling, M.; Müller, A.-S.

    2013-02-01

    A new compact versatile linear accelerator named FLUTE is currently being designed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. This paper presents the status of this 42 MeV machine. It will be used to generate strong (several 100 MV/m) ultra-short (˜1 ps) THz pulses (up to ˜4-25 THz) for photon science experiments, as well as to conduct a variety of accelerator studies. The latter range from comparing different coherent THz radiation generation schemes to compressing electron bunches and studying the electron beam stability. The bunch charge will cover a wide range (˜100 pC-3 nC). Later we plan to also produce ultra-short x-ray pulses from the electron bunches, which, for example, could then be combined for THz pump-x-ray probe experiments.

  13. Life history of the fluted kidneyshell Ptychobranchus subtentum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, V.M.; Layzer, J.B.

    2012-01-01

    The fluted kidneyshell Ptychobranchus subtentum (Say, 1825) is a candidate for listing under the Endangered Species Act by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. Fecundity, fish hosts, and selected population demographics were determined during 2005–2006 for the fluted kidneyshell in the upper Clinch River, Hancock County, Tennessee. Females were fertilized in Aug. within a 5 d period and contained viable glochidia about 4 wk later. As the embryos began to develop, the marsupium gradually changed color from white to dark brown. Glochidia were contained within conglutinates that resemble Simuliidae pupae likely to attract benthic insectivorous fish and were held over winter and released in May. Fecundity was positively related to mussel length (r2  =  0.81) and ranged from 43,000 to 500,000 glochidia. Eight species of darters (Etheostoma spp. and Percina spp.) were infested with glochidia in the laboratory to examine potential hosts and host suitability. Juveniles transformed on bluebreast darters E. camurum and dusky darters P. scieraand previously reported hosts: rainbow darters E. caeruleum and fantail darters E. flabellare. In addition, fantail darters and rainbow darters were infested with glochidia from two river systems. The median time of glochidial metamorphosis did not differ significantly between the two mussel populations. The observed ratio of adult females to males (1.9∶1) in the Clinch River differed significantly from 1∶1. Based upon thin-sections, individuals live to at least 26 y and females become sexually mature at age five.

  14. Discrimination between Tone Quality and Intonation in Unaccompanied Flute/Oboe Duets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madsen, Clifford K.; Geringer, John M.

    1981-01-01

    Reports the results of a study that investigated patterns of judgmental discriminations and preferences with regard to tone quality versus intonation of accompanied flute and oboe duet performances of simple melodies among music and nonmusic graduate and undergraduate students. (AM)

  15. Spatiotemporal control and synchronization of flute modes and drift waves in a magnetized plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Brochard, F.; Bonhomme, G.; Gravier, E.; Oldenbuerger, S.; Philipp, M.

    2006-05-15

    An open-loop spatiotemporal synchronization method is applied to flute modes in a cylindrical magnetized plasma. It is demonstrated that synchronization can be achieved only if the exciter signal rotates in the same direction as the propagating mode. Moreover, the efficiency of the synchronization is shown to depend on the radial properties of the instability under consideration. It is also demonstrated that the control disposition can alternatively be used to produce strongly developed turbulence of drift waves or flute instabilities.

  16. Analysis of Lung Flute-collected Sputum for Lung Cancer Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Su, Jian; Anjuman, Nigar; Guarnera, Maria A; Zhang, Howard; Stass, Sanford A; Jiang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Molecular analysis of sputum can help diagnose lung cancer. We have demonstrated that Lung Flute can be used to collect sputum from individuals who cannot spontaneously expectorate sputum. The objective of this study is to further evaluate the performance of the Lung Flute by comparing the characteristics of parallel samples collected with and without the Lung Flute and the usefulness for diagnosis of lung cancer. Fifty-six early-stage lung cancer patients (40 current smokers and 16 former smokers) and 73 cancer-free individuals (52 current smokers and 21 former smokers) were instructed to spontaneously cough and use Lung Flute for sputum sampling. Sputum cytology and polymerase chain reaction analysis of three miRNAs (miRs-21, 31, and 210) were performed in the specimens. All 92 current smokers and 11 (28.7%) of 37 former smokers spontaneously expectorated sputum and also produced sputum when using the Lung Flute. Twenty-seven former smokers (70.3%) who could not spontaneously expectorate sputum, however, were able to produce sputum when using the Lung Flute. The specimens were of low respiratory origin without contamination from other sources, eg, saliva. There was no difference of sputum volume and cell populations, diagnostic efficiency of cytology, and analysis of the miRNAs in the specimens collected by the two approaches. Analysis of the sputum miRNAs produced 83.93% sensitivity and 87.67% specificity for identifying lung cancer. Therefore, sputum collected by the Lung Flute has comparable features as spontaneously expectorated sputum. Using the Lung Flute enables former smokers who cannot spontaneously expectorate to provide adequate sputum to improve sputum collection for lung cancer diagnosis. PMID:26309391

  17. CO2 volume fluxes outgassing from champagne glasses in tasting conditions: flute versus coupe.

    PubMed

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Villaume, Sandra; Cilindre, Clara; Polidori, Guillaume; Jeandet, Philippe

    2009-06-10

    Measurements of CO(2) fluxes outgassing from glasses containing a standard Champagne wine initially holding about 11.5 g L(-1) of dissolved CO(2) were presented, in tasting conditions, during the first 10 min following the pouring process. Experiments were performed at room temperature, with a flute and a coupe, respectively. The progressive loss of dissolved CO(2) concentration with time was found to be significantly higher in the coupe than in the flute, which finally constitutes the first analytical proof that the flute prolongs the drink's chill and helps it to retain its effervescence in contrast with the coupe. Moreover, CO(2) volume fluxes outgassing from the coupe were found to be much higher in the coupe than in the flute in the early moments following pouring, whereas this tendency reverses from about 3 min after pouring. Correlations were proposed between CO(2) volume fluxes outgassing from the flute and the coupe and their continuously decreasing dissolved CO(2) concentration. The contribution of effervescence to the global kinetics of CO(2) release was discussed and modeled by use of results developed over recent years. Due to a much shallower liquid level in the coupe, bubbles collapsing at the free surface of the coupe were found to be significantly smaller than those collapsing at the free surface of the flute, and CO(2) volume fluxes released by collapsing bubbles only were found to be approximately 60% smaller in the coupe than in the flute. Finally, the contributions of gas discharge by invisible diffusion through the free surface areas of the flute and coupe were also approached and compared for each type of drinking vessel. PMID:19419170

  18. Growth rate reduction of the curvature-driven flute instability by plasma blanket line tying

    SciTech Connect

    Segal, D.

    1983-09-01

    The effect of an annular, line-tied blanket, on the curvature-driven flute in a magnetic mirror is considered. The blanket is assumed to be line tied to a thermoionically emitting annular end plate. Reduction of the flute growth rate is computed as function of Larmor radius, blanket radius, and axial plasma conductance through either an external plasma or mirror sheath. It is found that significant reduction in growth rate can be achieved.

  19. Visualization of the flow and its vibration in Japanese traditional bamboo flute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Someya, Satoshi; Okamoto, Koji; Iida, Masao

    2006-11-01

    Any wind instrument can sound due to the vibration of the air, expiration flow inside of the wind instrument. In case of a trumpet or a clarinet, a mouth or a reed helps to sound variable tones. In case of a flute, there is no mechanical vibration. The basic mechanism of the sound, i.e., the vibration, is well-known. A hot wire type flowmeter may be applied to measure the vibration and its frequency, but it can measure only at a certain point. We would like to investigate more detail about the flow and the vibration with sound inside and outside of the flute, in order to understand the mechanism of the wind instrument and to aid in the manufacture of the good instrument. In this report, a Japanese traditional bamboo flute was used in the experiment. We tried to measure the vibration multi-dimensionally by the Dynamic PIV. 2 kinds of experiments were done. At first, we measured the Argon-gas flow with different tone inside/outside of the bamboo flute at 5000Hz using a high frequency pulse laser. Oil mist was used as the tracer particles. Then, we also tried to measure the flow of bamboo flute when a human player played, using a CW-laser and the water-mist as the tracers. As a result, we successfully measured the oscillating flow. The flow near a hole of the bamboo flute went out from and came into the flute at about 500Hz dependent on the tone. The flow outside of the labium of flute was also measured.

  20. Sedimentary anisotropy diverges from flute trends in south-east Finnish Lapland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutinen, Raimo; Hyvönen, Eija; Närhi, Paavo; Haavikko, Paula; Piekkari, Matti; Middleton, Maarit

    2010-12-01

    Subglacial flutes are parallel-to-ice flow lineations indicative of glacial streamlining, yet their depositional/erosional origin or sedimentary anisotropy is not fully understood. The flutes, aligned NW-SE with a flow direction to the SE, are superimposed on westerly oriented drumlins, in Kuusamo, south-eastern Finnish Lapland (65°45'N and 29°40'E) and reflect ice stream flow pattern towards the Younger Dryas End Moraines (YDEMs) in Russian Karelia. We investigated bedform morphology (flutes, drumlins and crescentic troughs), as well as sedimentary anisotropy of flute ridges and troughs using digital elevation models (DEMs), airborne radiometric (AR) data, and measurements of azimuthal electrical conductivity ( σa). The DEM-AR revealed elongation ratios ( L/ W) from 2:1 to 25:1, yet the highest ratios reached L/ W = 48:1. Flutes in the study area fan towards the east and south-east, whereas the drumlins on which they are superimposed show ice flow from the west (280°). The σa-anisotropy of the flute ridges and troughs indicates sedimentation from 340° to 350°, diagonal with respect to both drumlins and flutes. We found erosional crescentic troughs with down-flow rims indicative of both phases, but failed to find evidence for subglacial meltwater boulder lags or ice-flow erosional bedrock bump sticky spots. We contend that the studied flutes are erosional and date to the YDEM-phase, yet the origin of the precursory sediments may date to Early Weichselian.

  1. Experimental Study of the Compression Response of Fluted-Core Composite Panels with Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Marc R.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Guzman, J. Carlos; McCarville, Douglas; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Fluted-core sandwich composites consist of integral angled web members spaced between laminate face sheets, and may have the potential to provide benefits over traditional sandwich composites for certain aerospace applications. However, fabrication of large autoclave-cured fluted-core cylindrical shells with existing autoclaves will require that the shells be fabricated in segments, and joined longitudinally to form a complete barrel. Two different longitudinal fluted-core joint designs were considered experimentally in this study. In particular, jointed fluted-core-composite panels were tested in longitudinal compression because longitudinal compression is the primary loading condition in dry launch-vehicle barrel sections. One of the joint designs performed well in comparison with unjointed test articles, and the other joint design failed at loads approximately 14% lower than unjointed test articles. The compression-after-impact (CAI) performance of jointed fluted-core composites was also investigated by testing test articles that had been subjected to 6 ft-lb impacts. It was found that such impacts reduced the load-carrying capability by 9% to 40%. This reduction is dependent on the joint concept, component flute size, and facesheet thickness.

  2. Development of flute modes on expanding plasma clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.

    1989-09-01

    Structuring that results from plasma streaming at sub-Alfvenic speeds across an external magnetic field is considered. Previously, it has been proposed the lower hybrid drift instability enhanced by the deceleration of the plasma by the field produces the flute modes observed on the surface of expanding laser produced plasmas and the AMPTE magnetotail releases (Eos (Trans) /bold 63/, 843 (1982)). An appropriate dispersion equation to describe the properties of the unstable waves has been derived and particle simulations carried out to show the growth and evolution of the instability. The salient features of this earlier work are reviewed here, and then additions and refinements to the theory and simulations are described. In particular, the scaling of the wave properties with the ratio of the ion gyroradius to the magnetic confinement radius is discussed and the nonlinear evolution of the instability is investigated more thoroughly. The consequences of these results, both for the laser experiments and for AMPTE, are also considered. To this end, a comparison of the linear and nonlinear properties of the waves observed in the simulations with those seen in the experiments is carried out. While there is considerable discrepancy between the observed and predicted wavelengths of the modes, the effects considered here are in the direction of reducing the disagreement.

  3. Flute instability growth on a magnetized plasma column.

    SciTech Connect

    Genoni, Thomas C.; Rose, David Vincent; Ditmire, T.; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Welsh, D. R.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The growth of the flute-type instability for a field-aligned plasma column immersed in a uniform magnetic field is studied. Particle-in-cell simulations are compared with a semi-analytic dispersion analysis of the drift cyclotron instability in cylindrical geometry with a Gaussian density profile in the radial direction. For the parameters considered here, the dispersion analysis gives a local maximum for the peak growth rates as a function of R/r{sub i}, where R is the Gaussian characteristic radius and r{sub i} is the ion gyroradius. The electrostatic and electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation results give azimuthal and radial mode numbers that are in reasonable agreement with the dispersion analysis. The electrostatic simulations give linear growth rates that are in good agreement with the dispersion analysis results, while the electromagnetic simulations yield growth rate trends that are similar to the dispersion analysis but that are not in quantitative agreement. These differences are ascribed to higher initial field fluctuation levels in the electromagnetic field solver. Overall, the simulations allow the examination of both the linear and nonlinear evolution of the instability in this physical system up to and beyond the point of wave energy saturation.

  4. Flute instability growth on a magnetized plasma column.

    SciTech Connect

    Genoni, Thomas C.; Welch, Dale Robert; Ditmire, T.; Rose, David Vincent; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Porter, John Larry, Jr.

    2006-08-01

    The growth of the flute-type instability for a field-aligned plasma column immersed in a uniform magnetic field is studied. Particle-in-cell simulations are compared with a semi-analytic dispersion analysis of the drift cyclotron instability in cylindrical geometry with a Gaussian density profile in the radial direction. For the parameters considered here, the dispersion analysis gives a local maximum for the peak growth rates as a function of R/r{sub i}, where R is the Gaussian characteristic radius and r{sub i} is the ion gyroradius. The electrostatic and electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation results give azimuthal and radial mode numbers that are in reasonable agreement with the dispersion analysis. The electrostatic simulations give linear growth rates that are in good agreement with the dispersion analysis results, while the electromagnetic simulations yield growth rate trends that are similar to the dispersion analysis but that are not in quantitative agreement. These differences are ascribed to higher initial field fluctuation levels in the electromagnetic field solver. Overall, the simulations allow the examination of both the linear and nonlinear evolution of the instability in this physical system up to and beyond the point of wave energy saturation. Keywords: Microinstabilities, Magnetic confinement and equilibrium, Particle-in-cell method.

  5. Detecting overblown flute fingerings from the residual noise spectrum.

    PubMed

    Verfaille, Vincent; Depalle, Philippe; Wanderley, Marcelo M

    2010-01-01

    Producing a tone by increasing the blowing pressure to excite a higher frequency impedance minimum, or overblowing, is widely used in standard flute technique. In this paper, the effect of overblowing a fingering is explored with spectral analysis, and a fingering detector is designed based on acoustical knowledge and pattern classification techniques. The detector performs signal analysis of the strong broadband signal, that is, spectrally shaped by the pipe impedance, and measures the spectral energy during the attack around multiples of the fundamental frequency sub-multiples over the first octave and a half. It is trained and evaluated on sounds recorded with four expert performers. They played six series of tones from overblown and regular fingerings, with frequencies that are octave- and non-octave-related to the playing frequency. The best of the four proposed sound descriptors allows for a detection error below 1.3% for notes with two and three fingerings (C(5), D(5), C(6), and Cmusical sharp(6)) and below 14% for four (E(6)) or five fingerings (G(6)). The error is shown to dramatically increase when two fingerings' impedance become too similar (E(6) and A(4) and G(6) and C(5)). PMID:20058998

  6. Flute instability growth on a magnetized plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, D. V.; Genoni, T. C.; Welch, D. R.; Mehlhorn, T. A.; Porter, J. L.; Ditmire, T.

    2006-09-15

    The growth of the flute-type instability for a field-aligned plasma column immersed in a uniform magnetic field is studied. Particle-in-cell simulations are compared with a semi-analytic dispersion analysis of the drift cyclotron instability in cylindrical geometry with a Gaussian density profile in the radial direction. For the parameters considered here, the dispersion analysis gives a local maximum for the peak growth rates as a function of R/r{sub i}, where R is the Gaussian characteristic radius and r{sub i} is the ion gyroradius. The electrostatic and electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation results give azimuthal and radial mode numbers that are in reasonable agreement with the dispersion analysis. The electrostatic simulations give linear growth rates that are in good agreement with the dispersion analysis results, while the electromagnetic simulations yield growth rate trends that are similar to the dispersion analysis but that are not in quantitative agreement. These differences are ascribed to higher initial field fluctuation levels in the electromagnetic field solver. Overall, the simulations allow the examination of both the linear and nonlinear evolution of the instability in this physical system up to and beyond the point of wave energy saturation.

  7. Flute ``breath support'' perception and its acoustical correlates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossette, Isabelle A.; Sabourin, Patrick

    2001-05-01

    Music educators and performers commonly refer to ``breath support'' in flute playing, yet the term ``support'' is neither well-defined nor consistently used. Different breathing strategies used by professional flautists who were instructed to play with and without support were previously identified by the authors. In the current study, 14 musical excerpts with and without support were recorded by five professional flautists. Eleven professional flautists listened to the recordings in a random order and ranked (1 to 6) how much of the following sound qualities they judged to be in each example: support, intonation, control and musical expressiveness. Answers to the test showed that musical expressiveness was associated more closely with the supported excerpts than the answers about support itself. The ratings for each sound quality were highly intercorrelated. Acoustical parameters were analyzed (frequency and centroid variation within each note) and compared with the results of the perception test in order to better understand how the acoustical and psychological variables were related. The acoustical analysis of the central part of the notes did not show evident correlation with the answers of the perception test. [Work funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

  8. Excitation of collective modes in a quantum flute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torfason, Kristinn; Manolescu, Andrei; Molodoveanu, Valeriu; Gudmundsson, Vidar

    2012-06-01

    We use a generalized master equation (GME) formalism to describe the nonequilibrium time-dependent transport of Coulomb interacting electrons through a short quantum wire connected to semi-infinite biased leads. The contact strength between the leads and the wire is modulated by out-of-phase time-dependent potentials that simulate a turnstile device. We explore this setup by keeping the contact with one lead at a fixed location at one end of the wire, whereas the contact with the other lead is placed on various sites along the length of the wire. We study the propagation of sinusoidal and rectangular pulses. We find that the current profiles in both leads depend not only on the shape of the pulses, but also on the position of the second contact. The current reflects standing waves created by the contact potentials, like in a wind musical instrument (for example, a flute), but occurring on the background of the equilibrium charge distribution. The number of electrons in our quantum “flute” device varies between two and three. We find that for rectangular pulses the currents in the leads may flow against the bias for short time intervals, due to the higher harmonics of the charge response. The GME is solved numerically in small time steps without resorting to the traditional Markov and rotating wave approximations. The Coulomb interaction between the electrons in the sample is included via the exact diagonalization method. The system (leads plus sample wire) is described by a lattice model.

  9. Color removal from textile wastewater by using treated flute reed in a fixed bed column.

    PubMed

    Inthorn, Duangrat; Tipprasertsin, Kannika; Thiravetyan, Paitip; Khan, Eakalak

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of acid treated flute reed to adsorb color (dye) from synthetic reactive dye solutions, and actual dyeing and printing textile wastewaters in a laboratory scale fixed bed column. The effects of particle size, initial reactive dye concentration, bed depth and flow rate on adsorption performances were examined. The results from experiments with synthetic reactive dye solutions showed that the volume treated (until the breakthrough occurred) increased with decreasing particle size, influent reactive dye concentration and flow rate, and increasing bed depth. The bed depth service time model was suitable for describing the experimental data. The treated flute reed was able to reduce color efficiently, 99% for dyeing textile wastewater with ten adsorption columns in series and 78% for printing textile wastewater with a single adsorption column. The difference in the numbers of columns used for the two types of actual textile wastewater led to a substantial discrepancy in suspended solids removal, 99% for dyeing wastewater and 12% for printing wastewater. Similar pH and chemical oxygen demand (COD) results were obtained for the two types of textile wastewater. The acid pretreatment of flute reed resulted in dramatic decreases in pH after the adsorption and very acidic effluents (pH 3). Increases of COD after the adsorption due to organic leaching from the treated flute reed were observed. A different pretreatment method to solve these pH and COD problems is needed before flute reed can be used in practice. PMID:20390911

  10. A study of the structural efficiency of fluted core graphite-epoxy panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    1990-01-01

    The structural efficiency of compression-loaded graphite-epoxy sandwich panels with fluted cores is studied to determine their weight saving potential. Graphite-epoxy equilateral triangular elements are used to construct the fluted cores for the sandwich panels. Two panel configurations are considered. One configuration has two layers of triangular elements in the fluted core and the second configuration has only one layer of triangular elements in the core. An optimization code is used to find the minimum weight design for each panel configuration. Laminate ply orientations are limited to approx. 45, 0, and 90 deg. A constraint on the axial stiffness is included in the design process so the panel will conform to typical constraints for aircraft wing structures. Minimum thickness requirements for each laminate and maximum allowable strains are also included. A comparison is made of the calculated structural efficiency of the fluted core panels to the structural efficiency of aluminum transport aircraft structures and simple blade-stiffened graphite-epoxy panels. Limited experimental results are also included for comparison with the analytical predictions and to identify the critical failure mechanisms of graphite-epoxy fluted-core sandwich panels.

  11. DNA Taxonomy of Paranemertes (Nemertea: Hoplonemertea) with Spirally Fluted Stylets.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yue; Kajihara, Hiroshi; Chernyshev, Alexei V; Okazaki, Robert K; Sun, Shi-Chun

    2015-12-01

    Of the 14 nominal species that are now or have ever been assigned to the genus Paranemertes Coe, 1901 , four have been reported to have stylets with a spirally fluted or braided appearance. Although differentiation in color patterns has been documented among species/populations, these nemerteans share similar external characters. Using the sequence datasets of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI), 16S rRNA, and nuclear 28S rRNA genes of specimens from 14 localities of Canada, USA, Russia, Japan, and China, we analyzed the genetic differentiation and reconstructed the phylogenetic trees for these nemerteans. In conjunction with the external characters, we discuss their taxonomy and species delimitation. An analysis based on COI dataset showed high genetic variations among populations and even among worms from the same geographic area. The analyzed 111 individuals were assigned into seven networks by statistical parsimony analysis. The inter-network uncorrected p-distances ranged from 0.044 to 0.172 and the mean intra-network uncorrected p-distances varied from 0.001 to 0.005. With the exception of two networks that contain specimens from the East China Sea, all networks were well-supported by the results of Bayesian and neighbor-joining analyses on the COI data. Phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA and 28S rRNA datasets were basically similar to the COI trees, but specimens in some networks were merged into larger clades. Present molecular analyses support the validity of P. sanjuanensis and the synonymization of P. cylindracea with P. peregrina. Nemerteans previously recorded as P. peregrina may contain several species and sympatric speciation might have been occurred in this nemertean group. PMID:26654040

  12. Analysis of heat transfer and fluid flow through a spirally fluted tube using a porous substrate approach

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, V.; Vafai, K.; Christensen, R.N. )

    1994-08-01

    An innovative approach was opted for modeling the flow and heat transfer through spirally fluted tubes. The model divided the flow domain into two regions. The flutes were modeled as a porous substrate with direction-dependent permeabilities. This enabled modeling the swirl component in the fluted tube. The properties of the porous substrate such as its thickness, porosity, and ratio of the direction-dependent permeabilities were obtained from the geometry of the fluted tube. Experimental data on laminar Nusselt numbers and friction factors for different types of fluted tubes representing a broad range of flute geometry were available. Experimental data from a few of the tubes tested were used to propose a relationship between the permeability of the porous substrate and the flute parameters, particularly the flute spacing. The governing equations were discretized using the Finite Element Method. The model was verified and applied to the other tubes in the test matrix. Very good agreement was found between the numerical predictions and the experimental data. 20 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Low-frequency flute instabilities of self-pinched ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2005-12-15

    The stability properties of the low-frequency flute instabilities in a self-pinched ion beam propagating through a preformed plasma channel are investigated for long-wavelength and low-frequency perturbations. Consistent with the flute instabilities, the stability analysis is restricted to the surface perturbations on the ion beam. A closed algebraic dispersion relation of the flute instabilities for Bennett [Phys. Rev. 45, 890 (1934)] density profile is obtained, by making use of the energy group model. From the analytical and numerical calculations of the dispersion relation for highly collisional plasma, we find the necessary condition for instability in terms of the fractional current neutralization f. Threshold values of the fractional current neutralization for instability are tabulated for each azimuthal mode number l.

  14. Particle simulation on radio frequency stabilization of flute modes in a tandem mirror. I. Parallel antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Kadoya, Y.; Abe, H.

    1988-04-01

    A two- and one-half-dimensional electromagnetic particle code (PS2M) (H. Abe and S. Nakajima, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 53, xxx (1987)) is used to study how an electric field applied parallel to the magnetic field affects the radio frequency stabilization of flute modes in a tandem mirror plasma. The parallel electric field E/sub parallel/ perturbs the electron velocity v/sub parallel/ parallel to the magnetic field and also induces a perpendicular magnetic field perturbation B/sub perpendicular/. The unstable growth of the flute mode in the absence of such a radio frequency electric field is first studied as a basis for comparison. The ponderomotive force originating from the time-averaged product is then shown to stabilize the flute modes. The stabilizing wave power threshold, the frequency dependency, and the dependence on delchemically bondE/sub parallel/chemically bond all agree with the theoretical predictions.

  15. Generation and saturation of large-scale flows in flute turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, I.; Isliker, H.; Pavlenko, V. P.; Hizanidis, K.; Vlahos, L.

    2005-03-01

    The excitation and suppression of large-scale anisotropic modes during the temporal evolution of a magnetic-curvature-driven electrostatic flute instability are numerically investigated. The formation of streamerlike structures is attributed to the linear development of the instability while the subsequent excitation of the zonal modes is the result of the nonlinear coupling between linearly grown flute modes. When the amplitudes of the zonal modes become of the same order as that of the streamer modes, the flute instabilities get suppressed and poloidal (zonal) flows dominate. In the saturated state that follows, the dominant large-scale modes of the potential and the density are self-organized in different ways, depending on the value of the ion temperature.

  16. Active feedback stabilization of multimode flute instability in a mirror trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Be'ery, I.; Seemann, O.; Fisher, A.

    2014-07-01

    The flute instability in a table-top mirror machine has been stabilized by a feedback system consisting of optical sensors, a digital signal processor and charge-injecting electrodes. The use of multiple sensors and actuators enable the feedback to simultaneously stabilize two modes of the fast-growing, slowly rotating flute instability. Step function response and magnetohydrodynamic spectroscopy indicate a smooth frequency response and an inherent delayed response of the plasma drift due to the sheath resistivity. The measured feedback power is very small relative to the heating power of the plasma.

  17. Cascading process in the flute-mode turbulence of a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, R.; Gomez, D.; Ferro Fontan, C. Buenos Aires Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, C C No. 67, Sucursal 28, Buenos Aires ); Sicardi Schifino, A.C.; Montagne, R. Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de la Republica, CC No. 30, CP 11000, Montevideo )

    1993-06-01

    The cascades of ideal invariants in the flute-mode turbulence are analyzed by considering a statistics based on an elementary three-mode coupling process. The statistical dynamics of the system is investigated on the basis of the existence of the physically most important (PMI) triad. When finite ion Larmor radius effects are considered, the PMI triad describes the formation of zonal flows.

  18. The Effects of Verbal Instruction, Modeling, Rehearsal, and Feedback on Correct Posture during Flute Playing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dib, Nancy Ellen; Sturmey, Peter

    2007-01-01

    A behavioral skills training package, including verbal instruction, modeling, rehearsal, and feedback, was used to teach children correct posture, defined as keeping feet on the floor, legs parallel to each other, and the back and neck perpendicular to the floor, during flute lessons. Three typically developing girls aged 8 to 9 years…

  19. Formation of isobaric discontinuities in large-scale flute drift motions

    SciTech Connect

    Dreizin, Y.A.; Sokolov, E.P.

    1982-05-01

    The flute drift motion in MHD-stable plasma configurations with closed lines of force is analyzed qualitatively. The onset of this motion can lead to isobaric discontinuities in experimentally observable quantitites: the electric potential and the electron and ion densities and temperatures.

  20. Cascading process in the flute-mode turbulence of a plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, R.; Gomez, D.; Fontan, C. F.; Schifino, A. C. S.; Montagne, R.

    1993-01-01

    The cascades of ideal invariants in the flute-mode turbulence are analyzed by considering a statistics based on an elementary three-mode coupling process. The statistical dynamics of the system is investigated on the basis of the existence of the physically most important (PMI) triad. When finite ion Larmor radius effects are considered, the PMI triad describes the formation of zonal flows.

  1. Flute stabilization due to ponderomotive force created by an rf field with a variable gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Yasaka, Y.; Itatani, R.

    1986-06-30

    An rf-stabilization experiment was performed in the axisymmetric single-mirror device HIEI by controlling the radial-gradient scale length of the rf field with the aid of an azimuthally phased antenna array. The flute stability depends sensitively on the scale length of the perpendicular rf electric field, which shows that rf stabilization is caused by the ponderomotive force for ions.

  2. Design and analysis of a 5-MW vertical-fluted-tube condenser for geothermal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Llewellyn, G.H.

    1982-03-01

    The design and analysis of an industtial-sized vertical-fluted-tube condenser. The condenser is used to condense superheated isobutane vapor discharged from a power turbine in a geothermal test facility operated for the US Department of Energy. The 5-MW condenser has 1150 coolant tubes in a four-pass configuration with a total heat transfer area of 725 m/sup 2/ (7800 ft/sup 2/). The unit is being tested at the Geothermal Components Test Facility in the Imperial Valley of East Mesa, California. The condenser design is based on previous experimental research work done at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on condensing refrigerants on a wide variety of single vertical tubes. Condensing film coefficients obtained on the high-performance vertical fluted tubes in condensing refrigerants are as much as seven times greater than those obtained with vertical smooth tubes that have the same diameter and length. The overall heat transfer performance expected from the fluted tube condenser is four to five times the heat transfer obtained from the identical units employing smooth tubes. Fluted tube condensers also have other direct applications in the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) program in condensing ammonia, in the petroleum industry in condensing light hydrocarbons, and in the air conditioning and refrigeration industry in condensing fluorocarbon vapors.

  3. 78 FR 59269 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Species Status for the Fluted...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ... habitat on October 4, 2012 (77 FR 60804). For a complete history of all Federal actions related to these..., proposed listing and critical habitat rule (77 FR 60804). Habitat and Life History Mussels generally live... past decade or two indicate that the fluted kidneyshell is rare in nearly all extant populations,...

  4. Idea Bank: The Native American Flute--A Possibility for Your Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kacanek, Hal

    2011-01-01

    The sound of the Native American flute seems to convey care, sadness, loneliness, longing, heartfelt emotion, a sense of the natural world, wisdom, the human spirit, and a sense of culture. It is a sound that competes for attention, dramatically punctuating messages about First Nation peoples on television and in movies. A relatively small group…

  5. Particle simulation of radio frequency stabilization of the flute mode in a tandem mirror. II. Perpendicular antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, H.; Kadoya, Y.

    1988-10-01

    A two-and-a-half-dimensional electromagnetic particle code PS2M (J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 56, 3899 (1987)) is used to study how an electric field applied perpendicularly to the magnetic field affects the radio frequency stabilization of flute modes in a tandem mirror plasma. The electric field perpendicular to the magnetic field stabilizes or destabilizes the flute mode through the mechanism of the ponderomotive force acting on electrons and ions and through the mechanism of sideband coupling. In the simulations two typical examples have been shown: (i) when the sideband coupling effects (in which the electron terms are dominant) stabilize the flute modes and (ii) when the perpendicular ponderomotive force acting on the electrons destabilizes the flute modes.

  6. Experimental study of curvature-driven flute instability in the gas-dynamic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A.A.; Anikeev, A.V.; Bagryansky, P.A.; Bocharov, V.N.; Deichuli, P.P.; Karpushov, A.N.; Maximov, V.V.; Pod'minogin, A.A.; Rogozin, A.I.; Salikova, T.V.; Tsidulko, Y.A. )

    1994-05-01

    A curvature-driven flute instability will be excited in the magnetized plasmas if the magnetic field lines curve toward the entire plasma boundary. Conditions under which it can be effectively stabilized in axisymmetric geometry have been experimentally studied in a gas-dynamic trap (GDT) at Novosibirsk. Flexible design of the experimental device and the availability of neutral beams and ion cyclotron heating enabled the pressure-weighted curvature to be varied over a wide range. The stability limits were thus measured and compared with those predicted by the modified Rosenbluth--Longmire criterion. Characteristics of unstable curvature-driven flute modes were also measured and found to conform to a theory including finite ion Larmor radius (FLR) effects. Stable operation during neutral beam injection was achieved with a cusp end cell, resulting in an increase in [ital T][sub [ital e

  7. Flute instability of an ion-focused slab electron beam in a broad plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, D.H. , 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 ); Lampe, M.; Joyce, G.; Slinker, S.P. ); Yu, S.S.; Sharp, W.M. )

    1992-11-15

    An intense relativistic electron beam with an elongated cross section, propagating in the ion-focused regime through a broad, uniform, unmagnetized plasma, is shown to suffer a transverse flute instability. This instability arises from the electrostatic coupling between the beam and the plasma electrons at the ion-channel edge. The instability is found to be absolute and the asymptotic growth of the flute amplitude is computed in the frozen-field'' approximation and the large skin-depth limit. The minimum growth length is shown to be much less than the betatron period, with the consequence that focusing is rendered ineffective. It is further shown that growth is much reduced when the beam propagates through a narrow channel where the ion density greatly exceeds that of the surrounding plasma. In this limit, a modest spread in betatron frequency produces rapid saturation. The effect of plasma electron collisions is also considered. Results of beam breakup simulations are noted.

  8. Pressure drop and heat transfer for spirally fluted tubes including validation of the role of transition

    SciTech Connect

    Obot, N.T.; Esen, E.B.; Snell, K.H. . Fluid Mechanics, Heat and Mass Transfer Lab.); Rabas, T.J. )

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out to determine the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics for spirally fluted tubes in laminar, transitional and turbulent flow of air. It is established that, in the laminar, transitional and turbulent regimes, the friction factor for the spirally fluted tube is generally higher than that for a smooth tube. The values for the critical Reynolds number at the onset of transition to turbulent flow are lower, while the corresponding critical friction factors are higher, than those for a smooth tube. Consistent with the expected effect of transition on heat transfer, the experimentally determined Nusselt numbers are generally higher than the smooth tube values. The results indicate that there is a definite connection between transition and the heat transfer enhancement. 10 refs., 11 figs.

  9. Flute-like musical instruments: A toy model investigated through numerical continuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrien, Soizic; Vergez, Christophe; Fabre, Benoît

    2013-07-01

    Self-sustained musical instruments (bowed string, woodwind and brass instruments) can be modelled by nonlinear lumped dynamical systems. Among these instruments, flutes and flue organ pipes present the particularity to be modelled as a delay dynamical system. In this paper, such a system, a toy model of flute-like instruments, is studied using numerical continuation. Equilibrium and periodic solutions are explored with respect to the blowing pressure, with focus on amplitude and frequency evolutions along the different solution branches, as well as "jumps" between periodic solution branches. The influence of a second model parameter (namely the inharmonicity) on the behaviour of the system is addressed. It is shown that harmonicity plays a key role in the presence of hysteresis or quasiperiodic regime. Throughout the paper, experimental results on a real instrument are presented to illustrate various phenomena, and allow some qualitative comparisons with numerical results.

  10. Forced organization of flute-type turbulence by convective cell injection

    SciTech Connect

    Iizuka, S.; Huld, T.; Pecseli, H.L.; Rasmussen, J.J.

    1988-03-14

    Nonlinear interactions between flute-type turbulence and an externally excited convective cell in a strongly magnetized plasma are investigated. During the interaction the azimuthal-mode-number spectrum of the turbulence is deformed and a broad spectrum evolves, indicating an inverse cascade. As a result of a modification in phase and amplitude of the fluctuations, an organized structure is created in turbulence. The macroscopic behavior is well explained by a Van der Pol--type equation.

  11. Development of Table-Top mirror trap for flute stabilization research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seemann, Omri; Be'Ery, Ilan

    2015-11-01

    Mirror traps might be viable candidates for fusion machines. These machines are technically and physically simple but suffer from the Rayleigh-Taylor-like flute instability. A new table top mirror machine was built in order to research ways to mitigate this instability. One possible solution for this problem which was researched in the past is using oscillatory fields. A description of the system and diagnostics, preliminary results and a review of the main mechanisms with which stabilization might occur are presented.

  12. Large-scale flows and coherent structure phenomena in flute turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, I.; Andrushchenko, Zh.N.; Pavlenko, V.P.

    2005-04-15

    The properties of zonal and streamer flows in the flute mode turbulence are investigated. The stability criteria and the frequency of these flows are determined in terms of the spectra of turbulent fluctuations. Furthermore, it is shown that zonal flows can undergo a further nonlinear evolution leading to the formation of long-lived coherent structures which consist of self-bound wave packets supporting stationary shear layers, and thus can be characterized as regions with a reduced level of anomalous transport.

  13. Pitted and fluted rocks in the Western Desert of Egypt - Viking comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, J. F.; Breed, C. S.; Grolier, M. J.; El-Baz, F.; Whitney, M. I.; Ward, A. W.

    1979-01-01

    The Western Desert of Egypt is one of the most arid regions on earth and is probably the closest terrestrial analog to the surface of Mars. An expedition to the area in 1978 revealed an abundance of quartzite and basalt rocks that have been pitted and fluted by wind erosion and deflation of the desert surface. These pitted rocks are internally homogeneous, show no internal holes or vesicles, and are considered an important but neglected type of ventifact. They bear a striking resemblance to the pitted and fluted rocks seen by the Viking Landers, rocks that have generally been interpreted as vesicular basalts only slightly modified by wind erosion. Wind tunnel studies of the air flow over and around nonstreamlined hand specimens from the Western Desert show that windward abrasion coupled with negative flow, secondary flow, and vorticity in a unidirectional wind can explain the complex arrays of pits and flutes. These field and laboratory observations suggest that the pitted rocks at the Viking Lander sites are also ventifacts, and thus the Martian surface may be far more wind eroded than previously thought.

  14. Contributing factors, prevention, and management of playing-related musculoskeletal disorders among flute players internationally.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, Karen; Laakso, E-Liisa; Tomlinson, Vanessa

    2014-09-01

    Major studies have shown that flutists report playing-related pain in the neck, middle/upper back, shoulders, wrists, and hands. The current survey was designed to establish the injury concerns of flute players and teachers of all backgrounds, as well as their knowledge and awareness of injury prevention and management. Questions addressed a range of issues including education, history of injuries, preventative and management strategies, lifestyle factors, and teaching methods. At the time of the survey, 26.7% of all respondents were suffering from flute playing-related discomfort or pain; 49.7% had experienced flute playing-related discomfort or pain that was severe enough to distract while performing; and 25.8% had taken an extended period of time off playing because of discomfort or pain. Consistent with earlier studies, the most common pain sites were the fingers, hands, arms, neck, middle/upper back, and shoulders. Further research is needed to establish possible links between sex, instrument types, and ergonomic set up. Further investigation is recommended to ascertain whether certain types of physical training, education, and practice approaches may be more suitable than current methods. A longitudinal study researching the relationship between early education, playing position, ergonomic set-up, and prevalence of injury is recommended. PMID:25194113

  15. The sound of oscillating air jets: Physics, modeling and simulation in flute-like instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Cuadra, Patricio

    Flute-like instruments share a common mechanism that consists of blowing across one open end of a resonator to produce an air jet that is directed towards a sharp edge. Analysis of its operation involves various research fields including fluid dynamics, aero-acoustics, and physics. An effort has been made in this study to extend this description from instruments with fixed geometry like recorders and organ pipes to flutes played by the lips. An analysis of the jet's response to a periodic excitation is the focus of this study, as are the parameters under the player's control in forming the jet. The jet is excited with a controlled excitation consisting of two loudspeakers in opposite phase. A Schlieren system is used to visualize the jet, and image detection algorithms are developed to extract quantitative information from the images. In order to study the behavior of jets observed in different flute-like instruments, several geometries of the excitation and jet shapes are studied. The obtained data is used to propose analytical models that correctly fit the observed measurements and can be used for simulations. The control exerted by the performer on the instrument is of crucial importance in the quality of the sound produced for a number of flute-like instruments. The case of the transverse flute is experimentally studied. An ensemble of control parameters are measured and visualized in order to describe some aspects of the subtle control attained by an experienced flautist. Contrasting data from a novice flautist are compared. As a result, typical values for several non-dimensional parameters that characterize the normal operation of the instrument have been measured, and data to feed simulations has been collected. The information obtained through experimentation is combined with research developed over the last decades to put together a time-domain simulation. The model proposed is one-dimensional and driven by a single physical input. All the variables in the

  16. Generation of Large-Scale Zonal Structures by Drift Flute Waves in High-Beta HED Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Essam; Sotnikov, Vladmir; Kindel, Joseph; Onishchenko, O. G.; Leboeuf, J. N.

    2009-05-01

    Our aim is to develop a more general analysis of nonlinear dynamics of drift-flute waves, applicable to arbitrary plasma beta and arbitrary spatial scales in comparison with the ion Larmor radius. This study is of interest for fundamental plasma theory as well as for the interpretation of Z-pinch and laboratory astrophysics experiments. Description of low-frequency waves and in particular drift flute waves in a high beta plasma, generally speaking, requires a kinetic approach, based on the Vlasov-Maxwell set of equations. In the present work we show that the alternative two-fluid description can adequately describe the ion perturbations with arbitrary ratio of the characteristic spatial scales to the ion Larmor radius in so-called Pade approximation. For this purpose reduced two-fluid hydrodynamic equations which describe nonlinear dynamics of the flute waves with arbitrary spatial scales and arbitrary plasma beta are derived. The linear dispersion relation of the flute waves and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability are analyzed. A general nonlinear dispersion relation which describes generation of large-scale zonal structures by the flute waves is presented and analyzed.

  17. The songs of Tlaloc: Interference of ten ceramical duct flutes, Offering 89 of the Aztec Templo Mayor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Both, M. A. Adje

    2002-11-01

    Among the many preserved sound artefacts deposited in the offerings of the Aztec Templo Mayor are a set of ten tubular duct flutes made from clay, dating Late Postclassic Mesoamerica, 1350-1521 AD. The aerophones are completely painted in blue, and characterized by: (1) a short mouthpiece; (2) a framed aperture; (3) a tube with four fingerholes; and (4) an applicated mask with features of the Aztec rain god Tlaloc, basically three rings and a standardized relief structure of two clouds. While all measurements follow the same pattern, one particular organological distinction was made, as five flutes show an exit hole in the middle ring of the mask and five flutes are stopped. Thus, five instruments sound considerably higher, apart from the minimal pitch deviation of each specimen. Both the tonal capacity of each flute and the acoustics of several flutes played simultaneously were recorded and measured. A series of remarkable interference effects could be produced, which were strongly related to the ritual complex reflected in the offering. Taking in consideration the Aztec concept of music, it could be supposed that they were perceived as a principle of the song, or proper voice of Tlaloc.

  18. Transitions to spatiotemporal chaos and turbulence of flute instabilities in a low-{beta} magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Brochard, F.; Gravier, E.; Bonhomme, G.

    2006-03-15

    The spatiotemporal transition scenario of flute instabilities from a regular to a turbulent state is experimentally investigated in the low-{beta} plasma column of a thermionic discharge. The same transition scenario, i.e., the Ruelle-Takens route to turbulence, is found for both the Kelvin-Helmholtz and the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. It is demonstrated that the transition can be more or less smooth, according to the discharge mode. In both cases, a strong radial dependence is observed, which is linked to the velocity shear layer in the case of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.

  19. Ponderomotive stabilization of flute modes in mirrors Feedback control and numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Similon, P. L.

    1987-01-01

    Ponderomotive stabilization of rigid plasma flute modes is numerically investigated by use of a variational principle, for a simple geometry, without eikonal approximation. While the near field of the studied antenna can be stabilizing, the far field has a small contribution only, because of large cancellation by quasi mode-coupling terms. The field energy for stabilization is evaluated and is a nonnegligible fraction of the plasma thermal energy. A new antenna design is proposed, and feedback stabilization is investigated. Their use drastically reduces power requirements.

  20. Flute instability in a plasma confined by perfectly reflecting end walls

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, D.; Pozzoli, R.; Ryutov, D. )

    1993-11-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic stability of a low-pressure plasma confined along the magnetic field by the end walls that are perfectly reflecting the impinging particles is considered. It is shown that, if the magnetic field lines do not intersect the walls along the normal, a fast instability can develop. An explicit expression for the growth rate has been derived, and an analogy with the usual flute instability has been traced. The instability can play some role in the scrape-off layers of tokamaks with poloidal limiter.

  1. Flute mode waves near the lower hybrid frequency excited by ion rings in velocity space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattell, C.; Hudson, M.

    1982-01-01

    Discrete emissions at the lower hybrid frequency are often seen on the S3-3 satellite. Simultaneous observation of perpendicularly heated ions suggests that these ions may provide the free energy necessary to drive the instability. Studies of the dispersion relation for flute modes excited by warm ion rings in velocity space show that waves are excited with real frequencies near the lower hybrid frequency and with growth rates ranging from about 0.01 to 1 times the ion cyclotron frequency. Numerical results are therefore consistent with the possibility that the observed ions are the free energy source for the observed waves.

  2. Flute-model acoustic metamaterials with simultaneously negative bulk modulus and mass density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Hong-Cheng; Luo, Chun-Rong; Chen, Huai-Jun; Zhai, Shi-Long; Ding, Chang-Lin; Zhao, Xiao-Peng

    2013-11-01

    We experimentally constructed a three-dimensional flute-model meta-molecule structure acoustic metamaterial (AM) from a periodic array of perforated hollow steel tubes (PHSTs) and investigated its transmission and reflection behaviors in an impedance tube system. The AM exhibited a peak and dip, and an inverse phase, thus exhibiting the local resonance of the PHSTs. Based on the homogeneous media theory, the effective bulk modulus and mass density of the AM were calculated to be simultaneously negative; the refractive index was also negative. PHST AM slab focusing experiments showed that the medium with a resonant structure exhibited a distinct metamaterial property.

  3. Excitation of flute waves by an ion beam in an open confinement system

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.V.

    1988-04-01

    This paper analyzes the electrostatic instability driven by a fast ion beam in a low-..beta.. plasma in a mirror system as the result of a resonance between the wave and the longitudinal bounces of ions between the mirrors. The frequency of this instability is close to the ion bounce frequency, and its growth rate is several times low than that of the flute instability. This electrostatic instability is characteristic of beams with a small angular spread and is sensitive to the magnetic field profile in the mirror system.

  4. Simultaneous and integrated neutron-based techniques for material analysis of a metallic ancient flute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Festa, G.; Pietropaolo, A.; Grazzi, F.; Sutton, L. F.; Scherillo, A.; Bognetti, L.; Bini, A.; Barzagli, E.; Schooneveld, E.; Andreani, C.

    2013-09-01

    A metallic 19th century flute was studied by means of integrated and simultaneous neutron-based techniques: neutron diffraction, neutron radiative capture analysis and neutron radiography. This experiment follows benchmark measurements devoted to assessing the effectiveness of a multitask beamline concept for neutron-based investigation on materials. The aim of this study is to show the potential application of the approach using multiple and integrated neutron-based techniques for musical instruments. Such samples, in the broad scenario of cultural heritage, represent an exciting research field. They may represent an interesting link between different disciplines such as nuclear physics, metallurgy and acoustics.

  5. Lung flute improves symptoms and health status in COPD with chronic bronchitis: A 26 week randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by mucus hypersecretion that contributes to disease related morbidity and is associated with increased mortality. The Lung Flute® is a new respiratory device that produces a low frequency acoustic wave with moderately vigorous exhalation to increase mucus clearance. We hypothesized that the Lung Flute, used on a twice daily basis will provide clinical benefit to patients with COPD with chronic bronchitis. Methods We performed a 26 week randomized, non-intervention controlled, single center, open label trial in 69 patients with COPD and Chronic Bronchitis. The primary endpoint was change in respiratory symptoms measured with the Chronic COPD Questionnaire (CCQ). Secondary endpoints included health status, assessed by the St. George Respiratory questionnaire (SGRQ), BODE (Body-Mass Index, Airflow Obstruction, Dyspnea, and Exercise Capacity) index score and exacerbation frequency. Results While the control patients did not demonstrate any significant changes in the primary endpoint (CCQ change at 26 weeks of +0.01, p = 0.8), a trend (p = 0.08) to decrease (improvement) in the CCQ (-0.23 at 26 weeks) was seen with the Lung Flute. Furthermore, a significant improvement in the symptom domain of the CCQ was seen only with the lung flute (-0.42, p = 0.004). Health status (SGRQ) improvement, was also only seen with the Lung Flute (-3.23, p = 0.03). The BODE score increased in the control group (3.31 at baseline, 4.14 at 26 weeks), however it remained stable in the Lung Flute arm (3.16 at baseline and 26 weeks), with the changes from baseline being significantly different between the 2 arms (p = 0.01). There was a trend for less exacerbations in the Lung Flute group (p = 0.07). Adverse effects were minor, with only 1 patient discontinuing treatment because of lack of efficacy. Serious adverse effects seen were all determined to be unrelated to the device use. Conclusions

  6. Individuality of movements in music--finger and body movements during playing of the flute.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Stefan; Janssen, Daniel; Quarz, Esther; Newell, Karl M; Schöllhorn, Wolfgang I

    2014-06-01

    The achievement of mastery in playing a composition by means of a musical instrument typically requires numerous repetitions and corrections according to the keys and notations of the music piece. Nevertheless, differences in the interpretation of the same music piece by highly skilled musicians seem to be recognizable. The present study investigated differences within and between skilled flute players in their finger and body movements playing the same piece several times on the same and on different days. Six semiprofessional and four professional musicians played an excerpt of Mozart's Flute Concerto No. 2 several times on three different days. Finger and body movements were recorded by 3D motion capture and analyzed by linear and nonlinear classification approaches. The findings showed that the discrete and continuous movement timing data correctly identified individuals up to 100% by means of their finger movements and up to 94% by means of their body movements. These robust examples of identifying individual movement patterns contradict the prevailing models of small, economic finger movements that are favored in the didactic literature for woodwind players and question traditional recommendations for teaching the learning of motor skills. PMID:24767961

  7. The magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability and flute waves at the ion Larmor radius scales

    SciTech Connect

    Onishchenko, O. G.; Pokhotelov, O. A.; Stenflo, L.; Shukla, P. K.

    2011-02-15

    The theory of flute waves (with arbitrary spatial scales compared to the ion Larmor radius) driven by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) is developed. Both the kinetic and hydrodynamic models are considered. In this way we have extended the previous analysis of RTI carried out in the long wavelength limit. It is found that complete finite ion Larmor radius stabilization is absent when the ion diamagnetic velocity attains the ion gravitation drift velocity. The hydrodynamic approach allowed us to deduce a new set of nonlinear equations for flute waves with arbitrary spatial scales. It is shown that the previously deduced equations are inadequate when the wavelength becomes of the order of the ion Larmor radius. In the linear limit a Fourier transform of these equations yields the dispersion relation which in the so-called Pade approximation corresponds to the results of the fully kinetic treatment. The development of such a theory gives us enough grounds for an adequate description of the RTI stabilization by the finite ion Larmor radius effect.

  8. Stability criteria for edge flute modes in the two-fluid regime

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L. )

    1993-05-01

    Necessary and sufficient stability criteria for flute modes localized at the edge of toroidal plasmas are obtained from the Braginskii's two-fluid equations without taking into account the collisional effects. It is assumed that the plasma pressure tends to vanish, but its gradient remains finite at the edge of the plasma. The results show that the free-boundary edge flute modes (namely, the peeling modes) are more dangerous than the fixed-boundary modes (namely, the Mercier modes). Numerical investigation of the criterion for peeling modes shows that the finite ion-gyroradius effect can substantially stabilize the modes, especially for the case [Delta][ge]0, where the equilibrium quantity [Delta][equivalent to]1/2+[ital S][sup [minus]1][lt][bold j][center dot][bold B][vert bar][del][ital v][vert bar][sup [minus]2][gt], with [ital S] denoting the global shear, [bold B] the magnetic field, [bold j] the current density, [ital v] the volume inside the reference magnetic surface, and [lt]...[gt] denoting the average over the magnetic surface. Equilibria with [Delta][ge]0 are shown to be more stable to the peeling modes than those with [Delta][le]0.

  9. Complete genome sequence of a new bipartite begomovirus infecting fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis) plants in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Leke, Walter N; Khatabi, Behnam; Fondong, Vincent N; Brown, Judith K

    2016-08-01

    The complete genome sequence was determined and characterized for a previously unreported bipartite begomovirus from fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis, family Cucurbitaceae) plants displaying mosaic symptoms in Cameroon. The DNA-A and DNA-B components were ~2.7 kb and ~2.6 kb in size, and the arrangement of viral coding regions on the genomic components was like those characteristic of other known bipartite begomoviruses originating in the Old World. While the DNA-A component was more closely related to that of chayote yellow mosaic virus (ChaYMV), at 78 %, the DNA-B component was more closely related to that of soybean chlorotic blotch virus (SbCBV), at 64 %. This newly discovered bipartite Old World virus is herein named telfairia mosaic virus (TelMV). PMID:27262944

  10. Adsorption of transition metals in aqueous solutions by fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis Hook f) waste.

    PubMed

    Horsfall, Michael; Spiff, Ayebaemi Ibuteme

    2005-09-01

    The adsorption of some divalent transition metal (Hg, Rh, Pt, and Pd) ions in aqueous solution onto fluted pumpkin waste biomass has been investigated. The data were discussed in terms of ionic radii, surface area, and the hard-soft acid-base (HSAB) concept. The monolayer sorption capacities as obtained by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model were determined to be ca. 9.89 mg/g, 9.81 mg/g, 10.59 mg/g, and 6.84 mg/g for for Hg(II), Rh(II), Pt(II), and Pd(II), respectively. The results are relevant for the optimal design of a wastewater treatment plant and for prediction of model parameters of sorbate-sorbent interactions. PMID:17193209

  11. Low-frequency flute instabilities of a hollow cathode arc discharge - Theory and experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilic, D. B.; Rognlien, T. D.; Self, S. A.; Crawford, F. W.

    1973-01-01

    The characteristics of two low-frequency electrostatic flute instabilities of a low-pressure hollow cathode arc discharge are reported. Mode I has azimuthal mode number m = 1, and occurs when the radial electric field is negative (directed inward), while mode II has m = - 1 and occurs when the field is positive. The radial electric field is controlled by varying the potential of a secondary anode cylinder located close to the outer discharge radius. A linear perturbation analysis, based on the two-fluid equations, is given for a low-beta, collisionless, cylindrical plasma column, immersed in a uniform axial magnetic field, having a Gaussian density profile and an arbitrary radial electric field profile. Reasonable correlation between theory and experiment is demonstrated for both modes.

  12. The flute instability as the trigger mechanism for disruption of cometary plasma tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ip, W.-H.; Mendis, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The sporadic disruption of the plasma tails of some comets has recently been explained to be caused by magnetic-field-line reconnection in the cometary ionospheres due to magnetic-sector-boundary traversals. An alternative model is proposed in which the tail disruption is the end result of compression of the cometary ionosphere by high-velocity solar-wind streams, triggering the flute instability in the marginally stable tangential-discontinuity surface which separates the cometary ionosphere from the solar-wind plasma. According to the proposed model, the tail-disruption events could occur at all heliographic latitudes, whereas the Niedner-Brandt (1978) model should predict that these events are restricted to low heliographic latitudes in view of the present understanding of the sector structure of the heliosphere. Consequently, the high-latitude disruption events observed seem to present a difficulty for the latter model.

  13. Flute instability in the tandem mirror with the divertor/dipole regions

    SciTech Connect

    Katanuma, I.; Masaki, S.; Sato, S.; Sekiya, K.; Ichimura, M.; Imai, T.

    2011-11-15

    The numerical simulation is performed in GAMMA10 A-divertor magnetic configuration, which is a candidate of remodeled device of the GAMMA10 tandem mirror [M. Inutake et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 939 (1985)]. Both divertor and dipole regions are included in the numerical calculation, which is a new point. The electron short circuit effect along x-point, therefore, is not assumed so that it is not used the boundary condition of the electrostatic perturbations being zero at the separatrix on which the magnetic field lines pass through x-point. The simulation results reveal that the dipole field plays a role of a good magnetic field line curvature to the GAMMA10 A-divertor, and so the flute modes are stabilized without help of electron short circuit effects.

  14. Effect of high-energy particles on ballooning flute modes in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Boiko, A.Y.; Cheremnykh, O.K.

    1988-08-01

    A dispersion relation for ideal ballooning flute modes is derived for a tokamak with a finite pressure (..beta../sub theta/approx. =1), a large aspect ratio, circular magnetic surfaces, and a group of high-energy particles assuming that the potential wells are shallow. In addition to waves which are already known, this dispersion relation describes two neutrally stable natural wave branches with frequencies ..omega..approx. <..omega../sub */, where ..omega../sub */ is the ion drift frequency. Either untrapped or trapped ions can excited one of these branches (with the higher frequency) and can damp the other (with the lower frequency). Analytic expressions are derived for the growth rate and the damping rate. The results found here can be used to explain the fishbone oscillations which have been observed experimentally.

  15. The 3D Structure of Flux Tubes That Admit Flute Instability in the Scrape-Off-Layer (SOL) of Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hironori

    2014-10-01

    A severe reduction in size down to an ion gyro-radius scale, commonly known as ``squeezing,'' in a lateral dimension of the cross section of a flux tube is traditionally thought to inhibit the occurrence of the flute instability in the Scrape-off-Layer of a diverted tokamak by isolating the main volume of the flux tube from its ends at electrically conducting target plates. A study reported here in the 3D flux tube structure reveals the absence of squeezing for a flux tube that is sufficiently large in its toroidal extent (small toroidal harmonic number n) and located in a layer of low field-line shear around the ``sweet spot'' (about mid-way between the primary and secondary separatrices). The low-shear layer does not hence inhibit the flute instability through the squeezing mechanism, and may thus restore the flute instability, among the most virulent in the magnetized plasma, to the ranks of candidate electrostatic instabilities thought to underlie the turbulence in the SOL in tokamaks. Variations along the flux tube of geometrical characteristics including the cross section will be calculated to develop criteria for the absence of squeezing. Supported in part by the US DOE under DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  16. Erosion of Fluted Cliffs on the Na Pali Coast, Kauai, Hawaiian Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, G.; Mohr, S.; Blay, C.

    2015-12-01

    Precipitous sea cliffs on the northwest side of Kauai, sculpted into deep bedrock gullies and sharp divides, are known as "Na Pali", Hawaiian for "the cliffs", and are commonly referred to as fluted cliffs. Rising 500 m above the coast, they constitute some of the most dramatic scenery on planet Earth and are a world famous tourist attraction. After the discovery of flank collapses on some Hawaiian volcanoes the great Na Pali escarpment was hypothesized to have been generated by a megalandslide, but bathymetric data show the shallow submarine shelf off the Na Pali coast bears no landslide deposits. It is likely that wave erosion at the base of the local thin-bedded lavas, particularly in winter, is responsible for the escarpment. Superimposed on the escarpment are the deep gullies, or grooves, and divides, which constitute drainage networks that happen to be developed on very steep slopes. Networks are poorly developed on relatively young parts of the escarpment and well developed on older parts, which feature coalescing tributaries and very deep gullies. In most cases gullies shallow going upslope, and many fade out completely just below drainage divides, just like in drainage networks developed on more gently sloping landscapes. The drainage networks show that the basalts along this coast are relatively easily eroded by runoff. Rocks easily eroded by runoff generally do not stand in 500-m-high cliffs because they are not mechanically strong enough to resist failure and mass movement. The key to development of high fluted cliffs is a mix of mechanical strength and erodibiity, a combination whose rarity explains why analogs to the Na Pali cliffs are not found outside the Hawaiian Islands. The combination here is provided by basalt which is strong where unweathered but rotten and in some case completely decomposed close to the surface, courtesy of the Hawaiian climate. Weathering must proceed downward at about the same rate as removal of mass by runoff erosion

  17. Champagne flutes and brandy snifters: modelling protostellar outflow-cloud chemical interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollins, R. P.; Rawlings, J. M. C.; Williams, D. A.; Redman, M. P.

    2014-10-01

    A rich variety of molecular species has now been observed towards hot cores in star-forming regions and in the interstellar medium. An increasing body of evidence from millimetre interferometers suggests that many of these form at the interfaces between protostellar outflows and their natal molecular clouds. However, current models have remained unable to explain the origin of the observational bias towards wide-angled `brandy snifter' shaped outflows over narrower `champagne flute' shapes in carbon monoxide imaging. Furthermore, these wide-angled systems exhibit unusually high abundances of the molecular ion HCO+. We present results from a chemodynamic model of such regions where a rich chemistry arises naturally as a result of turbulent mixing between cold, dense molecular gas and the hot, ionized outflow material. The injecta drives a rich and rapid ion-neutral chemistry in qualitative and quantitative agreement with the observations. The observational bias towards wide-angled outflows is explained naturally by the geometry-dependent ion injection rate causing rapid dissociation of CO in the younger systems.

  18. Fit to play: the fitness effect on physically challenging flute repertoire.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Jennifer A

    2011-03-01

    This case study was done to determine whether physical fitness plays a part in performing flute repertoire. Most repertoire allows performers the choice of where to breathe. However, there exists a "brute" repertoire where breathing is prescribed by the composer, which poses physical challenges for performers. The author contrasted pieces from traditional repertoire with Heinz Holliger's (t)air(e), which requires passages of breath-holding and measured inhalations. The author was tested for cardiovascular fitness (VO2max) and corresponded these levels to pulse rates while playing at baseline and 6 months after undertaking a physical fitness program. After the exercise program, expertise with standard repertoire combined with the unmeasured variables of resonance, openness of the chest and oral cavities, embouchure size, and air speed saw little improvement with increased fitness levels. However, when air regulation is out of the performer's control, the effect of cardiovascular training brought the "brute" repertoire into the same range of difficulty as the standard repertoire. PMID:21442138

  19. Experimental investigation of a coherent flute instability using a heavy ion beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Glowienka, J.C.; Jennings, W.C.; Hickok, R.L.

    1988-09-01

    A coherent, low-frequency instability found in a cylindrical, hollow cathode arc plasma has been investigated by using a heavy ion beam probe (HIBP). The energy density of the plasma was high enough to render it inaccessible to Langmuir probes, but the HIBP was able to provide measurements throughout the plasma cross section. The data clearly show that azimuthal symmetry does not exist. Radial profiles of steady-state density and space potential and of simultaneous n-italic-tilde, phi-tilde amplitude and phase were obtained to allow detailed comparison between theory and experiment. Predictions from a cylindrically symmetric, small-perturbation theoretical model provide reasonably conclusive identification of the instability as a Kelvin--Helmholtz flute driven by and localized in a region of fluid shear. The most serious discrepancy was with regard to the oscillation frequency, which was consistently predicted to be three to four times lower than that observed experimentally. The reason for the discrepancy is not understood, but it is probably related to inadequacies in the theory caused by assumptions of azimuthal symmetry and of small linear perturbations.

  20. The kinetics and acoustics of fingering and note transitions on the flute.

    PubMed

    Almeida, André; Chow, Renee; Smith, John; Wolfe, Joe

    2009-09-01

    Motion of the keys was measured in a transverse flute while beginner, amateur, and professional flutists played a range of exercises. The time taken for a key to open or close was typically 10 ms when pushed by a finger or 16 ms when moved by a spring. Because the opening and closing of keys will never be exactly simultaneous, transitions between notes that involve the movement of multiple fingers can occur via several possible pathways with different intermediate fingerings. A transition is classified as "safe" if it is possible to be slurred from the initial to final note with little perceptible change in pitch or volume. Some transitions are "unsafe" and possibly involve a transient change in pitch or a decrease in volume. Players, on average, used safe transitions more frequently than unsafe transitions. Delays between the motion of the fingers were typically tens of milliseconds, with longer delays as more fingers become involved. Professionals exhibited smaller average delays between the motion of their fingers than did amateurs. PMID:19739765

  1. Fabrication and Testing of Durable Redundant and Fluted-Core Joints for Composite Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shih-Yung; Splinter, Scott C.; Tarkenton, Chris; Paddock, David A.; Smeltzer, Stanley S.; Ghose, Sayata; Guzman, Juan C.; Stukus, Donald J.; McCarville, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of durable bonded joint technology for assembling composite structures is an essential component of future space technologies. While NASA is working toward providing an entirely new capability for human space exploration beyond low Earth orbit, the objective of this project is to design, fabricate, analyze, and test a NASA patented durable redundant joint (DRJ) and a NASA/Boeing co-designed fluted-core joint (FCJ). The potential applications include a wide range of sandwich structures for NASA's future launch vehicles. Three types of joints were studied -- splice joint (SJ, as baseline), DRJ, and FCJ. Tests included tension, after-impact tension, and compression. Teflon strips were used at the joint area to increase failure strength by shifting stress concentration to a less sensitive area. Test results were compared to those of pristine coupons fabricated utilizing the same methods. Tensile test results indicated that the DRJ design was stiffer, stronger, and more impact resistant than other designs. The drawbacks of the DRJ design were extra mass and complex fabrication processes. The FCJ was lighter than the DRJ but less impact resistant. With barely visible but detectable impact damages, all three joints showed no sign of tensile strength reduction. No compression test was conducted on any impact-damaged sample due to limited scope and resource. Failure modes and damage propagation were also studied to support progressive damage modeling of the SJ and the DRJ.

  2. Multiple antibiotic-resistant bacteria on fluted pumpkin leaves, a herb of therapeutic value.

    PubMed

    Igbeneghu, Oluwatoyin A; Abdu, Abdulrasheed B

    2014-06-01

    Fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis) is a minimally-processed green leafy vegetable traditionally used for its antianaemic properties in the form of leaf juice without a heating or inactivation step before consumption. The aim of the study was to assess the presence of surface microbiota on T. occidentalis leaves and also to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated organisms. Bacterial contaminants on 50 samples of T. occidentalis leaves were isolated and characterized using standard biochemical methods and the antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated organisms was determined using the antibiotic disc diffusion assay. The results obtained show that the leaves of T. occidentalis is contaminated with organisms which included Enterobacter agglomerans (25.9%), Proteus vulgaris (24.9%), Klebsiella spp. (2.6%), and Serratia liquefaciens (2.1%). Other bacterial isolates recovered in order of frequency included: Staphylococcus spp. (33.7%), Bacillus spp. (8.3%), and Pseudomonas fluorescens (2.6%). Of the 193 bacterial isolates from the leaves of T. occidentalis samples tested for antimicrobial resistance, all (100%) were found to be resistant to ampicillin, cloxacillin, augmentin, erythromycin, and tetracycline while 96% of the isolates were resistant to cephalothin. Resistance to trimethoprim (93%) and gentamicin (83%) was also observed. Approximately, 22% of the isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin; however, only 11 (5.8%) were resistant to ofloxacin. Thus, uncooked T. occidentalis is a potential source of highly-resistant epiphytic bacteria which could be opportunistic pathogens in consumers. PMID:25076655

  3. Cutoff frequencies and cross fingerings in baroque, classical, and modern flutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Joe; Smith, John

    2003-10-01

    Baroque, classical, and modern flutes have successively more and larger tone holes. This paper reports measurements of the standing waves in the bores of instruments representing these three classes. It presents the frequency dependence of propagation of standing waves in lattices of open tone holes and compares these measurements with the cutoff frequency: the frequency at which, in an idealized system, the standing waves propagate without loss in such a lattice. It also reports the dependence of the sound field in the bore of the instrument as a function of both frequency and position along the bore for both simple and ``cross fingerings'' (configurations in which one or more tone holes are closed below an open hole). These measurements show how ``cross fingerings'' produce a longer standing wave, a technique used to produce the nondiatonic notes on instruments with a small number of tone holes closed only by the unaided fingers. They also show why the changes from baroque to classical to modern gave the instruments a louder, brighter sound and a greater range.

  4. Bone Grafts

    MedlinePlus

    A bone graft transplants bone tissue. Surgeons use bone grafts to repair and rebuild diseased bones in your hips, knees, spine, and sometimes other bones and joints. Grafts can also repair bone loss caused by some ...

  5. Bone tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  6. Combined use of straddle packer testing and FLUTe profiling for hydraulic testing in fractured rock boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Patryk; Cherry, John A.; Parker, Beth L.

    2015-05-01

    A combination of high resolution hydraulic tests using straddle packers and transmissivity (T) profiling using the FLUTe flexible liner method (liner profiling) in densely fractured rock boreholes is shown to be efficient for the determination of the vertical distribution of T along the entire hole. The liner T profiling method takes a few hours or less to scan the entire borehole length resulting in a T profile. Under favorable conditions this method has good reliability for identifying the highest T zones identified by distinct decreases in liner velocity when these zones are covered by the descending liner. In contrast, for one short test interval (e.g., 1-2 m) the multiple-test, straddle-packer method takes a few hours to measure T with good precision and accuracy using a combination of steady-state and transient tests (e.g., constant head step tests, slug tests, and constant rate pumping tests). Because of the time consuming aspect of this multiple-test method, it is most efficient in each borehole to conduct straddle packer testing only in priority zones selected after assessment of other borehole data collected prior to packer testing. The T profile from the liner method is instrumental in selecting high permeable zones for application of the multiple-test method using straddle packers, which in turn, refines the T estimation from the liner profile. Results from three boreholes in densely fractured sandstone demonstrate this approach showing the synergistic use of the methods with emphasis on information important for determining hydraulic apertures.

  7. Hypolipidemic effect of Telfairia occidentalis (fluted pumpkin) in rats fed a cholesterol-rich diet.

    PubMed

    Adaramoye, O A; Achem, J; Akintayo, O O; Fafunso, M A

    2007-06-01

    Telfairia occidentalis (fluted pumpkin) is one of the commonly consumed leafy vegetables in Nigeria. In order to justify its inclusion in herbal preparations in African traditional medicine, the possible hypolipidemic effect of this vegetable was investigated in rats fed a cholesterol-rich diet. The ability of Questran, a hypolipidemic drug, to attenuate hypercholesterolemia was also examined. Rats were fed with either a basal diet containing cholic acid (0.2%) or a supplemented diet with T. occidentalis at the 3% and 6% levels. Oral administration of cholesterol for 9 consecutive weeks resulted in a significant increase (P < .001) in the relative weight of the heart of cholesterol-fed rats. However, supplemented diets significantly (P < .001) ameliorated the cholesterol-induced enlargement of the heart. Rats fed on supplemented diets had a dose-dependent reduction in plasma and postmitochondrial supernatant fraction (PMF) cholesterol levels. In particular, supplemented diets containing 3% and 6% T. occidentalis decreased plasma and PMF cholesterol levels by 20% and 30% and by 30% and 45%, respectively. A similar decrease in plasma and PMF cholesterol levels was obtained in Questran-treated hypercholesterolemic rats. Furthermore, 3% and 6% T. occidentalis-supplemented diets significantly (P < .05) decreased the cholesterol-induced increase in plasma and PMF low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels by 24% and 48% and by 28% and 52%, respectively. In contrast, there was no significant difference (P > .05) in plasma and PMF triglyceride levels of rats fed on supplemented diets when compared with cholesterol-fed rats. There were significant decreases (P < .05) in lipid peroxidation levels in rats fed on the supplemented diets. Specifically, 3% and 6% T. occidentalis-supplemented diets decreased plasma and PMF lipid peroxidation by 24% and 20% and by 42% and 21%, respectively. This study demonstrates that T. occidentalis may be a useful therapy for

  8. Recruitment constraints in Singapore's fluted giant clam (Tridacna squamosa) population—A dispersal model approach

    PubMed Central

    Neo, Mei Lin; Erftemeijer, Paul L. A.; van Beek, Jan K. L.; van Maren, Dirk S.; Teo, Serena L-M.; Todd, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Recruitment constraints on Singapore's dwindling fluted giant clam, Tridacna squamosa, population were studied by modelling fertilisation, larval transport, and settlement using real-time hydrodynamic forcing combined with knowledge of spawning characteristics, larval development, behaviour, and settlement cues. Larval transport was simulated using a finite-volume advection-diffusion model coupled to a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. Three recruitment constraint hypotheses were tested: 1) there is limited connectivity between Singapore's reefs and other reefs in the region, 2) there is limited exchange within Singapore's Southern Islands, and 3) there exist low-density constraints to fertilisation efficacy (component Allee effects). Results showed that connectivity among giant clam populations was primarily determined by residual hydrodynamic flows and spawning time, with greatest chances of successful settlement occurring when spawning and subsequent larval dispersal coincided with the period of lowest residual flow. Simulations suggested poor larval transport from reefs located along the Peninsular Malaysia to Singapore, probably due to strong surface currents between the Andaman Sea and South China Sea combined with a major land barrier disrupting larval movement among reefs. The model, however, predicted offshore coral reefs to the southeast of Singapore (Bintan and Batam) may represent a significant source of larvae. Larval exchange within Singapore's Southern Islands varied substantially depending on the locations of source and sink reefs as well as spawning time; but all simulations resulted in low settler densities (2.1–68.6 settled individuals per 10,000 m2). Poor fertilisation rates predicted by the model indicate that the low density and scattered distribution of the remaining T. squamosa in Singapore are likely to significantly inhibit any natural recovery of local stocks. PMID:23555597

  9. Anomalous resistivity at the field null of the FRC: a quasi-linear expression based upon flute-type modes

    SciTech Connect

    Gerwin, R.

    1983-10-01

    In the Field-Reversed Theta Pinch (FRC) experiment, the poloidal flux is observed to be lost at a rate several times greater than classical resistivity would allow. Thus, there must be anomalous resistivity at the field null. Assuming that an electromagnetic microinstability of the flute mode type is responsible for this, we derived a general expression for the anomalous resistivity at the field null based upon a quasi-linear model of the microturbulence. This general expression does not depend upon the details of the ion-species model, for example, whether the ions are fluid or kinetic.

  10. Bone Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... avoid smoking and drinking too much alcohol. Bone diseases can make bones easy to break. Different kinds ... break Osteogenesis imperfecta makes your bones brittle Paget's disease of bone makes them weak Bones can also ...

  11. Monitoring gaseous CO2 and ethanol above champagne glasses: flute versus coupe, and the role of temperature.

    PubMed

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Bourget, Marielle; Pron, Hervé; Polidori, Guillaume; Cilindre, Clara

    2012-01-01

    In champagne tasting, gaseous CO(2) and volatile organic compounds progressively invade the headspace above glasses, thus progressively modifying the chemical space perceived by the consumer. Simultaneous quantification of gaseous CO(2) and ethanol was monitored through micro-gas chromatography (μGC), all along the first 15 minutes following pouring, depending on whether a volume of 100 mL of champagne was served into a flute or into a coupe. The concentration of gaseous CO(2) was found to be significantly higher above the flute than above the coupe. Moreover, a recently developed gaseous CO(2) visualization technique based on infrared imaging was performed, thus confirming this tendency. The influence of champagne temperature was also tested. As could have been expected, lowering the temperature of champagne was found to decrease ethanol vapor concentrations in the headspace of a glass. Nevertheless, and quite surprisingly, this temperature decrease had no impact on the level of gaseous CO(2) found above the glass. Those results were discussed on the basis of a multiparameter model which describes fluxes of gaseous CO(2) escaping the liquid phase into the form of bubbles. PMID:22347390

  12. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Electromagnetic Wave Scattering From Numerically Generated Flute-type Density Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, D. S.; Caplinger, J.; Kim, T. C.; Sotnikov, V. I.

    2014-12-01

    The propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves can be influenced by the presence of plasma turbulence. It is known that Flute-type density irregularities can develop during the nonlinear stage of an interchange instability in Earth's ionosphere and can affect radio communication channels. These density structures play an important role in the refraction and scattering of EM waves in Earth's ionosphere and also in laser diagnostic scattering experiments. To generate Flute-type density irregularities, we will use previously obtained numerical solution of nonlinear fluid equations involving the electrostatic potential and density. The solutions to these fluid equations govern the development of an interchange instability and results in the spatial dependence of density irregularities which can be used to analyze scattering of high frequency EM waves. This solution contains both large scale vortex density structures coexisting with short scale density perturbations. Next we will initialize a PIC simulation with the density structure from the fluid simulation to calculate the scattering cross-section and compare the results with an analytic solution obtained using numerically calculated density spectra. Because the linear and non-linear stages are well separated in time, we will compare the effect of scattering from density irregularities which form in both the linear and non-linear stages.

  13. Monitoring Gaseous CO2 and Ethanol above Champagne Glasses: Flute versus Coupe, and the Role of Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Bourget, Marielle; Pron, Hervé; Polidori, Guillaume; Cilindre, Clara

    2012-01-01

    In champagne tasting, gaseous CO2 and volatile organic compounds progressively invade the headspace above glasses, thus progressively modifying the chemical space perceived by the consumer. Simultaneous quantification of gaseous CO2 and ethanol was monitored through micro-gas chromatography (μGC), all along the first 15 minutes following pouring, depending on whether a volume of 100 mL of champagne was served into a flute or into a coupe. The concentration of gaseous CO2 was found to be significantly higher above the flute than above the coupe. Moreover, a recently developed gaseous CO2 visualization technique based on infrared imaging was performed, thus confirming this tendency. The influence of champagne temperature was also tested. As could have been expected, lowering the temperature of champagne was found to decrease ethanol vapor concentrations in the headspace of a glass. Nevertheless, and quite surprisingly, this temperature decrease had no impact on the level of gaseous CO2 found above the glass. Those results were discussed on the basis of a multiparameter model which describes fluxes of gaseous CO2 escaping the liquid phase into the form of bubbles. PMID:22347390

  14. Preparation and properties of flours and protein concentrates from raw, fermented and germinated fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis Hook) seeds.

    PubMed

    Giami, S Y; Isichei, I

    1999-01-01

    In vitro protein digestibility, chemical composition and selected functional properties of flours and protein concentrates prepared from raw, fermented and germinated fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis Hook) seeds were studied. Protein concentrates prepared by an alkaline extraction process had increased crude protein contents (61.5-70.8%) compared to flour samples (46.4-52.7%). The yields of protein concentrates ranged from 24.5% to 29.4% while values for protein recoveries varied between 64.8% and 65.2%. Protein concentrates also had increased foam volume and decreased foam stability (100% decrease over a 2 h period), compared to flour samples. Fermentation and germination were observed to significantly (p < 0.05) lower polyphenol and phytic acid contents, but increased protein digestibility of fluted pumpkin seed flours and concentrates. Both raw flour and concentrate were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in water absorption capacity than germinated or fermented flours and concentrates. Protein concentrates had comparatively better fat absorption properties than the flour samples. Hence protein concentrates may prove to have useful applications in ground meat formulations. PMID:10646631

  15. Bone Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... also avoid smoking and drinking too much alcohol. Bone diseases can make bones easy to break. Different kinds ... Bones can also develop cancer and infections Other bone diseases, which are caused by poor nutrition, genetics, or ...

  16. Bone Grafts

    MedlinePlus

    ... repair and rebuild diseased bones in your hips, knees, spine, and sometimes other bones and joints. Grafts can also repair bone loss caused by some types of fractures or cancers. Once your body accepts the bone ...

  17. Infrared Thermal Imaging During Ultrasonic Aspiration of Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotter, D. J.; Woodworth, G.; Gupta, S. V.; Manandhar, P.; Schwartz, T. H.

    Ultrasonic surgical aspirator tips target removal of bone in approaches to tumors or aneurysms. Low profile angled tips provide increased visualization and safety in many high risk surgical situations that commonly were approached using a high speed rotary drill. Utilization of the ultrasonic aspirator for bone removal raised questions about relative amount of local and transmitted heat energy. In the sphenoid wing of a cadaver section, ultrasonic bone aspiration yielded lower thermal rise in precision bone removal than rotary mechanical drills, with maximum temperature of 31 °C versus 69 °C for fluted and 79 °C for diamond drill bits. Mean ultrasonic fragmentation power was about 8 Watts. Statistical studies using tenacious porcine cranium yielded mean power levels of about 4.5 Watts to 11 Watts and mean temperature of less than 41.1 °C. Excessively loading the tip yielded momentary higher power; however, mean thermal rise was less than 8 °C with bone removal starting at near body temperature of about 37 °C. Precision bone removal and thermal management were possible with conditions tested for ultrasonic bone aspiration.

  18. Additional ECR heating of a radially inhomogeneous plasma via the absorption of satellite harmonics of the surface flute modes in a rippled magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Girka, V. O.; Girka, I. O.

    2006-12-15

    A theoretical study is made of the possibility of additional heating of a radially inhomogeneous plasma in confinement systems with a rippled magnetic field via the absorption of satellite harmonics of the surface flute modes with frequencies below the electron gyrofrequency in the local resonance region, {epsilon}{sub 1} (r{sub 1}) = [2{pi}c/({omega}L)]{sup 2}, where {epsilon}{sub 1} is the diagonal element of the plasma dielectric tensor in the hydrodynamic approximation, L is the period of a constant external rippled magnetic field, and the radical coordinate r{sub 1} determines the position of the local resonance. It is found that the high-frequency power absorbed near the local resonance is proportional to the square of the ripple amplitude of the external magnetic field. The mechanism proposed is shown to ensure the absorption of the energy of surface flute modes and, thereby, the heating of a radially inhomogeneous plasma.

  19. Field tests of a vertical-fluted-tube condenser in the prototype power plant at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R.W.

    1983-04-01

    A vertical-fluted-tube condenser was designed, fabricated, and tested with isobutane as the shell-side working fluid in a binary prototype power plant at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site. After shakedown and contamination removal operations were completed, the four-pass water-cooled unit (with 102 outside-fluted Admiralty tubes) achieved performance predictions while operating with the plant surface evaporator on-line. A sample comparison shows that use of this enhanced condenser concept offers the potential for a reduction of about 65% from the size suggested by corresponding designs using conventional horizontal-smooth-tube concepts. Subsequent substitution of a direct-contact evaporator for the surface evaporator brought drastic reductions in system performance, the apparent consequence of high concentrations of noncondensible gases introduced by the brine/working-fluid interaction.

  20. Living Bones, Strong Bones

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this classroom activity, engineering, nutrition, and physical activity collide when students design and build a healthy bone model of a space explorer which is strong enough to withstand increas...

  1. Reduce chest pain using modified silicone fluted drain tube for chest drainage after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lung resection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Hu, Bin; Miao, Jinbai

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility, efficacy and safety of a modified silicone fluted drain tube after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lung resection. Methods The prospective randomized study included 50 patients who underwent VATS lung resection between March 2015 and June 2015. Eligible patients were randomized into two groups: experimental group (using the silicone fluted drain tubes for chest drainage) and control group (using standard drain tubes for chest drainage). The volume and characteristics of drainage, postoperative (PO) pain scores and hospital stay were recorded. All patients received standard care during hospital admission. Results In accordance with the exit criteria, three patients were excluded from study. The remaining 47 patients included in the final analysis were divided into two groups: experiment group (N=24) and control group (N=23). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, sex, height, weight, clinical diagnosis and type of surgical procedure. There was a trend toward less PO pain in experimental group on postoperative day (POD) 1, with a statistically significant difference. Patients in experimental group had a reduced occurrence of fever [temperature (T) >37.4 °C] compared to the control group. Conclusions The silicone fluted drain tube is feasible and safe and may relieve patient PO pain and reduce occurrence of fever without the added risk of PO complications. PMID:26941976

  2. Bone scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... scan is an imaging test used to diagnose bone diseases and find out how severe they are. How ... a 3-phase bone scan. To evaluate metastatic bone disease, images are taken only after the 3- to ...

  3. Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  4. Bone scan

    MedlinePlus

    A bone scan is an imaging test used to diagnose bone diseases and find out how severe they are. ... A bone scan involves injecting a very small amount of radioactive material (radiotracer) into a vein. The substance travels through ...

  5. Bone Density

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone health. It compares your bone density, or mass, to that of a healthy person who is ... Whether your osteoporosis treatment is working Low bone mass that is not low enough to be osteoporosis ...

  6. Bone Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common types of primary bone cancer are: • Multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma is the most common primary bone cancer. It ... Any bone can be affected by this cancer. Multiple myeloma affects approximately six people per 100,000 each ...

  7. Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another part of the body is more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 ...

  8. Time-domain simulation of flute-like instruments: comparison of jet-drive and discrete-vortex models.

    PubMed

    Auvray, Roman; Ernoult, Augustin; Fabre, Benoît; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents two models of sound production in flute-like instruments that allow time-domain simulations. The models are based on different descriptions of the jet flow within the window of the instrument. The jet-drive model depicts the jet by its transverse perturbation that interacts with the labium to produce sound. The discrete-vortex model depicts the jet as two independent shear layers along which vortices are convected and interact with the acoustic field within the window. The limit of validity between both models is usually discussed according to the aspect ratio of the jet W/h, with W the window length and h the flue channel height. The present simulations, compared with experimental data gathered on a recorder, allow to extend the aspect ratio criterion to the notion of dynamic aspect ratio defined as λ/h where λ is the hydrodynamic wavelength that now accounts for geometrical properties, such as W/h, as well as for dynamic properties, such as the Strouhal number. The two models are found to be applicable over neighboring values of geometry and blowing pressure. PMID:24993223

  9. Short bones

    MedlinePlus

    Short bones in the human body are often cube-like, their length, width, and height are all about the same. Short bones include the carpal bones of the hands and wrist, and the tarsal bones of the feet and ankles.

  10. Bone scanning.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, L D; Bennett, L R

    1975-03-01

    Scanning is based on the uptake of a nuclide by the crystal lattice of bone and is related to bone blood flow. Cancer cells do not take up the tracer. Normally, the scan visualizes the highly vascular bones. Scans are useful and are indicated in metastatic bone disease, primary bone tumors, hematologic malignancies and some non-neoplastic diseases. The scan is more sensitive than x-ray in the detection of malignant diseases of the skeleton. PMID:1054210

  11. Low Bone Density

    MedlinePlus

    ... Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your bone density ... people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine whether you ...

  12. Bone Markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alkaline Phosphatase; Osteocalcin; P1NP; Procollagen Type 1 N-Terminal Propeptide Formal name: Biochemical Markers of Bone Remodeling ... tests for evaluating bone turnover: C-telopeptide (C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTx)) – a marker ...

  13. Bone tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... physical exam. Tests that may be done include: Alkaline phosphatase blood level Bone biopsy Bone scan Chest x- ... also affect the results of the following tests: Alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme Blood calcium level Parathyroid hormone Blood phosphorus ...

  14. Bone Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the body, bones can get infected. The infections are usually bacterial, but can also be fungal. ... bloodstream. People who are at risk for bone infections include those with diabetes, poor circulation, or recent ...

  15. Bone cement

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Chauhan, Mayank; Vaish, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge about the bone cement is of paramount importance to all Orthopaedic surgeons. Although the bone cement had been the gold standard in the field of joint replacement surgery, its use has somewhat decreased because of the advent of press-fit implants which encourages bone in growth. The shortcomings, side effects and toxicity of the bone cement are being addressed recently. More research is needed and continues in the field of nanoparticle additives, enhanced bone–cement interface etc. PMID:26403875

  16. Bone Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The danger of disuse osteoporosis under weightless condition in space led to extensive research into measurements of bone stiffness and mass by the Biomedical Research Division of Ames and Stanford University. Through its Technology Utilization Program, NASA funded an advanced SOBSA, a microprocessor-controlled bone probe system. SOBSA determines bone stiffness by measuring responses to an electromagnetic shaker. With this information, a physician can identify bone disease, measure deterioration and prescribe necessary therapy. The system is now undergoing further testing.

  17. Influence of Non-MHD Flutes on the Efficiency of Energy Transfer from the Laser-Produced, ICF and Space Exploding Plasmas to Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, Yuri P.; Antonov, Vladimir M.; Boyarintsev, Eduard L.; Melekhov, Alexandr V.; Posukh, Vitaliy G.; Shaikhislamov, Ildar F.; Nakashima, Hideki; Vchivkov, Konstantin V

    2005-01-15

    The results of <> experiment with quasispherical Laser-produced Plasma Clouds (LPC) expanding into strong (B{sub 0} {approx}10 kG) and uniform magnetic field at KI-1 facility of ILP are presented. Main characteristics and the influence of non-MHD flute instability onto effectiveness of plasma-field interaction were studied especially for the purpose of plasma confinement and the direct conversion of its kinetic energy into magnetic and electric ones (of pick-up coils). A new model of enhanced field penetration into plasma due to Hall-effect in its flutes and under conditions of finite ion Larmor radius is discussed. The data obtained on the current generation by LPC in short-circuited surrounding coils (with total conversion efficiency up to {approx}10%) are compared with the models of ILP and last results of relevant 3D/PIC calculations done at KU. All these results show the opportunities of LPC-experiments to simulate both space exploding plasmas (AMPTE) and MHD-effects of ICF micro-explosions in planned NIF experiments for study Laser Fusion Rocket like a VISTA.

  18. The Effect of the Double-Deck Filament Setup on Enhancing the Uniformity of Temperature Field on Long-Flute Cutting Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bin; Chen, Sulin; Cheng, Lei; Sun, Fanghong

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, a double-deck filament setup is proposed for the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) method and an optimization method is presented to determine its optimal geometry that is able to produce a highly uniform temperature field on the whole flute surface of long-flute cutting tools. The optimization method is based on the finite volume method (FVM) simulation and the Taguchi method. The simulation results show that this double-deck filament setup always produce a highly uniform temperature distribution along the filament direction. Comparatively, for the temperature uniformity along the drill axis, the heights of the two filament decks present virtually significant influence, while the separations between the two filaments in either deck exhibit a relative weak effect. An optimized setup is obtained that can produce a highly uniform temperature field with an average temperature of 834°C, a standard deviation (σ) of 2.59°C and a temperature range (R) of 11.75°C. Finally, the precision of the proposed simulation method is verified by an additional temperature measurement. The measured temperature results show that a highly uniform temperature fields with σ/R = 9.6/35.2°C can be generated by the optimized setup and the deviation of the simulated results from the measured actual temperatures are within 0.5-3.5%, which justifies the correctness of the simulation method proposed in present study.

  19. Heat accumulation during sequential cortical bone drilling.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Andrew C; Tai, Bruce L; Belmont, Barry; Irwin, Todd A; Shih, Albert; Holmes, James R

    2016-03-01

    Significant research exists regarding heat production during single-hole bone drilling. No published data exist regarding repetitive sequential drilling. This study elucidates the phenomenon of heat accumulation for sequential drilling with both Kirschner wires (K wires) and standard two-flute twist drills. It was hypothesized that cumulative heat would result in a higher temperature with each subsequent drill pass. Nine holes in a 3 × 3 array were drilled sequentially on moistened cadaveric tibia bone kept at body temperature (about 37 °C). Four thermocouples were placed at the center of four adjacent holes and 2 mm below the surface. A battery-driven hand drill guided by a servo-controlled motion system was used. Six samples were drilled with each tool (2.0 mm K wire and 2.0 and 2.5 mm standard drills). K wire drilling increased temperature from 5 °C at the first hole to 20 °C at holes 6 through 9. A similar trend was found in standard drills with less significant increments. The maximum temperatures of both tools increased from <0.5 °C to nearly 13 °C. The difference between drill sizes was found to be insignificant (P > 0.05). In conclusion, heat accumulated during sequential drilling, with size difference being insignificant. K wire produced more heat than its twist-drill counterparts. This study has demonstrated the heat accumulation phenomenon and its significant effect on temperature. Maximizing the drilling field and reducing the number of drill passes may decrease bone injury. PMID:26334198

  20. The Comparison of the Effect of Block Flute Accompanied Song Teaching with Multi-Sound Notation and Vocalization Program Accompanied Song Teaching on the Success of Students' Song Learning Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saktanli, S. Cem

    2011-01-01

    This experimental study was done to see if using computer supported notation and vocalization program for teaching songs instead of using block flute accompanied song teaching has any significant effect on students' singing behavior. The study group is composed of the 5th, 6th and 7th graders of 2008-2009 educational term in T.O.K.I. Yahya Kemal…

  1. [Bone diseases].

    PubMed

    Uebelhart, Brigitte; Rizzoli, René

    2016-01-13

    Calcium intake shows a small impact on bone mineral density and fracture risk. Denosumab is a more potent inhibitor of bone resorption than zoledronate. Abaloparatide, PTHrP analog, increases bone mineral density and decreases fracture incidence. Teriparatide could be delivered via a transdermic device. Romosozumab and odanacatib improve calculated bone strength. Sequential or combined treatments with denosumab and teriparatide could be of interest, but not denosumab followed by teriparatide. Fibrous dysplasia, Paget disease and hypophosphatasia are updated, as well as atypical femoral fracture and osteonecrosis of the jaw. PMID:26946704

  2. Space Flute Duet

    NASA Video Gallery

    Harmony reaches new heights as NASA Astronaut Cady Coleman, circling Earth aboard the International Space Station, and musician Ian Anderson, founder of the rock band Jethro Tull, join together for...

  3. Talking Bones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jaclyn; Kassing, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Describes cooperation with the Saint Louis Zoo to provide opportunities for elementary school students to learn about bones, how animals move, what they eat, and how much they grow. Uses biofacts which include bones, skulls, and other parts to make the laboratory a hands-on experience for students. (YDS)

  4. Bone Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... include those with diabetes, poor circulation, or recent injury to the bone. You may also be at risk if you are having hemodialysis. Symptoms of bone infections include Pain in the infected area Chills and fever Swelling, warmth, and redness A blood ...

  5. Characterization of chlorinated solvent contamination in limestone using innovative FLUTe® technologies in combination with other methods in a line of evidence approach.

    PubMed

    Broholm, Mette M; Janniche, Gry S; Mosthaf, Klaus; Fjordbøge, Annika S; Binning, Philip J; Christensen, Anders G; Grosen, Bernt; Jørgensen, Torben H; Keller, Carl; Wealthall, Gary; Kerrn-Jespersen, Henriette

    2016-06-01

    Characterization of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones in limestone aquifers/bedrock is essential to develop accurate site-specific conceptual models and perform risk assessment. Here innovative field methods were combined to improve determination of source zone architecture, hydrogeology and contaminant distribution. The FACT™ is a new technology and it was applied and tested at a contaminated site with a limestone aquifer, together with a number of existing methods including wire-line coring with core subsampling, FLUTe® transmissivity profiling and multilevel water sampling. Laboratory sorption studies were combined with a model of contaminant uptake on the FACT™ for data interpretation. Limestone aquifers were found particularly difficult to sample with existing methods because of core loss, particularly from soft zones in contact with chert beds. Water FLUTe™ multilevel groundwater sampling (under two flow conditions) and FACT™ sampling and analysis combined with FLUTe® transmissivity profiling and modeling were used to provide a line of evidence for the presence of DNAPL, dissolved and sorbed phase contamination in the limestone fractures and matrix. The combined methods were able to provide detailed vertical profiles of DNAPL and contaminant distributions, water flows and fracture zones in the aquifer and are therefore a powerful tool for site investigation. For the limestone aquifer the results indicate horizontal spreading in the upper crushed zone, vertical migration through fractures in the bryozoan limestone down to about 16-18m depth with some horizontal migrations along horizontal fractures within the limestone. Documentation of the DNAPL source in the limestone aquifer was significantly improved by the use of FACT™ and Water FLUTe™ data. PMID:27116640

  6. Characterization of chlorinated solvent contamination in limestone using innovative FLUTe® technologies in combination with other methods in a line of evidence approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broholm, Mette M.; Janniche, Gry S.; Mosthaf, Klaus; Fjordbøge, Annika S.; Binning, Philip J.; Christensen, Anders G.; Grosen, Bernt; Jørgensen, Torben H.; Keller, Carl; Wealthall, Gary; Kerrn-Jespersen, Henriette

    2016-06-01

    Characterization of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones in limestone aquifers/bedrock is essential to develop accurate site-specific conceptual models and perform risk assessment. Here innovative field methods were combined to improve determination of source zone architecture, hydrogeology and contaminant distribution. The FACT™ is a new technology and it was applied and tested at a contaminated site with a limestone aquifer, together with a number of existing methods including wire-line coring with core subsampling, FLUTe® transmissivity profiling and multilevel water sampling. Laboratory sorption studies were combined with a model of contaminant uptake on the FACT™ for data interpretation. Limestone aquifers were found particularly difficult to sample with existing methods because of core loss, particularly from soft zones in contact with chert beds. Water FLUTe™ multilevel groundwater sampling (under two flow conditions) and FACT™ sampling and analysis combined with FLUTe® transmissivity profiling and modeling were used to provide a line of evidence for the presence of DNAPL, dissolved and sorbed phase contamination in the limestone fractures and matrix. The combined methods were able to provide detailed vertical profiles of DNAPL and contaminant distributions, water flows and fracture zones in the aquifer and are therefore a powerful tool for site investigation. For the limestone aquifer the results indicate horizontal spreading in the upper crushed zone, vertical migration through fractures in the bryozoan limestone down to about 16-18 m depth with some horizontal migrations along horizontal fractures within the limestone. Documentation of the DNAPL source in the limestone aquifer was significantly improved by the use of FACT™ and Water FLUTe™ data.

  7. Paget's Disease of Bone

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Paget's Disease of Bone What is Paget's Disease of Bone? Click for more information Enlarged and Misshapen Bones Paget's disease of bone causes affected bones to ...

  8. Metastatic Bone Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bone Disease cont. Page ( 4 ) MBD vs. Primary Bone Cancer The diagnosis of metastatic bone disease should not ... from an unknown primary carcinoma or a primary bone cancer (sarcoma). For example, if an area of bone ...

  9. Bone x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... or broken bone Bone tumors Degenerative bone conditions Osteomyelitis (inflammation of the bone caused by an infection) ... Multiple myeloma Osgood-Schlatter disease Osteogenesis imperfecta Osteomalacia Osteomyelitis Paget disease of the bone Rickets X-ray ...

  10. Adaptive Bone Remodeling of the Femoral Bone After Tumor Resection Arthroplasty With an Uncemented Proximally Hydroxyapatite-Coated Stem.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mikkel R; Petersen, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    Loss of bone stock and stress shielding is a significant challenge in limb salvage surgery. This study investigates the adaptive bone remodeling of the femoral bone after implantation of a tumor prosthesis with an uncemented press fit stem. We performed a prospective 1 yr follow-up of 6 patients (mean age: 55 (26-78) yr, female/male=3/3) who underwent bone tumor resection surgery of the proximal femur (n=3) or distal femur (n=3). Reconstruction was done using a Global Modular Replacement System (Stryker® Orthopaedics, Mahwah, NJ) tumor prosthesis, and all patients received a straight-fluted 125-mm uncemented press-fit titanium alloy stem with hydroxyapatite coating of the proximal part of the stem. Measurements of bone mineral density (BMD; g/cm2) were done postoperatively and after 3, 6, and 12 mo in the part of the femur bone containing the Global Modular Replacement System stem using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. BMD was measured in 3 regions of interest (ROIs) in the femur bone. Nonparametric analysis of variance (Friedman test) for evaluation of changes in BMD over time. BMD decreased in all 3 ROIs with time. In ROI 1 (p=0.01), BMD decreased by 10% after 3 mo and ended with a total decrease of 14% after 1 yr. In ROI 2 (p=0.006), BMD was decreased by 6% after 3 and 6 mo; after 1 yr of follow-up, BMD was 9% below the postoperative value. In ROI 3 (p=0.009), BMD decreased by 6% after 3 and 6 mo; after 1 yr of follow-up, BMD was 8% below the postoperative value. A bone loss of 8%-9% during the first postoperative year was seen along the femoral stem, but in the bone containing the hydroxyapatite-coated part of the stem, the decrease in BMD was 14%, thus indicating that stress shielding of this part of the bone may play a role for the adaptive bone remodeling. PMID:25843447

  11. Influence of tool geometry on drilling performance of cortical and trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Tuijthof, G J M; Frühwirt, C; Kment, C

    2013-08-01

    Minimally invasive surgery poses high demands on tool design. The goal was to measure the influence of drill bit geometry on maximum thrust forces required for drilling, and compare this relative to the known influence of feed rate and bone composition. Blind holes were drilled perpendicular to the iliac crest up to 10 mm depth in cadaveric pelvic bones of 20 pigs (adolescent) and 11 goats (full grown) with eight substantially different drill bits of ∅ 3-3.2 mm. Subsequently, boreholes were drilled perpendicular to the ilium with the same drill bits at three different feed rates (0.58 mm/s, 0.83 mm/s, 1.08 mm/s). The mean maximum thrust force ranges from 10 to 110 N for cortical bone, and from 3 to 65 N for trabecular bone. The results show that both drill bit geometry and feed rate have a significant influence on the maximum thrust forces, with a dominant influence of drill bit geometry in terms of shape of the flutes, sharpness of cutting edges and value of point angle. The differences in thrust forces between cortical and trabecular bone are substantial for all measured conditions. The measured values can be used for drill design. PMID:23298783

  12. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; ...

  13. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity, nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; Umbilical ...

  14. Gallium-assisted growth of flute-like MgO nanotubes, Ga2O3-filled MgO nanotubes, and MgO/Ga2O3 co-axial nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Jie, Jiansheng; Wu, Chunyan; Yu, Yongqiang; Wang, Li; Hu, Zhizhong

    2009-02-18

    Flute-like MgO nanotubes were successfully synthesized via a simple thermal evaporation method by using Mg(3)N(2) and Ga(2)O(3) as the source materials. The nanotubes are single-crystal cubic MgO, and have [100] orientation. In contrast to conventional nanotubes with intact walls, the flute-like MgO nanotubes possess a unique porous structure. On the nanotubes there are series of holes aligned along the nanotube length with approximate equidistance. Ga(2)O(3)-filled MgO nanotubes and MgO/Ga(2)O(3) co-axial nanotubes were also found in the product. Further investigation confirms that the inner beta-Ga(2)O(3) has an epitaxial growth relation with the outer MgO nanotube due to their perfect lattice matching. A gallium-assisted growth mechanism was proposed to interpret the growth of the flute-like MgO nanotubes. The thermal expansion and evaporation of the filled liquid gallium in MgO nanotubes are likely responsible for the formation of the hole structures on the side walls. PMID:19417423

  15. Bone Marrow Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. ... the platelets that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem cells ...

  16. Bone Marrow Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. ... platelets, which help the blood to clot. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that replaces a person's ...

  17. Genetics of Bone Density

    MedlinePlus

    ... study linked 32 novel genetic regions to bone mineral density. The findings may help researchers understand why ... or treating osteoporosis. Bones are made of a mineral and protein scaffold filled with bone cells. Bone ...

  18. Calcium and bones

    MedlinePlus

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  19. Bone biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A bone biopsy is performed by making a small incision into the skin. A biopsy needle retrieves a sample of bone and it ... examination. The most common reasons for bone lesion biopsy are to distinguish between benign and malignant bone ...

  20. Bone lesion biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Bone biopsy; Biopsy - bone ... needle is gently pushed and twisted into the bone. Once the sample is obtained, the needle is ... sample is sent to a lab for examination. Bone biopsy may also be done under general anesthesia ...

  1. Bone Quality in Paget's Disease of Bone.

    PubMed

    Singer, Frederick R

    2016-04-01

    Paget's disease of bone is produced by a localized increase in osteoclastic and osteoblastic activity which can progress slowly to involve an entire bone if untreated. A common feature is enlarged bones which are deformed, particularly in weight-bearing regions of the skeleton such as the lower extremity. Pathologic fractures may be a consequence, and nonunion of femoral fractures is not uncommon. Analyses of bone biopsies from patients with Paget's disease indicate that there is a lower, heterogeneous degree of bone mineralization and a younger tissue age than that found in control bone. Pagetic bone also has less resistance to plastic deformation and a straighter crack path than control bone. PMID:26943142

  2. BONE BANKS

    PubMed Central

    de Alencar, Paulo Gilberto Cimbalista; Vieira, Inácio Facó Ventura

    2015-01-01

    Bone banks are necessary for providing biological material for a series of orthopedic procedures. The growing need for musculoskeletal tissues for transplantation has been due to the development of new surgical techniques, and this has led to a situation in which a variety of hospital services have been willing to have their own source of tissue for transplantation. To increase the safety of transplanted tissues, standards for bone bank operation have been imposed by the government, which has limited the number of authorized institutions. The good performance in a bone bank depends on strict control over all stages, including: formation of well-trained harvesting teams; donor selection; conducting various tests on the tissues obtained; and strict control over the processing techniques used. Combination of these factors enables greater scope of use and numbers of recipient patients, while the incidence of tissue contamination becomes statistically insignificant, and there is traceability between donors and recipients. This paper describes technical considerations relating to how a bone bank functions, the use of grafts and orthopedic applications, the ethical issues and the main obstacles encountered. PMID:27026958

  3. Broken bone

    MedlinePlus

    ... from a height Motor vehicle accidents Direct blow Child abuse Repetitive forces, such as those caused by running, ... you can clearly see a deformity, assume the child has a broken bone and get medical help. Prevention Take the following steps to reduce your risk ...

  4. Bone banking and sterilization of bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamisawa, I.; Itoman, M.; Maehara, H.; Kobayashi, A.; Watanabe, T.

    1995-08-01

    The use of banked bone (preserved allograft bone) is various and essential, because it has numerous advantages including the relative ease in retrieval a large amount of bone material and requisite shape and size. But bone banking and allografting must be promoted under obligation to stably supply safe and high-quality bone. To avoid transferring disease perfectly, irradiation sterilization is especially recommended at the present time.

  5. [Bone quantitative ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Mami

    2016-01-01

    The conventional ultrasonic bone densitometry system can give us information of bone as ultrasonic wave velocity and attenuation. However, the data reflect both structural and material properties of bone. In order to focus only on the bone matrix properties without the effect of bone structure, studies of microscopic Brillouin scattering technique are introduced. The wave velocity in a trabecula was anisotropic and depended on the position and structure of the cancellous bone. The glycation also affected on the wave velocities in bone. As a new bone quality, the piezoelectricity of bone is also discussed. PMID:26728531

  6. Bone scan appearances following bone and bone marrow biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    McKillop, J.H.; Maharaj, D.; Boyce, B.F.; Fogelman, I.

    1984-01-01

    Bone marrow and bone biopsies are performed not infrequently in patients referred for bone scans and represent a potential cause of a ''false positive'' focal abnormality on the bone scan. The authors have therefore examined the scan appearances in a series of patients who had undergone either sternal marrow biopsy, (Salah needle, diameter 1.2 mm) trephine iliac crest marrow biopsy (Jamshidi 11 gauge needle, diameter 3.5 mm) or a transiliac bone biopsy (needle diameter 8 mm). Of 18 patients studied 1 to 45 days after sternal marrow 17 had normal scan appearances at the biopsy site and 1 had a possible abnormality. None of 9 patients studied 4 to 19 days after trephine iliac crest marrow biopsy had a hot spot at the biopsy site. A focal scan abnormality was present at the biopsy site in 9/11 patients studied 5 to 59 days after a trans iliac bone biopsy. No resultant scan abnormality was seen in 4 patients imaged within 3 days of the bone biopsy or in 3 patients imaged 79 to 138 days after the procedure. Bone marrow biopsy of the sternum or iliac crest does not usually cause bone scan abnormalities. A focal abnormality at the biopsy site is common in patients imaged 5 days to 2 months after bone biopsy. The gauge of the needle employed in the biopsy and thus the degree of bone trauma inflicted, is likely to be main factor determining the appearance of bone scan abnormalities at the biopsy site.

  7. Facts about Broken Bones

    MedlinePlus

    ... las fracturas de huesos Your bones are tough stuff — but even tough stuff can break. Like a wooden pencil, bones will ... that? Get a lot of physical activity, especially stuff like jumping and running. Feed your bones the ...

  8. Bone marrow aspiration

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003658.htm Bone marrow aspiration To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bone marrow is the soft tissue inside bones that helps ...

  9. Bone density scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone the higher the risk of fractures. A bone scan, along with a patient's medical history, is a ... and whether any preventative treatment is needed. A bone density scan has the advantage of being painless and exposing ...

  10. Smoking and Bone Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... direct relationship between tobacco use and decreased bone density. Analyzing the impact of cigarette smoking on bone ... hard to determine whether a decrease in bone density is due to smoking itself or to other ...

  11. Menopause and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... You reach your highest bone mass (size and density) at about age 30. Then, sometime between age ... your bones, your doctor may do a bone density test (DEXA scan). This test gives exact measurements ...

  12. [Evaluation of bone sterngth].

    PubMed

    Mashiba, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    Biomechanical testing of the bone provides the most important and direct information about bone strength. This article explains biomechanical priciples including structural mechanical properties and intrinsic material properties, and serves actual biomechanical testing tedhniques for bone specimens. PMID:26728529

  13. Bone marrow biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - bone marrow ... A bone marrow biopsy may be done in the health care provider's office or in a hospital. The sample may be taken from the pelvic or breast bone. Sometimes, other areas are used. Marrow is removed ...

  14. Biomechanical and histologic basis of osseodensification drilling for endosteal implant placement in low density bone. An experimental study in sheep.

    PubMed

    Lahens, Bradley; Neiva, Rodrigo; Tovar, Nick; Alifarag, Adham M; Jimbo, Ryo; Bonfante, Estevam A; Bowers, Michelle M; Cuppini, Marla; Freitas, Helora; Witek, Lukasz; Coelho, Paulo G

    2016-10-01

    A bone drilling concept, namely osseodensification, has been introduced for the placement of endosteal implants to increase primary stability through densification of the osteotomy walls. This study investigated the effect of osseodensification on the initial stability and early osseointegration of conical and parallel walled endosteal implants in low density bone. Five male sheep were used. Three implants were inserted in the ilium, bilaterally, totaling 30 implants (n=15 conical, and n=15 parallel). Each animal received 3 implants of each type, inserted into bone sites prepared as follows: (i) regular-drilling (R: 2mm pilot, 3.2mm, and 3.8mm twist drills), (ii) clockwise osseodensification (CW), and (iii) counterclockwise (CCW) osseodensification drilling with Densah Bur (Versah, Jackson, MI, USA): 2.0mm pilot, 2.8mm, and 3.8mm multi-fluted burs. Insertion torque as a function of implant type and drilling technique, revealed higher values for osseodensification relative to R-drilling, regardless of implant macrogeometry. A significantly higher bone-to-implant contact (BIC) for both osseodensification techniques (p<0.05) was observed compared to R-drilling. There was no statistical difference in BIC as a function of implant type (p=0.58), nor in bone-area-fraction occupancy (BAFO) as a function of drilling technique (p=0.22), but there were higher levels of BAFO for parallel than conic implants (p=0.001). Six weeks after surgery, new bone formation along with remodeling sites was observed for all groups. Bone chips in proximity with the implants were seldom observed in the R-drilling group, but commonly observed in the CW, and more frequently under the CCW osseodensification technique. In low-density bone, endosteal implants present higher insertion torque levels when placed in osseodensification drilling sites, with no osseointegration impairment compared to standard subtractive drilling methods. PMID:27341291

  15. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow - discharge; Stem cell transplant - discharge; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant - discharge; Reduced intensity; Non-myeloablative transplant - discharge; Mini transplant - discharge; Allogenic bone marrow transplant - ...

  16. Bone demineralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, P. B.; Vose, G. P.; Vogt, F. B.; Lachance, P. A.

    1971-01-01

    Crew members of the Gemini 4, Gemini 5, and Gemini 7 missions were compared regarding skeletal changes in three major anatomic sites with respect to changes in skeletal density during space flight. Bone-mass changes have been found for the command pilot and the pilot of each mission in the conventional os calcis section, in the combined sections covering 60 percent of the os calcis, and in hand phalanges 5-2 and 4-2. Comparison of radiographically determined losses in X-ray absorbence with X-ray absorbence losses in healthy young men subjected to bedrest immobilization for the same length of time showed that losses for the crewmembers exceeded losses for the bedrest subjects in all cases; this was an indication that restriction of body movement did not represent the only factor involved.

  17. Exercise, lifestyle, and your bones

    MedlinePlus

    Osteoporosis - exercise; Low bone density - exercise ... Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bones to become brittle and more likely to fracture (break). With osteoporosis, the bones lose density. Bone density is the amount of bone ...

  18. Bone scan appearances following biopsy of bone and bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    McKillop, J.H.; Maharaj, D.; Boyce, B.F.; Fogelman, I.

    1984-10-01

    The influence of sternal marrow aspiration, iliac crest marrow aspiration, and iliac crest bone biopsy on bone scan appearances was examined. Eighteen patients were scanned a mean of 9.9 days after sternal marrow aspiration with a Salah needle. Bone scans obtained in 9 patients a mean of 10 days aftr iliac crest trephine marrow biopsy with a Jamshidi needle showed no abnormality at the biopsy site. In 18 patients with metabolic bone disease who had undergone iliac crest bone biopsy with an 8 mm needle, a scan abnormality due to the biopsy was usually present when the interval between the biopsy and the scan was 5 days to 2 months. Patients who were scanned within 3 days of iliac crest bone biopsy or more than 2 months after biopsy had normal scan appearance at the biopsy site.

  19. Bone grafts in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prasanna; Vinitha, Belliappa; Fathima, Ghousia

    2013-01-01

    Bone grafts are used as a filler and scaffold to facilitate bone formation and promote wound healing. These grafts are bioresorbable and have no antigen-antibody reaction. These bone grafts act as a mineral reservoir which induces new bone formation. PMID:23946565

  20. Bone Marrow Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains immature cells, called stem cells. The ... platelets, which help the blood to clot. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that replaces a ...

  1. Does running strengthen bone?

    PubMed

    Boudenot, Arnaud; Achiou, Zahra; Portier, Hugues

    2015-12-01

    Bone is a living tissue needing mechanical stress to maintain strength. Traditional endurance exercises offer only modest effects on bone. Walking and running produce low impact but lead to bone fatigue. This article is specifically addressed to therapists and explains the mechanisms involved for the effects of exercise on bone. Intermittent exercise limits bone fatigue, and downhill exercises increase ground impact forces and involve eccentric muscle contractions, which are particularly osteogenic. PMID:26562001

  2. Basic bone radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    This clinical book surveys the skeletal system as seen through radiological imaging. It emphasizing abnormalities, disease, and trauma, and includes vital information on bones, bone growth, and the cells involved in bone pathology. It covers many bone diseases and injuries which are rarely covered in medical texts, as well as descriptions of radiologic procedures that specifically relate to the skeleton. This edition includes many illustrations, information on MR imaging and CT scanning, and discussions of osteoporosis, dysplasias, and metabolic bone disease.

  3. Anorexia nervosa and bone.

    PubMed

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-06-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a condition of severe low weight that is associated with low bone mass, impaired bone structure, and reduced bone strength, all of which contribute to increased fracture risk. Adolescents with AN have decreased rates of bone accrual compared with normal-weight controls, raising additional concerns of suboptimal peak bone mass and future bone health in this age group. Changes in lean mass and compartmental fat depots, and hormonal alterations secondary to nutritional factors contribute to impaired bone metabolism in AN. The best strategy to improve bone density is to regain weight and menstrual function. Oral estrogen-progesterone combinations are not effective in increasing bone density in adults or adolescents with AN, and transdermal testosterone replacement is not effective in increasing bone density in adult women with AN. However, physiological estrogen replacement as transdermal estradiol with cyclic progesterone does increase bone accrual rates in adolescents with AN to approximate that in normal-weight controls, leading to a maintenance of bone density Z-scores. A recent study has shown that risedronate increases bone density at the spine and hip in adult women with AN. However, bisphosphonates should be used with great caution in women of reproductive age, given their long half-life and potential for teratogenicity, and should be considered only in patients with low bone density and clinically significant fractures when non-pharmacological therapies for weight gain are ineffective. Further studies are necessary to determine the best therapeutic strategies for low bone density in AN. PMID:24898127

  4. Anorexia Nervosa and Bone

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a condition of severe low weight that is associated with low bone mass, impaired bone structure and reduced bone strength, all of which contribute to increased fracture risk., Adolescents with AN have decreased rates of bone accrual compared with normal-weight controls, raising addition concerns of suboptimal peak bone mass and future bone health in this age group. Changes in lean mass and compartmental fat depots, hormonal alterations secondary to nutritional factors contribute to impaired bone metabolism in AN. The best strategy to improve bone density is to regain weight and menstrual function. Oral estrogen-progesterone combinations are not effective in increasing bone density in adults or adolescents with AN, and transdermal testosterone replacement is not effective in increasing bone density in adult women with AN. However, physiologic estrogen replacement as transdermal estradiol with cyclic progesterone does increase bone accrual rates in adolescents with AN to approximate that in normal-weight controls, leading to a maintenance of bone density Z-scores. A recent study has shown that risedronate increases bone density at the spine and hip in adult women with AN. However, bisphosphonates should be used with great caution in women of reproductive age given their long half-life and potential for teratogenicity, and should be considered only in patients with low bone density and clinically significant fractures when non-pharmacological therapies for weight gain are ineffective. Further studies are necessary to determine the best therapeutic strategies for low bone density in AN. PMID:24898127

  5. Bisphosphonates and bone quality

    PubMed Central

    Pazianas, Michael; van der Geest, Stefan; Miller, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are bone-avid compounds used as first-line medications for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. They are also used in other skeletal pathologies such as Paget's and metastatic bone disease. They effectively reduce osteoclast viability and also activity in the resorptive phase of bone remodelling and help preserve bone micro-architecture, both major determinants of bone strength and ultimately of the susceptibility to fractures. The chemically distinctive structure of each BP used in the clinic determines their unique affinity, distribution/penetration throughout the bone and their individual effects on bone geometry, micro-architecture and composition or what we call ‘bone quality'. BPs have no clinically significant anabolic effects. This review will touch upon some of the components of bone quality that could be affected by the administration of BPs. PMID:24876930

  6. [Microdestruction of the bone].

    PubMed

    Iankovskiĭ, V É

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was the detection of microcracks in the compact bone tissue surrounding the fracture and in deformed bone undergoing subcritical loading. The portions of deformed bone tissue and terminal fragments of broken bones were obtained in the form of blocks longitudinally sawcut from the regions of primary and secondary bone rupture. A total of 300 such blocks were available for the examination. All portions of the deformed bone tissue and terminal fragments of broken bones showed up microcracks commensurate with the bone structures. They were actually hardened traces of deformation that preceded the fracture and reflected the volume of the destroyed bone tissue; moreover, in certain cases they allowed to identify the kind of the object that exerted the external action (either a blow or slow bending). PMID:25269164

  7. Bone strength: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Turner, Charles H

    2006-04-01

    Bones serve several mechanical functions, including acoustic amplification in the middle ear, shielding vital organs from trauma, and serving as levers for muscles to contract against. Bone is a multiphase material made up of a tough collagenous matrix intermingled with rigid mineral crystals. The mineral gives bone its stiffness. Without sufficient mineralization, bones will plastically deform under load. Collagen provides toughness to bone making it less brittle so that it better resists fracture. Bone adapts to mechanical stresses largely by changing its size and shape, which are major determinants of its resistance to fracture. Tissue is added in regions of high mechanical stress providing an efficient means for improving bone strength. Experiments have shown that small additions of bone mineral density (BMD) (5-8%) caused by mechanical loading can improve bone strength by over 60% and extend bone fatigue life by 100-fold. Consequently, it is clear that bone tissue possesses a mechanosensing apparatus that directs osteogenesis to where it is most needed for improving bone strength. The biological processes involved in bone mechanotransduction are poorly understood and further investigation of the molecular mechanisms involved might uncover drug targets for osteoporosis. Several pathways are emerging from current research, including membrane ion channels, ATP signaling, second messengers, such as prostaglandins and nitric oxide, insulin-like growth factors, and Wnt signaling. PMID:16831941

  8. Bone marrow (stem cell) donation

    MedlinePlus

    Stem cell transplant; Allogeneic-donation ... There are two types of bone marrow donation: Autologous bone marrow transplant is when people donate their own bone marrow. "Auto" means self. Allogenic bone marrow transplant is when another person ...

  9. How Is Bone Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic How is bone cancer staged? How is bone cancer diagnosed? A patient’s symptoms, physical exam, and results ... and other imaging tests. Imaging tests to detect bone cancer X-rays Most bone cancers show up on ...

  10. Bone mineral density test

    MedlinePlus

    BMD test; Bone density test; Bone densitometry; DEXA scan; DXA; Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; p-DEXA; Osteoporosis-BMD ... need to undress. This scan is the best test to predict your risk of fractures. Peripheral DEXA ( ...

  11. Ultrasonic bone densitometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoop, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Human bone density changes can be determined by a device originally developed for in-flight testing of astronauts' bones during extended space missions. Device is comparable in size, weight and power consumption to portable television set.

  12. Bone marrow aspiration

    MedlinePlus

    ... creates suction. A small sample of bone marrow fluid flows into the tube. The needle is removed. Pressure and then a bandage are applied to the skin. The bone marrow fluid is sent to a laboratory and examined under ...

  13. Paget's Disease of Bone

    MedlinePlus

    ... might be responsible. It tends to run in families. Many people do not know they have Paget's disease because their symptoms are mild. For others, symptoms can include Pain Enlarged bones Broken bones Damaged cartilage in joints Doctors use blood ...

  14. What Is Bone?

    MedlinePlus

    ... a soft framework, and calcium phosphate is a mineral that adds strength and hardens the framework. This ... bone formation continues at a faster pace than removal until bone mass peaks during the third decade ...

  15. Bone fracture repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100077.htm Bone fracture repair - series To use the sharing features on ... to slide 4 out of 4 Indications Overview Fractures of the bones are classified in a number ...

  16. Bone Loss in IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... DENSITY? Although bone seems as hard as a rock, it’s actually living tissue. Throughout your life, old ... available Bone Loss (.pdf) File: 290 KB 733 Third Avenue, Suite 510, New York, NY 10017 | 800- ...

  17. Bone Marrow Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem cells or ... marrow makes too many white blood cells Other diseases, such as lymphoma, can spread into the bone ...

  18. Adenosine and Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mediero, Aránzazu; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    2013-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic organ that undergoes continuous remodeling whilst maintaining a balance between bone formation and resorption. Osteoblasts, which synthesize and mineralize new bone, and osteoclasts, the cells that resorb bone, act in concert to maintain bone homeostasis. In recent years, there has been increasing appreciation of purinergic regulation of bone metabolism. Adenosine, released locally, mediates its physiologic and pharmacologic actions via interactions with G-protein coupled receptors and recent work has indicated that these receptors are involved in the regulation of osteoclast differentiation and function, as well as osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Moreover, adenosine receptors also regulate chondrocyte and cartilage homeostasis. These recent findings underscore the potential therapeutic importance of adenosine receptors in regulating bone physiology and pathology. PMID:23499155

  19. Eating disorders and bone.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Dale; Morgan, Sarah L

    2013-01-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) is a frequent and often-overlooked consequence of eating disorders, in particular anorexia nervosa and eating disorders associated with the female athlete triad. The causes of low BMD are multifactorial and include low peak bone mass accrual, accelerated bone resorption, and changes in bone microarchitecture. Early diagnosis and interventions focused on nutritional rehabilitation and weight gain reduce the risk of further BMD deficits and fractures. PMID:24094471

  20. Radionuclide bone imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Webber, M.M.

    1981-12-01

    Radionuclide bone imaging of the skeleton, now well established as the most important diagnostic procedure in detecting bone metastases, is also a reliable method for the evaluation of the progression or regression of metastatic bone disease. The article concentrates on the technetium-99m agents and the value of these agents in the widespread application of low-dose radioisotope scanning in such bone diseases as metastasis, osteomyelitis, trauma, osteonecrosis, and other abnormal skeletal conditions.

  1. [Bone tissue engineering scaffolds].

    PubMed

    Fang, Liru; Weng, Wenjian; Shen, Ge; Han, Gaorong; Santos, J D; Du, Peiyi

    2003-03-01

    Bone tissue engineering may provide an alternative to the repairs to skeletal defects resulting from disease, trauma or surgery. Scaffold has played an important role in bone tissue engineering, which functions as the architecture for bone in growth. In this paper, the authors gave a brief introduction about the requirement of bone tissue engineering scaffold, the key of the design of scaffolds and the current research on this subject. PMID:12744187

  2. Bone cysts: unicameral and aneurysmal bone cyst.

    PubMed

    Mascard, E; Gomez-Brouchet, A; Lambot, K

    2015-02-01

    Simple and aneurysmal bone cysts are benign lytic bone lesions, usually encountered in children and adolescents. Simple bone cyst is a cystic, fluid-filled lesion, which may be unicameral (UBC) or partially separated. UBC can involve all bones, but usually the long bone metaphysis and otherwise primarily the proximal humerus and proximal femur. The classic aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is an expansive and hemorrhagic tumor, usually showing characteristic translocation. About 30% of ABCs are secondary, without translocation; they occur in reaction to another, usually benign, bone lesion. ABCs are metaphyseal, excentric, bulging, fluid-filled and multicameral, and may develop in all bones of the skeleton. On MRI, the fluid level is evocative. It is mandatory to distinguish ABC from UBC, as prognosis and treatment are different. UBCs resolve spontaneously between adolescence and adulthood; the main concern is the risk of pathologic fracture. Treatment in non-threatening forms consists in intracystic injection of methylprednisolone. When there is a risk of fracture, especially of the femoral neck, surgery with curettage, filling with bone substitute or graft and osteosynthesis may be required. ABCs are potentially more aggressive, with a risk of bone destruction. Diagnosis must systematically be confirmed by biopsy, identifying soft-tissue parts, as telangiectatic sarcoma can mimic ABC. Intra-lesional sclerotherapy with alcohol is an effective treatment. In spinal ABC and in aggressive lesions with a risk of fracture, surgical treatment should be preferred, possibly after preoperative embolization. The risk of malignant transformation is very low, except in case of radiation therapy. PMID:25579825

  3. Bone marrow biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - bone marrow ... A bone marrow biopsy may be done in the health care provider's office or in a hospital. The sample may ... This captures a tiny sample, or core, of bone marrow within the needle. The sample and needle are ...

  4. What's a Funny Bone?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help White House Lunch Recipes What's a Funny Bone? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's a Funny Bone? Print A A A Text Size Have you ... prickly kind of dull pain? That's your funny bone! It doesn't really hurt as much as ...

  5. Bone mineral density test

    MedlinePlus

    BMD test; Bone density test; Bone densitometry; DEXA scan; DXA; Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; p-DEXA; Osteoporosis-BMD ... Bone density testing can be done several ways. The most common and accurate way uses a dual-energy x- ...

  6. Calcium and bones

    MedlinePlus

    Bone strength and calcium ... or if your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ... injury. As you age, your body still needs calcium to keep your bones dense and strong. Most experts recommend at least ...

  7. [Bone quality and strength relating with bone remodeling].

    PubMed

    Mori, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The bone has the functions of mineral reservoir and mechanical support as skeleton. Bone remodeling is the adult mode of bone metabolism, replacing old bone tissue to new one. Bone strength is determined by bone volume, structure and quality such as micro damage, degree of mineralization and collagen cross linkage, which are all controlled by bone remodeling. Bone strength decreases under high turn-over condition by decreasing bone volume and deterioration of bone structure, which also decreases under low turn-over condition by increased micro damage, increasing mineralization and AGE collagen cross linkage. PMID:26728527

  8. Oxytocin and bone.

    PubMed

    Colaianni, Graziana; Sun, Li; Zaidi, Mone; Zallone, Alberta

    2014-10-15

    One of the most meaningful results recently achieved in bone research has been to reveal that the pituitary hormones have profound effect on bone, so that the pituitary-bone axis has become one of the major topics in skeletal physiology. Here, we discuss the relevant evidence about the posterior pituitary hormone oxytocin (OT), previously thought to exclusively regulate parturition and breastfeeding, which has recently been established to directly regulate bone mass. Both osteoblasts and osteoclasts express OT receptors (OTR), whose stimulation enhances bone mass. Consistent with this, mice deficient in OT or OTR display profoundly impaired bone formation. In contrast, bone resorption remains unaffected in OT deficiency because, even while OT stimulates the genesis of osteoclasts, it inhibits their resorptive function. Furthermore, in addition to its origin from the pituitary, OT is also produced by bone marrow osteoblasts acting as paracrine-autocrine regulator of bone formation modulated by estrogens. In turn, the power of estrogen to increase bone mass is OTR-dependent. Therefore, OTR(-/-) mice injected with 17β-estradiol do not show any effects on bone formation parameters, while the same treatment increases bone mass in wild-type mice. These findings together provide evidence for an anabolic action of OT in regulating bone mass and suggest that bone marrow OT may enhance the bone-forming action of estrogen through an autocrine circuit. This established new physiological role for OT in the maintenance of skeletal integrity further suggests the potential use of this hormone for the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:25209411

  9. Method for fusing bone

    DOEpatents

    Mourant, Judith R.; Anderson, Gerhard D.; Bigio, Irving J.; Johnson, Tamara M.

    1996-01-01

    Method for fusing bone. The present invention is a method for joining hard tissue which includes chemically removing the mineral matrix from a thin layer of the surfaces to be joined, placing the two bones together, and heating the joint using electromagnetic radiation. The goal of the method is not to produce a full-strength weld of, for example, a cortical bone of the tibia, but rather to produce a weld of sufficient strength to hold the bone halves in registration while either external fixative devices are applied to stabilize the bone segments, or normal healing processes restore full strength to the tibia.

  10. Proteomics in bone research.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hengwei; Recker, Robert; Lee, Wai-Nang Paul; Xiao, Gary Guishan

    2010-02-01

    Osteoporosis is prevalent among the elderly and is a major cause of bone fracture in this population. Bone integrity is maintained by the dynamic processes of bone resorption and bone formation (bone remodeling). Osteoporosis results when there is an imbalance of the two counteracting processes. Bone mineral density, measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry has been the primary method to assess fracture risk for decades. Recent studies demonstrated that measurement of bone turnover markers allows for a dynamic assessment of bone remodeling, while imaging techniques, such as dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, do not. The application of proteomics has permitted discoveries of new, sensitive, bone turnover markers, which provide unique information for clinical diagnosis and treatment of patients with bone diseases. This review summarizes the recent findings of proteomic studies on bone diseases, properties of mesenchymal stem cells with high expansion rates and osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation, with emphasis on the role of quantitative proteomics in the study of signaling dynamics, biomarkers and discovery of therapeutic targets. PMID:20121480

  11. Ultrasound simulation in bone.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Jonathan J; Luo, Gangming; Siffert, Robert S

    2008-01-01

    The manner in which ultrasound interacts with bone is of key interest in therapy and diagnosis alike. These may include applications directly to bone, as, for example, in treatment to accelerate the healing of bone fractures and in assessment of bone density in osteoporosis, or indirectly in diagnostic imaging of soft tissue with interest in assessing exposure levels to nearby bone. Because of the lack of analytic solutions to virtually every "practical problem" encountered clinically, ultrasound simulation has become a widely used technique for evaluating ultrasound interactions in bone. This paper provides an overview of the use of ultrasound simulation in bone. A brief description of the mathematical model used to characterize ultrasound propagation in bone is first provided. A number of simulation examples are then presented that explain how simulation may be utilized in a variety of practical configurations. The focus of this paper in terms of examples presented is on diagnostic applications in bone, and, in particular, for assessment of osteoporosis. However, the use of simulation in other areas of interest can easily be extrapolated from the examples presented. In conclusion, this paper describes the use of ultrasound simulation in bone and demonstrates the power of computational methods for ultrasound research in general and tissue and bone applications in particular. PMID:18599409

  12. Nanomaterials and bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Tao; Xie, Jing; Liao, Jinfeng; Zhang, Tao; Lin, Shiyu; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of bone disorders and conditions has been increasing. Bone is a nanomaterials composed of organic (mainly collagen) and inorganic (mainly nano-hydroxyapatite) components, with a hierarchical structure ranging from nanoscale to macroscale. In consideration of the serious limitation in traditional therapies, nanomaterials provide some new strategy in bone regeneration. Nanostructured scaffolds provide a closer structural support approximation to native bone architecture for the cells and regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, which results in the formation of functional tissues. In this article, we focused on reviewing the classification and design of nanostructured materials and nanocarrier materials for bone regeneration, their cell interaction properties, and their application in bone tissue engineering and regeneration. Furthermore, some new challenges about the future research on the application of nanomaterials for bone regeneration are described in the conclusion and perspectives part. PMID:26558141

  13. Marble Bone Disease: A Rare Bone Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Harinathbabu, Maheswari; Thillaigovindan, Ranjani; Prabhu, Geetha

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis, or marble bone disease, is a rare skeletal disorder due to a defective function of the osteoclasts. This defect renders bones more susceptible to osteomyelitis due to decreased vascularity. This disorder is inherited as autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive. Healthcare professionals should urge these patients to maintain their oral health as well as general health, as this condition makes these patients more susceptible to frequent infections and fractures. This case report emphasizes the signs and symptoms of marble bone disease and presents clinical and radiographic findings.  PMID:26594603

  14. [Bone and Nutrition. Bone and phosphorus intake].

    PubMed

    Arai, Hidekazu; Sakuma, Masae

    2015-07-01

    Phosphorus is necessary for bone mineralization. Although adequate phosphorus intake is essential for skeletal mineralization, it is reported that excessive phosphorus intake can induce deleterious effect on bone. Recently, since the Japanese diet has been westernized, phosphorus intake by the meat and dairy products has increased. Furthermore, along with the development of processed foods, excessive intake of inorganic phosphorus from food additives has become a problem. An adverse effect on parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion from high phosphorus intake was seen only when calcium intake was inadequate. Dietary calcium to phosphorus ratio can be considered as one of the indicators that can predict the health of the bone. PMID:26119308

  15. Bone grafts, bone substitutes and orthobiologics

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Timothy T.; Rosenbaum, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    The biology of fracture healing is better understood than ever before, with advancements such as the locking screw leading to more predictable and less eventful osseous healing. However, at times one’s intrinsic biological response, and even concurrent surgical stabilization, is inadequate. In hopes of facilitating osseous union, bone grafts, bone substitutes and orthobiologics are being relied on more than ever before. The osteoinductive, osteoconductive and osteogenic properties of these substrates have been elucidated in the basic science literature and validated in clinical orthopaedic practice. Furthermore, an industry built around these items is more successful and in demand than ever before. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the basic science, clinical utility and economics of bone grafts, bone substitutes and orthobiologics. PMID:23247591

  16. Toxicokinetics of bone lead.

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, M B

    1991-01-01

    This article discusses bone as a source of lead to the rest of the body and as a record of past lead exposure. Bone lead levels generally increase with age at rates dependent on the skeletal site and lead exposure. After occupational exposure, the slow decline in blood lead, a 5- to 19-year half-life, reflects the long skeletal half-life. Repeated measurements of bone lead demonstrate the slow elimination of lead from bone. Stable isotope ratios have revealed many details of skeletal uptake and subsequent release. The bulk turnover rates for compact bone are about 2% per year and 8% for spine. Turnover activity varies with age and health. Even though lead approximates calcium, radium, strontium, barium, fluorine, and other bone seekers, the rates for each are different. A simple, two-pool (bone and blood) kinetic model is presented with proposed numerical values for the changes in blood lead levels that occur with changes in turnover rates. Two approaches are offered to further quantify lead turnover. One involves a study of subjects with known past exposure. Changes in the ratio of blood lead to bone lead with time would reflect the course of bone lead availability. Also, stable isotopes and subjects who move from one geographical area to another offer opportunities. Sequential isotope measurements would indicate how much of the lead in blood is from current exposure or bone stores, distinct from changes in absorption or excretion. PMID:2040248

  17. Biophotonics and Bone Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory; Fischer, David; Asipauskas, Marius; Chauhan, Chirag; Compitello, Nicole; Burke, Jamie; Tate, Melissa Knothe

    2004-01-01

    One of the more-serious side effects of extended space flight is an accelerated bone loss [Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap, http://research.hq.nasa.gov/code_u/bcpr/index.cfm]. Rates of bone loss are highest in the weight-bearing bones of the hip and spine regions, and the average rate of bone loss as measured by bone mineral density measurements is around 1.2% per month for persons in a microgravity environment. It shows that an extrapolation of the microgravity induced bone loss rates to longer time scales, such as a 2.5 year round-trip to Mars (6 months out at 0 g, 1.5 year stay on Mars at 0.38 g, 6 months back at 0 g), could severely compromise the skeletal system of such a person.

  18. Biomaterials and bone mechanotransduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikavitsas, V. I.; Temenoff, J. S.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Bone is an extremely complex tissue that provides many essential functions in the body. Bone tissue engineering holds great promise in providing strategies that will result in complete regeneration of bone and restoration of its function. Currently, such strategies include the transplantation of highly porous scaffolds seeded with cells. Prior to transplantation the seeded cells are cultured in vitro in order for the cells to proliferate, differentiate and generate extracellular matrix. Factors that can affect cellular function include the cell-biomaterial interaction, as well as the biochemical and the mechanical environment. To optimize culture conditions, good understanding of these parameters is necessary. The new developments in bone biology, bone cell mechanotransduction, and cell-surface interactions are reviewed here to demonstrate that bone mechanotransduction is strongly influenced by the biomaterial properties.

  19. Pelvic aneurysmal bone cyst

    PubMed Central

    Sharifah, MIA; Nor Hazla, MH; Suraya, A; Tan, SP

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an extremely rare case of a huge aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) in the pelvis, occurring in the patient’s 5th decade of life. The patient presented with a history of painless huge pelvic mass for 10 years. Plain radiograph and computed tomography showed huge expansile lytic lesion arising from the right iliac bone. A biopsy was performed and histology confirmed diagnosis of aneurysmal bone cyst. Unfortunately, the patient succumbed to profuse bleeding from the tumour. PMID:22279501

  20. Nanocomposites and bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Roshan; Deng, Meng; Laurencin, Cato T.; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.

    2011-12-01

    This manuscript focuses on bone repair/regeneration using tissue engineering strategies, and highlights nanobiotechnology developments leading to novel nanocomposite systems. About 6.5 million fractures occur annually in USA, and about 550,000 of these individual cases required the application of a bone graft. Autogenous and allogenous bone have been most widely used for bone graft based therapies; however, there are significant problems such as donor shortage and risk of infection. Alternatives using synthetic and natural biomaterials have been developed, and some are commercially available for clinical applications requiring bone grafts. However, it remains a great challenge to design an ideal synthetic graft that very closely mimics the bone tissue structurally, and can modulate the desired function in osteoblast and progenitor cell populations. Nanobiomaterials, specifically nanocomposites composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) and/or collagen are extremely promising graft substitutes. The biocomposites can be fabricated to mimic the material composition of native bone tissue, and additionally, when using nano-HA (reduced grain size), one mimics the structural arrangement of native bone. A good understanding of bone biology and structure is critical to development of bone mimicking graft substitutes. HA and collagen exhibit excellent osteoconductive properties which can further modulate the regenerative/healing process following fracture injury. Combining with other polymeric biomaterials will reinforce the mechanical properties thus making the novel nano-HA based composites comparable to human bone. We report on recent studies using nanocomposites that have been fabricated as particles and nanofibers for regeneration of segmental bone defects. The research in nanocomposites, highlight a pivotal role in the future development of an ideal orthopaedic implant device, however further significant advancements are necessary to achieve clinical use.

  1. Radionuclide bone imaging and densitometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mettler, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 13 selections. Some of the titles are: Radionuclides and the Normal Bone Scan; The Radionuclide Bone Scan in Malignant Disease; Pediatric Applications of Radionuclide Bone Imaging; The Radionuclide Bone Scan in Arthritis and Metabolic and Miscellaneous Disorders; and Soft Tissue Activity on the Radionuclide Bone Scan.

  2. Imaging of Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sopo; Ouyang, Tao; Kanekar, Sangam

    2016-08-01

    Bone marrow is the essential for function of hematopoiesis, which is vital for the normal functioning of the body. Bone marrow disorders or dysfunctions may be evaluated by blood workup, peripheral smears, marrow biopsy, plain radiographs, computed tomography (CT), MRI and nuclear medicine scan. It is important to distinguish normal spinal marrow from pathology to avoid missing a pathology or misinterpreting normal changes, either of which may result in further testing and increased health care costs. This article focuses on the diffuse bone marrow pathologies, because the majority of the bone marrow pathologies related to hematologic disorders are diffuse. PMID:27444005

  3. Biophotonics and Bone Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory; Fischer, David; Asipauskas, Marius; Chauhan, Chirag; Compitello, Nicole; Burke, Jamie; Tate, Melissa Knothe

    2004-01-01

    One of the more serious side effects of extended space flight is an accelerated bone loss. Rates of bone loss are highest in the weight-bearing bones of the hip and spine regions, and the average rate of bone loss as measured by bone mineral density measurements is around 1.2% per month for persons in a microgravity environment. It is well known that bone remodeling responds to mechanical forces. We are developing two-photon microscopy techniques to study bone tissue and bone cell cultures to better understand the fundamental response mechanism in bone remodeling. Osteoblast and osteoclast cell cultures are being studied, and the goal is to use molecular biology techniques in conjunction with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) to study the physiology of in-vitro cell cultures in response to various stimuli, such as fluid flow induced shear stress and mechanical stress. We have constructed a two-photon fluorescence microscope for these studies, and are currently incorporating FLIM detection. Current progress will be reviewed. This work is supported by the NASA John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium.

  4. Bone marrow fat.

    PubMed

    Hardouin, Pierre; Pansini, Vittorio; Cortet, Bernard

    2014-07-01

    Bone marrow fat (BMF) results from an accumulation of fat cells within the bone marrow. Fat is not a simple filling tissue but is now considered as an actor within bone microenvironment. BMF is not comparable to other fat depots, as in subcutaneous or visceral tissues. Recent studies on bone marrow adipocytes have shown that they do not appear only as storage cells, but also as cells secreting adipokines, like leptin and adiponectin. Moreover bone marrow adipocytes share the same precursor with osteoblasts, the mesenchymal stem cell. It is now well established that high BMF is associated with weak bone mass in osteoporosis, especially during aging and anorexia nervosa. But numerous questions remain discussed: what is the precise phenotype of bone marrow adipocytes? What is the real function of BMF, and how does bone marrow adipocyte act on its environment? Is the increase of BMF during osteoporosis responsible for bone loss? Is BMF involved in other diseases? How to measure BMF in humans? A better understanding of BMF could allow to obtain new diagnostic tools for osteoporosis management, and could open major therapeutic perspectives. PMID:24703396

  5. Genetics of aging bone.

    PubMed

    Adams, Douglas J; Rowe, David W; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L

    2016-08-01

    With aging, the skeleton experiences a number of changes, which include reductions in mass and changes in matrix composition, leading to fragility and ultimately an increase of fracture risk. A number of aspects of bone physiology are controlled by genetic factors, including peak bone mass, bone shape, and composition; however, forward genetic studies in humans have largely concentrated on clinically available measures such as bone mineral density (BMD). Forward genetic studies in rodents have also heavily focused on BMD; however, investigations of direct measures of bone strength, size, and shape have also been conducted. Overwhelmingly, these studies of the genetics of bone strength have identified loci that modulate strength via influencing bone size, and may not impact the matrix material properties of bone. Many of the rodent forward genetic studies lacked sufficient mapping resolution for candidate gene identification; however, newer studies using genetic mapping populations such as Advanced Intercrosses and the Collaborative Cross appear to have overcome this issue and show promise for future studies. The majority of the genetic mapping studies conducted to date have focused on younger animals and thus an understanding of the genetic control of age-related bone loss represents a key gap in knowledge. PMID:27272104

  6. Bone Quality in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Mitsuru; Marumo, Keishi

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased risk of fracture, although type 2 diabetes is characterized by normal bone mineral density (BMD). The fracture risk of type 1 diabetes increases beyond an explained by a decrease of BMD. Thus, diabetes may be associated with a reduction of bone strength that is not reflected in the measurement of BMD. Based on the present definition, both bone density and quality, which encompass the structural and material properties of bone, are important factors in the determination of bone strength. Diabetes reduces bone quality rather than BMD. Collagen cross-linking plays an important role in bone strength. Collagen cross-links can be divided into lysyl hydroxylase and lysyl oxidase-mediated enzymatic immature divalent cross-links, mature trivalent cross-links, and glycation- or oxidation-induced non-enzymatic cross-links (Advanced Glycation End-products: AGEs) such as pentosidine. These types of cross-links differ in the mechanism of formation and in function. Not only hyperglycemia, but also oxidative stress induces the reduction in enzymatic beneficial cross-links and the accumulation of disadvantageous AGEs in bone. In this review, we describe the mechanism of low bone quality in diabetes. PMID:23785354

  7. Method for fusing bone

    DOEpatents

    Mourant, J.R.; Anderson, G.D.; Bigio, I.J.; Johnson, T.M.

    1996-03-12

    The present invention is a method for joining hard tissue which includes chemically removing the mineral matrix from a thin layer of the surfaces to be joined, placing the two bones together, and heating the joint using electromagnetic radiation. The goal of the method is not to produce a full-strength weld of, for example, a cortical bone of the tibia, but rather to produce a weld of sufficient strength to hold the bone halves in registration while either external fixative devices are applied to stabilize the bone segments, or normal healing processes restore full strength to the tibia.

  8. Parosteal aneurysmal bone cyst☆

    PubMed Central

    Meohas, Walter; de Sá Lopes, Ana Cristina; da Silveira Möller, João Victor; Barbosa, Luma Duarte; Oliveira, Marcelo Bragança dos Reis

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of aneurysmal bone cysts is 0.14 cases per 100,000 individuals. Parosteal aneurysmal bone cysts are the least prevalent subtype and represent 7% of all aneurysmal bone cysts. We present the case of a 38-year-old male patient with pain and bulging in his right arm for eight months. He had previously been diagnosed as presenting giant-cell tumor, but his slides were reviewed and his condition was then diagnosed as parosteal aneurysmal bone cyst. The patient was treated with corticosteroid and calcitonin infiltration into the lesion and evolved with clinical and radiological improvement within the first five weeks after the operation. PMID:26535209

  9. Aging and Bone

    PubMed Central

    Boskey, A.L.; Coleman, R.

    2010-01-01

    Bones provide mechanical and protective function, while also serving as housing for marrow and a site for regulation of calcium ion homeostasis. The properties of bones do not remain constant with age; rather, they change throughout life, in some cases improving in function, but in others, function deteriorates. Here we review the modifications in the mechanical function and shape of bones, the bone cells, the matrix they produce, and the mineral that is deposited on this matrix, while presenting recent theories about the factors leading to these changes. PMID:20924069

  10. Hypercalciuric Bone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favus, Murray J.

    2008-09-01

    Hypercalciuria plays an important causal role in many patients with calcium oxalate (CaOx) stones. The source of the hypercalciuria includes increased intestinal Ca absorption and decreased renal tubule Ca reabsorption. In CaOx stone formers with idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH), Ca metabolic balance studies have revealed negative Ca balance and persistent hypercalciuria in the fasting state and during low dietary Ca intake. Bone resorption may also contribute to the high urine Ca excretion and increase the risk of bone loss. Indeed, low bone mass by DEXA scanning has been discovered in many IH patients. Thiazide diuretic agents reduce urine Ca excretion and may increase bone mineral density (BMD), thereby reducing fracture risk. Dietary Ca restriction that has been used unsuccessfully in the treatment of CaOx nephrolithiasis in the past may enhance negative Ca balance and accelerate bone loss. DEXA scans may demonstrate low BMD at the spine, hip, or forearm, with no predictable pattern. The unique pattern of bone histologic changes in IH differs from other causes of low DEXA bone density including postmenopausal osteoporosis, male hypogonadal osteoporosis, and glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Hypercalciuria appears to play an important pathologic role in the development of low bone mass, and therefore correction of urine Ca losses should be a primary target for treatment of the bone disease accompanying IH.

  11. Aneurysmal bone cyst involving the metacarpal bone in a child.

    PubMed

    Song, Kwang Soon; Lee, Si Wook; Bae, Ki Cheor; Sohn, Eun Seok

    2015-03-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts associated with tubular bones of the hand occur rarely and require particular diagnostic and therapeutic management techniques. While optimal treatment has not been established, accepted treatments range from aggressive radical treatment, including en bloc resection and excision diaphysectomy with strut bone grafting, to relatively simple techniques, such as thorough curettage followed by bone graft. Aggressive treatment approaches may be optimal for the cases with articular surface involvement, full-bone invasion of the phalanx or metacarpal, or more than 1 recurrence. We report a monocentric case of aneurysmal bone cysts involving metacarpal bone in a child who achieved favorable outcome with curettage and morselized cancellous bone grafts. PMID:25750953

  12. Fusion of the ear bones

    MedlinePlus

    Fusion of the ear bones is the joining of the bones of the inner ear. These are the incus, malleus, and stapes bones. Related topics include: Chronic ear infection Otosclerosis Middle ear malformations

  13. Bone Grafting the Cleft Maxilla

    MedlinePlus

    ... amount of bone from one place (usually the hip, head, ribs, or leg) and placing it in ... adjacent teeth into the bone graft; 2) prosthetic replacement (dental bridge); or 3) dental metallic bone implants. ...

  14. Exercise for Your Bone Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... supported by your browser. Home Bone Basics Lifestyle Exercise for Your Bone Health Publication available in: PDF ( ... A Complete Osteoporosis Program For Your Information Why Exercise? Like muscle, bone is living tissue that responds ...

  15. Spatial modeling of bone microarchitecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Li, Kang; Kim, Taehyong; Zhang, Aidong; Ramanathan, Murali

    2012-03-01

    We develop and evaluate a novel 3D computational bone framework, which is capable of enabling quantitative assessment of bone micro-architecture, bone mineral density and fracture risks. Our model for bone mineral is developed and its parameters are estimated from imaging data obtained with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and x-ray imaging methods. Using these parameters, we propose a proper 3D microstructure bone model. The research starts by developing a spatio-temporal 3D microstructure bone model using Voronoi tessellation. Then, we simulate and analyze the architecture of human normal bone network and osteoporotic bone network with edge pruning process in an appropriate ratio. Finally, we design several measurements to analyze Bone Mineral Density (BMD) and bone strength based on our model. The validation results clearly demonstrate our 3D Microstructure Bone Model is robust to reflect the properties of bone in the real world.

  16. Oral Health and Bone Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Bones Resources For Your Information Skeletal Bone Density and Dental Concerns The portion of the jawbone ... who do not have the disease. Low bone density in the jaw can result in other dental ...

  17. Biodegradable synthetic bone composites

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gao; Zhao, Dacheng; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2013-01-01

    The invention provides for a biodegradable synthetic bone composition comprising a biodegradable hydrogel polymer scaffold comprising a plurality of hydrolytically unstable linkages, and an inorganic component; such as a biodegradable poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate)/hydroxyapatite (pHEMA/HA) hydrogel composite possessing mineral content approximately that of human bone.

  18. Wnt Signaling in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Takuo; Michigami, Toshimi; Ozono, Keiichi

    2010-01-01

    Wnt signaling is involved not only in embryonic development but also in maintenance of homeostasis in postnatal tissues. Multiple lines of evidence have increased understanding of the roles of Wnt signaling in bone since mutations in the LRP5 gene were identified in human bone diseases. Canonical Wnt signaling promotes mesenchymal progenitor cells to differentiate into osteoblasts. The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway possibly through Lrp6, a co-receptor for Wnts as well as Lrp5, in osteoblasts regulates bone resorption by increasing the OPG/RANKL ratio. However, endogenous inhibitors of Wnt signaling including sclerostin block bone formation. Regulation of sclerostin appears to be one of the mechanisms of PTH anabolic actions on bone. Since sclerostin is almost exclusively expressed in osteocytes, inhibition of sclerostin is the most promising design. Surprisingly, Lrp5 controls bone formation by inhibiting serotonin synthesis in the duodenum, but not by directly promoting bone formation. Pharmacological intervention may be considered in many components of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, although adverse effects and tumorigenicity to other tissues are important. More studies will be needed to fully understand how the Wnt signaling pathway actually influences bone metabolism and to assure the safety of new interventions. PMID:23926379

  19. Surgery for Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... heat. The heat helps kill any remaining tumor cells. This allows PMMA to be used without cryosurgery for some types of bone tumors. Surgical treatment of metastasis To be able to cure a bone cancer, it and any existing metastases must be removed ...

  20. Benign bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Gilday, D L; Ash, J M

    1976-01-01

    There is little information in the literature concerning the role of bone scanning in benign bone neoplasms except for sporadic reports. Since the advent of 99mTc-polyphosphate, bone imaging has proven feasible and useful in locating the cause of bone pain, such as in osteoid osteomas, which are not always radiologically apparent, and in evaluating whether or not a radiologic lesion is indeed benign and solitary. Blood-pool images are particularly important in neoplastic disease, since the absence of hyperemia in the immediate postinjection period favors the diagnosis of a benign neoplasm, as does low-grade uptake on the delayed study. The scan, including pinhole magnification images, is especially valuable in diagnosing lesions in the spine and pelvis, which are poorly seen radiologically. We have studied various types of benign bone tumors, including simple and aneurysmal bone cysts, fibrous cortical defects, and nonossifying fibromas, all of which had minimal or no increased uptake of the radiopharmaceutical, unless traumatized. Although osteochondromas and enchondromas showed varied accumulation of activity, the scan was useful in differentiating these from sarcomatous lesions. All osteoid osteomas demonstrated marked activity, and could be accurately located preoperatively, as could the extent of fibrous dysplasia. The bone scan in the reticuloses also showed abnormal accumulation of activity, and aided in arriving at the prognosis and treatment of histiocytic bone lesions. PMID:1082170

  1. Semaphorin signaling in bone.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, Lieve; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Verstuyf, Annemieke

    2016-09-01

    Semaphorin molecules regulate cell adhesion and motility in a wide variety of cell types and are therefore involved in numerous processes including axon guidance, angiogenesis, cardiogenesis, tumor growth, and immune response. Increasing evidence points to a role of transmembrane, membrane-associated and soluble semaphorins during bone development as well as in the control of normal bone homeostasis. Within bone, semaphorins are implicated in the communication between different cell types by relaying signals in an autocrine or paracrine way. Semaphorins are not only involved in bone resorption but also in bone formation. Therefore, targeting semaphorin-induced signaling in bone may constitute an interesting new therapeutic strategy in osteoporosis. However, all the pioneering research on semaphorins is performed in mice and it remains to be established to what extent semaphorin signaling pathways are conserved between mice and men. In addition, knowledge of semaphorin signaling in bone mostly arises from loss/gain of function studies of one single semaphorin and/or receptor. However, different semaphorin molecules are co-expressed in bone and their signaling pathways are likely to interact in a complex and coherent way that needs proper understanding before targeting semaphorin signaling can be therapeutically exploited. PMID:26365296

  2. Automated trabecular bone histomorphometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polig, E.; Jee, W. S. S.

    1985-01-01

    The toxicity of alpha-emitting bone-seeking radionuclides and the relationship between bone tumor incidence and the local dosimetry of radionuclides in bone are investigated. The microdistributions of alpha-emitting radionuclides in the trabecular bone from the proximal humerus, distal humerus, proximal ulna, proximal femur, and distal femur of six young adult beagles injected with Am-241 (three with 2.8 micro-Ci/kg and three with 0.9 micro-Ci/kg) are estimated using a computer-controlled microscope photometer system; the components of the University of Utah Optical Track Scanner are described. The morphometric parameters for the beagles are calculated and analyzed. It is observed that the beagles injected with 0.9 micro-Ci of Am-241/kg showed an increase in the percentage of bone and trabecular bone thickness, and a reduction in the width of the bone marrow space and surface/volume ratio. The data reveal that radiation damage causes abnormal bone structure.

  3. BONES, TEACHER'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elementary Science Study, Newton, MA.

    THIS GUIDE WAS DEVELOPED FOR USE WITH THE ELEMENTARY SCIENCE STUDY UNIT ON "BONES.""BONES" HAS BEEN TAUGHT IN THE FOURTH GRADE AND REQUIRES FROM 10 TO 25 LESSONS, DEPENDING ON THE NUMBER OF ACTIVITIES USED. THE GUIDE DOES NOT PROVIDE DETAILED INSTRUCTION FOR CONDUCTING CLASSES, BUT RATHER SOME POSSIBLE ACTIVITIES, AND LEAVES THE DAY-TO-DAY…

  4. Assessment of bone vascularization and its role in bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Lafage-Proust, Marie-Hélène; Roche, Bernard; Langer, Max; Cleret, Damien; Vanden Bossche, Arnaud; Olivier, Thomas; Vico, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a composite organ that fulfils several interconnected functions, which may conflict with each other in pathological conditions. Bone vascularization is at the interface between these functions. The roles of bone vascularization are better documented in bone development, growth and modeling than in bone remodeling. However, every bone remodeling unit is associated with a capillary in both cortical and trabecular envelopes. Here we summarize the most recent data on vessel involvement in bone remodeling, and we present the characteristics of bone vascularization. Finally, we describe the various techniques used for bone vessel imaging and quantitative assessment, including histology, immunohistochemistry, microtomography and intravital microscopy. Studying the role of vascularization in adult bone should provide benefits for the understanding and treatment of metabolic bone diseases. PMID:25861447

  5. Ultrasonic bone densitometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoop, J. M. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A device, for measuring the density of a bone structure so as to monitor the calcium content, is described. A pair of opposed spaced ultrasonic transducers are held within a clamping apparatus closely adjacent the bone being analyzed. These ultrasonic transducers incude piezoelectric crystals shaped to direct signals through the bone encompassed in the heel and finger of the subject being tested. A pulse generator is coupled to one of the transducers and generates an electric pulse for causing the transducers to generate an ultrasonic sound wave which is directed through the bone structure to the other transducer. An electric circuit, including an amplifier and a bandpass filter couples the signals from the receiver transducer back to the pulse generator for retriggering the pulse generator at a frequency proportional to the duration that the ultrasonic wave takes to travel through the bone structure being examined.

  6. Bone and Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Zanchetta, María Belén; Longobardi, Vanesa; Bai, Julio César

    2016-04-01

    More than 50 % of untreated patients with celiac disease (CD) have bone loss detected by bone densitometry (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry:DXA). Moreover, patients with CD are more likely to have osteoporosis and fragility fractures, especially of the distal radius. Although still controversial, we recommend DXA screening in all celiac disease patients, particularly in those with symptomatic CD at diagnosis and in those who present risk factors for fracture such as older age, menopausal status, previous fracture history, and familial hip fracture history. Bone microarchitecture, especially the trabecular network, may be deteriorated, explaining the higher fracture risk in these patients. Adequate calcium and vitamin D supplementation are also recommended to optimize bone recovery, especially during the first years of gluten free diet (GFD). If higher fracture risk persists after 1 or 2 years of GFD, specific osteoactive treatment may be necessary to improve bone health. PMID:26875096

  7. Bone grafts and their substitutes.

    PubMed

    Fillingham, Y; Jacobs, J

    2016-01-01

    The continual cycle of bone formation and resorption is carried out by osteoblasts, osteocytes, and osteoclasts under the direction of the bone-signaling pathway. In certain situations the host cycle of bone repair is insufficient and requires the assistance of bone grafts and their substitutes. The fundamental properties of a bone graft are osteoconduction, osteoinduction, osteogenesis, and structural support. Options for bone grafting include autogenous and allograft bone and the various isolated or combined substitutes of calcium sulphate, calcium phosphate, tricalcium phosphate, and coralline hydroxyapatite. Not all bone grafts will have the same properties. As a result, understanding the requirements of the clinical situation and specific properties of the various types of bone grafts is necessary to identify the ideal graft. We present a review of the bone repair process and properties of bone grafts and their substitutes to help guide the clinician in the decision making process. PMID:26733632

  8. Gallium scintigraphy in bone infarction. Correlation with bone imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Armas, R.R.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The appearance of gallium-67 images in bone infarction was studied in nine patients with sickle cell disease and correlated with the bone scan findings. Gallium uptake in acute infarction was decreased or absent with a variable bone scan uptake, and normal in healing infarcts, which showed increased uptake on bone scan. The significance of these findings is discussed.

  9. SILICON AND BONE HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    JUGDAOHSINGH, R.

    2009-01-01

    Low bone mass (osteoporosis) is a silent epidemic of the 21st century, which presently in the UK results in over 200,000 fractures annually at a cost of over one billion pounds. Figures are set to increase worldwide. Understanding the factors which affect bone metabolism is thus of primary importance in order to establish preventative measures or treatments for this condition. Nutrition is an important determinant of bone health, but the effects of the individual nutrients and minerals, other than calcium, is little understood. Accumulating evidence over the last 30 years strongly suggest that dietary silicon is beneficial to bone and connective tissue health and we recently reported strong positive associations between dietary Si intake and bone mineral density in US and UK cohorts. The exact biological role(s) of silicon in bone health is still not clear, although a number of possible mechanisms have been suggested, including the synthesis of collagen and/or its stabilization, and matrix mineralization. This review gives an overview of this naturally occurring dietary element, its metabolism and the evidence of its potential role in bone health. PMID:17435952

  10. [Physiology and bone physiopathology].

    PubMed

    Lafita, J

    2003-01-01

    The bone tissue is one of the largest of the organism, with clear functions: to serve as a support and protection for the soft parts, as support for movement with the anchorage of the muscles, as mineral reserve and as interactive storage of the bone marrow. To exercise all these functions the bone must maintain its quality, a concept that combines its degree of mineralisation, its microarchitecture and its capacity to repair lesions, aspects that are included in the broad definition of osteoporosis: "A systemic disease of the skeleton, characterised by a low bone mass and a deterioration of the microarchitecture of the bone tissue, which jointly result in an increase in bone fragility and the consequent increase of the risk of fractures", although from the clinical point of view we have to centre our attention on mineralisation, a quantifiable aspect, understanding as osteoporosis a fall in bone mass greater than 2.5 standard deviations below that of young healthy patients. This article reviews the physiopathological aspects that influence the development of this frequent clinical picture. PMID:14716355

  11. Growth and bone development.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Cyrus; Harvey, Nicholas; Javaid, Kassim; Hanson, Mark; Dennison, Elaine

    2008-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality through its association with age-related fractures. Although most effort in fracture prevention has been directed at retarding the rate of age-related bone loss, and reducing the frequency and severity of trauma among elderly people, evidence is growing that peak bone mass is an important contributor to bone strength during later life. The normal patterns of skeletal growth have been well characterized in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. It has been confirmed that boys have higher bone mineral content, but not volumetric bone density, than girls. Furthermore, there is a dissociation between the peak velocities for height gain and bone mineral accrual, in both genders. Puberty is the period during which volumetric density appears to increase in both axial and appendicular sites. Many factors influence the accumulation of bone mineral during childhood and adolescence, including heredity, gender, diet, physical activity, endocrine status, and sporadic risk factors such as cigarette smoking. In addition to these modifiable factors during childhood, evidence has also accrued that fracture risk might be programmed during intrauterine life. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a relationship between birthweight, weight in infancy, and adult bone mass. This appears to be mediated through modulation of the set-point for basal activity of pituitary-dependent endocrine systems such as the hypothalamicpituitary-adrenal and growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axes. Maternal smoking, diet (particularly vitamin D deficiency), and physical activity also appear to modulate bone mineral acquisition during intrauterine life; furthermore, both low birth size and poor childhood growth are directly linked to the later risk of hip fracture. The optimization of maternal nutrition and intrauterine growth should also be included within preventive strategies against osteoporotic fracture, albeit for future

  12. [Determinants of bone quality and strength independent of bone remodeling].

    PubMed

    Saito, Mitsuru; Marumo, Keishi

    2016-01-01

    Bone mineral density(BMD)and bone microstructure are regulated mainly by bone remodeling. In contrast, bone collagen enzymatic immature and mature cross-links and advanced glycation end products such as pentosidine and carboxyl methyl lysine are affected by various factors. Aging bone tissue is repaired in the process of bone remodeling. However, deterioration of bone material properties markedly advances due to increases in oxidative stress, glycation stress, reactive oxygen species, carbonyl stress associated with aging and reduced sex hormone levels, and glucocorticoid use. To improve bone material properties in osteoporosis, we should use different drug (Saito M, Calcif Tissue Int, REVIEW, 97;242-261, 2015). In this review, we summarized determinants of bone quality and strength independent of bone remodeling. PMID:26728528

  13. Dependence of Long Bone Flexural Properties on Bone Mineral Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, BethAnn; Cleek, Tammy M.; Whalen, Robert T.; Connolly, James P. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess whether a non-invasive determination of long bone cross-sectional areal properties using bone densitometry accurately estimates true long bone flexural properties. In this study, section properties of two pairs of human female embalmed tibiae were compared using two methods: special analysis of bone densitometry data, and experimental determination of flexural regidities from bone surface strain measurements during controlled loading.

  14. Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow KidsHealth > For Teens > Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow Print A A A Text Size What's in ... Risks If You Have Questions What It Is Bone marrow aspirations and biopsies are performed to examine bone ...

  15. Bone Remodeling Under Pathological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wenmei; Li, Shuai; Pacios, Sandra; Wang, Yu; Graves, Dana T

    2016-01-01

    Bone is masterfully programmed to repair itself through the coupling of bone formation following bone resorption, a process referred to as coupling. In inflammatory or other conditions, the balance between bone resorption and bone formation shifts so that a net bone loss results. This review focuses on four pathologic conditions in which remodeling leads to net loss of bone, postmenopausal osteoporosis, arthritis, periodontal disease, and disuse bone loss, which is similar to bone loss associated with microgravity. In most of these there is an acceleration of the resorptive process due to increased formation of bone metabolic units. This initially leads to a net bone loss since the time period of resorption is much faster than the time needed for bone formation that follows. In addition, each of these processes is characterized by an uncoupling that leads to net bone loss. Mechanisms responsible for increased rates of bone resorption, i.e. the formation of more bone metabolic units, involve enhanced expression of inflammatory cytokines and increased expression of RANKL. Moreover, the reasons for uncoupling are discussed which range from a decrease in expression of growth factors and bone morphogenetic proteins to increased expression of factors that inhibit Wnt signaling. PMID:26599114

  16. Bone Grafts in Craniofacial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Elsalanty, Mohammed E.; Genecov, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Reconstruction of cranial and maxillofacial defects is a challenging task. The standard reconstruction method has been bone grafting. In this review, we shall describe the biological principles of bone graft healing, as pertinent to craniofacial reconstruction. Different types and sources of bone grafts will be discussed, as well as new methods of bone defect reconstruction. PMID:22110806

  17. Instrumentation for bone density measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meharg, L. S.

    1968-01-01

    Measurement system evaluates the integrated bone density over a specific cross section of bone. A digital computer converts stored bone scan data to equivalent aluminum calibration wedge thickness, and bone density is then integrated along the scan by using the trapezoidal approximation integration formula.

  18. The Geometry of the Bone Structure Associated with Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhang; Jian, Wang; Zhi-han, Li; Jun, Xiao; Liang, Zhao; Ge, Yan; Zhan-jun, Shi

    2014-01-01

    Close adaptation of the prosthesis to the bone is the key to achieving optimal stability and fixation for total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, there have been no adequate studies of bone morphology, especially in different races. The aim of this study was to analyze the geometry of the acetabulum and proximal femur of people from South China, based on three-dimensional reconstruction, and to detect differences between different population subsets. CT scans were performed on 80 healthy volunteers (160 hips) from South China, comprising 40 males (80 hips) and 40 females (80 hips). The images were imported into Mimics 10.01 to perform 3D reconstruction. THA-associated anatomical parameters were measured and compared with other published data. In comparison with published data, it seemed that people from South China have smaller acetabular abduction angle, larger acetabular supro-inferior diameter, larger neck-shaft angle, smaller offset, thinner femoral shaft and more proximal isthmus, which needed to be further confirmed. There were significant differences between the genders in most parameters. As significant differences in canal flare index (CFI) and distal canal flare index (DCFI) were found between genders, it was concluded the most significant differences lay in the isthmus of the femur. Among the femora, according to Noble’s classification we identified more normal types and fewer stovepipe and champagne-flute types than expected from the literature, indicating that uncemented prostheses would be suitable for most people from South China. Our findings reveal that simply choosing the smallest of a series of prostheses would not necessarily provide a good fit, due to the different trends from the proximal to the distal part of the femur. Significant variation exists in THA-associated anatomy between genders and population subsets. It is therefore imperative that each patient receives individual consideration rather than assuming all patients have the same

  19. The geometry of the bone structure associated with total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhang; Jian, Wang; Li, Zhi-han; Jun, Xiao; Liang, Zhao; Ge, Yan; Shi, Zhan-jun

    2014-01-01

    Close adaptation of the prosthesis to the bone is the key to achieving optimal stability and fixation for total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, there have been no adequate studies of bone morphology, especially in different races. The aim of this study was to analyze the geometry of the acetabulum and proximal femur of people from South China, based on three-dimensional reconstruction, and to detect differences between different population subsets. CT scans were performed on 80 healthy volunteers (160 hips) from South China, comprising 40 males (80 hips) and 40 females (80 hips). The images were imported into Mimics 10.01 to perform 3D reconstruction. THA-associated anatomical parameters were measured and compared with other published data. In comparison with published data, it seemed that people from South China have smaller acetabular abduction angle, larger acetabular supro-inferior diameter, larger neck-shaft angle, smaller offset, thinner femoral shaft and more proximal isthmus, which needed to be further confirmed. There were significant differences between the genders in most parameters. As significant differences in canal flare index (CFI) and distal canal flare index (DCFI) were found between genders, it was concluded the most significant differences lay in the isthmus of the femur. Among the femora, according to Noble's classification we identified more normal types and fewer stovepipe and champagne-flute types than expected from the literature, indicating that uncemented prostheses would be suitable for most people from South China. Our findings reveal that simply choosing the smallest of a series of prostheses would not necessarily provide a good fit, due to the different trends from the proximal to the distal part of the femur. Significant variation exists in THA-associated anatomy between genders and population subsets. It is therefore imperative that each patient receives individual consideration rather than assuming all patients have the same

  20. [Allergy towards bone cement].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Schuh, A; Summer, B; Mazoochian, F; Thomsen, M

    2006-09-01

    Bone cements based on polymethylmethacrylate are typically used for fixation of artificial joints. Intolerance reactions to endoprostheses not explained by infection or mechanical failure may lead to allergological diagnostics, which mostly focuses on metal allergy. However, also bone cement components may provoke hypersensitivity reactions leading to eczema, implant loosening, or fistula formation. Elicitors of such reactions encompass acrylates and additives such as benzoyl peroxide, N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine, hydroquinone, or antibiotics (particularly gentamicin). Upon repeated contact with bone cement components, e.g., acrylate monomers, also in medical personnel occasionally hand eczema or even asthma may develop. Therefore, in the case of suspected hypersensitivity reactions to arthroplasty, the allergological diagnostics should include bone cement components. PMID:16865384

  1. Healthy Bones Matter

    MedlinePlus

    ... keep my bones more healthy? Definitions What can go wrong? Reprinted from The Surgeon General’s Report on ... women who don’t smoke, and they often go through menopause earlier. Smokers also may absorb less ...

  2. Proximal Tibial Bone Graft

    MedlinePlus

    ... Complications Potential problems after a PTBG include infection, fracture of the proximal tibia and pain related to the procedure. Frequently Asked Questions If proximal tibial bone graft is taken from my knee, will this prevent me from being able to ...

  3. Bone marrow culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2015 Updated by: Yi-Bin Chen, MD, Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. Also reviewed ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  4. Reduction of bone strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingham, Cindy

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on reduction of bone strength are presented. WEHI 231 B growth rates, experimental chambers used to apply the electric field to the cell cultures, and a mouse suspended by rotating cuff in electromagnetic field are shown.

  5. Immunoregulation of bone remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajai; Mehdi, Abbass A; Srivastava, Rajeshwer N; Verma, Nar Singh

    2012-01-01

    Remodeling, a continuous physiological process maintains the strength of the bones, which maintains a delicate balance between bone formation and resorption process. This review gives an insight to the complex interaction and correlation between the bone remodeling and the corresponding changes in host immunological environment and also summarises the most recent developments occuring in the understanding of this complex field. T cells, both directly and indirectly increase the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kB ligand (RANKL); a vital step in the activation of osteoclasts, thus positively regulates the osteoclastogenesis. Though various cytokines, chemikines, transcription factors and co-stimulatory molecules are shared by both skeletal and immune systems, but researches are being conducted to establish and analyse their role and / or control on this complex but vital process. The understanding of this part of research may open new horizons in the management of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, resulting into bone loss and that of osteoporosis also. PMID:22837895

  6. Petrous Bone Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, Mario; Zini, Carlo; Gamoletti, Roberto; Frau, Niccolò; Taibah, Abdel Kader; Russo, Alessandra; Pasanisi, Enrico

    1993-01-01

    Petrous bone cholesteatoma is a rare pathologic entity and may be a difficult surgical challenge because of potential involvement of the facial nerve, carotid artery, dura mater, otic capsule, and risk of cerebrospinal fluid leak. The objective of this article is to present a personal classification of petrous bone cholesteatomas, a survey of recent surgical attitudes, and our present surgical strategy based on our experience with 54 operations between 1978 and 1990. Radical petromastoid exenteration with marsupialization and the middle cranial fossa approach were used only for small pure infra- or supralabyrinthine cholesteatomas, respectively. The enlarged transcochlear approach with closure of the external auditory canal was used for infralabyrinthine, infralabyrinthine-apical, and massive petrous bone cholesteatomas. Five cases with petrous bone cholesteatomas in different locations are described in detail to present the signs and symptoms together with the management. ImagesFigure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16Figure 17Figure 18 PMID:17170912

  7. Calcium and bones (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human body. Bones, like other tissues in the body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their ...

  8. Bone morphogenetic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Yongtao; Xiang Lixin; Shao Jianzhong

    2007-10-26

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are multi-functional growth factors belonging to the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily. It has been demonstrated that BMPs had been involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, survival, differentiation and apoptosis. However, their hallmark ability is that play a pivotal role in inducing bone, cartilage, ligament, and tendon formation at both heterotopic and orthotopic sites. In this review, we mainly concentrate on BMP structure, function, molecular signaling and potential medical application.

  9. Bone Remodeling Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foucar, Charlie; Goldberg, Leslie; Hon, Bodin; Moore, Shannon; Williams, Evan

    2009-01-01

    The impact of bone loss due to different mechanical loadings in microgravity is a major concern for astronauts upon reintroduction to gravitational forces in exploration missions to the Moon and Mars. it has been shown that astronauts not only lose bone at differing rates, with levels up to 2% per month, but each astronaut will respond to bone loss treatments differently. Pre- and post-flight imaging techniques and frozen urine samples for post-flight laboratory immunoassays To develop a novel, non-invasive, highly . sensitive, portable, intuitive, and low-powered device to measure bone resorption levels in 'real time' to provide rapid and Individualized feedback to maximize the efficacy of bone loss countermeasures 1. Collect urine specimen and analyze the level of bone resorption marker, DPD (deoxypridinoline) excreted. 2. Antibodies specific to DPD conjugated with nanoshells and mixed with specimen, the change in absorbance from agglutination is measured by an optical device. 3. The concentration of DPD is displayed and recorded on a PDA

  10. Boning up on autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Irving M; Layfield, Robert; Lotz, Martin; Settembre, Carmine; Whitehouse, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    From an evolutionary perspective, the major function of bone is to provide stable sites for muscle attachment and affording protection of vital organs, especially the heart and lungs (ribs) and spinal cord (vertebrae and intervertebral discs). However, bone has a considerable number of other functions: serving as a store for mineral ions, providing a site for blood cell synthesis and participating in a complex system-wide endocrine system. Not surprisingly, bone and cartilage cell homeostasis is tightly controlled, as is the maintenance of tissue structure and mass. While a great deal of new information is accruing concerning skeletal cell homeostasis, one relatively new observation is that the cells of bone (osteoclasts osteoblasts and osteocytes) and cartilage (chondrocytes) exhibit autophagy. The focus of this review is to examine the significance of this process in terms of the functional demands of the skeleton in health and during growth and to provide evidence that dysregulation of the autophagic response is involved in the pathogenesis of diseases of bone (Paget disease of bone) and cartilage (osteoarthritis and the mucopolysaccharidoses). Delineation of molecular changes in the autophagic process is uncovering new approaches for the treatment of diseases that affect the axial and appendicular skeleton. PMID:24225636

  11. The obesity of bone

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Emanuela A.; Lenzi, Andrea; Migliaccio, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    During the last decades, obesity and osteoporosis have become important global health problems, and the belief that obesity is protective against osteoporosis has recently come into question. In fact, some recent epidemiologic and clinical studies have shown that a high level of fat mass might be a risk factor for osteoporosis and fragility fractures. Several potential mechanisms have been proposed to explain the complex relationship between adipose tissue and bone. Indeed, adipose tissue secretes various molecules, named adipokines, which are thought to have effects on metabolic, skeletal and cardiovascular systems. Moreover, fat tissue is one of the major sources of aromatase, an enzyme that synthesizes estrogens from androgen precursors, hormones that play a pivotal role in the maintenance of skeletal homeostasis, protecting against osteoporosis. Moreover, bone cells express several specific hormone receptors and recent observations have shown that bone-derived factors, such as osteocalcin and osteopontin, affect body weight control and glucose homeostasis. Thus, the skeleton is considered an endocrine target organ and an endocrine organ itself, likely influencing other organs as well. Finally, adipocytes and osteoblasts originate from a common progenitor, a pluripotential mesenchymal stem cell, which has an equal propensity for differentiation into adipocytes or osteoblasts (or other lines) under the influence of several cell-derived transcription factors. This review will highlight recent insights into the relationship between fat and bone, evaluating both potential positive and negative influences between adipose and bone tissue. It will also focus on the hypothesis that osteoporosis might be considered the obesity of bone. PMID:26623005

  12. Primary Lymphoma of Bone

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun Yong; Hahn, Jee Sook; Suh, Chang Ok; Yang, Woo Ick

    2002-01-01

    Background: Primary lymphoma of bone is a rare disease. There is yet no systematical evaluation of primary lymphoma of bone in Korea. Here we report our experience of sixteen cases with primary lymphoma of bone focusing on the survival. Methods: Sixteen cases, collected for 13 years, were evaluated on the clinical presentation, histologic subtype, stage and treatment outcomes of the primary bone lymphoma. Results: The most common presenting complaint was bone pain. Malignant lymphoma of bone involved a wide variety of sites, the most prevalent site of which in this study was the spine. Most of the cases were in the diffuse large B-cell category. The clinical stage of lymphoma was IEA in two cases, IIEA in three cases, IVEA in five cases and IVEB in three cases. All treated cases received systemic chemotherapy and ten cases among them were treated with combined modality therapy. Median overall survival was not reached after median follow-up period of 28 months and five-year overall survival rate was 54%. Conclusion: More promising therapeutic strategies are needed for survival improvement on more accumulated cases. PMID:12298430

  13. Bone nutrients for vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Mangels, Ann Reed

    2014-07-01

    The process of bone mineralization and resorption is complex and is affected by numerous factors, including dietary constituents. Although some dietary factors involved in bone health, such as calcium and vitamin D, are typically associated with dairy products, plant-based sources of these nutrients also supply other key nutrients involved in bone maintenance. Some research suggests that vegetarian diets, especially vegan diets, are associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD), but this does not appear to be clinically significant. Vegan diets are not associated with an increased fracture risk if calcium intake is adequate. Dietary factors in plant-based diets that support the development and maintenance of bone mass include calcium, vitamin D, protein, potassium, and soy isoflavones. Other factors present in plant-based diets such as oxalic acid and phytic acid can potentially interfere with absorption and retention of calcium and thereby have a negative effect on BMD. Impaired vitamin B-12 status also negatively affects BMD. The role of protein in calcium balance is multifaceted. Overall, calcium and protein intakes in accord with Dietary Reference Intakes are recommended for vegetarians, including vegans. Fortified foods are often helpful in meeting recommendations for calcium and vitamin D. Plant-based diets can provide adequate amounts of key nutrients for bone health. PMID:24898231

  14. Osteogenic Scaffolds for Bone Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling-jiang; Liu, Ning; Liu, Qing; Jia, Lian-shun; Yuan, Wen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A highly osteogenic hybrid bioabsorbable scaffold was developed for bone reconstruction/augmentation. Through the use of a solid free-form fabrication technology, a bioabsorbable polycaprolactone (PCL) cage scaffold with a desired size and shape was produced and then filled with osteogenic bone graft particles, that is, morselized autologous bone chips. A rabbit total lamina defect model was chosen to demonstrate its efficacy in regenerating bone with a complicated anatomic shape. Both iliac bone and morselized iliac bone grafts were used in this study for comparison purposes. Serum osteocalcin and collagen type I cross-linked C-terminal telopeptide (CTx) determination showed that active bone remodeling occurred after bone grafts were implanted. X-ray images showed that the bony defects were completely filled with bone mass in all the groups with bone grafts. However, biomechanical tests showed that only the iliac bone and hybrid scaffold groups could restore the mechanical properties to the normal level after 10 weeks of implantation. A histology study showed that both iliac and hybrid scaffold groups had extensive new bone formation, and no adhesion and fibrosis were found. These results indicated that this osteogenic hybrid scaffold can be a good alternative to autologous iliac bone, because it does not need a second iliac bone-harvesting surgery, and thus the morbidity and the possible infections that are often associated with the bone harvesting surgery can be avoided. PMID:23515416

  15. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein induces bone formation.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, E A; Rosen, V; D'Alessandro, J S; Bauduy, M; Cordes, P; Harada, T; Israel, D I; Hewick, R M; Kerns, K M; LaPan, P

    1990-01-01

    We have purified and characterized active recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2A. Implantation of the recombinant protein in rats showed that a single BMP can induce bone formation in vivo. A dose-response and time-course study using the rat ectopic bone formation assay revealed that implantation of 0.5-115 micrograms of partially purified recombinant human BMP-2A resulted in cartilage by day 7 and bone formation by day 14. The time at which bone formation occurred was dependent on the amount of BMP-2A implanted; at high doses bone formation could be observed at 5 days. The cartilage- and bone-inductive activity of the recombinant BMP-2A is histologically indistinguishable from that of bone extracts. Thus, recombinant BMP-2A has therapeutic potential to promote de novo bone formation in humans. Images PMID:2315314

  16. [Morphological analysis of bone dynamics and metabolic bone disease. Histomorphometric concepts of bone remodeling and modeling].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideaki E

    2011-04-01

    In tissue level turnover of bone cells, bone remodeling shows a sequential events of activation, resorption, reversal and formation. This may be observed as secondary osteons in the cortical bone and trabecular packets in the cancellous bone. Microcracks are repaired by targeted remodeling, and calcium is released by non-targeted remodeling. In macromodeling, a macroscopic size of a bone increases with growth, without changing its basic figure. In micromodelimg, a shift of trabecula, a minishift, is biomechnically controlled. New lamellar bone is added parallel to compressive and tensile force, and bone resorption occurs at the opposite surface of formation. In minimodeling new lamellar bone is formed with a sequence of activation, then directly formation, without scalloping at the cement line between newly formed bone and its basic bone. PMID:21447918

  17. Bone formation: roles of genistein and daidzein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bone remodeling consists of a balance between bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts. Osteoporosis is the result of increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation causing a decreased bone mass density, loss of bone microarchitecture, and an increased risk of fractu...

  18. Porous Surface Modified Bioactive Bone Cement for Enhanced Bone Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li; Dong, Jingjing; Guo, Dagang; Mao, Mengmeng; Kong, Liang; Li, Yang; Wu, Zixiang; Lei, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Background Polymethylmethacrylate bone cement cannot provide an adhesive chemical bonding to form a stable cement-bone interface. Bioactive bone cements show bone bonding ability, but their clinical application is limited because bone resorption is observed after implantation. Porous polymethylmethacrylate can be achieved with the addition of carboxymethylcellulose, alginate and gelatin microparticles to promote bone ingrowth, but the mechanical properties are too low to be used in orthopedic applications. Bone ingrowth into cement could decrease the possibility of bone resorption and promote the formation of a stable interface. However, scarce literature is reported on bioactive bone cements that allow bone ingrowth. In this paper, we reported a porous surface modified bioactive bone cement with desired mechanical properties, which could allow for bone ingrowth. Materials and Methods The porous surface modified bioactive bone cement was evaluated to determine its handling characteristics, mechanical properties and behavior in a simulated body fluid. The in vitro cellular responses of the samples were also investigated in terms of cell attachment, proliferation, and osteoblastic differentiation. Furthermore, bone ingrowth was examined in a rabbit femoral condyle defect model by using micro-CT imaging and histological analysis. The strength of the implant–bone interface was also investigated by push-out tests. Results The modified bone cement with a low content of bioactive fillers resulted in proper handling characteristics and adequate mechanical properties, but slightly affected its bioactivity. Moreover, the degree of attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblast cells was also increased. The results of the push-out test revealed that higher interfacial bonding strength was achieved with the modified bone cement because of the formation of the apatite layer and the osseointegration after implantation in the bony defect. Conclusions

  19. Bone health in eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman-Levin, N; Hochberg, Z; Latzer, Y

    2014-03-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) put adolescents and young adults at risk for impaired bone health. Low bone mineral density (BMD) with ED is caused by failure to accrue peak bone mass in adolescence and bone loss in young adulthood. Although ED patients diagnosed with bone loss may be asymptomatic, some suffer bone pains and have increased incidence of fractures. Adolescents with ED are prone to increased prevalence of stress fractures, kyphoscoliosis and height loss. The clinical picture of the various EDs involves endocrinopathies that contribute to impaired bone health. Anorexia nervosa (AN) is characterized by low bone turnover, with relatively higher osteoclastic (bone resorptive) than osteoblastic (bone formation) activity. Bone loss in AN occurs in both the trabecular and cortical bones, although the former is more vulnerable. Bone loss in AN has been shown to be influenced by malnutrition and low weight, reduced fat mass, oestrogen and androgen deficiency, glucocorticoid excess, impaired growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor 1 axis, and more. Bone loss in AN may not be completely reversible despite recovery from the illness. Treatment modalities involving hormonal therapies have limited effectiveness, whereas increased caloric intake, weight gain and resumption of menses are essential to improved BMD. PMID:24165231

  20. Bone impairment in oxalosis: An ultrastructural bone analysis.

    PubMed

    Bacchetta, Justine; Farlay, Delphine; Abelin-Genevois, Kariman; Lebourg, Ludivine; Cochat, Pierre; Boivin, Georges

    2015-12-01

    Deposition of calcium oxalate crystals in the kidney and bone is a hallmark of systemic oxalosis. Since the bone compartment can store massive amounts of oxalate, patients present with recurrent low-trauma fractures, bone deformations, severe bone pains and specific oxalate osteopathy on plain X-ray. Bone biopsy from the iliac crest displays specific features such as oxalate crystals surrounded by a granulomatous reaction due to an invasion of bone surface by macrophages. We present data obtained in 10 samples from 8 patients with oxalosis (16-68 years) who underwent iliac crest bone biopsy and bone quality analysis using modern methods (microradiography, microindentation, Fourier Transform InfraRed Microspectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy) in addition to histomorphometry. Disseminated calcium oxalate deposits (whewellite) were found in the bone marrow space (with a granulomatous reaction) but not in the bone matrix. Calcium oxalate deposits were totally surrounded by macrophages and multinucleated giant cells, and a phagocytosis activity was sometimes observed. Very few calcium oxalate crystals were directly in close contact with the mineral substance of the bone. Bone mineralization was not modified by the presence of calcium oxalate even in close vicinity. Bone quality analysis also revealed a harder bone than normal, perhaps in relationship with decreased carbonate content in the mineral. This increase in bone hardness could explain a more "brittle" bone. In patients with oxalosis, the formation and growth of calcium oxalate crystals in the bone appeared independent of apatite. The mechanisms leading to nucleation and growth of oxalate deposits are still unclear and deserve further studies. PMID:26164477

  1. Microarchitecture of irradiated bone: comparison with healthy bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bléry, Pauline; Amouriq, Yves; Guédon, Jeanpierre; Pilet, Paul; Normand, Nicolas; Durand, Nicolas; Espitalier, Florent; Arlicot, Aurore; Malard, Olivier; Weiss, Pierre

    2012-03-01

    The squamous cell carcinomas of the upper aero-digestive tract represent about ten percent of cancers. External radiation therapy leads to esthetic and functional consequences, and to a decrease of the bone mechanical abilities. For these patients, the oral prosthetic rehabilitation, including possibilities of dental implant placement, is difficult. The effects of radiotherapy on bone microarchitecture parameters are not well known. Thus, the purpose of this study is to assess the effects of external radiation on bone micro architecture in an experimental model of 25 rats using micro CT. 15 rats were irradiated on the hind limbs by a single dose of 20 Grays, and 10 rats were non irradiated. Images of irradiated and healthy bone were compared. Bone microarchitecture parameters (including trabecular thickness, trabecular number, trabecular separation, connectivity density and tissue and bone volume) between irradiated and non-irradiated bones were calculated and compared using a Mann and Whitney test. After 7 and 12 weeks, images of irradiated and healthy bone are different. Differences on the irradiated and the healthy bone populations exhibit a statistical significance. Trabecular number, connectivity density and closed porosity are less important on irradiated bone. Trabecular thickness and separation increase for irradiated bone. These parameters indicate a decrease of irradiated bone properties. Finally, the external irradiation induces changes on the bone micro architecture. This knowledge is of prime importance for better oral prosthetic rehabilitation, including implant placement.

  2. Bone metabolism during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Salles, Jean Pierre

    2016-06-01

    During pregnancy, mineral concentrations, of calcium and phosphorus in particular, are maintained at a high level in fetal blood so that the developing skeleton may accrete adequate mineral content. The placenta actively transports minerals for this purpose. Maternal intestinal absorption increases in order to meet the fetal demand for calcium, which is only partly dependent on calcitriol. Mineral regulation is essentially dependent on parathyroid hormone (PTH) and PTH-related protein (PTHrP). The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) regulates PTH and PTHrP production. If calcium intake is insufficient, the maternal skeleton will undergo resorption due to PTHrP. After birth, a switch from fetal to neonatal homeostasis occurs through increase in PTH and calcitriol, and developmental adaptation of the kidneys and intestines with bone turnover contributing additional mineral to the circulation. Calcium absorption becomes progressively active and dependent on calcitriol. The postnatal skeleton can transiently present with osteoposis but adequate mineral diet usually allows full restoration. Cases of primary osteoporosis must be identified. Loss of trabecular mineral content occurs during lactation in order to provide calcium to the newborn. This programmed bone loss is dependent on a "brain-breast-bone" circuit. The physiological bone resorption during reproduction does not normally cause fractures or persistent osteoporosis. Women who experience fracture are likely to have other causes of bone loss. PMID:27157104

  3. Periostin action in bone.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Garnero, Patrick; Ferrari, Serge

    2016-09-01

    Periostin is a highly conserved matricellular protein that shares close homology with the insect cell adhesion molecule fasciclin 1. Periostin is expressed in a broad range of tissues including the skeleton, where it serves both as a structural molecule of the bone matrix and a signaling molecule through integrin receptors and Wnt-beta-catenin pathways whereby it stimulates osteoblast functions and bone formation. The development of periostin null mice has allowed to elucidate the crucial role of periostin on dentinogenesis and osteogenesis, as well as on the skeletal response to mechanical loading and parathyroid hormone. The use of circulating periostin as a potential clinical biomarker has been explored in different non skeletal conditions. These include cancers and more specifically in the metastasis process, respiratory diseases such as asthma, kidney failure, renal injury and cardiac infarction. In postmenopausal osteoporosis, serum levels have been shown to predict the risk of fracture-more specifically non-vertebral- independently of bone mineral density. Because of its preferential localization in cortical bone and periosteal tissue, it can be speculated that serum periostin may be a marker of cortical bone metabolism, although additional studies are clearly needed. PMID:26721738

  4. [Inflammation and bone : Osteoimmunological aspects].

    PubMed

    Frommer, K W; Neumann, E; Lange, U

    2016-06-01

    Microscopic fractures (so-called microcracks) or traumatic macrofractures require bone, as the basic scaffold of the human body, to have a high regenerative capability. In order to be able to provide this regenerative capability, bone is in a constant process of remodeling. This finely tuned homeostasis of bone formation and degradation can become disrupted, which leads to osteoporosis or other bone disorders. It has been shown that the immune system is substantially involved in the regulation of bone homeostasis and that chronic inflammation in particular can disturb this balance; therefore, this article reviews the osteoimmunological aspects contributing to osteoporosis and other diseases associated with bone degradation. PMID:27250491

  5. Bone printing: new frontiers in the treatment of bone defects.

    PubMed

    Arealis, Georgios; Nikolaou, Vasileios S

    2015-12-01

    Bone defects can be congenital or acquired resulting from trauma, infection, neoplasm and failed arthroplasty. The osseous reconstruction of these defects is challenging. Unfortunately, none of the current techniques for the repair of bone defects has proven to be fully satisfactory. Bone tissue engineering (BTE) is the field of regenerative medicine (RM) that focuses on alternative treatment options for bone defects that will ideally address all the issues of the traditional techniques in treating large bone defects. However, current techniques of BTE is laborious and have their own shortcomings. More recently, 2D and 3D bone printing has been introduced to overcome most of the limitations of bone grafts and BTE. So far, results are extremely promising, setting new frontiers in the management of bone defects. PMID:26747913

  6. Bone Morphogenetic Proteins.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Takenobu; Watabe, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), originally identified as osteoinductive components in extracts derived from bone, are now known to play important roles in a wide array of processes during formation and maintenance of various organs including bone, cartilage, muscle, kidney, and blood vessels. BMPs and the related "growth and differentiation factors" (GDFs) are members of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family, and transduce their signals through type I and type II serine-threonine kinase receptors and their intracellular downstream effectors, including Smad proteins. Furthermore, BMP signals are finely tuned by various agonists and antagonists. Because deregulation of the BMP activity at multiple steps in signal transduction is linked to a wide variety of human diseases, therapeutic use of activators and inhibitors of BMP signaling will provide potential avenues for the treatment of the human disorders that are caused by hypo- and hyperactivation of BMP signals, respectively. PMID:27252362

  7. Periodontitis and bone metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Barbato, Luigi; Francioni, Edoardo; Bianchi, Massimiliano; Mascitelli, Eleonora; Marco, Leila Brancato; Tonelli, Duvina Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Periodontitis is a plaque induced disease characterized by tissue destruction. The extent of the alveolar bone loss depends on the host response stimulated by bacterial infection. Recently researchers have focused on the role of the immune system, of RANK/RANKL/OPG pathway and of cytokines network. Another recent field of interest is osteoimmunology that try to explain the relationship between immune and bone cells in activating bone resorption. Advances in the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms allowed a better understanding of the relationship with other diseases like osteoporosis and also to hypothesize new therapies based on modulation of host response (host modulatory therapy - HMT). The purpose of this mini-review is to briefly discuss these topics. PMID:26604945

  8. Aneurysmal bone cyst.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Timothy B; Ward, James P; Alaia, Michael J

    2012-04-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts are rare skeletal tumors that most commonly occur in the first two decades of life. They primarily develop about the knee but may arise in any portion of the axial or appendicular skeleton. Pathogenesis of these tumors remains controversial and may be vascular, traumatic, or genetic. Radiographic features include a dilated, radiolucent lesion typically located within the metaphyseal portion of the bone, with fluid-fluid levels visible on MRI. Histologic features include blood-filled lakes interposed between fibrous stromata. Differential diagnosis includes conditions such as telangiectatic osteosarcoma and giant cell tumor. The mainstay of treatment is curettage and bone graft, with or without adjuvant treatment. Other management options include cryotherapy, sclerotherapy, radionuclide ablation, and en bloc resection. The recurrence rate is low after appropriate treatment; however, more than one procedure may be required to completely eradicate the lesion. PMID:22474093

  9. Alveolar bone grafting

    PubMed Central

    Lilja, Jan

    2009-01-01

    In patients with cleft lip and palate, bone grafting in the mixed dentition in the residual alveolar cleft has become a well-established procedure. The main advantages can be summarised as follows: stabilisation of the maxillary arch; facilitation of eruption of the canine and sometimes facilitation of the lateral incisor eruption; providing bony support to the teeth adjacent to the cleft; raising the alar base of the nose; facilitation of closure of an oro-nasal fistula; making it possible to insert a titanium fixture in the grafted site and to obtain favourable periodontal conditions of the teeth within and adjacent to the cleft. The timing of the ABG surgery take into consideration not only eruption of the canine but also that of the lateral incisor, if present. The best time for bone grafting surgery is when a thin shell of bone still covers the soon erupting lateral incisor or canine tooth close to the cleft. PMID:19884665

  10. Diabetes and bone health.

    PubMed

    Antonopoulou, Marianna; Bahtiyar, Gül; Banerji, Mary Ann; Sacerdote, Alan S

    2013-11-01

    The increasing prevalence of diabetes especially type 2 diabetes worldwide is indisputable. Diabetics suffer increased morbidity and mortality, compared to their non-diabetic counterparts, not only because of vascular complications, but also because of an increased fracture incidence. Both types 1 and 2 diabetes and some medications used to treat it are associated with osteoporotic fractures. The responsible mechanisms remain incompletely elucidated. In this review, we evaluate the role of glycemic control in bone health, and the effect of anti-diabetic medications such as thiazolidinediones, sulfonylureas, DPP-4 inhibitors, and GLP-1 agonists. In addition, we examine the possible role of insulin and metformin as anabolic agents for bone. Lastly, we identify the current and future screening tools that help evaluate bone health in diabetics and their limitations. In this way we can offer individualized treatment, to the at-risk diabetic population. PMID:23628280

  11. Bone imaging in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Dotan, Zohar A

    2008-08-01

    Bone metastases of solid tumors are common, and about 80% of them occur in patients with breast, lung or prostate cancer. Bone metastases can be suspected clinically and by laboratory tests; however, a final diagnosis relies on radiographic evidence. Bone metastases of prostate cancer usually have osteoblastic characteristics, manifested by pathological bone resorption and formation. Conventional bone scans (e.g. with (99m)Tc-labeled methylene diphosphonate) are preferred to plain-film radiography for surveillance of the entire skeleton. Radiologic diagnosis of bone metastases, particularly in patients with low burden of disease, is difficult because noncancerous bone lesions that mimic cancer are common. Conventional bone scans are limited by their low sensitivity and high false-negative rate (up to 40%) compared with advanced bone-imaging modalities such as PET, PET-CT and MRI, which might assist or replace conventional scanning methods. The correct diagnosis of bone involvement in prostate cancer is crucial to assess the effects of therapy on the primary tumor, the patient's prognosis, and the efficacy of bone-specific treatments that can reduce future bone-associated morbidity. In addition, predictive tools such as nomograms enable the identification of patients at risk of bone involvement during the course of their disease. Such tools may limit treatment costs by avoidance of unnecessary tests and might reduce both short-term and long-term complication rates. PMID:18682719

  12. Multiscale imaging of bone microdamage.

    PubMed

    Poundarik, Atharva A; Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-04-01

    Bone is a structural and hierarchical composite that exhibits remarkable ability to sustain complex mechanical loading and resist fracture. Bone quality encompasses various attributes of bone matrix from the quality of its material components (type-I collagen, mineral and non-collagenous matrix proteins) and cancellous microarchitecture, to the nature and extent of bone microdamage. Microdamage, produced during loading, manifests in multiple forms across the scales of hierarchy in bone and functions to dissipate energy and avert fracture. Microdamage formation is a key determinant of bone quality, and through a range of biological and physical mechanisms, accumulates with age and disease. Accumulated microdamage in bone decreases bone strength and increases bone's propensity to fracture. Thus, a thorough assessment of microdamage, across the hierarchical levels of bone, is crucial to better understand bone quality and bone fracture. This review article details multiple imaging modalities that have been used to study and characterize microdamage; from bulk staining techniques originally developed by Harold Frost to assess linear microcracks, to atomic force microscopy, a modality that revealed mechanistic insights into the formation diffuse damage at the ultrastructural level in bone. New automated techniques using imaging modalities, such as microcomputed tomography are also presented for a comprehensive overview. PMID:25664772

  13. [Inflammatory bowel disease and bone decreased bone mineral density].

    PubMed

    Hisamatsu, Tadakazu; Wada, Yasuyo; Kanai, Takanori

    2015-11-01

    Metabolic bone diseases such as osteopenia and osteoporosis increase the risk of bone fracture that negatively affects quality of life of individuals. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease(IBD), including ulcerative colitis(UC)and Crohn's disease(CD), have been shown to be at increased risk of decreased bone mineral density, however frequency of metabolic bone disease in IBD and identified risk factors are varied among reports. PMID:26503868

  14. Detecting microdamage in bone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, TC; Mohsin, S; Taylor, D; Parkesh, R; Gunnlaugsson, T; O'Brien, FJ; Giehl, M; Gowin, W

    2003-01-01

    Fatigue-induced microdamage in bone contributes to stress and fragility fractures and acts as a stimulus for bone remodelling. Detecting such microdamage is difficult as pre-existing microdamage sustained in vivo must be differentiated from artefactual damage incurred during specimen preparation. This was addressed by bulk staining specimens in alcohol-soluble basic fuchsin dye, but cutting and grinding them in an aqueous medium. Nonetheless, some artefactual cracks are partially stained and careful observation under transmitted light, or epifluorescence microscopy, is required. Fuchsin lodges in cracks, but is not site-specific. Cracks are discontinuities in the calcium-rich bone matrix and chelating agents, which bind calcium, can selectively label them. Oxytetracycline, alizarin complexone, calcein, calcein blue and xylenol orange all selectively bind microcracks and, as they fluoresce at different wavelengths and colours, can be used in sequence to label microcrack growth. New agents that only fluoresce when involved in a chelate are currently being developed – fluorescent photoinduced electron transfer (PET) sensors. Such agents enable microdamage to be quantified and crack growth to be measured and are useful histological tools in providing data for modelling the material behaviour of bone. However, a non-invasive method is needed to measure microdamage in patients. Micro-CT is being studied and initial work with iodine dyes linked to a chelating group has shown some promise. In the long term, it is hoped that repeated measurements can be made at critical sites and microdamage accumulation monitored. Quantification of microdamage, together with bone mass measurements, will help in predicting and preventing bone fracture failure in patients with osteoporosis. PMID:12924817

  15. Joint bone radiobiology workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Tomich, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Joint Bone Radiobiology Workshop was held on July 12--13, 1991 in Toronto, Canada. This document contains the papers presented at the meeting. The five sections were: Dose-effects, Endogenous Cofactors, Tumorigenesis, New Methods and Medical Implications. The papers covered risk assessment, tissue distribution of radionuclides, lifetime studies, biological half-lifes, the influence of age at time of exposure, tumor induction by different radionuclides, microscopic localization of radionuclides, and nuclear medicine issues including tissue distribution in the skeleton and bone marrow transplantation. (MHB)

  16. [Cytogenetics of bone sarcomas].

    PubMed

    Vagner-Capodano, A M; Poitout, D

    There has been much progress in the cytogenesis, and molecular biology of bone tumours such as Ewing sarcoma and osteosarcomas, greatly improving diagnostic possibilities and prognosis. Ewing's sarcoma is an indifferentiated sarcoma with round cells which usually occurs in children or adolescents. Ewing's sarcoma corresponds to 6% of all bone tumours. Histologically Ewing's sarcoma belongs to a group of small round cell tumours including neuroblastoma, embryon and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Differential diagnosis is difficult. Cytogenetic examinations can now differentiate Ewing's sarcoma from other small round cell tumours. There is a specific 11:12 translocation (q24; q12) which can be used as a marker. PMID:8785922

  17. Murine Hind Limb Long Bone Dissection and Bone Marrow Isolation.

    PubMed

    Amend, Sarah R; Valkenburg, Kenneth C; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the bone and the bone marrow is critical in many research fields including basic bone biology, immunology, hematology, cancer metastasis, biomechanics, and stem cell biology. Despite the importance of the bone in healthy and pathologic states, however, it is a largely under-researched organ due to lack of specialized knowledge of bone dissection and bone marrow isolation. Mice are a common model organism to study effects on bone and bone marrow, necessitating a standardized and efficient method for long bone dissection and bone marrow isolation for processing of large experimental cohorts. We describe a straightforward dissection procedure for the removal of the femur and tibia that is suitable for downstream applications, including but not limited to histomorphologic analysis and strength testing. In addition, we outline a rapid procedure for isolation of bone marrow from the long bones via centrifugation with limited handling time, ideal for cell sorting, primary cell culture, or DNA, RNA, and protein extraction. The protocol is streamlined for rapid processing of samples to limit experimental error, and is standardized to minimize user-to-user variability. PMID:27168390

  18. Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health March 2012 Download PDFs ... helps keep your bones strong. Why are vitamin D and calcium important to bone health? Vitamin D ...

  19. Pregnancy, Breastfeeding, and Bone Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... supported by your browser. Home Osteoporosis Women Pregnancy, Breastfeeding, and Bone Health Publication available in: PDF (63 ... to get enough calcium during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Breastfeeding and Bone Health Breastfeeding also affects a mother’s ...

  20. Graphite-reinforced bone cement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoell, A. C.

    1976-01-01

    Chopped graphite fibers added to surgical bone cement form bonding agent with mechanical properties closely matched to those of bone. Curing reaction produces less heat, resulting in reduced traumatization of body tissues. Stiffness is increased without affecting flexural strength.

  1. Altered bone turnover during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. T.; Morey, E. R.; Liu, C.; Baylink, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    Modifications in calcium metabolism during spaceflight were studied, using parameters that reflect bone turnover. Bone formation rate, medullary area, bone length, bone density, pore size distribution, and differential bone cell number were evaluated in growing rate both immediately after and 25 days after orbital spaceflights aboard the Soviet biological satellites Cosmos 782 and 936. The primary effect of space flight on bone turnover was a reversible inhibition of bone formation at the periosteal surface. A simultaneous increase in the length of the periosteal arrest line suggests that bone formation ceased along corresponding portions of that surface. Possible reasons include increased secretion of glucocorticoids and mechanical unloading of the skeleton due to near-weightlessness, while starvation and immobilization are excluded as causes.

  2. Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bone marrow and capability for blood cell production, including red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells ( ... can affect the bone marrow and blood cell production. A specialist who has expertise in the diagnosis ...

  3. Bone-marrow transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100112.htm Bone-marrow transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Go to slide 4 out of 4 Overview Bone-marrow is a soft, fatty tissue found inside of ...

  4. Anorexia nervosa and bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fazeli, Pouneh K; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-09-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disorder characterized by self-induced starvation with a lifetime prevalence of 2.2% in women. The most common medical co-morbidity in women with AN is bone loss, with over 85% of women having bone mineral density values more than one standard deviation below an age comparable mean. The low bone mass in AN is due to multiple hormonal adaptations to under nutrition, including hypothalamic amenorrhea and growth hormone resistance. Importantly, this low bone mass is also associated with a seven-fold increased risk of fracture. Therefore, strategies to effectively prevent bone loss and increase bone mass are critical. We will review hormonal adaptations that contribute to bone loss in this population as well as promising new therapies that may increase bone mass and reduce fracture risk in AN. PMID:24882734

  5. Bone fracture repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... main treatment options for bone fractures are: Casting Open reduction, and internal fixation- this involves a surgery to repair the fracture-frequently, metal rods, screws or plates are used to repair the bone, and remain ...

  6. Bone and cancer: the osteoncology

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Toni; Mercatali, Laura; Amadori, Dino

    2013-01-01

    Summary In recent years clinicians have witnessed a radical change in the relationship between bone and cancer, with in particular an increase in bone metastases incidence due to an improvement of patients survival. Bone metastases are responsible for the high morbidity in cancer patients with a strong clinical impact. For all these reasons, efforts have been directed to this important field with the foundation of the osteoncology, a new scientific and clinical branch involved in the management of patients with bone cancer disease, including primary bone tumors and bone metastases. Another innovative and important osteoncology topic is the Cancer Treatment Induced Bone Loss (CTIBL) that is mainly caused by antitumoral treatment with bone resorption induction. The diagnostic and therapeutic options are described briefly in order to highlight the importance of the multidisciplinary approach in this new field. PMID:24133529

  7. Cutting thin sections of bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashley, W. W.

    1972-01-01

    Medical equipment for obtaining repetitive planoparallel sections of bone to study healing of bone structure under high gravity stress is described. Device consists of modified saw with diamond cutting edges. Construction of device and manner of use are explained.

  8. Paget disease of the bone

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/000414.htm Paget disease of the bone To use the sharing features on this page, ... Paget disease is a disorder that involves abnormal bone destruction and regrowth. This results in deformity of ...

  9. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Cosmegen (Dactinomycin) Dactinomycin Denosumab Doxorubicin Hydrochloride ...

  10. Anorexia nervosa and bone metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disorder characterized by self-induced starvation with a lifetime prevalence of 2.2% in women. The most common medical co-morbidity in women with AN is bone loss, with over 85% of women having bone mineral density values more than one standard deviation below an age comparable mean. The low bone mass in AN is due to multiple hormonal adaptations to under nutrition, including hypothalamic amenorrhea and growth hormone resistance. Importantly, this low bone mass is also associated with a seven-fold increased risk of fracture. Therefore, strategies to effectively prevent bone loss and increase low bone mass are critical. We will review hormonal adaptations that contribute to bone loss in this population as well as promising new therapies that may increase bone mass and reduce fracture risk in AN. PMID:24882734

  11. Transcutaneous Raman Spectroscopy of Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Jason R.

    Clinical diagnoses of bone health and fracture risk typically rely upon measurements of bone density or structure, but the strength of a bone is also dependent upon its chemical composition. One technology that has been used extensively in ex vivo, exposed-bone studies to measure the chemical composition of bone is Raman spectroscopy. This spectroscopic technique provides chemical information about a sample by probing its molecular vibrations. In the case of bone tissue, Raman spectra provide chemical information about both the inorganic mineral and organic matrix components, which each contribute to bone strength. To explore the relationship between bone strength and chemical composition, our laboratory has contributed to ex vivo, exposed-bone animal studies of rheumatoid arthritis, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, and prolonged lead exposure. All of these studies suggest that Raman-based predictions of biomechanical strength may be more accurate than those produced by the clinically-used parameter of bone mineral density. The utility of Raman spectroscopy in ex vivo, exposed-bone studies has inspired attempts to perform bone spectroscopy transcutaneously. Although the results are promising, further advancements are necessary to make non-invasive, in vivo measurements of bone that are of sufficient quality to generate accurate predictions of fracture risk. In order to separate the signals from bone and soft tissue that contribute to a transcutaneous measurement, we developed an overconstrained extraction algorithm that is based upon fitting with spectral libraries derived from separately-acquired measurements of the underlying tissue components. This approach allows for accurate spectral unmixing despite the fact that similar chemical components (e.g., type I collagen) are present in both soft tissue and bone and was applied to experimental data in order to transcutaneously detect, to our knowledge for the first time, age- and disease-related spectral

  12. Chemical Makeup of Microdamaged Bone Differs from Undamaged Bone

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel,M.; Burr, D.; Miller, L.

    2006-01-01

    Microdamage naturally occurs in bone tissue as a result of cyclic loading placed on the body from normal daily activities. While it is usually repaired through the bone turnover process, accumulation of microdamage may result in reduced bone quality and increased fracture risk. It is unclear whether certain areas of bone are more susceptible to microdamage than others due to compositional differences. This study examines whether areas of microdamaged bone are chemically different than undamaged areas of bone. Bone samples (L3 vertebrae) were harvested from 15 dogs. Samples were stained with basic fuchsin, embedded in poly-methylmethacrylate, and cut into 5-{micro}m-thick sections. Fuchsin staining was used to identify regions of microdamage, and synchrotron infrared microspectroscopic imaging was used to determine the local bone composition. Results showed that microdamaged areas of bone were chemically different than the surrounding undamaged areas. Specifically, the mineral stoichiometry was altered in microdamaged bone, where the carbonate/protein ratio and carbonate/phosphate ratio were significantly lower in areas of microdamage, and the acid phosphate content was higher. No differences were observed in tissue mineralization (phosphate/protein ratio) or crystallinity between the microdamaged and undamaged bone, indicating that the microdamaged regions of bone were not over-mineralized. The collagen cross-linking structure was also significantly different in microdamaged areas of bone, consistent with ruptured cross-links and reduced fracture resistance. All differences in composition had well-defined boundaries in the microcrack region, strongly suggesting that they occurred after microcrack formation. Even so, because microdamage results in an altered bone composition, an accumulation of microdamage might result in a long-term reduction in bone quality.

  13. Multiscale imaging of bone microdamage

    PubMed Central

    Poundarik, Atharva A.; Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a structural and hierarchical composite that exhibits remarkable ability to sustain complex mechanical loading and resist fracture. Bone quality encompasses various attributes of bone matrix from the quality of its material components (type-I collagen, mineral and non-collagenous matrix proteins) and cancellous microarchitecture, to the nature and extent of bone microdamage. Microdamage, produced during loading, manifests in multiple forms across the scales of hierarchy in bone and functions to dissipate energy and avert fracture. Microdamage formation is a key determinant of bone quality, and through a range of biological and physical mechanisms, accumulates with age and disease. Accumulated microdamage in bone decreases bone strength and increases bone’s propensity to fracture. Thus, a thorough assessment of microdamage, across the hierarchical levels of bone, is crucial to better understand bone quality and bone fracture. This review article details multiple imaging modalities that have been used to study and characterize microdamage; from bulk staining techniques originally developed by Harold Frost to assess linear microcracks, to atomic force microscopy, a modality that revealed mechanistic insights into the formation diffuse damage at the ultrastructural level in bone. New automated techniques using imaging modalities such as microcomputed tomography are also presented for a comprehensive overview. PMID:25664772

  14. Biology of cancellous bone grafts.

    PubMed

    Heiple, K G; Goldberg, V M; Powell, A E; Bos, G D; Zika, J M

    1987-04-01

    Despite 30 years of experimental bone grafting research, the fresh cancellous bone graft remains the most osteogenic and reliable bone grafting material. Recent experimental data suggest that modification of the graft-host interaction by antigen matching or immune manipulation may allow increasingly successful use of allografts. PMID:3550570

  15. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Breast Cancer and Bone Loss Fact Sheet Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July, 2010 Download PDFs English ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  16. Female Reproductive System and Bone

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Bart L.; Khosla, Sundeep

    2010-01-01

    The female reproductive system plays a major role in regulating the acquisition and loss of bone by the skeleton from menarche through senescence. Onset of gonadal sex steroid secretion at puberty is the major factor responsible for skeletal longitudinal and radial growth, as well as significant gain in bone density, until peak bone density is achieved in third decade of life. Gonadal sex steroids then help maintain peak bone density until menopause, including during the transient changes in skeletal mineral content associated with pregnancy and lactation. At menopause, decreased gonadal sex steroid production normally leads to rapid bone loss. The most rapid bone loss associated with decreased estrogen levels occurs in the first 8–10 years after menopause, with slower age-related bone loss occurring during later life. Age-related bone loss in women after the early menopausal phase of bone loss is caused by ongoing gonadal sex steroid deficiency, vitamin D deficiency, and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Other factors also contribute to age-related bone loss, including intrinsic defects in osteoblast function, impairment of the GH/IGF axis, reduced peak bone mass, age-associated sarcopenia, and various sporadic secondary causes. Further understanding of the relative contributions of the female reproductive system and each of the other factors to development and maintenance of the female skeleton, bone loss, and fracture risk will lead to improved approaches for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:20637179

  17. Scaffold Design for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Polo-Corrales, Liliana; Latorre-Esteves, Magda; Ramirez-Vick, Jaime E.

    2014-01-01

    The use of bone grafts is the standard to treat skeletal fractures, or to replace and regenerate lost bone, as demonstrated by the large number of bone graft procedures performed worldwide. The most common of these is the autograft, however, its use can lead to complications such as pain, infection, scarring, blood loss, and donor-site morbidity. The alternative is allografts, but they lack the osteoactive capacity of autografts and carry the risk of carrying infectious agents or immune rejection. Other approaches, such as the bone graft substitutes, have focused on improving the efficacy of bone grafts or other scaffolds by incorporating bone progenitor cells and growth factors to stimulate cells. An ideal bone graft or scaffold should be made of biomaterials that imitate the structure and properties of natural bone ECM, include osteoprogenitor cells and provide all the necessary environmental cues found in natural bone. However, creating living tissue constructs that are structurally, functionally and mechanically comparable to the natural bone has been a challenge so far. This focus of this review is on the evolution of these scaffolds as bone graft substitutes in the process of recreating the bone tissue microenvironment, including biochemical and biophysical cues. PMID:24730250

  18. Bone vascularization: a way to study bone microarchitecture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blery, P.; Autrusseau, F.; Crauste, E.; Freuchet, Erwan; Weiss, Pierre; Guédon, J.-P.; Amouriq, Y.

    2014-03-01

    Trabecular bone and its microarchitecture are of prime importance for health. Studying vascularization helps to better know the relationship between bone and vascular microarchitecture. This research is an animal study (nine Lewis rats), based on the perfusion of vascularization by a contrast agent (a mixture of 50% barium sulfate with 1.5% of gelatin) before euthanasia. The samples were studied by micro CT at a resolution of 9μm. Softwares were used to show 3D volumes of bone and vessels, to calculate bone and vessels microarchitecture parameters. This study aims to understand simultaneously the bone microarchitecture and its vascular microarchitecture.

  19. [Metabolic bone disease osteomalacia].

    PubMed

    Reuss-Borst, M A

    2014-05-01

    Osteomalacia is a rare disorder of bone metabolism leading to reduced bone mineralization. Underlying vitamin D deficiency and a disturbed phosphate metabolism (so-called hypophosphatemic osteomalacia) can cause the disease. Leading symptoms are dull localized or generalized bone pain, muscle weakness and cramps as well as increased incidence of falls. Rheumatic diseases, such as polymyalgia rheumatica, rheumatoid arthritis, myositis and fibromyalgia must be considered in the differential diagnosis. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) is typically elevated in osteomalacia while serum phosphate and/or 25-OH vitamin D3 levels are reduced. The diagnosis of osteomalacia can be confirmed by an iliac crest bone biopsy. Histological correlate is reduced or deficient mineralization of the newly synthesized extracellular matrix. Treatment strategies comprise supplementation of vitamin D and calcium and for patients with intestinal malabsorption syndromes vitamin D and calcium are also given parenterally. In renal phosphate wasting syndromes substitution of phosphate is the treatment of choice, except for tumor-induced osteomalacia when removal of the tumor leads to a cure in most cases. PMID:24811356

  20. Bone Marrow Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunne, Mark; Maklad, Rania; Heaney, Emma

    2014-01-01

    As a final-year student teacher specialising in primary science, Emma Heaney faced the challenge of having to plan, organise, and conduct a small-scale, classroom-based research project. She had to teach about bones in the final block practice session and thought it would be a good idea to bring in some biological specimens obtained from the local…

  1. Bone marrow aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Bain, B

    2001-01-01

    Bone marrow aspiration biopsies are carried out principally to permit cytological assessment but also for immunophenotypic, cytogenetic, molecular genetic, and other specialised investigations. Often, a trephine biopsy is carried out as part of the same procedure. Bone marrow aspirations should be carried out by trained individuals who are aware of the indications, contraindications, and hazards of the procedure. They should follow a standard operating procedure. The operator should have made an adequate assessment of clinical and haematological features to ensure both that appropriate indications exist and that all relevant tests are performed. For the patient's comfort and safety, the posterior iliac crest is generally the preferred site of aspiration. Films of aspirated marrow and, when appropriate, films of crushed particles should be made and labelled. Once thoroughly dry, films should be fixed and stained. As a minimum, a Romanowsky stain and a Perls' stain are required. A cover slip should be applied. The bone marrow films should be assessed and reported in a systematic manner so that nothing of importance is overlooked, using a low power, then intermediate, then high power objective. A differential count should be performed. An interpretation of the findings, in the light of the clinical and haematological features, should be given. The report should be signed or computer authorised, using a secure password, and issued in a timely manner. Key Words: bone marrow aspirate • haematological diagnosis PMID:11533068

  2. Infrared laser bone ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Nuss, R.C.; Fabian, R.L.; Sarkar, R.; Puliafito, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The bone ablation characteristics of five infrared lasers, including three pulsed lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1064 micron; Hol:YSGG, lambda = 2.10 micron; and Erb:YAG, lambda = 2.94 micron) and two continuous-wave lasers (Nd:YAG, lambda = 1.064 micron; and CO/sub 2/, lambda = 10.6 micron), were studied. All laser ablations were performed in vitro, using moist, freshly dissected calvarium of guinea pig skulls. Quantitative etch rates of the three pulsed lasers were calculated. Light microscopy of histologic sections of ablated bone revealed a zone of tissue damage of 10 to 15 micron adjacent to the lesion edge in the case of the pulsed Nd:YAG and the Erb:YAG lasers, from 20 to 90 micron zone of tissue damage for bone ablated by the Hol:YSGG laser, and 60 to 135 micron zone of tissue damage in the case of the two continuous-wave lasers. Possible mechanisms of bone ablation and tissue damage are discussed.

  3. Are Bones Alive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caravita, Silvia; Falchetti, Elisabetta

    2005-01-01

    Many studies have investigated the classification of living things. Our study deals with a different problem: the attribution of life to one component of a living organism, specifically the bones. The task involves not only specifying what we mean by "alive", but also requires "informed thinking" leading to an understanding of the concept of life…

  4. Management of Bone Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, Christina J; Basu-Mallick, Atrayee; Abraham, John A

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of bone sarcoma requires careful planning and involvement of an experienced multidisciplinary team. Significant advancements in systemic therapy, radiation, and surgery in recent years have contributed to improved functional and survival outcomes for patients with these difficult tumors, and emerging technologies hold promise for further advancement. PMID:27542644

  5. Osteoporosis: The Bone Thief

    MedlinePlus

    ... 51 and 70 and 1,200 mg after age 70. Foods that are high in calcium are the best source. For example, eat low-fat dairy foods, canned fish with soft bones such as salmon, and some dark-green leafy vegetables. Check the labels on foods ...

  6. Pediatric temporal bone rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Monica J

    2016-08-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is one of the most common soft-tissue sarcomas in children. Prompt diagnosis and treatment significantly improve survival; however, misdiagnosis is common because of this aggressive temporal bone lesion's similarity to more common benign diseases. Clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for rhabdomyosarcoma in patients with a presumed otologic infection not responsive to medical therapy. PMID:27467294

  7. Stress shielding in bone of a bone-cement interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Hang; Cossey, Andrew; Tong, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Cementation is one of the main fixation methods used in joint replacement surgeries such as Total Knee Replacement (TKR). This work was prompted by a recent retrieval study, which shows losses up to 75% of the bone stock at the bone-cement interface ten years post TKR. It aims to examine the effects of cementation on the stress shielding of the interfacing bone, when the influence of an implant is removed. A micromechanics finite element study of a generic bone-cement interface is presented here, where bone elements in the partially and the fully interdigitated regions were evaluated under selected load cases. The results revealed significant stress shielding effect in the bone of all bone-cement interface regions, particularly in fully interdigitated region. This finding may be useful in the studies of implant fixation and other related orthopedic treatment strategies. PMID:26904919

  8. Evolutionary Patterns of Bone Histology and Bone Compactness in Xenarthran Mammal Long Bones

    PubMed Central

    Straehl, Fiona R.; Scheyer, Torsten M.; Forasiepi, Analía M.; MacPhee, Ross D.; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R.

    2013-01-01

    Bone microstructure reflects physiological characteristics and has been shown to contain phylogenetic and ecological signals. Although mammalian long bone histology is receiving increasing attention, systematic examination of the main clades has not yet been performed. Here we describe the long bone microstructure of Xenarthra based on thin sections representing twenty-two species. Additionally, patterns in bone compactness of humeri and femora are investigated. The primary bone tissue of xenarthran long bones is composed of a mixture of woven, parallel-fibered and lamellar bone. The vascular canals have a longitudinal, reticular or radial orientation and are mostly arranged in an irregular manner. Concentric rows of vascular canals and laminar organization of the tissue are only found in anteater bones. The long bones of adult specimens are marked by dense Haversian bone, a feature that has been noted for most groups of mammals. In the long bones of armadillos, secondary osteons have an oblique orientation within the three-dimensional bone tissue, thus resulting in their irregular shape when the bones are sectioned transversely. Secondary remodeling is generally more extensive in large taxa than in small taxa, and this could be caused by increased loading. Lines of arrested growth are assumed to be present in all specimens, but they are restricted to the outermost layer in bones of armadillos and are often masked by secondary remodeling in large taxa. Parameters of bone compactness show a pattern in the femur that separates Cingulata and Pilosa (Folivora and Vermilingua), with cingulates having a lower compactness than pilosans. In addition, cingulates show an allometric relationship between humeral and femoral bone compactness. PMID:23874932

  9. Evolutionary patterns of bone histology and bone compactness in xenarthran mammal long bones.

    PubMed

    Straehl, Fiona R; Scheyer, Torsten M; Forasiepi, Analía M; MacPhee, Ross D; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2013-01-01

    Bone microstructure reflects physiological characteristics and has been shown to contain phylogenetic and ecological signals. Although mammalian long bone histology is receiving increasing attention, systematic examination of the main clades has not yet been performed. Here we describe the long bone microstructure of Xenarthra based on thin sections representing twenty-two species. Additionally, patterns in bone compactness of humeri and femora are investigated. The primary bone tissue of xenarthran long bones is composed of a mixture of woven, parallel-fibered and lamellar bone. The vascular canals have a longitudinal, reticular or radial orientation and are mostly arranged in an irregular manner. Concentric rows of vascular canals and laminar organization of the tissue are only found in anteater bones. The long bones of adult specimens are marked by dense Haversian bone, a feature that has been noted for most groups of mammals. In the long bones of armadillos, secondary osteons have an oblique orientation within the three-dimensional bone tissue, thus resulting in their irregular shape when the bones are sectioned transversely. Secondary remodeling is generally more extensive in large taxa than in small taxa, and this could be caused by increased loading. Lines of arrested growth are assumed to be present in all specimens, but they are restricted to the outermost layer in bones of armadillos and are often masked by secondary remodeling in large taxa. Parameters of bone compactness show a pattern in the femur that separates Cingulata and Pilosa (Folivora and Vermilingua), with cingulates having a lower compactness than pilosans. In addition, cingulates show an allometric relationship between humeral and femoral bone compactness. PMID:23874932

  10. Peripheral Leptin Regulates Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Russell T.; Kalra, Satya P.; Wong, Carmen P.; Philbrick, Kenneth A.; Lindenmaier, Laurence B.; Boghossian, Stephane; Iwaniec, Urszula T.

    2012-01-01

    Substantial evidence does not support the prevailing view that leptin, acting through a hypothalamic relay, decreases bone accrual by inhibiting bone formation. To clarify the mechanisms underlying regulation of bone architecture by leptin, we evaluated bone growth and turnover in wild type (WT) mice, leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice, leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and ob/ob mice treated with leptin. We also performed hypothalamic leptin gene therapy to determine the effect of elevated hypothalamic leptin levels on osteoblasts. Finally, to determine the effects of loss of peripheral leptin signaling on bone formation and energy metabolism, we used bone marrow (BM) from WT or db/db donor mice to reconstitute the hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cell compartments in lethally irradiated WT recipient mice. Decreases in bone growth, osteoblast-lined bone perimeter and bone formation rate were observed in ob/ob mice and greatly increased in ob/ob mice following subcutaneous administration of leptin. Similarly, hypothalamic leptin gene therapy increased osteoblast-lined bone perimeter in ob/ob mice. In spite of normal osteoclast-lined bone perimeter, db/db mice exhibited a mild but generalized osteopetrotic-like (calcified cartilage encased by bone) skeletal phenotype and greatly reduced serum markers of bone turnover. Tracking studies and histology revealed quantitative replacement of BM cells following BM transplantation. WT mice engrafted with db/db BM did not differ in energy homeostasis from untreated WT mice or WT mice engrafted with WT BM. Bone formation in WT mice engrafted with WT BM did not differ from WT mice, whereas bone formation in WT mice engrafted with db/db cells did not differ from the low rates observed in untreated db/db mice. In summary, our results indicate that leptin, acting primarily through peripheral pathways, increases osteoblast number and activity. PMID:22887758

  11. Bone quality and bone strength: benefits of the bone-forming approach

    PubMed Central

    Iolascon, Giovanni; Frizzi, Laura; Di Pietro, Gioconda; Capaldo, Annarita; Luciano, Fabrizio; Gimigliano, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Summary The ability of bone to resist fracture depends on the intrinsic properties of the materials that comprise the bone matrix mineralization, the amount of bone (i.e. mass), and the spatial distribution of the bone mass (i.e. microarchitecture). Antiresorptive agents may prevent the decay of cancellous bone and cortical thinning, with no improvement of bone microstructure, leading to a partial correction of the principal bone quality defect in osteoporosis, the disruption of trabecular microarchitecture. Anabolic agents promote bone formation at both trabecular and endocortical surfaces, resulting in an increase of cancellous bone volume and cortical thickness. The improvement of cortical bone strength may be limited by an increase in cortical porosity. strontium ranelate improves trabecular network and cortical thickness that will contribute to anti-fracture efficacy at both vertebral and non-vertebral sites. The results of clinical and experimental studies are consistent with the mode of action of strontium involving dissociation between bone formation and resorption leading to a stimulation both trabecular and cortical bone formation without increasing cortical porosity. PMID:25002875

  12. Digital electronic bone growth stimulator

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-05-09

    A device is described for stimulating bone tissue by applying a low level alternating current signal directly to the patient`s skin. A crystal oscillator, a binary divider chain and digital logic gates are used to generate the desired waveforms that reproduce the natural electrical characteristics found in bone tissue needed for stimulating bone growth and treating osteoporosis. The device, powered by a battery, contains a switch allowing selection of the correct waveform for bone growth stimulation or osteoporosis treatment so that, when attached to the skin of the patient using standard skin contact electrodes, the correct signal is communicated to the underlying bone structures. 5 figs.

  13. Digital electronic bone growth stimulator

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1995-01-01

    A device for stimulating bone tissue by applying a low level alternating current signal directly to the patient's skin. A crystal oscillator, a binary divider chain and digital logic gates are used to generate the desired waveforms that reproduce the natural electrical characteristics found in bone tissue needed for stimulating bone growth and treating osteoporosis. The device, powered by a battery, contains a switch allowing selection of the correct waveform for bone growth stimulation or osteoporosis treatment so that, when attached to the skin of the patient using standard skin contact electrodes, the correct signal is communicated to the underlying bone structures.

  14. [Many issues about bone quality].

    PubMed

    Saito, Mitsuru

    2012-06-01

    According to the present definition of osteoporosis, bone mineral density, architecture, and tissue material properties are important factors in determining bone strength. Bone matrix consists of a two-phase composite material in which the mineral phase provides stiffness and collagen provide tensile strength and ductility. The proposed determinants of bone strength at the material level are the degree of mineralization of basic structure units, microdamage accumulation, and collagen cross-link formation. These are regulated by cellular activities, tissue turnover rate, and the levels of oxidative stress and glycation. In this review, I describe the concerns regarding bone qualities. PMID:22653026

  15. [Bone histomorphometry;A role of evaluation for bone quality and mechanical strength].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Noriaki; Takahashi, Hideaki; Shimakura, Taketoshi

    2016-01-01

    Bone histomorphometry is defined as a quantitative evaluation of bone remodeling and bone turnover. Bone remodeling is the important mechanism for calcium metabolism and mechanical usage. The changes of bone remodeling in special condition with metabolic bone disease or osteoporosis agents have the effectiveness on bone mechanical strength. PMID:26728526

  16. Bone Anchored Hearing Aid

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) in improving the hearing of people with conduction or mixed hearing loss. The Technology The (BAHA) is a bone conduction hearing device that includes a titanium fixture permanently implanted into the mastoid bone of the skull and an external percutaneous sound processor. The sound processor is attached to the fixture by means of a skin penetrating abutment. Because the device bypasses the middle ear and directly stimulates the cochlea, it has been recommended for individuals with conduction hearing loss or discharging middle ear infection. The titanium implant is expected to last a lifetime while the external sound processor is expected to last 5 years. The total initial device cost is approximately $5,300 and the external sound processor costs approximately $3,500. Review of BAHA by the Medical Advisory Secretariat The Medical Advisory Secretariat’s review is a descriptive synthesis of findings from 36 research articles published between January 1990 and May 2002. Summary of Findings No randomized controlled studies were found. The evidence was derived from level 4 case series with relative small sample sizes (ranging from 30-188). The majority of the studies have follow-up periods of eight years or longer. All except one study were based on monaural BAHA implant on the side with the best bone conduction threshold. Safety Level 4 evidence showed that BAHA has been be implanted safely in adults and children with success rates of 90% or higher in most studies. No mortality or life threatening morbidity has been reported. Revision rates for tissue reduction or resiting were generally under 10% for adults but have been reported to be as high as 25% in pediatric studies. Adverse skin reaction around the skin penetration site was the most common complication reported. Most of these

  17. Space flight and bone formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, St B.

    2004-01-01

    Major physiological changes which occur during spaceflight include bone loss, muscle atrophy, cardiovascular and immune response alterations. When trying to determine the reason why bone loss occurs during spaceflight, one must remember that all these other changes in physiology and metabolism may also have impact on the skeletal system. For bone, however, the role of normal weight bearing is a major concern and we have found no adequate substitute for weight bearing which can prevent bone loss. During the study of this problem, we have learned a great deal about bone physiology and increased our knowledge about how normal bone is formed and maintained. Presently, we do not have adequate ground based models which can mimic the tissue loss that occurs in spaceflight but this condition closely resembles the bone loss seen with osteoporosis. Although a normal bone structure will respond to application of mechanical force and weight bearing by forming new bone, a weakened osteoporotic bone may have a tendency to fracture. The study of the skeletal system during weightless conditions will eventually produce preventative measures and form a basis for protecting the crew during long term space flight. The added benefit from these studies will be methods to treat bone loss conditions which occur here on earth.

  18. Bone metabolism in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Fazeli, Pouneh K; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-03-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), a psychiatric disorder predominantly affecting young women, is characterized by self-imposed, chronic nutritional deprivation and distorted body image. AN is associated with a number of medical comorbidities including low bone mass. The low bone mass in AN is due to an uncoupling of bone formation and bone resorption, which is the result of hormonal adaptations aimed at decreasing energy expenditure during periods of low energy intake. Importantly, the low bone mass in AN is associated with a significant risk of fractures and therefore treatments to prevent bone loss are critical. In this review, we discuss the hormonal determinants of low bone mass in AN and treatments that have been investigated in this population. PMID:24419863

  19. Nutritional aspects of bone health.

    PubMed

    Rizzoli, René

    2014-12-01

    Bone mass, geometry and microstructure, and bony tissue material level properties determine bone strength, hence the resistance to fracture. At a given age, all these variables are the consequence of the amount accumulated and of the structure developed during growth, up to the so-called peak bone mass, and of the bone loss and microstructure degradation occurring later in life. Genetic factors primarily contribute to the variance of the determinants of bone strength. Nutritional intakes are environmental factors that influence both processes, either directly by modifying modelling and remodelling, or indirectly through changes in calcitropic hormone secretion and action. Some effects of nutrition on the offspring bone could take place during foetal life. There are interplays between genetic factors, nutritional intakes and physical exercise. Among the nutrients, sufficient dietary intakes of calcium and protein are necessary for bone health in childhood and adolescence as well as later in life. PMID:25432353

  20. Bone Metabolism in Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), a psychiatric disorder predominantly affecting young women, is characterized by self-imposed chronic nutritional deprivation and distorted body image. AN is associated with a number of medical co-morbidities including low bone mass. The low bone mass in AN is due to an uncoupling of bone formation and bone resorption, which is the result of hormonal adaptations aimed at decreasing energy expenditure during periods of low energy intake. Importantly, the low bone mass in AN is associated with a significant risk of fractures and therefore treatments to prevent bone loss are critical. In this review, we discuss the hormonal determinants of low bone mass in AN and treatments that have been investigated in this population. PMID:24419863

  1. Bone marrow trephine biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Bain, B

    2001-01-01

    Trephine biopsies of the bone marrow should be carried out, when clinically indicated, by trained individuals following a standard operating procedure. A bone marrow aspiration should be performed as part of the same procedure. For patient safety and convenience, biopsies are usually performed on the posterior iliac crest. The biopsy specimen should measure at least 1.6 cm and, if it does not, consideration should be given to repeating the procedure, possibly on the contralateral iliac crest. If bone marrow aspiration is found to be impossible, imprints from the biopsy specimen should be obtained. Otherwise, the specimen is placed immediately into fixative and after fixation is embedded in a resin or, more usually, decalcified and embedded in paraffin wax. Thin sections are cut and are stained, as a minimum, with haematoxylin and eosin and with a reticulin stain. A Giemsa stain is also desirable. A Perls' stain does not often give useful information and is not essential in every patient. The need for other histochemical or immunohistochemical stains is determined by the clinical circumstances and the preliminary findings. Trephine biopsy sections should be examined and reported in a systematic manner, assessment being made of the bones, the vessels and stroma, and the haemopoietic and any lymphoid or other tissue. Assessment should begin with a very low power objective, the entire section being examined. Further examination is then done with an intermediate and high power objective. Ideally, reporting of trephine biopsy sections should be done by an individual who is competent in both histopathology and haematology, and who is able to make an appropriate assessment of both the bone marrow aspirate and the trephine biopsy sections. When this is not possible, there should be close consultation between a haematologist and a histopathologist. The report should both describe the histological findings and give an interpretation of their importance. A signed or computer

  2. Bone Targeted Therapies for Bone Metastasis in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Razaq, Wajeeha

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis to the bone develops commonly in patients with various malignancies, and is a major cause of morbidity and diminished quality of life in many affected patients. Emerging treatments for metastatic bone disease have arisen from advances in our understanding of the unique cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to the bone metastasis. The tendency of cancer cells to metastasize to bone is probably the end result of many factors including vascular pathways, the highly vascular nature of the bone marrow (which increases the probability that cancer cells will be deposited in bone marrow capillaries), and molecular characteristics of the cancer cells that allow them to adapt to the bone marrow microenvironment. The goals of treating osseous metastases are manifold. Proper treatment can lead to significant improvements in pain control and function, and maintain skeletal integrity. The treatment plan requires a multidisciplinary approach. Widespread metastatic disease necessitates systemic therapy, while a localized problem is best managed with surgery, external beam radiotherapy, or both. Patients with bone metastasis can have prolonged survival, and proper management can have a significant impact on their quality of life. We will review the factors in this article that are promising molecular bone-targeted therapies or will be likely targets for future therapeutic intervention to restore bone remodeling and suppress tumor growth. PMID:26237142

  3. Response of canine bone to a synthetic bone graft material.

    PubMed

    St John, K R; Zardiackas, L D; Black, R J; Armstrong, R

    1993-01-01

    A model simulating a spiral diaphyseal fracture with butterfly fragments and bone loss was utilized to evaluate an hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate, and collagen composite bone graft substitute in twelve dogs. The resultant grafted and contralateral control femora were tested in torsion at one year. This study examines the histological response to the graft material as well as crack propagation and fracture surface morphology using light microscopy and SEM. SEM and gross evaluation of the grafted bones revealed that 8/12 had fractured through bone outside the osteotomy site and all fractures included bone outside the graft site. No graft material was demonstrated at the points of initiation or termination of fracture for any of the bones. It was apparent that recorticalization had begun to occur at the graft site but the canal had not yet fully formed. The HA/TCP was seen to be tightly bound in tissue which had the appearance of new bone. Bone was found to be in direct apposition to the surface of the ceramic and within pores with no intervening soft tissue. Much of the new bone had remodeled into well organized Haversian systems with some patchy areas of woven bone and osteoid seen with polarized light illumination. PMID:10148784

  4. Osteopontin Deficiency Increases Bone Fragility but Preserves Bone Mass

    PubMed Central

    Thurner, Philipp J.; Chen, Carol G.; Ionova-Martin, Sophi; Sun, Luling; Harman, Adam; Porter, Alexandra; Ager, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.; Alliston, Tamara

    2010-01-01

    The ability of bone to resist catastrophic failure is critically dependent upon the material properties of bone matrix, a composite of hydroxyapatite, collagen type I, and noncollagenous proteins. These properties include elastic modulus, hardness, and fracture toughness. Like other aspects of bone quality, matrix material properties are biologically-defined and can be disrupted in skeletal disease. While mineral and collagen have been investigated in greater detail, the contribution of noncollagenous proteins such as osteopontin to bone matrix material properties remains unclear. Several roles have been ascribed to osteopontin in bone, many of which have the potential to impact material properties. To elucidate the role of osteopontin in bone quality, we evaluated the structure, composition, and material properties of bone from osteopontin-deficient mice and wild-type littermates at several length scales. Most importantly, the results show that osteopontin deficiency causes a 30% decrease in fracture toughness, suggesting an important role for OPN in preventing crack propagation. This significant decline in fracture toughness is independent of changes in whole bone mass, structure, or matrix porosity. Using nanoindentation and quantitative backscattered electron imaging to evaluate osteopontin-deficient bone matrix at the micrometer level, we observed a significant reduction in elastic modulus and increased variability in calcium concentration. Matrix heterogeneity was also apparent at the ultrastructural level. In conclusion, we find that osteopontin is essential for the fracture toughness of bone, and reduced toughness in osteopontin-deficient bone may be related to the increased matrix heterogeneity observed at the micro-scale. By exploring the effects of osteopontin-deficiency on bone matrix material properties, composition and organization, this study suggests that reduced fracture toughness is one mechanism by which loss of noncollagenous proteins contribute

  5. Acidic microenvironment and bone pain in cancer-colonized bone

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Hiasa, Masahiro; Nagata, Yuki; Okui, Tatsuo; White, Fletcher A

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancers and hematologic cancers frequently colonize bone and induce skeletal-related complications. Bone pain is one of the most common complications associated with cancer colonization in bone and a major cause of increased morbidity and diminished quality of life, leading to poor survival in cancer patients. Although the mechanisms responsible for cancer-associated bone pain (CABP) are poorly understood, it is likely that complex interactions among cancer cells, bone cells and peripheral nerve cells contribute to the pathophysiology of CABP. Clinical observations that specific inhibitors of osteoclasts reduce CABP indicate a critical role of osteoclasts. Osteoclasts are proton-secreting cells and acidify extracellular bone microenvironment. Cancer cell-colonized bone also releases proton/lactate to avoid intracellular acidification resulting from increased aerobic glycolysis known as the Warburg effect. Thus, extracellular microenvironment of cancer-colonized bone is acidic. Acidosis is algogenic for nociceptive sensory neurons. The bone is densely innervated by the sensory neurons that express acid-sensing nociceptors. Collectively, CABP is evoked by the activation of these nociceptors on the sensory neurons innervating bone by the acidic extracellular microenvironment created by bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-colonizing cancer cells. As current treatments do not satisfactorily control CABP and can elicit serious side effects, new therapeutic interventions are needed to manage CABP. Understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism by which the acidic extracellular microenvironment is created in cancer-colonized bone and by which the expression and function of the acid-sensing nociceptors on the sensory neurons are regulated would facilitate to develop novel therapeutic approaches for the management of CABP. PMID:25987988

  6. Vitamin D: beyond bone

    PubMed Central

    Christakos, Sylvia; Hewison, Martin; Gardner, David G; Wagner, Carol L; Sergeev, Igor N; Rutten, Erica; Pittas, Anastassios G; Boland, Ricardo; Ferrucci, Luigi; Bikle, Daniel D

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, vitamin D has been received increased attention due to the resurgence of vitamin D deficiency and rickets in developed countries and the identification of extraskeletal effects of vitamin D, suggesting unexpected benefits of vitamin D in health and disease, beyond bone health. The possibility of extraskeletal effects of vitamin D was first noted with the discovery of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in tissues and cells that are not involved in maintaining mineral homeostasis and bone health, including skin, placenta, pancreas, breast, prostate and colon cancer cells, and activated T cells. However, the biological significance of the expression of the VDR in different tissues is not fully understood, and the role of vitamin D in extraskeletal health has been a matter of debate. This report summarizes recent research on the roles for vitamin D in cancer, immunity and autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular and respiratory health, pregnancy, obesity, erythropoiesis, diabetes, muscle function, and aging. PMID:23682710

  7. [Primary liposarcoma of bone].

    PubMed

    Tatić, V; Cerović, S; Skaro-Milić, A; Jovanović, Z

    2001-01-01

    A case of 75-year-old man with extremely rare primary liposarcoma of the bone was presented. Stains for lipid, Sudan III, Sudan IV, and Oil Red "O", demonstrated the presence of intracellular lipid in the lipoblasts. Similarly, the S-100 immunoreactivity and electron microscopic findings of tumor cells confirmed the diagnosis of liposarcoma. Histochemical stains for PAS, Alcian-blue, mucikarmin, Toluidin-blue and Coloidal Iron were negative. PMID:11419292

  8. Shang Oracle Bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankenier, David W.

    Astronomical observations first appear in China's archaeological record on turtle plastrons and ox scapulae from the reigns of the last few kings of the Shang Dynasty (1250-1046 BCE). A variety of meteorological and astronomical phenomena were divined about and recorded by scribes in formulaic language that is recognizably archaic Chinese. The oracle bone inscriptions record sacrifices to celestial bodies and the proper ritual response to anomalous phenomena like eclipses.

  9. Developing better artificial bones.

    PubMed

    Flinn, Edward D

    2003-01-01

    Researchers at the Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space at the Colorado School of Mines are preparing the Space-DRUMS (Dynamically Responding Ultrasonic Matrix Systems) materials processing facility for transport to the International Space Station. The Space-DRUMS uses acoustic pressure beams to maintain the position of a suspended liquid or solid. Space-DRUMS will be used to extend experiments with tricalcium phosphate in the development of artificial bone material. PMID:12524712

  10. The bone anabolic therapy.

    PubMed

    Nardi, A; Ventura, L; Cozzi, L; Tonini, G; Zennaro, R; Celi, M; Ramazzina, E

    2013-10-01

    Teriparatide (TPTD), the amino-terminal parathyroid hormone recombinant peptide [PTH (1–34)], is a drug with a proven anabolic action on the bone, effective in preventing vertebral and non-vertebral fragility fractures. Recent publications have investigated in great detail the TPTD action on the cortical bone, highlighting the increased strength in the critical zone of the hip with high risk of fracture in osteoporotic patients Poole (PLoS ONE 6:e16190, 2011). In November 2002, TPTD was approved by the FDA for use in post-menopausal women and men with osteoporosis at high risk of fracture and in patients with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis and, since then, has been used to treat more than 1 million patients worldwide (J Bone Miner Res 27(12):2429-2437, 2012). The unchanged safety profile and the well-known mechanism of action of this drug have led doctors to explore the use of TPTD in other conditions such as delayed fracture healing, non-union, osteonecrosis of the jaw, etc. The positive reports that have resulted from these studies are helping to hypothesize a new perspective on the wider use of this drug, but warrant further clinical investigation to consolidate these results. PMID:24078441

  11. [Long Bone Nonunion].

    PubMed

    Schmidmaier, G; Moghaddam, A

    2015-12-01

    The percentage of delayed or non-unions after fractures of long bones depends on the individual risk profile at approximately 10 %. The current definition states that a non-union is a fracture that will not consolidate without any further intervention - independent from the treatment time. At the early stage of a non-union a conservative treatment is possible in case of an adequately stable situation. The operative treatment depends on the type of the non-union. There are one-step or two-step procedures, all according to the principles of the "diamond concept". This means improvement of the mechanical situation - in most cases by means of a reosteosynthesis - and vascularization, local application of osteoconductive carriers e.g. tricalciumphosphate, vital cells from autologous bone and osteoinductive substances like bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP-2 or BMP-7). Hypertrophic and atrophic non-unions without large defect gaps or signs of infection can be treated with a one-step procedure. For treating infected non-unions or non-unions with large defect gaps the Masquelet technique is recommended. PMID:26670151

  12. Battling Brittle Bones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The accuDEXA(R) Bone Mineral Density Assessment System, manufactured by Schick Technologies, Inc., utilizes "camera on a chip" sensor technology invented and developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Schick's accuDEXA system offers several advantages over traditional osteoporosis tests, which assess bone density loss in the hip and spine, and require specialized personnel to conduct. With accuDEXA, physicians can test the entire body's bone density at a peripheral site, such as the finger, without applying gels or having patients remove garments. Results are achieved in 30 seconds and printed out in less than a minute, compared to the estimated exam time of 15 minutes for hip and spine density analyses. Schick has also applied the CMOS APS technology to a new software product that performs dental radiography using up to 90 percent less radiation exposure than conventional X-rays. Called Computed Dental Radiography(R), the new digital imaging product utilizes an electronic sensor in place of X-ray film to generate sharp and clear images that appear on a computer screen within 3 seconds, and can be enlarged and enhanced to identify problems.

  13. Bone Metabolism on ISS Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. M.; Heer, M. A.; Shackelford, L. C.; Zwart, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Spaceflight-induced bone loss is associated with increased bone resorption (1, 2), and either unchanged or decreased rates of bone formation. Resistive exercise had been proposed as a countermeasure, and data from bed rest supported this concept (3). An interim resistive exercise device (iRED) was flown for early ISS crews. Unfortunately, the iRED provided no greater bone protection than on missions where only aerobic and muscular endurance exercises were available (4, 5). In 2008, the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED), a more robust device with much greater resistance capability, (6, 7) was launched to the ISS. Astronauts who had access to ARED, coupled with adequate energy intake and vitamin D status, returned from ISS missions with bone mineral densities virtually unchanged from preflight (7). Bone biochemical markers showed that while the resistive exercise and adequate energy consumption did not mitigate the increased bone resorption, bone formation was increased (7, 8). The typical drop in circulating parathyroid hormone did not occur in ARED crewmembers. In 2014, an updated look at the densitometry data was published. This study confirmed the initial findings with a much larger set of data. In 42 astronauts (33 male, 9 female), the bone mineral density response to flight was the same for men and women (9), and those with access to the ARED did not have the typical decrease in bone mineral density that was observed in early ISS crewmembers with access to the iRED (Figure 1) (7). Biochemical markers of bone formation and resorption responded similarly in men and women. These data are encouraging, and represent the first in-flight evidence in the history of human space flight that diet and exercise can maintain bone mineral density on long-duration missions. However, the maintenance of bone mineral density through bone remodeling, that is, increases in both resorption and formation, may yield a bone with strength characteristics different from those

  14. Cancer-associated bone disease.

    PubMed

    Rizzoli, R; Body, J-J; Brandi, M-L; Cannata-Andia, J; Chappard, D; El Maghraoui, A; Glüer, C C; Kendler, D; Napoli, N; Papaioannou, A; Pierroz, D D; Rahme, M; Van Poznak, C H; de Villiers, T J; El Hajj Fuleihan, G

    2013-12-01

    Bone is commonly affected in cancer. Cancer-induced bone disease results from the primary disease, or from therapies against the primary condition, causing bone fragility. Bone-modifying agents, such as bisphosphonates and denosumab, are efficacious in preventing and delaying cancer-related bone disease. With evidence-based care pathways, guidelines assist physicians in clinical decision-making. Of the 57 million deaths in 2008 worldwide, almost two thirds were due to non-communicable diseases, led by cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Bone is a commonly affected organ in cancer, and although the incidence of metastatic bone disease is not well defined, it is estimated that around half of patients who die from cancer in the USA each year have bone involvement. Furthermore, cancer-induced bone disease can result from the primary disease itself, either due to circulating bone resorbing substances or metastatic bone disease, such as commonly occurs with breast, lung and prostate cancer, or from therapies administered to treat the primary condition thus causing bone loss and fractures. Treatment-induced osteoporosis may occur in the setting of glucocorticoid therapy or oestrogen deprivation therapy, chemotherapy-induced ovarian failure and androgen deprivation therapy. Tumour skeletal-related events include pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, surgery and radiotherapy to bone and may or may not include hypercalcaemia of malignancy while skeletal complication refers to pain and other symptoms. Some evidence demonstrates the efficacy of various interventions including bone-modifying agents, such as bisphosphonates and denosumab, in preventing or delaying cancer-related bone disease. The latter includes treatment of patients with metastatic skeletal lesions in general, adjuvant treatment of breast and prostate cancer in particular, and the prevention of cancer-associated bone disease. This has led to the development of guidelines by several societies and

  15. Secondary alveolar bone grafting: our experience with olecranon bone graft.

    PubMed

    Nadal, Emmanuela; Sabás, Mariana; Dogliotti, Pedro; Espósito, Raquel

    2010-03-01

    Management of alveolar cleft has dramatically changed during the last century: secondary alveolar bone grafting is now an integral part of cleft palate and craniofacial center's protocols. The objectives of alveolar repair and bone grafting are as follows: providing a continuous and stable maxillary dental arch, closure of oronasal fistulae, adequate bone for tooth eruption or orthodontic movement, and nasal base support, improving facial aesthetic. Although cancellous iliac bone is the donor site selected more frequently, bone grafts harvested from different sites have been advocated to decrease donor site morbidity.The aim of this study was to propose and evaluate the use of olecranon as a donor site in 24 patients with secondary alveolar cleft. The graft is taken as a single piece to fit the alveolar cleft defect, and it includes periosteum and corticocancellous bone to improve early vascularization and greater volume maintenance. PMID:20186086

  16. Automatic recognition of bone for x-ray bone densitometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepp, Larry A.; Vardi, Y.; Lazewatsky, J.; Libeau, James; Stein, Jay A.

    1991-06-01

    We described a method for automatically identifying and separating pixels representing bone from those representing soft tissue in a dual- energy point-scanned projection radiograph of the abdomen. In order to achieve stable quantitative measurement of projected bone mineral density, a calibration using sample bone in regions containing only soft tissue must be performed. In addition, the projected area of bone must be measured. We show that, using an image with a realistically low noise, the histogram of pixel values exhibits a well-defined peak corresponding to the soft tissue region. A threshold at a fixed multiple of the calibration segment value readily separates bone from soft tissue in a wide variety of patient studies. Our technique, which is employed in the Hologic QDR-1000 Bone Densitometer, is rapid, robust, and significantly simpler than a conventional artificial intelligence approach using edge-detection to define objects and expert systems to recognize them.

  17. Bone fragility and imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    D’Elia, Giovanni; Caracchini, Giuseppe; Cavalli, Loredana; Innocenti, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Bone fragility is a silent condition that increases bone fracture risk, enhanced by low bone mass and microarchitecture deterioration of bone tissue that lead to osteoporosis. Fragility fractures are the major clinical manifestation of osteoporosis. A large body of epidemiological data indicates that the current standard for predicting fragility fracture risk is an areal BMD (aBMD) measurement by DXA. Although mineral density measurements assess the quantity of bone, the quality of the tissue is an important predictor of fragility. Thus, bone strength is explained not only by BMD but also by macrostructural and microstructural characteristics of bone tissue. Imaging diagnostics, through the use of X-rays, DXA, Ultrasonography, CT and MR, provides methods for diagnosis and characterization of fractures, and semi- and quantitative methods for assessment of bone consistency and strength, that become precious for bone fragility clinical management if they are integrated by clinical risk factors. The last employment of sophisticated non-invasively imaging techniques in clinical research as high-resolution CT (hrCT), microCT (μ-CT), high-resolution MR (hrMR) and, microRM (μRM), combined with finite element analysis methods, open to new challenges in a better bone strength assessment to enhance the comprehension of biomechanical parameters and the prediction of fragility fractures. PMID:22461252

  18. Effects of myokines on bone.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The links between muscle and bone have been recently examined because of the increasing number of patients with osteoporosis and sarcopenia. Myokines are skeletal muscle-derived humoral cytokines and growth factors, which exert physiological and pathological functions in various distant organs, including the regulation of glucose, energy and bone metabolism. Myostatin is a crucial myokine, the expression of which is mainly limited to muscle tissues. The inhibition of myostatin signaling increases bone remodeling, bone mass and muscle mass, and it may provide a target for the treatment of both sarcopenia and osteoporosis. As myostatin is involved in osteoclast formation and bone destruction in rheumatoid arthritis, myostatin may be a target myokine for the treatment of accelerated bone resorption and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. Numerous other myokines, including transforming growth factor-β, follistatin, insulin-like growth factor-I, fibroblast growth factor-2, osteoglycin, FAM5C, irisin, interleukin (IL)-6, leukemia inhibitory factor, IL-7, IL-15, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, ciliary neurotrophic factor, osteonectin and matrix metalloproteinase 2, also affect bone cells in various manners. However, the effects of myokines on bone metabolism are largely unknown. Further research is expected to clarify the interaction between muscle and bone, which may lead to greater diagnosis and the development of the treatment for muscle and bone disorders, such as osteoporosis and sarcopenia. PMID:27579164

  19. Effects of cortical bone perforation on experimental guided bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Ichiro; Shimizu, Yoshinaka; Ooya, Kiyoshi

    2004-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of cortical bone perforation histologically and histomorphometrically on guided bone regeneration (GBR) in rabbits. After elimination of the periosteum, cortical bone defects of two sizes were made in the external cortical plate of the frontal bone (Group A: 1 x 15 mm; Group B: 3 x 15 mm). A non-resorbable membrane filled with autogenous blood was placed in the experimental area and secured with titanium pins. After 1 and 2 weeks, vascularized connective tissue and new bone were generated in the space surrounding the defects in both the groups. The amount of vascularized connective tissue generated in Group B was greater than that in Group A at 1 week. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was expressed on the bone surrounding the perforation. The expression of ALP was more extensive in Group B than in Group A and was proportional to the breadth of perforation. At 2 weeks, the perforated region was almost covered with new bone in Group A. ALP was expressed at the periphery of newly formed bone. The expression of ALP was proportional to the breadth and height of perforation. At 6 weeks, semicircular outgrowth of bone towards the periphery of the perforated region was observed in both the groups. Newly formed bone volume and ALP expression in Group B were more extensive than those in Group A. At 12 weeks, the space was filled with bone and connective tissue in both the groups. There was no difference in ALP expression between Groups A and B. Histomorphometric analysis showed significant differences between both the groups (two-way ANOVA, P<0.01). We conclude that a larger perforation is associated with prompter bone formation in the secluded space during GBR. PMID:15142091

  20. Method for Automated Bone Shape Correction within Bone Distraction Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blynskiy, F. Yu

    2016-01-01

    The method for automated bone shape correction within bone distraction procedure is presented. High precision deformation angle measurement is provided by the software for X- Ray images processing. Special BDC v.1.0.1. application is designed. The purpose of the BDC is modeling of the bone geometry structure to calculate the appropriate distraction forces. The correction procedure control is realized by the hardware of the distraction system.

  1. Development of Bone Remodeling Model for Spaceflight Bone Physiology Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennline, James A.; Werner, Christopher R.; Lewandowski, Beth; Thompson, Bill; Sibonga, Jean; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2015-01-01

    Current spaceflight exercise countermeasures do not eliminate bone loss. Astronauts lose bone mass at a rate of 1-2% a month (Lang et al. 2004, Buckey 2006, LeBlanc et al. 2007). This may lead to early onset osteoporosis and place the astronauts at greater risk of fracture later in their lives. NASA seeks to improve understanding of the mechanisms of bone remodeling and demineralization in 1g in order to appropriately quantify long term risks to astronauts and improve countermeasures. NASA's Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) is working with NASA's bone discipline to develop a validated computational model to augment research efforts aimed at achieving this goal.

  2. Bone cement treatment for aneurysmal bone cyst in a dog.

    PubMed

    Sarierler, Murat; Cullu, Emre; Yurekli, Yakup; Birincioglu, Serap

    2004-09-01

    An eighteen month old female Doberman pinscher dog was referred to teaching hospital of Adnan Menderes University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine with the complaint of right forelimb lameness for a month. On the basis of clinical, radiographical, scintigraphical, computed tomographical and histopathological findings, aneurysmal bone cyst was diagnosed. Surgical curettage and bone cement treatment were applied. The patient recovered after 12 months. This case proves that aneurysmal bone cyst, without osteolysis and/or damages to the surrounding tissues, may result in a good prognosis if curettage and treatment with bone cement are done. PMID:15472481

  3. Effect of cadmium on bone resorption in cultured fetal bone

    SciTech Connect

    Miyahara, T.; Miyakoshi, M.; Kozuka, H.

    1980-08-01

    Itai-itai disease which occurred in Toyama Prefecture, Japan, was thought to be due, at least partly, to chronic cadmium poisoning. Patients suffered severe pain in the waist, back and joints as well as kyphosis spinal column. In addition, x-ray film of these patients revealed abnormalities in the humerus and ribs. These bone lesions have been considered to be caused secondarily by dysfunction of other tissues, especially that of the kidneys, but there are some reports that the bone lesions appear before the occurrence of pathological changes in the kidneys of Cd-administered rat. It is currently unclear whether bone lesions by Cd are due to the direct action on the bone or indirect action which is caused by dysfunction of the kidney or intestine. To clarify the direct action of Cd on the bone, we studied the effect of Cd on the ossification of chick-embryo cultured bones biochemically and histologically. The results showed that Cd inhibited the bone matrix formation and brought about a malfunction in the ossification process. In the present work the effect of Cd on demineralization was studied using /sup 45/Ca-prelabeled bone in tissue culture and low levels of Cd were found to stimulate /sup 45/Ca from the bone.

  4. Bone disease in primary hypercalciuria

    PubMed Central

    Sella, Stefania; Cattelan, Catia; Realdi, Giuseppe; Giannini, Sandro

    2008-01-01

    Primary Hypercalciuria (PH) is very often accompanied with some degrees of bone demineralization. The most frequent clinical condition in which this association has been observed is calcium nephrolithiasis. In patients affected by this disorder bone density is very frequently low and increased susceptibility to fragility fractures is reported. The very poor definition of this bone disease from a histomorphometric point of view is a crucial aspect. At present, the most common finding seems to be a low bone turnover condition. Many factors are involved in the complex relationships between bone loss and PH. Since bone loss was mainly reported in patients with fasting hypercalciuria, a primary alteration in bone metabolism was proposed as a cause of both hypercalciuria and bone demineralization. This hypothesis was strengthened by the observation that some bone resorbing-cytokines, such as IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α are high in hypercalciuric patients. The effect of an excessive response to the acid load induced by dietary protein intake seems an additional factor explaining a primitive alteration of bone. The intestine plays a major role in the clinical course of bone disease in PH. Patients with absorptive hypercalciuria less frequently show bone disease and a reduction in dietary calcium greatly increases the probability of bone loss in PH subjects. It has recently been reported that greater bone loss is associated with a larger increase in intestinal calcium absorption in PH patients. Considering the absence of PTH alterations, it was proposed that this is not a compensatory phenomenon, but probably the marker of disturbed cell calcium transport, involving both intestinal and bone tissues. While renal hypercalciuria is rather uncommon, the kidney still seems to play a role in the pathogenesis of bone loss of PH patients, possibly via the effect of mild to moderate urinary phosphate loss with secondary hypophosphatemia. In conclusion, bone loss is very common in PH

  5. Microgravity and bone cell mechanosensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein-Nulend, J.; Bacabac, R. G.; Veldhuijzen, J. P.; Van Loon, J. J. W. A.

    2003-10-01

    The capacity of bone tissue to alter its mass and structure in response to mechanical demands has long been recognized but the cellular mechanisms involved remained poorly understood. Bone not only develops as a structure designed specifically for mechanical tasks, but it can adapt during life toward more efficient mechanical performance. Mechanical adaptation of bone is a cellular process and needs a biological system that senses the mechanical loading. The loading information must then be communicated to the effector cells that form new bone or destroy old bone. The in vivo operating cell stress derived from bone loading is likely the flow of interstitial fluid along the surface of osteocytes and lining cells. The response of bone cells in culture to fluid flow includes prostaglandin (PG) synthesis and expression of prostaglandin G/H synthase inducible cyclooxygenase (COX-2). Cultured bone cells also rapidly produce nitric oxide (NO) in response to fluid flow as a result of activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS), which enzyme also mediates the adaptive response of bone tissue to mechanical loading. Earlier studies have shown that the disruption of the actin-cytoskeleton abolishes the response to stress, suggesting that the cytoskeleton is involved in cellular mechanotransduction. Microgravity, or better near weightlessness, is associated with the loss of bone in astronauts, and has catabolic effects on mineral metabolism in bone organ cultures. This might be explained as resulting from an exceptional form of disuse under near weightlessness conditions. However, under near weightlessness conditions the assembly of cytoskeletal elements may be altered since it has been shown that the direction of the gravity vector determines microtubular pattern formation in vivo. We found earlier that the transduction of mechanical signals in bone cells also involves the cytoskeleton and is related to PGEZ production. Therefore it is possible that the

  6. Animal Models of Bone Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Simmons, J K; Hildreth, B E; Supsavhad, W; Elshafae, S M; Hassan, B B; Dirksen, W P; Toribio, R E; Rosol, T J

    2015-09-01

    Bone is one of the most common sites of cancer metastasis in humans and is a significant source of morbidity and mortality. Bone metastases are considered incurable and result in pain, pathologic fracture, and decreased quality of life. Animal models of skeletal metastases are essential to improve the understanding of the molecular pathways of cancer metastasis and growth in bone and to develop new therapies to inhibit and prevent bone metastases. The ideal animal model should be clinically relevant, reproducible, and representative of human disease. Currently, an ideal model does not exist; however, understanding the strengths and weaknesses of the available models will lead to proper study design and successful cancer research. This review provides an overview of the current in vivo animal models used in the study of skeletal metastases or local tumor invasion into bone and focuses on mammary and prostate cancer, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and miscellaneous tumors that metastasize to bone. PMID:26021553

  7. Animal Models of Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, J. K.; Hildreth, B. E.; Supsavhad, W.; Elshafae, S. M.; Hassan, B. B.; Dirksen, W. P.; Toribio, R. E.; Rosol, T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Bone is one of the most common sites of cancer metastasis in humans and is a significant source of morbidity and mortality. Bone metastases are considered incurable and result in pain, pathologic fracture, and decreased quality of life. Animal models of skeletal metastases are essential to improve the understanding of the molecular pathways of cancer metastasis and growth in bone and to develop new therapies to inhibit and prevent bone metastases. The ideal animal model should be clinically relevant, reproducible, and representative of human disease. Currently, an ideal model does not exist; however, understanding the strengths and weaknesses of the available models will lead to proper study design and successful cancer research. This review provides an overview of the current in vivo animal models used in the study of skeletal metastases or local tumor invasion into bone and focuses on mammary and prostate cancer, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and miscellaneous tumors that metastasize to bone. PMID:26021553

  8. [Radiological assessment of bone quality].

    PubMed

    Ito, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Structural property of bone includes micro- or nano-structural property of the trabecular and cortical bone, and macroscopic geometry. Radiological technique is useful to analyze the bone structural property;micro-CT or synchrotron-CT is available to analyze micro- or nano-structural property of bone samples ex vivo, and multi-detector row CT(MDCT)or high-resolution peripheral QCT(HR-pQCT)is available to analyze human bone in vivo. For the analysis of hip geometry, CT-based hip structure analysis(HSA)is available aw sell se radiography and DXA-based HSA. These structural parameters are related to biomechanical property, and these assessment tools provide information of pathological changes or the effects of anti-osteoporotic agents on bone. PMID:26728530

  9. Stress fractures and bone pain

    SciTech Connect

    Groshar, D.; Even-Sapir, E.; Lam, M.; Israel, O.; Front, D.

    1984-01-01

    Stress fractures result from an unusual repetitive physical activity causing absorption of bone in excess of repair and bone formation. This leads to the weakening of the bone and subsequently to a fracture. It is a benign condition that if recognized in time does not need any treatment besides rest. However, if diagnosis is not made and physical activity continues it may result in severe injury to the bone and a frank fracture may result. Pain is the typical clinical feature and bone scintigraphy, being more sensitive than radiography, is done to establish early diagnosis. The presence of asymptomatic sites of abnormal bone uptake typical of stress fracture in which pain appeared only about 2 weeks after scintigraphy, drew the authors' attention to the question of how close is the relationship between stress fractures and bone pain. Sixty-four military recruits diagnosed as suffering from stress fracture were investigated in order to correlate sites with abnormal uptake of Tc-99m MDP on bone scintigraphy with sites of local pain. In 37 (58%) subjects multiple sites of abnormal uptake were recognised. Of 123 sites of abnormal uptake, 31 (25%) were asymptomatic. In three patients bone pain appeared at the site of the abnormal uptake two weeks after scintigraphy. Bone scintigraphy appears to be more sensitive than bone pain in the diagnosis of stress fractures. The osteoblastic activity which manifests itself by abnormal uptake appears in some cases earlier than the pain caused by the fracture. Present findings may suggest that under certain circumstances, in a population prone to stress fracture, bone scan should be considered as a screening method.

  10. Diagnosis of metabolic bone disease

    SciTech Connect

    Grech, P.; Martin, T.J.; Barrington, N.A.; Ell, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents a reference on the radiologic evaluation, features, and differential diagnosis of metabolic diseases involving the whole skeleton, calcium deficiencies resulting from pharmacologic agents, and bone changes related to endocrine disturbances. It also stresses how radiology, nuclear medicine, and biochemistry - either alone or in concert - contribute to clinical diagnosis. It covers renal bone disease, Paget's disease, hyperphosphatasia, extraskeletal mineralization, metabolic bone disorders related to malnutrition, tumors, plus radionuclide studies including materials and methods.

  11. 21 CFR 872.4760 - Bone plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bone plate. 872.4760 Section 872.4760 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4760 Bone plate. (a) Identification. A bone plate is a metal device intended to stabilize fractured bone structures in the oral cavity. The bone segments are attached to...

  12. 21 CFR 872.4760 - Bone plate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bone plate. 872.4760 Section 872.4760 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4760 Bone plate. (a) Identification. A bone plate is a metal device intended to stabilize fractured bone structures in the oral cavity. The bone segments are attached to...

  13. Symmetry analysis of talus bone

    PubMed Central

    Islam, K.; Dobbe, A.; Komeili, A.; Duke, K.; El-Rich, M.; Dhillon, S.; Adeeb, S.; Jomha, N. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The main object of this study was to use a geometric morphometric approach to quantify the left-right symmetry of talus bones. Methods Analysis was carried out using CT scan images of 11 pairs of intact tali. Two important geometric parameters, volume and surface area, were quantified for left and right talus bones. The geometric shape variations between the right and left talus bones were also measured using deviation analysis. Furthermore, location of asymmetry in the geometric shapes were identified. Results Numerical results showed that talus bones are bilaterally symmetrical in nature, and the difference between the surface area of the left and right talus bones was less than 7.5%. Similarly, the difference in the volume of both bones was less than 7.5%. Results of the three-dimensional (3D) deviation analyses demonstrated the mean deviation between left and right talus bones were in the range of -0.74 mm to 0.62 mm. It was observed that in eight of 11 subjects, the deviation in symmetry occurred in regions that are clinically less important during talus surgery. Conclusions We conclude that left and right talus bones of intact human ankle joints show a strong degree of symmetry. The results of this study may have significance with respect to talus surgery, and in investigating traumatic talus injury where the geometric shape of the contralateral talus can be used as control. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:139–45. PMID:24802391

  14. Interaction of staphylococci with bone

    PubMed Central

    Wright, John A.; Nair, Sean P.

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococci, in particular Staphylococcus aureus, are the predominant cause of bone infections worldwide. These infections are painful, debilitating and with the rise in antibiotic-resistant forms, increasingly difficult to treat. The growth in the number of prosthetic joint replacement procedures also provides new opportunities for these infections to take hold. Comprehending the mechanisms by which staphylococci interact with and damage bone is critical to the development of new approaches to meet this challenge. This review summarises current understanding of the mechanisms by which staphylococci infect and damage bone. We address the role of the inflammatory response to staphylococcal infection in disrupting the homeostatic balance of bone matrix deposition and resorption and thereby mediating bone destruction. A number of virulence factors that have been shown to contribute to bone infection and pathology are discussed, however no single factor has been defined as being specific to bone infections. Although traditionally considered an extracellular pathogen, there is increasing evidence that staphylococci are able to invade host cells, and that an intracellular lifestyle may facilitate long-term persistence in bone tissue, enabling evasion of antimicrobials and host immune responses. ‘Small colony variant’ strains, with mutations disabling the electron transport pathway appear particularly adept at invading and persisting within host cells, and exhibit enhanced antimicrobial resistance, and may represent a further complication in the treatment and management of staphylococcal bone disease. PMID:19889575

  15. Bone Density in Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Houlihan, Christine Murray; Stevenson, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength predisposing a person to an increased risk of fracture.1 Osteoporosis remains a major health problem worldwide, costing an estimated $13.8 billion in health care each year in the United States. Despite advances in treating osteoporosis in the elderly, no cure exists. Osteoporosis has its roots in childhood. Accrual of bone mass occurs throughout childhood and early adulthood, and peak bone mass is a key determinant of the lifetime risk of osteoporosis. Because the foundation for skeletal health is established so early in life, osteoporosis prevention begins by optimizing gains in bone mineral throughout childhood and adolescence.2,3 Osteoporosis evaluation and prevention is relevant to children with cerebral palsy (CP). CP is the most prevalent childhood condition associated with osteoporosis. Bone density is significantly decreased, and children with CP often sustain painful fractures with minimal trauma that impair their function and quality of life. Preventing or improving osteoporosis and maximizing bone accrual during critical stages of growth will minimize the future lifelong risks of fractures in children with CP. This article addresses the anatomy and structure of bone and bone metabolism, the clinical assessment of bone mass, the causes of osteoporosis and its evaluation and treatment in children with CP. PMID:19643349

  16. Osteocyte-Driven Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Bellido, Teresita

    2013-01-01

    Osteocytes, the most abundant cells in bone, have been long postulated to detect and respond to mechanical and hormonal stimuli and to coordinate the function of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. The discovery that the inhibitor of bone formation sclerostin is primarily expressed in osteocytes in bone and it is downregulated by anabolic stimuli provided a mechanism by which osteocytes influence the activity of osteoblasts. Advances of the last few years provided experimental evidence demonstrating that osteocytes also participate in the recruitment of osteoclasts and the initiation of bone remodeling. Apoptotic osteocytes trigger yet to be identified signals that attract osteoclast precursors to specific areas of bone, which in turn differentiate to mature, bone resorbing osteoclasts. Osteocytes are also the source of molecules that regulate generation and activity of osteoclasts, such as OPG and RANKL; and genetic manipulations of the mouse genome leading to loss or gain of function, or to altered expression of either molecule in osteocytes, markedly affect bone resorption. This review highlights these investigations and discusses how the novel concept of osteocyte-driven bone resorption and formation impacts our understanding of the mechanisms by which current therapies control bone remodeling. PMID:24002178

  17. Biomechanical properties of bone allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Pelker, R.R.; Friedlaender, G.E.; Markham, T.C.

    1983-04-01

    The biomechanical properties of allograft bone can be altered by the methods chosen for its preservation and storage. These effects are minimal with deep-freezing or low-level radiation. Freeze-drying, however, markedly diminishes the torsional and bending strength of bone allografts but does not deleteriously affect the compressive or tensile strength. Irradiation of bone with more than 3.0 megarad or irradiation combined with freeze-drying appears to cause a significant reduction in breaking strength. These factors should be considered when choosing freeze-dried or irradiated allogeneic bone that will be subjected to significant loads following implantation.

  18. Craniometadiaphyseal dysplasia, wormian bone type.

    PubMed

    Santolaya, J M; Hall, C M; García-Miñaur, S; Delgado, A

    1998-05-18

    We report on a 4-year-old boy with craniometadiaphyseal dysplasia (CMDD), wormian bone type. Component manifestations include a large head with prominent forehead, skull changes showing multiple wormian bones, wide long tubular bones without the usual metaphyseal flare, wide and short tubular bones without the normal diaphyseal constriction, and wide ribs and clavicles. In addition to these findings, the propositus, his brother, his father, and a paternal aunt all have parietal protuberances, which seem not related to CMDD. Parental consanguineity supports the autosomal recessive transmission of the condition. PMID:9605592

  19. Bone Disease after Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bouquegneau, Antoine; Salam, Syrazah; Delanaye, Pierre; Eastell, Richard; Khwaja, Arif

    2016-07-01

    Bone and mineral disorders occur frequently in kidney transplant recipients and are associated with a high risk of fracture, morbidity, and mortality. There is a broad spectrum of often overlapping bone diseases seen after transplantation, including osteoporosis as well as persisting high- or low-turnover bone disease. The pathophysiology underlying bone disorders after transplantation results from a complex interplay of factors, including preexisting renal osteodystrophy and bone loss related to a variety of causes, such as immunosuppression and alterations in the parathyroid hormone-vitamin D-fibroblast growth factor 23 axis as well as changes in mineral metabolism. Management is complex, because noninvasive tools, such as imaging and bone biomarkers, do not have sufficient sensitivity and specificity to detect these abnormalities in bone structure and function, whereas bone biopsy is not a widely available diagnostic tool. In this review, we focus on recent data that highlight improvements in our understanding of the prevalence, pathophysiology, and diagnostic and therapeutic strategies of mineral and bone disorders in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:26912549

  20. How the osteoclast degrades bone.

    PubMed

    Blair, H C

    1998-10-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated monocyte-macrophage derivatives that degrade bone. Their specialized role is central to a process that continuously removes and replaces segments of the skeleton in the higher vertebrates. Osteoclasts allow skeletal mineral to be used to manage extracellular calcium activity, which is an important adaptation for life on land, and solid skeletal structure to be replaced by hollow architecture that has a superior strength-to-weight ratio. Degrading bone also allows periodic repair and remodeling for ordered growth and efficient response to mechanical loads. A fairly comprehensive view of osteoclastic ontogeny and function is emerging from recent studies. Osteoclasts dissolve bone mineral by massive acid secretion and secrete specialized proteinases that degrade the organic matrix, mainly type I collagen, in this acidic milieu. The site of bone dissolution is a high-calcium environment; removal of degradation products by transcytosis of membrane vesicles allows the osteoclast to maintain a normal intracellular calcium. Osteoclastic differentiation is normally balanced with bone formation, although bone formation is the function of unrelated stromal cell-derived osteoblasts. Interactions between osteoclast precursors and bone-forming cells are believed to control osteoclast differentiation under most circumstances, preserving bone architecture over many cycles of bone replacement. PMID:9819571

  1. Crosstalk between cartilage and bone: when bone cytokines matter.

    PubMed

    Funck-Brentano, Thomas; Cohen-Solal, Martine

    2011-04-01

    The cartilage damage which characterizes osteoarthritis is often accompanied by bone lesions. Joint integrity results from the balance in the physiological interactions between bone and cartilage. Several local factors regulate the physiological remodeling of cartilage, the disequilibrium of these leading to a higher cartilage catabolism. Several cytokines secreted by bone cells can induce chondrocyte differentiation, which suggests their role in the dialogue between both cells. Accumulative in vivo evidence shows that increased bone resorption occurs at an early stage in the development of osteoarthritis and that blocking bone-resorbing cytokines prevents cartilage damage, confirming the role of bone factors in the crosstalk of both tissues. Recently, molecules of the Wnt pathway have emerged as key regulators of bone and cartilage. Activation of Wnt/βcatenin induces an imbalance in cartilage homeostasis, and agonists/antagonists of Wnt are potential candidates for this interaction. This review will summarize what is known about the contribution of bone cytokines to the physiological remodeling of cartilage and in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis. PMID:21596615

  2. Raman spectroscopy of bone metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Sottnik, Joseph; Morris, Michael; Keller, Evan

    2012-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy of bone has been used to characterize chemical changes occurring in diseases such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and osteomyelitis. Metastasis of cancer into bone causes changes to bone quality that are similar to those observed in osteoporosis, such as decreased bone strength, but with an accelerated timeframe. In particular, osteolytic (bone degrading) lesions in bone metastasis have a marked effect on patient quality of life because of increased risk of fractures, pain, and hypercalcemia. We use Raman spectroscopy to examine bone from two different mouse models of osteolytic bone metastasis. Raman spectroscopy measures physicochemical information which cannot be obtained through standard biochemical and histological measurements. This study was reviewed and approved by the University of Michigan University Committee on the Care and Use of Animals. Two mouse models of prostate cancer bone metastasis, RM1 (n=3) and PC3-luc (n=4) were examined. Tibiae were injected with RM1 or PC3-luc cancer cells, while the contralateral tibiae received a placebo injection for use as controls. After 2 weeks of incubation, the mice were sacrificed and the tibiae were examined by Raman microspectroscopy (λ=785 nm). Spectroscopic markers corresponding to mineral stoichiometry, bone mineralization, and mineral crystallinity were compared in spectra from the cancerous and control tibiae. X-ray imaging of the tibia confirmed extensive osteolysis in the RM1 mice, with tumor invasion into adjoining soft tissue and moderate osteolysis in the PC3-luc mice. Raman spectroscopic markers indicate that osteolytic lesions are less mineralized than normal bone tissue, with an altered mineral stoichiometry and crystallinity.

  3. Exercise Brings Bone Benefits that Last

    MedlinePlus

    ... External link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Exercise Brings Bone Benefits that Last Building bone as ... lose bone. Studies of animals have shown that exercise during periods of rapid growth can lead to ...

  4. Paget’s disease of the bone

    MedlinePlus

    Tests that may indicate Paget's disease include: Bone scan Bone x-ray Elevated markers of bone breakdown (for instance, N-telopeptide) This disease may also affect the results of the following tests: ...

  5. Broken Bones, Sprains, and Strains (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Broken Bones, Sprains, and Strains KidsHealth > For Parents > Broken Bones, ... home. What to Do: For a Suspected Broken Bone: Do not move a child whose injury involves ...

  6. Closed reduction of a fractured bone

    MedlinePlus

    Fracture reduction - closed ... Closed reduction is a procedure to set (reduce) a broken bone without surgery. This allows the bone ... soon as possible after the bone breaks. A closed reduction can be done by an orthopedic surgeon ( ...

  7. Fractures and Biomechanical Characteristics of the Bone

    PubMed Central

    Velnar, Tomaz; Bunc, Gorazd; Gradisnik, Lidija

    2016-01-01

    The biological tissue is affected by external and internal deformation forces: tractive/tensile forces, shearing and compressive forces. The bone is deformed under the effect of a force. If the load exceeds the bone solidity limitation, fracture occurs. A mature bone consists of compact and spongy bone tissue. The basic structural unit of the cortical bone tissue are osteons and spongiosa consists of a network of bone trabeculae. The organic and mineral parts of the bone are responsible for the special bone characteristics. The effect of a physical activity on the mechanical characteristics of the bone is associated with the intensity of the load. Fractures are more common in elderly people as the bone structure is altered on account of osteoporosis and contains less bone tissue. Biomechanical characteristics with anatomic and histological bone structure as well as osteoporotic hip fractures are described in the paper. PMID:27110433

  8. Bone Mass Measurement: What the Numbers Mean

    MedlinePlus

    ... Friendly Page June 2015 What Is a Bone Density Test? A bone mineral density (BMD) test is ... check your progress. Who Should Get a Bone Density Test? The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends ...

  9. ISS Update: Bone Health in Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean interviews Dr. Jean Sibonga, Bone Lead Human Research Program, about the changes in bone structure and bone loss as a result of long term missions in space a...

  10. [Bone metastasis and RANKL].

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Tomoki

    2014-08-01

    The mice with a disruption of Rank or Rankl exhibit normal mammary development during puberty, but their mammary epithelium fails to proliferate and form lobuloalveolar structures during pregnancy, resulting in the death of newborns. Hormone replacement therapy is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Importantly, specific deletion of RANK in mammary epithelium cells prevents both the onset and progression of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) -driven mammary cancer and impairs self-renewal of breast cancer stem cells. Furthermore, RANK is highly expressed in several cancer cells. Functionally, it has been shown that RANKL can stimulate the directed migration of mammary epithelial cells as well as prostate cancer and melanoma cells toward a source of RANKL. In an in vivo metastasis model, OPG reduced the tumor burden in bones and ameliorated clinical paralysis, but did not affect the frequency of the spread of metastases into other tissues. These findings show that the RANK/RANKL system is crucial for mammary development, breast tumorigenesis and bone metastasis. PMID:25065872

  11. Bone densitometry in infants

    SciTech Connect

    Barden, H.S.; Mazess, R.B.

    1988-07-01

    Bone mineral mass and density can be measured noninvasively by various absorptiometric procedures. Two methods, dual-photon absorptiometry (DPA) and quantitative computed tomography, have widespread application in adults but only limited use in children. One method, single-photon absorptiometry (SPA), has been used extensively in adults and children and has been modified for use in infants. The radius shaft has been used for most research on infants. However, the difficulty of using older SPA methods on this small bone (4 to 7 mm width) has led a few investigators to measure the shaft of the humerus. The typical precision of measurement in a newborn is about 5% with the use of computerized rectilinear scanners for the radius; older linear scanners have a precision error of 5% to 10% on the humerus. Linear scanners cannot measure precisely the radius in individual neonates. The SPA scans typically take about 5 minutes. The DPA technique using /sup 153/Gd has been modified for use on smaller animals (5 to 10 kg monkeys and dogs), but it has not been used on infants because DPA scans take 20 minutes. New methods using x-ray absorptiometry allow rapid (1 minute), precise (1%) measurements in the perinate. The need for a soft tissue bolus is eliminated, and both the axial and peripheral skeletons can be measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Ultrasonic measurements do not yet offer adequate precision in the neonate, given the limited biologic range of values. 83 references.

  12. Green Tea and Bone Metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteoporosis is a major health problem in elderly men and women. Epidemiological evidence has shown association between tea consumption and age-related bone loss in elderly men and women. The aim of this review is to provide a systemic review of green tea and bone health to cover the following topi...

  13. Bone tissue engineering in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Jakob, Franz; Ebert, Regina; Ignatius, Anita; Matsushita, Takashi; Watanabe, Yoshinobu; Groll, Juergen; Walles, Heike

    2013-06-01

    Osteoporosis is a polygenetic, environmentally modifiable disease, which precipitates into fragility fractures of vertebrae, hip and radius and also confers a high risk of fractures in accidents and trauma. Aging and the genetic molecular background of osteoporosis cause delayed healing and impair regeneration. The worldwide burden of disease is huge and steadily increasing while the average life expectancy is also on the rise. The clinical need for bone regeneration applications, systemic or in situ guided bone regeneration and bone tissue engineering, will increase and become a challenge for health care systems. Apart from in situ guided tissue regeneration classical ex vivo tissue engineering of bone has not yet reached the level of routine clinical application although a wealth of scaffolds and growth factors has been developed. Engineering of complex bone constructs in vitro requires scaffolds, growth and differentiation factors, precursor cells for angiogenesis and osteogenesis and suitable bioreactors in various combinations. The development of applications for ex vivo tissue engineering of bone faces technical challenges concerning rapid vascularization for the survival of constructs in vivo. Recent new ideas and developments in the fields of bone biology, materials science and bioreactor technology will enable us to develop standard operating procedures for ex vivo tissue engineering of bone in the near future. Once prototyped such applications will rapidly be tailored for compromised conditions like vitamin D and sex hormone deficiencies, cellular deficits and high production of regeneration inhibitors, as they are prevalent in osteoporosis and in higher age. PMID:23562167

  14. Low Bone Mass in Thalassemia

    MedlinePlus

    4 Low Bone Mass in Thalassemia • In addition to a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D, your doctor may recommend taking calcium ... What can be done to treat low bone mass? Following all of the above prevention measures is ...

  15. Bone Marrow Derived Eosinophil Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas X.; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional effector cells implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases including asthma, eosinophil gastrointestinal disorders and helminth infection. Mouse bone marrow derived progenitor cells can be differentiated into eosinophils following IL-5 exposure. These bone marrow derived eosinophils are fully differentiated at the end of a 14 day culture based on morphology and expression of molecular markers.

  16. [Chronic Kidney Disease and Bone].

    PubMed

    James, Junichiro

    2016-08-01

    Both bone and kidney are members of the physiological network sharing a purpose of systemic mineral metabolism. In patients with chronic kidney disease whose kidney function is lost, the organ functions of other mineral metabolism network member including bone fail into uncontrollable due to dysregulated feedback system. This is the concept of Chronic Kidney Disease(related)- Mineral and Bone Disorder(CKD-MBD). However, the bone metabolic abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease cannot be explained merely by the framework of this mineral metabolism network. Although dialysis patients show several times higher hip fracture risk than general population, the main pathogenesis seems not to be their disordered mineral metabolism. We need to consider "uremic osteoporosis" characterized by deteriorated bone material properties due to uremic condition. PMID:27461505

  17. [Bone grafts in orthopedic surgery].

    PubMed

    Zárate-Kalfópulos, Barón; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro

    2006-01-01

    In orthopedic surgery the demand for the use of bone grafts increases daily because of the increasing quantity and complexity of surgical procedures. At present, the gold standard is the autologous bone graft but the failure rate, morbidity of the donor site and limited availability have stimulated a proliferation for finding materials that work as bone graft substitutes. In order to have good success, we must know the different properties of these choices and the environment where the graft is going to be used. As bone graft substitutes and growth factors become clinical realities, a new gold standard will be defined. Tissue engineering and gene therapy techniques have the objective to create an optimum bone graft substitute with a combination of substances with properties of osteconduction, osteogenesis and osteoinduction. PMID:16875525

  18. [Fibrin glue and bone regeneration].

    PubMed

    Zilch, H; Wolff, R

    1987-01-01

    The osteoinductive property of fibrin glue with and without admixture of aprotinin was proven in animal model. Aprotinin as an inhibitor of the fibrinolysis is supposed to be an inhibitor of the osteogenesis, too. Three holes of 4 mm diameter and 2 mm depth were placed into the diaphysis of both femura in 12 adults dogs. The defects were filled with either pure fibrin glue or with glue containing aprotinin (3000 KIE), or with nothing (vacant). After 8 weeks the quantity of the new built woven-bone was examined by plane geometry and the "Bone Metabolising Unit (BMU)" (Frost) which are crossing the border of lamellar bone and new woven bone were counted out. There was seen no statistical significantly between the three groups neither in the quantity of new bone nor in the BMU. Therefore the fibrin glue has no osteoinductive property. PMID:2441537

  19. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and TGF-β signaling in bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Janet L.; Cao, Xu

    2014-01-01

    During bone resorption, abundant factors previously buried in the bone matrix are released into the bone marrow microenvironment, which results in recruitment and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for subsequent bone formation, temporally and spatially coupling bone remodeling. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) orchestrates the signaling of many pathways that direct MSC fate. The spatiotemporal release and activation of matrix TGF-β during osteoclast bone resorption recruits MSCs to bone-resorptive sites. Dysregulation of TGF-β alters MSC fate, uncoupling bone remodeling and causing skeletal disorders. Modulation of TGF-β or PTH signaling may reestablish coupled bone remodeling and be a potential therapy. PMID:24487640

  20. Bacterial porins stimulate bone resorption.

    PubMed Central

    Meghji, S; Henderson, B; Nair, S P; Tufano, M A

    1997-01-01

    Porins are abundant outer membrane proteins of gram-negative bacteria involved in transport of low-molecular-mass molecules. During the past decade, porins from a number of bacteria have also been shown to have proinflammatory activities including inducing the synthesis of proinflammatory mediators (cytokines, platelet-activating factor, and nitric oxide) in cultured cells and inducing inflammation in vivo. With this range of actions, it was possible that porins could also interact with bone cells to cause aberrant bone remodeling and that this could contribute to the bone destruction seen in gram-negative bone infections. By using purified preparations of Salmonella typhimurium and Pseudomonas aeruginosa porins, in the presence of polymyxin B, it was possible to induce concentration-dependent loss of calcium from cultured murine calvaria at porin concentrations in the range of 1 to 10 nM. The mechanism of action of the porins was determined by the inclusion of inhibitors of cyclooxygenase or inflammatory cytokines in the culture media. The bone-resorbing activity of both porins was not inhibited by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin or by neutralizing the activity of tumor necrosis factor. Indeed, relatively high concentrations of these agents produced an unexpected increase in the bone resorption induced by the porins. In contrast, porin-induced bone resorption could be inhibited by relatively high concentrations of the natural inhibitor of interleukin-1 (IL-1 receptor antagonist). It appears that these porins stimulate bone resorption by a mechanism distinct from that of lipopolysaccharide, and the possibility therefore exists that porins play a role in bone destruction in gram-negative bacterial infections of bone. PMID:9119467

  1. Progesterone and Bone: Actions Promoting Bone Health in Women

    PubMed Central

    Seifert-Klauss, Vanadin; Prior, Jerilynn C.

    2010-01-01

    Estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) collaborate within bone remodelling on resorption (E2) and formation (P4). We integrate evidence that P4 may prevent and, with antiresorptives, treat women's osteoporosis. P4 stimulates osteoblast differentiation in vitro. Menarche (E2) and onset of ovulation (P4) both contribute to peak BMD. Meta-analysis of 5 studies confirms that regularly cycling premenopausal women lose bone mineral density (BMD) related to subclinical ovulatory disturbances (SODs). Cyclic progestin prevents bone loss in healthy premenopausal women with amenorrhea or SOD. BMD loss is more rapid in perimenopause than postmenopause—decreased bone formation due to P4 deficiency contributes. In 4 placebo-controlled RCTs, BMD loss is not prevented by P4 in postmenopausal women with increased bone turnover. However, 5 studies of E2-MPA co-therapy show greater BMD increases versus E2 alone. P4 fracture data are lacking. P4 prevents bone loss in pre- and possibly perimenopausal women; progesterone co-therapy with antiresorptives may increase bone formation and BMD. PMID:21052538

  2. Auto Bone Banking: Innovative Method for Bone Preservation

    PubMed Central

    M, Desai Mohan; R, Biraris Sandeep; M, Wade Roshan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Bone grafting is an integral part of orthopaedic surgery; the use of bone graft is increasing consistently in traumatology and also in complex revision surgeries of hip and knee arthroplasties. Considering this fact there is a need for some way to find solution for a bone graft which has more osteoinduction, osteoconduction as well as osteogenecity and also reduced rates of graft rejection and transmission of infections. All these qualities are found in autogenous bone graft. We hereby put forward a innovative method of bone preservation by using patients own femoral head and preserving it in patients own iliac pouch and making it available for future use. Case Report: From 2008 to 2012, total 17 numbers of operated sides were included in this method; patients had femoral neck fracture, osteoarthritis or avascular necrosis of femoral head and who underwent either hemi or total hip arthroplasty. Intraoperatively the resected femoral head was preserved in iliac pouch on ipsilateral side. This integrates with the native bone and additional bone graft would be made available for future use. We did not get opportunity to use the stored auograft. Conclusion: This is very innovative concept for preserving patient’s autogenous femoral head for future use. As conventional allograft relies upon screening procedure for infections, proper storage facilities and are expensive. PMID:27298993

  3. Bone composition: relationship to bone fragility and antiosteoporotic drug effects.

    PubMed

    Boskey, Adele L

    2013-01-01

    The composition of a bone can be described in terms of the mineral phase, hydroxyapatite, the organic phase, which consists of collagen type I, noncollagenous proteins, other components and water. The relative proportions of these various components vary with age, site, gender, disease and treatment. Any drug therapy could change the composition of a bone. This review, however, will only address those pharmaceuticals used to treat or prevent diseases of bone: fragility fractures in particular, and the way they can alter the composition. As bone is a heterogeneous tissue, its composition must be discussed in terms of the chemical makeup, properties of its chemical constituents and their distributions in the ever-changing bone matrix. Emphasis, in this review, is placed on changes in composition as a function of age and various diseases of bone, particularly osteoporosis. It is suggested that while some of the antiosteoporotic drugs can and do modify composition, their positive effects on bone strength may be balanced by negative ones. PMID:24501681

  4. Bone composition: relationship to bone fragility and antiosteoporotic drug effects

    PubMed Central

    Boskey, Adele L

    2013-01-01

    The composition of a bone can be described in terms of the mineral phase, hydroxyapatite, the organic phase, which consists of collagen type I, noncollagenous proteins, other components and water. The relative proportions of these various components vary with age, site, gender, disease and treatment. Any drug therapy could change the composition of a bone. This review, however, will only address those pharmaceuticals used to treat or prevent diseases of bone: fragility fractures in particular, and the way they can alter the composition. As bone is a heterogeneous tissue, its composition must be discussed in terms of the chemical makeup, properties of its chemical constituents and their distributions in the ever-changing bone matrix. Emphasis, in this review, is placed on changes in composition as a function of age and various diseases of bone, particularly osteoporosis. It is suggested that while some of the antiosteoporotic drugs can and do modify composition, their positive effects on bone strength may be balanced by negative ones. PMID:24501681

  5. [Management of bone metastases].

    PubMed

    Nagykálnai, Tamás; Landherr, László

    2014-02-01

    The skeleton is the most common site to be affected by advanced breast, prostatic, lung, kidney, thyroid and other solid tumors (in addition to myeloma multiplex). Bone metastases cause significant morbidity with nearly always fatal outcome. Over 600 000 new patients diagnosed in the developed countries yearly. On average every 4-6 months patients suffer from series of severe skeletal complications such as pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, hypercalcemic events, etc., besides the permanent pain. Local external beam radiotherapy, systemic radioisotope-, endocrine-, and chemotherapy, oral and i.v. bisphosphonates and recently s.c. denosumab are the mainstays of treatment, in addition to pain-killers and other usual "classical" interventions. The modern treatments singificantly reduce the probability of skeletal complications and improve the patients' quality of life and, sometimes, they extend the survival as well. The authors briefly summarize the available treatment options. PMID:24486845

  6. Bone Biochemistry on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Heer, Martina; Zwart, Sara R.

    2016-01-01

    Bone biochemical measures provide valuable insight into the nature and time course of microgravity effects on bone during space flight, where imaging technology cannot be employed. Increased bone resorption is a hallmark of space flight, while markers of bone formation are typically unchanged or decreased. Recent studies (after the deployment to ISS of the advanced resistive exercise device, ARED), have documented that astronauts with good nutritional intake (e.g., maintenance of body mass), good vitamin D status, and exercise maintained bone mineral density. These data are encouraging, but crewmembers exercising on the ARED do have alterations in bone biochemistry, specifically, bone resorption is still increased above preflight levels, but bone formation is also significantly increased. While this bone remodeling raises questions about the strength of the resulting bone, however documents beneficial effects of nutrition and exercise in counteracting bone loss of space flight.

  7. Re-evaluation of bone pain in patients with type 1 Gaucher disease suggests that bone crises occur in small bones as well as long bones.

    PubMed

    Baris, Hagit N; Weisz Hubshman, Monika; Bar-Sever, Zvi; Kornreich, Liora; Shkalim Zemer, Vered; Cohen, Ian J

    2016-09-01

    Bone crises in type 1 Gaucher disease are reported in long bones and occasionally in weight bearing bones and other bones, but rarely in small bones of the hands and feet. We retrospectively examined the incidence of bone pain in patients followed at the Rabin Medical Center, Israel, before and following the initiation of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and evaluated them for bone crises. Of 100 type I Gaucher disease patients, 30 (30%) experienced one or more bone crises. Small bone crises represented 31.5% of all bone crises and were always preceded by crises in other bones. While the incidence of long bone crises reduced after the initiation of ERT, small bone crises increased. Almost 60% of patients with bone crises were of the N370S/84GG genotype suggesting a greater susceptibility of N370S/84GG patients to severe bone complications. These patients also underwent the greatest number of splenectomies (70.6% of splenectomised patients). Splenectomised patients showed a trend towards increased long and small bone crises after surgery. Active investigation of acute pain in the hands and feet in patients in our cohort has revealed a high incidence of small bone crises. Physicians should consider imaging studies to investigate unexplained pain in these areas. PMID:26051481

  8. Impregnation of bone chips with alendronate and cefazolin, combined with demineralized bone matrix: a bone chamber study in goats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bone grafts from bone banks might be mixed with bisphosphonates to inhibit the osteoclastic response. This inhibition prevents the osteoclasts to resorb the allograft bone before new bone has been formed by the osteoblasts, which might prevent instability. Since bisphosphonates may not only inhibit osteoclasts, but also osteoblasts and thus bone formation, we studied different bisphosphonate concentrations combined with allograft bone. We investigated whether locally applied alendronate has an optimum dose with respect to bone resorption and formation. Further, we questioned whether the addition of demineralized bone matrix (DBM), would stimulate bone formation. Finally, we studied the effect of high levels of antibiotics on bone allograft healing, since mixing allograft bone with antibiotics might reduce the infection risk. Methods 25 goats received eight bone conduction chambers in the cortical bone of the proximal medial tibia. Five concentrations of alendronate (0, 0.5 mg/mL, 1 mg/mL, 2 mg/mL, and 10 mg/mL) were tested in combination with allograft bone and supplemented with cefazolin (200 μg/mL). Allograft not supplemented with alendronate and cefazolin served as control. In addition, allograft mixed with demineralized bone matrix, with and without alendronate, was tested. After 12 weeks, graft bone area and new bone area were determined with manual point counting. Results Graft resorption decreased significantly (p < 0.001) with increasing alendronate concentration. The area of new bone in the 1 mg/mL alendronate group was significantly (p = 0.002) higher when compared to the 10 mg/mL group. No differences could be observed between the group without alendronate, but with demineralized bone, and the control groups. Conclusions A dose-response relationship for local application of alendronate has been shown in this study. Most new bone was present at 1 mg/mL alendronate. Local application of cefazolin had no effect on bone remodelling. PMID:22443362

  9. Bone health in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Anorexia nervosa is associated with low bone mineral density (BMD), concerning for an increased risk of fractures, and decreased bone accrual in adolescents, concerning for suboptimal peak bone mass. This review discusses causes of impaired bone health in anorexia nervosa and potential therapeutic strategies. Recent findings Low BMD in anorexia nervosa is consequent to decreased lean mass, hypogonadism, low insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), relative hypercortisolemia and alterations in hormones impacted by energy availability. Weight gain causes some improvement in bone accrual, but not to the extent observed in controls, and vitamin D supplementation does not increase BMD. Oral estrogen is not effective in increasing BMD, likely from IGF-1 suppressive effects. In contrast, transdermal estrogen replacement is effective in increasing bone accrual in adolescents with anorexia nervosa, although not to the extent seen in controls. Recombinant human IGF-1 increases bone formation in adolescents, and with oral estrogen increases BMD in adults with anorexia nervosa. Bisphosphonates increase BMD in adults, but not in adolescents, and should be used cautiously given their long half-life. Summary Further investigation is necessary to explore therapies for low BMD in anorexia nervosa. Weight gain is to be encouraged. Transdermal estrogen in adolescents, and bisphosphonates in adults, have a potential therapeutic role. PMID:21897220

  10. Dilatational band formation in bone

    PubMed Central

    Poundarik, Atharva A.; Diab, Tamim; Sroga, Grazyna E.; Ural, Ani; Boskey, Adele L.; Gundberg, Caren M.; Vashishth, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Toughening in hierarchically structured materials like bone arises from the arrangement of constituent material elements and their interactions. Unlike microcracking, which entails micrometer-level separation, there is no known evidence of fracture at the level of bone’s nanostructure. Here, we show that the initiation of fracture occurs in bone at the nanometer scale by dilatational bands. Through fatigue and indentation tests and laser confocal, scanning electron, and atomic force microscopies on human and bovine bone specimens, we established that dilatational bands of the order of 100 nm form as ellipsoidal voids in between fused mineral aggregates and two adjacent proteins, osteocalcin (OC) and osteopontin (OPN). Laser microdissection and ELISA of bone microdamage support our claim that OC and OPN colocalize with dilatational bands. Fracture tests on bones from OC and/or OPN knockout mice (OC−/−, OPN−/−, OC-OPN−/−;−/−) confirm that these two proteins regulate dilatational band formation and bone matrix toughness. On the basis of these observations, we propose molecular deformation and fracture mechanics models, illustrating the role of OC and OPN in dilatational band formation, and predict that the nanometer scale of tissue organization, associated with dilatational bands, affects fracture at higher scales and determines fracture toughness of bone. PMID:23129653

  11. Bone development: overview of bone cells and signaling.

    PubMed

    Teti, Anna

    2011-12-01

    Vertebrates evolved elaborating a structure made up of more than 200 bones and cartilages articulated with one another to form the skeleton, through which locomotion, organ protection, lodging of hematopoiesis, and mineral homeostasis are allowed. Skeletogenesis starts at the fetal stage, along with marrow hematopoiesis, and evolves postnatally through modeling and remodeling processes that permit skeletal mass buildup. Preservation of skeletal mass is then implemented by balanced remodeling, which ensures continuous renovation of the tissue to allow its mechanical, structural, and metabolic properties to remain unaltered until ageing or diseases disrupt this equilibrium. Skeletal homeostasis is fulfilled by specialized bone cells in association with systemic and local regulators. Herein I review landmark discoveries that shed light on the intricate mesh connecting bone cells among themselves and with other systems, thus representing the cellular basis of normal and abnormal bone development and homeostasis. PMID:21948208

  12. Identification of cooked bone using TEM imaging of bone collagen.

    PubMed

    Koon, Hannah E C

    2012-01-01

    Mild heating (≤100° C, 1 h)-typical of cooking-does not lead to detectable changes in any biochemical parameter yet measured; consequently bones that have been cooked, but which have not reached a temperature that will induce charring go undetected. We have used a microscopy based approach to investigate changes in the organization of the bone protein, collagen, as it is heated, using bone from heating experiments, short term burials, and archaeological sites. The work has revealed that the presence of a mineral matrix stabilizes the collagen enabling the damage to accumulate, but preventing it from causing immediate gelatinization. Once the mineral is removed, the damage can be observed using appropriate visualization methods. This chapter describes the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique that has been used to detect cooked bone by visualizing minor heat-induced damage at the level of the collagen fibril. PMID:22907413

  13. [Allergy to bone cement components].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Schuh, A; Eben, R; Thomsen, M

    2008-02-01

    Intolerance reactions to endoprostheses may lead to allergological diagnostics, which focus mainly on metal allergy. However, bone cement may also contain potential allergens, e.g. acrylates and additives such as benzoyl peroxide (BPO), N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine, hydroquinone, and antibiotics (particularly gentamicin). In the Munich implant allergy clinic, we found that 28 of 113 patients (24.8%) with cemented prostheses had contact allergies to bone cement components, mostly to gentamicin (16.8%) and BPO (8.0%). The clinical significance of test results cannot always be shown, but we still recommend including bone cement components in the allergological diagnostics of suspected hypersensitivity reactions to arthroplasty. PMID:18227996

  14. Novel Adipokines and Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Song, Cheng-Yuan; Wu, Shan-Shan; Liang, Qiu-Hua; Yuan, Ling-Qing; Liao, Er-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a serious social issue nowadays. Both the high morbidity and its common complication osteoporotic fracture load a heavy burden on the whole society. The adipose tissue is the biggest endocrinology organ that has a different function on the bone. The adipocytes are differentiated from the same cell lineage with osteoblast, and they can secrete multiple adipokines with various functions on bone remolding. Recently, several novel adipokines have been identified and investigated thoroughly. In this paper, we would like to highlight the complicated relation between the bone metabolism and the novel adipokines, and it may provide us with a new target for prediction and treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:23431296

  15. [Pathological assessment of bone sarcomas].

    PubMed

    Jundt, G; Baumhoer, D

    2014-06-01

    Bone tumors are very rare. Diagnosis and treatment is an interdisciplinary task for experienced radiologists, pathologist, and surgeons that is ideally performed in specialized centers. For optimal processing of bone specimens, basic laboratory equipment and special techniques are required. The cornerstone of the histological diagnosis remains H&E staining, supplemented by special stains, immunohistochemistry, and molecular techniques. For an appropriate diagnosis, data on clinical history, age, location, topography within bone, and imaging are required. Major differences between histological and radiological diagnosis have to be clarified before starting treatment (e.g., by involving a reference registry). PMID:24903501

  16. A Boon for Bone Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA studies for astronaut health in long-term space missions led to the development of the Mechanical Response Tissue Analyzer (MRTA), a research tool for astronaut disuse, osteoporosis and related bone disorders among the general population. Ames Research Center and Stanford University generated a workable device and with Gait Scan, Inc., refined and commercialized it. The MRTA is a portable dsinstrument that measures the bending stiffness of bones using electrically-induced vibration and detects and analyzes the frequencies of the resonating bone. Unlike some other methods, the MRTA uses no radiation and is fast, simple and relatively inexpensive.

  17. The genetics of bone mass and susceptibility to bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Karasik, David; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Johnson, Mark L

    2016-06-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mass and an increased risk of fracture. Genetic factors, environmental factors and gene-environment interactions all contribute to a person's lifetime risk of developing an osteoporotic fracture. This Review summarizes key advances in understanding of the genetics of bone traits and their role in osteoporosis. Candidate-gene approaches dominated this field 20 years ago, but clinical and preclinical genetic studies published in the past 5 years generally utilize more-sophisticated and better-powered genome-wide association studies (GWAS). High-throughput DNA sequencing, large genomic databases and improved methods of data analysis have greatly accelerated the gene-discovery process. Linkage analyses of single-gene traits that segregate in families with extreme phenotypes have led to the elucidation of critical pathways controlling bone mass. For example, components of the Wnt-β-catenin signalling pathway have been validated (in both GWAS and functional studies) as contributing to various bone phenotypes. These notable advances in gene discovery suggest that the next decade will witness cataloguing of the hundreds of genes that influence bone mass and osteoporosis, which in turn will provide a roadmap for the development of new drugs that target diseases of low bone mass, including osteoporosis. PMID:27052486

  18. Investigation of using bone texture analysis on bone densitometry images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinander, Michael R.; Giger, Maryellen L.; Shah, Ruchi D.; Vokes, Tamara

    2002-05-01

    We previously developed bone texture analysis methods to assess bone strength on digitized radiographs. Here, we compare the analyses performed on digitized screen-film to those obtained on peripheral bone densitometry images. A leg phantom was imaged with both a PIXI (GE Medical Systems; Milwaukee, WI) bone densitometer (0.200-mm pixel size) and a screen-film system, with the films being subsequently digitized by a laser film digitizer (0.100-mm pixel size). The phantom was radiographically scanned multiple times with the densitometer at the default parameters and for increasing exposure times. Fourier-based texture features were calculated from regions of interest from images from both modalities. The bone densitometry images contained more quantum noise than the radiographs resulting in increased values for the first moment of the power spectrum texture feature (1.22 times higher than from the standard radiograph). Presence of such noise may adversely affect the texture feature's ability to distinguish between strong and weak bone. By either increasing the exposure time or averaging multiple scans in the spatial frequency domain, we showed a reduction in the effect of the quantum mottle on the first moment of the power spectrum.

  19. What Happens After Treatment for Bone Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer? Can I get another cancer after having bone cancer? Lifestyle changes after treatment for bone cancer How does having bone cancer affect your ... talk to your cancer care team about any changes or problems you notice and any ... extensive bone surgery, a program of rehabilitation and physical therapy ...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3015 - Bone heterograft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bone heterograft. 888.3015 Section 888.3015 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3015 Bone heterograft. (a) Identification. Bone heterograft is a device intended to be implanted that is made from mature (adult) bovine bones and used...

  1. Estimation of In vivo Cancellous Bone Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otani, Takahiko; Mano, Isao; Tsujimoto, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Tadahito; Teshima, Ryota; Naka, Hiroshi

    2009-07-01

    The effect of decreasing bone density (a symptom of osteoporosis) is greater for cancellous bone than for dense cortical bone, because cancellous bone is metabolically more active. Therefore, the bone density or bone mineral density of cancellous bone is generally used to estimate the onset of osteoporosis. Elasticity or elastic constant is a fundamental mechanical parameter and is directly related to the mechanical strength of bone. Accordingly, elasticity is a preferable parameter for assessing fracture risk. A novel ultrasonic bone densitometer LD-100 has been developed to determine the mass density and elasticity of cancellous bone with a spatial resolution comparable to that of peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Bone density and bone elasticity are evaluated using ultrasonic parameters based on fast and slow waves in cancellous bone by modeling the ultrasonic wave propagation path. Elasticity is deduced from the measured bone density and the propagation speed of the fast wave. Thus, the elasticity of cancellous bone is approximately expressed by a cubic equation of bone density.

  2. 21 CFR 888.3015 - Bone heterograft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bone heterograft. 888.3015 Section 888.3015 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3015 Bone heterograft. (a) Identification. Bone heterograft is a device intended to be implanted that is made from mature (adult) bovine bones and used...

  3. Understanding the Structure of Bones

    MedlinePlus

    ... make up OI bone do not give the skeleton full strength because the quantity or shape of ... of fractures. They need more strength than the skeleton can provide. When growth stops after sexual maturation, ...

  4. Bare Bones of Bioactive Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Paul Ducheyne, a principal investigator in the microgravity materials science program and head of the University of Pernsylvania's Center for Bioactive Materials and Tissue Engineering, is leading the trio as they use simulated microgravity to determine the optimal characteristics of tiny glass particles for growing bone tissue. The result could make possible a much broader range of synthetic bone-grafting applications. Bioactive glass particles (left) with a microporous surface (right) are widely accepted as a synthetic material for periodontal procedures. Using the particles to grow three-dimensional tissue cultures may one day result in developing an improved, more rugged bone tissue that may be used to correct skeletal disorders and bone defects. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research.

  5. Bone disease in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Dede, Anastasia D; Lyritis, George P; Tournis, Symeon

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a serious psychiatric disorder accompanied by high morbidity and mortality. It is characterized by emaciation due to self-starvation and displays a unique hormonal profile. Alterations in gonadal axis, growth hormone resistance with low insulin-like growth factor I levels, hypercortisolemia and low triiodothyronine levels are almost universally present and constitute an adaptive response to malnutrition. Bone metabolism is likewise affected resulting in low bone mineral density, reduced bone accrual and increased fracture risk. Skeletal deficits often persist even after recovery from the disease with serious implications for future skeletal health. The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying bone disease are quite complicated and treatment is a particularly challenging task. PMID:24722126

  6. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bone cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  7. Osteoporosis: Build Up Your Bones!

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Osteoporosis Build Up Your Bones! Past Issues / Winter 2011 ... special needs of people with osteoporosis. A Complete Osteoporosis Program Remember, exercise is only one part of ...

  8. Bone Cancer: Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... determine the level of an enzyme called alkaline phosphatase. A large amount of this enzyme is present ... abnormal bone tissue. Because high levels of alkaline phosphatase are normal in growing children and adolescents, this ...

  9. [Classification of primary bone tumors].

    PubMed

    Dominok, G W; Frege, J

    1986-01-01

    An expanded classification for bone tumors is presented based on the well known international classification as well as earlier systems. The current status and future trends in this area are discussed. PMID:3461626

  10. Children's Bone Health and Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Resources and Publications Children's Bone Health and Calcium: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links ... straight, walk, run, and lead an active life. Calcium is one of the key dietary building blocks ...

  11. Healthy Bones at Every Age

    MedlinePlus

    ... include walking and running, as well as team sports like soccer and basketball. AAOS does not endorse ... to cause hormonal changes that stop menstrual periods (amenorrhea). This loss of estrogen can cause bone loss ...

  12. Bone biopsy in haematological disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, R; Frisch, B; Bartl, R

    1982-01-01

    Bone marrow biopsies are now widely used in the investigation and follow-up of many diseases. Semi-thin sections of 8216 undecalcified biopsies of patients with haematological disorders were studied. Observations were made on the cytopenias and the myelodysplastic syndromes, the acute leukaemias the myeloproliferative disorders, Hodgkin's disease and the malignant lymphomas including multiple myeloma, hairy cell leukaemia and angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy. Bone marrow biopsies are essential for the differential diagnosis of most cytopenias and for the early recognition of fibrosis which most frequently occurred as a consequence of megakaryocytic proliferation in the myeloproliferative disorders. Different patterns of bone marrow involvement were found in the lymphoproliferative disorders and both their type and extent constituted factors of prognostic significance. A survey of the literature is given and the conclusion is drawn that bone marrow biopsies provide indispensible information for the diagnostic evaluation and the follow-up of patients with haematological disorders. Images PMID:7040489

  13. Bone fractures: assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Lim, L; Sirichai, P

    2016-03-01

    Severe dental traumatic injuries often involve the supporting bone and soft tissues. This article outlines the current concepts in the management of dentoalveolar fractures for the general dental practitioner with case reports to illustrate management principles and techniques. PMID:26923449

  14. Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Recipes En Español Teachers - Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents ... bone marrow sample for procedures (such as a stem cell transplant ) or other testing (such as chromosomal ...

  15. How Is Bone Cancer Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors. This information about the tumor, lymph nodes, metastasis, and grade is combined in a process called ... the bone or nearby lymph nodes M1: Distant metastasis (the cancer has spread) M1a: The cancer has ...

  16. Brown adipose tissue and bone

    PubMed Central

    Lidell, M E; Enerbäck, S

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is capable of transforming chemically stored energy, in the form of triglycerides, into heat. Recent studies have shown that metabolically active BAT is present in a large proportion of adult humans, where its activity correlates with a favorable metabolic status. Hence, the tissue is now regarded as an interesting target for therapies against obesity and associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes, the hypothesis being that an induction of BAT would be beneficial for these disease states. Apart from the association between BAT activity and a healthier metabolic status, later studies have also shown a positive correlation between BAT volume and both bone cross-sectional area and bone mineral density, suggesting that BAT might stimulate bone anabolism. The aim of this review is to give the reader a brief overview of the BAT research field and to summarize and discuss recent findings regarding BAT being a potential player in bone metabolism. PMID:27152171

  17. Bone scintigraphy in diabetic osteoarthropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Eymontt, M.J.; Alavi, A.; Dalinka, M.K.; Kyle, G.C.

    1981-08-01

    Bone scans of patients with diabetic osteoarthropathy of the ankle and foot were characterized by a combination of diffuse and focal increased uptake, similar to that seen with hyperemia and reactive new bone formation. Scintigraphy showed more extensive abnormalities than radiography, with the scan abnormalities sometimes preceding the radiographic changes. The clinical and scintigraphic appearance of osteoarthropathy may improve following strict diabetic control and non-weight-bearing.

  18. Unsuspected pregnancy during bone scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Oates, E.; Ramberg, K.; Becker, J.L. )

    1990-06-01

    Despite careful screening efforts to avoid it, nuclear medicine studies are unintentionally performed on pregnant patients. Three-phase bone scanning is a common procedure performed in women of child-bearing age. Unsuspected pregnancies have been discovered on the flow and early view of the pelvis. The authors present a case of a pregnant girl, aged 15, who had a bone scan. They explain how this occurred and how they plan to prevent a recurrence. Dosimetry for the fetus also is considered.

  19. Bone Diseases of the Jaws

    PubMed Central

    Slootweg, Pieter Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Lesions specific for the jaws and not occurring in any other bones mostly are related to the teeth or to odontogenic tissues. Moreover, the jaws may harbor nonodontogenic bone lesions not seen in any other part of the skeleton. This paper pays attention to the diseases that are specific for the jaws, odontogenic as well as nonodontogenic. Both neoplastic and nonneoplastic entities will be discussed. PMID:20379356

  20. [Clinical nuclear medicine in bone metastases].

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Joji; Higashiyama, Shigeaki; Shiomi, Susumu

    2013-03-01

    (99m)Tc-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate is not directly to Calcium of the bone matrix, but is binding to hydroxyapatite within the bone matrix. Strontium-89 is a member of family II A of the periodic table, same as Calcium, and is incorporated into bone matrix directly. It is very important that the the regions of the pain from bone metastases are present in the site of the abnormal uptake by bone metastases. PMID:23445892

  1. Research opportunities in bone demineralization, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, S. A. (Editor); Cohn, S. H. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    An overview of bone demineralization during space flight, observations in bone demineralization and experiments related to bone loss planned for Spacelab flights, and suggestions for further research are investigated. The observations of the working group focused upon the following topics: (1) pathogenesis of bone demineralization, (2) potential for occurrence of renal stones consequent to prolonged hypercalciuria, (3) development of appropriate ground based and inflight models to study bone demineralization, (4) integration of research efforts, and (5) development of effective countermeasures.

  2. Mineralized three-dimensional bone constructs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Mark S. F. (Inventor); Sundaresan, Alamelu (Inventor); Pellis, Neal R. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present disclosure provides ex vivo-derived mineralized three-dimensional bone constructs. The bone constructs are obtained by culturing osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors under randomized gravity vector conditions. Preferably, the randomized gravity vector conditions are obtained using a low shear stress rotating bioreactor, such as a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) culture system. The bone constructs of the disclosure have utility in physiological studies of bone formation and bone function, in drug discovery, and in orthopedics.

  3. Mineralized Three-Dimensional Bone Constructs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Mark S. F. (Inventor); Sundaresan, Alamelu (Inventor); Pellis, Neal R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present disclosure provides ex vivo-derived mineralized three-dimensional bone constructs. The bone constructs are obtained by culturing osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors under randomized gravity vector conditions. Preferably, the randomized gravity vector conditions are obtained using a low shear stress rotating bioreactor, such as a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) culture system. The bone constructs of the disclosure have utility in physiological studies of bone formation and bone function, in drug discovery, and in orthopedics.

  4. Bone culture research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Nicola C.

    1993-01-01

    The experiments described are aimed at exploring PTH regulation of production of collagenase and protein inhibitors of collagenase (tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases, TIMP-1 and -2) by osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells under conditions of weightlessness. The results of this work will contribute to information as to whether a microgravity environment alters the functions and responsiveness of the osteoblast. The objectives of the Bone Culture Research (BCR) experiment are: to observe the effects of microgravity on the morphology, rate of proliferation, and behavior of the osteoblastic cells, UMR 106-01; to determine whether microgravy affects the hormonal sensitivity of osteroblastic cells; and to measure the secretion of collagenase and its inhibitors into the medium under conditions of microgravity. The methods employed will consist of the following: the osteoblast-like cells, UMR-106-01, will be cultured in four NASDA cell culture chambers; two chambers will be subjected to microgravity on SL-J; two chambers will remain on the ground at KSC as ground controls but subjected to an identical set of culture conditions as on the shuttle; media will be changed four times; twice the cells will receive the hormone parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) and media collected; cells will be photographed under conditions of microgravity; and media and photographs will be analyzed upon return to determine whether functions of the cells changed.

  5. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibition causes simultaneous bone loss and excess bone formation within growing bone in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nurmio, Mirja; Joki, Henna; Kallio, Jenny; Maeaettae, Jorma A.; Vaeaenaenen, H. Kalervo; Toppari, Jorma; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Laitala-Leinonen, Tiina

    2011-08-01

    During postnatal skeletal growth, adaptation to mechanical loading leads to cellular activities at the growth plate. It has recently become evident that bone forming and bone resorbing cells are affected by the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitor imatinib mesylate (STI571, Gleevec (registered)) . Imatinib targets PDGF, ABL-related gene, c-Abl, c-Kit and c-Fms receptors, many of which have multiple functions in the bone microenvironment. We therefore studied the effects of imatinib in growing bone. Young rats were exposed to imatinib (150 mg/kg on postnatal days 5-7, or 100 mg/kg on postnatal days 5-13), and the effects of RTK inhibition on bone physiology were studied after 8 and 70 days (3-day treatment), or after 14 days (9-day treatment). X-ray imaging, computer tomography, histomorphometry, RNA analysis and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate bone modeling and remodeling in vivo. Imatinib treatment eliminated osteoclasts from the metaphyseal osteochondral junction at 8 and 14 days. This led to a resorption arrest at the growth plate, but also increased bone apposition by osteoblasts, thus resulting in local osteopetrosis at the osteochondral junction. The impaired bone remodelation observed on day 8 remained significant until adulthood. Within the same bone, increased osteoclast activity, leading to bone loss, was observed at distal bone trabeculae on days 8 and 14. Peripheral quantitative computer tomography (pQCT) and micro-CT analysis confirmed that, at the osteochondral junction, imatinib shifted the balance from bone resorption towards bone formation, thereby altering bone modeling. At distal trabecular bone, in turn, the balance was turned towards bone resorption, leading to bone loss. - Research Highlights: > 3-Day imatinib treatment. > Causes growth plate anomalies in young rats. > Causes biomechanical changes and significant bone loss at distal trabecular bone. > Results in loss of osteoclasts at osteochondral junction.

  6. Quantitative computed tomography of bone.

    PubMed

    Rüegsegger, P; Stebler, B; Dambacher, M

    1982-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is well accepted as an imaging procedure, but comparatively little effort has been made to utilize the potential capability of CT to quantify tissue densities and composition. There are two reasons for this. First, precision and accuracy of quantification are limited by nonlinear effects. These effects are nonlocal and are object and scanner dependent. Second, intraindividual and interindividual variations of tissue compositions are considerable. Single energy measurements require restrictive assumptions on tissue compositions. The diagnosis and treatment monitoring of osteopenic bone diseases with low-dose CT is given as an example of a successful application of quantitative CT. With a special-purpose CT system and an analytic procedure for the quantification of bone at peripheral measuring sites, longitudinal examinations were performed. Low-dose quantitative CT permitted quantification, on an individual basis, of the bone loss of immobilization osteoporosis on a week-by-week basis. Changes due to postmenopausal osteoporosis are less drastic, and so measurement at intervals of months is adequate. In women after menopause, 3-month intervals were used in evaluating the natural course of osteoporosis and in quantifying the effects of sodium fluoride treatment on trabecular bone. Low-dose quantitative CT has proved to be a sensitive and highly reproducible procedure for the noninvasive evaluation of bone loss or bone accretion. During a disease or therapy, each patient can be evaluated individually. PMID:7121079

  7. Green Tea and Bone metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chwan-Li; Yeh, James K.; Cao, Jay; Wang, Jia-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major health problem in both elderly women and men. Epidemiological evidence has shown an association between tea consumption and the prevention of age-related bone loss in elderly women and men. Ingestion of green tea and green tea bioactive compounds may be beneficial in mitigating bone loss of this population and decreasing their risk of osteoporotic fractures. This review describes the effect of green tea or its bioactive components on bone health, with an emphasis on: (i) the prevalence and etiology of osteoporosis, (ii) the role of oxidative stress and antioxidants in osteoporosis, (iii) green tea composition and bioavailability, (iv) the effects of green tea and its active components on osteogenesis, osteoblastogenesis, and osteoclastogenesis from human epidemiological, animal, as well as cell culture studies, (v) possible mechanisms explaining the osteo-protective effects of green tea bioactive compounds, (vi) other bioactive components in tea that benefit bone health, and (vii) a summary and future direction of green tea and bone health research and the translational aspects. In general, tea and its bioactive components might decrease the risk of fracture by improving bone mineral density (BMD) and supporting osteoblastic activities while suppressing osteoclastic activities. PMID:19700031

  8. [Palliative Radiotherapy for Bone Metastases].

    PubMed

    Nagakura, Hisayasu

    2015-11-01

    Bone metastasis is associated with many symptoms such as bone pain, pathological fracture, and spinal cord compression. Especially, pain secondary to bone metastases is a serious problem in many patients with metastatic cancer. Radiotherapy can provide remarkable pain relief, reduce the requirement for analgesic drugs, and prevent pathological fracture or spinal cord compression with few complications in most patients. Many randomized controlled trials have shown equivalent extent of pain relief between single-fraction and multiple-fraction regimens. Reirradiation of painful bone metastases is effective for palliation of pain in non-responders or patients with recurrent pain after an initial satisfactory response to a previous radiation therapy. Systemic administration of radioisotopes is an important palliative care option for painful multifocal bone metastases detected on nuclear imaging; however, the application of this option depends on the histologic features of the tumor and distribution of the metastases. Metastatic spinal cord compression is the most frequent oncologic emergency and necessitates timely and appropriate treatment. External beam radiotherapy is commonly used for the treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression. Surgical decompression and stabilization should be considered for metastatic spinal cord compression or pathological fracture in select patients. Postoperative radiotherapy should be administered to patients who have undergone surgical intervention for bone metastases. For patients at a high risk for oncologic emergency, optimal prophylactic management is highly recommended. PMID:26602393

  9. Bone age in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Eduardo Régis de Alencar Bona; Palmieri, Maurício D'arc; de Assumpção, Rodrigo Montezuma César; Yamada, Helder Henzo; Rancan, Daniela Regina; Fucs, Patrícia Maria de Moraes Barros

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the chronological age and bone age among cerebral palsy patients in the outpatient clinic and its correlation with the type of neurological involvement, gender and functional status. Methods 401 patients with spastic cerebral palsy, and ages ranging from three months to 20 years old, submitted to radiological examination for bone age and analyzed by two independent observers according Greulich & Pyle. Results In the topographic distribution, there was a significant delay (p<0.005) in tetraparetic (17.7 months), hemiparetic (10.1 months), and diparetic patients (7.9 months). In the hemiparetic group, the mean bone age in the affected side was 96.88 months and the uncompromised side was 101.13 months (p<0.005). Regarding functional status, the ambulatory group showed a delay of 18.73 months in bone age (p<0.005). Comparing bone age between genders, it was observed a greater delay in males (13.59 months) than in females (9.63 months), but not statistically significant (p = 0.54). Conclusion There is a delay in bone age compared to chronological age influenced by the topography of spasticity, functional level and gender in patients with cerebral palsy. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453693

  10. Infection, Inflammation, and Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, M.V.; Puleo, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Various strategies have been developed to promote bone regeneration in the craniofacial region. Most of these interventions utilize implantable materials or devices. Infections resulting from colonization of these implants may result in local tissue destruction in a manner analogous to periodontitis. This destruction is mediated via the expression of various inflammatory mediators and tissue-destructive enzymes. Given the well-documented association among microbial biofilms, inflammatory mediators, and tissue destruction, it seems reasonable to assume that inflammation may interfere with bone healing and regeneration. Paradoxically, recent evidence also suggests that the presence of certain pro-inflammatory mediators is actually required for bone healing. Bone injury (e.g., subsequent to a fracture or surgical intervention) is followed by a choreographed cascade of events, some of which are dependent upon the presence of pro-inflammatory mediators. If inflammation resolves promptly, then proper bone healing may occur. However, if inflammation persists (which might occur in the presence of an infected implant or graft material), then the continued inflammatory response may result in suboptimal bone formation. Thus, the effect of a given mediator is dependent upon the temporal context in which it is expressed. Better understanding of this temporal sequence may be used to optimize regenerative outcomes. PMID:21248364

  11. [Comparative studies on the material performances of natural bone-like apatite from different bone sources].

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoxia; Ren, Haohao; Chen, Shutian; Wang, Guangni; Deng, Tianyu; Chen, Xingtao; Yan, Yonggang

    2014-04-01

    The compressive strength of the original bone tissue was tested, based on the raw human thigh bone, bovine bone, pig bone and goat bone. The four different bone-like apatites were prepared by calcining the raw bones at 800 degrees C for 8 hours to remove organic components. The comparison of composition and structure of bone-like apatite from different bone sources was carried out with a composition and structure test. The results indicated that the compressive strength of goat bone was similar to that of human thigh bone, reached (135.00 +/- 7.84) MPa; Infrared spectrum (IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis results showed that the bone-like apatite from goat bone was much closer to the structure and phase composition of bone-like apatite of human bones. Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) test results showed that the content of trace elements of bone-like apatite from goat bone was closer to that of apatite of human bone. Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) results showed that the Ca/P value of bone-like apatite from goat bone was also close to that of human bone, ranged to 1.73 +/- 0.033. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) patterns indicated that the macrographs of the apatite from human bone and that of goat bone were much similar to each other. Considering all the results above, it could be concluded that the goat bone-like apatite is much similar to that of human bone. It can be used as a potential natural bioceramic material in terms of material properties. PMID:25039141

  12. Bone Metabolism in Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN) are at risk for low bone mass at multiple sites, associated with decreased bone turnover. Bone microarchitecture is also affected, with a decrease in bone trabecular volume and trabecular thickness, and an increase in trabecular separation. The adolescent years are typically the time when marked increases occur in bone mass accrual towards the attainment of peak bone mass, an important determinant of bone health and fracture risk in later life. AN often begins in the adolescent years, and decreased rates of bone mass accrual at this critical time are therefore also concerning for deficits in peak bone mass. Factors contributing to low bone density and decreased rates of bone accrual include alterations in body composition such as low BMI and lean body mass, and hormonal alterations such as hypogonadism, a nutritionally acquired resistance to growth hormone and low levels of IGF-1, relative hypercortisolemia, low levels of leptin, and increased adiponectin (for fat mass) and peptide YY. Therapeutic strategies include optimizing weight and menstrual recovery, and adequate calcium and vitamin D replacement. Oral estrogen-progesterone combination pills are not effective in increasing bone density in adolescents with AN. RhIGF-1 increases levels of bone formation markers in the short-term, while long-term effects remain to be determined. Bisphosphonates act by decreasing bone resorption, and are not optimal for use in adolescents with AN, in whom the primary defect is low bone formation. PMID:21301203

  13. Controlling Bone Graft Substitute Microstructure to Improve Bone Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Zeeshan; Drager, Justin; Zhang, Yu Ling; Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Tamimi, Faleh; Barralet, Jake

    2016-07-01

    Vertical bone augmentation procedures are frequently carried out to allow successful placement of dental implants in otherwise atrophic ridges and represent one of the most common bone grafting procedures currently performed. Onlay autografting is one of the most prevalent and predictable techniques to achieve this; however, there are several well documented complications and drawbacks associated with it and synthetic alternatives are being sought. Monetite is a bioresorbable dicalcium phosphate with osteoconductive and osteoinductive potential that has been previously investigated for onlay bone grafting and it is routinely made by autoclaving brushite to simultaneously sterilize and phase convert. In this study, monetite disc-shaped grafts are produced by both wet and dry heating methods which alter their physical properties such as porosity, surface area, and mechanical strength. Histological observations after 12 weeks of onlay grafting on rabbit calvaria reveal higher bone volume (38%) in autoclaved monetite grafts in comparison with the dry heated monetite grafts (26%). The vertical bone height gained is similar for both the types of monetite grafts (up to 3.2 mm). However, it is observed that the augmented bone height is greater in the lateral than the medial areas of both types of monetite grafts. It is also noted that the higher porosity of autoclaved monetite grafts increases the bioresorbability, whereas the dry heated monetite grafts having lower porosity but higher surface area resorb to a significantly lesser extent. This study provides information regarding two types of monetite onlay grafts prepared with different physical properties that can be further investigated for clinical vertical bone augmentation applications. PMID:27214877

  14. Biology of Bone Tissue: Structure, Function, and Factors That Influence Bone Cells

    PubMed Central

    Florencio-Silva, Rinaldo; Sasso, Gisela Rodrigues da Silva; Sasso-Cerri, Estela; Simões, Manuel Jesus; Cerri, Paulo Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue is continuously remodeled through the concerted actions of bone cells, which include bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, whereas osteocytes act as mechanosensors and orchestrators of the bone remodeling process. This process is under the control of local (e.g., growth factors and cytokines) and systemic (e.g., calcitonin and estrogens) factors that all together contribute for bone homeostasis. An imbalance between bone resorption and formation can result in bone diseases including osteoporosis. Recently, it has been recognized that, during bone remodeling, there are an intricate communication among bone cells. For instance, the coupling from bone resorption to bone formation is achieved by interaction between osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Moreover, osteocytes produce factors that influence osteoblast and osteoclast activities, whereas osteocyte apoptosis is followed by osteoclastic bone resorption. The increasing knowledge about the structure and functions of bone cells contributed to a better understanding of bone biology. It has been suggested that there is a complex communication between bone cells and other organs, indicating the dynamic nature of bone tissue. In this review, we discuss the current data about the structure and functions of bone cells and the factors that influence bone remodeling. PMID:26247020

  15. The nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein CIZ reduces adult bone mass by inhibiting bone morphogenetic protein-induced bone formation.

    PubMed

    Morinobu, Mikihiko; Nakamoto, Tetsuya; Hino, Kazunori; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Shen, Zhong-Jian; Nakashima, Kazuhisa; Nifuji, Akira; Yamamoto, Haruyasu; Hirai, Hisamaru; Noda, Masaki

    2005-03-21

    Osteoporosis is a major health problem; however, the mechanisms regulating adult bone mass are poorly understood. Cas-interacting zinc finger protein (CIZ) is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that localizes at cell adhesion plaques that form where osteoblasts attach to substrate. To investigate the potential role of CIZ in regulating adult bone mass, we examined the bones in CIZ-deficient mice. Bone volume was increased and the rates of bone formation were increased in CIZ-deficient mice, whereas bone resorption was not altered. CIZ deficiency enhanced the levels of mRNA expression of genes encoding proteins related to osteoblastic phenotypes, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as well as osterix mRNA expression in whole long bones. Bone marrow cells obtained from the femora of CIZ-deficient mice revealed higher ALP activity in culture and formed more mineralized nodules than wild-type cells. CIZ deficiency enhanced bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-induced osteoblastic differentiation in bone marrow cells in cultures, indicating that BMP is the target of CIZ action. CIZ deficiency increased newly formed bone mass after femoral bone marrow ablation in vivo. Finally, BMP-2-induced bone formation on adult mouse calvariae in vivo was enhanced by CIZ deficiency. These results establish that CIZ suppresses the levels of adult bone mass through inhibition of BMP-induced activation of osteoblasts. PMID:15781586

  16. Targeted radiotherapy of bone malignancies.

    PubMed

    Jansen, David R; Krijger, Gerard C; Kolar, Zvonimir I; Zonnenberg, Bernard A; Zeevaart, Jan Rijn

    2010-12-01

    The severe pain associated with many disorders affecting bone account for a large proportion of cases of patient morbidity, due to the encumbrance of mobility and therefore, compromised quality of life. Skeletal metastasis is one such condition, which generally complicates the treatment of the primary cancers such as that of the breast, prostate and lung - causing intense pain and eventually even mortality. This paper presents examples of various approaches explored and proposed in the ongoing search to identify better radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of bone disorders such as metastases. The primary objective of these developments is to alleviate the debilitating pain commonly associated with bone lesions. The efficacy of a radiotherapeutic agent intended for the treatment of diseased bone is particularly dependent on the radiation dose to the tumor cells and on the extent to which suppression of bone marrow or other critical organs can be avoided. Therefore, the design rationale requires careful consideration of the choice radionuclide and especially ensuring that the drug selectively targets the lesion or tumor site. The options pursued include the use of radioisotopes with an intrinsic affinity for bone, such as (89)Sr or (223)Ra, or the design of bone-seeking ligands, such as phosphonates, to selectively deliver the radionuclide to the target, e.g. [(153)Sm]Sm-EDTMP. A combination of the above may too be possible, where the bone seeking ligand facilitates the selective accumulation of a radionuclide, which by itself is also bone homing. In terms of therapeutic application radionuclides with various decay modes are proposed, including beta (-) emitters: (153)Sm, (89)Sr, (186)Re, (188)Re, (32)P, (177)Lu and (170)Tm; alpha (α) emitters: (223)Ra and (225)Ra; and Auger or conversion electron emitter: (117)mSn. From a purely diagnostic perspective, the radioisotopes used for imaging include the well known photon emitting (99)mTc, and positron emitters (18)F

  17. Biomimetically enhanced demineralized bone matrix for bone regenerative applications

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Sriram; Huang, Chun-Chieh; Gajendrareddy, Praveen; Narayanan, Raghuvaran

    2015-01-01

    Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) is one of the most widely used bone graft materials in dentistry. However, the ability of DBM to reliably and predictably induce bone regeneration has always been a cause for concern. The quality of DBM varies greatly depending on several donor dependent factors and also manufacturing techniques. In order to standardize the quality and to enable reliable and predictable bone regeneration, we have generated a biomimetically-enhanced version of DBM (BE-DBM) using clinical grade commercial DBM as a control. We have generated the BE-DBM by incorporating a cell-derived pro-osteogenic extracellular matrix (ECM) within clinical grade DBM. In the present study, we have characterized the BE-DBM and evaluated its ability to induce osteogenic differentiation of human marrow derived stromal cells (HMSCs) with respect to clinical grade commercial DBM. Our results indicate that the BE-DBM contains significantly more pro-osteogenic factors than DBM and enhances HMSC differentiation and mineralized matrix formation in vitro and in vivo. Based on our results, we envision that the BE-DBM has the potential to replace DBM as the bone graft material of choice. PMID:26557093

  18. Adynamic Bone Decreases Bone Toughness During Aging by Affecting Mineral and Matrix.

    PubMed

    Ng, Adeline H; Omelon, Sidney; Variola, Fabio; Allo, Bedilu; Willett, Thomas L; Alman, Benjamin A; Grynpas, Marc D

    2016-02-01

    Adynamic bone is the most frequent type of bone lesion in patients with chronic kidney disease; long-term use of antiresorptive therapy may also lead to the adynamic bone condition. The hallmark of adynamic bone is a loss of bone turnover, and a major clinical concern of adynamic bone is diminished bone quality and an increase in fracture risk. Our current study aims to investigate how bone quality changes with age in our previously established mouse model of adynamic bone. Young and old mice (4 months old and 16 months old, respectively) were used in this study. Col2.3Δtk (DTK) mice were treated with ganciclovir and pamidronate to create the adynamic bone condition. Bone quality was evaluated using established techniques including bone histomorphometry, microcomputed tomography, quantitative backscattered electron imaging, and biomechanical testing. Changes in mineral and matrix properties were examined by powder X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Aging controls had a natural decline in bone formation and resorption with a corresponding deterioration in trabecular bone structure. Bone turnover was severely blunted at all ages in adynamic animals, which preserved trabecular bone loss normally associated with aging. However, the preservation of trabecular bone mass and structure in old adynamic mice did not rescue deterioration of bone mechanical properties. There was also a decrease in cortical bone toughness in old adynamic mice that was accompanied by a more mature collagen matrix and longer bone crystals. Little is known about the effects of metabolic bone disease on bone fracture resistance. We observed an age-related decrease in bone toughness that was worsened by the adynamic condition, and this decrease may be due to material level changes at the tissue level. Our mouse model may be useful in the investigation of the mechanisms involved in fractures occurring in elderly patients on antiresorptive therapy who have very low bone turnover. PMID:26332924

  19. [Abnormality in bone metabolism after burn].

    PubMed

    Gong, X; Xie, W G

    2016-08-20

    Burn causes bone metabolic abnormality in most cases, including the changes in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, bone mass loss, and bone absorption, which results in decreased bone mineral density. These changes are sustainable for many years after burn and even cause growth retardation in burned children. The mechanisms of bone metabolic abnormality after burn include the increasing glucocorticoids due to stress response, a variety of cytokines and inflammatory medium due to inflammatory response, vitamin D deficiency, hypoparathyroidism, and bone loss due to long-term lying in bed. This article reviews the pathogenesis and regularity of bone metabolic abnormality after burn, the relationship between bone metabolic abnormality and burn area/depth, and the treatment of bone metabolic abnormality, etc. and discusses the research directions in the future. PMID:27562160

  20. Evidence for arrested bone formation during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. T.; Bobyn, J. D.; Duvall, P.; Morey, E. R.; Baylink, D. J.; Spector, M.

    1982-01-01

    Addressing the question of whether the bone formed in space is unusual, the morphology of bone made at the tibial diaphysis of rats before, during, and after spaceflight is studied. Evidence of arrest lines in the bone formed in space is reported suggesting that bone formation ceases along portions of the periosteum during spaceflight. Visualized by microradiography, the arrest lines are shown to be less mineralized than the surrounding bone matrix. When viewed by scanning electron microscopy, it is seen that bone fractures more readily at the site of an arrest line. These observations are seen as suggesting that arrest lines are a zone of weakness and that their formation may result in decreased bone strength in spite of normalization of bone formation after flight. The occurrence, location, and morphology of arrest lines are seen as suggesting that they are a visible result of the phenomenon of arrested bone formation.

  1. [Mechanisms of myeloma-induced bone disease].

    PubMed

    Abe, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Multiple myeloma(MM)develops and expands almost exclusively in the bone marrow, and generates devastating bone destruction. MM cells produce a variety of cytokines to stimulate RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis and suppress osteoblastic differentiation from bone marrow stromal cells, leading to extensive bone destruction with rapid loss of bone. Furthermore, osteocyte apoptosis has been demonstrated to be induced in parallel with enhanced osteoclast recruitment and osteoclastogenesis in myeloma bone lesions. Of note, osteocytes physically interact with myeloma cells to skew their signaling pathways and thereby production of mediators responsible for exacerbated bone resorption and suppressed bone formation in myeloma. The role of osteocytes in myeloma-induced bone lesions remains to be further clarified. PMID:27117615

  2. [Bone metabolic markers and diagnosis of abnormal bone and calcium metabolism].

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, M; Sone, T

    2001-07-01

    Bone metabolic markers increase in blood or urine, when bone formation or bone resorption accelerates. Reference values of bone metabolic markers are determined in male or female, and in pre- or post-menopause, respectively. Values of bone metabolic markers in most patients with primary osteoporosis were distributed within a reference value, mean+/-1.96 SD. When measured values exceeded a reference values, we should survey a possibility of abnormal calcium or bone metabolism such as primary hyperparathyroidism, renal osteodystrophy, hyperthyroidism and Paget's disease of bone or bone metastasis associated with malignant tumor. PMID:15775589

  3. Method for improved prediction of bone fracture risk using bone mineral density in structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cann, Christopher E. (Inventor); Faulkner, Kenneth G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A non-invasive in-vivo method of analyzing a bone for fracture risk includes obtaining data from the bone such as by computed tomography or projection imaging which data represents a measure of bone material characteristics such as bone mineral density. The distribution of the bone material characteristics is used to generate a finite element method (FEM) mesh from which load capability of the bone can be determined. In determining load capability, the bone is mathematically compressed, and stress, strain force, force/area versus bone material characteristics are determined.

  4. Fruits and dietary phytochemicals in bone protection.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chwan-Li; von Bergen, Vera; Chyu, Ming-Chien; Jenkins, Marjorie R; Mo, Huanbiao; Chen, Chung-Hwan; Kwun, In-Sook

    2012-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a disease of bone characterized by loss of bone matrix and deterioration of bone microstructure that leads to an increased risk of fracture. Cross-sectional studies have shown a positive association between higher fruit intake and higher bone mineral density. In this review, we evaluated animal and cellular studies of dried plum and citrus and berry fruits and bioactive compounds including lycopene, phenolics, favonoids, resveratrol, phloridzin, and pectin derived from tomato, grapes, apples, and citrus fruits. In addition, human studies of dried plum and lycopene were reviewed. Animal studies strongly suggest that commonly consumed antioxidant-rich fruits have a pronounced effect on bone, as shown by higher bone mass, trabecular bone volume, number, and thickness, and lower trabecular separation through enhancing bone formation and suppressing bone resorption, resulting in greater bone strength. Such osteoprotective effects seem to be mediated via antioxidant or anti-inflammatory pathways and their downstream signaling mechanisms, leading to osteoblast mineralization and osteoclast inactivation. In future studies, randomized controlled trials are warranted to extend the bone-protective activity of fruits and their bioactive compounds. Mechanistic studies are needed to differentiate the roles of phytochemicals and other constitutes in bone protection offered by the fruits. Advanced imaging technology will determine the effective doses of phytochemicals and their metabolites in improving bone mass, microarchitecture integrity, and bone strength, which is a critical step in translating the benefits of fruit consumption on osteoporosis into clinical data. PMID:23244535

  5. Exploring the Bone Proteome to Help Explain Altered Bone Remodeling and Preservation of Bone Architecture and Strength in Hibernating Marmots.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Alison H; Roteliuk, Danielle M; Gookin, Sara E; McGrew, Ashley K; Broccardo, Carolyn J; Condon, Keith W; Prenni, Jessica E; Wojda, Samantha J; Florant, Gregory L; Donahue, Seth W

    2016-01-01

    Periods of physical inactivity increase bone resorption and cause bone loss and increased fracture risk. However, hibernating bears, marmots, and woodchucks maintain bone structure and strength, despite being physically inactive for prolonged periods annually. We tested the hypothesis that bone turnover rates would decrease and bone structural and mechanical properties would be preserved in hibernating marmots (Marmota flaviventris). Femurs and tibias were collected from marmots during hibernation and in the summer following hibernation. Bone remodeling was significantly altered in cortical and trabecular bone during hibernation with suppressed formation and no change in resorption, unlike the increased bone resorption that occurs during disuse in humans and other animals. Trabecular bone architecture and cortical bone geometrical and mechanical properties were not different between hibernating and active marmots, but bone marrow adiposity was significantly greater in hibernators. Of the 506 proteins identified in marmot bone, 40 were significantly different in abundance between active and hibernating marmots. Monoaglycerol lipase, which plays an important role in fatty acid metabolism and the endocannabinoid system, was 98-fold higher in hibernating marmots compared with summer marmots and may play a role in regulating the changes in bone and fat metabolism that occur during hibernation. PMID:27617358

  6. Biomaterials for Craniofacial Bone Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tevlin, R.; McArdle, A.; Atashroo, D.; Walmsley, G.G.; Senarath-Yapa, K.; Zielins, E.R.; Paik, K.J.; Longaker, M.T.; Wan, D.C.

    2014-01-01

    Conditions such as congenital anomalies, cancers, and trauma can all result in devastating deficits of bone in the craniofacial skeleton. This can lead to significant alteration in function and appearance that may have significant implications for patients. In addition, large bone defects in this area can pose serious clinical dilemmas, which prove difficult to remedy, even with current gold standard surgical treatments. The craniofacial skeleton is complex and serves important functional demands. The necessity to develop new approaches for craniofacial reconstruction arises from the fact that traditional therapeutic modalities, such as autologous bone grafting, present myriad limitations and carry with them the potential for significant complications. While the optimal bone construct for tissue regeneration remains to be elucidated, much progress has been made in the past decade. Advances in tissue engineering have led to innovative scaffold design, complemented by progress in the understanding of stem cell–based therapy and growth factor enhancement of the healing cascade. This review focuses on the role of biomaterials for craniofacial bone engineering, highlighting key advances in scaffold design and development. PMID:25139365

  7. Osteocytes: Master Orchestrators of Bone

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Wing-Yee; Majeska, Robert; Kennedy, Oran

    2013-01-01

    Osteocytes comprise the overwhelming majority of cells in bone and are its only true “permanent” resident cell population. In recent years, conceptual and technological advances on many fronts have helped to clarify the role osteocytes play in skeletal metabolism and the mechanisms they use to perform them. The osteocyte is now recognized as a major orchestrator of skeletal activity, capable of sensing and integrating mechanical and chemical signals from their environment to regulate both bone formation and resorption. Recent studies have established that the mechanisms osteocytes use to sense stimuli and regulate effector cells (e.g. osteoblasts and osteoclasts) are directly coupled to the environment they inhabit – entombed within the mineralized matrix of bone and connected to each other in multicellular networks. Communication within these networks is both direct (via cell-cell contacts at gap junctions) and indirect (via paracrine signaling by secreted signals). Moreover, the movement of paracrine signals is dependent on movement of both solutes and fluid through the space immediately surrounding the osteocytes (i.e. the Lacunar-Canalicular System, LCS). Finally, recent studies have also shown that the regulatory capabilities of osteocytes extend beyond bone to include a role in endocrine control of systemic phosphate metabolism. This review will discuss how a highly productive combination of experimental and theoretical approaches has managed to unearth these unique features of osteocytes and bring to light novel insights into the regulatory mechanisms operating in bone. PMID:24042263

  8. [Interaction between bone and artery].

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2016-08-01

    Both osteoporosis and vascular calcification are highly prevalent in aged subjects and patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease(CKD). Although it has long been thought that vascular calcification is a consequence of degeneration of vessel walls, recent studies unveiled the molecular mechanism of vascular calcification and identified the vascular calcification as a process similar to bone formation. With the advent of the understanding of the basis for bone remodeling, several hypotheses have been proposed for the underlying mechanism of the interaction between osteoporosis and vascular calcification. Briefly,(1)impaired bone remodeling may perturb serum calcium/phosphate, thus contributing to increased vascular calcification,(2)vascular calcification may precede osteoporosis, and(3)molecules responsible for bone remodeling, including estrogen, parathyroid hormone and vitamin D, RANK(receptor activator of nuclear factor kB), RANK ligand(RANKL), and osteoprotegerin(OPG), Wnt signaling, and loss of calcification inhibitors(matrix Gla protein)may promote vascular calcification. This review discusses the emerging role of bone remodeling factors in vascular calcification. PMID:27461494

  9. Protein intake and bone health.

    PubMed

    Bonjour, Jean-Philippe

    2011-03-01

    Adequate nutrition plays an important role in the development and maintenance of bone structures resistant to usual mechanical stresses. In addition to calcium in the presence of an adequate supply of vitamin D, dietary proteins represent key nutrients for bone health and thereby function in the prevention of osteoporosis. Several studies point to a positive effect of high protein intake on bone mineral density or content. This fact is associated with a significant reduction in hip fracture incidence, as recorded in a large prospective study carried out in a homogeneous cohort of postmenopausal women. Low protein intake (< 0.8 g/kg body weight/day) is often observed in patients with hip fractures and an intervention study indicates that following orthopedic management, protein supplementation attenuates post-fracture bone loss, tends to increase muscle strength, and reduces medical complications and rehabilitation hospital stay. There is no evidence that high protein intake per se would be detrimental for bone mass and strength. Nevertheless, it appears reasonable to avoid very high protein diets (i. e. more than 2.0 g/kg body weight/day) when associated with low calcium intake (i. e. less than 600 mg/day). In the elderly, taking into account the attenuated anabolic response to dietary protein with ageing, there is concern that the current dietary protein recommended allowance (RDA), as set at 0.8 g/kg body weight/day, might be too low for the primary and secondary prevention of fragility fractures. PMID:22139564

  10. Recent advances in bone tissue engineering scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Susmita; Roy, Mangal; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2012-01-01

    Bone disorders are of significant concern due to increase in the median age of our population. Traditionally, bone grafts have been used to restore damaged bone. Synthetic biomaterials are now being used as bone graft substitutes. These biomaterials were initially selected for structural restoration based on their biomechanical properties. Later scaffolds were engineered to be bioactive or bioresorbable to enhance tissue growth. Now scaffolds are designed to induce bone formation and vascularization. These scaffolds are often porous, biodegradable materials that harbor different growth factors, drugs, genes or stem cells. In this review, we highlight recent advances in bone scaffolds and discuss aspects that still need to be improved. PMID:22939815

  11. Mechanisms of Guided Bone Regeneration: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Kerns, David G

    2014-01-01

    Post-extraction crestal bone resorption is common and unavoidable which can lead to significant ridge dimensional changes. To regenerate enough bone for successful implant placement, Guided Bone Regeneration (GBR) is often required. GBR is a surgical procedure that uses barrier membranes with or without particulate bone grafts or/and bone substitutes. There are two approaches of GBR in implant therapy: GBR at implant placement (simultaneous approach) and GBR before implant placement to increase the alveolar ridge or improve ridge morphology (staged approach). Angiogenesis and ample blood supply play a critical role in promoting bone regeneration. PMID:24894890

  12. Inhibition of bone formation during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey, E. R.; Baylink, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Parameters of bone formation and resorption were measured in rats orbited for 19.5 days aboard the Soviet Cosmos 782 biological satellite. The most striking effects were on bone formation. During flight, rats formed significantly less periosteal bone than did control rats on the ground. An arrest line at both the periosteum and the endosteum of flight animals suggests that a complete cecessation of bone growth occurred. During a 26-day postflight period, the defect in bone formation was corrected. No significant changes in bone resorption were observed.

  13. Fat and Bone: An Odd Couple

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Richard; Gilsanz, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we will first discuss the concept of bone strength and introduce how fat at different locations, including the bone marrow, directly or indirectly regulates bone turnover. We will then review the current literature supporting the mechanistic relationship between marrow fat and bone and our understanding of the relationship between body fat, body weight, and bone with emphasis on its hormonal regulation. Finally, we will briefly discuss the importance and challenges of accurately measuring the fat compartments using non-invasive methods. This review highlights the complex relationship between fat and bone and how these new concepts will impact our diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in the very near future. PMID:27014187

  14. Effect of strontium-containing hydroxyapatite bone cement on bone remodeling following hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Ni, Guo X; Lin, Jian H; Chiu, Peter K Y; Li, Zhao Y; Lu, William W

    2010-01-01

    It is uncertain whether the use of bioactive bone cement has any beneficial effect on local bone adaptation following hip replacement. In this study, twelve goats underwent cemented hip hemiarthroplasty unilaterally, with either PMMA bone cement or strontium-containing hydroxyapatite (Sr-HA) bioactive bone cement. Nine months later, the femoral cortical bones at different levels were analyzed by microhardness testing and micro-CT scanning. Extensive bone remodeling was found at proximal and mid-levels in both PMMA and Sr-HA groups. However, with regard to the differences of bone mineral density, cortical bone area and bone hardness between implanted and non-implanted femur, less decreases were found in Sr-HA group than PMMA group at proximal and mid-levels, and significant differences were shown for bone area and hardness at proximal level. The results suggested that the use of Sr-HA cement might alleviate femoral bone remodeling after hip replacement. PMID:19728042

  15. Use of serial bone scans in assessing response of bone metastases to systemic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Citrin, D.L.; Hougen, C.; Zweibel, W.; Schlise, S.; Pruitt, B.; Ershler, W.; Davis, T.E.; Harberg, J.; Cohen, A.I.

    1981-02-15

    The accuracy levels of serial radioisotope bone scans and conventional bone radiographs in assessing the response of bone metastases to systemic therapy were compared in 34 women with metastatic breast cancer. Each patient had measurable or evaluable nonosseous metastases, which were assessed independently of skeletal disease. The bone scan was found to be more accurate and sensitive indicator of the status of bone metastases than the radiograph. The bone scan correlated well with response of soft tissue or visceral disease, while the results of repeated bone radiographs were frequently misleading. With use of a digital model, it was possible to accurately measure the area of skeletal involvement of the bone scan, and from this derive quantitative criteria for response in bone metastases analogous to response criteria currently in use for soft tissue and visceral disease. It is suggested that serial quantitative bone scans be done, in preference to radiographs, to assess the response of bone metastases to systemic therapy.

  16. [Bone Cell Biology Assessed by Microscopic Approach. Assessment of bone quality using Raman and infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Suda, Hiromi Kimura

    2015-10-01

    Bone quality, which was defined as "the sum total of characteristics of the bone that influence the bone's resistance to fracture" at the National Institute of Health (NIH) conference in 2001, contributes to bone strength in combination with bone mass. Bone mass is often measured as bone mineral density (BMD) and, consequently, can be quantified easily. On the other hand, bone quality is composed of several factors such as bone structure, bone matrix, calcification degree, microdamage, and bone turnover, and it is not easy to obtain data for the various factors. Therefore, it is difficult to quantify bone quality. We are eager to develop new measurement methods for bone quality that make it possible to determine several factors associated with bone quality at the same time. Analytic methods based on Raman and FTIR spectroscopy have attracted a good deal of attention as they can provide a good deal of chemical information about hydroxyapatite and collagen, which are the main components of bone. A lot of studies on bone quality using Raman and FTIR imaging have been reported following the development of the two imaging systems. Thus, both Raman and FTIR imaging appear to be promising new bone morphometric techniques. PMID:26412727

  17. Diseases of Subchondral Bone 2.

    PubMed

    Lerebours, Frantz; ElAttrache, Neal S; Mandelbaum, Bert

    2016-06-01

    Osteonecrosis of the knee can be divided into the following 3 categories: primary or Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SONK), secondary osteonecrosis (ON), and postarthroscopic osteonecrosis. Patient characteristics as well as underlying risk factors can help categorize the type of osteonecrosis and guide treatment. SONK was first described by Ahlback et al in 1968. It is described as a disease of subchondral bone that leads to focal ischemia and bone marrow edema, necrosis, and possible subsequent structural collapse. SONK typically presents in the older women with frequent involvement of the medial femoral condyle. Secondary osteonecrosis is typically present in patients below 55 years of age. Unlike SONK, secondary ON presents multiple foci of bone marrow involvement with extension into the metaphysis and diaphysis. Postarthroscopic ON has been described after arthroscopic meniscectomy, shaver-assisted chondroplasty, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and laser or radiofrequency-assisted debridement. PMID:27135286

  18. [Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes].

    PubMed

    Okuno, Yusuke

    2016-02-01

    Inherited bone marrow failure syndromes comprise a series of disorders caused by various gene mutations. Genetic tests were formerly difficult to perform because of the large size and number of causative genes. However, recent advances in next-generation sequencing has enabled simultaneous testing of all causative genes to be performed at an acceptable cost. We collaboratively conducted a series of whole-exome sequencing studies of patients with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes and discovered RPS27/RPL27 and FANCT as causative genes of Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Fanconi anemia, respectively. Furthermore, we established a target gene sequencing system to cover 189 genes associated with pediatric blood diseases to assist genetic diagnoses in clinical practice. In this review, discovery of new causative genes and possible roles of next-generation sequencing in the genetic diagnosis of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes are discussed. PMID:26935625

  19. Genetics of pediatric bone strength.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jonathan A; Cousminer, Diana L; Zemel, Babette S; Grant, Struan F A; Chesi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the most common chronic forms of disability in postmenopausal women and represents a major health burden around the world. Bone fragility is affected by bone mineral density (BMD), and, one of the most important factors in preventing osteoporosis is optimizing peak bone mass, which is achieved during growth in childhood and adolescence. BMD is a complex trait resulting from environmental and genetic factors. Genome-wide association studies have discovered robust genetic signals influencing BMD in adults, and similar studies have also been conducted to investigate the genetics of BMD in the pediatric setting. These latter studies have revealed that many adult osteoporosis-related loci also regulate BMD during growth. These investigations have the potential to profoundly impact public health and will allow for the eventual development of effective interventions for the prevention of osteoporosis. PMID:27579163

  20. Fibrillin microfibrils in bone physiology.

    PubMed

    Smaldone, Silvia; Ramirez, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The severe skeletal abnormalities associated with Marfan syndrome (MFS) and congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA) underscore the notion that fibrillin assemblies (microfibrils and elastic fibers) play a critical role in bone formation and function in spite of representing a low abundance component of skeletal matrices. Studies of MFS and CCA mice have correlated the skeletal phenotypes of these mutant animals with distinct pathophysiological mechanisms that reflect the contextual contribution of fibrillin-1 and -2 scaffolds to TGFβ and BMP signaling during bone patterning, growth and metabolism. Illustrative examples include the unique role of fibrillin-2 in regulating BMP-dependent limb patterning and the distinct impact of the two fibrillin proteins on the commitment and differentiation of marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Collectively, these findings have important implication for our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms that drive age- and injury-related processes of bone degeneration. PMID:26408953