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Sample records for john day fall

  1. John Day Fall Chinook/Salmon Mitigation Plan Acclimation and Imprinting Site Feasibility Study: Summary Report : Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Sverdrup Corporation; United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this Plan is to replace upriver bright fall chinook salmon which were lost by construction of the John Day Dam. This will be accomplished by releasing salmon fry and smolts, incubated in the Spring Creek and Bonneville Hatcheries, at several upriver locations. Prior to release it is desired to feed and acclimate the juvenile fish to relieve the stress of truck transport, and to imprint them to the release site. This will ultimately produce adult chinook salmon that return to their historic spawning areas through traditional common property fisheries. It will also provide sexually mature broodstock fish that can be captured and spawned to supplement continued hatchery operation. This report summarizes results of an engineering feasibility study done for 10 potential acclimation sites on the Columbia, Yakima and Walla Walla Rivers. A detailed report has been prepared for each site and each is bound separately.

  2. Effects of Flow on the Migratory Behavior and Survival of Juvenile Fall and Summer Chinook Salmon in John Day Reservior, 1982 Annual Report of Research.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David R.; Sims, Carl W.

    1983-11-01

    The National Marine Fisheries Service in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration is conducting a 6-year study of the effects of instream flows on the passage time, survival, and migrational behavior of juvenile fall and summer (O-age) chinook salmon in John Day Reservoir. In 1982, the second year of the study, research activities concentrated on refining distribution and behavior data in John Day Reservoir and on releasing and recapturing marked fish needed to define flow/travel time relationships. Twenty-two groups (61,887 fish) of marked O-age chinook salmon were wire-tagged, branded, and released into the tailrace at McNary Dam, and forty-four groups (13,128 fish) were branded and released into the reservoir at various other sites. Sampling at the John Day Dam airlift facility captured 54,647 subyearling chinook salmon including 482 marked recoveries. Additional marks (279) were recovered from purse seine samples taken at various sites throughout the reservoir. The average passage time to John Day Dam for marked O-age chinook salmon released in the McNary tailrace was 23 days. Weekend flow reductions at McNary Dam did not affect passage time of subyearling chinook salmon in John Day Reservoir. There was no statistical evidence to indicate that instream flows affected either the rate of movement or residence time of O-age chinook salmon in John Day Reservoir.

  3. Effects of Flow on the Migratory Behavior and Survival of Juvenile Fall and Summer Chinook Salmon in John Day Reservoir : Annual Report 1983.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David R.; Sims, Carl W.

    1984-06-01

    The effects of instream river flow on the passage time, survival, and migrational behavior of juvenile fall and summer (O-age) chinook salmon in John Day Reservoir is being studied. In 1983, the final year of juvenile sampling in the reservoir, research activities continued to refine flow/travel time relationships and distributional behavior of O-age chinook salmon. Fifteen groups (72,559 fish) of marked O-age chinook salmon were wire-tagged, branded, and released into the tailrace at McNary Dam, and thirty-two groups (22,206 fish) were branded and released into the reservoir at various other sites. Sampling at John Day Dam, utilizing the airlift pump system in the B and C slots of Turbine Intake Unit 3, captured 82,698 subyearling chinook salmon including 640 mark recoveries. Additional marks (458) were recovered from purse seine samples taken at various sites throughout the reservoir. Weekly mean fork lengths of O-age chinook salmon captured at McNary and John fsm Dams and in the reservoir by purse seine ranged from 103 mm in mid-June to 166 mm in mid-December. Fish captured at the John Day Dam monitoring facility and by purse seine throughout the reservoir were in excellent condition. Preliminary analysis of stomach samples taken in 1982 and 1983 from purse seine catches indicates active feeding is taking place. The average passage time of the fastest moving marked O-age chinook salmon from McNary Dam to John Day Dam was 11 days (based on 25th percentile of mark recaptures). The average reservoir residence time was 22 days. Regression analysis was used to develop a description of the relationship of river flow to the rate of downstream movement of O-age chinook salmon in John Day Reservoir in 1983. The slope of this line and the correlation coefficient (R) were not significantly different from zero.

  4. Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning below Bonneville, The Dalles, John Day and McNary Dams; 1999-2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    van der Naald, Wayne; Spellman, Bryant; Clark, Roy

    2001-10-01

    This report describes work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) from 1 October 1999 to 30 September 2000. The work is part of studies to evaluate spawning of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and chum salmon (O. keta) below the four lowermost Columbia River dams under the Bonneville Power Administration's Project 99-003. The purpose of this project is twofold: (1) Document the existence of fall chinook and chum populations spawning below Bonneville Dam (river mile (RM) 145), The Dalles Dam (RM 192), John Day Dam (RM 216), and McNary Dam (RM 292) (Figure 1) and estimate the size of these populations; and (2) Profile stocks for important population characteristics; including spawning time, genetic make-up, emergence timing, migration size and timing, and juvenile to adult survival rates.

  5. Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning below Bonneville, The Dalles, John Day, and McNary Dams; 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    van der Naald, Wayne; Clark, Roy; Spellman, Bryant

    2002-09-17

    This report describes work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) from 1 October 2000 to 30 September 2001. The work is part of studies to evaluate spawning of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and chum salmon (O. keta) below the four lowermost Columbia River dams under the Bonneville Power Administration's Project 99-003. The purpose of this project is twofold: (1) Document the existence of fall chinook and chum populations spawning below Bonneville Dam (river mile (RM) 145), The Dalles Dam (RM 192), John Day Dam (RM 216), and McNary Dam (RM 292) (Figure 1) and estimate the size of these populations. (2) Profile stocks for important population characteristics; including spawning time, genetic make-up, emergence timing, migration size and timing, and juvenile to adult survival rates. Specific tasks conducted by ODFW and WDFW during this period were: (1) Documentation of fall chinook and chum spawning below Bonneville, The Dalles, John Day and McNary dams using on-water observations; (2) Collection of biological data to profile stocks in areas described in Task 1; (3) Determination of spawning population estimates and age composition, average size at return, and sex ratios in order to profile stocks in areas described in Task 1; (4) Collection of data to determine stock origin of adult salmon found in areas described in Task 1; (5) Determination of possible stock origins of adult salmon found in areas described in Task 1 using tag rates based on coded-wire tag recoveries and genetic baseline analysis; (6) Determination of emergence timing and hatching rate of juvenile fall chinook and chum below Bonneville Dam; (7) Determination of migration time and size for juvenile fall chinook and chum rearing in the area described in Task 6; (8) Investigation of feasibility of determining stock composition of juvenile fall chinook and chum rearing in the area described in Task 6; (9

  6. Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon below Bonneville, The Dalles, John Day and McNary Dams; 1998-1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    van der Naald, Wayne; Clark, Roy; Spellman, Bryant

    1999-12-01

    This report describes work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) from 1 October 1998 to 30 September 1999. The work is part of studies to evaluate spawning of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and chum salmon (O. keta) below the four lowermost Columbia River dams under the Bonneville Power Administration's Project 99-003. The purpose of this project is twofold: (1) Document the existence of fall chinook and chum populations spawning below Bonneville Dam (river mile (RM) 145), The Dalles Dam (RM 192), John Day Dam (RM 216), and McNary Dam (RM 292) (Figure 1) and estimate the size of these populations; and (2) Profile stocks for important population characteristics; including spawning time, genetic make-up, emergence timing, migration size and timing, and juvenile to adult survival rates. Specific tasks conducted by ODFW and WDFW during this period were: (1) Documentation of fall chinook and chum spawning below Bonneville, The Dalles, John Day and McNary dams using on-water observations; (2) Collection of biological data to profile stocks in areas described in Task 1; (3) Determination of spawning population estimates and age composition, average size at return, and sex ratios in order to profile stocks in areas described in Task 1; (4) Collection of data to determine stock origin of adult salmon found in areas described in Task 1; (5) Determination of possible stock origins of adult salmon found in areas described in Task 1 using tag rates based on coded-wire tag recoveries and genetic baseline analysis; (6) Determination of emergence timing and hatching rate of juvenile fall chinook and chum below Bonneville Dam; (7) Determination of migration time and size for juvenile fall chinook and chum rearing in the area described in Task 6; (8) Investigation of feasibility of determining stock composition of juvenile fall chinook and chum rearing in the area described in Task 6

  7. Predicted changes in subyearling fall Chinook salmon rearing and migratory habitat under two drawdown scenarios for John Day Reservoir, Columbia River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiffan, K.F.; Garland, R.D.; Rondorf, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the potential effects of two different drawdown scenarios on rearing and migration habitat of subyearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in John Day Reservoir on the Columbia River. We compared habitats at normal operating pool elevation with habitats at drawdown to spillway crest elevation and drawdown to the historical natural river elevation for two flows (4,417 and 8,495 m3/s). Using two-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling and a predictive habitat model, we determined the quantity and spatial distribution of rearing habitat and predicted water velocities. We predicted that the most habitat area would occur under normal pool elevation, but 93% of habitat was located in the upper third of the reservoir. Although less habitat area was predicted under drawdown to the spillway crest and the natural river, it was distributed more homogeneously throughout the study area. Habitat connectivity, patch size, and percent of suitable shoreline were greatest under drawdown to the natural river elevation. Mean cross-sectional water velocity and the variation in velocity increased with increasing level of reservoir drawdown. Water velocities under drawdown to the natural river were about twice as high as those under drawdown to spillway crest and five times higher than those under normal pool. The variability in water velocity, which may provide cues to fish migration, was highest under drawdown to the natural river and lowest under normal pool elevation. The extent to which different drawdown scenarios would be effective in John Day Reservoir depends in part on restoring normative riverine processes.

  8. Effects of Flow on the Migratory Behavior and Survival of Juvenile Fall and Summer Chinook Salmon in John Day Reservoir, 1981 Annual Report of Research.

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, Carl W.; Miller, David R.

    1982-06-01

    Research was conducted by NMFS in 1981 to define the effects of instream flows on the passage time, survival, and migrational behavior of 0-age chinook salmon in John Day Reservoir. Fourteen groups (74,683 fish) of marked 0-age chinook salmon were wire-tagged, branded, and released into the tailrace at McNary Dam, fourteen groups (13,746 fish) were branded and released into the reservoir at River Kilometer 375, and 34 groups (14,273) were branded and released into the reservoir at various other sites. More than 55,000 0-age chinook salmon were sampled at the John Day Dam airlift facility. This sample included 623 mark recoveries. Four hundred and eight (408) additional marks were recovered from purse seine samples taken at various sites throughout the reservoir. The average passage time of marked 0-age chinook salmon released in the McNary trailrace was 22 days in 1981. There was no statistically significant evidence to indicate that instream flows affected either the rate of movement or residence time of 0-age chinook salmon in John Day Reservoir in 1981. 7 references, 1 figure, 12 tables.

  9. Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning below Bonneville, The Dalles, John Day, and McNary Dams; 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    van der Naald, Wayne; Clark, Roy; Spellman, Bryant

    2003-04-01

    In 2001 a total of 309 adult fall chinook and 264 chum were sampled in the Ives and Pierce islands area below Bonneville Dam. The peak redd count for fall chinook was 48. The peak redd count for chum was 181. Peak spawning time for fall chinook was set at approximately 16 November. Peak spawning time for chum occurred approximately 26 November. There were estimated to be a total of 721 fall chinook spawning below Bonneville Dam in 2001. The 2001 chum population below Bonneville Dam was estimated to be 532 spawning fish. Temperature unit data suggests that below Bonneville Dam 2001 brood chinook emergence began on 11 March 2002 and ended 18 May 2002, with peak emergence occurring 26 April. 2001 brood juvenile chum emergence below Bonneville Dam began 29 January and continued through 31 March 2002. Peak chum emergence took place 25 February. A total of 5,487 juvenile chinook and 678 juvenile chum were sampled between the dates of 22 January and 30 July 2002 below Bonneville Dam. Juvenile chum migrated from the study area in the 40-55 mm fork length range. Migration of chum occurred during the months of March, April and May. Sampling results suggest fall chinook migration from rearing areas took place from mid June through early July 2002 when juvenile fall chinook were in the 65 to 80 mm fork length size range. Adult and juvenile sampling below Bonneville Dam provided information to assist in determining the stock of fall chinook and chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville Dam. Based on observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, GSI analysis, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration, it appears that in 2001 and 2002 the majority of fall chinook using the area below Bonneville Dam were of a late-spawning bright stock of fall chinook. Observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, GSI analysis, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration

  10. John Day Dam - Underwater video inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    An underwater video inspection device has recently been designed and built for use at John Day Powerhouse on the Columbia River. It is used to inspect for damage on the submerged traveling screens, vertical barrier screens and orifices which are used to guide juvenile fish away from the turbines. The Corps of Engineers is legally required to inspect this equipment once per month. It is possible but time consuming to perform the inspections on submerged traveling screens by removing them. The removal of screens requires a six person crew and gantry crane. The time to remove and install a screen is about 3 hours. A typical plant such as John Day has 48 screens. On most power plants, it is not practical to remove the vertical barrier screens because it is so time consuming. These were formerly inspected by shutting down the generating units and using a camera on a tether to inspect. The new inspection device uses minimal crew and doesn`t require shutting down generating units. This system is intended to be a prototype and it is expected that some improvements to the system will be developed as the system is used.

  11. 33 CFR 117.881 - John Day River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false John Day River. 117.881 Section 117.881 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Oregon § 117.881 John Day River. The draw of...

  12. Fall Colors, Temperature, and Day Length

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Stephen; Miller, Heather; Roossinck, Carrie

    2007-01-01

    Along with the bright hues of orange, red, and yellow, the season of fall represents significant changes, such as day length and temperature. These changes provide excellent opportunities for students to use science process skills to examine how abiotic factors such as weather and temperature impact organisms. In this article, the authors describe…

  13. John Day Watershed Restoration Projects, annual report 2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Linda

    2004-01-01

    The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional

  14. John Day Fish Passage and Screening; 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Steve

    2002-03-26

    The accomplishments of the John Day, Umatilla, and Walla Walla Fish Passage and Screening Programs include the following: Operation and maintenance of 364 existing fish screening devices (see Table 4), replacement of 18 outdated fish screening devices that totaled 31 rotary drums (some were multiple drum systems), 4 new screens at unscreened diversions, 26 pump intake fish screens, fabrication of components for 16 additional fish screens for the Rogue basin, construction of two fish passage structures, and participation in other activities. After the replacement or construction of 22 fish screening devices during 2001, we now have 108 screening devices that meet NMFS criteria. Funding for these projects was attained from BPA, NMFS and OWEB. The John Day Fish Passage and Screening Program focused construction efforts into new and replacement fish screening devices for these various programs throughout the state of Oregon. The program also continued to develop and implement innovative designs to meet the diverse and expanding needs for the state of Oregon. Projects completed during this report period meet the current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria. Fish species targeted for protection include ESA Listed Mid-Columbia steelhead, Columbia basin bull trout, anadromous and resident salmonids, and numerous non-game fish species. Priority project locations have been identified as the upper reaches of the Middle Fork, North Fork, South Fork and the Mainstem of the John Day River and their tributaries. These upper reaches contain critical salmon and steelhead spawning and rearing habitat.

  15. 78 FR 42972 - Notice of Intent To Collect Fees on the John Day River, Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ...-Snake River Resource Advisory Committee (John Day-Snake RAC). Future adjustments in the fee amount would be made in accordance with the plan and through consultation with the John Day-Snake RAC and...

  16. Fossil Flora of the John Day Basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knowlton, Frank Hall

    1902-01-01

    For a number of years I have been gradually accumulating material for a thorough revision of the Tertiary floras of the Pacific slope. Fossil plants are known to occur at numerous points within this area, and their study and identification has already furnished valuable data bearing on the geological history of the region, and when still further exploited it is confidently expected that they will afford more exact data for the use of geologists. This investigation is progressing satisfactorily, and at no distant day it is hoped to have it in form for final publication. From time to time various members of the United States Geological Survey, as well as others not connected with this organization, have sent in small collections of fossil plants for determination. These have been studied and reported upon as fully as the condition of the problem permitted, so that the determinations could be immediately available to geologists, but with the reservation that none of the questions could be fully settled until all known material had been studied and properly correlated. The rich fossil plant deposits in the John Day Basin, as set forth more fully in the historical account which follows, have been known for a period of nearly fifty years, but their study has been carried on in a more or less desultory manner. There has also been considerable confusion as to the horizons whence these plants came. As various species of plants described originally from the John Day region were detected in various other localities in Oregon, and in surrounding areas, as central Washington, western Idaho, and northern California, it became more than ever apparent that a thorough study of all material obtainable from this type area would be necessary before any definite or satisfactory conclusions could be reached. The immediate incentive for this revision was furnished by the receipt of a considerable collection of plants, made by Dr. John C. Merriam in 1900 while he was in charge of an

  17. NORTH FORK JOHN DAY RIVER ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, James G.; Conyac, Martin D.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the North Fork John Day River Roadless Area in Oregon indicates that a narrow belt along the river has a substantiated resource potential for placer gold, and several other drainages tributary to the North Fork a probable resource potential for placer or lode gold. Further study of the roadless area may reveal other areas with a potential for gold, and could help to delineate bedrock or additional placer resources, especially in drainages tributary to the North Fork. This work could also point to other mineral deposits near the roadless boundary.

  18. 75 FR 18235 - Meeting Notice for the John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... Bureau of Land Management Meeting Notice for the John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Meeting notice for the John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council..., the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) John Day-Snake Resource...

  19. 75 FR 37461 - Notice of Public Meeting, John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Meeting notice for the John Day/Snake Resource Advisory... Committee Act, the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) John Day-Snake...

  20. 75 FR 27359 - Meeting Notice for the John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... Bureau of Land Management Meeting Notice for the John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Meeting Notice for the John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council..., the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) John Day-Snake Resource...

  1. 78 FR 64236 - Notice of Public Meeting for the John Day; Snake Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting for the John Day; Snake Resource Advisory Council... U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM), the John Day--Snake Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet as indicated below: DATES: The John Day--Snake RAC will hold a...

  2. 76 FR 46321 - Notice of Public Meeting, John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ... Bureau Of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council AGENCY... Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet as...: A joint meeting of the John Day-Snake and the Southeast Oregon RACs will be held at 1 Sunridge...

  3. 75 FR 69701 - Notice of Public Meeting, John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Meeting notice for the John Day/Snake Resource Advisory... Committee Act, the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) John Day-Snake...

  4. 78 FR 76175 - Notice of Public Meeting for the John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting for the John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council... U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM), the John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet as indicated below: DATES: The John Day-Snake RAC will hold a...

  5. 75 FR 5803 - John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council; Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-04

    ... Bureau of Land Management John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council; Meetings AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Meeting Notice for the John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council. SUMMARY.... Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council...

  6. 75 FR 50779 - Notice of Public Meeting, John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Meeting Notice for the John Day/Snake Resource Advisory... Committee Act, the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) John Day-Snake...

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the John Day Dam Tailrace

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2010-07-08

    US Army Corps of Engineers - Portland District required that a two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged and a three-dimensional (3D) free-surface numerical models to be developed and validated for the John Day tailrace. These models were used to assess potential impact of a select group of structural and operational alternatives to tailrace flows aimed at improving fish survival at John Day Dam. The 2D model was used for the initial assessment of the alternatives in conjunction with a reduced-scale physical model of the John Day Project. A finer resolution 3D model was used to more accurately model the details of flow in the stilling basin and near-project tailrace hydraulics. Three-dimensional model results were used as input to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory particle tracking software, and particle paths and times to pass a downstream cross section were used to assess the relative differences in travel times resulting from project operations and structural scenarios for multiple total river flows. Streamlines and neutrally-buoyant particles were seeded in all turbine and spill bays with flows. For a Total River of 250 kcfs running with the Fish Passage Plan spill pattern and a spillwall, the mean residence times for all particles were little changed; however the tails of the distribution were truncated for both spillway and powerhouse release points, and, for the powerhouse releases, reduced the residence time for 75% of the particles to pass a downstream cross section from 45.5 minutes to 41.3 minutes. For a total river of 125 kcfs configured with the operations from the Fish Passage Plan for the temporary spillway weirs and for a proposed spillwall, the neutrally-buoyant particle tracking data showed that the river with a spillwall in place had the overall mean residence time increase; however, the residence time for 75% of the powerhouse-released particles to pass a downstream cross section was reduced from 102.4 min to 89 minutes.

  8. John Day Fish Passage and Screening; 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Steve

    2005-02-01

    The primary goal of the Oregon Screens Project was to implement 20 replacement screens projects in the John Day sub-basin and any projects identified in the Umatilla and Walla Walla sub-basins. A secondary goal is to complete a passage project, if one is identified, in any of the above sub-basins. Mid-Columbia ESU listed steelhead and USF&W listed bull trout inhabit these sub-basins and are present at most locations, along with a variety of resident fish species. We also provide assistance to our Enterprise Screen Shop, in the Grande Ronde/Imnaha subbasins, if needed. All projects were designed and implemented under current National Marine Fisheries Service screening and passage criteria.

  9. John Day Fish Passage and Screening; 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Steve

    2004-02-01

    The primary goal of the Oregon Screens Project was to implement 20 replacement screens projects in the John Day sub-basin and any projects identified in the Umatilla and Walla Walla sub-basins. A secondary goal is to complete a passage project, if one is identified, in any of the above sub-basins. Mid-Columbia ESU listed steelhead and USF&W listed bull trout inhabit these sub-basins and are present at most locations, along with a variety of resident fish species. We also provide assistance to our Enterprise Screen Shop, in the Grande Ronde/Imnaha sub-basins, if needed. All projects were designed and implemented under current National Marine Fisheries Service screening and passage criteria.

  10. Survival of Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Free-flowing Snake River and Lower Snake River Reservoirs in 2003 and from McNary Dam Tailrace to John Day Dam Tailrace in the Columbia River from 1999 to 2002, 1999-2003 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, William D.; Axel, Gordon A.; Smith, Steven G.

    2004-12-01

    Nary Dam, PIT tagged them, and released them to the tailrace as part of an evaluation of transportation from McNary Dam in 2002. Estimated survival in 2002 from the tailrace of McNary Dam to the tailrace of John Day Dam was 0.746 (s.e. 0.036). For migration years 1999-2002, we found that in the reach from McNary to John Day Dam reach, travel time was shorter (migration rate was greater) and survival probabilities were greater when flow volume was greater. Survival was also correlated with water temperature: warmer water was associated with decreased survival, and there was an apparent survival threshold at about 19.3 C (above this temperature survival decreased substantially).

  11. John Day Fish Passage and Screening; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hartlerode, Ray; Dabashinsky, Annette; Allen, Steve

    2003-01-28

    This project is necessary to insure that replacement of fish screening devices and fishways meet current NMFS design criteria for the protection of all salmonid life stages. The mission of the fish passage program in Northeast Oregon is to protect and enhance fish populations by assisting private landowners, public landowners, irrigation districts and others by maintaining fish screening devices and fishways. These facilities reduce or eliminate fish loss associated with irrigation withdrawals, and as a result insure fish populations are maintained for enjoyment by present and future generations. Assistance is provided through state and federal programs. This can range from basic technical advice to detailed construction, fabrication and maintenance of screening and passage facilities. John Day screens personnel identified 50 sites for fish screen replacement, and one fish passage project. These sites are located in critical spawning, rearing and migration areas for spring chinook, summer steelhead and bull trout. All projects were designed and implemented to meet current NMFS criteria. It is necessary to have a large number of sites identified due to changes in weather, landowner cooperation and access issues that come up as we try and implement our goal of 21 completed projects.

  12. Study of Wild Spring Chinook Salmon in the John Day River System, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, Robert B.

    1986-02-01

    A study of wild spring chinook salmon was conducted in the John Day River, Oregon: (1) recommend harvest regulations to achieve escapement goals in the John Day River; (2) recommend adtustments in timing of fish passage operations at Columbia River dams that will increase survival of John Day migrants; (3) recommend habitat or environmental improvements that will increase production of spring chinook salmon; (4) determine escapement goals for wild spring chinook salmon in the John Day River; and (5) recommend procedures for hatchery supplementation in the John Day River in the event it becomes necessary to artificially maintain the run of spring chinook salmon. Juveniles were captured as smolts during migration and as fingerlings during summer rearing. Juveniles were coded-wire tagged, and recoveries of tagged adults were used to assess contribution to ocean and Columbia River fisheries, timing of adult migrations through the Columbia River in relation to fishing seasons, and age and size of fish in fisheries. Scoop traps and seines were used to determine timing of smolt migrations through the John Day River. In addition, recoveries of tagged smolts at John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Jones Beach were used to determine migration timing through the Columbia River. We examined freshwater life history of spring chinook salmon in the John Day River and related it to environmental factors. We looked at adult holding areas, spawning, incubation and emergence, fingerling rearing distribution, size and growth of juveniles and scales. Escapement goals fo the John Day River as well as reasons for declines in John Day stocks were determiend by using stock-recruitment analyses. Recommendations for hatchery supplementation in the John Day were based on results from other study objectives.

  13. Johns Hopkins University Announces Frederick CREST Classes for Fall 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Johns Hopkins University’s (JHU) Advanced Academic Programs (AAP) division recently announced two classes that will be hosted at the Frederick Center for Research and Education in Science and Technology (CREST) this fall. According to a JHU press release, the classes are Biochemistry, which is part of the M.S. in Biotechnology program at JHU AAP, and Molecular Biology, a part of the M.S. in Bioinformatics program at JHU AAP.

  14. 76 FR 67206 - Notice of Public Meeting, John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council AGENCY... Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet...

  15. 76 FR 18777 - Notice of Public Meeting, John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council AGENCY... Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet...

  16. 77 FR 16257 - Notice of Public Meeting, John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council AGENCY... Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet...

  17. 76 FR 78691 - Notice of Public Meeting, John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council AGENCY... Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet...

  18. Increasing fall fruit production in short-day strawberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the mid-Atlantic coast region of the United States (30 deg N, 77 deg W), the harvest period for short-day (SD) strawberry cultivars is only 7 weeks long from early May to late June. Strawberry transplants from a new propagation technique that improves fall flowering were grown under high tunnel ...

  19. Geochemical map of the North Fork John Day River Roadless Area, Grant County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, James G.

    1986-01-01

    The North Fork John Day River Roadless Area comprised 21,210 acres in the Umatilla and Wallowa-Whitman National Forests, Grant County, Oregon, about 30 miles northwest of Baker, Oregon. The irregularly shaped area extends for about 1 mile on both sides of a 25-mile segment of the North Fork John Day River from Big Creek on the west to North Fork John Day Campground on the east. Most of the roadless area is in the northern half of the Desolation Butte 15-minute quadrangle. The eastern end of the area is in parts of the Granite and Trout Meadows 7½-minute quadrangles.

  20. Monitoring Fine Sediment; Grande Ronde and John Day Rivers, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, Jonathan J.; Greene, M. Jonas; Purser, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    This project was initiated to monitor surface fine sediment levels and overwinter intrusion of fine sediment in spring chinook salmon spawning habitat in the North Folk John Day and Grande Ronde Rivers, for five years.

  1. 33 CFR 117.881 - John Day River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... after each day's authorized commercial fishing period established by the Columbia River Compact (Washington State Department of Fisheries and the Fish Commission of Oregon) for the Columbia River...

  2. 33 CFR 117.881 - John Day River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... after each day's authorized commercial fishing period established by the Columbia River Compact (Washington State Department of Fisheries and the Fish Commission of Oregon) for the Columbia River...

  3. 33 CFR 117.881 - John Day River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... after each day's authorized commercial fishing period established by the Columbia River Compact (Washington State Department of Fisheries and the Fish Commission of Oregon) for the Columbia River...

  4. 33 CFR 117.881 - John Day River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... after each day's authorized commercial fishing period established by the Columbia River Compact (Washington State Department of Fisheries and the Fish Commission of Oregon) for the Columbia River...

  5. Fall 2008 Congressional Visits Day Focuses on Underfunding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Brian

    2009-03-01

    ``Can't you fill my recruiting schedule with more students?'' a company recruiter recently asked Andreas Kronenberg, professor and head of the Department of Geology and Geophysics at Texas A&M University. Kronenberg gave a simple, honest answer: ``No.'' He shared that anecdote with U.S. Representative Chet Edwards (D-Tex.) to underscore the fact that a number of college students are majoring in subjects other than geosciences due to the lack of secure funding and jobs in that field. Kronenberg had met with Edwards during AGU's fall 2008 Congressional Visits Day (CVD), a 2-day program when more than 60 scientists discussed with their legislators the importance of science funding.

  6. Fall Chinook Acclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, were located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, was located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, targeted to work towards achieving

  7. Fall Chinook Aclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, are located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, is located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, and will ultimately work towards achieving

  8. Technical Review of the CENWP Computational Fluid Dynamics Model of the John Day Dam Forebay

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2010-12-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (CENWP) has developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the John Day forebay on the Columbia River to aid in the development and design of alternatives to improve juvenile salmon passage at the John Day Project. At the request of CENWP, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hydrology Group has conducted a technical review of CENWP's CFD model run in CFD solver software, STAR-CD. PNNL has extensive experience developing and applying 3D CFD models run in STAR-CD for Columbia River hydroelectric projects. The John Day forebay model developed by CENWP is adequately configured and validated. The model is ready for use simulating forebay hydraulics for structural and operational alternatives. The approach and method are sound, however CENWP has identified some improvements that need to be made for future models and for modifications to this existing model.

  9. Fall Chinook Acclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, are located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, is located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, targeted to work towards achieving

  10. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS - John Day Watershed Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2004-08-04

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund the John Day Watershed Restoration Program, which includes projects to improve watershed conditions, resulting in improved fish and wildlife habitat. The project was planned and coordinated by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs through the John Day Basin Office in Prairie City, Oregon. A variety of activities will be implemented, described below. The project will involve the installation of four permanent lay flat diversions (structures) to replace temporary diversions. Two structures would be constructed in Beech Creek, one in Little Beech Creek and one in the John Day River. The structures will replace temporary pushup dams, which were constructed annually of various materials. Installation of the permanent diversion structures eliminates the stream-disturbing activities associated with annual installation of temporary structures. They also will enable fish passage in all flow conditions, an improvement over the temporary structures which can obstruct fish passage under some conditions. Five scour chains will be installed in six sites within the John Day River. The chains will be 3 feet long and consist of 1/4 inch chain. They will be buried within the streambed to monitor the movement of material in the streambed. Other activities that will be implemented include: Installation of off-site water systems in areas where fencing and revegetation projects are implemented, in order to restrict livestock access to waterways; construction of facilities to return irrigation flows to the Johns Day River, including the installation of pipe to replace failing drains or return ditches; installation of pumps to replace temporary diversions; and removal of junipers from approximately 500 acres per year by hand felling.

  11. John Day River Sub-Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project; 2008 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Russ M.; Alley, Pamela D.; Goin Jr, Lonnie

    2009-07-15

    Work undertaken in 2008 included: (1) Seven new fence projects were completed thereby protecting approximately 10.97 miles of streams with 16.34 miles of riparian fence; (2) Renewal of one expired lease was completed thereby continuing to protect 0.75 miles of stream with 1.0 mile of riparian fence. (3) Maintenance of all active project fences (106.54 miles), watergaps (78), spring developments (33) were checked and repairs performed; (3) Planted 1000 willow/red osier on Fox Creek/Henslee property; (4) Planted 2000 willows/red osier on Middle Fork John Day River/Coleman property; (5) Planted 1000 willow/red osier cuttings on Fox Creek/Johns property; (6) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Project in 1984 we have 126.86 miles of stream protected using 211.72 miles of fence protecting 5658 acres. The purpose of the John Day Fish Habitat Enhancement Program is to enhance production of indigenous wild stocks of spring Chinook and summer steelhead within the sub basin through habitat protection, enhancement and fish passage improvement. The John Day River system supports the largest remaining wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead in Northeast Oregon.

  12. 78 FR 6832 - Call for Nominations for the John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council, Oregon/Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... Bureau of Land Management Call for Nominations for the John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council, Oregon.../ Washington John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council (RAC). Citizens who serve on this council will provide...-Snake RAC seeks nominations to fill one vacancy in one category: Category Three--Representatives...

  13. 78 FR 76175 - Notice of Public Meeting for the John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council: Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting for the John Day--Snake Resource Advisory Council..., regarding a public meeting of the John Day/Snake Resource Advisory Council which was scheduled for...

  14. Flow-Net Relationships in the Forebay of John Day Dam, 1982 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgi, Albert E.

    1983-04-01

    During the spring of 1982, the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated a multiyear research program to define the effects of river conditions and dam operations on the current system (flow-net) in the forebay of John Day Dam on the Columbia River and to relate smolt passage behavior to the physical characteristics of the flow-net. Twelve digital, magnetic recording current meters were deployed in a grid within the restricted zone adjacent to the dam on 13 May 1982. Current velocity and direction were monitored until 3 November 1982. During this initial year, research efforts focused on gathering the first general data on flows within the forebay of John Day Dam and developing the computer software necessary to ultimately construct the flow-net model.

  15. Enrollment Data: Community Colleges--Day Division. Fall Semester, 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, T.

    This series of six tables provides fall 1981 data on enrollments in each of the 15 community colleges in Massachusetts and for the system as a whole. Table 1 presents information on the number of freshman, sophomore, and unclassified students who made requests for admission, were qualified applicants, and were notified of admission. In table 2,…

  16. Water Velocity Measurement on an Extended-Length Submerged Bar Screen at John Day Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, Mark A.; Escher, Charles

    2001-04-02

    This report describes a study of water velocity around an extended-length submerged bar screen (ESBS) at John Day Dam. The study was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers by AScI Corporation and MEVATEC Corporation in March of 2000. This report was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. ESBS are being studied as one method for diverting juvenile migrating fish from the dam's turbine intakes into the gate well and through the juvenile fish bypass channels.

  17. Monitoring Fine Sediment; Grande Ronde and John Day Rivers, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Purser, Michael D.; Rhodes, Jonathan J.

    1999-01-01

    Fine sediment levels in spawning substrate have a major effect on salmon survival from egg to smolt. Assessments have consistently concluded that fine sediment is a major problem for salmon in the Grande Ronde and, to a lesser extent, the John Day rivers. It is likely that fine sediment levels in these rivers must be reduced if salmon survival from egg to smolt is to be increased.

  18. Mapping the Riverscape of the Middle Fork John Day River with Structure-from-Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    Aerial photography has proven an efficient method to collect a wide range of continuous variables for large sections of rivers. These data include variables such as the planimetric shape, low-flow and bank-full widths, bathymetry, and sediment sizes. Mapping these variables in a continuous manner allows us to explore the heterogeneity of the river and build a more complete picture of the holistic riverscape. To explore a low-cost option for aerial photography and riverscape mapping, I used the combination of a piloted helicopter and an off-the-shelf digital SLR camera to collect aerial imagery for a 32 km segment of the Middle Fork John Day River in eastern Oregon. This imagery was processed with Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry to produce high-resolution 10 cm orthophotos and digital surface models that were used to extract riverscape variables. The Middle Fork John Day River is an important spawning river for anadromous Chinnook and Steelhead and has been the focus of widespread restoration and conservation activities in response to the legacies of extensive grazing and mining activity. By mapping the riverscape of the Middle Fork John Day, I explored downstream relationships between several geomorphic variables with hyperscale analysis. These riverscape data also provided an opportunity to make a continuous map of habitat suitability for migrating adult Chinook. Both the geomorphic and habitat suitability analysis provide an important assessment of the natural variation in the river and the impact of human modification, both positive and negative.

  19. Abundance and Distribution of Walleye, Northern Squawfish and Smallmouth Bass in John Day Reservoir and Tailrace, 1983 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Nigro, Anthony A.; Uremovich, Barry L.; Elliott, John C.

    1985-04-01

    Walleye, northern squawfish and smallmouth bass abundances were estimated in portions of John Day Reservoir and tailrace using a multiple mark and recapture method. Sampling was conducted from March 28 to September 23, 1983, using gill nets, trap nets, boat electrofishing, angling and an angler survey. A total of 1808 walleye, 6423 northern squawfish and 974 small mouth bass were collected. Abundance was estimated using a modified Schnabel estimator. Discrete populations were defined according to observed movements of recaptured and radiotagged fish. Abundance estimates were corrected for angler harvest, size selectivity by gear and recruitment due to growth during sampling. In addition, the likelihood of biases resulting from differential mortality of marked fish and tag loss was examined. Abundances of walleye with fork lengths greater than 250 mm were estimated as 6877 below John Day Dam and 9,463 in the upper John Day pool. Extensive movements by walleye within pools were observed. Angler harvest of walleye between May 25 and September 6 was estimated as 527 in John Day tailrace and 465 in McNary tailrace. Abundances of northern squawfish with fork lengths greater than 250 mm were estimated to be 32,126 below John Day Dam, 10,841 forebay and 27,771 in upper John Day pool. The estimated number of northern squawfish in the McNary tailrace boat restricted zone after cessation of spill (July 2) was twice the estimated abundance during spill (March 28-July 1). Smallmouth bass abundance was estimated as 1087 below John Day Dam, 1501 in John Day forebay and 3,450 in upper John Day pool. 16 refs., 32 figs., 47 tabs.

  20. Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Kim, Jin A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Wagner, Katie A.; Fischer, Eric S.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Batten, G.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Elder, T.; Etherington, D. J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Miracle, Ann L.; Mitchell, T. D.; Prather, K.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Royer, Ida; Seaburg, Adam; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2013-06-21

    This report presents survival, behavioral, and fish passage results for tagged yearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead as part of a survival study conducted at John Day Dam during spring 2011. This study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead to assist managers in identifying dam operations for compliance testing as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. Survival estimates were based on a paired-release survival model.

  1. John Day River Subbasin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, Jeff A.; Jerome, James P.; Delano, Kenneth H.

    2001-01-01

    During 2000, 3 new projects were completed thereby adding 4.6 miles of stream to the program. Protection for these reaches required the construction of 3.2 miles of riparian fence and 1 livestock watering sites. 5,750 pounds of grass and shrub seed were planted for revegetating ground disturbed during construction. Stream temperatures were monitored on the Middle Fork of the John Day. All project fences, watergaps, spring developments and plantings were checked and repairs performed where needed. We now have 70 miles of stream protected using 111 miles of fence.

  2. Oxbow Conservation Area; Middle Fork John Day River, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Shaun; Smith, Brent; Cochran, Brian

    2003-04-01

    In early 2001, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, through their John Day Basin Office, concluded the acquisition of the Middle Fork Oxbow Ranch. Under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Tribes are required to provided BPA an 'annual written report generally describing the real property interests in the Project, HEP analyses undertaken or in progress, and management activities undertaken or in progress'. This report is to be provided to the BPA by 30 April of each year. This is the first annual report filed for the Oxbow Ranch property.

  3. Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Kim, Jin A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Fischer, Eric S.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Wagner, Katie A.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Miller, Benjamin L.; Miracle, Ann L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Royer, Ida M.; Khan, Fenton; Cushing, Aaron W.; Etherington, D. J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Elder, T.; Batton, George; Johnson, Gary E.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01

    This report presents survival, behavioral, and fish passage results for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon smolts and juvenile steelhead tagged with JSATS acoustic micro-transmitters as part of a survival study conducted at John Day Dam during 2010. This study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead to assist managers in identifying dam operations for compliance testing as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. Survival estimates were based on a single-release survival estimate model.

  4. 77 FR 23747 - Notice of Availability of the Proposed John Day Basin Resource Management Plan and Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... circumstances are cause for the BLM to update these plans. Changed circumstances include, but are not limited to... ACEC that would complement the adjacent John Day Fossil Beds National Monument and partially...

  5. John Day River Subbasin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 1991 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, Jeff A.; Jerome, James P.; Delano, Kenneth H.

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of the John Day Fish Habitat Enhancement Program is to enhance production of indigenous wild stocks of spring chinook and summer steelhead within the subbasin through habitat enhancement and access improvement. The John Day River system supports the largest remaining wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead in northeast Oregon. It is the goal of this program to preserve and enhance the unique genetic component of the stocks. By attaining this goal we will be able to rebuild fish runs in other Columbia River tributaries in the future, if desired. During 1991, 5 leases were signed adding 5.25 miles of stream to the program. Fence construction included 9.95 miles of riparian fence and 15 livestock water crossings. We constructed 3 log wiers for adult salmon holding, added 280 ft. of new channel, and placed 274 fish habitat boulders, 6 trees and 31 rootwads for juvenile rearing. We constructed 15 stream deflectors and 274 linear feet of bank riprap for streambank stabilization.

  6. Monitoring Fine Sediment; Grande Ronde and John Day Rivers, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, Jonathan J.; Greene, M. Jonas; Purser, Michael D.

    2001-01-01

    Fine sediment in spawning substrate has a major effect on salmon survival from egg to smolt. Basin-wide restoration plans have established targets for fine sediment levels in spawning habitat. The project was initiated to monitor surface fine sediment levels and overwinter intrusion of fine sediment in spring chinook salmon spawning habitat in the North Fork John Day (NFJDR) and Grande Ronde Rivers, for five years. The project is also investigating the potential relationship between surface fine levels and overwinter sedimentation. It will provide data to assess trends in substrate conditions in monitored reaches and whether trends are consistent with efforts to improve salmon habitat conditions. The data on the magnitude of overwinter sedimentation will also be used to estimate salmon survival from egg to emergence. In Sept. 1998, 1999, and Aug. 2000, sites for monitoring overwinter sedimentation were established in salmon spawning habitat in the upper Grande Ronde River, Catherine Creek (a Grande Ronde tributary), the North Fork John Day River (NFJDR), and Granite Creek (a NFJDR tributary). Surface fine sediment levels were measured in these reaches via the grid method and visually estimated to test the relative accuracy of these two methods. In 1999 and 2000, surface fine sediment was also estimated via pebble counts at selected reaches to allow comparison of results among the methods. Overwintering substrate samples were collected in April 1999 and April-May 2000 to estimate the amount of overwinter sedimentation in clean gravels in spawning habitat. Monitoring methods and locations are described.

  7. Oxbow Conservation Area; Middle Fork John Day River, Annual Report 2003-2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, Brian

    2004-02-01

    In early 2001, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, through their John Day Basin Office, concluded the acquisition of the Oxbow Ranch, now know as the Oxbow Conservation Area (OCA). Under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Tribes are required to provided BPA an 'annual written report generally describing the real property interests in the Project, HEP analyses undertaken or in progress, and management activities undertaken or in progress'. The project during 2003 was crippled due to the aftermath of the BPA budget crisis. Some objectives were not completed during the first half of this contract because of limited funds in the 2003 fiscal year. The success of this property purchase can be seen on a daily basis. Water rights were utilized only in the early, high water season and only from diversion points with functional fish screens. After July 1, all of the OCA water rights were put instream. Riparian fences on the river, Ruby and Granite Boulder creeks continued to promote important vegetation to provide shade and bank stabilization. Hundreds of willow, dogwood, Douglas-fir, and cottonwood were planted along the Middle Fork John Day River. Livestock grazing on the property was carefully managed to ensure the protection of fish and wildlife habitat, while promoting meadow vigor and producing revenue for property taxes. Monitoring of property populations, resources, and management activities continued in 2003 to build a database for future management of this and other properties in the region.

  8. A Technique to Promote Fall Flowering in Short-Day Strawberry Varieties.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Short-day strawberry cultivars bloom in spring under mid-Atlantic coast growing conditions. Day-neutral varieties produce flowers from late summer to early winter, but fall flowering in short-day plants during that time is rare in this region. The intent of this presentation is to describe a new m...

  9. Upstream migration of Pacific lampreys in the John Day River, Oregon: Behavior, timing, and habitat use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, T. Craig; Bayer, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Adult Pacific lamprey migration and habitat preferences for over-winter holding and spawning, and larval rearing in tributaries to the Columbia River are not well understood. The John Day River is one such tributary where larval and adult stages of this species have been documented, and its free-flowing character provided the opportunity to study migration of Pacific lampreys unimpeded by passage constraints. Forty-two adult Pacific lampreys were captured in the John Day River near its mouth during their upstream migration. Pacific lampreys were surgically implanted with radio transmitters and released onsite, and tracked by fixed-site, aerial, and terrestrial telemetry methods for nearly one year. Adults moved upstream exclusively at night, with a mean rate of 11.1 ?? 6.3 km/day. They halted upstream migration by September, and held a single position for approximately six months in the lateral margins of riffles and glides, using boulders for cover. More than half of Pacific lampreys resumed migration in March before ending movement in early May. Pacific lampreys that resumed migration in spring completed a median of 87% of their upstream migration before over-winter holding. Upon completing migration. Pacific lampreys briefly held position before beginning downstream movement at the end of May. Though not directly observed, halting migration and movement downstream were likely the result of spawning and death. Gains in adult Pacific lamprey passage through the Columbia River hydrosystem and tributaries may be made by improvements that would expedite migration during spring and summer and increase the quantity and variety of cover and refuge opportunities. ?? 2005 by the Northwest Scientific Association. All rights reserved.

  10. Implementing world class manufacturing ideas: A case study at the Dalles/John Day Dams

    SciTech Connect

    Armentrout, T.B.

    1995-12-31

    The key question is can a very autocratically lead, vertically defined organization change to a horizontal, employee empowered structure where the employees have significant influence? All too often managers look to a simple and easy procedure which will bring about dramatic change, however this kind of dreaming is naive. {open_quotes}For every complex question there is a simple answer, and it is wrong!{close_quotes} This experience described in this case indicates the transformation from the autocratic extreme to the team model takes a long time and is a difficult process. To begin the transformation at The Dalles and John Day has taken concerted effort over six years to set the foundations in place. Guiding the organization to a complete restructuring will take at least several more years. Managers and organizations who are not willing to make the long term commitment need not attempt the change!

  11. John Day River Subbasin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Russ M.; Delano, Kenneth H.; Jerome, James P.

    2002-07-01

    Work undertaken in 2001 included: (1) 3335 structure posts were pounded on six new projects thereby protecting 10 miles of stream (2) Completion of 1000 ft. of barbed wire fence and one watergap on the Middle Fork of the John Day River/ Forrest property. (3) Fence removal of 5010 ft. of barbed wire fence on the Meredith project. (4) Maintenance of all active project fences (66 miles), watergaps (76), spring developments (32) and plantings were checked and repairs performed. (5) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Project in 1984 we have 63.74 miles of stream protected using 106.78 miles of fence. With the addition of the Restoration and Enhancement Projects we have 180.64 miles of fence protecting 120.6 miles of stream.

  12. Monitoring of Juvenile Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Summer 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.

    2012-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha; CH0) at John Day Dam (JDA) during summer 2010. This study was conducted by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC) and the University of Washington (UW). The study was designed to estimate the effects of 30% and 40% spill treatment levels on single release survival rates of CH0 passing through two reaches: (1) the dam, and 40 km of tailwater, (2) the forebay, dam, and 40 km of tailwater. The study also estimated additional passage performance measures which are stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  13. Benefits of increased streamflow: The case of the John Day River Steelhead Fishery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Neal S.; Adams, Richard M.

    1988-11-01

    Conflicts between instream water uses such as fish production and traditional out-of-stream uses are an important water resource issue. One criterion for evaluating the merits of alternative water allocations is economic efficiency. This study uses an integrated approach to measure the recreational steelhead fishery benefits of incremental streamflow changes in the John Day River in Oregon. The analysis combines a steelhead fishery production model with a contingent valuation assessment of changes in fishing quality to obtain estimates of the marginal value of water in producing fishing quality. The results suggest that increased summer flows to enhance fishing have a marginal value of about $2.40 acre-foot. When expressed in terms of water actually consumed, the value may be up to 10 times higher. These values are sensitive to the location of flow alterations in the river, potential for downstream uses and number of anglers in the fishery.

  14. Petrogenesis of Age Equivalent John Day Ash Flows near Prineville, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patridge, K. A.; Wolff, J. A.; McClaughry, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Early Oligocene volcanism in central Oregon underwent a chemical shift from the chiefly calc-alkaline intermediate rocks of the Clarno Formation (~54Ma - ~33Ma) to the primarily bimodal alkali-basalt and rhyolite assemblage of the John Day Formation (~39Ma - ~20Ma). The western facies of the John Day Formation between the Blue Mountains uplift and the Cascade Range contains several rhyolitic ash flow tuffs (members A-I) around Ashwood and Antelope as well as several age equivalent units to the south near Prineville. Suggested sources for these units range from (1) vents at or near the present Cascade Range, (2) isolated rhyolite domes west of the Blue Mountains, and (3) the Crooked River Caldera. Preliminary whole rock data of these age equivalent rhyolitic ash flows reveal two chemical types that are characterized by relative Zr contents. Both groups plot within the A-type rhyolite range on a Ga/Al diagram, though the high- Zr group has a stronger A-type affinity with higher concentrations of HFS elements (Zr, Hf, Ti), Fe and Ba, but is less enriched in Th and light rare earths. The low- Zr group tends to be less enriched in HFS elements, Fe and Ba, and is slightly more enriched in Th and light rare earths. Neither group shows significant Na-Ta depletions, and LIL/HFS element ratios are not decoupled to a degree (except for Ba, Sr, and Rb from feldspar fractionation) that would suggest a subduction related origin for these units. These data support petrogenesis of the rhyolites in an intraplate extensional setting, rather than subduction related arc volcanism typified by the Clarno Formation. Extension may have developed in a back-arc regime as a result of westward migration of the subduction zone.

  15. Abundance and Distribution of Walleye, Northern Squawfish and Smallmouth Bass in John Day Reservoir and Tailrace, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Nigro, Anthony A.; Faler, Michael P.; Elliott, John C.

    1985-06-01

    Walleye, northern squawfish and smallmouth bass abundances were estimated in John Day Reservoir using a modified Schnabel multiple mark and recapture estimator. Sampling was conducted from March 25 to August 31 using gill nets, trap nets, boat electrofishing, angling and an angler survey. A total of 858 walleye, 4552 northern squawfish, and 1599 smallmouth bass were collected. Discrete populations were defined according to observed movements of recaptured and radiotagged fish. Abundance estimates were corrected for angler harvest, size selectivity of gear, tag loss and recruitment due to growth during sampling. In addition, the likelihood of biases resulting from differential mortality of marked fish was examined. Abundances in John Day pool of walleye and northern squawfish with fork lengths greater than 250 mm were estimated at 15,832 and 80,486. Abundances of smallmouth bass with fork lengths greater than 200 mm were estimated to be 2596 in lower John Day pool and 1791 in upper John Day pool. Walleye and northern squawfish moved throughout the pool, whereas movements by smallmouth bass were more localized. Angler harvests of walleye and smallmouth bass in upper John Day pool from April through August were estimated at 309 and 584 fish. Angler harvest of northern squawfish was negligible. Most walleye collected were age 5. The most abundant age groups of northern squawfish and smallmouth bass were 10 and 2. 10 refs., 28 figs., 12 tabs.

  16. John Day Basin Spring Chinook Salmon Escapement and Productivity Monitoring; Fish Research Project Oregon, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, Richard W.; Claire, Glenda M.; Seals, Jason

    2002-01-01

    The four objectives of this report are: (1) Estimate annual spawner escapement and number of spring chinook salmon redds in the John Day River basin; (2) Determine sex ratio, age composition, length-at-age of spawners, and proportion of natural spawners that are hatchery origin strays; (3) Determine adequacy of historic index surveys for indexing spawner abundance and for detecting changes in spawner distribution through time; and (4) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival for spring chinook salmon emigrating from the John Day River basin.

  17. North Fork John Day Dredge Tailings Restoration Project Final Report 1997-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, John A.

    2002-12-01

    The USDA Forest Service (USFS) and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) worked together to rehabilitate 2.1 miles of Clear Creek floodplain, a tributary of the North Fork John Day River Basin. Dredge tailing were deposited from mining operations on Clear Creek's floodplain from the 1930's to the 1950's. These tailing confined the stream channel and degraded the floodplain. The work was completed by moving dredge tailing piles adjacent to the Clear Creek channel, using track-mounted excavators and dump trucks. A caterpillar tractor was used to contour the material placed outside the immediate floodplain, blending it into the hillside. The restored floodplain was very near channel bankfull level following excavation and contoured to accept future flood flows. Monitoring was initiated through pre and post-project photo points and cross-section measurements. Work was completed in two efforts. In 1997 and 1998 floodplain restoration was adjacent to the reconstruction of Road 13 from the junction with Road 10 from Clear Creek River Mile 1.9 to 3.1 for a distance of 1.2 miles. In 1999 the Environmental Assessment for Lower Clear Creek--Granite Creek Floodplain Restoration Project was completed for work proposed on Clear Creek from the mouth up to River mile 1.9 and the Granite Creek floodplain from River miles 5.9 to 7.7. Restoration proposed in the 1999 Environmental Assessment is the subject of this report.

  18. Effects of Engineered Log Jams on Channel Morphology, Middle Fork of the John Day River, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffin, J.; McDowell, P. F.

    2015-12-01

    Engineered log jams (ELJs) were constructed on the Middle Fork of the John Day River in eastern Oregon as part of a large river restoration project. These log structures were designed to address many of the restoration goals including creating scour pools, creating and maintaining a sinuous river planform, providing fish cover, and increasing complexity of fish habitat. This study uses geomorphic change detection techniques to monitor topographic change under and around the 26 log structures in two different river reaches over a six to seven year period. This study finds that the ELJs are remaining stable within the river, even following a large flood in 2011. While some pools are shallowing or shifting laterally slightly, in general they are maintaining deep pool habitat. The study provides insight into which log structure variables are most related to the patterns and amounts of aggradation and degradation. Analysis suggests that volume of aggradation is related to both porosity and volume of the log structures, while the area of aggradation was correlated with porosity, as well as, the proportion of logs within bankfull. Understanding the geomorphic changes to the riverbed in response to the placement of the ELJs can influence the design and future effectiveness of ELJs.

  19. John Day River Subbasin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Russ M.; Alley, Pamela D.; Delano, Kenneth H.

    2006-03-01

    Work undertaken in 2005 included: (1) Four new fence projects were completed thereby protecting 7.55 miles of stream with 9.1 miles of new riparian fence (2) Fence removal 1.7 miles of barbed wire. (3) Completed three spring developments (repair work on two BLM springs on Cottonwood Creek (Dayville), 1 solar on Rock Creek/ Collins property). (4) Dredge tail leveling completed on 0.9 miles of the Middle Fork of the John Day River (5) Cut, hauled and placed 30 junipers on Indian Creek/Kuhl property for bank stability. (6) Collected and planted 1500 willow cuttings on Mountain Creek/Jones property. (7) Conducted steelhead redd counts on Lake Cr./Hoover property and Cottonwood Cr./Mascall properties (8) Seeded 200 lbs of native grass seed on projects where the sites were disturbed by fence construction activities. (9) Maintenance of all active project fences (72.74 miles), watergaps (60), spring developments (30) were checked and repairs performed. (10) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Program in 1984 we have installed 156.06 miles of riparian fence on leased property protecting 88.34 miles of anadromous fish bearing stream. With the addition of the Restoration and Enhancement Projects from 1996-2001, where the landowner received the materials, built and maintained the project we have a total of 230.92 miles of fence protecting 144.7 miles of stream and 3285 acres of riparian habitat.

  20. 75 FR 33997 - Safety Zone; McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project, Columbia River, Hermiston, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project... zone would subject the public to the hazards associated with the reconstruction of the transmission... transmission towers on the banks of the Columbia River near Hermiston, Oregon between June 10, 2010 and...

  1. Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-02-01

    The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  2. Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-06-01

    The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  3. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Measurements in the Tailrace at John Day Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Chris B.; Dibrani, Berhon; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Titzler, P. Scott; Dennis, Gary W.

    2006-01-30

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) were used to measure water velocities in the tailrace at John Day Dam over a two-week period in February 2005. Data were collected by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Hydraulic Design Section, Portland District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The objective of this project was therefore to collect field measurements of water velocities in the near-field draft tube exit zone as well as the far-field tailrace to be used for improving these models. Field data were collected during the project using five separate ADCPs. Mobile ADCP data were collected using two ADCPs mounted on two separate boats. Data were collected by either holding the boat on-station at pre-defined locations for approximately 10 minutes or in moving transect mode when the boat would move over large distances during the data collection. Results from the mobile ADCP survey indicated a complex hydrodynamic flow field in the tailrace downstream of John Day Dam. A large gyre was noted between the skeleton section of the powerhouse and non-spilling portion of the spillway. Downstream of the spillway, the spillway flow is constrained against the navigation lock guide wall, and large velocities were noted in this region. Downstream of the guide wall, velocities decreased as the spillway jet dispersed. Near the tailrace island, the flow split was measured to be approximately equal on Day 2 (25.4 kcfs spillway/123 kcfs total). However, approximately 60% of the flow passed along the south shore of the island on Day 1 (15.0 kcfs spillway/150 kcfs total). At a distance of 9000 ft downstream of the dam, flows had equalized laterally and were generally uniform over the cross section. The collection of water velocities near the draft tube exit of an operating turbine unit is not routine, and equipment capable of measuring 3D water velocities in these zones are at the forefront of hydraulic measurement technology. Although the feasibility of

  4. Falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems with circulation, thyroid or nervous systems. Some medicines make people dizzy. Eye problems or alcohol can be factors. Any of these things can make a fall more likely. Babies and young children are also at risk of falling - off ...

  5. Comparing effects of active and passive restoration on the Middle Fork John Day River, NE Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, P. F.; Goslin, M.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2000, cattle grazing has been eliminated on over 14 km of the upper Middle Fork John Day. Starting in 2008, active restoration (log structures with dug pools, woody vegetation planting, and modifications to increase channel-floodplain hydrologic connectivity) was implemented on nearly 6 km within the cattle exclosure length. Implementation of active and passive restoration strategies in the same and adjacent reaches allows comparison of these two approaches. We have been monitoring these reaches since 2008. Unexpectedly in response to grazing exclosure, a native sedge, Carex nudata (torrent sedge), has exploded in population. C. nudata grows in the active channel, anchoring itself tightly to the gravel-cobble river bed with a dense root network. As a result, C. nudata has changed erosion and sedimentation patterns including bank erosion, channel bed scour, and island formation. We present data on fish cover increases due to C. nudata and log structures, and on channel complexity before and after restoration. Both active and passive restorations are increasing channel complexity and juvenile fish cover, although in different ways. Fish cover provided by active and passive restoration are similar in area but different in depth and position, with C. nudata fish cover generally shallower and partly mid-channel. Residual pool depth is larger in log structure pools than in C. nudata scour pools, but C. nudata pools are more numerous in some reaches. By producing frequent, small scour features and small islands, it can be argued that C. nudata is increasing hydraulic complexity more than the large, meander-bend pools at log structures, but this is hard to quantify. C. nudata has also stabilized active bars, perhaps changing the bedload sediment budget. Positive habitat benefits of active restoration appear to be greater in the short term, but over the long term (20 years or more) effects of C. nudata may be comparable or greater.

  6. Geomorphic Effects of Engineered Log Jams in River Restoration, Middle Fork John Day River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffin, J.; McDowell, P. F.

    2014-12-01

    The Middle Fork of the John Day River (MFJD) Intensively Monitored Watershed in eastern Oregon is a multi-phase restoration implementation and monitoring project. MFJD is a tributary to the Colombia and is part of one of the longest free flowing rivers systems in the continental United States. It is a gravel and cobble bed river with a drainage area of 2,100 km2. The river has endured extensive channel and floodplain degradation from years of channel alteration and straightening due to human influences including dredge mining, ranching, and farming. As part of the river restoration project on the MFJD, engineered log jams have been constructed to address many of the restoration goals including creating scour pools, inhibiting bank erosion, creating and maintaining a sinuous river planform, and increasing complexity of fish habitat. There is a need for more detailed understanding on ELJ channel morphologic effects and how site-specific characteristics and differences in log jam infrastructure interact to create the in-channel features over timescales longer than a few years. This study uses detailed channel bed topographic surveys collected either with a total station or RTK-GPS technology. Geomorphic change detection techniques are utilized to monitor topographic change under and around the 26 log structures in two different river reaches over a six to seven year period The log structures are often associated with deepening of pools as desired, but also some structures show sedimentation under the structure. Differences in the patterns will be assessed based on the design, location, and specific characteristics of the log structures; variables include number and placement of logs, volume of structure, location on meander bend, and sediment sizes.

  7. Feeding Activity, Rate of Consumption, Daily Ration and Prey Selection of Major Predators in John Day Reservoir, 1986 : Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Poe, Thomas P.; United States. Bonneville Power Administration; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; National Fishery Research Center

    1987-02-01

    This report summarizes activities in 1986 to determine the significance of predation on juvenile salmonids in John Day Reservoir. Salmonids were the single most important food item (by weight) for northern squawfish (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) at McNary tailrace during all sampling periods and at John Day forebay during July. Salmonids accounted for 23.7% of the diet of walleye (Stizostedion vitreum vitreum) in July 1986, which was higher than in previous years (although the sample size examined was low). Salmonids contributed little to smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) diet but comprised about 25% of the diet of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). Composition of prey taxa in beach seine catches in July 1986 was similar to previous years with chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha), largescale sucker (Catostomus macrocheilus), and sand roller (Percopsis transmontana) dominating the catch.

  8. Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.

    2012-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare dam passage survival, at two spill treatment levels, of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at John Day Dam during spring 2010. The two treatments were 30% and 40% spill out of total project discharge. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal 0.015. The study also estimated forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. However, by agreement among the stakeholders, this study was not an official BiOp compliance test because the long-term passage measures at John Day Dam have yet to be finalized and another year of spill-treatment testing was desired.

  9. Evaluating the effectiveness of floodplain restoration on the North Fork John Day River, Northeast Oregon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifton, C. F.; Blanton, P.; Long, W.; Walterman, M. T.; McDowell, P. F.; Maus, P.

    2007-12-01

    Over the last decade hundreds of river restoration projects intended to maintain, protect, and restore watersheds, rivers, and habitat for native species in the Pacific Northwest have been implemented. By some counts, investment in watershed restoration exceeds hundreds of millions of dollars annually yet the effectiveness of these efforts remains an elusive question (Roni, 2005). Remote sensing and GIS technologies show great promise for large-scale river monitoring, however most natural resource organizations who implement these projects have limited budget and staff and would benefit from simple, low cost monitoring techniques that use readily available imagery. We used 1:24000 digitized orthorectified resource imagery from 1995, and National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) digital orthophotography from 2005 to assess the effectiveness of floodplain restoration on a 16 km reach of the North Fork John Day River. Between 1993 and 1997 this section was restored by mechanically removing, reshaping, and revegetating cobble-boulder tailings piles left from dredge mining. The project was intended to directly improve floodplain function (i.e. inundation, riparian habitat) and indirectly improve instream habitat (pools, spawning) by reconnecting the active river channel with a reconstructed floodplain surface. Project effectiveness was not well documented initially in terms of quantifying floodplain functional area improvement or channel condition and response at the river-reach scale. Our objectives were to field-verify remote sensing measurements of response variables to test the applicability of available remote sensing imagery for project effectiveness monitoring, and to quantify adjustment in river response variables, using a "before-after" case study approach. Bracketing restoration activities with 1995 and 2000 imagery, we developed and tested methods for acquisition and processing of digital imagery and identified a core set of response variables to sample

  10. Annual Progress Report Fish Research Project Oregon : Project title, Evaluation of Habitat Improvements -- John Day River.

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Erik A.

    1984-01-01

    This report summarizes data collected in 1983 to evaluate habitat improvements in Deer, Camp, and Clear creeks, tributaries of the John Day River. The studies are designed to evaluate changes in abundance of spring chinook and summer steelhead due to habitat improvement projects and to contrast fishery benefits with costs of construction and maintenance of each project. Structure types being evaluated are: (1) log weirs, rock weirs, log deflectors, and in stream boulders in Deer Creek; (2) log weirs in Camp Creek; and (3) log weir-boulder combinations and introduced spawning gravel in Clear Creek. Abundance of juvenile steelhead ranged from 16% to 119% higher in the improved (treatment) area than in the unimproved (control) area of Deer Creek. However, abundance of steelhead in Camp Creek was not significantly different between treatment and control areas. Chinook and steelhead abundance in Clear Creek was 50% and 25% lower, respectively in 1983, than the mean abundance estimated in three previous years. The age structure of steelhead was similar between treatment and control areas in Deer and Clear creeks. The treatment area in Camp Creek, however, had a higher percentage of age 2 and older steelhead than the control. Steelhead redd counts in Camp Creek were 36% lower in 1983 than the previous five year average. Steelhead redd counts in Deer Creek were not made in 1983 because of high streamflows. Chinook redds counted in Clear Creek were 64% lower than the five year average. Surface area, volume, cover, and spawning gravel were the same or higher than the corresponding control in each stream except in Deer Creek where there was less available cover and spawning gravel in sections with rock weirs and in those with log deflectors, respectively. Pool:riffle ratios ranged from 57:43 in sections in upper Clear Creek with log weirs to 9:91 in sections in Deer Creek with rock weirs. Smolt production following habitat improvements is estimated for each stream

  11. Oxbow Conservation Area; Middle Fork John Day River, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, Brian; Smith, Brent

    2003-07-01

    In early 2001, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, through their John Day Basin Office, concluded the acquisition of the Oxbow Ranch, now know as the Oxbow Conservation Area (OCA). Under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Tribes are required to provided BPA an 'annual written report generally describing the real property interests in the Project, HEP analyses undertaken or in progress, and management activities undertaken or in progress'. The 2002 contract period was well funded and the second year of the project. A new manager started in April, allowing the previous manager to focus his efforts on the Forrest Ranch acquisition. However, the Oxbow Habitat manager's position was vacant from October through mid February of 2003. During this time, much progress, mainly O&M, was at a minimum level. Many of the objectives were not completed during this contract due to both the size and duration needed to complete such activities (example: dredge mine tailings restoration project) or because budget crisis issues with BPA ending accrual carryover on the fiscal calendar. Although the property had been acquired a year earlier, there were numerous repairs and discoveries, which on a daily basis could pull personnel from making progress on objectives for the SOW, aside from O&M objectives. A lack of fencing on a portion of the property's boundary and deteriorating fences in other areas are some reasons much time was spent chasing trespassing cattle off of the property. The success of this property purchase can be seen on a daily basis. Water rights were used seldom in the summer of 2002, with minor irrigation water diverted from only Granite Boulder Creek. Riparian fences on the river, Ruby and Granite Boulder creeks help promote important vegetation to provide shade and bank stabilization. Trees planted in this and past years are growing and will someday provide cover fish and wildlife. Even grazing on the property was

  12. John Day Basin Spring Chinook Salmon Escapement and Productivity Monitoring; Fish Research Project Oregon, 1998-1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Jonasson, Brian C.; Albaladejo, Victor D.; Carmichael, Richard W.

    1999-12-01

    The John Day River basin supports one of the healthiest naturally-produced populations of spring chinook in the mid-Columbia River basin. The study of life history and natural escapement conducted from 1978 to 1985 (Lindsay et al. 1986) provided valuable information on production and productivity of the John Day River spring chinook. With the exception of two years since completion of the study in 1985 (1989 and 1995), spring chinook spawning surveys were conducted in index areas only and have not provided adequate information to assess age composition, progeny-to-parent production values, and estimate natural spawning escapement. The PATH project (Marmorek and Peters 1996) has identified the John Day basin spring chinook as an index population for assessing the effects of alternative future management actions on salmon stocks in the Columbia Basin. To meet the data needs as an index stock, sufficient annual estimates of spawner escapement, age composition, and smolt-to-adult survival are essential. There is need to determine the annual spawner escapement and age composition for the John Day basin spring chinook to provide us the ability to estimate progeny-to-parent production for each brood year. This need can be met by expanding the annual chinook spawning surveys, estimating the annual escapement, and determining age composition by scale pattern analyses. This project provides information as directed under two measures of the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Measure 4.3C specifies that the key indicator populations should be monitored to provide detailed stock status information. In addition, measure 7.1C identifies the need for collection of population status, life history, and other data on wild and naturally spawning populations. This project was developed in direct response to recommendations and needs of the PATH project, the Fish and Wildlife Program, and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Multi-Year Implementation Plan.

  13. Compliance Monitoring of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at John Day Dam during the spring and summer outmigrations in 2012. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 for spring migrants and greater than or equal to 0.93 for summer migrants, estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal to 0.015. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 3 km downstream of the dam, as well as the forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and fish passage efficiency (FPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords (Fish Accords). A virtual/paired-release design was used to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam. The approach included releases of smolts, tagged with acoustic micro-transmitters, above John Day Dam that contributed to the formation of a virtual release at the face of John Day Dam. A survival estimate from this release was adjusted by a paired release below John Day Dam. A total of 3376 yearling Chinook salmon, 5726 subyearling Chinook salmon, and 3239 steelhead smolts were used in the virtual releases. Sample sizes for the below-dam paired releases (R2 and R3, respectively) were 997 and 995 for yearling Chinook salmon smolts, 986 and 983 for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts, and 1000 and 1000 for steelhead smolts. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tags were manufactured by Advanced Telemetry Systems. Model SS300 tags, weighing 0.304 g in air, were surgically implanted in yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon, and Model SS130 tag, weighing 0.438 g in air, were surgically implanted in juvenile steelhead for this investigation. The intent of the spring study was to estimate dam passage survival during both 30% and 40% spill conditions. The two

  14. Geologic Reconnaissance of the Antelope-Ashwood Area, North-Central Oregon: With Emphasis on the John Day Formation of Late Oligocene and Early Miocene Age

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, Dallas L.

    1964-01-01

    This report briefly describes the geology of an area of about 750 square miles in Jefferson, Wasco, Crook, and Wheeler Counties, Oregon. About 16,000 feet of strata that range in age from pre-Tertiary to Quaternary are exposed. These include the following units: pre-Tertiary slate, graywacke, conglomerate, and meta-andesite; Clarno Formation of Eocene age - lava flows, volcanic breccia, tuff, and tuffaceous mudstone, chiefly of andesitic composition; John Day Formation of late Oligocene and early Miocene age - pyroclastic rocks, flows, and domes, chiefly of rhyolitic composition; Columbia River Basalt of middle Miocene age - thick, columnar jointed flows of very fine grained dense dark-gray basalt; Dalles Formation of Pliocene age - bedded tuffaceous sandstone, siltstone, and conglomerate; basalt of Pliocene or Pleistocene age - lava flows of porous-textured olivine basalt; and Quaternary loess, landslide debris, and alluvium. Unconformities separate pre-Tertiary rocks and Clarno Formation, Clarno and John Day Formations, John Day Formation and Columbia River Basalt, and Columbia River Basalt and Dalles Formation. The John Day Formation, the only unit studied in detail, consists of about 4,000 feet of tuff, lapilli tuff, strongly to weakly welded rhyolite ash flows, and less abundant trachyandesite flows and rhyolite flows and domes. The formation was divided into nine mappable members in part of the area, primarily on the basis of distinctive ledge-forming welded ash-flow sheets. Most of the sheets are composed of stony rhyolite containing abundant lithophysae and sparse phenocrysts. One sheet contains 10 to 20 percent phenocrysts, mostly cryptoperthitic soda sanidine, but including less abundant quartz, myrmekitic intergrowths of quartz and sanidine, and oligoclase. The rhyolitic ash flows and lava flows were extruded from nearby vents, in contrast to some of the interbedded air-fall tuff and lapilli tuff of dacitic and andesitic composition that may have been

  15. Timing of cut-and-fill sequences in the John Day Formation (Eocene-Oligocene), Painted Hills area, central Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Bestland, E.A.; Retallack, G.J. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Swisher, C.C. III ); Fremd, T.J. )

    1993-04-01

    Large-scale cut-and-fill features in the Eocene-Oligocene part of the John Day Formation in the Pained Hills area of central Oregon can be interpreted as terrestrial depositional sequences, mapped as lithostratigraphic units, and correlated to North American Land Mammal Ages (NALMA). New laser-fusion 40Ar/39Ar single-crystal ages from the John Day Formation provide evidence for the timing of these sequences and a revised placement of the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. The sequences are bound by erosional surfaces that have relief of up to 60 m, are marked in places by claystone breccias full of reworked soil clasts, and separate otherwise conformable strata. The lowermost depositional sequence in the John Day Formation contains very well developed, Fe- and Al-rich paleosols, laterite horizons, and the welded tuff of member A (39.7 my), and probably correlates to the Duchesean and Chadronian NALMA. These brick-rid claystones are sharply truncated by prominent detrital laterite horizon. Overlying this basal sequence is a second sequence of much less well developed paleosols, abundant tuffs and lacustrine tuffaceous claystones. This sequence contains a distinctive biotite tuff (33 my) and the type locality of the Bridge Creek fossil flora and probably correlates to the Orellan NALMA. Above this biotite tuff are alternating red, dark gray, and tan paleosols and a prominent crystal vitric tuff (32.7 my). The Eocene-Oligocene boundary lies between these two sequences, associated with the laterite horizon that truncates the basal red beds. A major truncation surface cuts this sequence and is overlain by a third sequence of thin red paleosols which probably correlates with the Whitneyan NALMA. Above this is a fourth sequence (Arikareean NALMA) consisting of greenish-tan paleosols, a crystal vitric tuff near its base (29.8 my) and the Picture Gorge Ignimbrite (28.7 my).

  16. John Day Basin Spring Chinook Salmon Escapement and Productivity Monitoring; Fish Research Project Oregon, 1999-2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ruzycki, James R.; Wilson, Wayne H.; Carmichael, Richard W.

    2002-01-01

    The John Day River basin supports one of the healthiest populations of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the entire Columbia River basin. Spring chinook salmon in this basin are therefore, used as an important index stock to measure the effects of future management actions on other salmon stocks in the Columbia basin. To meet the data requirements as an index stock, we estimated annual spawner escapement, age-structure, and smolt-to-adult survival. This information will allow us to estimate progeny-to-parent production for each brood year. To estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates, 1,852 chinook smolts were tagged with PIT tags from 3 March to 5 May, 2000. Length of captured smolts varied, ranging from 80 to 147 mm fork length (mean = 113 mm). These fish will be monitored for PIT tags as returning adults at dams and during future spawning ground surveys. During spawning ground surveys, a total of 351.3 km of stream were surveyed resulting in the observation of 478 redds. When expanded, we estimated total number of redds at 481 and total number of spawners at 1,583 fish in the John Day River basin. We estimated that 13% of the redds were in the mainstem John Day, 27% in the Middle Fork, 34% in the North Fork, and 26% were in the Granite Creek basin. Sampled carcasses had a sex ratio comprised of 53% females and 47% males with an age structure comprised of 0.5% age-2, 6.3% age-3, 88.7% age-4, and 4.5% age-5 fish. Five of the 405 carcasses examined had fin clips suggesting they were of hatchery origin. The 1999 index redd count total for the North Fork, Mainstem, and Granite Creek was lower than the 1999 average (535) but well within the range of annual redd counts during this period. The index redd count for the Middle Fork was higher than the 1990's average (92) but considerably lower than the average from 1978-1985 (401). Although quite variable over the past 40 years, the number of redds in the John Day River basin during 1999 was well within the

  17. Comparison of Stream Restoration and Vegetation Restoration on Stream Temperature in the Middle Fork John Day River, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diabat, M.; Wondzell, S. M.; Haggerty, R.

    2013-12-01

    Stream temperature is an important component of aquatic ecosystems. During the past century, various anthropogenic activities (such as timber harvest, mining, and agriculture) reduced riparian vegetation and channel complexity along many streams around the world. As a result, stream temperature increased and suitable habitat for cool- and cold-water organisms declined. Stream temperatures are expected to increase even more under future climate. The effects of warmer climate and anthropogenic activities are proposed to be mitigated by restoration projects aimed to reduce stream temperatures. Common restoration practices are replanting natural vegetation along stream banks and restoring channel complexity. The Middle Fork John Day River, in northeastern Oregon, USA is an example of such a process. We modeled stream temperature along a 37-km section of the Middle Fork John Day River for current and projected conditions of climate, restored riparian vegetation along 6.6-km, and restored channel meanders along 1.5 km. Preliminary simulations suggest that if current riparian vegetation remains unchanged, an average summertime air warming of 4°C increased the 7-day average daily maximum (7DADM) by about 1.3°C. However, restored riparian vegetation reduced the 7DADM by about 0.7°C relative to the current temperature. Restored channel meanders reduced the 7DADM by less than 0.05°C relative to the current temperature. These preliminary simulations assume no hyporheic exchange and riparian vegetation that is 10 m tall and has 30% canopy density.

  18. Statistics of Public Elementary and Secondary Day Schools, Fall 1972: Pupils, Instructional and Noninstructional Staff, Expenditures and Salaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Betty J.

    For the 19th consecutive year the U.S. Office of Education, assisted by education officials from the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the outlying areas of the United States, has conducted a fall survey of public elementary and secondary day schools. Included are national trend data since fall 1968 on selected items of information. Data…

  19. Feeding Activity, Rate of Consumption, Daily Ration and Prey Selection of Major Predators in John Day Reservoir, 1984 : Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Gerard A.; United States. Bonneville Power Administration; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; National Fishery Research Center

    1986-07-01

    The extent of predation on juvenile salmonids in John Day Reservoir was determined. Salmonids were the single most important food item by weight for northern squawfish (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in the restricted zones at McNary tailrace and John Day forebay during all sampling periods. Salmonids accounted for 18.1% of the weight in the diet of walleyes (Stizostedion vitreum vitreum) in 1984 which was at least twice that found in previous years. In smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) salmonids contributed little to their diet whereas for channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) fish accounted for 64.1% of the weight in their diet with salmonids responsible for approximately half of this weight. An intensive search of the fisheries literature was conducted to review various fish capture and control techniques which might have potential as predation control measures for the major predators of juvenile salmonids in the Columbia River system. Most prey protection measures were judged to have high potential and direct predator control measures were judged to have moderate or low potential.

  20. Smolt Passage Behavior and Flow-Net Relationships in the Forebay of John Day Dam, 1983 Annual Report of Research.

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgi, Albert E.

    1984-04-01

    During 1983, the research program had three separate but complementary phases - monitoring current patterns in the forebay, defining fish distribution with purse seine sampling, and describing the migration routes of salmonid smolts using radio tracking techniques. Preliminary results from the radio-tracking and purse seining operations in FY 1983 suggest that the discharge from the John Day River and the turbid plume it forms in the forebay may have a pronounced effect on the distribution of smolts, especially chinook and sockeye salmon, as they approach the dam. The implication of these data is that the plume may be shunting salmon toward the Washington (spill) side of the river where they would be more susceptible to spill passage. This resulted in higher spill passage of tagged chinook salmon than the proportion of water being spilled. In contrast, sillway passage of steelhead not influenced by the plume is approximately the same as the proportion of water being spilled. These findings are based on limited data and must be considered preliminary at this time. Data describing the current patterns have just recently been reduced to a usable format and have not yet been correlated with findings from radio tracking and purse seining. Such data will be icorporated into an overall analysis of the relations of current patterns and John Day River discharge to fish migration patterns. Representative examples of prevailing current patterns during the spring migration have been completed and are included in this document. 10 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Feeding Activity, Rate of Consumption, Daily Ration and Prey Selection of Major Predators in John Day Reservoir, 1985: Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Douglas E.; United States. Bonneville Power Administration; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; National Fishery Research Center

    1986-10-01

    This report summarizes activities in 1985 to determine the extent of predation on juvenile salmonids in John Day Reservoir. To estimate consumption of juvenile salmonids we used the composition of the natural diet of predators and in the laboratory determined rate of gastric evacuation by predators. Salmonids were the single most important food item for northern squawfish (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) at McNary tailrace during all sampling periods and at John Day forebay during July. Salmonids accounted for 11.6% of the diet of walleye (Stizostedion vitreum vitreum) in 1985 which was about twice that found in previous years. Salmonids contributed little to smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) diet but comprised about 25% of the diet of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). Composition of prey taxa in beach seine catches in 1985 was similar to 1983 and 1984 with chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha), northern squawfish, largescale sucker (Catostomus macrocheilus), and sand roller (Percopsis transmontana) dominating the catch at main channel stations and crappies (Pomoxis spp.) and largescale sucker dominating at backwater stations. Preliminary results of beach seine efficiency studies suggest that seine efficiency varied significantly among prey species and between substrate types in 1985. Results of digestion rate experiments indicate that gastric evacuation in northern squawfish can be predicted using water temperature, prey weight, predator weight and time. 19 refs., 19 figs., 13 tabs.

  2. Optimization of Concurrent Deployments of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System and Other Hydroacoustic Equipment at John Day Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Khan, Fenton; Kim, Jina; Lamarche, Brian L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Choi, Eric Y.; Faber, Derrek M.; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Fischer, Eric S.; Cushing, Aaron W.

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the results of the acoustic optimization study conducted at John Day Dam during January and February 2008. The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods to minimize electrical and acoustic interference from various other acoustic sampling devices. Thereby, this would allow concurrent sampling by active and passive acoustic methods during the formal evaluations of the prototype surface flow outlets at the dam during spring and summer outmigration seasons for juvenile salmonids. The objectives for the optimization study at John Day Dam were to: 1. Design and test prototypes and provide a total needs list of pipes and trolleys to deploy JSATS hydrophones on the forebay face of the powerhouse and spillway. 2. Assess the effect on mean percentage decoded of JSATS transmissions from tags arrayed in the forebay and detected on the hydrophones by comparing: turbine unit OFF vs. ON; spill bay OPEN vs. CLOSED; dual frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) both OFF vs. ON at a spill bay; and, fixed-aspect hydroacoustic system OFF vs. ON at a turbine unit and a spill bay. 3. Determine the relationship between fixed-aspect hydroacoustic transmit level and mean percentage of JSATS transmissions decoded. The general approach was to use hydrophones to listen for transmissions from JSATS tags deployed in vertical arrays in a series perpendicular to the face of the dam. We used acoustic telemetry equipment manufactured by Technologic and Sonic Concepts. In addition, we assessed old and new JSATS signal detectors and decoders and two different types of hydrophone baffling. The optimization study consisted of a suite of off/on tests. The primary response variable was mean percentage of tag transmissions decoded. We found that there was no appreciable adverse effect on mean percentage

  3. Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, Technical Report 2004-2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Wayne

    2007-04-01

    The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. Spawning ground surveys for spring (stream-type) Chinook salmon were conducted in four main spawning areas (Mainstem, Middle Fork, North Fork, and Granite Creek System) and seven minor spawning areas (South Fork, Camas Creek, Desolation Creek, Trail Creek, Deardorff Creek, Clear Creek, and Big Creek) in the John Day River basin during August and September of 2005. Census surveys included 298.2 river kilometers (88.2 rkm within index, 192.4 rkm additional within census, and 17.6 rkm within random survey areas) of spawning habitat. We observed 902 redds and 701 carcasses including 227 redds in the Mainstem, 178 redds in the Middle Fork, 420 redds in the North Fork, 62 redds in the Granite Creek System, and 15 redds in Desolation Creek. Age composition of carcasses sampled for the entire basin was 1.6% age 3, 91.2% age 4, and 7.1% age 5. The sex ratio was 57.4% female and 42.6% male. Significantly more females than males were observed in the Granite Creek System. During 2005, 82.3% of female carcasses sampled had released all of their eggs. Significantly more pre-spawn mortalities were observed in Granite Creek. Nine (1.3%) of 701 carcasses were of hatchery origin. Of 298 carcasses examined, 4.0% were positive for the presence of lesions. A significantly higher incidence of gill lesions was found in the Granite Creek System when compared to the rest of the basin. Of 114 kidney samples tested, two (1.8%) had clinical BKD levels. Both infected fish were age-4 females in the Middle Fork. All samples tested for IHNV were negative. To estimate spring Chinook and summer steelhead smolt-to-adult survival (SAR) we PIT tagged 5,138 juvenile

  4. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2002-12-01

    The John Day River is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States, which is entirely unsupplemented for it's runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the John Day Basin drains over 8,000 square miles, is Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and the basin incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the mainstem John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon, summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The Majority of the John Day Basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in John Day to coordinate basin restoration projects, monitoring, planning, and other watershed restoration activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in John Day, who subcontracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these restoration projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2001, the JDBO and GSWCD continued their successful partnership

  5. Abundance and Distribution of Walleye, Northern Squawfish, and Smallmouth Bass in John Day Reservoir, 1984-1985 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Beamesderfer, Raymond C.

    1985-12-01

    Sampling was conducted in John Day Reservoir to collect walleye, northern squawfish and smallmouth bass. Changes in distributions during sampling were characterized from changes in catch per unit effort (CPUE) in sampling areas. Observed movements of marked and radiotagged fish were examined and used to define discrete populations. Abundances were estimated using a modified Schnabel multiple mark and recapture estimator. Abundance estimates were corrected for angler harvest, size specific vulnerability to gear, recruitment due to growth and tag loss during sampling. Age composition of catch was determined to characterize relative contributions of various year classes to the populations. Ages at which fish were fully recruited to gear were defined by catch curves. Survival of fully recruited year classes was calculated from differences in CPUE's between 1984 and 1985. Mean length at age was estimated and used to determine age specific incremental growth. Eighty-eight percent of walleye were caught in McNary tailrace or Irrigon-Paterson, whereas 95% of smallmouth bass were caught from Irrigon-Paterson to the John Day forebay. Abundances of walleye and northern squawfish with fork lengths greater than 250 mm and smallmouth bass with fork lengths greater than 200 mm were estimated to be 16,219, 95,407, and 11,259. Anglers harvested an estimated 235 walleye, 2004 northern squawfish and 4383 smallmouth bass during the sampling season. Six-year-old walleye, 4-year-old northern squawfish and 3-year-old smallmouth bass were most abundant in catches. Walleye and smallmouth bass were fully recruited to sampling gear by age 3. Age at which northern squawfish were fully recruited was uncertain. Mean survival was 46.1% for walleye and 46.5% for northern squawfish. Mean smallmouth bass survival was 46.5% in the lower and 43.7% in the upper reservoir.

  6. Productivity of Spring Chinook Salmon and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, 2008 Annual Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Wayne H.; Schricker, Jaym'e; Ruzychi, James R.

    2009-02-13

    The John Day River subbasin supports one of the last remaining intact wild populations of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead in the Columbia River Basin. These populations remain depressed relative to historic levels and limited information is available for steelhead life history. Numerous habitat protection and rehabilitation projects have been implemented in the basin to improve salmonid freshwater production and survival. However, these projects often lack effectiveness monitoring. While our monitoring efforts outlined here will not specifically measure the effectiveness of any particular project, they will provide much needed programmatic or watershed (status and trend) information to help evaluate project-specific effectiveness monitoring efforts as well as meet some data needs as index stocks. Our continued monitoring efforts to estimate salmonid smolt abundance, age structure, SAR, smolts/redd, freshwater habitat use, and distribution of critical life states will enable managers to assess the long-term effectiveness of habitat projects and to differentiate freshwater and ocean survival. Because Columbia Basin managers have identified the John Day subbasin spring Chinook population as an index population for assessing the effects of alternative future management actions on salmon stocks in the Columbia Basin (Schaller et al. 1999) we continue our ongoing studies. This project is high priority based on the level of emphasis by the NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Independent Scientific Advisory Board (ISAB), Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP), NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds (OWEB). Each of these groups have placed priority on monitoring and evaluation to provide the real-time data to guide restoration and adaptive management in the region. The objective is to estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and summer

  7. Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Fish Enhancement Project, Annual Report for FY 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Macy, Tom L.; James, Gary A.

    2003-03-01

    The CTUIR North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Enhancement Project (NFJDAFEP) identified and prioritized stream reaches in The North Fork John day River basin for habitat improvements during the 2000 project period. Public out reach was emphasized during this first year of the project. We presented multiple funding and enhancement options to landowners. We concentrated on natural recovery methods, riparian fencing and off-stream livestock water developments. Under this BPA contract four riparian easements were signed protecting almost 5 miles of tributary streams. There are nine offstream water developments associated with these easements. Some landowners chose to participate in other programs based on Tribal outreach efforts. Two landowners chose NRCS programs for enhancement and one chose OWEB as a funding source. Two landowners implemented there own enhancement measures protecting 3 miles of stream. Cooperation between the NRCS/FSA/SWCDs and the Tribe to create joint projects and develop alternative funding scenarios for riparian enhancement was a major effort. The Tribe also worked with the North Fork John Day Watershed Council, USFS and ODFW to coordinate projects and support similar projects throughout the John Day Basin. We provided input to the John Day Summary prepared for the NWPPC by ODFW. The Tribe worked with the Umatilla National Forest on the Clear Creek Dredgetailings Rehabilitation project and coordinated regularly with USFS Fisheries, Hydrology and Range staff.

  8. Objective Assessment of Fall Risk in Parkinson's Disease Using a Body-Fixed Sensor Worn for 3 Days

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Aner; Herman, Talia; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) suffer from a high fall risk. Previous approaches for evaluating fall risk are based on self-report or testing at a given time point and may, therefore, be insufficient to optimally capture fall risk. We tested, for the first time, whether metrics derived from 3 day continuous recordings are associated with fall risk in PD. Methods and Materials 107 patients (Hoehn & Yahr Stage: 2.6±0.7) wore a small, body-fixed sensor (3D accelerometer) on lower back for 3 days. Walking quantity (e.g., steps per 3-days) and quality (e.g., frequency-derived measures of gait variability) were determined. Subjects were classified as fallers or non-fallers based on fall history. Subjects were also followed for one year to evaluate predictors of the transition from non-faller to faller. Results The 3 day acceleration derived measures were significantly different in fallers and non-fallers and were significantly correlated with previously validated measures of fall risk. Walking quantity was similar in the two groups. In contrast, the fallers walked with higher step-to-step variability, e.g., anterior-posterior width of the dominant frequency was larger (p = 0.012) in the fallers (0.78±0.17 Hz) compared to the non-fallers (0.71±0.07 Hz). Among subjects who reported no falls in the year prior to testing, sensor-derived measures predicted the time to first fall (p = 0.0034), whereas many traditional measures did not. Cox regression analysis showed that anterior-posterior width was significantly (p = 0.0039) associated with time to fall during the follow-up period, even after adjusting for traditional measures. Conclusions/Significance These findings indicate that a body-fixed sensor worn continuously can evaluate fall risk in PD. This sensor-based approach was able to identify transition from non-faller to faller, whereas many traditional metrics were not successful. This approach may facilitate earlier detection of fall

  9. Projected climate-induced habitat loss for salmonids in the John Day River network, Oregon, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Ruesch, Aaron S; Torgersen, Christian E; Lawler, Joshua J; Olden, Julian D; Peterson, Erin E; Volk, Carol J; Lawrence, David J

    2012-10-01

    Climate change will likely have profound effects on cold-water species of freshwater fishes. As temperatures rise, cold-water fish distributions may shift and contract in response. Predicting the effects of projected stream warming in stream networks is complicated by the generally poor correlation between water temperature and air temperature. Spatial dependencies in stream networks are complex because the geography of stream processes is governed by dimensions of flow direction and network structure. Therefore, forecasting climate-driven range shifts of stream biota has lagged behind similar terrestrial modeling efforts. We predicted climate-induced changes in summer thermal habitat for 3 cold-water fish species-juvenile Chinook salmon, rainbow trout, and bull trout (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, O. mykiss, and Salvelinus confluentus, respectively)-in the John Day River basin, northwestern United States. We used a spatially explicit statistical model designed to predict water temperature in stream networks on the basis of flow and spatial connectivity. The spatial distribution of stream temperature extremes during summers from 1993 through 2009 was largely governed by solar radiation and interannual extremes of air temperature. For a moderate climate change scenario, estimated declines by 2100 in the volume of habitat for Chinook salmon, rainbow trout, and bull trout were 69-95%, 51-87%, and 86-100%, respectively. Although some restoration strategies may be able to offset these projected effects, such forecasts point to how and where restoration and management efforts might focus. PMID:22827880

  10. Projected climate-induced habitat loss for salmonids in the John Day River network, Oregon, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruesch, Aaron S.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Lawler, Joshua J.; Olden, Julian D.; Peterson, Erin E.; Volk, Carol J.; Lawrence, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Climate change will likely have profound effects on cold-water species of freshwater fishes. As temperatures rise, cold-water fish distributions may shift and contract in response. Predicting the effects of projected stream warming in stream networks is complicated by the generally poor correlation between water temperature and air temperature. Spatial dependencies in stream networks are complex because the geography of stream processes is governed by dimensions of flow direction and network structure. Therefore, forecasting climate-driven range shifts of stream biota has lagged behind similar terrestrial modeling efforts. We predicted climate-induced changes in summer thermal habitat for 3 cold-water fish species—juvenile Chinook salmon, rainbow trout, and bull trout (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, O. mykiss, and Salvelinus confluentus, respectively)—in the John Day River basin, northwestern United States. We used a spatially explicit statistical model designed to predict water temperature in stream networks on the basis of flow and spatial connectivity. The spatial distribution of stream temperature extremes during summers from 1993 through 2009 was largely governed by solar radiation and interannual extremes of air temperature. For a moderate climate change scenario, estimated declines by 2100 in the volume of habitat for Chinook salmon, rainbow trout, and bull trout were 69–95%, 51–87%, and 86–100%, respectively. Although some restoration strategies may be able to offset these projected effects, such forecasts point to how and where restoration and management efforts might focus.

  11. Field Review of Fish Habitat Improvement Projects in the Grande Ronde and John Day River Basins of Eastern Oregon.

    SciTech Connect

    Beschta, Robert L.; Platts, William S.; Kauffman, J. Boone

    1991-10-01

    The restoration of vegetation adapted to riparian environments and the natural succession of riparian plant communities is necessary to recreate sustainable salmonid habitat and should be the focal point for fish habitat improvement programs. In mid-August of 1991, a field review of 16 Salmon habitat improvement sites in the Grande Ronde and John Day River Basins in Eastern Oregon was undertaken. The review team visited various types of fish habitat improvements associated with a wide range of reach types, geology, channel gradients, stream sizes, and vegetation communities. Enhancement objectives, limiting factors, landuse history, and other factors were discussed at each site. This information, in conjunction with the reviewer's field inspection of portions of a particular habitat improvement project, provided the basis for the following report. This report that follows is divided into four sections: (1) Recommendations, (2) Objectives, (3) Discussion and Conclusions, and (4) Site Comments. The first section represents a synthesis of major recommendations that were developed during this review. The remaining sections provide more detailed information and comments related to specific aspects of the field review.

  12. Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Fish Enhancement Project, Annual Report for FY 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Macy, Tom L.; James, Gary A.

    2003-03-01

    The CTUIR North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Enhancement Project (NFJDAFEP) identified and prioritized stream reaches in The North Fork John day River basin for habitat improvements during the 2000 project period. Public outreach was emphasized during this first year of the project. During the past year we concentrated on satisfying landowner needs, providing cost share alternatives, providing joint projects and starting implementation. We presented multiple funding and enhancement options to landowners. We concentrated on natural recovery methods, riparian fencing and offstream livestock water developments. Under this BPA contract four riparian easements have been signed protecting almost 5 miles of tributary streams. There are nine offstream water developments associated with these easements. Some landowners chose to participate in other programs based on Tribal outreach efforts. Some landowners chose NRCS programs for enhancement and others chose OWEB as a funding source. The exact amount of stream protection due to other funding sources probably exceeds that by BPA, however most would not have entered any program without initial Tribal outreach. Cooperation between the NRCS/FSA/SWCDs and the Tribe to create joint projects and develop alternative funding scenarios for riparian enhancement was a major effort. The Tribe also worked with the North Fork John Day Watershed Council, USFS and ODFW to coordinate projects and support similar projects throughout the John Day Basin.

  13. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office: FY 1999 Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Shawn W.

    2001-03-01

    The John Day River is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and one of the few major subbasins in the Columbia River basin containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, the fourth largest drainage area in Oregon. With its beginning in the Strawberry Mountains near the town of Prairie City, the John Day flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly one of national significance. The entire John Day basin was granted to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) initiated contracting the majority of its construction implementation actions with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of the projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 1999, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional eleven (11

  14. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2003-06-30

    The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day, who contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2002, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin

  15. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2001-03-01

    The John Day is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles--Oregon's third largest drainage basin--and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. Most all of the entire John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the Basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Using funding from the Bonneville Power Administration, Bureau of Reclamation, and others, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) subcontracts the majority of its construction implementation activities with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/review, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2000, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and

  16. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office: Watershed Restoration Projects: Annual Report, 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    1999-10-01

    The John Day River is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous US and one of the few major subbasins in the Columbia River basin containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, the fourth largest drainage area in Oregon. With its beginning in the Strawberry Mountains near the town of Prairie City, the John Day flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly one of national significance. The entire John Day basin was granted to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) initiated contracting the majority of its construction implementation actions with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of the projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 1998, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional ten (10) watershed

  17. How do you learn to walk? Thousands of steps and dozens of falls per day.

    PubMed

    Adolph, Karen E; Cole, Whitney G; Komati, Meghana; Garciaguirre, Jessie S; Badaly, Daryaneh; Lingeman, Jesse M; Chan, Gladys L Y; Sotsky, Rachel B

    2012-01-01

    A century of research on the development of walking has examined periodic gait over a straight, uniform path. The current study provides the first corpus of natural infant locomotion derived from spontaneous activity during free play. Locomotor experience was immense: Twelve- to 19-month-olds averaged 2,368 steps and 17 falls per hour. Novice walkers traveled farther faster than expert crawlers, but had comparable fall rates, which suggests that increased efficiency without increased cost motivates expert crawlers to transition to walking. After walking onset, natural locomotion improved dramatically: Infants took more steps, traveled farther distances, and fell less. Walking was distributed in short bouts with variable paths--frequently too short or irregular to qualify as periodic gait. Nonetheless, measures of periodic gait and of natural locomotion were correlated, which indicates that better walkers spontaneously walk more and fall less. Immense amounts of time-distributed, variable practice constitute the natural practice regimen for learning to walk. PMID:23085640

  18. Sensor Fish Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through John Day Dam Spillbay 20 with a Modified Flow Deflector

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2011-04-29

    Fish passage conditions over a modified deflector in Spillbay 20 at John Day Dam were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objectives of the study were to describe and compare passage exposure conditions at two spill discharges, 2.4 and 4.0 thousand cubic feet per second (kcfs), identifying potential fish injury regions within the routes, and to evaluate a low-tailwater condition at the 2.4-kcfs discharge. The study was performed in April 2010 concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision and shear events; 2) differences in passage conditions between treatments; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Nearly all Sensor Fish significant events were classified as collisions; the most severe occurred at the gate, on the spillbay chute, or at the deflector transition. Collisions in the gate region were observed only during the 2.4-kcfs discharge, when the tainter gate was open 1.2 ft. One shear event was observed during the evaluation, occurring at the deflector transition during passage at the 2.4-kcfs discharge at low tailwater. Flow quality, computed using the Sensor Fish turbulence index, was best for passage at the low-flow low-tailwater condition as well. The worst flow quality was observed for the 4.0-kcfs test condition. Contrasting the passage exposure conditions, the 2.4-kcfs low-tailwater treatment would be most deleterious to fish survival and well-being.

  19. How Do You Learn to Walk? Thousands of Steps and Dozens of Falls Per Day

    PubMed Central

    Adolph, Karen E.; Cole, Whitney G.; Komati, Meghana; Garciaguirre, Jessie S.; Badaly, Daryaneh; Lingeman, Jesse M.; Chan, Gladys; Sotsky, Rachel B.

    2013-01-01

    A century of research has described the development of walking based on periodic gait over a straight, uniform path. The current study provides the first corpus of natural infant locomotion based on spontaneous activity during free play. Locomotor experience was immense: 12- to 19-month-olds averaged 2368 steps and fell 17 times/hour. Novice walkers traveled farther faster than expert crawlers, but fall rates were comparable, suggesting that increased efficiency without increased cost motivates expert crawlers to transition to walking. After walking onset, natural locomotion dramatically improved: Infants took more steps, traveled farther distances, and fell less. Walking was distributed in short bouts with variable paths—frequently too short or irregular to qualify as periodic gait. Nonetheless, measures of periodic gait and natural locomotion were correlated, indicating that better walkers spontaneously walk more and fall less. Immense amounts of time-distributed, variable practice constitute the natural practice regimen for learning to walk. PMID:23085640

  20. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2004-02-27

    The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional

  1. Analysis of the Capacity Potential of Current Day and Novel Configurations for New York's John F. Kennedy Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Patricia; Tamburro, Ralph; Lee, Paul

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, a series of systems analysis studies were conducted on John F. Kennedy Airport in New York (NY) in a collaborative effort between NASA and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ). This work was performed to build a deeper understanding of NY airspace and operations to determine the improvements possible through operational changes with tools currently available, and where new technology is required for additional improvement. The analysis was conducted using tool-based mathematical analyses, video inspection and evaluation using recorded arrival/departure/surface traffic captured by the Aerobahn tool (used by Kennedy Airport for surface metering), and aural data archives available publically through the web to inform the video segments. A discussion of impacts of trajectory and operational choices on capacity is presented, including runway configuration and usage (parallel, converging, crossing, shared, independent, staggered), arrival and departure route characteristics (fix sharing, merges, splits), and how compression of traffic is staged. The authorization in March of 2015 for New York to use reduced spacing under the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Wake Turbulence Recategorization (RECAT) also offers significant capacity benefit for New York airports when fully transitioned to the new spacing requirements, and the impact of these changes for New York is discussed. Arrival and departure capacity results are presented for each of the current day Kennedy Airport configurations. While the tools allow many variations of user-selected conditions, the analysis for these studies used arrival-priority, no-winds, additional safety buffer of 5% to the required minimum spacing, and a mix of traffic typical for Kennedy. Two additional "novel" configurations were evaluated. These configurations are of interest to Port Authority and to their airline customers, and are believed to offer near-term capacity benefit with minimal operational and

  2. Distribution, Abundance, and Population Dynamics of Northern Squawfish, Walleye, Smallmouth Bass, and Channel Catfish in John Day Reservoir, 1986 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Beamesderfer, Raymond C.

    1987-04-01

    John Day Reservoir was sampled from 25 March to 1 September 1986 using gill nets, trap nets, boat electrofishers, hook and line, and an angler survey to collect 4945 northern squawfish Ptychocheilus oregonesis, 602 walleye Stizostedion vitreum 2894 smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieui, and 563 channel catfish Icatalurus punctatus. Distribution, abundance and population parameters of each species were examined. One year growth, mortality, and relative year class strength was described.

  3. Feeding Activity, Rate of Consumption, Daily Ration and Prey Selection of Major Predators in the John Day Pool : 1983, Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Gerard A.; United States. Bonneville Power Administration; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; National Fishery Research Center

    1985-02-01

    This report summarizes activities in 1983, the second of a five year study to determine the extent of predation by resident populations of native and introduced fishes on juvenile salmonids in John Day Reservoir. As in 1982, catches of northern squawfish (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) were highest in areas adjacent to dams; percent by weight of juvenile salmonids in the diet was up to 89.7% higher in these areas. Catches of walleyes (Stizostedion vitreum vitreum) were greatest outside restricted zones (700 to 900 m above and below the dams) in spring of both 1982 and 1983. Percent by weight of juvenile salmonids in walleyes collected in 1983 was generally higher at McNary tailrace and lower at Irrigon and John Day tailrace than in 1982. Smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) was the most common species collected and contained few salmonids in 1983. Results of the diet analysis for channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) varied substantially between 1982 and 1983 as a result of eliminating the John Day River sampling transect and increasing sampling effort at McNary tailrace, Irrigon, and John Day tailrace. The beach seine and boat electroshocker were effective gears for evaluating prey abundance. Data obtained to estimate relationships between fork length of juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and other body or bone measurements indicated that body length predicted fork length best, followed by cleithrum, dentary, and opercle measurements. Digestion over time was estimated for 162 northern squawfish fed juvenile salmonids at temperatures ranging from 10 to 20 C. 1 ref., 7 figs., 31 tabs.

  4. Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam with Emphasis on the Prototype Surface Flow Outlet, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Monter, Tyrell J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Faber, Derrek M.; Durham, Robin E.; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.; Kim, Jina; Fischer, Eric S.; Meyer, Matthew M.

    2009-12-01

    The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the performance of Top Spill Weirs installed at two spillbays at John Day Dam and evaluate the effectiveness of these surface flow outlets at attracting juvenile salmon away from the powerhouse and reducing turbine passage. The Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was used to estimate survival of juvenile salmonids passing the dam and also for calculating performance metrics used to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of the dam at passing juvenile salmonids.

  5. Preliminary Estimates of Loss of Juvenile Anadromous Salmonids to Predators in John Day Reservoir and Development of a Predation Model : Interim Report, 1986.

    SciTech Connect

    Rieman, Bruce E.

    1986-03-01

    We made preliminary estimates of the loss of juvenile salmonids to predation by walleye, Stizostedion v. vitreum, and northern squawfish, Ptychocheilus oregonensis, in John Day Reservoir in 1984 and 1985 using estimates of predator abundance and daily prey consumption rates. Preliminary estimates may be biased and may be adjusted as much as 30%, but indications are that predation could account for the majority of unexplained loss of juvenile salmonids in John Day Reservoir. Total loss was estimated at 4.1 million in 1984 and 3.3 million in 1985. Northern squawfish consumed 76% and 92% of these totals, respectively. The majority of loss occurred in mid reservoir areas, but loss in a small area, the boat-restricted zone immediately below McNary Dam, was disproportionately large. Peaks in loss in May and July corresponded with peaks in availability of salmonids. Estimated mortality from predation for April through June in 1984 and 1985 was 9% and 7% respectively, for chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and 10% and 15% for steelhead, Salmogairdneri. Mortality was variable with time but tended to increase over the period of migration. Mortality of chinook was estimated at 26% to 55% during July and August. A model of predation in John Day Reservoir is outlined. The model includes a predation submodel that can calculate loss from predator number and consumption rate; a population submodel that can relate predator abundance and population structure to recruitment, exploitation, natural mortality and growth; and a distribution submodel that can apportion predators among areas of the reservoir over time. Applications of the model are discussed for projecting expected changes in predation over time and identifying management alternatives that might limit the impact of predation.

  6. 26 CFR 301.7503-1 - Time for performance of acts where last day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... expires on Thursday, November 23, 1995 (Thanksgiving Day), the suit will be timely if filed on Friday... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Time for performance of acts where last day... where last day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday. (a) In general. Section 7503 provides...

  7. 26 CFR 301.7503-1 - Time for performance of acts where last day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... expires on Thursday, November 23, 1995 (Thanksgiving Day), the suit will be timely if filed on Friday... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Time for performance of acts where last day... where last day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday. (a) In general. Section 7503 provides...

  8. 26 CFR 301.7503-1 - Time for performance of acts where last day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... expires on Thursday, November 23, 1995 (Thanksgiving Day), the suit will be timely if filed on Friday... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Time for performance of acts where last day... where last day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday. (a) In general. Section 7503 provides...

  9. 26 CFR 301.7503-1 - Time for performance of acts where last day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... expires on Thursday, November 23, 1995 (Thanksgiving Day), the suit will be timely if filed on Friday... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Time for performance of acts where last day... where last day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday. (a) In general. Section 7503 provides...

  10. Predation by Resident Fish on Juvenile Salmonids in John Day Reservoir: Final Report, 1983-1986: Volume 2: Supplemental Papers and Data Documentation.

    SciTech Connect

    Poe, Thomas P.; Rieman, Bruce E.

    1988-07-01

    In 1982 the NPPC included in its Fish and Wildlife Program measure that called for studies ''... to investigate juvenile salmon and steelhead losses to predators while these fish are migrating through Columbia and Snake River reservoirs.'' In the same year the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded ODFW and FWS to conduct collaborative studies to estimate the number of juvenile salmoids lost to predators in John Day Reservoir. Also included as study objectives were: (1) a description of the importance of predation losses relative to mortality at the dam and total reservoir mortality; (2) a description of how predation losses might vary (spatially and temporally); and (3) recommendations of measures to control predation on smolts. We studied four species of predator; northern squawfish, walleye, smallmouth bass, and channel catfish. We selected John Day Reservoir as the study site because the following factors led us to believe if predation was a problem in any reservoir, it would be most obvious there because: (1) the reservoir is an important subyearling chinook rearing area; (2) passage and residualism of juvenile salmonids were considered a problem there; and (3) substantial populations of predators were known to reside in the reservoir. Individual reports were processed separately for the data base.

  11. Smolt Passage Behavior and Flow-Net Relationships in the Forebay of John Day Dam, 1983 [Amended] Annual Report of Research.

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgi, Albert E.

    1984-04-01

    During 1983, the research program had three separate but complementary phases--monitoring current patterns in the forebay, defining fish distribution with purse seine sampling, and describing the migration routes of salmonid smolts using radio tracking techniques. Preliminary results from the radio-tracking and purse seining operations in FY83 suggest that the discharge from the John Day River and the turbid plume it forms in the forebay may have a pronounced effect on the distribution of smolts, especially chinook and sockeye salmon, as they approach the dam. The implication of these data is that the plume may be shunting salmon toward the Washington (spill) side of the river where they would be more susceptible to spill passage. This resulted in higher spill passage of tagged chinook salmon than the proportion of water being spilled. In contrast, spillway passage of steelhead not influenced by the plume is approximately the same as the proportion of water being spilled. These findings are based on limited data and must be considered preliminary at this time. Data describing the current patterns have just recently been reduced to a usable format and have not yet been correlated with findings from radio tracking and purse seining. Such data will be incorporated into an overall analysis of the relations of current patterns and John Day River discharge to fish migration patterns. Representative examples of prevailing current patterns during the spring migration have been completed and are included in this document.

  12. Predation by Resident Fish on Juvenile Salmonids in John Day Reservoir: Final Report, 1983-1986: Volume 1, Final Report of Research.

    SciTech Connect

    Poe, Thomas P.; Rieman, Bruce E.

    1988-07-01

    In 1982 the NPPC included in its Fish and Wildlife Program a measure that called for studies ''... to investigate juvenile salmon and steelhead losses to predators while these fish are migrating through Columbia and Snake River reservoirs.'' In the same year the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded ODFW and FWS to conduct collaborative studies to estimate the number of juvenile salmonids lost to predators in John Day Reservoir. Also included as study objectives were: (1) a description of the importance of predation losses relative to mortality at the dam and total reservoir mortality; (2) a description of how predation losses might vary (spatially and temporally); and (3) recommendations of measures to control predation on smolts. We studied four species of predator: northern squawfish, walleye, smallmouth bass, and channel catfish. We selected John Day Reservoir as the study site because the following factors led us to believe if predation was a problem in any reservoir, it would be most obvious there because: (1) the reservoir is an important subyearling chinook rearing area; (2) passage and residualism of juvenile salmonids were considered a problem there; and (3) substantial populations of predators were known to reside in the reservoir. Individual reports were processed separately for the data base.

  13. 43 CFR 4.905 - What if a due date falls on a day the Department or relevant office is not open for business?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Department or relevant office is not open for business? 4.905 Section 4.905 Public Lands: Interior Office of... day the Department or relevant office is not open for business? If a due date under this subpart falls on a day the relevant office is not open for business (such as a weekend, Federal holiday,...

  14. 43 CFR 4.905 - What if a due date falls on a day the Department or relevant office is not open for business?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Department or relevant office is not open for business? 4.905 Section 4.905 Public Lands: Interior Office of... day the Department or relevant office is not open for business? If a due date under this subpart falls on a day the relevant office is not open for business (such as a weekend, Federal holiday,...

  15. Data Overview for Sensor Fish Samples Acquired at Ice Harbor, John Day, and Bonneville II Dams in 2005, 2006, and 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Deng, Zhiqun

    2008-03-12

    The purpose of this work was to acquire Sensor Fish data on turbine passage at Bonneville II, John Day, and Ice Harbor dams for later analysis and use. The original data sets have been entered into a database and are being maintained by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory pending delivery to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers when requested. This report provides documentation for the data sets acquired and details about the operations of the Sensor Fish and interpretation of Sensor Fish data that will be necessary for later use of the acquired data. A limited review of the acquired data was conducted to assess its quality and to extract information that might prove useful to its later use.

  16. Survey of Potential Hanford Site Contaminants in the Upper Sediment for the Reservoirs at McNary, John Day, The Dalles, and Bonneville Dams, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, Gregory W.; Priddy, M; Yokel, Jerel W.; Delistraty, Damon A.; Stoops, Thomas M.

    2005-02-01

    This report presents the results from a multi-agency cooperative environmental surveillance study. of the study looked at sediment from the pools upstream from dams on the Columbia River that are downstream from Hanford Site operations. The radiological and chemical conditions existing in the upper-level sediment found in the pools upstream from McNary Dam, John Day Dam, The Dalles Lock and Dam, and Bonneville Dam were evaluated. This study also evaluated beach sediment where available. Water samples were collected at McNary Dam to further evaluate potential Hanford contaminants in the lower Columbia River. Samples were analyzed for radionuclides, chemicals, and physical parameters. Results from this study were compared to background values from sediment and water samples collect from the pool upstream of Priest Rapids Dam (upstream of the Hanford Site) by the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project.

  17. Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook Salmon and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, 2005-2006 Annual Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Terra Lang; Wilson, Wayne H.; Ruzycki, James R.

    2009-04-10

    The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. The John Day River subbasin supports one of the last remaining intact wild populations of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead in the Columbia River Basin. These populations, however, remain depressed relative to historic levels. Between the completion of the life history and natural escapement study in 1984 and the start of this project in 1998, spring Chinook spawning surveys did not provide adequate information to assess age structure, progeny-to-parent production values, smolt-to-adult survival (SAR), or natural spawning escapement. Further, only very limited information is available for steelhead life history, escapement, and productivity measures in the John Day subbasin. Numerous habitat protection and rehabilitation projects to improve salmonid freshwater production and survival have also been implemented in the basin and are in need of effectiveness monitoring. While our monitoring efforts outlined here will not specifically measure the effectiveness of any particular project, they will provide much needed background information for developing context for project-specific effectiveness monitoring efforts. To meet the data needs as index stocks, to assess the long-term effectiveness of habitat projects, and to differentiate freshwater and ocean survival, sufficient annual estimates of spawner escapement, age structure, SAR, egg-to-smolt survival, smolt-per-redd ratio, and freshwater habitat use are essential. We have begun to meet this need through spawning ground surveys initiated for spring Chinook salmon in 1998 and smolt PIT-tagging efforts initiated in 1999. Additional sampling and analyses to meet these goals

  18. Feeding Activity, Rate of Consumption, Daily Ration and Prey Selection of Major Predators in the John Day Pool. 1982 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Gerard A.; United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    1984-03-01

    This study was initiated to determine the extent of predation by resident populations of native and introduced fish on juvenile salmonids in main stem Columbia River Reservoirs. The John Day Reservoir and tailrace was selected as the study area. First year objectives were: (1) determine whether native and introduced predators preyed on juvenile salmonids; (2) determine which species were major predators; and (3) locate areas where predation was most intense. Results indicated that juvenile salmonids were consumed by all four predatory fish species studied: northern squawfish (Ptychocheilus oregonensis), walleye (Stizostedion vitreum vitreum), smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). However, degree of predation varied among predators as a function of spatial distribution, apparent abundance, size, and temporal feeding behavior. 15 figs., 16 tabs.

  19. Analyses of potential factors affecting survival of juvenile salmonids volitionally passing through turbines at McNary and John Day Dams, Columbia River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeman, John; Hansel, Hal; Perry, Russell; Hockersmith, Eric; Sandford, Ben

    2011-01-01

    This report describes analyses of data from radio- or acoustic-tagged juvenile salmonids passing through hydro-dam turbines to determine factors affecting fish survival. The data were collected during a series of studies designed to estimate passage and survival probabilities at McNary (2002-09) and John Day (2002-03) Dams on the Columbia River during controlled experiments of structures or operations at spillways. Relatively few tagged fish passed turbines in any single study, but sample sizes generally were adequate for our analyses when data were combined from studies using common methods over a series of years. We used information-theoretic methods to evaluate biological, operational, and group covariates by creating models fitting linear (all covariates) or curvilinear (operational covariates only) functions to the data. Biological covariates included tag burden, weight, and water temperature; operational covariates included spill percentage, total discharge, hydraulic head, and turbine unit discharge; and group covariates included year, treatment, and photoperiod. Several interactions between the variables also were considered. Support of covariates by the data was assessed by comparing the Akaike Information Criterion of competing models. The analyses were conducted because there was a lack of information about factors affecting survival of fish passing turbines volitionally and the data were available from past studies. The depth of acclimation, tag size relative to fish size (tag burden), turbine unit discharge, and area of entry into the turbine intake have been shown to affect turbine passage survival of juvenile salmonids in other studies. This study indicates that turbine passage survival of the study fish was primarily affected by biological covariates rather than operational covariates. A negative effect of tag burden was strongly supported in data from yearling Chinook salmon at John Day and McNary dams, but not for subyearling Chinook salmon or

  20. A physiological approach to quantifying thermal habitat quality for redband rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri) in the south Fork John Day River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feldhaus, J.W.; Heppell, S.A.; Li, H.; Mesa, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    We examined tissue-specific levels of heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) and whole body lipid levels in juvenile redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri) from the South Fork of the John Day River (SFJD), Oregon, with the goal of determining if these measures could be used as physiological indicators of thermal habitat quality for juvenile redband trout. Our objectives were to determine the hsp70 induction temperature in liver, fin, and white muscle tissue and characterize the relation between whole body lipids and hsp70 for fish in the SFJD. We found significant increases in hsp70 levels between 19 and 22??C in fin, liver, and white muscle tissue. Maximum hsp70 levels in liver, fin, and white muscle tissue occurred when mean weekly maximum temperatures (MWMT) exceeded 20-22??C. In general, the estimated hsp70 induction temperature for fin and white muscle tissue was higher than liver tissue. Whole body lipid levels began to decrease when MWMT exceeded 20. 4??C. There was a significant interaction between temperature and hsp70 in fin and white muscle tissue, but not liver tissue. Collectively, these results suggest that increased hsp70 levels in juvenile redband trout are symptomatic of thermal stress, and that energy storage capacity decreases with this stress. The possible decrease in growth potential and fitness for thermally stressed individuals emphasizes the physiological justification for thermal management criteria in salmon-bearing streams. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010.

  1. Route-Specific Passage Proportions and Survival Rates for Fish Passing through John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Bonneville Dam in 2010 and 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-06-04

    This report fulfills a request of the U.S. Army Engineer District, Portland, Oregon, to produce an interim report of estimates of route-specific fish passage proportions and survival rates for lower Columbia River dams in 2010 and 2011. The estimates are needed to update the Compass Model for the Columbia River Treaty and the new Biological Opinion before detail technical reports are published in late 2012. This report tabulates route-specific fish-passage proportions and survival rates for steelhead and Chinook salmon smolts passing through various sampled routes at John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Bonneville Dam in 2010 and 2011. Results were compiled from analyses of data acquired in spring 2010 and 2011 studies that were specifically designed to estimate dam-passage and forebay-to-tailrace survival rates, travel time metrics, and spill passage efficiency, as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The study designs allowed for estimation of route-specific fish passage proportions and survival rates as well as estimation of forebay-passage survival, all of which are summarized herein.

  2. Smolt Passage Behavior and Flow-Net Relationship in the Forebay of John Day Dam, 1984-1985 Final Report of Research.

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgi, Albert E.

    1985-12-01

    The migration routes of downstream migrant salmonids in the forebay of John Day Dam were defined and assessed in relation to current velocities and water turbidity and temperature. Forebay current patterns were obtained from current meters at fixed sampling stations, the distribution of outmigrants was determined from purse seine sampling, and migration routes of yearling chinook salmon and steelhead were identified by radio telemetry techniques. All species of emigrating salmonids alter their distribution across the forebay as they approach the dam. Fish abundance was positively correlated with water clarity. There was no evidence to suggest that the migration routes were in response to current patterns in the forebay. Radio telemetry studies demonstrated that a certain segment of yearling chinook salmon approaching the dam are predisposed to spill passage (Washington side of the river) by virtue of their lateral position across the forebay. A new application of radio tag methodology was assessed and found to be useful in evaluating the effectiveness of spill for bypassing outmigrant salmon. A program system and cartographic model was developed which displays for any specified hour forebay current patterns at prevailing river flows and dam operations. The system can be used at other dam sites where investigations may wish to detail forebay current patterns.

  3. A native sedge, Carex nudata, as facilitator of restoration goals: effects on channel morphology and planform in the Middle Fork John Day River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goslin, M.; McDowell, P. F.

    2015-12-01

    In the Middle Fork of the John Day River, the native riparian sedge, Carex nudata, has exploded across the landscape following the removal of cattle grazing in the late 1990s. C. nudata now forms fringes along the edges of the low flow channel and grows as islands within the river. C. nudata appears to be altering channel morphology and planform in ways that may facilitate key restoration goals. I have employed multiple methods to investigate changes in channel morphology and planform in association with C. nudata: aerial imagery analysis, repeated topographic surveys, and erosion pins in cut banks with C. nudata fringes. Preliminary results suggest that C. nudata stabilizes the edges of the low flow channel, but cut banks behind C. nudata fringes continue to erode such that the bankflow width and channel boundaries continue to move. Aerial imagery analysis indicates that current C. nudata islands are often the result of C. nudata fringes becoming "detached" from banks rather than from initial establishment of plants in midchannel positions. Topographic surveys suggest scouring upstream of C. nudata islands and along the edges of C. nudata fringes. We propose a conceptual model in which multiple alternative pathways of river development may be possible after the establishment of C. nudata, depending on the antecedent conditions where it becomes established (e.g. bank composition, river curvature). Alternative pathways include: 1) bank stabilization, channel narrowing and deepening; 2) formation of a compound channel with a side channel that is activated at high flows; 3) the formation of islands within the channel. The potential for multiple pathways of development after C. nudata establishment may lead to complex patterns of river morphology and planform consistent with habitat complexity goals of river restoration.

  4. 33 CFR 165.T13-149 - Safety Zone; McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project, Columbia River, Hermiston, OR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR Part 165, Subpart C, no person may enter or remain in the safety zone created in this section or... or vessels permission to enter or remain in the safety zone created by this section. See 33 CFR part... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone; McNary-John...

  5. Fall Enrollment Report. 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes and analyzes fall enrollment in Iowa's community colleges. Each year, Iowa's 15 community colleges submit data on enrollment on the 10th business day of the fall semester. Some highlights from this report include: (1) Fall 2014 enrollment was 93,772 students--a decline of 0.49 percent from last fall; (2) Enrollment continues…

  6. Recent Innovations in Cultural Practices in the Mid-Atlantic Coast Region of the U. S.: Novel Systems for Increasing Fall Fruiting in Short-day Type Strawberry Cultivars and Opportunities for Out-of-Season Fruit Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Producing strawberry transplants from runner tips that were plugged about one month earlier (early July) than the standard time (early August) promoted fall flowering in some short-day strawberry cultivars. In 2002, 100 percent of ‘Chandler’ transplants produced in early July flowered in the fall,...

  7. John Napier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Kylie; Scott, Paul

    2004-01-01

    John Napier was born in 1550 in the Tower of Merchiston, near Edinburgh, Scotland. Napier's work on logarithms greatly influenced the work that was to be done in the future. The logarithm's ability to simplify calculations meant that Kepler and many others were able to find the relationships and formulas for motion of bodies. In turn, Kepler's…

  8. John Manke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    On October 1, 1981, John A. Manke was named to head the Directorate of Flight Operations, Ames Research Center, which resulted from the consolidation of NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, and Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. He also served as site manager of the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility. Prior to this assignment, he served as Director of the Flight Operations and Support Directorate at Dryden. Manke attended the University of South Dakota before joining the U.S. Navy in 1951. He graduated from Marquette University at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1956 with a Bachelor Degree in Electrical Engineering. While at school he was selected for the NROTC program and after graduating in 1956 entered flight training and served as a fighter pilot with the U.S. Marine Corps. John left the service in 1960, and prior to joining NASA, worked for Honeywell Corporation as a test engineer. John joined Dryden in 1962 as a research engineer and later became a research pilot, testing advanced craft such as the wingless lifting bodies, forerunners of the Space Shuttle. He was project pilot on the X-24B and also flew the M-2, HL-10 and the X-24A lifting bodies. Manke retired on April 27, 1984. John is a member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots. He has been honored with two NASA Medals of Outstanding Leadership, two NASA Medals for Exceptional Service and was selected for the Aerospace Walk of Honor in 1997.

  9. 7. John and James Dobson Carpet Mill, East and West ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. John and James Dobson Carpet Mill, East and West Parcels, May 17, 1926, (John and James Dobson, Inc. East Falls, Aero Service Corp., Neg. No. 5986, May 17, 1926, Free Library of Philadelphia, Print Collection). - John & James Dobson Carpet Mill (West Parcel), 4041-4055 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  10. Estimated loss of juvenile salmonids to predation by northern squawfish, walleyes, and smallmouth bass in John Day Reservoir, Columbia River. [Oncorhynchus spp. ; Ptychocheilus oregonensis; Stizostedion vitreum; Micropterus dolomieu; O. tshawytscha

    SciTech Connect

    Rieman, B.E.; Beamesderfer, R.C. ); Vigg, S.; Poe, T.P. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors estimated the loss of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. to predation by northern squawfish Ptychocheilus oregonensis, walleyes Stizostedion vitreum, and smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu in John Day Reservoir during 1983-1986. Their estimates were based on measures of daily prey consumption, predator numbers, and numbers of juvenile salmonids entering the reservoir during the April-August period of migration. They estimated the mean annual loss was 2.7 million juvenile salmonids. Northern squawfish were responsible for 78% of the total loss; walleyes accounted for 13% and smallmouth bass for 9%. Twenty-one percent of the loss occurred in a small area immediately below McNary Dam at the head of John Day Reservoir. The authors estimated that the three predator species consumed 14% of all juvenile salmonids that entered the reservoir. Mortality changed by month and increased late in the migration season. Monthly mortality estimates ranged from 7% in June and 61% in August. Mortality from predation was highest for chinook salmon O. tshawytscha, which migrated in July and August. Despite uncertainties in the estimates, it is clear that predation by resident fish predators can easily account for previously explained mortality of out-migrating juvenile salmonids. Alteration of the Columbia River by dams and a decline in the number of salmonids could have increased the fraction of mortality caused by predation over what is was in the past.

  11. John Keats and tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Radetsky, M

    2001-05-01

    John Keats was trained as an apothecary, the general practitioner of the day. Precocious in his sensibilities and fluent in his imagery, he also was the model of the romantic poet. That he was a physician and a poet makes his early death from tuberculosis poignant and revealing. This history traces his life and death against the backdrop of medicine at the turn of the 19th century. PMID:11368115

  12. A 60-day probiotic protocol with Dietzia subsp. C79793-74 prevents development of Johne's disease parameters after in utero and/or neonatal MAP infection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The research reported herein was designed to assess whether the bacterium, Dietzia subspecies C79793-74, used as a probiotic, could prevent development of parameters indicative of bovine paratuberculosis after potential in utero, birthing and neonatal (colostrum) exposure to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Such exposure avenues are especially relevant for dairy farms practicing good management procedures since calves on these farms could be infected via dams that have yet to be identified as MAP-positive. Indeed, of 18 calves in the present study that became paratuberculosis parameter-positive, five had dams that were negative for all parameters pre-calving. Parameters used herein to define paratuberculosis status were serum ELISA, serum agar gel immunodiffusion, cultureable fecal MAP, histopathology at necropsy and clinical disease. Thirty-four newborn calves whose dams were paratuberculosis-positive were assigned to four different treatment groups. Ten were treated daily for 60 days with viable Dietzia added to their antibiotic-free milk feedings; none became positive for any parameter with age. In contrast, seven of eight calves that were not treated became positive for one or more paratuberculosis-associated parameter. Sixteen calves were treated with viable Dietzia for the first two days of life; eight were then not treated further, whereas the other eight were treated an additional 58 days with Dietzia added to tetracycline-fortified milk (Dietzia is sensitive to tetracycline). In these two groups, positivity developed in five of eight and six of eight, respectively. These results indicated that (a) a daily, 60-day treatment with viable Dietzia effectively prevented development of parameters indicative of paratuberculosis and (b) this treatment, in combination with good management practices, has the potential to eradicate MAP from animals/herds, which should curtail the spread of MAP. Such results should significantly reduce human

  13. John Henry--The Steel Driving Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, David E.; Gulley, Laura L.

    2005-01-01

    The story of John Henry provided the setting for sixth-grade class to participate in a John Henry Day of mathematics experiments. The students collected data from experiments where students competed against machines and technology. The student analyzed the data by comparing two box plots, a box plot of human data, and a box plot of machine or…

  14. 7-Years of Using Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) to assess river restoration efforts : synergies of high-resolution observation and modeling on the Middle Fork of the John Day River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, A.; Diabat, M.

    2014-12-01

    Temperature is a key factor for salmonid health and is an important restoration metric on the Middle Fork of the John Day River, northeast Oregon. The longest undammed tributary to the Columbia, the headwaters of the Middle Fork are crucial to steelhead and spring Chinook and summer Chinook juvenile rearing. In the past century the river has been altered by dredge mining, overgrazing, logging activities, and irrigation resulting in bank erosion, low effective shade, and channelization. These factors decreased fish habitat and led to increased stream temperature maxima. Restoration has focused on restoring fish habitat, creating thermal refugia, and planting native vegetation. The most recent completed restoration project diverted the flow into the historic, meandering stream channel from the dredged, straightened channel. Over the past seven years, Oregon State University researchers (Tara O'Donnell-2012, Julie Huff-2009) have been involved in a planned-to-be 10-year stream temperature monitoring study to assess maximum temperatures during low-flow summer months. The use of fiber optics through distributed temperature sensing (DTS) made it possible to record high resolution temperature data at both temporal and spatial scales; data which is used to assess the efficacy of restoration efforts on the reach. Furthermore, DTS provided temperature data that reveals subtle hydrologic processes such as groundwater or hyporheic inflows and quantifies their effect on the stream. Current research has focused on large scale DTS installations on the Middle Fork of the John Day River on the Oxbow, Forrest, and the upstream Galena ("RPB") conservation properties. In the summers of 2013 and 2014, 16 km of river were monitored. Our study compares temperatures before and after the restoration project and provides essential guidance for future restoration projects. Direct comparisons coupled with a deterministic modeling using HeatSource assist in better understanding the

  15. Fall Leaf Portraits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hara, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how students can create a stunning as well as economical mosaic utilizing fall's brilliantly colored leaves, preserved at their peak in color. Start by choosing a beautiful fall day to take students on a nature walk to collect a variety of leaves in different shapes, sizes, and colors. Focus on collecting a…

  16. Preventing falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... worsened. Improving your vision will help reduce falls. Images ... for preventing falls in older people living in the community. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2009, Issue 2. Art. No.: ...

  17. St. John's Wort (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The herb St. John's Wort is believed to be helpful in relieving mild to moderate depression, but should only be taken under a physician's supervision. St. John's Wort may clash with other medications or foods ...

  18. St. John's Wort

    MedlinePlus

    ... 359–366. St. John's wort. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Web site. Accessed at www.naturaldatabase.com on February ... St. John's wort ( Hypericum perforatum L.). Natural Standard Database Web site. Accessed at www.naturalstandard.com on February ...

  19. Preventing Falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... from osteoporosis. Lower-body strength exercises and balance exercises can help you prevent falls and avoid the disability that may result from falling. Here are some fall prevention tips from Go4Life : l Have your eyes and hearing tested often. Always wear your glasses when you ...

  20. Raindrops Keep Falling on My Tent: The Rainy Day Book. Packed with Hundreds of Great Ideas of What To Do in Camp When It Pours.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackay, Joy

    This booklet lists numerous ideas to use for rainy-day camp activities, and many that are appropriate for other situations. Chapter 1, "Rain Can Be Beautiful" encourages planning for and a positive attitude about rain. It suggests ways to take advantage of rainy days to relax, read about camping skills, repair equipment, or test campcraft skills.…

  1. A Follow Up Study of Children with Get Set Day Care and Prekindergarten Head Start Experience Who Enrolled in the School District of Philadelphia, Fall, 1978 & 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asano, Mildred M.

    The subsequent school progress of children who attended the Get Set Day Care (GSDC) or Prekindergarten Head Start (PKHS) preschool programs compared to peers who had a different type or no preschool experience is examined in this document. The study corroborates the two major findings of the Consortium for Longitudinal Studies: that preschool…

  2. 5. John N. Vogel, Photographer, June 2000 View to northeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. John N. Vogel, Photographer, June 2000 View to northeast. West end (up river), north sid guard (dewatering) gate. Northwest operating shelter to right center. Northwest intermediate shelter to right. - St. Mary's Falls Canal, Soo Locks, Sabin Lock Subcomplex, Sabin Lock, St. Mary's River at Falls, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  3. Forecasting method of ice blocks fall by logistic model and melting degree-days calculation: a case study in northern Gaspésie, Québec, Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Francis; Hétu, Bernard; Allard, Michel

    2013-04-01

    Ice blocks fall is a serious natural hazard that frequently happens in mountainous cold region. The ice blocks result from the melting and collapse of rockwall icings (ice walls or frozen waterfalls). Environment Canada weather data were analysed for 440 cases of ice blocks fall events reported in northern Gaspésie by the "Ministère des Transports du Québec" (M.T.Q.). The analysis shows that the ice blocks fall are mainly controlled by an increase of the air temperature above 0oC. The melting degree-days (DDmelt) can be used to follow the temperature variations and the heat transfer into the ice bodies. Furthermore, large daily temperature changes, especially drastic drops of temperatures and freeze-thaw cycles, can induce enough mechanical stress to favour the opening of cracks and possibly cause the collapse of unstable ice structures such as freestanding ice formations. By following the evolution of the DDmelt and the best logistic model, it is possible to forecast the collapse of some of the most problematic rockwall icings and target the most hazardous periods along the northern Gaspésie roads.

  4. John Glenn - Mini Biography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Mini Biography of John Glenn, as it was up to 1962. From film to tape transfer of the film 'Friendship 7 - John Glenn' Depicts the historical orbital flight of John Glenn aboard 'Friendship 7', launched on February 20, 1962. Footage of staff at tracking stations worldwide and at Goddard Space Flight Center. Launch from cape canaveral. Flight tracking, re-entry, landing and recovery of Friendship 7.

  5. Triple oxygen and sulfur isotope analyses of sulfate extracted from voluminous volcanic ashes in the Oligocene John Day Formation: insight into dry climate conditions and ozone contribution to supereruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workman, J.; Bindeman, I. N.; Martin, E.; Retallack, G.; Palandri, J. L.; Weldon, N.

    2014-12-01

    Large volume pyroclastic silicic eruptions emit hundreds of megatons of SO2 into the troposphere and stratosphere that is oxidized into sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by a variety of reactions with mass independent oxygen signatures (MIF), Δ17O>0. Sulfuric acid is then preserved as gypsum in parental volcanic deposits. Diagenic effects are mass dependent and can dilute, but otherwise do not affect MIF ratios. Pleistocene Yellowstone and Bishop tuffs and modern volcanic eruptions preserved under arid climate conditions in North American playa lakes, preserve small amounts of volcanic sulfate as gypsum. This gypsum's Δ17O>0, in combination with isotopic variations of δ18O, δ33S and δ34S is distinct from sedimentary sulfate and reveals its original MIF sulfate isotopic signal and the effect of super eruptions on the atmosphere, and ozone consumption in particular. We use linear algebraic equations to resolve volcanic versus sedimentary (MIF=0) sources. We have found that many large volume ignimbrites have very high initial Δ17O in volcanic sulfate that can only be acquired from reaction with stratospheric ozone. We here investigate nine thick (>2 m) ash beds ranging in age from ~33-23 Ma in the John Day Formation of central Oregon, including massive 28.6 Ma Picture Gorge tuff of newly identified Crooked River supercaldera. The 28.6 Ma Picture Gorge tuff (PGT) has the highest measured Δ17O of 3.5‰, and other tuffs (Tin Roof, Biotite, Deep Creek) have +1.3 to 3.4‰ Δ17O excesses. Sulfate from modern smaller tropospheric eruptions studied for comparison have a resolvable 0.4‰ range consistent with liquid-phase based H2O2 oxidation. The PGT is coeval with the ignimbrite flare-up in western N. America, the 28-29 Ma eruption of the 5000 km3 Fish Canyon tuff and the 28 Ma Never Summer Field eruption in Nebraska-Colorado that have the highest measured Δ17O of 6‰ (Bao et al. 2003). We speculate on the climatic/atmospheric effects of these multiple ~28 Ma supereruptions

  6. John Glenn: Friendship 7 Splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Splasdown of Freindship 7 From: The John Glenn Story: Summary of astronaut John Glenn's flying career, from naval aviation training to space flight. The Mercury project is featured as John Glenn flies the Friendship 7 spacecraft. President John F. Kennedy presents the NASA Distinguished service Medal to Astronaut John Glenn.

  7. Foreword: Sir John Pendry FRS Sir John Pendry FRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglesfield, John; Echenique, Pedro

    2008-07-01

    realised that he should explore the properties of pseudopotentials in depth. This had never been done before, and the result was a paper of typical originality. The story of how John explored truly original aspects of physics, right from the start of his research career, is given by Volker Heine (in his own inimitable style), at the end of this short biography. Of course the result of John's PhD research was his development of the entire methodology for computing and interpreting LEED intensities, and their relationship to surface atomic structure. With experiments performed by Stig Andersson in Gothenburg, John's calculations led to the first ever surface structure determination, of Na adsorbed in a c(2 x 2) structure on Ni(001) [2]. His 1974 book, 'Low Energy Electron Diffraction' [3], remains a classic, and not only for LEED theorists—there is plenty of other surface science here to get one's teeth into. John extended the theory of LEED in the 1980s with the introduction of several new theoretical techniques and concepts. The Pendry R-factor [4] enabled surface structure determination to be largely automated, and quantified agreement between LEED theory and experiment. Tensor-LEED was developed by John, together with his PhD student Philip Rous [5], as an accurate approximation for calculating the LEED spectra of complex surface structures, enabling structures of hitherto impossible complexity to be determined. The methods of DLEED—both the experimental technique and its theoretical interpretation—were developed with Saldin, Van Hove and the Erlangen group of Heinz and Müller [6, 7]; this is a technique for interpreting electron scattering from atoms randomly adsorbed on surfaces, hence determining their bonding to neighbouring atoms. LEED experiments and calculations continue to this day, of course, with John's contribution remaining fundamental. Articles in this issue by John's former PhD student Michel Van Hove, his one-time post-doc Dilano Saldin, and his

  8. The Unretiring John Krumboltz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFromboise, Teresa D.; Neumann, Harly

    2002-01-01

    John D. Krumboltz continues to contribute to the field of counseling psychology, including the subspecialty of career counseling, after five decades of professional experience. Inspired by B. F. Skinner, John operationalized a behavioral approach to counseling. After 4 years at Michigan State University, where he initiated research on programmed…

  9. Jasper Johns' Painted Words.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinger, Esther

    1989-01-01

    States that the painted words in Jasper Johns' art act in two different capacities: concealed words partake in the artist's interrogation of visual perception; and visible painted words question classical representation. Argues that words are Johns' means of critiquing modernism. (RS)

  10. John Dewey, an Appreciation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clopton, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The subject of the annual Presidential address of Phi Kappa Phi, presented on May 8, 1962, was John Dewey. Dewey is identified in the public mind chiefly as an educational philosopher. In this address, the author describes the life and work of John Dewey as an indefatigable student of life whose interests ranged, like those of Aristotle, over the…

  11. The use of the LANDSAT data collection system and imagery in reservoir management and operation. [Maine, Vermont, New Hamphire, Canada, St. John River, Beech Ridge, Merrimack River, and Franklin Falls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, S. (Principal Investigator); Buckelew, T. D.; Mckim, H. L.; Merry, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An increase in the data collection system's (DCS) ability to function in the flood control mission with no additional manpower was demonstrated during the storms which struck New England during April and May of 1975 and August 1976. It was found that for this watershed, creditable flood hydrographs could be generated from DCS data. It was concluded that an ideal DCS for reservoir regulation would draw features from LANDSAT and GOES. MSS grayscale computer printout and a USGS topographic map were compared, yielding an optimum computer classification map of the wetland areas of the Merrimack River estuary. A classification accuracy of 75% was obtained for the wetlands unit, taking into account the misclassified and the unclassified pixels. The MSS band 7 grayscale printouts of the Franklin Falls reservoir showed good agreement to USGS topographic maps in total area of water depicted at the low water reservoir stage and at the maximum inundation level. Preliminary analysis of the LANDSAT digital data using the GISS computer algorithms showed that the radiance of snow cover/vegetation varied from approximately 20 mW/sq cm sr in nonvegetated areas to less than 4 mW/sq cm sr for densely covered forested area.

  12. John Greenleaf's life of science.

    PubMed

    Watenpaugh, Donald E

    2012-12-01

    This article summarizes the life and career of John E. Greenleaf, PhD. It complements an interview of Dr. Greenleaf sponsored by the American Physiological Society Living History Project found on the American Physiological Society website. Dr. Greenleaf is a "thought leader" and internationally renowned physiologist, with extensive contributions in human systems-level environmental physiology. He avoided self-aggrandizement and believed that deeds rather than words define one's legacy. Viewed another way, however, Greenleaf's words define his deeds: 48% of his 185 articles are first author works, which is an unusually high proportion for a scientist of his stature. He found that writing a thorough and thoughtful discussion section often led to novel ideas that drove future research. Beyond Greenleaf's words are the many students, postdocs, and collaborators lucky enough to have worked with him and thus learn and carry on his ways of science. His core principles included the following: avoid research "fads," embrace diversity, be the first subject in your own research, adhere to rules of fiscal responsibility, and respect administrative forces-but never back down from them when you know you are right. Greenleaf's integrity ensured he was usually right. He thrived on the axiom of many successful scientists: avoid falling in love with hypotheses, so that when unexpected findings appear, they arouse curiosity instead of fear. Dr. Greenleaf's legacy will include the John and Carol Greenleaf Award for prolific environmental and exercise-related publication in the Journal of Applied Physiology. PMID:23209002

  13. Injuries sustained by falls.

    PubMed Central

    Rozycki, G S; Maull, K I

    1991-01-01

    During a recent 4-year period, 381 patients were admitted with injuries sustained from falls. Equal numbers of patients were less than and greater than 50 years of age and included 53 children (less than or equal to 16 years) and 214 elderly (greater than or equal to 55 years). Falls from heights occurred predominantly in young males (mean age 34.2 years), were most commonly job or recreation related and resulted in higher injury severity scores (ISS). Falls in the elderly occurred more commonly in women, typically on a flat surface, and were less severe. Despite lower mean ISS, fall victims over 55 years of age had longer hospitalizations (11.4 vs. 4.5 days) and incurred higher hospital charges compared to younger patients. There were 35 deaths (9.2%). In patients under 55 years, deaths resulted from fall-related central nervous system (CNS) injury and/or multisystem trauma. In patients over 55 years, fatalities were most commonly related to pre-existent medical conditions. Based on a review of this experience, we conclude that: (1) unlike other causes of blunt and penetrating trauma, both sexes are equally at risk from fall-related injuries but sex incidence is age related; (2) falls from heights are more common in men; (3) advanced age and pre-existing medical conditions account for the increased morbidity and mortality following falls and; (4) cost containment measures for fall-related trauma must consider not only injury severity, but the age and pre-existent medical conditions of the patient. PMID:1772536

  14. John Glenn OK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Astronaut John Glenn and technicians inspect artwork that will be painted on the outside of his Mercury spacecraft. John Glenn nicknamed his capsule 'Friendship 7'. On February 20, 1962 astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. lifted off into space aboard his Mercury Atlas (MA-6) rocket and became the first American to orbit the Earth. After orbiting the Earth 3 times, Friendship 7 landed in the Atlantic Ocean 4 hours, 55 minutes and 23 seconds later, just East of Grand Turk Island in the Bahamas. Glenn and his capsule were recovered by the Navy Destroyer Noa, 21 minutes after splashdown.

  15. Astronaut John Young's Career

    NASA Video Gallery

    John Young served as a NASA astronaut for over four decades, flying on Gemini, Apollo and the Space Shuttle. He walked on the moon during Apollo 16 in 1972 and commanded the first shuttle mission, ...

  16. Students fall for Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedley, Kara

    2012-02-01

    From Boston to Beijing, thousands of students traveled to San Francisco for the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting. Of those who participated, 183 students were able to attend thanks to AGU's student travel grant program, which assists students with travel costs and seeks to enrich the meeting through ethnic and gender diversity. Students at Fall Meeting enjoyed a variety of programs and activities designed to help them better network with their peers, learn about new fields, and disseminate their research to the interested public. More than 800 students attended AGU's first annual student mixer, sharing drinks and ideas with fellow student members and future colleagues as well as forging new friendships and intellectual relationships.

  17. John Henry: Then and Now.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikola-Lisa, W.

    1998-01-01

    Compares three children's books retelling the legend of John Henry: "John Henry: An American Legend" by Ezra Jack Keats (1965), "John Henry" by Julius Lester (1994), and "The Legend of John Henry" by Terry Small (1994). Differences in imagery, language, symbolism, and themes are discussed. (MAK)

  18. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Chickasaw Dance Troupe performs an Honor Dance for John Herrington's parents during the Native American Ceremony at the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  19. Foreword: Sir John Pendry FRS Sir John Pendry FRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglesfield, John; Echenique, Pedro

    2008-07-01

    realised that he should explore the properties of pseudopotentials in depth. This had never been done before, and the result was a paper of typical originality. The story of how John explored truly original aspects of physics, right from the start of his research career, is given by Volker Heine (in his own inimitable style), at the end of this short biography. Of course the result of John's PhD research was his development of the entire methodology for computing and interpreting LEED intensities, and their relationship to surface atomic structure. With experiments performed by Stig Andersson in Gothenburg, John's calculations led to the first ever surface structure determination, of Na adsorbed in a c(2 x 2) structure on Ni(001) [2]. His 1974 book, 'Low Energy Electron Diffraction' [3], remains a classic, and not only for LEED theorists—there is plenty of other surface science here to get one's teeth into. John extended the theory of LEED in the 1980s with the introduction of several new theoretical techniques and concepts. The Pendry R-factor [4] enabled surface structure determination to be largely automated, and quantified agreement between LEED theory and experiment. Tensor-LEED was developed by John, together with his PhD student Philip Rous [5], as an accurate approximation for calculating the LEED spectra of complex surface structures, enabling structures of hitherto impossible complexity to be determined. The methods of DLEED—both the experimental technique and its theoretical interpretation—were developed with Saldin, Van Hove and the Erlangen group of Heinz and Müller [6, 7]; this is a technique for interpreting electron scattering from atoms randomly adsorbed on surfaces, hence determining their bonding to neighbouring atoms. LEED experiments and calculations continue to this day, of course, with John's contribution remaining fundamental. Articles in this issue by John's former PhD student Michel Van Hove, his one-time post-doc Dilano Saldin, and his

  20. Commemorating John Dyson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittard, Julian M.

    2015-03-01

    John Dyson was born on the 7th January 1941 in Meltham Mills, West Yorkshire, England, and later grew up in Harrogate and Leeds. The proudest moment of John's early life was meeting Freddie Trueman, who became one of the greatest fast bowlers of English cricket. John used a state scholarship to study at Kings College London, after hearing a radio lecture by D. M. McKay. He received a first class BSc Special Honours Degree in Physics in 1962, and began a Ph.D. at the University of Manchester Department of Astronomy after being attracted to astronomy by an article of Zdenek Kopal in the semi-popular journal New Scientist. John soon started work with Franz Kahn, and studied the possibility that the broad emission lines seen from the Orion Nebula were due to flows driven by the photoevaporation of neutral globules embedded in a HII region. John's thesis was entitled ``The Age and Dynamics of the Orion Nebula`` and he passed his oral examination on 28th February 1966.

  1. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume IX : Evaluation of the 2001 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Migrant Salmon and Steelhead Trout Migrating to Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day Dams using Program RealTime.

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, Caitlin; Skalski, John R.

    2001-12-01

    Program RealTime provided tracking and forecasting of the 2001 inseason outmigration via the internet for eighteen PIT-tagged stocks of wild salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams and eleven passage-indexed stocks to Rock Island, McNary, or John Day dams. Nine of the PIT-tagged stocks tracked this year were new to the project. Thirteen ESUs of wild subyearling and yearling chinook salmon and steelhead, and one ESU of hatchery-reared sockeye salmon were tracked and forecasted to Lower Granite Dam. Eight wild ESUs of subyearling and yearling chinook salmon, sockeye salmon and steelhead were tracked to McNary Dam for the first time this year. Wild PIT-tagged ESUs tracked to Lower Granite Dam included yearling spring/summer chinook salmon release-recovery stocks (from Bear Valley Creek, Catherine Creek, Herd Creek, Imnaha River, Johnson Creek, Lostine River, Minam River, South Fork Salmon River, Secesh River, and Valley Creek), PIT-tagged wild runs-at-large of yearling chinook salmon and steelhead, and a PIT-tagged stock of subyearling fall chinook salmon. The stock of hatchery-reared PIT-tagged summer-run sockeye salmon smolts outmigrating to Lower Granite Dam, consisted this year of a new stock of fish from Alturas Lake Creek, Redfish Lake Creek Trap and Sawtooth Trap. The passage-indexed stocks, counted using FPC passage indices, included combined wild- and hatchery-reared runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead migrating to Rock Island and McNary dams, and, new this year, combined wild and hatchery subyearling chinook salmon to John Day Dam. Unusual run-timing and fish passage characteristics were observed in this low-flow, negligible-spill migration year. The period for the middle 80% of fish passage (i.e., progress from the 10th to the 90th percentiles) was unusually short for nine out of ten PIT-tagged yearling spring/summer chinook salmon stocks tracked to Lower Granite Dam. It was the

  2. The Rise of Conservatism on Campus: The Role of the John M. Olin Foundation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Forest, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    In fall 2005 the John M. Olin Foundation dispensed the last of its funds, liquidated its belongings, and vacated its offices. John Merrill Olin intended his wealth to promote conservatism in academia, and for 52 years his foundation pursued that aim by creating grants for individuals and organizations that have become founts of right-wing…

  3. Obituary: John W. Firor (1927-2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, Peter A.

    2009-12-01

    scientific division of NCAR (Roberts made it a requirement if he was to be NCAR Director). He chose John to be the new HAO Director. John was 33 then; his leadership potential was recognized very early. While Director of HAO, John presided over a very active scientific program that focused on non-equilibrium thermodynamics, radiative transfer, plasma physics, coronal spectroscopy, geomagnetism, physics of the Earth's upper atmosphere, and solar activity. Prominent scientists such as Jack Evans, Sydney Chapman, Gene Parker, Leo Goldberg and Donald Menzel visited to share their insights and enthusiasm with the HAO staff. John was also an active participant in HAO's well-known solar eclipse expeditions, traveling to New Guinea and to Lake Chad in Africa. Late in his tenure as HAO Director, he took the lead in helping to improve the involvement of the AAS in solar physics, and solar physicists in the AAS. Having led the AAS committee that planned its birth, he was the founding chair of the new Solar Physics Division. Much less importantly, he gave me a summer position in 1966 when I was joining the faculty at CU--that is when I first met John. In 1968, John became the Director of NCAR when Walter Roberts decided to split the directorship from the Presidency of UCAR. As NCAR Director, John had responsibility for a vastly broadened program compared to his HAO days. NCAR, the largest NSF supported research center, conducted research covering all of atmospheric sciences, as well as oceanography and solar-terrestrial physics. It also provided major observational and computational facilities to the atmospheric sciences community. John showed very quickly he understood and could guide all of it. I came to know John best during this period, because in 1971 he chose me to head the Advanced Study Program, which supported (and still supports) postdoctoral and graduate education. In that time, budgets were good, and NCAR was a relatively collegial, informal place. But in December 1973, that

  4. Astronaut John Glenn dons space suit during preflight operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Astronaut John Glenn dons space suit during preflight operations at Cape Canaveral, February 20, 1962, the day he flew his Mercury-Atlas 6 spacecraft, Friendship 7, into orbital flight around the Earth.

  5. Scholarship in Teaching and Learning: An Interview with John Mitterer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, David B.

    2009-01-01

    John Mitterer earned his PhD in cognitive psychology from McMaster University. Like many teaching professors, his career took an unexpected turn early on when he was hired to teach introductory psychology at Brock University, near Niagara Falls, in Ontario, Canada. It was love at first lecture. He never left the course and now, as a full professor…

  6. What Ever Happened to . . . John Adams High School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doremus, Richard R.

    1981-01-01

    First in a series, this article describes the rise and fall of John Adams High School, an experimental school in Portland (Oregon) that was recently closed after 12 years of operation. The experiences of those who tried to make the experiment work may help others interested in educational innovation. (WD)

  7. Astronaut John H. Glenn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Astronaut John H. Glenn, one of the original seven astronauts for Mercury Project selected by NASA on April 27, 1959. The MA-6 mission, boosted by the Mercury-Atlas vehicle, was the first manned orbital launch by the United States, and carried Astronaut Glenn aboard the Friendship 7 spacecraft to orbit the Earth.

  8. Dedication: John Reuben Clark.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volume 40 of Horticultural reviews is dedicated to John Reuben Clark (University of Arkansas) for his outstanding contributions to horticulture. While known particularly for his impact on blackberry, blueberry, table grape, and peach cultivar development, he has also been a strong and enthusiastic v...

  9. John Galen Howard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Joan

    1979-01-01

    A biographical sketch of John Galen Howard, founder of the Department of Architecture at the University of California at Berkeley, is presented. Howard's conservative outlook and idealistic nature are examined and his influence on the curriculum at the university is traced. (PHR)

  10. John C. Houbolt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    John C. Houbolt at blackboard, showing his space rendezvous concept for lunar landings. Lunar Orbital Rendezvous (LOR) would be used in the Apollo program. Although Houbolt did not invent the idea of LOR, he was the person most responsible for pushing it at NASA.

  11. John Carroll University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Kathleen Lis; Rombalski, Patrick; O'Dell, Kyle

    2009-01-01

    John Carroll University (JCU) is a Jesuit Catholic institution located in University Heights, approximately 10 miles east of Cleveland, Ohio. Founded in 1888, the university has a population of 3,400 undergraduates and 800 graduate students. The Division of Student Affairs at JCU comprises 11 units. The mission of the division is the same as that…

  12. The John Muir Award.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Graham

    2002-01-01

    The John Muir Award was established in the United Kingdom to respond to minimal environmental awareness, especially among youth. The Award has three levels of effort; all involve discovering a wild place, exploring its wildness, helping to conserve it, and sharing the experience with a wider audience. There is an effort to establish the award in…

  13. John Cage Discusses Fluxus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Ellsworth

    1992-01-01

    Presents an informal discussion with composer John Cage which includes his response to George Maciunas' work, his recollections of Marcel Duchamp, the complex relationship between inelegant material and revealing works of art, neo-Dada and neo-Fluxus, Wittgenstein and the artist's ultimate responsibility to initiate a change in the viewer or…

  14. Who Killed John Keats?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leal, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Two months before he died, John Keats claimed he had been poisoned. Although most scholars and biographers have attributed Keats's fears of persecution, betrayal, and murder to consumptive dementia, Keats's suspicions had begun long before 1820 and were not without some justification. In this article, the author talks about the death of John…

  15. John Glenn's Space Ride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schamel, Wynell; Potter, Lee Ann

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the accomplishments of John Glenn as a pilot, astronaut, senator, and pioneer in relation to his 1998 flight that made him the oldest person to ever travel into space. Includes photographs for students to study, and recommends classroom activities related to Glenn's career. (DSK)

  16. Peter Pindar (John Wolcot).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vales, Robert L.

    This book is designed as an introduction to John Wolcot's works for the general reader, the college student, and the college teacher. Wolcot, whose pen name was Peter Pindar, wrote topical satire on public personalities of the eighteenth century, and his methods of criticism are the motif which guides each chapter and which unites all the satires…

  17. John Glenn: His first Flying Lesson Remembered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Pilot Harry Clever remembers giving John Glenn his first flying lesson. From: The John Glenn Story: Summary of astronaut John Glenn's flying career, from naval aviation training to space flight. The Mercury project is featured as John Glenn flies the Friendship 7 spacecraft. President John F. Kennedy presents the NASA Distinguished service Medal to Astronaught John Glenn.

  18. Every Day Is Mathematical

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barger, Rita H.; Jarrah, Adeeb M.

    2012-01-01

    March 14 is special because it is Pi Day. Mathematics is celebrated on that day because the date, 3-14, replicates the first three digits of pi. Pi-related songs, websites, trivia facts, and more are at the fingertips of interested teachers and students. Less celebrated, but still fairly well known, is National Metric Day, which falls on October…

  19. Oliver St John Gogarty.

    PubMed

    Clarke, R W

    1997-01-01

    Oliver St John Gogarty--Otolaryngologist to fashionable Edwardian Dublin--was a distinguished poet and a Senator in the fledgling Irish Free State after its establishment in 1922. He numbered amongst his acquaintances the poet William Butler Yeats, the novelist James Joyce and a host of political and literary persona who helped to shape modern Ireland. He was satirised as 'stately plump Buck Mulligan' in Joyce's novel Ulysses. PMID:9292124

  20. John McCain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phi Delta Kappan, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article presents speeches describing John McCain's position on education posted on the McCain campaign's official web site, www.johnmccain.com. These include McCain's speech to LaRaza convention, July 14; McCain's speech to the NAACP, July 16; McCain's speech at the Greater Columbus (Ohio) Convention Center, May 15; and McCain's speech at…

  1. Obituary: John Louis Perdrix, 1926-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, D. Wayne

    2006-12-01

    journals appeared under the banner of his own publishing house, Astral Press, until 2005 when JAH2 was transferred to the Centre of Astronomy at James Cook University. When cancer was first diagnosed, this did not deter John, and he continued to pursue his astronomical and editorial interests. Early in 2005 the cancer was in remission and John decided to make one final overseas trip, a long-anticipated visit to St. Petersburg. It was while he was returning to Australia that the illness aggressively reappeared, and he was taken off the airplane at Dubai and died peacefully in Rashid Hospital three days later. He was just three days short of his seventy-ninth birthday. Always the consummate gentleman, John Perdrix had a keen sense of humor and was wonderful company. He will be greatly missed by all who knew him. Our condolences go to his six children, Louise, John, Timothy, Fleur, Lisa and Angella.

  2. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.

    SciTech Connect

    Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-12-01

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

  3. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Griswold, Jim

    2007-01-01

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

  4. The mystery of John Wilkes Booth's dentist.

    PubMed

    Hyson, J M; Kauffman, M W

    1999-11-01

    For many years there has been much speculation over the identity of the dentist of President Abraham Lincoln's assassin, John Wilkes Booth. Some have considered Dr. William Merrill (1833-1918), a rather prominent Washington, D.C. dentist, as the man who restored two of Booth's teeth with gold a few days before the assassination. Who was the mysterious Dr. Merrill and what evidence do we have that he ever treated Booth? PMID:10726569

  5. John Hunter, Frederick Treves and intussusception.

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, M. D.; Willetts, I. E.

    2000-01-01

    Early this century, intussusception in childhood was usually fatal. John Hunter, one of the founding fathers of scientific surgery was amongst the first to accurately describe the clinico-pathological features of the condition and one of the great nineteenth century surgeons, Sir Frederick Treves, suggested a plan of management for intussusception which remains little changed up to the present day. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10700761

  6. John Marshall: the making of true spectacles.

    PubMed Central

    Bryden, D. J.; Simms, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    In 1693 John Marshall of London devised a novel method of grinding batches of identical, good quality, lenses of a specified focal length. Its commendation by the Royal Society led to a trade war between Marshall and rivals in the Worshipful Company of Spectacle Makers. Despite initial opposition the method was rapidly adopted by London opticians and, though much modified, it forms the unrecognised basis of present day practice. Images p1714-a PMID:7819998

  7. John Campbell Begg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Robert

    2002-03-01

    John Campbell Begg born in Dunedin in 1876 was the son of Alexander Campbell Begg and Katherine Begg, early Otago settlers. He studied physics and philosophy at the University of Otago before turning to business and rural pursuits. He died in Dunedin in 1965 age 89. The Begg family were foundation members of the Otago Astronomical Society. Visits to the Tanna Hill Observatory were made in 1915. The astronomical observatory which stands in Robin Hood Park, Roslyn, Dunedin bears his name; Beverly Begg Observatory

  8. Southeast Elevation, Attic Stair Nosing, Day Room Fireplace Details, Day ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Southeast Elevation, Attic Stair Nosing, Day Room Fireplace Details, Day Room Mantel Shelf, Northeast Elevation - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers - Battle Mountain Sanitarium, Ward 4, 500 North Fifth Street, Hot Springs, Fall River County, SD

  9. 2010 Stennis Day of Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Rich Delgado, commanding officer of the Fleet Survey Team located at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, visits with Kertrina Watson Lewis, executive director of the HandsOn volunteer organization in New Orleans, during Day of Service activities Jan. 12. The Day of Service was part of the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day observance at Stennis. During the day, Mississippi and Louisiana organizations visited the center to encourage employees to register and serve as volunteers for various community activities.

  10. 2010 Stennis Day of Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Employees at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center visit exhibits of volunteer organizations during their observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day with a Day of Service on Jan. 12. During the day, Mississippi and Louisiana organizations visited the center to encourage employees to register and serve as volunteers for various community activities. The day's focus was emphasized again and again - great things can happen when individuals work together toward a common goal.

  11. Falls and Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... rises with age. Click for more information Falls Lead to Fractures, Trauma Each year, more than 1. ... and injury deaths. Fractures caused by falls can lead to hospital stays and disability. Most often, fall- ...

  12. Home Improvements Prevent Falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Falls and Older Adults Home Improvements Prevent Falls Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents ... or home modification programs to help older people prevent falls. Check with your local health department, senior ...

  13. Falls in Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... for health care providers. Learn More Falls in Nursing Homes Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... 5 Why do falls occur more often in nursing homes? Falling can be a sign of other ...

  14. Marcel Breuer at Saint John's

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Scott

    2008-01-01

    A visitor to Saint John's University and Saint John's Abbey, in north-central Minnesota, sees something of Gothic heritage while standing in front of the abbey church, designed and built around 1960. The church's 112-foot campanile--a trapezoidal slab made of 2,500 tons of steel and concrete--stands boldly in front of a huge concrete honeycomb…

  15. John Bartlett and bioterrorism.

    PubMed

    Henderson, D A

    2014-09-15

    Until 1997, the subject of bioterrorism was not discussed within the medical community and deliberately ignored in national planning efforts. Biological weapons were regarded as "morally repulsive." This complacency stemmed from a 1972 Biological Weapons Convention where all countries agreed to cease offensive biological weapons research. In the 1990s, however, the Soviet Union was discovered to have an extensive bioweapons program and a Japanese religious cult sought to launch an anthrax attack on Tokyo. Biological weapons such as smallpox and anthrax had the potential to cause a national catastrophe. However, little was done until John Bartlett in 1997 led a symposium and program to educate the medical community and the country of the need for definitive bioweapons programs. It was highly persuasive and received a final stimulus when the anthrax attack occurred in the United States in 2001. PMID:25151482

  16. JOHN MUIR WILDERNESS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dellinger, David A.; Johnson, Frederick L.

    1984-01-01

    The mineral survey of the John Muir Wilderness, California revealed eight areas of probable and substantiated potential for the occurrence of mineral resources. Tungsten, with accompanying resources of gold, copper, silver, and molybdenum, is found along contacts between granitic rocks and metamorphosed calcareous sedimentary rocks; it is estimated that more than 1 million tons of demonstrated tungsten resources exist in areas of sustantiated resource potential within the wilderness. Resources of gold, silver, lead, copper, zinc, molydenum, and cobalt, occur in small deposits not associated with tungsten; however, the known deposits of these commodities are small and the possibility of the occurrence of larger ones is unlikely. The geologic setting precludes the presence of fossil fuel resources.

  17. Student Characteristics Report, Fall, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metropolitan Community Colleges of Kansas City, MO. Div. of Planning and Development.

    This report provides basic characteristics data for 15,329 students enrolled in the Metropolitan Community Colleges during the fall 1975 semester. Twenty-nine tables organize information by campus in terms of: males/females by part-and full-time status; enrollment by college and day/other; freshmen/sophomores; race and ethnic origin; student age…

  18. Obituary: John J. Hillman, 1938-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanover, Nancy

    2007-12-01

    the last several years of his career he was a Co-Director of the College Park Scholars program at the University of Maryland. There he had an opportunity to share his love of science with college freshmen and provide them with unique educational experiences such as small seminars, individualized attention, and field trips. Even at Goddard, John maintained contact with numerous graduate students, many of whom he brought to Goddard as postdoctoral fellows funded through the National Research Council Resident Research Associateship Program. He was a natural mentor, providing leadership, advice, and friendship to the junior scientists who worked with him over the years. One of the most exciting things about John was that he had numerous interests outside of astronomy. He enjoyed painting, and was a copyist at the National Gallery of Art. He was a skilled floral designer and won floral design contests in addition to owning a flower shop with one of his daughters. He was a gourmet chef, and could make a delicious meal out of the most basic of ingredients. He loved to ski, travel, garden, work on old cars, and read thriller novels. Most significantly, though, John was a deeply dedicated family man. He frequently shared stories about his adventures with his wife of 47 years, Patricia, his five children, his twelve grandchildren, and their extended family. With all of the professional accolades and successes he had received by the time he retired from Goddard, he viewed his family as his most significant accomplishment. The astronomical community suffered a great loss in the passing of John Hillman. His commitment to professional service, his dedication to mentoring younger scientists, and his ability to bring together scientists from widely varying disciplines to work on a problem enabled him to make unique contributions to our field. Those of us who knew him miss his outgoing, friendly, inquisitive, and generous personality. John greeted each day with optimism, as a

  19. Physiological development and migratory behavior of subyearling fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiffan, K.F.; Rondorf, D.W.; Wagner, P.G.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the migratory behavior and physiological development of subyearling fall chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha migrating through John Day Reservoir on the Columbia River, Washington and Oregon. Fish were freeze-branded and coded-wire-tagged at McNary Dam, Oregon, from 1991 to 1994, to determine travel time to John Day Dam and subsequent adult contribution. Stepwise multiple regression showed that 47% of the variation in subyearling fall chinook salmon travel time was explained by the reciprocal of minimum flow and fish size. Smoltification, as measured by gill Na+-K+ adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity, was not important in explaining variability in travel time of subyearling chinook salmon. Fish marked early in the out-migration generally traveled faster than middle and late migrants. Seawater challenges were used to describe physiological development and showed that osmoregulatory competence of premigrants in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River increased with fish size and gill ATPase activity. Once active migrants began passing McNary Dam, fish generally had survival exceeding 90% and were able to regulate their blood plasma Na+ in seawater. Gill ATPase activity increased as premigrants, reared in nearshore areas of the Hanford Reach, reached a peak among active migrants in late June and early July then decreased through the remainder of the out-migration. Salinity preference also peaked in subyearling fall chinook salmon during late June to mid July in 1995. Return of adults from marked groups showed no consistent patterns that would suggest a survival advantage for any portion of the juvenile out-migration. Presumed wild migrants from the middle and late portions of the out-migration were primary contributors to all fisheries, except the Priest Rapids Hatchery. As such, fishery managers should take action to ensure the survival of these fish, especially because they migrate under more unfavorable environmental conditions than early

  20. Day to Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurecki, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    A clean, healthy and safe school provides students, faculty and staff with an environment conducive to learning and working. However, budget and staff reductions can lead to substandard cleaning practices and unsanitary conditions. Some school facility managers have been making the switch to a day-schedule to reduce security and energy costs, and…

  1. Mensa 21 Research Journal, Fall 1986-Spring 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Phyllis, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Eight issues of this research journal on gifted children include the following topics: (1) Profile of a Gifted Child: The Johns Hopkins Program for Mathematically Precocious Youth--Fall 1986; (2) The Impact of the Arts on Our Civilization: Excerpts from Colloquium III (Louisville, Kentucky)--Summer 1987; (3) Why Are Asians so Smart? An…

  2. Pope John XXI, ophthalmologist.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, D

    1995-01-01

    Pope John XXI was an ophthalmologist before becoming Pope. He was born in Lisbon and trained at University of Paris and was part of the early medical school faculty in Siena. He became physician for Pope Gregory X and shifted to church duties. He rose quickly in the ranks of the Catholic church and was elected Pope in 1276 AD. His term was short. He died when construction in the Papal Palace at Viterbo, collapsed on him. His text book is in two parts with introductions to the eye followed by descriptions of diseases with their mostly medical treatments. He concludes with a section about his own wonderful waters. The work survived and a copy was even found amongst Michelangelo's papers. Unfortunately the book turns out to be a plagiarism of two earlier text books. His most notable achievement supposedly was discovering that glaucoma was a disease with a hard eye. It turns out that this section is referring only to a suppurative external disease with indurated lids called sclerophthalmia. PMID:7555583

  3. Searching for John Goodricke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.

    2010-01-01

    John Goodricke (1764-1786) is one of the most intriguing and enigmatic figures in the history of astronomy. Deaf from the age of five, his observations of the light variation of Algol brought him acclaim and the Copley Medal of the Royal Society by the age of nineteen. Together with his neighbor, mentor, and distant relative Edward Pigott, he went on to discover and quantify the light variations of other stars, including Delta Cephei. Goodricke's careful accounts of his observations, and their accuracy, remain a model of clear scientific thinking and reporting. Goodricke's career was short, as was his time on Earth: he died before his 22nd birthday. He left few personal notes or letters, and even many basic circumstances of his life have been misunderstood or misinterpreted. I will discuss Goodricke's apparent change of mind regarding the variations of Algol. I will further describe recent research into his family circumstances and into the allegation advanced by Zdenek Kopal in the 1980s that Goodricke was buried apart from his family because they were ashamed of his deafness.

  4. John Herschel's Graphical Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankins, Thomas L.

    2011-01-01

    In 1833 John Herschel published an account of his graphical method for determining the orbits of double stars. He had hoped to be the first to determine such orbits, but Felix Savary in France and Johann Franz Encke in Germany beat him to the punch using analytical methods. Herschel was convinced, however, that his graphical method was much superior to analytical methods, because it used the judgment of the hand and eye to correct the inevitable errors of observation. Line graphs of the kind used by Herschel became common only in the 1830s, so Herschel was introducing a new method. He also found computation fatiguing and devised a "wheeled machine" to help him out. Encke was skeptical of Herschel's methods. He said that he lived for calculation and that the English would be better astronomers if they calculated more. It is difficult to believe that the entire Scientific Revolution of the 17th century took place without graphs and that only a few examples appeared in the 18th century. Herschel promoted the use of graphs, not only in astronomy, but also in the study of meteorology and terrestrial magnetism. Because he was the most prominent scientist in England, Herschel's advocacy greatly advanced graphical methods.

  5. Obituary: John W. Firor (1927-2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, Peter A.

    2009-12-01

    scientific division of NCAR (Roberts made it a requirement if he was to be NCAR Director). He chose John to be the new HAO Director. John was 33 then; his leadership potential was recognized very early. While Director of HAO, John presided over a very active scientific program that focused on non-equilibrium thermodynamics, radiative transfer, plasma physics, coronal spectroscopy, geomagnetism, physics of the Earth's upper atmosphere, and solar activity. Prominent scientists such as Jack Evans, Sydney Chapman, Gene Parker, Leo Goldberg and Donald Menzel visited to share their insights and enthusiasm with the HAO staff. John was also an active participant in HAO's well-known solar eclipse expeditions, traveling to New Guinea and to Lake Chad in Africa. Late in his tenure as HAO Director, he took the lead in helping to improve the involvement of the AAS in solar physics, and solar physicists in the AAS. Having led the AAS committee that planned its birth, he was the founding chair of the new Solar Physics Division. Much less importantly, he gave me a summer position in 1966 when I was joining the faculty at CU--that is when I first met John. In 1968, John became the Director of NCAR when Walter Roberts decided to split the directorship from the Presidency of UCAR. As NCAR Director, John had responsibility for a vastly broadened program compared to his HAO days. NCAR, the largest NSF supported research center, conducted research covering all of atmospheric sciences, as well as oceanography and solar-terrestrial physics. It also provided major observational and computational facilities to the atmospheric sciences community. John showed very quickly he understood and could guide all of it. I came to know John best during this period, because in 1971 he chose me to head the Advanced Study Program, which supported (and still supports) postdoctoral and graduate education. In that time, budgets were good, and NCAR was a relatively collegial, informal place. But in December 1973, that

  6. Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1993.

    SciTech Connect

    Rondorf, Dennis W.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

    1994-12-01

    Recovery efforts for the endangered fall chinook salmon necessitates knowledge of the factors limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which affect spawning of the fish in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing seward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs. The spawning was generally a November event in 1993, with some activity in late Oct. and early Dec. Spawning habitat availability was assessed by applying hydraulic and habitat models to known fall chinook salmon spawning sites. Juveniles were seined and PIT tagged in the free-flowing Snake River, and in the Columbia River in he Hanford Reach and in McNary Reservoir. Subyearling fish were marked at McNary Dam to relate river flow and migration patterns of juveniles to adult returns. Hydroacoustic surveys were conducted on McNary and John Day reservoirs and in net pens.

  7. Magic moments with John Bell

    SciTech Connect

    Bertlmann, Reinhold A.

    2015-07-15

    John Bell, with whom I had a fruitful collaboration and warm friendship, is best known for his seminal work on the foundations of quantum physics, but he also made outstanding contributions to particle physics and accelerator physics.

  8. John Glenn Entering Friendship 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Overall view of astronaut John Glenn, Jr., as he enters into the spacecraft Friendship 7 prior to MA-6 launch operations at Launch Complex 14. Astronaut Glenn is entering his spacecraft to begin the first American manned Earth orbital mission.

  9. My working week: John Innes.

    PubMed

    Innes, John

    2016-07-23

    In the first of a new series of features for Vet Record Careers, John Innes describes a recent working week as referrals director for CVS and a RCVS specialist in small animal orthopaedics. PMID:27450857

  10. An Interview with John Wilson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halstead, J. Mark; McLaughlin, Terence H.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an interview with John Wilson covering topics such as: addressing the people who influenced him, highlighting Wilson's career and home background, and providing discussions on his opinions related to religion, morality, moral education, and the concept of authority. (CMK)

  11. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S.

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2000. This was the fifth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 397,339 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,477 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,421 from Big Canyon and 2,488 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 980 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 157.7 mm (157.3-158.1 mm) at Big Canyon to 172.9 mm (172.2-173.6 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.12 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 87.0% (84.7-89.4%) for Pittsburg Landing to 95.2% (91.5-98.9%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to

  12. John locke on personal identity.

    PubMed

    Nimbalkar, Namita

    2011-01-01

    John Locke speaks of personal identity and survival of consciousness after death. A criterion of personal identity through time is given. Such a criterion specifies, insofar as that is possible, the necessary and sufficient conditions for the survival of persons. John Locke holds that personal identity is a matter of psychological continuity. He considered personal identity (or the self) to be founded on consciousness (viz. memory), and not on the substance of either the soul or the body. PMID:21694978

  13. John Locke on Personal Identity**

    PubMed Central

    Nimbalkar, Namita

    2011-01-01

    John Locke speaks of personal identity and survival of consciousness after death. A criterion of personal identity through time is given. Such a criterion specifies, insofar as that is possible, the necessary and sufficient conditions for the survival of persons. John Locke holds that personal identity is a matter of psychological continuity. He considered personal identity (or the self) to be founded on consciousness (viz. memory), and not on the substance of either the soul or the body. PMID:21694978

  14. John F. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The John F. Kennedy Space Center, America's spaceport, is located along Florida's eastern shore on Cape Canaveral. Established as NASA's Launch Operations Center on July 1, 1962, the center has been the site of launching all U.S. human space flight missions, from the early days of Project Mercury to the space shuttle and the next generation of vehicles. In addition, the center is home to NASA's Launch Services Program, which coordinates all expendable vehicle launches carrying a NASA payload.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 32.6 by 51.2 kilometers (20.2 by 32.2 miles) Location: 28.6 degrees North latitude, 80.6 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49

  15. Falls in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Hodgetts, P. Geoffrey

    1992-01-01

    Falls are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. One in three older people will fall every year. Assessing intrinsic (patient) factors and extrinsic (environmental) factors that increase the risk of falling is an important part of caring for the elderly. Physicians can readily assess balance and mobility as part of a preventive approach. PMID:21221300

  16. Prevalence and cost of imaging in inpatient falls: the rising cost of falling

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Jessica; Alturkistani, Tahani; Kumar, Neal; Kanuri, Arjun; Salem, Deeb N; Munn, Samson; Blazey-Martin, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Objective To quantify the type, prevalence, and cost of imaging following inpatient falls, identify factors associated with post-fall imaging, and determine correlates of positive versus negative imaging. Design Single-center retrospective cohort study of inpatient falls. Data were collected from the hospital’s adverse event reporting system, DrQuality. Age, sex, date, time, and location of fall, clinical service, Morse Fall Scale/fall protocol, admitting diagnosis, and fall-related imaging studies were reviewed. Cost included professional and facilities fees for each study. Setting Four hundred and fifteen bed urban academic hospital over 3 years (2008–2010). Patients All adult inpatient falls during the study period were included. Falls experienced by patients aged <18 years, outpatient and emergency patients, visitors to the hospital, and staff were excluded. Measurements and main results Five hundred and thirty inpatient falls occurred during the study period, average patient age 60.7 years (range 20–98). More than half of falls were men (55%) and patients considered at risk of falls (56%). Falls were evenly distributed across morning (33%), evening (34%), and night (33%) shifts. Of 530 falls, 178 (34%) patients were imaged with 262 studies. Twenty percent of patients imaged had at least one positive imaging study attributed to the fall and 82% of studies were negative. Total cost of imaging was $160,897, 63% ($100,700) from head computed tomography (CT). Conclusion Inpatient falls affect patients of both sexes, all ages, occur at any time of day and lead to expensive imaging, mainly from head CTs. Further study should be targeted toward clarifying the indications for head CT after inpatient falls and validating risk models for positive and negative imaging, in order to decrease unnecessary imaging and thereby limit unnecessary cost and radiation exposure. PMID:26082653

  17. STS-95 Day 02 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On this second day of the STS-95 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Curtis L. Brown, Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Stephen K. Robinson, and Pedro Duque, and Payload Specialists Chiaki Mukai and John H. Glenn, are seen preparing a glovebox device in the middeck area of Discovery, an enclosed research facility that will support numerous science investigations throughout the mission. Payload Specialist John Glenn, activates the Microgravity Encapsulation Process experiment (MEPS). This experiment will study the formation of capsules containing two kinds of anti-tumor drugs that could be delivered directly to solid tumors with applications for future chemotherapy treatments and the pharmaceutical industry.

  18. Elton John Wake Up Song and Greeting for STS-135

    NASA Video Gallery

    Flight Day 6 was kick-started for the STS-135 astronauts with a special wake-up message from Elton John and one of the legendary performer’s greatest hits. "Rocket Man" debuted around the time of...

  19. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a pre-launch Native American ceremony, Radmilla Cody, the 2001 Miss Navaho Nation, sings the 'Star Spangled Banner' in her native language. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  20. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Chickasaw Dance Troupe performs an Honor Dance during the Native American Ceremony at the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  1. Captain John Smith and the Enterprise of Virginia: Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schick, James B. M.

    1986-01-01

    This article describes the modern-day equivalent prices of items Captain John Smith required for colonists traveling from England to Virginia in 1624. Includes information on wages and cost of living in 1624 and today in the United States. Concludes that the colonists paid a high price for traveling to the New World. (JDH)

  2. Obituary: John P. Oliver (1939-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Howard

    2011-12-01

    John P. Oliver, an emeritus professor of astronomy at the University of Florida in Gainesville, passed away Thursday, February 10, 2011, after a courageous and long battle with renal cancer. He left behind memories of a life and career to envy. During his forty years of service to his profession and department, this unique astronomer distinguished himself as a research scientist and instrumentalist, creative software designer, gifted teacher and speaker, a vocal advocate of public outreach, and friend to all who knew him. Oliver was born in New Rochelle, New York, during late fall 1939 on November 24. His father, James P. Oliver, was a naval officer and his mother was the former Dorothy Armstrong Cambell. Oliver's early days were spent in various cities due to his father's military life but he eventually received a high school diploma from Princess Ann High School in Virginia. Oliver subsequently graduated with a bachelor of science degree in physics in 1963 from the prestigious Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy. Lick Observatory awarded him a graduate assistantship so he moved west to California where he met and, on November 2, 1963, married Barbara Kay McKenna, who became his lifelong love and partner. In California Oliver had the good fortune to work with several eminent astronomers. This included Albert E. Whifford, director of Lick Observatory and known for his work on interstellar reddening, and Merle F. Walker, an expert in photometry, who also helped establish Pluto's rotation period. His close relation with Lawrence H. Aller, one of the 20th century's memorable astronomers, known for his ability to combine observation, theory and education, and for his care and kindness, helped bind Oliver and astronomy together for life. Oliver would also join the technical staff of the Aerospace Corporation, become an acting director of the Pine Mountain Observatory (University of Oregon), and a research assistant at the University of California in Los Angeles

  3. Building an infrastructure to prevent falls in older Californians: the Fall Prevention Center of Excellence.

    PubMed

    Rose, Debra J; Alkema, Gretchen E; Choi, In Hee; Nishita, Christy M; Pynoos, Jon

    2007-10-01

    The Fall Prevention Center of Excellence (Center), a consortium of federal, state, and private organizations, was established in 2005 to guide the implementation of a statewide initiative to prevent falls among older Californians. The process began with the convening of a representative group of recognized leaders in California's health and human services in 2003. This group engaged in a 2-day strategic planning process that culminated in the development of the California Blueprint for Fall Prevention. The overarching goal of the Blueprint is to build a statewide infrastructure for fall prevention services and programs that will serve as a model for the rest of the country. The specific goals of the Center are to establish fall prevention as a key public health priority in California; create, test, and evaluate effective and sustainable fall prevention programs; and build a comprehensive and sustainable fall prevention system in California. To accomplish these goals, the Center is currently engaged in developing and disseminating fall prevention tools and informational resources directed at the needs of both consumer and professional audiences; linking organizations involved in fall prevention while increasing awareness of fall prevention as an important public health issue; and helping communities build their capacity to effectively address falls in older adults through the delivery of integrated fall prevention services and "best practice" programs. PMID:17986582

  4. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rocklage, Stephen J.

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2003. This was the eighth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 437,633 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,492 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,494 from Big Canyon and 2,497 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium with 37-83% of the fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 153.7 mm (153.2-154.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.2 mm (163.9-164.5 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.22 at Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 83.1% (80.7-85.5%) for Big Canyon to 91.7% (87.7-95.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 59.9% (54.6-65.2%) for Big Canyon to 69.4% (60.5-78.4%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.8 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain

  5. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S.

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1999. This was the fourth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 453,117 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities not only slightly exceeded the 450,000 fish quota, but a second release of 76,386 yearlings (hereafter called Surplus) were acclimated at the Big Canyon facility and released about two weeks after the primary releases. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 9,941 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 9,583 from Big Canyon, 2,511 Big Canyon Surplus and 2,494 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 983 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low and did not appear to increase after transport to the acclimation facilities. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery and relatively high at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the release groups ranged from 147.4 mm (146.7-148.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 163.7 mm (163.3-164.1 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.04 at

  6. Children's Rights, "die Antipadagogen," and the Paternalism of John Stuart Mill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordenbo, Sven Erik

    1989-01-01

    Examines how John Stuart Mill would have viewed present-day educational liberalists' claims that children should be included in Mill's principle of individual liberty. Concludes that educational liberalists cannot rightly claim Mill as spokesman for their views. (KO)

  7. Interview with John Taylor Gatto.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Ellen

    1994-01-01

    Introduces ex-teacher and author John Taylor Gatto's experiences and views on education, including contradictory patterns of family life and education in the United States, based on traditions of various immigrant groups; deleterious impacts of standardization and institutional usurpation of family functions; and conflict between the development…

  8. John Rawls and Affirmative Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the philosophy of John Rawls, asserting that although Rawls never wrote about affirmative action, his ideas are relevant to the issue. Rawls concentrated on "ideal theory," which he believed was the theory of what constituted a truly just society. He considered slavery and racial segregation paradigms of injustice. His ideal theory of…

  9. John Dewey, Gothic and Modern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminsky, James S.

    2010-01-01

    It is argued here that understanding John Dewey's thought as that of a prodigal liberal or a fellow traveller does not capture the complexity of his work. It is also important to recognise the portion of his work that is "historie morale." In the very best sense it is epic, encapsulating the hopes and dreams of a history of the American people in…

  10. John Eliot in Recent Scholarship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cogley, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the recent literature on John Eliot--seventeenth-century Massachusetts missionary, minister, and millenarian. Examines disagreements between Alden Vaughan's and Francis Jennings's interpretations of Eliot's missionary writings and Puritan-Indian relations. Discusses James Axtell's ethnohistorical interpretation of Eliot. Emphasizes the…

  11. The Art of John Biggers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2010-01-01

    In their 2005 exhibit of John Biggers' work, the New Orleans Museum of Art described it as being inspired by "African art and culture, the injustices of a segregated United States, the stoic women in his own family, and the heroes of everyday survival." In this article, the author describes how her students reinterpreted Biggers' work. (Contains 1…

  12. John Milton Oskison and Assimilation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larre, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    John Milton Oskison (1874-1947) was a Cherokee writer, journalist, and activist and the author of novels and biographies as well as numerous short stories, essays, and articles about a great variety of subjects. Oskison thought of himself as "an interpreter to the world, of the modern, progressive Indian." The kind of representation Oskison gave…

  13. John Wilson on Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Terence H.; Halstead, J. Mark

    2000-01-01

    Describes the approach to moral education utilized by John Wilson focusing on his claims, arguments, and conclusions. Explores eight specific topics, such as his general perspective on moral education and the meaning and nature of moral. Reports on the areas of difficulty and criticism in relation to his approach. (CMK)

  14. The Johns Hopkins Hospital Network

    PubMed Central

    Tolchin, Stephen G.; Barta, Wendy; Harkness, Kenneth

    1985-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins Hospital has initiated an ambitious program to apply modern technologies to the development of a new, comprehensive clinical information system. One component of this system is a networking technology for supporting the integration of diverse and functionally distinct information systems. This paper discusses the selection of the networking technology implemented at JHH, issues and problems, networking concepts, protocols and reliability.

  15. John James Audubon & the Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Craig

    2012-01-01

    In the first half of the 1800s, John James Audubon roamed the wilds of America attempting to draw all the birds in their natural habitat. He published his life-sized paintings in a huge book entitled "Birds of America." Audubon developed a unique system of depicting the birds in natural poses, such as flying. After shooting the bird, he would wire…

  16. Symposium: John Dewey: Patron Saint?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York University Education Quarterly, 1979

    1979-01-01

    James E. Wheeler, Mortimer Smith, Walter Feinberg, and Christiana M. Smith comment on the work of John Dewey and its relevance to modern educators. They respectively judge Dewey as significant and enduring, anti-intellectual, biased, and ambiguous. (Editor/SJL)

  17. John Wilson as Moral Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, John L.

    1977-01-01

    The work of John Wilson, now teaching at Oxford University, as moral educator is summarized and evaluated. His rationalist humanistic approach is based on a componential characterization of the morally educated person. The rationale and conceptual status of the components is discussed. His position is compared to that of Peter McPhail, R. S.…

  18. John Milton: A Research Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Noate, Judith, Comp.

    This handout is a guide to library resources in the J. Murrey Atkins Library at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte, for sources of criticism for the study of 17th-century British author John Milton. The guide is intended to help readers find critical and biographical information on Milton. It explains important reference sources in the…

  19. John Couch Adams, the astronomer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, N.

    1989-03-01

    The planet Neptune was discovered more than 140 years ago. The circumstances of the discovery gave rise to great controversy, and very nearly led to an international incident between Britain and France, but this was only one of John Couch Adams' many contributions to astronomical science.

  20. John Milton's Rainbow: Sonnet XIX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scher, Amy

    John Milton presented a wide spectrum of materials and ideas illuminating the literary landscape like a rainbow which critics and authors have been discussing for centuries. One example of the multiple layers of meaning in Milton's poems is found in Sonnet XIX, which can be useful for both forensic discussion as well as for composition…

  1. John N Bahcall (1934 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, Lars; Botner, Olga; Carlson, Per; Hulth, Per Olof; Ohlsson, Tommy

    2005-01-01

    John Norris Bahcall, passed away on August 17, 2005, in NewYork City, USA. He was born on December 30, 1934, in Shreveport, Louisiana, USA. He was Richard Black Professor of Astrophysics in the School of Natural Sciences at the Institute forAdvanced Study (IAS) in Princeton, New Jersey, USA and a recipient of the National Medal of Science. In addition, he was President of the American Astronomical Society, President-Elect of the American Physical Society, and a prominent leader of the astrophysics community. John had a long and prolific career in astronomy and astrophysics, spanning five decades and the publication of more than five hundred technical articles, books, and popular papers. John's most recognized scientific contribution was the novel proposal in 1964, together with Raymond Davis Jr, that scientific mysteries of our Sun `how it shines, how old it is, how hot it is' could be examined by measuring the number of neutrinos arriving on Earth from the Sun. Measuring the properties of these neutrinos tests both our understanding of how stars shine and our understanding of fundamental particle physics. However, in the 1960s and 1970s, the observations by Raymond Davis Jr showed a clear discrepancy between John's theoretical predictions, based on standard solar and particle physics models, and what was experimentally measured. This discrepancy, known as the `Solar Neutrino Problem', was examined by hundreds of physicists, chemists, and astronomers over the subsequent three decades. In the late 1990s through 2002, new large-scale neutrino experiments in Japan, Canada, Italy, and Russia culminated in the conclusion that the discrepancy between John's theoretical predictions and the experimental results required a modification of our understanding of particle physics: neutrinos must have a mass and `oscillate' among different particle states. In addition to neutrino astrophysics, John contributed to many areas of astrophysics including the study of dark matter in

  2. John Glenn: Chosen To Cross The Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    John Glenn in training. From film to tape transfer of the film 'Friendship 7 - John Glenn' Depicts the historical orbital flight of John Glenn aboard 'Friendship 7', launched on February 20, 1962. Footage of staff at tracking stations worldwide and at Goddard Space Flight Center. Launch from cape canaveral. Flight tracking, re-entry, landing and recovery of Friendship 7.

  3. First Aid: Falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Falls KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Falls Print A A A Text Size en ... Floors, Doors & Windows, Furniture, Stairways: Household Safety Checklist First Aid: Broken Bones Head Injuries Preventing Children's Sports Injuries ...

  4. Experiments in Free Fall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Art, Albert

    2006-01-01

    A model lift containing a figure of Albert Einstein is released from the side of a tall building and its free fall is arrested by elastic ropes. This arrangement allows four simple experiments to be conducted in the lift to demonstrate the effects of free fall and show how they can lead to the concept of the equivalence of inertial and…

  5. Fall armyworm migration patterns.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), infestations in most of North America arise from annual migrations of populations that overwinter in southern Texas and Florida. Cytochrome Oxidase I haplotype profiles within the fall armyworm corn-strain, the subgroup tha...

  6. Learning From Falling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joh, Amy, S.; Adolph, Karen, E.

    2006-01-01

    Walkers fall frequently, especially during infancy. Children (15, 21, 27, 33, and 39 month-olds) and adults were tested in a novel foam pit paradigm to examine age-related changes in the relationship between falling and prospective control of locomotion. In trial 1, participants walked and fell into a deformable foam pit marked with distinct…

  7. Welfare effects of reduced milk production associated with Johne's disease on Johne's-positive versus Johne's-negative dairy operations.

    PubMed

    Losinger, Willard C

    2006-08-01

    An examination of the economic impacts of reduced milk production associated with Johne's disease on Johne's-positive and Johne's-negative dairy operations indicated that, if Johne's disease had not existed in US dairy cows in 1996, then the economic surplus of Johne's-negative operations would have been $600 million+/-$530 million lower, while the economic surplus of Johne's-positive operations would have been higher by $28 million+/-$79 million, which was not significantly different from zero. The data available for projecting changes in surplus were not sufficiently precise to allow an exact statement on whether Johne's-positive operations would have been better or worse off economically, in terms of the value received for producing more milk if they had not been affected by Johne's disease. The changes in producer surplus, based upon eliminating specific epidemiological risk factors for Johne's disease, were disaggregated between Johne's-positive dairy operations exposed to the risk factor and all other US dairy operations. Eliminating the risk factor of having any cows not born on the operation would have had a significant positive effect on the economic surplus of Johne's-positive operations that had any cows not born on the operation. PMID:16827950

  8. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rocklage, Stephen J. Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapawi, ID)

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2004. This was the ninth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 414,452 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 4,983 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 4,984 from Big Canyon and 4,982 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered low with 53-94% rating not detected to low. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 154.6 mm (154.0-155.2 mm) at Pittsburg Landing to 163.0 mm (162.6-163.4 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.7% (72.9-76.5%) for Big Canyon to 88.1% (85.7-90.6%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 45.3% (39.2-51.5%) for Pittsburg Landing to 52.1% (42.9-61.2%) for Big Canyon. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.5 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 12.8 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration

  9. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S.

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2001. This was the sixth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 318,932 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,503 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,499 from Big Canyon and 2,518 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 991 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 155.4 mm (154.7-156.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 171.6 mm (170.7-172.5 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.02 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.4% (73.2-75.5%) for Big Canyon to 85.2% (83.5-87.0%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release

  10. John F. Dewey—Tectonics Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    ‘I want the journal to acquire a reputation for very rapid, fair, and accurate reviewing,’ asserted John F. Dewey, editor-in-chief of AGU's newest journal, Tectonics. Dewey said that he will rule the bimonthly, which will begin publication in February, ‘with a bit of a rod of iron’ to ensure that Tectonics is ‘where only original and important papers are published.’‘I'm going to be very strict with reviewers,’ Dewey explained in his quick British clip. ‘If the review does not come back to me within 10 days to 2 weeks, I'll review the paper myself. I'm also going to have a system whereby, if a paper needs major surgery after being refereed, it will be rejected. Papers will have to be in virtually publishable condition before they are first submitted,’ he said.

  11. Pre-impact fall detection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinyao; Qu, Xingda

    2016-01-01

    Pre-impact fall detection has been proposed to be an effective fall prevention strategy. In particular, it can help activate on-demand fall injury prevention systems (e.g. inflatable hip protectors) prior to fall impacts, and thus directly prevent the fall-related physical injuries. This paper gave a systematical review on pre-impact fall detection, and focused on the following aspects of the existing pre-impact fall detection research: fall detection apparatus, fall detection indicators, fall detection algorithms, and types of falls for fall detection evaluation. In addition, the performance of the existing pre-impact fall detection solutions were also reviewed and reported in terms of their sensitivity, specificity, and detection/lead time. This review also summarized the limitations in the existing pre-impact fall detection research, and proposed future research directions in this field. PMID:27251528

  12. John Glenn: Enters Friendship 7 to Prepare for Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    John glenn entering the capsule prior to the launch of Friendship 7 From: The John Glenn Story: Summary of astronaut John Glenn's flying career, from naval aviation training to space flight. The Mercury project is featured as John Glenn flies the Friendship 7 spacecraft. President John F. Kennedy presents the NASA Distinguished service Medal to Astronaut John Glenn.

  13. John Glenn: Post-Flight Recovery of Friendship 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Mini Biography of John Glenn, as it was up to 1962. From: The John Glenn Story: Summary of astronaut John Glenn's flying career, from naval aviation training to space flight. The Mercury project is featured as John Glenn flies the Friendship 7 spacecraft. President John F. Kennedy presents the NASA Distinguished service Medal to Astronaut John Glenn.

  14. John Glenn: Presented with NASA Distinguished Service Medal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    John Glenn tours with his family, meets JFK and is presented with the NASA distinguished Service Medal. From: The John Glenn Story: Summary of astronaut John Glenn's flying career, from naval aviation training to space flight. The Mercury project is featured as John Glenn flies the Friendship 7 spacecraft. President John F. Kennedy presents the NASA Distinguished service Medal to Astronaut John Glenn.

  15. The letters of John Dastin.

    PubMed

    Thiesen, Wilfred

    2008-07-01

    John Dastin, a noted alchemist who lived ca. 1300, followed the lead of many of his contemporaries and predecessors in using letters to propagate his views on alchemy. This article identifies a number of letters that Dastin wrote, and includes one text addressed to a cardinal of the city of Naples. This letter is virtually a copy of a work by Arnold of Villanova. I believe that other works ascribed to Dastin will also show a great dependence on Arnold's works. PMID:19048973

  16. Charles Darwin and John Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, B.

    2009-11-01

    The influence of John Herschel on the philosophical thoughts of Charles Darwin, both through the former's book, Natural Philosophy, and through their meeting in 1836 at the Cape of Good Hope, is discussed. With Herschel having himself speculated on evolution just a few months before he met Darwin, it is probable that he stimulated at least the beginnings of the latter's lifelong work on the subject.

  17. John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nall, Marsha

    2004-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium is an inter-institutional research and technology development, beginning with ten projects in FY02 that are aimed at applying GRC expertise in fluid physics and sensor development with local biomedical expertise to mitigate the risks of space flight on the health, safety, and performance of astronauts. It is anticipated that several new technologies will be developed that are applicable to both medical needs in space and on earth.

  18. Kindergarten: All Day Every Day?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oelerich, Marjorie L.

    This paper reports findings that all-day every-day educational programs have positive effects on kindergarten children. Also included is a Minnesota Association for Childhood Education (MACE) position paper which advocates the provision of full-day kindergarten programs and details seven criteria that a quality full-day program must meet. Efforts…

  19. The 2008 AGU Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Catherine

    2008-11-01

    The 2008 AGU Fall Meeting, to be held 15-19 December in San Francisco, is likely to be the largest AGU meeting to date. More than 15,800 presentations are scheduled, and more than 11,000 participants registered prior to the early-bird deadline of 14 November. This year, all oral sessions and the exhibit hall will be in Moscone West, and all poster sessions will be in Moscone North. (The American Society for Cell Biology will be holding its annual meeting in Moscone South.) Meeting attendees will receive general information including an author index, maps, and a list of sessions by discipline, cosponsors, day, time, and location.

  20. Survival of falling robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Jonathan M.; Arkin, Ronald C.

    1992-01-01

    As mobile robots are used in more uncertain and dangerous environments, it will become important to design them so that they can survive falls. In this paper, we examine a number of mechanisms and strategies that animals use to withstand these potentially catastrophic events and extend them to the design of robots. A brief survey of several aspects of how common cats survive falls provides an understanding of the issues involved in preventing traumatic injury during a falling event. After outlining situations in which robots might fall, a number of factors affecting their survival are described. From this background, several robot design guidelines are derived. These include recommendations for the physical structure of the robot as well as requirements for the robot control architecture. A control architecture is proposed based on reactive control techniques and action-oriented perception that is geared to support this form of survival behavior.

  1. Osteoporosis: Preventing Falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Osteoporosis Preventing Falls Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of ... next to your bed Free NIH Videos About Osteoporosis The NIHSeniorHealth Web site features five brief, informative ...

  2. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffert, Barbara; Heilbrun, Margaret; Kuzyk, Raya; Kim, Ann; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Burns, Ann; Williams, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    From the fall's cascade of great new books, "Library Journal's" editors select their favorites--a dark rendition of Afghan life, a look at the "self-esteem trap," a celebration of Brooklyn activism, and much more.

  3. Survival of falling robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Jonathan M.; Arkin, Ronald C.

    1992-02-01

    As mobile robots are used in more uncertain and dangerous environments, it will become important to design them so that they can survive falls. In this paper, we examine a number of mechanisms and strategies that animals use to withstand these potentially catastrophic events and extend them to the design of robots. A brief survey of several aspects of how common cats survive falls provides an understanding of the issues involved in preventing traumatic injury during a falling event. After outlining situations in which robots might fall, a number of factors affecting their survival are described. From this background, several robot design guidelines are derived. These include recommendations for the physical structure of the robot as well as requirements for the robot control architecture. A control architecture is proposed based on reactive control techniques and action-oriented perception that is geared to support this form of survival behavior.

  4. Impacts of the Columbia River Hydroelectric System on Mainstem Habitats of Fall Chinook Salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Dauble, Dennis D.; Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Geist, David R.; Parsley, Michael J.

    2003-08-01

    Salmonid habitats in mainstem reaches of the Columbia and Snake rivers have changed dramatically during the past 60 years because of hydroelectric development and operation. Only about 13 and 58% of riverine habitats in the Columbia and Snake rivers, respectively, remain. Most riverine habitat is found in the upper Snake River; however, it is upstream of Hells Canyon Dam and not accessible to anadromous salmonids. We determined that approximately 661 and 805 km of the Columbia and Snake rivers, respectively, were once used by fall chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha for spawning. Fall chinook salmon currently use only about 85 km of the mainstem Columbia River and 163 km of the mainstem Snake River for spawning. We used a geomorphic model to identify three river reaches downstream of present migration barriers with high potential for restoration of riverine processes: the Columbia River upstream of John Day Dam, the Columbia-Snake-Yakima River confluence, and the lower Snake River upstream of Little Goose Dam. Our analysis substantiated the assertion that historic spawning areas for fall chinook salmon occurred primarily within wide alluvial floodplains once common in the mainstem Columbia and Snake rivers. These areas possessed more unconsolidated sediment, more bars and islands, and had lower water surface slopes than areas not extensively used. Because flows in the mainstem are now highly regulated, the pre-development alluvial river ecosystem is not expected to be restored simply by operational modification of one or more dams. Establishing more normative flow regimes, specifically sustained peak flows for scouring, is essential to restoring the functional characteristics of existing, altered habitats. Restoring production of fall chinook salmon to any of these reaches also requires that population genetics and viability of potential seed populations (i.e., from tributaries and tailrace spawning areas, and hatcheries) be considered.

  5. Impacts of the Columbia River hydroelectric system on main-stem habitats of fall chinook salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dauble, D.D.; Hanrahan, T.P.; Geist, D.R.; Parsley, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Salmonid habitats in main-stem reaches of the Columbia and Snake rivers have changed dramatically during the past 60 years because of hydroelectric development and operation. Only about 13% and 58% of riverine habitats in the Columbia and Snake rivers, respectively, remain. Most riverine habitat is found in the upper Snake River; however, it is upstream of Hells Canyon Dam and not accessible to anadromous salmonids. We determined that approximately 661 and 805 km of the Columbia and Snake rivers, respectively, were once used by fall chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha for spawning. Fall chinook salmon currently use only about 85 km of the main-stem Columbia River and 163 km of the main-stem Snake River for spawning. We used a geomorphic model to identify three river reaches downstream of present migration barriers with high potential for restoration of riverine processes: the Columbia River upstream of John Day Dam, the Columbia-Snake-Yakima River confluence, and the lower Snake River upstream of Little Goose Dam. Our analysis substantiated the assertion that historic spawning areas for fall chinook salmon occurred primarily within wide alluvial floodplains, which were once common in the mainstem Columbia and Snake rivers. These areas possessed more unconsolidated sediment and more bars and islands and had lower water surface slopes than did less extensively used areas. Because flows in the main stem are now highly regulated, the predevelopment alluvial river ecosystem is not expected to be restored simply by operational modification of one or more dams. Establishing more normative flow regimes - specifically, sustained peak flows for scouring - is essential to restoring the functional characteristics of existing, altered habitats. Restoring production of fall chinook salmon to any of these reaches also requires that population genetics and viability of potential seed populations (i.e., from tributaries, tailrace spawning areas, and hatcheries) be considered.

  6. Polypharmacy and falls in the middle age and elderly population

    PubMed Central

    Ziere, G; Dieleman, J P; Hofman, A; Pols, H A P; van der Cammen, T J M; Stricker, B H CH

    2006-01-01

    Aim Falls in the elderly are common and often serious. We studied the association between multiple drug use (polypharmacy) and falls in the elderly. Methods This was a population-based cross-sectional study, part of the Rotterdam Study. The participants were 6928 individuals aged ≥55 years. The prevalence of falls in the previous year was assessed. Medication use was determined with an interviewer-administered questionnaire with verification of use. Polypharmacy was defined as the use of four or more drugs per day. Results The prevalence of falls strongly increased with age. Falls were more common in women than in men. Fall risk increased with increasing disability, presence of joint complaints, use of a walking aid and fracture history. The risk of falling increased significantly with the number of drugs used per day (P for trend <0.0001). After adjustment for a large number of comorbid conditions and disability, polypharmacy remained a significant risk factor for falling. Stratification for polypharmacy with or without at least one drug which is known to increase fall risk (notably CNS drugs and diuretics) disclosed that only polypharmacy with at least one risk drug was associated with an increased risk of falling. Conclusions Fall risk is associated with the use of polypharmacy, but only when at least one established fall risk-increasing drug was part of the daily regimen. PMID:16433876

  7. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Chickasaw Indian princesses pose with folk singer Buffy Saint- Marie (center) during a Native American ceremony held in the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex. Several days of activities were held at KSC and in Orlando commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  8. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Chickasaw Indian princesses 'sign' the Lord's Prayer during a Native American Ceremony at the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex. The princesses are Crystal Underwood, Julie Underwood and Tamela Alexander. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  9. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Chickasaw Indian princesses seen here contributed to a pre-launch Native American ceremony at the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex by leading a prayer. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  10. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - An elder of her Navaho tribe, Dorothy Cody shares the stage with her granddaughter Radmilla Cody (not shown), the 2001 Miss Navaho Nation, who is singing the 'Star Spangled Banner' in her native language during a pre-launch Native American ceremony. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  11. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a pre-launch Native American ceremony, Radmilla Cody (right) , the 2001 Miss Navaho Nation, sings the 'Star Spangled Banner' in her native language. With her is her grandmother. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  12. John von Neumann Birthday Centennial

    SciTech Connect

    Grcar, Joseph F.

    2004-11-12

    In celebration of John von Neumann's 100th birthday, a series of four lectures were presented on the evening of February 10, 2003 during the SIAM Conference on Computational Science and Engineering in San Diego. The venue was appropriate because von Neumann spent much of the later part of his life, in the 1950's, as an unofficial ambassador for computational science. He was then the only senior American scientist who had experience with the new computers (digital, electronic, and programmable) and a vision of their future importance. No doubt he would have relished the chance to attend a meeting such as this. The first speaker, William Aspray, described the ''interesting times'' during which computers were invented. His remarks were based on his history [1] of this period in von Neumann's life. We were honored to have John von Neumann's daughter, Marina von Neumann-Whitman, as our second speaker. Other accounts of von Neumann's life can be found in books by two of his colleagues [2] and [3]. Our third speaker, Peter Lax, provided both mathematical and international perspectives on John von Neumann's career. Finally, Pete Stewart spoke about von Neumann's numerical error analysis [4] in the context of later work; this talk did not lend itself to transcription, but readers may consult the historical notes in [5]. Our thanks to all the speakers for a remarkable evening. We are grateful to the DOE Applied Mathematical Sciences (AMS) program for partially supporting these lectures. Thanks are also due to SIAM and William Kolata, to our emcee, Gene Golub, to Paul Saylor for recording and editing, and to Barbara Lytle for the transcriptions. More about von Neumann's work can be learned from the recent American Mathematical Society proceedings [6].

  13. STS-79 Flight Day 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    On this seventh day of the STS-79 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. William F. Readdy, Pilot Terrence W. Wilcutt, Mission Specialists, Thomas D. Akers, Shannon Lucid, Jay Apt, and Carl E. Walz, share a brief video tour of the Mir Space Station with flight controllers, taking a break from the transfer activities that has occupied the astronauts' time during three days of docked operations. Readdy and Apt floated through several of Mir's modules and back into Atlantis' double Spacehab module during the tour pointing out the numerous transfer items stowed on both spacecraft. Readdy, Wilcutt, Lucid and Blaha are seen discussing their mission in an interview with CNN's John Holliman.

  14. John Bardeen: an extraordinary physicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoddeson, Lillian

    2008-04-01

    On the morning of 1 November 1956 the US physicist John Bardeen dropped the frying-pan of eggs that he was cooking for breakfast, scattering its contents on the kitchen floor. He had just heard that he had won the Nobel Prize for Physics along with William Shockley and Walter Brattain for their invention of the transistor. That evening Bardeen was startled again, this time by a parade of his colleagues from the University of Illinois marching to the door of his home bearing champagne and singing "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow".

  15. John Dalton (1766-1844).

    PubMed Central

    Emery, A E

    1988-01-01

    There is no doubt that John Dalton ranks among the great names in science, a position which rests on his enunciation of the Atomic Theory. However, his very first scientific paper in 1798 was concerned with his own affliction of colour blindness and was in fact the first clear description of the disorder. This publication stimulated much subsequent research into the pathophysiology and genetics of the condition. His recorded observations on colour blindness are detailed and precise and betoken the approach which was to characterise all his later research in chemistry. Images PMID:3294412

  16. Stennis Space Center celebrates Diversity Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Kendall Mitchell of the Naval Oceanographic Office (right) learns about the culture of Bolivia from Narda Inchausty, president of the Foreign Born Wives Association in Slidell, La., during 2009 Diversity Day events at NASA's John Stennis Space Center. Stennis hosted Diversity Day activities for employees on Oct. 7. The day's events included cultural and agency exhibits, diversity-related performances, a trivia contest and a classic car and motorcycle show. It also featured the first-ever sitewide Stennis Employee Showcase.

  17. Obituary: John Beverley Oke, 1928-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesser, James Edward

    2004-12-01

    painstaking work he enabled the advances of astronomers worldwide for subsequent generations and extending to the present day. Among his 222 refereed publications, his 1974 paper on absolute spectral-energy distributions for white dwarfs and his 1983 paper with Jim Gunn on secondary standard stars for absolute spectrophotometry led his extraordinary citations. He maintained a career-long interest in the theoretical modeling of stellar atmospheres to help him analyze his lengthy series of observational determinations of absolute stellar fluxes in variable and non-variable stars. As CCD technologies became practical for real science in the late 1970s, Bev leapt to apply them, publishing in 1977 among the first, if not the first, astronomical spectra obtained with them. Using the new detector technology, he seized the opportunity to design and build a very efficient, low-resolution, double (blue, red) spectrograph for the Cassegrain focus of the 5-m Palomar telescope. It went into operation in 1981 and was still in use (with upgraded detectors) in 2004. When the design and construction of the Keck 10-m Telescope began in the 1980s, Bev applied lessons he had learned from the experiences of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope to design the Keck dome, with its many innovations. With Judith Cohen he designed and built the low-resolution imaging spectrograph (LRIS) for the Keck telescopes, which contributed greatly to the impact of that observatory in its early years. LRIS was a logical continuation of the Palomar Double Spectrograph design but had even greater efficiency. They commissioned LRIS on Mauna Kea in 1993, some two years after Bev's early retirement from Cal Tech. In Fall, 1991 Bev became a visiting worker at the National Research Council Canada's Dominion Astrophysical Observatory in Victoria, B.C., where he remained active until the day of his death. During those years he used LRIS extensively to study the evolution of clusters of galaxies, and actively pursued time

  18. STS-95 Day 08 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On this eighth day of the STS-95 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Curtis L. Brown, Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Stephen K. Robinson, and Pedro Duque, and Payload Specialists Chiaki Mukai and John H. Glenn, continue to perform microgravity experiments. Specialist John Glenn completes a back-pain questionnaire as part of a study of how the muscle, intervertebral discs and bone marrow change due to microgravity. The results will then be compared with data provided by astronauts during previous missions. Glenn continues blood sample analysis and blood processing that are part of the Protein Turnover (PTO) experiment, which is studying the muscle loss that occurs during space flight.

  19. STS-95 Day 07 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On this seventh day of the STS-95 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Curtis L. Brown, Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Stephen K. Robinson, and Pedro Duque, and Payload Specialists Chiaki Mukai and John H. Glenn, again test the Orbiter Space Vision System. OSVS uses special markings on Spartan and the shuttle cargo bay to provide an alignment aid for the arm's operator using shuttle television images. It will be used extensively on the next Space Shuttle flight in December as an aid in using the arm to join together the first two modules of the International Space Station. Specialist John Glenn will complete a daily back-pain questionnaire by as part of a study of how the muscle, intervertebral discs and bone marrow change after exposure to microgravity.

  20. Dinosaur Day!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Sandra; Baptiste, H. Prentice

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they capitalized on their first-grade students' love of dinosaurs by hosting a fun-filled Dinosaur Day in their classroom. On Dinosaur Day, students rotated through four dinosaur-related learning stations that integrated science content with art, language arts, math, and history in a fun and time-efficient…

  1. CEMI Days

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    CEMI Days are an important channel of engagement between DOE and the manufacturing industry to identify challenges and opportunities for increasing U.S. manufacturing competitiveness. CEMI Days that are held at manufacturing companies’ facilities can include tours of R&D operations or other points of interest determined by the host company.

  2. Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merro, John; And Others

    Interviews on the quality of day care in the United States are presented in this transcript of a program broadcast in the National Public Radio weekly series, "Options in Education." Writers, day care center personnel and others describe and evaluate the current situation. Federal legislation concerning children is examined, and researchers…

  3. John Bardeen and transistor physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Howard R.

    2001-01-01

    John Bardeen and Walter Brattain invented the point-contact semiconductor amplifier (transistor action) in polycrystalline germanium (also observed in polycrystalline silicon) on Dec. 15, 1947, for which they received a patent on Oct. 3, 1950. Bill Shockley was not a co-patent holder on Bardeen and Brattain's point-contact semiconductor amplifier patent since Julius Lilienfeld had already received a patent in 1930 for what would have been Shockley's contribution; namely, the field-effect methodology. Shockley received patents for both his minority-carrier injection concept and junction transistor theory, however, and deservedly shared the Nobel prize with Bardeen and Brattain for his seminal contributions of injection, p-n junction theory and junction transistor theory. We will review the events leading up to the invention of Bardeen and Brattain's point-contact semiconductor amplifier during the magic month of November 17-December 16, 1947 and the invention of Shockley's junction semiconductor amplifier during his magic month of December 24, 1947-January 23, 1948. It was during the course of Bardeen and Brattain's research in November, 1947 that Bardeen also patented the essence of the MOS transistor, wherein the induced minority carriers were confined to the inversion layer enroute to the collector. C. T. Sah has described this device as a sourceless MOS transistor. Indeed, John Bardeen, co-inventor of the point-contact semiconductor amplifier and inventor of the MOS transistor, may rightly be called the father of modern electronics.

  4. John Frassanito &Associates: Designer for Space Travel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zukowsky, John

    2002-01-01

    When most people think of design for space travel they think immediately of engineers and scientists, not architects or industrial designers. Yet, one of those arts professionals has been at the center of creating "space" in space for almost four decades. John Frassanito (born 1941) is an industrial designer who trained at the Art Center (now the famous Art Center College of Design in Pasadena) in the mid 1960s. After graduation in 1968, he began his design career by working with Raymond Loewy and William Snaith at the same time that Loewy's office was designing the interiors of Skylab, America's first space station (launched 1973). Frassanito worked on Skylab while at the Loewy firm until the early 1970s, when he was hired as a designer within the Computer Terminal Corporation where, in 1972, he designed the Datapoint 2000 -- the computer that the journal Invention and Technology (Fall 1994) called the "direct ancestor of today's PC." Frassanito started his own firm in 1983, where he continued to design computers as well as products for companies such as Sani-Fresh and Scott Paper. But he has made his mark on design for space travel since the mid-1980s, where he has been an outside contractor who has worked on a variety of NASA projects through today. These include 1980s works such as interior configuration and design for Space Station Freedom, as well as concepts for inflatable TransHab structures, through 1990s computer- generated animations for NASA missions, real and conceptual. In fact, Frassanito's high quality of design and animated imaging has been consistently utilized by NASA over the past decade to present mission realities and future concepts to scientists, engineers, lawmakers, and the general public alike. A survey of his work will be the subject of this paper in an effort to document the essential role that visual arts professionals play in designing "space" for space.

  5. Harvesting strawberries in fall and early spring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New management strategies are needed to produce strawberry planting materials that will fruit in the off-season in the mid-Atlantic coast region. Also, a better understanding of mechanisms that control flowering in strawberries is needed to improve fall flowering in short-day type cultivars. When ...

  6. West Tennessee ACEI 2006 Fall Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, Anna; Hailey, Beth

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the West Tennessee ACEI 2006 Fall Conference held at Union University in Jackson, Tennessee on October 14, 2006. The conference theme, Turning the Pages: A Focus on Children's Literature, was emphasized throughout the day. During the conference, the early childhood classroom teachers, preservice teachers, and administrators…

  7. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S.

    2005-07-01

    day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 14.1 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 10.9 rkm/d for Big Canyon to 15.9 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 9-12 days to Lower Granite Dam and 25-30 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, ranged from April 20-28. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for the FCAP groups were all May 11. The objectives of this project are to quantify and evaluate pre-release fish health, condition and mark retention as well as post-release survival, migration timing, migration rates, travel times and movement patterns of fall Chinook salmon from supplementation releases at the FCAP facilities, then provide feedback to co-managers for project specific and basin wide management decision-making.

  8. Student Enrollments, Fall 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Higher Education, Little Rock.

    This document presents demographic information about enrollment at public and independent institutions of higher education in Arkansas as of fall 1995. A listing of abbreviations for the public four-year, public two-year, and independent institutions is followed by a map of their locations. An executive summary identifies highlights such as the…

  9. Falling into Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Carolyn Lang

    2000-01-01

    Presents an activity that connects art, science, and nature in which elementary school students learn about deciduous trees. Explains that students create a torn-tissue collage, using fall colors for a background and drawing a silhouette of a tree without leaves on top of the background with black crayon. (CMK)

  10. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilbrun, Margaret; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Kuzyk, Raya; Roncevic, Mirela; Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal's" review editors select fall titles readers won't want to miss--"Waiting on a Train: The Embattled Future of Passenger Rail Service" (James McCommons); "Happy" (Alex Lemon); "Free for All: Joe Papp, the Public, and the Greatest Theater Story Ever Told" (Kenneth Turan & Joseph Papp); "In My Father's Shadow: A Daughter Remembers…

  11. Fall 2013 International Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This Fall report is an aggregated statistical analysis of Measures of Academic Progress® (MAP®) data from international schools. The report provides a consistent means of comparisons of specific sub-groups by subject and grade, which allows partners to compare their MAP® results with other schools within their region or membership organization.…

  12. The News, Fall 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Ray, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This fall 2002 newsletter from the Community College League of California contains several articles, news stories, and the brochure from the 2002 Annual Convention, "Celebrating the Way California LEARNS." Articles include: (1) "Nursing Shortage Poses Dilemma for Colleges: Access vs. Efficiency," a discussion of the debate over how to increase the…

  13. Freshmen Survey. Fall 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodyear, Don

    In 1985, College of the Sequoias (COS) was asked by the Cooperative Institutional Research Program (conducted jointly by the American Council on Education and the University of California, Los Angeles) to participate in a survey of incoming freshmen for the fall 1985 semester. During the summer counseling session, 259 new COS freshmen were…

  14. Career Day

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's 2013 Career Days was a joint collaboration between NASA Langley and the Newport News Shipbuilding where 600 high school students from Virginia took on two design challenges -- designing a ca...

  15. STS-113 Flight Day 11 Highlights Replay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The STS-113 eleventh flight day begins with Flight Engineer John Herrington and ISS Science Officer Peggy Whitson answering questions from the media. Earth Views from the Space Shuttle Endeavor payload bay, as the Space Shuttle Endeavor Expedition Five Crew travel over the Baja Peninsula are also presented.

  16. STS-113 Flight Day 8 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The STS-113 eigth flight day begins with Michael Lopez Alegria exiting the Quest Airlock to begin working on the P1 truss structure. Michael Lopez alegria is installing spool positioning devices (SPD) on the P1 truss structure. John Herrington is also seen working outside of the International Space Station. A good view of the deployed UHF radio antenna is shown.

  17. John Herschel and astronomy: a bicentennial appraisal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskin, M. A.

    An assessment is given of John Herschel's overall contributions to nineteenth century astronomy. John Herschel built on his pioneering father William Herschel's foundations, with revisions and extensions to the southern hemisphere. His work, incorporated into his general treatises on astronomy, had a major influence on the direction of astronomical progress.

  18. John Herschel: Britain's first modern physical scientist.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, M. J.

    The author presents a sketch of the life and contributions to science of Sir John F. W. Herschel (1792 - 1871). One of the theses he develops is that John Herschel can meaningfully be described as Britain's first modern physical scientist. In addition to developing this thesis, the author makes some remarks about lesser known aspects of Herschel's life.

  19. Symposium on John Dewey's "Art as Experience."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Joe R.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Reports on a symposium about John Dewey's philosophy of art. John Fisher, Richard Shusterman, and Joe R. Burnett state their views on Dewey's contributions to art theory and aesthetics citing Dewey's work, "Art As Experience." The consensus was that although Dewey's opinions are dated, his pragmatist's views offer the opportunity for further study…

  20. Solving: The Case of John, Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drell, Martin J.; Josephson, Allan; Pleak, Richard; Riggs, Paula; Rosenfeld, Alvin

    2006-01-01

    In this article, one of the authors was called to see an 18-year old boy named John, who had done poorly during his first year at college and was depressed. His parents feared that their son may be suicidal, a concern heightened by the recent news that one of their son's friends had committed suicide. Here, he interviews John about his…

  1. 75 FR 49497 - John Bonnes: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration John Bonnes: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug... the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) debarring John Bonnes for a period of 5 years from... the act, under authority delegated to the Director (Staff Manual Guide 1410.35), finds that Mr....

  2. A to Z with Jasper Johns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirker, Sara Schmickle

    2008-01-01

    One contemporary artist that kindergarten students can easily relate to is Jasper Johns. In this article, the author discusses how she introduced John's numeric and alphabetic paintings to her kindergarten students. The young artists were amazed that art can be created from the familiar symbols that they are learning to make in their regular…

  3. John H. Reynolds (1923-2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Grenville

    John Reynolds, AGU Fellow since 1968 and a member of the Volcanology Geochemistry and Petrology section since 1961, died unexpectedly on November 4, 2000. John was a professor emeritus of physics at the University of California, Berkeley and a pioneer in the development and application of noble gas mass spectrometry He was recovering from pneumonia when he suffered a pulmonary embolism.

  4. John Kotter on Leadership, Management and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bencivenga, Jim

    2002-01-01

    Excerpts from interview with John Kotter, Konosuke Matsushita Professor of Leadership at the Harvard Business School, about his thoughts on the role of the superintendent as leader and manager. Describes his recent book "John P. Kotter on What Leaders Really Do," 1999. Lists eight-step change process from his book "Leading Change," 1996. (PKP)

  5. Struggle for the Soul: John Lawrence Childs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallones, Jared

    2010-01-01

    John Lawrence Childs was born in Eau Claire, Wisconsin on January 11, 1889, the second child of John Nelson Childs and Helen Janette (Nettie) Smith. In childhood Childs absorbed the values of industry, democracy, and a traditional, but socially conscious, religion. Childs was a Methodist and an intensely private person not given to talking about…

  6. John Bahcall and the Solar Neutrino Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcall, Neta

    2016-03-01

    ``I feel like dancing'', cheered John Bahcall upon hearing the exciting news from the SNO experiment in 2001. The results confirmed, with remarkable accuracy, John's 40-year effort to predict the rate of neutrinos from the Sun based on sophisticated Solar models. What began in 1962 by John Bahcall and Ray Davis as a pioneering project to test and confirm how the Sun shines, quickly turned into a four-decade-long mystery of the `Solar Neutrino Problem': John's models predicted a higher rate of neutrinos than detected by Davis and follow-up experiments. Was the theory of the Sun wrong? Were John's calculations in error? Were the neutrino experiments wrong? John worked tirelessly to understand the physics behind the Solar Neutrino Problem; he led the efforts to greatly increase the accurately of the solar model, to understand its seismology and neutrino fluxes, to use the neutrino fluxes as a test for new physics, and to advocate for important new experiments. It slowly became clear that none of the then discussed possibilities --- error in the Solar model or neutrino experiments --- was the culprit. The SNO results revealed that John's calculations, and hence the theory of the Solar model, have been correct all along. Comparison of the data with John's theory demanded new physics --- neutrino oscillations. The Solar Neutrino saga is one of the most amazing scientific stories of the century: exploring a simple question of `How the Sun Shines?' led to the discovery of new physics. John's theoretical calculations are an integral part of this journey; they provide the foundation for the Solar Neutrino Problem, for confirming how the Sun shines, and for the need of neutrino oscillations. His tenacious persistence, dedication, enthusiasm and love for the project, and his leadership and advocacy of neutrino physics over many decades are a remarkable story of scientific triumph. I know John is smiling today.

  7. Photocopy of photograph (from Mrs. Martin, grandniece of John French, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (from Mrs. Martin, grandniece of John French, Clinton, Missouri) Circa 1900, photographer unknown JOHN AND ALMIRA FRENCH IN FRONT OF WEST AND SOUTH FACADES - John French Farm, South Grand River, Deepwater, Henry County, MO

  8. Fall prevention and bathroom safety in the epilepsy monitoring unit.

    PubMed

    Spritzer, Scott D; Riordan, Katherine C; Berry, Jennnifer; Corbett, Bryn M; Gerke, Joyce K; Hoerth, Matthew T; Crepeau, Amy Z; Drazkowski, Joseph F; Sirven, Joseph I; Noe, Katherine H

    2015-07-01

    Falls are one of the most common adverse events occurring in the epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) and can result in significant injury. Protocols and procedures to reduce falls vary significantly between institutions as it is not yet known what interventions are effective in the EMU setting. This study retrospectively examined the frequency of falls and the impact of serial changes in fall prevention strategies utilized in the EMU between 2001 and 2014 at a single institution. Overall fall rate was 2.81 per 1000 patient days and varied annually from 0 to 9.02 per 1000 patient days. Both seizures and psychogenic nonepileptic events occurring in the bathroom were more likely to result in falls compared with events occurring elsewhere in the room. With initiation of increased patient education, hourly nurse rounding, nocturnal bed alarms, having two persons assisting for high fall risk patients when out of bed, and immediate postfall team review between 2001 and 2013, there was a trend of decreasing fall frequency; however, no specific intervention could be identified as having a particular high impact. In late 2013, a ceiling lift system extending into the bathroom was put in place for use in all EMU patients when out of bed. In the subsequent 15 months, there have been zero falls. The results reinforce both the need for diligent safety standards to prevent falls in the EMU as well as the challenges in identifying the most effective practices to achieve this goal. PMID:26074343

  9. What Constitution Day Means and Why It Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamieson, Kathleen Hall

    2014-01-01

    For almost three quarters of a century, advocates have worked to give comparable federal stature to September 17, the day on which we celebrate the anniversary of the 1787 signing of the U.S. Constitution by the nation's founders. As President John F. Kennedy noted in his 1961 Constitution Day proclamation, it is a day for…

  10. Make Your Own Snow Day!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robeck, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Children love snow days, even when they come during the warmest weather. In this lesson the snow isn't falling outside, it's in the classroom--thanks to "Snowflake Bentley" (Briggs Martin 1998) and several models of snowflakes. A lesson on snow demonstrates several principles of practice for using models in elementary science. Focusing on snow was…

  11. Falling film evaporator

    DOEpatents

    Bruns, Lester E.

    1976-01-01

    A falling film evaporator including a vertically oriented pipe heated exteriorly by a steam jacket and interiorly by a finned steam tube, all heating surfaces of the pipe and steam tube being formed of a material wet by water such as stainless steel, and packing within the pipe consisting of Raschig rings formed of a material that is not wet by water such as polyvinylidene fluoride.

  12. John Bardeen and the theory of superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Schrieffer, J.R. )

    1992-04-01

    Bardeen's knowledge of the experimental data had bounded the theory of superconductivity quite tightly before B, C and S developed their theory. When one speaks with John Bardeen's friends about him, one frequently hears words such as brilliant, quiet, persistent, generous, visionary, athletic, kind, thoughtful and remarkable. It is the author's good fortune to have the chance to recount some incidents from his life that are connected with the theory of superconductivity. This article draws on the author's personal memories; his many other friends and colleagues will set down their own recollections elsewhere. The evolution of the microscopic theory of superconductivity closely parallels the scientific life of Joh Bardeen. Starting with his PhD dissertation, done under the guidance of Eugene Wigner, he spent much of his life developing an understanding of electron interaction effects and transport properties of metals, semiconductors and superconductors. His fascination with the remarkable phenomenon of superconductivity goes back to his graduate student days at Princeton. Although interrupted during the war years and in the late 1940's at Bell Labs, he returned to this perplexing topic when he moved to the University of Illinois in 1951. 20 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Inspire Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohach, Barbara M.; Meade, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    The authors collaborated on hosting a "Spring Inspire Day." planned and delivered by preservice elementary teachers as a social studies/science methods project. Projects that have authentic application opportunities can make learning meaningful for prospective teachers as well as elementary students. With the impetus for an integrated…

  14. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July 9, 1952 SOUTHWEST PERSPECTIVE. - St. John's Episcopal Mission, Chapel & Rectory, Fort Bennett Vicinity, Green Grass, Dewey County, SD

  15. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July 9, 1952 SOUTHEAST PERSPECTIVE. - St. John's Episcopal Mission, Chapel & Rectory, Fort Bennett Vicinity, Green Grass, Dewey County, SD

  16. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July 9, 1952 CHAPEL INTERIOR. - St. John's Episcopal Mission, Chapel & Rectory, Fort Bennett Vicinity, Green Grass, Dewey County, SD

  17. Obituary: John P. Oliver (1939-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Howard

    2011-12-01

    John P. Oliver, an emeritus professor of astronomy at the University of Florida in Gainesville, passed away Thursday, February 10, 2011, after a courageous and long battle with renal cancer. He left behind memories of a life and career to envy. During his forty years of service to his profession and department, this unique astronomer distinguished himself as a research scientist and instrumentalist, creative software designer, gifted teacher and speaker, a vocal advocate of public outreach, and friend to all who knew him. Oliver was born in New Rochelle, New York, during late fall 1939 on November 24. His father, James P. Oliver, was a naval officer and his mother was the former Dorothy Armstrong Cambell. Oliver's early days were spent in various cities due to his father's military life but he eventually received a high school diploma from Princess Ann High School in Virginia. Oliver subsequently graduated with a bachelor of science degree in physics in 1963 from the prestigious Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy. Lick Observatory awarded him a graduate assistantship so he moved west to California where he met and, on November 2, 1963, married Barbara Kay McKenna, who became his lifelong love and partner. In California Oliver had the good fortune to work with several eminent astronomers. This included Albert E. Whifford, director of Lick Observatory and known for his work on interstellar reddening, and Merle F. Walker, an expert in photometry, who also helped establish Pluto's rotation period. His close relation with Lawrence H. Aller, one of the 20th century's memorable astronomers, known for his ability to combine observation, theory and education, and for his care and kindness, helped bind Oliver and astronomy together for life. Oliver would also join the technical staff of the Aerospace Corporation, become an acting director of the Pine Mountain Observatory (University of Oregon), and a research assistant at the University of California in Los Angeles

  18. U.S. Cancer Death Rate Continues to Fall

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157680.html U.S. Cancer Death Rate Continues to Fall But there's been a ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Overall rates of cancer and deaths from cancer in the United States continue to ...

  19. John M. T. Finney: distinguished surgeon and Oslerphile

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    John Finney (1863–1942) was born near Natchez, Mississippi. After receiving his medical degree from Harvard, he interned at Massachusetts General Hospital and then went to Baltimore to become one of the first interns at the new Johns Hopkins Hospital. He met William Osler the day the hospital opened and became a lifelong admirer of “the Chief.” Finney specialized in gastrointestinal surgery and was recognized for his expertise in the field. Osler recommended Finney to a physician colleague, writing, “You could not be in better hands…. Finney has been most successful and his judgment is so good.” Finney served for 33 years under William Halsted at Hopkins. After Halsted's death, Finney was offered the chair of surgery at Johns Hopkins but declined. He was a founder and first president of the American College of Surgeons. He also served as president of the American Surgical Association and the Society of Clinical Surgery. Finney became chief surgical consultant for the Allied Expeditionary Forces in World War I. He was decorated by the United States, France, and Belgium. Finney was a master surgeon and a role model for generations of students and physicians. PMID:26722185

  20. Inpatient falls: the impact of family and personal caregivers.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Yin, Chang-Yi

    2009-08-01

    The impact of family and personal caregivers on inpatients with fall-related injuries in a Taiwanese medical center is investigated in this study. Taiwan has a prevalent custom for families to accompany their hospitalized loved ones during hospital stays. During the 95-day data collection period, 228 falls occurred. Results showed that if no family members were present when a patient fell, the fall-related injury was less serious. Nurses in Taiwan tend to depend on family members to help provide patient care. Regardless of whether an inpatient has a family member present, frequent bedside nursing visits are important to prevent falls. PMID:19616163

  1. Medicine in John Locke's philosophy.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Gonzalez, M A

    1990-12-01

    John Locke's philosophy was deeply affected by medicine of his times. It was specially influenced by the medical thought and practice of Thomas Sydenham. Locke was a personal friend of Sydenham, expressed an avid interest in his work and shared his views and methods. The influence of Sydenham's medicine can be seen in the following areas of Locke's philosophy: his "plain historical method"; the emphasis on observation and sensory experience instead of seeking the essence of things; the rejection of hypotheses and principles; the refusal of research into final causes and inner mechanisms; the ideal of irrefutable evidence and skepticism on the possibilities of certainty in science. The science which for Locke held the highest paradigmatic value in his theory of knowledge was precisely medicine. To a great extent, Locke's Essay on Human Understanding can be understood as an attempt to justify, substantiate, and promote Sydenham's medical method. This method, generalized, was then proposed as an instrument for the elaboration of all natural sciences. PMID:2290077

  2. John Keats: poet, patient, physician.

    PubMed

    Smith, H

    1984-01-01

    John Keats, son of an ostler , was born in London in 1795. Despite an early interest in literature he was, surprisingly, apprenticed to an apothecary and continued his medical training at Guy's Hospital, obtaining the Licentiate of the Society of Apothecaries in 1816. He never practiced medicine. His early poems were not well received, and for the young poet with very slender means, life was difficult. Tragedy was added to difficulty when tuberculosis, which had already caused the death of his mother and uncle, became apparent in his brother Tom, whom Keats nursed through his illness when the brothers were living together in Hampstead . Subsequently Keats developed the disease, but despite its rapid progress, he managed in a single year - 1819 - to produce some of the finest lyrical poetry in the language. He went to Italy in the hope of obtaining a cure but died in Rome in 1821, aged 25. Medicine certainly contributed to the man, but also something to the poet, Keats; his training and his family and personal experience of tuberculosis speak for themselves. More subtly , his medical experience influenced in some degree his ideas and even his choice of words. The interrelations of poet-patient and trainee-physician are examined in this essay. PMID:6377444

  3. `In free fall'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beijerinck, Herman C. W.

    2014-01-01

    Physicists in the lead of a fiction book or a play, that's a rare event! Writers in general do not understand physics, while physicists seldom have the talent of writing for a large audience. So when it happens, we should rejoice. The up-and-coming German author Juli Zeh [1] (1974), who studied law, has succeeded in combining beautiful prose, psychological drama, crime and physics in a challenging book `In free fall' [2]. A good friend of hers, Bettina Bruinier, has put the core message of the book into a compelling play in the `Volkstheater' in Munich [1]. Yes, it can be done.

  4. Archival Footage: John Glenn's Mercury Flight

    NASA Video Gallery

    Archival films document John Glenn's historic Feb. 20, 1962 Mercury flight in his Friendship 7, in which he became the first American to orbit the Earth. Clips include boarding the capsule, splashd...

  5. Obituary: John Louis Perdrix (1926-2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, W.

    2005-12-01

    On 27 June 2005 the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage lost its founder and Australia lost one of its leading historians of astronomy when John Louis Perdrix died in Dubai after a brief battle with cancer.

  6. John Dewey--Philosopher and Educational Reformer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talebi, Kandan

    2015-01-01

    John Dewey was an American philosopher and educator, founder of the philosophical movement known as pragmatism, a pioneer in functional psychology, and a leader of the progressive movement in education in the United States.

  7. Corporate Perspective: An Interview with John Sculley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temares, M. Lewis

    1989-01-01

    John Sculley, the chairman of the board of Apple Computer, Inc., discusses information technology management, management strategies, network management, the Chief Information Officer, strategic planning, back-to-the-future planning, business and university joint ventures, and security issues. (MLW)

  8. John Peter Zenger, Battler for Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallerstein, Gerry

    1974-01-01

    Examines the freedom of the press precedent set by the John Peter Zenger case in 1743 and considers its application to such current events as the jailing of reporters for not disclosing news sources. (RB)

  9. Saxon Falls Dam rehabilitation

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, R.M.; Quist, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    The Saxon Falls Hydro Project is a high-head hydro owned and operated by Northern States Power Company (NSP) in northwest Wisconsin. Saxon Falls comprises a concrete buttress overflow spillway; mass-concrete tainter gate spillway, conduit intake, and nonoverflow section; earth dam; 1,600-foot-long, 72-inch-diameter steel conduit; two 150-foot-long, 54-inch-diameter penstocks; steel surge tank; and reinforced concrete powerhouse. All structures are founded on bedrock. Engineering inspections revealed severe concrete deterioration and leakage within the intake and deterioration of the middle nonoverflow section. Subsequent to the inspection, concrete cores confirmed the level of deterioration and indicated that immediate measures were necessary to correct the deficiencies and restore project integrity. Because the dam is located on the border between Michigan and Wisconsin, coordination with the respective Departments of Natural Resources was crucial to obtain permits to construct the repairs. Due to concerns regarding a sensitive fishery, a reservoir drawdown was not allowed. To accomplish the work and allow for a suitable construction area, a special braced sheetpile cofferdam was required to complete the project. NSP elected to complete the construction using its own special-construction crews. Close coordination allowed construction personnel, the owner, and the engineer to overcome difficulties encountered during construction.

  10. [Can falls be prevented?].

    PubMed

    Dubousset, Jean

    2014-06-01

    Most recommendations and measures intended to prevent falls focus on the elderly (see HAS guideline of April 2009) but, in our opinion, this isfar too late: prevention must begin much earlier, not only by identifying persons at risk, but also by providing personalized lifestyle advice adapted to each individual's biomechanical, somatic, neurological and biological characteristics. The first preventive measure is to identify a possible deterioration of balance, starting with a physical examination at the age of 45 and repeated regularly throughout life. Extrinsic preventive measures focusing on the domestic and external environments are clearly necessary. But what is most important is to detect and, if necessary, correct any degradation of intrinsic (intracorporeal or somatic) factors starting at the age of 45 years; these include vision, vestibular function and balance, proprioception, and psychological and neurological status. Chronic illnesses and their treatments must also be taken into account: treatment must be limited to indispensable drugs; sedative psychotropics must be avoided if possible; and polymedication must be tightly controlled, as it is a major risk factor for falls. Prevention also requires a diet sufficiently rich in protein, calcium and vitamin D3 (to prevent osteoporosis), and regular daily exercise adapted to the individual, if possible associated with a simultaneous cognitive task. The last key point is the absolute need for thorough functional rehabilitation after any accidental or medical trauma, regardless of age, with the aim of restoring functional status to that existing prior to the accident. PMID:26983186

  11. Valentine's Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02174 Valentine's Day

    This isolated mesa [lower left center of the image] has an almost heart-shaped margin. Happy Valentine's Day from Mars.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 29.4N, Longitude 79.1E. 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Seminole Native American Veterans serve as color guard during a pre-launch Native American ceremony at the Rocket Garden in the KSC Visitor Complex. David Nunez, U.S. Navy, carries the State of Florida Flag; David Stephen Bowers, U.S. Army, carries the Flag of the United States of America; Charles Billie Hiers, U.S. Marine Corps., carries the Seminole Tribe of Florida Flag. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  13. John Twysden and John Palmer: 17th-century Northamptonshire astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    John Twysden (1607-1688) and John Palmer (1612-1679) were two astronomers in the circle of Samuel Foster (circa 1600-1652), the subject of a recent paper in this journal. John Twysden qualified in law and medicine and led a peripatetic life around England and Europe. John Palmer was Rector of Ecton, Northamptonshire and later Archdeacon of Northampton. The two astronomers catalogued observations made from Northamptonshire from the 1640s to the 1670s. In their later years Twysden and Palmer published works on a variety of topics, often astronomical. Palmer engaged in correspondence with Henry Oldenburg, the first secretary of the Royal Society, on topics in astronomy and mathematics.

  14. [Falls in patients with dementia].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi

    2008-11-01

    People with cognitive impairment are at about 2 to 3 times higher risk of falling compared with cognitively intact elderly. Incidence of falls among patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is high, nevertheless the clinical feature common in patients with mild to moderate AD is the absence of motor impairment. Recent studies suggest that the divided attention markedly impairs the ability of patients with AD to regulate the gait. Falls are particularly common in Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) patients and may aid diagnosis, and the falls are associated with parkinsonism and other unclear factors. Treatment studies evaluating fall reduction strategies in dementia patients are a priority. PMID:18974447

  15. Clinical Problem Solving: The Case of John, Part III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drell, Martin J.; Josephson, Allan; Pleak, Richard; Riggs, Paula; Rosenfeld, Alvin

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors share the case of John, a college freshman who had been struggling with depression. To work around John's case, the authors conducted an interview with John's parents. Based on the interview, it is found out that John's depression was largely caused by his relationship with his parents and the environment at their…

  16. Retrospective analysis of fatal falls.

    PubMed

    Thierauf, Annette; Preuss, Johanna; Lignitz, Eberhard; Madea, Burkhard

    2010-05-20

    Fatal falls are frequent and inhomogeneous events and affect every age. The criminalistic classification can often only be done on the basis of extensive investigations and the autopsy results. We retrospectively surveyed 291 cases of fatal falls on which a post-mortem examination had been carried out in the institutes of Forensic Medicine in Bonn and Greifswald. In large part, these cases are falls from height (n=123) and ground-level falls (n=122). These are compared to fatal falls down a stairs (n=46); the analysis is confined to injuries to the cranium. In ground-level falls the injury pattern in falls under the influence of alcohol differs from that of falls with no alcohol in the case history: all injuries are seen in higher relative frequency in casualties after the consumption of alcohol. In falls from height, the previous consumption of alcohol did not influence the injury pattern; the intracranial traumas are seen in decreasing frequency with increasing heights. The aim of this retrospective analysis is to present injury patterns and influencing factors like fall heights and alcohol for the different kinds of falls on the basis of our collective and to demonstrate similarities and differences between the subgroups. PMID:20176452

  17. Hydrology day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel-Seytoux, H. J.

    Registration for the Hydrology Day sponsored by the Front Range Branch of AGU on April 23 at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado, totaled 121 participants, of whom 61 were students.Thirty-one individuals joined the Front Range Branch. Three students from Colorado State University won the awards for best paper in their category: Thomas W. Anzia (Sr.), ‘A Comprehensive Table of Standard Deviates for Confidence Limits on Extreme Events’ Victor Nazareth (M.S.), ‘Aquifer Properties from Single-Hole Aquifer Tests’ and Roy W. Koch (Ph.D.), ‘A Physically Based Derivation of the Distribution of Excess Precipitation.’ Judges for the awards were Dr. Bittinger, Resource Consultants, Fort Collins; George Leavesley and Daniel Bauer, USGS, Water Resources Division, Denver; Scott Tucker, Executive Director, Denver Urban Drainage and Flood Control District; Charles Brendecke, Department of Civil Engineering, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder.

  18. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... included in the designation of business day, as in § 300.148(d)(1)(ii)). (c)(1) School day means any day... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.11 Day; business day; school day....

  19. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... included in the designation of business day, as in § 300.148(d)(1)(ii)). (c)(1) School day means any day... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.11 Day; business day; school day....

  20. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... included in the designation of business day, as in § 300.148(d)(1)(ii)). (c)(1) School day means any day... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.11 Day; business day; school day....

  1. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... included in the designation of business day, as in § 300.148(d)(1)(ii)). (c)(1) School day means any day... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.11 Day; business day; school day....

  2. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... included in the designation of business day, as in § 300.148(d)(1)(ii)). (c)(1) School day means any day... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.11 Day; business day; school day....

  3. Exceptional Scholarship and Democratic Agendas: Interviews with John Goodlad, John Hoyle, Joseph Murphy, and Thomas Sergiovanni

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Carol A.

    2006-01-01

    This portraiture study of four exceptional scholars in education--John Goodlad, John Hoyle, Joseph Murphy, and Thomas Sergiovanni--provides insight into their scholarly work and life habits, direction and aspirations, assessment and analysis of major trends in the profession, and advice for aspiring leaders and academics. Telephone interviews with…

  4. Exceptional Scholarship and Democratic Agendas: Interviews with John Goodlad, John Hoyle, Joseph Murphy, and Thomas Sergiovanni

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    This portraiture study of four exceptional scholars in education--John Goodlad, John Hoyle, Joseph Murphy, and Thomas Sergiovanni--provides insight into their scholarly work and life habits, direction and aspirations, assessment and analysis of major trends in the profession, and advice for aspiring leaders and academics. Telephone interviews with…

  5. Conceptions of Childhood in the Educational Philosophies of John Locke and John Dewey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bynum, Gregory Lewis

    2015-01-01

    This article compares progressive conceptions of childhood in the educational philosophies of John Locke and John Dewey. Although the lives of the two philosophers were separated by an ocean and two centuries of history, they had in common the following things: (1) a relatively high level of experience working with, and observing, children that is…

  6. The Use of PIT Tagging to Estimate Juvenile Fall Chinook Salmon Migration Time Through the Priest Rapids Project Area on the Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, R; McMichael, Geoffrey A. )

    2000-12-01

    We are in the process of evaluating how the Priest Rapids Project (PRP, located north of the Hanford reach on the Columbia River) affects populations of wild, fall Chinook salmon that are produced. One part of this project involves using mark-recapture technique to monitor fall juvenile Chinook movement in the area. A passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag technology was used to document migration timing out of the influence of the PRP, and track fish through downstream dams as they make their way to the ocean. On June 6 and 7, 2000, we tagged 1083 fall Chinook sub-yearlings above and below Wanapum Dam, subsequently detecting them as they began to pass through downstream dams. As of 9 August 2000, 122 fish had been detected in one or more of the dams downstream of the PRP. A mean migration time for tagged the fish of 5.5 km/day below the McNary dam and 4.5 km/day above the McNary Dam. The mean migration rate between McNary Dam and John Day Dam was 21.4 km/day. Back calculation, indicated the mean date of departure for juveniles tagged in the pool above Wanapum Dam was July 16, 2000, while juveniles tagged below Wanapum Dam was July 1, 2000. Because fish are still being detected at the dams only preliminary conclusions can be attempted. Since the peak of migration time for these fish seems to have passed, the time when these fish most likely left the PRP area can also be estimated. Data analysis will continue analysis, and hopefully some of the adult returns will be measured as they come through the dams throughout the duration of the project.

  7. AAS 227: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    and astronomy) who transitioned to being a freelance science writer. Wearing a distinctive bowler hat, Francis talked to a room full of students (and some non-students!) about what its like to be a science writer. Here are some highlights from among his recommendations and comments.A day in the life of a science writer.About the mechanics of freelancing:Some sample numbers: he wrote 73 articles in 2015, for 12 different publications. These vary in length and time invested. He supports himself fully by freelancing.The time between pitching a story and getting it published can vary between a few hours for online news stories to months for feature articles.The answer to the question, What do science writers do all day? (see photo)About transitioning into science writing:If youre interested in a science writing career, start blogging now to build up a portfolio.Use your training! As a researcher, you can read plots, understand scientific articles, and talk to scientists as colleagues. These are great strengths.About writing for the public:Theres a difference in writing for academics and the public: when writing for academics, youre trying to bring them up to your level. When writing for the public, thats probably not the goal.That said, on the subject of dumbing down: If you think your audience is somehow deficient, youve already failed.writing for the web: youll make fundamental spelling/grammar errors, youll find them only when you read the published post. Truth! #aas227 astrobites (@astrobites) January 8, 2016At the end of the session, Francis told us what he considers to be the best part of being a science writer: getting to tell people something that theyve never heard before. Getting it right is communicating a mundane fact to you that is an astounding surprise to your audience.Plenary Talk: News on the Search for Milky Way Satellite Galaxies (by Susanna Kohler)The second-to-last plenary talk of the meeting was given by Keith Bechtol, John Bahcall fellow at

  8. Astronaut John H. Casper, mission commander and veteran of three Space Shuttle flights, awaits the

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-77 TRAINING VIEW --- Astronaut John H. Casper, mission commander and veteran of three Space Shuttle flights, awaits the beginning of a training session for emergency bailout. All six crew members participated in the session, held in the Johnson Space Centers (JSC) Weightless Environment Training Facility (WET-F). The six astronauts will spend nine days aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour next month.

  9. How Can Older Adults Prevent Falls?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Falls and Older Adults How Can Older Adults Prevent Falls? Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents ... healthy and happy. There are simple ways to prevent most falls. "Injuries from falls are a major ...

  10. Tailored Prevention of Inpatient Falls

    PubMed Central

    ZUYEV, LYUBOV; BENOIT, ANGELA N.; CHANG, FRANK Y.; DYKES, PATRICIA C.

    2011-01-01

    Patient falls and fall-related injuries are serious problems in hospitals. The Fall TIPS application aims to prevent patient falls by translating routine nursing fall risk assessment into a decision support intervention that communicates fall risk status and creates a tailored evidence-based plan of care that is accessible to the care team, patients, and family members. In our design and implementation of the Fall TIPS toolkit, we used the Spiral Software Development Life Cycle model. Three output tools available to be generated from the toolkit are bed poster, plan of care, and patient education handout. A preliminary design of the application was based on initial requirements defined by project leaders and informed by focus groups with end users. Preliminary design partially simulated the paper version of the Morse Fall Scale currently used in hospitals involved in the research study. Strengths and weaknesses of the first prototype were identified by heuristic evaluation. Usability testing was performed at sites where research study is implemented. Suggestions mentioned by end users participating in usability studies were either directly incorporated into the toolkit and output tools, were slightly modified, or will be addressed during training. The next step is implementation of the fall prevention toolkit on the pilot testing units. PMID:20975543

  11. 1991 Fall Meeting Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, David S.

    The AGU 1991 Fall Meeting, held in San Francisco December 9-13, was the largest national AGU meeting ever held. Meeting participation continued the steady growth trend set throughout the previous decade. A total of 4,037 papers and posters were presented, and by Friday noon of the meeting over 5,500 members had registered.Several special events were scheduled to inform and engage members on societal and programmatic aspects of our science. AGU's Committee on Education and Human Resources sponsored an open forum that addressed opportunities and problems associated with dual-career couples. A discussion of NASA's strategic plan by Berrien Moore and Joseph Alexander drew a large audience, and a special session on societal aspects of the Mt. Pinatubo eruption drew an overflow crowd. Two special lectures— “Plumes, Plates, and Deep Earth Structure” by Don L. Anderson and “New Frontiers in Aeronomy: Effects of Global Atmospheric Change” by P. M. Banks-also drew overflow crowds.

  12. Pen Rearing and Imprinting of Fall Chinook Salmon, 1983 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Novotny, Jerry F.; Macy, Thomas L.; Gardenier, James T.

    1984-02-01

    Backwaters and protected sites located along the Columbia River between John Day and Priest Rapids dams, and the lower reaches of the Umatilla, Yakima, and Snake rivers were surveyed to determine their suitability for experimental rearing of age-0 fall (upriver bright) chinook salmon. All but eight potential study sites observed were judged as unusable based on criteria which included depth, area, accessibility, potential water level and temperature fluctuations, entrance-access to the river, public use, and obvious water quality problems. These eight sites were then thoroughly evaluated to determine suitability for rearing studies, using water quality and biological data to supplement physical observations. The criteria used in the final selection of rearing sites included an assessment of water source, depth, temperature, and quality, proximity to natural spawning sites, ease of adult capture, and benthos and zooplankton abundance. Two sites were selected as satisfying the most criteria for experimental rearing studies: Rock Creek (river km 337) and Social Security Pond (river km 468). All other sites surveyed were ranked as either less desirable, or unusable for these studies.

  13. STS-109 Flight Day 11 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On the 11th day of the STS-109 mission, Commander Scott Altman, Pilot Duane Carey, Payload Commander John Grunsfeld, and Mission Specialists Nancy Currie, James Newman, Richard Linnehan, and Michael Massimino are seen answering questions from students in an on-orbit interview. Various shots of the Earth are shown as Columbia orbits over the north of the Australian coast, the west coast of Mexico, Madagascar and the southern Indian Ocean, and the Atlantic coast of Africa.

  14. Rural Folklife Days: Resources for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Jon, Ed.; Beasley, Holly, Ed.; Hollingsworth, Teresa, Ed.; Smith, KC, Ed.

    Rural Folklife Days is an annual celebration of customs and crafts that have been practiced every fall by generations of people in rural areas of north Florida. This packet is designed to help teachers prepare elementary students for Rural Folklife Days and to introduce them to traditional crafts and arts that are still practiced in parts of north…

  15. Press Site Auditorium dedicated to John Holliman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    From left, Center Director Roy Bridges and NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin applaud as Jay Holliman, with the help of his mother, Mrs. Dianne Holliman, unveils a plaque honoring his father, the late John Holliman. At right is Tom Johnson, news group chairman of CNN. The occasion was the dedication of the KSC Press Site auditorium as the John Holliman Auditorium to honor the CNN national correspondent for his enthusiastic, dedicated coverage of America's space program. The auditorium was built in 1980 and has been the focal point for new coverage of Space Shuttle launches. The ceremony followed the 94th launch of a Space Shuttle, on mission STS-96, earlier this morning.

  16. Press Site Auditorium dedicated to John Holliman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin hands Mrs. Dianne Holliman a plaque honoring her late husband, John Holliman, a CNN national correspondent. Standing behind Goldin is Center Director Roy Bridges. At right is Tom Johnson, news group chairman of CNN. A ceremony dedicated the KSC Press Site auditorium as the John Holliman Auditorium to honor the correspondent for his enthusiastic, dedicated coverage of America's space program. The auditorium was built in 1980 and has been the focal point for new coverage of Space Shuttle launches. The ceremony followed the 94th launch of a Space Shuttle, on mission STS-96, earlier this morning.

  17. Sir John Gurdon: father of nuclear reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Blau, Helen M

    2014-07-01

    Sir John Gurdon founded the field of nuclear reprogramming. His work set the stage for the ever burgeoning area of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. Here I provide personal reflections on times I shared with John Gurdon and professional reflections of the impact of his ground-breaking research on my own development as a scientist and on the field in general. His paradigm-shifting experiments will continue to provoke scientists to think outside the box for many years to come. PMID:24954777

  18. Sir John Gurdon: Father of nuclear reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Blau, Helen M.

    2015-01-01

    Sir John Gurdon founded the field of nuclear reprogramming. His work set the stage for the ever burgeoning area of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. Here I provide personal reflections on times I shared with John Gurdon and professional reflections of the impact of his ground-breaking research on my own development as a scientist and on the field in general. His paradigm-shifting experiments will continue to provoke scientists to think outside the box for many years to come. PMID:24954777

  19. Not Just a Fall Tree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller-Hewes, Kathy A.

    2004-01-01

    Trees burst with color in the northern states. Autumn leaves dust the ground. Painting the fall landscape is nothing new. Teachers have been doing it in classrooms for decades. The approach, however, can make the difference between whether the fall landscape is simply painting for fun, or a real learning experience. Students learn best when they…

  20. Automatic Fall Monitoring: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Pannurat, Natthapon; Thiemjarus, Surapa; Nantajeewarawat, Ekawit

    2014-01-01

    Falls and fall-related injuries are major incidents, especially for elderly people, which often mark the onset of major deterioration of health. More than one-third of home-dwelling people aged 65 or above and two-thirds of those in residential care fall once or more each year. Reliable fall detection, as well as prevention, is an important research topic for monitoring elderly living alone in residential or hospital units. The aim of this study is to review the existing fall detection systems and some of the key research challenges faced by the research community in this field. We categorize the existing platforms into two groups: wearable and ambient devices; the classification methods are divided into rule-based and machine learning techniques. The relative merit and potential drawbacks are discussed, and we also outline some of the outstanding research challenges that emerging new platforms need to address. PMID:25046016

  1. Automatic fall detectors and the fear of falling.

    PubMed

    Brownsell, Simon; Hawley, Mark S

    2004-01-01

    We studied the effect of automatic fall detection units on the fear of falling. Participants were community alarm users living in the community aged over 75 years or those aged 60-74 years who had experienced a fall in the previous six months. Of those approached, 31% consented to take part; the main reason given for potential participants declining involvement was that they were happy with the technology they already had. Subjects were assigned to a control group (n = 21) or intervention group (n = 34) based on age, the number of self-reported falls in the previous six months and their score on the self-administered Falls Efficacy Scale (FES), which measures fear of falling on a scale of 0-100, with higher scores indicating less fear. The monitoring period lasted a mean of 17 weeks (SD 3.1). There was no significant difference between the intervention and control groups in their mean ratings of fear of falls (40.3 vs 37.5, difference 2.8, 95% CI 6.2 to 11.8), health-related quality of life or morale. Differences in fear of falling between an intervention subgroup who wore their detector at least occasionally (62%) and those who did not (38%) suggested that some people may benefit from a fall detector while others may lose confidence if they are provided with one. Most users who wore their detectors at least occasionally felt more confident and independent and considered that the detector improved their safety. PMID:15494083

  2. Cowlitz Falls Fish Passage.

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The upper Cowlitz was once home to native salmon and steelhead. But the combined impacts of overharvest, farming, logging and road building hammered fish runs. And in the 1960s, a pair of hydroelectric dams blocked the migration path of ocean-returning and ocean-going fish. The lower Cowlitz still supports hatchery runs of chinook, coho and steelhead. But some 200 river miles in the upper river basin--much of it prime spawning and rearing habitat--have been virtually cut off from the ocean for over 26 years. Now the idea is to trap-and-haul salmon and steelhead both ways and bypass previously impassable obstacles in the path of anadromous fish. The plan can be summarized, for the sake of explanation, in three steps: (1) trap and haul adult fish--collect ocean-returning adult fish at the lowermost Cowlitz dam, and truck them upstream; (2) reseed--release the ripe adults above the uppermost dam, and let them spawn naturally, at the same time, supplement these runs with hatchery born fry that are reared and imprinted in ponds and net pens in the watershed; (3) trap and haul smolts--collection the new generation of young fish as they arrive at the uppermost Cowlitz dam, truck them past the three dams, and release them to continue their downstream migration to the sea. The critical part of any fish-collection system is the method of fish attraction. Scientists have to find the best combination of attraction system and screens that will guide young fish to the right spot, away from the turbine intakes. In the spring of 1994 a test was made of a prototype system of baffles and slots on the upriver face of the Cowlitz Falls Dam. The prototype worked at 90% efficiency in early tests, and it worked without the kind of expensive screening devices that have been installed on other dams. Now that the success of the attraction system has been verified, Harza engineers and consultants will design and build the appropriate collection part of the system.

  3. First Fall-Related Injuries Requiring Hospitalization Increase the Risk of Recurrent Injurious Falls: A Nationwide Cohort Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Carlos; Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Lin, Hsiao-Yu; Huang, Hung-Chang; Wu, Chia-Chieh; Chen, Ping-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Recurrent falls not only have risk factors different from those of single falls but also have less favorable outcomes. The aim of our study was to determine the association between the injury characteristics of a first fall and the likelihood of recurrent injurious falls in a cohort of hospitalized patients. Methods We designed a nationwide retrospective cohort study and selected hospitalized patients who had injurious falls between 2001 and 2010. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) of recurrent injurious falls requiring hospitalization in the following year on the basis of the patients’ demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and the characteristics of injuries from the first injurious fall requiring hospitalization. Results Among the 504 512 patients hospitalized for injurious falls, 19 442 experienced recurrent injurious falls requiring hospitalization. The 1-year incidence of recurrent injurious falls requiring hospitalization was 3.85%. The incidence density was the highest within the 3-month period after the first injurious fall. The risk of recurrent injurious falls among patients aged 40 to 64, 65 to 74, and ≥ 75 years increased progressively (HR: 2.11, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.90–2.34; HR: 2.80, 95% CI: 2.51–3.11; and HR: 3.80, 95% CI: 3.42–4.23, respectively). The length of hospitalization (LOH) ≥ 15 or ≥ 31 days (HR: 1.39, 95% CI: 1.30–1.48; and HR: 1.59, 95% CI: 1.43–1.77, respectively) and injury to the head (HR: 1.59, 95% CI: 1.53–1.65) or spine (HR: 1.66, 95% CI: 1.59–1.74) were also found to be major risk factors. Conclusions Our findings show that the LOH and head and spine injuries are associated with an increased risk of recurrent injurious falls leading to hospitalization. The risk of recurrent injurious falls requiring hospitalization increased significantly among adults older than 40 years. We suggest further research on the effects of injury

  4. Astronaut John Glenn Enters Friendship 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Astronaut John Glenn enters the Mercury spacecraft, Friendship 7, prior to the launch of MA-6 on February 20, 1961 and became the first American who orbited the Earth. The MA-6 mission was the first manned orbital flight boosted by the Mercury-Atlas vehicle, a modified Atlas ICBM (Intercontinental Ballistic Missile), lasted for five hours, and orbited the Earth three times.

  5. Press Site Auditorium dedicated to John Holliman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A ceremony dedicated the KSC Press Site auditorium as the John Holliman Auditorium to honor the correspondent for his enthusiastic, dedicated coverage of America's space program. The auditorium was built in 1980 and has been the focal point for new coverage of Space Shuttle launches. The ceremony followed the 94th launch of a Space Shuttle, on mission STS-96, earlier this morning.

  6. John M. Neale (1943-2011).

    PubMed

    Oltmanns, Thomas F; Kring, Ann M

    2012-09-01

    Presents an obituary for John M. Neale. Neale died in Hilton Head, South Carolina, on November 19, 2011, after a long illness. He was born on August 31, 1943, in Toronto, Canada. He received his bachelor's degree from the University of Toronto in 1965, where his interest in psychology had been sparked by an introductory course taught by George Mandler. After working at a residential treatment center for emotionally disturbed children, he decided to pursue graduate training in clinical psychology and enrolled at Vanderbilt University. Rue Cromwell served as John's mentor and stimulated his interest in the investigation of perception and cognition in schizophrenia. His doctorate was awarded in 1969, after completion of his internship at the Langley Porter Neuropsychiatric Institute in San Francisco. John was hired in 1969 as an assistant professor in the new and exciting psychology department (founded in 1965) at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. That department remained his academic home for his entire career. Outside of his academic pursuits, John was an avid New York Giants fan, an extensive traveler, an excellent skier and tennis player, a music lover and jukebox collector, an outstanding cook, a terrific dancer, and a devoted dog owner. He continued to pursue these interests throughout his life, taking cooking classes, traveling to exotic locales with his wife Gail, and, when his health precluded more rigorous athletic pursuits, faithfully walking and playing with his dogs. PMID:22963420

  7. John Dewey and Adult Learning in Museums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, David F.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate learning in museums through the lens of John Dewey's philosophy of education and experiential learning. The influence of Dewey's philosophy of education is widespread and resounding. In this article, I examine the experiential qualities of Dewey's philosophy and compare it with the objectives of the…

  8. Three Gentlemen of NAIS: John Chandler

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Cary

    1981-01-01

    Describes the many contributions of John Chandler in his 15 years at the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS); cites his concern with the nature and problems of school administration and describes some of the developments at NAIS under his direction; notes his family background. (SB)

  9. An Interview with John Trim at 80

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saville, Nick

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Dr. John Trim, which was recorded at his home in Cambridge on January 21, 2005, not long after his 80th birthday in October 2004. Although he would not consider himself a language tester, Dr. Trim has followed the trends in language assessment since the 1960s and his own work, particularly as a coauthor of…

  10. John Wilkes Booth and the Lincoln Conspiracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nufrio, Ronald M.

    The 1865 conspiracy to assassinate Abraham Lincoln also included plans to assassinate other government officials on that same April evening. The actor, John Wilkes Booth, succeeded in killing Lincoln, but his fellow conspirators bungled their attempts to kill William Seward, Andrew Johnson, Ulysses S. Grant, and possibly Edwin Stanton. In…

  11. John Robinson: Sustainer of the Pilgrimage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    Contends that, although Pilgrim leader John Robinson never traveled to North America, he personified the sense of purpose that held the pilgrimage together through trials, failures, and harassments. Discusses the history and issues of separatism during the development of the Puritan church in England and the Netherlands. (DK)

  12. Speaking Personally--With John Seely Brown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Distance Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with John Seely Brown, a visiting scholar at the University of Southern California and a former chief scientist of Xerox Corporation and director of its Palo Alto Research Center (PARC)--a position he held for nearly two decades. While head of PARC, Brown expanded the role of corporate research to include such…

  13. John Dewey on Philosophy and Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Maughn; Granger, David

    2012-01-01

    John Dewey was not a philosopher of education in the now-traditional sense of a doctor of philosophy who examines educational ends, means, and controversies through the disciplinary lenses of epistemology, ethics, and political theory, or of agenda-driven schools such as existentialism, feminism, and critical theory. Rather, Dewey was both an…

  14. John Wilson on the Necessity of Punishment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, James D.

    1984-01-01

    According to John Wilson, the punishment of children is logically necessary, or inevitable, and punishment is the necessary concommitant of serious education. It is argued here that Wilson has not successfully established his case for the necessity of the punishment of children. (RM)

  15. John Paul College: The Professional Renewal Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundie, Pauline; Marr, Robert

    2014-01-01

    John Paul College, a K-12 School in Queensland, Australia, recognises the centrality of classroom teachers to the ongoing improvement of student outcomes. The College has implemented a multi-tiered "professional renewal and assessment process." These changes of emphasis are the result of significant research and subsequent/associated…

  16. Whole Genome Association Study of Johne's Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine Paratuberculosis, commonly referred to as Johne's disease, is a contagious bacterial disease estimated to be present in over 65% of US dairy herds and results in annual losses in the hundreds of millions of US dollars. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is the bacteria resp...

  17. John Furlong and the "University Project"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, David

    2014-01-01

    Like many senior teacher-educators and educational researchers, John Furlong has faced in several directions throughout his career, sometimes simultaneously. He has clearly not lost his enthusiasm for what happens in the classroom: he strongly appreciates those magical moments which can happen at any time, and which keep teachers going. He loves…

  18. John Todd--Numerical Mathematics Pioneer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albers, Don

    2007-01-01

    John Todd, now in his mid-90s, began his career as a pure mathematician, but World War II interrupted that. In this interview, he talks about his education, the significant developments in his becoming a numerical analyst, and the journey that concluded at Caltech. Among the interesting stories are how he met his wife-to-be the mathematician Olga…

  19. Speaking Personally--With John "Pathfinder" Lester

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaubois, Terry

    2013-01-01

    John Lester is currently the chief learning officer at ReactionGrid, a software company developing 3-D simulations and multiuser virtual world platforms. Lester's background includes working with Linden Lab on Second Life's education activities and neuroscience research. His primary focus is on collaborative learning and instructional…

  20. We, John Dewey's Audience of Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    da Cunha, Marcus Vinicius

    2016-01-01

    This article suggests that John Dewey's "Democracy and Education" does not describe education in an existing society, but it conveys a utopia, in the sense coined by Mannheim: utopian thought aims at instigating actions towards the transformation of reality, intending to attain a better world in the future. Today's readers of Dewey (his…

  1. John W. Thoburn: International Humanitarian Award

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association's International Humanitarian Award. The 2012 winner, John W. Thoburn, is an extraordinary psychologist who devotes himself consistently to service to underserved populations, especially in the aftermath of natural or human-induced disasters. He exemplifies a genuine…

  2. John Hull and the Money Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attfield, David

    2008-01-01

    John Hull's recent educational writings have included several on what he calls the "money culture". This is analysed and criticised in this article. Hull offers a Marxist and a neo-Marxist account of the role of money in western societies utilising the labour theory of value, false consciousness and the materialist interpretation of history. It is…

  3. A Posthumous Dialogue with John Nicolis: IERU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, Otto E.

    2014-12-01

    The reader is taken into the heart of a fictitious dialogue between two friends who never talked long enough with each other during the lifetime of both. It is the fearlessness of the mind of John that prompted the hopefully not too erratic thoughts that are going to be offered. The central figure is Heraclitus, the Great.

  4. Jean Piaget's Debt to John Dewey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Jean Piaget became a veritable institution unto himself in education and psychology, largely as the result of his developmental-stage theory advanced over the second quarter of the twentieth century. Not until Piaget was 73 did he make mention of John Dewey's work at Dewey's laboratory school, founded in 1894 at the University of Chicago. But here…

  5. Astronaut Virgil Grissom and Astronaut John Glenn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Astronaut Virgil Grissom chats with Astronaut John Glenn prior to entering the Liberty Bell 7 capsule for the MR-4 Mission. The MR-4 mission was the second manned suborbital flight using the Mercury-Redstone booster, which was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  6. Transcriptional profiling of bovine Johne's Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Johne's Disease is a chronic, contagious disease prevalent in ruminants. The animal is infected early in life by the bacteria Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The characteristic symptoms of rapid weight loss and diarrhea may not appear for years after infection. We investigated t...

  7. An Interview with John H. Ritter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowe, Chris

    2000-01-01

    Presents an interview with John H. Ritter discussing his life, his books, his views on sports literature, and a variety of other subjects. Discusses in particular his two novels "Choosing Up Sides," and "Over the Wall." Describes how he uses baseball scenes as metaphors to depict difficult choices that kids are dealing with. (SC)

  8. Capitalism in Six Westerns by John Ford

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Carlos Rodriguez

    2011-01-01

    The economic and institutional analysis of capitalism can be illustrated through John Ford's Westerns. This article focuses on six classics by Ford that show the move toward modern order, the creation of a new society, and the rule of law. Economic features are pervading, from property rights and contracts to markets, money, and trade. Ford has…

  9. John Ogbu and Minority Education in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okubo, Yuko

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses John Ogbu and his work in the context of Japan. First, his interest in Japan, his interactions with Japanese educators and researchers, and their responses to his work are discussed. Then Ogbu's cultural model from the author's fieldwork experiences is examined and a relational and dialectic perspective is proposed to study…

  10. John B. Watson's Legacy: Learning and Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Frances Degen

    1992-01-01

    Evaluates John B. Watson's contributions to developmental psychology. Watson's insistence on objective methodology in psychology retains its influence, but his extreme environmentalism has been rejected. His concern with the principles of learning is reflected in the work of Hull and Skinner. (BC)

  11. The Life and Work of John Snow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melville, Wayne; Fazio, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Due to his work to determine how cholera was spread in the 18th century, John Snow (1813-1858) has been hailed as the father of modern epidemiology. This article presents an inquiry model based on his life and work, which teachers can use to develop a series of biology lessons involving the history and nature of science. The lessons presented use…

  12. Radar fall detectors: a comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erol, Baris; Amin, Moeness; Ahmad, Fauzia; Boashash, Boualem

    2016-05-01

    Falls are a major cause of accidents in elderly people. Even simple falls can lead to severe injuries, and sometimes result in death. Doppler fall detection has drawn much attention in recent years. Micro-Doppler signatures play an important role for the Doppler-based radar systems. Numerous studies have demonstrated the offerings of micro-Doppler characteristics for fall detection. In this respect, a plethora of micro-Doppler signature features have been proposed, including those stemming from speech recognition and wavelet decomposition. In this work, we consider four different sets of features for fall detection. These can be categorized as spectrogram based features, wavelet based features, mel-frequency cepstrum coefficients, and power burst curve features. Support vector machine is employed as the classifier. Performance of the respective fall detectors is investigated using real data obtained with the same radar operating resources and under identical sensing conditions. For the considered data, the spectrogram based feature set is shown to provide superior fall detection performance.

  13. Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer Past ... Prostate Cancer" Articles Progress Against Prostate Cancer / Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer / Prostate ...

  14. Fastballs a Fast Track to 'Tommy John Surgery'?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159058.html Fastballs a Fast Track to 'Tommy John Surgery'? Other pitches not linked to the elbow ... pitcher's risk of an elbow injury requiring "Tommy John surgery." "Our findings suggest that throwing a high ...

  15. 4. VIEW OF JOHN HOPE HOMES LOOKING SOUTHEAST THROUGH BLOCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF JOHN HOPE HOMES LOOKING SOUTHEAST THROUGH BLOCK C FROM ROOFTOP OF COMMUNITY BUILDING. - John Hope Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by Larkin, Dora, Spelman Streets & Lane, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  16. 6. VIEW OF JOHN HOPE HOMES LOOKING NORTHWEST THROUGH COMMUNITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF JOHN HOPE HOMES LOOKING NORTHWEST THROUGH COMMUNITY PORCH AT FRONT COURTYARD IN BLOCK C. - John Hope Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by Larkin, Dora, Spelman Streets & Lane, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  17. 2. VIEW OF JOHN HOPE HOMES LOOKING NORTHEAST UP NORTHSIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF JOHN HOPE HOMES LOOKING NORTHEAST UP NORTHSIDE DRIVE FROM INTERSECTION OF LEONARD STREET AND NORTHSIDE DRIVE. - John Hope Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by Larkin, Dora, Spelman Streets & Lane, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  18. 1. VIEW OF JOHN HOPE HOMES LOOKING EAST TOWARD NORTHSIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF JOHN HOPE HOMES LOOKING EAST TOWARD NORTHSIDE DRIVE FROM INTERSECTION OF GREENSFERRY AVENUE AND DORA STREET. - John Hope Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by Larkin, Dora, Spelman Streets & Lane, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  19. 3. VIEW OF JOHN HOPE HOMES LOOKING WEST FROM INTERSECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF JOHN HOPE HOMES LOOKING WEST FROM INTERSECTION OF NORTHSIDE DRIVE AND MCDANIEL STREET TOWARD BLOCK B. - John Hope Homes (Public Housing), Bounded by Larkin, Dora, Spelman Streets & Lane, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  20. 68. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer August 27, 1936 8:15 A. M. FINDINGS IN MASON HOUSE RUINS. - General John Mason House, Analostan Island or Theodore Roosevelt Island, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  1. 69. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer August ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer August 27, 1936 8:10 A. M. DETAIL OF FINDINGS IN MASON HOUSE RUINS. - General John Mason House, Analostan Island or Theodore Roosevelt Island, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  2. SUSPENSION BRIDGE BETWEEN THE OFFICE JOHN A. ROEBLING SONS COMPANY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SUSPENSION BRIDGE BETWEEN THE OFFICE JOHN A. ROEBLING SONS COMPANY AND THEIR RESEARCH LABORATORY BUILDING - John A. Roebling's Sons Company & American Steel & Wire Company, South Broad, Clark, Elmer, Mott & Hudson Streets, Trenton, Mercer County, NJ

  3. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July 9, 1952 MEMORIAL PLAQUE IN CHAPEL. - St. John's Episcopal Mission, Chapel & Rectory, Fort Bennett Vicinity, Green Grass, Dewey County, SD

  4. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July 9, 1952 SOUTH WALL OF CHAPEL. - St. John's Episcopal Mission, Chapel & Rectory, Fort Bennett Vicinity, Green Grass, Dewey County, SD

  5. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July 9, 1952 WEST ELEVATION OF CHAPEL. - St. John's Episcopal Mission, Chapel & Rectory, Fort Bennett Vicinity, Green Grass, Dewey County, SD

  6. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July 9, 1952 CHAPEL AND CLASSROOM, SOUTHWEST PERSPECTIVE. - St. John's Episcopal Mission, Chapel & Rectory, Fort Bennett Vicinity, Green Grass, Dewey County, SD

  7. John Moulton Homestead, water channel with board cover for walkway ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    John Moulton Homestead, water channel with board cover for walkway to house, looking east - John Moulton Homestead, Northwest corner of Mormon Row Road and Antelope Flats Road, Kelly, Teton County, WY

  8. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer April 2, 1937 10:25 A.M. VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST (front). - Colonel John Cox House, 3339 N Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer April 2, 1937 10:40 A.M. DETAIL OF ENTRANCE (south elevation). - Colonel John Cox House, 3339 N Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. W. St. John Street. View looking west from intersection of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    W. St. John Street. View looking west from intersection of Pleasant and W. St. John Streets - River Street Historic District, Bounded by West Saint James Street, West Santa Clara Street, Pleasant Street, & Guadalupe River, San Jose, Santa Clara County, CA

  11. Fall Meeting by the numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, Pranoti

    2012-02-01

    - Visits to the Fall Meeting Web site: 650,000 - Total participants at the meeting: 20,890 - Abstracts submitted to the meeting: 20,087 - Donors who attended and took advantage of donor lounges: 1835 - Total attendance at Simon Winchester's Presidential Forum Lecture: 1200 - Total attendance at the Honors Banquet: 905 - Books sold at the AGU Marketplace: 671 - Individuals registered for the Fun Run: 487 - Students who participated in the Student Breakfast: 450 - Individuals who crossed the finish line at the Fun Run: 384 - Total attendees at Exploration Station: 307 - Total booths sold in the Exhibit Hall: 304 - registered for the meeting: 288 - Membership transactions completed for renewing and registering members at AGU Marketplace: 156 - Meeting attendees who were past Congressional Visits Day participants: 82 - Editors, associate editors, and their student guests who visited the Editors Resource Center: 63 - Copies of Navigating Graduate School and Beyond: A Career Guide for Graduate Students and a Must Read for Every Advisor sold during and after the talk and book signing by author Sundar A. Christopher: 50 - Kegs of beer consumed during the Ice Breaker on Sunday, 4 December: 48 - Hours of video footage shot at the meeting by the AGU videographer: 40 - Potential geopress authors and editors who attended the daily "Come Publish With geopress" sessions in the AGU Marketplace: 31 - Press conferences held at the meeting: 25 - Average age of minors attending Exploration Station: 8.7 - Educational seminars sponsored by AGU Publications: 2 (one on how to write a good scientific paper and the other on the rewards of reviewing) - Watching three preschoolers in space suits waiting to meet astronaut Andrew Feustel after the Public Lecture: Priceless (with apologies to Mastercard®)

  12. John Tweedie and Charles Darwin in Buenos Aires.

    PubMed

    Ollerton, Jeff; Chancellor, Gordon; van Wyhe, John

    2012-06-20

    The journey of exploration undertaken by Charles Darwin FRS during the voyage of HMS Beagle has a central place within the historical development of evolutionary theory and has been intensively studied. Despite this, new facts continue to emerge about some of the details of Darwin's activities. Drawing on recently published Darwin material and unpublished letters in the archives of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, we document a hitherto unexamined link between Darwin and John Tweedie (1775-1862), a relatively obscure Scottish gardener turned South American plant collector. All of the available evidence points to a meeting between the two men in Buenos Aires in 1832. Tweedie provided Darwin with information about the geography of the Rio Paraná, including the locality of fossilized wood eroding from the river bank. It also seems likely that Tweedie supplied Darwin with seeds that he later shipped back to John Stevens Henslow in Cambridge. Although this brief meeting was at the time relatively unimportant to either man, echoes of that encounter have resonated with Tweedie's descendants to the present day and have formed the basis for a family story about a written correspondence between Darwin and Tweedie. Local information supplied to Darwin by residents such as Tweedie was clearly important and deserves further attention. PMID:23045784

  13. STS-79 Flight Day 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    On this second day of the STS-79 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. William F. Readdy, Pilot Terrence W. Wilcutt, Mission Specialists, Thomas D. Akers, John E. Blaha, Jay Apt, and Carl E. Walz, are seen in activating the double Spacehab module in the shuttle's payload bay, packing materials and supplies and filling the first four containers of water which will be delivered to the Mir Space Station. Apt and Walz set up the Active Rack Isolation System experiment in the Spacehab, a prototype of an International Space Station payload system designed to eliminate vibrations or disturbances caused by crew activity or engine firings. The double-rack which houses ARIS also contains almost 400 pounds of Russian food which is being used to simulate the weight and mass of a scientific investigation for this first test.

  14. STS-95 Day 01 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On this first day of the STS-95 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Curtis L. Brown, Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Stephen K. Robinson, and Pedro Duque, and Payload Specialists Chiaki Mukai and John H. Glenn, can be seen performing pre-launch activities such as eating the traditional breakfast, crew suit-up, and the ride out to the launch pad. Also, included are various panoramic views of the shuttle on the pad. The crew is readied in the 'white room' for their mission. After the closing of the hatch and arm retraction, launch activities are shown including countdown, engine ignition, launch, and the separation of the Solid Rocket Boosters.

  15. 33 CFR 110.183 - St. Johns River, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false St. Johns River, Florida. 110.183... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.183 St. Johns River, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... anchor in the St. Johns River, as depicted on NOAA chart 11491, between the entrance buoy (STJ) and...

  16. 33 CFR 110.73 - St. Johns River, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false St. Johns River, Fla. 110.73... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.73 St. Johns River, Fla. (a) Area A. The waters lying within an area bounded by a line beginning at a point located at the west bank of St. Johns River...

  17. 33 CFR 110.73 - St. Johns River, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false St. Johns River, Fla. 110.73... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.73 St. Johns River, Fla. (a) Area A. The waters lying within an area bounded by a line beginning at a point located at the west bank of St. Johns River...

  18. 33 CFR 110.183 - St. Johns River, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false St. Johns River, Florida. 110.183... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.183 St. Johns River, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... anchor in the St. Johns River, as depicted on NOAA chart 11491, between the entrance buoy (STJ) and...

  19. 33 CFR 110.73 - St. Johns River, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false St. Johns River, Fla. 110.73... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.73 St. Johns River, Fla. (a) Area A. The waters lying within an area bounded by a line beginning at a point located at the west bank of St. Johns River...

  20. 33 CFR 110.183 - St. Johns River, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false St. Johns River, Florida. 110.183... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.183 St. Johns River, Florida. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... anchor in the St. Johns River, as depicted on NOAA chart 11491, between the entrance buoy (STJ) and...

  1. Falls and Physical Activity in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sosnoff, J. J.; Sandroff, B. M.; Pula, J. H.; Morrison, S. M.; Motl, R. W.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To examine the association between fall history and physical activity using an objective measure of physical activity (i.e., accelerometry) in persons with multiple sclerosis. Design. A community-based sample of 75 ambulatory persons with multiple sclerosis volunteered for the investigation. Participants self-reported fall history in the last year, underwent a neurological exam to determine Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score, and wore an accelerometer around the waist for 7 consecutive days to determine physical activity. Results. Overall, 37 persons (49.3% of the sample) reported falling in the last year with 28 of the 37 falling more than once. Persons who fell in the last year had a significantly lower number of steps/day than nonfallers (3510 versus 4940 steps/day; P < .05). However, when controlling for disability status there was no statistically significant difference between fallers and nonfallers (4092 versus 4373 steps/day; P > .05). Conclusions. Collectively, the findings suggest that fall history may have little impact on current physical activity levels in persons with multiple sclerosis. PMID:22966459

  2. Exercises to help prevent falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000493.htm Exercises to help prevent falls To use the sharing ... and easily. Do not hold your breath. Balance exercises You can do some balance exercises during everyday ...

  3. Highlights of 2012 Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Carol

    2013-01-01

    This past December the streets of San Francisco, Calif., surrounding the Moscone Center were awash with a sea of Earth and space scientists attending the 45th consecutive AGU Fall Meeting, eager to share and expand their knowledge "for the benefit of humanity." As it has for many years, attendance at AGU's Fall Meeting—the largest gathering of Earth and space scientists in the world—continued to increase, this year passing the 24,000 mark. Attendees at the meeting, which took place on 3-7 December 2012, hailed from 97 countries; nearly 7000 of them were students. News from the Fall Meeting was carried in newspapers and on Web sites around the world, and the social media sphere lit up with talk of AGU and the Fall Meeting. It's even reported that for a short time we were a trending topic on Twitter.

  4. 76 FR 26767 - Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ... National Park Service Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council AGENCY... Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail will hold a meeting. Designated through an amendment... John Maounis, Superintendent, Captain John Smith National Historic Trail, telephone: (410)...

  5. 76 FR 52691 - Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... National Park Service Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council AGENCY... Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail will hold a meeting. Designated through an amendment... John Maounis, Superintendent, Captain John Smith National Historic Trail, telephone: (410)...

  6. 77 FR 12324 - Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... National Park Service Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council AGENCY... Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail will hold a meeting. Designated through an amendment... John Maounis, Superintendent, Captain John Smith National Historic Trail, telephone: (410)...

  7. Community College Estimated Growth: Fall 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillippe, Kent; Mullin, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    A survey from the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) found that enrollment growth in fall 2010 slowed its pace at community colleges, increasing 3.2% from the previous year. This contrasts with more dramatic increases in recent years: more than 11% between fall 2008 and fall 2009, and nearly 17% between fall 2007 and fall 2009,…

  8. STS-113 Flight Day 7 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The STS-113 seventh flight day begins with a view of the Russian Segment of the International Space Station from a camera at the end of the S1 truss. Live footage of Michael Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington are shown aboard the International Space Station. A change of command ceremony is presented to welcome the Expedition Six Crew and to say farewell to the Expedition Five crew. Commander Valery Korzun, Flight Engineer Sergei Treschev, NASA ISS Science Officer Peggy Whitson, Expedition Six Commander Ken Bowersox, Flight Engineer Nikolai Budarin, NASA ISS Science Officer Don Pettit, Commander Jim Wetherbee, Pilot Paul Lockhart and Mission Specialists Michael Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington are all are shown during the ceremony.

  9. Career perspective: John B West.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2012-01-01

    been explained. Measurements made after astronauts were exposed to 6 months of microgravity in the International Space Station indicate that the function of the lung returns to its preexposure state within a few days. PMID:23849052

  10. Introduction to General Relativity and John Archibald Wheeler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Matzner, Richard

    John Archibald Wheeler was born on July 9, 1911, in Jacksonville, Florida, and passed away on April 13, 2008, in Hightstown, New Jersey; his influence on gravitational physics and science in general will remain forever. Among his many and important contributions to physics, he was one of the fathers of the renaissance of General Relativity. After a golden starting age of General Relativity, a few years after the Einstein's papers of 1915-1916, Einstein's gravitational theory was for many years, to quote the preface of a 1960 book of General Relativity [1], confined to "an ivory tower…and no doubt many a relativist looks forward to the day when the governments will seek his opinion on important questions".

  11. John Locke and the case of Anthony Ashley Cooper.

    PubMed

    Anstey, Peter R; Principe, Lawrence M

    2011-01-01

    In June 1668 Anthony Ashley Cooper, later to become the 1st Earl of Shaftesbury, underwent abdominal surgery to drain a large abscess above his liver. The case is extraordinary, not simply on account of the eminence of the patient and the danger of the procedure, but also because of the many celebrated figures involved. A trove of manuscripts relating to this famous operation survives amongst the Shaftesbury Papers in the National Archives at Kew. These include case notes in the hand of the philosopher John Locke and advice from leading physicians of the day including Francis Glisson, Sir George Ent and Thomas Sydenham. The majority of this material has never been published before. This article provides complete transcriptions and translations of all of these manuscripts, thus providing for the first time a comprehensive case history. It is prefaced with an extended introduction. PMID:22332471

  12. John Locke's seed lists: a case study in botanical exchange.

    PubMed

    Harris, Stephen A; Anstey, Peter R

    2009-12-01

    This paper gives a detailed analysis of four seed lists in the journals of John Locke. These lists provide a window into a fascinating open network of botanical exchange in the early 1680s which included two of the leading botanists of the day, Pierre Magnol of Montpellier and Jacob Bobart the Younger of Oxford. The provenance and significance of the lists are assessed in relation to the relevant extant herbaria and plant catalogues from the period. The lists and associated correspondence provide the main evidence for Locke's own important, though modest contribution to early modern botany, a contribution which he would have regarded as a small part of the broader project of constructing a natural history of plants. They also provide a detailed case study of the sort of open and informal network of knowledge exchange in the early modern period that is widely recognised by historians of science, but all too rarely illustrated. PMID:19917484

  13. Fall prevention in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ungar, Andrea; Rafanelli, Martina; Iacomelli, Iacopo; Brunetti, Maria Angela; Ceccofiglio, Alice; Tesi, Francesca; Marchionni, Niccolò

    2013-01-01

    Summary Falls are frequent in the elderly and affect mortality, morbidity, loss of functional capacity and institutionalization. In the older patient the incidence of falls can sometimes be underestimated, even in the absence of a clear cognitive impairment, because it is often difficult to reconstruct the dynamics. It is quite common that forms due to syncope are associated with retrograde amnesia and in 40 to 60% of the cases falls happen in the absence of witnesses. The pathogenesis of falls is often multifactorial, due to physiological age-related changes or more properly pathological factors, or due to the environment. The identification of risk factors is essential in the planning of preventive measures. Syncope is one of major causes of falls. About 20% of cardiovascular syncope in patients older than 70 appears as a fall and more than 20% of older people with Carotid Sinus Syndrome complain of falls as well as syncope. These data clearly state that older patients with history of falls should undergo a cardiovascular and neuroautonomic assessment besides the survey of other risk factors. Multifactorial assessment requires a synergy of various specialists. The geriatrician coordinates the multidisciplinary intervention in order to make the most effective evaluation of the risk of falling, searching for all predisposing factors, aiming towards a program of prevention. In clear pathological conditions it is possible to enact a specific treatment. Particular attention must indeed be paid to the re-evaluation of drug therapy, with dose adjustments or withdrawal especially for antihypertensive, diuretics and benzodiazepines. The Guidelines of the American Geriatrics Society recommend modification of environmental hazards, training paths, hip protectors and appropriate use of support tools (sticks, walkers), which can be effective elements of a multifactorial intervention program. Balance exercises are also recommended. In conclusion, an initial assessment

  14. John Holt Stanway: Gone to Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, J.

    2008-01-01

    John Holt Stanway (1799Ð1872) was an amateur astronomer who lived in Manchester, England until 1845. He was in contact with the English Ôgrand amateurÕ astronomer, William Henry Smyth, who supported him for Fellowship of the Royal Astronomical Society and evidently advised him on how to build and equip an observatory. Apparently, Stanway had an observatory at Chorlton-cum-Hardy in 1837. In 1845, Stanway left for the United States in response to serious business problems. En route, he met Ashbel Smith, a representative of the government of the Republic of Texas, who convinced Stanway to go to Texas. There he changed his name to John H. Smythe Stanley and settled in Houston, where he re-established his observatory. He became a commercial photographer and wrote about astronomy and other scientific subjects in Houston newspapers until his death in 1872.

  15. John Banister: an Elizabethan surgeon in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mello, Amílcar D'Avila de

    2011-03-01

    In Brazil's sixteenth-century history, very few references are made to health professionals. On the expedition of Edward Fenton, dispatched by the English Crown in 1582 to set up a trading post in Asia, was the famous barber-surgeon and physician John Banister. The naval squadron, diverted from its original route to repeat the feats of Sir Francis Drake, stopped over in Africa, crossed the Atlantic and anchored off the Santa Catarina coast in Brazil. In these waters, the expedition degenerated into piracy and returned unsuccessful to Europe. John Banister is considered the person who liberated English anatomy from mediaeval slavery, shedding upon it the light of the Renaissance. It was the first time that anyone of this importance in the area of health had visited these latitudes. PMID:21552689

  16. Obituary: Michael John Klein, 1940-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulkis, Samuel

    2006-12-01

    Michael John Klein died on 14 May 2005 at home in South Pasadena, California. The cause of death was tongue cancer that metastasized to the lungs. He was a non-smoker. Mike was a passionate radio astronomer, a trusted astronomical observer, an educator and a family man. Mike was born on 19 January 1940 in Ames, Iowa, the son of Florence Marie (Graf) and Fred Michael Klein. His mother was a homemaker, and his father was a banker. Mike had two older sisters, Lois Jean (Klein) Flauher and Marilyn June (Klein) Griffin. In 1962, Mike married his high school sweetheart Barbara Dahlberg, who survives him along with their three children, Kristin Marie (Klein) Shields, Michael John Klein Jr., Timothy Joel Klein, and six grandchildren. Mike developed a love for astronomy early in his life, and credited an early morning, newspaper-delivery route that he had at age twelve, which took him outside well before sunrise. He told family members that as he walked along his route, he stared into the sky and wondered what everything was. He studied sky charts, located stars, and began to understand how the planets shifted their positions relative to the stars each day. Another big influence in Mike's life was his brother in-law, Jim Griffin. Jim helped Mike understand that his passion for science did not have to remain a hobby, but could and should become a career. Jim's encouragement led Mike to attend Iowa State University in Ames, where he earned a BS in electrical engineering in 1962. Mike then started graduate school in electrical engineering at Michigan State, but after one semester transferred to the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where he earned an MS (1966) and PhD (1968) in astronomy. His doctoral dissertation, under the direction of Professor Fred Haddock, was based on extensive observations of the planets and examined the physical and thermal properties of planetary atmospheres and surfaces. Mike was awarded a Resident Research Associate position at JPL by the National

  17. Incidence and predicting factors of falls of older inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Hellen Cristina de Almeida; Reiners, Annelita Almeida Oliveira; Azevedo, Rosemeiry Capriata de Souza; da Silva, Ageo Mário Cândido; Abreu, Débora Regina de Oliveira Moura; de Oliveira, Adriana Delmondes

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the incidence and predicting factors associated with falls among older inpatients. METHODS Prospective cohort study conducted in clinical units of three hospitals in Cuiaba, MT, Midwestern Brazil, from March to August 2013. In this study, 221 inpatients aged 60 or over were followed until hospital discharge, death, or fall. The method of incidence density was used to calculate incidence rates. Bivariate analysis was performed by Chi-square test, and multiple analysis was performed by Cox regression. RESULTS The incidence of falls was 12.6 per 1,000 patients/day. Predicting factors for falls during hospitalization were: low educational level (RR = 2.48; 95%CI 1.17;5.25), polypharmacy (RR = 4.42; 95%CI 1.77;11.05), visual impairment (RR = 2.06; 95%CI 1.01;4.23), gait and balance impairment (RR = 2.95; 95%CI 1.22;7.14), urinary incontinence (RR = 5.67; 95%CI 2.58;12.44) and use of laxatives (RR = 4.21; 95%CI 1.15;15.39) and antipsychotics (RR = 4.10; 95%CI 1.38;12.13). CONCLUSIONS The incidence of falls of older inpatients is high. Predicting factors found for falls were low education level, polypharmacy, visual impairment, gait and balance impairment, urinary incontinence and use of laxatives and antipsychotics. Measures to prevent falls in hospitals are needed to reduce the incidence of this event. PMID:26083943

  18. John Dewey's Visits to Hawai'i

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwan, Hunter

    2015-01-01

    John Dewey visited Hawai'i on three separate occasions. Of all three trips, by far the most important, as far as Dewey's influence on education in Hawai'i is concerned, was in 1899 when he came with his wife, Alice Chipman Dewey, to help launch the University Extension program in Honolulu. The Deweys' second trip was a very brief one--twenty years…

  19. Astronaut John Young displays drawing of Snoopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut John W. Young, Apollo 10 command module pilot, displays drawing of Snoopy in this color reproduction taken from the fourth telecast made by the color television camera aboard the Apollo 10 spacecraft. When this picture was made the Apollo 10 spacecraft was about half-way to the moon, or approximately 112,000 nautical miles from the earth. Snoopy will be the code name of the Lunar Module (LM) during Apollo 10 operations when the LM and CM are separated.

  20. John A. Simpson (1916-2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John A. Simpson, recipient of the 2000 William Bowie Medal, died August 31 in Chicago at the age of 83. Dr. Simpson, who became an AGU member in 1957 and a Fellow in 1962, spent most of his professional career with the Enrico Fermi Institute for Nuclear Studies of the University of Chicago, and at that university's department of physics. He was a member of the Solar and Heliospheric Physics subsection of SPA.

  1. John Wesley Powell: soldier, explorer, scientist

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1969-01-01

    One hundred years ago John Wesley Powell and nine adventure-seeking companions completed the first exploration of the dangerous and almost uncharted canyons of the Green and Colorado Rivers. By this trip, Powell, a 35-year old teacher of natural history, apparently unhampered by the lack of his right forearm (amputated after the Battle of Shiloh) opened up a large unknown part of continental United States and brought to a climax the era of western exploration.

  2. Astronaut John Young photographed collecting lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, is photographed collecting lunar samples near North Ray crater during the third Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA-3) at the Descartes landing site. This picture was taken by Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot. Young is using the lunar surface rake and a set of tongs. The Lunar Roving Vehicle is parked in the field of large boulders in the background.

  3. Catching a Falling Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-07-01

    . Comets are another important source of meteoroids and perhaps the most spectacular. After many visits near the Sun, a comet "dirty-snowball" nucleus of ice and dust decays and fragments, leaving a trail of meteoroids along its orbit. Some "meteoroid streams" cross the earth's orbit and when our planet passes through them, some of these particles will enter the atmosphere. The outcome is a meteor shower - the most famous being the "Perseids" in the month of August [2] and the "Leonids" in November. Thus, although meteors are referred to as "shooting" or "falling stars" in many languages, they are of a very different nature. More information The research presented in this paper is published in the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science, Vol. 39, Nr. 4, p. 1, 2004 ("Spectroscopic anatomy of a meteor trail cross section with the ESO Very Large Telescope", by P. Jenniskens et al.). Notes [1] The team is composed of Peter Jenniskens (SETI Institute, USA), Emmanuël Jehin (ESO), Remi Cabanac (Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile), Christophe Laux (Ecole Centrale de Paris, France), and Iain Boyd (University of Michigan, USA). [2] The maximum of the Perseids is expected on August 12 after sunset and should be easily seen.

  4. Patient falls in hospitals: an increasing problem.

    PubMed

    Weil, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    Despite six decades of worldwide efforts that include publishing virtually hundreds of related epidemiological-type studies, there has been an increase (estimated to be 46% per 1000 patient days from 1954-6 to 2006-10) in the number of patient falls in hospitals and other health care facilities. These still occur most frequently near the bedside or in the bathroom, among mentally confused or physically impaired patients, and often involve those with greater comorbidity. The reasons that hospitals during the past half century have demonstrated a significant increase in patient falls per discharge or per patient days are numerous, are not completely surprising, and are certainly interrelated: improved accident reporting systems; on the average older, more impaired, more acutely ill, and more heavily sedated patients; and, less time spent by nursing personnel at the bedside. Most safety committees are not as effective as they should be, since they have difficulty in implementing a long-term, aggressive, facility-wide prevention program. Within that context, it may be worthwhile to discuss the advantages of nursing leadership rather than a representative of the facility's management staff to chair these safety committees. PMID:26304626

  5. MayDay Colloquium 24: The Aims of Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, David J.

    2013-01-01

    On June 20, 2012, Professor John Kratus welcomed the MayDay Group to Michigan State University for "Colloquium 24: The Aims of Music Education". On behalf of all members of the Mayday Group, the author wishes to extend his deepest gratitude to Professor Kratus and his colleagues at Michigan State for their extremely gracious and…

  6. 78 FR 19723 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request; Evaluation of the Brain Disorders in the Developing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request; Evaluation of the Brain Disorders in the Developing World Program of the John E. Fogarty International Center...: Evaluation of the Brain Disorders in the Developing World Program of the John E. Fogarty International...

  7. STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape. Part 1 of 4; Flight Days 1 - 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This video, Part 1 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-109 crew (Scott Altman, Commander; Duane Carey, Pilot; John Grunsfeld, Payload Commander; Nancy Currie, James Newman, Richard Linnehan, Michael Massimino, Mission Specialists) during flight days 1 through 3. The activities from other flight days can be seen on 'STS 109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002137664), 'STS 109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139471), and 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002137577). The main activity recorded during flight day 1 is the liftoff of Columbia. Attention is given to suit-up, boarding, and pre-flight procedures. The pre-launch crew meal has no sound. The crew members often wave to the camera before liftoff. The jettisoning of the solid rocket boosters is shown, and the External Tank is seen as it falls to Earth, moving over African dunes in the background. There are liftoff replays, including one from inside the cockpit. The opening of the payload bay doors is seen from the rear of the shuttle's cockpit. The footage from flight day 2 shows the Flight Support System for bearthing the HST (Hubble Space Telescope). Crew preparations for the bearthing are shown. Flight day 3 shows the tracking of and approach to the HST by Columbia, including orbital maneuvers, the capture of the HST, and its lowering onto the Flight Support System. Many views of the HST are shown, including one which reveals an ocean and cloud background as the HST retracts a solar array.

  8. Factors associated with falls among older adults living in institutions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Falls have enormous impact in older adults. Yet, there is insufficient evidence regarding the effectiveness of preventive interventions in this setting. The objectives were to measure the frequency of falls and associated factors among older people living institutions. Methods Data were obtained from a survey on a probabilistic sample of residents aged ≥65 years, drawn in 1998-99 from institutions of Madrid (Spain). Residents, their caregivers, and facility physicians were interviewed. Fall rates were computed based on the number of physician-reported falls in the preceding 30 days. Adjusted rate ratios were computed using negative binomial regression models, including age, sex, cognitive status, functional dependence, number of diseases, and polypharmacy. Results The final sample comprised 733 residents. The fall rate was 2.4 falls per person-year (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.04-2.82). The strongest risk factor was number of diseases, with an adjusted rate ratio (RR) of 1.32 (95% CI, 1.17-1.50) for each additional diagnosis. Other variables associated with falls were: urinary incontinence (RR = 2.56 [95% CI, 1.32-4.94]); antidepressant use (RR = 2.32 [95% CI, 1.22-4.40]); arrhythmias (RR = 2.00 [95% CI, 1.05-3.81]); and polypharmacy (RR = 1.07 [95% CI, 0.95-1.21], for each additional medication). The attributable fraction for number of diseases (with reference to those with ≤ 1 condition) was 84% (95% CI, 45-95%). Conclusions Number of diseases was the main risk factor for falls in this population of institutionalized older adults. Other variables associated with falls, probably more amenable to preventive action, were urinary incontinence, antidepressants, arrhythmias, and polypharmacy. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/3916151157277337 PMID:23320746

  9. [Accidental falls in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Heinimann, Niklas B; Kressig, Reto W

    2014-06-18

    Falls in the elderly are common with consecutive high mortality and morbidity. Recent consecutive data focus on identification and therapy of intrinsic risk factors. Sarcopenia, imbalance and gait disorders represent the major risk factors. Sarcopenia is caused by a disequilibrium of protein synthesis and breakdown, probably in consequence of age-related changes in protein metabolism. Protein supplements in combination with strength training shows the best benefit. Disorders in balance and gait are caused by age-related or pathologic changes in a complex regulation system of gait. The individual fall risk correlates with the gait variability and even increases with bad dual task performance. Activities with high requirements of attention and body awareness are the most effective prevention for falls in the elderly (-50%). PMID:24938159

  10. Obituary: John Daniel Kraus, 1910-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, John D., Jr.; Marhefka, Ronald J.

    2005-12-01

    John Daniel Kraus, 94, of Delaware, Ohio, director of the Ohio State University "Big Ear" Radio Observatory, physicist, inventor, and environmentalist died 18 July 2004 at his home in Delaware, Ohio. He was born on 28 June 1910 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He received a Bachelor of Science in 1930, a Master of Science in 1931, and a PhD in physics in 1933 (at 23 years of age), all from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. During the 1930s at Michigan, he was involved in physics projects, antenna consulting, and in atomic-particle-accelerator research using the University of Michigan's premier cyclotron. Throughout the late 1920s and the 1930s, John was an avid radio amateur with call sign W8JK. He was back on the air in the 1970s. In 2001 the amateur radio magazine CQ named him to the inaugural class of its Amateur Radio Hall of Fame. He developed many widely used innovative antennas. The "8JK closely spaced array" and the "corner reflector" were among his early designs. Edwin H. Armstrong wrote John in July 1941 indicating in part, "I have read with interest your article in the Proceedings of the Institute on the corner reflector...Please let me congratulate you on a very fine piece of work." Perhaps John's most famous invention, and a product of his intuitive reasoning process, is the helical antenna, widely used in space communications, on global positioning satellites, and for other applications. During World War II, John was in Washington, DC as a civilian scientist with the U.S. Navy responsible for "degaussing" the electromagnetic fields of steel ships to make them safe from magnetic mines. He also worked on radar countermeasures at Harvard University's Radio Research Laboratory. He received the U.S. Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Award for his war work. In 1946 he took a faculty position at Ohio State University, becoming professor in 1949, and retiring in 1980 as McDougal Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering and Astronomy. Even so, he never retired

  11. A Piece of Paper Falling Faster than Free Fall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vera, F.; Rivera, R.

    2011-01-01

    We report a simple experiment that clearly demonstrates a common error in the explanation of the classic experiment where a small piece of paper is put over a book and the system is let fall. This classic demonstration is used in introductory physics courses to show that after eliminating the friction force with the air, the piece of paper falls…

  12. Beyond Socks, Signs, and Alarms: A Reflective Accountability Model for Fall Prevention.

    PubMed

    Hoke, Linda M; Guarracino, Dana

    2016-01-01

    Despite standard fall precautions, including nonskid socks, signs, alarms, and patient instructions, our 48-bed cardiac intermediate care unit (CICU) had a 41% increase in the rate of falls (from 2.2 to 3.1 per 1,000 patient days) and a 65% increase in the rate of falls with injury (from 0.75 to 1.24 per 1,000 patient days) between fiscal years (FY) 2012 and 2013. An evaluation of the falls data conducted by a cohort of four clinical nurses found that the majority of falls occurred when patients were unassisted by nurses, most often during toileting. Supported by the leadership team, the clinical nurses developed an accountability care program that required nurses to use reflective practice to evaluate each fall, including sending an e-mail to all staff members with both the nurse's and the patient's perspective on the fall, as well as the nurse's reflection on what could have been done to prevent the fall. Other program components were a postfall huddle and guidelines for assisting and remaining with fall risk patients for the duration of their toileting. Placing the accountability for falls with the nurse resulted in decreases in the unit's rates of falls and falls with injury of 55% (from 3.1 to 1.39 per 1,000 patient days) and 72% (from 1.24 to 0.35 per 1,000 patient days), respectively, between FY2013 and FY2014. Prompt call bell response (less than 60 seconds) also contributed to the goal of fall prevention. PMID:26710147

  13. Payload Specialist John Glenn dons glove during equipment check prior to launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-95 Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr. pulls on a glove, part of his equipment check. The STS-95 crew were conducting flight crew equipment fit checks prior to launch on Oct. 29. STS-95 is expected to launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and land at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7.

  14. Obituary: John J. Hillman, 1938-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanover, Nancy

    2007-12-01

    John J. Hillman, a dedicated NASA civil servant, spectroscopist, astrophysicist, planetary scientist, and mentor, died on February 12, 2006 of ocular melanoma at his home in Columbia, Maryland. His professional and personal interests were wide-reaching and varied, and he devoted his career to the advancement of our understanding of the beauty and wonder in the world around us. His love of nature, art, and science made him a true Renaissance man. John was born in Fort Jay, New York, on November 22, 1938, and was raised in Washington, D.C. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Physics from American University in 1967, 1970, and 1975, respectively. He began working at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, then in its infancy, in 1969, juggling a full-time position as a Research Physicist, the completion of his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, and a young family. His background in molecular spectroscopy enabled him to apply his skills to numerous disciplines within NASA: infrared and radio astronomy; electronic, vibrational, and rotational structure of interstellar molecules; solar and stellar atmospheres; and planetary atmospheres. He published more than 70 journal papers in these disciplines. He was a frequent contributor to the Ohio State University International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, and possessed a rare ability to bridge the gap between laboratory and remote sensing spectroscopy, bringing scientists from different disciplines together to understand our Universe. The last fifteen years of John's career were devoted to the development of acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) cameras. He championed this technology as a low-cost, low-power alternative to traditional imaging cameras for in situ or remotely sensed planetary exploration. It was within this context that I got to know John, and eventually worked closely with him on the demonstration and application of this technology for planetary science using ground-based telescopes in New Mexico, California

  15. Obituary: John Leroy Climenhaga, 1916-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarfe, Colin

    2009-01-01

    John Leroy Climenhaga was born on 7 November 1916 on a farm some 10 km from Delisle, a small town on the Canadian prairies, located about 50 km south-west of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, and died at his home in Victoria, British Columbia, on 27 May 2008. His parents, Reuben and Elizabeth (nee Bert) Climenhaga, were farming folk, and he carried their honest and open attitude to the world throughout his life. John was the seventh born, and last to die, of their ten children. His father also served as an ordained minister of the Brethren in Christ. In early adulthood, John worked on his father's farm, but then attended the University of Saskatchewan, obtaining a B.A. with Honors in Mathematics and Physics and an M.A. in Physics, in 1945 and 1949 respectively. Between these events he worked as a Physics Instructor at Regina College from 1946 to 1948. In 1949 Climenhaga joined the faculty of Victoria College, as one of only two physicists in a small institution that was then part of the University of British Columbia. He remained in Victoria for the rest of his career, playing a major role in the College's growth into a full-fledged university, complete with thriving graduate programs in physics and astronomy as well as in many other fields. He served as Head of the Physics Department during the 1960s, a period which saw the College become the University of Victoria, with a full undergraduate program in Physics, and campaigned successfully for the establishment of a program in Astronomy, which began in 1965. From 1969 until 1972 he held the position of Dean of Arts and Science, and championed the university's participation in the Tri-University Meson Facility, whose high-current medium-energy beam was ideal for the production and study of mesons and their physics. That period was a turbulent one in the university's history, but John's integrity and his balanced and fair-minded approach to conflicts were of immeasurable importance in steering the young institution through it

  16. Falls prevention for the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Balzer, Katrin; Bremer, Martina; Schramm, Susanne; Lühmann, Dagmar; Raspe, Heiner

    2012-01-01

    Background An ageing population, a growing prevalence of chronic diseases and limited financial resources for health care underpin the importance of prevention of disabling health disorders and care dependency in the elderly. A wide variety of measures is generally available for the prevention of falls and fall-related injuries. The spectrum ranges from diagnostic procedures for identifying individuals at risk of falling to complex interventions for the removal or reduction of identified risk factors. However, the clinical and economic effectiveness of the majority of recommended strategies for fall prevention is unclear. Against this background, the literature analyses in this HTA report aim to support decision-making for effective and efficient fall prevention. Research questions The pivotal research question addresses the effectiveness of single interventions and complex programmes for the prevention of falls and fall-related injuries. The target population are the elderly (> 60 years), living in their own housing or in long term care facilities. Further research questions refer to the cost-effectiveness of fall prevention measures, and their ethical, social and legal implications. Methods Systematic literature searches were performed in 31 databases covering the publication period from January 2003 to January 2010. While the effectiveness of interventions is solely assessed on the basis of randomised controlled trials (RCT), the assessment of the effectiveness of diagnostic procedures also considers prospective accuracy studies. In order to clarify social, ethical and legal aspects all studies deemed relevant with regard to content were taken into consideration, irrespective of their study design. Study selection and critical appraisal were conducted by two independent assessors. Due to clinical heterogeneity of the studies no meta-analyses were performed. Results Out of 12,000 references retrieved by literature searches, 184 meet the inclusion criteria

  17. Dr John Dickinson (1832-1863): The man behind the bird.

    PubMed

    Conacher, I D

    2016-08-01

    The surgeon/naturalists Dr John Kirk, Dr Charles Meller and Dr John Dickinson, associated with the Zambezi Expedition (1857-1864) under the leadership of Dr David Livingstone are, like him, credited with the discovery of new species' of birds. A raptor, Falco dickinsoni, is named after Dr John Dickinson. Dickinson, born in the north east of England, trained in medicine in Newcastle upon Tyne. He volunteered to join the Universities' Mission to Central Africa and arrived as part of a second group to join Bishop Frederick Mackenzie, then attempting to build a Mission in Magomero, on the Shire Mountain Plateau in modern Malawi. Livingstone and Mackenzie had sown the seeds of disaster for the first UMCA venture while Dickinson was on his way to Central Africa, and his one meeting with Livingstone was trigger to a chain of events that threatened the whole expedition. Shortly after Dickinson's arrival in Magomero, Bishop Mackenzie and a fellow traveller, Reverend Henry de Wint Burrup, died. Magomero was abandoned and the remaining missionaries retrenched in Chibisa's Village on the River Shire. There, where Dickinson did most of his bird collecting, on 17 March 1863, he died of blackwater fever. Livingstone and Kirk were present at the burial. A marble cross at Chikwawa in Malawi is marker to the event that occurred on the day of Dr John Dickinson's 32nd birthday. PMID:24906404

  18. The Use of Space for Instruction, Fall 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Edward; Chakupurakal, Thomas

    The use of space for formal instruction in fall 1977 at the Center and South campuses of Macomb County Community College was examined for five time spans: prime time day (weekdays, 8 a.m.-1 p.m.), prime time night (Monday-Thursday, 6 p.m.-10 p.m.), prime time week (prime time day and night), afternoon (Monday-Thursday, 1 p.m.-6 p.m.), and schedule…

  19. Pupil Membership and Related Information. Fall 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamboldt, Martina

    Information used to prepare this report on Colorado's public school enrollment was collected from the state's public school districts. In fall 1996, there were 673,438 students in Colorado's public schools, an increase of 17,159 students (2.6%) over the fall 1995 membership. Membership increased by 9.9% from fall 1992 to fall 1996, and this…

  20. Fall management of eastern gamagrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent research has suggested that eastern gamagrass (EGG) may be an effective alternative to chopped straw in the blended diets of dairy heifers and cows. Most extension materials discussing appropriate fall management of EGG recommend avoiding harvest within 6 weeks of first frost. Using this guid...

  1. Student Characteristics Report, Fall 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metropolitan Community Colleges of Kansas City, MO. Div. of Planning and Development.

    As part of a continuing survey of student population characteristics at the Metropolitan Community Colleges, this report presents questionnaire responses of 14,630 regular credit enrollment students for fall 1976. Twenty-eight tables organize information by campus in terms of: male and female students by part- or full-time status; enrollment…

  2. Student Characteristics Report, Fall 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metropolitan Community Colleges of Kansas City, MO. Div. of Planning and Development.

    As part of a continuing survey of student characteristics at the Metropolitan Community Colleges, this report presents data from 14,918 regular credit enrollment students for fall 1977 and compares them to data from 1972. For the first time in the district's history, the majority of students (54%) were female, a shift that has only occurred in the…

  3. New Student Survey, Fall 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weglarz, Shirley

    The Fall 1998 annual survey of new Johnson County Community College (JCCC) students was designed to determine new students' educational objectives and what factors influence new students' decisions to attend JCCC. Surveys mailed to 3874 students identified by the Admissions Office resulted in 713 usable returned surveys. This evaluation reports…

  4. Fellows Celebrated at Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-12-01

    The 2010 AGU Fellows will be presented during the Fall Meeting Honors Tribute in San Francisco, Calif. The formal ceremony will be held on Wednesday, 15 December 2010. President-Elect Carol Finn will introduce each Fellow and read a brief statement of the achievements for which each has been selected.

  5. Fellows celebrated at Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 AGU Fellows will be presented during the Fall Meeting Honors Tribute in San Francisco, Calif. The formal ceremony will be held on Wednesday, 14 December 2011, during which President-Elect Carol Finn will introduce each Fellow and read a brief statement of the achievements for which each has been selected.

  6. Fellows celebrated at Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-11-01

    The 2012 AGU Fellows will be presented during the Fall Meeting Honors Tribute in San Francisco, Calif. The formal ceremony will be held on Wednesday, 5 December 2012, during which President-elect Carol Finn will introduce each Fellow and read a brief statement of the achievements for which each has been selected.

  7. Fall 1972 University Racial Census.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Glenwood C., Jr.; Sedlacek, William E.

    This document reports the results of the fall 1972 racial census at the University of Maryland. Only new freshmen, transfer students, and readmitted students filled out the racial census cards. All returning students constituted the data base of the student body. By adding new and deleting old racial census cards, counts could be made. Results of…

  8. Continuing Education Survey, Fall 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaCalle, James F.; And Others

    In fall 1981, all students attending a continuing education course at Harford Community College (HCC) were asked to complete a survey instrument designed to collect information on student demographics, reasons for attendance, tuition payment, sources of information about the non-credit courses, registration and commuting patterns, satisfaction…

  9. Space Utilization Analysis, Fall 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, John

    In an effort to inform space allocation decisions, Gainesville College (GC) in Georgia, undertook a project to analyze classroom usage for fall 1995 and make projections to the year 2000 based on annual enrollment increases of 3%. Factors potentially affecting the use of space were determined to include the following: (1) conversion to the…

  10. Fall Armyworm in the Southeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two separate experiments testing fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) migration patterns were set up in the southeastern U.S. in 2012. Previous results showed that moths from progeny of overwintering populations from south Texas were found west of the Chattahoochee-Flint-Apalachicola river basin, ...

  11. NOVA Fall 2000 Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ransick, Kristina; Rosene, Dale; Sammons, Fran Lyons; Sammons, James

    This teacher's guide complements six programs that aired on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the fall of 2000. Programs include: (1) "Lincoln's Secret Weapon"; (2) "Hitler's Lost Sub"; (3) "Runaway Universe"; (4) "Garden of Eden"; (5) "Dying to Be Thin"; and (6) "Japan's Secret Garden". It provides activity set-ups related to the programs…

  12. John Goodricke, Edward Pigott, and Their Study of Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.

    2011-05-01

    John Goodricke (1764-1786) and Edward Pigott (1753-1825) are credited with determining the first accurate periods for several important variable stars. Goodricke's name is associated with the determination of the period of the eclipsing binary Algol (Beta Persei); for this he was awarded the Copley Prize of the Royal Society of London. He also determined the periods of the contact binary Beta Lyrae and of Delta Cephei, the prototype Cepheid variable. Around the same time, Edward Pigott obtained the period of Eta Aquilae, another Cepheid. In actuality, the two collaborated on all these observations; today we would call them co-discoverers. Goodricke is the better known of the two, in part because he won the Copley Medal, in part because of his tragically short life, and in part because he was deaf. Edward Pigott was the more experienced observer, having worked with his father Nathaniel on determining the longitudes of several cities on the Continent. Evidence shows, however, that Goodricke had some astronomical experience while a student at the Warrington Academy. The journals of the two show that they developed a partnership that made the most of both their talents over the brief time (less than five years) they worked together before Goodricke's death. Today, the two are remembered as having suggested eclipses as the cause for the periodic dimming of Algol. This explanation is accepted today as the correct one. In their day, however, most eminent astronomers believed that starspots were a more likely cause for the dimming. By the time of John Goodricke's death, he seems to have accepted that explanation as well. A study of the work of Goodricke and Pigott contains many lessons for today's observers of variable stars. This work was supported by an AAS Small Research Grant and by the Pollack Award of the Dudley Observatory.

  13. John Ray in Italy: lost manuscripts rediscovered

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper discloses the content of two manuscripts of John Ray that have hitherto been unknown to Ray scholars. The manuscripts survive in the Hampshire Record Office, having descended through the Prideaux-Brune family. They record information about Ray's tour of Italy in the 1660s that does not appear in his Observations … made in a journey through … the Low-countries, Germany, Italy and France (1673), including a visit to the museum of Athanasius Kircher in Rome, and provide clues concerning the composition of Ray's 1673 book. PMID:24921104

  14. Obituary: John Daniel Kraus, 1910-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, John D., Jr.; Marhefka, Ronald J.

    2005-12-01

    John Daniel Kraus, 94, of Delaware, Ohio, director of the Ohio State University "Big Ear" Radio Observatory, physicist, inventor, and environmentalist died 18 July 2004 at his home in Delaware, Ohio. He was born on 28 June 1910 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He received a Bachelor of Science in 1930, a Master of Science in 1931, and a PhD in physics in 1933 (at 23 years of age), all from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. During the 1930s at Michigan, he was involved in physics projects, antenna consulting, and in atomic-particle-accelerator research using the University of Michigan's premier cyclotron. Throughout the late 1920s and the 1930s, John was an avid radio amateur with call sign W8JK. He was back on the air in the 1970s. In 2001 the amateur radio magazine CQ named him to the inaugural class of its Amateur Radio Hall of Fame. He developed many widely used innovative antennas. The "8JK closely spaced array" and the "corner reflector" were among his early designs. Edwin H. Armstrong wrote John in July 1941 indicating in part, "I have read with interest your article in the Proceedings of the Institute on the corner reflector...Please let me congratulate you on a very fine piece of work." Perhaps John's most famous invention, and a product of his intuitive reasoning process, is the helical antenna, widely used in space communications, on global positioning satellites, and for other applications. During World War II, John was in Washington, DC as a civilian scientist with the U.S. Navy responsible for "degaussing" the electromagnetic fields of steel ships to make them safe from magnetic mines. He also worked on radar countermeasures at Harvard University's Radio Research Laboratory. He received the U.S. Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Award for his war work. In 1946 he took a faculty position at Ohio State University, becoming professor in 1949, and retiring in 1980 as McDougal Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering and Astronomy. Even so, he never retired

  15. Who was... John A Hunt OBE?

    PubMed

    Payne, D

    2001-12-01

    Major John A (Anthony) Hunt OBE (1906 - 1986) was a professional geologist who spent part of his working life in the oil fields of the world and a further highly significant period of 28 years (1936 - 58) as a Colonial Administrative Service Officer in the former British Protectorate of Somaliland. In 1943, he was personally selected by the Governor to carry out a wide-ranging General Survey of the Protectorate. The report of this General Survey attained such repute that newly appointed colonial administrators were recommended to rely on three basic documents: the Koran, the Bible and Hunt's, A General Survey of British Somaliland. PMID:11740081

  16. John Hughlings-Jackson: a sesquicentennial tribute.

    PubMed

    Swash, M

    1986-09-01

    One hundred and fifty years have elapsed since the birth of John Hughlings-Jackson, a pivotal figure in the development of clinical neuroscience. In this review the origin of Jackson's postulate of a hierarchical organisation of function in the nervous system is described in the context of his education and his contacts with contemporaries, both in his clinical practice at The London Hospital and at the National Hospital, Queen Square, and in relation to the evolutionary approach to the organisation and ideas on biology and society set out by the philosopher Herbert Spencer. PMID:3531410

  17. The healing philosopher: John Locke's medical ethics.

    PubMed

    Short, Bradford William

    2004-01-01

    This article examines a heretofore unexplored facet of John Locke's philosophy. Locke was a medical doctor and he also wrote about medical issues that are controversial today. Despite this, Locke's medical ethics has yet to be studied. An analysis of Locke's education and his teachers and colleagues in the medical profession, of the 17th century Hippocratic Oath, and of the reaction to the last recorded outbreak of the bubonic plague in London, shines some light on the subject of Locke's medical ethics. The study of Locke's medical ethics confirms that he was a deontologist who opposed all suicide and abortion through much of pregnancy. PMID:15709441

  18. Dedication: John W. Wright, 1929-1978

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John W.

    1980-09-01

    The death of John W. Wright in an automobile accident on November 20, 1978, came as a great shock to all who knew him. His family and friends lost a stimulating, compassionate human being whose many-faceted personality they greatly admired. The scientific community working on remote sensing of the air-water interface lost one of its pioneers and leaders. To dedicate this issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research to Dr. Wright seems a fitting tribute to his many scientific achievements.

  19. STS-113 Flight Day 10 Highlights Replay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The activities of the STS-113 (Jim Wetherbee, Commander; Paul Lockhart, Pilot; Michael Lopez-Alegria, John Herrington, Mission Specialists) crew during flight day 10 are shown. Also seen are the outgoing Expedition 5 (Valeri Korzun, Commander; Peggy Whitsun, ISS Science Officer/Flight Engineer; Sergei Treschev, Flight Engineer) and incoming Expedition 6 (Kenneth Bowersox, Commander; Donald Pettit, Nikolai Budarin, Flight Engineers) crews of the International Space Station (ISS). A panoramic view of the undocking of the Space Shuttle Endeavor from the International Space Station is also presented.

  20. STS-113 Flight Day 1 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The first flight day of the STS-113 begins with a live shot of the Space Shuttle Endeavor at the Kennedy Space Center. The STS-113 crew consists of Commander Jim Wetherbee, Pilot Paul Lockhart, and Mission Specialists Michael Lopez-Alegria, and John Herrington. The STS-113 crewmembers are accompanied Expedition 6 astronauts Kenneth Bowersox, Donald Pettit and Nikolai Budarin. The purpose of this flight is to carry the P1 truss segment to the International Space Station along with the Expedition 6 flight crew. The crewmembers are shown getting suited for the space flight. Countdown and lift off of the Space Shuttle Endeavor is also shown.