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Sample records for jochen zschau andreas

  1. [Andrea's story].

    PubMed

    Nobili, A; Tognoni, G; Staszewsky, L

    2001-01-01

    First-hand accounts of illness experiences provide important insights for other patients and their carers and can be a powerful tool for patient information and professional education. Andrea was ran over by a motor-bike while he was carried by bike and reported a complicated femur fracture. Three different representations of the story are reported and confronted: the bold chronicle of events, that sets the scenery and time sequence; Andrea's mother point of view on what happened after the accident, and during the course of the illness; and Andrea's story, told with his words and drawings. The methodological comments offered as discussion, stress how the collection of relevant patients stories can be a valuable research resource because it can offer a broad perspective which cannot be obtained by other means. PMID:11910835

  2. [Andreas Vesalius in Pisa].

    PubMed

    Ciranni, Rosalba

    2010-01-01

    Andreas Vesalius is the most commanding figure in European medicine, after Galen and before Harvey. His dissections and lectures were in considerable demand. Having just published the De humani corporis fabrica, and before operating as a private physician of Emperor Charles V, the anatomist spent some months conducting demonstrations of anatomy at the universities of Bologna, Pisa and Florence. The present study aim to reconstruct the journey he made to Pisa, where he was invited by Duke Cosimo I De' Medici. The work of Andrea Corsini and O'Malley, the study of Vesalius' Epistola... rationem modumque propinandi radicis Chynae dedocti... , and other documents make possible a more detailed reconstruction of the period Vesalius spent in the Nuovo Studio Pisano, carrying out public human dissections, discussing and refuting most of the Galenic doctrine. PMID:21563472

  3. The Andrea Levialdi Fellowship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieschi, Roberto

    My first encounter with Cuba dates back to winter 1967-1968 at the Cultural Congress of La Havana, a very large international event to promote greater understanding of the reality of the Cuban Revolution. In fact the person invited was my friend and colleague Andrea Levialdi (Andrea already knew Cuba and loved it) who, unable to participate, allowed me to go in her place. So I landed at the airport of the "first free country in Latin America" with the delegation of the Italian Communist Party. In Havana I met other Italian physicists whom I already knew, among them Bruno Vitale and Daniele Amati. They, like me, were embarrassed by the generous hospitality of `Havana Libre,' especially in a country which was going through such difficulties. Despite our best efforts we did not succeed in receiving a more modest welcome.

  4. Subtropical Storm Andrea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The circling clouds of an intense low-pressure system sat off the southeast coast of the United States on May 8, 2007, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image. By the following morning, the storm developed enough to be classified as a subtropical storm, a storm that forms outside of the tropics, but has many of the characteristics--hurricane-force winds, driving rains, low pressure, and sometimes an eye--of a tropical storm. Although it arrived several weeks shy of the official start of the hurricane season (June 1), Subtropical Storm Andrea became the first named storm of the 2007 Atlantic hurricane season. The storm has the circular shape of a tropical cyclone in this image, but lacks the tight organization seen in more powerful storms. By May 9, the storm's winds reached 75 kilometers per hour (45 miles per hour), and the storm was not predicted to get any stronger, said the National Hurricane Center. Though Subtropical Storm Andrea was expected to remain offshore, its strong winds and high waves pummeled coastal states, prompting a tropical storm watch. The winds fueled wild fires (marked with red boxes) in Georgia and Florida. The wind-driven flames generated thick plumes of smoke that concentrated in a gray-brown mass over Tampa Bay, Florida. Unfortunately for Georgia and Florida, which are experiencing moderate to severe drought, Subtropical Storm Andrea was not predicted to bring significant rain to the region right away, according to reports on the Washington Post Website.

  5. Andrea Levialdi in Memoriam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waisman, Dina

    Professor Andrea Levialdi was born in Bologna Italy in 1911, son of a very modest scientist who at the time was active in the socialist ranks. From an early age Levialdi felt the contradictions between the bourgeois environment surrounding him and his family's deep antifascism. He earned a doctorate in mathematics and physics at the University of Rome in 1937 with a dissertation on photoelasticity, methods and applications. Soon after, he was awarded a scholarship for specializing in optics at the Arcetri National Optics Institute (Florence).

  6. [Andreas Vesalius--the life].

    PubMed

    De Caro, Raffaele; Goddeeris, Theodoor; Plessas, Pavlos; Biebrouck, Maurits; Steeno, Omer

    2014-01-01

    The details of Vesalius' life can be found in Charles O'Malley, Andreas Vesalius of Brussels, 1514-1564, (University of California Press, 1964) and in Stephen N Joffe, Andreas Vesalius: The Making, The Madman, and the Myth, (Persona Publishing, 2009). This session reviews the circumstances of his last voyage and his death and other aspects of his life. PMID:25181776

  7. Andreas Vesalius' corpses.

    PubMed

    Biesbrouck, Maurits; Steeno, Omer

    2014-01-01

    Judging from his writings, Andreas Vesalius must have had dozens of bodies at his disposal, thirteen of which were definitely from before 1543. They came from cemeteries, places of execution or hospitals. Not only did his students help him obtain the bodies, but also public and judicial authorities. At first, he used the corpses for his own learning purposes, and later to teach his students and to write De humani corporis fabrica, his principal work. Clearly he had an eye for comparative anatomy. He observed anatomical variants and studied foetal anatomy. Occasionally, he would dissect a body to study physiological processes, while the post-mortems on the bodies brought in by the families of the deceased gave him an insight into human pathology. Some of his dissection reports have been preserved. PMID:25310608

  8. [Andreas Vesalius and surgery].

    PubMed

    Van Hee, R

    1993-01-01

    By publishing De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem in 1543, Andries van Wesel (1514-1564) gave surgical science an immense impulse. The revolutionary renovation in the knowledge of man's anatomical structure changed slowly and progressively into topographical and physiological understanding of surgical diseases. At the same time, this made better aimed and more secure operations possible. Apart from the importance of this anatomical publication, Andreas Vesalius also won his spurs as a surgeon. He taught surgery in Padua for many years. He was appointed court physician and surgeon at the Habsburg Court of Charles V and Philip II. He personally performed lots of operations known at the time as major ones. He not only quickly adopted the surgical innovations of his fellow-surgeon Ambroise Paré, but he even performed operations that had been forgotten during several centuries, among which thoracocentesis for pleural empyema. His clinical perspicacity in discovering the indication for some operations was staggering and was appreciated by all great monarchs of Europe in the 16th century. In his several consilia, numerous pieces of advice were given for the treatment of surgical patients. The surgical practice which Vesalius had in Brussels for many years, consequently became most successful. Many publications by Vesalius about surgery and blood-letting are well-known. His Chirurgia magna in septem Libros digesta still remains controversial; these books were published by Prospero Borgarruccio (1560) in 1568 by the Venetian editor Valgrisi. This book gives an excellent survey of surgical pathology as it was taught and treated in the 16th century. The scientific method that Vesalius used, not only in his anatomical studies but also in his surgical practice, deserves not only our full appraisal but should still be studied in our own time. PMID:8209577

  9. GOES video of Tropical Storm Andrea

    NASA Video Gallery

    This NOAA GOES-East satellite animation shows the development of System 91L into Tropical Storm Andrea over the course of 3 days from June 4 to June 6, just after Andrea was officially designated a...

  10. Update: San Andreas Fault experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulidis, D. C.; Smith, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    Satellite laser ranging techniques are used to monitor the broad motion of the tectonic plates comprising the San Andreas Fault System. The San Andreas Fault Experiment, (SAFE), has progressed through the upgrades made to laser system hardware and an improvement in the modeling capabilities of the spaceborne laser targets. Of special note is the launch of the Laser Geodynamic Satellite, LAGEOS spacecraft, NASA's only completely dedicated laser satellite in 1976. The results of plate motion projected into this 896 km measured line over the past eleven years are summarized and intercompared.

  11. GOES-14 Sees Remnants of Andrea

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of GOES-14 satellite data from Saturday, June 8, through Monday, June 10 at 7:31 a.m. EDT shows Post-Tropical Storm Andrea’s movement. On June 8, Andrea was centered off the coast ...

  12. Radon emanation on San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, C.-Y.

    1978-01-01

    Subsurface radon emanation monitored in shallow dry holes along an active segment of the San Andreas fault in central California shows spatially coherent large temporal variations that seem to be correlated with local seismicity. ??1978 Nature Publishing Group.

  13. Perspective View, San Andreas Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The prominent linear feature straight down the center of this perspective view is California's famous San Andreas Fault. The image, created with data from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. This segment of the fault lies west of the city of Palmdale, Calif., about 100 kilometers (about 60 miles) northwest of Los Angeles. The fault is the active tectonic boundary between the North American plate on the right, and the Pacific plate on the left. Relative to each other, the Pacific plate is moving away from the viewer and the North American plate is moving toward the viewer along what geologists call a right lateral strike-slip fault. Two large mountain ranges are visible, the San Gabriel Mountains on the left and the Tehachapi Mountains in the upper right. Another fault, the Garlock Fault lies at the base of the Tehachapis; the San Andreas and the Garlock Faults meet in the center distance near the town of Gorman. In the distance, over the Tehachapi Mountains is California's Central Valley. Along the foothills in the right hand part of the image is the Antelope Valley, including the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve. The data used to create this image were acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000.

    This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    SRTM uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space

  14. Andreas Vesalius 1514-1564.

    PubMed

    Benini, A; Bonar, S K

    1996-06-01

    Andreas Vesalius was born in Brussels on December 31, 1514. After having spent some disappointing years at the Universities of Louvain and Paris, he graduated as Doctor of Medicine in Padua on December 5, 1537. The next day he was appointed as a teacher of both human anatomy and surgery. During the 6 years he held this chair, Vesalius engaged in impressive academic activities and published three masterly anatomic books: Tabulae Anatomicae Sex, De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem, and Epitome. The last two works contain anatomic woodcuts of incomparable artistic quality by Titian's pupils (by Stefan v. Calcar in particular). In 1544, at the age of 28, Vesalius gave up his chair and took up service as a court physician, first with Emperor Charles V and later with his son, Philip II of Spain. He died in 1564 on the small Greek island of Zante on return from a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. The gist of Vesalius' teaching was his conviction that valid anatomic knowledge could be gained only through dissection of the human corpse and not through the study of the traditional texts. Vesalius rid the study of human anatomy of mythic speculations, which had encrusted it for two millennia. Through Vesalius' work, human anatomy became an empirical science. Like Copernicus, Kepler, Bruno, and Galileo, Vesalius was one of the initiators of the new science. The tables of osteology and of the spine in Fabrica and Epitome are most impressive. Much of the nomenclature used for the spine today can be credited to him. PMID:8725935

  15. Satellite Shows Landfall and Movement of Tropical Storm Andrea

    NASA Video Gallery

    This NOAA GOES-East satellite animation shows the landfall and movement of Tropical Storm Andrea from June 5 to June 7. The video ends as Andrea's center was moving over South Carolina on its way u...

  16. Perspective View, San Andreas Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The prominent linear feature straight down the center of this perspective view is the San Andreas Fault in an image created with data from NASA's shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), which will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. This segment of the fault lies west of the city of Palmdale, California, about 100 kilometers (about 60 miles) northwest of Los Angeles. The fault is the active tectonic boundary between the North American plate on the right, and the Pacific plate on the left. Relative to each other, the Pacific plate is moving away from the viewer and the North American plate is moving toward the viewer along what geologists call a right lateral strike-slip fault. This area is at the junction of two large mountain ranges, the San Gabriel Mountains on the left and the Tehachapi Mountains on the right. Quail Lake Reservoir sits in the topographic depression created by past movement along the fault. Interstate 5 is the prominent linear feature starting at the left edge of the image and continuing into the fault zone, passing eventually over Tejon Pass into the Central Valley, visible at the upper left.

    This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994

  17. The San Andreas Fault 'Supersite' (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudnut, K. W.

    2013-12-01

    An expanded and permanent Supersite has been proposed to the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) for the San Andreas Fault system, based upon the successful initial Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Geohazard Supersite for the Los Angeles region from 2009-2013. As justification for the comprehensive San Andreas Supersite, consider the earthquake history of California, in particular the devastating M 7.8 San Francisco earthquake of 1906, which occurred along the San Andreas Fault, as did an earthquake of similar magnitude in 1857 in southern California. Los Angeles was only a small town then, but now the risk exposure has increased for both of California's megacities. Between the San Francisco and Los Angeles urban areas lies a section of the San Andreas Fault known to creep continually, so it has relatively less earthquake hazard. It used to be thought of as capable of stopping earthquakes entering it from either direction. Transitional behavior at either end of the creeping section is known to display a full range of seismic to aseismic slip events and accompanying seismicity and strain transient events. Because the occurrence of creep events is well documented by instrumental networks such as CISN and PBO, the San Andreas Supersite can be expected to be especially effective. A good baseline level of geodetic data regarding past events and strain accumulation and release exists. Many prior publications regarding the occurrence of geophysical phenomena along the San Andreas Fault system mean that in order to make novel contributions, state-of-the-art science will be required within this Supersite region. In more recent years, the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake struck adjacent to the San Andreas Fault and caused the most damage along the western side of the San Francisco Bay Area. More recently, the concern has focused on the potential for future events along the Hayward Fault along the eastern side of San Francisco Bay. In Southern California, earthquakes

  18. Andreas Vesalius--the reformer of anatomy.

    PubMed

    Holomanova, A; Ivanova, A; Brucknerova, I; Benuska, J

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with two main topics. The first part provides data on the life of Andreas Vesalius, a scholar and anatomist of the 16th century, and describes the environment in which he lived and worked. It highlights his personality of a great doctor and teacher and points out the importance of his scientific methods and techniques as opposed to speculative methods that were prevalent in the scientific research in those days. The second part of the paper is devoted to the characteristics and description of his famous and, given the times he lived in, grand work called "De Humani Corporis Fabrica", which opened a new epoch in the history of anatomy. Andreas Vesalius is considered to be the founder of the science of anatomy which is based on observation and experience gained by using scalpel on dead bodies of humans. This is how he proved the then valid statements wrong. This complex view of life and work of Andreas Vesalius is aimed at highlighting the milestone which he represents in this traditional science of anatomy that has been conscientiously developed since the Classical times. (Fig. 4, Ref. 6.) PMID:11723674

  19. The last months of Andreas Vesalius.

    PubMed

    Biesbrouck, Maurits; Steeno, Omer

    2010-12-01

    A good deal has already been written about the last months of Andreas Vesalius' life. Most of it has been fairly speculative, because the necessary primary sources have been lacking. Much of what was supposedly known for sure seemed bizarre, and various writers even frankly characterised their own accounts as 'legend'. It is only since the discovery of several letters in the archives of Simancas by Josh Baron in 1962 that various points have become somewhat clearer. Baron presented these letters at the 19th International Congress on the History of Medicine in Basel in September 1964. PMID:21560612

  20. Homage to genial anatomist - Andreas Vesalius.

    PubMed

    Brucknerova, Ingrid; Holomanova, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The paper highlights the personality of the founder of modern anatomy, who was able to use his knowledge and skills to change the view on the construction of the human body extending over centuries. He introduced a new scientific approach and highlighted the importance of autopsies for understanding of human body which carefully demonstrated and documented. De humani corporis fabrica - the spectacular work, in which he summarized results of his theoretical and practical findings, has opened a new path for the study of anatomy. Andreas Vesalius became a pioneer in the history of medical education. In 2014 will pass 500 years since his birth. PMID:24378449

  1. Aerial views of the San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, M.

    1988-01-01

    These aerial photographs of the San Andreas fault were taken in 1965 by Robert E. Wallace of the U.S Geological Survey. The pictures were taken with a Rolliflex camera on 20 format black and white flim; Wallace was aboard a light, fixed-wing aircraft, flying mostly at low altitudes. He photographed the fault from San Francisco near its north end where it enters by the Salton Sea. These images represent only a sampling of the more than 300 images prodcued during this project. All the photographs reside in the U.S Geological Survey Library in Menlo Park, California. 

  2. [Andreas Vesalius in the Spanish Court].

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hyonosuke

    2004-12-01

    After the publication of "Fabrica," Andreas Vesalius entered the Spanish court and became a court physician to Charles the Fifth, Holy Roman Emperor, and then to Philip the Second, Spanish king. The author studied this process and its historical background. The ancestors of Vesalius had close relations with the Hapsburgs and the dukes of BUrgundy, and served them as court physician or a court pharmacist. Vesalius was born in Brussels, obtained his degree at the University of Padua, Italy, became professor of anatomy and surgery there, and published "Tabulae Anatomicae Sex" and "Fabrica."In the ear of the Spanish court, the treatments of Henry the Second, French king, and of Don Carlos, Spanish crown prince, are famous among Vesalius' medical contributions. In the year of his resignation, Charles the Fifth conferred the title of count palatine on Vesalius. PMID:15818875

  3. Taking the pulse of the San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kerr, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    But the same research suggests that the fault's average behavior could be misleading. A newly refined dating of the past 10 San Andreas ruptures adjacent to Los Angeles reveals a previously unrecognized clustering of large earthquakes in bunches of two or three. If this pattern were to hold, Los Angeles would wait at least another 80 years for another jolt from there. But the San Andreas is not that easy to get around. 

  4. San Andreas Fault in the Carrizo Plain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The 1,200-kilometer (800-mile)San Andreas is the longest fault in California and one of the longest in North America. This perspective view of a portion of the fault was generated using data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), which flew on NASA's Space Shuttle last February, and an enhanced, true-color Landsat satellite image. The view shown looks southeast along the San Andreas where it cuts along the base of the mountains in the Temblor Range near Bakersfield. The fault is the distinctively linear feature to the right of the mountains. To the left of the range is a portion of the agriculturally rich San Joaquin Valley. In the background is the snow-capped peak of Mt. Pinos at an elevation of 2,692 meters (8,831 feet). The complex topography in the area is some of the most spectacular along the course of the fault. To the right of the fault is the famous Carrizo Plain. Dry conditions on the plain have helped preserve the surface trace of the fault, which is scrutinized by both amateur and professional geologists. In 1857, one of the largest earthquakes ever recorded in the United States occurred just north of the Carrizo Plain. With an estimated magnitude of 8.0, the quake severely shook buildings in Los Angeles, caused significant surface rupture along a 350-kilometer (220-mile) segment of the fault, and was felt as far away as Las Vegas, Nev. This portion of the San Andreas is an important area of study for seismologists. For visualization purposes, topographic heights displayed in this image are exaggerated two times.

    The elevation data used in this image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of Earth's land surface. To collect the 3-D SRTM data, engineers added a mast 60

  5. Rhazes in the renaissance of Andreas Vesalius.

    PubMed

    Compier, Abdul Haq

    2012-01-01

    Andreas Vesalius' (1514-64) first publication was a Paraphrasis of the ninth book of the Liber ad Almansorem, written by the Arab-Persian physician and alchemist Rhazes (854-925). The role of Rhazes in Vesalius' oeuvre has thus far been much disregarded. The different ways Rhazes recurs reveal an intellectual evolution in Vesalius' work. In the Paraphrasis, Vesalius subjects Rhazes to the authority of Galen in the context of the early sixteenth-century humanist campaign for the substitution of Arab influences by Greek 'originals'. Over the years Vesalius continues his work on Rhazes, but his approach becomes more internationalistic. Ultimately, Vesalius criticises Galen while expressing sympathy for the Arab author. This may be the more significant as Rhazes could have influenced Vesalius in the act of criticising Galen - critical discussions of Galen were available to Vesalius in Latin translations of Rhazes's Liber Continens. Although Vesalius never refers to the work, it is hardly possible he was unaware of it: similarities in structure, rhetoric and form between the Continens and the De humani corporis fabrica could support this hypothesis. PMID:23752981

  6. The martyrdom of Doctor Andreas Vesalius.

    PubMed

    Lasky, I I

    1990-10-01

    The development of modern medicine began in the 16th century when Dr. Andreas Vesalius overthrew the previously uncontested medical dogma of the Greek physician Galen. Medical progress had been hindered for more than a millennium by strict adherence to Galen's authority. Flemish-born Vesalius challenged the political and societal forces of the time. At the University of Padua, he studied and later taught human anatomy by performing dissections. His discoveries were published in 1543 in his monumental De Humani Corporis Fabrica. Controversy led to his resignation from the University of Padua. His magnum opus was interpreted as a challenge to both academia and the church. He went to Spain, where he served as personal physician to Emperor Charles V. After almost 20 years in Spain, he became involved in an unfortunate incident that incurred the condemnation of the Inquisition. The royal court's intervention saved Vesalius from being burned at the stake, however, and he was ordered to make a pilgrimage to Jerusalem to atone for his error. On the return voyage, he became ill and died on the Greek island of Zante. PMID:2208869

  7. Andreas Vesalius' understanding of pulmonary ventilation.

    PubMed

    Hage, J Joris; Brinkman, Romy J

    2016-09-01

    The historical evolution of understanding of the mechanical aspects of respiration is not well recorded. That the anatomist Andreas Vesalius (1515-1564) first recorded many of these mechanics in De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem has received little attention. We searched a digital copy of De Fabrica (1543) and its English translation as provided by Richardson and Carman (1998-2009) for references to aspects of pulmonary ventilation. We found that Vesalius grasped the essentials of tidal and forced respiration. He recognized that atmospheric pressure carried air into the lungs, approximately 100 years before Borelli did. He described an in vivo experiment of breathing, some 120 years before John Mayow produced his artificial model. He reported on positive pressure ventilation through a tracheotomy and on its life-saving effect, some 100 years before Robert Hook did. In publicly recording his insights over 450 years ago, Vesalius laid a firm basis for our understanding of the physiology of respiration and the management of its disorders. PMID:27238371

  8. [Epitome, an ignored work of Andreas Vesalius].

    PubMed

    Vons, Jacqueline

    2006-01-01

    A few days before De humani corporis fabrica libri septem publication, in 1543, from Oporinus' office at Basel, a very large but not too bulky in-folio was published, which Andreas Vesalius, the author; offered as the Epitome or Summary of the seven Fabricae books. This work, written in latin, is divided into two parts: the first of them includes six chapters describing the human body, the second is composed of eleven anatomical plates with indices; the reader is invited to cut up the last two and stick them onto the preceding, so as to make a human three-dimensional figure. This method inserts the work in a modern conception of anatomical learning. Vesalius involves himself patiently gives many explanations for learning the body in dissection order through plates and text as well. But these plates--and most of them are different from those in the Fabrica-, are not simple illustrations, but play an active part in anatomical knowledge acquisition, just as the text does, but through a different access. We will attract your attention on this originality, often ignored, of the Epitome. PMID:17152529

  9. Rhazes in the Renaissance of Andreas Vesalius

    PubMed Central

    Compier, Abdul Haq

    2012-01-01

    Andreas Vesalius' (1514–64) first publication was a Paraphrasis of the ninth book of the Liber ad Almansorem, written by the Arab–Persian physician and alchemist Rhazes (854–925). The role of Rhazes in Vesalius' oeuvre has thus far been much disregarded. The different ways Rhazes recurs reveal an intellectual evolution in Vesalius' work. In the Paraphrasis, Vesalius subjects Rhazes to the authority of Galen in the context of the early sixteenth-century humanist campaign for the substitution of Arab influences by Greek ‘originals’. Over the years Vesalius continues his work on Rhazes, but his approach becomes more internationalistic. Ultimately, Vesalius criticises Galen while expressing sympathy for the Arab author. This may be the more significant as Rhazes could have influenced Vesalius in the act of criticising Galen – critical discussions of Galen were available to Vesalius in Latin translations of Rhazes's Liber Continens. Although Vesalius never refers to the work, it is hardly possible he was unaware of it: similarities in structure, rhetoric and form between the Continens and the De humani corporis fabrica could support this hypothesis. PMID:23752981

  10. Crustal deformation along the San Andreas, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Victor C.

    1992-01-01

    The goal is to achieve a better understanding of the regional and local deformation and crustal straining processes in western North America, particularly the effects of the San Andreas and nearby faults on the spatial and temporal crustal deformation behavior. Construction of theoretical models based on the mechanics of coupled elastic plate, viscoelastic foundation and large scale crack mechanics provide a rational basis for the interpretation of seismic and aseismic anomalies and expedite efforts in forecasting the stability of plate boundary deformation. Special focus is placed on the three dimensional time dependent surface deformation due to localized slippage in a elastic layer coupled to a visco-elastic substrate. The numerical analysis is based on a 3-D boundary element technique. Extension to visco-elastic coupling demands the derivation of 3-D time dependent Green's function. This method was applied to analyze the viscoelastic surface displacements due to a dislocated embedded patch. Surface uplift as a function of time and position are obtained. Comparisons between surface uplift for long and short dislocated patches are made.

  11. Andrea del Sarto rehabilitated: a psychoanalytic emendation.

    PubMed

    Trosman, Harry

    2002-01-01

    Ernest Jones's "The Influence of Andrea del Sarto's Wife on His Art" (1913) is an early example of psychoanalysis applied to the study of a prominent painter. Greatly influenced by Freud's Leonardo da Vinci and a Memory of His Childhood, Jones gave excessive credence to Vasari's highly prejudicial account of the life of del Sarto, on which the study relied heavily. Jones attempted to account psychologically for the circumstance that del Sarto, though highly skilled and "faultless," was not the equal of the three preeminent masters of the Italian High Renaissance: Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael. Jones's uncritical acceptance of the Vasari biography encouraged him to view Sarto's assumed deficiency as the result of excessive attachment to his wife, a pathological uxoriousness. A contemporary psychoanalytic perspective, with its emphasis on the emotive response of the analyst, requires us to pay attention to the evocative nature of the work of the artist, an approach Jones neglected. In an examination of several paintings, the artist's sensitivity to the position of the spectator is explored, as is the interest in involving the viewer spatially and emotionally. An appreciation for the viewer's position is consistent with a capacity for using projected internal objects for creative purposes. The presence of this capacity suggests a revised view of del Sarto's contribution to art and of his relationship with his wife. PMID:12580329

  12. Crustal deformation along the San Andreas, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Victor C.

    1992-03-01

    The goal is to achieve a better understanding of the regional and local deformation and crustal straining processes in western North America, particularly the effects of the San Andreas and nearby faults on the spatial and temporal crustal deformation behavior. Construction of theoretical models based on the mechanics of coupled elastic plate, viscoelastic foundation and large scale crack mechanics provide a rational basis for the interpretation of seismic and aseismic anomalies and expedite efforts in forecasting the stability of plate boundary deformation. Special focus is placed on the three dimensional time dependent surface deformation due to localized slippage in a elastic layer coupled to a visco-elastic substrate. The numerical analysis is based on a 3-D boundary element technique. Extension to visco-elastic coupling demands the derivation of 3-D time dependent Green's function. This method was applied to analyze the viscoelastic surface displacements due to a dislocated embedded patch. Surface uplift as a function of time and position are obtained. Comparisons between surface uplift for long and short dislocated patches are made.

  13. Observing the San Andreas Fault at Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellsworth, W.; Hickman, S.; Zoback, M.; Davis, E.; Gee, L.; Huggins, R.; Krug, R.; Lippus, C.; Malin, P.; Neuhauser, D.; Paulsson, B.; Shalev, E.; Vajapeyam, B.; Weiland, C.; Zumberge, M.

    2005-12-01

    Extending 4 km into the Earth along a diagonal path that crosses the divide between Salinian basement accreted to the Pacific Plate and Cretaceous sediments of North America, the main hole at the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) was designed to provide a portal into the inner workings of a major plate boundary fault. The successful drilling and casing of the main hole in the summer of 2005 to a total vertical depth of 3.1 km make it possible to conduct spatially extensive and long-duration observations of active tectonic processes within the actively deforming core of the San Andreas Fault. In brief, the observatory consists of retrievable seismic, deformation and environmental sensors deployed inside the casing in both the main hole (maximum temperature 135 C) and the collocated pilot hole (1.1 km depth), and a fiber optic strainmeter installed behind casing in the main hole. By using retrievable systems deployed on either wire line or rigid tubing, each hole can be used for a wide range of scientific purposes, with instrumentation that takes maximum advantage of advances in sensor technology. To meet the scientific and technical challenges of building the observatory, borehole instrumentation systems developed for use in the petroleum industry and by the academic community in other deep research boreholes have been deployed in the SAFOD pilot hole and main hole over the past year. These systems included 15Hz omni-directional and 4.5 Hz gimbaled seismometers, micro-electro-mechanical accelerometers, tiltmeters, sigma-delta digitizers, and a fiber optic interferometeric strainmeter. A 1200-m-long, 3-component 80-level clamped seismic array was also operated in the main hole for 2 weeks of recording in May of 2005, collecting continuous seismic data at 4000 sps. Some of the observational highlights include capturing one of the M 2 SAFOD target repeating earthquakes in the near-field at a distance of 420 m, with accelerations of up to 200 cm/s and a

  14. Taking the pulse of the San Andreas Fault

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    The ninth of January, 1989, was the 132nd anniversary of the great southern California earthquake of 1857. The latest research shows that, on average, at least part of the section of the San Andreas fault that broke then should break again this year. But the same research suggests that the fault's average behavior could be misleading. A newly refined dating of the past 10 San Andreas ruptures adjacent to Los Angeles reveals a previously unrecognized clustering of large earthquakes in bunches of two or three. If this pattern were to hold, Los Angeles would wait at least another 80 years for another jolt from there. But the San Andreas is not that easy to get around. The paper discusses these findings.

  15. Stress diffusion along the san andreas fault at parkfield, california.

    PubMed

    Malin, P E; Alvarez, M G

    1992-05-15

    Beginning in January 1990, the epicenters of microearthquakes associated with a 12-month increase in seismicity near Parkfield, California, moved northwest to southeast along the San Andreas fault. During this sequence of events, the locally variable rate of cumulative seismic moment increased. This increase implies a local increase in fault slip. These data suggest that a southeastwardly diffusing stress front propagated along the San Andreas fault at a speed of 30 to 50 kilometers per year. Evidently, this front did not load the Parkfield asperities fast enough to produce a moderate earthquake; however, a future front might do so. PMID:17795004

  16. Von Tondern nach Gotha. Der Astronom Peter Andreas Hansen, 1795 - 1874.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strumpf, M.; Pehlemann, E.; Wolfschmidt, G.

    This companion booklet to an exposition in honor of Peter Andreas Hansen's 200th birthday contains three papers. Contents: 1. Peter Andreas Hansen - Leben und Wirken in Gotha (M. Strumpf). 2. Peter Andreas Hansens wissenschaftliches Werk (E. Pehlemann). 3. Beobachtungsinstrumente der Sternwarte Gotha zur Zeit Hansens (G. Wolfschmidt).

  17. Empowering Andrea to Help Year 5 Students Construct Fraction Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baturo, Annette R

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a glimpse into the positive effect on student learning as a result of empowering a classroom teacher of 20 years (Andrea) with subject matter knowledge relevant to developing fraction understanding. Having a facility with fractions is essential for life skills in any society, whether metricated or non-metricated, and yet…

  18. Andreas Vesalius and his De humani corporis Fabrica libri septem.

    PubMed

    Steele, Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    Andreas Vesalius of Brussels (1514-1564) was a Renaissance physician and surgeon whose most famous work was the De humani corporis fabrica libri septem a monograph describing human anatomy, first published in 1543. The Fabrica precipitated advances both anatomical and pedagogical, and its influence was such that Vesalius has since been described as the 'founder of modern anatomy'. PMID:25181775

  19. NASA's 3-D TRMM Satellite Animation of Tropical Storm Andrea

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 3-D view from the west was derived from TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) data captured when Andrea was examined by the TRMM satellite with the June 5, 2234 UTC (6:34 p.m. EDT) orbit. It clearly s...

  20. Continuity of the San Andreas Fault at San Gorgonio Pass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carena, S.; Suppe, J.

    2002-12-01

    The San Andreas fault at San Gorgonio Pass does not have a clear surface trace and is considered aseismic. Our findings suggest in fact that the existence of a through-going vertical or near-vertical San Andreas fault between Yucaipa and North Palm Springs is highly unlikely. We mapped over 70 faults in the San Gorgonio Pass-San Bernardino Mountains region using the catalog of 43,500 relocated 1975-1998 earthquakes of Richards-Dinger and Shearer (2000). A clustering algorithm was applied to the relocated earthquakes in order to obtain tighter earthquake clouds and thus better-defined fault surfaces. The earthquakes were then imported into Gocad, a 3D modeling software that allowed us to separate earthquakes into coplanar clusters associated with different faults and fault strands and to fit optimized surfaces to them. We also used the catalog of 13,000 focal mechanisms of Hauksson (2000) to confirm the nature of the mapped faults. We were able to constrain the 3D geometry of the San Andreas fault near San Gorgonio Pass from the 3D geometry of the fault network surrounding it. None of these faults show any displacement due to an hypothetical sub-vertical San Andreas. The San Andreas fault must therefore rotate to much shallower dips, or lose its continuity at depths between 3 and 15 km The most likely configuration is the one where the San Andreas fault merges into the shallow-dipping San Gorgonio Pass thrust W of North Palm Springs. Strike-slip motion is taken up by both the thrust (the slip vector on the N. Palm Springs segment is reverse/right-lateral strike-slip) and by a series of NW striking faults in the footwall of the thrust. The W termination of the most active part of the San Gorgonio Pass thrust coincides with one of these footwall faults at depth, and with the south bend in the San Andreas fault strand N of Banning. This boundary also marks a change in the stress field, with a dominant strike-slip regime to the E (and localized thrusting between San

  1. The Influence of the Geometry of the San Andreas Fault System on Earthquakes in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Liu, M.

    2004-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault is believed to be the main surface trace of the plate boundary between the North American and the Pacific plates. From 1800 to present, three large historical earthquakes (1857 M7.9, 1906 M8.25, and 1989 M7.1) ruptured the San Andreas Fault. At the same time, more than a dozen M>7.0 earthquakes occurred outside the main trace of the San Andreas Fault. Most of the off-main-trace large earthquakes were scattered in Southern California, whereas in northern and central California, earthquakes were clustered along the main trace of the San Andreas Fault. Such a seismic distribution may be related to the geometry of the San Andreas Fault, which is curved with a major bending in southern California. In this study, we constructed a finite element model to explore the influence of the geometry of the San Andreas Fault system on stress distribution and seismicity in California. In the model, the San Andreas Fault is simulated with a weak zone that obeys the Coulomb Friction Law. The model results show that along relative straight segments of the San Andreas Fault in northern and central California, fault slip on the main fault trace causes low level stresses in nearby regions. Along the bended San Andreas Fault in southern California, however, the relative plate motion causes significant off-main-trace stress buildup, consistent with the distribution of large historical earthquakes outside the San Andreas Fault.

  2. The North Sea Andrea storm and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitner-Gregersen, E. M.; Fernandez, L.; Lefèvre, J. M.; Monbaliu, J.; Toffoli, A.

    2014-06-01

    A coupling of a spectral wave model with a nonlinear phase-resolving model is used to reconstruct the evolution of wave statistics during a storm crossing the North Sea on 8-9 November 2007. During this storm a rogue wave (named the Andrea wave) was recorded at the Ekofisk field. The wave has characteristics comparable to the well-known New Year wave measured by Statoil at the Draupner platform 1 January 1995. Hindcast data of the storm at the nearest grid point to the Ekofisk field are here applied as input to calculate the evolution of random realizations of the sea surface and its statistical properties. Numerical simulations are carried out using the Euler equations with a higher-order spectral method (HOSM). Results are compared with some characteristics of the Andrea wave record measured by the down-looking lasers at Ekofisk.

  3. Strain accumulation and surface deformation along the San Andreas, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Victor C.

    1989-01-01

    The goal of this project remains to be the achievement of a better understanding of the regional and local deformation and crustal straining processes in western North America, particularly the effect of the San Andreas and nearby faults on the spatial and temporal crustal deformation behavior. Construction of theoretical models based on the mechanics of coupled elastic plate/viscoelastic foundation and large scale crack mechanics provide a rational basis for the interpretation of seismic and aseismic anomalies and expedite efforts in forecasting the stability of plate boundary deformations. In the present period, special focus is placed on the 3-D effect of irregular fault locked patches on the ground measured deformation fields. Specifically, use is made of a newly developed 3-D boundary element program to analyze the fault slip and vertical ground motion in the Parkfield area on the San Andreas.

  4. Expression of San Andreas fault on Seasat radar image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabins, F. F., Jr.; Blom, R.; Elachi, C.

    1980-01-01

    A Seasat image (23.5 cm wavelength) of the Durmid Hills in southern California, the San Andreas Fault was analyzed. It is shown that a prominent southeast trending tonal lineament exists that is bright on the southwest side and dark on the northeast side. The cause of the contrasting signatures on opposite sides of the lineament was determined and the geologic signficance of the lineament was evaluated.

  5. Earthquakes and fault creep on the northern San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nason, R.

    1979-01-01

    At present there is an absence of both fault creep and small earthquakes on the northern San Andreas fault, which had a magnitude 8 earthquake with 5 m of slip in 1906. The fault has apparently been dormant after the 1906 earthquake. One possibility is that the fault is 'locked' in some way and only produces great earthquakes. An alternative possibility, presented here, is that the lack of current activity on the northern San Andreas fault is because of a lack of sufficient elastic strain after the 1906 earthquake. This is indicated by geodetic measurements at Fort Ross in 1874, 1906 (post-earthquake), and 1969, which show that the strain accumulation in 1969 (69 ?? 10-6 engineering strain) was only about one-third of the strain release (rebound) in the 1906 earthquake (200 ?? 10-6 engineering strain). The large difference in seismicity before and after 1906, with many strong local earthquakes from 1836 to 1906, but only a few strong earthquakes from 1906 to 1976, also indicates a difference of elastic strain. The geologic characteristics (serpentine, fault straightness) of most of the northern San Andreas fault are very similar to the characteristics of the fault south of Hollister, where fault creep is occurring. Thus, the current absence of fault creep on the northern fault segment is probably due to a lack of sufficient elastic strain at the present time. ?? 1979.

  6. San Andreas fault zone head waves near Parkfield, California

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zion, Y.; Malin, P. Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA )

    1991-03-29

    Microearthquakes seismograms from the borehole seismic network on the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield, California, provide three lines of evidence that first P arrivals are head waves refracted along the cross-fault material contrast. First, the travel time difference between these arrivals and secondary phases identified as direct P waves scales linearly with the source-receiver distance. Second, these arrivals have the emergent wave character associated in theory and practice with refracted head waves instead of the sharp first breaks associated with direct P arrivals. Third, the first motion polarities of the emergent arrivals are reversed from those of the direct P waves as predicted by the theory of fault zone head waves for slip on the San Andreas fault. The presence of fault zone head waves in local seismic network data may help account for scatter in earthquake locations and source mechanisms. The fault zone head waves indicate that the velocity contrast across the San Andreas fault near Parkfield is approximately 4 percent. Further studies of these waves may provide a way of assessing changes in the physical state of the fault system.

  7. Coulomb Stress Accumulation along the San Andreas Fault System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Bridget; Sandwell, David

    2003-01-01

    Stress accumulation rates along the primary segments of the San Andreas Fault system are computed using a three-dimensional (3-D) elastic half-space model with realistic fault geometry. The model is developed in the Fourier domain by solving for the response of an elastic half-space due to a point vector body force and analytically integrating the force from a locking depth to infinite depth. This approach is then applied to the San Andreas Fault system using published slip rates along 18 major fault strands of the fault zone. GPS-derived horizontal velocity measurements spanning the entire 1700 x 200 km region are then used to solve for apparent locking depth along each primary fault segment. This simple model fits remarkably well (2.43 mm/yr RMS misfit), although some discrepancies occur in the Eastern California Shear Zone. The model also predicts vertical uplift and subsidence rates that are in agreement with independent geologic and geodetic estimates. In addition, shear and normal stresses along the major fault strands are used to compute Coulomb stress accumulation rate. As a result, we find earthquake recurrence intervals along the San Andreas Fault system to be inversely proportional to Coulomb stress accumulation rate, in agreement with typical coseismic stress drops of 1 - 10 MPa. This 3-D deformation model can ultimately be extended to include both time-dependent forcing and viscoelastic response.

  8. San andreas fault zone head waves near parkfield, california.

    PubMed

    Ben-Zion, Y; Malin, P

    1991-03-29

    Microearthquake seismograms from the borehole seismic network on the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, California, provide three lines of evidence that first P arrivals are "head" waves refracted along the cross-fault material contrast. First, the travel time difference between these arrivals and secondary phases identified as direct P waves scales linearly with the source-receiver distance. Second, these arrivals have the emergent wave character associated in theory and practice with refracted head waves instead of the sharp first breaks associated with direct P arrivals. Third, the first motion polarities of the emergent arrivals are reversed from those of the direct P waves as predicted by the theory of fault zone head waves for slip on the San Andreas fault. The presence of fault zone head waves in local seismic network data may help account for scatter in earthquake locations and source mechanisms. The fault zone head waves indicate that the velocity contrast across the San Andreas fault near Parkfield is approximately 4 percent. Further studies of these waves may provide a way of assessing changes in the physical state of the fault system. PMID:17793143

  9. Conductivity Structure of the San Andreas Fault, Parkfield, Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. K.; Roberts, J. J.

    2003-12-01

    Laboratory measurements of samples of sedimentary rocks from the Parkfield syncline reveal resistivities as low as 1 ohm m when saturated with fluids comparable to those found in nearby wells. The syncline lies on the North American side of the San Andreas fault at Parkfield and plunges northwestward into the fault zone. A previous interpretation of a high resolution magnetotelluric profile across the San Andreas fault at Parkfield identified an anomalously conductive (1-3 ohm m) region just west of the fault and extending to depths of 3 km. These low resistivity rocks were inferred to be crushed rock in the fault zone that was saturated with brines. As an alternative to this interpretation, we suggest that this anomalous region is actually the Parkfield syncline and that the current trace of the San Andreas fault at Middle Mountain does not form the boundary between the Salinian block and the North American plate. Instead, that boundary is approximately 1 km west and collocated with current seismicity. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract W-7405-ENG-48 and supported specifically by the Office of Basic Energy Science. Additional support was provided by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Department of the Interior, under USGS Award number 03HQGR0041. The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the U.S. Government.

  10. Periodic pulsing of characteristic microearthquakes on the San Andreas fault.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Robert M; McEvilly, Thomas V

    2004-01-01

    Deep fault slip information from characteristically repeating microearthquakes reveals previously unrecognized patterns of extensive, large-amplitude, long-duration, quasiperiodic repetition of aseismic events along much of a 175-kilometer segment of the central San Andreas fault. Pulsing occurs both in conjunction with and independent of transient slip from larger earthquakes. It extends to depths of approximately 10 to 11 kilometers but may be deeper, and it may be related to similar phenomena occurring in subduction zones. Over much of the study area, pulse onset periods also show a higher probability of larger earthquakes, which may provide useful information for earthquake forecasting. PMID:14716011

  11. Nonvolcanic tremors deep beneath the San Andreas Fault.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Robert M; Dolenc, David

    2005-01-21

    We have discovered nonvolcanic tremor activity (i.e., long-duration seismic signals with no clear P or S waves) within a transform plate boundary zone along the San Andreas Fault near Cholame, California, the inferred epicentral region of the 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake (moment magnitude approximately 7.8). The tremors occur between 20 to 40 kilometers' depth, below the seismogenic zone (the upper approximately 15 kilometers of Earth's crust where earthquakes occur), and their activity rates may correlate with variations in local earthquake activity. PMID:15591163

  12. Thermal regime of the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sass, J. H.; Williams, C. F.; Lachenbruch, Arthur H.; Galanis, S. P., Jr.; Grubb, F. V.

    1997-12-01

    Knowledge of the temperature variation with depth near the San Andreas fault is vital to understanding the physical processes that occur within the fault zone during earthquakes and creep events. Parkfield is near the southern end of the Coast Ranges segment of the San Andreas fault. This segment has higher mean heat flow than the Cape Mendocino segment to the northwest or the Mojave segment to the southeast. Boreholes were drilled specifically for the U.S. Geological Survey's Parkfield earthquake prediction experiment or converted from other uses at 25 sites within a few kilometers of the fault near Parkfield. These holes, which range in depth from 150 to over 1500m, were intended mainly for the deployment of volumetric strain meters, water-level recorders, and other downhole instruments. Temperature profiles were obtained from all the holes, and heat flow values were estimated from 17 of them. For a number of reasons, including a paucity of thermal conductivity data and rugged local topography, the accuracy of individual determinations was not sufficiently high to document local variations in heat flow. Values range from 54 to 92 mW m-2, with mean and 95% confidence limits of 74±4 mW m-2. This mean is slightly lower than the mean (83±3) of 39 previously published values from the central Coast Ranges, but it is consistent with the overall pattern of elevated heat flow in the Coast Ranges, and it is transitional to the mean of 68±2 mW m-2 that characterizes the Mojave segment of the San Andreas fault immediately to the south. The lack of a heat flow peak near the fault underscores the absence of a frictional thermal anomaly and provides additional support for a very small resolved shear stress parallel to the San Andreas fault and the nearly fault-normal maximum compressive stress observed in this region. Estimates of subsurface thermal conditions indicate that the seismicaseismic transition for the Parkfield segment corresponds to temperatures in the range of

  13. Mantle fluids in the San Andreas fault system, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, B.M.; Kharaka, Y.K.; Evans, William C.; Ellwood, A.; DePaolo, D.J.; Thordsen, J.; Ambats, G.; Mariner, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    Fluids associated with the San Andreas and companion faults n central and south-central California have high 3He/4He ratios. The lack of correlation between helium isotopes and fluid chemistry or local geology requires that fluids enter the fault system from the mantle. Mantle fluids passing through the ductile lower crust must enter the brittle fault zone at or near lithostatic pressures; estimates of fluid flux based on helium isotopes suggest that they may thus contribute directly to fault-weakening high-fluid pressures at seismogenic depths.

  14. Mantle fluids in the San Andreas fault system, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, B.M.; Kharaka, Y.K.; Evans, W.C.

    1997-11-14

    Fluids associated with the San Andreas and companion faults in central and south-central California have high {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios. The lack of correlation between helium isotopes and fluid chemistry or local geology requires that fluids enter the fault system from the mantle. Mantle fluids passing through the ductile lower crust must enter the brittle fault zone at or near lithostatic pressures; estimates of fluid flux based on helium isotopes suggest that they may thus contribute directly to fault-weakening high-fluid pressures at seismogenic depths. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Internal structure of the San Andreas fault at Parkfield, California

    SciTech Connect

    Unsworth, M.J.; Booker, J.R.; Malin, P.E.; Egbert, G.D.

    1997-04-01

    Magnetotelluric and seismic reflection surveys at Parkfield, California, show that the San Andreas fault zone is characterized by a vertical zone of low electrical resistivity. This zone is {approx} 500 m wide and extends to a depth of {approx} 4000 m. The low electrical resistivity is attributed to high porosity of saline fluids present in the highly fractured fault zone. The occurrence of microearthquakes and creep in the low resistivity zone is consistent with suggestions that seismicity at Parkfield is fluid driven. 33 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Deep permeability of the San Andreas Fault from San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) core samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, Carolyn A.; Lockner, David A.; Moore, Diane E.; Hickman, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) scientific borehole near Parkfield, California crosses two actively creeping shear zones at a depth of 2.7 km. Core samples retrieved from these active strands consist of a foliated, Mg-clay-rich gouge containing porphyroclasts of serpentinite and sedimentary rock. The adjacent damage zone and country rocks are comprised of variably deformed, fine-grained sandstones, siltstones, and mudstones. We conducted laboratory tests to measure the permeability of representative samples from each structural unit at effective confining pressures, Pe up to the maximum estimated in situ Pe of 120 MPa. Permeability values of intact samples adjacent to the creeping strands ranged from 10−18 to 10−21 m2 at Pe = 10 MPa and decreased with applied confining pressure to 10−20–10−22 m2 at 120 MPa. Values for intact foliated gouge samples (10−21–6 × 10−23 m2 over the same pressure range) were distinctly lower than those for the surrounding rocks due to their fine-grained, clay-rich character. Permeability of both intact and crushed-and-sieved foliated gouge measured during shearing at Pe ≥ 70 MPa ranged from 2 to 4 × 10−22 m2 in the direction perpendicular to shearing and was largely insensitive to shear displacement out to a maximum displacement of 10 mm. The weak, actively-deforming foliated gouge zones have ultra-low permeability, making the active strands of the San Andreas Fault effective barriers to cross-fault fluid flow. The low matrix permeability of the San Andreas Fault creeping zones and adjacent rock combined with observations of abundant fractures in the core over a range of scales suggests that fluid flow outside of the actively-deforming gouge zones is probably fracture dominated.

  17. Deep permeability of the San Andreas Fault from San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) core samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, C. A.; Lockner, D. A.; Moore, D. E.; Hickman, S.

    2014-07-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) scientific borehole near Parkfield, California crosses two actively creeping shear zones at a depth of 2.7 km. Core samples retrieved from these active strands consist of a foliated, Mg-clay-rich gouge containing porphyroclasts of serpentinite and sedimentary rock. The adjacent damage zone and country rocks are comprised of variably deformed, fine-grained sandstones, siltstones, and mudstones. We conducted laboratory tests to measure the permeability of representative samples from each structural unit at effective confining pressures, Pe up to the maximum estimated in situ Pe of 120 MPa. Permeability values of intact samples adjacent to the creeping strands ranged from 10-18 to 10-21 m2 at Pe = 10 MPa and decreased with applied confining pressure to 10-20-10-22 m2 at 120 MPa. Values for intact foliated gouge samples (10-21-6 × 10-23 m2 over the same pressure range) were distinctly lower than those for the surrounding rocks due to their fine-grained, clay-rich character. Permeability of both intact and crushed-and-sieved foliated gouge measured during shearing at Pe ≥ 70 MPa ranged from 2 to 4 × 10-22 m2 in the direction perpendicular to shearing and was largely insensitive to shear displacement out to a maximum displacement of 10 mm. The weak, actively-deforming foliated gouge zones have ultra-low permeability, making the active strands of the San Andreas Fault effective barriers to cross-fault fluid flow. The low matrix permeability of the San Andreas Fault creeping zones and adjacent rock combined with observations of abundant fractures in the core over a range of scales suggests that fluid flow outside of the actively-deforming gouge zones is probably fracture dominated.

  18. New evidence on the state of stress of the san andreas fault system.

    PubMed

    Zoback, M D; Zoback, M L; Mount, V S; Suppe, J; Eaton, J P; Healy, J H; Oppenheimer, D; Reasenberg, P; Jones, L; Raleigh, C B; Wong, I G; Scotti, O; Wentworth, C

    1987-11-20

    Contemporary in situ tectonic stress indicators along the San Andreas fault system in central California show northeast-directed horizontal compression that is nearly perpendicular to the strike of the fault. Such compression explains recent uplift of the Coast Ranges and the numerous active reverse faults and folds that trend nearly parallel to the San Andreas and that are otherwise unexplainable in terms of strike-slip deformation. Fault-normal crustal compression in central California is proposed to result from the extremely low shear strength of the San Andreas and the slightly convergent relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates. Preliminary in situ stress data from the Cajon Pass scientific drill hole (located 3.6 kilometers northeast of the San Andreas in southern California near San Bernardino, California) are also consistent with a weak fault, as they show no right-lateral shear stress at approximately 2-kilometer depth on planes parallel to the San Andreas fault. PMID:17839366

  19. Andreas Vesalius 500 years - A Renaissance that revolutionized cardiovascular knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; de Souza Júnior, Celso Vale; Ferreira, Thiago Reigado

    2015-01-01

    The history of medicine and cardiology is marked by some geniuses who dared in thinking, research, teaching and transmitting scientific knowledge, and the Italian Andreas Vesalius one of these brilliant masters. His main scientific work "De Humani Corporis Fabrica" is not only a landmark study of human anatomy but also an artistic work of high aesthetic quality published in 1543. In the year 2014 we celebrated 500 years since the birth of the brilliant professor of Padua University, who with his courage and sense of observation changed the understanding of cardiovascular anatomy and founded a school to date in innovative education and research of anatomy. By identifying "the anatomical errors" present in Galen's book and speech, he challenged the dogmas of the Catholic Church, the academic world and the doctors of his time. However, the accuracy of his findings and his innovative way to disseminate them among his students and colleagues was essential so that his contributions are considered by many the landmark of modern medicine. His death is still surrounded by mysteries having different hypotheses, but a certainty, suffered sanctions of the Catholic Church for the spread of their ideas. The cardiologists, cardiovascular surgeons, interventional cardiologists, electrophysiologists and cardiovascular imaginologists must know the legacy of genius Andreas Vesalius that changed the paradigm of human anatomy. PMID:26107459

  20. Heat flow and energetics of the San Andreas fault zone.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lachenbruch, A.H.; Sass, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Approximately 100 heat flow measurements in the San Andreas fault zone indicate 1) there is no evidence for local frictional heating of the main fault trace at any latitude over a 1000-km length from Cape Mendocino to San Bernardino, 2) average heat flow is high (ca.2 HFU, ca.80 mW m-2) throughout the 550-km segment of the Coast Ranges that encloses the San Andreas fault zone in central California; this broad anomaly falls off rapidly toward the Great Valley to the east, and over a 200-km distance toward the Mendocino Triple Junction to the northwest. As others have pointed out, a local conductive heat flow anomaly would be detectable unless the frictional resistance allocated to heat production on the main trace were less than 100 bars. Frictional work allocated to surface energy of new fractures is probably unimportant, and hydrologic convection is not likely to invalidate the conduction assumption, since the heat discharge by thermal springs near the fault is negligible. -Authors

  1. Strain accumulation and surface deformation along the San Andreas, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Victor C.

    1986-01-01

    Stressing and rupture of a locked zone adjacent to a creeping fault segment was studied with special reference to strength heterogeneity depthwise and along-strike. The resulting precursory temporal and spatial variations of surface strain rate profiles were compared to geodetic measurements on the San Andreas fault in central California. Crustal deformation in great California earthquake cycles was also studied with special reference to the temporal decay of strain rate observed since the 1957 and 1906 great earthquakes, and comtemporary surface strain rate and velocity profiles at several locations along the San Andreas. The effect of viscoelastic response in the deep aseismic shear zone on the surface deformation behavior was examined. Work was begun on a fundamental reformulation of the crustal deformation problem focusing on the crustal deformation process affected by deep aseismic slip as the slip zone progresses toward an instability and as deep seismic slip continues postseismically, the 3-D nature of the problem due to geometry and material heterogeneity, and the time-dependent source coming from the lithosphere/astenospheric coupling process.

  2. Pemeability and frictional properties of San Andreas fault gouges

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, C.L.; Wang, C.Y.; Lin, W.

    1981-06-01

    The permeability of a San Andreas fault gouge is determined under confining pressures up to 220 bars; it decreases with pressure from 10 nanodarcy at 15 bars to 0.3 nanodarcy at 220 bars. These values are lower than the values determined by Morrow et al. (1981). Five different samples of fault gouge with significantly different grain-size distributions were sheared between rock joints under confining pressures to determine the effects of grain size and constitution on the strength of the fault gouge. The strength of fault gorge clearly depends on its constitution and grain size distribution, with the coarser sandy fault gouge being stronger than the finer clayey gouge. Furthermore, the coarser gouge tends to strain harden after yielding, leading to greater strength. Thus, on the San Andreas fault, inhomogeneties in gouge materials may cause spatial variations in strength. Using the permeability determined above, we estimate that the excess pore pressure generated in the fault gauge samples during the experimental shear loading may be negligible.

  3. A Look Inside the San Andreas fault at Parkfield Through Vertical Seismic Profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chavarria, J.A.; Malin, P.; Catchings, R.D.; Shalev, E.

    2003-01-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth pilot hole is located on the southwestern side of the Parkfield San Andreas fault. This observatory includes a vertical seismic profiling (VSP) array. VSP seismograms from nearby micro-earthquakes contain signals between the P and S waves. These signals may be P and S waves scattered by the local geologic structure. The collected scattering points form planar surfaces that we interpret as the San Andreas fault and four other secondary faults. The scattering process includes conversions between P and S waves, the strengths of which suggest large contrasts in material properties, possibly indicating the presence of cracks or fluids.

  4. A look inside the San Andreas Fault at Parkfield through vertical seismic profiling.

    PubMed

    Chavarria, J Andres; Malin, Peter; Catchings, Rufus D; Shalev, Eylon

    2003-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth pilot hole is located on the southwestern side of the Parkfield San Andreas fault. This observatory includes a vertical seismic profiling (VSP) array. VSP seismograms from nearby microearthquakes contain signals between the P and S waves. These signals may be P and S waves scattered by the local geologic structure. The collected scattering points form planar surfaces that we interpret as the San Andreas fault and four other secondary faults. The scattering process includes conversions between P and S waves, the strengths of which suggest large contrasts in material properties, possibly indicating the presence of cracks or fluids. PMID:14657494

  5. Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) - an unfinished life.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Charles T

    2014-01-01

    The fame of Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) rests on his anatomy text, De humani corporis fabrica, regarded as a seminal book in modern medicine. It was compiled while he taught anatomy at Padua, 1537-1543. Some of his findings challenged Galen's writings of the 2c AD, and caused De fabrica to be rejected immediately by classically trained anatomists. At age 29, Vesalius abandoned his studies and over the next two decades served as physician to Emperor Charles V of the Holy Roman Empire (HRE) and later to King Philip II of Spain in Madrid. In 1564, he sought to resume teaching anatomy in Padua, but release from royal service obliged him first to make a pilgrimage to Palestine. During the return voyage to Venice, he became ill and was put ashore alone on an Ionian island Zakynthos, where he died days later at age 50. PMID:25811684

  6. The Last Months of Andreas Vesalius: a Coda.

    PubMed

    Biesbrouck, Maurits; Goddeeris, Theodoor; Steeno, Omer

    2012-12-01

    Since the publication in this journal of our two articles on the end of Andreas Vesalius' life, some very old sources have recently become available that we were unable to consult at the time of writing and that now prompt us to add a coda. These sources give an even better picture of both the circumstances of the disaster that led to Vesalius' death and the correct site of his burial. Firstly, there is a text by Reinerus Solenander that casts a completely different light on the circumstances in which his ship was at sea and the way in which it reached land; in addition, there is a new early eye-witness report of his burial-place by Christoph Fürer von Haimendorf, dating from 6 August 1565. PMID:26255386

  7. Tilt precursors before earthquakes on the San Andreas fault, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, M.J.S.; Mortensen, C.E.

    1974-01-01

    An array of 14 biaxial shallow-borehole tiltmeters (at 10-7 radian sensitivity) has been installed along 85 kilometers of the San Andreas fault during the past year. Earthquake-related changes in tilt have been simultaneously observed on up to four independent instruments. At earthquake distances greater than 10 earthquake source dimensions, there are few clear indications of tilt change. For the four instruments with the longest records (>10 months), 26 earthquakes have occurred since July 1973 with at least one instrument closer than 10 source dimensions and 8 earthquakes with more than one instrument within that distance. Precursors in tilt direction have been observed before more than 10 earthquakes or groups of earthquakes, and no similar effect has yet been seen without the occurrence of an earthquake.

  8. The San Andreas fault experiment. [gross tectonic plates relative velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Vonbun, F. O.

    1973-01-01

    A plan was developed during 1971 to determine gross tectonic plate motions along the San Andreas Fault System in California. Knowledge of the gross motion along the total fault system is an essential component in the construction of realistic deformation models of fault regions. Such mathematical models will be used in the future for studies which will eventually lead to prediction of major earthquakes. The main purpose of the experiment described is the determination of the relative velocity of the North American and the Pacific Plates. This motion being so extremely small, cannot be measured directly but can be deduced from distance measurements between points on opposite sites of the plate boundary taken over a number of years.

  9. Tilt Precursors before Earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault, California.

    PubMed

    Johnston, M J; Mortensen, C E

    1974-12-13

    An array of 14 biaxial shallow-borehole tiltmeters (at 1O(-7) radian sensitivity) has been installed along 85 kilometers of the San Andreas fault during the past year. Earthquake-related changes in tilt have been simultaneously observed on up to four independent instruments. At earthquake distances greater than 10 earthquake source dimensions, there are few clear indications of tilt change. For the four instruments with the longest records (> 10 months), 26 earthquakes have occurred since July 1973 with at least one instrument closer than 10 source dimensions and 8 earthquakes with more than one instrument within that distance. Precursors in tilt direction have been observed before more than 10 earthquakes or groups of earthquakes, and no similar effect has yet been seen without the occurrence of an earthquake. PMID:17843056

  10. Electromagnetic Imaging of Fluids in the San Andreas Fault

    SciTech Connect

    Martyn Unsworth

    2002-05-01

    OAK 270 - Magnetotelluric data were collected on six profiles across the san Andreas Fault at Cholame,Parkfield, and Hollister in Central California. On each profile, high electrical resistivities were imaged west of the fault, and are due to granitic rocks of the Salinian block. East of the fault, lower electrical resistivities are associated with rocks of the Fanciscan formation. On the seismically active Parkfield and Hollister segments, a region of low resistivity was found in the fault zone that extends to a depth of several kilometers. This is due to a zone of fracturing (the damaged zone) that has been infiltrated by saline ground water. The shallowest micro-earthquakers occur at a depth that is coincident with the base of the low resistivity wedge. This strongly suggests that above this depth, the fault rocks are too weak to accumulate sufficient stress for earthquake rupture to occur and fault motion is accommodated through aseismic creep.

  11. Resurvey of site stability quadrilaterals, Otay Mountain and Quincy, California. [San Andreas fault experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, C. H.

    1977-01-01

    Trilateration quadrilaterals established across two faults near the San Andreas Fault Experiment laser/satellite ranging sites were resurveyed after four years. No evidence of significant tectonic motion was found.

  12. Earthquake Swarm Along the San Andreas Fault near Palmdale, Southern California, 1976 to 1977.

    PubMed

    McNally, K C; Kanamori, H; Pechmann, J C; Fuis, G

    1978-09-01

    Between November 1976 and November 1977 a swarm of small earthquakes (local magnitude Andreas fault near Palmdale, California. This swarm was the first observed along this section of the San Andreas since cataloging of instrumental data began in 1932. The activity followed partial subsidence of the 35-centimeter vertical crustal uplift known as the Palmdale bulge along this "locked" section of the San Andreas, which last broke in the great (surface-wave magnitude = 8(1/4)+) 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake. The swarm events exhibit characteristics previously observed for some foreshock sequences, such as tight clustering of hypocenters and time-dependent rotations of stress axes inferred from focal mechanisms. However, because of our present lack of understanding of the processes that precede earthquake faulting, the implications of the swarm for future large earthquakes on the San Andreas fault are unknown. PMID:17738534

  13. Earthquake swarm along the San Andreas fault near Palmdale, Southern California, 1976 to 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mcnally, K.C.; Kanamori, H.; Pechmann, J.C.; Fuis, G.

    1978-01-01

    Between November 1976 and November 1977 a swarm of small earthquakes (local magnitude ??? 3) occurred on or near the San Andreas fault near Palmdale, California. This swarm was the first observed along this section of the San Andreas since cataloging of instrumental data began in 1932. The activity followed partial subsidence of the 35-centimeter vertical crustal uplift known as the Palmdale bulge along this "locked" section of the San Andreas, which last broke in the great (surface-wave magnitude = 81/4+) 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake. The swarm events exhibit characteristics previously observed for some foreshock sequences, such as tight clustering of hypocenters and time-dependent rotations of stress axes inferred from focal mechanisms. However, because of our present lack of understanding of the processes that precede earthquake faulting, the implications of the swarm for future large earthquakes on the San Andreas fault are unknown. Copyright ?? 1978 AAAS.

  14. Fracture surface energy of the Punchbowl fault, San Andreas system.

    PubMed

    Chester, Judith S; Chester, Frederick M; Kronenberg, Andreas K

    2005-09-01

    Fracture energy is a form of latent heat required to create an earthquake rupture surface and is related to parameters governing rupture propagation and processes of slip weakening. Fracture energy has been estimated from seismological and experimental rock deformation data, yet its magnitude, mechanisms of rupture surface formation and processes leading to slip weakening are not well defined. Here we quantify structural observations of the Punchbowl fault, a large-displacement exhumed fault in the San Andreas fault system, and show that the energy required to create the fracture surface area in the fault is about 300 times greater than seismological estimates would predict for a single large earthquake. If fracture energy is attributed entirely to the production of fracture surfaces, then all of the fracture surface area in the Punchbowl fault could have been produced by earthquake displacements totalling <1 km. But this would only account for a small fraction of the total energy budget, and therefore additional processes probably contributed to slip weakening during earthquake rupture. PMID:16136142

  15. A slow earthquake sequence on the San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Linde, A.T.; Gladwin, M.T.; Johnston, M.J.S.; Gwyther, R.L.; Bilham, R.G.

    1996-01-01

    EARTHQUAKES typically release stored strain energy on timescales of the order of seconds, limited by the velocity of sound in rock. Over the past 20 years, observations and laboratory experiments have indicated that capture can also occur more slowly, with durations up to hours. Such events may be important in earthquake nucleation and in accounting for the excess of plate convergence over seismic slip in subduction zones. The detection of events with larger timescales requires near-field deformation measurements. In December 1992, two borehole strainmeters close to the San Andreas fault in California recorded a slow strain event of about a week in duration, and we show here that the strain changes were produced by a slow earthquake sequence (equivalent magnitude 4.8) with complexity similar to that of regular earthquakes. The largest earthquakes associated with these slow events were small (local magnitude 3.7) and contributed negligible strain release. The importance of slow earthquakes in the seismogenic process remains an open question, but these observations extend the observed timescale for slow events by two orders of magnitude.

  16. A slow earthquake sequence on the San Andreas fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, Alan T.; Gladwin, Michael T.; Johnston, Malcolm J. S.; Gwyther, Ross L.; Bilham, Roger G.

    1996-09-01

    EARTHQUAKES typically release stored strain energy on timescales of the order of seconds, limited by the velocity of sound in rock. Over the past 20 years, observations1-13 and laboratory experiments14 have indicated that rupture can also occur more slowly, with durations up to hours. Such events may be important in earthquake nucleation15 and in accounting for the excess of plate convergence over seismic slip in subduction zones. The detection of events with larger timescales requires near-field deformation measurements. In December 1992, two borehole strainmeters close to the San Andreas fault in California recorded a slow strain event of about a week in duration, and we show here that the strain changes were produced by a slow earthquake sequence (equivalent magnitude 4.8) with complexity similar to that of regular earthquakes. The largest earthquakes associated with these slow events were small (local magnitude 3.7) and contributed negligible strain release. The importance of slow earthquakes in the seismogenic process remains an open question, but these observations extend the observed timescale for slow events by two orders of magnitude.

  17. Lithosphere-Asthenosphere interactions near the San Andreas fault.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlie, N.

    2015-12-01

    We decipher the strain history of the upper mantle in California through the comparison of the long-term finite strain field in the mantle and the surface strain-rate field, respectively inferred from fast polarization directions of seismic phases (SKS and SKKS), and Global Positioning System (GPS) surface velocity fields. We show that mantle strain and surface strain-rate fields are consistent in the vicinity of San Andreas Fault (SAF) in California. Such an agreement suggests that the lithosphere and strong asthenosphere have been deformed coherently and steadily since >1 Ma. We find that the crustal stress field rotates (up to 40 degrees of rotation across a 50 km distance from 50 degrees relative to the strike of the SAF, in the near-field of SAF) from San Francisco to the Central Valley. Both observations suggest that the SAF extends to depth, likely through the entire lithosphere. From Central Valley towards the Basin and Range, the orientations of GPS strain-rates, shear wave splitting measurements and seismic stress fields diverge indicating reduced coupling or/and shallow crustal extension and/or presence of frozen anisotropy.

  18. A simulation of the San Andreas fault experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agreen, R. W.; Smith, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    The San Andreas fault experiment (Safe), which employs two laser tracking systems for measuring the relative motion of two points on opposite sides of the fault, has been simulated for an 8-yr observation period. The two tracking stations are located near San Diego on the western side of the fault and near Quincy on the eastern side; they are roughly 900 km apart. Both will simultaneously track laser reflector equipped satellites as they pass near the stations. Tracking of the Beacon Explorer C spacecraft has been simulated for these two stations during August and September for 8 consecutive years. An error analysis of the recovery of the relative location of Quincy from the data has been made, allowing for model errors in the mass of the earth, the gravity field, solar radiation pressure, atmospheric drag, errors in the position of the San Diego site, and biases and noise in the laser systems. The results of this simulation indicate that the distance of Quincy from San Diego will be determined each year with a precision of about 10 cm. Projected improvements in these model parameters and in the laser systems over the next few years will bring the precision to about 1-2 cm by 1980.

  19. A simulation of the San Andreas fault experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agreen, R. W.; Smith, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    The San Andreas Fault Experiment, which employs two laser tracking systems for measuring the relative motion of two points on opposite sides of the fault, was simulated for an eight year observation period. The two tracking stations are located near San Diego on the western side of the fault and near Quincy on the eastern side; they are roughly 900 kilometers apart. Both will simultaneously track laser reflector equipped satellites as they pass near the stations. Tracking of the Beacon Explorer C Spacecraft was simulated for these two stations during August and September for eight consecutive years. An error analysis of the recovery of the relative location of Quincy from the data was made, allowing for model errors in the mass of the earth, the gravity field, solar radiation pressure, atmospheric drag, errors in the position of the San Diego site, and laser systems range biases and noise. The results of this simulation indicate that the distance of Quincy from San Diego will be determined each year with a precision of about 10 centimeters. This figure is based on the accuracy of earth models and other parameters available in 1972.

  20. Northern San Andreas fault near Shelter Cove, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prentice, C.S.; Merritts, D.J.; Beutner, E.C.; Bodin, P.; Schill, A.; Muller, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    The location of the San Andreas fault in the Shelter Cove area of northern California has been the subject of long-standing debate within the geological community. Although surface ruptures were reported near Shelter Cove in 1906, several subsequent workers questioned whether these ruptures represented true fault slip or shaking-related, gravity-driven deformation. This study, involving geologic and geomorphic mapping, historical research, and excavation across the 1906 rupture zone, concludes that the surface ruptures reported in 1906 were the result of strike-slip faulting, and that a significant Quaternary fault is located onshore near Shelter Cove. Geomorphic arguments suggest that the Holocene slip rate of this fault is greater than about 14 mm/yr, indicating that it plays an important role within the modern plate-boundary system. The onshore trace of the fault zone is well expressed as far north as Telegraph Hill; north of Telegraph Hill, its location is less well-constrained, but we propose that a splay of the fault may continue onshore northward for at least 9 km to the vicinity of Saddle Mountain.

  1. Abrupt along-strike change in tectonic style: San Andreas fault zone, San Francisco Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zoback, M.L.; Jachens, R.C.; Olson, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Seismicity and high-resolution aeromagnetic data are used to define an abrupt change from compressional to extensional tectonism within a 10- to 15-km-wide zone along the San Andreas fault on the San Francisco Peninsula and offshore from the Golden Gate. This 100-km-long section of the San Andreas fault includes the hypocenter of the Mw = 7.8 1906 San Francisco earthquake as well as the highest level of persistent microseismicity along that ???470-km-long rupture. We define two distinct zones of deformation along this stretch of the fault using well-constrained relocations of all post-1969 earthquakes based a joint one-dimensional velocity/hypocenter inversion and a redetermination of focal mechanisms. The southern zone is characterized by thrust- and reverse-faulting focal mechanisms with NE trending P axes that indicate "fault-normal" compression in 7- to 10-km-wide zones of deformation on both sides of the San Andreas fault. A 1- to 2-km-wide vertical zone beneath the surface trace of the San Andreas is characterized by its almost complete lack of seismicity. The compressional deformation is consistent with the young, high topography of the Santa Cruz Mountains/Coast Ranges as the San Andreas fault makes a broad restraining left bend (???10??) through the southernmost peninsula. A zone of seismic quiescence ???15 km long separates this compressional zone to the south from a zone of combined normal-faulting and strike-slip-faulting focal mechanisms (including a ML = 5.3 earthquake in 1957) on the northernmost peninsula and offshore on the Golden Gate platform. Both linear pseudo-gravity gradients, calculated from the aeromagnetic data, and seismic reflection data indicate that the San Andreas fault makes an abrupt ???3-km right step less than 5 km offshore in this northern zone. A similar right-stepping (dilatational) geometry is also observed for the subparallel San Gregorio fault offshore. Persistent seismicity and extensional tectonism occur within the San

  2. Aspects of the earthquake geology and seismotectonics of the southern San Andreas and related faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Patrick Lee

    Aspects of the mechanics and movement history of the southernmost San Andreas or related faults are addressed. The seismotectonic context of the southernmost San Andreas fault is investigated. Microstratigraphic and geomorphological investigations of the fault's segmentation, slip potential and latest seismogenic slip history are presented. Measurements of geological deposits, man-made structures, alignment arrays and creepmeters offset across the southernmost San Andreas fault are presented. These measure the fault's aseismic slip rate during the past three hundred years. Observations of triggered aseismic slippage along the southernmost 100 km of the San Andreas fault soon after the North Palm Springs earthquake are described. Dextral surficial slip ranging from less than or equal to 9 mm and occurred on three sections of the San Andreas fault that lie between 44 and 86 km from the epicenter near North Palm Springs. Data complied and interpretations gleaned from repeated measurements of surface slip at dozens of site along the Superstition Hills fault during the period of two hours to one year after the Superstition Hills earthquake are presented. The common result of these five investigations is increased understanding of phenomena associated with fault motion along the highly active border between the Pacific and North American plates.

  3. Complexity of the deep San Andreas Fault zone defined by cascading tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelly, David R.

    2015-02-01

    Weak seismic vibrations--tectonic tremor--can be used to delineate some plate boundary faults. Tremor on the deep San Andreas Fault, located at the boundary between the Pacific and North American plates, is thought to be a passive indicator of slow fault slip. San Andreas Fault tremor migrates at up to 30 m s-1, but the processes regulating tremor migration are unclear. Here I use a 12-year catalogue of more than 850,000 low-frequency earthquakes to systematically analyse the high-speed migration of tremor along the San Andreas Fault. I find that tremor migrates most effectively through regions of greatest tremor production and does not propagate through regions with gaps in tremor production. I interpret the rapid tremor migration as a self-regulating cascade of seismic ruptures along the fault, which implies that tremor may be an active, rather than passive participant in the slip propagation. I also identify an isolated group of tremor sources that are offset eastwards beneath the San Andreas Fault, possibly indicative of the interface between the Monterey Microplate, a hypothesized remnant of the subducted Farallon Plate, and the North American Plate. These observations illustrate a possible link between the central San Andreas Fault and tremor-producing subduction zones.

  4. Interseismic strain accumulation and the earthquake potential on the southern San Andreas fault system.

    PubMed

    Fialko, Yuri

    2006-06-22

    The San Andreas fault in California is a mature continental transform fault that accommodates a significant fraction of motion between the North American and Pacific plates. The two most recent great earthquakes on this fault ruptured its northern and central sections in 1906 and 1857, respectively. The southern section of the fault, however, has not produced a great earthquake in historic times (for at least 250 years). Assuming the average slip rate of a few centimetres per year, typical of the rest of the San Andreas fault, the minimum amount of slip deficit accrued on the southern section is of the order of 7-10 metres, comparable to the maximum co-seismic offset ever documented on the fault. Here I present high-resolution measurements of interseismic deformation across the southern San Andreas fault system using a well-populated catalogue of space-borne synthetic aperture radar data. The data reveal a nearly equal partitioning of deformation between the southern San Andreas and San Jacinto faults, with a pronounced asymmetry in strain accumulation with respect to the geologically mapped fault traces. The observed strain rates confirm that the southern section of the San Andreas fault may be approaching the end of the interseismic phase of the earthquake cycle. PMID:16791192

  5. San Andreas-sized Strike-slip Fault on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This mosaic of the south polar region of Jupiter's moon Europa shows the northern 290 kilometers (180 miles) of a strike-slip fault named Astypalaea Linea. The entire fault is about 810 kilometers (500 miles) long, about the size of the California portion of the San Andreas fault, which runs from the California-Mexico border north to the San Francisco Bay.

    In a strike-slip fault, two crustal blocks move horizontally past one another, similar to two opposing lanes of traffic. Overall motion along the fault seems to have followed a continuous narrow crack along the feature's entire length, with a path resembling steps on a staircase crossing zones that have been pulled apart. The images show that about 50 kilometers (30 miles) of displacement have taken place along the fault. The fault's opposite sides can be reconstructed like a puzzle, matching the shape of the sides and older, individual cracks and ridges broken by its movements.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The red line marks the once active central crack of the fault. The black line outlines the fault zone, including material accumulated in the regions which have been pulled apart.

    Bends in the fault have allowed the surface to be pulled apart. This process created openings through which warmer, softer ice from below Europa's brittle ice shell surface, or frozen water from a possible subsurface ocean, could reach the surface. This upwelling of material formed large areas of new ice within the boundaries of the original fault. A similar pulling-apart phenomenon can be observed in the geological trough surrounding California's Salton Sea, in Death Valley and the Dead Sea. In those cases, the pulled-apart regions can include upwelled materials, but may be filled mostly by sedimentary and eroded material from above.

    One theory is that fault motion on Europa is induced by the pull of variable daily tides generated by Jupiter's gravitational tug on Europa. Tidal tension

  6. Crustal Dehydration and Overpressure Development on the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, P. M.; Saffer, D. M.; Bekins, B. A.

    2005-12-01

    Previous authors have hypothesized that the apparent weakness of the San Andreas Fault may be explained by fluid overpressures resulting from the combination of crustal dehydration of the Franciscan mélange and the presence of a low-permeability serpentinite cap at its geologic contact with the Great Valley Sequence. We previously evaluated this hypothesis by calculating the spatial and temporal distribution of fluid sources and then incorporating these sources in 2-D models of fluid flow and heat transport perpendicular to the fault. We have refined our fluid source calculations using theoretical values of whole-rock H2O content and PT histories for the Franciscan crust in the wake of northward migration of the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ). The sources obtained reach peak values of 10-16 s-1. The coupled fluid flow and heat transport model now accommodates large-scale crustal deformation in a more rigorous manner by constructing new model grids after each change in crustal thickness. In the models, we assign permeability of the crust as a function of depth. A 500-m-thick, low-permeability serpentinite body (k=10-20 m-2) extends across the eastern half of the 50 km-wide model domain at a depth of 2 km. In addition, various model simulations include fault structures centered in the model domain such as: a 500 m wide low permeability fault barrier (kfault = kcrust/100), a fault conduit (kfault = kcrust x 100), a barrier within a 1.5 km wide conduit damage zone, and a conduit plugged by a 3 km-thick and 2 km-wide barrier simulating a broad, clay-rich, low-permeability zone, at shallow depth within the fault system, which is one possible interpretation of seismic and electromagnetic data. We also test additional scenarios to evaluate sensitivity to changes in model permeability. Model results show overpressures, as large as 162% of hydrostatic (62% of lithostatic) for the model with a serpentinite cap and fault barrier, develop within 4 Ma of Mendocino Triple

  7. Vibroseis Monitoring of San Andreas Fault in California

    SciTech Connect

    Korneev, Valeri; Nadeau, Robert

    2004-06-11

    A unique data set of seismograms for 720 source-receiver paths has been collected as part of a controlled source Vibroseis experiment San Andreas Fault (SAF) at Parkfield. In the experiment, seismic waves repeatedly illuminated the epicentral region of the expected M6 event at Parkfield from June 1987 until November 1996. For this effort, a large shear-wave vibrator was interfaced with the 3-component (3-C) borehole High-Resolution Seismic Network (HRSN), providing precisely timed collection of data for detailed studies of changes in wave propagation associated with stress and strain accumulation in the fault zone (FZ). Data collected by the borehole network were examined for evidence of changes associated with the nucleation process of the anticipated M6 earthquake at Parkfield. These investigations reported significant traveltime changes in the S coda for paths crossing the fault zone southeast of the epicenter and above the rupture zone of the 1966 M6 earthquake. Analysis and modeling of these data and comparison with observed changes in creep, water level, microseismicity, slip-at-depth and propagation from characteristic repeating microearthquakes showed temporal variations in a variety of wave propagation attributes that were synchronous with changes in deformation and local seismicity patterns. Numerical modeling suggests 200 meters as an effective thickness of SAF. The observed variations can be explained by velocity 6 percent velocity variation within SAF core. Numerical modeling studies and a growing number of observations have argued for the propagation of fault-zone guided waves (FZGW) within a SAF zone that is 100 to 200 m wide at seismogenic depths and with 20 to 40 percent lower shear-wave velocity than the adjacent unfaulted rock. Guided wave amplitude tomographic inversion for SAF using microearthquakes, shows clearly that FZGW are significantly less attenuated in a well-defined region of the FZ. This region plunges to the northwest along the

  8. Scattered Wavefield Within the San Andreas Fault System, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, T.; Silver, P. G.; Niu, F.; Nadeau, R. M.

    2004-12-01

    Since transient aseismic deformation at seismogenic depth is one of the key phenomena related to earthquake occurrence, it is important to estimate the physical characteristics of such stress/strain transients within the deeper structure of the fault zone. Analysis of coda (scattered) waves has the potential for identifying such transients because the scattered wavefield is attributed mainly to small-scale heterogeneity that is likely formed by these transient events. In addition, the sampling area of scattered waves is concentrated within the fault zone, compared to the area sampled by direct waves. We have begun a program to map the spatial distribution of fault-zone scatterers and their time dependence within two regions of San Andreas Fault system: the Hayward Fault and the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault. In order to most reliably evaluate the scattered wavefields, we limited our analysis to records from borehole seismographs recorded by the Hayward Fault Network (HFN) and the High-Resolution Seismic Network (HRSN) in each area. For the Hayward fault, we mapped the spatial distribution of scatterers by analysis of the S-wave coda amplification factor (CAF) in a manner similar to Taira and Yomogida (2003). CAF is defined as the amplitude ratio of coda waves among different stations after corrections for source, station, and overall propagation effects (e.g., coda Q). This parameter allows for a statistical characterization of the distribution of scatterers. The station effect for each station and the coda Q averaged over all the seismograms in this area were estimated by the coda-normalization and maximum likelihood methods, respectively, using five regional earthquakes (epicentral distance > 50 km). We evaluated the CAF value of each source-station pair for the transverse-component, using 294 seismograms for 39 local earthquakes (epicentral distance < 50 km) recorded by 14 stations of the HFN. A map of CAF values for stations near the Hayward Fault

  9. Nanoscale porosity in SAFOD core samples (San Andreas Fault)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Christoph; Wirth, Richard; Reinicke, Andreas; Rybacki, Erik; Naumann, Rudolf; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Dresen, Georg

    2011-01-01

    With transmission electron microscopy (TEM) we observed nanometer-sized pores in four ultracataclastic and fractured core samples recovered from different depths of the main bore hole of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD). Cutting of foils with a focused ion beam technique (FIB) allowed identifying porosity down to the nm scale. Between 40 and 50% of all pores could be identified as in-situ pores without any damage related to sample preparation. The total porosity estimated from TEM micrographs (1-5%) is comparable to the connected fault rock porosity (2.8-6.7%) estimated by pressure-induced injection of mercury. Permeability estimates for cataclastic fault rocks are 10- 21-10- 19 m2 and 10- 17 m2 for the fractured fault rock. Porosity and permeability are independent of sample depth. TEM images reveal that the porosity is intimately linked to fault rock composition and associated with deformation. The TEM-estimated porosity of the samples increases with increasing clay content. The highest porosity was estimated in the vicinity of an active fault trace. The largest pores with an equivalent radius > 200 nm occur around large quartz and feldspar grains or grain-fragments while the smallest pores (equivalent radius < 50 nm) are typically observed in the extremely fine-grained matrix (grain size < 1 μm). Based on pore morphology we distinguish different pore types varying with fault rock fabric and alteration. The pores were probably filled with formation water and/or hydrothermal fluids at elevated pore fluid pressure, preventing pore collapse. The pore geometry derived from TEM observations and BET (Brunauer, Emmett and Teller) gas adsorption/desorption hysteresis curves indicates pore blocking effects in the fine-grained matrix. Observations of isolated pores in TEM micrographs and high pore body to pore throat ratios inferred from mercury injection suggest elevated pore fluid pressure in the low permeability cataclasites, reducing shear strength

  10. Correction to “Constraints on the stress state of the San Andreas Fault with analysis based on core and cuttings from San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drilling phases 1 and 2”

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tembe, Sheryl; Lockner, David; Wong, Teng-Fong

    2010-01-01

    This article corrects: Constraints on the stress state of the San Andreas Fault with analysis based on core and cuttings from San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drilling phases 1 and 2. Vol. 114, Issue B11, Article first published online: 5 NOV 2009.

  11. The Flemish anatomist Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) and the kidney.

    PubMed

    DeBroe, M E; Sacré, D; Snelders, E D; De Weerdt, D L

    1997-01-01

    Andreas Vesalius was born in Brussels on December 31, 1514 from a long line of physicians. He died in Zante in 1564. He was a typical son of the Renaissance. In 1543, his two most important books were published: De Humani Corporis Fabrica, Libri Septum and the Epitome. The former was a book of over 700 pages with several illustrations, highly systematically composed and fully indexed. Andreas Vesalius was the first modern anatomist who based his anatomical descriptions on personal observation. The kidney was a fascinating organ to Vesalius, whose function, particularly regarding the production of urine, he did not fully grasp. He makes short work of the 'perforated membrane theory' which was the current conception of the origin of urine in the kidney. Andreas Vesalius broke with the established rigid and fabricated way of teaching anatomy, and introduced the modern concept of learning based on personal observations, using illustration combined with a critical spirit and sense of experiment. PMID:9189243

  12. A comparison of the measured North Sea Andrea rogue wave with numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitner-Gregersen, E. M.; Fernandez, L.; Lefèvre, J. M.; Monbaliu, J.; Toffoli, A.

    2013-09-01

    A coupling of a spectral wave model with a nonlinear phase resolving model is used to reconstruct the evolution of wave statistics during a storm crossing the North Sea on 8-9 November 2007. During this storm a rogue wave (named the Andrea wave) was recorded at the Ekofisk field. The wave has characteristics comparable to the well-known New Year wave measured by Statoil at the Draupner platform the 1 January 1995. Hindcast data of the storm are here applied as input to calculate random realizations of sea surface and evolution of its statistical properties associated with this specific wave event by solving the Euler equations with a Higher Order Spectral Method (HOSM). The numerical results are compared with the Andrea wave profile as well as characteristics of the Andrea wave record measured by the down-looking lasers at the Ekofisk field.

  13. Postseismic relaxation along the San Andreas fault at Parkfield from continuous seismological observations.

    PubMed

    Brenguier, F; Campillo, M; Hadziioannou, C; Shapiro, N M; Nadeau, R M; Larose, E

    2008-09-12

    Seismic velocity changes and nonvolcanic tremor activity in the Parkfield area in California reveal that large earthquakes induce long-term perturbations of crustal properties in the San Andreas fault zone. The 2003 San Simeon and 2004 Parkfield earthquakes both reduced seismic velocities that were measured from correlations of the ambient seismic noise and induced an increased nonvolcanic tremor activity along the San Andreas fault. After the Parkfield earthquake, velocity reduction and nonvolcanic tremor activity remained elevated for more than 3 years and decayed over time, similarly to afterslip derived from GPS (Global Positioning System) measurements. These observations suggest that the seismic velocity changes are related to co-seismic damage in the shallow layers and to deep co-seismic stress change and postseismic stress relaxation within the San Andreas fault zone. PMID:18787165

  14. Irregular recurrence of large earthquakes along the san andreas fault: evidence from trees.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, G C; Sheppard, P R; Sieh, K E

    1988-07-01

    Old trees growing along the San Andreas fault near Wrightwood, California, record in their annual ring-width patterns the effects of a major earthquake in the fall or winter of 1812 to 1813. Paleoseismic data and historical information indicate that this event was the "San Juan Capistrano" earthquake of 8 December 1812, with a magnitude of 7.5. The discovery that at least 12 kilometers of the Mojave segment of the San Andreas fault ruptured in 1812, only 44 years before the great January 1857 rupture, demonstrates that intervals between large earthquakes on this part of the fault are highly variable. This variability increases the uncertainty of forecasting destructive earthquakes on the basis of past behavior and accentuates the need for a more fundamental knowledge of San Andreas fault dynamics. PMID:17841050

  15. A Case for Historic Joint Rupture of the San Andreas and San Jacinto Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozos, J.

    2015-12-01

    The ~M7.5 southern California earthquake of 8 December 1812 ruptured the San Andreas Fault from Cajon Pass to at least as far north as Pallet Creek (Biasi et al., 2002). The 1812 rupture has also been identified in trenches at Burro Flats to the south (Yule and Howland, 2001). However, the lack of a record of 1812 at Plunge Creek, between Cajon Pass and Burro Flats (McGill et al., 2002), complicates the interpretation of this event as a straightforward San Andreas rupture. Paleoseismic records of a large early 19th century rupture on the northern San Jacinto Fault (Onderdonk et al., 2013; Kendrick and Fumal, 2005) allow for alternate interpretations of the 1812 earthquake. I use dynamic rupture modeling on the San Andreas-San Jacinto junction to determine which rupture behaviors produce slip patterns consistent with observations of the 1812 event. My models implement realistic fault geometry, a realistic velocity structure, and stress orientations based on seismicity literature. Under these simple assumptions, joint rupture of the two faults is the most common behavior. My modeling rules out a San Andreas-only rupture that is consistent with the data from the 1812 earthquake, and also shows that single fault events are unable to match the average slip per event for either fault. The choice of nucleation point affects the details of rupture directivity and slip distribution, but not the first order result that multi-fault rupture is the preferred behavior. While it cannot be definitively said that joint San Andreas-San Jacinto rupture occurred in 1812, these results are consistent with paleoseismic and historic data. This has implications for the possibility of future multi-fault rupture within the San Andreas system, as well as for interpretation of other paleoseismic events in regions of complex fault interactions.

  16. Low strength of deep San Andreas fault gouge from SAFOD core

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, David A.; Morrow, Carolyn A.; Moore, Diane E.; Hickman, Stephen H.

    2011-01-01

    The San Andreas fault accommodates 28–34 mm yr−1 of right lateral motion of the Pacific crustal plate northwestward past the North American plate. In California, the fault is composed of two distinct locked segments that have produced great earthquakes in historical times, separated by a 150-km-long creeping zone. The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) is a scientific borehole located northwest of Parkfield, California, near the southern end of the creeping zone. Core was recovered from across the actively deforming San Andreas fault at a vertical depth of 2.7 km (ref. 1). Here we report laboratory strength measurements of these fault core materials at in situ conditions, demonstrating that at this locality and this depth the San Andreas fault is profoundly weak (coefficient of friction, 0.15) owing to the presence of the smectite clay mineral saponite, which is one of the weakest phyllosilicates known. This Mg-rich clay is the low-temperature product of metasomatic reactions between the quartzofeldspathic wall rocks and serpentinite blocks in the fault2, 3. These findings provide strong evidence that deformation of the mechanically unusual creeping portions of the San Andreas fault system is controlled by the presence of weak minerals rather than by high fluid pressure or other proposed mechanisms1. The combination of these measurements of fault core strength with borehole observations1, 4, 5 yields a self-consistent picture of the stress state of the San Andreas fault at the SAFOD site, in which the fault is intrinsically weak in an otherwise strong crust.

  17. Late Cenozoic geology of Cajon Pass: implications for tectonics and sedimentation along the San Andreas fault

    SciTech Connect

    Weldon, R.J. II

    1986-01-01

    The geology in Cajon Pass, southern California, provides a detailed history of strike-slip activity on the San Andreas fault, compressional deformation associated with the uplift of the central Transverse Ranges and an excellent Cenozoic record of syntectonic sedimentation. Age control was established in all of the sediments deposited since the Early Miocene, using biostratigraphy, magnetostratigraphy, fission-track dating of volcanic ashes, radiocarbon dating, soil development, and the relative stratigraphic and geomorphic position of the units. Detailed mapping revealed that tectonic deformation and sedimentation styles varied through time, reflecting the evolution of the San Andreas fault zone within the Pacific-North American plate boundary and climatic changes. Three distinct phases of the uplift of the San Bernardino Mountains have been recognized, suggesting a long-term interaction between the strike-slip activity on the San Andreas system and the compressional tectonics of the Transverse Ranges. Uplift began in the late Miocene, paused during the Pliocene, recommenced in the earliest Pleistocene and culminated in the late Pleistocene. The average slip rate across the combined San Andreas and San Jacinto faults was 37.5 +/- 2 mm/yr during the Quaternary Period. The Holocene slip rate on the San Andreas fault in Cajon Pass was determined to be 24.5 +/- 3.5 mm/yr. This investigation indicates that the last earthquake associated wit rupture on the San Andreas fault in Cajon Pass occurred around 1700 AD and that the average recurrence interval between earthquakes is between 150 and 200 years. A kinematic model was constructed from the structural and slip rate data developed here that produces internally consistent motions for all of the fault-bounded blocks in southern California.

  18. Low strength of deep San Andreas fault gouge from SAFOD core.

    PubMed

    Lockner, David A; Morrow, Carolyn; Moore, Diane; Hickman, Stephen

    2011-04-01

    The San Andreas fault accommodates 28-34 mm yr(-1) of right lateral motion of the Pacific crustal plate northwestward past the North American plate. In California, the fault is composed of two distinct locked segments that have produced great earthquakes in historical times, separated by a 150-km-long creeping zone. The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) is a scientific borehole located northwest of Parkfield, California, near the southern end of the creeping zone. Core was recovered from across the actively deforming San Andreas fault at a vertical depth of 2.7 km (ref. 1). Here we report laboratory strength measurements of these fault core materials at in situ conditions, demonstrating that at this locality and this depth the San Andreas fault is profoundly weak (coefficient of friction, 0.15) owing to the presence of the smectite clay mineral saponite, which is one of the weakest phyllosilicates known. This Mg-rich clay is the low-temperature product of metasomatic reactions between the quartzofeldspathic wall rocks and serpentinite blocks in the fault. These findings provide strong evidence that deformation of the mechanically unusual creeping portions of the San Andreas fault system is controlled by the presence of weak minerals rather than by high fluid pressure or other proposed mechanisms. The combination of these measurements of fault core strength with borehole observations yields a self-consistent picture of the stress state of the San Andreas fault at the SAFOD site, in which the fault is intrinsically weak in an otherwise strong crust. PMID:21441903

  19. Low strength of deep San Andreas fault gouge from SAFOD core

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.A.; Morrow, C.; Moore, D.; Hickman, S.

    2011-01-01

    The San Andreas fault accommodates 28-"34-???mm-???yr ????'1 of right lateral motion of the Pacific crustal plate northwestward past the North American plate. In California, the fault is composed of two distinct locked segments that have produced great earthquakes in historical times, separated by a 150-km-long creeping zone. The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) is a scientific borehole located northwest of Parkfield, California, near the southern end of the creeping zone. Core was recovered from across the actively deforming San Andreas fault at a vertical depth of 2.7-???km (ref. 1). Here we report laboratory strength measurements of these fault core materials at in situ conditions, demonstrating that at this locality and this depth the San Andreas fault is profoundly weak (coefficient of friction, 0.15) owing to the presence of the smectite clay mineral saponite, which is one of the weakest phyllosilicates known. This Mg-rich clay is the low-temperature product of metasomatic reactions between the quartzofeldspathic wall rocks and serpentinite blocks in the fault. These findings provide strong evidence that deformation of the mechanically unusual creeping portions of the San Andreas fault system is controlled by the presence of weak minerals rather than by high fluid pressure or other proposed mechanisms. The combination of these measurements of fault core strength with borehole observations yields a self-consistent picture of the stress state of the San Andreas fault at the SAFOD site, in which the fault is intrinsically weak in an otherwise strong crust. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  20. Crustal Deformation Along the Northern San Andreas Fault System From Geodetic and Geologic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, M. H.

    2004-12-01

    The San Andreas fault system north of the San Francisco Bay area is composed of three sub-parallel right-lateral faults: the San Andreas, Rodgers Creek-Ma'acama, and Green Valley-Bartlett Springs. The San Andreas has been essentially aseismic since it last ruptured in 1906, and no major historical earthquakes have occurred on the more seismically active Ma'acama and Bartlett Springs faults, although the slip deficit on the Ma'acama fault may now be large enough to generate a magnitude 7 earthquake. Since 2002, we have been collecting GPS measurements at about 80 monuments that form roughly 10-station profiles across the northern San Andreas fault system from Pt. Reyes to Cape Mendocino. Most of the monuments were last observed in 1993 or 1995, so the new observations significantly improve estimates of their relative motion and models of average interseismic strain accumulation, including possible spatial variations along the fault system. We use angular velocity-backslip block modeling to determine a self-consistent northern California deformation field and rates of strain accumulation along the northern San Andreas fault system. Preliminary results from our modeling, which includes 2 blocks within the San Andreas fault system, as well as a Sierran-Great Valley block, and the Pacific and North America plates, show agreement between observed and predicted velocities at less than 2 mm/yr. Fault-parallel deformation across the entire San Andreas fault system is 38 mm/yr, but deep slip rates on the sub-parallel faults are poorly constrained due to significant correlations between the deep slip rates and locking depths, which we fully characterize using Monte Carlo techniques. We use Bayesian techniques to combine the GPS observations with constraints derived from other seismic, geodetic, and paleoseismic observations, such as locking depths, surface creep rates, and inferred geologic slip rates. These additional constraints significantly improve the estimates of the

  1. First epoch measurements by Mark III VLBI of the San Andreas Fault experiment baseline

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, J.W.

    1985-08-01

    The 883-km-long San Andreas Fault Experiment (SAFE) baseline between Quincy in northern California and Monument Peak in southern California spans the San Andreas Fault in a way designed to measure motion between the North American and the Pacific Plates. This baseline and a closely related baseline have been measured with the satellite laser ranging techniques (SLR) for over 10 years. The baseline was measured with the very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) technique to confirm or reject the results already obtained from SLR.

  2. Local geomagnetic events associated with displacements on the san andreas fault.

    PubMed

    Breiner, S; Kovach, R L

    1967-10-01

    The piezomagnetic properties of rock suggest that a change in subsurface stress will manifest itself as a change in the magnetic susceptibility and remanent magnetization and hence the local geomagnetic field. A differential array of magnetometers has been operating since late 1965 on the San Andreas fault in the search for piezomagnetic signals under conditions involving active fault stress. Local changes in the geomagnetic field have been observed near Hollister, California, some tens of hours preceding the onset of abrupt creep displacement on the San Andreas fault. PMID:17798647

  3. Paleoseismic displacement history, Coachella Valley segment, San Andreas fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. L.

    2009-12-01

    This paper examines individual earthquake displacements and slip curves for the southern segment of the San Andreas fault. In prior work, detailed geomorphic slip evidence (features offset up to ~20 meters right-laterally) were inventoried along the southern 50 km (Bombay Beach to Thermal) of the Coachella Valley Segment (CVS). Compilation of that survey, and current work indicate that the latest 5 events produced moderate offsets, averaging 3-4 meters from Durmid Hill (adjacent to the Salton Sea) through the central Indio Hills (adjacent to Palm Desert). Streams exhibiting cumulative offset of 15 to 18 meters are interpreted to record five events, with locally higher values obtained in the southern Mecca Hills and central Indio Hills. Stream displacements of 21 to 24 and 25 to 28 meters have been documented at a small number of sites. The presence of larger values, and absence of intervening values, indicates these events likely were characterized by offsets larger than 3-4 meters. Addressing the contribution to total offset from fault creep is especially important to characterize slip-per-event on the CVS, since creep contributes up to 20 to 30% of the long-term slip rate there (Sieh and Williams 1990). While creep probably can't be discriminated from seismic offset in geomorphic study of multi-event fault offsets, the consistency of field evidence indicates that creep may be a neutral or minor factor in interpreting the offset record: i.e., the surface slip in a given earthquake cycle, while a sum of seismic + postseismic surface slip, approximates total seismogenic slip at depth. In the present open interval, for example, the strongest signal for prior event slip is ~3.5m. 1-1.5m of this is presumed to be postseismic creep (ibid). Thus the latest seismic surface slip was probably about 2-2.5m, and the latest seismogenic rupture (at depth) was probably in the range of 3-3.5 m, and 1-1.5m of this occurred as postseismic slip plus creep at the surface. Prior event

  4. Neotectonics of the San Andreas Fault system, basin and range province juncture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, J. E.; Crowell, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The development, active processes, and tectonic interplay of the southern San Andreas fault system and the basin and range province were studied. The study consist of data acquisition and evaluation, technique development, and image interpretation and mapping. Potentially significant geologic findings are discussed.

  5. Andreas Vesalius and the Occo medals of Augsburg. Evidence of a professional friendship.

    PubMed

    Houtzager, H L

    2000-06-01

    The friendly connection that existed between Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) and his learned friends in Augsburg comprised three periods in the life of the emperor's court physician. The close ties that must have connected Adolphus Occo II and III and Vesalius are expressed in a number of medals carrying their images. PMID:11624585

  6. Andreas Vesalius on the anatomy and function of the lower thoracic vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Biesbrouck, Maurits; Vanden Berghe, Alex

    2016-04-01

    Some remarkable statements made by Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) in his principal work De Humani Corporis Fabrica (1543) about the anatomy and function of the lower thoracic vertebrae are discussed in the light of information from the literature. Their accuracy is evaluated on the basis of several pieces of anatomical evidence and clinical cases. PMID:27385301

  7. Chicks in Charge: Andrea Baker & Amy Daniels--Airport High School Media Center, Columbia, SC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This article briefly discusses two librarians exploration of Linux. Andrea Baker and Amy Daniels were tired of telling their students that new technology items were not in the budget. They explored Linux, which is a program that recycles older computers, installs free operating systems and free software.

  8. 1855 and 1991 Surveys of the San Andreas Fault: Implications for Fault Machanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Lisa B.; Donnellan, Andrea

    1993-01-01

    Two monuments from an 1855 survey that spans the San Andreas fault in the Carrizo Plain have been displaced 11.0+/-2.5m right-laterally by the 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake and associated seismicity and afterslip by the 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake and associated seismicity and afterslip.

  9. Behavior of the southernmost San Andreas fault during the past 300 years

    SciTech Connect

    Sieh, K.E.; Williams, P.L. )

    1990-05-10

    Surficial creep occurs at low rates along the Coachella Valley segment of the San Andreas fault, which has not produced a large earthquake during the period of historical record. Geodetic data indicate, however, that the crust adjacent to this segment of the San Andreas fault is accumulating strain at a high rate. Furthermore, neotectonic and paleoseismic data indicate that the fault does produce very large earthquakes every two to three centuries. In view of its long-term behavior, the occurrence of creep along the surficial trace of the fault in the Coachella Valley is of particular interest. Along two short reaches of the San Andreas fault in the Coachella Valley, measurements of offset geological deposits and man-made structures and from alignment arrays and creep meters show that slip rates of 2-4 mm/yr near Indio and near the Salton Sea have persisted for the past three centuries. This slow aseismic surficial creep is not a transient precursor to seismic failure of this segment of the fault. The authors suggest that the Coachella Valley segment of the San Andreas fault creeps in its upper few kilometers. This behavior may be due to tectonically induced high pore pressures in the coarse sediments that abut the fault.

  10. State of stress near the San Andreas fault: implications for wrench tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, V.S.; Suppe, J.

    1987-12-01

    Borehole elongations or breakouts in central California show that the direction of regional maximum horizontal stress is nearly perpendicular to the San Andreas fault and to the axes of young thrust-related anticlines. This observation resolves much of the controversy over shear-stress magnitude in the crust and around the San Andreas fault specifically. A low shear stress of 10-20 MPa (100-200 bar) or less on the San Andreas fault, suggested by heat-flow and seismic observations, is compatible with a high regional deviatoric stress (100 MPa, 1 kbar) when the observed principal stress directions are considered. Therefore, the San Andreas fault is a nearly frictionless interface, which causes the transpressive plate motion to be decoupled into a low-stress strike-slip component and a high-stress compressive component. These observations suggest that standard concepts of transpressive wrench tectonics - which envisage drag on a high-friction fault - are wrong. The thrust structures are largely decoupled from the strike-slip fault.

  11. Andrea Dworkin's "Mercy": Pain, Ad Personam, and Silence in the "War Zone."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberly, Rosa A.

    1993-01-01

    Studies the public responses to Andrea Dworkin's novel "Mercy" (about rape specifically and the sexual abuse of women in general). Suggests that Dworkin's "Mercy"--like other controversial cultural texts--fostered a type of literary public sphere and that defining these spheres as "war zones" does not foster open debate or a common space for…

  12. Fine-scale delineation of the location of and relative ground shaking within the San Andreas Fault zone at San Andreas Lake, San Mateo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Rymer, M.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Prentice, C.S.; Sickler, R.R.

    2013-01-01

    The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission is seismically retrofitting the water delivery system at San Andreas Lake, San Mateo County, California, where the reservoir intake system crosses the San Andreas Fault (SAF). The near-surface fault location and geometry are important considerations in the retrofit effort. Because the SAF trends through highly distorted Franciscan mélange and beneath much of the reservoir, the exact trace of the 1906 surface rupture is difficult to determine from surface mapping at San Andreas Lake. Based on surface mapping, it also is unclear if there are additional fault splays that extend northeast or southwest of the main surface rupture. To better understand the fault structure at San Andreas Lake, the U.S. Geological Survey acquired a series of seismic imaging profiles across the SAF at San Andreas Lake in 2008, 2009, and 2011, when the lake level was near historical lows and the surface traces of the SAF were exposed for the first time in decades. We used multiple seismic methods to locate the main 1906 rupture zone and fault splays within about 100 meters northeast of the main rupture zone. Our seismic observations are internally consistent, and our seismic indicators of faulting generally correlate with fault locations inferred from surface mapping. We also tested the accuracy of our seismic methods by comparing our seismically located faults with surface ruptures mapped by Schussler (1906) immediately after the April 18, 1906 San Francisco earthquake of approximate magnitude 7.9; our seismically determined fault locations were highly accurate. Near the reservoir intake facility at San Andreas Lake, our seismic data indicate the main 1906 surface rupture zone consists of at least three near-surface fault traces. Movement on multiple fault traces can have appreciable engineering significance because, unlike movement on a single strike-slip fault trace, differential movement on multiple fault traces may exert compressive and

  13. Permeability of the San Andreas Fault Zone at Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbun, A. P.; Song, I.; Saffer, D.

    2010-12-01

    Quantifying fault rock permeability is important toward understanding both the regional hydrologic behavior of fault zones, and poro-elastic processes that affect fault mechanics by mediating effective stress. These include long-term fault strength as well as dynamic processes that may occur during earthquake slip, including thermal pressurization and dilatancy hardening. Despite its importance, measurements of fault zone permeability for relevant natural materials are scarce, owing to the difficulty of coring through active fault zones seismogenic depths. Most existing measurements of fault zone permeability are from altered surface samples or from thinner, lower displacement faults than the SAF. Here, we report on permeability measurements conducted on gouge from the actively creeping Central Deformation Zone (CDZ) of the San Andreas Fault, sampled in the SAFOD borehole at a depth of ~2.7 km (Hole G, Run 4, sections 4,5). The matrix of the gouge in this interval is predominantly composed of particles <10 µm, with ~5 vol% clasts of serpentinite, very fine-grained sandstone, and siltstone. The 2.6 m-thick CDZ represents the main fault trace and hosts ~90% of the active slip on the SAF at this location, as documented by repeated casing deformation surveys. We measured permeability in two different configurations: (1) in a uniaxial pressure cell, in which a sample is placed into a rigid steel ring which imposes a zero lateral strain condition and subjected to axial load, and (2) in a standard triaxial system under isostatic stress conditions. In the uniaxial configuration, we obtained permeabilities at axial effective stresses up to 90 MPa, and in the triaxial system up to 10 MPa. All experiments were conducted on cylindrical subsamples of the SAFOD core 25 mm in diameter, with lengths ranging from 18mm to 40mm, oriented for flow approximately perpendicular to the fault. In uniaxial tests, permeability is determined by running constant rate of strain (CRS) tests up

  14. Frictional strength and heat flow of southern San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, P. P.

    2016-01-01

    Frictional strength and heat flow of faults are two related subjects in geophysics and seismology. To date, the investigation on regional frictional strength and heat flow still stays at the stage of qualitative estimation. This paper is concentrated on the regional frictional strength and heat flow of the southern San Andreas Fault (SAF). Based on the in situ borehole measured stress data, using the method of 3D dynamic faulting analysis, we quantitatively determine the regional normal stress, shear stress, and friction coefficient at various seismogenic depths. These new data indicate that the southern SAF is a weak fault within the depth of 15 km. As depth increases, all the regional normal and shear stresses and friction coefficient increase. The former two increase faster than the latter. Regional shear stress increment per kilometer equals 5.75 ± 0.05 MPa/km for depth ≤15 km; regional normal stress increment per kilometer is equal to 25.3 ± 0.1 MPa/km for depth ≤15 km. As depth increases, regional friction coefficient increment per kilometer decreases rapidly from 0.08 to 0.01/km at depths less than ~3 km. As depth increases from ~3 to ~5 km, it is 0.01/km and then from ~5 to 15 km, and it is 0.002/km. Previously, frictional strength could be qualitatively determined by heat flow measurements. It is difficult to obtain the quantitative heat flow data for the SAF because the measured heat flow data exhibit large scatter. However, our quantitative results of frictional strength can be employed to investigate the heat flow in the southern SAF. We use a physical quantity P f to describe heat flow. It represents the dissipative friction heat power per unit area generated by the relative motion of two tectonic plates accommodated by off-fault deformation. P f is called "fault friction heat." On the basis of our determined frictional strength data, utilizing the method of 3D dynamic faulting analysis, we quantitatively determine the regional long-term fault

  15. Perspective view, Landsat overlay San Andreas Fault, Palmdale, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The prominent linear feature straight down the center of this perspective view is the San Andreas Fault. This segment of the fault lies near the city of Palmdale, California (the flat area in the right half of the image) about 60 kilometers (37 miles) north of Los Angeles. The fault is the active tectonic boundary between the North American plate on the right, and the Pacific plate on the left. Relative to each other, the Pacific plate is moving away from the viewer and the North American plate is moving toward the viewer along what geologists call a right lateral strike-slip fault. Two large mountain ranges are visible, the San Gabriel Mountains on the left and the Tehachapi Mountains in the upper right. The Lake Palmdale Reservoir, approximately 1.5 kilometers (0.9 miles) across, sits in the topographic depression created by past movement along the fault. Highway 14 is the prominent linear feature starting at the lower left edge of the image and continuing along the far side of the reservoir. The patterns of residential and agricultural development around Palmdale are seen in the Landsat imagery in the right half of the image. SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics.

    This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture

  16. Talc-bearing serpentinite and the creeping section of the San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Diane E.; Rymer, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    The section of the San Andreas fault located between Cholame Valley and San Juan Bautista in central California creeps at a rate as high as 28 mm yr -1 (ref. 1), and it is also the segment that yields the best evidence for being a weak fault embedded in a strong crust. Serpentinized ultramafic rocks have been associated with creeping faults in central and northern California, and serpentinite is commonly invoked as the cause of the creep and the low strength of this section of the San Andreas fault. However, the frictional strengths of serpentine minerals are too high to satisfy the limitations on fault strength, and these minerals also have the potential for unstable slip under some conditions. Here we report the discovery of talc in cuttings of serpentinite collected from the probable active trace of the San Andreas fault that was intersected during drilling of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) main hole in 2005. We infer that the talc is forming as a result of the reaction of serpentine minerals with silica-saturated hydrothermal fluids that migrate up the fault zone, and the talc commonly occurs in sheared serpentinite. This discovery is significant, as the frictional strength of talc at elevated temperatures is sufficiently low to meet the constraints on the shear strength of the fault, and its inherently stable sliding behaviour is consistent with fault creep. Talc may therefore provide the connection between serpentinite and creep in the San Andreas fault, if shear at depth can become localized along a talc-rich principal-slip surface within serpentinite entrained in the fault zone. ??2007 Nature Publishing Group.

  17. Talc-bearing serpentinite and the creeping section of the San Andreas fault.

    PubMed

    Moore, Diane E; Rymer, Michael J

    2007-08-16

    The section of the San Andreas fault located between Cholame Valley and San Juan Bautista in central California creeps at a rate as high as 28 mm yr(-1) (ref. 1), and it is also the segment that yields the best evidence for being a weak fault embedded in a strong crust. Serpentinized ultramafic rocks have been associated with creeping faults in central and northern California, and serpentinite is commonly invoked as the cause of the creep and the low strength of this section of the San Andreas fault. However, the frictional strengths of serpentine minerals are too high to satisfy the limitations on fault strength, and these minerals also have the potential for unstable slip under some conditions. Here we report the discovery of talc in cuttings of serpentinite collected from the probable active trace of the San Andreas fault that was intersected during drilling of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) main hole in 2005. We infer that the talc is forming as a result of the reaction of serpentine minerals with silica-saturated hydrothermal fluids that migrate up the fault zone, and the talc commonly occurs in sheared serpentinite. This discovery is significant, as the frictional strength of talc at elevated temperatures is sufficiently low to meet the constraints on the shear strength of the fault, and its inherently stable sliding behaviour is consistent with fault creep. Talc may therefore provide the connection between serpentinite and creep in the San Andreas fault, if shear at depth can become localized along a talc-rich principal-slip surface within serpentinite entrained in the fault zone. PMID:17700697

  18. Subsurface geometry of the San Andreas-Calaveras fault junction: influence of the Coast Range Ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, J. T.; Ponce, D. A.; Graymer, R. W.; Jachens, R. C.; Simpson, R. W.

    2013-12-01

    Potential-field modeling, surface geologic mapping, and relocated seismicity are used to investigate the three-dimensional structure of the San Andreas-Calaveras fault junction to gain insight into regional tectonics, fault kinematics, and seismic hazard. South of the San Francisco Bay area, the San Andreas and Hayward-Calaveras fault zones join to become a single San Andreas Fault. The fault junction, as defined in this study, represents a three-dimensional volume of crust extending from San Juan Bautista in the north to Bitterwater Valley in the south, bounded by the San Andreas Fault on the southwest and the Calaveras fault zone on the northeast. South of Hollister, the Calaveras fault zone includes the Paicines, San Benito, and Pine Rock faults. Within the junction, the San Andreas and Calaveras faults are both creeping at the surface, and strike parallel to each other for about 50 km, separated by only 2 to 6 km, but never actually merge at the surface. Geophysical evidence suggests that the San Andreas and Calaveras faults dip away from each other within the northern portion of the fault junction, bounding a triangular wedge of crust. This wedge changes shape to the south as the dips of both the San Andreas and Calaveras faults vary along strike. The main trace of the San Andreas Fault is clearly visible in cross-sections of relocated seismicity as a vertical to steeply southwest-dipping structure between 5 and 10 km depth throughout the junction. The Calaveras fault dips steeply to the northeast in the northern part of the junction. Near the intersection with the Vallecitos syncline, the dip of the Calaveras fault, as identified in relocated seismicity, shallows to 60 degrees. Northeast of the Calaveras fault, we identify a laterally extensive magnetic body 1 to 8 km below the surface that we interpret as a folded 1 to 3 km-thick tabular body of Coast Range Ophiolite at the base of the Vallecitos syncline. Potential-field modeling and relocated seismicity

  19. Geophysical properties within the San Andreas Fault Zone at the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth and their relationships to rock properties and fault zone structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeppson, Tamara N.; Bradbury, Kelly K.; Evans, James P.

    2010-12-01

    We examine the relationships between borehole geophysical data and physical properties of fault-related rocks within the San Andreas Fault as determined from data from the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth borehole. Geophysical logs, cuttings data, and drilling data from the region 3- to 4-km measured depth of the borehole encompass the active part of the San Andreas Fault. The fault zone lies in a sequence of deformed sandstones, siltstone, shale, serpentinite-bearing block-in-matrix rocks, and sheared phyllitic siltstone. The borehole geophysical logs reveal the presence of a low-velocity zone from 3190 to 3410 m measured depth with Vp and Vs values 10-30% lower than the surrounding rocks and a 1-2 m thick zone of active shearing at 3301-3303 m measured depth. Seven low-velocity excursions with increased porosity, decreased density, and mud-gas kick signatures are present in the fault zone. Geologic data on grain-scale deformation and alteration are compared to borehole data and reveal weak correlations and inverse relationships to the geophysical data. In places, Vp and Vs increase with grain-scale deformation and alteration and decrease with porosity in the fault zone. The low-velocity zone is associated with a significant lithologic and structural transition to low-velocity rocks, dominated by phyllosilicates and penetratively foliated, sheared rocks. The zone of active shearing and the regions of low sonic velocity appear to be associated with clay-rich rocks that exhibit fine-scale foliation and higher porosities that may be a consequence of the fault-related shearing of foliated and fine-grained sedimentary rocks.

  20. Seismic tomography and deformation modeling of the junction of the San Andreas and Calaveras faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorbath, C.; Oppenheimer, D.; Amelung, F.; King, G.

    1996-01-01

    Local earthquake P traveltime data is inverted to obtain a three-dimensional tomographic image of the region centered on the junction of the San Andreas and Calaveras faults. The resulting velocity model is then used to relocate more than 17,000 earthquakes and to produce a model of fault structure in the region. These faults serve as the basis for modeling the topography using elastic dislocation methods. The region is of interest because active faults join, it marks the transition zone from creeping to locked fault behavior on the San Andreas fault, it exhibits young topography, and it has a good spatial distribution of seismicity. The tomographic data set is extensive, consisting of 1445 events, 96 stations, and nearly 95,000 travel time readings. Tomographic images are resolvable to depths of 12 km and show significant velocity contrasts across the San Andreas and Calaveras faults, a low-velocity zone associated with the creeping section of the San Andreas fault, and shallow low-velocity sediments in the southern Santa Clara valley and northern Salinas valley. Relocated earthquakes only occur where vp>5 km/s and indicate that portions of the San Andreas and Calaveras faults are non vertical, although we cannot completely exclude the possibility that all or part of this results from ray tracing problems. The new dips are more consistent with geological observations that dipping faults intersect the surface where surface traces have been mapped. The topographic modeling predicts extensive subsidence in regions characterized by shallow low-velocity material, presumably the result of recent sedimentation. Some details of the topography at the junction of the San Andreas and Calaveras faults are not consistent with the modeling results, suggesting that the current position of this "triple junction" has changed with time. The model also predicts those parts of the fault subject to contraction or extension perpendicular to the fault strike and hence the sense of any

  1. Tectonic history of the north portion of the San Andreas fault system, California, inferred from gravity and magnetic anomalies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griscom, A.; Jachens, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Geologic and geophysical data for the San Andreas fault system north of San Francisco suggest that the eastern boundary of the Pacific plate migrated eastward from its presumed original position at the base of the continental slope to its present position along the San Andreas transform fault by means of a series of eastward jumps of the Mendocino triple junction. These eastward jumps total a distance of about 150 km since 29 Ma. Correlation of right-laterally displaced gravity and magnetic anomalies that now have components at San Francisco and on the shelf north of Point Arena indicates that the presently active strand of the San Andreas fault north of the San Francisco peninsula formed recently at about 5 Ma when the triple junction jumped eastward a minimum of 100 km to its present location at the north end of the San Andreas fault. -from Authors

  2. Shallow structure and deformation along the San Andreas fault in Cholame Valley, California, based on high-resolution reflection profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Shedlock, K.M.; Harding, S.T. ); Brocher, T.M. )

    1990-04-10

    The mapped active traces of the San Andreas fault are separated by a 1-km-wide right-stepping offset in Cholame Valley. The authors collected 18 km of high-resolution seismic reflection data specifically designed to image the San Andreas fault zone in the shallow crust surrounding this offset. The reflection profiles and available well data indicate that west of the mapped active traces of the San Andreas fault the shallow subsurface structure of the crust consists of thin ({le} 400 m thick), offset packages of reflections, laterally coherent on the scale of tens of meters, overlying deformed clastic sedimentary rocks. East of the San Andreas fault, the structure of the shallow crust in southern Cholame Valley is characterized by thick packages of reflections, laterally coherent on the scale of kilometers, overlying the Franciscan complex. All of the strata east of the fault (within Cholame Valley) dip toward the San Andreas fault and the offset, into an approximately 1-km-deep sedimentary basin abutting the south strand of San Andreas fault. The offset in Cholame Valley is characterized by a gentle downwarping of sediments into the offset, the presence of many small faults and discontinuous reflections between the traces of the main fault, localized subsidence abutting the main strike-slip fault, the formation of a basin, near the offset, that is about as deep as the jog is wide, and the southward propagation of the deformation associated with the offset. Strain field modeling based on simple geometries of the San Andreas and associated faults successfully predicts the general features of the observed topography and subsurface structure of southern Cholame Valley, including subsidence and basin formation near the offset, a discontinuous San Andreas fault plane, and at least one fault in southeastern Cholame Valley.

  3. Loading of the San Andreas fault by flood-induced rupture of faults beneath the Salton Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, Daniel; Kilb, Debi; Luttrell, Karen; Driscoll, Neal W.; Kent, Graham

    2011-01-01

    The southern San Andreas fault has not experienced a large earthquake for approximately 300 years, yet the previous five earthquakes occurred at ~180-year intervals. Large strike-slip faults are often segmented by lateral stepover zones. Movement on smaller faults within a stepover zone could perturb the main fault segments and potentially trigger a large earthquake. The southern San Andreas fault terminates in an extensional stepover zone beneath the Salton Sea—a lake that has experienced periodic flooding and desiccation since the late Holocene. Here we reconstruct the magnitude and timing of fault activity beneath the Salton Sea over several earthquake cycles. We observe coincident timing between flooding events, stepover fault displacement and ruptures on the San Andreas fault. Using Coulomb stress models, we show that the combined effect of lake loading, stepover fault movement and increased pore pressure could increase stress on the southern San Andreas fault to levels sufficient to induce failure. We conclude that rupture of the stepover faults, caused by periodic flooding of the palaeo-Salton Sea and by tectonic forcing, had the potential to trigger earthquake rupture on the southern San Andreas fault. Extensional stepover zones are highly susceptible to rapid stress loading and thus the Salton Sea may be a nucleation point for large ruptures on the southern San Andreas fault.

  4. [Legitimation of Andries Van Wesele, Andreas Vesalius's father, by the Holy Roman Emperor Charles the Fifth].

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hyonosuke

    2006-06-01

    Andries van Wesele, Andreas Vesalius's father and a court pharmacist of the Holy Roman Emperor Charles the fifth, was an illegitimate son of Everard van Wesele, a court physician of the Hapsburgs. In the year of 1531, Andries was legitimated by the Emperor. The legitimation letter was written in French. The author tried to translate and analyze the letter. By this legitimation, not only Andries himself was legitimated but also his successors were approved to succeed Andries. By this letter, Andreas Vesalius obtained his position as a hereditary member of a family serving the court of the Hapsburgs, and as a result, he started his career as a physician of the court. PMID:17152536

  5. On simultaneous tilt and creep observations on the San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, M.J.S.; McHugh, S.; Burford, S.

    1976-01-01

    THE installation of an array of tiltmeters along the San Andreas Fault 1 has provided an excellent opportunity to study the amplitude and spatial scale of the tilt fields associated with fault creep. We report here preliminary results from, and some implications of, a search for interrelated surface tilts and creep event observations at four pairs of tiltmeters and creepmeters along an active 20-km stretch of the San Andreas Fault. We have observed clear creep-related tilts above the instrument resolution (10 -8 rad) only on a tiltmeter less than 0.5 km from the fault. The tilt events always preceded surface creep observations by 2-12 min, and were not purely transient in character. ?? 1975 Nature Publishing Group.

  6. Probabilistic fault displacement hazards for the southern san andreas fault using scenarios and empirical slips

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, R.; Petersen, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    We apply a probabilistic method to develop fault displacement hazard maps and profiles for the southern San Andreas Fault. Two slip models are applied: (1) scenario slip, defined by the ShakeOut rupture model, and (2) empirical slip, calculated using regression equations relating global slip to earthquake magnitude and distance along the fault. The hazard is assessed using a range of magnitudes defined by the Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast and the ShakeOut. For hazard mapping we develop a methodology to partition displacement among multiple fault branches basedon geological observations. Estimated displacement hazard extends a few kilometers wide in areas of multiple mapped fault branches and poor mapping accuracy. Scenario and empirical displacement hazard differs by a factor of two or three, particularly along the southernmost section of the San Andreas Fault. We recommend the empirical slip model with site-specific geological data to constrain uncertainties for engineering applications. ?? 2011, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  7. Slip in the 1857 and earlier large earthquakes along the Carrizo Plain, San Andreas Fault.

    PubMed

    Zielke, Olaf; Arrowsmith, J Ramón; Grant Ludwig, Lisa; Akçiz, Sinan O

    2010-02-26

    The moment magnitude (Mw) 7.9 Fort Tejon earthquake of 1857, with a approximately 350-kilometer-long surface rupture, was the most recent major earthquake along the south-central San Andreas Fault, California. Based on previous measurements of its surface slip distribution, rupture along the approximately 60-kilometer-long Carrizo segment was thought to control the recurrence of 1857-like earthquakes. New high-resolution topographic data show that the average slip along the Carrizo segment during the 1857 event was 5.3 +/- 1.4 meters, eliminating the core assumption for a linkage between Carrizo segment rupture and recurrence of major earthquakes along the south-central San Andreas Fault. Earthquake slip along the Carrizo segment may recur in earthquake clusters with cumulative slip of approximately 5 meters. PMID:20093436

  8. Cumulative offset of the San Andreas fault in Central California: A seismic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Revenaugh, J.; Reasoner, C.

    1997-02-01

    Scattered-wave imaging of upper crustal heterogeneity along nearly 500 km of the San Andreas fault in central California is used to estimate cumulative offset of basement rocks in the fault zone. Optimal cross-fault realignment of scattering patterns in achieved through removal of nearly 315 km of right-lateral slip. This value agrees with most previous estimates of early Miocene displacement, placing the initiation of movement on the San Andreas no earlier than ca, 23.1 Ma. Scattering along the fault correlates with segment boundaries established on the basis of historic and paleo seismicity, corroborating evidence from southern California that the upper crustal structures responsible for scattering are important in seismogenesis. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Strain on the san andreas fault near palmdale, california: rapid, aseismic change.

    PubMed

    Savage, J C; Prescott, W H; Lisowski, M; King, N E

    1981-01-01

    Frequently repeated strain measurements near Palmdale, California, during the period from 1971 through 1980 indicate that, in addition to a uniform accumulation of right-lateral shear strain (engineering shear, 0.35 microradian per year) across the San Andreas fault, a 1-microstrain contraction perpendicular to the fault that accumulated gradually during the interval 1974 through 1978 was aseismically released between February and November 1979. Subsequently (November 1979 to March 1980), about half of the contraction was recovered. This sequence of strain changes can be explained in terms of south-southwestward migration of a slip event consisting of the south-southwestward movement of the upper crust on a horizontal detachment surface at a depth of 10 to 30 kilometers. The large strain change in 1979 corresponds to the passage of the slip event beneath the San Andreas fault. PMID:17731244

  10. Aseismic slip and seismogenic coupling along the central San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, R.; Simons, M.; Agram, P. S.; Duputel, Z.; Shen, Z.-K.

    2015-01-01

    We use high-resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar- and GPS-derived observations of surface displacements to derive the first probabilistic estimates of fault coupling along the creeping section of the San Andreas Fault, in between the terminations of the 1857 and 1906 magnitude 7.9 earthquakes. Using a fully Bayesian approach enables unequaled resolution and allows us to infer a high probability of significant fault locking along the creeping section. The inferred discreet locked asperities are consistent with evidence for magnitude 6+ earthquakes over the past century in this area and may be associated with the initiation phase of the 1857 earthquake. As creeping segments may be related to the initiation and termination of seismic ruptures, such distribution of locked and creeping asperities highlights the central role of the creeping section on the occurrence of major earthquakes along the San Andreas Fault.

  11. The wister mud pot lineament: Southeastward extension or abandoned strand of the San Andreas fault?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lynch, D.K.; Hudnut, K.W.

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of a survey of mud pots in the Wister Unit of the Imperial Wildlife Area. Thirty-three mud pots, pot clusters, or related geothermal vents (hundreds of pots in all) were identified, and most were found to cluster along a northwest-trending line that is more or less coincident with the postulated Sand Hills fault. An extrapolation of the trace of the San Andreas fault southeastward from its accepted terminus north of Bombay Beach very nearly coincides with the mud pot lineament and may represent a surface manifestation of the San Andreas fault southeast of the Salton Sea. Additionally, a recent survey of vents near Mullet Island in the Salton Sea revealed eight areas along a northwest-striking line where gas was bubbling up through the water and in two cases hot mud and water were being violently ejected.

  12. Predictive Upper Cretaceous to Early Miocene Paleogeography of the San Andreas Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnham, K.

    2006-12-01

    Paleogeographic reconstruction of the region of the San Andreas fault was hampered for more than twenty years by the apparent incompatibility of authoritative lithologic correlations. These led to disparate estimates of dextral strike-slip offsets, notably 315 km between Pinnacles and Neenach Volcanics (Matthews, 1976), versus 563 km between Anchor Bay and Eagle Rest Peak (Ross et al., 1973). In addition, estimates of total dextral slip on the San Gregorio fault have ranged from 5 km to 185 km. Sixteen upper Cretaceous and Paleogene conglomerates of the California Coast Ranges, from Anchor Bay to Simi Valley, have been included in a multidisciplinary study. Detailed analysis, including microscopic petrography and microprobe geochemistry, verified Seiders and Cox's (1992) and Wentworth's (1996) correlation of the upper Cretaceous Strata of Anchor Bay with an unnamed conglomerate east of Half Moon Bay. Similar detailed study, with the addition of SHRIMP U/Pb zircon dating, verified that the Paleocene or Eocene Point Reyes Conglomerate at Point Reyes is a tectonically displaced segment of the Carmelo Formation of Point Lobos. These studies centered on identification of matching unique clast varieties, rather than on simply counting general clast types, and included analyses of matrices, fossils, paleocurrents, diagenesis, adjacent rocks, and stratigraphy. The work also led to three new correlations: the Point Reyes Conglomerate with granitic source rock at Point Lobos; a magnetic anomaly at Black Point with a magnetic anomaly near San Gregorio; and the Strata of Anchor Bay with previously established source rock, the potassium-poor Logan Gabbro (Ross et al., 1973) at a more recently recognized location (Brabb and Hanna, 1981; McLaughlin et al., 1996) just east of the San Gregorio fault, south of San Gregorio. From these correlations, an upper Cretaceous early Oligocene paleogeography of the San Andreas fault system was constructed that honors both the Anchor Bay

  13. Andreas Vesalius on the teeth: an annotated translation from De humani corporis fabrica. 1543.

    PubMed

    Hast, M H; Garrison, D H

    1995-01-01

    An annotated translation into English of Chapter 11, Book One, "On the Teeth, Which Are Also Counted as Bones," from Andreas Vesalius' De humani corporis fabrica. The translation incorporates the text of both the 1543 and 1555 editions, and verified citations of ancient sources. In this chapter, Vesalius corrects errors of Galen and demonstrates and describes for the first time the anatomy and function of the dental pulp cavity. PMID:7712325

  14. Migrating tremors illuminate complex deformation beneath the seismogenic San Andreas fault.

    PubMed

    Shelly, David R

    2010-02-01

    The San Andreas fault is one of the most extensively studied faults in the world, yet its physical character and deformation mode beneath the relatively shallow earthquake-generating portion remain largely unconstrained. Tectonic 'non-volcanic' tremor, a recently discovered seismic signal probably generated by shear slip on the deep extension of some major faults, can provide new insight into the deep fate of such faults, including that of the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, California. Here I examine continuous seismic data from mid-2001 to 2008, identifying tremor and decomposing the signal into different families of activity based on the shape and timing of the waveforms at multiple stations. This approach allows differentiation between activities from nearby patches of the deep fault and begins to unveil rich and complex patterns of tremor occurrence. I find that tremor exhibits nearly continuous migration, with the most extensive episodes propagating more than 20 kilometres along fault strike at rates of 15-80 kilometres per hour. This suggests that the San Andreas fault remains a localized through-going structure, at least to the base of the crust, in this area. Tremor rates and recurrence behaviour changed markedly in the wake of the 2004 magnitude-6.0 Parkfield earthquake, but these changes were far from uniform within the tremor zone, probably reflecting heterogeneous fault properties and static and dynamic stresses decaying away from the rupture. The systematic recurrence of tremor demonstrated here suggests the potential to monitor detailed time-varying deformation on this portion of the deep San Andreas fault, deformation which unsteadily loads the shallower zone that last ruptured in the 1857 magnitude-7.9 Fort Tejon earthquake. PMID:20130648

  15. Topographically driven groundwater flow and the San Andreas heat flow paradox revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.; Hickman, S.

    2003-01-01

    Evidence for a weak San Andreas Fault includes (1) borehole heat flow measurements that show no evidence for a frictionally generated heat flow anomaly and (2) the inferred orientation of ??1 nearly perpendicular to the fault trace. Interpretations of the stress orientation data remain controversial, at least in close proximity to the fault, leading some researchers to hypothesize that the San Andreas Fault is, in fact, strong and that its thermal signature may be removed or redistributed by topographically driven groundwater flow in areas of rugged topography, such as typify the San Andreas Fault system. To evaluate this scenario, we use a steady state, two-dimensional model of coupled heat and fluid flow within cross sections oriented perpendicular to the fault and to the primary regional topography. Our results show that existing heat flow data near Parkfield, California, do not readily discriminate between the expected thermal signature of a strong fault and that of a weak fault. In contrast, for a wide range of groundwater flow scenarios in the Mojave Desert, models that include frictional heat generation along a strong fault are inconsistent with existing heat flow data, suggesting that the San Andreas Fault at this location is indeed weak. In both areas, comparison of modeling results and heat flow data suggest that advective redistribution of heat is minimal. The robust results for the Mojave region demonstrate that topographically driven groundwater flow, at least in two dimensions, is inadequate to obscure the frictionally generated heat flow anomaly from a strong fault. However, our results do not preclude the possibility of transient advective heat transport associated with earthquakes.

  16. Elevated time-dependent strengthening rates observed in San Andreas Fault drilling samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, Matt J.; Carpenter, Brett M.; Vogt, Christoph; Kopf, Achim J.

    2016-09-01

    The central San Andreas Fault in California is known as a creeping fault, however recent studies have shown that it may be accumulating a slip deficit and thus its seismogenic potential should be seriously considered. We conducted laboratory friction experiments measuring time-dependent frictional strengthening (healing) on fault zone and wall rock samples recovered during drilling at the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD), located near the southern edge of the creeping section and in the direct vicinity of three repeating microearthquake clusters. We find that for hold times of up to 3000 s, frictional healing follows a log-linear dependence on hold time and that the healing rate is very low for a sample of the actively shearing fault core, consistent with previous results. However, considering longer hold times up to ∼350,000 s, the healing rate accelerates such that the data for all samples are better described by a power law relation. In general, samples having a higher content of phyllosilicate minerals exhibit low log-linear healing rates, and the notably clay-rich fault zone sample also exhibits strong power-law healing when longer hold times are included. Our data suggest that weak faults, such as the creeping section of the San Andreas Fault, can accumulate interseismic shear stress more rapidly than expected from previous friction data. Using the power-law dependence of frictional healing on hold time, calculations of recurrence interval and stress drop based on our data accurately match observations of discrete creep events and repeating Mw = 2 earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault.

  17. Migrating tremors illuminate complex deformation beneath the seismogenic San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelly, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    The San Andreas fault is one of the most extensively studied faults in the world, yet its physical character and deformation mode beneath the relatively shallow earthquake-generating portion remain largely unconstrained. Tectonic non-volcanic tremor, a recently discovered seismic signal probably generated by shear slip on the deep extension of some major faults, can provide new insight into the deep fate of such faults, including that of the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, California. Here I examine continuous seismic data from mid-2001 to 2008, identifying tremor and decomposing the signal into different families of activity based on the shape and timing of the waveforms at multiple stations. This approach allows differentiation between activities from nearby patches of the deep fault and begins to unveil rich and complex patterns of tremor occurrence. I find that tremor exhibits nearly continuous migration, with the most extensive episodes propagating more than 20 kilometres along fault strike at rates of 15-80 kilometres per hour. This suggests that the San Andreas fault remains a localized through-going structure, at least to the base of the crust, in this area. Tremor rates and recurrence behaviour changed markedly in the wake of the 2004 magnitude-6.0 Parkfield earthquake, but these changes were far from uniform within the tremor zone, probably reflecting heterogeneous fault properties and static and dynamic stresses decaying away from the rupture. The systematic recurrence of tremor demonstrated here suggests the potential to monitor detailed time-varying deformation on this portion of the deep San Andreas fault, deformation which unsteadily loads the shallower zone that last ruptured in the 1857 magnitude-7.9 Fort Tejon earthquake. ?? 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  18. Correlation of data on strain accumulation adjacent to the San Andreas Fault with available models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical studies of deformation on strike slip faults were performed and the results applied to geodetic observations performed in the vicinity of the San Andreas Fault in California. The initial efforts were devoted to an extensive series of finite element calculations of the deformation associated with cyclic displacements on a strike-slip fault. Measurements of strain accumulation adjacent to the San Andreas Fault indicate that the zone of strain accumulation extends only a few tens of kilometers away from the fault. There is a concern about the tendency to make geodetic observations along the line to the source. This technique has serious problems for strike slip faults since the vector velocity is also along the fault. Use of a series of stations lying perpendicular to the fault whose positions are measured relative to a reference station are suggested to correct the problem. The complexity of faulting adjacent to the San Andreas Fault indicated that the homogeneous elastic and viscoelastic approach to deformation had serious limitations. These limitation led to the proposal of an approach that assumes a fault is composed of a distribution of asperities and barriers on all scales. Thus, an earthquake on a fault is treated as a failure of a fractal tree. Work continued on the development of a fractal based model for deformation in the western United States. In order to better understand the distribution of seismicity on the San Andreas Fault system a fractal analog was developed. The fractal concept also provides a means of testing whether clustering in time or space is a scale-invariant process.

  19. Lake level observations to detect crustal tilt: San Andreas Lake, California, 1979-1989

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, R.J.; Johnston, M.J.S.; Myren, G.D. ); Murray, T. )

    1989-07-01

    A pair precision lake level gauging stations, installed in 1978, have been monitoring differential crustal uplift (crustal tilt) at San Andreas lake, California, near the suspected epicenter on the San Andreas fault of the M = 8.3, 1906 San Francisco earthquake. The stations are installed in the lake with a 4.2 km station separation parallel to the San Andreas fault. The gauging stations use quartz pressure transducers that are capable of detecting intermediate to long-term vertical displacements greater than 0.4 mm relative to a fluid surface. Differencing data from the two sites reduces the noise contributed by atmospheric pressure, temperature, and density changes, and isolates the relative elevation changes between the ends of the lake. At periods less than 20 minutes, the differenced data are dominated by lake seiches which have a fundamental mode at a period of 13 {plus minus} 0.3 minutes. These seiche harmonics can be filtered or predicted and removed from the data. Wind shear, typically lasting several days, can generate apparent short term tilt of the lake and large seiche amplitudes. The tilt noise power spectrum obtained from these data decreases by about 15 dB/decade of frequency. Monthly averages of the data between 1979-1989 indicate a tilt rate of 0.02 {plus minus} 0.08 microradians/yr (down S34{degree}E). No measurable horizontal tilt has apparently occurred in this region of the San Andreas fault during the last decade, however, measurements of trilateration networks show this region to be undergoing a horizontal strain of 0.6 {plus minus} 0.2 {mu}strain/yr.

  20. The morphology of strike-slip faults - Examples from the San Andreas Fault, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilham, Roger; King, Geoffrey

    1989-01-01

    The dilatational strains associated with vertical faults embedded in a horizontal plate are examined in the framework of fault kinematics and simple displacement boundary conditions. Using boundary element methods, a sequence of examples of dilatational strain fields associated with commonly occurring strike-slip fault zone features (bends, offsets, finite rupture lengths, and nonuniform slip distributions) is derived. The combinations of these strain fields are then used to examine the Parkfield region of the San Andreas fault system in central California.

  1. Electrical resistivity variations associated with earthquakes on the san andreas fault.

    PubMed

    Mazzella, A; Morrison, H F

    1974-09-01

    A 24 percent precursory change in apparent electrical resistivity was observed before a magnitude 3.9 earthquake of strike-slip nature on the San Andreas fault in central California. The experimental configuration and numerical calculations suggest that the change is associated with a volume at depth rather than some near-surface phenomenon. The character and duration of the precursor period agree well with those of other earthquake studies and support a dilatant earthquake mechanism model. PMID:17833697

  2. A case for historic joint rupture of the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults.

    PubMed

    Lozos, Julian C

    2016-03-01

    The San Andreas fault is considered to be the primary plate boundary fault in southern California and the most likely fault to produce a major earthquake. I use dynamic rupture modeling to show that the San Jacinto fault is capable of rupturing along with the San Andreas in a single earthquake, and interpret these results along with existing paleoseismic data and historic damage reports to suggest that this has likely occurred in the historic past. In particular, I find that paleoseismic data and historic observations for the ~M7.5 earthquake of 8 December 1812 are best explained by a rupture that begins on the San Jacinto fault and propagates onto the San Andreas fault. This precedent carries the implications that similar joint ruptures are possible in the future and that the San Jacinto fault plays a more significant role in seismic hazard in southern California than previously considered. My work also shows how physics-based modeling can be used for interpreting paleoseismic data sets and understanding prehistoric fault behavior. PMID:27034977

  3. Dipping San Andreas and Hayward faults revealed beneath San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.; Hart, P.E.

    1999-01-01

    The San Francisco Bay area is crossed by several right-lateral strike-slip faults of the San Andreas fault zone. Fault-plane reflections reveal that two of these faults, the San Andreas and Hayward, dip toward each other below seismogenic depths at 60?? and 70??, respectively, and persist to the base of the crust. Previously, a horizontal detachment linking the two faults in the lower crust beneath San Francisco Bay was proposed. The only near-vertical-incidence reflection data available prior to the most recent experiment in 1997 were recorded parallel to the major fault structures. When the new reflection data recorded orthogonal to the faults are compared with the older data, the highest, amplitude reflections show clear variations in moveout with recording azimuth. In addition, reflection times consistently increase with distance from the faults. If the reflectors were horizontal, reflection moveout would be independent of azimuth, and reflection times would be independent of distance from the faults. The best-fit solution from three-dimensional traveltime modeling is a pair of high-angle dipping surfaces. The close correspondence of these dipping structures with the San Andreas and Hayward faults leads us to conclude that they are the faults beneath seismogenic depths. If the faults retain their observed dips, they would converge into a single zone in the upper mantle -45 km beneath the surface, although we can only observe them in the crust.

  4. Base and precious metal occurrences along the San Andreas Fault, Point Delgada, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, Robert J.; Sorg, D.H.; Ohlin, H.N.; Heropoulos, Chris

    1979-01-01

    Previously unrecognized veins containing lead, zinc, and copper sulfide minerals at Point Delgada, Calif., are associated with late Mesozoic(?) and Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the Franciscan assemblage. Sulfide minerals include pyrite, sphalerite, galena, and minor chalcopyrite, and galena-rich samples contain substantial amounts of silver. These minerals occur in a quartz-carbonate gangue along northeast-trending faults and fractures that exhibit (left?) lateral and vertical slip. The sense of fault movement and the northeasterly strike are consistent with predicted conjugate fault sets of the present San Andreas fault system. The sulfide mineralization is younger than the Franciscan rocks of Point Delgada and King Range, and it may have accompanied or postdated the inception of San Andreas faulting. Mineralization largely preceded uplift, the formation of a marine terrace, and the emplacement of landslide-related debris-flow breccias that overlie the mineralized rocks and truncate the sulfide veins. These field relations indicate that the sulfide mineralization and inception of San Andreas faulting were clearly more recent than the early Miocene and that the mineralization could be younger than about 1.2 m.y. The sulfide veins at Point Delgada may be of economic significance. However, prior to any exploitation of the occurrence, economic and environmental conflicts of interest involving private land ownership, the Shelter Cove home development, and proximity of the coast must be resolved.

  5. Major Quaternary uplift along the northernmost San Andreas fault, King Range, northwestern California

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, T.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The King Range is a rugged coastal mountain range that parallels the San Andreas transform fault system just south of the Mendocino triple junction. Point Delgada is a small coastal headland that projects into the Pacific Ocean just southwest of the King Range. Apatite fission-track ages from parts of the King Range are remarkably young, averaging 1.2 Ma, indicating that a minimum of 2-5 km of uplift and unroofing have occured in the past 1.2 m.y. In contrast, ages from Point Delgada are about 12 Ma, and fission-track length data indicate that rocks there have resided at low temperatures ({le}50{degree}C) and thus at shallow depths since soon after 12 Ma. Therefore Point Delgada has experienced relative vertical stability. The contrast in uplift histories indicates that the two areas are separated by a major fault with a minimum of {approximately}1 km of Quaternary vertical offset. The fault is probably part of the San Andreas system and so may also have undergone major Quaternary strike-slip offset. The uplift in the King Range seems too great and too localized to have resulted from isostatic effects accompanying passage of the Mendocino triple junction and development of a slab-free window; rather, it is probably a local response to space problems among the various moving crustal blocks around the triple junction and San Andreas fault.

  6. A case for historic joint rupture of the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults

    PubMed Central

    Lozos, Julian C.

    2016-01-01

    The San Andreas fault is considered to be the primary plate boundary fault in southern California and the most likely fault to produce a major earthquake. I use dynamic rupture modeling to show that the San Jacinto fault is capable of rupturing along with the San Andreas in a single earthquake, and interpret these results along with existing paleoseismic data and historic damage reports to suggest that this has likely occurred in the historic past. In particular, I find that paleoseismic data and historic observations for the ~M7.5 earthquake of 8 December 1812 are best explained by a rupture that begins on the San Jacinto fault and propagates onto the San Andreas fault. This precedent carries the implications that similar joint ruptures are possible in the future and that the San Jacinto fault plays a more significant role in seismic hazard in southern California than previously considered. My work also shows how physics-based modeling can be used for interpreting paleoseismic data sets and understanding prehistoric fault behavior. PMID:27034977

  7. The Eastern California Shear Zone as the northward extension of the southern San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, W.; Savage, J. C.; Simpson, R. W.

    2016-04-01

    Cluster analysis offers an agnostic way to organize and explore features of the current GPS velocity field without reference to geologic information or physical models using information only contained in the velocity field itself. We have used cluster analysis of the Southern California Global Positioning System (GPS) velocity field to determine the partitioning of Pacific-North America relative motion onto major regional faults. Our results indicate the large-scale kinematics of the region is best described with two boundaries of high velocity gradient, one centered on the Coachella section of the San Andreas Fault and the Eastern California Shear Zone and the other defined by the San Jacinto Fault south of Cajon Pass and the San Andreas Fault farther north. The ~120 km long strand of the San Andreas between Cajon Pass and Coachella Valley (often termed the San Bernardino and San Gorgonio sections) is thus currently of secondary importance and carries lesser amounts of slip over most or all of its length. We show these first order results are present in maps of the smoothed GPS velocity field itself. They are also generally consistent with currently available, loosely bounded geologic and geodetic fault slip rate estimates that alone do not provide useful constraints on the large-scale partitioning we show here. Our analysis does not preclude the existence of smaller blocks and more block boundaries in Southern California. However, attempts to identify smaller blocks along and adjacent to the San Gorgonio section were not successful.

  8. Focal mechanisms and the state of stress on the San Andreas Fault in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Lucile M.

    1988-08-01

    Focal mechanisms have been determined from P wave first motion polarities for 138 small to moderate (2.6 ≤ M ≤ 4.3) earthquakes that occurred within 10 km of the surface trace of the San Andreas fault in southern California between 1978 and 1985. On the basis of these mechanisms the southern San Andreas fault has been divided into five segments with different stress regimes. Earthquakes in the Fort Tejon segment show oblique reverse sup on east-west and northwest striking faults. The Mojave segment has earthquakes with oblique reverse and right-lateral strikesup motion on northwest strikes. The San Bernardino segment has normal faulting earthquakes on north-south striking planes, while the Banning segment has reverse, strike-sup, and normal faulting events all occurring in the same area. The earthquakes in the Indio segment show strike-slip and oblique normal faulting on northwest to north-south striking planes. These focal mechanism data have been inverted to determine how the stresses acting on the San Andreas fault in southern California vary with position along strike of the fault. One of the principal stresses is vertical in all of the regions. The vertical stress is the minimum principal stress in Fort Tejon and Mojave, the intermediate principal stress in Banning and Indio, and the maximum principal stress in San Bernardino. The orientations of the horizontal principal stresses also vary between the regions. The trend of the maximum horizontal stress rotates over 35°, from N15°W at Fort Tejon to N20° at Indio. Except for the San Bernardino segment, the trend of the maximum horizontal stress is at a constant angle of about 65° to the local strike of the San Andreas fault, implying a weak fault. The largest change in the present stress state occurs at the end of the rupture zone of the 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake. It appears that the 1857 rupture ended when it propagated into an area of low stress amplitude, possibly caused by the 15° angle between the

  9. Impact of a Large San Andreas Fault Earthquake on Tall Buildings in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, S.; Ji, C.; Komatitsch, D.; Tromp, J.

    2004-12-01

    In 1857, an earthquake of magnitude 7.9 occurred on the San Andreas fault, starting at Parkfield and rupturing in a southeasterly direction for more than 300~km. Such a unilateral rupture produces significant directivity toward the San Fernando and Los Angeles basins. The strong shaking in the basins due to this earthquake would have had a significant long-period content (2--8~s). If such motions were to happen today, they could have a serious impact on tall buildings in Southern California. In order to study the effects of large San Andreas fault earthquakes on tall buildings in Southern California, we use the finite source of the magnitude 7.9 2001 Denali fault earthquake in Alaska and map it onto the San Andreas fault with the rupture originating at Parkfield and proceeding southward over a distance of 290~km. Using the SPECFEM3D spectral element seismic wave propagation code, we simulate a Denali-like earthquake on the San Andreas fault and compute ground motions at sites located on a grid with a 2.5--5.0~km spacing in the greater Southern California region. We subsequently analyze 3D structural models of an existing tall steel building designed in 1984 as well as one designed according to the current building code (Uniform Building Code, 1997) subjected to the computed ground motion. We use a sophisticated nonlinear building analysis program, FRAME3D, that has the ability to simulate damage in buildings due to three-component ground motion. We summarize the performance of these structural models on contour maps of carefully selected structural performance indices. This study could benefit the city in laying out emergency response strategies in the event of an earthquake on the San Andreas fault, in undertaking appropriate retrofit measures for tall buildings, and in formulating zoning regulations for new construction. In addition, the study would provide risk data associated with existing and new construction to insurance companies, real estate developers, and

  10. Earthquakes, Segments, Bends, and Fault-Face Geology: Correlations Within the San Andreas System, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jachens, R. C.; Simpson, R. W.; Thurber, C. H.; Murray, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    Three-dimensional geologic maps of regions surrounding parts of the San Andreas Fault system reveal correlations between fault face geology and both short- and long-term behavior of the faults. The Loma Prieta fault segment that ruptured during the 1989 M6.9 earthquake, as defined by its aftershocks, closely corresponds to the subsurface reach (80 km long) where a large body of Logan gabbro is truncated at the fault, as defined by its magnetic anomaly. This Jurassic ophiolitic gabbro and its related rocks occupy an unusual fault-bounded basement block within Salinaa, a largely Cretaceous granitic terrane SW of the San Andreas Fault. The along-fault reach of the Logan gabbro also coincides with essentially the entire Santa Cruz Mountains left-bend in the San Andreas Fault. Rejecting a chance coincidence, the position of the Logan gabbro with respect to the left bend implies that the bend is fixed relative to Salinia and that the block NE of the San Andreas Fault has been forced to negotiate around the bend as the blocks moved past each other. Thus the basement rocks of the Logan block appear to define (control?) the Loma Prieta segment in terms both of short-term behavior (earthquakes) and long-term behavior (restraining bend fault geometry). The Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault also closely corresponds to a characteristic geologic unit in the NE face of the fault, the greenstone-rich Permanente terrane of the Franciscan Complex. The along-fault subsurface extent of the Permanente terrane at the fault face, as inferred from a recent 3D tomographic wavespeed model, corresponds to the reach filled by the aftershocks of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake. Furthermore, the 2004 co-seismic slip inferred from geodetic observations also coincides with the Permanente terrane at the fault face. To test whether these observations are directly related to the presence of the Permanente terrane along the fault face, we looked at fault behavior at the location of its offset

  11. Change in failure stress on the southern san andreas fault system caused by the 1992 magnitude = 7.4 landers earthquake.

    PubMed

    Stein, R S; King, G C; Lin, J

    1992-11-20

    The 28 June Landers earthquake brought the San Andreas fault significantly closer to failure near San Bernardino, a site that has not sustained a large shock since 1812. Stress also increased on the San Jacinto fault near San Bernardino and on the San Andreas fault southeast of Palm Springs. Unless creep or moderate earthquakes relieve these stress changes, the next great earthquake on the southern San Andreas fault is likely to be advanced by one to two decades. In contrast, stress on the San Andreas north of Los Angeles dropped, potentially delaying the next great earthquake there by 2 to 10 years. PMID:17778356

  12. Change in failure stress on the southern San Andreas fault system caused by the 1992 magnitude = 7.4 Landers earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stein, R.S.; King, G.C.P.; Lin, J.

    1992-01-01

    The 28 June Landers earthquake brought the San Andreas fault significantly closer to failure near San Bernardino, a site that has not sustained a large shock since 1812. Stress also increased on the San Jacinto fault near San Bernardino and on the San Andreas fault southeast of Palm Springs. Unless creep or moderate earthquakes relieve these stress changes, the next great earthquake on the southern San Andreas fault is likely to be advanced by one to two decades. In contrast, stress on the San Andreas north of Los Angeles dropped, potentially delaying the next great earthquake there by 2 to 10 years.

  13. Evidence for Late Oligocene-Early Miocene episode of transtension along San Andreas Fault system in central California

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, R.G.

    1986-04-01

    The San Andreas is one of the most intensely studied fault systems in the world, but many aspects of its kinematic history remain controversial. For example, the period from the late Eocene to early Miocene is widely believed to have been a time of negligible strike-slip movement along the San Andreas fault proper, based on the rough similarity of offset of the Eocene Butano-Point of rocks Submarine Fan, the early Miocene Pinnacles-Neenach volcanic center, and an early Miocene shoreline in the northern Gabilan Range and San Emigdio Mountains. Nonetheless, evidence indicates that a late Oligocene-early Miocene episode of transtension, or strike-slip motion with a component of extension, occurred within the San Andreas fault system. The evidence includes: (1) about 22-24 Ma, widespread, synchronous volcanic activity occurred at about 12 volcanic centers along a 400-km long segment of the central California coast; (2) most of these volcanic centers are located along faults of the San Andreas system, including the San Andreas fault proper, the San Gregorio-Hosgri fault, and the Zayante-Vergeles fault, suggesting that these and other faults were active and served as conduits for magmas rising from below; (3) during the late Oligocene and early Miocene, a pull-apart basin developed adjacent to the San Andreas fault proper in the La Honda basin near Santa Cruz; and (4) during the late Oligocene and early Miocene, active faulting, rapid subsidence, and marine transgression occurred in the La Honda and other sedimentary basins in central California. The amount of right-lateral displacement along the San Andreas fault proper during this transtentional episode is unknown but was probably about 7.5-35 km, based on model studies of pull-apart basin formation. This small amount of movement is well within the range of error in published estimates of the offset of the Eocene to early Miocene geologic features noted.

  14. Recurrence of seismic migrations along the central California segment of the San Andreas fault system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, M.D.; Allen, S.S.

    1973-01-01

    VERIFICATIONS of tectonic concepts1 concerning seafloor spreading are emerging in a manner that has direct bearing on earthquake prediction. Although the gross pattern of worldwide seismicity contributed to the formulation of the plate tectonic hypothesis, it is the space-time characteristics of this seismicity that may contribute more toward understanding the kinematics and dynamics of the driving mechanism long speculated to originate in the mantle. If the lithosphere is composed of plates that move essentially as rigid bodies, then there should be seismic edge effects associated with this movement. It is these interplate effects, especially seismic migration patterns, that we discuss here. The unidirectional propagation at constant velocity (80 km yr-1 east to west) for earthquakes (M???7.2) on the Antblian fault for the period 1939 to 1956 (ref. 2) is one of the earliest observations of such a phenomenon. Similar studies3,4 of the Alaska Aleutian seismic zone and certain regions of the west coast of South America suggest unidirectional and recurring migrations of earthquakes (M???7.7) occur in these areas. Between these two regions along the great transform faults of the west coast of North America, there is some evidence 5 for unidirectional, constant velocity and recurrent migration of great earthquakes. The small population of earthquakes (M>7.2) in Savage's investigation5 indicates a large spatial gap along the San Andreas system in central California from 1830 to 1970. Previous work on the seismicity of this gap in central California indicates that the recurrence curves remain relatively constant, independent of large earthquakes, for periods up to a century6. Recurrence intervals for earthquakes along the San Andreas Fault have been calculated empirically by Wallace7 on the basis of geological evidence, surface measurements and assumptions restricted to the surficial seismic layer. Here we examine the evidence for recurrence of seismic migrations along

  15. The Earthquake Cycle on the San Andreas Fault System in northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yikilmaz, M. B.; Turcotte, D. L.; Beketova, O.; Kellogg, L. H.; Rundle, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    An important aspect of the tectonics in northern California is the northward migration of the triple junction across the region which gave birth to the San Andreas transform fault about 28 Myrs ago. The triple junction has formed by the subduction of a spreading ridge that once bounded the Farallon and the Pacific plates. A "slab window" has also been formed during this subduction event. Due to the high heat flow caused by this slab window, a soft zone of deformation with a width of ~100 km has been generated. This deformation zone is bounded on the west by the near rigid Pacific Plate and on the east by the near rigid Sierra-Nevada Central Valley Plate. Continuous and campaign GPS measurements indicate a near-uniform shear strain in this zone of deformation. We propose a hypothesis for the deformation pattern associated with great earthquakes and the linear strain field discussed above. We separate the earthquake cycle into three parts, beginning with the great 1906 earthquake on the San Andreas Fault, these are: 1) The coseismic behavior associated with the great earthquake. We take the slip to be 4 m and the associated stress drop extends some 15 km on either side of the fault. 2) Stress relaxation following the earthquake. This relaxation results in a near uniform state of stress across the zone of deformation and a reloading of the San Andreas Fault. 3)Uniform shear stress loading until the next great earthquake occurs in agreement with the GPS observations. We attribute this near uniform shear to fluid-like behavior beneath the brittle upper lithosphere in which earthquakes occur.

  16. Time-Dependent Coulomb Stres along the San Andreas Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. R.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2003-12-01

    Many questions remain regarding the evolution of stress along the San Andreas Fault System: Which segments of the San Andreas System are approaching failure? What is the stress interaction along different fault segments for likely slip scenarios? To what extent does locking depth influence the regional stress field? To better address these questions, we have developed and tested a semi-analytic, time-dependent model for 3-D displacement and stress caused by a dislocation in an elastic layer over a viscoelastic half-space. Our model is remarkably efficient: a single time-step computation of 2048 by 2048 horizontal grid cells, containing over 400 fault elements within a 900 x 1700 km fault zone, requires approximately 1 minute of CPU time on an ordinary workstation. This speed enables us to rapidly explore various full 3-D viscoelastic models with realistic 1000-year faulting scenarios. Our approach for investigating time-dependent deformation and stress evolution of the San Andreas Fault System is as follows: We represent far-field plate motion by continuous slip in the lower portion of a 50 km thick elastic layer. Earthquakes are modeled by episodic slip along individual faults using spatially-variable locking depth and geologically-estimated recurrence intervals. Each co-seismic event results in an instantaneous change of stress within the viscoelastic half-space that slowly relaxes with time and is coupled with the evolution of stresses within the elastic plate. We investigate such evolving stresses by computing time-dependent Coulomb stress within the seismogenic zone. We find that the evolving stress field is sensitive to plate thickness, half-space viscosity, and faulting scenario. We are currently establishing a suite of models, consistent with both geodetic and geological observations, that will increase our understanding of how temporal plate-boundary deformation and stress variations within the seismogenic crust can result from different tectonic settings

  17. Correlation between deep fluids, tremor and creep along the central San Andreas fault.

    PubMed

    Becken, Michael; Ritter, Oliver; Bedrosian, Paul A; Weckmann, Ute

    2011-12-01

    The seismicity pattern along the San Andreas fault near Parkfield and Cholame, California, varies distinctly over a length of only fifty kilometres. Within the brittle crust, the presence of frictionally weak minerals, fault-weakening high fluid pressures and chemical weakening are considered possible causes of an anomalously weak fault northwest of Parkfield. Non-volcanic tremor from lower-crustal and upper-mantle depths is most pronounced about thirty kilometres southeast of Parkfield and is thought to be associated with high pore-fluid pressures at depth. Here we present geophysical evidence of fluids migrating into the creeping section of the San Andreas fault that seem to originate in the region of the uppermost mantle that also stimulates tremor, and evidence that along-strike variations in tremor activity and amplitude are related to strength variations in the lower crust and upper mantle. Interconnected fluids can explain a deep zone of anomalously low electrical resistivity that has been imaged by magnetotelluric data southwest of the Parkfield-Cholame segment. Near Cholame, where fluids seem to be trapped below a high-resistivity cap, tremor concentrates adjacent to the inferred fluids within a mechanically strong zone of high resistivity. By contrast, subvertical zones of low resistivity breach the entire crust near the drill hole of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth, northwest of Parkfield, and imply pathways for deep fluids into the eastern fault block, coincident with a mechanically weak crust and the lower tremor amplitudes in the lower crust. Fluid influx to the fault system is consistent with hypotheses of fault-weakening high fluid pressures in the brittle crust. PMID:22129729

  18. Correlation between deep fluids, tremor and creep along the central San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becken, M.; Ritter, O.; Bedrosian, P.A.; Weckmann, U.

    2011-01-01

    The seismicity pattern along the San Andreas fault near Parkfield and Cholame, California, varies distinctly over a length of only fifty kilometres. Within the brittle crust, the presence of frictionally weak minerals, fault-weakening high fluid pressures and chemical weakening are considered possible causes of an anomalously weak fault northwest of Parkfield. Non-volcanic tremor from lower-crustal and upper-mantle depths is most pronounced about thirty kilometres southeast of Parkfield and is thought to be associated with high pore-fluid pressures at depth. Here we present geophysical evidence of fluids migrating into the creeping section of the San Andreas fault that seem to originate in the region of the uppermost mantle that also stimulates tremor, and evidence that along-strike variations in tremor activity and amplitude are related to strength variations in the lower crust and upper mantle. Interconnected fluids can explain a deep zone of anomalously low electrical resistivity that has been imaged by magnetotelluric data southwest of the Parkfield-Cholame segment. Near Cholame, where fluids seem to be trapped below a high-resistivity cap, tremor concentrates adjacent to the inferred fluids within a mechanically strong zone of high resistivity. By contrast, subvertical zones of low resistivity breach the entire crust near the drill hole of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth, northwest of Parkfield, and imply pathways for deep fluids into the eastern fault block, coincident with a mechanically weak crust and the lower tremor amplitudes in the lower crust. Fluid influx to the fault system is consistent with hypotheses of fault-weakening high fluid pressures in the brittle crust. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  19. Earthquake geology of the northern San Andreas Fault near Point Arena, California

    SciTech Connect

    Prentice, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    Excavations into a Holocene alluvial fan provided exposures of a record of prehistoric earthquakes near Point Arena, California. At least five earthquakes were recognized in the section. All of these occurred since the deposition of a unit that is approximately 2000 years old. Radiocarbon dating allows constraints to be placed on the dates of these earthquakes. A buried Holocene (2356-2709 years old) channel has been offset a maximum of 64 {plus minus} 2 meters. This implies a maximum slip rate of 25.5 {plus minus} 2.5 mm/yr. These data suggest that the average recurrence interval for great earthquakes on this segment of the San Andreas fault is long - between about 200 and 400 years. Offset marine terrace risers near Point Arena and an offset landslide near Fort Ross provide estimates of the average slip rate since Late Pleistocene time. Near Fort Ross, an offset landslide implies a slip rate of less than 39 mm/yr. Correlation and age estimates of two marine terrace risers across the San Andreas fault near Point Arena suggest slip rates of about 18-19 mm/yr since Late Pleistocene time. Tentative correlation of the Pliocene Ohlson Ranch Formation in northwestern Sonoma County with deposits 50 km to the northwest near Point Arean, provides piercing points to use in calculation of a Pliocene slip rate for the northern San Andreas fault. A fission-track age 3.3 {plus minus} 0.8 Ma was determined for zicrons separated from a tuff collected from the Ohlson Ranch Formation. The geomorphology of the region, especially of the two major river drainages, supports the proposed 50 km Pliocene offset. This implies a Pliocene slip rate of at least 12-20 mm/yr. These rates for different time periods imply that much of the Pacific-North American plate motion must be accommodated on other structures at this latitude.

  20. [The copy of De humani corporis fabrica of Andreas Vesalius of the municipal library of Reims].

    PubMed

    Ségal, Alain

    2014-01-01

    The author presents a copy of the De humani corporis fabrica by Andreas Vesalius; this book is preserved in the department of rare books of the municipal Library in Reims. This copy is a first edition as the author gives positive proofs. This book results of a donation to the Minimes's congregation of Reims by Seigneur Guillaume Le Vergeur, Count of Saint Souplet and Baillif of Vermandois in the 17th century. Guillaume Le Vergeur has also given other precious books to the monastery's library and his name is inscribed on the register of obituaries and on the pediment of the Minimes' Church. PMID:25962217

  1. Animals, Pictures, and Skeletons: Andreas Vesalius's Reinvention of the Public Anatomy Lesson.

    PubMed

    Shotwell, R Allen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I examine the procedures used by Andreas Vesalius for conducting public dissections in the early sixteenth century. I point out that in order to overcome the limitations of public anatomical demonstration noted by his predecessors, Vesalius employed several innovative strategies, including the use of animals as dissection subjects, the preparation and display of articulated skeletons, and the use of printed and hand-drawn illustrations. I suggest that the examination of these three strategies for resolving the challenges of public anatomical demonstration helps us to reinterpret Vesalius's contributions to sixteenth-century anatomy. PMID:25733589

  2. Peter Andreas Hansen und die astronomische Gemeinschaft - eine erste Auswertung des Hansen-Nachlasses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, O.; Strumpf, M.

    The literary assets of Peter Andreas Hansen are deposited in the Staatsarchiv Hamburg, the Forschungs- und Landesbibliothek Gotha and the Thüringer Staatsarchiv Gotha. They were never systematically investigated. The authors present here some results of a first evaluation. It was possible to reconstruct the historical events with regard to the maintenance of the Astronomische Nachrichten and the Altona observatory in 1854. Hansen was a successful teacher for many young astronomers. His way of stimulating the evolution of astronomy followed Zach's tradition.

  3. The Renaissance and the universal surgeon: Giovanni Andrea Della Croce, a master of traumatology.

    PubMed

    Di Matteo, Berardo; Tarabella, Vittorio; Filardo, Giuseppe; Viganò, Anna; Tomba, Patrizia; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2013-12-01

    All the medical knowledge of all time in one book, the universal and perfect manual for the Renaissance surgeon, and the man who wrote it. This paper depicts the life and works of Giovanni Andrea della Croce, a 16th Century physician and surgeon, who, endowed with true spirit of Renaissance humanism, wanted to teach and share all his medical knowledge through his opus magnum, titled "Universal Surgery Complete with All the Relevant Parts for the Optimum Surgeon". An extraordinary book which truly represents a defining moment and a founding stone for traumatology, written by a lesser known historical personality, but nonetheless the Renaissance Master of Traumatology. PMID:24173678

  4. Impulsive radon emanation on a creeping segment of the San Andreas fault, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, C.-Y.

    1985-01-01

    Radon emanation was continuously monitored for several months at two locations along a creeping segment of the San Andreas fault in central California. The recorded emanations showed several impulsive increases that lasted as much as five hours with amplitudes considerably larger than meteorologically induced diurnal variations. Some of the radon increases were accompanied or followed by earthquakes or fault-creep events. They were possibly the result of some sudden outbursts of relatively radon-rich ground gas, sometimes triggered by crustal deformation or vibration. ?? 1985 Birkha??user Verlag.

  5. Aseismic Slip Events along the Southern San Andreas Fault System Captured by Radar Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, P

    2001-10-01

    A seismic slip is observed along several faults in the Salton Sea and southernmost Landers rupture zone regions using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data spanning different time periods between 1992 and 1997. In the southernmost Landers rupture zone, projecting south from the Pinto Mountain Fault, sharp discontinuities in the interferometric phase are observed along the sub-parallel Burnt Mountain and Eureka Peak Faults beginning three months after the Landers earthquake and is interpreted to be post-Landers after-slip. Abrupt phase offsets are also seen along the two southernmost contiguous 11 km Durmid Hill and North Shore segments of the San Andreas Fault with an abrupt termination of slip near the northern end of the North Shore Segment. A sharp phase offset is seen across 20 km of the 30 km-long Superstition Hills Fault before phase decorrelation in the Imperial Valley along the southern 10 km of the fault prevents coherent imaging by InSAR. A time series of deformation interferograms suggest most of this slip occurred between 1993 and 1995 and none of it occurred between 1992 and 1993. A phase offset is also seen along a 5 km central segment of the Coyote Creek fault that forms a wedge with an adjoining northeast-southwest trending conjugate fault. Most of the slip observed on the southern San Andreas and Superstition Hills Faults occurred between 1993 and 1995--no slip is observed in the 92-93 interferograms. These slip events, especially the Burnt Mountain and Eureka Peak events, are inferred to be related to stress redistribution from the June, 1992 M{sub w} = 7.3 Landers earthquake. Best-fit elastic models of the San Andreas and Superstition Hills slip events suggest source mechanisms with seismic moments over three orders of magnitude larger than a maximum possible summation of seismic moments from all seismicity along each fault segment during the entire 4.8-year time interval spanned by the InSAR data. Aseismic moment releases of this

  6. Deformation rates across the San Andreas Fault system, central California determined by geology and geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, Sarah J.

    The San Andreas fault system is a transpressional plate boundary characterized by sub-parallel dextral strike-slip faults separating internally deformed crustal blocks in central California. Both geodetic and geologic tools were used to understand the short- and long-term partitioning of deformation in both the crust and the lithospheric mantle across the plate boundary system. GPS data indicate that the short-term discrete deformation rate is ˜28 mm/yr for the central creeping segment of the San Andreas fault and increases to 33 mm/yr at +/-35 km from the fault. This gradient in deformation rates is interpreted to reflect elastic locking of the creeping segment at depth, distributed off-fault deformation, or some combination of these two mechanisms. These short-term fault-parallel deformation rates are slower than the expected geologic slip rate and the relative plate motion rate. Structural analysis of folds and transpressional kinematic modeling were used to quantify long-term distributed deformation adjacent to the Rinconada fault. Folding accommodates approximately 5 km of wrench deformation, which translates to a deformation rate of ˜1 mm/yr since the start of the Pliocene. Integration with discrete offset on the Rinconada fault indicates that this portion of the San Andreas fault system is approximately 80% strike-slip partitioned. This kinematic fold model can be applied to the entire San Andreas fault system and may explain some of the across-fault gradient in deformation rates recorded by the geodetic data. Petrologic examination of mantle xenoliths from the Coyote Lake basalt near the Calaveras fault was used to link crustal plate boundary deformation at the surface with models for the accommodation of deformation in the lithospheric mantle. Seismic anisotropy calculations based on xenolith petrofabrics suggest that an anisotropic mantle layer thickness of 35-85 km is required to explain the observed shear wave splitting delay times in central

  7. Photomosaics and logs of trenches on the San Andreas Fault at Arano Flat near Watsonville, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fumal, Thomas E.; Heingartner, Gordon F.; Samrad, Laura; Dawson, Timothy E.; Hamilton, John C.; Baldwin, John N.

    2004-01-01

    We present photomosaics and logs of the walls of trenches excavated for a paleoseismic study at Arano Flat, one of two sites along the San Andreas fault in the Santa Cruz Mountains on the Kelley-Thompson Ranch. At this location, the fault consists of a narrow zone along the northeast side of a low ridge adjacent to a possible sag pond and extends about 60-70 meters across a broad alluvial flat. This site was a part of Rancho Salsipuedes beginning in 1834 and was purchased by the present owner’s family in 1851.

  8. Photomosaics and logs of trenches on the San Andreas Fault at Mill Canyon near Watsonville, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fumal, Thomas E.; Dawson, Timothy E.; Flowers, Rebecca; Hamilton, John C.; Heingartner, Gordon F.; Kessler, James; Samrad, Laura

    2004-01-01

    We present photomosaics and logs of the walls of trenches excavated for a paleoseismic study at Mill Canyon, one of two sites along the San Andreas fault in the Santa Cruz Mtns. on the Kelley-Thompson Ranch. This site was a part of Rancho Salsipuedes begining in 1834. It was purchased by the present owner’s family in 1851. Remnants of a cabin/mill operations still exist up the canyon dating from 1908 when the area was logged. At this location, faulting has moved a shutter ridge across the mouth of Mill Canyon ponding Holocene sediment. Recent faulting is confined to a narrow zone near the break in slope.

  9. The accommodation of relative motion at depth on the San Andreas fault system in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prescott, W. H.; Nur, A.

    1981-01-01

    Plate motion below the seismogenic layer along the San Andreas fault system in California is assumed to form by aseismic slip along a deeper extension of the fault or may result from lateral distribution of deformation below the seismogenic layer. The shallow depth of California earthquakes, the depth of the coseismic slip during the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, and the presence of widely separated parallel faults indicate that relative motion is distributed below the seismogenic zone, occurring by inelastic flow rather than by aseismic slip on discrete fault planes.

  10. Structural analysis and risk assessment of the All American pipeline at the San Andreas fault crossing

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, J.D.; Row, D.G.; Drugovich, D.

    1995-12-31

    The All American oil transmission pipeline crosses the San Andreas fault and a series of smaller, associated faults in a fault zone southwest (SW) of Bakersfield, California. The possibility of fault rupture on any of these faults during a major earthquake is a source of concern since such an event could result in pipeline damage or failure. This paper describes the development of a fault displacement risk model, the evaluation of the risk at the All American Pipeline (AAPL) site provided by an initial crossing design, and the evaluation of various alternative designs. A practical alternative design scheme, which significantly reduces the risk of pipeline damage or failure is then recommended.

  11. Photomosaics and logs of trenches on the San Andreas Fault, Thousand Palms Oasis, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fumal, Thomas E.; Frost, William T.; Garvin, Christopher; Hamilton, John C.; Jaasma, Monique; Rymer, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    We present photomosaics and logs of the walls of trenches excavated for a paleoseismic study at Thousand Palms Oasis (Fig. 1). The site is located on the Mission Creek strand of the San Andreas fault zone, one of two major active strands of the fault in the Indio Hills along the northeast margin of the Coachella Valley (Fig. 2). The Coachella Valley section is the most poorly understood major part of the San Andreas fault with regard to slip rate and timing of past large-magnitude earthquakes, and therefore earthquake hazard. No large earthquakes have occurred for more than three centuries, the longest elapsed time for any part of the southern San Andreas fault. In spite of this, the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities (1995) assigned the lowest 30-year conditional probability on the southern San Andreas fault to the Coachella Valley. Models of the behavior of this part of the fault, however, have been based on very limited geologic data. The Thousand Palms Oasis is an attractive location for paleoseismic study primarily because of the well-bedded late Holocene sedimentary deposits with abundant layers of organic matter for radiocarbon dating necessary to constrain the timing of large prehistoric earthquakes. Previous attempts to develop a chronology of paleoearthquakes for the region have been hindered by the scarcity of in-situ 14C-dateable material for age control in this desert environment. Also, the fault in the vicinity of Thousand Palms Oasis consists of a single trace that is well expressed, both geomorphically and as a vegetation lineament (Figs. 2, 3). Results of our investigations are discussed in Fumal et al. (2002) and indicate that four and probably five surface-rupturing earthquakes occurred along this part of the fault during the past 1200 years. The average recurrence time for these earthquakes is 215 ± 25 years, although interevent times may have been as short as a few decades or as long as 400 years. Thus, although the elapsed

  12. Sawtooth segmentation and deformation processes on the southern San Andreas fault, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilham, R.; Williams, P.

    1985-01-01

    Five contiguous 12-13 km fault segments form a sawtooth geometry on the southernmost San Andreas fault. The kinematic and morphologic properties of each segment depend on fault strike, despite differences of strike between segments of as little as 3 degrees. Oblique slip (transpression) of fault segments within the Indio Hills, Mecca Hills and Durmid Hill results from an inferred 8:1 ratio of dextral slip to convergence across the fault zone. Triggered slip and creep are confined almost entirely to transpressive segments of the fault. Durmid Hill has been formed in the last 28 + or - 6 ka by uplift at an average rate of 3 + or - 1 mm/a.

  13. SEISMIC-REFRACTION PROFILE ACROSS THE SAN ANDREAS, SARGENT, AND CALAVERAS FAULTS, WEST-CENTRAL CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mooney, Walter D.; Colburn, Robert H.

    1985-01-01

    Geophysical studies of the upper crustal structure of west-central California are important for the further understanding of the geologic structure and tectonics in this seismically active region. In 1981, the United States Geological Survey recorded a seismic-refraction profile across the southern Santa Cruz Mountains in west-central California to examine the shallow velocity structure of this seismogenic region. This 40-km-long profile, which consisted of three shotpoints, extended northeastward from near Watsonville, California, to Coyote Lake, crossing the San Andreas, Sargent, and Calaveras faults. Refs.

  14. Stress near geometrically complex strike-slip faults - Application to the San Andreas fault at Cajon Pass, southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saucier, Francois; Humphreys, Eugene; Weldon, Ray, II

    1992-01-01

    A model is presented to rationalize the state of stress near a geometrically complex major strike-slip fault. Slip on such a fault creates residual stresses that, with the occurrence of several slip events, can dominate the stress field near the fault. The model is applied to the San Andreas fault near Cajon Pass. The results are consistent with the geological features, seismicity, the existence of left-lateral stress on the Cleghorn fault, and the in situ stress orientation in the scientific well, found to be sinistral when resolved on a plane parallel to the San Andreas fault. It is suggested that the creation of residual stresses caused by slip on a wiggle San Andreas fault is the dominating process there.

  15. Complex fault interactions in a restraining bend on the San Andreas fault, southern Santa Cruz Mountains, California

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.Y.; Orange, D.L.; Anderson, R.S. )

    1990-07-01

    The unusual oblique thrust mechanism of the October 18, 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake focused attention on the complex tectonic setting of this segment of the San Andreas Fault. Near the mainshock epicenter, the San Andreas Fault curves to the left defining a restraining bend. The large thrust component of the mainshock focal mechanism is consistent with the horizontal compression expected across restraining bends. However, repeated Loma Prieta type earthquakes cannot exclusively produce the observed topography of the southern Santa Cruz Mountains, the highest point of which experienced subsidence during the 1989 earthquake. In this paper, the authors integrate seismic, geomorphic and tectonic data to investigate the possibility that motions on faults adjacent to the San Andreas Fault play an important role in producing the observed topography. The three-dimensional geometry of active faults in this region is imaged using the Loma Prieta preshock and aftershock sequences. The most conspicuous features of the fault geometries at depth are: (1) the presence of two distinct zones of seismicity corresponding to the San Andreas and the Sargent-Berrocal Fault Zones, (2) the concave upward shape of the Loma Prieta rupture surface, (3) the reduction in dip of the deepest portions of the rupture plane as the mainshock hypocenter is approached, (4) the apparent transfer of shallow slip in some areas from faults in the San Andreas Fault Zone to those in the Sargent-Berrocal Fault Zone, and (5) the presence of a deep northeasterly dipping plane associated with the Sargent-Berrocal Fault Zone. The authors find that a model of fault interactions which involves displacement on faults in both the San Andreas and the Sargent-Berrocal Fault Zones is consistent with Loma Prieta coseismic displacements, preshock and aftershock seismicity and observed topography.

  16. Near-field stress and pore pressure observations along the Carrizo Plain segment of the San Andreas fault in California

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, D.A.; Hickman, S.H.

    1996-12-31

    Preliminary observations of wellbore breakouts from 9 wells drilled to depths approaching 5 km and located within 3-10 km of the San Andreas fault in the Carrizo Plain area indicate maximum principal stress orientations (SHmax) 30-40{degrees} from the fault trend, consistent with high shear stress resolved unto the fault. Analysis of stress orientation data from additional wells located >10 km from the fault confirm previous observations that SHmax stresses are at high angles to the fault trend, consistent with low shear stress on the San Andreas. We suggest that the overall variation in shear stresses resolved onto the fault may be depth dependent, with greater shear stress at shallower depths. Alternatively, these stress rotations observed in the vicinity of the San Andreas might also reflect the influence of local secondary faulting and folding, variations in lithology and/or slip heterogeneties associated with the 1857 M8+ Fort Tejon earthquake. Estimates of crustal pore pressure inferred from drilling mud-weights and drill-stem tests from wells in the vicinity (<10 km) of the San Andreas fault indicate near-hydrostatic conditions to depths of about 5 km. However, 20-30 km from the San Andreas fault and within the central portions of the southern San Joaquin Valley, crustal pore pressures approach 60% of the lithostatic load starting at about 3.5 km depth. Thus, our data close to the fault suggests that elevated fluid pressures within the fault zone, as proposed to explain the long-term low-strength of the San Andreas, either do not penetrate far into the adjacent crust and/or are confined largely to deeper portions of the fault zone.

  17. Near-field stress and pore pressure observations along the Carrizo Plain segment of the San Andreas fault in California

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, D.A. ); Hickman, S.H. )

    1996-01-01

    Preliminary observations of wellbore breakouts from 9 wells drilled to depths approaching 5 km and located within 3-10 km of the San Andreas fault in the Carrizo Plain area indicate maximum principal stress orientations (SHmax) 30-40[degrees] from the fault trend, consistent with high shear stress resolved unto the fault. Analysis of stress orientation data from additional wells located >10 km from the fault confirm previous observations that SHmax stresses are at high angles to the fault trend, consistent with low shear stress on the San Andreas. We suggest that the overall variation in shear stresses resolved onto the fault may be depth dependent, with greater shear stress at shallower depths. Alternatively, these stress rotations observed in the vicinity of the San Andreas might also reflect the influence of local secondary faulting and folding, variations in lithology and/or slip heterogeneties associated with the 1857 M8+ Fort Tejon earthquake. Estimates of crustal pore pressure inferred from drilling mud-weights and drill-stem tests from wells in the vicinity (<10 km) of the San Andreas fault indicate near-hydrostatic conditions to depths of about 5 km. However, 20-30 km from the San Andreas fault and within the central portions of the southern San Joaquin Valley, crustal pore pressures approach 60% of the lithostatic load starting at about 3.5 km depth. Thus, our data close to the fault suggests that elevated fluid pressures within the fault zone, as proposed to explain the long-term low-strength of the San Andreas, either do not penetrate far into the adjacent crust and/or are confined largely to deeper portions of the fault zone.

  18. Structure and Composition of the San Andreas Fault at Seismogenic Depths: Recent Results from the SAFOD Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, S.; Zoback, M.; Ellsworth, W.; Kirschner, D.; Solum, J.

    2004-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) was drilled into the San Andreas Fault Zone to study the physics of earthquake nucleation and rupture and determine the composition, physical properties, and mechanical behavior of an active, plate-bounding fault at seismogenic depths. SAFOD is located 10 km NW of Parkfield, CA, and penetrates a section of the fault that is moving through a combination of repeating microearthquakes and fault creep. During Phases 1 and 2 in the summers of 2004 and 2005, SAFOD was drilled vertically to a depth of 1.5 km and then deviated to penetrate the active San Andreas Fault Zone at a vertical depth of about 2.7 km. During Phase 3 in the summer of 2007, cores were acquired from holes branching off the main SAFOD borehole to directly sample fault and country rocks at depth. Geophysical logs and cuttings analyses conducted during Phases 1 and 2 define the San Andreas Fault Zone to be relatively broad (~250 m), containing several discrete, highly localized zones only 2-3 m wide that exhibit very low P- and S-wave velocities and low resistivity. Two of these zones have progressively deformed the cemented casing at measured depths of 3194 m and 3301 m, indicating that they are actively creeping shear zones. These active shear zones were targeted for coring during Phase 3. The 3194 m casing deformation zone lies ~100 m above a cluster of repeating M2 earthquakes that form the southwestern boundary of the creeping and microseismically active San Andreas Fault Zone. Casing deformation is most pronounced across the 3301 m zone; hence this zone is believed to accommodate most of the current creep deformation across the San Andreas Fault at this location. During Phase 3 we have obtained core from just outside the geologically defined San Andreas Fault Zone, at the boundary between the Salinian and Great Valley/Franciscan terranes, and from the active deformation zones at 3194 and 3301 m. The cores obtained from these deformation zones

  19. Structure and Composition of the San Andreas Fault at Seismogenic Depths: Recent Results from the SAFOD Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, S.; Zoback, M.; Ellsworth, W.; Kirschner, D.; Solum, J.

    2007-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) was drilled into the San Andreas Fault Zone to study the physics of earthquake nucleation and rupture and determine the composition, physical properties, and mechanical behavior of an active, plate-bounding fault at seismogenic depths. SAFOD is located 10 km NW of Parkfield, CA, and penetrates a section of the fault that is moving through a combination of repeating microearthquakes and fault creep. During Phases 1 and 2 in the summers of 2004 and 2005, SAFOD was drilled vertically to a depth of 1.5 km and then deviated to penetrate the active San Andreas Fault Zone at a vertical depth of about 2.7 km. During Phase 3 in the summer of 2007, cores were acquired from holes branching off the main SAFOD borehole to directly sample fault and country rocks at depth. Geophysical logs and cuttings analyses conducted during Phases 1 and 2 define the San Andreas Fault Zone to be relatively broad (~250 m), containing several discrete, highly localized zones only 2-3 m wide that exhibit very low P- and S-wave velocities and low resistivity. Two of these zones have progressively deformed the cemented casing at measured depths of 3194 m and 3301 m, indicating that they are actively creeping shear zones. These active shear zones were targeted for coring during Phase 3. The 3194 m casing deformation zone lies ~100 m above a cluster of repeating M2 earthquakes that form the southwestern boundary of the creeping and microseismically active San Andreas Fault Zone. Casing deformation is most pronounced across the 3301 m zone; hence this zone is believed to accommodate most of the current creep deformation across the San Andreas Fault at this location. During Phase 3 we have obtained core from just outside the geologically defined San Andreas Fault Zone, at the boundary between the Salinian and Great Valley/Franciscan terranes, and from the active deformation zones at 3194 and 3301 m. The cores obtained from these deformation zones

  20. Fault coupling and potential for earthquakes on the creeping section of the central San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Jeremy; Johnson, Kaj

    2014-05-01

    The 150 km long central section of the San Andreas Fault (CSAF) in central California creeps at the surface and has not produced a large earthquake historically. However, sections of the San Andreas Fault to the north and south are known to have ruptured repeatedly in M~7-8 earthquakes. It is currently unclear whether the creeping CSAF could rupture in large earthquakes, either individually or along with earthquakes on the locked sections to the north and south. We invert Global Positioning System and interferometric synthetic aperture radar data with elastic block models to estimate the degree of locking on the CSAF and place bounds on the moment accumulation rate on the fault. We find that the inferred moment accumulation rate is highly dependent on the long-term fault slip rate, which is poorly constrained along the CSAF. The inferred moment accumulation rate, normalized by shear modulus, ranges from 3.28 × 104 to 5.85 × 107 m3/yr, which is equivalent to a Mw = 5.5-7.2 earthquake every 150 years for a long-term slip rate of 26 mm/yr and Mw = 7.3-7.65 for a long-term slip rate of 34 mm/yr. The comparisons of slip distributions with microseismicity and repeating earthquakes indicate a possible locked patch between 10 and 20 km depth on the CSAF that could potentially rupture with Mw = 6.5.

  1. Geodimeter measurements of slip and strain accumulation along the san andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Prescott, W.H.

    1974-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducts repeated geodimeter surveys of trilateration networks in central California in order to study the processes of slip and strain accumulation along the San Andreas fault. The precision of distance measurement is described by a standard deviation ?? = (a2 + b2L2) 1 2 where a = 3mm, b = 2 ?? 10-7, and L is the line length. Within the precision of measurement, no anomalous strain episodes preceding earthquakes or even strain discontinuities at the time of earthquakes were detected from repeated measurements of lines near the epicenters of small (magnitude 4.5-5.1) earthquakes. Annual measurements of small (5-km aperture) strain polygons near the San Andreas fault have not proved strain accumulation in a 3-year period. Repeated measurements of longer lines over periods of 8 to 14 years indicate changes that cannot be attributed to fault slip and must represent strain accumulation at the level of a few parts in 107 per year. ?? 1974.

  2. Andreas Vesalius 500 years--A Renaissance that revolutionized cardiovascular knowledge.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Souza Júnior, Celso Vale de; Ferreira, Thiago Reigado

    2015-01-01

    The history of medicine and cardiology is marked by some geniuses who dared in thinking, research, teaching and transmitting scientific knowledge, and the Italian Andreas Vesalius one of these brilliant masters. His main scientific work "De Humani Corporis Fabrica" is not only a landmark study of human anatomy but also an artistic work of high aesthetic quality published in 1543. In the year 2014 we celebrated 500 years since the birth of the brilliant professor of Padua University, who with his courage and sense of observation changed the understanding of cardiovascular anatomy and founded a school to date in innovative education and research of anatomy. By identifying "the anatomical errors" present in Galen's book and speech, he challenged the dogmas of the Catholic Church, the academic world and the doctors of his time. However, the accuracy of his findings and his innovative way to disseminate them among his students and colleagues was essential so that his contributions are considered by many the landmark of modern medicine. His death is still surrounded by mysteries having different hypotheses, but a certainty, suffered sanctions of the Catholic Church for the spread of their ideas. The cardiologists, cardiovascular surgeons, interventional cardiologists, electrophysiologists and cardiovascular imaginologists must know the legacy of genius Andreas Vesalius that changed the paradigm of human anatomy. PMID:26107459

  3. Tremor-tide correlations and near-lithostatic pore pressure on the deep San Andreas fault.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Amanda M; Nadeau, Robert M; Bürgmann, Roland

    2009-12-24

    Since its initial discovery nearly a decade ago, non-volcanic tremor has provided information about a region of the Earth that was previously thought incapable of generating seismic radiation. A thorough explanation of the geologic process responsible for tremor generation has, however, yet to be determined. Owing to their location at the plate interface, temporal correlation with geodetically measured slow-slip events and dominant shear wave energy, tremor observations in southwest Japan have been interpreted as a superposition of many low-frequency earthquakes that represent slip on a fault surface. Fluids may also be fundamental to the failure process in subduction zone environments, as teleseismic and tidal modulation of tremor in Cascadia and Japan and high Poisson ratios in both source regions are indicative of pressurized pore fluids. Here we identify a robust correlation between extremely small, tidally induced shear stress parallel to the San Andreas fault and non-volcanic tremor activity near Parkfield, California. We suggest that this tremor represents shear failure on a critically stressed fault in the presence of near-lithostatic pore pressure. There are a number of similarities between tremor in subduction zone environments, such as Cascadia and Japan, and tremor on the deep San Andreas transform, suggesting that the results presented here may also be applicable in other tectonic settings. PMID:20033046

  4. Ground-squirrel mounds and related patterned ground along the San Andreas Fault in Central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    Extensive areas of mound topography and related patterned ground, apparently derived from the mounds of the California Ground Squirrel (Spermophilus beecheyi beecheyi), are in central California.  The relation of patterned ground to the San Andreas fault west of Bakersfield may provide insight into the timing of deformation along the fault as well as the history of ground squirrels.  Mound topography appears to have evolved through several stages from scattered mounds currently being constructed on newly deposited alluvial surfaces, to saturation of areas by mounds, followed by coalescence, elongation and lineation of the mounds.  Elongation, coalescence and modification of the mounds has been primarily by wind, but to a lesser extent by drainage and solifluction.  A time frame including ages of 4,000, 10,500, 29,000, and 73,000 years BP is derived by relating the patterns to slip on the San Andreas fault.  Further relating of the patterns to faulting, tilting, and warping may illuminate details of the rates and history of deformation.  Similarly, relating the patterns to the history of ground squirrel activity may help answer such problems as rates of dispersal and limits on population density.

  5. Seismic images of the deep structure of the San Andreas fault system, central coast ranges, California

    SciTech Connect

    Zandt, G.

    1981-06-10

    Three-dimensional inversion of teleseimic P wave travel time residuals recorded at the U.S. Geological Survey central California array has resolved small-scale (approx.tens of kilometers) crustal and upper mantle heterogeneity down to depths of 90 km beneath the California coast ranges. Upper crustal lateral velocity variations of +- 8% correlate closely with surface geology. Lower-than-average velocities are associated with thick Tertiary sedimentary fill and higher-than-average velocities with basement exposures. Lower crustal velocity heterogeneity of +- 4% appear to reflect crustal thickness variations. A thinner crust is indicated southwest of the San Andreas fault and northwest of San Pablo Bay. A linear zone of low-velocities (0 to -40%) subparallel to the San Andreas fault was resolved in the upper mantle. The preferred interpretation is that the low-velocities indicate a narrow upwarp of asthenosphere to unusually shallow depths (approx.45 km) beneath the coast ranges. Such an unusual upper mantle structure may have been produced by the northwestward migration along the California coast of a transiently unstable Mendocino triple junction. The inversion results also indicate the possibility of partial decoupling of the crust from the upper mantle.

  6. Isotope constraints on the involvement of fluids in the San Andreas Fault System, California

    SciTech Connect

    Pili, E.; Kennedy, B.M.; Conrad, S.M.; Gratier, J.-P.; Poitrasson, F.

    1998-07-01

    Fluids are suspected to play a major role in earthquake mechanics, especially in the case of the weak San Andreas Fault (SAF). Models developed to explain the weakness of the fault are similar but rely on different fluid sources. A recent study of groundwaters associated with the SAF has provided evidence for a geopressured mantle fluid source (Kennedy et al., 1997). We present here an isotope study comparing deformation zones (gouges, breccias, fault veins, slickensides, cataclasites), and vein fillings with their hosts and the fluids associated with these materials, as sampled by fluid inclusions. We are investigating ca. 250 samples from over 20 localities along the San Andreas and adjacent faults from South San Francisco to East Los Angeles. Samples from the exhumed San Gabriel Fault, a deeper equivalent of the SAF, are included as well as samples from the Santa Ynez Fault, another former strand of the SAF embedded in Miocene limestones. All the major lithologies (granites, gneisses, sandstones, limestones, marbles and serpentinites) have been sampled for isotope analyses of C, O, H, He, Ne, Ar, Sr, Nd, and Pb.

  7. Layered crustal anisotropy around the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audet, Pascal

    2015-05-01

    The rheology of the Earth's crust controls the long-term and short-term strength and stability of plate boundary faults and depends on the architecture and physical properties of crustal materials. In this paper we examine the seismic structure and anisotropy of the crust around the San Andreas Fault (SAF) near Parkfield, California, using teleseismic receiver functions. These data indicate that the crust is characterized by spatially variable and strongly anisotropic upper and middle crustal layers, with a Moho at ˜35 km depth. The upper layer is ˜5-10 km thick and is characterized by strong (≥30%) anisotropy with a slow axis of hexagonal symmetry, where the plane of fast velocity has a strike parallel to that of the SAF and a dip of ˜40∘. We interpret this layer as pervasive fluid-filled microcracks within the brittle deformation regime. The ˜10-15 km thick midcrustal layer is also characterized by a weak axis of hexagonal symmetry with ≥20% anisotropy, but the dip direction of the plane of fast velocity is reversed. The midcrustal anisotropic layer is more prominent to the northeast of the San Andreas Fault. We interpret the mid crustal anisotropic layer as fossilized fabric within fluid-rich foliated mica schists. When combined with various other geophysical observations, our results suggest that fault creep behavior around Parkfield is favored by intrinsically weak and overpressured crustal fabric.

  8. Slow and Go: Pulsing slip rates on the creeping section of the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Ryan C.; Shirzaei, Manoochehr; Nadeau, Robert M.; Bürgmann, Roland

    2015-08-01

    Rising and falling slip rates on the creeping section of the San Andreas Fault have been inferred from variations of recurrence intervals of characteristically repeating microearthquakes, but this observation has not previously been confirmed using modern geodetic data. Here we report on observations of this "pulsing" slip obtained from advanced multitemporal interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data, confirmed using continuous GPS sites of the Plate Boundary Observatory. The surface deformation time series show a strong correlation to the previously documented slip rate variations derived from repeating earthquakes on the fault interface, at various spatial and temporal scales. Time series and spectral analyses of repeating earthquake and InSAR data reveal a quasiperiodic pulsing with a roughly 2 year period along some sections of the fault, with the earthquakes on the fault interface lagging behind the far-field deformation by about 6 months. This suggests a temporal delay between the pulsing crustal strain generated by deep-seated shear and the time-variable slip on the shallow fault interface, and that at least in some places this process may be cyclical. There exist potential impacts for time-dependent seismic hazard forecasting in California and, as it becomes better validated in the richly instrumented natural laboratory of the central San Andreas Fault, the process used here will be even more helpful in characterizing hazard and fault zone rheology in areas without California's geodetic infrastructure.

  9. Nonlinear strain buildup and the earthquake cycle on the San Andreas Fault

    SciTech Connect

    Thatcher, W.

    1983-07-10

    Two contrasting models of the earthquake deformation cycle on strike slip faults predict significant temporal declines in shear strain rate near the fault, accompanied by a progressive broadening of the zone of deformation adjacent to it. In the thin lithosphere model, transient deformation results from flow in the asthenosphere due to stress relaxation following faulting through most or all of the lithosphere. For an earth model with a thick elastic lithosphere (plate thickness >> depth of seismic slip), transient motions are due to postearthquake aseismic slip below the coseismic fault plane. Data from the San Andreas fault indicate a long-term temporal decrease in strain rate that persists for at least 30 years and may extend through the entire earthquake cycle. Observations support a cycle-long rate decrease and a temporal spreading of the deformation profile only if movement cycles on the northern and southern locked sections of the fault are basically similar. If so, the usually lower strain rates and broader deformation zone currently observed on the sourthern San Andreas represent a later evolutionary stage of the northern locked section, where a great earthquake is a more recent occurrence. Although the data allow some extreme models to be discarded, no sufficiently strong constraints exist to decide between the thin and thick lithosphere models. Regardless of the appropriate model the geodetic observations themselves indicate that strain buildup is sufficiently nonlinear to cause signficant departures fromm recurrence estimates based on linear strain accumulation and the time-predictable model.

  10. San Andreas fault zone drilling project: scientific objectives and technological challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickman, Stephen; Younker, Leland; Zobeck, Mark; Cooper, George

    1994-01-01

    We are leading a new international initiative to conduct scientific drilling within the San Andreas fault zone at depths of up to 10 km. This project is motivated by the need to understand the physical and chemical processes operating within the fault zone and to answer fundamental questions about earthquake generation along major plate-boundary faults. Through an integrated program of coring, fluid sampling, in-situ and laboratory experimentation and long-term monitoring, we hope to provide fundamental constraints on the structure, composition, mechanical behavior and physical state of the San Andreas fault system at depths comparable to the nucleation zones of great earthquakes. The drilling, sampling and observational requirements needed to ensure the success of this project are stringent. These include: 1) drilling stable vertical holes to depths of about 9 km in fractured rock at temperatures of up to 300??C; 2) continuous coring of inclined holes branched off these vertical boreholes to intersect the fault at depths of 3, 6 and 9 km; 3) conducting sophisticated borehole geophysical measurements and fluid/rock sampling at high temperatures and pressures; and 4) instrumenting some or all of these inclined core holes for continuous monitoring of seismicity and a broad range of physical and chemical properties over periods of up to several decades. For all of these tasks, because of the overpressured clay-rich formations anticipated within the fault zone at depth, we expect to encounter difficult drilling, coring and hole-completion conditions in the regions of greatest scientific interest.

  11. San Andreas fault zone drilling project: scientific objectives and technological challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickman, S.H.; Younker, L.W.; Zoback, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    We are leading a new international initiative to conduct scientific drilling within the San Andreas fault zone at depths of up to 10 km. This project is motivated by the need to understand the physical and chemical processes operating within the fault zone and to answer fundamental questions about earthquake generation along major plate-boundary faults. Through a comprehensive program of coring, fluid sampling, downhole measurements, laboratory experimentation, and long-term monitoring, we hope to obtain critical information on the structure, composition, mechanical behavior and physical state of the San Andreas fault system at depths comparable to the nucleation zones of great earthquakes. The drilling, sampling and observational requirements needed to ensure the success of this project are stringent. These include: 1) drilling stable vertical holes to depths of about 9 km in fractured rock at temperatures of up to 300°C; 2) continuous coring and completion of inclined holes branched off these vertical boreholes to intersect the fault at depths of 3, 6, and 9 km; 3) conducting sophisticated borehole geophysical measurements and fluid/rock sampling at high temperatures and pressures; and 4) instrumenting some or all of these inclined core holes for continuous monitoring of earthquake activity, fluid pressure, deformation and other parameters for periods of up to several decades. For all of these tasks, because of the overpressured clay-rich formations anticipated within the fault zone at depth, we expect to encounter difficult drilling, coring and hole-completion conditions in the region of greatest scientific interest.

  12. Paragenesis and tectonic significance of base and precious metal occurrences along the San Andreas fault at Point Delgada, California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, R.J.; Sorg, D.H.; Morton, J.L.; Theodore, T.G.; Meyer, C.E.; Delevaux, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The mineralogy, geochemistry and origin of sulphide veins along cross faults in the San Andreas fault system are described and cited for a natural history of local plate tectonics and for 'a detailed understanding of the role of major strike-slip faults in the formation and tectonic translation of hydrothermal ore deposits'. -G.J.N.

  13. A critical evaluation of crustal dehydration as the cause of an overpressured and weak San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulton, P.M.; Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.

    2009-01-01

    Many plate boundary faults, including the San Andreas Fault, appear to slip at unexpectedly low shear stress. One long-standing explanation for a "weak" San Andreas Fault is that fluid release by dehydration reactions during regional metamorphism generates elevated fluid pressures that are localized within the fault, reducing the effective normal stress. We evaluate this hypothesis by calculating realistic fluid production rates for the San Andreas Fault system, and incorporating them into 2-D fluid flow models. Our results show that for a wide range of permeability distributions, fluid sources from crustal dehydration are too small and short-lived to generate, sustain, or localize fluid pressures in the fault sufficient to explain its apparent mechanical weakness. This suggests that alternative mechanisms, possibly acting locally within the fault zone, such as shear compaction or thermal pressurization, may be necessary to explain a weak San Andreas Fault. More generally, our results demonstrate the difficulty of localizing large fluid pressures generated by regional processes within near-vertical fault zones. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  14. M ≥ 7.0 earthquake recurrence on the San Andreas fault from a stress renewal model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

     Forecasting M ≥ 7.0 San Andreas fault earthquakes requires an assessment of their expected frequency. I used a three-dimensional finite element model of California to calculate volumetric static stress drops from scenario M ≥ 7.0 earthquakes on three San Andreas fault sections. The ratio of stress drop to tectonic stressing rate derived from geodetic displacements yielded recovery times at points throughout the model volume. Under a renewal model, stress recovery times on ruptured fault planes can be a proxy for earthquake recurrence. I show curves of magnitude versus stress recovery time for three San Andreas fault sections. When stress recovery times were converted to expected M ≥ 7.0 earthquake frequencies, they fit Gutenberg-Richter relationships well matched to observed regional rates of M ≤ 6.0 earthquakes. Thus a stress-balanced model permits large earthquake Gutenberg-Richter behavior on an individual fault segment, though it does not require it. Modeled slip magnitudes and their expected frequencies were consistent with those observed at the Wrightwood paleoseismic site if strict time predictability does not apply to the San Andreas fault.

  15. The San Andreas fault in the San Francisco Bay region, California: Structure and kinematics of a Young plate boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jachens, R.C.; Zoback, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    Recently acquired high-resolution aeromagnetic data delineate offset and/or truncated magnetic rock bodies of the Franciscan Complex that define the location and structure of, and total offset across, the San Andreas fault in the San Francisco Bay region. Two distinctive magnetic anomalies caused by ultramafic rocks and metabasalts east of, and truncated at, the San Andreas fault have clear counterparts west of the fault that indicate a total right-lateral offset of only 22 km on the Peninsula segment, the active strand that ruptured in 1906. The location of the Peninsula segment is well defined magnetically on the northern peninsula where it goes offshore, and can be traced along strike an additional ~6 km to the northwest. Just offshore from Lake Merced, the inferred fault trace steps right (northeast) 3 km onto a nearly parallel strand that can be traced magnetically northwest more than 20 km as the linear northeast edge of a magnetic block bounded by the San Andreas fault, the Pilarcitos fault, and the San Gregorio-Hosgri fault zone. This right-stepping strand, the Golden Gate segment, joins the eastern mapped trace of the San Andreas fault at Bolinas Lagoon and projects back onshore to the southeast near Lake Merced. Inversion of detailed gravity data on the San Francisco Peninsula reveals a 3 km wide basin situated between the two strands of the San Andreas fault, floored by Franciscan basement and filled with Plio-Quaternary sedimentary deposits of the Merced and Colma formations. The basin, ~1 km deep at the coast, narrows and becomes thinner to the southeast along the fault over a distance of ~12 km. The length, width, and location of the basin between the two strands are consistent with a pull-apart basin formed behind the right step in the right-lateral strike-slip San Andreas fault system and currently moving southeast with the North American plate. Slight nonparallelism of the two strands bounding the basin (implying a small component of convergence

  16. The San Andreas Fault: A state of stress analysis in central and northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Ann-Sophie

    The San Andreas Fault system is a network of faults extending from the Gulf of California to the Mendocino Triple Junction that accommodates the motion between the North American and Pacific tectonic plates. The faults' types, slip rates and distributions of seismicity varies from south to north; the question addressed by this dissertation is whether or not the mechanical behavior of this plate boundary varies as well. We used suites of fault plane solutions of earthquakes occurring in central and northern California, and inverted them for the best stress tensors. We obtained a map of stress orientations close to and far away from the major strands of the San Andreas Fault system in these areas. In the creeping zone on the central San Andreas the maximum horizontal compression, S H, is oriented almost perpendicular to the fault trend far away from it and as close as 2 km from it, whereas in the fault zone itself SH lies at a smaller angle to the fault (˜50°). In northern California there is no clear difference between on-fault and off-fault orientations and SH orientations are on average at 55° from the trend of major faults. The Bay Area shows an intermediate behavior between the two just mentioned. This difference in the orientation of SH from central to northern California suggest a change in the mechanical behavior of the plate boundary between these two regions. This situation could be related to the "young and multiple stranded" SAF system in northern California compared to the "old" SAF in central California where much more slip has accumulated on this one fault strand. Using the same data we investigated possible temporal variations in the orientation of SH before and after the occurrence of a major earthquake. Such variations could be related to the stress release produced by the mainshock. For the four events studied, 1986 Mt. Lewis, 1984 Morgan Hill, 1979 Coyote Lake, and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, a rotation of SH to an orientation more normal to

  17. Neogene contraction between the San Andreas fault and the Santa Clara Valley, San Francisco Bay region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Schmidt, K.M.; Jachens, R.C.; Stanley, R.G.; Jayko, A.S.; McDougall, K.A.; Tinsley, J.C.; Valin, Z.C.

    1999-01-01

    In the southern San Francisco Bay region of California, oblique dextral reverse faults that verge northeastward from the San Andreas fault experienced triggered slip during the 1989 M7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake. The role of these range-front thrusts in the evolution of the San Andreas fault system and the future seismic hazard that they may pose to the urban Santa Clara Valley are poorly understood. Based on recent geologic mapping and geophysical investigations, we propose that the range-front thrust system evolved in conjunction with development of the San Andreas fault system. In the early Miocene, the region was dominated by a system of northwestwardly propagating, basin-bounding, transtensional faults. Beginning as early as middle Miocene time, however, the transtensional faulting was superseded by transpressional NE-stepping thrust and reverse faults of the range-front thrust system. Age constraints on the thrust faults indicate that the locus of contraction has focused on the Monte Vista, Shannon, and Berrocal faults since about 4.8 Ma. Fault slip and fold reconstructions suggest that crustal shortening between the San Andreas fault and the Santa Clara Valley within this time frame is ~21%, amounting to as much as 3.2 km at a rate of 0.6 mm/yr. Rates probably have not remained constant; average rates appear to have been much lower in the past few 100 ka. The distribution of coseismic surface contraction during the Loma Prieta earthquake, active seismicity, late Pleistocene to Holocene fluvial terrace warping, and geodetic data further suggest that the active range-front thrust system includes blind thrusts. Critical unresolved issues include information on the near-surface locations of buried thrusts, the timing of recent thrust earthquake events, and their recurrence in relation to earthquakes on the San Andreas fault.

  18. Reinterpretation of the Northern Terminus of the San Andreas Transform System: Implications for basin development and hydrocarbon exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Foland, S.S. ); Enzor, K.J. )

    1994-07-01

    The northern San Andreas transform system was studied to evaluate the tectonic history of offshore Point Arena basin, northern California. The Point Arena basin lies 250 km north of San Francisco and encompasses 8500 km[sup 2] on the outer continental shelf. It is a tertiary basin formed during Eocene subduction and overprinted by Pliocene-Pleistocene strike-slip motion of the San Andreas fault system. Interpretation of the data yields a new tectonic model for the northern San Andreas fault system and Point Arena basin. Previous models curved the fault system east parallel to the coast, intersecting faults exposed on Point Delgada, and then bending the fault sharply west to join the Mendocino triple junction. The new model projects the San Andreas fault system due northwest, straight into the offshore basin, as a series of parallel faults aligned with the onshore fault trace to directly intersect the triple junction. The new interpretation is supported by aeromagnetic data, which indicates the basin is divided by a major northwest-trending structural boundary and floored by two distinct basement types (Mesozoic Salinian granies and Jurassic Franciscan metasediments). The latest seismic data contain enough information to determine the genesis and orientation of the offshore fault system and associated folds. Basin modeling indicates hydrocarbon generation has occurred in the Miocene source beds. The model estimates the Point Arena basin contains multibillion barrel potential trapped in large antiforms associated with the through-going San Andreas system. Integration of all geotechnical data allowed reinterpretation of the tectonic history, and produced an enhanced understanding of Point Arena basin.

  19. A 100-year average recurrence interval for the San Andreas fault at Wrightwood, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fumal, T.E.; Pezzopane, S.K.; Weldon, R.J., II; Schwartz, D.P.

    1993-01-01

    Evidence for five large earthquakes during the past five centuries along the San Andreas fault zone 70 kilometers northeast of Los Angeles, California, indicates that the average recurrence interval and the temporal variability are significantly smaller than previously thought. Rapid sedimentation during the past 5000 years in a 150-meter-wide structural depression has produced a greater than 21-meter-thick sequence of debris flow and stream deposits interbedded with more than 50 datable peat layers. Fault scarps, colluvial wedges, fissure infills, upward termination of ruptures, and tilted and folded deposits above listric faults provide evidence for large earthquakes that occurred in A.D. 1857, 1812, and about 1700, 1610, and 1470.

  20. Annual modulation of seismicity along the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christiansen, L.B.; Hurwitz, S.; Ingebritsen, S.E.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze seismic data from the San Andreas Fault (SAF) near Parkfield, California, to test for annual modulation in seismicity rates. We use statistical analyses to show that seismicity is modulated with an annual period in the creeping section of the fault and a semiannual period in the locked section of the fault. Although the exact mechanism for seasonal triggering is undetermined, it appears that stresses associated with the hydrologic cycle are sufficient to fracture critically stressed rocks either through pore-pressure diffusion or crustal loading/ unloading. These results shed additional light on the state of stress along the SAF, indicating that hydrologically induced stress perturbations of ???2 kPa may be sufficient to trigger earthquakes.

  1. Andreas Vesalius as a renaissance innovative neuroanatomist: his 5th centenary of birth.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marleide da Mota; Moscovici, Mauricio; Engelhardt, Eliasz

    2015-02-01

    Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) is considered the Father of Modern Anatomy, and an authentic representative of the Renaissance. His studies, founded on dissection of human bodies, differed from Galeno, who based his work on dissection of animals, constituted a notable scientific advance. Putting together science and art, Vesalius associated himself to artists of the Renaissance, and valued the images of the human body in his superb work De Humani Corporis Fabrica.This paper aims to honor this extraordinary European Renaissance physician and anatomist, who used aesthetic appeal to bind text and illustration, science and art. His achievements are highlighted, with an especial attention on neuroanatomy. Aspects about his personal life and career are also focused. PMID:25742586

  2. Andreas Vesalius' 500th Anniversary: Initiation of the Superficial Facial System and Superficial Musculoaponeurotic System Concepts.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Romy J; Hage, J Joris

    2016-02-01

    Because of their relevance for liposuction and rhytidectomies, respectively, the superficial fascial system (SFS) and superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) have been thoroughly studied over the past decennia. Although it is well known that the SMAS concept was introduced by Tessier in 1974, it remains unknown who first properly described the stratum membranosum of the SFS. In light of the 500th birthday of Andreas Vesalius (1515-1564), we searched his 1543 masterwork De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem and related work for references to these structures. We found ample reference to both structures as the membrana carnosa (or fleshy membrane) in his works and concluded that Vesalius recognized the extension, nature, and functions of the stratum membranosum of the SFS, as well as its more musculous differentiation as the SMAS in the head and neck area, and the dartos in the perineogenital area. In doing so, Vesalius recorded most details of the SFS and SMAS concepts avant la lettre. PMID:26761152

  3. Andreas Vesalius' 500th Anniversary: First Description of the Mammary Suspensory Ligaments.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Romy J; Hage, J Joris

    2016-09-01

    Sir Astley Paston Cooper has, to date, been acknowledged to be the first to describe the suspensory ligaments of the breast, or Cooper's ligaments, in 1840. We found these ligaments to be recorded in the first edition of 'De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem' by Andreas Vesalius, published in 1543. To commemorate Vesalius' 500th birthday, we quote and discuss this earlier record. Vesalius' record of the nature and function of the fleshy membrane between mammary gland and pectoral muscle, the hard fat intervening the mammary glands, and the fibers running from the fleshy membrane to the skin are a clear representation of posterior layer of the superficial fascial system, the fibro-adipose stroma surrounding and linking the mammary glandular elements, and the suspensory ligaments as we know them. Vesalius recorded the anatomy and function of the latter structures nearly 300 years before Sir Astley Paston Cooper did. PMID:26943658

  4. Break of slope in earthquake size distribution and creep rate along the San Andreas Fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobieva, Inessa; Shebalin, Peter; Narteau, Clément

    2016-07-01

    Crustal faults accommodate slip either by a succession of earthquakes or continuous slip, and in most instances, both these seismic and aseismic processes coexist. Recorded seismicity and geodetic measurements are therefore two complementary data sets that together document ongoing deformation along active tectonic structures. Here we study the influence of stable sliding on earthquake statistics. We show that creep along the San Andreas Fault is responsible for a break of slope in the earthquake size distribution. This slope increases with an increasing creep rate for larger magnitude ranges, whereas it shows no systematic dependence on creep rate for smaller magnitude ranges. This is interpreted as a deficit of large events under conditions of faster creep where seismic ruptures are less likely to propagate. These results suggest that the earthquake size distribution does not only depend on the level of stress but also on the type of deformation.

  5. A 100-year average recurrence interval for the san andreas fault at wrightwood, california.

    PubMed

    Fumal, T E; Schwartz, D P; Pezzopane, S K; Weldon, R J

    1993-01-01

    Evidence for five large earthquakes during the past five centuries along the San Andreas fault zone 70 kilometers northeast of Los Angeles, California, indicates that the average recurrence interval and the temporal variability are significantly smaller than previously thought. Rapid sedimentation during the past 5000 years in a 150-meter-wide structural depression has produced a greater than 21-meter-thick sequence of debris flow and stream deposits interbedded with more than 50 datable peat layers. Fault scarps, colluvial wedges, fissure infills, upward termination of ruptures, and tilted and folded deposits above listric faults provide evidence for large earthquakes that occurred in A.D. 1857, 1812, and about 1700, 1610, and 1470. PMID:17790984

  6. Evidence for chaotic fault interactions in the seismicity of the San Andreas fault and Nankai trough

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jie; Turcotte, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamical behavior introduced by fault interactions is examined here using a simple spring-loaded, slider-block model with velocity-weakening friction. The model consists of two slider blocks coupled to each other and to a constant-velocity driver by elastic springs. For an asymmetric system in which the frictional forces on the two blocks are not equal, the solutions exhibit chaotic behavior. The system's behavior over a range of parameter values seems to be generally analogous to that of weakly coupled segments of an active fault. Similarities between the model simulations and observed patterns of seismicity on the south central San Andreas fault in California and in the Nankai trough along the coast of southwestern Japan.

  7. Geodetic measurement of deformation east of the San Andreas Fault in Central California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauber, Jeanne; Solomon, Sean C.; Lisowski, Michael

    1988-01-01

    The shear strain rates in the Diablo Range of California have been calculated, and the slip rate along the Calaveras and Paicines faults in Central California have been estimated, on the basis of triangulation and trilateration data from two geodetic networks located between the western edge of the Great Valley and the San Andreas Fault. The orientation of the principal compressive strain predicted from the azimuth of the major structures in the region is N 25 deg E, leading to an average shear strain value that corresponds to a relative shortening rate of 4.5 + or - 2.4 mm/yr. It is inferred that the measured strain is due to compression across the fold of this area. The hypothesized uniform, fault-normal compression within the Coast Ranges is not supported by these results.

  8. Clustering and periodic recurrence of microearthquakes on the san andreas fault at parkfield, california.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, R M; Foxall, W; McEvilly, T V

    1995-01-27

    The San Andreas fault at Parkfield, California, apparently late in an interval between repeating magnitude 6 earthquakes, is yielding to tectonic loading partly by seismic slip concentrated in a relatively sparse distribution of small clusters (<20-meter radius) of microearthquakes. Within these clusters, which account for 63% of the earthquakes in a 1987-92 study interval, virtually identical small earthquakes occurred with a regularity that can be described by the statistical model used previously in forecasting large characteristic earthquakes. Sympathetic occurrence of microearthquakes in nearby clusters was observed within a range of about 200 meters at communication speeds of 10 to 100 centimeters per second. The rate of earthquake occurrence, particularly at depth, increased significantly during the study period, but the fraction of earthquakes that were cluster members decreased. PMID:17788785

  9. Periodic, chaotic, and doubled earthquake recurrence intervals on the deep San Andreas fault.

    PubMed

    Shelly, David R

    2010-06-11

    Earthquake recurrence histories may provide clues to the timing of future events, but long intervals between large events obscure full recurrence variability. In contrast, small earthquakes occur frequently, and recurrence intervals are quantifiable on a much shorter time scale. In this work, I examine an 8.5-year sequence of more than 900 recurring low-frequency earthquake bursts composing tremor beneath the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, California. These events exhibit tightly clustered recurrence intervals that, at times, oscillate between approximately 3 and approximately 6 days, but the patterns sometimes change abruptly. Although the environments of large and low-frequency earthquakes are different, these observations suggest that similar complexity might underlie sequences of large earthquakes. PMID:20538948

  10. Steep-dip seismic imaging of the shallow San Andreas fault near Parkfield.

    PubMed

    Hole, J A; Catchings, R D; St Clair, K C; Rymer, M J; Okaya, D A; Carney, B J

    2001-11-16

    Seismic reflection and refraction images illuminate the San Andreas Fault to a depth of 1 kilometer. The prestack depth-migrated reflection image contains near-vertical reflections aligned with the active fault trace. The fault is vertical in the upper 0.5 kilometer, then dips about 70 degrees to the southwest to at least 1 kilometer subsurface. This dip reconciles the difference between the computed locations of earthquakes and the surface fault trace. The seismic velocity cross section shows strong lateral variations. Relatively low velocity (10 to 30%), high electrical conductivity, and low density indicate a 1-kilometer-wide vertical wedge of porous sediment or fractured rock immediately southwest of the active fault trace. PMID:11711672

  11. Variations in strength and slip rate along the san andreas fault system.

    PubMed

    Jones, C H; Wesnousky, S G

    1992-04-01

    Convergence across the San Andreas fault (SAF) system is partitioned between strike-slip motion on the vertical SAF and oblique-slip motion on parallel dip-slip faults, as illustrated by the recent magnitude M(s) = 6.0 Palm Springs, M(s) = 6.7 Coalinga, and M(s) = 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquakes. If the partitioning of slip minimizes the work done against friction, the direction of slip during these recent earthquakes depends primarily on fault dip and indicates that the normal stress coefficient and frictional coefficient (micro) vary among the faults. Additionally, accounting for the active dip-slip faults reduces estimates of fault slip rates along the vertical trace of the SAF by about 50 percent in the Loma Prieta and 100 percent in the North Palm Springs segments. PMID:17802597

  12. Comparative geometry of the San Andreas Fault, California, and laboratory fault zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Diane E.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Textural examination of fault gouge deformed in triaxial friction experiments has revealed differences in the orientations of secondary shear sets between the stably sliding and stick-slip samples. In order to determine whether such differences can be identified in natural faults, maps of recently active breaks along the San Andreas fault were examined to compare the types and orientations of secondary structures mapped in the creeping and locked sections. The fault zone was divided into 52 geometrically defined segments of uniform strike, which were then grouped into 7 sections: 4 straight and two curved sections, and Cholame Valley. Many of the gross geometric characteristics of the individual segments, such as length, width, and stepover size, reflect their position in either a straight or a curved section. In contrast, with respect to the orientations of the recent breaks within the segments, the single creeping section differs from all of the locked sections, both straight and curved. -from Authors

  13. Christian Andreas Doppler: A legendary man inspired by the dazzling light of the stars

    PubMed Central

    Katsi, V; Felekos, I; Kallikazaros, I

    2013-01-01

    Christian Andreas Doppler is renowned primarily for his revolutionary theory of the Doppler effect, which has deeply influenced many areas of modern science and technology, including medicine. His work has laid the foundations for modern ultrasonography and his ideas are still inspiring discoveries more than a hundred years after his death. Doppler may well earn the title of Homo Universalis for his broad knowledge of physics, mathematics and astronomy and most of all for his indefatigable investigations for new ideas and his ingenious mind. According to Bolzano: “It is hard to believe how fruitful a genius Austria has in this man”. His legacy of scientific achievement have seen Doppler honoured in the later years on coinage and money, names of streets, educational institutions, rock groups, even of a lunar crater; while the ultimate tribute to his work is the countless references to the homonymous medical eponym. PMID:24376313

  14. Steep-dip seismic imaging of the shallow San Andreas Fault near Parkfield

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hole, J.A.; Catchings, R.D.; St. Clair, K.C.; Rymer, M.J.; Okaya, D.A.; Carney, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    Seismic reflection and refraction images illuminate the San Andreas Fault to a depth of 1 kilometer. The prestack depth-migrated reflection image contains near-vertical reflections aligned with the active fault trace. The fault is vertical in the upper 0.5 kilometer, then dips about 70° to the southwest to at least 1 kilometer subsurface. This dip reconciles the difference between the computed locations of earthquakes and the surface fault trace. The seismic velocity cross section shows strong lateral variations. Relatively low velocity (10 to 30%), high electrical conductivity, and low density indicate a 1-kilometer-wide vertical wedge of porous sediment or fractured rock immediately southwest of the active fault trace.

  15. Christian Andreas Doppler: A legendary man inspired by the dazzling light of the stars.

    PubMed

    Katsi, V; Felekos, I; Kallikazaros, I

    2013-04-01

    Christian Andreas Doppler is renowned primarily for his revolutionary theory of the Doppler effect, which has deeply influenced many areas of modern science and technology, including medicine. His work has laid the foundations for modern ultrasonography and his ideas are still inspiring discoveries more than a hundred years after his death. Doppler may well earn the title of Homo Universalis for his broad knowledge of physics, mathematics and astronomy and most of all for his indefatigable investigations for new ideas and his ingenious mind. According to Bolzano: "It is hard to believe how fruitful a genius Austria has in this man". His legacy of scientific achievement have seen Doppler honoured in the later years on coinage and money, names of streets, educational institutions, rock groups, even of a lunar crater; while the ultimate tribute to his work is the countless references to the homonymous medical eponym. PMID:24376313

  16. The California geodimeter network; measuring movement along the San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.

    1974-01-01

    Following the great California earthquake of 1906 H. F. Reid, a contemporary seismologist, proposed the elastic rebound theory which in effect says that earthquake potential arises from the accumulation of elastic strain within the Earth's crust, just as the stretching of a rubberband creates the potential for violent rebound upon rupture. A direct manifestation of this crustal strain accumulation is the change in distance between adjacent points along opposite sides of a fault. In order to measure the rate at which strain is accumulating along California's San Andreas fault, a netwrok of precise survey lines which criss-cross the fault along its entire lenght in the State is periodically resurveyed with very accurate electro-opitcal distance measuring devices called geodimeters. 

  17. Fault coupling and potential for earthquakes on the creeping section of the Central San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, J.; Johnson, K. M.; Segall, P.

    2013-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault (SAF) has been known historically to produce large earthquakes in northern California along the northern coast section and in southern California along the Carrizo and Mojave sections. However, it is currently unclear whether the 150-km long central creeping section between these two sections could also rupture in large earthquakes. This section of the fault is known to be creeping at the surface, and in some areas may creep at nearly the long-term slip rate. We invert Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data to estimate the degree of locking on the central San Andreas Fault (CSAF) that place bounds on potential moment release. We use an elastic block model to compute present-day creep rates on the CSAF and compare these rates to seismicity patterns and observed surface creep rates. We find the inferred moment accumulation rate on the fault is highly dependent on the long-term fault slip rate, which is poorly constrained along the CSAF. The inferred potency accumulation rates on the creeping section, defined to be the seismic moment rate divided by shear modulus, range from 3.28x10^4 to 5.85x10^7 m^3/yr. The equivalent 150-year recurring earthquake magnitude is Mw = 5.5 - 7.2 for a long-term slip rate of 26 mm/yr and Mw = 7.3-7.65 for a long-term slip rate of 34 mm/yr. Although it is unclear how much of the accumulating moment would be released in future earthquakes, comparisons of slip distributions with seismicity indicate a possible locked patch between 10 and 20 km depth on the CSAF that could potentially rupture with Mw=6.5.

  18. Fault coupling and potential for earthquakes on the creeping section of the Central San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Jeremy Lee

    The San Andreas Fault (SAF) has been known historically to produce large earthquakes in northern California along the northern coast section and in southern California along the Carrizo and Mojave sections. However, it is currently unclear whether the 150-km long central creeping section between these two sections could also rupture in large earthquakes. This section of the fault is known to be creeping at the surface, and in some areas may creep at nearly the long-term slip rate. We invert Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data to estimate the degree of locking on the central San Andreas Fault (CSAF) that place bounds on potential moment release. We use an elastic block model to compute present-day creep rates on the CSAF and compare these rates to seismicity patterns and observed surface creep rates. We find the inferred moment accumulation rate on the fault is highly dependent on the long-term fault slip rate, which is poorly constrained along the CSAF. The inferred potency accumulation rates on the creeping section, defined to be the seismic moment rate divided by shear modulus, range from 3.28x104 to 5.85x107m 3/yr. The equivalent 150-year recurring earthquake magnitude is M w = 5.5 - 7.2 for a long-term slip rate of 26 mm/yr and Mw = 7.3-7.65 for a long-term slip rate of 34 mm/yr. Although it is unclear how much of the accumulating moment would be released in future earthquakes, comparisons of slip distributions with seismicity indicate a possible locked patch between 10 and 20 km depth on the CSAF that could potentially rupture with M w=6.5.

  19. Fault Creep along the Southern San Andreas from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar, Permanent Scatterers, and Stacking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Suzanne; Sandwell, David

    2003-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) provides a practical means of mapping creep along major strike-slip faults. The small amplitude of the creep signal (less than 10 mm/yr), combined with its short wavelength, makes it difficult to extract from long time span interferograms, especially in agricultural or heavily vegetated areas. We utilize two approaches to extract the fault creep signal from 37 ERS SAR images along the southem San Andreas Fault. First, amplitude stacking is utilized to identify permanent scatterers, which are then used to weight the interferogram prior to spatial filtering. This weighting improves correlation and also provides a mask for poorly correlated areas. Second, the unwrapped phase is stacked to reduce tropospheric and other short-wavelength noise. This combined processing enables us to recover the near-field (approximately 200 m) slip signal across the fault due to shallow creep. Displacement maps fiom 60 interferograms reveal a diffuse secular strain buildup, punctuated by localized interseismic creep of 4-6 mm/yr line of sight (LOS, 12-18 mm/yr horizontal). With the exception of Durmid Hill, this entire segment of the southern San Andreas experienced right-lateral triggered slip of up to 10 cm during the 3.5-year period spanning the 1992 Landers earthquake. The deformation change following the 1999 Hector Mine earthquake was much smaller (4 cm) and broader than for the Landers event. Profiles across the fault during the interseismic phase show peak-to-trough amplitude ranging from 15 to 25 mm/yr (horizontal component) and the minimum misfit models show a range of creeping/locking depth values that fit the data.

  20. Potential role of mantle-derived fluids in weakening the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, Patrick M.; Saffer, Demian M.

    2009-07-01

    On the basis of both geomechanical and thermal data, the San Andreas Fault (SAF) has been interpreted to act as a weak plane within much stronger crust, allowing it to slip at very low shear stresses. One explanation for this weakness is that large fluid overpressures exist locally within the fault zone. However, mechanisms for generating, maintaining, and localizing pressures within the fault are poorly quantified. Here we evaluate whether realistic sources of mantle-derived fluids, proposed on the basis of high mantle helium signatures near the SAF, can generate localized fluid pressures within the fault zone in a manner consistent with a wide range of observations along the fault and in the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth borehole. We first calculate a reasonable estimate of the magnitude and location of a mantle-derived flux of water into the crust. This fluid flux results from dehydration of a serpentinized mantle wedge following the northward migration of the Mendocino Triple Junction and the transition from subduction to strike-slip tectonics. We then evaluate the potential effect of this water on fluid pressures within the crust using 2-D cross-sectional models of coupled fluid flow and heat transport. We show that in models with realistic permeability anisotropy, controlled by NE dipping faults and fractures within the country rock, large localized fluid pressures can be focused within a SAF acting as a hydrologic barrier. Our results illustrate a simple and potentially plausible means of weakening the SAF in a manner generally consistent with available hydrologic, thermal, and mechanical constraints.

  1. Holocene geologic slip rate for the Banning strand of the southern San Andreas Fault, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gold, Peter O.; Behr, Whitney M.; Rood, Dylan; Sharp, Warren D.; Rockwell, Thomas; Kendrick, Katherine J.; Salin, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Northwest directed slip from the southern San Andreas Fault is transferred to the Mission Creek, Banning, and Garnet Hill fault strands in the northwestern Coachella Valley. How slip is partitioned between these three faults is critical to southern California seismic hazard estimates but is poorly understood. In this paper, we report the first slip rate measured for the Banning fault strand. We constrain the depositional age of an alluvial fan offset 25 ± 5 m from its source by the Banning strand to between 5.1 ± 0.4 ka (95% confidence interval (CI)) and 6.4 + 3.7/−2.1 ka (95% CI) using U-series dating of pedogenic carbonate clast coatings and 10Be cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating of surface clasts. We calculate a Holocene geologic slip rate for the Banning strand of 3.9 + 2.3/−1.6 mm/yr (median, 95% CI) to 4.9 + 1.0/−0.9 mm/yr (median, 95% CI). This rate represents only 25–35% of the total slip accommodated by this section of the southern San Andreas Fault, suggesting a model in which slip is less concentrated on the Banning strand than previously thought. In rejecting the possibility that the Banning strand is the dominant structure, our results highlight an even greater need for slip rate and paleoseismic measurements along faults in the northwestern Coachella Valley in order to test the validity of current earthquake hazard models. In addition, our comparison of ages measured with U-series and 10Be exposure dating demonstrates the importance of using multiple geochronometers when estimating the depositional age of alluvial landforms.

  2. Geodetic Measurement of Deformation East of the San Andreas Fault in Central California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauber, Jeanne M.; Lisowski, Michael; Solomon, Sean C.

    1988-01-01

    Triangulation and trilateration data from two geodetic networks located between the western edge of the Great Valley and the San Andreas fault have been used to calculate shear strain rates in the Diablo Range and to estimate the slip rate along the Calaveras and Paicines faults in Central California. Within the Diablo Range the average shear strain rate was determined for the time period between 1962 and 1982 to be 0.15 + or - 0.08 microrad/yr, with the orientation of the most compressive strain at N 16 deg E + or - 14 deg. The orientation of the principal compressive strain predicted from the azimuth of the major structures in the region is N 25 deg E. It is inferred that the measured strain is due to compression across the folds of this area: the average shear straining corresponds to a relative shortening rate of 4.5 + or - 2.4 mm/yr. From an examination of wellbore breakout orientations and the azimuths of P-axes from earthquake focal mechanisms the inferred orientation of maximum compressive stress was found to be similar to the direction of maximum compressive strain implied by the trend of local fold structures. Results do not support the hypothesis of uniform fault-normal compression within the Coast Ranges. From trilateration measurements made between 1972 and 1987 on lines that are within 10 km of the San Andreas fault, a slip rate of 10 to 12 mm/yr was calculated for the Calaveras-Paicines fault south of Hollister. The slip rate of the Paicines fault decreases to 4 mm/yr near Bitter.

  3. San Andreas fault zone velocity structure at SAFOD at core, log, and seismic scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeppson, Tamara N.; Tobin, Harold J.

    2015-07-01

    The San Andreas Fault (SAF), like other mature brittle faults, exhibits a zone of low seismic velocity hypothesized to result from fluid pressure effects and/or development of a damage zone. To address the relative contributions of these mechanisms in developing low-velocity zones, we measured P and S wave velocities ultrasonically at elevated confining and pore pressures on core samples from the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD). We compared those data to wireline and seismic-scale velocities to examine the scale dependence of acoustic properties of the fault core and damage zone. Average laboratory P and S wave velocities of the fault gouge at estimated in situ conditions are 3.1 and 1.5 km/s, respectively, consistent with the sonic log from the same intervals. These data show that fault core has intrinsically low velocity, even if no anomalous pore pressure is assumed, due to alteration and mechanical damage. In contrast, laboratory average P and S wave velocities for the damage zone are 4.7 and 2.5 km/s, up to 41% greater than the sonic log in the damage zone. This scale dependence indicates that stress conditions or macroscale features dominate the damage zone's acoustic properties, although velocity dispersion could play a role. Because no pressure anomaly was detected while drilling the SAFOD borehole, we infer that damage at a scale larger than core samples controls the elastic properties of the broader damage zone. This result bolsters other independent lines of evidence that the SAF does not contain major pore fluid overpressure at SAFOD.

  4. The San Andreas fault zone drilling project: Scientific objectives and technological challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, S.; Younker, L.; Zobeck, M.; Cooper, G.

    1994-12-31

    The authors are leading a new international initiative to conduct scientific drilling within the San Andreas fault zone at depths of up to 10 km. This project is motivated by the need to understand the physical and chemical processes operating within the fault zone and to answer fundamental questions about earthquake generation along major plate-boundary faults. Through an integrated program of coring, fluid sampling, in-situ and laboratory experimentation and long-term monitoring, the authors hope to provide fundamental constraints on the structure, composition, mechanical behavior and physical state of the San Andreas fault system at depths comparable to the nucleation zones of great earthquakes. The drilling, sampling and observational requirements needed to ensure the success of this project are stringent. These include: (1) drilling stable vertical holes to depths of about 9 km in fractured rock at temperatures of up to 300 C; (2) continuous coring of inclined holes branched off these vertical boreholes to intersect the fault at depths of 3, 6 and 9 km; (3) conducting sophisticated borehole geophysical measurements and fluid/rock sampling at high temperatures and pressures; and (4) instrumenting some or all of these inclined core holes for continuous monitoring of seismicity and a broad range of physical and chemical properties over periods of up to several decades. For all of these tasks, because of the overpressured clay-rich formations anticipated within the fault zone at depth, the authors expect to encounter difficult drilling, coring and hole-completion conditions in the regions of greatest scientific interest.

  5. Holocene geologic slip rate for the Banning strand of the southern San Andreas Fault, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Peter O.; Behr, Whitney M.; Rood, Dylan; Sharp, Warren D.; Rockwell, Thomas K.; Kendrick, Katherine; Salin, Aaron

    2015-08-01

    Northwest directed slip from the southern San Andreas Fault is transferred to the Mission Creek, Banning, and Garnet Hill fault strands in the northwestern Coachella Valley. How slip is partitioned between these three faults is critical to southern California seismic hazard estimates but is poorly understood. In this paper, we report the first slip rate measured for the Banning fault strand. We constrain the depositional age of an alluvial fan offset 25 ± 5 m from its source by the Banning strand to between 5.1 ± 0.4 ka (95% confidence interval (CI)) and 6.4 + 3.7/-2.1 ka (95% CI) using U-series dating of pedogenic carbonate clast coatings and 10Be cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating of surface clasts. We calculate a Holocene geologic slip rate for the Banning strand of 3.9 + 2.3/-1.6 mm/yr (median, 95% CI) to 4.9 + 1.0/-0.9 mm/yr (median, 95% CI). This rate represents only 25-35% of the total slip accommodated by this section of the southern San Andreas Fault, suggesting a model in which slip is less concentrated on the Banning strand than previously thought. In rejecting the possibility that the Banning strand is the dominant structure, our results highlight an even greater need for slip rate and paleoseismic measurements along faults in the northwestern Coachella Valley in order to test the validity of current earthquake hazard models. In addition, our comparison of ages measured with U-series and 10Be exposure dating demonstrates the importance of using multiple geochronometers when estimating the depositional age of alluvial landforms.

  6. Response of creepmeters on the San Andreas fault near Parkfield to the earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, S.S.; Mavko, G.M.; Brown, B.D.

    1990-01-01

    A total of 14 US Geological Survey creepmeters on the San Andreas fault in central California recorded coseismic steps coincident with the M = 6.7 May 2 earthquake. Creepmeters near Parkfield recorded the largest effects. Postearthquake creep rates slowed significantly, and creep at one station reversed to left lateral. About 4 months after the earthquake, decreased rates caused cumulative creep at four Parkfield stations to fall below long-term linear trends observed before May 2. At several stations, creep continued to be either left lateral or slower than normal for the rest of 1983. By January 31, 1984, all but two stations recorded resumption of right-lateral creep at reduced rates. As late as April 1, 1984, however, one station north of Parkfield continued to record left-lateral drift, and another station at the south end of the creeping section south of Parkfield recorded little or no movement. One interpretation of the creep slowdown after May 2 is that the Coalinga main shock released accumulated stress in the upper kilometer or so of the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, and several months elapsed before stress built up sufficiently to allow creep to resume. A multiple-linear-regression analysis of coseismic-step size as a function of distance from the creepmeter to an earthquake focus and (or) earthquake magnitude showed a linear correlation between step size and magnitude for the data from two stations. No correlation was found between step size and distance to focus for the data from any of the stations. Reduction in step sizes after May 2, despite numerous large aftershocks, suggests that stored local stress is the dominant factor in coseismic-step size.

  7. The San Andreas fault zone drilling project: Scientific objectives and technological challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, S.H.; Younker, L.W.; Zoback, M.D.; Cooper, G.A.

    1995-12-01

    The authors are leading a new international initiative to conduct scientific drilling within the San Andreas fault zone at depths of up to 10 km. This project is motivated by the need to understand the physical and chemical processes operating within the fault zone and to answer fundamental questions about earthquake generation along major plate-boundary faults. Through a comprehensive program of coring, fluid sampling, downhole measurements, laboratory experimentation, and long-term monitoring, the authors hope to obtain critical information on the structure, composition, mechanical behavior and physical state of the San Andreas fault system at depths comparable to the nucleation zones of great earthquakes. The drilling, sampling and observational requirements needed to ensure the success of this project are stringent. These include: (1) drilling stable vertical holes to depths of about 9 km in fractured rock at temperatures of up to 300 C; (2) continuous coring and completion of inclined holes branched off these vertical boreholes to intersect the fault at depths of 3, 6, and 9 km; (3) conducting sophisticated borehole geophysical measurements and fluid/rock sampling at high temperatures and pressures; and (4) instrumenting some or all of these inclined core holes for continuous monitoring of earthquake activity, fluid pressure, deformation and other parameters for periods of up to several decades. For all of these tasks, because of the overpressured clay-rich formations anticipated within the fault zone at depth, the authors expect to encounter difficult drilling, coring and hole-completion conditions in the region of greatest scientific interest.

  8. A more precise chronology of earthquakes produced by the San Andreas fault in southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Sieh, K. ); Stuiver, M. ); Brillinger, D. )

    1989-01-10

    Improved methods of radiocarbon analysis have enabled the authors to date more precisely the earthquake ruptures of the San Andreas fault that are recorded in the sediments at Pallett Creek. New error limits are less than 23 calendar years for all but two of the dated event. The new date ranges, with one exception, fall within the broader ranges estimated previously, but the estimate of the average interval between the latest 10 episodes of faulting is now about 132 years. Five of the nine intervals are shorter than a century: Three of the remaining four intervals are about two to three centuries long. Despite the wide range of these intervals, a pattern in the occurrence of large earthquakes at Pallett Creek is apparent in the new data. The past 10 earthquakes occur in four clusters, each of which consists of two or three events. Earthquakes within the clusters are separated by periods of several decades, but the clusters are separated by dormant periods of two to three centuries. This pattern may reflect important mechanical aspects of the fault's behavior. If this pattern continues into the future, the current period of dormancy will probably be greater than two centuries. This would mean that the section of the fault represented by the Pallett Creek site is currently in the middle of one of its longer periods of repose between clusters, and sections of the fault farther to the southeast are much more likely to produce the next great earthquake in California. The greater precision of dates now available for large earthquakes recorded at the Pallett Creek site enables speculative correlation of events between paleoseismic sites along the southern half of the San Andreas fault. A history of great earthquakes with overlapping rupture zones along the Mojave section of the fault remains one of the more attractive possibilities.

  9. Low resistivity and permeability in actively deforming shear zones on the San Andreas Fault at SAFOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, C.; Lockner, D. A.; Hickman, S.

    2015-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) scientific drill hole near Parkfield, California, crosses the San Andreas Fault at a depth of 2.7 km. Downhole measurements and analysis of core retrieved from Phase 3 drilling reveal two narrow, actively deforming zones of smectite-clay gouge within a roughly 200 m wide fault damage zone of sandstones, siltstones, and mudstones. Here we report electrical resistivity and permeability measurements on core samples from all of these structural units at effective confining pressures up to 120 MPa. Electrical resistivity (~10 Ω-m) and permeability (10-21 to 10-22 m2) in the actively deforming zones were 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than the surrounding damage zone material, consistent with broader-scale observations from the downhole resistivity and seismic velocity logs. The higher porosity of the clay gouge, 2 to 8 times greater than that in the damage zone rocks, along with surface conduction were the principal factors contributing to the observed low resistivities. The high percentage of fine-grained clay in the deforming zones also greatly reduced permeability to values low enough to create a barrier to fluid flow across the fault. Together, resistivity and permeability data can be used to assess the hydrogeologic characteristics of the fault, key to understanding fault structure and strength. The low resistivities and strength measurements of the SAFOD core are consistent with observations of low resistivity clays that are often found in the principal slip zones of other active faults making resistivity logs a valuable tool for identifying these zones.

  10. Samples and Data Products from the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, C.; Zoback, M.; Hickman, S.; Ellsworth, W.

    2007-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD), a part of the National Science Foundation's EarthScope program, has recently completed the third phase of drilling and coring. With additional support from the USGS and the International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP), we have obtained over 30m of core from active deforming sections of the San Andreas Fault. In addition to the core, cuttings, and fluid samples collected at the drill site, there have been several successful instrument deployments in both the Pilot Hole and Main Hole, during the past year. This paper will discuss the acquisition, storage and distribution plan for the diverse types of data and samples that have been collected at SAFOD to date. The website at http://safod.icdp-online.org provides the detailed descriptions of all the physical samples (cuttings, core and fluid samples) available from SAFOD, together with sample request form and other general information on the SAFOD project. The samples are being archived at the , Integrated Ocean Drilling Program's Gulf Coast Repository in College Station, Texas. The geophysical monitoring program at SAFOD continues to expand. There is a real-time seismic data stream of 250 sample/sec data (downsampled from the 4000 sample/sec onsite data). Helicorder previews can be viewed at http://quake.wr.usgs.gov/cgi-bin/helipark.pl. The high sample rate data are available in SEED format from the Northern California Earthquake Data Center (http://quake.geo.berkeley.edu/safod/) and from the IRIS data center (http://www.iris.edu/data/data.htm). And, new this year, there are now both tiltmeter and strainmeter data flowing to the data centers on a daily basis, available at http://www.ncedc.org. As with all elements of EarthScope, these data and samples are openly available to members of the scientific and educational communities.

  11. Northern California LIDAR Data: A Tool for Mapping the San Andreas Fault and Pleistocene Marine Terraces in Heavily Vegetated Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, C. S.; Crosby, C. J.; Harding, D. J.; Haugerud, R. A.; Merritts, D. J.; Gardner, T. W.; Koehler, R. D.; Baldwin, J. N.

    2003-12-01

    Recent acquisition of airborne LIDAR (also known as ALSM) data covering approximately 418 square kilometers of coastal northern California provides a powerful new tool for mapping geomorphic features related to the San Andreas Fault and coastal uplift. LIDAR data has been previously used in the Puget Lowland region of Washington to identify and map Holocene faults and uplifted shorelines concealed under dense vegetation (Haugerud et al., 2003; see http://pugetsoundlidar.org). Our effort represents the first use of LIDAR data for this purpose along the San Andreas Fault. This data set is the result of a collaborative effort between NASA Solid Earth and Natural Hazards Program, Goddard Space Flight Center, Stennis Space Center, USGS, and TerraPoint, LLC. The coverage extends from near Fort Ross, California, in Sonoma County, along the coast northward to the town of Mendocino, in Mendocino County, and as far inland as about 1-3 km east of the San Andreas Fault. The survey area includes about 70 km of the northern San Andreas Fault under dense redwood forest, and Pleistocene coastal marine terraces both north and south of the fault. The average data density is two laser pulses per square meter, with up to four LIDAR returns per pulse. Returns are classified as ground or vegetation, allowing construction of both canopy-top and bare-earth DEMs with 1.8m grid spacing. Vertical accuracy is better than 20 cm RMSE, confirmed by a network of ground-control points established using high-precision GPS surveying. We are using hillshade images generated from the bare-earth DEMs to begin detailed mapping of geomorphic features associated with San Andreas Fault traces, such as scarps, offset streams, linear valleys, shutter ridges, and sag ponds. In addition, we are using these data in conjunction with field mapping and interpretation of conventional 1:12,000 and 1:6000 scale aerial photographs to map and correlate marine terraces to better understand rates of coastal uplift, and

  12. Multi-scale InSAR analysis of aseismic creep across the San Andreas, Calevaras,and Hayward Fault systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agram, P. S.; Simons, M.

    2011-12-01

    We apply the Multi-scale Interferometric Time-series (MInTS) technique, developed at Caltech,to study spatial variations in aseismic creep across the San Andreas, Calaveras and Hayward Faultsystems in Central California.Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) Time-series methods estimate the spatio-temporal evolution of surface deformation using multiple SAR interferograms. Traditional time-series analysis techniques like persistent scatterers and short baseline methods assume the statistical independence of InSAR phase measurements over space and time when estimating deformation. However, existing atmospheric phase screen models clearly show that noise in InSAR phase observations is correlated over the spatial domain. MInTS is an approach designed to exploit the correlation of phase observations over space to significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio in the estimated deformation time-series compared to the traditional time-series InSAR techniques. The MInTS technique reduces the set of InSAR observations to a set of almost uncorrelated observations at various spatial scales using wavelets. Traditional inversion techniques can then be applied to the wavelet coefficients more effectively. Creep across the Central San Andreas Fault and the Hayward Fault has been studied previously using C-band (6 cm wavelength) ERS data, but detailed analysis of the transition zone between the San Andreas and Hayward Faults was not possible due to severe decorrelation. Improved coherence at L-band (24 cm wavelength) significantly improves the spatial coverage of the estimated deformation signal in our ALOS PALSAR data set. We analyze 450 ALOS PALSAR interferograms processed using 175 SAR images acquired between Dec 2006 and Dec 2010 that cover the area along the San Andreas Fault System from Richmond in the San Francisco Bay Area to Maricopa in the San Joaquin Valley.We invert the InSAR phase observations to estimate the constant Line-of-Sight (LOS) deformation

  13. Peter Andreas Hansen and the astronomical community - a first investigation of the Hansen papers. (German Title: Peter Andreas Hansen und die astronomische Gemeinschaft - eine erste Auswertung des Hansen-Nachlasses. )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Oliver; Strumpf, Manfred

    The literary assets of Peter Andreas Hansen are deposited in the Staatsarchiv Hamburg, the Forschungs- und Landesbibliothek Gotha and the Thüringer Staatsarchiv Gotha. They were never systematically investigated. We present here some results of a first evaluation. It was possible to reconstruct the historical events with regard to the maintenance of the Astronomische Nachrichten and the Altona observatory in 1854. Hansen was a successful teacher for many young astronomers. His way of stimulating the evolution of astronomy followed Zach's tradition.

  14. Constraints on the stress state of the San Andreas Fault with analysis based on core and cuttings from San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drilling phases 1 and 2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tembe, S.; Lockner, D.; Wong, T.-F.

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of field data has led different investigators to conclude that the San Andreas Fault (SAF) has either anomalously low frictional sliding strength (?? 0.6). Arguments for the apparent weakness of the SAF generally hinge on conceptual models involving intrinsically weak gouge or elevated pore pressure within the fault zone. Some models assert that weak gouge and/or high pore pressure exist under static conditions while others consider strength loss or fluid pressure increase due to rapid coseismic fault slip. The present paper is composed of three parts. First, we develop generalized equations, based on and consistent with the Rice (1992) fault zone model to relate stress orientation and magnitude to depth-dependent coefficient of friction and pore pressure. Second, we present temperature-and pressure-dependent friction measurements from wet illite-rich fault gouge extracted from San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) phase 1 core samples and from weak minerals associated with the San Andreas Fault. Third, we reevaluate the state of stress on the San Andreas Fault in light of new constraints imposed by SAFOD borehole data. Pure talc (?????0.1) had the lowest strength considered and was sufficiently weak to satisfy weak fault heat flow and stress orientation constraints with hydrostatic pore pressure. Other fault gouges showed a systematic increase in strength with increasing temperature and pressure. In this case, heat flow and stress orientation constraints would require elevated pore pressure and, in some cases, fault zone pore pressure in excess of vertical stress. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Late Holocene slip rate of the San Andreas fault and its accommodation by creep and moderate-magnitude earthquakes at Parkfield, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toke, N.A.; Arrowsmith, J.R.; Rymer, M.J.; Landgraf, A.; Haddad, D.E.; Busch, M.; Coyan, J.; Hannah, A.

    2011-01-01

    Investigation of a right-laterally offset channel at the Miller's Field paleoseismic site yields a late Holocene slip rate of 26.2 +6.4/-4.3 mm/yr (1??) for the main trace of the San Andreas fault at Park-field, California. This is the first well-documented geologic slip rate between the Carrizo and creeping sections of the San Andreas fault. This rate is lower than Holocene measurements along the Carrizo Plain and rates implied by far-field geodetic measurements (~35 mm/yr). However, the rate is consistent with historical slip rates, measured to the northwest, along the creeping section of the San Andreas fault (<30 mm/yr). The paleoseismic exposures at the Miller's Field site reveal a pervasive fabric of clay shear bands, oriented clockwise oblique to the San Andreas fault strike and extending into the upper-most stratigraphy. This fabric is consistent with dextral aseismic creep and observations of surface slip from the 28 September 2004 M6 Parkfield earthquake. Together, this slip rate and deformation fabric suggest that the historically observed San Andreas fault slip behavior along the Parkfield section has persisted for at least a millennium, and that significant slip is accommodated by structures in a zone beyond the main San Andreas fault trace. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  16. Crustal structure across the San Andreas Fault at the SAFOD site from potential field and geologic studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPhee, D.K.; Jachens, R.C.; Wentworth, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    We present newly compiled magnetic, gravity, and geologic datasets from the Parkfield region around the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) pilot hole in order to help define the structure and geophysical setting of the San Andreas Fault (SAF). A 2-D cross section of the SAF zone at SAFOD, based on new, tightly spaced magnetic and gravity observations and surface geology, shows that as drilling proceeds NE toward the SAF, it is likely that at least 2 fault bounded magnetic slivers, possibly consisting of magnetic granitic rock, serpentinite, or unusually magnetic sandstone, will be encountered. The upper 2 km of the model is constrained by an order of magnitude increase in magnetic susceptibility at 1400 m depth observed in pilot hole measurements. NE of the SAF, a flat lying, tabular body of serpentinite at 2 km depth separates two masses of Franciscan rock and truncates against the SAF.

  17. Climate-modulated channel incision and rupture history of the San Andreas Fault in the Carrizo Plain.

    PubMed

    Grant Ludwig, Lisa; Akçiz, Sinan O; Noriega, Gabriela R; Zielke, Olaf; Arrowsmith, J Ramón

    2010-02-26

    The spatial and temporal distribution of fault slip is a critical parameter in earthquake source models. Previous geomorphic and geologic studies of channel offset along the Carrizo section of the south central San Andreas Fault assumed that channels form more frequently than earthquakes occur and suggested that repeated large-slip earthquakes similar to the 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake illustrate typical fault behavior. We found that offset channels in the Carrizo Plain incised less frequently than they were offset by earthquakes. Channels have been offset by successive earthquakes with variable slip since ~1400. This nonuniform slip history reveals a more complex rupture history than previously assumed for the structurally simplest section of the San Andreas Fault. PMID:20093439

  18. A nonlinear least-squares inverse analysis of strike-slip faulting with application to the San Andreas fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Charles A.; Richardson, Randall M.

    1988-01-01

    A nonlinear weighted least-squares analysis was performed for a synthetic elastic layer over a viscoelastic half-space model of strike-slip faulting. Also, an inversion of strain rate data was attempted for the locked portions of the San Andreas fault in California. Based on an eigenvector analysis of synthetic data, it is found that the only parameter which can be resolved is the average shear modulus of the elastic layer and viscoelastic half-space. The other parameters were obtained by performing a suite of inversions for the fault. The inversions on data from the northern San Andreas resulted in predicted parameter ranges similar to those produced by inversions on data from the whole fault.

  19. Evolution of the northern santa cruz mountains by advection of crust past a san andreas fault bend.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R S

    1990-07-27

    The late Quaternary marine terraces near Santa Cruz, California, reflect uplift associated with the nearby restraining bend on the San Andreas fault. Excellent correspondence of the coseismic vertical displacement field caused by the 17 October 1989 magnitude 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake and the present elevations of these terraces allows calculation of maximum long-term uplift rates 1 to 2 kilometers west of the San Andreas fault of 0.8 millimeters per year. Over several million years, this uplift, in concert with the right lateral translation of the resulting topography, and with continual attack by geomorphic processes, can account for the general topography of the northern Santa Cruz Mountains. PMID:17755944

  20. Detection of a locked zone at depth on the Parkfield, California, segment of the San Andreas fault ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, R.A.; Segall, P.

    1987-01-01

    The Parkfield, California, segment of the San Andreas fault is transitional in character between the creeping segment of the fault to the NW and the locked Carrizo Plain segment to the SE. The rate of shallow fault slip decreases from 25-30 mm/yr NW of the epicenter of the 1966 Parkfield earthquake to zero at the SE end of the 1966 rupture zone. Data from a network of trilateration lines spanning the San Andreas fault near Parkfield and extending to the Pacific coast near San Luis Obispo shed light on the rate of fault slip at depth since the 1966 earthquake. In this study, average rates of line length change and shallow fault slip were inverted to determine the slip rate at depth on the Parkfield fault segment. -from Authors

  1. Investigating the creeping section of the San Andreas Fault using ALOS PALSAR interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agram, P. S.; Wortham, C.; Zebker, H. A.

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, time-series InSAR techniques have been used to study the temporal characteristics of various geophysical phenomena that produce surface deformation including earthquakes and magma migration in volcanoes. Conventional InSAR and time-series InSAR techniques have also been successfully used to study aseismic creep across faults in urban areas like the Northern Hayward Fault in California [1-3]. However, application of these methods to studying the time-dependent creep across the Central San Andreas Fault using C-band ERS and Envisat radar satellites has resulted in limited success. While these techniques estimate the average long-term far-field deformation rates reliably, creep measurement close to the fault (< 3-4 Km) is virtually impossible due to heavy decorrelation at C-band (6cm wavelength). Shanker and Zebker (2009) [4] used the Persistent Scatterer (PS) time-series InSAR technique to estimate a time-dependent non-uniform creep signal across a section of the creeping segment of the San Andreas Fault. However, the identified PS network was spatially very sparse (1 per sq. km) to study temporal characteristics of deformation of areas close to the fault. In this work, we use L-band (24cm wavelength) SAR data from the PALSAR instrument on-board the ALOS satellite, launched by Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) in 2006, to study the temporal characteristics of creep across the Central San Andreas Fault. The longer wavelength at L-band improves observed correlation over the entire scene which significantly increased the ground area coverage of estimated deformation in each interferogram but at the cost of decreased sensitivity of interferometric phase to surface deformation. However, noise levels in our deformation estimates can be decreased by combining information from multiple SAR acquisitions using time-series InSAR techniques. We analyze 13 SAR acquisitions spanning the time-period from March 2007 to Dec 2009 using the Short Baseline

  2. Shallow structure and geomorphology, northern San Andreas fault, Bodega Bay to Fort Ross, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. Y.; Hartwell, S. R.; Manson, M. W.

    2013-12-01

    We mapped a 35-km-long section of the northwest-trending San Andreas fault zone (SAFZ), extending through Bodega Bay, crossing the onshore Bodega Head isthmus, and continuing in the offshore to Fort Ross, California. Mapping is based on integrated analysis of high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles (38 fault crossings), multibeam bathymetry and backscatter data, onshore geology, seafloor-sediment samples, and digital camera and video imagery. In Bodega Bay, the SAFZ comprises multiple parallel to subparallel strands that extend through a 2-km-wide basin flanked by massive basement terranes, Cretaceous granitic rock on the southwest and Jurassic and Cretaceous Franciscan Complex on the northeast. Seismic profiles reveal the smooth basin seafloor is underlain by a thin (1 to 12 m) layer of latest Pleistocene and Holocene sediments and an underlying inferred Pleistocene unit characterized by faulted and folded reflections revealing numerous angular unconformities and channels. This geology suggests that Bodega Bay originated as a pull-apart basin formed by an eastern transfer of slip within the SAFZ. If so, the pervasive internal folding and faulting of the young basin fill suggests basin subsidence has largely ended and the basin fill is now being deformed. North of the Bodega Head isthmus, the SAFZ is relatively narrow (200 to 500 m wide) and cuts across relatively flat seafloor covered by sediments derived from the Russian River and Salmon Creek. Gentle fault bends and transfers of slip between subparallel strands have resulted in small fault-zone uplifts and four distinct, elongate (~ 500- to 2300-m long), narrow (~ 200- to 300-m wide) sag basins containing as much as 56 m of inferred latest Pleistocene to Holocene sediment. The offshore mapping suggests the presence of an important, previously unrecognized onshore SAFZ strand cutting across the Bodega Head isthmus about 800 m southwest of the only reported 1906 surface rupture in the map area. Onshore, this

  3. Response of deformation patterns to reorganizations of the southern San Andreas fault system since ca. 1.5 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, M. L.; Fattaruso, L.; Dorsey, R. J.; Housen, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Between ~1.5 and 1.1 Ma, the southern San Andreas fault system underwent a major reorganization that included initiation of the San Jacinto fault and termination of slip on the extensional West Salton detachment fault. The southern San Andreas fault itself has also evolved since this time, with several shifts in activity among fault strands within San Gorgonio Pass. We use three-dimensional mechanical Boundary Element Method models to investigate the impact of these changes to the fault network on deformation patterns. A series of snapshot models of the succession of active fault geometries explore the role of fault interaction and tectonic loading in abandonment of the West Salton detachment fault, initiation of the San Jacinto fault, and shifts in activity of the San Andreas fault. Interpreted changes to uplift patterns are well matched by model results. These results support the idea that growth of the San Jacinto fault led to increased uplift rates in the San Gabriel Mountains and decreased uplift rates in the San Bernardino Mountains. Comparison of model results for vertical axis rotation to data from paleomagnetic studies reveals a good match to local rotation patterns in the Mecca Hills and Borrego Badlands. We explore the mechanical efficiency at each step in the evolution, and find an overall trend toward increased efficiency through time. Strain energy density patterns are used to identify regions of off-fault deformation and potential incipient faulting. These patterns support the notion of north-to-south propagation of the San Jacinto fault during its initiation. The results of the present-day model are compared with microseismicity focal mechanisms to provide additional insight into the patterns of off-fault deformation within the southern San Andreas fault system.

  4. Body-Wave Scattering from Seismic Interferometry: Preliminary Results from the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, S. G.; Audet, P.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution direct tomographic imaging of subsurface Earth structures is generally limited by the distribution of seismic sources necessary for such studies. However, seismic interferometry has the potential to significantly overcome this issue through the use of ambient seismic noise recordings. Whereas the recovery of virtual surface waves via seismic interferometry techniques are the most abundant results produced by such studies, it has recently been shown that virtual body waves can also be recovered under appropriate conditions. Of particular interest to us is the scattering of body waves produced by velocity discontinuities in the subsurface, which dramatically improves our ability to characterize seismic velocity structures. In this work, using ambient seismic noise recordings across a network of stations near Parkfield, California, we observe both virtual P waves traversing the San Andreas Fault as well as non-fault-traversing P waves on either side. From observed fault-traversing P waves we propose a P wave velocity model of the San Andreas Fault. We further investigate the possibility of recovering body-wave scattering from interactions with velocity discontinuities associated with the fault. From such body-wave scattering interactions we test whether mode-conversions (P to S waves) can be observed using these virtual Green's functions. Additionally, using non-fault-traversing P waves we explore differences in velocity structure on either side of the San Andreas Fault in the Parkfield region. Finally, we examine the potential of seismic interferometry to produce time-lapse body-wave characterizations of the San Andreas Fault, in which properties of the fault can be seen to change in time

  5. Detection of aseismic creep along the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, California with ERS-1 radar interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, Charles L.; Rosen, Paul; Hensley, Scott; Fielding, Eric; Buckley, Sean

    1997-01-01

    The differential interferometric analysis of ERS data from Parkfield (CA) observations revealed the wide area distribution of creep along the moving fault segment of the San Andreas fault over a 15 month interval. The removal of the interferometric phase related to the surface topography was carried out. The fault was clearly visible in the differential interferogram. The magnitude of the tropospheric water vapor phase distortions is greater than the signal and hinders quantitative analysis beyond order of magnitude calculations.

  6. Magnitude of shear stress on the san andreas fault: implications of a stress measurement profile at shallow depth.

    PubMed

    Zoback, M D; Roller, J C

    1979-10-26

    A profile of measurements of shear stress perpendicular to the San Andreas fault near Palmdale, California, shows a marked increase in stress with distance from the fault. The pattern suggests that shear stress on the fault increases slowly with depth and reaches a value on the order of the average stress released during earthquakes. This result has important implications for both long- and shortterm prediction of large earthquakes. PMID:17809367

  7. Frictional strength heterogeneity and surface heat flow: Implications for the strength of the creeping San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    d'Alessio, M. A.; Williams, C.F.; Burgmann, R.

    2006-01-01

    Heat flow measurements along much of the San Andreas fault (SAF) constrain the apparent coefficient of friction (??app) of the fault to 0.2 should be detectable even with the sparse existing observations, implying that ??app for the creeping section is as low as the surrounding SAF. Because the creeping section does not slip in large earthquakes, the mechanism controlling its weakness is not related to dynamic processes resulting from high slip rate earthquake ruptures. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Paleoseismic Studies of the Peninsula San Andreas Fault near Crystal Springs Reservoir, Woodside, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, C. S.; Zachariasen, J. A.; Kozaci, O.; Clahan, K.; Sickler, R. R.; Rosa, C. M.; Hassett, W.; Feigelson, L.; Haproff, P. J.; DeLong, S.; Perkins, A.; Brooks, B. A.; Delano, J.; Baldwin, J. N.

    2013-12-01

    The Peninsula section of the San Andreas Fault (SAFP) is within 10 km of downtown San Francisco, making it among the most significant contributors to seismic hazard in the San Francisco Bay area. However, the history of earthquakes along this fault is poorly known. The most recent ground-rupturing earthquake occurred in 1906, but the ages of earlier earthquakes associated with surface rupture on this fault segment remain uncertain. Most researchers assume that the historically documented earthquake in 1838 occurred on the SAFP, but no definitive evidence of surface rupture at that time has been found. South of Crystal Springs Reservoir, the San Andreas Fault zone is expressed as a prominent fault scarp that is cut back in several locations by recent fluvial processes. At our Crystal Springs South (CSS) trench site, the fault is expressed as a low scarp with no other surface expression to suggest additional young fault traces. Excavations at this site revealed two distinct sets of faults, a younger set of faults that extend nearly to the modern ground surface that we assume represent the 1906 surface rupture, and an older set of faults that terminate lower in the stratigraphic section and are overlain by a scarp-derived colluvial deposit. Radiocarbon dating constrains the age of this older earthquake to 830-930 Cal. years BP. We determined that a buried channel deposit that dates to 790-960 Cal. years BP is displaced approximately 6-7m across both sets of faults. The closest 1906 offset measurement was made about 11 km northwest of this site, and is about 2.9m. Therefore our measurement of 6-7m of offset on the buried channel deposit at the CSS site could represent slip from 1906 and only one previous event comparable in size to the 1906 earthquake. The surprisingly old age of the earlier earthquake raises concerns that one or both of the event horizons exposed at the CSS site could represent multiple earthquakes. We therefore excavated an exploratory trench about 0

  9. A Study of the San Andreas Slip Rate on the San Francisco Peninsula, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, L. M.; Prentice, C.; Grove, K.; Caskey, J.; Ritz, J. F.; Leslie, S.

    2008-12-01

    The most recent large earthquake on the San Andreas Fault (SAF) along the San Francisco Peninsula was the great San Francisco earthquake of April 18, 1906, when a Mw= 7.8 event ruptured 435-470 km of the northern SAF. The slip rate for this segment of the SAF is incompletely known but is important for clarifying seismic hazard in this highly urbanized region. A previous study south of our site has found an average slip rate of 17±4 mm/yr for the late Holocene on the San Francisco Peninsula segment of the SAF. North of the Golden Gate, the SAF joins the San Gregorio Fault with an estimated slip rate of 6 mm/yr. A trench study north of where the two faults join has produced an average late Holocene slip rate of 24±3 mm/yr. To refine slip-rate estimates for the peninsula segment of the SAF, we excavated a trench across the fault where we located an abandoned channel between the San Andreas and Lower Crystal Springs reservoirs. This abandoned channel marks the time when a new channel cut across the SAF; the new channel has since been offset in a right-lateral sense about 20 m. The measured amount of offset and the age of the youngest fluvial sediments in the abandoned channel will yield a slip rate for the San Francisco Peninsula segment of the SAF. We excavated a trench across the abandoned channel and logged the exposed sediments. Our investigation revealed channel-fill alluvium incised and filled by probable debris flow sediments, and a wide fault zone in bedrock, west of the channel deposits. The most prominent fault is probably the strand that moved in 1906. We completed a total-station survey to more precisely measure the offset stream, and to confirm that the fault exposed in the trench aligns with a fence that is known to have been offset 2.8m during the 1906 earthquake. We interpret the debris flow sediments to represent the last phase of deposition prior to abandonment of the old channel. We collected samples for radiocarbon dating, optically stimulated

  10. Investigating the Creeping Segment of the San Andreas Fault using InSAR time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolandone, Frederique; Ryder, Isabelle; Agram, Piyush S.; Burgmann, Roland; Nadeau, Robert M.

    2010-05-01

    We exploit the advanced Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technique referred to as the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) algorithm to analyze the creeping section of the San Andreas Fault in Central California. Various geodetic creep rate measurements along the Central San Andreas Fault (CSAF) have been made since 1969 including creepmeters, alignment arrays, geodolite, and GPS. They show that horizontal surface displacements increase from a few mm/yr at either end to a maximum of up to ~34 mm/yr in the central portion. They also indicate some discrepancies in rate estimates, with the range being as high as 10 mm/yr at some places along the fault. This variation is thought to be a result of the different geodetic techniques used and of measurements being made at variable distances from the fault. An interferometric stack of 12 interferograms for the period 1992-2001 shows the spatial variation of creep that occurs within a narrow (<2 km) zone close to the fault trace. The creep rate varies spatially along the fault but also in time. Aseismic slip on the CSAF shows several kinds of time dependence. Shallow slip, as measured by surface measurements across the narrow creeping zone, occurs partly as ongoing steady creep, along with brief episodes with slip from mm to cm. Creep rates along the San Juan Bautista segment increased after the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake and slow slip transients of varying duration and magnitude occurred in both transition segments The main focus of this work is to use the SBAS technique to identify spatial and temporal variations of creep on the CSAF. We will present time series of line-of-sight (LOS) displacements derived from SAR data acquired by the ASAR instrument, on board the ENVISAT satellite, between 2003 and 2009. For each coherent pixel of the radar images we compute time-dependent surface displacements as well as the average LOS deformation rate. We compare our results with characteristic repeating microearthquakes that