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Sample records for john kosak thomas

  1. Exceptional Scholarship and Democratic Agendas: Interviews with John Goodlad, John Hoyle, Joseph Murphy, and Thomas Sergiovanni

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Carol A.

    2006-01-01

    This portraiture study of four exceptional scholars in education--John Goodlad, John Hoyle, Joseph Murphy, and Thomas Sergiovanni--provides insight into their scholarly work and life habits, direction and aspirations, assessment and analysis of major trends in the profession, and advice for aspiring leaders and academics. Telephone interviews with…

  2. Exceptional Scholarship and Democratic Agendas: Interviews with John Goodlad, John Hoyle, Joseph Murphy, and Thomas Sergiovanni

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    This portraiture study of four exceptional scholars in education--John Goodlad, John Hoyle, Joseph Murphy, and Thomas Sergiovanni--provides insight into their scholarly work and life habits, direction and aspirations, assessment and analysis of major trends in the profession, and advice for aspiring leaders and academics. Telephone interviews with…

  3. An essay concerning human understanding: how the cerebri anatome of Thomas Willis influenced John Locke.

    PubMed

    Lega, Bradley C

    2006-03-01

    Neurosurgeons are familiar with the anatomic investigations of Thomas Willis, but his intellectual legacy actually extends into the arena of philosophy. John Locke was a student of Willis while at Oxford, and this essay explores how some of Willis's anatomic discoveries might have influenced the ideas Locke expressed in his Essay Concerning Human Understanding. It also includes historical information about 17th century England and the group of men (including Christopher Wren and Robert Boyle) who worked with Willis and founded the Oxford Experimental Philosophy Club, which became the Royal Society. PMID:16528199

  4. Introduction: A Symposium in Honor of Professor Sir John Meurig Thomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, P. L.; Saka, H.; Tomokiyo, Y.; Boyes, E. D.

    2002-02-01

    This issue is dedicated to Professor Sir John Meurig Thomas for his renowned contributions to electron microscopy in the chemical sciences. It is a collection of peer-reviewed leading articles in electron microscopy, based on the presentations at the Microscopy and Microanalysis (M&M) 2000 symposium, which was held to honor Professor Thomas's exceptional scientific leadership and wide-ranging fundamental contributions in the chemical applications of electron microscopy.The issue contains key papers by leading international researchers on the recent developments and applications of electron microscopy in the solid state and liquid state sciences. They include synthesis and characterization of silicon nitride nanorods, nanostructures of amorphous silica, electron microscopy studies of nanoscale structure and chemistry of Pt-Ru electrocatalysts of interest in direct methanol fuel cells, development of in situ wet-environmental transmission electron microscopy for the first nanoscale studies of dynamic liquid-catalyst reactions, strain analysis of silicon by finite element method and energy filtering convergent beam electron diffraction, applications of chemistry with electron microscopy, bismuth nanowires for applications in nanoelectronics technology, synthesis and characterization of quantum dots for superlattices and in situ electron microscopy at very high temperatures to study the motion of W5Si3 on [alpha][beta]-SiN3 substrates.We thank all the participants, including the invited speakers, contributors, and session chairs, who made the symposium successful. We also thank the authors and reviewers of the papers who worked assiduously towards the publication of this issue.We are very grateful to the Microscopy Society of America (MSA) for providing the opportunity to honor Professor Sir John Meurig Thomas. Organizational support from the MSA is also gratefully acknowledged.We thank Charles E. Lyman, editor in chief of Microscopy and Microanalysis for coordinating

  5. Geology of the insular shelf south of St. Thomas and St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, L. E.; Holmes, Charles Ward; Trumbull, James V.

    1971-01-01

    A reconnaissance study has been made of the geology of the insular shelf south of St. Thomas and St. John, Virgin Islands. High-resolution seismic-reflection profiling reveals that a buried northeast-southwest striking bedrock ridge controls the shallow structure of the eastern portion of the shelf. This ridge is thought to be related to the Virgin Islands pluton farther north. Bedrock in the western shelf portion is more deeply buried and is thought to be a flatter terrain, probably lithologically similar to rocks exposed on St. Thomas. The sediment cover appears to consist principally of carbonate grains in the sand-size range. This sand is covered to various degrees by carbonate nodules at depths below about 34 m, but at shallower depths the nodules are not present. Three large areas of sandy bottom were mapped 1) west of Brewers Bay, 2) near Buck Island, and 3) off south-central St. John. Variations in the amounts of land-derived particles, organic matter, and silt/clay sized material were mapped in these bodies.

  6. Overall view, looking westsouthwest Thomas Murphy Homestead, North of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overall view, looking west-southwest - Thomas Murphy Homestead, North of John Moulton Homestead, approximately 1,000 feet west of Mormon Row Road, and .25 mile north of Antelope Flats Road, Kelly, Teton County, WY

  7. Overall view with ditch lateral, looking north Thomas Murphy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overall view with ditch lateral, looking north - Thomas Murphy Homestead, North of John Moulton Homestead, approximately 1,000 feet west of Mormon Row Road, and .25 mile north of Antelope Flats Road, Kelly, Teton County, WY

  8. Overall view, looking northwest Thomas Murphy Homestead, North of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overall view, looking northwest - Thomas Murphy Homestead, North of John Moulton Homestead, approximately 1,000 feet west of Mormon Row Road, and .25 mile north of Antelope Flats Road, Kelly, Teton County, WY

  9. 16. Photocopy of photograph (from collection of Chester H. Thomas, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of photograph (from collection of Chester H. Thomas, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania) ca. 1930, photographer unknown WEST SIDE AND SOUTH FRONT - John Chad House, State Route 100, U.S. Route 1 vicinity, Chadds Ford, Delaware County, PA

  10. SOFIA Engineer Thomas Keilig

    NASA Video Gallery

    Thomas Keilig, the German Aerospace Agency's (DLR) chief telescope engineer for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), comments on technical details of the high-tech primary ...

  11. 14. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer April 6, 1936 11:45 A. M. VIEW FROM WEST (front) - Thomas Law House, 1252 Sixth Street Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. 16. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Historic American Buildings Survey John O. Brostrup, Photographer March 2, 1937 10:00 A. M. DETAIL OF CORNICE. - Thomas Law House, 1252 Sixth Street Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  13. Astronaut John Young in Command Module Simulator during Apollo Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Astronaut John W. Young, command module pilot, inside the Command Module Simulator in bldg 5 during an Apollo Simulation. Astronauts Thomas P. Stafford, commander and Eugene A. Cernan, lunar module pilot are out of the view.

  14. Pumphouse/garage and shed, looking southwest Thomas Murphy Homestead, North ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Pumphouse/garage and shed, looking southwest - Thomas Murphy Homestead, North of John Moulton Homestead, approximately 1,000 feet west of Mormon Row Road, and .25 mile north of Antelope Flats Road, Kelly, Teton County, WY

  15. Teaching with Purpose: An Interview with Thomas E. Ludwig

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludwig, Timothy D.; Ludwig, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Thomas E. Ludwig is the John Dirk Werkman Professor of Psychology at Hope College, where he joined the faculty in 1977 after receiving his PhD in development and aging from Washington University in St. Louis. His research focuses on developmental issues in cognitive neuropsychology. He is also the author or coauthor of more than a dozen sets of…

  16. Thomas Jack Lee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Thomas Jack Lee served as the sixth director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from July 6, 1989 to January 6, 1994. Prior to the appointment, Lee held positions as Center Deputy Director (1980 - 1989) and Spacelab Program Manager (1973 - 1980). Lee began his NASA career in July 1960 when he transferred to the newly formed MSFC from Redstone Arsenal's Army Ballistic Missile Agency.

  17. Thomas Jefferson's Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Catherine F.

    1996-01-01

    Notes that taken together, Thomas Jefferson's contributions to the history of writing technology demonstrate a virtual "computer." Links Jefferson's development of writing technology to his democratic political philosophy. Argues that this link should interest writing teachers. Suggests that Jeffersonian optimism effectively counters Foucaultian…

  18. John Manke

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    On October 1, 1981, John A. Manke was named to head the Directorate of Flight Operations, Ames Research Center, which resulted from the consolidation of NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, and Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. He also served as site manager of the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility. Prior to this assignment, he served as Director of the Flight Operations and Support Directorate at Dryden. Manke attended the University of South Dakota before joining the U.S. Navy in 1951. He graduated from Marquette University at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1956 with a Bachelor Degree in Electrical Engineering. While at school he was selected for the NROTC program and after graduating in 1956 entered flight training and served as a fighter pilot with the U.S. Marine Corps. John left the service in 1960, and prior to joining NASA, worked for Honeywell Corporation as a test engineer. John joined Dryden in 1962 as a research engineer and later became a research pilot, testing advanced craft such as the wingless lifting bodies, forerunners of the Space Shuttle. He was project pilot on the X-24B and also flew the M-2, HL-10 and the X-24A lifting bodies. Manke retired on April 27, 1984. John is a member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots. He has been honored with two NASA Medals of Outstanding Leadership, two NASA Medals for Exceptional Service and was selected for the Aerospace Walk of Honor in 1997.

  19. John Napier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Kylie; Scott, Paul

    2004-01-01

    John Napier was born in 1550 in the Tower of Merchiston, near Edinburgh, Scotland. Napier's work on logarithms greatly influenced the work that was to be done in the future. The logarithm's ability to simplify calculations meant that Kepler and many others were able to find the relationships and formulas for motion of bodies. In turn, Kepler's…

  20. Practicing like Thomas Edison.

    PubMed

    Baum, Neil; Ornstein, Hal

    2013-01-01

    For many centuries, medicine has practiced in a vacuum, and the healthcare profession has been isolated from other scientific disciplines. Beginning in the 20th century, doctors and scientists have looked to others for ideas, suggestions, innovations, and new technologies. Probably no one in the past hundred years has done so much to change the world than Thomas Edison. This article will discuss eight principles of Edison and how they may apply to our profession and our practices. PMID:23866659

  1. Vivien Thomas (1910-1985): the backstage pioneer and educator.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chin Ting Justin

    2014-06-01

    Vivien Thomas (1910-1985) was an African-American scientist, pioneer, and renowned educator. Thomas's contributions to cardiovascular surgery were unequivocal, and yet it was only after his death that he gained more widespread recognition. Thomas's more notable work involves aiding in the discovery of the cause of traumatic shock, designing and guiding the first operation to treat Tetralogy of Fallot, carrying out the first atrial septectomy, and helping develop the electrical defibrillator. Thomas struggled amidst the adversities of racism and the Great Depression (1929-1941), armed merely with a high school degree. Nevertheless, his genius and determination eventually led him to receive an honorary doctorate from John Hopkins University. His story inspired the creation of the award winning PBS documentary in 2003 Partners of the Heart and also the 2004 Emmy Award-winning HBO film Something the Lord Made. This article will aim to provide an overview to the more notable events in Thomas's amazing tale, with a particular focus on his work on the Tetralogy of Fallot. PMID:24354350

  2. William Osler and Seymour Thomas, "the boy artist of Texas".

    PubMed

    Bryan, Charles S

    2016-07-01

    Critics consider the 1908-1909 portrait of William Osler by S. Seymour Thomas the best of six oil-on-canvas portraits of Osler done from life, including those by the more acclaimed US artists John Singer Sargent and William Merritt Chase. Osler called it "the best pictorial diagnosis I have ever seen" and told Thomas "I am at your service." A reappraisal of Seymour Thomas explains why his portrait makes us feel much as the artist did in Osler's presence, which is the original English-language definition of "empathy." Thomas told his subject that "I feel that you can look clear through me and see the wall on the other side." The intensity of Osler's gaze affects us similarly. The portrait satisfied Osler, but his wife, Grace Revere Osler, never warmed to it, perhaps because it depicts so clearly a highly focused, agenda-driven man. Helen Thomas used the portrait to promote her husband's business, and, after a tortuous history, the portrait eventually returned to Oxford University, where it now hangs inconspicuously in the Radcliffe Science Library. PMID:27365894

  3. John Tracy Ellis and the Figure of the Catholic Intellectual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conniff, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Fifty years after John Tracy Ellis challenged the quality and character of Catholic intellectual life, much work remains to be done. This essay explores Ellis's original assertions and places them in an overarching historical context that involves Flannery O'Connor and Thomas Merton.

  4. APOLLO 13 CREW JOHN SWIGERT, JAMES LOVELL, AND FRED HAISE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    John L. Swigert, Jr., left, the Apollo 13 backup crewman being considered as command module pilot in place of Thomas K. Mattingly II because of the latter's exposure to measles, has been training with the prime crew -- James A. Lovell, Jr., center and Fred W. Haise, Jr.

  5. A gift from Oxford: the Osler-Thomas connection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In June 1926, Dr. Henry M. Thomas Jr. (“Hal”) received as a gift from Grace Osler in Oxford an Einhorn Duodenal Bucket Set that had belonged to Sir William Osler. The Thomases were a distinguished multigenerational physician family of Baltimore with high educational standards and major accomplishments in medicine and medical education. An extraordinary number of the Thomas women earned doctorates and made significant contributions in an era when this was a pioneering achievement. This is exemplified by Martha Carey Thomas, who earned a PhD in 1882 and served as dean and president of Bryn Mawr College for women. As a leading feminist and member of the Women's Fund Committee, she was a major force in providing the endowment that permitted the opening of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine under the strict stipulations that admission requirements include an undergraduate degree and that women be admitted on the basis of total equality with men. Osler established relationships that extended over three generations of the Thomas family during his Baltimore tenure, an influence that proved mutually beneficial. PMID:23077379

  6. [Thomas Fincke and trigonometry].

    PubMed

    Schönbeck, Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    Thomas Fincke (January 6th, 1561 - April 24th, 1650), born in Flensburg (Germany), was one of the very most important and significant scientists in Denmark during the seventeenth century, a mathematician and astrologer and physician in the beginning of modern science, a representative of humanism and an influentual academic organizer. He studied in Strasbourg (since 1577) and Padua (since 1583) and received his M.D. in Basel (1587), he practised as a physician throughtout his life (since 1587 or 1590) and became a professor at Copenhagen (1591). But he was best known because of his Geometriae rotundi libri XIIII (1583), a famous book on plane and spherical trigonometry, based not on Euclid but on Petrus Ramus. In this influentual work, in which Fincke introduced the terms tangent and secant and probable first noticed the Law of Tangents and the so-called Newton-Oppel-Mauduit-Simpson-Mollweide-Gauss-formula, he showed himself to be ,,abreast of the mathematics of his time". PMID:15290836

  7. Thomas Kuhn's Influence on Astronomers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Harry L.

    2000-01-01

    Surveys the astronomical community on their familiarity with the work of Thomas Kuhn. Finds that for some astronomers, Kuhn's thought resonated well with their picture of how science is done and provided perspectives on their scientific careers. (Author/CCM)

  8. Thomas Jefferson and American Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coonen, Lester P.; Porter, Charlotte M.

    1976-01-01

    Presented are the numerous contributions made by Thomas Jefferson to the fields of biological sciences. In addition to his actual contributions and discoveries, his extensive verbal and literacy support of the sciences is traced. (SL)

  9. Astronaut Thomas Mattingly performs EVA during Apollo 16 transearth coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, performs extravehicular activity (EVA) during the Apollo 16 transearth coast. mattingly is assisted by Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot. Mattingly inspected the SIM bay of the Service Module, and retrieved film from the Mapping and Panoramic cameras. Mattingly is wearing the helmet of Astronaut John W. Young, commander. The helmet's lunar extravehicular visor assembly helped protect Mattingly's eyes frmo the bright sun. This view is a frame from motion picture film exposed by a 16mm Maurer camera.

  10. St. John's Wort (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The herb St. John's Wort is believed to be helpful in relieving mild to moderate depression, but should only be taken under a physician's supervision. St. John's Wort may clash with other medications or foods ...

  11. St. John's Wort

    MedlinePlus

    ... 359–366. St. John's wort. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Web site. Accessed at www.naturaldatabase.com on February ... St. John's wort ( Hypericum perforatum L.). Natural Standard Database Web site. Accessed at www.naturalstandard.com on February ...

  12. Doubting Thomas: Reading Between the Lines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrington, Bruce; Denscombe, Martyn

    1987-01-01

    Explains the continuing popularity of the Reverend W. Awdry's "Railway Series" featuring Thomas the Tank Engine. Argues that though the settings are anachronistic, the ideology expressed through Thomas the Tank Engine is congruent with that of the New Right. (SRT)

  13. Thomas Moran: "The Grand Canyon."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brubaker, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan for introducing students in grades four through six to Thomas Moran's painting, "The Grand Canyon." The goal of the lesson is to illustrate the importance of the American West as a subject for artists in the nineteenth century. (JDH)

  14. Astronaut Thomas Stafford and Snoopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Thomas P. Stafford, commander of the Apollo 10 lunar orbit mission, takes time out from his preflight training activities to have his picture made with Snoopy, the character from Charles Schulz's syndicated comic strip, 'Peanuts'. During the Apollo 10 lunar orbit operations the Lunar Module will be called Snoopy when it is separated from the Command/Service Modules.

  15. Confronting Thomas Jefferson, Slave Owner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, James A.

    1992-01-01

    Although Thomas Jefferson's view of freedom was the cornerstone of the Declaration of Independence, this founding father owned 170 slaves to run his 5,000 acre plantation. This article describes a unit developed by the Monticello (Virginia) Education Department that teaches secondary students about slave Isaac Jefferson while exposing them to…

  16. The Vision of Thomas Jefferson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    Contends that it was the blend of public service and public interests that distinguish the life of Thomas Jefferson. Discusses Jefferson's political philosophy found in his writings. Explains that nearly all of his writing was done to accomplish specific goals, although it had significance far beyond the immediate context. (CFR)

  17. Thomas Jefferson and the Constitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Merrill D.

    1987-01-01

    Examines Thomas Jefferson's role in the making and interpretation of the United States Constitution. Discusses the dominant features of Jefferson's constitutional theory; the character of Jefferson's presidency; and Jefferson's ongoing concern about constitutional preservation and change. Lists important dates in the history of the constitution.…

  18. Jim Thomas, 1946-2010

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Maureen; Kasik, David; Bailey, Mike; van Dam, Andy; Dill, John; Rhyne, Theresa-Marie; Foley, Jim; Encarnacao, L. M.; Rosenblum, Larry; Earnshaw, Rae; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Wong, Pak C.; Encarnacao, Jose; Fellner, Dieter; Urban, Bodo

    2010-11-01

    Jim Thomas, a visionary scientist and inspirational leader, died on 6 August 2010 in Richland, Washington. His impact on the fields of computer graphics, user interface software, and visualization was extraordinary, his ability to personally change people’s lives even more so. He is remembered for his enthusiasm, his mentorship, his generosity, and, most of all, his laughter. This collection of remembrances images him through the eyes of his many friends.

  19. John Glenn - Mini Biography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Mini Biography of John Glenn, as it was up to 1962. From film to tape transfer of the film 'Friendship 7 - John Glenn' Depicts the historical orbital flight of John Glenn aboard 'Friendship 7', launched on February 20, 1962. Footage of staff at tracking stations worldwide and at Goddard Space Flight Center. Launch from cape canaveral. Flight tracking, re-entry, landing and recovery of Friendship 7.

  20. Medicine in John Locke's philosophy.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Gonzalez, M A

    1990-12-01

    John Locke's philosophy was deeply affected by medicine of his times. It was specially influenced by the medical thought and practice of Thomas Sydenham. Locke was a personal friend of Sydenham, expressed an avid interest in his work and shared his views and methods. The influence of Sydenham's medicine can be seen in the following areas of Locke's philosophy: his "plain historical method"; the emphasis on observation and sensory experience instead of seeking the essence of things; the rejection of hypotheses and principles; the refusal of research into final causes and inner mechanisms; the ideal of irrefutable evidence and skepticism on the possibilities of certainty in science. The science which for Locke held the highest paradigmatic value in his theory of knowledge was precisely medicine. To a great extent, Locke's Essay on Human Understanding can be understood as an attempt to justify, substantiate, and promote Sydenham's medical method. This method, generalized, was then proposed as an instrument for the elaboration of all natural sciences. PMID:2290077

  1. John Glenn: Friendship 7 Splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Splasdown of Freindship 7 From: The John Glenn Story: Summary of astronaut John Glenn's flying career, from naval aviation training to space flight. The Mercury project is featured as John Glenn flies the Friendship 7 spacecraft. President John F. Kennedy presents the NASA Distinguished service Medal to Astronaut John Glenn.

  2. Jasper Johns' Painted Words.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinger, Esther

    1989-01-01

    States that the painted words in Jasper Johns' art act in two different capacities: concealed words partake in the artist's interrogation of visual perception; and visible painted words question classical representation. Argues that words are Johns' means of critiquing modernism. (RS)

  3. John Dewey, an Appreciation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clopton, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The subject of the annual Presidential address of Phi Kappa Phi, presented on May 8, 1962, was John Dewey. Dewey is identified in the public mind chiefly as an educational philosopher. In this address, the author describes the life and work of John Dewey as an indefatigable student of life whose interests ranged, like those of Aristotle, over the…

  4. The Unretiring John Krumboltz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFromboise, Teresa D.; Neumann, Harly

    2002-01-01

    John D. Krumboltz continues to contribute to the field of counseling psychology, including the subspecialty of career counseling, after five decades of professional experience. Inspired by B. F. Skinner, John operationalized a behavioral approach to counseling. After 4 years at Michigan State University, where he initiated research on programmed…

  5. The Mind at Every Stage Has Its Own Logic: John Dewey as Genetic Psychologist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallace, Thomas Daniel

    2010-01-01

    In this essay Thomas Fallace argues that John Dewey can best be described as a pragmatic historicist and a genetic psychologist. This means that Dewey believed that the best way to understand any idea, phenomenon, or entity is to trace its history, that the history of the individual and race pass through distinct stages of development, and that…

  6. APOLLO 16 ASTRONAUTS JOHN YOUNG AND CHARLES DUKE EXAMINE FAR ULTRAVIOLET CAMERA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Apollo 16 Lunar Module Pilot Charles M. Duke, Jr., left and Mission Commander John W. Young examine Far Ultraviolet Camera they will take to the Moon in March. They will measure the universe's ultraviolet spectrum. They will be launched to the Moon no earlier than March 17, 1972, with Command Module Pilot Thomas K. Mattingly, II.

  7. William Osler and Seymour Thomas, “the boy artist of Texas”

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Critics consider the 1908–1909 portrait of William Osler by S. Seymour Thomas the best of six oil-on-canvas portraits of Osler done from life, including those by the more acclaimed US artists John Singer Sargent and William Merritt Chase. Osler called it “the best pictorial diagnosis I have ever seen” and told Thomas “I am at your service.” A reappraisal of Seymour Thomas explains why his portrait makes us feel much as the artist did in Osler's presence, which is the original English-language definition of “empathy.” Thomas told his subject that “I feel that you can look clear through me and see the wall on the other side.” The intensity of Osler's gaze affects us similarly. The portrait satisfied Osler, but his wife, Grace Revere Osler, never warmed to it, perhaps because it depicts so clearly a highly focused, agenda-driven man. Helen Thomas used the portrait to promote her husband's business, and, after a tortuous history, the portrait eventually returned to Oxford University, where it now hangs inconspicuously in the Radcliffe Science Library. PMID:27365894

  8. The 2013 Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal: Thomas Douglas Petes.

    PubMed

    Jinks-Robertson, Sue; Hieter, Philip

    2013-05-01

    The Genetics Society of America annually honors members who have made outstanding contributions to genetics. The Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal recognizes a lifetime contribution to the science of genetics. The Genetics Society of America Medal recognizes particularly outstanding contributions to the science of genetics over the past 32 years. The George W. Beadle Award recognizes distinguished service to the field of genetics and the community of geneticists. The Elizabeth W. Jones Award for Excellence in Education recognizes individuals or groups who have had a significant, sustained impact on genetics education at any level, from kindergarten through graduate school and beyond. The Novitski Prize recognizes an extraordinary level of creativity and intellectual ingenuity in solving significant problems in biological research through the application of genetic methods. We are pleased to announce the 2013 awards. PMID:23633133

  9. John Glenn OK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Astronaut John Glenn and technicians inspect artwork that will be painted on the outside of his Mercury spacecraft. John Glenn nicknamed his capsule 'Friendship 7'. On February 20, 1962 astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. lifted off into space aboard his Mercury Atlas (MA-6) rocket and became the first American to orbit the Earth. After orbiting the Earth 3 times, Friendship 7 landed in the Atlantic Ocean 4 hours, 55 minutes and 23 seconds later, just East of Grand Turk Island in the Bahamas. Glenn and his capsule were recovered by the Navy Destroyer Noa, 21 minutes after splashdown.

  10. Astronaut John Young's Career

    NASA Video Gallery

    John Young served as a NASA astronaut for over four decades, flying on Gemini, Apollo and the Space Shuttle. He walked on the moon during Apollo 16 in 1972 and commanded the first shuttle mission, ...

  11. John Dewey and early Chicago functionalism.

    PubMed

    Backe, A

    2001-11-01

    John Dewey and James Angell are regarded respectively as the founder and systematizer of the Chicago school of functional psychology. The early Chicago school traditionally has been portrayed as a unified theoretical approach based primarily on William James's naturalist theory of mental processes. It is argued in this article that although the psychology systematized by Angell bore a close affinity to James's naturalism, Dewey's own psychology was based primarily on the neo-Hegelian philosophy of Thomas Hill Green. Through a review of a number of Dewey's major writings, Green's neo-Hegelian philosophy is shown to have influenced Dewey's views on psychological concepts such as reaction, emotion, and perception during the formative period of the Chicago school. The interpretation of Dewey's psychology developed in this article leads to the conclusion that early Chicago functionalism should not be regarded as a unified theoretical approach. PMID:11763887

  12. John Henry: Then and Now.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikola-Lisa, W.

    1998-01-01

    Compares three children's books retelling the legend of John Henry: "John Henry: An American Legend" by Ezra Jack Keats (1965), "John Henry" by Julius Lester (1994), and "The Legend of John Henry" by Terry Small (1994). Differences in imagery, language, symbolism, and themes are discussed. (MAK)

  13. Commemorating John Dyson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittard, Julian M.

    2015-03-01

    John Dyson was born on the 7th January 1941 in Meltham Mills, West Yorkshire, England, and later grew up in Harrogate and Leeds. The proudest moment of John's early life was meeting Freddie Trueman, who became one of the greatest fast bowlers of English cricket. John used a state scholarship to study at Kings College London, after hearing a radio lecture by D. M. McKay. He received a first class BSc Special Honours Degree in Physics in 1962, and began a Ph.D. at the University of Manchester Department of Astronomy after being attracted to astronomy by an article of Zdenek Kopal in the semi-popular journal New Scientist. John soon started work with Franz Kahn, and studied the possibility that the broad emission lines seen from the Orion Nebula were due to flows driven by the photoevaporation of neutral globules embedded in a HII region. John's thesis was entitled ``The Age and Dynamics of the Orion Nebula`` and he passed his oral examination on 28th February 1966.

  14. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Grames, Douglas Higinbotham, Hugh Montgomery

    2010-09-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia, USA, is one of ten national laboratories under the aegis of the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It is managed and operated by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC. The primary facility at Jefferson Lab is the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) as shown in an aerial photograph in Figure 1. Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 as CEBAF and started operations for physics in 1995. The accelerator uses superconducting radio-frequency (srf) techniques to generate high-quality beams of electrons with high-intensity, well-controlled polarization. The technology has enabled ancillary facilities to be created. The CEBAF facility is used by an international user community of more than 1200 physicists for a program of exploration and study of nuclear, hadronic matter, the strong interaction and quantum chromodynamics. Additionally, the exceptional quality of the beams facilitates studies of the fundamental symmetries of nature, which complement those of atomic physics on the one hand and of high-energy particle physics on the other. The facility is in the midst of a project to double the energy of the facility and to enhance and expand its experimental facilities. Studies are also pursued with a Free-Electron Laser produced by an energy-recovering linear accelerator.

  15. Thomas Henry Huxley and neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Smith, C U

    1999-01-01

    In the latter decades of the nineteenth century Thomas Henry Huxley was at the heart of British Science: President of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (1870), President of the Royal Society (1883-86), Chairman of innumerable committees. His thought in many ways characterises the spirit of the 'high' Victorian age in Britain. He was not only the most eminent academic biologist of his time but also deeply interested in philosophical issues. His re-examination of the evolution of the brain in response to Richard Owen's 'telenomic' views formed the kernel of the notorious debate at the 1860 meeting of the British Association in Oxford. From his early youth until old age he thought long and hard about the mind/body problem. This paper follows the development of his ideas and shows how in debate with many of the leading thinkers of his age, in the X-club and the Metaphysical Society, he struggled to develop a biologically-based account of the relationship between mind and brain. However, at the end, he seems to have recognized that his position was not entirely satisfactory and ultimately famously confessing himself 'agnostic' turned from metaphysics to devote himself to more practical issues. The unresolved problems of mind and brain which perplexed Huxley remain to torment his epigoni. PMID:11640239

  16. Earth Science Week 2012: Janel Thomas

    NASA Video Gallery

    A short video profile of Janel Thomas. She was a member of NASA's Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field campaign in 2010 where she operated the dropsonde instrument on board NASA...

  17. Generalized Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Binglu; Zhu Jiongming; Yan Zongchao

    2006-01-15

    The generalized Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule is established for any Coulombic system with arbitrary masses and charges of its constituent particles. Numerical examples are given for the hydrogen molecular ions.

  18. Thomas Jefferson and the Purposes of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewett, Thomas O.

    1997-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson was the first conspicuous U.S. advocate of free education supported by local taxation and of state aid to higher education. He believed that only an educated citizenry could assume the responsibilities of self-government. (SK)

  19. APOLLO 16 COMMANDER JOHN YOUNG ENTERS ALTITUDE CHAMBER FOR TESTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Apollo 16 commander John W. Young prepares to enter the lunar module in an altitude chamber in the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building at the spaceport prior to an altitude run. During the altitude run, in which Apollo 16 lunar module pilot Charles M. Duke also participated, the chamber was pumped down to simulate pressure at an altitude in excess of 200,000 feet. Young, Duke and command module pilot Thomas K. Mattingly II, are training at the Kennedy Space Center for the Apollo 16 mission. Launch is scheduled from Pad 39A, March 17, 1972.

  20. Who Killed John Keats?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leal, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Two months before he died, John Keats claimed he had been poisoned. Although most scholars and biographers have attributed Keats's fears of persecution, betrayal, and murder to consumptive dementia, Keats's suspicions had begun long before 1820 and were not without some justification. In this article, the author talks about the death of John…

  1. John Glenn's Space Ride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schamel, Wynell; Potter, Lee Ann

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the accomplishments of John Glenn as a pilot, astronaut, senator, and pioneer in relation to his 1998 flight that made him the oldest person to ever travel into space. Includes photographs for students to study, and recommends classroom activities related to Glenn's career. (DSK)

  2. John Carroll University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Kathleen Lis; Rombalski, Patrick; O'Dell, Kyle

    2009-01-01

    John Carroll University (JCU) is a Jesuit Catholic institution located in University Heights, approximately 10 miles east of Cleveland, Ohio. Founded in 1888, the university has a population of 3,400 undergraduates and 800 graduate students. The Division of Student Affairs at JCU comprises 11 units. The mission of the division is the same as that…

  3. Astronaut John H. Glenn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Astronaut John H. Glenn, one of the original seven astronauts for Mercury Project selected by NASA on April 27, 1959. The MA-6 mission, boosted by the Mercury-Atlas vehicle, was the first manned orbital launch by the United States, and carried Astronaut Glenn aboard the Friendship 7 spacecraft to orbit the Earth.

  4. Dedication: John Reuben Clark.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volume 40 of Horticultural reviews is dedicated to John Reuben Clark (University of Arkansas) for his outstanding contributions to horticulture. While known particularly for his impact on blackberry, blueberry, table grape, and peach cultivar development, he has also been a strong and enthusiastic v...

  5. John Galen Howard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Joan

    1979-01-01

    A biographical sketch of John Galen Howard, founder of the Department of Architecture at the University of California at Berkeley, is presented. Howard's conservative outlook and idealistic nature are examined and his influence on the curriculum at the university is traced. (PHR)

  6. John C. Houbolt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    John C. Houbolt at blackboard, showing his space rendezvous concept for lunar landings. Lunar Orbital Rendezvous (LOR) would be used in the Apollo program. Although Houbolt did not invent the idea of LOR, he was the person most responsible for pushing it at NASA.

  7. Peter Pindar (John Wolcot).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vales, Robert L.

    This book is designed as an introduction to John Wolcot's works for the general reader, the college student, and the college teacher. Wolcot, whose pen name was Peter Pindar, wrote topical satire on public personalities of the eighteenth century, and his methods of criticism are the motif which guides each chapter and which unites all the satires…

  8. The John Muir Award.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Graham

    2002-01-01

    The John Muir Award was established in the United Kingdom to respond to minimal environmental awareness, especially among youth. The Award has three levels of effort; all involve discovering a wild place, exploring its wildness, helping to conserve it, and sharing the experience with a wider audience. There is an effort to establish the award in…

  9. John Cage Discusses Fluxus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Ellsworth

    1992-01-01

    Presents an informal discussion with composer John Cage which includes his response to George Maciunas' work, his recollections of Marcel Duchamp, the complex relationship between inelegant material and revealing works of art, neo-Dada and neo-Fluxus, Wittgenstein and the artist's ultimate responsibility to initiate a change in the viewer or…

  10. Letter from Thomas Moran to Ferdinand Hayden and Paintings by Thomas Moran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann; Eder, Elizabeth K.; Hussey, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Medical doctor and geologist Dr. Ferdinand Vandiveer Hayden selected more than 30 scientists, technical personnel, and artists, including photographer William Henry Jackson and painter Thomas Moran, to join the survey of the Yellowstone region in northwest Wyoming territory. Thomas Moran was an accomplished artist when he joined the survey to…

  11. Thomas C. McMurtry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Thomas C. McMurtry in November 1982. He graduated in June 1957 from the University of Notre Dame with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering. McMurtry had been part of the university's Navy ROTC program, and after graduation he joined the Navy as a pilot. Before retiring from the Navy in 1964 as a Lieutenant, he graduated from the U.S. Navy Test Pilot School, and had flown such aircraft as the F9F, A3D, A4D, F3D, F-8, A-6, and S-2. McMurtry was then a consultant for the Lockheed Corporation until joining NASA as a research pilot in 1967. While at the Dryden Flight Research Center, he was co-project pilot on the F-8 Digital Fly-By-Wire program, and the 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft, as well as project pilot on the F-15 Digital Electronic Engine Control (DEEC) project, the KC-135 Winglets, the F-8 Supercritical Wing project, and the AD-1 Oblique Wing Project. He also made research flights in NASA's YF-12C aircraft (actually a modified SR-71). McMurtry made the last glide flight of the X-24B lifting body on November 26, 1975, and was co-pilot of the 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft on the first free flight of the space shuttle Enterprise on August 12, 1977. He was involved in several remotely piloted research vehicle programs, including the FAA/NASA 720 Controlled Impact Demonstration and the 3/8 F-15 Spin Research Vehicle. During McMurtry's 32 years as a pilot and manager at Dryden, he received numerous awards. These include the NASA Exceptional Service Award for his work on the F-8 Supercritical Wing, and the Iven C. Kincheloe Award from the Society of Experimental Test Pilots for his role as chief pilot on the AD-1 project, the NASA Distinguished Service Medal, and the 1999 Milton O. Thomson Lifetime Achievement Award. McMurtry also held a number of management positions at Dryden, including Chief Pilot, Director of Flight Operations, Associate Director of Flight Operations, and was the acting Chief Engineer at the time of his retirement on June 3, 1999

  12. John Glenn: His first Flying Lesson Remembered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Pilot Harry Clever remembers giving John Glenn his first flying lesson. From: The John Glenn Story: Summary of astronaut John Glenn's flying career, from naval aviation training to space flight. The Mercury project is featured as John Glenn flies the Friendship 7 spacecraft. President John F. Kennedy presents the NASA Distinguished service Medal to Astronaught John Glenn.

  13. Obituary: Thomas Michael Donahue, 1921-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gombosi, Tamás I.

    2004-12-01

    Thomas M. Donahue, one of the nation's leading space and planetary scientists and a pioneer of space exploration, died Saturday October 16, 2004, from complications following heart surgery. The Edward H. White II Distinguished University Professor of Planetary Science at the University of Michigan, Tom shaped space exploration through his scientific achievements and policy positions. His work started with the first use of sounding rockets following World War II and continued for almost 60 years. Tom was born in Healdton, Oklahoma on May 23, 1921 to Robert Emmet and Mary (Lyndon) Donahue. His father was a plumber in the oil fields when Tom was born (Healdton OK was an oil town) and worked as a plumber in Kansas City for a time. Tom grew up in Kansas City, graduating in 1942 from Rockhurst College in that city with degrees in classics and physics. His graduate work in physics at Johns Hopkins University was interrupted by service in the Army Signal Corps. He obtained his PhD degree in atomic physics from Hopkins in the fall of 1947. After three years as a post-doctoral research associate and assistant professor at Hopkins, Tom joined the University of Pittsburgh Physics Department in 1951. At Pittsburgh he organized an atomic physics and atmospheric science program that led to experimental and theoretical studies of the upper atmosphere of the Earth and other solar system planets with instruments flown on sounding rockets and spacecraft. He became Professor of Physics in 1959 and eventually Director of the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Sciences and the Space Research Coordination Center at the University. In 1960 he spent a sabbatical year on a Guggenheim Fellowship at the Service d'Aeronomie in Paris, which began collaborations with French colleagues that flourished for more than 40 years. In 1974 he became the Chairman of the Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Department, University of Michigan, a position he held until 1981. In 1986, he was named the Henry

  14. John Keats and tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Radetsky, M

    2001-05-01

    John Keats was trained as an apothecary, the general practitioner of the day. Precocious in his sensibilities and fluent in his imagery, he also was the model of the romantic poet. That he was a physician and a poet makes his early death from tuberculosis poignant and revealing. This history traces his life and death against the backdrop of medicine at the turn of the 19th century. PMID:11368115

  15. Oliver St John Gogarty.

    PubMed

    Clarke, R W

    1997-01-01

    Oliver St John Gogarty--Otolaryngologist to fashionable Edwardian Dublin--was a distinguished poet and a Senator in the fledgling Irish Free State after its establishment in 1922. He numbered amongst his acquaintances the poet William Butler Yeats, the novelist James Joyce and a host of political and literary persona who helped to shape modern Ireland. He was satirised as 'stately plump Buck Mulligan' in Joyce's novel Ulysses. PMID:9292124

  16. John McCain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phi Delta Kappan, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article presents speeches describing John McCain's position on education posted on the McCain campaign's official web site, www.johnmccain.com. These include McCain's speech to LaRaza convention, July 14; McCain's speech to the NAACP, July 16; McCain's speech at the Greater Columbus (Ohio) Convention Center, May 15; and McCain's speech at…

  17. Reviews of the Book, "The Bell Curve: Intelligence and Class Structure in American Life"; "An Annotated Bibliography of Reviews of 'The Bell Curve'" (Lyle J. White); "A Statistical Critique of Herrnstein & Murray's 'The Bell Curve'" (Thomas R. Knapp); "A Response to 'The Bell Curve': Conversation with John Goodlad" (Mary R. Sudzina); "Voices in Education" (Marlene Schommer); "What Is 'Heritability' and What Is It Not?" (Lisabeth F. DiLalla, David L. DiLalla); "My Swing...!" (Dennis W. Leitner).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitner, Dennis W., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    Collection of reviews of the controversial book "The Bell Curve" includes an annotated bibliography of 36 reviews in professional journals, edited books, and the popular press; a critique of the book's statistical appendixes; comments from John Goodlad, Howard Gardner, and others; discussion of heritability estimates; and summaries of a…

  18. Parallelization of the Pipelined Thomas Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povitsky, A.

    1998-01-01

    In this study the following questions are addressed. Is it possible to improve the parallelization efficiency of the Thomas algorithm? How should the Thomas algorithm be formulated in order to get solved lines that are used as data for other computational tasks while processors are idle? To answer these questions, two-step pipelined algorithms (PAs) are introduced formally. It is shown that the idle processor time is invariant with respect to the order of backward and forward steps in PAs starting from one outermost processor. The advantage of PAs starting from two outermost processors is small. Versions of the pipelined Thomas algorithms considered here fall into the category of PAs. These results show that the parallelization efficiency of the Thomas algorithm cannot be improved directly. However, the processor idle time can be used if some data has been computed by the time processors become idle. To achieve this goal the Immediate Backward pipelined Thomas Algorithm (IB-PTA) is developed in this article. The backward step is computed immediately after the forward step has been completed for the first portion of lines. This enables the completion of the Thomas algorithm for some of these lines before processors become idle. An algorithm for generating a static processor schedule recursively is developed. This schedule is used to switch between forward and backward computations and to control communications between processors. The advantage of the IB-PTA over the basic PTA is the presence of solved lines, which are available for other computations, by the time processors become idle.

  19. Obituary: Thomas Michael Donahue, 1921-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gombosi, Tamás I.

    2004-12-01

    Thomas M. Donahue, one of the nation's leading space and planetary scientists and a pioneer of space exploration, died Saturday October 16, 2004, from complications following heart surgery. The Edward H. White II Distinguished University Professor of Planetary Science at the University of Michigan, Tom shaped space exploration through his scientific achievements and policy positions. His work started with the first use of sounding rockets following World War II and continued for almost 60 years. Tom was born in Healdton, Oklahoma on May 23, 1921 to Robert Emmet and Mary (Lyndon) Donahue. His father was a plumber in the oil fields when Tom was born (Healdton OK was an oil town) and worked as a plumber in Kansas City for a time. Tom grew up in Kansas City, graduating in 1942 from Rockhurst College in that city with degrees in classics and physics. His graduate work in physics at Johns Hopkins University was interrupted by service in the Army Signal Corps. He obtained his PhD degree in atomic physics from Hopkins in the fall of 1947. After three years as a post-doctoral research associate and assistant professor at Hopkins, Tom joined the University of Pittsburgh Physics Department in 1951. At Pittsburgh he organized an atomic physics and atmospheric science program that led to experimental and theoretical studies of the upper atmosphere of the Earth and other solar system planets with instruments flown on sounding rockets and spacecraft. He became Professor of Physics in 1959 and eventually Director of the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Sciences and the Space Research Coordination Center at the University. In 1960 he spent a sabbatical year on a Guggenheim Fellowship at the Service d'Aeronomie in Paris, which began collaborations with French colleagues that flourished for more than 40 years. In 1974 he became the Chairman of the Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Department, University of Michigan, a position he held until 1981. In 1986, he was named the Henry

  20. Jim Thomas: A Collection of Memories

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.

    2010-12-01

    Jim Thomas, a guest editor and a long-time associate editor of Information Visualization (IVS), died in Richland, WA, on August 6, 2010 due to complications from a brain tumor. His friends and colleagues from around the world have since expressed their sadness and paid tribute to a visionary scientist in multiple public forums. For those who didn't get the chance to know Jim, I share a collection of my own memories of Jim Thomas and memories from some of his colleagues.

  1. Using THOMAS for Service Oriented Open MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julian, V.; Rebollo, M.; Argente, E.; Botti, V.; Carrascosa, C.; Giret, A.

    Recent technological advances in open systems have imposed new needs on multi-agent systems. Nowadays, open systems require open autonomous scenarios in which heterogeneous entities (agents or services) interact to fulfill the system goals. This impose the need for open architectures and computational models for large-scale open multi-agent systems based on service-oriented approaches. THOMAS is a new architecture specifically addressed for the design of virtual organizations for open systems. In this paper we present a case study that exemplifies the usage of THOMAS for implementing a management system of a travel agency.

  2. Thomas Willis's practice of paediatric neurology and neurodisability.

    PubMed

    Williams, A N

    2003-12-01

    Thomas Willis (1621-1675) is regarded as a founder of modern clinical neuroscience. He conceived the word "neurology" and left a body of work that defined mid-seventeenth-century medicine. Recent interpretations of Willis's work have led to a growing appreciation of his significant contributions to paediatric neurology, a speciality founded properly some three centuries after his death. This paper presents abstracts and plates taken from Willis's major published works, together with student notes by John Locke (1632-1704) and Robert Boyle (1627-1691) taken from lectures delivered by Willis in Oxford in the 1660s. The material embraces a wide variety of conditions now managed within modern paediatric neurology and neurodisability. In several cases, these are the first descriptions recorded in the medical literature. Willis fused astute history taking and clinical observation (sometimes supported by subsequent post-mortem studies) into a structured medical intervention. Willis's practice was state of the art, being based on acceptance of Harvey, a traditional Galenic infrastructure, iatrochemistry and Gassendi's "psychology". Although Willis's discoveries became a cornerstone of modern medical science, his medical practice did not lead to any therapeutic advances. However, up to the mid-eighteenth century his works were internationally accepted for their practical usefulness. The corpus of material left by Willis affords a fascinating insight into the clinical rationale of a seventeenth century physician in his management of paediatric cases. PMID:15069866

  3. Nietzche's echo--a dialogue with Thomas Altizer.

    PubMed

    Moss, David M

    2010-03-01

    Prophets provoke psychological unrest, especially when exposing accepted beliefs as profound deceptions. The biblical prophets exemplify such confrontation as do certain atheists ardently opposed to the images of God created by those seers. The German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche dramatically illustrates this type of counterforce to the Judeo-Christian tradition. His prophet Zarathustra is intended to be a model for the modern mind, one free of superstitions inflicted by antiquated religious dogma. Nietzsche's credo "God is dead" served as a declaration for the nineteenth century. In the twentieth century, it became a theological diagnosis. As a "movement," or "tenor," the death of God or radical theology was spearheaded by Thomas Altizer, a well-published young professor center-staged during the turbulent 1960s. His work foreshadows a new strain of atheism currently represented by biologist Richard Dawkins (2006, The God delusion. New York: Houghton Mifflin), philosopher Daniel Dennett (2006, Breaking the spell. New York: Penquin), neuroscientist Sam Harris (2004, The end of faith. New York: W.W. Norton; 2008, Letter to a Christian nation. New York: Vintage), journalist Christopher Hitchens (2007, God is not great. New York: Twelve), and mathematician John Allen Paulos (Paulos 2008, Irreligion. New York: Hill & Wang). This twenty-first century crusade against belief in God is best understood as a psychodynamic ignited by Altizer's Christian atheism. The present dialogue reflects that dynamic while the prologue and epilogue reveal evidence of Providence amidst claims of God's demise in contemporary history. PMID:19399624

  4. John Campbell Begg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Robert

    2002-03-01

    John Campbell Begg born in Dunedin in 1876 was the son of Alexander Campbell Begg and Katherine Begg, early Otago settlers. He studied physics and philosophy at the University of Otago before turning to business and rural pursuits. He died in Dunedin in 1965 age 89. The Begg family were foundation members of the Otago Astronomical Society. Visits to the Tanna Hill Observatory were made in 1915. The astronomical observatory which stands in Robin Hood Park, Roslyn, Dunedin bears his name; Beverly Begg Observatory

  5. Teaching the "Leviathan": Thomas Hobbes on Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bejan, Teresa M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers Thomas Hobbes's educational thought both in its historical context and in the context of his political philosophy as a whole. It begins with Hobbes's diagnosis of the English Civil War as the product of the miseducation of the commonwealth and shows that education was a central and consistent concern of his political theory…

  6. The Theological Anthropology of Thomas Groome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudoin, Tom

    2005-01-01

    Theological anthropology in the work of Thomas Groome can be understood by exploring the relationship between subjectivity and knowledge in his major works. This relationship is constituted by five fundamental elements: the knowing subject in religious education as existential, liberational, pedagogical, theological, and critical. A comprehension…

  7. Thomas precession and squeezed states of light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Hardekopf, E. E.; Kim, Y. S.

    1989-01-01

    The Lorentz group, which is the language of special relativity, is a useful theoretical toll in modern optics. Optics experiments can therefore serve as analog computers for special relativity. Possible optics experiments involving squeezed states are discussed in connection with the Thomas precession and the Wigner rotation.

  8. To: Thomas Jefferson. Re: Your Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deyoe-Chiullan, Rita M.

    1993-01-01

    A tongue-in-check response claimed to be from the prime minister of England to Thomas Jefferson regarding the "Declaration of Independence." Claims that the declaration fails to meet recently adopted specifications for proposals to the Crown and lacks a line-item budget, citations from recent literature, and measurable goals. (MLF)

  9. Thomas Jefferson and Architecture. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Robin H.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the importance of architecture in Thomas Jefferson's life. Presents a lesson plan based on Jefferson's Monticello and designed to encourage students to identify and understand elements of classical architecture in their local area. Includes a photograph of Monticello and six architectural illustrations. (CFR)

  10. Strategies: The Thomas Jefferson University Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, Jane L.

    1991-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson University (Pennsylvania) has two dental professional hygiene education programs, one a prelicensure, entry-level clinical education program and the other a postcertificate or baccalaureate degree completion program. Recruitment strategies include prerequisite restructuring and part-time programs, and retention efforts begin with…

  11. Thomas Jefferson versus Wellesley High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loss, Richard

    1983-01-01

    One reason for the concern with high schools is that their performance limits, sometimes severely, what the colleges and universities can accomplish. Thomas Jefferson's views of education are used as criteria to judge the quality of liberal education the author received from Wellesley (Massachusetts) High School. (RM)

  12. Evolution and Education: Lessons from Thomas Huxley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Sherrie Lynne

    2010-01-01

    Thomas Huxley more than anyone else was responsible for disseminating Darwin's theory in the western world and maintained that investigating the history of life should be regarded as a purely scientific question free of theological speculation. The content and rhetorical strategy of Huxley's defense of evolution is analyzed. Huxley argued that the…

  13. Thomas Wolfe: An Introduction and Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walser, Richard

    One of a series of works aimed at presenting contemporary critical opinion on major American authors, this volume contains critical studies of Thomas Wolfe. Designed for use by both literary critics and secondary and college teachers of English, this work would also be of value to undergraduate and graduate students of literature. Topics covered…

  14. Thomas Clifford Allbutt and Comparative Pathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Danny C. K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reconceptualizes Thomas Clifford Allbutt's contributions to the making of scientific medicine in late nineteenth-century England. Existing literature on Allbutt usually describes his achievements, such as his design of the pocket thermometer and his advocacy of the use of the ophthalmoscope in general medicine, as independent events;…

  15. What's in a Trend? A Comment on Gray, Goldstein and Thomas (2001), "Predicting the Future: The Role of Past Performance in Determining Trends in Institutional Effectiveness at A Level."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugh, Geoff; Mangan, Jean

    2003-01-01

    Argues that although John Gray, Harvey Goldstein, and Sally Thomas treat the notion of trend in an unproblematic manner, as deterministic time trends, movements in data identified by Gray as school improvement trends may not be generated by the deterministic processes they assume. Opines these upward and downward movements may reflect a purely…

  16. Marcel Breuer at Saint John's

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Scott

    2008-01-01

    A visitor to Saint John's University and Saint John's Abbey, in north-central Minnesota, sees something of Gothic heritage while standing in front of the abbey church, designed and built around 1960. The church's 112-foot campanile--a trapezoidal slab made of 2,500 tons of steel and concrete--stands boldly in front of a huge concrete honeycomb…

  17. John Bartlett and bioterrorism.

    PubMed

    Henderson, D A

    2014-09-15

    Until 1997, the subject of bioterrorism was not discussed within the medical community and deliberately ignored in national planning efforts. Biological weapons were regarded as "morally repulsive." This complacency stemmed from a 1972 Biological Weapons Convention where all countries agreed to cease offensive biological weapons research. In the 1990s, however, the Soviet Union was discovered to have an extensive bioweapons program and a Japanese religious cult sought to launch an anthrax attack on Tokyo. Biological weapons such as smallpox and anthrax had the potential to cause a national catastrophe. However, little was done until John Bartlett in 1997 led a symposium and program to educate the medical community and the country of the need for definitive bioweapons programs. It was highly persuasive and received a final stimulus when the anthrax attack occurred in the United States in 2001. PMID:25151482

  18. JOHN MUIR WILDERNESS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dellinger, David A.; Johnson, Frederick L.

    1984-01-01

    The mineral survey of the John Muir Wilderness, California revealed eight areas of probable and substantiated potential for the occurrence of mineral resources. Tungsten, with accompanying resources of gold, copper, silver, and molybdenum, is found along contacts between granitic rocks and metamorphosed calcareous sedimentary rocks; it is estimated that more than 1 million tons of demonstrated tungsten resources exist in areas of sustantiated resource potential within the wilderness. Resources of gold, silver, lead, copper, zinc, molydenum, and cobalt, occur in small deposits not associated with tungsten; however, the known deposits of these commodities are small and the possibility of the occurrence of larger ones is unlikely. The geologic setting precludes the presence of fossil fuel resources.

  19. Fractal generalization of Thomas-Fermi model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekhviashvili, S. Sh.; Sokurov, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    The Thomas-Fermi model is developed for a multielectron neutral atom at an arbitrary metric dimension of the electron cloud. It has been shown that the electron cloud with the reduced dimension should be located in the close vicinity of the nucleus. At a metric dimension of the electron cloud of 2, the differential equation of the model admits an analytical solution. In this case, the screening parameter does not depend on the charge of the nucleus.

  20. The suicide of Thomas Wentworth Wills.

    PubMed

    de Moore, G M

    Thomas Wentworth Wills was the most important Australian sportsman of his time. He captained the Victorian colony at cricket and was the first hero of Australian Rules football. Although his picture now adorns the conservative Melbourne Cricket Club, he died in 1880, an isolated, destitute alcoholic, after stabbing himself in the heart. Wills embodied a tradition, as prevalent today as it was over 100 years ago, that weds sport with alcohol in Australian culture. PMID:10721360

  1. Pope John XXI, ophthalmologist.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, D

    1995-01-01

    Pope John XXI was an ophthalmologist before becoming Pope. He was born in Lisbon and trained at University of Paris and was part of the early medical school faculty in Siena. He became physician for Pope Gregory X and shifted to church duties. He rose quickly in the ranks of the Catholic church and was elected Pope in 1276 AD. His term was short. He died when construction in the Papal Palace at Viterbo, collapsed on him. His text book is in two parts with introductions to the eye followed by descriptions of diseases with their mostly medical treatments. He concludes with a section about his own wonderful waters. The work survived and a copy was even found amongst Michelangelo's papers. Unfortunately the book turns out to be a plagiarism of two earlier text books. His most notable achievement supposedly was discovering that glaucoma was a disease with a hard eye. It turns out that this section is referring only to a suppurative external disease with indurated lids called sclerophthalmia. PMID:7555583

  2. Searching for John Goodricke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Linda M.

    2010-01-01

    John Goodricke (1764-1786) is one of the most intriguing and enigmatic figures in the history of astronomy. Deaf from the age of five, his observations of the light variation of Algol brought him acclaim and the Copley Medal of the Royal Society by the age of nineteen. Together with his neighbor, mentor, and distant relative Edward Pigott, he went on to discover and quantify the light variations of other stars, including Delta Cephei. Goodricke's careful accounts of his observations, and their accuracy, remain a model of clear scientific thinking and reporting. Goodricke's career was short, as was his time on Earth: he died before his 22nd birthday. He left few personal notes or letters, and even many basic circumstances of his life have been misunderstood or misinterpreted. I will discuss Goodricke's apparent change of mind regarding the variations of Algol. I will further describe recent research into his family circumstances and into the allegation advanced by Zdenek Kopal in the 1980s that Goodricke was buried apart from his family because they were ashamed of his deafness.

  3. John Herschel's Graphical Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankins, Thomas L.

    2011-01-01

    In 1833 John Herschel published an account of his graphical method for determining the orbits of double stars. He had hoped to be the first to determine such orbits, but Felix Savary in France and Johann Franz Encke in Germany beat him to the punch using analytical methods. Herschel was convinced, however, that his graphical method was much superior to analytical methods, because it used the judgment of the hand and eye to correct the inevitable errors of observation. Line graphs of the kind used by Herschel became common only in the 1830s, so Herschel was introducing a new method. He also found computation fatiguing and devised a "wheeled machine" to help him out. Encke was skeptical of Herschel's methods. He said that he lived for calculation and that the English would be better astronomers if they calculated more. It is difficult to believe that the entire Scientific Revolution of the 17th century took place without graphs and that only a few examples appeared in the 18th century. Herschel promoted the use of graphs, not only in astronomy, but also in the study of meteorology and terrestrial magnetism. Because he was the most prominent scientist in England, Herschel's advocacy greatly advanced graphical methods.

  4. Obituary: Thomas Gold, 1920-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermott, Stanley F.

    2004-12-01

    Thomas "Tommy" Gold died of heart disease at Cayuga Medical Center, Ithaca NY on 22 June 2004 at the age of 84. He will be remembered as one of the most interesting, dynamic and influential scientists of his generation. Tommy's paradigm-changing ideas in astronomy and planetary science, while original and bold, were also highly controversial. With his radical work on the origin of natural gas and petroleum, the controversy is likely to continue. Tommy was born in Vienna, Austria on 22 May 1920, moving with his family to Berlin at age 10 and then, after the rise of Hitler in 1933, to England. His parents were Josephine (nee Martin) and Maximillian Gold, a successful steel magnate. Tommy was educated at Zuoz College in Switzerland where he became an expert skier and developed an athletic prowess that he maintained throughout his life, winning a NASTAR gold medal for skiing at the age of 65. He studied Mechanical Sciences at Trinity College, Cambridge, but much to his disgust his education was interrupted because of internment by the British as a suspected enemy alien. That unfortunate period (I remember him saying to me "Can you believe the stupidity, interring people like me who had fled from Nazi Germany?") had one good outcome: on his first night in camp he met Hermann Bondi who had an important influence on his early development as a scientist. They were both born in Vienna, their parents knew each other, and they were fellow students at Trinity, but this was their first meeting. On release, he went immediately into top-secret radar research for the British Admiralty, working as a team with Bondi and Fred Hoyle in a farm cottage in Dunsfold, Surrey. Tommy's first published research, which was a Nature paper with R.J. Pumphrey in 1947, was not in astronomy but physiology. He applied his engineer's understanding of positive feedback to develop and test a resonance model for how the human ear determines pitch. His conclusion that pitch discrimination occurs

  5. My working week: John Innes.

    PubMed

    Innes, John

    2016-07-23

    In the first of a new series of features for Vet Record Careers, John Innes describes a recent working week as referrals director for CVS and a RCVS specialist in small animal orthopaedics. PMID:27450857

  6. An Interview with John Wilson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halstead, J. Mark; McLaughlin, Terence H.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an interview with John Wilson covering topics such as: addressing the people who influenced him, highlighting Wilson's career and home background, and providing discussions on his opinions related to religion, morality, moral education, and the concept of authority. (CMK)

  7. Magic moments with John Bell

    SciTech Connect

    Bertlmann, Reinhold A.

    2015-07-15

    John Bell, with whom I had a fruitful collaboration and warm friendship, is best known for his seminal work on the foundations of quantum physics, but he also made outstanding contributions to particle physics and accelerator physics.

  8. John Glenn Entering Friendship 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Overall view of astronaut John Glenn, Jr., as he enters into the spacecraft Friendship 7 prior to MA-6 launch operations at Launch Complex 14. Astronaut Glenn is entering his spacecraft to begin the first American manned Earth orbital mission.

  9. John Locke and the case of Anthony Ashley Cooper.

    PubMed

    Anstey, Peter R; Principe, Lawrence M

    2011-01-01

    In June 1668 Anthony Ashley Cooper, later to become the 1st Earl of Shaftesbury, underwent abdominal surgery to drain a large abscess above his liver. The case is extraordinary, not simply on account of the eminence of the patient and the danger of the procedure, but also because of the many celebrated figures involved. A trove of manuscripts relating to this famous operation survives amongst the Shaftesbury Papers in the National Archives at Kew. These include case notes in the hand of the philosopher John Locke and advice from leading physicians of the day including Francis Glisson, Sir George Ent and Thomas Sydenham. The majority of this material has never been published before. This article provides complete transcriptions and translations of all of these manuscripts, thus providing for the first time a comprehensive case history. It is prefaced with an extended introduction. PMID:22332471

  10. John Locke on Personal Identity**

    PubMed Central

    Nimbalkar, Namita

    2011-01-01

    John Locke speaks of personal identity and survival of consciousness after death. A criterion of personal identity through time is given. Such a criterion specifies, insofar as that is possible, the necessary and sufficient conditions for the survival of persons. John Locke holds that personal identity is a matter of psychological continuity. He considered personal identity (or the self) to be founded on consciousness (viz. memory), and not on the substance of either the soul or the body. PMID:21694978

  11. John locke on personal identity.

    PubMed

    Nimbalkar, Namita

    2011-01-01

    John Locke speaks of personal identity and survival of consciousness after death. A criterion of personal identity through time is given. Such a criterion specifies, insofar as that is possible, the necessary and sufficient conditions for the survival of persons. John Locke holds that personal identity is a matter of psychological continuity. He considered personal identity (or the self) to be founded on consciousness (viz. memory), and not on the substance of either the soul or the body. PMID:21694978

  12. Thomas Young and the Rosetta Stone.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Andrew

    2007-06-01

    Who deciphered the Rosetta Stone and the Egyptian hieroglyphs? The usual answer is Jean-François Champollion, beginning in 1822. But ever since that time, Egyptologists have debated the role of his rival, the polymath Thomas Young, the first person to publish a partially correct translation of the Rosetta Stone. A recent BBC television dramatisation rekindled the controversy by presenting Champollion as a 'lone genius' who succeeded independently of Young. While there is no doubt that Champollion deciphered the hieroglyphic script as a whole, the evidence suggests that Young's early detailed study of the Rosetta Stone created the conceptual framework that made possible Champollion's later breakthrough. PMID:17583792

  13. Thomas Reiche Kuhn populations in alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeretti, P.; Caputo, M. C.; Ferraro, M. B.

    1999-07-01

    Atomic populations in a molecule have been defined via the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule for oscillator strengths written within the acceleration gauge. These atomic populations are related to nuclear electric shieldings, i.e., to geometrical derivatives of electric dipole moment, and can therefore be connected with observable infrared intensities. A number of relationships can be considered to test a priori the quality of calculated electronic charges and to assess their physical meaning. It is shown via extended numerical tests on the first members of the alkane series that the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn populations are consistent with a (small) polarity C +-H - of carbon-hydrogen bond in methane, for which a bond dipole moment can be exactly defined. Although the idea of bond dipole cannot be extended to the C-H fragments belonging to other alkane molecules in the absence of local C3 v symmetry, the calculations prove that the same electron charge polarization should characterize the whole homologous series.

  14. Thomas D. Oakland (1939-2015).

    PubMed

    Jimerson, Shane R

    2015-09-01

    Internationally renowned school and educational psychologist Thomas D. Oakland died tragically on March 4, 2015, at his home in Gainesville, Florida. Tom was born on November 23, 1939, in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Tom is survived by his first wife, Judy (Defferding) Higgins and their sons: David Thomas Oakland, of Houston, Texas, and Christopher Oakland, of Austin, Texas. Tom is also survived by his daughter-in-law, Patricia Oakland, and three children: Jacob, Sara Cate, and Brooks. Early in his career, Tom became actively engaged in international scholarship and collaborations. Tom was a prolific author, editing 12 books, more than 200 chapters and articles, and 11 psychological tests. Tom received numerous awards of distinction from state, national, and international professional associations. A diplomat in forensic psychology and neuropsychology, and a fellow of the American Psychological Society, Tom was also a fellow of four divisions of the American Psychological Psychological Association (APA). Tom is remembered by students, colleagues, friends, and family as generous, kind, thoughtful, and insightful-an outstanding school psychologist, father, and human being who gave his time and energy selflessly to advance the field and promote the development of children throughout the world. PMID:26348339

  15. Physician, philosopher, and paediatrician: John Locke's practice of child health care.

    PubMed

    Williams, A N

    2006-01-01

    G.F. Still's History of Paediatrics restricted the philosopher John Locke's (1632-1704) influence in paediatrics to pedagology and specifically his Some Thoughts Concerning Education (1693). This significantly limits Locke's immense ongoing influence on child health care and human rights. Locke was a physician and had a lifelong interest in medicine. His case records and journals relate some of his paediatric cases. His correspondence includes letters from Thomas Sydenham, the "English Hippocrates" (1624-89) when Locke has sought advice on a paediatric case as well as other correspondence from parents regarding child health care and management of learning disability. Locke assisted and influenced Thomas Sydenham with his writing, and Locke's own work, Two Treatises on Government, clearly stated the rights of children and limitation of parental authority. Furthermore, Locke's thoughts on Poor Law, making an economic case for a workhouse in every parish, were implemented from 1834. PMID:16371386

  16. 76 FR 9012 - Favinger, Thomas G.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Favinger, Thomas G.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on January 31, 2011 Thomas G. Favinger submitted for filing, an application for authority to hold interlocking...

  17. Student Rights, Clarence Thomas, and the Revolutionary Vision of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnick, Bryan R.; Rowe, Bradley; Kim, Sang Hyun

    2009-01-01

    In his concurring opinion to the 2007 U.S. Supreme Court decision, "Morse v. Frederick," Justice Clarence Thomas argues that the "Tinker" decision, which granted students constitutional rights in public schools, should be overturned on originalist grounds. In this essay, Bryan Warnick, Bradley Rowe, and Sang Hyun Kim make the case that Thomas's…

  18. Public Financing of Religious Schools: Justice Clarence Thomas's "Bigotry Thesis"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Kern

    2008-01-01

    United States Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, writing for a plurality of the Court in "Mitchell v. Helms" in 2000, advanced the idea that state constitutional prohibitions against public funding of religious schools were manifestations of anti-Catholic bigotry in the late 19th century. Thomas's reading of history and law led him to believe…

  19. The 2013 Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal

    PubMed Central

    Jinks-Robertson, Sue; Hieter, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The Genetics Society of America annually honors members who have made outstanding contributions to genetics. The Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal recognizes a lifetime contribution to the science of genetics. The Genetics Society of America Medal recognizes particularly outstanding contributions to the science of genetics over the past 32 years. The George W. Beadle Award recognizes distinguished service to the field of genetics and the community of geneticists. The Elizabeth W. Jones Award for Excellence in Education recognizes individuals or groups who have had a significant, sustained impact on genetics education at any level, from kindergarten through graduate school and beyond. The Novitski Prize recognizes an extraordinary level of creativity and intellectual ingenuity in solving significant problems in biological research through the application of genetic methods. We are pleased to announce the 2013 awards. PMID:23633133

  20. Thomas Eshelby (1769-1811), Nelson's Surgeon.

    PubMed

    Khan, S K; Saeed, I; Brinsden, M D

    2016-08-01

    Horatio Nelson is an icon of British naval history. His above-elbow amputation by Thomas Eshelby remains one of the most famous surgical procedures ever performed. Yet the surgeon himself remains relatively obscure and uncelebrated. We present a vignette of this young Yorkshireman and reflect on his life and times. Eshelby was a competent and conscientious surgeon and was certainly held in high regard by Nelson. Quite a few documents pertaining to his tour of duty in the Mediterranean and to his later appointment at Plymouth have been archived. These shed valuable light on his professional life, betraying his clinical acumen, his conscientious and pragmatic nature and his demeanour toward both his peers and his superiors. Eshelby was also the patriarch of an enterprising family including three generations of surgeons and others with eponymous discoveries in the fields of geography and science. PMID:24833537

  1. Foreword: Sir John Pendry FRS Sir John Pendry FRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglesfield, John; Echenique, Pedro

    2008-07-01

    John Pendry John Inglesfield and Pedro Echenique write: John Pendry's 65th birthday is on 4 July 2008, and this issue of the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter is dedicated to him, with articles by friends, colleagues, and former students. By any standards, John Pendry is a great scientist, who has made—and continues to make—an enormous contribution to physics; the wide range of his interests is reflected in the scope of these articles. Not many scientists can establish a completely new and unexpected area of research, but this has been John's achievement in the last few years in the field of metamaterials, materials whose electromagnetic properties depend on their structure rather than the materials of which the structure is built. In this way, structures with effectively negative electrical permittivity and negative magnetic permeability can be constructed, demonstrating negative refraction; through metamaterials scientists now have access to properties not found in nature, and never previously explored experimentally. Never a week goes by without a potential new application of metamaterials, whether it is perfect lensing, or the cloak of invisibility. This has certainly led to tremendous visibility for John himself, with guest lectures all over the world, and radio and television appearances. John Pendry's first paper was published exactly 40 years ago, 'Analytic properties of pseudopotentials' [1], and since then he has published 310 articles at the latest count. But this first paper already reflected something of the way John works. His PhD project, with Volker Heine at the Cavendish Laboratory, was to interpret the scattering of low energy electrons from surfaces, the technique of LEED which was to become the method of choice for determining surface structure. Although the energy of the electrons in LEED is relatively low—say 50 eV—it is much higher than the energy of the conduction electrons, for which pseudopotentials had been devised, and John

  2. Determinants of female dispersal in Thomas langurs.

    PubMed

    Sterck, E H

    1997-01-01

    Female dispersal occurs in a number of primate species. It may be related to: avoidance of inbreeding, reduction in food competition, reduction of predation risk, or avoidance of infanticide in combination with mate choice. Female dispersal was studied for a 5-year period in a wild population of Thomas langurs (Presbytis thomasi) that lived in one-male multi-female groups. Juvenile and adult individuals of both sexes were seen to disperse. Females appeared to transfer unhindered between groups, mostly from a larger group to a recently formed smaller one. They transferred without their infants and when not pregnant, and seemed to transfer preferentially during periods when extra-group males were harassing their group. During these inter-group encounters extra-group males seemed to try to commit infanticide. Thus, the timing of female transfer was probably closely linked to infanticide avoidance. Moreover, females seemed to transfer when the resident male of their group was no longer a good protector. The observations in the present study suggest that females transferred to reduce the risk of infanticide. Female dispersal may have another ultimate advantage as well, namely inbreeding avoidance. Due to the dispersal of both females and males the social organization of Thomas langurs was rather fluid. New groups were formed when females joined a male; male takeovers were not observed. Bisexual groups had only a limited life span, because all adult females of a bisexual group could emigrate. This pattern of unhindered female dispersal affects male reproductive strategies, and in particular it might lead to infanticidal behavior during inter-group encounters. PMID:9209584

  3. Q & A with Ed Tech Leaders: Interview with Curtis J. Bonk, Mimi Miyoung Lee, Thomas C. Reeves, & Thomas H. Reynolds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viner, Mark; Gardner, Ellen; Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Curtis J. Bonk, is Professor of Instructional Systems Technology at Indiana University and President of CourseShare. Mimi Miyoung Lee is Associate Professor in the Department of Curriculum and instruction at the University of Houston. Thomas C. Reeves is Professor Emeritus of Learning, Design, and Technology at the University of Georgia. Thomas H.…

  4. 78 FR 16780 - Special Local Regulation; 2013 International Rolex Regatta; St. Thomas Harbor; St. Thomas, U.S...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-19

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information The... Register (78 FR 7663). The Coast Guard received no public comments in the docket and no requests for public... Regatta; St. Thomas Harbor; St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION:...

  5. The Reverend John Michell: A Letter from his Great-grandson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, E.

    2006-12-01

    Very little is known about the life of John Michell (1724-1793), apart from his various published papers. The writer of a letter to the English Mechanic newspaper, under a nom de plume, claiming to be Michell's great-grandson, has now been identified as being written by Andrew Thomas Turton Peterson. Peterson reports that 'hearsay and family tradition' places Michell as the person who inspired William Herschel to take up astronomy, and who tutored him in making specula. Some of the claims made in the letter can be substantiated by independent documentation; others can be shown to be exaggeration or erroneous.

  6. John Wilson as Moral Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, John L.

    1977-01-01

    The work of John Wilson, now teaching at Oxford University, as moral educator is summarized and evaluated. His rationalist humanistic approach is based on a componential characterization of the morally educated person. The rationale and conceptual status of the components is discussed. His position is compared to that of Peter McPhail, R. S.…

  7. John Wilson on Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Terence H.; Halstead, J. Mark

    2000-01-01

    Describes the approach to moral education utilized by John Wilson focusing on his claims, arguments, and conclusions. Explores eight specific topics, such as his general perspective on moral education and the meaning and nature of moral. Reports on the areas of difficulty and criticism in relation to his approach. (CMK)

  8. The Johns Hopkins Hospital Network

    PubMed Central

    Tolchin, Stephen G.; Barta, Wendy; Harkness, Kenneth

    1985-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins Hospital has initiated an ambitious program to apply modern technologies to the development of a new, comprehensive clinical information system. One component of this system is a networking technology for supporting the integration of diverse and functionally distinct information systems. This paper discusses the selection of the networking technology implemented at JHH, issues and problems, networking concepts, protocols and reliability.

  9. John Milton: A Research Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Noate, Judith, Comp.

    This handout is a guide to library resources in the J. Murrey Atkins Library at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte, for sources of criticism for the study of 17th-century British author John Milton. The guide is intended to help readers find critical and biographical information on Milton. It explains important reference sources in the…

  10. Interview with John Taylor Gatto.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Ellen

    1994-01-01

    Introduces ex-teacher and author John Taylor Gatto's experiences and views on education, including contradictory patterns of family life and education in the United States, based on traditions of various immigrant groups; deleterious impacts of standardization and institutional usurpation of family functions; and conflict between the development…

  11. John Rawls and Affirmative Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the philosophy of John Rawls, asserting that although Rawls never wrote about affirmative action, his ideas are relevant to the issue. Rawls concentrated on "ideal theory," which he believed was the theory of what constituted a truly just society. He considered slavery and racial segregation paradigms of injustice. His ideal theory of…

  12. John Dewey, Gothic and Modern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminsky, James S.

    2010-01-01

    It is argued here that understanding John Dewey's thought as that of a prodigal liberal or a fellow traveller does not capture the complexity of his work. It is also important to recognise the portion of his work that is "historie morale." In the very best sense it is epic, encapsulating the hopes and dreams of a history of the American people in…

  13. John Eliot in Recent Scholarship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cogley, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the recent literature on John Eliot--seventeenth-century Massachusetts missionary, minister, and millenarian. Examines disagreements between Alden Vaughan's and Francis Jennings's interpretations of Eliot's missionary writings and Puritan-Indian relations. Discusses James Axtell's ethnohistorical interpretation of Eliot. Emphasizes the…

  14. The Art of John Biggers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2010-01-01

    In their 2005 exhibit of John Biggers' work, the New Orleans Museum of Art described it as being inspired by "African art and culture, the injustices of a segregated United States, the stoic women in his own family, and the heroes of everyday survival." In this article, the author describes how her students reinterpreted Biggers' work. (Contains 1…

  15. John Milton Oskison and Assimilation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larre, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    John Milton Oskison (1874-1947) was a Cherokee writer, journalist, and activist and the author of novels and biographies as well as numerous short stories, essays, and articles about a great variety of subjects. Oskison thought of himself as "an interpreter to the world, of the modern, progressive Indian." The kind of representation Oskison gave…

  16. Symposium: John Dewey: Patron Saint?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York University Education Quarterly, 1979

    1979-01-01

    James E. Wheeler, Mortimer Smith, Walter Feinberg, and Christiana M. Smith comment on the work of John Dewey and its relevance to modern educators. They respectively judge Dewey as significant and enduring, anti-intellectual, biased, and ambiguous. (Editor/SJL)

  17. John Couch Adams, the astronomer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, N.

    1989-03-01

    The planet Neptune was discovered more than 140 years ago. The circumstances of the discovery gave rise to great controversy, and very nearly led to an international incident between Britain and France, but this was only one of John Couch Adams' many contributions to astronomical science.

  18. John Milton's Rainbow: Sonnet XIX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scher, Amy

    John Milton presented a wide spectrum of materials and ideas illuminating the literary landscape like a rainbow which critics and authors have been discussing for centuries. One example of the multiple layers of meaning in Milton's poems is found in Sonnet XIX, which can be useful for both forensic discussion as well as for composition…

  19. John James Audubon & the Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Craig

    2012-01-01

    In the first half of the 1800s, John James Audubon roamed the wilds of America attempting to draw all the birds in their natural habitat. He published his life-sized paintings in a huge book entitled "Birds of America." Audubon developed a unique system of depicting the birds in natural poses, such as flying. After shooting the bird, he would wire…

  20. John N Bahcall (1934 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, Lars; Botner, Olga; Carlson, Per; Hulth, Per Olof; Ohlsson, Tommy

    2005-01-01

    John Norris Bahcall, passed away on August 17, 2005, in NewYork City, USA. He was born on December 30, 1934, in Shreveport, Louisiana, USA. He was Richard Black Professor of Astrophysics in the School of Natural Sciences at the Institute forAdvanced Study (IAS) in Princeton, New Jersey, USA and a recipient of the National Medal of Science. In addition, he was President of the American Astronomical Society, President-Elect of the American Physical Society, and a prominent leader of the astrophysics community. John had a long and prolific career in astronomy and astrophysics, spanning five decades and the publication of more than five hundred technical articles, books, and popular papers. John's most recognized scientific contribution was the novel proposal in 1964, together with Raymond Davis Jr, that scientific mysteries of our Sun `how it shines, how old it is, how hot it is' could be examined by measuring the number of neutrinos arriving on Earth from the Sun. Measuring the properties of these neutrinos tests both our understanding of how stars shine and our understanding of fundamental particle physics. However, in the 1960s and 1970s, the observations by Raymond Davis Jr showed a clear discrepancy between John's theoretical predictions, based on standard solar and particle physics models, and what was experimentally measured. This discrepancy, known as the `Solar Neutrino Problem', was examined by hundreds of physicists, chemists, and astronomers over the subsequent three decades. In the late 1990s through 2002, new large-scale neutrino experiments in Japan, Canada, Italy, and Russia culminated in the conclusion that the discrepancy between John's theoretical predictions and the experimental results required a modification of our understanding of particle physics: neutrinos must have a mass and `oscillate' among different particle states. In addition to neutrino astrophysics, John contributed to many areas of astrophysics including the study of dark matter in

  1. John Glenn: Chosen To Cross The Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    John Glenn in training. From film to tape transfer of the film 'Friendship 7 - John Glenn' Depicts the historical orbital flight of John Glenn aboard 'Friendship 7', launched on February 20, 1962. Footage of staff at tracking stations worldwide and at Goddard Space Flight Center. Launch from cape canaveral. Flight tracking, re-entry, landing and recovery of Friendship 7.

  2. Foreword: Sir John Pendry FRS Sir John Pendry FRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglesfield, John; Echenique, Pedro

    2008-07-01

    John Pendry John Inglesfield and Pedro Echenique write: John Pendry's 65th birthday is on 4 July 2008, and this issue of the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter is dedicated to him, with articles by friends, colleagues, and former students. By any standards, John Pendry is a great scientist, who has made—and continues to make—an enormous contribution to physics; the wide range of his interests is reflected in the scope of these articles. Not many scientists can establish a completely new and unexpected area of research, but this has been John's achievement in the last few years in the field of metamaterials, materials whose electromagnetic properties depend on their structure rather than the materials of which the structure is built. In this way, structures with effectively negative electrical permittivity and negative magnetic permeability can be constructed, demonstrating negative refraction; through metamaterials scientists now have access to properties not found in nature, and never previously explored experimentally. Never a week goes by without a potential new application of metamaterials, whether it is perfect lensing, or the cloak of invisibility. This has certainly led to tremendous visibility for John himself, with guest lectures all over the world, and radio and television appearances. John Pendry's first paper was published exactly 40 years ago, 'Analytic properties of pseudopotentials' [1], and since then he has published 310 articles at the latest count. But this first paper already reflected something of the way John works. His PhD project, with Volker Heine at the Cavendish Laboratory, was to interpret the scattering of low energy electrons from surfaces, the technique of LEED which was to become the method of choice for determining surface structure. Although the energy of the electrons in LEED is relatively low—say 50 eV—it is much higher than the energy of the conduction electrons, for which pseudopotentials had been devised, and John

  3. Welfare effects of reduced milk production associated with Johne's disease on Johne's-positive versus Johne's-negative dairy operations.

    PubMed

    Losinger, Willard C

    2006-08-01

    An examination of the economic impacts of reduced milk production associated with Johne's disease on Johne's-positive and Johne's-negative dairy operations indicated that, if Johne's disease had not existed in US dairy cows in 1996, then the economic surplus of Johne's-negative operations would have been $600 million+/-$530 million lower, while the economic surplus of Johne's-positive operations would have been higher by $28 million+/-$79 million, which was not significantly different from zero. The data available for projecting changes in surplus were not sufficiently precise to allow an exact statement on whether Johne's-positive operations would have been better or worse off economically, in terms of the value received for producing more milk if they had not been affected by Johne's disease. The changes in producer surplus, based upon eliminating specific epidemiological risk factors for Johne's disease, were disaggregated between Johne's-positive dairy operations exposed to the risk factor and all other US dairy operations. Eliminating the risk factor of having any cows not born on the operation would have had a significant positive effect on the economic surplus of Johne's-positive operations that had any cows not born on the operation. PMID:16827950

  4. Thomas Kuhn as a Historian of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brush, Stephen G.

    Thomas S. Kuhn (1922-1996) exerted a strong force on intellectual discourse in the last third of the 20th century, by the publication of a book only 200 pages long. Why did Kuhn's publications in his own primary field, history of science, have so little impact on that field? Was The Structure of Scientific Revolutions so successful in accelerating the trend toward social history of science that his own internalist work seemed outmoded? Kuhn wrote incisive articles on a wide range of topics including Robert Boyle and structural chemistry, energy conservation as an example of simultaneous discovery, the Cagnard engine, and the historiography of science, as well as a book on the Copernican Revolution; they are rarely cited by historians of science. His most important historical contribution in later years was in the history of quantum theory; he led a project to collect and preserve source materials, and published a monograph on the origin of the quantum hypothesis. Why does he receive almost no recognition for his remarkable work on the history of quantum physics? Does everyone still believe (in spite of Kuhn) that Planck introduced a physical quantum discontinuity in 1900?

  5. Professor Thomas Lehner: archetypal translational scientist.

    PubMed

    Challacombe, S J

    2013-05-01

    Professor Thomas Lehner is one of the most distinguished oral and dental researchers to have come out of the UK. Over the past 40 years, he has made an astonishing number of discoveries which have had an impact on our understanding of the pathogenesis of a variety of mucosal diseases. He has consistently practiced both basic and clinical research and built an integrated group of clinical and non-clinical researchers, which allowed him easy transition from the laboratory to the clinic. Tom Lehner was among the early scientists studying mucosal immunology, initially exploring oral diseases, with special emphasis on the immunobiology of Streptococcus mutans, leading to active and passive vaccination against dental caries. He was the first to demonstrate cellular immunity as the immunopathological basis of periodontal diseases, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, and candidiasis. Over the past 20 years, his expertise in mucosal immunobiology has been applied to the immunology of HIV/SIV infections. His seminal contributions include regional innate mucosal immunity, prevention of SIV infection in macaques by secretory IgA antibodies, up-regulation of CC chemokines, and the first demonstration of protective CCR5 antibodies. Arguably, his leadership, his students, and the establishment of immunology applied to oral mucosal diseases will be his greatest legacy. His contributions continue unabated. PMID:23481587

  6. The Nuclear Thomas-Fermi Model

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Myers, W. D.; Swiatecki, W. J.

    1994-08-01

    The statistical Thomas-Fermi model is applied to a comprehensive survey of macroscopic nuclear properties. The model uses a Seyler-Blanchard effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, generalized by the addition of one momentum-dependent and one density-dependent term. The adjustable parameters of the interaction were fitted to shell-corrected masses of 1654 nuclei, to the diffuseness of the nuclear surface and to the measured depths of the optical model potential. With these parameters nuclear sizes are well reproduced, and only relatively minor deviations between measured and calculated fission barriers of 36 nuclei are found. The model determines the principal bulk and surface properties of nuclear matter and provides estimates for the more subtle, Droplet Model, properties. The predicted energy vs density relation for neutron matter is in striking correspondence with the 1981 theoretical estimate of Friedman and Pandharipande. Other extreme situations to which the model is applied are a study of Sn isotopes from {sup 82}Sn to {sup 170}Sn, and the rupture into a bubble configuration of a nucleus (constrained to spherical symmetry) which takes place when Z{sup 2}/A exceeds about 100.

  7. Regeneration: Thomas Hunt Morgan's window into development.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Mary Evelyn

    2010-01-01

    Early in his career Thomas Hunt Morgan was interested in embryology and dedicated his research to studying organisms that could regenerate. Widely regarded as a regeneration expert, Morgan was invited to deliver a series of lectures on the topic that he developed into a book, Regeneration (1901). In addition to presenting experimental work that he had conducted and supervised, Morgan also synthesized and critiqued a great deal of work by his peers and predecessors. This essay probes into the history of regeneration studies by looking in depth at Regeneration and evaluating Morgan's contribution. Although famous for his work with fruit fly genetics, studying Regeneration illuminates Morgan's earlier scientific approach which emphasized the importance of studying a diversity of organisms. Surveying a broad range of regenerative phenomena allowed Morgan to institute a standard scientific terminology that continues to inform regeneration studies today. Most importantly, Morgan argued that regeneration was a fundamental aspect of the growth process and therefore should be accounted for within developmental theory. Establishing important similarities between regeneration and development allowed Morgan to make the case that regeneration could act as a model of development. The nature of the relationship between embryogenesis and regeneration remains an active area of research. PMID:20665231

  8. Thomas J. Ahrens (1936-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    2011-03-01

    Thomas J. Ahrens, a leader in the study of high-pressure shock wave and planetary impact phenomena, died at his home in Pasadena, Calif., on 24 November 2010 at the age of 74. He was the California Institute of Technology's Fletcher Jones Professor of Geophysics, emeritus since 2005 but professionally active to the end. He had been president of AGU's Tectonophysics section, editor of Journal of Geophysical Research, founding member of both the Mineral and Rock Physics and Study of the Earth's Deep Interior focus groups, and editor—more like key driving force—for AGU's Handbook of Physical Constants. Tom was a pioneer in experimental and numerical studies of the effects of projectiles hitting a target at velocities exceeding the speed of sound (hypervelocity impact), arguably the most important geophysical process in the formation, growth, and, in many cases, surface evolution of planets. As a professor at Caltech, he established the foremost university laboratory for shock wave experiments, where students and research associates from around the world pursued basic research in geophysics, planetary science, and other disciplines. Previously, high-pressure shock experiments were conducted primarily in national laboratories, where they were initially associated with the development of nuclear weapons.

  9. Evolution and Education: Lessons from Thomas Huxley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Sherrie Lynne

    2010-05-01

    Thomas Huxley more than anyone else was responsible for disseminating Darwin’s theory in the western world and maintained that investigating the history of life should be regarded as a purely scientific question free of theological speculation. The content and rhetorical strategy of Huxley’s defense of evolution is analyzed. Huxley argued that the classification of humans should be determined independent of any theories of origination of species. Besides providing evidence that demonstrated the close relationship between apes and humans, he also argued that a pithecoid ancestry in no way degraded humankind. In his broader defense of evolution he drew on his agnosticism to define what science could and could not explain. Theology made empirical claims and needed to be subject to the same standards of evidence as scientific claims. He maintained that even most scientific objections to evolution were religiously based. The objections to the theory fundamentally remain the same as in the nineteenth century and much can be learned from Huxley to develop effective strategies for educating the public about evolution. Huxley’s own scientific articles as well as his popular writings provide numerous examples that could be harnessed not only for the teaching of evolution, but also for understanding science as a process.

  10. EAARL topography: Thomas Stone National Historic Site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Patterson, Matt; Nayegandhi, Amar; Patterson, Judd

    2007-01-01

    This Web site contains Lidar-derived topography (first return and bare earth) maps and GIS files for Thomas Stone National Historic Site in Maryland. These Lidar-derived topography maps were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program, FISC St. Petersburg, the National Park Service (NPS) South Florida/Caribbean Network Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey coral reefs and barrier islands for the purposes of geomorphic change studies, habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, change detection, and event assessment. As part of this project, data from an innovative instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL) are being used. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in this realm for measuring subaerial and submarine topography wthin cross-environment surveys. High spectral resolution, water-column correction, and low costs were found to be key factors in providing accurate and affordable imagery to costal resource managers.

  11. John Glenn: Enters Friendship 7 to Prepare for Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    John glenn entering the capsule prior to the launch of Friendship 7 From: The John Glenn Story: Summary of astronaut John Glenn's flying career, from naval aviation training to space flight. The Mercury project is featured as John Glenn flies the Friendship 7 spacecraft. President John F. Kennedy presents the NASA Distinguished service Medal to Astronaut John Glenn.

  12. John Glenn: Post-Flight Recovery of Friendship 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Mini Biography of John Glenn, as it was up to 1962. From: The John Glenn Story: Summary of astronaut John Glenn's flying career, from naval aviation training to space flight. The Mercury project is featured as John Glenn flies the Friendship 7 spacecraft. President John F. Kennedy presents the NASA Distinguished service Medal to Astronaut John Glenn.

  13. John Glenn: Presented with NASA Distinguished Service Medal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    John Glenn tours with his family, meets JFK and is presented with the NASA distinguished Service Medal. From: The John Glenn Story: Summary of astronaut John Glenn's flying career, from naval aviation training to space flight. The Mercury project is featured as John Glenn flies the Friendship 7 spacecraft. President John F. Kennedy presents the NASA Distinguished service Medal to Astronaut John Glenn.

  14. 35. Photocopy of blueprint (original in HABS files) Thomas W. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Photocopy of blueprint (original in HABS files) Thomas W. Lamb, Architect July 15, 1926 GRAND FOYER INTERIOR DETAILS - B. F. Keith Memorial Theatre, 539 Washington Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  15. STS-79 Mission Specialist Thomas Akers in White Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-79 Mission Specialist Thomas D. Akers shares a light moment with white room closeout crew members Rick Welty (left) and Travis Thompson, before entering the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A.

  16. 2. Photocopy of circa 183839 engraving Thomas B. Ashton, Artist ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of circa 1838-39 engraving Thomas B. Ashton, Artist J. Sartain, Engraver SOUTH FRONT AND WEST SIDE CIRCA 1838 - West Chester Young Ladies Seminary, 300 Maple Avenue, West Chester, Chester County, PA

  17. 36. Photocopy of blueprint (original in HABS files) Thomas W. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. Photocopy of blueprint (original in HABS files) Thomas W. Lamb, Architect July 22, 1927 INTERIOR DETAILS OF AUDITORIUM - B. F. Keith Memorial Theatre, 539 Washington Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  18. Overall view, Chicken Coop and Windmill, looking northwest Thomas ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overall view, Chicken Coop and Windmill, looking northwest - Thomas Perry Homestead, East side of Mormon Row Road, approximately .6 miles south of Antelope Flats Road, bounded on the north by Ditch Creek, Kelly, Teton County, WY

  19. Overall view, looking southeast Thomas Perry Homestead, East side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overall view, looking southeast - Thomas Perry Homestead, East side of Mormon Row Road, approximately .6 miles south of Antelope Flats Road, bounded on the north by Ditch Creek, Kelly, Teton County, WY

  20. 13. Historic American Buildings Survey, Thomas T. Waterman, Photographer December ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic American Buildings Survey, Thomas T. Waterman, Photographer December 29, 1938 EAST TERMINAL SENTRY BOX IN FOREGROUND AND NORT DRY AND WALL LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Castillo de San Christobal, Boulevard Norzagaray, San Juan, San Juan Municipio, PR

  1. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey, Thomas T. Waterman, Photographer December ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey, Thomas T. Waterman, Photographer December 29, 1938 EAST TERMINAL SENTRY BOX AND DRY MOAT-VIEW LOOKING NORTH. - Castillo de San Christobal, Boulevard Norzagaray, San Juan, San Juan Municipio, PR

  2. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey, Thomas T. Waterman, Photographer December ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey, Thomas T. Waterman, Photographer December 29, 1938 EAST TERMINAL SENTRY BOX, VIEW LOOKING NORTH. - Castillo de San Christobal, Boulevard Norzagaray, San Juan, San Juan Municipio, PR

  3. "I Cannot Live Without Books": Thomas Jefferson, Bibliophile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladenson, Alex

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses Thomas Jefferson's preoccupation with collecting books and some of his other intellectual pursuits, including the classification scheme he developed for his personal library. The sale of his personal library to the federal government is briefly described. (JPF)

  4. Thomas Jefferson, the Community College and the Pursuit of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, George B.

    1980-01-01

    Demonstrates the strong philosophical ties between Thomas Jefferson's views on public education and the modern day community college. Reviews Jefferson's proposals for publicly financed education and for increased access to education and discusses the mission of the community college. (AYC)

  5. The letters of John Dastin.

    PubMed

    Thiesen, Wilfred

    2008-07-01

    John Dastin, a noted alchemist who lived ca. 1300, followed the lead of many of his contemporaries and predecessors in using letters to propagate his views on alchemy. This article identifies a number of letters that Dastin wrote, and includes one text addressed to a cardinal of the city of Naples. This letter is virtually a copy of a work by Arnold of Villanova. I believe that other works ascribed to Dastin will also show a great dependence on Arnold's works. PMID:19048973

  6. Charles Darwin and John Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, B.

    2009-11-01

    The influence of John Herschel on the philosophical thoughts of Charles Darwin, both through the former's book, Natural Philosophy, and through their meeting in 1836 at the Cape of Good Hope, is discussed. With Herschel having himself speculated on evolution just a few months before he met Darwin, it is probable that he stimulated at least the beginnings of the latter's lifelong work on the subject.

  7. John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nall, Marsha

    2004-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium is an inter-institutional research and technology development, beginning with ten projects in FY02 that are aimed at applying GRC expertise in fluid physics and sensor development with local biomedical expertise to mitigate the risks of space flight on the health, safety, and performance of astronauts. It is anticipated that several new technologies will be developed that are applicable to both medical needs in space and on earth.

  8. 1990 astronaut candidate Thomas prepares bedding during wilderness training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Under a camouflage tarp, Donald A. Thomas assembles small pieces of wood for bedding during a wilderness survival training course at Fairchild Air Force Base in the state of Washington. Thomas, one of 23 1990 Group 13 astronaut candidates, participated in the training near Spokane, Washington, 08-26-90 through 08-30-90. The survival exercise is part of a year's evaluation and training program.

  9. John von Neumann Birthday Centennial

    SciTech Connect

    Grcar, Joseph F.

    2004-11-12

    In celebration of John von Neumann's 100th birthday, a series of four lectures were presented on the evening of February 10, 2003 during the SIAM Conference on Computational Science and Engineering in San Diego. The venue was appropriate because von Neumann spent much of the later part of his life, in the 1950's, as an unofficial ambassador for computational science. He was then the only senior American scientist who had experience with the new computers (digital, electronic, and programmable) and a vision of their future importance. No doubt he would have relished the chance to attend a meeting such as this. The first speaker, William Aspray, described the ''interesting times'' during which computers were invented. His remarks were based on his history [1] of this period in von Neumann's life. We were honored to have John von Neumann's daughter, Marina von Neumann-Whitman, as our second speaker. Other accounts of von Neumann's life can be found in books by two of his colleagues [2] and [3]. Our third speaker, Peter Lax, provided both mathematical and international perspectives on John von Neumann's career. Finally, Pete Stewart spoke about von Neumann's numerical error analysis [4] in the context of later work; this talk did not lend itself to transcription, but readers may consult the historical notes in [5]. Our thanks to all the speakers for a remarkable evening. We are grateful to the DOE Applied Mathematical Sciences (AMS) program for partially supporting these lectures. Thanks are also due to SIAM and William Kolata, to our emcee, Gene Golub, to Paul Saylor for recording and editing, and to Barbara Lytle for the transcriptions. More about von Neumann's work can be learned from the recent American Mathematical Society proceedings [6].

  10. John Dalton (1766-1844).

    PubMed Central

    Emery, A E

    1988-01-01

    There is no doubt that John Dalton ranks among the great names in science, a position which rests on his enunciation of the Atomic Theory. However, his very first scientific paper in 1798 was concerned with his own affliction of colour blindness and was in fact the first clear description of the disorder. This publication stimulated much subsequent research into the pathophysiology and genetics of the condition. His recorded observations on colour blindness are detailed and precise and betoken the approach which was to characterise all his later research in chemistry. Images PMID:3294412

  11. John Bardeen: an extraordinary physicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoddeson, Lillian

    2008-04-01

    On the morning of 1 November 1956 the US physicist John Bardeen dropped the frying-pan of eggs that he was cooking for breakfast, scattering its contents on the kitchen floor. He had just heard that he had won the Nobel Prize for Physics along with William Shockley and Walter Brattain for their invention of the transistor. That evening Bardeen was startled again, this time by a parade of his colleagues from the University of Illinois marching to the door of his home bearing champagne and singing "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow".

  12. Obituary: Thomas Robert Metcalf, 1961-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leka, K. D.

    2007-12-01

    The astronomy community lost a good friend when Tom Metcalf was killed in a skiing accident on Saturday, 7 July 2007, in the mountains near Boulder, Colorado. Tom was widely known for prolific work on solar magnetic fields, hard-X-ray imaging of solar flares, and spectral line diagnostics. He was often characterized as "one of the nicest guys in science." Born October 5, 1961 in Cheverly, Maryland, to Fred and Marilyn, Thomas R. Metcalf joined his sister, Karen, two years his elder, in a close family that loved sailing, inquisitiveness, and the natural world. Sibling rivalry (usually a Tonka truck intruding on Barbie's sub-table "castle") melted when Tom and Karen collaborated on elaborately engineered room-sized blanket-forts. Tom confidently signed up at age of three to crew for his family's sailboat; when the family moved to California in 1966, as Tom's father took a Professor of Mathematics position at the University of California Riverside, Tom's love for sailing was well-established. Week-long cruises or short trips in the harbor were all fun; when school friends came aboard, it was even better--if "only slightly too crowded" from the adults' points of view. Tom's introduction to astronomy began one cold, very clear, December night in the early 1970s, on a family camping trip to Death Valley. The "Sidewalk Astronomers of San Francisco" had lined the sidewalk near the visitors' center with all sorts of telescopes for public viewing. Soon after, Tom and his boyhood friend Jim O'Linger were building their own scopes, attending "Amateur Telescope Makers" conferences, and Tom was setting up his scope on a sidewalk for public viewing. In 1986, Tom set up his telescope on the bluffs above Dana Point Harbor, and gave numerous strangers a stunning view of Halley's Comet. His interest in physics and mathematics became evident during Tom's last years in high school (Poly High in Riverside), and as a senior he qualified to take freshman Physics at the University of

  13. Museum security and the Thomas Crown Affair.

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, E. C.

    2010-01-01

    Over the years, I've daydreamed about stealing a Vermeer, a Picasso, or Rembrandt. It tickles me, as much as watching the reboot of The Thomas Crown Affair. Why is it, do you suppose, so much fun to think about stealing a world renowned piece off the wall of a major metropolitan museum? Is it the romantic thoughts of getting away with it, walking past infrared detectors, and pressure sensors ala Indiana Jones with the sack of sand to remove the idol without triggering the security system? Is it the idea of snatching items with such fantastic prices, where the romance of possessing an item of such value is less intoxicating than selling it to a private collector for it to never be seen again? I suspect others share my daydreams as they watch theater or hear of a brazen daylight heist at museums around the world, or from private collections. Though when reality sets in, the mind of the security professional kicks in. How could one do it, why would one do it, what should you do once it's done? The main issue a thief confronts when acquiring unique goods is how to process or fence them. They become very difficult to sell because they are one-of-a-kind, easy to identify, and could lead to the people involved with the theft. The whole issue of museum security takes up an ironic twist when one considers the secretive British street artist 'Banksy'. Banksy has made a name for himself by brazenly putting up interesting pieces of art in broad daylight (though many critics don't consider his work to be art) on building walls, rooftops, or even museums. I bring him up for a interesting take on what may become a trend in museum security. In March of 2005, Banksy snuck a piece of his called 'Vandalized Oil Painting' into the Brooklyn Museum's Great Historical Painting Wing, plus 3 other pieces into major museums in New York. Within several days, 2 paintings had been torn down, but 2 stayed up much longer. In his home country of the UK, a unauthorized piece he created and placed

  14. John Greenleaf's life of science.

    PubMed

    Watenpaugh, Donald E

    2012-12-01

    This article summarizes the life and career of John E. Greenleaf, PhD. It complements an interview of Dr. Greenleaf sponsored by the American Physiological Society Living History Project found on the American Physiological Society website. Dr. Greenleaf is a "thought leader" and internationally renowned physiologist, with extensive contributions in human systems-level environmental physiology. He avoided self-aggrandizement and believed that deeds rather than words define one's legacy. Viewed another way, however, Greenleaf's words define his deeds: 48% of his 185 articles are first author works, which is an unusually high proportion for a scientist of his stature. He found that writing a thorough and thoughtful discussion section often led to novel ideas that drove future research. Beyond Greenleaf's words are the many students, postdocs, and collaborators lucky enough to have worked with him and thus learn and carry on his ways of science. His core principles included the following: avoid research "fads," embrace diversity, be the first subject in your own research, adhere to rules of fiscal responsibility, and respect administrative forces-but never back down from them when you know you are right. Greenleaf's integrity ensured he was usually right. He thrived on the axiom of many successful scientists: avoid falling in love with hypotheses, so that when unexpected findings appear, they arouse curiosity instead of fear. Dr. Greenleaf's legacy will include the John and Carol Greenleaf Award for prolific environmental and exercise-related publication in the Journal of Applied Physiology. PMID:23209002

  15. John Bardeen and transistor physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Howard R.

    2001-01-01

    John Bardeen and Walter Brattain invented the point-contact semiconductor amplifier (transistor action) in polycrystalline germanium (also observed in polycrystalline silicon) on Dec. 15, 1947, for which they received a patent on Oct. 3, 1950. Bill Shockley was not a co-patent holder on Bardeen and Brattain's point-contact semiconductor amplifier patent since Julius Lilienfeld had already received a patent in 1930 for what would have been Shockley's contribution; namely, the field-effect methodology. Shockley received patents for both his minority-carrier injection concept and junction transistor theory, however, and deservedly shared the Nobel prize with Bardeen and Brattain for his seminal contributions of injection, p-n junction theory and junction transistor theory. We will review the events leading up to the invention of Bardeen and Brattain's point-contact semiconductor amplifier during the magic month of November 17-December 16, 1947 and the invention of Shockley's junction semiconductor amplifier during his magic month of December 24, 1947-January 23, 1948. It was during the course of Bardeen and Brattain's research in November, 1947 that Bardeen also patented the essence of the MOS transistor, wherein the induced minority carriers were confined to the inversion layer enroute to the collector. C. T. Sah has described this device as a sourceless MOS transistor. Indeed, John Bardeen, co-inventor of the point-contact semiconductor amplifier and inventor of the MOS transistor, may rightly be called the father of modern electronics.

  16. California: 'the Stem Cell State'. Interview with Jonathan Thomas.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jonathan

    2011-11-01

    We talked to Jonathan Thomas, newly elected Chairman of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), a few weeks into a role he describes as "the opportunity of the lifetime" to find out what he sees as the key goals for the CIRM and why patient advocates are so critical to the future of the Institute. Jonathan Thomas was elected as Chairman of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) in June 2011, succeeding the Founder and former Chairman, Bob Klein. Thomas has had a successful career in finance and law and is a Co-Founding Partner at Saybrook Capital, an investment banking and private equity firm. His commitment to patient advocacy and keen interest in biological sciences, developed as a Biology Major at Yale, led him to stand for Chairman. PMID:21999272

  17. Obituary: Thomas Julian Ahrens (1936-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanloz, Raymond; Asimow, Paul

    2011-12-01

    Thomas J. Ahrens, a leader in the use of shock waves to study planetary interiors and impact phenomena, died at his home in Pasadena, California on November 24, 2010, at the age of 74. He was the California Institute of Technology's Fletcher Jones Professor of Geophysics, formally emeritus since 2005 but professionally active to the end. Tom was a pioneer in experimental and numerical studies of the effects of hypervelocity impact, arguably the most important geophysical process in the formation, growth and - in many cases - surface evolution of planets. As a professor at Caltech, he established the foremost university laboratory for shock wave experiments, where students and research associates from around the world pursued basic research in geophysics, planetary science and other disciplines. Previously, high-pressure shock experiments were primarily conducted in national laboratories, where they were initially associated with development of nuclear weapons. The shock wave laboratory at Caltech was noted for key measurements addressing major questions in planetary geophysics. Equation-of-state studies on silicate melts showed that magma deep in Earth's mantle could be denser than the coexisting crystals, implying downward transport of melts (and associated heat) rather than the upward eruption of lavas observed in volcanic regions at Earth's surface. Shock-melting experiments on iron at pressures of Earth's core provide a crucial constraint on the temperature at the center of our planet. And studies of hydrous, carbonate and sulphate minerals under shock compression document how climate-altering molecules can be released by major impacts, such as the K/T event associated with the most recent mass extinction of biota in Earth history. In addition, Tom was a leader in numerical simulation of cratering, bringing the most recent laboratory measurements into the modeling of planetary impacts. Tom's training was in geophysics and applied experimental physics, as

  18. Pink topaz from the Thomas Range, Juab County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foord, E.E.; Chirnside, W.; Lichte, F.E.; Briggs, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    The Thomas Range is world-famous for its production of topaz Al2SiO4(F,OH)2, occurring in lithophysal cavities in rhyolite. Topaz Valley, at the southern end of the range, is perhaps the single most famous locality. While fine-quality, sherry-orange crystals to 5 cm or more in length occur at various localities, pale to medium pink crystals were first reported from the Thomas Range in 1934. The cause of the unusual coloration, unknown for 60 years, is now believed to be substitution of Mn3+ ?? Fe3+ for Al3+. -Authors

  19. 75 FR 49497 - John Bonnes: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration John Bonnes: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug... the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) debarring John Bonnes for a period of 5 years from... the act, under authority delegated to the Director (Staff Manual Guide 1410.35), finds that Mr....

  20. A to Z with Jasper Johns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirker, Sara Schmickle

    2008-01-01

    One contemporary artist that kindergarten students can easily relate to is Jasper Johns. In this article, the author discusses how she introduced John's numeric and alphabetic paintings to her kindergarten students. The young artists were amazed that art can be created from the familiar symbols that they are learning to make in their regular…

  1. John Herschel and astronomy: a bicentennial appraisal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskin, M. A.

    An assessment is given of John Herschel's overall contributions to nineteenth century astronomy. John Herschel built on his pioneering father William Herschel's foundations, with revisions and extensions to the southern hemisphere. His work, incorporated into his general treatises on astronomy, had a major influence on the direction of astronomical progress.

  2. John Herschel: Britain's first modern physical scientist.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, M. J.

    The author presents a sketch of the life and contributions to science of Sir John F. W. Herschel (1792 - 1871). One of the theses he develops is that John Herschel can meaningfully be described as Britain's first modern physical scientist. In addition to developing this thesis, the author makes some remarks about lesser known aspects of Herschel's life.

  3. Symposium on John Dewey's "Art as Experience."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Joe R.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Reports on a symposium about John Dewey's philosophy of art. John Fisher, Richard Shusterman, and Joe R. Burnett state their views on Dewey's contributions to art theory and aesthetics citing Dewey's work, "Art As Experience." The consensus was that although Dewey's opinions are dated, his pragmatist's views offer the opportunity for further study…

  4. Solving: The Case of John, Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drell, Martin J.; Josephson, Allan; Pleak, Richard; Riggs, Paula; Rosenfeld, Alvin

    2006-01-01

    In this article, one of the authors was called to see an 18-year old boy named John, who had done poorly during his first year at college and was depressed. His parents feared that their son may be suicidal, a concern heightened by the recent news that one of their son's friends had committed suicide. Here, he interviews John about his…

  5. John Henry--The Steel Driving Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, David E.; Gulley, Laura L.

    2005-01-01

    The story of John Henry provided the setting for sixth-grade class to participate in a John Henry Day of mathematics experiments. The students collected data from experiments where students competed against machines and technology. The student analyzed the data by comparing two box plots, a box plot of human data, and a box plot of machine or…

  6. John Kotter on Leadership, Management and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bencivenga, Jim

    2002-01-01

    Excerpts from interview with John Kotter, Konosuke Matsushita Professor of Leadership at the Harvard Business School, about his thoughts on the role of the superintendent as leader and manager. Describes his recent book "John P. Kotter on What Leaders Really Do," 1999. Lists eight-step change process from his book "Leading Change," 1996. (PKP)

  7. Struggle for the Soul: John Lawrence Childs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallones, Jared

    2010-01-01

    John Lawrence Childs was born in Eau Claire, Wisconsin on January 11, 1889, the second child of John Nelson Childs and Helen Janette (Nettie) Smith. In childhood Childs absorbed the values of industry, democracy, and a traditional, but socially conscious, religion. Childs was a Methodist and an intensely private person not given to talking about…

  8. John H. Reynolds (1923-2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Grenville

    John Reynolds, AGU Fellow since 1968 and a member of the Volcanology Geochemistry and Petrology section since 1961, died unexpectedly on November 4, 2000. John was a professor emeritus of physics at the University of California, Berkeley and a pioneer in the development and application of noble gas mass spectrometry He was recovering from pneumonia when he suffered a pulmonary embolism.

  9. Changing Concepts of Equal Educational Opportunity: A Comparison of the Views of Thomas Jefferson, Horace Mann and John Dewey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brick, Blanche

    2005-01-01

    Current educational policies regarding equal educational opportunity are confused and often contradictory. There is no clear consensus as to what constitutes an equal opportunity. Most modern educators agree that the modern equal educational movement began in the 1950's with the Supreme Court decision in "Brown vs. the Board of Education," 1954…

  10. Gender differences in flashbulb memories elicited by the Clarence Thomas hearings.

    PubMed

    Morse, C K; Woodward, E M; Zweigenhaft, R L

    1993-08-01

    American students and other adults aged 19-75 completed a questionnaire about flashbulb memories and recollections of autobiographical events elicited by the Senate hearings for confirmation of Clarence Thomas as a Supreme Court Justice. The respondents were less likely to recall vivid image memories than were respondents in earlier studies about memories of the assassinations of John Kennedy, Robert Kennedy, and Martin Luther King. Women were significantly more likely than men to report vivid image memories and recall of autobiographical events elicited by the hearings, but they did not differ significantly from men in the ratings of these memories. Women were also significantly more likely than men to report specific memories of having been victims of sexual harassment and abuse. Women recalled reconsidering incidents in which they might have been victims of sexual harassment more often than men did. Exposure to media coverage did not differ by gender, although the amount of coverage paid attention to did correlate with the number of personal memories elicited. PMID:8231123

  11. John Bahcall and the Solar Neutrino Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcall, Neta

    2016-03-01

    ``I feel like dancing'', cheered John Bahcall upon hearing the exciting news from the SNO experiment in 2001. The results confirmed, with remarkable accuracy, John's 40-year effort to predict the rate of neutrinos from the Sun based on sophisticated Solar models. What began in 1962 by John Bahcall and Ray Davis as a pioneering project to test and confirm how the Sun shines, quickly turned into a four-decade-long mystery of the `Solar Neutrino Problem': John's models predicted a higher rate of neutrinos than detected by Davis and follow-up experiments. Was the theory of the Sun wrong? Were John's calculations in error? Were the neutrino experiments wrong? John worked tirelessly to understand the physics behind the Solar Neutrino Problem; he led the efforts to greatly increase the accurately of the solar model, to understand its seismology and neutrino fluxes, to use the neutrino fluxes as a test for new physics, and to advocate for important new experiments. It slowly became clear that none of the then discussed possibilities --- error in the Solar model or neutrino experiments --- was the culprit. The SNO results revealed that John's calculations, and hence the theory of the Solar model, have been correct all along. Comparison of the data with John's theory demanded new physics --- neutrino oscillations. The Solar Neutrino saga is one of the most amazing scientific stories of the century: exploring a simple question of `How the Sun Shines?' led to the discovery of new physics. John's theoretical calculations are an integral part of this journey; they provide the foundation for the Solar Neutrino Problem, for confirming how the Sun shines, and for the need of neutrino oscillations. His tenacious persistence, dedication, enthusiasm and love for the project, and his leadership and advocacy of neutrino physics over many decades are a remarkable story of scientific triumph. I know John is smiling today.

  12. Photocopy of photograph (from Mrs. Martin, grandniece of John French, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (from Mrs. Martin, grandniece of John French, Clinton, Missouri) Circa 1900, photographer unknown JOHN AND ALMIRA FRENCH IN FRONT OF WEST AND SOUTH FACADES - John French Farm, South Grand River, Deepwater, Henry County, MO

  13. Public health assessment for Tutu Wellfield, St. Thomas, St. Thomas County, Virgin Islands. Cerclis No. VID982272569. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-14

    The Tutu Wellfield National Priorities List (NPL) site is in east-central St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Island. Twenty-two wells in the Turpentine Run Basin contain at minimum a trace of volatile organic contaminants. Volatile and chlorinated hydrocarbons including benzene; toluene; 1,2-trans-dichloroethene (DCE); trichloroethene (TCE); and tetrachloroethene (PCE) were detected in several of the wells. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has concluded that the Tutu Wellfield National Priorities List (NPL) site, St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, poses a public health hazard for past, present, and possible future ingestion of contaminated groundwater.

  14. Obituary: Thomas Robert Metcalf, 1961-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leka, K. D.

    2007-12-01

    The astronomy community lost a good friend when Tom Metcalf was killed in a skiing accident on Saturday, 7 July 2007, in the mountains near Boulder, Colorado. Tom was widely known for prolific work on solar magnetic fields, hard-X-ray imaging of solar flares, and spectral line diagnostics. He was often characterized as "one of the nicest guys in science." Born October 5, 1961 in Cheverly, Maryland, to Fred and Marilyn, Thomas R. Metcalf joined his sister, Karen, two years his elder, in a close family that loved sailing, inquisitiveness, and the natural world. Sibling rivalry (usually a Tonka truck intruding on Barbie's sub-table "castle") melted when Tom and Karen collaborated on elaborately engineered room-sized blanket-forts. Tom confidently signed up at age of three to crew for his family's sailboat; when the family moved to California in 1966, as Tom's father took a Professor of Mathematics position at the University of California Riverside, Tom's love for sailing was well-established. Week-long cruises or short trips in the harbor were all fun; when school friends came aboard, it was even better--if "only slightly too crowded" from the adults' points of view. Tom's introduction to astronomy began one cold, very clear, December night in the early 1970s, on a family camping trip to Death Valley. The "Sidewalk Astronomers of San Francisco" had lined the sidewalk near the visitors' center with all sorts of telescopes for public viewing. Soon after, Tom and his boyhood friend Jim O'Linger were building their own scopes, attending "Amateur Telescope Makers" conferences, and Tom was setting up his scope on a sidewalk for public viewing. In 1986, Tom set up his telescope on the bluffs above Dana Point Harbor, and gave numerous strangers a stunning view of Halley's Comet. His interest in physics and mathematics became evident during Tom's last years in high school (Poly High in Riverside), and as a senior he qualified to take freshman Physics at the University of

  15. Obituary: Thomas Julian Ahrens (1936-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanloz, Raymond; Asimow, Paul

    2011-12-01

    Thomas J. Ahrens, a leader in the use of shock waves to study planetary interiors and impact phenomena, died at his home in Pasadena, California on November 24, 2010, at the age of 74. He was the California Institute of Technology's Fletcher Jones Professor of Geophysics, formally emeritus since 2005 but professionally active to the end. Tom was a pioneer in experimental and numerical studies of the effects of hypervelocity impact, arguably the most important geophysical process in the formation, growth and - in many cases - surface evolution of planets. As a professor at Caltech, he established the foremost university laboratory for shock wave experiments, where students and research associates from around the world pursued basic research in geophysics, planetary science and other disciplines. Previously, high-pressure shock experiments were primarily conducted in national laboratories, where they were initially associated with development of nuclear weapons. The shock wave laboratory at Caltech was noted for key measurements addressing major questions in planetary geophysics. Equation-of-state studies on silicate melts showed that magma deep in Earth's mantle could be denser than the coexisting crystals, implying downward transport of melts (and associated heat) rather than the upward eruption of lavas observed in volcanic regions at Earth's surface. Shock-melting experiments on iron at pressures of Earth's core provide a crucial constraint on the temperature at the center of our planet. And studies of hydrous, carbonate and sulphate minerals under shock compression document how climate-altering molecules can be released by major impacts, such as the K/T event associated with the most recent mass extinction of biota in Earth history. In addition, Tom was a leader in numerical simulation of cratering, bringing the most recent laboratory measurements into the modeling of planetary impacts. Tom's training was in geophysics and applied experimental physics, as

  16. Obituary: Thomas Gold, 1920-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermott, Stanley F.

    2004-12-01

    Thomas "Tommy" Gold died of heart disease at Cayuga Medical Center, Ithaca NY on 22 June 2004 at the age of 84. He will be remembered as one of the most interesting, dynamic and influential scientists of his generation. Tommy's paradigm-changing ideas in astronomy and planetary science, while original and bold, were also highly controversial. With his radical work on the origin of natural gas and petroleum, the controversy is likely to continue. Tommy was born in Vienna, Austria on 22 May 1920, moving with his family to Berlin at age 10 and then, after the rise of Hitler in 1933, to England. His parents were Josephine (nee Martin) and Maximillian Gold, a successful steel magnate. Tommy was educated at Zuoz College in Switzerland where he became an expert skier and developed an athletic prowess that he maintained throughout his life, winning a NASTAR gold medal for skiing at the age of 65. He studied Mechanical Sciences at Trinity College, Cambridge, but much to his disgust his education was interrupted because of internment by the British as a suspected enemy alien. That unfortunate period (I remember him saying to me "Can you believe the stupidity, interring people like me who had fled from Nazi Germany?") had one good outcome: on his first night in camp he met Hermann Bondi who had an important influence on his early development as a scientist. They were both born in Vienna, their parents knew each other, and they were fellow students at Trinity, but this was their first meeting. On release, he went immediately into top-secret radar research for the British Admiralty, working as a team with Bondi and Fred Hoyle in a farm cottage in Dunsfold, Surrey. Tommy's first published research, which was a Nature paper with R.J. Pumphrey in 1947, was not in astronomy but physiology. He applied his engineer's understanding of positive feedback to develop and test a resonance model for how the human ear determines pitch. His conclusion that pitch discrimination occurs

  17. 75 FR 78335 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Thomas Lawrence: Regency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Thomas Lawrence: Regency Power and... ``Thomas Lawrence: Regency Power and Brilliance,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within...

  18. Thomas B. Greenfield: A Challenging Perspective of Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Organizations are not real; people are. Any science or theory of organizations must consider how the organization impinges, in a very real and tangible way, on the lives of its members. This article traces the development of one such theoretical branch of organizational science through the pioneering work of Thomas B. Greenfield. The author uses…

  19. Thomas Munro vs. the All American Blue Dishwasher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worth, Sarah E.

    2002-01-01

    Thomas Munro was one of the foremost enthusiasts of twentieth-century American philosophy for a new way of looking at how we study the arts and for defining the role of aesthetics in American education. He wrote prolifically on how aesthetics should be taught, the role of scientific aesthetics, and the interrelations of individual arts and how…

  20. Thomas B. Fordham Foundation Sponsorship Accountability Report, 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Foundation, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Thomas B. Fordham Foundation believes that all children deserve a high-quality K-12 education at the school of their choice. Nationally and in its home state of Ohio, the Foundation strives to close America's vexing achievement gaps by raising standards, strengthening accountability, and expanding education options for students and families.…

  1. Thomas Henry Huxley's developmental view of the cell.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Marsha L

    2002-01-01

    In 1853, the British physiologist Thomas Henry Huxley roundly criticized German cell theory. Historians have had difficulty explaining how such a 'progressive' biologist could have rejected cellular autonomy and the central role of the nucleus in cell life. The key to Huxley's thinking is provided by understanding his 'epigenetic' philosophy of biology. PMID:11823799

  2. A new perceived reality: Thomas Harriot's Moon maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Allan

    2009-02-01

    This article examines the world of the 17th-century mathematician Thomas Harriot, who first drew what he saw when he looked through a telescope, and, in doing so, changed the perception of the world in ways that reached far beyond astronomy.

  3. The Sovereign as Educator: Thomas Hobbes's National Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry, Geraint

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on Thomas Hobbes, an English political philosopher who argued that the solution to civil disorders lay in a sovereign authority backed with force. Argues that education should be seen at the center of Hobbes's project of rescuing society from the disorders threatening civilization throughout 17th-century Europe. (CMK)

  4. Oscillations and Analogies: Thomas Young, MD, FRS, Genius.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martindale, Colin

    2001-01-01

    Thomas Young was a renowned genius in his time who did important work in many scientific disciplines. In today's specialized environment, scientists in each discipline do not appreciate his work. Despite his current obscurity, Young exemplifies traits found in a first-order genius (analogical thinking, high intelligence, hard work, wide interests,…

  5. The Basic Concepts in Thomas Pynchon's "Gravity's Rainbow".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jokhadze, Lali

    This paper uses passages from Thomas Pynchon's novel, "Gravity's Rainbow," to examine basic concepts, explaining that the process of identifying the basic word-concepts in literary texts is to some extent a tension between anticipation and unexpected frustration. The paper focuses on an interpretation of the basic concept "paranoia" from Pynchon's…

  6. The Fallacies of Flatness: Thomas Friedman's "The World Is Flat"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abowitz, Kathleen Knight; Roberts, Jay

    2007-01-01

    Thomas Friedman's best-selling "The World is Flat" has exerted much influence in the west by providing both an accessible analysis of globalization and its economic and social effects, and a powerful cultural metaphor for globalization. In this review, we more closely examine Friedman's notion of the social contract, the moral center of his…

  7. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Gift of Thomas C. Vint, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Gift of Thomas C. Vint, Chief of Design and Construction, National Park Service, Washington, D.C., view of 1892, photocopied 1960, LAYING THE CAP STONE OF THE TEMPLE. - Salt Lake Temple, Temple Square, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  8. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Gift of Thomas C. Vint, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey, Gift of Thomas C. Vint, Chief of Design and Construction, National Park Service, Washington, D.C., view of 1892, photocopied 1960, CAP STONE OF THE TEMPLE TAKEN A FEW SECONDS BEFORE THE STONE DROPPED INTO POSITION. - Salt Lake Temple, Temple Square, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  9. Matrix models and stochastic growth in Donaldson-Thomas theory

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, Richard J.; Tierz, Miguel

    2012-10-15

    We show that the partition functions which enumerate Donaldson-Thomas invariants of local toric Calabi-Yau threefolds without compact divisors can be expressed in terms of specializations of the Schur measure. We also discuss the relevance of the Hall-Littlewood and Jack measures in the context of BPS state counting and study the partition functions at arbitrary points of the Kaehler moduli space. This rewriting in terms of symmetric functions leads to a unitary one-matrix model representation for Donaldson-Thomas theory. We describe explicitly how this result is related to the unitary matrix model description of Chern-Simons gauge theory. This representation is used to show that the generating functions for Donaldson-Thomas invariants are related to tau-functions of the integrable Toda and Toeplitz lattice hierarchies. The matrix model also leads to an interpretation of Donaldson-Thomas theory in terms of non-intersecting paths in the lock-step model of vicious walkers. We further show that these generating functions can be interpreted as normalization constants of a corner growth/last-passage stochastic model.

  10. Wigner-Thomas spin precession in polarized coincidence electronuclear scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitrasinovic, V. )

    1993-05-01

    The role of the Wigner-Thomas precession in nucleon recoil polarization measurements in coincidence electron scattering processes is examined. The necessary formalism is developed within the framework of the Jacob-Wick method, and then applied to two processes: the pseudoscalar electroproduction off a nucleon and the deuteron two-body electrodisintegration.

  11. Cosmonaut Aleksey Leonov displays drawing of Astronaut Thomas Stafford

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Cosmonaut Aleksey A. Leonov, commander of the Soviet ASTP crew, displays a drawing of Astronaut Thomas P. Stafford during the joint U.S.-U.S.S.R. Apollo-Soyuz Test Project docking in Earth orbit mission. He is in the Soyuz Orbital module. This picture was taken by an American ASTP crewmen with a 35mm camera.

  12. WEST FRONT; STATUE ON STEPS IS THOMAS JEFFERSON (PLACED THERE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WEST FRONT; STATUE ON STEPS IS THOMAS JEFFERSON (PLACED THERE IN 1927); FLANKING BRONZE STATUES DEPICT "THE GREAT RIVERS," THE MISSOURI AND THE MISSISSIPPI; FIGURE OF CERES, GODDESS OF GRAIN TOPS DOME (PLACED THERE IN SEPTEMBER, 1916) - Missouri State Capitol, High Street between Broadway & Jefferson Streets, Jefferson City, Cole County, MO

  13. 1. WEST FRONT; STATUE ON STEPS IS THOMAS JEFFERSON (PLACED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. WEST FRONT; STATUE ON STEPS IS THOMAS JEFFERSON (PLACED THERE IN 1927); FLANKING BRONZE STATUES DEPICT 'THE GREAT RIVERS,' THE MISSOURI AND THE MISSISSIPPI; FIGURE OF CERES, GODDESS OF GRAIN TOPS DOME (PLACED THERE IN SEPTEMBER, 1916) - Missouri State Capitol, High Street between Broadway & Jefferson Streets, Jefferson City, Cole County, MO

  14. Thomas Hopley and Mid-Victorian Attitudes to Corporal Punishment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Jacob

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the trial of Thomas Hopley, accused of killing his pupil Reginald Cancellor in 1860 during an act of corporal punishment. The case provoked immediate sensational interest and became an important defining point in how corporal punishment is treated in British law. Established by this trial was the test that any corporal…

  15. Thomas Jefferson: A Teacher's Guide and Video Segment Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterman, Leah, Ed.; Logan, Claudia

    This teacher's guide accompanies the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) two-part videotape documentary that uses portraits and paintings, original architectural drawings and excerpts from Thomas Jefferson's journals, letters, scientific papers, and political writings to tell the story of this remarkable yet contradictory man. The guide introduces…

  16. Thomas Paine: An Englishman Who Became an American Patriot.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlon, Thomas M.

    The life of Thomas Paine had been one of constant failure and misfortune until he arrived in Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) where he rose to fame as the politically astute author of "Common Sense." Published in January 1776, "Common Sense" called for the colonies' independence from England and was written in the simple, unrestrained, and frank…

  17. The Invention Factory: Thomas Edison's Laboratories. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolger, Benjamin

    This lesson explores the group of buildings in West Orange, New Jersey, built in 1887, that formed the core of Thomas Edison's research and development complex. They consisted of chemistry, physics, and metallurgy laboratories; machine shop; pattern shop; research library; and rooms for experiments. The lesson explains that the prototypes (ideas…

  18. Counseling Implications of Genetic Research: A Dialogue with Thomas Bouchard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skovholt, Thomas M.

    1990-01-01

    Presents interview with Thomas Bouchard, a leading researcher of identical twins reared apart. Describes major themes in the Minnesota twin research. Claims, although genetic influence is central, Bouchard pleas for the impact of environmental factors in optimal human development. Includes Bouchard's surprising experiences, current focus, and…

  19. The World of Thomas Jefferson: A Guide for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valand, Elisabeth, Ed.

    This teaching guide contains two essays about Thomas Jefferson, along with teaching activities, resources and organizations, a chronology, and quotes. The two essays are: (1) "The Architect of Democracy" (Merrill D. Peterson); and (2) "Jefferson's Legacy: Civic Learning in Public Education" (R. Freeman Butts). Teaching activities center around the…

  20. Thomas Jefferson and Slaves: Teaching an American Paradox. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehn, Bruce

    2000-01-01

    Provides 11 primary sources that enable students to contemplate how Thomas Jefferson and his slaves produced a culture and community at Monticello (Virginia) and his other plantations. Focuses on Jefferson's relationship with his slaves, particularly addressing Sally Hemming's relationship with Jefferson, in order to study the complicated history…

  1. Thomas Jefferson: The Architect of Democracy. Classroom Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Merrill D.

    1994-01-01

    Presents a biographical sketch and teaching activities on the life of Thomas Jefferson. Asserts that the world's political geography changed dramatically during his lifetime and presents a classroom lesson on this topic. Includes a chronology of Jefferson's life and six quotations exemplifying his political and social views. (CFR)

  2. 19. VIEW OF EAST ELEVATION. THOMAS G. WILSON ADDED THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW OF EAST ELEVATION. THOMAS G. WILSON ADDED THE ONE-STORY RETAIL STORE IN 1958. IT REPLACED A SMALLER ONE-STORY OFFICE IN THE SAME LOCATION. Photographer: Louise Taft Cawood, July 1986 - Alexander's Grist Mill, Lock 37 on Ohio & Erie Canal, South of Cleveland, Valley View, Cuyahoga County, OH

  3. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July 9, 1952 SOUTHWEST PERSPECTIVE. - St. John's Episcopal Mission, Chapel & Rectory, Fort Bennett Vicinity, Green Grass, Dewey County, SD

  4. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July 9, 1952 SOUTHEAST PERSPECTIVE. - St. John's Episcopal Mission, Chapel & Rectory, Fort Bennett Vicinity, Green Grass, Dewey County, SD

  5. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey, John A. Bryan, Photographer July 9, 1952 CHAPEL INTERIOR. - St. John's Episcopal Mission, Chapel & Rectory, Fort Bennett Vicinity, Green Grass, Dewey County, SD

  6. Generalized charge-screening in relativistic Thomas-Fermi model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we study the charge shielding within the relativistic Thomas-Fermi model for a wide range of electron number-densities and the atomic-number of screened ions. A generalized energy-density relation is obtained using the force-balance equation and taking into account the Chandrasekhar's relativistic electron degeneracy pressure. By numerically solving a second-order nonlinear differential equation, the Thomas-Fermi screening length is investigated, and the results are compared for three distinct regimes of the solid-density, warm-dense-matter, and white-dwarfs (WDs). It is revealed that our nonlinear screening theory is compatible with the exponentially decaying Thomas-Fermi-type shielding predicted by the linear response theory. Moreover, the variation of relative Thomas-Fermi screening length shows that extremely dense quantum electron fluids are relatively poor charge shielders. Calculation of the total number of screening electrons around a nucleus shows that there is a position of maximum number of screening localized electrons around the screened nucleus, which moves closer to the point-like nucleus by increase in the plasma number density but is unaffected due to increase in the atomic-number value. It is discovered that the total number of screening electrons, ( N s ∝ r T F 3 / r d 3 where rTF and rd are the Thomas-Fermi and interparticle distance, respectively) has a distinct limit for extremely dense plasmas such as WD-cores and neutron star crusts, which is unique for all given values of the atomic-number. This is equal to saying that in an ultrarelativistic degeneracy limit of electron-ion plasma, the screening length couples with the system dimensionality and the plasma becomes spherically self-similar. Current analysis can provide useful information on the effects of relativistic correction to the charge screening for a wide range of plasma density, such as the inertial-confined plasmas and compact stellar objects.

  7. 78 FR 22778 - Safety Zone; Corp. Event Finale UHC, St. Thomas Harbor; St. Thomas, U.S.V.I.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-17

    ... INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... (NPRM) on March 14, 2013, in the Federal Register (78 FR 16211). The Coast Guard received no public... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Corp. Event Finale UHC, St. Thomas...

  8. 78 FR 7663 - SLR; 2013 International Rolex Regatta; St. Thomas Harbor; St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Public Participation and Request for... regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 SLR; 2013 International Rolex Regatta; St. Thomas...

  9. 78 FR 16211 - Safety Zone, Corp. Event Finale UHC, St. Thomas Harbor; St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ...) 366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal... regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). B. Basis... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Corp. Event Finale UHC, St. Thomas...

  10. 78 FR 16208 - Safety Zone; V. I. Carnival Finale; St. Thomas Harbor; St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ... Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register ] NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Public... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). B. Basis and Purpose The legal basis for the rule is the Coast Guard's... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; V. I. Carnival Finale; St. Thomas...

  11. 78 FR 23489 - Safety Zone; V.I. Carnival Finale, St. Thomas Harbor; St. Thomas, U.S.V.I.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information The... (78 FR 16208). The Coast Guard received no public comments in the docket and no requests for public... proposed. This safety zone encompasses waters in St. Thomas Harbor. The zone will be enforced from 5...

  12. John Keats: poet, patient, physician.

    PubMed

    Smith, H

    1984-01-01

    John Keats, son of an ostler , was born in London in 1795. Despite an early interest in literature he was, surprisingly, apprenticed to an apothecary and continued his medical training at Guy's Hospital, obtaining the Licentiate of the Society of Apothecaries in 1816. He never practiced medicine. His early poems were not well received, and for the young poet with very slender means, life was difficult. Tragedy was added to difficulty when tuberculosis, which had already caused the death of his mother and uncle, became apparent in his brother Tom, whom Keats nursed through his illness when the brothers were living together in Hampstead . Subsequently Keats developed the disease, but despite its rapid progress, he managed in a single year - 1819 - to produce some of the finest lyrical poetry in the language. He went to Italy in the hope of obtaining a cure but died in Rome in 1821, aged 25. Medicine certainly contributed to the man, but also something to the poet, Keats; his training and his family and personal experience of tuberculosis speak for themselves. More subtly , his medical experience influenced in some degree his ideas and even his choice of words. The interrelations of poet-patient and trainee-physician are examined in this essay. PMID:6377444

  13. Corporate Perspective: An Interview with John Sculley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temares, M. Lewis

    1989-01-01

    John Sculley, the chairman of the board of Apple Computer, Inc., discusses information technology management, management strategies, network management, the Chief Information Officer, strategic planning, back-to-the-future planning, business and university joint ventures, and security issues. (MLW)

  14. Obituary: John Louis Perdrix (1926-2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, W.

    2005-12-01

    On 27 June 2005 the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage lost its founder and Australia lost one of its leading historians of astronomy when John Louis Perdrix died in Dubai after a brief battle with cancer.

  15. John Dewey--Philosopher and Educational Reformer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talebi, Kandan

    2015-01-01

    John Dewey was an American philosopher and educator, founder of the philosophical movement known as pragmatism, a pioneer in functional psychology, and a leader of the progressive movement in education in the United States.

  16. Archival Footage: John Glenn's Mercury Flight

    NASA Video Gallery

    Archival films document John Glenn's historic Feb. 20, 1962 Mercury flight in his Friendship 7, in which he became the first American to orbit the Earth. Clips include boarding the capsule, splashd...

  17. John Peter Zenger, Battler for Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallerstein, Gerry

    1974-01-01

    Examines the freedom of the press precedent set by the John Peter Zenger case in 1743 and considers its application to such current events as the jailing of reporters for not disclosing news sources. (RB)

  18. John Twysden and John Palmer: 17th-century Northamptonshire astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    John Twysden (1607-1688) and John Palmer (1612-1679) were two astronomers in the circle of Samuel Foster (circa 1600-1652), the subject of a recent paper in this journal. John Twysden qualified in law and medicine and led a peripatetic life around England and Europe. John Palmer was Rector of Ecton, Northamptonshire and later Archdeacon of Northampton. The two astronomers catalogued observations made from Northamptonshire from the 1640s to the 1670s. In their later years Twysden and Palmer published works on a variety of topics, often astronomical. Palmer engaged in correspondence with Henry Oldenburg, the first secretary of the Royal Society, on topics in astronomy and mathematics.

  19. John F. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The John F. Kennedy Space Center, America's spaceport, is located along Florida's eastern shore on Cape Canaveral. Established as NASA's Launch Operations Center on July 1, 1962, the center has been the site of launching all U.S. human space flight missions, from the early days of Project Mercury to the space shuttle and the next generation of vehicles. In addition, the center is home to NASA's Launch Services Program, which coordinates all expendable vehicle launches carrying a NASA payload.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 32.6 by 51.2 kilometers (20.2 by 32.2 miles) Location: 28.6 degrees North latitude, 80.6 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49

  20. Clinical Problem Solving: The Case of John, Part III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drell, Martin J.; Josephson, Allan; Pleak, Richard; Riggs, Paula; Rosenfeld, Alvin

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors share the case of John, a college freshman who had been struggling with depression. To work around John's case, the authors conducted an interview with John's parents. Based on the interview, it is found out that John's depression was largely caused by his relationship with his parents and the environment at their…

  1. Self-capacitance of a Thomas--Fermi nanosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Krcmar, Maja; Saslow, Wayne M.; Zangwill, Andrew

    2000-12-04

    We calculate the self-capacitance and charging energy of a spherical nanoparticle in the Thomas--Fermi approximation. The result is C{sub TF}=C{sub 0}[1-p{sup -1}tanhp]/[1-(1-{epsilon}{sup -1})p{sup -1}tanhp], with C{sub TF}{>=}C{sub 0}. Here C{sub 0}=4{pi}{epsilon}{sub 0}R is the classical geometrical value, p=R/l is the ratio of the particle radius R to the Thomas--Fermi screening length l, and {epsilon} is the material dielectric constant. The addition of surface localized states drives C toward C{sub 0}. These results should be relevant to tunneling spectroscopy studies of giant carbon onions and ''large'' semiconductor nanocrystals that do not require a full quantum treatment.

  2. 76 FR 26223 - Petition for Rulemaking Submitted by Thomas Popik

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is publishing for public comment a notice of receipt for a petition for rulemaking (PRM), dated March 14, 2011, which was filed with the NRC by Thomas Popik. The petition was docketed by the NRC on March 15, 2011, and has been assigned Docket No. PRM-50-96. The petition requests that the NRC amend its regulations regarding the domestic licensing of......

  3. Obituary: John W. Firor (1927-2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, Peter A.

    2009-12-01

    John W. Firor, a former Director of the High Altitude Observatory and the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and a founder of the Solar Physics Division of the American Astronomical Society, died of Alzheimer's disease in Pullman, Washington on November 5, 2007, he was 80. He was born in Athens Georgia on October 18, 1927, where his father was a professor of agricultural economics. John had an unusually diverse scientific career. His interest in physics and astrophysics began while serving in the army, during which time he was assigned to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, where he guarded highly radioactive materials (many have heard him describe how informal the protections were compared to later times). After his service he returned to college and graduated in physics from Georgia Tech in 1949. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1954, writing his thesis on cosmic rays under John Simpson. John Firor would later remark that: "If you needed cosmic rays to actually do anything, you are sunk." That thought, partly in jest, may help explain his motivation for moving to so many new scientific and management pursuits. John moved from cosmic ray physics to radio astronomy (particularly of the Sun) when he began work at the Carnegie Institution of Washington's Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, where he remained until 1961. During this time, he met Walter Orr Roberts, then the Director of the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) in Boulder, Colorado. HAO was then affiliated with the University of Colorado. In 1959, a movement began to upgrade the atmospheric sciences in the United States by establishing a National Center, where the largest, most important atmospheric research problems could be addressed. Roberts became the first Director of NCAR, as well as the first president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), the consortium of universities that was commissioned to manage and staff the new Center. HAO became a

  4. Conceptions of Childhood in the Educational Philosophies of John Locke and John Dewey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bynum, Gregory Lewis

    2015-01-01

    This article compares progressive conceptions of childhood in the educational philosophies of John Locke and John Dewey. Although the lives of the two philosophers were separated by an ocean and two centuries of history, they had in common the following things: (1) a relatively high level of experience working with, and observing, children that is…

  5. Press Site Auditorium dedicated to John Holliman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    From left, Center Director Roy Bridges and NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin applaud as Jay Holliman, with the help of his mother, Mrs. Dianne Holliman, unveils a plaque honoring his father, the late John Holliman. At right is Tom Johnson, news group chairman of CNN. The occasion was the dedication of the KSC Press Site auditorium as the John Holliman Auditorium to honor the CNN national correspondent for his enthusiastic, dedicated coverage of America's space program. The auditorium was built in 1980 and has been the focal point for new coverage of Space Shuttle launches. The ceremony followed the 94th launch of a Space Shuttle, on mission STS-96, earlier this morning.

  6. Press Site Auditorium dedicated to John Holliman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin hands Mrs. Dianne Holliman a plaque honoring her late husband, John Holliman, a CNN national correspondent. Standing behind Goldin is Center Director Roy Bridges. At right is Tom Johnson, news group chairman of CNN. A ceremony dedicated the KSC Press Site auditorium as the John Holliman Auditorium to honor the correspondent for his enthusiastic, dedicated coverage of America's space program. The auditorium was built in 1980 and has been the focal point for new coverage of Space Shuttle launches. The ceremony followed the 94th launch of a Space Shuttle, on mission STS-96, earlier this morning.

  7. Sir John Gurdon: father of nuclear reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Blau, Helen M

    2014-07-01

    Sir John Gurdon founded the field of nuclear reprogramming. His work set the stage for the ever burgeoning area of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. Here I provide personal reflections on times I shared with John Gurdon and professional reflections of the impact of his ground-breaking research on my own development as a scientist and on the field in general. His paradigm-shifting experiments will continue to provoke scientists to think outside the box for many years to come. PMID:24954777

  8. Sir John Gurdon: Father of nuclear reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Blau, Helen M.

    2015-01-01

    Sir John Gurdon founded the field of nuclear reprogramming. His work set the stage for the ever burgeoning area of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. Here I provide personal reflections on times I shared with John Gurdon and professional reflections of the impact of his ground-breaking research on my own development as a scientist and on the field in general. His paradigm-shifting experiments will continue to provoke scientists to think outside the box for many years to come. PMID:24954777

  9. Obituary: John Louis Perdrix, 1926-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, D. Wayne

    2006-12-01

    John Perdrix, astronomical historian and co-founder of the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage, died on 27 June 2005. John Louis Perdrix was born in Adelaide, Australia, on 30 June 1926. After studying chemistry at Melbourne Technical College and working in industry, he joined the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation's Division of Minerals and Geochemistry. In 1974 the Division relocated to the Western Australian capital, Perth, and John spent the rest of his working life there involved in geochemical research. From his teenage years John had a passion for astronomy, which he fine-tuned through the Astronomical Society of Victoria and the Victorian Branch of the British Astronomical Association. He was very active in both groups, serving as President of the former and Secretary/Treasurer of the latter. He was also an FRAS, and a member of the AAS, the BAA parent body, and the IAU (Commission 41)?no mean feat for an Australian amateur astronomer. Throughout his life, he was a strong advocate of close amateur-professional relations. John's main research interest was history of astronomy, and over the years he wrote a succession of research papers, mainly about aspects of Australian astronomy. His well-researched and neatly-illustrated papers on the Melbourne Observatory and the Great Melbourne Telescope are classics, and when the Observatory's future was in the balance they played a key role in the State Government's decision to convert this unique facility into a museum precinct. To support his research activities, John built up an amazing library that developed its own distinctive personality and quickly took over his house and garage before invading commercial storage facilities! Apart from writing papers, John had an even greater passion for editing and publishing. From 1985 to 1997 he produced the Australian Journal of Astronomy, and in 1998 this was replaced by the Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage (JAH2). Both

  10. Porter-Thomas distribution in unstable many-body systems

    SciTech Connect

    Volya, Alexander

    2011-04-15

    We use the continuum shell model approach to explore the resonance width distribution in unstable many-body systems. The single-particle nature of a decay, the few-body character of the interaction Hamiltonian, and the collectivity that emerges in nonstationary systems due to the coupling to the continuum of reaction states are discussed. Correlations between the structures of the parent and daughter nuclear systems in the common Fock space are found to result in deviations of decay width statistics from the Porter-Thomas distribution.