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Sample records for johnnie boy crater

  1. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 371: Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Matthews

    2010-07-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 371, Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe, located within Areas 11 and 18 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 371 comprises two corrective action sites (CASs): • 11-23-05, Pin Stripe Contamination Area • 18-45-01, U-18j-2 Crater (Johnnie Boy) The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 371 based on the implementation of corrective actions. The corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls was implemented at both CASs. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from January 8, 2009, through February 16, 2010, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 371: Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides and investigation of other releases (migration in washes and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 371 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the dataset is acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. Radiological doses exceeding the FAL of 25 millirem per year were not found to be present in the surface soil. However, it was assumed that radionuclides are present in subsurface media within the Johnnie Boy crater and the fissure at Pin Stripe. Due to the assumption of radiological dose exceeding the FAL, corrective actions were undertaken

  2. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 371: Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Matthews

    2009-02-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 371 is located in Areas 11 and 18 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 371 is comprised of the two corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 11-23-05, Pin Stripe Contamination Area • 18-45-01, U-18j-2 Crater (Johnnie Boy) These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on November 19, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 371. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 371 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological surveys. • Measure in situ external dose rates using thermoluminescent dosimeters or other dose measurement devices. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine internal dose rates. • Combine internal and external dose rates to determine whether total

  3. Operation Sun Beam, Shot Small Boy. Project Officers report. Project 1. 9. Crater measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rooke, A.D.; Davis, L.K.; Strange, J.N.

    1985-09-01

    The objectives of Project 1.9 were to obtain the dimensions of the apparent and true craters formed by the Small Boy event and to measure the permanent earth deformation occurring beyond the true crater boundary. Measurements were made of the apparent crater by aerial stereophotography and ground survey and of the true crater and subsurface zones of residual deformation by the excavation and mapping of an array of vertical, colored sand columns which were placed along one crater diameter prior to the shot. The results of the crater exploration are discussed, particularly the permanent compression of the medium beneath the true crater which was responsible for the major portion of the apparent and true crater volumes. Apparent and true crater dimensions are compared with those of previous cratering events.

  4. Why Johnny Won't Read: Schools Often Dismiss What Boys Like. No Wonder They're Not Wild about Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Michael

    2004-01-01

    It's not that boys can not read, they just do not read. Study after study reveals that boys read less than girls. And according to the U.S. Department of Education, school-age boys tend to read a grade and a half lower than girls. How can librarians get guys to turn the page? For starters, they need to move beyond their traditional "here is a book…

  5. Johnny Appleseed Comes to Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffman, Margaret; Peggy, Liggit

    2005-01-01

    Just imagine the excitement in the classroom when Johnny Appleseed strides in. Barefoot and dressed in a burlap sack, he-well, actually, it's you dressed up as Johnny-wears a tin pan for a hat and smiles as he relates the reason for his visit. Fall is apple season, and he's here to explain how all the beautiful fall apples were produced. The story…

  6. Now Johnny CAN Learn To Read.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilsted, Joy

    "Now Johnny CAN Learn to Read" is an easy-to-read book intended for anyone involved in helping others learn to read. An initial section of the book focuses on how to make reading a socially stimulating, successful activity. In this section, viewpoints are shared from a child and a parent, and a reading specialist tells of the successes which…

  7. Camping under Western Stars: Joan Crawford in "Johnny Guitar."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Pamela

    1995-01-01

    Examines the dissonant and "camp" effect inherent in describing "Johnny Guitar" as a Joan Crawford western. Argues that the film's camp effect depends on its crossing of a female star vehicle with the western, a stereotypically masculine genre. Summarizes Crawford's childhood and rise to fame. Concludes by exploring the lesbian and "butch-femme"…

  8. 13. INTERIOR VIEW WITH JOHNNY TAYLOR HAND LEVELING FRESHLY DEPOSITED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. INTERIOR VIEW WITH JOHNNY TAYLOR HAND LEVELING FRESHLY DEPOSITED SAND INTO A FLASK PRIOR TO COMPRESSION BY THE MOLDING MACHINE INSIDE GREY IRON UNIT NO. 1. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  9. 14. INTERIOR VIEW WITH JOHNNY TAYLOR REMOVING A MOLD HALF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR VIEW WITH JOHNNY TAYLOR REMOVING A MOLD HALF FROM THE PATTERN ON THE MOLDING MACHINE, REVEALING THE CAVITY THAT WILL BE FILLED WITH MOLTEN IRON AFTER IT IS ASSEMBLED WITH THE OTHER MOLD HALF INSIDE GREY IRON UNIT NO. 1. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  10. Cratering mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, B. A.

    1986-01-01

    Main concepts and theoretical models which are used for studying the mechanics of cratering are discussed. Numerical two-dimensional calculations are made of explosions near a surface and high-speed impact. Models are given for the motion of a medium during cratering. Data from laboratory modeling are given. The effect of gravitational force and scales of cratering phenomena is analyzed.

  11. Why Johnny (and Jane) Read Whodunits in Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Barbara B.; Steinfirst, Susan

    1985-01-01

    Reviews series mysteries for children and adolescents in two categories: mysteries for girls ("Nancy Drew,""Doris Fein") and mysteries for boys ("Hardy Boys,""Race against Time"). Characters and plots, appeal of the series, and series books and adolescents are discussed. Eight sources are given. (EJS)

  12. Shackleton Crater

    NASA Video Gallery

    This visualization, created using Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter laser altimeter data, offers a view of Shackleton Crater located in the south pole of the moon. Thanks to these measurements, we now h...

  13. Copernicus (Crater)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    One of the Moon's most conspicuous craters, with a diameter of 93 km, centered at 9.7 °N, 20.1°W. It is named after the Polish astronomer Nicholas Copernicus. It is one of the Moon's younger features, the impact that produced it having taken place an estimated 1 billion years ago. Like other young craters it is surrounded by a system of bright rays formed by ejecta from the impact; the rays from ...

  14. Why Johnny Can't Read: An Applied Neurology Explanation Flesched Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preen, Bryan S.; Townsend, Diana O.

    1993-01-01

    Suggests that "Johnny can't read" because of high testosterone levels in fetal development and subsequent poor brain lateralization. Presents instructional strategies based on the principle of factorized teaching for each of three discrete lateralization categories. Notes that the use of factorized teaching appears to have improved diagnostic and…

  15. Heeeere's Johnny: A Case Study in the Five Factor Model of Personality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miserandino, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    I describe an assignment for personality psychology or introduction to psychology classes in which students used the Five Factor Model of personality to analyze the personality of entertainer Johnny Carson through his The New York Times obituary. Students evaluated this assignment highly: A majority indicated that the assignment was interesting,…

  16. Beyond Johnny Appleseed: Learning English as a New Language through Ethnically Diverse Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giambo, Debra; Gonzales, Maria Elizabeth; Szecsi, Tunde; Thirumurthy, Vidya

    2006-01-01

    The linguistic, cultural, and ethnic mixture in many countries, including the United States, is changing rapidly and varies significantly from such old standbys as "Johnny Appleseed" or "Dick and Jane." Learning to communicate effectively in a new language involves gaining familiarity with the present-day culture of the country in which one…

  17. Spallanzani Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (Released 17 July 2002) The craters on Mars display a variety of interior deposits one of which is shown here. Spallanzani Crater is located far enough south that it probably experiences the seasonal growth and retreat of the south polar cap. During the southern hemisphere winter, CO2 frost condenses out of the atmosphere onto the surface and probably brings with it small amounts of dust and even water ice. It is this sort of depositional process that is thought to have produced the polar layered deposits. The layered deposit in Spallanzani Crater shares some similarities with the polar deposits. Whatever the origin of the layered materials, they likely filled the crater at one time. Note how the interior slope of the northern rim displays layered material of similar if less distinct morphology as the main deposit on the floor. The process that filled the crater with sediment has been replaced by the opposite process. Erosion has taken over, leaving behind spectacular stair-stepped mesas and bizarre, contorted landforms. Unlike the interior crater deposits in the equatorial latitudes, the erosional process has not produced the yardang features that indicate wind erosion. It may be that ice was one of the cementing agents of the sediment and perhaps the sublimation of that ice has left the sediment susceptible to erosion. The details of the deposition and erosion of this interesting deposit remain to be discovered.

  18. Oudemans Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of the interior of Oudemans Crater was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 1800 UTC (1:00 p.m. EDT) on October 2, 2006, near 9.8 degrees south latitude, 268.5 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 20 meters (66 feet) across.

    Oudemans Crater is located at the extreme western end of Valles Marineris in the Sinai Planum region of Mars. The crater measures some 124 kilometers (77 miles) across and sports a large central peak.

    Complex craters like Oudemans are formed when an object, such as an asteroid or comet, impacts the planet. The size, speed and angle at which the object hits all determine the type of crater that forms. The initial impact creates a bowl-shaped crater and flings material (known as ejecta) out in all directions along and beyond the margins of the bowl forming an ejecta blanket. As the initial crater cavity succumbs to gravity, it rebounds to form a central peak while material along the bowl's rim slumps back into the crater forming terraces along the inner wall. If the force of the impact is strong enough, a central peak forms and begins to collapse back into the crater basin, forming a central peak ring.

    The uppermost image in the montage above shows the location of CRISM data on a mosaic taken by the Mars Odyssey spacecraft's Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS). The CRISM data was taken inside the crater, on the northeast slope of the central peak.

    The lower left image is an infrared false-color image that reveals several distinctive deposits. The center of the image holds a ruddy-brown deposit that appears to correlates with a ridge running southwest to northeast. Lighter, buff-colored deposits occupy low areas interspersed within the ruddy-brown deposit. The southeast corner holds small hills that form part of the central peak complex.

    The lower right image shows spectral

  19. Crater Chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The large crater at the top of this THEMIS visible image has several other craters inside of it. Most noticeable are the craters that form a 'chain' on the southern wall of the large crater. These craters are a wonderful example of secondary impacts. They were formed when large blocks of ejecta from an impact crashed back down onto the surface of Mars. Secondaries often form radial patterns around the impact crater that generated them, allowing researchers to trace them back to their origin.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 19.3, Longitude 347.5 East (12.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  20. Impact Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Today marks the 45th anniversary of the dawn of the Space Age (October 4, 1957). On this date the former Soviet Union launched the world's first satellite, Sputnik 1. Sputnik means fellow traveler. For comparison Sputnik 1 weighed only 83.6 kg (184 pounds) while Mars Odyssey weighs in at 758 kg (1,671 pounds).

    This scene shows several interesting geologic features associated with impact craters on Mars. The continuous lobes of material that make up the ejecta blanket of the large impact crater are evidence that the crater ejecta were fluidized upon impact of the meteor that formed the crater. Volatiles within the surface mixed with the ejecta upon impact thus creating the fluidized form. Several smaller impact craters are also observed within the ejecta blanket of the larger impact crater giving a relative timing of events. Layering of geologic units is also observed within the large impact crater walls and floor and may represent different compositional units that erode at variable rates. Cliff faces, dissected gullies, and heavily eroded impact craters are observed in the bottom half of the image at the terminus of a flat-topped plateau.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS

  1. Southern Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03583 Southern Crater

    This crater is located south of Agassiz Crater. It is likely that the polar freeze/thaw/frost cycle is responsible for unusual appearance of the ejecta region around the crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 76.2S, Longitude 247.8E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. Galle Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 June 2002) The Science This image is of part of Galle Crater, located at 51.9S, 29.5W. This image was taken far enough south and late enough into the southern hemisphere fall to catch observe water ice clouds partially obscuring the surface. The most striking aspect of the surface is the dissected layered unit to the left in the image. Other areas also appear to have layering, but they are either more obscured by clouds or are less well defined on the surface. The layers appear to be mostly flat lying and layer boundaries appear as topographic lines would on a map, but there are a few areas where it appears that these layers have been deformed to some level. Other areas of the image contain rugged, mountainous terrain as well as a separate pitted terrain where the surface appears to be a separate unit from the mountains and the layered terrain. The Story Galle Crater is officially named after a German astronomer who, in 1846, was the first to observe the planet Neptune. It is better known, however, as the 'Happy Face Crater.' The image above focuses on too small an area of the crater to see its beguiling grin, but you can catch the rocky line of a 'half-smile' in the context image to the right (to the left of the red box). While water ice clouds make some of the surface harder to see, nothing detracts from the fabulous layering at the center left-hand edge of the image. If you click on the above image, the scalloped layers almost look as if a giant knife has swirled through a landscape of cake frosting. These layers, the rugged, mountains near them, and pits on the surface (upper to middle section of the image on the right-hand side) all create varying textures on the crater floor. With such different features in the same place, geologists have a lot to study to figure out what has happened in the crater since it formed.

  3. Centrifuge impact cratering experiment 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Transient crates motions, cratering flow fields, crates dynamics, determining impact conditions from total crater welt, centrifuge quarter-space cratering, and impact cratering mechanics research is documented.

  4. Antum Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image shows the location of one of the highest spatial resolution NIMS images acquired. The left image is an airbrush map of the surface of Ganymede from Voyager data. The small square shows the location of Antum crater, target of the high-resolution NIMS image on the right. NIMS spatial resolution is approximately 4 km/pixel and the image is a falsely colored albedo for a single wavelength near 0.8 micrometers.

    Antum is what is known as a dark ray crater, that is, dark lines emanate from the central bright area. This NIMS image is a close-up of the central area and the dark rays are off the edges of the image. Dark ray craters are fairly unusual and are concentrated in one area of Ganymede's surface. They are thought to be composed of material from the body that impacted Ganymede and created the crater, rather than material brought up from the subsurface. Analysis of the NIMS data will yield compositional and mineralogical information on the dark material. This can help us to understand the nature of bodies that 'crash' into the Jupiter system, as did Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 in 1995, as well as give more information on the history of surface modification on Ganymede.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  5. Palos Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Palos Crater has been suggested as a future landing site for Mars Missions. This crater has a channel called Tinto Vallis, which enters from the south. This site was suggested as a landing site because it may contain lake deposits. Palos Crater is named in honor of the port city in Spain from which Christopher Columbus sailed on his way to the New World in August of 1492. The floor of Palos Crater appears to be layered in places providing further evidence that this site may in fact have been the location of an ancient lake.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Crater Landslide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA06088 Crater Landslide

    This landslide occurs in an unnamed crater southeast of Millochau Crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -24.4N, Longitude 87.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Cydonia Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Eroded mesas and secondary craters dot the landscape in this area of the Cydonia Mensae region. The single oval-shaped crater displays a 'butterfly' ejecta pattern, indicating that the crater formed from a low-angle impact.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 32.9, Longitude 343.8 East (16.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  8. Crater Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA06085 Crater Clouds

    The crater on the right side of this image is affecting the local wind regime. Note the bright line of clouds streaming off the north rim of the crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -78.8N, Longitude 320.0E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Crater Fill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03082 Crater Fill

    This VIS image shows part of the floor of an unnamed crater located between the Hellas and Argyre Basins. At some point in time the entire floor of the crater was filled by material. That material is now being eroded away to form the depressions seen in the center and bottom of the image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 46.6S, Longitude 5.0E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Should We Care that Johnny Can't Catch and Susie Can't Skip? What Should We Do about It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitall, Jill; Clark, Jane E.

    2011-01-01

    Physical and sport educators care that Johnny and Susie cannot move as well as their peers. They try their best to improve their skill levels because they value participation and skillfulness in sport and physical activity. However, many times there is a deeper problem as to why Johnny or Susie cannot move as well as their peers. Physical and…

  11. Crater Copernicus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    HUBBLE SHOOTS THE MOON in a change of venue from peering at the distant universe, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has taken a look at Earth's closest neighbor in space, the Moon. Hubble was aimed at one of the Moon's most dramatic and photogenic targets, the 58 mile-wide (93 km) impact crater Copernicus. The image was taken while the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph(STIS) was aimed at a different part of the moon to measure the colors of sunlight reflected off the Moon. Hubble cannot look at the Sun directly and so must use reflected light to make measurements of the Sun's spectrum. Once calibrated by measuring the Sun's spectrum, the STIS can be used to study how the planets both absorb and reflect sunlight.(upper left)The Moon is so close to Earth that Hubble would need to take a mosaic of 130 pictures to cover the entire disk. This ground-based picture from Lick Observatory shows the area covered in Hubble's photomosaic with the WideField Planetary Camera 2..(center)Hubble's crisp bird's-eye view clearly shows the ray pattern of bright dust ejected out of the crater over one billion years ago, when an asteroid larger than a mile across slammed into the Moon. Hubble can resolve features as small as 600 feet across in the terraced walls of the crater, and the hummock-like blanket of material blasted out by the meteor impact.(lower right)A close-up view of Copernicus' terraced walls. Hubble can resolve features as small as 280 feet across.

  12. Maunder Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 24 May 2002) The Science This image is of a portion of Maunder Crater located at about 49 S and 358 W (2 E). There are a number of interesting features in this image. The lower left portion of the image shows a series of barchan dunes that are traveling from right to left. The sand does not always form dunes as can be seen in the dark and diffuse areas surrounding the dune field. The other interesting item in this image are the gullies that can be seen streaming down from just beneath a number of sharp ridgelines in the upper portion of the image. These gullies were first seen by the MOC camera on the MGS spacecraft and it is though that they formed by groundwater leaking out of the rock layers on the walls of craters. The water runs down the slope and forms the fluvial features seen in the image. Other researchers think that these features could be formed by other fluids, such as CO2. These features are typically seen on south facing slopes in the southern hemisphere, though this image has gullies on north facing slopes as well. The Story Little black squigglies seem to worm their way down the left-hand side of this image. These land features are called barchan (crescent-shaped) dunes. Barchan dunes are found in sandy deserts on Earth, so it's no surprise the Martian wind makes them a common site on the red planet too. They were first named by a Russian scientist named Alexander von Middendorf, who studied the inland desert dunes of Turkistan. The barchan dunes in this image occur in the basin of Maunder crater on Mars, and are traveling from right to left. The sand does not always form dunes, though, as can be seen in the dark areas of scattered sand surrounding the dune field. Look for the streaming gullies that appear just beneath a number of sharp ridgelines in the upper portion of the image. These gullies were first discovered by the Mars Orbital Camera on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. While most crater gullies are found on south

  13. Arkhangelsky Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 September 2003

    Arkhangelsky crater is just to the northeast of the giant Argyre impact basin in the southern hemisphere of Mars. This THEMIS visible image shows the floor of this crater with a few dark barchan dunes. Dunes form when wind blows sand across a surface. The barchan dunes shown here form when there isn't a whole lot of sand to start with. If there were, other dune forms would be visible.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -41.2, Longitude 334.9 East (25.1 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  14. Gusev Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 25 July 2003

    Wrinkle ridges deform the plains in the bottom of Gusev crater, destination of the MER 'Spirit' rover. The plains were likely created from a flood basalt with ridges forming where there were compressional forces. Dark wind streaks come together to form a dark spot at the bottom of the image where the wind has removed a thin layer of bright dust off a dark surface. On the left side of the image a portion of a lobe of material is visible, which may have resulted from a mud or debris flow. This feature was recently identified by the THEMIS team and may represent the most recent deposit in the crater involving water.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -13.9, Longitude 175.4 East (184.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  15. Freedom Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Freedom crater, located in Acidalia Planitia, exhibits a concentric ring pattern in its interior, suggesting that there has been some movement of these materials towards the center of the crater. Slumping towards the center may have been caused by the presence of ground ice mixed in with the sediments. The origin for the scarps on the western edge of the interior deposit is unknown.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 43.3, Longitude 351.3 East (8.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  16. Crater chains on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, V.; Skobeleva, T.

    After discovery of disruption comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 into fragment train before it's collision with Jupiter there was proposed that linear crater chains on the large satellites of Jupiter and on the Moon are impact scars of past tidally disrupted comets.It's known that radar images have revealed the possible presence of water ice deposits in polar regions of Mercury. Impacts by a few large comets seem to provide the best explanation for both the amount and cleanliness of the ice deposits on Mercury because they have a larger volatile content that others external sources, for example, asteroid. A number of crater chains on the surface of Mercury are most likely the impact tracks of "fragment trains" of comets tidally disrupted by Sun or by Mercury and are not secondary craters. Mariner 10 image set (the three Mariner 10 flybys in 1974-1975) was used to recognize the crater chains these did not associate with secondary crater ejecta from observed impact structures. As example, it can be shown such crater chain located near crater Imhotep and crater Ibsen (The Kuiper Quadrangle of Mercury). Resolution of the Mariner 10 image is about 0.54 km/pixel. The crater chain is about 50 km long. It was found a similar crater chain inside large crater Sophocles (The Tolstoj Quadrangle of Mercury). The image resolution is about 1.46 km/pixel. The chain about 50 km long is located in northen part of the crater. Image resolution limits possibility to examine the form of craters strongly. It seems the craters in chains have roughly flat floor and smooth form. Most chain craters are approximately circular. It was examined many images from the Mariner 10 set and there were identified a total 15 crater chains and were unable to link any of these directly to any specific large crater associated with ejecta deposits. Chain craters are remarkably aligned. All distinguished crater chains are superposed on preexisting formations. A total of 127 craters were identified in the 15 recognized

  17. Changing Course: Thurgood Marshall College Fund President Johnny Taylor Seeks New Partnerships and Avenues of Support for Public HBCUs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Reginald

    2011-01-01

    When veteran educator Dr. N. Joyce Payne handed the reins of the organization she founded, the Thurgood Marshall College Fund, to entertainment lawyer and board member Johnny Taylor, Taylor began pursuing a remake of the prestigious group that has turned it on its head in just a matter of months. Today, with just more than a year of leading the…

  18. Crater Rim

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The late afternoon sun casts a shadow over a 700 meter-high rim of Huygens Crater.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -15.2, Longitude 51.6 East (308.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  19. Becquerel Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03676 Linear Clouds

    This interesting deposit is located on the floor of Becquerel Crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 21.3N, Longitude 352.2E. 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. Impact Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The layering of material observed at the bottom of this impact crater suggests multiple depositional and erosional episodes in a changing environment.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Martian Meteor Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    20 February 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a fairly young meteor impact crater on Mars that is about the same size ( 1 kilometer; 0.62 miles) as the famous Meteor Crater in northern Arizona, U.S.A. Like the Arizona crater, boulders of ejected bedrock can be seen on the crater's ejecta blanket and in the crater itself. This crater is located in the Aethiopis region of Mars near 4.7oN, 224.1oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  2. Boys Will Be "Boys": Variability in Boys' Experiences of Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokal, Laura; Katz, Herb; Adkins, Matthew; Gladu, Andrea; Jackson-Davis, Khalie; Kussin, Brian

    2005-01-01

    Sixty-nine grade 2 boys participated in a study of the effects of book genre and sex of reading model on boys' (a) view of reading as feminine, (b) intrinsic motivation toward reading, (c) interest in reading, and (d) attitude to reading. Differential effects occurred in boys based on whether they liked or disliked reading and whether they viewed…

  3. Crater studies: Part A: lunar crater morphometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pike, Richard J.

    1973-01-01

    Morphometry, the quantitative study of shape, complements the visual observation and photointerpretation in analyzing the most outstanding landforms of the Moon, its craters (refs. 32-1 and 32-2). All three of these interpretative tools, which were developed throughout the long history of telescopic lunar study preceding the Apollo Program, will continue to be applicable to crater analysis until detailed field work becomes possible. Although no large (>17.5 km diameter) craters were examined in situ on any of the Apollo landings, the photographs acquired from the command modules will markedly strengthen results of less direct investigations of the craters. For morphometry, the most useful materials are the orbital metric and panoramic photographs from the final three Apollo missions. These photographs permit preparation of contour maps, topographic profiles, and other numerical data that accurately portray for the first time the surface geometry of lunar craters of all sizes. Interpretations of craters no longer need be compromised by inadequate topographic data. In the pre-Apollo era, hypotheses for the genesis of lunar craters usually were constructed without any numerical descriptive data. Such speculations will have little credibility unless supported by accurate, quantitative data, especially those generated from Apollo orbital photographs. This paper presents a general study of the surface geometry of 25 far-side craters and a more detailed study of rim-crest evenness for 15 near-side and far-side craters. Analysis of this preliminary sample of Apollo 15 and 17 data, which includes craters between 1.5 and 275 km in diameter, suggests that most genetic interpretations of craters made from pre-Apollo topographic measurements may require no drastic revision. All measurements were made from topographic profiles generated on a stereoplotter at the Photogrammetric Unit of the U.S. Geological Survey, Center of Astrogeology, Flagstaff, Arizona.

  4. Antoniadi Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the Martian surface using five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from using multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    This false color image shows part of the floor of Antoniadi Crater. This image was collected during the Northern Spring season.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 37, Longitude 62.6 East (297.4 West). 35 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science

  5. Rampart Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 20 May 2004 This image of a rampart crater was acquired Dec. 6, 2002, during northern summer.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 28.4, Longitude 319.2 East (40.8 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The

  6. Moreux Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 27 May 2004 This image of material entering Moreux Crater from the rim area was acquired March 17, 2003, during northern summer.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 41.1, Longitude 44.1 East (315.9 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of

  7. Crater Ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 21 May 2004 This image of ejecta (top-left) from a rampart crater was acquired March 3, 2003, during northern summer.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 25.9, Longitude 322 East (38 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science

  8. Automated Crater Delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, J. S.; Pina, P.

    2015-05-01

    An algorithm to delineate impact craters based on Edge Maps and Dynamic Programming is presented. The global performance obtained on 1045 craters from Mars (5 m to about 200 km in diameter), achieved 96% of correct contour delineations.

  9. Cratering on Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, S.; Chapman, C. R.; Barnouin, O. S.; Richardson, J. E.; Vincent, J.-B.

    Impact craters are a ubiquitous feature of asteroid surfaces. On a local scale, small craters puncture the surface in a way similar to that observed on terrestrial planets and the Moon. At the opposite extreme, larger craters often approach the physical size of asteroids, thus globally affecting their shapes and surface properties. Crater measurements are a powerful means of investigation. Crater spatial and size distributions inform us of fundamental processes, such as asteroid collisional history. A paucity of craters, sometimes observed, may be diagnostic of mechanisms of erasure that are unique on low-gravity asteroids. Byproducts of impacts, such as ridges, troughs, and blocks, inform us of the bulk structure. In this chapter we review the major properties of crater populations on asteroids visited by spacecraft. In doing so we provide key examples to illustrate how craters affect the overall shape and can be used to constrain asteroid surface ages, bulk properties, and impact-driven surface evolution.

  10. A case of musical preference for Johnny Cash following deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Mantione, Mariska; Figee, Martijn; Denys, Damiaan

    2014-01-01

    Music is among all cultures an important part of the live of most people. Music has psychological benefits and may generate strong emotional and physiological responses. Recently, neuroscientists have discovered that music influences the reward circuit of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), even when no explicit reward is present. In this clinical case study, we describe a 60-year old patient who developed a sudden and distinct musical preference for Johnny Cash following deep brain stimulation (DBS) targeted at the NAcc. This case report substantiates the assumption that the NAcc is involved in musical preference, based on the observation of direct stimulation of the accumbens with DBS. It also shows that accumbens DBS can change musical preference without habituation of its rewarding properties. PMID:24834035

  11. A case of musical preference for Johnny Cash following deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Mantione, Mariska; Figee, Martijn; Denys, Damiaan

    2014-01-01

    Music is among all cultures an important part of the live of most people. Music has psychological benefits and may generate strong emotional and physiological responses. Recently, neuroscientists have discovered that music influences the reward circuit of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), even when no explicit reward is present. In this clinical case study, we describe a 60-year old patient who developed a sudden and distinct musical preference for Johnny Cash following deep brain stimulation (DBS) targeted at the NAcc. This case report substantiates the assumption that the NAcc is involved in musical preference, based on the observation of direct stimulation of the accumbens with DBS. It also shows that accumbens DBS can change musical preference without habituation of its rewarding properties. PMID:24834035

  12. Visible-Near Infrared Imaging Spectrometer Data of Explosion Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, T. G.

    2005-01-01

    In a continuing study to capture a realistic terrain applicable to studies of cratering processes and landing hazards on Mars, we have obtained new high resolution visible-near infrared images of several explosion craters at the Nevada Test Site. We used the Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) to obtain images in 224 spectral bands from 0.4-2.5 microns [1]. The main craters that were imaged were Sedan, Scooter, Schooner, Buggy, and Danny Boy [2]. The 390 m diameter Sedan crater, located on Yucca Flat, is the largest and freshest explosion crater on Earth that was formed under conditions similar to hypervelocity impact cratering. As such, it is effectively pristine, having been formed in 1962 as a result of the detonation of a 104 kiloton thermonuclear device, buried at the appropriate equivalent depth of burst required to make a "simple" crater [2]. Sedan was formed in alluvium of mixed lithology [3] and subsequently studied using a variety of field-based methods. Nearby secondary craters were also formed at the time and were also imaged by AVIRIS. Adjacent to Sedan and also in alluvium is Scooter, about 90 m in diameter and formed by a high-explosive event. Schooner (240 m) and Danny Boy (80 m, Fig. 1) craters were also important targets for AVIRIS as they were excavated in hard welded tuff and basaltic andesite, respectively [3, 4]. This variation in targets will allow the study of ejecta patterns, compositional modifications due to the explosions, and the role of craters as subsurface probes.

  13. Degraded Crater Rim

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 3 May 2002) The Science The eastern rim of this unnamed crater in Southern Arabia Terra is very degraded (beaten up). This indicates that this crater is very ancient and has been subjected to erosion and subsequent bombardment from other impactors such as asteroids and comets. One of these later (younger) craters is seen in the upper right of this image superimposed upon the older crater rim material. Note that this smaller younger crater rim is sharper and more intact than the older crater rim. This region is also mantled with a blanket of dust. This dust mantle causes the underlying topography to take on a more subdued appearance. The Story When you think of Arabia, you probably think of hot deserts and a lot of profitable oil reserves. On Mars, however, Southern Arabia Terra is a cold place of cratered terrain. This almost frothy-looking image is the badly battered edge of an ancient crater, which has suffered both erosion and bombardment from asteroids, comets, or other impacting bodies over the long course of its existence. A blanket of dust has also settled over the region, which gives the otherwise rugged landscape a soft and more subdued appearance. The small, round crater (upper left) seems almost gemlike in its setting against the larger crater ring. But this companionship is no easy romance. Whatever formed the small crater clearly whammed into the larger crater rim at some point, obliterating part of its edge. You can tell the small crater was formed after the first and more devastating impact, because it is laid over the other larger crater. How much younger is the small one? Well, its rim is also much sharper and more intact, which gives a sense that it is probably far more youthful than the very degraded, ancient crater.

  14. Impact craters on Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Charles A.; Lorenz, Ralph; Kirk, Randy; Lopes, Rosaly; Mitchell, Karl; Stofan, Ellen; Cassini RADAR Team

    2010-01-01

    Five certain impact craters and 44 additional nearly certain and probable ones have been identified on the 22% of Titan's surface imaged by Cassini's high-resolution radar through December 2007. The certain craters have morphologies similar to impact craters on rocky planets, as well as two with radar bright, jagged rims. The less certain craters often appear to be eroded versions of the certain ones. Titan's craters are modified by a variety of processes including fluvial erosion, mass wasting, burial by dunes and submergence in seas, but there is no compelling evidence of isostatic adjustments as on other icy moons, nor draping by thick atmospheric deposits. The paucity of craters implies that Titan's surface is quite young, but the modeled age depends on which published crater production rate is assumed. Using the model of Artemieva and Lunine (2005) suggests that craters with diameters smaller than about 35 km are younger than 200 million years old, and larger craters are older. Craters are not distributed uniformly; Xanadu has a crater density 2-9 times greater than the rest of Titan, and the density on equatorial dune areas is much lower than average. There is a small excess of craters on the leading hemisphere, and craters are deficient in the north polar region compared to the rest of the world. The youthful age of Titan overall, and the various erosional states of its likely impact craters, demonstrate that dynamic processes have destroyed most of the early history of the moon, and that multiple processes continue to strongly modify its surface. The existence of 24 possible impact craters with diameters less than 20 km appears consistent with the Ivanov, Basilevsky and Neukum (1997) model of the effectiveness of Titan's atmosphere in destroying most but not all small projectiles.

  15. Impact craters on Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, C.A.; Lorenz, R.; Kirk, R.; Lopes, R.; Mitchell, Ken; Stofan, E.

    2010-01-01

    Five certain impact craters and 44 additional nearly certain and probable ones have been identified on the 22% of Titan's surface imaged by Cassini's high-resolution radar through December 2007. The certain craters have morphologies similar to impact craters on rocky planets, as well as two with radar bright, jagged rims. The less certain craters often appear to be eroded versions of the certain ones. Titan's craters are modified by a variety of processes including fluvial erosion, mass wasting, burial by dunes and submergence in seas, but there is no compelling evidence of isostatic adjustments as on other icy moons, nor draping by thick atmospheric deposits. The paucity of craters implies that Titan's surface is quite young, but the modeled age depends on which published crater production rate is assumed. Using the model of Artemieva and Lunine (2005) suggests that craters with diameters smaller than about 35 km are younger than 200 million years old, and larger craters are older. Craters are not distributed uniformly; Xanadu has a crater density 2-9 times greater than the rest of Titan, and the density on equatorial dune areas is much lower than average. There is a small excess of craters on the leading hemisphere, and craters are deficient in the north polar region compared to the rest of the world. The youthful age of Titan overall, and the various erosional states of its likely impact craters, demonstrate that dynamic processes have destroyed most of the early history of the moon, and that multiple processes continue to strongly modify its surface. The existence of 24 possible impact craters with diameters less than 20 km appears consistent with the Ivanov, Basilevsky and Neukum (1997) model of the effectiveness of Titan's atmosphere in destroying most but not all small projectiles. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  16. Martian doublet craters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, V. R.; Aoyagi, M.

    1972-01-01

    A large number of Mars craters are nearly tangential to other craters. They occur in clusters or as isolated crater doublets. Results of probability calculations and a Monte Carlo cratering simulation model show conclusively that many of the Mars craters could not have resulted from random single-body impact. The possibility that these craters are calderas is considered possible only if calderas on Mars form by mechanisms different from those on earth. However, clusters and doublets could be caused by meteoroid breakup resulting from stresses induced in the meteoroid by the gravitational field of Mars. It is concluded that, under certain conditions, doublets should be produced on Mars as a direct result of breakup of an impacting meteoroid. The impact process can yield nonrandom crater distributions that should be observed in different degrees of development on different planetary surfaces.

  17. Simulated Craters on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The thick atmosphere of Venus prevents all but the largest impactors from cratering the surface. The number of small craters on Venus provides an interesting, and statistically significant test of models for the disruption and deceleration of impacting bodies. Here we compare Monte Carlo simulated crater distributions to the observed crater distribution on Venus. The simulation assumes: (1) a power law mass distribution for impactors of the form N(sub cum) alpha m (exp-b) where b=0.8; (2) isotropic incidence angles; (3) velocity at the top of the atmosphere of 20 kilometers per second (more realistic velocity distributions are also considered); (4) Schmidt-Housen crater scaling, modified such that only the normal component of the impact velocity contributes to cratering, and using crater slumping as parameterized (5) and modern populations (60% carbonaceous, 40% stone, 3% iron) and fluxes of asteroids. We use our previously developed model for the disruption and deceleration of large bodies striking thick planetary atmospheres to calculate the impact velocity at the surface as a function of impactor mass, incident velocity, and incident angle. We use a drag coefficient c(sub d) =1; other parameters are as described in Chyba et al. We set a low velocity cutoff of 500 meters per second on crater-forming impacts. Venus's craters are nicely matched by the simulated craters produced by 700 million years of striking asteroids. Shown for comparison are the simulated craters produced by incident comets over the same period, where for comets we have assumed b=0.7 and a flux at 10(exp 14) g 30% that of asteroids. Systematic uncertainties in crater scaling and crater slumping may make the surface age uncertain by a factor of two.

  18. Impact craters on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaber, G. G.

    1991-01-01

    Compared with volcanism and tectonism, impact cratering on Venus has played an overall minor role in sculpting the present-day landscape. The study of Venus impact craters is vital to help place the chronology of the geologic features on the surface in the context of the planet's geological evolution. The degradation of impact craters also provides information on surface and interior processes, particularly alteration by tectonism and volcanism. Through orbit 1422, Magellan mapped about 450 impact craters, with diameters ranging from 2 to 275 km, within an area of about 226 million sq km, or 49 percent of the planet's surface. These craters and their associated deposits show surprisingly little evidence of degradation at the 75 m/pixel resolution of the Magellan SAR. Remarkably few craters in the Magellan images appear to be in the process of being buried by volcanic deposits or destroyed by tectonic activity.

  19. Layers in Crater Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-431, 24 July 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a cluster of old, small impact craters near 36.3oN, 281.9oW. The group of craters was probably formed by secondary impacts following a much larger impact that occurred some distance away; the material that created these craters would have been the ejecta from the larger crater, rather than meteoroids from outer space. The craters cluster is considered to be relatively old because none of the craters have ejecta blankets any more, and each was filled, or partially filled, with layered material that was later eroded to form the terraced mounds found in their floors. This picture is illuminated from the lower left.

  20. Testing Crater Counting Assumptions with the Cratered Terrain Evolution Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minton, D. A.; Richardson, J. E.; Fassett, C. I.

    2015-05-01

    Using CTEM to answer the questions; 1) How close to Poisson-distributed are crater count uncertainties? and 2) How does observed clustering in crater count densities of large craters relate to the changes in the impactor flux?

  1. Crater Rays on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This mosaic of Voyager 2 images taken July 9, 1979, shows a prominent rayed crater on Jupiter's icy moon, Ganymede. The view on the left is a monochrome image, and that on the right is the same scene shown in false color designed to accentuate the icy ejecta rays splashed out by the impact. This crater is about 150 km (93 miles) across. Like several other large craters in this scene, the rayed one has a central pit, whose origins remain speculative but may involve impact melting or solid-state fluidization of the icy crust. Bright crater rays on Ganymede, like those on our own Moon, are useful to geologists because they constitute a set of features that were laid across the moon's surface at a discrete point in time--thus they serve as time markers that can be used to establish the sequence of events that shaped Ganymede's surface. For instance, the crater rays appear to be painted over, hence are younger than, areas of grooved terrain (lower left quadrant), whereas a somewhat smaller crater at the center of the scene has icy ejecta that appears to bury (hence, post-dates) the large crater ray system. One can conclude that the grooved terrain formed first, then the large crater and its rays, and then the smaller crater and its fresh icy ejecta deposits.

  2. High Resolution Digital Elevation Models of Pristine Explosion Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, T. G.; Krabill, W.; Garvin, J. B.

    2004-01-01

    In order to effectively capture a realistic terrain applicable to studies of cratering processes and landing hazards on Mars, we have obtained high resolution digital elevation models of several pristine explosion craters at the Nevada Test Site. We used the Airborne Terrain Mapper (ATM), operated by NASA's Wallops Flight Facility to obtain DEMs with 1 m spacing and 10 cm vertical errors of 4 main craters and many other craters and collapse pits. The main craters that were mapped are Sedan, Scooter, Schooner, and Danny Boy. The 370 m diameter Sedan crater, located on Yucca Flat, is the largest and freshest explosion crater on Earth that was formed under conditions similar to hypervelocity impact cratering. As such, it is effectively pristine, having been formed in 1962 as a result of a controlled detonation of a 100 kiloton thermonuclear device, buried at the appropriate equivalent depth of burst required to make a simple crater. Sedan was formed in alluvium of mixed lithology and subsequently studied using a variety of field-based methods. Nearby secondary craters were also formed at the time and were also mapped by ATM. Adjacent to Sedan and also in alluvium is Scooter, about 90 m in diameter and formed by a high-explosive event. Schooner (240 m) and Danny Boy (80 m) craters were also important targets for ATM as they were excavated in hard basalt and therefore have much rougher ejecta. This will allow study of ejecta patterns in hard rock as well as engineering tests of crater and rock avoidance and rover trafficability. In addition to the high resolution DEMs, crater geometric characteristics, RMS roughness maps, and other higher-order derived data products will be generated using these data. These will provide constraints for models of landing hazards on Mars and for rover trafficability. Other planned studies will include ejecta size-frequency distribution at the resolution of the DEM and at finer resolution through air photography and field measurements

  3. Experimental impact crater morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufresne, A.; Poelchau, M. H.; Hoerth, T.; Schaefer, F.; Thoma, K.; Deutsch, A.; Kenkmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    The research group MEMIN (Multidisciplinary Experimental and Impact Modelling Research Network) is conducting impact experiments into porous sandstones, examining, among other parameters, the influence of target pore-space saturation with water, and projectile velocity, density and mass, on the cratering process. The high-velocity (2.5-7.8 km/s) impact experiments were carried out at the two-stage light-gas gun facilities of the Fraunhofer Institute EMI (Germany) using steel, iron meteorite (Campo del Cielo IAB), and aluminium projectiles with Seeberg Sandstone as targets. The primary objectives of this study within MEMIN are to provide detailed morphometric data of the experimental craters, and to identify trends and characteristics specific to a given impact parameter. Generally, all craters, regardless of impact conditions, have an inner depression within a highly fragile, white-coloured centre, an outer spallation (i.e. tensile failure) zone, and areas of arrested spallation (i.e. spall fragments that were not completely dislodged from the target) at the crater rim. Within this general morphological framework, distinct trends and differences in crater dimensions and morphological characteristics are identified. With increasing impact velocity, the volume of craters in dry targets increases by a factor of ~4 when doubling velocity. At identical impact conditions (steel projectiles, ~5km/s), craters in dry and wet sandstone targets differ significantly in that "wet" craters are up to 76% larger in volume, have depth-diameter ratios generally below 0.19 (whereas dry craters are almost consistently above this value) at significantly larger diameters, and their spallation zone morphologies show very different characteristics. In dry craters, the spall zone surfaces dip evenly at 10-20° towards the crater centre. In wet craters, on the other hand, they consist of slightly convex slopes of 10-35° adjacent to the inner depression, and of sub-horizontal tensile

  4. 'Endurance Crater' Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This overview of 'Endurance Crater' traces the path of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity from sol 94 (April 29, 2004) to sol 205 (August 21, 2004). The route charted to enter the crater was a bit circuitous, but well worth the extra care engineers took to ensure the rover's safety. On sol 94, Opportunity sat on the edge of this impressive, football field-sized crater while rover team members assessed the scene. After traversing around the 'Karatepe' region and past 'Burns Cliff,' the rover engineering team assessed the possibility of entering the crater. Careful analysis of the angles Opportunity would face, including testing an Earth-bound model on simulated martian terrain, led the team to decide against entering the crater at that particular place. Opportunity then backed up before finally dipping into the crater on its 130th sol (June 5, 2004). The rover has since made its way down the crater's inner slope, grinding, trenching and examining fascinating rocks and soil targets along the way. The rover nearly made it to the intriguing dunes at the bottom of the crater, but when it got close, the terrain did not look safe enough to cross.

  5. Centrifuge Impact Cratering Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. M.; Housen, K. R.; Bjorkman, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    The kinematics of crater growth, impact induced target flow fields and the generation of impact melt were determined. The feasibility of using scaling relationships for impact melt and crater dimensions to determine impactor size and velocity was studied. It is concluded that a coupling parameter determines both the quantity of melt and the crater dimensions for impact velocities greater than 10km/s. As a result impactor radius, a, or velocity, U cannot be determined individually, but only as a product in the form of a coupling parameter, delta U micron. The melt volume and crater volume scaling relations were applied to Brent crater. The transport of melt and the validity of the melt volume scaling relations are examined.

  6. Exhuming South Polar Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    7 February 2004 The large, circular feature in this image is an old meteor impact crater. The crater is larger than the 3 kilometers-wide (1.9 miles-wide) Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image, thus only part of the crater is seen. The bright mesas full of pits and holes--in some areas resembling swiss cheese--are composed of frozen carbon dioxide. In this summertime view, the mesa slopes and pit walls are darkened as sunlight causes some of the ice to sublime away. At one time in the past, the crater shown here may have been completely covered with carbon dioxide ice, but, over time, it has been exhumed as the ice sublimes a little bit more each summer. The crater is located near 86.8oS, 111.6oW. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the upper left.

  7. Puberty in boys

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000650.htm Puberty in boys To use the sharing features on this page, ... body changes, when you develop from being a boy to a man. Learn what changes to expect ...

  8. The Mythical "Boy Crisis"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Husain, Muna; Millimet, Daniel L.

    2009-01-01

    The popular press has put forth the idea that the US educational system is experiencing a "boy crisis," where boys are losing ground to girls across multiple dimensions. Here, we analyze these claims in the context of math and reading achievement during early primary school. We reach two conclusions. First, white boys outperform white girls in…

  9. Bring Back the Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr-Chellman, Alison

    2012-01-01

    Boy culture is out of sync with school culture. There are several reasons for this, including zero tolerance policies that are too often taken to extremes, the lack of male teachers, and the compression of the curriculum. What's more, boy culture is not socially accepted, and boys quickly come to feel that they are not good at school. For many…

  10. Supporting Boys as Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serafini, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The challenges associated with boys and reading are focused on such factors as society's lack of focus on literacy skills, parents failings to inspire reading in boys, and internal motivational factors rather than looking at the environments created for reading in and out of school. In this column, several ideas for helping boys develop a…

  11. Raising Better Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canada, Geoffrey

    2000-01-01

    The author of "Reaching Up For Manhood" discusses troubling social/environmental conditions confronting boys. Raising better boys requires caring adults, safer risk-taking situations, positive reinforcement, and role models. Parents should monitor boys' media exposure, provide moral education, broaden their cultural and natural-world experiences,…

  12. Impact Crater with Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 14 June 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image shows a classic example of a martian impact crater with a central peak. Central peaks are common in large, fresh craters on both Mars and the Moon. This peak formed during the extremely high-energy impact cratering event. In many martian craters the central peak has been either eroded or buried by later sedimentary processes, so the presence of a peak in this crater indicates that the crater is relatively young and has experienced little degradation. Observations of large craters on the Earth and the Moon, as well as computer modeling of the impact process, show that the central peak contains material brought from deep beneath the surface. The material exposed in these peaks will provide an excellent opportunity to study the composition of the martian interior using THEMIS multi-spectral infrared observations. The ejecta material around the crater can is well preserved, again indicating relatively little modification of this landform since its initial creation. The inner walls of this approximately 18 km diameter crater show complex slumping that likely occurred during the impact event. Since that time there has been some downslope movement of material to form the small chutes and gullies that can be seen on the inner crater wall. Small (50-100 m) mega-ripples composed of mobile material can be seen on the floor of the crater. Much of this material may have come from the walls of the crater itself, or may have been blown into the crater by the wind. The Story When a meteor smacked into the surface of Mars with extremely high energy, pow! Not only did it punch an 11-mile-wide crater in the smoother terrain, it created a central peak in the middle of the crater. This peak forms kind of on the 'rebound.' You can see this same effect if you drop a single drop of milk into a glass of milk. With craters, in the heat and fury of the impact, some of the land material can even liquefy. Central peaks like the one

  13. Craters on comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Jean-Baptiste; Oklay, Nilda; Marchi, Simone; Höfner, Sebastian; Sierks, Holger

    2015-03-01

    This paper reviews the observations of crater-like features on cometary nuclei. We compare potential crater sizes and morphologies, and we discuss the probability of impacts between small asteroids in the Main Belt and a comet crossing this region of the Solar System. Finally, we investigate the fate of the impactor and its chances of survival on the nucleus. We find that comets do undergo impacts although the rapid evolution of the surface erases most of the features and make craters difficult to detect. In the case of a collision between a rocky body and a highly porous cometary nucleus, two specific crater morphologies can be formed: a central pit surrounded by a shallow depression, or a pit, deeper than typical craters observed on rocky surfaces. After the impact, it is likely that a significant fraction of the projectile will remain in the crater. During its two years long escort of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, ESA's mission Rosetta should be able to detect specific silicates signatures at the bottom of craters or crater-like features, as evidence of this contamination. For large craters, structural changes in the impacted region, in particular compaction of material, will affect the local activity. The increase of tensile strength can extinct the activity by preventing the gas from lifting up dust grains. On the other hand, material compaction can help the heat flux to travel deeper in the nucleus, potentially reaching unexposed pockets of volatiles, and therefore increasing the activity. Ground truth data from Rosetta will help us infer the relative importance of those two effects.

  14. Venus - Mead Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This Magellan image mosaic shows the largest (275 kilometers in diameter [170 miles]) impact crater known to exist on Venus at this point in the Magellan mission. The crater is located north of Aphrodite Terra and east of Eistla Regio at latitude 12.5 degrees north and longitude 57.4 degrees east, and was imaged during Magellan orbit 804 on November 12, 1990. The Magellan science team has proposed to name this crater Mead, after Margaret Mead, the American Anthropologist (1901- 1978). All Magellan-based names of features on Venus are, of course, only proposed until final approval is given by the International Astronomical Union-Commission on Planetary Nomenclature. Mead is classified as a multi-ring crater with its innermost, concentric scarp being interpreted as the rim of the original crater cavity. No inner peak-ring of mountain massifs is observed on Mead. The presence of hummocky, radar-bright crater ejecta crossing the radar-dark floor terrace and adjacent outer rim scarp suggests that the floor terrace is probably a giant rotated block that is concentric to, but lies outside of, the original crater cavity. The flat, somewhat brighter inner floor of Mead is interpreted to result from considerable infilling of the original crater cavity by impact melt and/or by volcanic lavas. To the southeast of the crater rim, emplacement of hummocky ejecta appears to have been impeded by the topography of preexisting ridges, thus suggesting a very low ground-hugging mode of deposition for this material. Radar illumination on this and all other Magellan image products is from the left to the right in the scene.

  15. Venus - Crater Aurelia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This Magellan image shows a complex crater, 31.9 kilometers (20 miles) in diameter with a circular rim, terraced walls, and central peaks, located at 20.3 degrees north latitude and 331.8 degrees east longitude. Several unusual features are evidenced in this image: large dark surface up range from the crater; lobate flows emanating from crater ejecta, and very radar-bright ejecta and floor. Aurelia has been proposed to the International Astronomical Union, Subcommittee of Planetary Nomenclature as a candidate name. Aurelia is the mother of Julius Caesar.

  16. Crater with Streak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    20 June 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a crater in the Memnonia region of Mars, around which has formed a wind streak. The bright streak is in the lee of the crater -- that is, it is on the crater's down-wind side. Thus, the winds responsible for the streak blew from the southeast (lower right).

    Location near: 6.7oS, 141.4oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  17. One View, Two Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This cylindrical projection was constructed from a sequence of four images taken by the navigation camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity.

    The images were acquired on sol 85 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum. The camera acquired the images at approximately 14:28 local solar time, or around 6:30 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time, on April 20, 2004.

    The view is from the rover's new location, a region dubbed 'Fram Crater' located some 450 meters (.3 miles) from 'Eagle Crater' and roughly 250 meters (820 feet) from 'Endurance Crater' (upper right).

  18. Rayed Gratteri Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger version

    This HiRISE image covers the western portion of the primary cavity of Gratteri crater situated in the Memnonia Fossae region. Gratteri crater is one of five definitive large rayed craters on Mars. Gratteri crater has a diameter of approximately 6.9 kilometers. Crater rays are long, linear features formed from the high-velocity ejection of blocks of material that re-impact the surface in linear clusters or chains that appear to emanate from the main or primary cavity. Such craters have been long recognized as the 'brightest' and 'freshest' craters on the Moon. However, Martian rays differ from lunar rays in that they are not 'bright,' but best recognized by their thermal signature (at night) in 100 meter/pixel THEMIS thermal infrared images. The HiRISE image shows that Gratteri crater has well-developed and sharp crater morphologic features with no discernable superimposed impact craters. The HiRISE sub-image shows that this is true for the ejecta and crater floor up to the full resolution of the image. Massive slumped blocks of materials on the crater floor and the 'spur and gully' morphology with the crater wall may suggest that the subsurface in this area may be thick and homogenous. Gratteri crater's ejecta blanket (as seen in THEMIS images) can be described as 'fluidized,' which may be suggestive of the presence of ground-ice that may have helped to 'liquefy' the ejecta as it was deposited near the crater. Gratteri's ejecta can be observed to have flowed in and around obstacles including an older, degraded crater lying immediately to the SW of Gratteri's primary cavity.

    Image PSP_001367_1620 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on November 10, 2006. The complete image is centered at -17.7 degrees latitude, 199.9 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 257.1 km

  19. Shackleton Crater Illumination

    NASA Video Gallery

    Simulated illumination conditions near the lunar South Pole. The 30km x 30km region highlights the Shackleton crater. The movie runs for 28 days, centered on the LCROSS impact date on October 9th, ...

  20. Craters in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, Heather K.

    1997-01-01

    Details an activity in which students create and study miniature impact craters in the classroom. Engages students in making detailed, meaningful observations, drawing inferences, reaching conclusions based on scientific evidence, and designing experiments to test selected variables. (DDR)

  1. Fresh, Rayed Impact Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-416, 9 July 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a fresh, young meteor impact crater on the martian surface. It is less than 400 meters (less than 400 yards) across. While there is no way to know the exact age of this or any other martian surface feature, the rays are very well preserved. On a planet where wind can modify surface features at the present time, a crater with rayed ejecta patterns must be very young indeed. Despite its apparent youth, the crater could still be many hundreds of thousands, if not several million, of years old. This impact scar is located within the much larger Crommelin Crater, near 5.6oN, 10.0oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  2. Craters and Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    1 April 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows two impact craters of nearly equal size, plus their associated wind streaks. These occur in far eastern Chryse Planitia. The wind streaks point toward the southwest (lower left), indicating that the responsible winds blew from the northeast. One of the two craters is shallower than the other, and has a suite of large, windblown ripples on its floor. The shallower crater with the ripples is probably older than the other, deeper crater.

    Location near: 20.6oN, 30.1oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Winter

  3. Craters and Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    11 March 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some typical relations between impact craters and light-toned, layered rock on Mars. The larger circular feature at the north (top) end of the image marks the location of a filled, buried crater on intermountain terrain north of Hellas Planitia. The larger crater at the southeast (lower right) corner formed by meteor impact into the layered material in which the buried crater is encased. The layered rock, in this case, has a light tone similar to the sedimentary rocks being explored by the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, thousands of kilometers away in Sinus Meridiani.

    Location near: 24.9oS, 299.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  4. Cratering evaluations and results

    SciTech Connect

    Church, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Investigations were performed on the 1-mil ultrasonic aluminum wire bonding process to determine how the interaction of the bonding parameters, ultrasonic power, time, force, and aluminum wire, contribute to cratering (cracking or damage to oxide/passivation layers). Investigations revealed that power, time, and force can interact at levels which can contribute to cratering. The age of the aluminum wire can also influence the quality of bonds.

  5. Har Crater on Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image shows a heavily cratered region near Callisto's equator. It was taken by the Galileo spacecraft Solid State Imaging (CCD) system on its ninth orbit around Jupiter. North is to the top of the image. The 50 kilometer (30 mile) double ring crater in the center of the image is named Har. Har displays an unusual rounded mound on its floor. The origin of the mound is unclear but probably involves uplift of ice-rich materials from below, either as a 'rebound' immediately following the impact that formed the crater or as a later process. Har is older than the prominent 20 kilometer (12 mile) crater superposed on its western rim. The large crater partially visible in the northeast corner of the image is called Tindr. Chains of secondary craters (craters formed from the impact of materials thrown out of the main crater during an impact) originating from Tindr crosscut the eastern rim of Har.

    The image, centered at 3.3 degrees south latitude and 357.9 degrees west longitude, covers an area of 120 kilometers by 115 kilometers (75 miles by 70 miles). The sun illuminates the scene from the west (left). The smallest distinguishable features in the image are about 294 meters (973 feet) across. This image was obtained on June 25, 1997, when Galileo was 14,080 kilometers (8,590 miles) from Callisto.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  6. Zhamanshin meteor crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florenskiy, P. V.; Dabizha, A. I.

    1987-01-01

    A historical survey and geographic, geologic and geophysical characteristics, the results of many years of study of the Zhamanshin meteor crater in the Northern Aral region, are reported. From this data the likely initial configuration and cause of formation of the crater are reconstructed. Petrographic and mineralogical analyses are given of the brecciated and remelted rocks, of the zhamanshinites and irgizite tektites in particular. The impact melting, dispersion and quenching processes resulting in tektite formation are discussed.

  7. Named Venusian craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Joel F.; Schaber, Gerald G.

    1993-01-01

    Schaber et al. compiled a database of 841 craters on Venus, based on Magellan coverage of 89 percent of the planet's surface. That database, derived from coverage of approximately 98 percent of Venus' surface, has been expanded to 912 craters, ranging in diameter from 1.5 to 280 km. About 150 of the larger craters were previously identified by Pioneer Venus and Soviet Venera projects and subsequently formally named by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). Altogether, the crater names submitted to the IAU for approval to date number about 550, a little more than half of the number of craters identified on Magellan images. The IAU will consider more names as they are submitted for approval. Anyone--planetary scientist or layman--may submit names; however, candidate names must conform to IAU rules. The person to be honored must be deceased for at least three years, must not be a religious figure or a military or political figure of the 19th or 20th century, and, for Venus, must be a woman. All formally and provisionally approved names for Venusian impact craters, along with their latitude, longitude, size, and origin of their name, will be presented at LPSC and will be available as handouts.

  8. Craters on comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, J.; Oklay, N.; Marchi, S.; Höfner, S.; Sierks, H.

    2014-07-01

    This paper reviews the observations of crater-like features on cometary nuclei. ''Pits'' have been observed on almost all cometary nuclei but their origin is not fully understood [1,2,3,4]. It is currently assumed that they are created mainly by the cometary activity with a pocket of volatiles erupting under a dust crust, leaving a hole behind. There are, however, other features which cannot be explained in this way and are interpreted alternatively as remnants of impact craters. This work focusses on the second type of pit features: impact craters. We present an in-depth review of what has been observed previously and conclude that two main types of crater morphologies can be observed: ''pit-halo'' and ''sharp pit''. We extend this review by a series of analysis of impact craters on cometary nuclei through different approaches [5]: (1) Probability of impact: We discuss the chances that a Jupiter Family Comet like 9P/Tempel 1 or the target of Rosetta 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko can experience an impact, taking into account the most recent work on the size distribution of small objects in the asteroid Main Belt [6]. (2) Crater morphology from scaling laws: We present the status of scaling laws for impact craters on cometary nuclei [7] and discuss their strengths and limitations when modeling what happens when a rocky projectile hits a very porous material. (3) Numerical experiments: We extend the work on scaling laws by a series of hydrocode impact simulations, using the iSALE shock physics code [8,9,10] for varying surface porosity and impactor velocity (see Figure). (4) Surface processes and evolution: We discuss finally the fate of the projectile and the effects of the impact-induced surface compaction on the activity of the nucleus. To summarize, we find that comets do undergo impacts although the rapid evolution of the surface erases most of the features and make craters difficult to detect. In the case of a collision between a rocky body and a highly porous

  9. Impact Cratering Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    Many Martian craters are surrounded by ejecta blankets which appear to have been fluidized forming lobate and layered deposits terminated by one or more continuous distal scarps, or ramparts. One of the first hypotheses for the formation of so-called rampart ejecta features was shock-melting of subsurface ice, entrainment of liquid water into the ejecta blanket, and subsequent fluidized flow. Our work quantifies this concept. Rampart ejecta found on all but the youngest volcanic and polar regions, and the different rampart ejecta morphologies are correlated with crater size and terrain. In addition, the minimum diameter of craters with rampart features decreases with increasing latitude indicating that ice laden crust resides closer to the surface as one goes poleward on Mars. Our second goal in was to determine what strength model(s) reproduce the faults and complex features found in large scale gravity driven craters. Collapse features found in large scale craters require that the rock strength weaken as a result of the shock processing of rock and the later cratering shear flows. In addition to the presence of molten silicate in the intensely shocked region, the presence of water, either ambient, or the result of shock melting of ice weakens rock. There are several other mechanisms for the reduction of strength in geologic materials including dynamic tensile and shear induced fracturing. Fracturing is a mechanism for large reductions in strength. We found that by incorporating damage into the models that we could in a single integrated impact calculation, starting in the atmosphere produce final crater profiles having the major features found in the field measurements (central uplifts, inner ring, terracing and faulting). This was accomplished with undamaged surface strengths (0.1 GPa) and in depth strengths (1.0 GPa).

  10. Crater Lake revealed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, David W.; Dartnell, Peter; Bacon, Charles R.; Robinson, Joel E.; Gardner, James V.

    2003-01-01

    Around 500,000 people each year visit Crater Lake National Park in the Cascade Range of southern Oregon. Volcanic peaks, evergreen forests, and Crater Lake’s incredibly blue water are the park’s main attractions. Crater Lake partially fills the caldera that formed approximately 7,700 years ago by the eruption and subsequent collapse of a 12,000-foot volcano called Mount Mazama. The caldera-forming or climactic eruption of Mount Mazama drastically changed the landscape all around the volcano and spread a blanket of volcanic ash at least as far away as southern Canada. Prior to the climactic event, Mount Mazama had a 400,000 year history of cone building activity like that of other Cascade volcanoes such as Mount Shasta. Since the climactic eruption, there have been several less violent, smaller postcaldera eruptions within the caldera itself. However, relatively little was known about the specifics of these eruptions because their products were obscured beneath Crater Lake’s surface. As the Crater Lake region is still potentially volcanically active, understanding past eruptive events is important to understanding future eruptions, which could threaten facilities and people at Crater Lake National Park and the major transportation corridor east of the Cascades. Recently, the lake bottom was mapped with a high-resolution multibeam echo sounder. The new bathymetric survey provides a 2m/pixel view of the lake floor from its deepest basins virtually to the shoreline. Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications, the bathymetry data can be visualized and analyzed to shed light on the geology, geomorphology, and geologic history of Crater Lake.

  11. Venus - Impact Crater 'Isabella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Crater Isabella, with a diameter of 175 kilometers (108 miles), seen in this Magellan radar image, is the second largest impact crater on Venus. The feature is named in honor of the 15th Century queen of Spain, Isabella of Castile. Located at 30 degrees south latitude, 204 degrees east longitude, the crater has two extensive flow-like structures extending to the south and to the southeast. The end of the southern flow partially surrounds a pre-existing 40 kilometer (25 mile) circular volcanic shield. The southeastern flow shows a complex pattern of channels and flow lobes, and is overlain at its southeastern tip by deposits from a later 20 kilometer (12 mile) diameter impact crater, Cohn (for Carola Cohn, Australian artist, 1892-1964). The extensive flows, unique to Venusian impact craters, are a continuing subject of study for a number of planetary scientists. It is thought that the flows may consist of 'impact melt,' rock melted by the intense heat released in the impact explosion. An alternate hypothesis invokes 'debris flows,' which may consist of clouds of hot gases and both melted and solid rock fragments that race across the landscape during the impact event. That type of emplacement process is similar to that which occurs in violent eruptions on Earth, such as the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines.

  12. The scaling of secondary craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, Steven K.

    1991-01-01

    Secondary craters are common features around fresh planetary-scale primary impact craters throughout most of the Solar System. They derive from the ejection phase of crater formation, thus secondary scaling relations provide constraints on parameters affecting ejection processes. Secondary crater fields typically begin at the edge of the continuous ejecta blankets (CEB) and extend out several crater radii. Secondaries tend to have rounded rims and bilateral symmetry about an axis through the primary crater's center. Prominent secondary chains can extend inward across the CEB close to the rim. A simple method for comparing secondary crater fields was employed: averaging the diameters and ranges from the center of the primary crater of the five largest craters in a secondary crater field. While not as much information is obtained about individual crater fields by this method as in more complete secondary field mapping, it facilitates rapid comparison of many secondary fields. Also, by quantifying a few specific aspects of the secondary crater field, this method can be used to construct scaling relations for secondary craters.

  13. Small Impact Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    22 June 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small impact crater with a 'butterfly' ejecta pattern. The butterfly pattern results from an oblique impact. Not all oblique impacts result in an elliptical crater, but they can result in a non-radial pattern of ejecta distribution. The two-toned nature of the ejecta -- with dark material near the crater and brighter material further away -- might indicate the nature of subsurface materials. Below the surface, there may be a layer of lighter-toned material, underlain by a layer of darker material. The impact throws these materials out in a pattern that reflects the nature of the underlying layers.

    Location near: 3.7oN, 348.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  14. 'Happy Face' Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-361, 15 May 2003

    Every day, the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) wide angle instruments obtain a global view of the planet to help monitor weather and seasonal patterns of frost deposition and removal. The two pictures shown here are taken from the same daily global image mosaic (the only difference is that each was processed slightly differently). The pictures show Galle Crater, informally known as 'Happy Face,' as it appeared in early southern winter. The white-ish gray surfaces are coated with wintertime carbon dioxide frost. The pattern of frost distribution gives the appearance that 'Happy Face' has opened its mouth. Galle Crater is located on the east rim of Argyre at 51oS, 31oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left. Galle Crater is 230 km (143 mi) across.

  15. Impact crater scaling laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holsapple, K. A.

    1987-01-01

    Impact craters are numerous on planetary bodies and furnish important information about the composition and past histories of those bodies. The interpretation of that information requires knowledge about the fundamental aspects of impact cratering mechanics. Since the typical conditions of impacts are at a size scale and velocity far in excess of experimental capabilities, direct simulations are precluded. Therefore, one must rely on extrapolation from experiments of relatively slow impacts of very small bodies, using physically based scaling laws, or must study the actual cases of interest using numerical code solutions of the fundamental physical laws that govern these processes. A progress report is presented on research on impact cratering scaling laws, on numerical studies that were designed to investigate those laws, and on various applications of the scaling laws developed by the author and his colleagues. These applications are briefly reviewed.

  16. 'Bonneville Crater' Panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for 'Bonneville Crater' Panorama (QTVR)

    This 360-degree view from a position beside the crater informally named 'Bonneville' was assembled from frames taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. Half of this panorama was first released on March 15, 2004. The entire mosaic, recently completed, reveals not only the crater rim and interior, but Spirit's tracks and a glimpse at part of the rover. The images were acquired on sol 68, March 12, 2004, just one day after Spirit reached this location.

    The image is a false-color composite made from frames taken with the camera's L2 (750 nanometer), L5 (530 nanometer) and L6 (480 nanometer) filters.

  17. Turn Your Boys into Readers!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allyn, Pam

    2011-01-01

    Girls outscore boys in reading proficiency levels; the gender gap is startling and concerning. The myth that boys won't read or that it's not "cool" for boys to love reading plays a big part in how these low levels come to be. Low expectations from teachers, and an assumption that boys prefer physical activity, mean that boys often don't find…

  18. Craters! A Multi-Science Approach to Cratering and Impacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, William K.; Cain, Joe

    This book provides a complete Scope Sequence and Coordination teaching module. First, craters are introduced as a generally observable phenomena. Then, by making craters and by investigating the results, students gain close-up, hands-on experience with impact events and their products. Real crater examples from the Moon and elsewhere are included…

  19. Khensu Crater on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The dark-floored crater, Khensu, is the target of this image of Ganymede. The solid state imaging camera on NASA's Galileo spacecraft imaged this region as it passed Ganymede during its second orbit through the Jovian system. Khensu is located at 2 degrees latitude and 153 degrees longitude in a region of bright terrain known as Uruk Sulcus, and is about 13 kilometers (8 miles) in diameter. Like some other craters on Ganymede, it possesses an unusually dark floor and a bright ejecta blanket. The dark component may be residual material from the impactor that formed the crater. Another possibility is that the impactor may have punched through the bright surface to reveal a dark layer beneath.

    Another large crater named El is partly visible in the top-right corner of the image. This crater is 54 kilometers (34 miles) in diameter and has a small 'pit' in its center. Craters with such a 'central pit' are common across Ganymede and are especially intriguing since they may reveal secrets about the structure of the satellite's shallow subsurface.

    North is to the top-left of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from nearly overhead. The image covers an area about 100 kilometers (62 miles) by 86 kilometers (54 miles) across at a resolution of 111 meters (370 feet) per picture element. The image was taken on September 6, 1996 by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  20. Nergal Crater on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Two impact craters surrounded by an unusual ejecta blanket dominate this high resolution image of the surface of Jupiter's moon, Ganymede. NASA's Galileo spacecraft imaged this region as it passed Ganymede during its second orbit through the Jovian system. North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the southeast. Nergal, the larger crater, is about eight kilometers (five miles) in diameter, while the smaller (unnamed) crater to its west is three kilometers (1.8 miles) across. The craters are situated in a region of bright grooved terrain named Byblus Sulcus, located in the northern part of Marius Regio at 39 degrees latitude and 201 degrees longitude. The distinctive ejecta blanket that surrounds them is darker nearer the craters and brighter further away. The inner region of the ejecta is characterized by a lobate appearance indicative of the flow of a liquid (or slushy) substance over the surface. The flow was probably icy surface material melted by the energy released during the impact that formed the crater.

    The picture covers an area about 48 kilometers (30 miles) by 34 kilometers (21 miles) across at a resolution of 86 meters (287 feet) per picture element. The image was taken on September 6, 1996 by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  1. National Boy Scout Jamboree

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This video looks at a NASA sponsored exhibit at the National Boy Scout Jamboree in Fredricksburg, VA. Boy Scouts are shown interacting with NASA researchers and astronauts and touring mockups of Space Station Freedom and Apollo 11. NASA's program to encourage the researchers of tomorrow is detailed.

  2. Boys and Girls Apart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahood, Ramona M.; Orr, Donald R.

    This paper reports on a study to see whether girls in middle school who took tests separately from boys did better than when they were tested together. A mathematics attitude and anxiety instrument was administered as part of the study to determine if either had any effect on test performance. Results indicate that boys were more anxious than…

  3. Boys and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper explores key gender differences in motivation from a quantitative perspective and presents findings from a qualitative study into boys' perceptions of motivating teachers and motivating pedagogy. Data collected from 3773 high school students suggest that girls score significantly higher than boys in their belief in the value of school,…

  4. Eskimo Boy Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Byron

    "Eskimo Boy Today" provides the reader with an account of what it is like to be a young Eskimo boy living in Barrow, Alaska, today. Accounts of his life at school depict the typical curriculum and learning activities, while accounts of his home life depict typical foods, clothing, and housing. The natural resources and their relationship to the…

  5. Planetary cratering mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, John D.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    To obtain a quantitative understanding of the cratering process over a broad range of conditions, we have numerically computed the evolution of impact induced flow fields and calculated the time histories of the major measures of crater geometry (e.g., depth diameter, lip height ...) for variations in planetary gravity (0 to 10 exp 9 cm/sq seconds), material strength (0 to 140 kbar), thermodynamic properties, and impactor radius (0.05 to 5000 km). These results were fit into the framework of the scaling relations of Holsapple and Schmidt (1987). We describe the impact process in terms of four regimes: (1) penetration; (2) inertial; (3) terminal; and (4) relaxation.

  6. Crater and Wind Streak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-461, 23 August 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a crater with a bright wind streak in southern Acidalia Planitia. The streak is mostly likely a very thin coating of dust. The orientation of the streak indicates that the winds responsible for its formation and maintenance came from the northeast (upper right) and blew toward the lower left (southwest). The crater is located near 24.8oN, 39.1oW. The image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  7. Layered Crater Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    16 September 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an impact crater that is approximately 3.5 kilometers (2.2 miles) in diameter. It is located to the northeast of Olympus Mons, in the Tharsis Region. Layered rock units are visible on the inside of the raised crater rim.

    Location near: 70.7oN, 271.0oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  8. Boy Trouble: Rhetorical Framing of Boys' Underachievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, Jordan J.

    2004-01-01

    This article examines discourse in the United States used to socially construct an "underachieving boys" moral panic. Employing discourse analysis I examine the adversarial rhetoric of claims-makers and the frames they deploy to undermine alternative and conflicting accounts (of females as disadvantaged) and to forestall any challenges to the…

  9. An understudied crater in Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, Harry D.

    1992-09-01

    A little-known possible meteorite crater discovered in the early 1920's in Nye County, Nevada, by Ralph Irwing is described. The crater called the Irwing Crater was visited by the author on July 11, 1992. Photographs of the feature are presented.

  10. Secrets of the Wabar craters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, Jeffrey C.; Shoemaker, Eugene M.

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on the existence of craters in the Empty Quarter of Saudi Arabia created by the impact of meteors in early times. Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor's encounter with impact craters; Elimination of craters in the Earth's surface by the action of natural elements; Impact sites' demand for careful scientific inspections; Location of the impact sites.

  11. Rim of Henry Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 02 April 2002) This portion of the rim of Henry Crater has numerous dark streaks located on the slopes of the inner crater wall. These dark slope streaks have been suggested to have formed when the relatively bright dust that mantles the slopes slides downhill, either exposing a dust-free darker surface or creating a darker surface by increasing its roughness. The topography in this region appears muted, indicating the presence of regional dust mantling. The materials on floor of the crater (middle to lower left) are layered, with differing degrees of hardness and resistance to erosion producing cliffs (resistant layers) and ledges (easily eroded layers). These layered materials may have been originally deposited in water, although deposition by other means, such as windblown dust and sand, is also possible. Henry Crater, named after a 19th Century French astronomer, is 170 km in diameter and is located at 10.9o N, 336.7o W (23.3o E) in a region called Arabia Terra.

  12. Reading 'Endurance Crater'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    This image shows the area inside 'Endurance Crater' that the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been examining. The rover is investigating the distinct layers of rock that make up this region. Each layer is defined by subtle color and texture variations and represents a separate chapter in Mars' history. The deeper the layer, the further back in time the rocks were formed. Scientists are 'reading' this history book by systematically studying each layer with the rover's scientific instruments. So far, data from the rover indicate that the top layers are sulfate-rich, like the rocks observed in 'Eagle Crater.' This implies that water processes were involved in forming the materials that make up these rocks.

    In figure 1, the layer labeled 'A' in this picture contains broken-up rocks that most closely resemble those of 'Eagle Crater.' Layers 'B,C and D' appear less broken up and more finely laminated. Layer 'E,' on the other hand, looks more like 'A.' At present, the rover is examining layer 'D.'

    So far, data from the rover indicates that the first four layers consist of sulfate-rich, jarosite-containing rocks like those observed in Eagle Crater. This implies that water processes were involved in forming the materials that make up these rocks, though the materials themselves may have been laid down by wind.

    This image was taken by Opportunity's navigation camera on sol 134 (June 9, 2004).

  13. Impact Cratering Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    Understanding the physical processes of impact cratering on planetary surfaces and atmospheres as well as collisions of finite-size self-gravitating objects is vitally important to planetary science. The observation has often been made that craters are the most ubiquitous landform on the solid planets and the satellites. The density of craters is used to date surfaces on planets and satellites. For large ringed basin craters (e.g. Chicxulub), the issue of identification of exactly what 'diameter' transient crater is associated with this structure is exemplified by the arguments of Sharpton et al. (1993) versus those of Hildebrand et al. (1995). The size of a transient crater, such as the K/T extinction crater at Yucatan, Mexico, which is thought to be the source of SO,-induced sulfuric acid aerosol that globally acidified surface waters as the result of massive vaporization of CASO, in the target rock, is addressed by our present project. The impact process excavates samples of planetary interiors. The degree to which this occurs (e.g. how deeply does excavation occur for a given crater diameter) has been of interest, both with regard to exposing mantle rocks in crater floors, as well as launching samples into space which become part of the terrestrial meteorite collection (e.g. lunar meteorites, SNC's from Mars). Only in the case of the Earth can we test calculations in the laboratory and field. Previous calculations predict, independent of diameter, that the depth of excavation, normalized by crater diameter, is d(sub ex)/D = 0.085 (O'Keefe and Ahrens, 1993). For Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) fragments impacting Jupiter, predicted excavation depths of different gas-rich layers in the atmosphere, were much larger. The trajectory and fate of highly shocked material from a large impact on the Earth, such as the K/T bolide is of interest. Melosh et al. (1990) proposed that the condensed material from the impact upon reentering the Earth's atmosphere induced. radiative

  14. Europa's Pwyll Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This view of the Pwyll impact crater on Jupiter's moon Europa taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft shows the interior structure and surrounding ejecta deposits. Pwyll's location is shown in the background global view taken by Galileo's camera on December 16, 1997. Bright rays seen radiating from Pwyll in the global image indicate that this crater is geologically young. The rim of Pwyll is about 26 kilometers (16 miles) in diameter, and a halo of dark material excavated from below the surface extends a few kilometers beyond the rim. Beyond this dark halo, the surface is bright and numerous secondary craters can be seen. The closeup view of Pwyll, which combines imaging data gathered during the December flyby and the flyby of February 20, 1997, indicates that unlike most fresh impact craters, which have much deeper floors, Pwyll's crater floor is at approximately the same level as the surrounding background terrain.

    North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the northeast. This closeup image, centered at approximately 26 degrees south latitude and 271 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 125 by 75 kilometers (75 by 45 miles). The finest details that can be discerned in this picture are about 250 meters (800 feet) across. This image was taken on at a range of 12,400 kilometers (7,400 miles), with the green filter of Galileo's solid state imaging system.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  15. 'Erebus Crater' on the Horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This is a mosaic assembled from some of the images taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the rover's 590th sol (Sept. 21, 2005). The view is toward the south and includes rock exposures north of 'Erebus Crater,' with the crater in the background. The rover will investigate the exposed rocks in the foreground and will take additional panoramic-camera images of Erebus Crater, which is about 300 meters (about 984 feet) across.

    Erebus Crater dwarfs the landing-site crater, 'Eagle Crater,' which measures about 22 meters (72 feet) in diameter. And, it is nearly twice the diameter of 'Endurance Crater,' which, at 130 meters (430 feet) wide, has been compared to a stadium.

    The camera's red filter was used for taking the images in this mosaic. It admits light with a wavelength of 750 nanometers.

  16. Central pit craters on Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzate, Nathalia; Barlow, Nadine G.

    2011-02-01

    Central pit craters are common on Mars, Ganymede and Callisto, and thus are generally believed to require target volatiles in their formation. The purpose of this study is to identify the environmental conditions under which central pit craters form on Ganymede. We have conducted a study of 471 central pit craters with diameters between 5 and 150 km on Ganymede and compared the results to 1604 central pit craters on Mars (diameter range 5-160 km). Both floor and summit pits occur on Mars whereas floor pits dominate on Ganymede. Central peak craters are found in similar locations and diameter ranges as central pit craters on Mars and overlap in location and at diameters <60 km on Ganymede. Central pit craters show no regional variations on either Ganymede or Mars and are not concentrated on specific geologic units. Central pit craters show a range of preservation states, indicating that conditions favoring central pit formation have existed since crater-retaining surfaces have existed on Ganymede and Mars. Central pit craters on Ganymede are generally about three times larger than those on Mars, probably due to gravity scaling although target characteristics and resolution also may play a role. Central pits tend to be larger relative to their parent crater on Ganymede than on Mars, probably because of Ganymede's purer ice crust. A transition to different characteristics occurs in Ganymede's icy crust at depths of 4-7 km based on the larger pit-to-crater-diameter relationship for craters in the 70-130-km-diameter range and lack of central peaks in craters larger than 60-km-diameter. We use our results to constrain the proposed formation models for central pits on these two bodies. Our results are most consistent with the melt-drainage model for central pit formation.

  17. Puberty in boys

    MedlinePlus

    ... boys will have it. You will also get erections more often. An erection is when your penis becomes bigger, hard, and stands out from your body. Erections can happen at any time. This is normal. ...

  18. Layered Rocks in Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    19 June 2004 Exposures of layered, sedimentary rock are common on Mars. From the rock outcrops examined by the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, in Meridiani Planum to the sequence in Gale Crater's central mound that is twice the thickness of of the sedimentary rocks exposed by Arizona's Grand Canyon, Mars presents a world of sediment to study. This unusual example, imaged by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), shows eroded layer outcrops in a crater in Terra Tyrrhena near 15.4oS, 270.5oW. Sedimentary rocks provide a record of past climates and events. Perhaps someday the story told by the rocks in this image will be known via careful field work. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the left.

  19. Layers in Terby Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-407, 30 June 2003

    Whether on Earth or Mars, sedimentary rocks provide a record of past environments. Of course, it is difficult to read that record without being able to visit the site. However, the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) has revealed hundreds of locales on Mars at which sedimentary rocks are exposed at the surface. Terby Crater exhibits hundreds of layers of similar thickness and physical properties--some have speculated these may be the record of an ancient lake or sea. This MOC image shows some of the layer outcrops in Terby Crater. Fans of debris have eroded from the steep, layered slopes in some places. This picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide near 27.5oS, 285.7oW. The image is illuminated from the upper left and was obtained in June 2003.

  20. Exhumed Arabian Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    26 August 2004 Eastern Arabia Terra shares many attributes with western Arabia and Sinus Meridiani. In particular, it is a region of vast layered rock within which are interbedded filled and buried craters and valleys. Erosion has subsequently re-exposed many of these landforms, including the exhumed and eroded crater shown in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image. Following the period in which erosion occurred, the region was blanketed by dust. This image is located near 22.5oN, 318.4oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left/lower left.

  1. The LCROSS cratering experiment.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Peter H; Hermalyn, Brendan; Colaprete, Anthony; Ennico, Kimberly; Shirley, Mark; Marshall, William S

    2010-10-22

    As its detached upper-stage launch vehicle collided with the surface, instruments on the trailing Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) Shepherding Spacecraft monitored the impact and ejecta. The faint impact flash in visible wavelengths and thermal signature imaged in the mid-infrared together indicate a low-density surface layer. The evolving spectra reveal not only OH within sunlit ejecta but also other volatile species. As the Shepherding Spacecraft approached the surface, it imaged a 25- to-30-meter-diameter crater and evidence of a high-angle ballistic ejecta plume still in the process of returning to the surface--an evolution attributed to the nature of the impactor. PMID:20966243

  2. Northern Plains 'Crater'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    10 December 2004 The lower left (southwest) corner of this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the location of a somewhat filled and buried meteor impact crater on the northern plains of Mars. The dark dots are boulders. A portion of a similar feature is seen in the upper right (northeast) corner of the image. This picture, showing landforms (including the odd mound north/northeast of the crater) that are typical of the martian northern lowland plains, was obtained as part of the MGS MOC effort to support the search for a landing site for the Phoenix Mars Scout lander. Phoenix will launch in 2007 and land on the northern plains in 2008. This image is located near 68.0oN, 227.4oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  3. Carbon associated nitrate (CAN) in the Ediacaran Johnnie Formation, Death Valley, California and links to the Shuram negative carbon isotope excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilles, Z. Y. G.; Prokopenko, M. G.; Bergmann, K.; Loyd, S. J.; Corsetti, F. A.; Berelson, W.; Gaines, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen, a major nutrient of marine primary production whose many redox states are linked through biological processes to O2, may afford better understanding of changes in post-Great Oxidation Event (GOE) environmental redox conditions. Using a novel approach to quantify nitrate content in carbonates, we identified a trend of CAN increase in the late-Proterozoic, including several distinct peaks within a carbonate succession of the Sonora province, Mexico, deposited ~630-500 Ma. The goal of the current study was to investigate CAN variability in the context of the global "Shuram" event, a large negative δ13C excursion expressed in Rainstorm member carbonates of the Johnnie Formation in Death Valley, CA. The lower Rainstorm Member "Johnnie Oolite", a time-transgressive, regionally extensive, shallow dolomitic oolite, was sampled. CAN concentrations ranged from 7.31 to 127.36 nmol/g, with higher values measured toward the base of the bed. This trend held at each sampled locality, along with a tendency towards decreasing CAN with larger magnitude negative δ13C excursions. Modern analog ooids formed in low-latitude marine environments lack CAN, consistent with their formation in low-nitrate waters of the euphotic zone characteristic of the modern ocean nitrogen cycling. In contrast, maximum values within the Johnnie oolite exceed by a factor of five to seven CAN measured in carbonates deposited below the main nitracline in the modern ocean, implying high nitrate content within shallow depositional environments. Johnnie oolite data, broadly consistent with the Sonora sequence findings, may indicate large perturbations in the Ediacaran nitrogen cycle immediately preceding the negative δ13C excursion. The implication of these findings for possible changes in the Ediacaran nitrogen, oxygen and carbon biogeochemical cycling will be further discussed.

  4. Teaching Boys: A Relational Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raider-Roth, Miriam B.; Albert, Marta K.; Bircann-Barkey, Ingrid; Gidseg, Eric; Murray, Terry

    2008-01-01

    Focus of Study: This article investigates how teachers' relationships with boys can be central in bolstering boys' resilience and connection to their work in schools. Specifically, we examine how teachers understand the ways that their relationships with boys shape their teaching practice as well as their understandings of boys' learning in…

  5. Callisto Crater Chain Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This mosaic of three images shows an area within the Valhalla region on Jupiter's moon, Callisto. North is to the top of the mosaic and the Sun illuminates the surface from the left. The smallest details that can be discerned in this picture are knobs and small impact craters about 160 meters (175 yards) across. The mosaic covers an area approximately 45 kilometers (28 miles) across. It shows part of a prominent crater chain located on the northern part of the Valhalla ring structure.

    Crater chains can form from the impact of material ejected from large impacts (forming secondary chains) or by the impact of a fragmented projectile, perhaps similar to the Shoemaker-Levy 9 cometary impacts into Jupiter in July 1994. It is believed this crater chain was formed by the impact of a fragmented projectile. The images which form this mosaic were obtained by the solid state imaging system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on Nov. 4, 1996 (Universal Time).

    Launched in October 1989, Galileo entered orbit around Jupiter on December 7, 1995. The spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web Galileo mission home page at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at http:// www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo.

  6. Craters and Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    8 April 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows craters with wind streaks in Acidalia Planitia. The winds responsible for the streaks blew from the upper right (northeast).

    Location near: 37.1oN, 36.8oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Summer

  7. Lohse Crater Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    8 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows windblown sand dunes in Lohse Crater in Noachis Terra near 43.8oS, 16.8oW. The winds responsible for these dunes blew largely from the lower left (southwest) toward the upper right (northeast). The picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across, and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  8. Wind Streak and Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    23 February 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a wind streak developed in the lee of a meteor impact crater in western Daedalia Planum. The dominant winds responsible for the streak blew from the bottom/lower right (southeast). The image is located near 9.9oS, 144.9oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left; the picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  9. Crater in Sabaeus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    12 October 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of an old impact crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars, just south of the large impact basin, Schiaparelli.

    Location near: 6.3oS, 341.7oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Spring

  10. Small Craters on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This high resolution view of the Conamara Chaos region on Jupiter's icy moon, Europa, reveals craters which range in size from about 30 meters to over 450 meters (slightly over a quarter of a mile) in diameter. The large number of craters seen here is unusual for Europa. This section of Conamara Chaos lies inside a bright ray of material which was ejected by the large impact crater, Pwyll, 1000 kilometers (620 miles) to the south. The presence of craters within the bright ray suggests that many are secondaries which formed from chunks of material that were thrown out by the enormous energy of the impact which formed Pwyll.

    North is to the upper right of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the east. The image, centered at 9 degrees latitude and 274 degrees longitude, covers an area approximately 8 by 4 kilometers (5 by 2.5 miles). The finest details that can be discerned in this picture are about 20 meters (66 feet) across. The images were taken on December 16, 1997 at a range of 960 kilometers (590 miles) by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  11. Terra Cimmeria Crater Landslide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The landslide in this VIS image is located inside an impact crater in the Terra Cimmeria region of Mars. The unnamed crater hosting this image is just east of Molesworth Crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -27.7, Longitude 152 East (208 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Isidis Crater Landslide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The landslide in this VIS image is located inside an impact crater located south of the Isidis Planitia region of Mars. As with the previous unnamed crater landslide, this one formed due to slope failure of the inner crater rim.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.9, Longitude 90.8 East (269.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  13. Impact Cratering Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    We examined the von Mises and Mohr-Coulomb strength models with and without damage effects and developed a model for dilatancy. The models and results are given in O'Keefe et al. We found that by incorporating damage into the models that we could in a single integrated impact calculation, starting with the bolide in the atmosphere produce final crater profiles having the major features found in the field measurements. These features included a central uplift, an inner ring, circular terracing and faulting. This was accomplished with undamaged surface strengths of approximately 0.1 GPa and at depth strengths of approximately 1.0 GPa. We modeled the damage in geologic materials using a phenomenological approach, which coupled the Johnson-Cook damage model with the CTH code geologic strength model. The objective here was not to determine the distribution of fragment sizes, but rather to determine the effect of brecciated and comminuted material on the crater evolution, fault production, ejecta distribution, and final crater morphology.

  14. Mare Chromium Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This crater, located in Mare Chromium, shows evidence of exterior modification, with little interior modification. While the rim is still visible, the ejecta blanket has been removed or covered. There is some material at the bottom of the crater, but the interior retains the bowl shape from the initial formation of the crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -34.4, Longitude 174.4 East (185.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  15. Fractured Craters on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Two highly fractured craters are visible in this high resolution image of Jupiter's moon, Ganymede. NASA's Galileo spacecraft imaged this region as it passed Ganymede during its second orbit through the Jovian system. North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the southeast. The two craters in the center of the image lie in the ancient dark terrain of Marius Regio, at 40 degrees latitude and 201 degrees longitude, at the border of a region of bright grooved terrain known as Byblus Sulcus (the eastern portion of which is visible on the left of this image). Pervasive fracturing has occurred in this area that has completely disrupted these craters and destroyed their southern and western walls. Such intense fracturing has occurred over much of Ganymede's surface and has commonly destroyed older features. The image covers an area approximately 26 kilometers (16 miles) by 18 kilometers (11 miles) across at a resolution of 86 meters (287 feet) per picture element. The image was taken on September 6, 1996 by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  16. Crater gradation in Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, J. A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Crumpler, L.S.; Golombek, M.P.; Hahn, B.; Haldemann, A.F.C.; Li, R.; Soderblom, L.A.; Squyres, S. W.; Wright, S.P.; Watters, W.A.

    2006-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers investigated numerous craters in Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum during the first ???400 sols of their missions. Craters vary in size and preservation state but are mostly due to secondary impacts at Gusev and primary impacts at Meridiani. Craters at both locations are modified primarily by eolian erosion and infilling and lack evidence for modification by aqueous processes. Effects of gradation on crater form are dependent on size, local lithology, slopes, and availability of mobile sediments. At Gusev, impacts into basaltic rubble create shallow craters and ejecta composed of resistant rocks. Ejecta initially experience eolian stripping, which becomes weathering-limited as lags develop on ejecta surfaces and sediments are trapped within craters. Subsequent eolian gradation depends on the slow production of fines by weathering and impacts and is accompanied by minor mass wasting. At Meridiani the sulfate-rich bedrock is more susceptible to eolian erosion, and exposed crater rims, walls, and ejecta are eroded, while lower interiors and low-relief surfaces are increasingly infilled and buried by mostly basaltic sediments. Eolian processes outpace early mass wasting, often produce meters of erosion, and mantle some surfaces. Some small craters were likely completely eroded/buried. Craters >100 m in diameter on the Hesperian-aged floor of Gusev are generally more pristine than on the Amazonian-aged Meridiani plains. This conclusion contradicts interpretations from orbital views, which do not readily distinguish crater gradation state at Meridiani and reveal apparently subdued crater forms at Gusev that may suggest more gradation than has occurred. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Young Martian crater Gratteri and its secondary craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quantin, Cathy; Popova, Olga; Hartmann, William K.; Werner, Stephanie C.

    2016-07-01

    In response to questions that have been raised about formation and effects of secondary craters on crater chronometry techniques, we studied properties of the secondary crater field around the young Martian primary ray crater Gratteri (diameter 7 km). The crater has an estimated age of 1 to 20 Myr, based on counts of small craters on flat interior surface, consistent with a likely age for a young crater its size (Hartmann et al., 2010). The following are among our findings: (1) We identify an unusual class of craters we call "rampart secondaries" which may suggest low-angle impacts. (2) We measure size distributions of secondaries as a function of distance from Gratteri and used these data to reconstruct the mass-velocity distribution of ejecta blasted out of Gratteri. Our data suggest that crater density in rays tends to peak around 120-230 km from Gratteri (roughly 20-30D) and reaches roughly 30-70 times the interray crater density. (3) Comparable total numbers of secondaries form inside rays and outside rays, and about half are concentrated in clusters in 2% of the area around Gratteri, with the others scattered over 98% of the area out to 400 km away from Gratteri. (4) In the old Noachian plains around Gratteri, secondaries have minimal effect on crater chronometry. These results, along with recently reported direct measurements of the rate of formation of 10 m to 20 m primaries on Mars (Daubar et al., 2013), tend to negate suggestions that the numbers and/or clustering of secondaries destroy the effectiveness of crater counting as a chronometric tool.

  18. Impacts into Sandstone: Crater Morphology, Crater Scaling and the Effects of Porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poelchau, M. H.; Dufresne, A.; Kenkmann, T.

    2011-03-01

    Crater morphology results from impact cratering experiments in sandstone within the MEMIN program are presented and compared to other brittle materials. The effects of porosity on crater shape, volume and cratering efficiency are analyzed.

  19. Degradation studies of Martian impact craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, N. G.

    1991-01-01

    The amount of obliteration suffered by Martian impact craters is quantified by comparing measurable attributes of the current crater shape to those values expected for a fresh crater of identical size. Crater diameters are measured from profiles obtained using photoclinometry across the structure. The relationship between the diameter of a fresh crater and a crater depth, floor width, rim height, central peak height, etc. was determined by empirical studies performed on fresh Martian impact craters. We utilized the changes in crater depth and rim height to judge the degree of obliteration suffered by Martian impact craters.

  20. Proctor Crater Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This image, located near 30E and 47.5S, displays sand dunes within Proctor Crater. These dunes are composed of basaltic sand that has collected in the bottom of the crater. The topographic depression of the crater forms a sand trap that prevents the sand from escaping. Dune fields are common in the bottoms of craters on Mars and appear as dark splotches that lean up against the downwind walls of the craters. Dunes are useful for studying both the geology and meteorology of Mars. The sand forms by erosion of larger rocks, but it is unclear when and where this erosion took place on Mars or how such large volumes of sand could be formed. The dunes also indicate the local wind directions by their morphology. In this case, there are few clear slipfaces that would indicate the downwind direction. The crests of the dunes also typically run north-south in the image. This dune form indicates that there are probably two prevailing wind directions that run east and west (left to right and right to left).

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project

  1. Iturralde Crater, Bolivia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA scientists will venture into an isolated part of the Bolivian Amazon to try and uncover the origin of a 5 mile (8 kilometer) diameter crater there known as the Iturralde Crater. Traveling to this inhospitable forest setting, the Iturralde Crater Expedition 2002 will seek to determine if the unusual circular crater was created by a meteor or comet. Organized by Dr. Peter Wasilewski of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., the Iturralde Crater Expedition 2002 will be led by Dr. Tim Killeen of Conservation International, which is based in Bolivia. Killeen will be assisted by Dr. Compton Tucker of Goddard. The team intends to collect and analyze rocks and soil, look for glass particles that develop from meteor impacts and study magnetic properties in the area to determine if the Iturralde site was indeed created by a meteor.

    This image was acquired on June 29, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation

  2. Mannann'an Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This composite view taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft shows the rim and interior of the impact crater, Mannann'an, on Jupiter's moon, Europa. A high resolution image (20 meters per picture element) was combined with lower resolution (80 meters per picture element) color images taken through violet, green and near-infrared filters, to produce this synthetic color composite image. The color data can be used to distinguish between regions of purer (clean) and more contaminated (dirty) ice on the surface, and also offers information on the size of the ice grains. The reddish brown material is thought to be dirty ice, while the bluish areas inside the crater are purer ice. The crater rim is on the left at the boundary between the reddish brown material and the gray material.

    The high resolution data show small features inside the crater, including concentric fractures and a spider-like set of fractures near the right (east) edge of the image. For a more regional perspective, the Mannann'an crater can be seen as a large circular feature with bright rays in the lower left corner of a regional image from Galileo's first orbit of Jupiter in June 1996.

    North is to the top of the picture and the Sun illuminates the scene from the east (right). The image, centered at 3 degrees north latitude and 240 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 18 by 4 kilometers (11 by 2.5 miles). The finest details that can be discerned in this picture are about 40 meters (44 yards) across. The images were taken by the spacecraft's onboard solid state imaging camera when Galileo flew by Europa on March 29th, 1998 at a distance of 1,934 kilometers (1,200 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo

  3. Oblique View of Eros' Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image, showing an oblique view of Eros' large central crater, was taken at a resolution of about 20 meters (65 feet) per pixel. The brightness or albedo patterns on the walls of this crater are clearly visible, with the brighter materials near the tops of the walls and darker materials on the lower walls. Boulders are seen inside this crater and the smaller nearby craters. The higher density of craters to the left of the large crater implies that this region is older than the smoother area seen associated with the saddle region on the opposite side of the asteroid.

    Built and managed by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland, NEAR was the first spacecraft launched in NASA's Discovery Program of low-cost, small-scale planetary missions. See the NEAR web page at http://near.jhuapl.edu for more details.

  4. The Martian impact cratering record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, Robert G.; Croft, Steven K.; Barlow, Nadine G.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the Martian impact cratering record is presented. The major differences in impact crater morphology and morphometry between Mars and the moon and Mercury are argued to be largely the result of subsurface volatiles on Mars. In general, the depth to these volatiles may decrease with increasing latitude in the southern hemisphere, but the base of this layer may be at a more or less constant depth. The Martial crustal dichotomy could have been the result of a very large impact near the end of the accretion of Mars. Monte Carlo computer simulations suggest that such an impact was not only possible, but likely. The Martian highland cratering record shows a marked paucity of craters less than about 30 km in diameter relative to the lunar highlands. This paucity of craters was probably the result of the obliteration of craters by an early period of intense erosion and deposition by aeolian, fluvial, and glacial processes.

  5. Crater Count Ages of Young Martian Ray Craters: a Successful Test of the Crater Chronometry System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, William K.; Quantin, C.; Werner, S. C.; Popova, O.

    2008-09-01

    McEwen et al. (2005) developed a useful test of crater-count chronometry systems [1]. They argued that fresh-looking, Zunil-style Martian ray craters are the youngest or near-youngest craters in their size ranges. The "McEwen et al. test" is that crater-count ages from small craters (D 10-25 m), superimposed on these "Zunils," should be comparable to the expected formation intervals of these host Zunil-style primaries themselves, typically 1 to a few My. McEwen et al., however, found few or no small superposed craters in MOC frames, and concluded that crater chronometry systems are in error by factors of 700 to 2000. Since then, Malin et al. discovered that 10-25m craters form at essentially the rate we used in our isochron system [2,3,4]. Thus, 10-25m craters should be usable for dating these "Zunils." We re-evaluate the "McEwen et al. test" with HiRise images, studying three young craters they discussed, and five others. In every case we found small-crater populations, giving approximately the expected ages. We conclude that the alleged large errors are incorrect. The semi-independent crater count systems of Neukum and of Hartmann agree with the Malin cratering rate, are internally consistent, and appear to give valid age information within about a factor 2 to 4. We thank the International Space Science Institute (ISSI), Bern, for hosting our working group. [1] McEwen et al. 2005 Icarus,176, 351-381. [2] Malin, M. et al. 2006 Science 314, 1573-1557. [3] Hartmann, W.K. 2007 Icarus, 189, 274-278. [4] Kreslavsky, M.A. 2007 7th Internatl. Conf. on Mars, Abstract 3325.

  6. 'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mars rover Opportunity edged 3.7 meters (12 feet) closer to the top of the 'Duck Bay' alcove along the rim of 'Victoria Crater' during the rover's 952nd Martian day, or sol (overnight Sept. 27 to Sept. 28), and gained this vista of the crater. The rover's navigation camera took the seven exposures combined into this mosaic view of the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

    The far side of the crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) away. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves, such as Duck Bay. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind. The rocky cliffs in the foreground have been informally named 'Cape Verde,' on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' on the right.

    Victoria Crater is about five times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than 'Eagle Crater,' where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is an expectation that the thick stack of geological layers exposed in the crater walls could reveal the record of past environmental conditions over a much greater span of time than Opportunity has read from rocks examined earlier in the mission.

    This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  7. Identification of craters on Moon using Crater Density Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandana, Vandana

    2016-07-01

    Lunar craters are the most noticeable features on the face of the moon. They take up 40.96% of the lunar surface and, their accumulated area is approximately three times as much as the lunar surface area. There are many myths about the moon. Some says moon is made of cheese. The moon and the sun chase each other across the sky etc. but scientifically the moon are closest and are only natural satellite of earth. The orbit plane of the moon is tilted by 5° and orbit period around the earth is 27-3 days. There are two eclipse i.e. lunar eclipse and solar eclipse which always comes in pair. Moon surface has 3 parts i.e. highland, Maria, and crater. For crater diagnostic crater density parameter is one of the means for measuring distance can be easily identity the density between two craters. Crater size frequency distribution (CSFD) is being computed for lunar surface using TMC and MiniSAR image data and hence, also the age for the selected test sites of mars is also determined. The GIS-based program uses the density and orientation of individual craters within LCCs (as vector points) to identify potential source craters through a series of cluster identification and ejection modeling analyses. JMars software is also recommended and operated only the time when connected with server but work can be done in Arc GIS with the help of Arc Objects and Model Builder. The study plays a vital role to determine the lunar surface based on crater (shape, size and density) and exploring affected craters on the basis of height, weight and velocity. Keywords: Moon; Crater; MiniSAR.

  8. Cratered terrain in Terra Meridiani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 30 April 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image shows a region in Terra Meridiani near -12o S, 358o W (2o E). An old, heavily degraded channel can be seen from the lower (southern) portion of the image toward the top. This channel appears to terminate abruptly at the rim of a 10 km diameter crater. This apparent 'superposition' of the crater on top of the channel suggests that the impact crater was created after the channel was formed. This crater has two 3-km sized blocks of material that have slumped off from the lower left segment of the original crater rim. These immense blocks must have moved as a single unit because the rock layers that can be seen in the original wall of the crater can still be seen in these detached blocks. The walls of several craters in this image show vague hints of possible gully formation at the bottom of pronounced rock layers, with the suggestion of alcoves above the individual gullies. Well-developed gullies that were imaged by the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) on Mars Global Surveyor have been suggested to form by seepage and runoff of a fluid. The MOC has observed these gullies in numerous craters and channels further south, but they are uncommon at latitudes this close to the equator. Several sections of the crater walls appear to have ridges and troughs formed by the dry avalanche of loose rock, and a similar process of dry avalanche may account for the gullies seen in this THEMIS image. Patches of lighter material, possibly small dunes ripples, can be seen in several places throughout this image. The Story When the walls come tumbling down! Take a closer look at the bright linear ridges within a deep crater near the center of this image (bottom, left-hand side of the crater). Almost 2 miles long, these chunks of material slumped off the crater side in one fell swoop. Phoozhj! Down they came as one massive unit. You can tell, because the rock layers seen in the original wall of the crater are also still there in the

  9. Why do complex impact craters have elevated crater rims?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenkmann, Thomas; Sturm, Sebastian; Krueger, Tim

    2014-05-01

    Most of the complex impact craters on the Moon and on Mars have elevated crater rims like their simple counterparts. The raised rim of simple craters is the result of (i) the deposition of a coherent proximal ejecta blanket at the edge of the transient cavity (overturned flap) and (ii) a structural uplift of the pre-impact surface near the transient cavity rim during the excavation stage of cratering [1]. The latter occurs either by plastic thickening or localized buckling of target rocks, as well as by the emplacement of interthrust wedges [2] or by the injection of dike material. Ejecta and the structural uplift contribute equally to the total elevation of simple crater rims. The cause of elevated crater rims of large complex craters [3] is less obvious, but still, the rim height scales with the final crater diameter. Depending on crater size, gravity, and target rheology, the final crater rim of complex craters can be situated up to 1.5-2.0 transient crater radii distance from the crater center. Here the thickness of the ejecta blanket is only a fraction of that occurring at the rim of simple craters, e.g. [4], and thus cannot account for a strong elevation. Likewise, plastic thickening including dike injection of the underlying target may not play a significant role at this distance any more. We started to systematically investigate the structural uplift and ejecta thickness along the rim of complex impact craters to understand the cause of their elevation. Our studies of two lunar craters (Bessel, 16 km diameter and Euler, 28 km diameter) [5] and one unnamed complex martian crater (16 km diameter) [6] showed that the structural uplift at the final crater rim makes 56-67% of the total rim elevation while the ejecta thickness contributes 33-44%. Thus with increasing distance from the transient cavity rim, the structural uplift seems to dominate. As dike injection and plastic thickening are unlikely at such a distance from the transient cavity, we propose that

  10. Crater Highlands, Tanzania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), flown aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour in February 2000, acquired elevation measurements for nearly all of Earth's landmass between 60oN and 56oS latitudes. For many areas of the world SRTM data provide the first detailed three-dimensional observation of landforms at regional scales. SRTM data were used to generate this view of the Crater Highlands along the East African Rift in Tanzania. Landforms are depicted with colored height and shaded relief, using a vertical exaggeration of 2X and a southwestwardly look direction.

    Lake Eyasi is depicted in blue at the top of the image, and a smaller lake occurs in Ngorongoro Crater. Near the image center, elevations peak at 3648 meters (11,968 feet) at Mount Loolmalasin, which is south of Ela Naibori Crater. Kitumbeine (left) and Gelai (right) are the two broad mountains rising from the rift lowlands. Mount Longido is seen in the lower left, and the Meto Hills are in the right foreground.

    Tectonics, volcanism, landslides, erosion and deposition -- and their interactions -- are all very evident in this view. The East African Rift is a zone of spreading between the African (on the west) and Somali (on the east) crustal plates. Two branches of the rift intersect here in Tanzania, resulting in distinctive and prominent landforms. One branch trends nearly parallel the view and includes Lake Eyasi and the very wide Ngorongoro Crater. The other branch is well defined by the lowlands that trend left-right across the image (below center, in green). Volcanoes are often associated with spreading zones where magma, rising to fill the gaps, reaches the surface and builds cones. Craters form if a volcano explodes or collapses. Later spreading can fracture the volcanoes, which is especially evident on Kitumbeine and Gelai Mountains (left and right, respectively, lower center).

    The Crater Highlands rise far above the adjacent savannas, capture moisture from passing air masses

  11. Martian Cratering 4: Mariner 9 Initial Analysis of Cratering Chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, W. K.

    1973-01-01

    Early analyses of cratering and other Martian surface properties that indicated extensive ancient erosion have been strongly supported by Mariner 9 data. By their great variations in density, these craters indicate a history of Martian erosion and crustal development intermediate between earth and the moon.

  12. Becquerel Crater Deposit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 28 May 2002) The finely layered deposit in Becquerel crater, seen in the center of this THEMIS image, is slowly being eroded away by the action of windblown sand. Dark sand from a source north of the bright deposit is collecting along its northern edge, forming impressive barchan style dunes. These vaguely boomerang-shaped dunes form with their two points extending in the downwind direction, demonstrating that the winds capable of moving sand grains come from the north. Grains that leave the dunes climb the eroding stair-stepped layers, collecting along the cliff faces before reaching the crest of the deposit. Once there, the sand grains are unimpeded and continue down the south side of the deposit without any significant accumulation until they fall off the steep cliffs of the southern margin. The boat-hull shaped mounds and ridges of bright material called yardangs form in response to the scouring action of the migrating sand. To the west, the deposit has thinned enough that the barchan dunes extend well into the deeply eroded north-south trending canyons. Sand that reaches the south side collects and reforms barchan dunes with the same orientation as those on the north side of the deposit. Note the abrupt transition between the bright material and the dark crater floor on the southern margin. Steep cliffs are present with no indication of rubble from the obvious erosion that produced them. The lack of debris at the base of the cliffs is evidence that the bright material is readily broken up into particles that can be transported away by the wind. The geological processes that are destroying the Becquerel crater deposit appear active today. But it is also possible that they are dormant, awaiting a particular set of climatic conditions that produces the right winds and perhaps even temperatures to allow the erosion to continue.

  13. Impactites from Popigai Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masaitis, V. L.

    1992-01-01

    Impactites (tagamites and suevites) from Popigai impact crater, whose diameter is about 100 km, are distributed over an area of 5000 sq km. The continuous sheet of suevite overlies the allogenic polymict breccia and partly authogenic breccia, and may also be observed in lenses or irregular bodies. The thickness of suevites in the central part of the crater is more than 100 m. Suevites may be distinguished by content of vitroclasts, lithoclasts, and crystalloclasts, by their dimensions, and by type of cementation, which reflects the facial settings of ejection of crushed and molten material, its sedimentation and lithification. Tagamites (impact melt rocks) are distributed on the surface predominantly in the western sector of the crater. The most characteristic are thick sheetlike bodies overlying the allogenic breccia and occurring in suevites where minor irregular bodies are widespread. The maximal thickness of separate tagamite sheets is up to 600 m. Tagamites, whose matrix is crystallized to a different degree, include fragments of minerals and gneiss blocks, among them shocked and thermally metamorphosed ones. Tagamite sheets have a complex inner structure; separate horizontal zones distinguish in crystallinity and fragment saturation. Differentiation in the impact melt in situ was not observed. The average chemical compositions of tagamites and suevites are similar, and correspond to the composition of biotite-garnet gneisses of the basement. According to the content of supplied Ir, Ni, and other siderophiles, impact melt was contaminated by 5 percent cosmic matter of collided body, probably ordinary chondrite. The total volume of remaining products of chilled impact melt is about 1750 cu km. Half this amount is represented by tagamite bodies. Though impact melt was in general well homogenized, the trend analysis showed that the concentric zonation is distribution of SiO2, MgO, and Na2O and the bandlike distribution of FeO and Al2O3 content testifies to a

  14. Bizarre Crater Mound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 5 June 2003

    The height of the interior mound of sediment inside this crater exceeds the crater rim heights by 900 meters (3,000 ft). This is a confounding problem. How does all this material get inside this crater and actually rise higher than its holding chamber? What is this material? Where did it come from? Why is it still here? It is exactly these kinds of enigmas that makes Mars so very interesting.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 12.2, Longitude 26.3 East (333.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  15. Gale Crater Mound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The eroded, layered deposit in Gale Crater is a mound of material rising 3 km above the crater floor. It has been sculpted by wind and possibly water to produce the dramatic landforms seen today. The origin of the sedimentary material that composes the mound remains a contested issue: was it produced from sedimentation in an ancient crater lake or by airfall onto dry land?

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -5.1, Longitude 137.5 East (222.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  16. Gullies in Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    6 April 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies in the wall of a large impact crater in Newton Basin near 41.9oS, 158.1oW. Such gullies may have formed by downslope movement of wet debris--i.e., water. Unfortunately, because the responsible fluid (if there was one) is no longer present today, only the geomorphology of the channels and debris aprons can be used to deduce that water might have been involved. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  17. Crater Down Below-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Scientists believe the circular feature in this image to be a crater near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The rover landed at Meridiani Planum on Mars at approximately 9:05 p.m. PST on Saturday, Jan. 24. This image was taken at an altitude of 1,404 meters (4,606 feet) by the descent image motion estimation system camera located on the bottom of the rover. The image spans approximately 1.2 kilometers (3/4 of a mile) across the surface of Mars.

  18. Crater Down Below

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Scientists believe the circular feature in this image to be a crater near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The rover landed at Meridiani Planum on Mars at approximately 9:05 p.m. PST on Saturday, Jan. 24. This image was taken at an altitude of 1,986 meters (6,516 feet) by the descent image motion estimation system camera located on the bottom of the rover. The image spans approximately 1.6 kilometers (1 mile) across the surface of Mars.

  19. Crater Down Below-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Scientists believe the circular feature in this image to be a crater near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The rover landed at Meridiani Planum on Mars at approximately 9:05 p.m. PST on Saturday, Jan. 24. This image was taken at an altitude of 1,690 meters (5,545 feet) by the descent image motion estimation system camera located on the bottom of the rover. The image spans approximately 1.4 kilometers (7/8 of a mile) across the surface of Mars.

  20. Of Boys and Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warburton, Edward C.

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, much has been written about threats to boys' and girls' healthy participation in dance. This Viewpoints essay considers some of the causes and proposed remedies, which focus almost exclusively on the roles and responsibilities of dance educators and administrators. I suggest that what is missing from recent research,…

  1. How Boys Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurian, Michael; Stevens, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors talk about the state of boyhood in education and explain the idea that not all elements of the brain--especially not gender--are plastic. They discuss the mismatch between boys and conventional education and how gender "really" happens in the brain and describe the three biological stages in which human nature…

  2. Boys in Primary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, Don; Langhelt, Syd

    This study was concerned with implementing guidelines from studies of the differences between boys and girls in school-related behaviors to test the contribution made to educational goals by considering gender of the learner. The basic strategy was to consider tested sex differences in behavior and to use these as a basis for developing classroom…

  3. Automatic Crater Counts on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesko, C.; Brumby, S.; Asphaug, E.; Chamberlain, D.; Engel, T.

    2004-03-01

    We present results of an automated crater counting technique for THEMIS data. Algorithms were developed using GENIE machine learning software. The technique detects craters, generalizes well to new data, and is used to rapidly produce R-plots and statistical data.

  4. Exploration Zone in Newton Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, P. E.

    2015-10-01

    Newton is a large crater (300 km) located in Terra Sirenum. This region is heavily cratered, preserves crustal magnetism, and has ground ice present. Within this EZ there are many potential science and resource ROIs, e.g. indicatives of past water.

  5. The terrestrial impact cratering record.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieve, R. A. F.; Pesonen, L. J.

    1992-12-01

    Approximately 130 terrestrial hypervelocity impact craters are currently known. The rate of discovery of new craters is 3 - 5 craters per year. Although modified by erosion, terrestrial impact craters exhibit the range of morphologies observed for craters on other terrestrial planetary bodies. Due to erosion and its effects on form, terrestrial craters are recognized primarily by the occurrence of shock metamorphic effects. Terrestrial craters have a set of geophysical characteristics which are largely the result of the passage of a shock wave and impact-induced fracturing. Much current work is focused on the effects of impact on Earth evolution. Previous work on shock metamorphism and the contamination of impact melt rocks by meteoritic siderophile elements provides a basis for the interpretation of the physical and chemical evidence from Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary sites as resulting from a major impact. By analogy with the lunar record and modelling of the effects of very large impacts, it has been proposed that biological and atmospheric evolution of the Earth could not stabilize before the end of the late heavy bombardment ≡3.8 Ga ago. The present terrestrial cratering rate is 5.4±2.7×10-15 km-2a-1 for a diameter ≥20 km. On a gobal scale, a major impact sufficient to cripple human civilization severely will occur on time scales of ≡106a.

  6. Secondary Craters on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Two large, ancient impact craters, known as palimpsests, have modified this area of dark terrain on Jupiter's moon Ganymede. In lower resolution images from the Voyager mission in 1979, it was observed that the diffuse edge of a large, circular bright feature cut through this area. This image was obtained by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft, on September 6, 1996, at a higher resolution of 190 meters (623 feet) per picture element (pixel). North is to the top. The diffuse margin of this palimpsest is noticeable only as a gradual increase in the area covered by bright hummocks toward the western edge of the image. A more recent palimpsest-forming impact to the south has peppered this area with chains and clusters of secondary craters ranging from 5.7 to 1.2 kilometers (3.5 to 0.7 miles) in diameter. The image covers an area of 73 by 65 kilometers (45 by 40 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  7. Landslide in a Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The landslide in this VIS image is located inside an impact crater in the Elysium region of Mars. The unnamed crater is located at the margin of the volcanic flows from the Elysium Mons complex.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 1.2, Longitude 134 East (226 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Aniakchak Crater, Alaska Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Walter R.

    1925-01-01

    The discovery of a gigantic crater northwest of Aniakchak Bay (see fig. 11) closes what had been thought to be a wide gap in the extensive series of volcanoes occurring at irregular intervals for nearly 600 miles along the axial line of the Alaska Peninsula and the Aleutian Islands. In this belt there are more active and recently active volcanoes than in all the rest of North America. Exclusive of those on the west side of Cook Inlet, which, however, belong to the same group, this belt contains at least 42 active or well-preserved volcanoes and about half as many mountains suspected or reported to be volcanoes. The locations of some of these mountains and the hot springs on the Alaska Peninsula and the Aleutian Islands are shown on a map prepared by G. A. Waring. Attention has been called to these volcanoes for nearly two centuries, but a record of their activity since the discovery of Alaska is far from being complete, and an adequate description of them as a group has never been written. Owing to their recent activity or unusual scenic beauty, some of the best known of the group are Mounts Katmai, Bogoslof, and Shishaldin, but there are many other beautiful and interesting cones and craters.

  9. Holden Crater Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03694 Holden Crater Delta

    This fan-shaped delta deposit is located in Holden Crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -27.3N, Longitude 324.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Eastern Floor of Holden Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 15 April 2002) The Science Today's THEMIS image covers territory on the eastern floor of Holden Crater, which is located in region of the southern hemisphere called Noachis Terra. Holden Crater is 154 km in diameter and named after American Astronomer Edward Holden (1846-1914). This image shows a mottled surface with channels, hills, ridges and impact craters. The largest crater seen in this image is 5 km in diameter. This crater has gullies and what appears to be horizontal layers in its walls. The Story With its beautiful symmetry and gullies radially streaming down to the floor, the dominant crater in this image is an impressive focal point. Yet, it is really just a small crater within a much larger one named Holden Crater. Take a look at the context image to the right to see just how much bigger Holden Crater is. Then come back to the image strip that shows the mottled surface of Holden Crater's eastern floor in greater detail, and count how many hills, ridges, channels, and small impact craters can be seen. No perfectly smooth terrain abounds there, that's for sure. The textured terrain of Holden Crater has been particularly intriguing ever since the Mars Orbital Camera on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft found evidence of sedimentary rock layers there that might have formed in lakes or shallow seas in Mars' ancient past. This finding suggests that Mars may have been more like Earth long ago, with water on its surface. Holden Crater might even have held a lake long ago. No one knows for sure, but it's an exciting possibility. Why? If water was once on the surface of Mars long enough to form sedimentary materials, maybe it was there long enough for microbial life to have developed too. (Life as we know it just isn't possible without the long-term presence of liquid water.) The question of life on the red planet is certainly tantalizing, but scientists will need to engage in a huge amount of further investigation to begin to know the answer. That

  11. Meteor Crater, AZ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Barringer Meteorite Crater (also known as 'Meteor Crater') is a gigantic hole in the middle of the arid sandstone of the Arizona desert. A rim of smashed and jumbled boulders, some of them the size of small houses, rises 50 m above the level of the surrounding plain. The crater itself is nearly a 1500 m wide, and 180 m deep. When Europeans first discovered the crater, the plain around it was covered with chunks of meteoritic iron - over 30 tons of it, scattered over an area 12 to 15 km in diameter. Scientists now believe that the crater was created approximately 50,000 years ago. The meteorite which made it was composed almost entirely of nickel-iron, suggesting that it may have originated in the interior of a small planet. It was 50 m across, weighed roughly 300,000 tons, and was traveling at a speed of 65,000 km per hour. This ASTER 3-D perspective view was created by draping an ASTER bands 3-2-1image over a digital elevation model from the US Geological Survey National Elevation Dataset.

    This image was acquired on May 17, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, along

  12. Boys & Girls Clubs of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Now Corporation for National and Community Service and Boys & Girls Clubs of America partner with Google to help ... Military Youth Arianna Skinner Receives Top Honor from Boys & Girls Clubs of America JB MDL- Fort Dix Youth ...

  13. Degradation of Victoria crater, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, J. A.; Wilson, S.A.; Cohen, B. A.; Golombek, M.P.; Geissler, P.E.; Sullivan, R.J.; Kirk, R.L.; Parker, T.J.

    2008-01-01

    The ???750 m diameter and ???75 m deep Victoria crater in Meridiani Planum, Mars, is a degraded primary impact structure retaining a ???5 m raised rim consisting of 1-2 m of uplifted rocks overlain by ???3 m of ejecta at the rim crest. The rim is 120-220 m wide and is surrounded by a dark annulus reaching an average of 590 m beyond the raised rim. Comparison between observed morphology and that expected for pristine craters 500-750 m across indicates that the original, pristine crater was close to 600 m in diameter. Hence, the crater has been erosionally widened by ???150 m and infilled by ???50 m of sediments. Eolian processes are responsible for most crater modification, but lesser mass wasting or gully activity contributions cannot be ruled out. Erosion by prevailing winds is most significant along the exposed rim and upper walls and accounts for ???50 m widening across a WNW-ESE diameter. The volume of material eroded from the crater walls and rim is ???20% less than the volume of sediments partially filling the crater, indicating eolian infilling from sources outside the crater over time. The annulus formed when ???1 m deflation of the ejecta created a lag of more resistant hematite spherules that trapped <10-20 cm of darker, regional basaltic sands. Greater relief along the rim enabled meters of erosion. Comparison between Victoria and regional craters leads to definition of a crater degradation sequence dominated by eolian erosion and infilling over time. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. From Crater to Graph: Manual and Automated Crater Counting Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesko, C. S.; Werner, S. C.; Brumby, S. P.; Foing, B. H.; Asphaug, E.; Neukum, G.; Team, H.; Team, I.

    2005-12-01

    Impact craters are some of the most abundant, and most interesting features on Mars. They hold a wealth of information about Martian geology, providing clues to the relative age, local composition and erosional history of the surface. A great deal of effort has been expended to count and understand the nature of planetary crater populations (Hartman and Neukum, 2001). Highly trained experts have developed personal methods for conducting manual crater surveys. In addition, several efforts are underway to automate this process in order to keep up with the rapid increase in planetary surface image data. These efforts make use of a variety of methods, including the direct application of traditional image processing algorithms such as the Hough transform, and recent developments in genetic programming, an artificial intelligence-based technique, in which manual crater surveys are used as examples to `grow' or `evolve' crater counting algorithms. (Plesko, C. S. et al., LPSC 2005, Kim, J. R. et al., LPSC 2001, Michael, G. G. P&SS 2003, Earl, J. et al, LPSC 2005) In this study we examine automated crater counting techniques, and compare them with traditional manual techniques on MOC imagery, and demonstrate capabilities for the analysis of multi-spectral and HRSC Digital Terrain Model data as well. Techniques are compared and discussed to define and develop a robust automated crater detection strategy.

  15. Secondary craters on Europa and implications for cratered surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bierhaus, Edward B; Chapman, Clark R; Merline, William J

    2005-10-20

    For several decades, most planetary researchers have regarded the impact crater populations on solid-surfaced planets and smaller bodies as predominantly reflecting the direct ('primary') impacts of asteroids and comets. Estimates of the relative and absolute ages of geological units on these objects have been based on this assumption. Here we present an analysis of the comparatively sparse crater population on Jupiter's icy moon Europa and suggest that this assumption is incorrect for small craters. We find that 'secondaries' (craters formed by material ejected from large primary impact craters) comprise about 95 per cent of the small craters (diameters less than 1 km) on Europa. We therefore conclude that large primary impacts into a solid surface (for example, ice or rock) produce far more secondaries than previously believed, implying that the small crater populations on the Moon, Mars and other large bodies must be dominated by secondaries. Moreover, our results indicate that there have been few small comets (less than 100 m diameter) passing through the jovian system in recent times, consistent with dynamical simulations. PMID:16237437

  16. Floor-fractured crater models for igneous crater modification on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichman, R. W.; Schultz, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    Although crater modification on the Earth, Moon, and Mars results from surface erosion and crater infilling, a significant number of craters on the Moon also exhibit distinctive patterns of crater-centered fracturing and volcanism that can be modeled as the result of igneous crater modification. Here, we consider the possible effects of Venus surface conditions on this model, describe two examples of such crater modification, and then briefly discuss the constraints these craters place on conditions at depth.

  17. Geology of five small Australian impact craters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shoemaker, E.M.; Macdonald, F.A.; Shoemaker, C.S.

    2005-01-01

    Here we present detailed geological maps and cross-sections of Liverpool, Wolfe Creek, Boxhole, Veevers and Dalgaranga craters. Liverpool crater and Wolfe Creek Meteorite Crater are classic bowlshaped, Barringer-type craters, Liverpool was likely formed during the Neoproterozoic and was filled and covered with sediments soon thereafter. In the Cenozoic, this cover was exhumed exposing the crater's brecciated wall rocks. Wolfe Creek Meteorite Crater displays many striking features, including well-bedded ejecta units, crater-floor faults and sinkholes, a ringed aeromagnetic anomaly, rim-skirting dunes, and numerous iron-rich shale balls. Boxhole Meteorite Crater, Veevers Meteorite Crater and Dalgaranga crater are smaller, Odessa-type craters without fully developed, steep, overturned rims. Boxhole and Dalgaranga craters are developed in highly follated Precambrian basement rocks with a veneer of Holocene colluvium. The pre-existing structure at these two sites complicates structural analyses of the craters, and may have influenced target deformation during impact. Veevers Meteorite Crater is formed in Cenozoic laterites, and is one of the best-preserved impact craters on Earth. The craters discussed herein were formed in different target materials, ranging from crystalline rocks to loosely consolidated sediments, containing evidence that the impactors struck at an array of angles and velocities. This facilitates a comparative study of the influence of these factors on the structural and topographic form of small impact craters. ?? Geological Society of Australia.

  18. Boys' Bodies in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, Murray

    2012-01-01

    This paper is based on qualitative research data from a project investigating early childhood boys' constructions of masculinities in relation to sport, health and the body. The focus group data, with 33 boys, has been collected in each of the boys' first three years at school. It is part of the data that will be collected over eight years with…

  19. Relational Strengths in Adolescent Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Judy

    There has been a resurgence of interest in boys' relationships and boys' development which seems to respond, at least in part, to findings about the centrality and protective power of relationships in girls' development. However, few empirical studies have sought to learn from boys about their experiences, and, in particular, the ways in which…

  20. Boys' Literacy: Negotiating the Territory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Wayne; Singh, Michael; Zhao, Dacheng

    2009-01-01

    The issue of boys' literacy has been explicitly named as "dangerous territory"--difficult to negotiate in terms of the validity of "failure" rhetoric, the stereotyping of boys' abilities and interests and the intersection of gender with factors such as class and geographical location. In this article, we address the issue of boys' literacy through…

  1. Raising Boys' Achievement in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleach, Kevan, Ed.

    This book offers insights into the range of strategies and good practice being used to raise the achievement of boys. Case studies by school-based practitioners suggest ideas and measures to address the issue of achievement by boys. The contributions are: (1) "Why the Likely Lads Lag Behind" (Kevan Bleach); (2) "Helping Boys Do Better in Their…

  2. Pollack Crater's White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of White Rock in Pollack crater was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on February 3, 2007 at 1750 UTC (12:50 p.m. EST), near 8 degrees south latitude, 25 degrees east longitude. The CRISM image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 40 meters (132 feet) across. The region covered is roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) long and 10 kilometers (6 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    First imaged by the Mariner 9 spacecraft in 1972, the enigmatic group of wind-eroded ridges known as White Rock has been the subject of many subsequent investigations. White Rock is located on the floor of Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. It measures some 15 by 18 kilometers (9 by 11 miles) and was named for its light-colored appearance. In contrast-enhanced images, the feature's higher albedo or reflectivity compared with the darker material on the floor of the crater makes it appear white. In reality, White Rock has a dull, reddish color more akin to Martian dust. This higher albedo as well as its location in a topographic low suggested to some researchers that White Rock may be an eroded remnant of an ancient lake deposit. As water in a desert lake on Earth evaporates, it leaves behind white-colored salts that it leached or dissolved out of the surrounding terrain. These salt deposits may include carbonates, sulfates, and chlorides.

    In 2001, the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor measured White Rock and found no obvious signature of carbonates or sulfates, or any other indication that White Rock holds evaporite minerals. Instead, it found Martian dust.

    CRISM's challenge was to obtain greater detail of White Rock's mineralogical composition and how it formed. The instrument operates at a different wavelength range than TES, giving it greater sensitivity to carbonate, sulfate and phyllosilicate (clay-like) minerals. It also

  3. Clouds Over Crater Rim

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Clouds above the rim of 'Endurance Crater' in this image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity can remind the viewer that Mars, our celestial neighbor, is subject to weather. On Earth, clouds like these would be referred to as 'cirrus' or the aptly nicknamed 'mares' tails.' These clouds occur in a region of strong vertical shear. The cloud particles (ice in this martian case) fall out, and get dragged along away from the location where they originally condensed, forming characteristic streamers. Opportunity took this picture with its navigation camera during the rover's 269th martian day (Oct. 26, 2004).

    The mission's atmospheric science team is studying cloud observations to deduce seasonal and time-of-day behavior of the clouds. This helps them gain a better understanding of processes that control cloud formation.

  4. Sexually abused boys.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, M A

    1987-01-01

    Male victims of child sexual abuse have received inadequate attention in the literature. This article is a retrospective review of the reports of 189 boys evaluated during 1983-85. This population was younger than those previously reported. Comparison to an age- and race-matched group of girl victims seen during the same period revealed many similarities in patterns of disclosure and perpetrator characteristics. The acts perpetrated against the boys included a wide array of invasive acts at all ages, but sodomy was more frequently reported in the older victims. Abnormal anogenital findings were seen more often in younger children, but the findings were often nonspecific. An examiner experienced with young children and infants is essential. PMID:3594283

  5. Tikhonravov Crater Dust Avalanches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Dust avalanches, also called slope streaks, occur on many Martian terrains. The deposition of airborne dust on surfaces causes a bright tone in the THEMIS VIS images. Any movement of the dust downhill, a dust avalanche, will leave behind a streak where the darker, dust-free surface is exposed.

    These dust avalanches are located within a small crater inside Tikhonravov Crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 12.6, Longitude 37.1 East (322.9 West). 36 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Pwyll Crater on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This enhanced color image of the region surrounding the young impact crater Pwyll on Jupiter's moon Europa was produced by combining low resolution color data with a higher resolution mosaic of images obtained on December 19, 1996 by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft. This region is on the trailing hemisphere of the satellite, centered at 11 degrees South and 276 degrees West, and is about 1240 kilometers across. North is toward the top of the image, and the sun illuminates the surface from the east.

    The 26 kilometer diameter impact crater Pwyll, just below the center of the image, is thought to be one of the youngest features on the surface of Europa. The diameter of the central dark spot, ejecta blasted from beneath Europa's surface, is approximately 40 kilometers, and bright white rays extend for over a thousand kilometers in all directions from the impact site. These rays cross over many different terrain types, indicating that they are younger than anything they cross. Their bright white color may indicate that they are composed of fresh, fine water ice particles, as opposed to the blue and brown tints of older materials elsewhere in the image.

    Also visible in this image are a number of the dark lineaments which are called 'triple bands' because they have a bright central stripe surrounded by darker material. Scientists can use the order in which these bands cross each other to determine their relative ages, as they attempt to reconstruct the geologic history of Europa.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  7. Holden Crater Dune Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

    A common location for dune fields on Mars is in the basin of large craters. This dune field is located in Holden Crater at 25 degrees South atitude.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -25.5, Longitude 326.8 East (33.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Kaiser Crater DCS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released July 29, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image covering a portion of Kaiser Crater. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    In this image, the basaltic sand dunes in bottom of Kaiser crater are colored a bright pink/magenta. The spectral features are clean and prominent on these dust-free surfaces and the dark color of the basaltic dunes helps them to absorb sunlight and produces higher surface temperatures, which also contributes to the image colors.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -46.5, Longitude 20.3 East (339.7 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin

  9. Largest impact craters on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, B. A.; Weitz, C. M.; Basilevsky, A. T.

    1992-01-01

    High-resolution radar images from the Magellan spacecraft have allowed us to perform a detailed study on 25 large impact craters on Venus with diameters from 70 to 280 km. The dimension of these large craters is comparable with the characteristic thickness of the venusian lithosphere and the atmospheric scale height. Some physical parameters for the largest impact craters on Venus (LICV), such as depth, ring/diameter ratio, and range of ballistic ejecta deposits, have been obtained from the SAR images and the altimetry dataset produced by MIT. Data related to each of these parameters is discussed.

  10. King of the Crater Ledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows a screenshot from software used by engineers to drive the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit up toward the rim of the crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The software simulates the rover's movements across the martian terrain, helping to plot a safe course. The virtual 3-D world around the rover is built from images taken by Spirit's stereo navigation cameras. Regions for which the rover has not yet acquired 3-D data are represented in beige.

    In this picture, the rover is seen in its projected final position at the rim of the crater. Later today, Spirit will travel 16 more meters (52 feet) to reach the crater ledge.

  11. Impact Craters in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieve, R. A. F.; Wood, C. A.; Garvin, J. B.; McLaughlin, G.; McHone, J. F.

    1988-03-01

    Meteor Crater Upheaval Dome Sierra Madera Middlesboro Pilot Lake Carswell Gow Lake Deep Bay Nicholson Lake West Hawk Lake Haughton Sudbury Wanapitei Brent Lac Couture New Quebec Clearwater Lakes Manicouagan Charlevoix Lac La Moinerie Mistastin

  12. Rover Tracks at Crater's Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Tracks left by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity as it traveled along the rim of Victoria Crater can be seen clearly in this image taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft.

    This is a subframe of a larger image that the camera acquired on June 26, 2007. The larger image will be released as HiRISE catalogue number PSP_004289_1780 after geometric processing.

    Opportunity first approached Victoria Crater at an alcove informally named 'Duck Bay' (see tracks at left). It then drove along the crater's sinuous edge in a clockwise direction before heading back to Duck Bay, where it is expected to enter the crater in early July 2007.

  13. LRO/LOLA - Counting Craters

    NASA Video Gallery

    Using the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter’s Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA), NASA scientists have created the first-ever comprehensive catalog of large craters on the moon. In this animation, lun...

  14. Hourly Illumination of Shackleton Crater

    NASA Video Gallery

    Illumination of Shackleton crater, a 21-km-diameter (12.5 mile-diameter) structure situated adjacent to the Moon’s south pole. The resolution is 30 meters (approximately 100 feet) per pixel. Fra...

  15. Degradation of Victoria Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Sharon A.; Grant, John A.; Cohen, Barbara A.; Golombek, Mathew P.; Geissler, Paul E.; Sullivan, Robert J.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Parker, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    The $\\sim$750 m diameter and $\\sim$75 m deep Victoria crater in Meridiani Planum, Mars, presents evidence for significant degradation including a low, serrated, raised rim characterized by alternating alcoves and promontories, a surrounding low relief annulus, and a floor partially covered by dunes. The amount and processes of degradation responsible for the modified appearance of Victoria crater were evaluated using images obtained in situ by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity in concert with a digital elevation model created using orbital HiRISE images. Opportunity traversed along the north and northwest rim and annulus, but sufficiently characterized features visible in the DEM to enable detailed measurements of rim relief, ejecta thickness, and wall slopes around the entire degraded, primary impact structure. Victoria retains a 5 m raised rim consisting of 1-2 m of uplifted rocks overlain by 3 m of ejecta at the rim crest. The rim is $\\sim$120 to 220 m wide and is surrounded by a dark annulus reaching an average of 590 m beyond the raised rim. Comparison between observed morphology and that expected for pristine craters 500 to 750 m across indicate the original, pristine crater was close to 600 m in diameter. Hence, the crater has been erosionally widened by approximately 150 m and infilled by about 50 m of sediments. Eolian processes are responsible for modification at Victoria, but lesser contributions from mass wasting or other processes cannot be ruled out. Erosion by prevailing winds is most significant along the exposed rim and upper walls and accounts for $\\sim$50 m widening across a WNW-ESE diameter. The volume of material eroded from the crater walls and rim is $\\sim$20% less than the volume of sediments partially filling the crater, indicating eolian infilling from sources outside the crater over time. The annulus formed when $\\sim$1 m deflation of the ejecta created a lag of more resistant hematite spherules that trapped darker, regional

  16. Limb of Copernicus Impact Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Copernicus is 93 km wide and is located within the Mare Imbrium Basin, northern nearside of the Moon (10 degrees N., 20 degrees W.). Image shows crater floor, floor mounds, rim, and rayed ejecta. Rays from the ejecta are superposed on all other surrounding terrains which places the crater in its namesake age group: the Copernican system, established as the youngest assemblage of rocks on the Moon (Shoemaker and Hackman, 1962, The Moon: London, Academic Press, p.289- 300).

  17. Impact cratering through geologic time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shoemaker, E.M.; Shoemaker, C.S.

    1998-01-01

    New data on lunar craters and recent discoveries about craters on Earth permit a reassessment of the bombardment history of Earth over the last 3.2 billion years. The combined lunar and terrestrial crater records suggest that the long-term average rate of production of craters larger than 20 km in diameter has increased, perhaps by as much as 60%, in the last 100 to 200 million years. Production of craters larger than 70 km in diameter may have increased, in the same time interval, by a factor of five or more over the average for the preceding three billion years. A large increase in the flux of long-period comets appears to be the most likely explanation for such a long-term increase in the cratering rate. Two large craters, in particular, appear to be associated with a comet shower that occurred about 35.5 million years ago. The infall of cosmic dust, as traced by 3He in deep sea sediments, and the ages of large craters, impact glass horizons, and other stratigraphic markers of large impacts seem to be approximately correlated with the estimated times of passage of the Sun through the galactic plane, at least for the last 65 million years. Those are predicted times for an increased near-Earth flux of comets from the Oort Cloud induced by the combined effects of galactic tidal perturbations and encounters of the Sun with passing stars. Long-term changes in the average comet flux may be related to changes in the amplitude of the z-motion of the Sun perpendicular to the galactic plane or to stripping of the outer Oort cloud by encounters with large passing stars, followed by restoration from the inner Oort cloud reservoir.

  18. Moreux Crater Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the Martian surface using five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from using multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    This false color image shows part of the interior of Moreux Crater. The crater peak is at the right edge of the image. Many dunes and a dunefield are also visible in the iamge. This image was collected during the Northern Spring season.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 41.9, Longitude 44.1 East (315.9 West). 35 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

  19. Geology of Lofn Crater, Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Heiner, Sarah; Klemaszewski, James E.

    2001-01-01

    Lofn crater is a 180-km-diameter impact structure in the southern cratered plains of Callisto and is among the youngest features seen on the surface. The Lofn area was imaged by the Galileo spacecraft at regional-scale resolutions (875 m/pixel), which enable the general geology to be investigated. The morphology of Lofn crater suggests that (1) it is a class of impact structure intermediate between complex craters and palimpsests or (2) it formed by the impact of a projectile which fragmented before reaching the surface, resulting in a shallow crater (even for Callisto). The asymmetric pattern of the rim and ejecta deposits suggests that the impactor entered at a low angle from the northwest. The albedo and other characteristics of the ejecta deposits from Lofn also provide insight into the properties of the icy lithosphere and subsurface configuration at the time of impact. The "target" for the Lofn impact is inferred to have included layered materials associated with the Adlinda multiring structure northwest of Loh and ejecta deposits from the Heimdall crater area to the southeast. The Lofn impact might have penetrated through these materials into a viscous substrate of ductile ice or possibly liquid water. This interpretation is consistent with models of the current interior of Callisto based on geophysical information obtained from the Galileo spacecraft.

  20. Distant Secondary Craters from Lyot Crater, Mars, and Implications for Ages of Planetary Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, S. J.; Hynek, B. M.

    2011-03-01

    We identified thousands of secondary craters in distinct clusters up to 5200 km from their primary crater, Lyot, on Mars. Their properties, relation to Lyot, and broader implications to secondary cratering and planetary ages will be discussed.

  1. The Wolf Boy

    PubMed Central

    Leckman, James F.; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2005-01-01

    An adolescent boy presented with episodic wolf-like aggressive behaviors, for which his rural community planned an exorcism. Admission to a tertiary care hospital revealed an adolescent suffering an array of severe psychiatric symptoms, which best fit the diagnosis of reactive attachment disorder (RAD). The differential diagnosis included delusional disorder, mood problems, anxiety, schizophrenia, and “feral child” syndrome. Nosology and pathophysiology as well as pharmacological and psychosocial treatments are discussed. We highlight the importance of early life events in determining mental health risk and resiliency. PMID:21120097

  2. Reuyl Crater Dust Avalanches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 13 May 2002) The Science The rugged, arcuate rim of the 90 km crater Reuyl dominates this THEMIS image. Reuyl crater is at the southern edge of a region known to be blanketed in thick dust based on its high albedo (brightness) and low thermal inertia values. This thick mantle of dust creates the appearance of snow covered mountains in the image. Like snow accumulation on Earth, Martian dust can become so thick that it eventually slides down the face of steep slopes, creating runaway avalanches of dust. In the center of this image about 1/3 of the way down is evidence of this phenomenon. A few dozen dark streaks can be seen on the bright, sunlit slopes of the crater rim. The narrow streaks extend downslope following the local topography in a manner very similar to snow avalanches on Earth. But unlike their terrestrial counterparts, no accumulation occurs at the bottom. The dust particles are so small that they are easily launched into the thin atmosphere where they remain suspended and ultimately blow away. The apparent darkness of the avalanche scars is due to the presence of relatively dark underlying material that becomes exposed following the passage of the avalanche. Over time, new dust deposition occurs, brightening the scars until they fade into the background. Although dark slope streaks had been observed in Viking mission images, a clear understanding of this dynamic phenomenon wasn't possible until the much higher resolution images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed the details. MOC images also showed that new avalanches have occurred during the time MGS has been in orbit. THEMIS images will allow additional mapping of their distribution and frequency, contributing new insights about Martian dust avalanches. The Story The stiff peaks in this image might remind you of the Alps here on Earth, but they really outline the choppy edge of a large Martian crater over 50 miles wide (seen in the context image at right). While these aren

  3. Stop Sign Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    With its rim eroded off by catastrophic floods in Tiu Vallis and its strangely angular shape, this 12 km diameter crater looks vaguely like a stop sign.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 8.6, Longitude 329.2 East (30.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  4. Concentric Crater Fill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The bizarre patterns on the floor of this crater in Nilosyrtis Mensae defy an easy explanation. At 34 degrees north latitude, this location hardly qualifies as 'Arctic' yet it is likely that some form of periglacial process possibly combined with the vaporization of ground ice is responsible for this intriguing landscape.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 10.3, Longitude 24.5 East (284.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  5. A Tale of 3 Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    11 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image captures some of the complexity of the martian upper crust. Mars does not simply have an impact-cratered surface, it's upper crust is a cratered volume. Over time, older craters on Mars have been eroded, filled, buried, and in some cases exhumed and re-exposed at the martian surface. The crust of Mars is layered to depths of 10 or more kilometers, and mixed in with the layered bedrock are a variety of ancient craters with diameters ranging from a few tens of meters (a few tens of yards) to several hundred kilometers (more than one or two hundred miles).

    The picture shown here captures some of the essence of the layered, cratered volume of the upper crust of Mars in a very simple form. The image shows three distinct circular features. The smallest, in the lower right quarter of the image, is a meteor crater surrounded by a mound of material. This small crater formed within a layer of bedrock that once covered the entire scene, but today is found only in this small remnant adjacent to the crater. The intermediate-sized crater, west (left) of the small one, formed either in the next layer down--that is, below the layer in which the small crater formed--or it formed in some layers that are now removed, but was big enough to penetrate deeply into the rock that is near the surface today. The largest circular feature in the image, in the upper right quarter of the image, is still largely buried. It formed in layers of rock that are below the present surface. Erosion has brought traces of its rim back to the surface of Mars. This picture is located near 50.0oS, 77.8oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates this October 2004 image from the upper left.

  6. Rayed craters on the moon and Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.

    1977-01-01

    Systems of bright rays are exhibited by many fresh craters on the moon and Mercury. Diameter/density distributions suggest that lunar-rayed craters represent the Class 1 craters, and that Mercurian rayed craters represent post-Caloris craters. Photogeological analyses of lunar imagery indicate that the ray systems are composed of finely divided material from the primary crater along with locally derived ejecta from secondary and tertiary craters. The primary ray material probably occurs in moderately thick (0.1-1 meter) deposits. The rate of darkening may depend more on the thickness of the ray material than on the rates of various darkening processes. Darkening rate may also be a function of crater size. It is observed that rays of craters more than 1 b.y. old remain bright, whereas those older than Class 1 generally fade to imperceptibility.

  7. 'Lyell' Panorama inside Victoria Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    During four months prior to the fourth anniversary of its landing on Mars, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity examined rocks inside an alcove called 'Duck Bay' in the western portion of Victoria Crater. The main body of the crater appears in the upper right of this stereo panorama, with the far side of the crater lying about 800 meters (half a mile) away. Bracketing that part of the view are two promontories on the crater's rim at either side of Duck Bay. They are 'Cape Verde,' about 6 meters (20 feet) tall, on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' about 15 meters (50 feet) tall, on the right. The rest of the image, other than sky and portions of the rover, is ground within Duck Bay.

    Opportunity's targets of study during the last quarter of 2007 were rock layers within a band exposed around the interior of the crater, about 6 meters (20 feet) from the rim. Bright rocks within the band are visible in the foreground of the panorama. The rover science team assigned informal names to three subdivisions of the band: 'Steno,' 'Smith,' and 'Lyell.'

    This view combines many images taken by Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) from the 1,332nd through 1,379th Martian days, or sols, of the mission (Oct. 23 to Dec. 11, 2007). Images taken through Pancam filters centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers, 535 nanometers and 432 nanometers were mixed to produce an approximately true-color panorama. Some visible patterns in dark and light tones are the result of combining frames that were affected by dust on the front sapphire window of the rover's camera.

    Opportunity landed on Jan. 25, 2004, Universal Time, (Jan. 24, Pacific Time) inside a much smaller crater about 6 kilometers (4 miles) north of Victoria Crater, to begin a surface mission designed to last 3 months and drive about 600 meters (0.4 mile).

  8. Crater Dust Avalanches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Dust avalanches, also called slope streaks, occur on many Martian terrains. The deposition of airborne dust on surfaces causes a bright tone in the THEMIS VIS images. Any movement of the dust downhill, a dust avalanche, will leave behind a streak where the darker, dust-free surface is exposed.

    These dust avalanches are located in a small canyon within a crater rim northeast of Naktong Vallis.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 7.1, Longitude 34.7 East (325.3 West). 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Crater Dust Avalanches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Dust avalanches, also called slope streaks, occur on many Martian terrains. The deposition of airborne dust on surfaces causes a bright tone in the THEMIS VIS images. Any movement of the dust downhill, a dust avalanche, will leave behind a streak where the darker, dust-free surface is exposed.

    This region of dust avalanches is located in and around a crater to the west of yesterday's image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 14.7, Longitude 32.7 East (327.3 West). 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Crater Floor Dune Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

    Our final dune image shows a small dune field inside an unnamed crater south of Nili Fossae.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 20.6, Longitude 79 East (281 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  11. Chipped Paint Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 9 April 2003

    In the high northern latitudes NW of Alba Patera, a smooth mantle of material that covers the landscape appears chipped away from the rim of a large crater. The prominent scarp that has formed from the retreat of the mantle lacks the rounded appearance of other ice-rich mantles found in the mid-latitudes. The nature of this mantling layer therefore is more enigmatic.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 62.9, Longitude 226.2 East (133.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  12. Boys Are People Too: Boys and Reading, Truth and Misconceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Rosemary

    2005-01-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent research on boys and reading that has been primarily conducted in Australia but is also available online to international readers. The research makes it clear that many boys are still reading, but competing claims on their busy lives easily sidetrack them from making reading their main activity. Educators…

  13. The Politics of Policy in Boys' Education: Getting Boys "Right"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver-Hightower, Marcus B.

    2008-01-01

    This book explores boy-focused education policy and how different educators struggle to implement or resist it in their schools. Weaver-Hightower examines masculinity politics in Australia and the United States, mapping how these politics create panic over raising and educating boys the "Right" way. Contextualizing this policy with movements for…

  14. How old is Autolycus crater?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesinger, Harald; Pasckert, Jan Henrik; van der Bogert, Carolyn H.; Robinson, Mark S.

    2016-04-01

    Accurately determining the lunar cratering chronology is prerequisite for deriving absolute model ages (AMAs) across the lunar surface and throughout the Solar System [e.g., 1]. However, the lunar chronology is only constrained by a few data points over the last 1 Ga and there are no calibration data available between 1 and 3 Ga and beyond 3.9 Ga [2]. Rays from Autolycus and Aristillus cross the Apollo 15 landing site and presumably transported material to this location [3]. [4] proposed that at the Apollo 15 landing site about 32% of any exotic material would come from Autolycus crater and 25% would come from Aristillus crater. [5,6] proposed that the 39Ar-40Ar age of 2.1 Ga derived from three petrologically distinct, shocked Apollo 15 KREEP basalt samples, date Autolycus crater. Grier et al. [7] reported that the optical maturity (OMAT) characteristics of these craters are indistinguishable from the background values despite the fact that both craters exhibit rays that were used to infer relatively young, i.e., Copernican ages [8,9]. Thus, both OMAT characteristics and radiometric ages of 2.1 Ga and 1.29 Ga for Autolycus and Aristillus, respectively, suggest that these two craters are not Copernican in age. [10] interpreted newer U-Pb ages of 1.4 and 1.9 Ga from sample 15405 as the formation ages of Aristillus and Autolycus. If Autolycus is indeed the source of the dated exotic material collected at the Apollo 15 landing site, than performing crater size frequency distribution (CSFD) measurements for Autolycus offers the possibility to add a new calibration point to the lunar chronology, particularly in an age range that was previously unconstrained. We used calibrated and map-projected LRO NAC images to perform CSFD measurements within ArcGIS, using CraterTools [11]. CSFDs were then plotted with CraterStats [12], using the production and chronology functions of [13]. We determined ages of 3.72 and 3.85 Ga for the interior (Ai1) and ejecta area Ae3, which we

  15. Self-Secondary Crater Populations on Copernican Continuous Ejecta Blankets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanetti, M.; Jolliff, B.; van der Bogert, C. H.; Hiesinger, H.; Plescia, J.; Artemieva, N.

    2016-05-01

    Self-secondary craters (a population of craters formed on continuous ejecta deposits by fragments from the parent crater) may account for melt/ejecta CSFD discrepancies, and may imply inner Solar System cratering flux estimates are overestimated.

  16. Geochemistry of the Neoproterozoic Johnnie Formation and Stirling Quartzite, southern Nopah Range, California: Deciphering the roles of climate, tectonics, and sedimentary process in reconstructing the early evolution of a rifted continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenborn, William A.

    The Neoproterozoic Stirling Quartzite and Johnnie Formation in the southern Nopah Range, southeastern California, comprise a thick sequence of predominantly siliciclastic sediment that is exposed along the Cordilleran margin. Located above the syn-rift Kingston Peak Formation, they mark the early deposits of passive margin sedimentation during the breakup of the Rodinia supercontinent. Disagreement exists between field-based observations and subsidence modeling as to whether these units represent rift or passive margin deposition. In this study, major-, trace-, and rare earth--element (REE) geochemistry, and U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology are used to determine their provenance, paleoclimatic information, and, consequently their paleotectonic setting. Geochemical and petrologic evidence confirm that Johnnie Formation mudstones and sandstones were the initial siliciclastic deposits laid along the Cordilleran Laurentian margin following the Neoproterozoic break-up of Rodinia. Johnnie Formation sediment has corrected CIA values between 63 and 83, and likely higher, which suggests moderate to intense weathering of the source. Modeling suggests the unweathered source likely possessed a composition of a 90% granodiorite + 10% high-K granite. This mixture balances petrographic observations, major element geochemistry, and the REE: (La/Sm)N = 4.19 +/- 1.26, (Gd/Yb)N = 1.34 +/- 0.38, Eu/Eu* = 0.63 +/- 0.09 and (La/Yb)N = 9.55 +/- 2.27. The hypothesis of a primary tectonic control on sediment composition (i.e. rift-basin deposition) is rejected because Johnnie Formation sediments largely lack lithic fragments that are indicative of derivation from a source area with rugged topography. Feldspars are distributed unevenly in finer grained sediments. Observed fluctuations in feldspar content of sediments from the lower to upper Johnnie Formation are attributed to increased abrasion and hydrodynamic sorting, which differentially segregated feldspars into finer grained

  17. Serving Boys through Readers' Advisory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Based on more than twenty years' experience working to get boys interested in reading, the author now offers his first readers' advisory volume. With an emphasis on nonfiction and the boy-friendly categories of genre fiction, the work offers a wealth of material including: (1) Suggestions for how to booktalk one-on-one as well as in large groups;…

  18. Car Hits Boy on Bicycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    In this article we present the fascinating reconstruction of an accident where a car hit a boy riding his bicycle. The boy dramatically flew several metres through the air after the collision and was injured, but made a swift and complete recovery from the accident with no long-term after-effects. Students are challenged to determine the speed of…

  19. ERS Focus On: Educating Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    This issue of "Focus On" examines where boys are underachieving and some possible reasons for their under-achievement, including biological and environmental factors. It also offers strategies that teachers can employ in their classrooms in order to address the educational needs of boys. Books in Brief; Web Resources; and Related ERS Resources are…

  20. Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, E.W.; Light, T.D.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral survey conducted in 1980 in the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas, Arizona, indicate little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral or fossil fuel resources in the area. The area contains deposits of cinder, useful for the production of aggregate block, and for deposits of decorative stone; however, similar deposits occur in great abundance throughout the San Francisco volcanic field outside the roadless areas. There is a possibility that the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas may overlie part of a crustal magma chamber or still warm pluton related to the San Francisco Mountain stratovolcano or to basaltic vents of late Pleistocene or Holocene age. Such a magma chamber or pluton beneath the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas might be an energy source from which a hot-, dry-rock geothermal energy system could be developed, and a probable geothermal resource potential is therefore assigned to these areas.

  1. Degradation of Endeavour Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J. A.; Crumpler, L. S.; Parker, T. J.; Golombek, M. P.; Wilson, S. A.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    The Opportunity rover has traversed portions of two western rim segments of Endeavour, a 22 km-diameter crater in Meridiani Planum, for the past three years. The resultant data enables the evaluation of the geologic expression and degradation state of the crater. Endeavour is Noa-chian-aged, complex in morphology, and originally may have appeared broadly similar to the more pristine 20.5 km-diameter Santa Fe complex crater in Lunae Palus (19.5degN, 312.0degE). By contrast, Endeavour is considerably subdued and largely buried by younger sulfate-rich plains. Exposed rim segments dubbed Cape York (CY) and Solander Point/Murray Ridge/Pillinger Point (MR) located approximately1500 m to the south reveal breccias interpreted as remnants of the ejecta deposit, dubbed the Shoemaker Formation. At CY, the Shoemaker Formation overlies the pre-impact rocks, dubbed the Matijevic Formation.

  2. Venus - Lavinia Region Impact Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Three large meteorite impact craters, with diameters that range from 37 to 50 kilometers (23 to 31 miles), are seen in this image of the Lavinia region of Venus. The image is centered at 27 degrees south latitude and 339 degrees east longitude (longitude on Venus is measured from 0 degrees to 360 degrees east), and covers an area 550 kilometers (342 miles) wide by about 500 kilometers (311 miles) long. Situated in a region of fractured plains, the craters show many features typical of meteorite impact craters, including rough (bright) material around the rim, terraced inner walls and central peaks. Numerous domes, probably caused by volcanic activity, are seen in the southeastern corner of the mosaic. The domes range in diameter from 1 to 12 kilometers (0.6 to 7 miles). Some of the domes have central pits that are typical of some types of volcanoes. North is at the top of the image.

  3. STRAWBERRY CRATER ROADLESS AREAS, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, Edward W.; Light, Thomas D.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral survey conducted in the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas, Arizona, indicate little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral or fossil fuel resources in the area. The area contains deposits of cinder, useful for the production of aggregate block, and for deposits of decorative stone; however, similar deposits occur in great abundance throughout the San Francisco volcanic field outside the roadless areas. There is a possibility that the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas may overlie part of a crustal magma chamber or still warm pluton related to the San Francisco Mountain stratovolcano or to basaltic vents of late Pleistocene or Holocene age. Such a magma chamber or pluton beneath the Strawberry Crater Roadless Areas might be an energy source from which a hot-, dry-rock geothermal energy system could be developed, and a probable geothermal resource potential is therefore assigned to these areas. 9 refs.

  4. Impact Crater in Coastal Patagonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Antoni, Hector L; Lasta, Carlos A.; Condon, Estelle (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Impact craters are geological structures attributed to the impact of a meteoroid on the Earth's (or other planet's) surface (Koeberl and Sharpton. 1999). The inner planets of the solar system as well as other bodies such as our moon show extensive meteoroid impacts (Gallant 1964, French 1998). Because of its size and gravity, we may assume that the Earth has been heavily bombarded but weathering and erosion have erased or masked most of these features. In the 1920's, a meteor crater (Mark 1987) was identified in Arizona and to this first finding the identification of a large number of impact structures on Earth followed (Hodge 1994). Shock metamorphic effects are associated with meteorite impact craters. Due to extremely high pressures, shatter cones are produced as well as planar features in quartz and feldspar grains, diaplectic glass and high-pressure mineral phases such as stishovite (French 1998).

  5. Rampart Crater Ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 25 May 2004 This image of rampart crater ejecta was acquired Feb. 16, 2003, during northern summer.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 45.9, Longitude 347 East (13 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D

  6. Cratered Acidalia Planitia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the Martian surface using five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from using multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    This false color image shows a region with craters of different ages located at the margin of Acidalia Planitia. This iamge was collected during the Northern Spring season.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 39.9, Longitude 350.4 East (9.6 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey

  7. Acidalia Planitia Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 24 May 2004 This image of a crater in Acidalia Planitia was acquired Sept. 29, 2002, during northern spring.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 49.6, Longitude 325.3 East (34.7 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science

  8. Acidalia Planitia Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 26 May 2004 This image of a crater in Acidalia Planitia was acquired March 8, 2003, during northern summer.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 45.9, Longitude 6.1 East (353.9 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science

  9. Nili Fossae Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 17 May 2004 This image of a crater near Nili Fossae was acquired July 31, 2002, during northern spring.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 21.2, Longitude 75.6 East (284.4 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington

  10. Automated and Manual Rocket Crater Measurement Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip; Immer, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    An update has been performed to software designed to do very rapid automated measurements of craters created in sandy substrates by rocket exhaust on liftoff. The previous software was optimized for pristine lab geometry and lighting conditions. This software has been enhanced to include a section for manual measurements of crater parameters; namely, crater depth, crater full width at half max, and estimated crater volume. The tools provide a very rapid method to measure these manual parameters to ease the burden of analyzing large data sets. This software allows for rapid quantization of the rocket crater parameters where automated methods may not work. The progress of spreadsheet data is continuously saved so that data is never lost, and data can be copied to clipboards and pasted to other software for analysis. The volume estimation of a crater is based on the central max depth axis line, and the polygonal shape of the crater is integrated around that axis.

  11. Crater Lake: blue through time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, Gary L.; Buktenica, Mark; Collier, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Blue is the color of constancy, hence the term true blue. The unearthly blueness of Crater Lake reflects its pristine character and gives scientists a focal point for studying human impacts on aquatic environments over long periods of time. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Park Service, and Oregon State University have systematically studied the lake for the last two decades. Long-term monitoring of this lake is a priority of Crater Lake National Park and will continue far into the future.

  12. Moon - 'Ghost' craters formed during Mare filling.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Hartmann, W. K.; Wood, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    This paper discusses formation of 'pathological' cases of crater morphology due to interaction of craters with molten lavas. Terrestrial observations of such a process are discussed. In lunar maria, a number of small impact craters (D less than 10 km) may have been covered by thin layers of fluid lavas, or formed in molten lava. Some specific lunar examples are discussed, including unusual shallow rings resembling experimental craters deformed by isostatic filling.

  13. View of Goclenius and other craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    This photograph was taken from the Apollo 8 spacecraft with long-focal length lens, looking south at the large crater Goclenius, which is in foreground. The three clustered craters are Magelhaens, Magelhaens A, and Colombo A. The crater at upper right is Gutenberg D. The crater Goclenius is located at 10 degrees south latitude, 45 degrees east longitude, and it is approximately 40 statue miles in diameter.

  14. Holden Crater/Uzboi Valles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 17 April 2002) The Science This image, located near 27.0S and 35.5W (324.5E), displays the intersection of Holden Crater with Uzboi Valles. This region of Mars contains a number of features that could be related to liquid water on the surface in the Martian past. Holden Crater contains finely layered sedimentary units that have been subsequently dissected. The hummucky terrain in the bottom half of the image is the remnants of this terrain, though the fine layers are not visible in this image at this resolution. The sedimentary units could have formed through deposition of material in a lacustrine type environment. Alternately, these layers could also be volcanic ash deposits. Uzboi Valles, which enters the crater from the southwest, is a catastrophic outflow channel that formed in the Martian past. The streamlined nature of the topographic features at the intersection of the crater with Uzboi Valles record the erosional pattern of flowing liquid water on the surface of Mars during the episodic outflow event. The Story Mars doesn't have a shortage of rugged terrain, and this area is no exception. While things look pretty quiet now, this cratered region was once the scene of some tremendous action. Long ago in Martian history, an incoming meteoroid probably smashed into the planet and produced a giant impact crater named Holden Crater, which stretches 88 miles across the Martian surface. The history of the area around Holden Crater doesn?t stop there. At some point, a catastrophic flood burst forth on the surface, forming an impressive outflow channel called Uzboi Valles. No one knows exactly how that happened, or whether the water might even have rushed into Holden Crater at some point, forming a long-ago lake. What we do know is that there is a lot of sedimentary material that could have formed in two hypothesized ways: in an ancient lake environment or as volcanic-ash deposits. Scientists are searching for the answers by studying the region where Uzboi

  15. Interior Slopes of Copernican Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, M. S.; Burns, K.; Stelling, R.; Speyerer, E.; Mahanti, P.

    2012-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) routinely acquires high resolution (50 to 200 cm pixel scales) stereo pairs from adjacent orbits through spacecraft slews; parallax angles are typically >20°, and the local incidence angle between 40° and 65°. These observations are reduced to digital elevation models (DEM) using a combination of ISIS (USGS) and SOCET Set (BAE Systems). For this study DEMs originally sampled at 2 m scales were reduced (averaging technique) to 5 m scales to provide slopes calculated over 3x3 pixel boxes (15 m x 15 m). The upper 50% of interior walls of Copernican craters (2 to 20 km diameter) typically have average slopes of 36°, with slopes locally above 40° not uncommon (i.e. Fig 1: 2.3 km diam, 17.68°S, 144.41°E). Giordano Bruno (GB; 35.97N°, 102.86°E) is likely the youngest 20-km diameter class crater on the Moon. Its floor is dominated by impact forms (ponds and flows), and inner walls exhibit a series of coalesced flow lobes emanating from steep upper slopes. The lobes appear to be composed of dry granular material based on the observation of boulder trails superposed on many examples. The upper slopes average 36° or more, with some slopes above 40°. For much of GB, slopes exceed 30° all the way to the crater floor (especially in the SE). The high slopes imply angular grains, some level of cohesion, and/or higher angles of repose due to the Moon's relatively low gravity. Larmor Q (28.56°N, 176.33°E), another large Copernican crater, is elliptical in plan (23 x 18 km diameter), with an interior floor dominated by large slump blocks. Like GB its walls exhibit overlapping lobes (granular materials) emanating from interior wall slopes that range from 30° to 36°. Other Copernican craters exhibit similar steep slopes on interior walls: Moore F (23 km diam), Necho (30 km), and two unnamed craters (9 km,13.31°S, 257.55°E; 9 km, 15.72°, 177.39°E). Slopes of the central peaks of Tycho crater (0

  16. The self-secondary crater population of the Hokusai crater on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zhiyong; Prieur, Nils C.; Werner, Stephanie C.

    2016-07-01

    Whether or not self-secondaries dominate small crater populations on continuous ejecta deposits and floors of fresh impact craters has long been a controversy. This issue potentially affects the age determination technique using crater statistics. Here the self-secondary crater population on the continuous ejecta deposits of the Hokusai crater on Mercury is unambiguously recognized. Superposition relationships show that this population was emplaced after both the ballistic sedimentation of excavation flows and the subsequent veneering of impact melt, but it predated the settlement and solidification of melt pools on the crater floor. Fragments that formed self-secondaries were launched via impact spallation with large angles. Complex craters on the Moon, Mercury, and Mars probably all have formed self-secondaries populations. Dating young craters using crater statistics on their continuous ejecta deposits can be misleading. Impact melt pools are less affected by self-secondaries. Overprint by subsequent crater populations with time reduces the predominance of self-secondaries.

  17. Characteristics of Polygonal Craters on (1) Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Katharina A.; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Buczkowski, Debra L.; von der Gathen, Isabel; Kersten, Elke; Mest, Scott C.; Naß, Andrea; Neesemann, Adrian; Preusker, Frank; Roatsch, Thomas; Schröder, Stefan E.; Schulzeck, Fanziska; Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Stephan, Katrin; Wagner, Roland; Williams, David A.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Chistopher T.

    2016-04-01

    The Dawn spacecraft arrived at Ceres in March 2015. There, the on-board Framing Camera (FC) collects image data with a resolution of up to 35 m/pixel, which reveal a large variety of impact crater morphologies including polygonal craters. Polygonal craters show straight rim sections aligned to form an angular shape. They are commonly associated with fractures in the target material, which may be preserved as linear structures on Ceres [3, 4]. On Ceres, we find polygonal craters with a size ranging between 5 km and 280 km in diameter. However, the majority of polygonal craters have diameters ranging between 10 km and 50 km diameter. A preferential hexagonal shape is observed and some polygonal craters exhibit central peaks or relaxed crater floors. On average there are eight to ten polygonal craters per 100,000 km², however the northern latitudes have a slightly higher and the southern latitudes a slightly lower polygonal crater density. This may hint at an older and younger age of the northern (> 60° N) and southern regions (> 60° S) compared to the mid latitudes, respectively. Alternatively, the relaxation of craters may be advanced in the mid latitudes which are generally warmer than the poles and thus support the relaxation of depressions. Also, the southern region harbors relatively large craters which may have altered or destroyed preexisting structures in the crust which are necessary for the formation of polygonal craters. Most polygonal craters have six or seven straight rim sections; however, there is a tendency for fewer edges with decreasing crater size. Although this observation may be biased due to the map resolution, it is also possible that the impactor creating a relatively small polygonal crater embeds less energy and thus forms the straight rim sections during the excavation stage. This may result in fewer straight rim sections compared to more energetic impactors which form their polygonal shape during the modification stage. Straight rim

  18. Crater Gradation in Gusev Crater, Meridiani Planum, and on the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J. A.; Golombek, M. P.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Crumpler, L.; Li, R.

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity have examined multiple impact craters since landing in Gusev Crater (14.569 deg. S, 175.473 deg. E) and Meridiani Planum (1.946 deg. S, 354.473 deg. E), respectively. Craters at both locations are in varying states of preservation and comparison between their evolved gradation signatures and those around simple, unglaciated terrestrial craters provide clues to the processes and amount of Martian crater modification.

  19. Stratigraphy of the crater Copernicus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paquette, R.

    1984-01-01

    The stratigraphy of copernicus based on its olivine absorption bands is presented. Earth based spectral data are used to develop models that also employ cratering mechanics to devise theories for Copernican geomorphology. General geologic information, spectral information, upper and lower stratigraphic units and a chart for model comparison are included in the stratigraphic analysis.

  20. Revisiting the crater of doom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Régules, Sergio

    2015-09-01

    The Chicxulub impact structure in Mexico is widely believed to be the site of the asteroid impact that allegedly killed the dinosaurs. As Sergio de Régules reports, scientists are now preparing to glean from it new insights into crater formation, materials science and the mechanisms of mass extinction.

  1. Channels on Bakhuysen Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Portion of channels on the wall of Bakhuysen crater (MOC 10605). These channels (22.1oS, 344.9oW) are the best examples of integrated drainage reminiscent of terrestrial systems. The pattern is topographically controlled; the relationships emphasized by light-colored sediments viewed in this low incidence angle (11.2o), nadir viewing (emission angle = 1.5o) image. The crater rim is marked by the escarpment running diagonally in the middle left to upper right of the image (downtrack scale = 8.4 m/pixel, crosstrack = 5.8 m/pixel). No channels outside the crater rim. This suggests that the source of the fluid was confined within the crater.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  2. At Home in the Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The wheel tracks seen above and to the left of the lander trace the path the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has traveled since landing in a small crater at Meridiani Planum, Mars. After this picture was taken, the rover excavated a trench near the soil seen at the lower left corner of the image. This image mosaic was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

  3. A Polar Crater on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This circular 36 kilometer (22 mile) diameter impact crater near the north pole of Jupiter's moon Ganymede has a floor that is partially brightened. On September 6, 1996, NASA's Galileo spacecraft obtained images of an 18 kilometer (11 miles) wide swath through this area. The Galileo data, acquired at a resolution of 46 meters (151 feet) pixel (picture element), is shown overlain on data obtained by NASA's Voyager spacecraft in 1979. In Voyager data the crater was thought to be flooded by icy volcanism, but in Galileo data it is seen to be brightened by frost deposition. The Voyager data, taken at a resolution of 1.3 kilometers (0.8 miles) per pixel, shows a circular feature with a bright deposit on the northern half of its floor. North is toward the top of the picture. Illumination in the image is from the southeast, and frost appears to be collecting on north facing slopes of ridges and crater rims. Fractures cross the floor of the large crater, and the northeastern rim displays two large blocks of ice which have collapsed off the side of the steep crater wall. The Galileo images were taken by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system at a range of about 2243 kilometers (1391 miles) from the surface of Ganymede.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  4. Analyses of radar images of small craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greeley, R.; Christensen, P. R.; McHone, J. F.

    1985-04-01

    Clouds hide the surface of Venus from all but radar imaging systems, supplemented by limited views from land spacecraft. Among the surfaces features likely to be observed by radar are craters that have formed by a variety of processes. In order to assess the radar characteristics of craters, volcanic craters and impact structures on Earth are described as imaged by the Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A) experiment. Although most of the craters are small, this analysis provides insight into the ability to discriminate craters of various origins and provides some basis for interpreting radar images returned from Venus.

  5. The Merna, Nebraska Meteorite Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povenmire, H.

    1995-09-01

    This crater-like structure was recognized by geomorphologist, Wakefield Dort in 1992 while examining topographic maps [1]. Using the same tradition as for meteorite discoveries, he named it after the nearest town with a post office, Merna, Nebraska, Zip code, 68856. This researcher has made two extensive field trips to the crater. The f1rst was to examine and confirm its nature and the second to field check the results after a computer simulation of the impacting projectile. This area is characterized by low rolling hills which are under cultivation. This area is unglaciated and the closest recent glacial approach was about 240 km. The prevailing winds are from the northwest and there are many parallel eolian features which have an azimuth of approximately 300 degrees. The predominate erosional factors are snowmelt and the spring rains. Most of the 53 cm annual precipitation occurs from March to May. The soil is predominantly Peoria loess with an estimated depth of approximately 260 m.[2]. This is probably underlaid with limestone bedrock. Well records of the area have not been very helpful in resolving this question. The Merna Crater is an approximately 1.6 km diameter, 23 m deep, well preserved depression with a flat bottom. It is located about 18 km west of and 2.4 km south of Merna, Nebraska. This site is on the U.S.G.S. 7.'5 Callaway N.W., Nebraska 1951 topographic map. The crater covers most of section 9 and the eastern portion of section 8. The coordinates of the crater center are approximately longitude 99 degrees 58' 20"W and latitude 41 degrees 27' 30" N. A significant landmark on section 9 is the Cliff Union Church and Cemetery which is on the eastern rim of the crater. Even though the land has been plowed for more than 150 years, the general topographic features have not been seriously disturbed. It is believed that the crater was caused by an air blast similar to Tunguska but of a much larger magnitude. It is therefore believed that there never was a

  6. On the Rim of 'Victoria Crater'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mars rover Opportunity reached the rim of 'Victoria Crater' in Mars' Meridiani Planum region with a 26-meter (85-foot) drive during the rover's 951st Martian day, or sol (Sept. 26, 2006). After the drive, the rover's navigation camera took the three exposures combined into this view of the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

    A half mile in the distance one can see about 20 percent of the far side of the crater framed by the rocky cliffs in the foreground to the left and right of the image. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind.

    The position at the end of the sol 951 drive is about six meters from the lip of an alcove called 'Duck Bay.' The rover team planned a drive for sol 952 that would move a few more meters forward, plus more imaging of the near and far walls of the crater.

    Victoria Crater is about five times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than 'Eagle Crater,' where Opportunity first landed.

    This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  7. The Explorer's Guide to Impact Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, F.; Pierazzo, E.; Osinski, G.

    2005-01-01

    Impact cratering is a fundamental geologic process of our solar system. It competes with other processes, such as plate tectonics, volcanism, fluvial, glacial and eolian activity, in shaping the surfaces of planetary bodies. In some cases, like the Moon and Mercury, impact craters are the dominant landform. On other planetary bodies impact craters are being continuously erased by the action of other geological processes, like volcanism on Io, erosion and plate tectonics on the Earth, tectonic and volcanic resurfacing on Venus, or ancient erosion periods on Mars. The study of crater populations is one of the principal tools for understanding the geologic history of a planetary surface. Among the general public, impact cratering has drawn wide attention through its portrayal in several Hollywood movies. Questions that are raised after watching these movies include: How do scientists learn about impact cratering? , and What information do impact craters provide in understanding the evolution of a planetary surface? Fundamental approaches used by scientists to learn about impact cratering include field work at known terrestrial craters, remote sensing studies of craters on various solid surfaces of solar system bodies, and theoretical and laboratory studies using the known physics of impact cratering.

  8. Low-emissivity impact craters on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, C. M.; Elachi, C.; Moore, H. J.; Basilevsky, A. T.; Ivanov, B. A.; Schaber, G. G.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of 144 impact craters on Venus has shown that 11 of these have floors with average emissivities lower than 0.8. The remaining craters have emissivities between 0.8 and 0.9, independent of the specific backscatter cross section of the crater floors. These 144 impact craters were chosen from a possible 164 craters with diameters greater than 30 km as identified by researchers for 89 percent of the surface of Venus. We have only looked at craters below 6053.5 km altitude because a mineralogical change causes high reflectivity/low emissivity above the altitude. We have also excluded all craters with diameters smaller than 30 km because the emissivity footprint at periapsis is 16 x 24 km and becomes larger at the poles.

  9. Backyard bolides: finding a buried impact crater.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poag, C. W.

    1998-10-01

    The author reports the scientific activities that led to his discovery of a huge submerged impact crater in Chesapeake Bay, some 140 km east of Atlantic City, New Jersey. This crater, buried under 350 m of sediment is 80 km wide and almost 1 km deep. Microfossil evidence shows that the crater is approximately 35 million years old. The author futher identified 14 small secondary craters with diamters of 0.4 to 0.5 km diameter within 60 km of the primary crater. These were caused by the impact of huge blocks of material ejected by the primary impact event. In addition, the author identified an intermediate-size primary crater (19 km diameter) in Toms Canyon, some 300 km from the Chesapeake crater and, again from microfossil evidence, identical in age.

  10. Concerns Boys Have about Puberty

    MedlinePlus

    ... a normal part of the growth process. Wet Dreams Boys may wake up in the morning to ... in their pajama pants and sheets. These " wet dreams ," or nocturnal emissions, are caused by an ejaculation, ...

  11. For Boys: Trouble "Down There"

    MedlinePlus

    ... re a boy, you probably already know your penis and scrotum are sensitive. Why? And more important, ... have grown up calling it something else, but penis (say: PEE-niss) is the official word for ...

  12. Empathy in Boys with Gender Identity Disorder: A Comparison to Externalizing Clinical Control Boys and Community Control Boys and Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen-Anderson, Allison F. H.; Jenkins, Jennifer M.; Bradley, Susan J.; Zucker, Kenneth J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The construct of empathy was examined in 20 boys with gender identity disorder (GID), 20 clinical control boys with externalizing disorders (ECC), 20 community control boys (NCB), and 20 community control girls (NCG). The mean age of the children was 6.86 years (range = 4-8 years). It was hypothesized that boys with GID would show…

  13. Guest Editorial: Are We Shortchanging Boys?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wardle, Francis

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the failure of early childhood education to meet the needs of boys. Describes developmental differences between boys and girls, and teacher attitudes towards boys. Suggests actions relating to environment, teacher training, hiring, evaluation, and activities that will meet the needs of boys. Lists characteristics of good early childhood…

  14. Impact Crater Particulates: Microscopic Meteoritic Material Surrounding Meteorite Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Toby Russell

    1995-01-01

    The influx of extraterrestrial matter onto the Earth is a ongoing process. Every year 40,000 metric tons of extraterrestrial matter is accreted by the Earth (Love 1993). A small fraction of this material arrives at Earth as objects large enough to survive the passage through atmosphere. Some of this material is completely melted as it passes through the atmosphere and arrives at the surface of the Earth as cosmic spherules. Cosmic spherules formed from metallic cosmic material undergoes changes in its elemental abundance as it passes through the atmosphere. The oxidation of the spherules results in the concentration of more refractory elements like Ni and Co into the metallic phase. Cosmic spherules are also formed by the passage of large meteorites through the atmosphere and their resulting impact onto the Earth. I found that the cosmic spherules from a wide variety of sources show a very similar trend in the elemental abundance patterns of their metallic phases. This trend is most obvious in the spherules recovered from the deep -sea and the spherules imbedded in impactite glass recovered from iron meteorite impact crater sites. The metallic spherules recovered from the soil surrounding impact craters do not show the high degree of elemental fractionation found in the deep-sea and impactite spherules. The composition of these spherules indicate that they are a mixture of meteoritic and target material. Metallic spherules are not the only meteoritic material to be found in the soil surrounding meteorite craters. I found that small fragments of the parent meteorite are an ubiquitous component of the soil surrounding the Odessa and Dalgaranga meteorite craters. These fragments occurred as small (most less than 400 mu m in size) heavily weathered fragments of meteoritic metal. The total calculated mass of these fragments is an order of magnitude larger than the mass of ponderable meteorites recovered from the site but 1 to 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the

  15. Fossil Meteorite Unearthed From Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L. M. V.

    2006-06-01

    A team of scientists lead by Wolf Maier (University of Quebec, Canada and University of Pretoria, South Africa and soon at University of Western Australia, Perth) and Marco Andreoli (University of the Witwatersrand and South African Nuclear Energy Corp.) and colleagues who also hail from Canada, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States, have announced the discovery of a 25-centimeter-wide chondritic meteorite unearthed from the 145-million-year-old Morokweng impact crater in South Africa. Found within the crater's impact melt sheet about 770 meters (half a mile) down a drilling borehole, the hefty meteorite's existence would seem improbable given its low chance of surviving the high shock pressures and temperatures normally associated with large impact events. Its unusual composition could mean it is a sample from a previously unknown part of the LL chondrite parent body or maybe it is from an entirely different asteroid population than other known meteorites.

  16. 'White Rock' of Pollack Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    1 January 2004 The famous 'White Rock' of Pollack Crater has been known for three decades; it was originally found in images acquired by the Mariner 9 spacecraft in 1972. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) close-up view, obtained in October 2003, shows some of the light-toned, wind-eroded sedimentary rock that makes up 'White Rock.' It is not actually white, except when viewed in a processed, grayscale image (in color, it is more of a light butterscotch to pinkish material). The sediment that comprises 'White Rock' was deposited in Pollack Crater a long time ago, perhaps billions of years ago; the material was later eroded by wind. Dark, windblown ripples are present throughout the scene. This picture is located near 8.2oS, 335.1oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  17. Bright crater outflows: Possible emplacement mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chadwick, D. John; Schaber, Gerald G.; Strom, Robert G.; Duval, Darla M.

    1992-01-01

    Lobate features with a strong backscatter are associated with 43 percent of the impact craters cataloged in Magellan's cycle 1. Their apparent thinness and great lengths are consistent with a low-viscosity material. The longest outflow yet identified is about 600 km in length and flows from the 90-km-diameter crater Addams. There is strong evidence that the outflows are largely composed of impact melt, although the mechanisms of their emplacement are not clearly understood. High temperatures and pressures of target rocks on Venus allow for more melt to be produced than on other terrestrial planets because lower shock pressures are required for melting. The percentage of impact craters with outflows increases with increasing crater diameter. The mean diameter of craters without outflows is 14.4 km, compared with 27.8 km for craters with outflows. No craters smaller than 3 km, 43 percent of craters in the 10- to 30-km-diameter range, and 90 percent in the 80- to 100-km-diameter range have associated bright outflows. More melt is produced in the more energetic impact events that produce larger craters. However, three of the four largest craters have no outflows. We present four possible mechanisms for the emplacement of bright outflows. We believe this 'shotgun' approach is justified because all four mechanisms may indeed have operated to some degree.

  18. Duke on the Craters Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., Lunar Module pilot of the Apollo 16 mission, is photographed collecting lunar samples at Station no. 1 during the first Apollo 16 extravehicular activity at the Descartes landing site. This picture, looking eastward, was taken by Astronaut John W. Young, commander. Duke is standing at the rim of Plum crater, which is 40 meters in diameter and 10 meters deep. The parked Lunar Roving Vehicle can be seen in the left background.

  19. Primordial Cratering Regimes on Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, W. K.

    2004-11-01

    Understanding of planetary surface evolution (and possibly biological evolution) is hampered by a longstanding uncertainty over the nature of impact cratering and interplanetary debris in the first 600 My of solar system history. On the one hand, a number of researchers (1-3) treat a cataclysmic spike in cratering 3.9 Gy ago as an observational fact, arguing that little or no cratering occurred from 4.5 to 4.0 Gy ago, and that all multi-ring lunar basins formed 3.85 to 4.0 Gy ago. On the other hand, dynamical theorists have had problems trying to explain the a large impactor spike, as reviewed in (4). Worse yet, meteorite evidence on lunar and asteroidal impact melts (3,5) fail to confirm the strong spike in Apollo-sample impact melts at 3.9 Gy. A semi-quantitative model has been suggested to reconcile the findings (5). References: (1) Tera, F., D.A. Papanastassiou, G. J. Wasserberg 1974. Isotopic evidence for a terminal Lunar cataclysm, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 22, 1-21. (2) Stoeffler, D., G. Ryder 2001. "Stratigraphy and Isotope Ages of Lunar Geologic Units: Chronological Standard for the Inner Solar System," in Chronology and Evolution of Mars, Eds. R. Kallenbach, J. Geiss, W. K. Hartmann. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Netherlands, pp. 105-164. (3) Cohen, B. A., T. D. Swindle, D. A. Kring 2000. Support for the Lunar Cataclysm Hypothesis from Lunar Meteorite Impact Melt Ages. Science 290, 1754-1756. (4) Hartmann, W. K., G. Ryder, L. Dones, D. Grinspoon 2000. The Time-Dependent Intense Bombardment of the Primordial Earth/Moon System. In Origin of the Earth and Moon, Eds. R. M. Canup, K. Righter (Tucson: Univ. Arizona Press), pp. 493-512. (5) Hartmann, W. K. 2003. Megaregolith evolution and cratering cataclysm models - Lunar cataclysm as a misconception (28 years later). Meteor. Planet. Sci. 38, 579-593.

  20. Brown Country: Johnny Rodriguez

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas, Deborah R.

    2007-01-01

    The year 1972 was part of a dynamic period of Chicano politics and cultural production in South Texas. A few years earlier, in the Crystal City Revolts, Tejanos had moved to gain control of city and school board positions, events that resulted in the creation of the Raza Unida Party in 1970. Nineteen seventy-two also marked the beginning of the…

  1. Autumn Afternoon in Hale Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The seasons on Mars and Earth are anti-correlated at present: days are getting shorter and shadows are getting longer as autumn end sand the beginning of winter draws nearer in the martian southern hemisphere, just as the same is occurring in Earth's northern hemisphere. Long shadows are especially prominent in this high resolution view of mountains forming part of the central peaks of Hale Crater (left), a 136 kilometer-(85 mile)-diameter impact crater at 36oS, 37oW. The two pictures were taken simultaneously by the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera on November 10, 2000. The sun illuminates the scene from the northwest (upper left)about 22o above the horizon. Knowing the sun angle and the length of the longest shadow (1.6 km; 1.0 mi), the height of the largest peak in the high resolution view (right) is about 630 meters (2,070 ft) above the crater floor. Sand dunes blanket the middle portion of the high resolution view, and small gullies--possibly carved by water--can be seen on the slopes of some of the peaks at the upper left. Winter in the southern hemisphere will begin in mid-December 2000. The high resolution view covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide at a full-resolution scale of 3 meters (9.8 ft) per pixel.

  2. Discourse Skills of Boys with Fragile X Syndrome in Comparison to Boys with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Joanne; Martin, Gary E.; Moskowitz, Lauren; Harris, Adrianne A.; Foreman, Jamila; Nelson, Lauren

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared the conversational discourse skills of boys who have fragile X syndrome with and without autism spectrum disorder (ASD) with those of boys with Down syndrome and boys who are typically developing. Method: Participants were boys who have fragile X syndrome with (n = 26) and without (n = 28) ASD, boys with Down syndrome…

  3. Paradigm lost: Venus crater depths and the role of gravity in crater modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpton, Virgil L.

    1992-01-01

    Previous to Magellan, a convincing case had been assembled that predicted that complex impact craters on Venus were considerably shallower than their counterparts on Mars, Mercury, the Moon, and perhaps even Earth. This was fueled primarily by the morphometric observation that, for a given diameter (D), crater depth (d) seems to scale inversely with surface gravity for the other planets in the inner solar system. The unpredicted depth of fresh impact craters on Venus argues against a simple inverse relationship between surface gravity and crater depth. Factors that could contribute to deep craters on Venus include (1) more efficient excavation on Venus, possibly reflecting rheological effects of the hot venusian environment; (2) more melting and efficient removal of melt from the crater cavity; and (3) enhanced ejection of material out of the crater, possibly as a result of entrainment in an atmosphere set in motion by the passage of the projectile. The broader issue raised by the venusian crater depths is whether surface gravity is the predominant influence on crater depths on any planet. While inverse gravity scaling of crater depths has been a useful paradigm in planetary cratering, the venusian data do not support this model and the terrestrial data are equivocal at best. The hypothesis that planetary gravity is the primary influence over crater depths and the paradigm that terrestrial craters are shallow should be reevaluated.

  4. Tabular comparisons of the Flynn Creek impact crater, United States, Steinheim impact crater, Germany and Snowball explosion crater, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddy, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    A tabular outline of comparative data is presented for 340 basic dimensional, morphological, and structural parameters and related aspects for three craters of the flat-floored, central uplift type, two of which are natural terrestrial impact craters and one is a large-scale experimental explosion crater. The three craters are part of a general class, in terms of their morphology and structural deformation that is represented on each of the terrestrial planets including the moon. One of the considered craters, the Flynn Creek Crater, was formed by a hypervelocity impact event approximately 360 m.y. ago in what is now north central Tennessee. The impacting body appears to have been a carbonaceous chondrite or a cometary mass. The second crater, the Steinheim Crater, was formed by an impact event approximately 14.7 m.y. ago in what is now southwestern Germany. The Snowball Crater was formed by the detonation of a 500-ton TNT hemisphere on flat-lying, unconsolidated alluvium in Alberta, Canada.

  5. Anaglyph, Manicouagan Crater, Quebec, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Manicouagan Crater is one of the world's largest and oldest known impact craters and perhaps the one most readily apparent to astronauts in orbit. The age of the impact is estimated at 214 million years before present. Since then erosion has removed about one kilometer (0.6 miles) of rock from the region and has created a topographic pattern that follows the structural pattern of the crater. A ring depression (prominently seen as dark gray) encloses a central peak. The ring depression now hosts the Manicouagan Reservoir and so appears as a distinct ring lake to astronauts and as a smooth and flat feature in this topographic visualization. A fine pattern of topographic striations trending south-southeast, most prominent within the crater itself, indicates the flow direction of glaciers that covered this area during the last ice age.

    This anaglyph is derived entirely from the SRTM elevation model. First a gray image was created that uses image brightness to represent a mix of topographic height (higher elevations are brighter) and topographic orientation (northern slopes are brighter). The stereoscopic effect was then created by generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter. Total topographic relief from the ring lake level to the central crater peak is about 600 meters (2000 feet).

    Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. The mission used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth

  6. Defrosting of Russell Crater Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    These two images (at right) were acquired by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) 39 days apart at 19:10 UTC (2:10 PM EST) on December 28, 2006 (upper right) and at 20:06 UTC (3:06 PM EST) on February 5, 2007 (lower right). These CRISM data were acquired in 544 colors covering the wavelength range from 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and show features as small as 20 meters (about 65 feet) across. Both images are false color composites of bands at 2.5, 1.5, and 1.25 micrometers, and are nearly centered at the same location, 54.875oS, 12.919oE (upper right) and 54.895oS, 12.943oE (lower right). Each image is approximately 11 kilometers (7 miles) across at its narrowest. These are part of a series of images capturing the evolution of carbon dioxide frost on the surface of the dunes in Russell Crater.

    Russell Crater is one of many craters in the southern highland region of Mars that contain large areas of sand dunes. The sand in these dunes has accumulated over a very long time period -- perhaps millions of years -- as wind blows over the highland terrain, picking up sand in some places and depositing in others. The topography of the craters forces the wind to blow up and over the crater rims, and the wind often isn't strong enough to keep the tiny grains suspended. This makes the sand fall to the ground and gradually pile up, and over time the surface breezes shape the sand into ripples and dunes. A similar process is at work at the Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve in Colorado, USA.

    The above left image shows a THEMIS daytime infrared mosaic of Russell Crater and the location of its (approximately) 30-kilometer wide dune field in the northeastern quadrant of the crater floor. Superposed on this view and shown enlarged at the upper right is CRISM image FRT000039DF. This CRISM image was acquired during the late Martian southern winter (solar longitude = 157.7o), and the bright blue in this false color composite indicates the

  7. Small Rayed Crater Ejecta Retention Age Calculated from Current Crater Production Rates on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calef, F. J. III; Herrick, R. R.; Sharpton, V. L.

    2011-01-01

    Ejecta from impact craters, while extant, records erosive and depositional processes on their surfaces. Estimating ejecta retention age (Eret), the time span when ejecta remains recognizable around a crater, can be applied to estimate the timescale that surface processes operate on, thereby obtaining a history of geologic activity. However, the abundance of sub-kilometer diameter (D) craters identifiable in high resolution Mars imagery has led to questions of accuracy in absolute crater dating and hence ejecta retention ages (Eret). This research calculates the maximum Eret for small rayed impact craters (SRC) on Mars using estimates of the Martian impactor flux adjusted for meteorite ablation losses in the atmosphere. In addition, we utilize the diameter-distance relationship of secondary cratering to adjust crater counts in the vicinity of the large primary crater Zunil.

  8. 'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay' (Stereo)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2

    NASA's Mars rover Opportunity edged 3.7 meters (12 feet) closer to the top of the 'Duck Bay' alcove along the rim of 'Victoria Crater' during the rover's 952nd Martian day, or sol (overnight Sept. 27 to Sept. 28), and gained this vista of the crater. The rover's navigation camera took the seven exposures combined into this mosaic view of the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

    The far side of the crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) away. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves, such as Duck Bay. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind. The rocky cliffs in the foreground have been informally named 'Cape Verde,' on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' on the right.

    Victoria Crater is about five times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than 'Eagle Crater,' where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is an expectation that the thick stack of geological layers exposed in the crater walls could reveal the record of past environmental conditions over a much greater span of time than Opportunity has read from rocks examined earlier in the mission.

    The stereo-anaglyph view presented here is a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  9. 'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay' (Polar Projection)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mars rover Opportunity edged 3.7 meters (12 feet) closer to the top of the 'Duck Bay' alcove along the rim of 'Victoria Crater' during the rover's 952nd Martian day, or sol (overnight Sept. 27 to Sept. 28), and gained this vista of the crater. The rover's navigation camera took the seven exposures combined into this mosaic view of the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

    The far side of the crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) away. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves, such as Duck Bay. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind. The rocky cliffs in the foreground have been informally named 'Cape Verde,' on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' on the right.

    Victoria Crater is about five times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than 'Eagle Crater,' where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is an expectation that the thick stack of geological layers exposed in the crater walls could reveal the record of past environmental conditions over a much greater span of time than Opportunity has read from rocks examined earlier in the mission.

    This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction.

  10. 'Victoria Crater' from 'Duck Bay' (Vertical Projection)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mars rover Opportunity edged 3.7 meters (12 feet) closer to the top of the 'Duck Bay' alcove along the rim of 'Victoria Crater' during the rover's 952nd Martian day, or sol (overnight Sept. 27 to Sept. 28), and gained this vista of the crater. The rover's navigation camera took the seven exposures combined into this mosaic view of the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

    The far side of the crater is about 800 meters (one-half mile) away. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves, such as Duck Bay. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind. The rocky cliffs in the foreground have been informally named 'Cape Verde,' on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' on the right.

    Victoria Crater is about five times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than 'Eagle Crater,' where Opportunity first landed. The great lure of Victoria is an expectation that the thick stack of geological layers exposed in the crater walls could reveal the record of past environmental conditions over a much greater span of time than Opportunity has read from rocks examined earlier in the mission.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

  11. Geology and cratering history of Ariel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, J. B.; Boyce, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    The surface of Ariel imaged by Voyager 2 can be divided into several types of terrain on the basis of morphology: cratered terrain, subdued terrain, ridged terrain, and plains. Crater statistics were compiled for each of the terrain types. Despite differing morphology, the various terrains on Ariel do not exhibit large variations in crater frequency. None of the observed surfaces on Ariel record the period of accretion. It seems that conditions appropriate for resurfacing could have occurred during the early history of Ariel.

  12. Interplanetary meteoroid debris in LDEF metal craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Joswiak, D.; Bradley, J.; Hoerz, Friedrich

    1993-01-01

    We have examined craters in Al and Au LDEF surfaces to determine the nature of meteoroid residue in the rare cases where projectile material is abundantly preserved in the crater floor. Typical craters contain only small amounts of residue and we find that less than 10 percent of the craters in Al have retained abundant residue consistent with survival of a significant fraction (greater than 20 percent) of the projectile mass. The residue-rich craters can usually be distinguished optically because their interiors are darker than ones with little or no apparent projectile debris. The character of the meteoroid debris in these craters ranges from thin glass liners, to thick vesicular glass containing unmelted mineral fragments, to debris dominated by unmelted mineral fragments. In the best cases of meteoroid survival, unmelted mineral fragments preserve both information on projectile mineralogy as well as other properties such as nuclear tracks caused by solar flare irradiation. The wide range of the observed abundance and alteration state of projectile residue is most probably due to differences in impact velocity. The crater liners are being studied to determine the composition of meteoroids reaching the Earth. The compositional types most commonly seen in the craters are: (1) chondritic (Mg, Si, S, Fe in approximately solar proportions), (2) Mg silicate. amd (3) iron sulfide. These are also the most common compositional types of extraterrestrial particle types collected in the stratosphere. The correlation between these compositions indicates that vapor fractionation was not a major process influencing residue composition in these craters. Although the biases involved with finding analyzable meteoroid debris in metal craters differ from those for extraterrestrial particles collected in and below the atmosphere, there is a common bias favoring particles with low entry velocity. For craters this is very strong and probably all of the metal craters with abundant

  13. The Explorer's Guide to Impact Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierazzo, E.; Osinski, G.; Chuang, F.

    2004-12-01

    Impact cratering is a fundamental geologic process of our solar system. It competes with other processes, such as plate tectonics, volcanism, or fluvial, glacial and eolian activity, in shaping the surfaces of planetary bodies. In some cases, like the Moon and Mercury, impact craters are the dominant landform. On other planetary bodies impact craters are being continuously erased by the action of other geological processes, like volcanism on Io, erosion and plate tectonics on the Earth, tectonic and volcanic resurfacing on Venus, or ancient erosion periods on Mars. The study of crater populations is one of the principal tools for understanding the geologic history of a planetary surface. Among the general public, impact cratering has drawn wide attention through its portrayal in several Hollywood movies. Questions that are raised after watching these movies include: ``How do scientists learn about impact cratering?'', and ``What information do impact craters provide in understanding the evolution of a planetary surface?'' Fundamental approaches used by scientists to learn about impact cratering include field work at known terrestrial craters, remote sensing studies of craters on various solid surfaces of solar system bodies, and theoretical and laboratory studies using the known physics of impact cratering. We will provide students, science teachers, and the general public an opportunity to experience the scientific endeavor of understanding and exploring impact craters through a multi-level approach including images, videos, and rock samples. This type of interactive learning can also be made available to the general public in the form of a website, which can be addressed worldwide at any time.

  14. Relative age of Camelot crater and crater clusters near the Apollo 17 landing site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucchitta, B.K.

    1979-01-01

    Topographic profiles and depth-diameter ratios from the crater Camelot and craters of the central cluster in the Apollo 17 landing area suggest that these craters are of the same age. Therefore, layers that can be recognized in the deep-drill core and that can be identified as ejecta deposits from Camelot or from the cluster craters should yield similar emplacement ages. ?? 1979.

  15. Venus - Multi-Floor Irregular Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This Magellan image shows an irregular crater of approximately 14- kilometer (8.7-mile) mean diameter. The crater is actually a cluster of four separate craters that are in rim contact. The noncircular rims and multiple, hummocky floors are probably the result of the breakup and dispersion of an incoming meteoroid during passage through the dense Venusian atmosphere. After breaking up, the meteoroid fragments impacted nearly simultaneously, creating the crater cluster. The area shown is 40 kilometers (25 miles) in width and 76 kilometers (47 miles) in length, it is centered at -21.4 degrees latitude, 335.2 degrees longitude in the northern Lavinia Region of Venus.

  16. Opportunity at Work Inside Victoria Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its front hazard-identification camera to capture this wide-angle view of its robotic arm extended to a rock in a bright-toned layer inside Victoria Crater.

    The image was taken during the rover's 1,322nd Martian day, or sol (Oct. 13, 2007).

    Victoria Crater has a scalloped shape of alternating alcoves and promontories around the crater's circumference. Opportunity descended into the crater two weeks earlier, within an alcove called 'Duck Bay.' Counterclockwise around the rim, just to the right of the arm in this image, is a promontory called 'Cabo Frio.'

  17. Central Remnant Craters on Mars - Localization of Hydrothermal Alteration at the Edge of Crater Floors?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, H. E.

    2001-01-01

    Localized erosion at the edge of crater floors may be caused by hydrothermal alteration due to focusing of fluid flow around an impact melt sheet following crater formation, coupled with hydrothermal self-sealing under the center of the crater. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Masculinities and Resistance: High School Boys (Un)doing Boy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehler, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    In Australia, Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom there has been a resurgence in attention directed at boys and schooling. The media and public discourse describes it as a burgeoning moral panic. Mainly grounded in public concerns about achievement levels and violence in schools, the response has been to develop quick fixes and…

  19. Paleohydrology of Eberswalde crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Rossman P.; Lewis, Kevin W.; Howard, Alan D.; Grant, John A.

    2015-07-01

    Eberswalde crater, Mars, contains a well-preserved fluvial distributary network in a likely deltaic setting. The meandering inverted paleochannels and closed drainage basin of this deposit support relatively well constrained estimates of channel-forming discharge (over an individual event flood timescale), runoff production (event and annual timescales), and longevity of deposition (geologic timescale) during the Late Hesperian to Early Amazonian Epochs. The width and meander dimensions of two inverted paleochannels reflect the channel-forming discharge from event floods (~ 200 to 400 m3/s), the deposit surface indicates the level (- 1400 to - 1350 m) and surface area (410 to 810 km2) of the likely paleolake, and the topography and mapped extent of tributaries constrain the watershed area (5000 to 17,000 km2). Based on these results and terrestrial empirical constraints on evaporation and sediment concentration, we evaluated three hypothetical water sources: meltwater liberated by the nearby Holden crater impact (continuous deposition over ~ 101-102 years), intermittent rainfall or snowmelt during finite periods controlled by orbital evolution (deposition over ~ 104-106 years), and highly infrequent runoff or melting of accumulated snowpacks following distant impacts or secular changes in orbital parameters. Local impact-generated runoff and highly infrequent rainfall or snowmelt require unreasonably high and low rates of evaporation, respectively, to maintain the paleolake level. The local impact hypothesis alternatively depends on one flooding episode with very high concentrations of fluvial sediment that are inconsistent with morphologic considerations. Multiple primary impact craters in the area postdate Holden ejecta but were later dissected, indicating fluvial erosion long after the Holden impact. Intermittent rainfall of ~ 1 cm/day and seasonal snowmelt are both consistent with our results over a deposition timescale totaling ~ 104-106 years.

  20. A Crater Split In Two

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 23 September 2003

    A 22 km-diameter crater has been sliced by the tectonic forces that produced the rift known as Sirenum Fossae. The orientation of this rift is roughly radial to the great Tharsis volcano Arsia Mons, probably indicating a link between the formation of the rift and the volcano. Note how the rift cuts through a jumble of mounds on the floor of the crater. This indicates a sequence of events beginning with the formation of the crater followed by an infilling of material that was then eroded into the mounds and ultimately split open by the shifting martian crust.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -29.7, Longitude 211.7 East (148.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. The Kamil Crater in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Folco, Luigi; Di Martino, Mario; El Barkooky, Ahmed; D'Orazio, Massimo; Lethy, Ahmed; Urbini, Stefano; Nicolosi, Iacopo; Hafez, Mahfooz; Cordier, Carole; van Ginneken, Matthias; Zeoli, Antonio; Radwan, Ali M; El Khrepy, Sami; El Gabry, Mohamed; Gomaa, Mahomoud; Barakat, Aly A; Serra, Romano; El Sharkawi, Mohamed

    2010-08-13

    We report on the detection in southern Egypt of an impact crater 45 meters in diameter with a pristine rayed structure. Such pristine structures are typically observed on atmosphereless rocky or icy planetary bodies in the solar system. This feature and the association with an iron meteorite impactor and shock metamorphism provides a unique picture of small-scale hypervelocity impacts on Earth's crust. Contrary to current geophysical models, ground data indicate that iron meteorites with masses of the order of tens of tons can penetrate the atmosphere without substantial fragmentation. PMID:20651117

  2. On the Rim of 'Victoria Crater' (Stereo)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left-eye view of a stereo pair for PIA08780

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right-eye view of a stereo pair for PIA08780

    NASA's Mars rover Opportunity reached the rim of 'Victoria Crater' in Mars' Meridiani Planum region with a 26-meter (85-foot) drive during the rover's 951st Martian day, or sol (Sept. 26, 2006). After the drive, the rover's navigation camera took the three exposures combined into this view of the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

    A half mile in the distance one can see about 20 percent of the far side of the crater framed by the rocky cliffs in the foreground to the left and right of the image. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind.

    The position at the end of the sol 951 drive is about six meters from the lip of an alcove called 'Duck Bay.' The rover team planned a drive for sol 952 that would move a few more meters forward, plus more imaging of the near and far walls of the crater.

    Victoria Crater is about five times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than 'Eagle Crater,' where Opportunity first landed.

    This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

  3. Numerical Simulations of Silverpit Crater Collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, G. S.; Ivanov, B. A.; Turtle, E. P.; Melosh, H. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Silverpit crater is a recently discovered, 60-65 Myr old complex crater, which lies buried beneath the North Sea, about 150 km east of Britain. High-resolution images of Silverpit's subsurface structure, provided by three-dimensional seismic reflection data, reveal an inner-crater morphology similar to that expected for a 5-8 km diameter terrestrial crater. The crater walls show evidence of terrace-style slumping and there is a distinct central uplift, which may have produced a central peak in the pristine crater morphology. However, Silverpit is not a typical 5-km diameter terrestrial crater, because it exhibits multiple, concentric rings outside the main cavity. External concentric rings are normally associated with much larger impact structures, for example Chicxulub on Earth, or Orientale on the Moon. Furthermore, external rings associated with large impacts on the terrestrial planets and moons are widely-spaced, predominantly inwardly-facing, asymmetric scarps. However, the seismic data show that the external rings at Silverpit represent closely-spaced, concentric faultbound graben, with both inwardly and outwardly facing fault-scarps. This type of multi-ring structure directly analogous to the Valhalla-type multi-ring basins found on the icy satellites. Thus, the presence and style of the multiple rings at Silverpit is surprising given both the size of the crater and its planetary setting. A further curiosity of the Silverpit structure is that the external concentric rings appear to be extensional features on the West side of the crater and compressional features on the East side. The crater also lies in a local depression, thought to be created by postimpact movement of a salt layer buried beneath the crater.

  4. Toys for Boys and Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Karen

    1994-01-01

    Many people in our society distinguish between girls and boys toys. A physical science toy collector shares her experience at a fast food restaurant when she was asked "Do you want a girl toy?" Her response was, "What's the difference?" (ZWH)

  5. "Good Morning Boys and Girls"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Rebecca S.

    2005-01-01

    It happens every day across the nation: Teachers welcome their students to class by saying, "Good morning, boys and girls." It is one of countless ways teachers highlight gender with their speech and behavior. Unfortunately, teachers' use of gender to label students and organize the classroom can have negative consequences. New research in the…

  6. How Schools Discriminate against Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuinness, Diane

    1979-01-01

    Biological differences between the sexes in motor, sensory, and some intellectual abilities are reviewed. The skills that lead to early success in school draw on female talents; as a result, boys are often labeled hyperactive. Journal availability: Human Nature, Inc., Subscriptions Department, P.O. Box 10702, Des Moines, Iowa 50340; single copy…

  7. Physical Development of Hyperactive Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Rob; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Anthropometric data collected on groups of 7-year-old New Zealand boys, identified as hyperactive-only, aggressive-hyperactive, aggressive-only and nonaggressive/nonhyperactive did not confirm the hypothesis that hyperactive-only Ss would show delayed maturation. However, hyperactive-only Ss were significantly more lean than Ss in other groups.…

  8. The Trouble with "Rainbow Boys"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Few pieces of GLBTQ fiction have received the popular and scholarly acclaim awarded to Alex Sanchez's "Rainbow Boys" series. Although "problem novels" are rarely taken seriously as literature, the books--the first novel in particular--have joined the few pieces of GLBTQ literature incorporated into educational discourse and curriculum. In this…

  9. Field Studies of Crater Gradation in Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum Using the Mars Exploration Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J. A.; Golombek, M. P.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Crumpler, L.; Li, R.; Watters, W. A.

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity investigated numerous craters since landing in Gusev crater (14.569degS, 175.473degE) and Meridiani Planum (1.946degS, 354.473degE) over the first 400 sols of their missions [1-4]. Craters at both sites are simple structures and vary in size and preservation state. Comparing observed and expected pristine morphology and using process-specific gradational signatures around terrestrial craters as a template [5-7] allows distinguishing gradation processes whose relative importance fundamentally differs from those responsible for most crater modification on the Earth.

  10. Infrared and radar signatures of lunar craters - Implications about crater evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Cutts, J. A.; Shorthill, R. W.; Zisk, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    Geological models accounting for the strongly crater size-dependent IR and radar signatures of lunar crater floors are examined. The simplest model involves the formation and subsequent 'gardening' of an impact melt layer on the crater floor, but while adequate in accounting for the gradual fading of IR temperatures and echo strengths in craters larger than 30 km in diameter, it is inadequate for smaller ones. It is concluded that quantitative models of the evolution of rock populations in regoliths and of the interaction of microwaves with regoliths are needed in order to understand crater evolutionary processes.

  11. High-explosive cratering analogs for bowl-shaped, central uplift, and multiring impact craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddy, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes six experimental explosion craters in terms of their basic morphology, subsurface structural deformation, and surrounding ejecta blanket. These craters exhibit one or more of the following features: bowl shapes with underlying breccia lens, central uplifts, multirings, terraced walls, rim strata, zones of concentric rim deformation, inner continuous ground cover of ejecta blankets formed by overturned flaps, secondary cratering, and fused alluvium. These craters were formed by large shock wave energy transfers at or near zero heights-of-burst, and it is possible that impact craters with analogous morphologic and structural features may have formed under similar surface energy transfer conditions.

  12. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Mars Impact Cratering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This document discusses the following topics: High Resolution Digital Elevation Models of Pristine Explosion Craters; Crater Degradation in the Martian Highlands: Morphometric Analysis of the Sinus Sabaeus Region and Simulation Modeling Suggest Fluvial Processes; Analysis of Impact Crater Preservation on Mars Using THEMIS Data; Atmospheric Entry Studies and the Smallest Impact Craters on Mars; Updating the Crater Count Chronology System for Mars; Control of Impact Crater-related Fracture Systems on the Subsurface Hydrology and Ground Collapse; Quantitative Analyses of Terrestrial Crater Deposits: Constraining Formation and Sediment Transport Processes on Mars; and Predicted Effects of Surface Processes on Martian Impact Crater Depth/Diameter Relationships

  13. Moon-Mercury: Relative preservation states of secondary craters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, D.H.

    1977-01-01

    Geologic mapping of the Kuiper quadrangle of Mercury and other geologic studies of the planet indicate that secondary craters are much better preserved than those on the moon around primary craters of similar size and morphology. Among the oldest recognized secondary craters on the moon associated with craters 100 km across or less are those of Posidonius, Atlas and Plato; these craters have been dated as middle to late Imbrian in age. Many craters on Mercury with dimensions, morphologies and superposed crater densities similar to these lunar craters have fields and clusters of fresher appearing secondary craters. The apparent differences between secondary-crater morphology and parent crater may be due in part to: (1) rapid isostatic adjustment of the parent crater; (2) different impact fluxes between the two planets; and (or) (3) to the greater concentration of Mercurian secondaries around impact areas, thereby accentuating crater forms. Another factor which may contribute to the better state of preservation of Mercurian secondaries relative to the moon is the difference in crater ejecta velocities on both bodies. These velocities have been calculated for fields of secondary craters at about equal ranges from lunar and Mercurian parent craters. Results show that ejection velocities of material producing most of the secondary craters are rather low (<1 km/s) but velocities on Mercury are about 50% greater than those on the moon for equivalent ranges. Higher velocities may produce morphologically enhanced secondary craters which may account for their better preservation with time. ?? 1977.

  14. Martian crater counts on Elysium Mons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Kathleen; Barlow, Nadine G.

    1990-01-01

    Without returned samples from the Martian surface, relative age chronologies and stratigraphic relationships provide the best information for determining the ages of geomorphic features and surface regions. Crater-size frequency distributions of six recently mapped geological units of Elysium Mons were measured to establish their relative ages. Most of the craters on Elysium Mons and the adjacent plains units are between 500 and 1000 meters in diameter. However, only craters 1 km in diameter or larger were used because of inadequate spatial resolution of some of the Viking images and to reduce probability of counting secondary craters. The six geologic units include all of the Elysium Mons construct and a portion of the plains units west of the volcano. The surface area of the units studied is approximately 128,000 sq km. Four of the geologic units were used to create crater distribution curves. There are no craters larger than 1 km within the Elysium Mons caldera. Craters that lacked raised rims, were irregularly shaped, or were arranged in a linear pattern were assumed to be endogenic in origin and not counted. A crater frequency distribution analysis is presented.

  15. Processes Modifying Cratered Terrains on Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.; White, O. L.; Umurhan, O. M.; Schenk, P.; Beyer, R. A.; McKinnon, W. B.; Singer, K. N.; Spencer, J. R.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Young, L. A.; Ennico Smith, K.; Olkin, C.

    2015-12-01

    The July encounter with Pluto by the New Horizons spacecraft permitted imaging of its cratered terrains with scales as high as ~100 m/pixel, and in stereo. In the initial download of images, acquired at 2.2 km/pixel, widely distributed impact craters up to 260 km diameter are seen in the near-encounter hemisphere. Many of the craters appear to be significantly degraded or infilled. Some craters appear partially destroyed, perhaps by erosion such as associated with the retreat of scarps. Bright ice-rich deposits highlight some crater rims and/or floors. While the cratered terrains identified in the initial downloaded images are generally seen on high-to-intermediate albedo surfaces, the dark equatorial terrain informally known as Cthulhu Regio is also densely cratered. We will explore the range of possible processes that might have operated (or still be operating) to modify the landscape from that of an ancient pristinely cratered state to the present terrains revealed in New Horizons images. The sequence, intensity, and type of processes that have modified ancient landscapes are, among other things, the record of climate and volatile evolution throughout much of the Pluto's existence. The deciphering of this record will be discussed.

  16. Processes Modifying Cratered Terrains on Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Howard, Alan D.; White, Oliver L.; Umurhan, Orkan M.; Schenk, Paul M.; Beyer, Ross A.; McKinnon, William B.; Singer, Kelsi N.; Spencer, John; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A.; Young, Leslie A.; Ennico, Kimberly; Olkin, Cathy B.

    2015-11-01

    The July encounter with Pluto by the New Horizons spacecraft permitted imaging of its cratered terrains with scales as high as ~100 m/pixel, and in stereo. In the initial download of images, acquired at 2.2 km/pixel, widely distributed impact craters up to 260 km diameter are seen in the near-encounter hemisphere. Many of the craters appear to be significantly degraded or infilled. Some craters appear partially destroyed, perhaps by erosion such as associated with the retreat of scarps. Bright ice-rich deposits highlight some crater rims and/or floors. While the cratered terrains identified in the initial downloaded images are generally seen on high-to-intermediate albedo surfaces, the dark equatorial terrain informally known as Cthulhu Regio is also densely cratered. We will explore the range of possible processes that might have operated (or still be operating) to modify the landscape from that of an ancient pristinely cratered state to the present terrains revealed in New Horizons images. The sequence, intensity, and type of processes that have modified ancient landscapes are, among other things, the record of climate and volatile evolution throughout much of the Pluto’s existence. The deciphering of this record will be discussed. This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.

  17. Surface expression of the Chicxulub crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Kevin O.; Ocampo, Adriana C.; Kinsland, Gary L.; Smith, Randy

    1996-06-01

    Analyses of geomorphic, soil, and topographic data from the northern Yucatán Peninsula, México, confirm that the buried Chicxulub impact crater has a distinct surface expression and that carbonate sedimentation throughout the Cenozoic has been influenced by the crater. Late Tertiary sedimentation was mostly restricted to the region within the buried crater, and a semicircular moat existed until at least Pliocene time. The topographic expression of the crater is a series of features concentric with the crater. The most prominent is an ˜ 83-km-radius trough or moat containing sinkholes (the Cenote ring). Early Tertiary surfaces rise abruptly outside the moat and form a stepped topography with an outer trough and ridge crest at radii of ˜103 and ˜ 129 km, respectively. Two discontinuous troughs lie within the moat at radii of ˜ 41 and ˜ 62 km. The low ridge between the inner troughs corresponds to the buried peak ring. The moat corresponds to the outer edge of the crater floor demarcated by a major ring fault. The outer trough and the ˜ 62-km-radius inner trough also mark buried ring faults. The ridge crest corresponds to the topographic rim of the crater as modified by postimpact processes. These interpretations support previous findings that the principal impact basin has a diameter of ˜ 180 km, but concentric, low-relief slumping extends well beyond this diameter and the eroded crater rim may extend to a diameter of ˜ 260 km.

  18. Numerical Simulations of Silverpit Crater Collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, G. S.; Turtle, E. P.; Melosh, H. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Silverpit crater is a recently discovered, 60-65 Myr old complex crater, which lies buried beneath the North Sea, about 150 km east of Britain. High-resolution images of Silverpit's subsurface structure, provided by three-dimensional seismic reflection data, reveal an inner-crater morphology similar to that expected for a 5-8 km diameter terrestrial crater. The crater walls show evidence of terracestyle slumping and there is a distinct central uplift, which may have produced a central peak in the pristine crater morphology. However, Silverpit is not a typical 5-km diameter terrestrial crater, because it exhibits multiple, concentric rings outside the main cavity. External concentric rings are normally associated with much larger impact structures, for example Chicxulub on Earth, or Orientale on the Moon. Furthermore, external rings associated with large impacts on the terrestrial planets and moons are widely-spaced, predominantly inwardly-facing, asymmetric scarps. However, the seismic data show that the external rings at Silverpit represent closely-spaced, concentric fault-bound graben, with both inwardly and outwardly facing faults-carps. This type of multi-ring structure is directly analogous to the Valhalla-type multi-ring basins found on the icy satellites. Thus, the presence and style of the multiple rings at Silverpit is surprising given both the size of the crater and its planetary setting.

  19. Dimensional scaling for impact cratering and perforation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Alan; Atkinson, Dale; Rieco, Steve

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the development of two physics-based scaling laws for describing crater depths and diameters caused by normal incidence impacts into aluminum and TFE Teflon. The report then describes equations for perforations in aluminum and TFE Teflon for normal impacts. Lastly, this report also studies the effects of non-normal incidence on cratering and perforation.

  20. Processes Modifying Cratered Terrains on Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The July encounter with Pluto by the New Horizons spacecraft permitted imaging of its cratered terrains with scales as high as approximately 100 m/pixel, and in stereo. In the initial download of images, acquired at 2.2 km/pixel, widely distributed impact craters up to 260 km diameter are seen in the near-encounter hemisphere. Many of the craters appear to be significantly degraded or infilled. Some craters appear partially destroyed, perhaps by erosion such as associated with the retreat of scarps. Bright ice-rich deposits highlight some crater rims and/or floors. While the cratered terrains identified in the initial downloaded images are generally seen on high-to-intermediate albedo surfaces, the dark equatorial terrain informally known as Cthulhu Regio is also densely cratered. We will explore the range of possible processes that might have operated (or still be operating) to modify the landscape from that of an ancient pristinely cratered state to the present terrains revealed in New Horizons images. The sequence, intensity, and type of processes that have modified ancient landscapes are, among other things, the record of climate and volatile evolution throughout much of the Pluto's existence. The deciphering of this record will be discussed. This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.

  1. Surface expression of the Chicxulub crater

    PubMed

    Pope, K O; Ocampo, A C; Kinsland, G L; Smith, R

    1996-06-01

    Analyses of geomorphic, soil, and topographic data from the northern Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, confirm that the buried Chicxulub impact crater has a distinct surface expression and that carbonate sedimentation throughout the Cenozoic has been influenced by the crater. Late Tertiary sedimentation was mostly restricted to the region within the buried crater, and a semicircular moat existed until at least Pliocene time. The topographic expression of the crater is a series of features concentric with the crater. The most prominent is an approximately 83-km-radius trough or moat containing sinkholes (the Cenote ring). Early Tertiary surfaces rise abruptly outside the moat and form a stepped topography with an outer trough and ridge crest at radii of approximately 103 and approximately 129 km, respectively. Two discontinuous troughs lie within the moat at radii of approximately 41 and approximately 62 km. The low ridge between the inner troughs corresponds to the buried peak ring. The moat corresponds to the outer edge of the crater floor demarcated by a major ring fault. The outer trough and the approximately 62-km-radius inner trough also mark buried ring faults. The ridge crest corresponds to the topographic rim of the crater as modified by postimpact processes. These interpretations support previous findings that the principal impact basin has a diameter of approximately 180 km, but concentric, low-relief slumping extends well beyond this diameter and the eroded crater rim may extend to a diameter of approximately 260 km. PMID:11539331

  2. Hydrothermal Alteration at Lonar Crater, India and Elemental Variations in Impact Crater Clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, H. E.; Nelson, M. J.; Shearer, C. K.; Misra, S.; Narasimham, V.

    2005-01-01

    The role of hydrothermal alteration and chemical transport involving impact craters could have occurred on Mars, the poles of Mercury and the Moon, and other small bodies. We are studying terrestrial craters of various sizes in different environments to better understand aqueous alteration and chemical transport processes. The Lonar crater in India (1.8 km diameter) is particularly interesting being the only impact crater in basalt. In January of 2004, during fieldwork in the ejecta blanket around the rim of the Lonar crater we discovered alteration zones not previously described at this crater. The alteration of the ejecta blanket could represent evidence of localized hydrothermal activity. Such activity is consistent with the presence of large amounts of impact melt in the ejecta blanket. Map of one area on the north rim of the crater containing highly altered zones at least 3 m deep is shown.

  3. Grooves and Craters on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Grooved terrain in this area of Nippur Sulcus on Jupiter's moon Ganymede is composed of ridges and troughs spaced 1 to 2 kilometers (0.6 to 1.2 miles) apart. North is to the top. A few broad (4 to 5 kilometer (2.5 to 3.1 mile) wide) ridges such as those in the northeast and southwest corners have smaller ridges on top of them. A 12 kilometer (7 mile) diameter impact crater is superimposed on these ridges. A dark ring at the base of the crater walls may be due to a collection of dark material at the base of the steep slopes. The image is 49 by 41 kilometers (30 by 25 miles) with a resolution of 200 meters (656 feet) per picture element (pixel). This image was obtained on September 6, 1996 by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  4. Formation of bowl-shaped craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piekutowski, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    High-explosive charges are used to form, in several types of granular media, laboratory-scale examples of the bowl-shaped craters that are found to be the largest and simplest class of impact structure on planetary and lunar surfaces. High-speed films of the experiments yield crater growth rate and particle displacement data, including quantitative stress, strain, displacement, and velocity data. These results are compared with the particle displacement and velocity data from large explosion experiments which have produced bowl-shaped craters. A time-sequence description of large, bowl-shaped impact crater formation is developed from the results of these comparisons, as well as those of the morphological features and structural deformations of large explosions and impact craters.

  5. The missing large impact craters on Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, S.; Ermakov, A. I.; Raymond, C. A.; Fu, R. R.; O'Brien, D. P.; Bland, M. T.; Ammannito, E.; de Sanctis, M. C.; Bowling, T.; Schenk, P.; Scully, J. E. C.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Williams, D. A.; Hiesinger, H.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-07-01

    Asteroids provide fundamental clues to the formation and evolution of planetesimals. Collisional models based on the depletion of the primordial main belt of asteroids predict 10-15 craters >400 km should have formed on Ceres, the largest object between Mars and Jupiter, over the last 4.55 Gyr. Likewise, an extrapolation from the asteroid Vesta would require at least 6-7 such basins. However, Ceres' surface appears devoid of impact craters >~280 km. Here, we show a significant depletion of cerean craters down to 100-150 km in diameter. The overall scarcity of recognizable large craters is incompatible with collisional models, even in the case of a late implantation of Ceres in the main belt, a possibility raised by the presence of ammoniated phyllosilicates. Our results indicate that a significant population of large craters has been obliterated, implying that long-wavelength topography viscously relaxed or that Ceres experienced protracted widespread resurfacing.

  6. The source crater of martian shergottite meteorites.

    PubMed

    Werner, Stephanie C; Ody, Anouck; Poulet, François

    2014-03-21

    Absolute ages for planetary surfaces are often inferred by crater densities and only indirectly constrained by the ages of meteorites. We show that the <5 million-year-old and 55-km-wide Mojave Crater on Mars is the ejection source for the meteorites classified as shergottites. Shergottites and this crater are linked by their coinciding meteorite ejection ages and the crater formation age and by mineralogical constraints. Because Mojave formed on 4.3 billion-year-old terrain, the original crystallization ages of shergottites are old, as inferred by Pb-Pb isotope ratios, and the much-quoted shergottite ages of <600 million years are due to resetting. Thus, the cratering-based age determination method for Mars is now calibrated in situ, and it shifts the absolute age of the oldest terrains on Mars backward by 200 million years. PMID:24603150

  7. The South Ray Crater age paradox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, D. S.; Heiken, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Relative exposure ages based on agglutinate content are calculated for 26 Apollo 16 surface and core samples. These ages increase from the northern part of the traverse to the southern part and are in general agreement with cosmogenic gas ages and particle track ages. An apparent paradox exists in which presumed ray soil from South Ray Crater is much older than the age of South Ray Crater itself as determined by a variety of methods. The most likely explanation for the paradox is that the presumed South Ray Crater soil is not ejecta from South Ray Crater but is pre-existing regolith upon which blocks and fragments from South Ray Crater are scattered.

  8. 'Big Crater' in 360-degree panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The crater dubbed 'Big Crater', approximately 2200 meters (7200 feet)away was imaged by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) as part of a 360-degree color panorama, taken over sols 8, 9 and 10. 'Big Crater' is actually a relatively small Martian crater to the southeast of the Mars Pathfinder landing site. It is 1500 meters (4900 feet) in diameter, or about the same size as Meteor Crater in Arizona.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  9. Compilation of a Global GIS Crater Database for the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Nadine G.; Mest, S. C.; Gibbs, V. B.; Kinser, R. M.

    2012-10-01

    We are using primarily Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) information to compile a new global database of lunar impact craters 5 km in diameter and larger. Each crater’s information includes coordinates of the crater center (ULCN 2005), crater diameter (major and minor diameters if crater is elliptical), azimuthal angle of orientation if crater is elliptical, ejecta and interior morphologies if present, crater preservation state, geologic unit, floor depth, average rim height, central peak height and basal diameter if present, and elevation and elemental/mineralogy data of surroundings. LROC WAC images are used in ArcGIS to obtain crater diameters and central coordinates and LROC WAC and NAC images are used to classify interior and ejecta morphologies. Gridded and individual spot data from LOLA are used to obtain crater depths, rim heights, and central peak height and basal diameter. Crater preservational state is based on crater freshness as determined by the presence/absence of specific interior and ejecta morphologies and elevated crater rim together with the ratio of current crater depth to depth expected for fresh crater of identical size. The crater database currently contains data on over 15,000 craters covering 80% of the nearside and 15% of the farside. We also include information allowing cross-correlation of craters in our database with those in existing crater catalogs, including the ground-based “System of Lunar Craters” by Arthur et al. (1963-1966), the Lunar Orbiter/Apollo-based crater catalog compiled by Andersson and Whitaker (1982), and the Apollo-based morphometric crater database by Pike (1980). We find significant differences in crater diameter and classification between these earlier crater catalogs and our new compilation. Utilizing the capability of GIS to overlay different datasets, we will report on how specific crater features such as central peaks, wall terraces, and impact melt deposits correlate with parameters such as elevation

  10. Comparing Styles of Crater Gradation in Gusev Crater, Meridiani Planum, and on the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, J. A.

    2004-12-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity investigation of impact craters yields data enabling comparisons to terrestrial craters and helps constrain the processes responsible for gradation within Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum. In Gusev, the Spirit rover has imaged variably preserved craters ranging between 1 to approximately 200 meters in diameter. These craters and their associated ejecta deposits dominate the surficial landscape, possess raised rims, and are characterized by walls sloping at angles generally less than 10 degrees. By contrast, craters explored at Meridiani Planum are between 10 and 150 m in diameter, formed into bedrock, and possess variably sloped walls that locally exceed the repose angle in Endurance crater. Comparisons between craters in Meridiani and Gusev and simple terrestrial craters provide clues to the amount and processes responsible for their gradation. For example, modification of terrestrial craters in even the most arid environments involves an appreciable water-driven component that typically leads to notched rims and disparate interior and exterior drainage networks. Drainage features evolve and eventually outpace mass wasting as wall gradients are reduced by back wasting and down slope redistribution of debris via incised debris chutes that terminate in a mix of talus and increasing alluvium. Terrestrial craters can also form an efficient trap for eolian sediments that accumulate to 10's of meters in Roter Kamm crater in Namibia, but still do not mask features diagnostic of gradation by water. None of the Martian craters display landforms diagnostic of significant modification by water. Moreover, the absence of debris chutes or obvious talus along crater walls in Gusev coupled with generally well preserved ejecta deposits implies modification by mass wasting is limited and accompanied by local deflation and eolian deposition typically less than 1-2 meters. In Meridiani, some craters appear relatively pristine (Fram

  11. International Assistance in Naming Craters on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, H. M.; Edmonds, J.; Hallau, K.; Hirshon, B.; Goldstein, J.; Hamel, J.; Hamel, S.; Solomon, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's robotic MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft made history in March 2011 by becoming the first to orbit Mercury. During the mission, MESSENGER acquired more than 250,000 images and made many other kinds of measurements. Names are often given to surface features that are of special scientific interest, such as craters. To draw international attention to the achievements of the spacecraft and engineers and scientists who made the MESSENGER mission a success, the MESSENGER Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Team initiated a Name a Crater on Mercury Competition.Five craters of particular geological interest were chosen by the science team. In accordance with International Astronomical Union (IAU) rules for Mercury, impact craters are named in honor of those who have made outstanding or fundamental contributions to the arts and humanities. He or she must have been recognized as a historically significant figure in the arts for at least 50 years and deceased for the last three years. We were particularly interested in entries honoring people from nations and cultural groups underrepresented in the current list of crater names. From more than 3600 entries received from around the world, the EPO team was able to reduce the number of entries to about 1200 names of 583 different artists who met the contest eligibility criteria. Next, the proposed individuals were divided into five artistic field groups and distributed to experts in that respective field. Each expert reviewed approximately100 artists with their biographical information. They narrowed down their list to a top ten, then to a top five by applying a rubric. The final selection was based on the reviewer lists and scores, with at least three finalist names selected from each artistic field. Of the 17 finalists provided to the IAU, the following names were selected: Carolan crater, Enheduanna crater, Karsh crater, Kulthum crater, and Rivera crater. For more

  12. Chronology of heavily cratered terrains on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, S.; Chapman, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Imaging of Mercury by Mariner 10 revealed a planet with more extensive plains units than on the Moon. Even in heavily cratered terrain, there is a lack of craters <40 km in diameter, relative to the size-frequency distribution on the Moon, a result attributed to resurfacing by the formation of widespread "intercrater plains". MESSENGER imaging has revealed that the more recent smooth plains are generally the result of widespread volcanism (rather than fluidized impact basin ejecta) and that at least localized volcanism may have persisted until comparatively recent times, despite the crustal contraction evidenced by the numerous lobate scarps. The older intercrater plains may also be volcanic. Here we address the ages of the oldest, most heavily cratered regions on Mercury that may predate most of the visible intercrater plains. We scale to Mercury the lunar crater chronology recently developed by Morbidelli et al., [1] in order to interpret new crater counts on these terrains. We find that these craters are probably not saturated but may have been in equilibrium with a rapid resurfacing process, presumably volcanism that formed the earliest recognized intercrater plains. The crater retention age for this terrain, which contains the oldest large craters on Mercury, is surprisingly young, perhaps hundreds of millions of years younger than the heavily cratered pre-Nectarian terrains on the Moon [2]. These results are important for understanding the early geological and geophysical evolution of Mercury. References: [1] Morbidelli A., Marchi S., Bottke W.F., and Kring D.A. 2012. A sawtooth timeline for the first billion years of the lunar bombardment. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, in press. [2] Marchi S., Bottke W.F., Kring D.A., and Morbidelli A. 2012. The onset of the lunar cataclysm as recorded in its ancient crater populations. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 325, 27-38.

  13. Flow-ejecta Crater in Icaria Planum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter Camera (MOC) acquired this high resolution image of a flow ejecta crater on November 19, 1997, at 8:26 PM PST, about 18 minutes after the start the 45th orbit of Mars. The area shown is roughly 6.5 by 40.2 kilometers (4 by 25 miles), and is located near 40 degrees South latitude, 120 degrees West longitude. Features as small as 15-18 m (50-60 feet) across are visible in the picture.

    Flow ejecta craters are so named because the material blasted out of the crater during the impact process appears to have flowed across the surface of Mars. First seen in Mariner 9 images in 1973, and described in detail using Viking Orbiter images acquired in 1976-78, flow-ejecta craters are considered by many scientists to be evidence that liquid water could be found in the near-subsurface at the time the craters formed. This image (right), a factor of two better than any previous view of such features (and a factor of 33 better than the best Viking frame of the specific crater, 056A61, left), shows two smaller, pre-existing craters and the interaction of the flowing ejecta with these craters. The uppermost small crater has been over-topped and partly buried by the flow, while the flow has been diverted around the lower crater. Ridges formed where the flow 'stacked up' behind obstacles, or came to rest.

    Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  14. Achievement in Boys' Schools 2010-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wylie, Cathy; Berg, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    This report explores the achievement of school leavers from state and state-integrated boys' schools. The analysis from 2010 to 2012 shows school leavers from state boys' schools had higher qualifications than their male counterparts who attended state co-educational schools. The research was carried out for the Association of Boys' Schools of New…

  15. Exploring the "Boy Crisis" in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappon, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The issue of the "boy gap" or "boy crisis" in education has been the subject of increasing attention across a number of Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. Given the importance of this issue and the need to better understand the situation in boys' education, this report draws on material and data from a review…

  16. Lunar polar craters - Icy, rough or just sloping?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eke, Vincent R.; Bartram, Sarah A.; Lane, David A.; Smith, David; Teodoro, Luis F. A.

    2014-10-01

    Circular Polarisation Ratio (CPR) mosaics from Mini-SAR on Chandrayaan-1 and Mini-RF on LRO are used to study craters near to the lunar north pole. The look direction of the detectors strongly affects the appearance of the crater CPR maps. Rectifying the mosaics to account for parallax also significantly changes the CPR maps of the crater interiors. It is shown that the CPRs of crater interiors in unrectified maps are biased to larger values than crater exteriors, because of a combination of the effects of parallax and incidence angle. Using the LOLA Digital Elevation Map (DEM), the variation of CPR with angle of incidence has been studied. For fresh craters, CPR ∼0.7 with only a weak dependence on angle of incidence or position interior or just exterior to the crater, consistent with dihedral scattering from blocky surface roughness. For anomalous craters, the CPR interior to the crater increases with both incidence angle and distance from the crater centre. Central crater CPRs are similar to those in the crater exteriors. CPR does not appear to correlate with temperature within craters. Furthermore, the anomalous polar craters have diameter-to-depth ratios that are lower than those of typical polar craters. These results strongly suggest that the high CPR values in anomalous polar craters are not providing evidence of significant volumes of water ice. Rather, anomalous craters are of intermediate age, and maintain sufficiently steep sides that sufficient regolith does not cover all rough surfaces.

  17. Palimpsest secondary craters on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This region of grooved terrain on Jupiter's moon Ganymede has been partially covered by ejecta from an ancient impact structure known as a palimpsest. Palimpsests are circular, bright, low relief features formed long ago by impacts into Ganymede's surface when this surface behaved differently than it does today.

    This composite of three images was obtained by the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on 6 September, 1996 (Universal Time) at a resolution of 88 meters per picture element (pixel). A lower resolution Voyager image of the same area is in the background. North is to the top. Part of this 350 kilometer (km) diameter unnamed palimpsest is visible as only a slight brightening of the surface in the upper left half of this image. The edge of the palimpsest crosses this picture from lower left to upper right.

    Secondary craters 5 to 7 km across produced during the palimpsest-forming impact are visible outside the palimpsest, in the lower right half of the picture. Inside the palimpsest, short northwest-southeast trending chains of similar sized craters can be discerned but with much more difficulty, as these craters inside the palimpsest are buried by ejecta. Similarly, the southwest-northeast trending grooves seen clearly outside the palimpsest can be seen with difficulty for a short distance within the palimpsest, where they have been covered by ejecta. This shows that the edge of the palimpsest is the edge of an ejecta blanket.

    Lower resolution images from the NASA's Voyager mission in 1979 revealed the palimpsests on Ganymede, but did not provide enough detail to allow them to be understood completely. Galileo images of this and several other palimpsests on Ganymede are used in conjunction with the Voyager images to provide a more complete understanding of just how these structures formed.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is

  18. The LCROSS Impact Cratering Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, P. H.; Hermalyn, B.; Ernst, C. M.; Colaprete, A.

    2009-12-01

    The large Earth-Departure-Upper Stage (the “EDUS”) and the LCROSS Shepherding Spacecraft (SSc) will both slam into the permanently shadowed regions near the lunar south pole on October 9, 2009. The goal of this mission is to excavate possible ice buried below the surface, thereby providing a measure of potential reservoirs of water for future human exploration. Impact experiments at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) have contributed to the mission design and planning. These experiments have included predictions for target selection (Schultz, 2006), a re-assessment of excavation at early times (Hermalyn and Schultz, 2009), and excavation depths (this study). Such predictions are critical for designing instrument sensitivity/selection for the SSc and earth-based telescopic observing campaigns. Because the EDUS has an effective low density (with concentrations at two ends), we have explored the effects of impactor density and configuration (hollow, solid) on the early-stage cratering process, including excavation depths. Most ejecta scaling studies use loose quartz or flint-shot sand in order to track late-stage excavation scaling. This approach does not work well at earlier stages, which comprise a greater fraction of growth at larger scales (see Hermalyn and Schultz, 2009; Hermalyn and Schultz, this volume). Experiments using solid and hollow aluminum spheres impacted a variety of target types (fine and coarse sand, fine pumice, and JSC-1a) in order to assess their effect on this earlier stage of crater growth. Tracers were placed at different depths allowed tracking of excavation. Results have direct implications to the LCROSS experiment and observations (after appropriate scaling). First, the effective low-density impactor significantly reduces excavation depths to a projectile diameter or less, even in sand. This becomes more important for regolith-like targets since the hollow projectile collapses and target compression prevents deep penetration

  19. Large Craters in Callisto's Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Galileo spacecraft provides a new view of this heavily cratered region in the southern hemisphere of the icy Jovian satellite Callisto. The region was not observed by NASA's Voyager spacecraft. Craters ranging in diameter from the 1.85 kilometer (1.13 mile) limit of resolution up to more than 70 kilometers (43 miles) can be observed in this image. Although all craters are generally round in outline, details in their structures vary with both size and relative age. Bright spots in the center of smaller craters (up to approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles)) are central peaks. Larger craters (up to the 51 kilometer (31 mile) wide crater in the east central part of the image) exhibit central pits or depressions. The largest crater, called Thrainn, has a diameter of 74 kilometers (45 miles) and is located in the southernmost corner of the image. This crater contains a broad central uplift, or dome, and has a highly eroded rim. In contrast, the 70 kilometer (43 mile) crater Audr, located along the northern margin of the image, is flat-bottomed, and has a less degraded and generally rounder rim. If erosional or degradational forces have been roughly constant with time on Callisto, scientists viewing this image can assume that Audr is relatively younger than Thrainn by noting the less degraded or fresher appearance of its rim. The differences in crater floor features between these two similarly sized craters could have been produced by differences in the impacting bodies that produced them, differences in the crustal materials in which the craters formed, or simply by a gradual evolution of crater floor shape with time.

    North is to the top of the image which was taken by the Galileo spacecraft's solid state imaging (CCD) system during its eighth orbit around Jupiter on May 6th, 1997. The center of the image is located at 34 degrees south latitude, 84 degrees west longitude, and was taken when the spacecraft was approximately 48,430 kilometers (29,542 miles) from

  20. The rayed crater Zunil and interpretations of small impact craters on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Alfred S.; Preblich, Brandon S.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; Artemieva, Natalia A.; Golombek, Matthew P.; Hurst, Michelle; Kirk, Randolph L.; Burr, Devon M.; Christensen, Philip R.

    2005-08-01

    A 10-km diameter crater named Zunil in the Cerberus Plains of Mars created ˜10 secondary craters 10 to 200 m in diameter. Many of these secondary craters are concentrated in radial streaks that extend up to 1600 km from the primary crater, identical to lunar rays. Most of the larger Zunil secondaries are distinctive in both visible and thermal infrared imaging. MOC images of the secondary craters show sharp rims and bright ejecta and rays, but the craters are shallow and often noncircular, as expected for relatively low-velocity impacts. About 80% of the impact craters superimposed over the youngest surfaces in the Cerberus Plains, such as Athabasca Valles, have the distinctive characteristics of Zunil secondaries. We have not identified any other large (⩾10 km diameter) impact crater on Mars with such distinctive rays of young secondary craters, so the age of the crater may be less than a few Ma. Zunil formed in the apparently youngest (least cratered) large-scale lava plains on Mars, and may be an excellent example of how spallation of a competent surface layer can produce high-velocity ejecta (Melosh, 1984, Impact ejection, spallation, and the origin of meteorites, Icarus 59, 234-260). It could be the source crater for some of the basaltic shergottites, consistent with their crystallization and ejection ages, composition, and the fact that Zunil produced abundant high-velocity ejecta fragments. A 3D hydrodynamic simulation of the impact event produced 10 10 rock fragments ⩾10 cm diameter, leading to up to 10 9 secondary craters ⩾10 m diameter. Nearly all of the simulated secondary craters larger than 50 m are within 800 km of the impact site but the more abundant smaller (10-50 m) craters extend out to 3500 km. If Zunil is representative of large impact events on Mars, then secondaries should be more abundant than primaries at diameters a factor of ˜1000 smaller than that of the largest primary crater that contributed secondaries. As a result, most small

  1. Impact cratering experiments in brittle targets with variable thickness: Implications for deep pit craters on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michikami, T.; Hagermann, A.; Miyamoto, H.; Miura, S.; Haruyama, J.; Lykawka, P. S.

    2014-06-01

    High-resolution images reveal that numerous pit craters exist on the surface of Mars. For some pit craters, the depth-to-diameter ratios are much greater than for ordinary craters. Such deep pit craters are generally considered to be the results of material drainage into a subsurface void space, which might be formed by a lava tube, dike injection, extensional fracturing, and dilational normal faulting. Morphological studies indicate that the formation of a pit crater might be triggered by the impact event, and followed by collapse of the ceiling. To test this hypothesis, we carried out laboratory experiments of impact cratering into brittle targets with variable roof thickness. In particular, the effect of the target thickness on the crater formation is studied to understand the penetration process by an impact. For this purpose, we produced mortar targets with roof thickness of 1-6 cm, and a bulk density of 1550 kg/m3 by using a mixture of cement, water and sand (0.2 mm) in the ratio of 1:1:10, by weight. The compressive strength of the resulting targets is 3.2±0.9 MPa. A spherical nylon projectile (diameter 7 mm) is shot perpendicularly into the target surface at the nominal velocity of 1.2 km/s, using a two-stage light-gas gun. Craters are formed on the opposite side of the impact even when no target penetration occurs. Penetration of the target is achieved when craters on the opposite sides of the target connect with each other. In this case, the cross section of crater somehow attains a flat hourglass-like shape. We also find that the crater diameter on the opposite side is larger than that on the impact side, and more fragments are ejected from the crater on the opposite side than from the crater on the impact side. This result gives a qualitative explanation for the observation that the Martian deep pit craters lack a raised rim and have the ejecta deposit on their floor instead. Craters are formed on the opposite impact side even when no penetration

  2. The variability of crater identification among expert and community crater analysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Stuart J.; Antonenko, Irene; Kirchoff, Michelle R.; Chapman, Clark R.; Fassett, Caleb I.; Herrick, Robert R.; Singer, Kelsi; Zanetti, Michael; Lehan, Cory; Huang, Di; Gay, Pamela L.

    2014-05-01

    The identification of impact craters on planetary surfaces provides important information about their geological history. Most studies have relied on individual analysts who map and identify craters and interpret crater statistics. However, little work has been done to determine how the counts vary as a function of technique, terrain, or between researchers. Furthermore, several novel internet-based projects ask volunteers with little to no training to identify craters, and it was unclear how their results compare against the typical professional researcher. To better understand the variation among experts and to compare with volunteers, eight professional researchers have identified impact features in two separate regions of the Moon. Small craters (diameters ranging from 10 m to 500 m) were measured on a lunar mare region and larger craters (100s m to a few km in diameter) were measured on both lunar highlands and maria. Volunteer data were collected for the small craters on the mare. Our comparison shows that the level of agreement among experts depends on crater diameter, number of craters per diameter bin, and terrain type, with differences of up to ∼±45%. We also found artifacts near the minimum crater diameter that was studied. These results indicate that caution must be used in most cases when interpreting small variations in crater size-frequency distributions and for craters ≲10 pixels across. Because of the natural variability found, projects that emphasize many people identifying craters on the same area and using a consensus result are likely to yield the most consistent and robust information.

  3. Little boy black and blue.

    PubMed

    Greene, Amanda E; Roosevelt, Genie E; Grubenhoff, Joseph A; Klein, Ulrich

    2011-08-01

    Tooth decay is common in US children, especially for children in low-income families. More than half of second-grade children have cavities. Therefore, root canal procedures are becoming more common in children. We report a case of a 2-year-old boy with a rare complication of a root canal procedure secondary to sodium hypochlorite toxicity. Sodium hypochlorite, a commonly used root canal irrigant, and its toxicity are reviewed. PMID:21822090

  4. Sand Dunes of Schaeberle Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-391, 14 June 2003

    This March 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark sand dunes near the center of Schaeberle Crater, located at 24.6oS, 310.3oW. The steepest slopes on the dunes point toward the left/upper left (northwest), indicating that, when the dunes were active, the dominant regional winds blew from the right/lower right (southeast). The dunes today, however, have a somewhat stunted and sculpted appearance, which suggests that in the most recent part of their history, they have been somewhat eroded. This image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated from the upper left.

  5. Saying Goodbye to 'Bonneville' Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Image

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this panoramic camera image on sol 86 (March 31, 2004) before driving 36 meters (118 feet) on sol 87 toward its future destination, the Columbia Hills. This is probably the last panoramic camera image that Spirit will take from the high rim of 'Bonneville' crater, and provides an excellent view of the ejecta-covered path the rover has journeyed thus far. The lander can be seen toward the upper right of the frame and is approximately 321 meters (1060 feet) away from Spirit's current location. The large hill on the horizon is Grissom Hill. The Colombia Hills, located to the left, are not visible in this image.

  6. A Stochastic Cratering Model for Asteroid Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, J. E.; Melosh, H. J.; Greenberg, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    The observed cratering records on asteroid surfaces (four so far: Gaspra, Ida, Mathilde, and Eros [1-4]) provide us with important clues to their past bombardment histories. Previous efforts toward interpreting these records have led to two basic modeling styles for reproducing the statistics of the observed crater populations. The first, and most direct, method is to use Monte Carlo techniques [5] to stochastically populate a matrix-model test surface with craters as a function of time [6,7]. The second method is to use a more general, parameterized approach to duplicate the statistics of the observed crater population [8,9]. In both methods, several factors must be included beyond the simple superposing of circular features: (1) crater erosion by subsequent impacts, (2) infilling of craters by impact ejecta, and (3) crater degradation and era- sure due to the seismic effects of subsequent impacts. Here we present an updated Monte Carlo (stochastic) modeling approach, designed specifically with small- to medium-sized asteroids in mind.

  7. Bright Ray Craters in Ganymede's Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    GANYMEDE COLOR PHOTOS: This color picture as acquired by Voyager 1 during its approach to Ganymede on Monday afternoon (the 5th of March). At ranges between about 230 to 250 thousand km. The images show detail on the surface with a resolution of four and a half km. This picture is of a region in the northern hemisphere near the terminator. It shows a variety of impact structures, including both razed and unrazed craters, and the odd, groove-like structures discovered by Voyager in the lighter regions. The most striking features are the bright ray craters which have a distinctly 'bluer' color appearing white against the redder background. Ganymede's surface is known to contain large amounts of surface ice and it appears that these relatively young craters have spread bright fresh ice materials over the surface. Likewise, the lighter color and reflectivity of the grooved areas suggests that here, too, there is cleaner ice. We see ray craters with all sizes of ray patterns, ranging from extensive systems of the crater in the southern part of this picture, which has rays at least 300-500 kilometers long, down to craters which have only faint remnants of bright ejects patterns (such as several of the craters in the southern half of PIA01516; P21262). This variation suggests that, as on the Moon, there are processes which act to darken ray material, probably 'gardening' by micrometeoroid impact. JPL manages and controls the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  8. Opportunity's First Dip into Victoria Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity entered Victoria Crater during the rover's 1,291st Martian day, or sol, (Sept. 11, 2007). The rover team commanded Opportunity to drive just far enough into the crater to get all six wheels onto the inner slope, and then to back out again and assess how much the wheels slipped on the slope. The driving commands for the day included a precaution for the rover to stop driving if the wheels were slipping more than 40 percent. Slippage exceeded that amount on the last step of the drive, so Opportunity stopped with its front pair of wheels still inside the crater. The rover team planned to assess results of the drive, then start Opportunity on an extended exploration inside the crater.

    This wide-angle view taken by Opportunity's front hazard-identification camera at the end of the day's driving shows the wheel tracks created by the short dip into the crater. The left half of the image looks across an alcove informally named 'Duck Bay' toward a promontory called 'Cape Verde' clockwise around the crater wall. The right half of the image looks across the main body of the crater, which is 800 meters (half a mile) in diameter.

  9. Venus - Multiple-Floored, Irregular Impact Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Magellan imaged this multiple-floored, irregular impact crater at latitude 16.4 degrees north, longitude 352.1 degrees east, during orbits 481 and 482 on 27 September 1990. This crater, about 9.2 kilometers in maximum diameter, was formed on what appears to be a slightly fractured, radar-dark (smooth) plain. The abundant, low viscosity flows associated with this cratering event have, however, filled local, fault-controlled troughs (called graben). These shallow graben are well portrayed on this Magellan image but would be unrecognizable but for their coincidental infilling by the radar-bright crater flows. This fortuitous enhancement by the crater flows of fault structures that are below the resolution of the Magellan synthetic aperture radar is providing the Magellan Science Team with valuable geologic information. The flow deposits from the craters are thought to consist primarily of shock melted rock and fragmented debris resulting from the nearly simultaneous impacts of two projectile fragments into the hot (800 degrees Fahrenheit) surface rocks of Venus. The presence of the various floors of this irregular crater is interpreted to be the result of crushing, fragmentation, and eventual aerodynamic dispersion of a single entry projectile during passage through the dense Venusian atmosphere.

  10. Processing Images of Craters for Spacecraft Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Yang; Johnson, Andrew E.; Matthies, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    A crater-detection algorithm has been conceived to enable automation of what, heretofore, have been manual processes for utilizing images of craters on a celestial body as landmarks for navigating a spacecraft flying near or landing on that body. The images are acquired by an electronic camera aboard the spacecraft, then digitized, then processed by the algorithm, which consists mainly of the following steps: 1. Edges in an image detected and placed in a database. 2. Crater rim edges are selected from the edge database. 3. Edges that belong to the same crater are grouped together. 4. An ellipse is fitted to each group of crater edges. 5. Ellipses are refined directly in the image domain to reduce errors introduced in the detection of edges and fitting of ellipses. 6. The quality of each detected crater is evaluated. It is planned to utilize this algorithm as the basis of a computer program for automated, real-time, onboard processing of crater-image data. Experimental studies have led to the conclusion that this algorithm is capable of a detection rate >93 percent, a false-alarm rate <5 percent, a geometric error <0.5 pixel, and a position error <0.3 pixel.

  11. Sands at Gusev Crater, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Farmer, Jack D.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Grin, E.A.; Li, Ron; Fenton, Lori; Cohen, B.; Bell, J.F., III; Yingst, R. Aileen

    2014-01-01

    Processes, environments, and the energy associated with the transport and deposition of sand at Gusev Crater are characterized at the microscopic scale through the comparison of statistical moments for particle size and shape distributions. Bivariate and factor analyses define distinct textural groups at 51 sites along the traverse completed by the Spirit rover as it crossed the plains and went into the Columbia Hills. Fine-to-medium sand is ubiquitous in ripples and wind drifts. Most distributions show excess fine material, consistent with a predominance of wind erosion over the last 3.8 billion years. Negative skewness at West Valley is explained by the removal of fine sand during active erosion, or alternatively, by excess accumulation of coarse sand from a local source. The coarse to very coarse sand particles of ripple armors in the basaltic plains have a unique combination of size and shape. Their distribution display significant changes in their statistical moments within the ~400 m that separate the Columbia Memorial Station from Bonneville Crater. Results are consistent with aeolian and/or impact deposition, while the elongated and rounded shape of the grains forming the ripples, as well as their direction of origin, could point to Ma'adim Vallis as a possible source. For smaller particles on the traverse, our findings confirm that aeolian processes have dominated over impact and other processes to produce sands with the observed size and shape patterns across a spectrum of geologic (e.g., ripples and plains soils) and aerographic settings (e.g., wind shadows).

  12. Locating the LCROSS Impact Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, William; Shirley, Mark; Moratto, Zachary; Colaprete, Anthony; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Hensley, Scott; Wilson, Barbara; Slade, Martin; Kennedy, Brian; Gurrola, Eric; Harcke, Leif

    2012-01-01

    The Lunar CRater Observations and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission impacted a spent Centaur rocket stage into a permanently shadowed region near the lunar south pole. The Sheperding Spacecraft (SSC) separated approx. 9 hours before impact and performed a small braking maneuver in order to observe the Centaur impact plume, looking for evidence of water and other volatiles, before impacting itself. This paper describes the registration of imagery of the LCROSS impact region from the mid- and near-infrared cameras onboard the SSC, as well as from the Goldstone radar. We compare the Centaur impact features, positively identified in the first two, and with a consistent feature in the third, which are interpreted as a 20 m diameter crater surrounded by a 160 m diameter ejecta region. The images are registered to Lunar Reconnaisance Orbiter (LRO) topographical data which allows determination of the impact location. This location is compared with the impact location derived from ground-based tracking and propagation of the spacecraft's trajectory and with locations derived from two hybrid imagery/trajectory methods. The four methods give a weighted average Centaur impact location of -84.6796 deg, -48.7093 deg, with a 1s uncertainty of 115 m along latitude, and 44 m along longitude, just 146 m from the target impact site. Meanwhile, the trajectory-derived SSC impact location is -84.719 deg, -49.61 deg, with a 1 alpha uncertainty of 3 m along the Earth vector and 75 m orthogonal to that, 766 m from the target location and 2.803 km south-west of the Centaur impact. We also detail the Centaur impact angle and SSC instrument pointing errors. Six high-level LCROSS mission requirements are shown to be met by wide margins. We hope that these results facilitate further analyses of the LCROSS experiment data and follow-up observations of the impact region

  13. Sands at Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth; Knoll, Andrew H.; Farmer, Jack; Arvidson, Raymond; Grin, Edmond; Li, Ronxing; Fenton, Lori; Cohen, Barbara; Bell, James F.; Aileen Yingst, R.

    2014-05-01

    Processes, environments, and the energy associated with the transport and deposition of sand at Gusev Crater are characterized at the microscopic scale through the comparison of statistical moments for particle size and shape distributions. Bivariate and factor analyses define distinct textural groups at 51 sites along the traverse completed by the Spirit rover as it crossed the plains and went into the Columbia Hills. Fine-to-medium sand is ubiquitous in ripples and wind drifts. Most distributions show excess fine material, consistent with a predominance of wind erosion over the last 3.8 billion years. Negative skewness at West Valley is explained by the removal of fine sand during active erosion, or alternatively, by excess accumulation of coarse sand from a local source. The coarse to very coarse sand particles of ripple armors in the basaltic plains have a unique combination of size and shape. Their distribution display significant changes in their statistical moments within the ~400 m that separate the Columbia Memorial Station from Bonneville Crater. Results are consistent with aeolian and/or impact deposition, while the elongated and rounded shape of the grains forming the ripples, as well as their direction of origin, could point to Ma'adim Vallis as a possible source. For smaller particles on the traverse, our findings confirm that aeolian processes have dominated over impact and other processes to produce sands with the observed size and shape patterns across a spectrum of geologic (e.g., ripples and plains soils) and aerographic settings (e.g., wind shadows).

  14. Impact mechanics at Meteor Crater, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shoemaker, Eugene Merle

    1959-01-01

    Meteor Crator is a bowl-shaped depression encompassed by a rim composed chiefly of debris stacked in layers of different composition. Original bedrock stratigraphy is preserved, inverted, in the debris. The debris rests on older disturbed strata, which are turned up at moderate to steep angles in the wall of the crater and are locally overturned near the contact with the debris. These features of Meteor Crater correspond closely to those of a crater produced by nuclear explosion where depth of burial of the device was about 1/5 the diameter of the resultant crater. Studies of craters formed by detonation of nuclear devices show that structures of the crater rims are sensitive to the depth of explosion scaled to the yield of the device. The structure of Meteor Crater is such as would be produced by a very strong shock originating about at the level of the present crater floor, 400 feet below the original surface. At supersonic to hypersonic velocity an impacting meteorite penetrates the ground by a complex mechanism that includes compression of the target rocks and the meteorite by shock as well as hydrodynamic flow of the compressed material under high pressure and temperature. The depth of penetration of the meteorite, before it loses its integrity as a single body, is a function primarily of the velocity and shape of the meteorite and the densities and equations of state of the meteorite and target. The intensely compressed material then becomes dispersed in a large volume of breccia formed in the expanding shock wave. An impact velocity of about 15 km/sec is consonant with the geology of Meteor Crater in light of the experimental equation of state of iron and inferred compressibility of the target rocks. The kinetic energy of the meteorite is estimated by scaling to have been from 1.4 to 1.7 megatons TNT equivalent.

  15. Cratering rates on the Galilean satellites.

    PubMed

    Zahnle, K; Dones, L; Levison, H F

    1998-12-01

    We exploit recent theoretical advances toward the origin and orbital evolution of comets and asteroids to obtain revised estimates for cratering rates in the jovian system. We find that most, probably more than 90%, of the craters on the Galilean satellites are caused by the impact of Jupiter-family comets (JFCs). These are comets with short periods, in generally low-inclination orbits, whose dynamics are dominated by Jupiter. Nearly isotropic comets (long period and Halley-type) contribute at the 1-10% level. Trojan asteroids might also be important at the 1-10% level; if they are important, they would be especially important for smaller craters. Main belt asteroids are currently unimportant, as each 20-km crater made on Ganymede implies the disruption of a 200-km diameter parental asteroid, a destruction rate far beyond the resources of today's asteroid belt. Twenty-kilometer diameter craters are made by kilometer-size impactors; such events occur on a Galilean satellite about once in a million years. The paucity of 20-km craters on Europa indicates that its surface is of order 10 Ma. Lightly cratered surfaces on Ganymede are nominally of order 0.5-1.0 Ga. The uncertainty in these estimates is about a factor of five. Callisto is old, probably more than 4 Ga. It is too heavily cratered to be accounted for by the current flux of JFCs. The lack of pronounced apex-antapex asymmetries on Ganymede may be compatible with crater equilibrium, but it is more easily understood as evidence for nonsynchronous rotation of an icy carapace. PMID:11878353

  16. Lunar Simple Crater Impact Melt Volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, Jeffrey B.; Barnouin, O. S.; Cintala, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Impact melt is observed in simple lunar craters having diameters as small as less than 200 m. The presence of ponds of impact melt on the floor of such small craters is interpreted to indicate vertical impacts. Data from the LRO LROC and LOLA experiments allow quantitative estimates of the volume of impact melt in simple crater. Such estimates allow for validation of theoretical models of impact melt generation and examination of target effects. Preliminary data have considerable scatter but are broadly consistent with the models.

  17. How many craters does exist in Romania?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    2015-06-01

    The author is discussing the occureness of impact craters in large areas of Southern Europe, particularly in Balkans. He is contrasting the results available with very prodigious results for Ukraine. What are the explanations for such a great dispersion of results? As a hypothesis, the author is discussing the site of Orheiul Vechi (in Bessarabia, near the city of Orkhey, 47Deg 20' North Lat, 28 Deg 50' East Long) as a possible impact crater. Another legendary informations refer to the city of Oradea, where a possible impact crater was formed in the site "Oraselul copiilor" and was covered by concrete in 1960.

  18. 'Hamersley' : Not Quite Like 'Eagle Crater'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This approximate true-color image mosaic from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the target nicknamed 'Hamersley' within 'Fram Crater.' The nature of the outcrop material seen in this location is visibly disrupted. Some areas also have layering that may be distinctive from what scientists saw previously in 'Eagle Crater.' Opportunity is traveling toward a large crater dubbed 'Endurance.' It may return to Fram for further analysis of its rocks and soils if time permits. The images in this mosaic were taken on sol 87 with the panoramic camera's 480-, 530- and 600-nanometer filters.

  19. Aboriginal oral traditions of Australian impact craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Duane W.; Goldsmith, John

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we explore Aboriginal oral traditions that relate to Australian meteorite craters. Using the literature, first-hand ethnographic records and field trip data, we identify oral traditions and artworks associated with four impact sites: Gosses Bluff, Henbury, Liverpool and Wolfe Creek. Oral traditions describe impact origins for Gosses Bluff, Henbury and Wolfe Creek Craters, and non-impact origins for Liverpool Crater, with Henbury and Wolfe Creek stories having both impact and non-impact origins. Three impact sites that are believed to have been formed during human habitation of Australia -- Dalgaranga, Veevers, and Boxhole -- do not have associated oral traditions that are reported in the literature.

  20. Impact crater degradation on venusian plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izenberg, N. R.; Arvidson, R. E.; Phillips, R. J.

    1994-02-01

    In venusian plains, impact craters without extensive low backscatter ejecta deposits are more likely to have low backscatter floors, be embayed by volcanic deposits, and exhibit fractures as compared to craters with extensive low backscatter ejecta. We interpret these trends as evidence of ongoing degradation of low backscatter ejecta by aeolian activity, weathering, and volcanism. Using a crater age sequence based on extent of preservation of low backscatter ejecta, together with Monte Carlo simulations, we find that tectonic activity has extended over a longer time period than volcanism.

  1. Why Landers Should Explore Fresh, Small Craters on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkland, L. E.; Herr, K. C.; Adams, P. M.

    2008-03-01

    Small, fresh craters at the Nevada Test Site are unique, high quality test beds to develop exploration techniques for new craters spotted on Mars by Malin et al. The NTS craters provide data to determine the optimum crater size for exploration.

  2. The Group of Macha Craters in Western Yakutia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurov, E. P.

    1996-03-01

    The group of Macha craters is placed in the marginal part of Aldan Anteclise in Macha river basin, the left tributary of Lena river. Coordinates of the craters: 60 degrees 06 minutes N, 117 degrees 35 minutes E. The Macha craters were discovered by aerovisual observations of Aldan Shield and Aldan Anteclise during the impact craters search in this region.

  3. Large floor-fractured craters and isostatic crater modification: Implications for lithospheric thickness on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichman, R. W.; Schultz, P. H.

    1993-03-01

    Several of the largest craters on Venus, including Mead, Meitner and Isabella, exhibit well-developed floor fracture patterns combining a central set of radial features with a peripheral set of concentric fractures. This pattern strongly resembles the fracture patterns observed in the largest floor-fractured craters on the Moon (e.g. Humboldt, Gauss, Petavius). Although most lunar floor-fractured craters apparently reflect crater modification by igneous intrusions and volcanism, we propose that the fractures in these larger craters represent domical flexure events in response to post-impact isostatic uplift. Since the extent of uplift and surface failure in this model depends on both the size of the basin cavity and the local lithospheric thickness, this interpretation also provides a means for constraining lithospheric thicknesses on Venus. Based on the apparent onset diameter of isostatic crater modification, we derive lithospheric thickness estimates for the Moon of approximately 80 - 100 km, and for Venus of approximately 50 - 70 km.

  4. Large floor-fractured craters and isostatic crater modification: Implications for lithospheric thickness on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichman, R. W.; Schultz, P. H.

    1993-01-01

    Several of the largest craters on Venus, including Mead, Meitner and Isabella, exhibit well-developed floor fracture patterns combining a central set of radial features with a peripheral set of concentric fractures. This pattern strongly resembles the fracture patterns observed in the largest floor-fractured craters on the Moon (e.g. Humboldt, Gauss, Petavius). Although most lunar floor-fractured craters apparently reflect crater modification by igneous intrusions and volcanism, we propose that the fractures in these larger craters represent domical flexure events in response to post-impact isostatic uplift. Since the extent of uplift and surface failure in this model depends on both the size of the basin cavity and the local lithospheric thickness, this interpretation also provides a means for constraining lithospheric thicknesses on Venus. Based on the apparent onset diameter of isostatic crater modification, we derive lithospheric thickness estimates for the Moon of approximately 80 - 100 km, and for Venus of approximately 50 - 70 km.

  5. Lunar crater volumes - Interpretation by models of impact cratering and upper crustal structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, S. K.

    1978-01-01

    Lunar crater volumes can be divided by size into two general classes with distinctly different functional dependence on diameter. Craters smaller than approximately 12 km in diameter are morphologically simple and increase in volume as the cube of the diameter, while craters larger than about 20 km are complex and increase in volume at a significantly lower rate implying shallowing. Ejecta and interior volumes are not identical and their ratio, Schroeters Ratio (SR), increases from about 0.5 for simple craters to about 1.5 for complex craters. The excess of ejecta volume causing the increase, can be accounted for by a discontinuity in lunar crust porosity at 1.5-2 km depth. The diameter range of significant increase in SR corresponds with the diameter range of transition from simple to complex crater morphology. This observation, combined with theoretical rebound calculation, indicates control of the transition diameter by the porosity structure of the upper crust.

  6. Degradation of Victoria Crater, Meridiani Planum, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, J. A.; Wilson, S. A.; Cohen, B. A.; Golombek, M. P.; Geissler, P. E.; Sullivan, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    Victoria crater (2.05N, 354.51E) is ~750 m in diameter and the largest crater on Mars observed in situ. The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity traversed NW to SE across a broad annulus dominated by dark sand that at least partially surrounds the crater before navigating the northern crater rim. Rover observations of the crater and ejecta deposits are complemented by images with 26-52 cm/pixel scales from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and enable assessment of degradation state. The present depth/diameter ratio for Victoria is 0.1, less than the 0.2 expected for a pristine primary impact structure. Together with the eroded, serrated rim, this implies an originally smaller crater diameter and/or considerable infilling consistent with occurrence of a large dune field and few exposed rocks on the crater floor. The height and width of the raised rim is generally 4-5 m and 150-225 m, respectively, less than the 30 m and 500-600 m, respectively, expected for a pristine 750 m diameter crater. Ejecta thicknesses around the rim were derived using rover-based and HiRISE images and yield consistent estimates averaging ~3 m. The serrated rim plan creates a series of promontories extending up to 50 m into the crater and generally fronted by 30-60 degree slopes that are locally vertical and are separated by bays whose floors typically slope 15-25 degrees. A crater originally on order of 600-650 m in diameter and subsequently enlarged by mass wasting and aeolian erosion may yield a structure resembling Victoria today. The steep expression of the promontories and local outcroppings of rocks in the ejecta blanket points to some ongoing mass wasting, but the relative paucity of associated flanking talus indicates derived blocks of sulfate sandstone are not resistant to saltating sand and are rapidly broken down by the wind or are completely covered/filled in by aeolian drift. At Cape St. Vincent, the promontory appears undercut

  7. Cratering statistics on asteroids: Methods and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C.

    2014-07-01

    Crater size-frequency distributions (SFDs) on the surfaces of solid-surfaced bodies in the solar system have provided valuable insights about planetary surface processes and about impactor populations since the first spacecraft images were obtained in the 1960s. They can be used to determine relative age differences between surficial units, to obtain absolute model ages if the impactor flux and scaling laws are understood, to assess various endogenic planetary or asteroidal processes that degrade craters or resurface units, as well as assess changes in impactor populations across the solar system and/or with time. The first asteroid SFDs were measured from Galileo images of Gaspra and Ida (cf., Chapman 2002). Despite the superficial simplicity of these studies, they are fraught with many difficulties, including confusion by secondary and/or endogenic cratering and poorly understood aspects of varying target properties (including regoliths, ejecta blankets, and nearly-zero-g rubble piles), widely varying attributes of impactors, and a host of methodological problems including recognizability of degraded craters, which is affected by illumination angle and by the ''personal equations'' of analysts. Indeed, controlled studies (Robbins et al. 2014) demonstrate crater-density differences of a factor of two or more between experienced crater counters. These inherent difficulties have been especially apparent in divergent results for Vesta from different members of the Dawn Science Team (cf. Russell et al. 2013). Indeed, they have been exacerbated by misuse of a widely available tool (Craterstats: hrscview.fu- berlin.de/craterstats.html), which incorrectly computes error bars for proper interpretation of cumulative SFDs, resulting in derived model ages specified to three significant figures and interpretations of statistically insignificant kinks. They are further exacerbated, and for other small-body crater SFDs analyzed by the Berlin group, by stubbornly adopting

  8. Method for evaluation of laboratory craters using crater detection algorithm for digital topography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamunićcar, Goran; Vinković, Dejan; Lončarić, Sven; Vučina, Damir; Pehnec, Igor; Vojković, Marin; Gomerčić, Mladen; Hercigonja, Tomislav

    In our previous work the following has been done: (1) the crater detection algorithm (CDA) based on digital elevation model (DEM) has been developed and the GT-115225 catalog has been assembled [GRS, 48 (5), in press, doi:10.1109/TGRS.2009.2037750]; and (2) the results of comparison between explosion-induced laboratory craters in stone powder surfaces and GT-115225 have been presented using depth/diameter measurements [41stLPSC, Abstract #1428]. The next step achievable using the available technology is to create 3D scans of such labo-ratory craters, in order to compare different properties with simple Martian craters. In this work, we propose a formal method for evaluation of laboratory craters, in order to provide objective, measurable and reproducible estimation of the level of achieved similarity between these laboratory and real impact craters. In the first step, the section of MOLA data for Mars (or SELENE LALT for Moon) is replaced with one or several 3D-scans of laboratory craters. Once embedment was done, the CDA can be used to find out whether this laboratory crater is similar enough to real craters, as to be recognized as a crater by the CDA. The CDA evaluation using ROC' curve represents how true detection rate (TDR=TP/(TP+FN)=TP/GT) depends on the false detection rate (FDR=FP/(TP+FP)). Using this curve, it is now possible to define the measure of similarity between laboratory and real impact craters, as TDR or FDR value, or as a distance from the bottom-right origin of the ROC' curve. With such an approach, the reproducible (formally described) method for evaluation of laboratory craters is provided.

  9. Towards a New Catalog of Lobed Martian Craters Compared with a New Global Crater Database, Complete to 1.5 km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, S. J.; Hynek, B. M.

    2009-03-01

    Presenting preliminary results of a new crater database, focusing on lobed crater characteristics. Database is complete to at least 1.5 km-diameter craters and contains more characteristics of each crater than previous catalogs.

  10. Peak Ring Craters and Multiring Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, H. J.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding of the mechanics of peak-ring crater and basin formation has expanded greatly due to the high precision data on lunar gravity from GRAIL. Peak rings coincide with the edges of underlying mantle uplifts on the Moon.

  11. Crater populations on Ganymede and Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, R. G.; Woronow, A.; Gurnis, M.

    1981-01-01

    Voyager 1 observations reveal heavily cratered surfaces on Ganymede and Callisto which suggest that a period of heavy bombardment occurred in the outer solar system. The overall crater density on Ganymede indicates that the oldest regions began recording the observed crater population at a later time than Callisto. A diameter-dependent loss of craters from 10-40 km occurs on Ganymede and may be due to ice formation or the formation of arcuate troughs. Evidence is given which suggests that the population of bodies responsible for the period of late heavy bombardment in the inner solar system is very different from that responsible for the late heavy bombardment in the outer solar system. In addition, it is postulated that Ganymede and Callisto may principally record a population of bodies that never penetrated the inner solar system in numbers great enough to leave a recognizable signature.

  12. LRO's Planetary CSI: Crater Science Investigations

    NASA Video Gallery

    If you want to learn more about the history of Earth and other rocky planets in the solar system, craters are a great place to look. Now, thanks to LRO's LROC instrument, we can take a much closer ...

  13. Schroeter's ratios for Martian craters - Radar results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    Schroeter's ratios (ratios of the rim volume to the apparent volume) are determined for a sample of 29 large, degraded Martian craters selected from the Goldstone Mars radar altimetry data. On the average, the values of the calculated Schroeter's ratios are about two orders of magnitude smaller than the same ratios for fresh lunar craters. This indicates a severe rim volume deficit in degraded Martian craters and it provides an additional support to the notion of a widespread resurfacing of intercrater plains on Mars. Schroeter's ratios for degraded craters could provide a semi-quantitative measure of the effects of the modification processes that had been active on Mars and on the other planetary bodies.

  14. Topography of the Martian Impact Crater Tooting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Garbeil, H.; Boyce, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Tooting crater is approx.29 km in diameter, is located at 23.4degN, 207.5degE, and is classified as a multi-layered ejecta crater [1]. Our mapping last year identified several challenges that can now be addressed with HiRISE and CTX images, but specifically the third dimension of units. To address the distribution of ponded sediments, lobate flows, and volatile-bearing units within the crater cavity, we have focused this year on creating digital elevation models (DEMs) for the crater and ejecta blanket from stereo CTX and HiRISE images. These DEMs have a spatial resolution of approx.50 m for CTX data, and 2 m for HiRISE data. Each DEM is referenced to all of the available individual MOLA data points within an image, which number approx.5,000 and 800 respectively for the two data types

  15. Empirical Scaling Laws of Rocket Exhaust Cratering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, Carly M.; Metzger, Philip T.; Immer, Christopher D.

    2005-01-01

    When launching or landing a space craft on the regolith of a terrestrial surface, special attention needs to be paid to the rocket exhaust cratering effects. If the effects are not controlled, the rocket cratering could damage the spacecraft or other surrounding hardware. The cratering effects of a rocket landing on a planet's surface are not understood well, especially for the lunar case with the plume expanding in vacuum. As a result, the blast effects cannot be estimated sufficiently using analytical theories. It is necessary to develop physics-based simulation tools in order to calculate mission-essential parameters. In this work we test out the scaling laws of the physics in regard to growth rate of the crater depth. This will provide the physical insight necessary to begin the physics-based modeling.

  16. Hydrothermal Occurrences in Gusev Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, S. W.; Farmer, J. D.; Milliken, R.; Mills, V. W.; Shock, E.

    2011-12-01

    Exploration of the Gusev crater landing site by the Spirit rover has revealed for the first time, in situ evidence of hydrothermal activity on Mars. Most compelling are eroded outcrops of opaline silica found adjacent to "Home Plate" [1], an eroded stack of volcaniclastic deposits stratigraphically overlain by a vesicular basalt unit [2]. Recent work [3] demonstrates that the silica outcrops occur in a stratiform unit that possibly surrounds Home Plate. The outcrops are dominated by opal-A with no evidence for diagenesis to other silica phases. No other hydrous or alteration phases have been identified within the outcrops; most notable is a lack of sulfur phases. The outcrops have porous and in some cases, brecciated microtextures. Taken together, these observations support the interpretation that the opaline silica outcrops were produced in a hot spring or perhaps geyser environment. In this context, they are silica sinter deposits precipitated from silica-rich hydrothermal fluids, possibly related to the volcanism that produced the Home Plate volcanic rocks. On Earth, debris aprons in which sinter is brecciated, reworked, and cemented, are common features of hot springs and geysers and are good analogs for the Martian deposits. An alternative hypothesis is that the silica resulted from acid-sulfate leaching of precursor rocks by fumarolic steam condensates. But stratigraphic, textural, and chemical observations tend to diminish this possibility [3]. We are conducting extensive laboratory and field investigations of silica from both hot spring/geyser and fumarole environments to understand the full range of mineralogical, chemical, textural, and morphological variations that accompany its production, in order to shed more light on the Home Plate occurrence. The recent discovery of abundant Mg-Fe carbonate (16-34 wt%) in outcrops named Comanche provides possible evidence for additional hydrothermal activity in Gusev [4]. However, the carbonate is hosted by olivine

  17. Interplanetary meteoroid debris in LDEF metal craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Horz, F.; Bradley, J.

    1992-01-01

    The extraterrestrial meteoroid residue found lining craters in the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) aluminum and gold targets is highly variable in both quantity and type. In typical craters only a minor amount of residue is found and for these craters it is evident that most of the impacting projectile was ejected during crater formation. Less than 10 percent of the craters greater than 100 microns contain abundant residue consistent with survival of a major fraction of the projectile. In these cases the residue can be seen optically as a dark liner and it can easily be analyzed by SEM-EDX techniques. Because they are rare, the craters with abundant residue must be a biased sampling of the meteoroids reaching the earth. Factors that favor residue retention are low impact velocity and material properties such as high melting point. In general, the SEM-EDX observations of crater residues are consistent with the properties of chondritic meteorites and interplanetary dust particles collected in the stratosphere. Except for impacts by particles dominated by single minerals such as FeS and olivine, most of the residue compositions are in broad agreement with the major element compositions of chondrites. In most cases the residue is a thin liner on the crater floor and these craters are difficult to quantitatively analyze by EDX techniques because the electron beam excites both residue and underlying metal substrate. In favorable cases, the liner is thick and composed of vesicular glass with imbedded FeNi, sulfide and silicate grains. In the best cases of meteoroid preservation, the crater is lined with large numbers of unmelted mineral grains. The projectiles fragmented into micron sized pieces but the fragments survived without melting. In one case, the grains contain linear defects that appear to be solar flare tracks. Solar flare tracks are common properties of small interplanetary particles and their preservation during impact implies that the fragments were

  18. Impact craters: An ice study on Rhea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalle Ore, Cristina M.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Mastrapa, Rachel M. E.; Lewis, Emma; White, Oliver L.

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this project is to study the properties of H2O ice in the environment of the Saturn satellites and in particular to measure the relative amounts of crystalline and amorphous H2O ice in and around two craters on Rhea. The craters are remnants of cataclysmic events that, by raising the local temperature, melted the ice, which subsequently crystallized. Based on laboratory experiments it is expected that, when exposed to ion bombardment at the temperatures typical of the Saturn satellites, the crystalline structure of the ice will be broken, resulting in the disordered, amorphous phase. We therefore expect the ice in and around the craters to be partially crystalline and partially amorphous. We have designed a technique that estimates the relative amounts of crystalline and amorphous H2O ice based on measurements of the distortion of the 2-μm spectral absorption band. The technique is best suited for planetary surfaces that are predominantly icy, but works also for surfaces slightly contaminated with other ices and non-ice components. We apply the tool to two areas around the Inktomi and the Obatala craters. The first is a young impact crater on the leading hemisphere of Rhea, the second is an older one on the trailing hemisphere. For each crater we obtain maps of the fraction of crystalline ice, which were overlain onto Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) images of the satellite searching for correlations between crystallinity and geography. For both craters the largest fractions of crystalline ice are in the center, as would be intuitively expected since the 'ground zero' areas should be most affected by the effects of the impact. The overall distribution of the crystalline ice fraction maps the shape of the crater and, in the case of Inktomi, of the rays. The Inktomi crater ranges between a maximum fraction of 67% crystalline ice to a minimum of 39%. The Obatala crater varies between a maximum of 51% and a minimum of 33%. Based on simplifying assumptions

  19. A suspected impact crater near Duckwater, Nevada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmude, R. W., Jr.; Westfall, J. E.

    1998-07-01

    Results of recent expeditions to a possible impact crater in central Nevada are summarized in this report. This feature has a mean diameter of 91.3 m, a mean depth of 5.1±0.1 m, a volume of 24560 m3 and a rim height of up to 0.6 m). Preliminary geological and topographic maps of this crater are presented.

  20. Crater Rim Path, Sol 1,215

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The route followed by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during its exploration partway around the rim of Victoria Crater is marked on this map. The rover first reached the edge of the crater on it's 951st Martian day, or sol (Sept. 26, 2006). This map shows travels through sol 1,215 (June 24, 2007). The underlying image is from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  1. Regolith transport in craters on Eros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantz, A.; Sullivan, R.; Veverka, J.

    2004-01-01

    Images of Eros from the NEAR Shoemaker spacecraft reveal bright and dark albedo features on steep crater walls unlike markings previously observed on asteroids. These features have been attributed to the downslope movement of space-weathered regolith, exposing less weathered material (Science 292 (2001) 484; Meteor. Planet. Sci. 36 (2001) 1617; Icarus 155 (2002) 145). Here we present observations of the interiors of large craters (>1 km in diameter) to test this hypothesis and constrain the origin of the features. We find that bright regions in these craters correspond to steep slopes, consistent with previous work. The geographic distribution of craters with albedo variations shows no pattern and does not resemble the distribution of ponds, another phenomenon on Eros attributed to regolith movement. Shadows and other indications of topography are not observed at feature boundaries, implying that the transported layer is ⩽1 m thick. The presence of multiple bright and dark units on long slopes with sharp boundaries between them suggests that mobilized regolith may be halted by frictional or other effects before reaching the foot of the slope. Features on crater walls should darken at the same rate as bright ejecta deposits from crater formation; the lack of observed, morphologically fresh craters with bright interiors or ejecta suggests that the albedo patterns are younger than the most recently formed craters greater than about 100 m in diameter. Smaller or micrometeorite impacts, which would not necessarily leave evident deposits of bright ejecta, remain possible causes of albedo patterns. Although their effectiveness is difficult to assess, electrostatic processes and thermal creep are also candidates.

  2. Petrological Mapping of the Crater Boguslawsky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöhler, C.; Evdokimova, N. A.; Feoktistova, E. A.; Grumpe, A.; Kapoor, K.; Berezhnoy, A. A.; Shevchenko, V. V.

    2015-10-01

    An analysis of orbital spectral data of the crater Boguslawsky, the intended target region of the Russian Luna-Glob mission, is performed. We have constructed a high- resolution DEM of the crater Boguslawsky, based on which the temperature regime on the surface is investigated. The depth of the OH absorption feature is analysed.The content of the main elements is estimated, and a petrologic map is constructed accordingly.

  3. Sand Sheet on Crater Floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

    As with yesterday's image, this dune field is located inside a crater, in this case an unnamed crater at 26 degrees North latitude. In this VIS image the dunes are coalescing into a sand sheet, note the lack of dune forms to the north of the small hills. The presence of ridges and hills in the area is affecting the dune shapes.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 26.4, Longitude 62.7 East (297.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology

  4. Gale Crater in IR Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 4, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image of Gale Crater. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    In the bottom of the crater, surrounding the central mound, there are extensive basaltic sand deposits. The basaltic sand spectral signature combined with the warm surface (due to the low albedo of basaltic sand) produces a very strong pink/magenta color. This color signature contrasts with the green/yellow color of soil and dust in the top of the image, and the cyan color due to the presence of water ice clouds at the bottom of the image. This migrating sand may be producing the erosional features seen on the central mound.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -4.4, Longitude 137.4 East (222.6 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University

  5. Basaltic Crater in Color IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 6, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image near Nili Fosse in the the Isidis region of Mars. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations. In many cases craters trap sand in their topographic depressions, interrupting the sand's migration across the Martian surface. This image is particularly interesting because there appears to be more than 1 type of sand in the bottom of this crater and in the hummocky terrain near the bottom of the image. The pink/magenta areas are characteristic of a basaltic composition, but there are also orange areas that are likely caused by the presence of andesite. These two compositions, basalt and andesite, are some of the most common found on Mars.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 24, Longitude 80.7 East (297.3 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip

  6. The size-frequency distribution of elliptical impact craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, G. S.; Elbeshausen, D.; Davison, T. M.; Robbins, S. J.; Hynek, B. M.

    2011-10-01

    Impact craters are elliptical in planform if the impactor's trajectory is below a threshold angle of incidence. Laboratory experiments and 3D numerical simulations demonstrate that this threshold angle decreases as the ratio of crater size to impactor size increases. According to impact cratering scaling laws, this implies that elliptical craters occur at steeper impact angles as crater size or target strength increases. Using a standard size-frequency distribution for asteroids impacting the terrestrial planets we estimate the fraction of elliptical craters as a function of crater size on the Moon, Mars, Earth, Venus and Mercury. In general, the expected fraction of elliptical craters is ~ 2-4% for craters between 5 and 100-km in diameter, consistent with the observed population of elliptical craters on Mars. At larger crater sizes both our model and observations suggest a dramatic increase in the fraction of elliptical craters with increasing crater diameter. The observed fraction of elliptical craters larger than 100-km diameter is significantly greater than our model predictions, which may suggest that there is an additional source of large elliptical craters other than oblique impact.

  7. CHILD syndrome in a boy

    SciTech Connect

    Happle, R.; Effendy, I., Megahed, M.; Orlow, S.J.; Kuester, W. |

    1996-03-15

    CHILD syndrome (congential hemidysplasia with ichthyosiform nevus and limb defects) occurs, as a rule, exclusively in girls because of the underlying X-linked gene exerts a lethal effect on male embryos. In this report the characteristic manifestations of CHILD syndrome are described in a 2-year-old boy with a normal chromosome constitution 46,XY. This exceptional case is best explained by the assumption of an early somatic mutation and thus compatible with the concept of X-linked dominant male-lethal inheritance of this trait. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  8. A boy with sudden headache.

    PubMed

    Norbedo, Stefania; Naviglio, Samuele; Murru, Flora Maria; Cavallin, Roberta; Giurici, Nagua; Rabusin, Marco; Barbi, Egidio

    2014-03-01

    Headache is a common presenting complaint in pediatric emergency departments. The goal of emergent evaluation is to identify those children with potentially life-threatening conditions. We present the case of an adolescent boy presenting with headache and hypertension who was diagnosed with a catecholamine-secreting abdominal paraganglioma. Genetic testing eventually led to the diagnosis of SDHB-related hereditary paraganglioma-pheochromocytoma syndrome. Alarm features ("red flags") in children presenting with headache are reviewed, as well as the main features of paragangliomas and the indications for genetic testing. PMID:24589807

  9. Crater Formation Due to Lunar Plume Impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsell, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Thruster plume impingement on a surface comprised of small, loose particles may cause blast ejecta to be spread over a large area and possibly cause damage to the vehicle. For this reason it is important to study the effects of plume impingement and crater formation on surfaces like those found on the moon. Lunar soil, also known as regolith, is made up of fine granular particles on the order of 100 microns.i Whenever a vehicle lifts-off from such a surface, the exhaust plume from the main engine will cause the formation of a crater. This crater formation may cause laterally ejected mass to be deflected and possibly damage the vehicle. This study is a first attempt at analyzing the dynamics of crater formation due to thruster exhaust plume impingement during liftoff from the moon. Though soil erosion on the lunar surface is not considered, this study aims at examining the evolution of the shear stress along the lunar surface as the engine fires. The location of the regions of high shear stress will determine where the crater begins to form and will lend insight into how big the crater will be. This information will help determine the probability that something will strike the vehicle. The final sections of this report discuss a novel method for studying this problem that uses a volume of fluid (VOF)ii method to track the movement of both the exhaust plume and the eroding surface.

  10. Polygonal Craters on Dwarf-Planet Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, K. A.; Jaumann, R.; Krohn, K.; Buczkowski, D. L.; von der Gathen, I.; Kersten, E.; Mest, S. C.; Preusker, F.; Roatsch, T.; Schenk, P. M.; Schröder, S.; Schulzeck, F.; Scully, J. E. C.; Stepahn, K.; Wagner, R.; Williams, D. A.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-10-01

    With approximately 950 km diameter and a mass of #1/3 of the total mass of the asteroid belt, (1) Ceres is the largest and most massive object in the Main Asteroid Belt. As an intact proto-planet, Ceres is key to understanding the origin and evolution of the terrestrialplanets [1]. In particular, the role of water during planet formation is of interest, because the differentiated dwarf-planet is thought to possess a water rich mantle overlying a rocky core [2]. The Dawn space craft arrived at Ceres in March this year after completing its mission at (4) Vesta. At Ceres, the on-board Framing Camera (FC) collected image data which revealed a large variety of impact crater morphologies including polygonal craters (Figure 1). Polygonal craters show straight rim sections aligned to form an angular shape. They are commonly associated with fractures in the target material. Simple polygonal craters develop during the excavation stage when the excavation flow propagates faster along preexisting fractures [3, 5]. Complex polygonal craters adopt their shape during the modification stage when slumping along fractures is favoured [3]. Polygonal craters are known from a variety of planetary bodies including Earth [e.g. 4], the Moon [e.g. 5], Mars [e.g. 6], Mercury [e.g. 7], Venus [e.g. 8] and outer Solar System icy satellites [e.g. 9].

  11. At Bright Band Inside Victoria Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A layer of light-toned rock exposed inside Victoria Crater in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars appears to mark where the surface was at the time, many millions of years ago, when an impact excavated the crater. NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drove to this bright band as the science team's first destination for the rover during investigations inside the crater.

    Opportunity's left front hazard-identification camera took this image just after the rover finished a drive of 2.25 meters (7 feet, 5 inches) during the rover's 1,305th Martian day, or sol, (Sept. 25, 2007). The rocks beneath the rover and its extended robotic arm are part of the bright band.

    Victoria Crater has a scalloped shape of alternating alcoves and promontories around the crater's circumference. Opportunity descended into the crater two weeks earlier, within an alcove called 'Duck Bay.' Counterclockwise around the rim, just to the right of the arm in this image, is a promontory called 'Cabo Frio.'

  12. Lunar craters with radar bright ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Zisk, S. H.; Schultz, P. H.; Cutts, J. A.; Shorthill, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of the 3.8-cm radar-bright halos observed around certain lunar impact craters are compiled and compared with 70-cm radar, thermal infrared and photogeological data in order to address the nature of the halos. Diameters, positions, and radar and IR signal strengths are presented for 120 radar-bright ejecta regions of size greater than 20 km and twice the diameter of the crater. The 3.8-cm halos are noted to range in size up to 30 times that of the crater itself, although the strength of the signal from the crater and rim lies in a narrow range, while the IR halos are smaller in extent and variable in signal strength. The radar-bright ejecta are found to have a range of optical properties, and to be associated with fresh primary impact craters. Data are thus consistent with craters having radar-bright ejecta deposits having ages of less than 10 million to 1 billion years, with the radar and infrared signatures of the ejecta deposits produced by combinations of enhanced blockiness and roughness.

  13. Cratering and Grooved Terrain on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This color picture as acquired by Voyager 1 during its approach to Ganymede on Monday afternoon (the 5th of March). At ranges between about 230 to 250 thousand km. The image shows detail on the surface with a resolution of four and a half km. This picture is just south of PIA001515 (P21161) and shows more craters. It also shows the two distinctive types of terrain found by Voyager, the darker ungrooved regions and the lighter areas which show the grooves or fractures in abundance. The most striking features are the bright ray craters which havE a distinctly 'bluer' color appearing white against the redder background. Ganymede's surface is known to contain large amounts of surface ice and it appears that these relatively young craters have spread bright fresh ice materials over the surface. Likewise, the lighter color and reflectivity of the grooved areas suggests that here too, there is cleaner ice. We see ray craters with all sizes of ray patterns, ranging from extensive systems of the crater in the northern part of this picture, which has rays at least 300-500 kilometers long, down to craters which have only faint remnants of bright ejecta patterns. This variation suggests that, as on the Moon, there are processes which act to darken ray material, probably 'gardening' by micrometeoroid impact. JPL manages and controls the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  14. Planetary cratering 2: Studies of saturation equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, William K.; Gaskell, Robert W.

    1997-01-01

    A realistic computer model has been developed to display images of imaginary cratered surfaces, taking into account empirically measured input size distributions of primary and secondary craters, ejecta blanket morphology including feathering with distance, obliteration due to ejecta from outside the imaged area, lighting effects, etc. The model allows us to track surface evolution of morphology as new craters are added. Using the model as well as lunar photos, we have studied the approach to saturation equilibrium (defined as a condition when no further proportionate increase in crater density occurs as input cratering increases). We find that an identifiable saturation equilibrium occurs close to a level previously identified for this state (Hartmann 1984), typically fluctuating around a crater density from about 0.4 to 2 times that level. This result is fairly robust vis-a-vis the range of model parameters we have chosen. Flooding, basin ejecta blankets, and other obliterative effects can introduce structure and oscillations within this range, even after saturation equilibrium is achieved. These findings may constrain or revise certain earlier interpretations of satellite and planet surface evolution and impactor populations which were predicated on the assumed absence of saturation equilibrium. In our fourth experimental run, we found that suppression of "sandblasting" by sub-resolution impacts allows the smallest secondaries to rise above the saturation equilibrium line, a result that might be relevant to a similar situation on Gaspra and perhaps some other asteroids.

  15. Do young martian ray craters have ages consistent with the crater count system?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, William K.; Quantin, Cathy; Werner, Stephanie C.; Popova, Olga

    2010-08-01

    McEwen et al. (McEwen, A.S., Preblich, B.S., Turtle, E.P., Artemieva, N.A., Golombek, M.P., Hurst, M., Kirk, R.L., Burr, D.M., Christensen, P. [2005]. Icarus 176, 351-381) developed a useful test for the internal consistency of crater-count chronometry systems. They argued that certain multi-kilometer, fresh-looking martian craters with prominent rays should be the youngest or near-youngest craters in their size range. The "McEwen et al. test" is that the ages determined from crater densities of the smallest superimposed craters (typically diameter D ˜ 5-20 m) should thus be comparable to the expected formation intervals of the host primary. McEwen et al. concluded from MOC data that crater chronometry failed this test by factors of 700-2000. We apply HiRISE and other imagery to eight different young craters in order to re-evaluate their arguments. We use existing crater chronology systems as well as the reported observed production rate of 16 m craters (Malin, M.C., Edgett, K., Posiolova, L., McColley, S., Noe Dobrea, E. [2006]. Science 314, 1573-1557; Hartmann, W.K., Quantin, C., Mangold, N. [2007]. Icarus 186, 11-23; Kreslavsky [2007]. Seventh International Conference on Mars, 3325). Every case passes the McEwen et al. test. We conclude that the huge inconsistencies suggested by McEwen et al. are spurious. Many of these craters show evidence of impact into ice-rich material, and appear to have ice-flow features and sublimation pits on their floors. As production rate data improve, decameter-scale craters will provide a valuable way of dating these young martian geological formations and the processes that modify them.

  16. Cratering on Mars with almost no atmosphere or volatiles: Pangboche crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Pangboche crater (17.2°N, 226.7°E; 10.4 km dia.) lies close to the summit of Olympus Mons volcano, Mars, at an elevation of ~20.9 km above the datum. Given a scale height of 11.1 km for the atmosphere, this relatively large fresh crater most likely formed at an atmospheric pressure <1 mbar in essentially volatile-free young lava flows. Detailed analysis of Pangboche crater from High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) and Context Camera (CTX) images reveals that volatile-related features (e.g., fluidized ejecta layers and pitted floor material) are absent. In contrast, abundant impact melt occurs on the floor, inner walls, and rim of the crater, and there is an extensive field of secondary craters that extend up to approximately 45 km from the rim crest. All of these attributes argue that it was the absence of volatiles in the target rocks at the time of crater formation, rather than the thin atmosphere, which had a controlling influence on crater morphology. Digital elevation data derived from the CTX images reveal that Pangboche crater has a depth of about 954 m (depth/diameter = approximately 0.092) and that uplifted target rocks comprise about 58% of the relief of the 180 m-high north rim. As the target material comprised a sequence of layered lava flows, Pangboche crater may well represent the best crater on Mars for direct comparison with craters formed on the Moon (permitting variations in gravitational effects to be investigated) or on Mercury (allowing the role of the atmosphere to be studied).

  17. The Mechanism for Forming Martian Rampart Craters: Clues from Crater Morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craddock, R. A.; Chuang, F.

    1996-03-01

    Many large craters on the martian surface have ejecta blankets that terminate with a pronounced lobate ridge. These rampart craters represent features unique to Mars, and their morphology suggests that their ejecta was emplaced as a highly mobile fluid instead of ballistically. High velocity experiments into mud have duplicated many of the common morphologic characteristics of rampart craters supporting this hypothesis. However, additional experiments performed at a variety of atmospheric pressures have also been able to duplicate aspects of rampart crater morphology These results suggest that rampart craters form as the result of a low pressure atmosphere. Obviously the presence of ice or water would have an effect on the target properties (i.e., material strength) of the martian substrate, which should also influence the overall crater morphometry, thus allowing us to test these competing hypotheses. In this study we used the photoclinometric algorithm developed by Davis and Soderblom and written for the Planetary Image Cartography System to determined the shape of over 300 fresh lunar-like or rampart impact craters at a variety of diameters (3 to 80 km). Because it is probable that Ethology would also effect the strength of the target material, we confined our study to craters formed in the dissected unit of the Highland Plateau (Npld) as defined by the 1:15M-scale geologic mappers and interpretable to the scale of our images. In addition we confined our study to +30 degrees to omit variations in crater morphology seen at higher latitudes. The images used were radiometrically-calibrated (red and minus-blue filter), moderate resolution (~200 m/pixel) obtained by the Viking orbiters. Our initial results show that there is a slight difference in morphometric relations between fresh lunar-like and rampart craters, supporting the hypothesis that the unique morphology of rampart crater ejecta results from the incorporation of volatile materials contained in the target

  18. Copernican craters: Early results from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, A. S.; Hiesinger, H.; Thomas, P. C.; Robinson, M. S.; van der Bogert, C.; Ostrach, L.; Plescia, J. B.; Bray, V. J.; Tornabene, L. L.

    2009-12-01

    The youngest (Copernican) craters on the Moon provide the best examples of original crater morphology and a record of the impact flux over the last ~1 Ga in the Earth-Moon system. The LRO Narrow Angle Cameras (NAC) provide 50 cm pixels from an altitude of 50 km. With changing incidence angle, global access, and very high data rates, these cameras provide unprecedented data on lunar craters. Stereo image pairs are being acquired for detailed topographic mapping. These data allow comparisons of relative ages of the larger young craters, some of which are tied to absolute radiometric ages from Apollo-returned samples. These relative ages, the crater populations at small diameters, and details of crater morphology including ejecta and melt morphologies, allow better delineation of recent lunar history and the formation and modification of impact craters. Crater counts may also reveal differences in the formation and preservation of small diameter craters as a function of target material (e.g., unconsolidated regolith versus solid impact melt). One key question: Is the current cratering rate constant or does it fluctuate. We will constrain the very recent cratering rate (at 10-100 m diameter) by comparing LROC images with those taken by Apollo nearly 40 years ago to determine the number of new impact craters. The current cratering rate and an assumption of constant cratering rate over time may or may not correctly predict the number of craters superimposed over radiometrically-dated surfaces such as South Ray, Cone, and North Ray craters, which range from 2-50 Ma and are not saturated by 10-100 m craters. If the prediction fails with realistic consideration of errors, then the present-day cratering rate must be atypical. Secondary craters complicate this analysis, but the resolution and coverage of LROC enables improved recognition of secondary craters. Of particular interest for the youngest Copernican craters is the possibility of self-cratering. LROC is providing the

  19. 'Mazatzal' Rock on Crater Rim

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Spirit took this navigation camera image of the 2-meter-wide (6.6-foot-wide) rock called 'Mazatzal' on sol 76, March 21, 2004. Scientists intend to aggressively analyze this target with Spirit's microscopic imager, Moessbauer spectrometer and alpha particle X-ray spectrometer before brushing and 'digging in' with the rock abrasion tool on upcoming sols.

    Mazatzal stood out to scientists because of its large size, light tone and sugary surface texture. It is the largest rock the team has seen at the rim of the crater informally named 'Bonneville.' It is lighter-toned than previous rock targets Adirondack and Humphrey. Its scalloped pattern may be a result of wind sculpting, a very slow process in which wind-transported silt and sand abrade the rock's surface, creating depressions. This leads scientists to believe that Mazatzal may have been exposed to the wind in this location for an extremely long time.

    The name 'Mazatzal' comes from a mountain range and rock formation that was deposited around 1.2 billion years ago in the Four Peaks area of Arizona.

  20. Layered Outcrops in Gusev Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit collected data on morphology, composition, and mineralogy of a rock nicknamed 'Tetl' using the microscopic imager, the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, and the Moessbauer spectrometer before moving on. Scientists are discussing a suggestion that this rock outcrop and others on the 'West Spur' of the 'Columbia Hills' in Gusev Crater on Mars may contain evidence of graded bedding, in which alternate layers of sediment are either coarser or finer depending on the turbulence of the processes that deposited them. Such layers could be deposited by water circulating in rivers or lakes, volcanic ash settling on the surface, wind carrying fine-grained sediments, or a combination of these processes. This view is a mosaic of images that Spirit took with its microscopic imager on the rover's 272nd and 273rd martian days, or sols (Oct. 7 and 8, 2004). It has been enhanced to bring out details in the shadows without washing out sunlit areas. The section of rock shown here is approximately 17 centimeters (6.7 inches) wide.

  1. Sand Dunes in Kaiser Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Full size (780 KBytes) This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) high resolution image shows a field of dark sand dunes on the floor of Kaiser Crater in southeastern Noachis Terra. The steepest slopes on each dune, the slip faces, point toward the east, indicating that the strongest winds that blow across the floor of Kaiser move sand in this direction. Wind features of three different scales are visible in this image: the largest (the dunes) are moving across a hard surface (light tone) that is itself partially covered by large ripples. These large ripples appear not to be moving--the dunes are burying some and revealing others. Another type of ripple pattern is seen on the margins of the dunes and where dunes coalesce. They are smaller (both in their height and in their separation) than the large ripples. These are probably coarse sediments that are moving with the dunes. This picture covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated from the upper left.

  2. Topographical analysis of lunar impact craters using SELENE images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, S.; Vani, K.; Sanjeevi, S.

    2013-10-01

    Lunar craters provide ample opportunities to study and understand crater morphology because of their vast numbers. This paper focuses on the topographical mapping of 33 Mare craters (Flat- and Round-floor) of ˜2 km diameter, using the SELENE DTM. Each crater was analyzed individually for its slope, regional topography and rim signature. The crater slope analysis revealed a small slope variation between the flat- and round-floor craters, in a similar diameter range, with some overlap between them. In the regional topographical analysis, the impact craters formed on the flat- and sloped-surface were analyzed in detail. The crater profile extracted through the rim crest was compared with its corresponding regional topographic profile (obtained over ˜3 crater radii). Four types of crater occurrences were observed: type i, ii and iv craters were formed on sloped surface, whereas type iii craters are formed on a flat surface with an equally raised rim. The occurrences of the rim crest on type i and ii craters are on the topographically elevated side of the terrain. But in type iv craters, the rim crest occurs on the topographically lower side of the terrain. The type iv craters uplifted the topographically lower terrain, which depicts the alteration that had taken place due to the impact. This topographical analysis suggests that the surrounding topography should also be considered for understanding the craters. Finally, from the crater rim signature analysis, it was evident that the prominent V-shaped incisions on the rim are caused due to landslide/slumping and by small impactors. This DTM based simple lunar crater analysis revealed information about the crater association with their surrounding topography and their morphological variations on flat- and sloped- surface.

  3. Impact Materials of Takamatsu Crater in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Y.; Okamoto, M.; Fukuchi, T.

    1995-09-01

    Shocked quartz materials have been found in Japanese K.T boundary (Hokkaido) and mountains of middle main-islands of Japan, though there are few direct evidence of "natural circular structure" on the surface in Japan. However circular structure has been recently found as a buried crater(up to 150m deep) [1] which is ca. 4km in diameter with -10 mgal of Bouguer gravity anomaly from surrounding Rhyoke granitic region of the southern part of Takamatsu City, Kagawa Prefecture, northeast Shikoku, Japan [1,2,3]. Two boring cores of 300m deep near small mountains inside the crater could not reach the bottom of the crater so far. From model calculation of the negative gravity anomaly, the Takamatsu crater shows deep basin structure up to 1.4km. If the Takamatsu crater is considered to be only impact crater, it is difficult to discuss only surface materials on the crater. But anomalous minerals are found only around small volcanic intrusions inside the crater, which the mixed minerals are clearly different with those of other volcanic intrusions of the Yashima and Goshikidai outside the crater [1,2,3]. The small volcanic intrusions are not origin of large Takamatsu crater, because the small volcanic intrusions are found on whole areas of Kagawa Prefecture. Major different activity of the small intrusions inside the crater is to bring the brecciated materials of the interior (esp. crater sediments). The xenolith materials around only volcanic intrusion of andesite are divided into the following four major mineral materials:(a) round pebble fragments from the Rhyoke granitic basement (Sampling No.15), (b) rock fragments from intruded biotite andesites (Nos. 2,15), (c) impact-induced fragments of shocked Quartz grains (Nos. 2,3,6,15), diaplectic feldspars (Nos. 2,3,6,15), silica glasses (Nos. 2,15) and small Fe-Ni metallic grains (No.15), and (d) small sedimentary fragments of halite and mordenite, as listed in Table 1. Table I, showing the characterization of surface samples

  4. The Degradational History of Endeavour Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J. A.; Parker, T. J.; Crumpler, L. S.; Wilson, S. A.; Golombek, M. P.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    Endeavour crater (2.28 deg S, 354.77 deg E) is a Noachian-aged 22 km-diameter impact structure of complex morphology in Meridiani Planum. The degradation state of the crater has been studied using Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and Opportunity rover data. Exposed rim segments rise approximately 10 m to approximately 100 m above the level of the embaying Burns Formation and the crater is 200-500 m deep with the southern interior wall exposing over approximately 300 m relief. Both pre-impact rocks (Matijevic Formation) and Endeavour impact ejecta (Shoemaker Formation) are present at Cape York, but only the Shoemaker crops out (up to approximately 140 m) along the rim segment from Murray Ridge to Cape Tribulation. Study of pristine complex craters Bopolu and Tooting, and morphometry of other martian complex craters, enables us to approximate Endeavour's pristine form. The original rim likely averaged 410 m (+/-)200 m in elevation and a 250-275 m section of ejecta ((+/-)50-60 m) would have composed a significant fraction of the rim height. The original crater depth was likely between 1.5 km and 2.2 km. Comparison between the predicted original and current form of Endeavour suggests approximately 100-200 m rim lowering that removed most ejecta in some locales (e.g., Cape York) while thick sections remain elsewhere (e.g., Cape Tribulation). Almost complete removal of ejecta at Cape York and minimal observable offset across fractures indicates current differences in rim relief are not solely due to original rim relief. Rim segments are embayed by approximately 100-200 m thickness of plains rocks outside the crater, but thicker deposits lie inside the crater. Ventifact textures confirm ongoing eolian erosion with the overall extent difficult to estimate. Analogy with degraded Noachian-aged craters south of Endeavour, however, suggests fluvial erosion dominated rim degradation in the Noachian and was likely followed by approximately 10s of meters modification by alternate

  5. Auto-Detection of Impact Crater Statistics and Crater Morphologies in Mars THEMIS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesko, C. S.; Brumby, S. P.; Asphaug, E.

    2003-12-01

    One of the challenges of planetary science is the development of tools adequate to provide automated crater statistics, for use in chronology, geomorphology and a variety of other investigations. We will present the current results of an ongoing effort to develop new tools for culling THEMIS imagery for crater statistics. Our eventual goal is to generate crater density and age maps of Mars. We are also developing tools to probe the morphologies and near-surface compositions of type-class craters. One crater type of particular significance is the rampart crater, which is unique to Mars. These are widely believed to be the result of impacts into volatile-rich surface materials. We will present the results of our examination of the spectral and morphological properties of several rampart craters in THEMIS IR images as a demonstration of image processing and automated feature extraction techniques. Using techniques developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, we are able to obtain an automated count of craters in an image, their centroids and radii, extract spectra and compare them to spectral libraries of known reference minerals.

  6. Gale Crater: An Amazonian Impact Crater Lake at the Plateau/Plain Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrol, N. A.; Grin, E. A.

    1998-01-01

    Gale is a 140-km diameter impact crater located at the plateau/plain boundary in the Aeolis Northeast subquadrangle of Mars (5S/223W). The crater is bordered in the northward direction by the Elysium Basin, and in eastward direction by Hesperian channels and the Aeolis Mensae 2. The crater displays a rim with two distinct erosion stages: (a) though eroded, the south rim of Gale has an apparent crest line visible from the north to the southwest (b) the west and northwest rims are characterized by a strong erosion that, in some places, partially destroyed the rampart, leaving remnant pits embayed in smooth-like deposits. The same type of deposits is observed north, outside Gale, it also borders the Aeolis Mensae, covers the bottom of the plateau scarp, and the crater floor. The central part of Gale shows a 6400 km2 subround and asymmetrical deposit: (a) the south part is composed of smooth material, (b) the north part shows spectacular terraces, streamlines, and channels. The transition between the two parts of the deposit is characterized by a scarp ranging from 200 to 2000 in high. The highest point of the scarp is at the center of the crater, and probably corresponds to a central peak. Gale crater does not show a major channel directly inflowing. However, several large fluvi systems are bordering the crater, and could be at the origin of the flooding of the crater, or have contributed to. One fluvial system is entering the crater by the southwest rim but cannot be accounted alone for the volume of sediment deposited in the crater. This channel erodes the crater floor deposit, and ends in a irregular-shaped and dark albedo feature. Gale crater shows the morphology of a crater filled during sedimentation episodes, and then eroded Part of the lower sediment deposition contained in Gale might be ancient and not only aqueous in origin. According to the regional geologic history, the sedimentary deposit could be a mixture of aeolian and pyroclastic material, and aqueous

  7. Cratering history of Miranda: Implications for geologic processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plescia, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Miranda's surface is divisible into cratered terrain and coronae. The cratered terrain is the most heavily cratered of the terrains and presumably is the oldest. The frequency of craters in the cratered terrain is variable and related to position on the satellite. The coronae are also variably cratered. Elsinore and Arden Coronae have similar crater frequencies and may have formed simultaneously. They are of intermediate agompared to the cratered terrain and to Inverness Corona, which is the youngest major terrain. Graben formation appears to have occured both before and after the formation of the coronae reflecting periods of global expansion. Miranda's surfaces are, in general, the least cratered and therefore inferred to be the youngest within the Uranian system. ?? 1988.

  8. What Made the Doughnuts Inside Lunar Concentric Craters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trang, D.

    2016-08-01

    Nearly all lunar impact craters smaller than 15 kilometers in diameter come in one basic shape, a circular bowl with a rim around it. However, there is a category, called concentric craters, with the basic crater and rim, plus a doughnut-shaped feature within the crater that is concentric to the crater rim. Jeffrey Gillis-Davis (University of Hawaii), the late B. Ray Hawke, and I decided to take on the task of determining how these concentric craters formed. After long meticulous measurements of their shape, determining their composition, examining their spatial relationship on the lunar surface, and calculating their age, we find that these craters are regular impact craters that experienced intrusions of magma beneath them. Each intrusion pushed on the material around the crater causing the construction of the concentric doughnut-shaped topographic ridge.

  9. Crater dimensions from apollo data and supplemental sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pike, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    A catalog of crater dimensions that were compiled mostly from the new Apollo-based Lunar Topographic Orthophotomaps is presented in its entirety. Values of crater diameter, depth, rim height, flank width, circularity, and floor diameter (where applicable) are tabulated for a sample of 484 craters on the Moon and 22 craters on Earth. Systematic techniques of mensuration are detailed. The lunar craters range in size from 400 m to 300 km across and include primary impact craters of the main sequence, secondary impact craters, craterlets atop domes and cones, and dark-halo craters. The terrestrial craters are between 10 m and 22.5 km in diameter and were formed by meteorite impact. ?? 1976 D. Reidel Publishing Company.

  10. Crater evolutionary tracks. [on Mars, earth and moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Lingenfelter, R. E.; Terrile, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    The technique proposed in the present paper for studying planetary surface processes is based on the measurement of crater rim height, h, depth, d, and diameter, D. The h/d and d/D ratios provide a quantitative description of crater morphology as well as a quantitative method for assessing the relative importance of competing crater modification processes (since h, d, and D change as a crater is degraded by surface processes, and h/d and d/D change with time). Different classes of processes produce distinctive evolutionary tracks on an h/d versus d/D diagram. Tracks for three general classes of crater modification (processes adding material to the crater; processes redistributing the material within the crater vicinity; and processes removing the material from the crater vicinity) are calculated, and h/d and d/D ratios for craters on the earth, moon, and Mars are compared.

  11. Framing black boys: parent, teacher, and student narratives of the academic lives of black boys.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Stephanie J; Ross, Latisha; Lozada, Fantasy T; Williams, Amber; Gale, Adrian; Kurtz-Costes, Beth

    2014-01-01

    The discourse on Black boys tends to suggest that Black boys are in complete peril. We begin with evidence that Black boys are excelling in certain contexts (i.e., in certain states, in certain schools, and in certain courses). We then discuss the ways in which the narratives used by parents, teachers, and Black boys themselves may serve to further reinforce views that Black boys are beyond hope. Research on Black parents suggests that they tend to view their sons as vulnerable and have lower expectations for sons than for daughters. Studies of teachers show that they tend to view Black boys as unteachable, as social problems, and as scary. Research on Black boys shows that they are sometimes complicit in supporting these narratives by engaging in negative or ste reotypical behavior. We also include recent research that includes counter-narratives of Black boys. We end with suggestions for future research. PMID:25345000

  12. Cratering Rates in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin

    2003-01-01

    We have constructed a self-consistent study of cratering rates in the outer solar system. Two papers were written, one on cratering asymmetries on synchronously rotating satellites and the other on the cratering rates themselves. The first addresses the well-founded expectation that the leading hemisphere of a synchronously rotating satellite should be more heavily cratered than the trailing hemisphere, and how our solar system has avoided showing much sign of this. We conclude that Ganymede has in the past rotated nonsynchronously, which may imply that it once harboured a thicker inner ocean than it does now. The other study began as an attempt to determine the age of the surface of Europa at a time when Europa was regarded as a major Exobiological target. In keeping with changing times the study expanded to the point that it now recommends cratering rates for worlds as diverse as Charon and Pluto, and includes the contributions of several invaluable co-authors, none of whom would agree with all of my conclusions. The nexus of the work is the size-frequency distribution of comets striking Jupiter (Figure). This was determined using the historically observed record of comets striking or nearly striking Jupiter; the size-frequency distributions of craters on lightly cratered surfaces of Europa, Ganymede, and Triton; and the size-frequncy distribution of Kuiper Belt objects. Extreme reductionists will be happy to know that the surface of Europa probably has an age of around 50 million years. Perhaps more intriguing is that Neptune's moon Triton, by origin a giant comet and by capture and orbital evolution a once fully melted giant comet, has a surface that is probably no older than Europa's.

  13. 'Lyell' Panorama inside Victoria Crater (Stereo)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    During four months prior to the fourth anniversary of its landing on Mars, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity examined rocks inside an alcove called 'Duck Bay' in the western portion of Victoria Crater. The main body of the crater appears in the upper right of this stereo panorama, with the far side of the crater lying about 800 meters (half a mile) away. Bracketing that part of the view are two promontories on the crater's rim at either side of Duck Bay. They are 'Cape Verde,' about 6 meters (20 feet) tall, on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' about 15 meters (50 feet) tall, on the right. The rest of the image, other than sky and portions of the rover, is ground within Duck Bay.

    Opportunity's targets of study during the last quarter of 2007 were rock layers within a band exposed around the interior of the crater, about 6 meters (20 feet) from the rim. Bright rocks within the band are visible in the foreground of the panorama. The rover science team assigned informal names to three subdivisions of the band: 'Steno,' 'Smith,' and 'Lyell.'

    This view incorporates many images taken by Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) from the 1,332nd through 1,379th Martian days, or sols, of the mission (Oct. 23 to Dec. 11, 2007). It combines a stereo pair so that it appears three-dimensional when seen through blue-red glasses. Some visible patterns in dark and light tones are the result of combining frames that were affected by dust on the front sapphire window of the rover's camera.

    Opportunity landed on Jan. 25, 2004, Universal Time, (Jan. 24, Pacific Time) inside a much smaller crater about 6 kilometers (4 miles) north of Victoria Crater, to begin a surface mission designed to last 3 months and drive about 600 meters (0.4 mile).

  14. Small Crater Morphology Within Gusev Crater and Isidis Planitia: Evidence for Widespread Secondaries on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, M.; Golombek, M. P.; Kirk, R.

    2004-01-01

    Large (greater than 2 km diameter) impact craters on the martian surface have been extensively studied and modeled. Craters smaller than this were known to exist but the lack of high-resolution images prevented detailed measurements and descriptions. Images obtained by the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) on Mars Global Surveyor are of sufficient resolution to perform detailed studies on the morphology of small (less than 1 km diameter) craters. Previous workers have suggested that many of these small craters are secondary craters; while others maintain that they represent primary impacts. The difference is significant, however, because of implications for surface age, climate change, impact generated regolith, provenance of surface rocks, engineering considerations (landing safety and rover trafficability), and the origin of martian meteorites.

  15. Lunar floor-fractured craters - Evidence for viscous relaxation of crater topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, J. L.; Solomon, S. C.; Head, J. W.

    1981-10-01

    Viscous relaxation is evaluated quantitatively as a possible mechanism to account for the observed topographical modification of floor-fractured lunar craters. On the basis of a model of the moon as a viscous material of uniform Newtonian viscosity, the ultimate topographic profiles of fresh craters predicted taking into account viscous relaxation effects are compared with the observed profiles of floor-fractured craters of similar diameter. It is found that for a number of crater pairs, the agreement of the observations with the predictions of the simple viscous relaxation model is good, suggesting that isostatic adjustment of craters in areas of anomalously high temperatures at shallow depth may be a more important source of deformation than previously realized.

  16. Mosaic of Europa's Ridges, Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This view of the icy surface of Jupiter's moon, Europa, is a mosaic of two pictures taken by the Solid State Imaging system on board the Galileo spacecraft during a close flyby of Europa on February 20, 1997. The pictures were taken from a distance of 2,000 kilometers (1,240 miles). The area shown is about 14 kilometers by 17 kilometers (8.7 miles by 10.6 miles), and has a resolution of 20 meters (22 yards) per pixel. Illumination is from the right (east). The picture is centered at about 14.8 north latitude, 273.8 west longitude, in Europa's trailing hemisphere.

    One of the youngest features seen in this area is the double ridge cutting across the picture from the lower left to the upper right. This double ridge is about 2.6 kilometers (1.6 miles) wide and stands some 300 meters (330 yards) high. Small craters are most easily seen in the smooth deposits along the south margin of the prominent double ridge, and in the rugged ridged terrain farther south. The complexly ridged terrain seen here shows that parts of the icy crust of Europa have been modified by intense faulting and disruption, driven by energy from the planet's interior.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington D.C. This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web Galileo mission home page at: http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  17. Growing Boys: Implementing a Boys' Empowerment Group in an Afterschool Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Georgia; Charmaraman, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The process of establishing a healthy male identity can be difficult for many boys. The limited definitions of masculinity available to boys and men are generally characterized by competition, repression of fear and emotion, and physical and emotional strength. Boys of color and those of lower economic status tend to encounter even fewer healthy…

  18. To Be a Boy, To Be a Reader: Engaging Teen and Preteen Boys in Active Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brozo, William G.

    When it comes to reading, teen and preteen boys are the most difficult students. This book addresses the growing concern among middle and high school teachers about boys' lack of literacy growth and independent reading. The book makes the case that boys are in the greatest need of help with literacy instruction and stresses the importance of…

  19. Boys' Music? School Context and Middle-School Boys' Musical Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennetts, Kathleen Scott

    2013-01-01

    This article focusses primarily on the findings relating to the musical participation of boys in one Melbourne school. As part of a project that investigated boys' attitudes and participation at fifty-one schools, several contextual features were identified that set "Balton Boys" High School' apart from other participating…

  20. "In the Eye of the Beholder...": Girls', Boys' and Teachers' Perceptions of Boys' Aggression to Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Laurence; Shute, Rosalyn; Slee, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    Because children and young teenagers usually associate in same-sex groups, psychological research concerned with adolescent aggression has often concentrated on within-sex relationships. However, during adolescence, boys and girls increasingly interact socially. This paper reports a study of boy-to-girl aggression as perceived by girls, boys and…

  1. Lunar crater chains of non-impact origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, D.; Heiken, G.

    1975-01-01

    Apollo 15, 16, and 17 photographs were scanned for lunar crater chains consisting of three or more aligned craters with similar states of degradation, and the origin of these chains is considered. The mode of origin for mare crater chains appears to be associated with either collapsed lava tubes or cinder cones, while the origin of highland crater chains generally seems to involve highland volcanoes. Crater chains from mare regions range from 20 to 40 km long and appear to have no preferred structural control of their orientation. Highland crater chains range from 1 to 113 km long and may be structurally controlled by the lunar grid system.

  2. Authentication controversies and impactite petrography of the New Quebec Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, Ursula B.; Kring, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The literature reports that led to the current acceptance of New Quebec Crater (Chubb Crater) as an authentic impact crater are reviewed, and it is noted that, for reasons that are not entirely clear, a meteoritic origin for the New Quebec Crater achieved wider acceptance at an earlier data than for the Lake Bosumtwi Crater, for which petrographic and chemical evidence is more abundant and compelling. The petrography of two impact melt samples from the New Quebec Crater was investigated, and new evidence is obtained on the degrees of shock metamorphism affecting the accessory minerals such as apatite, sphene, magnetite, and zircon.

  3. Ejecta thickness and structural rim uplift measurements of Martian impact craters: Implications for the rim formation of complex impact craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, Sebastian; Kenkmann, Thomas; Hergarten, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The elevated rim in simple craters results from the structural uplift of preimpact target rocks and the deposition of a coherent proximal ejecta blanket at the outer edge of the transient cavity. Given the considerable, widening of the transient cavity during crater modification and ejecta thickness distributions, the cause of elevated crater rims in complex craters is less obvious. The thick, proximal ejecta in complex impact craters is deposited well inside the final crater rim and target thickening should rapidly diminish with increasing distance from the transient cavity rim. Our study of 10 complex Martian impact craters ranging from 8.2 to 53.0 km in diameter demonstrates that the mean structural rim uplift at the final crater rim makes 81% of the total rim elevation, while the mean ejecta thickness contributes 19%. Thus, the structural rim uplift seems to be the dominant factor to build up the total amount of the raised crater rim of complex craters. To measure the widening of the transient cavity during modification and the distance between the rim of the final crater and that of the transient cavity, we constructed balanced cross section restorations to estimate the transient cavity of nine complex Martian impact craters. The final crater radii are ~1.38-1.87 times the transient cavity radii. We propose that target uplift at the position of the final crater rim was established during the excavation stage.

  4. Cratering Equations for Zinc Orthotitanate Coated Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, James; Christiansen, Eric; Liou, Jer-Chyi; Ryan, Shannon

    2009-01-01

    The final STS-125 servicing mission (SM4) to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May of 2009 saw the return of the 2nd Wide Field Planetary Camera (WFPC2) aboard the shuttle Discovery. This hardware had been in service on HST since it was installed during the SM1 mission in December of 1993 yielding one of the longest low Earth orbit exposure times (15.4 years) of any returned space hardware. The WFPC2 is equipped with a 0.8 x 2.2 m radiator for thermal control of the camera electronics (Figure 1). The space facing surface of the 4.1 mm thick aluminum radiator is coated with Z93 zinc orthotitanate thermal control paint with a nominal thickness of 0.1 0.2 mm. Post flight inspections of the radiator panel revealed hundreds of micrometeoroid/orbital debris (MMOD) impact craters ranging in size from less than 300 to nearly 1000 microns in diameter. The Z93 paint exhibited large spall areas around the larger impact sites (Figure 2) and the craters observed in the 6061-T651 aluminum had a different shape than those observed in uncoated aluminum. Typical hypervelocity impact craters in aluminum have raised lips around the impact site. The craters in the HST radiator panel had suppressed crater lips, and in some cases multiple craters were present instead of a single individual crater. Humes and Kinard observed similar behavior after the WFPC1 post flight inspection and assumed the Z93 coating was acting like a bumper in a Whipple shield. Similar paint behavior (spall) was also observed by Bland2 during post flight inspection of the International Space Station (ISS) S-Band Antenna Structural Assembly (SASA) in 2008. The SASA, with similar Z93 coated aluminum, was inspected after nearly 4 years of exposure on the ISS. The multi-crater phenomena could be a function of the density, composition, or impact obliquity angle of the impacting particle. For instance, a micrometeoroid particle consisting of loosely bound grains of material could be responsible for creating the

  5. Crater and cavity depth in hypervelocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadono, T.; Fujiwara, A.

    2003-04-01

    Hypervelocity impact experiments with low-density mediums (e.g., foams) have been so far carried out to develop the instruments for intact capture of interplanetary dust particles. The results show that the impact leads a "cavity", a cylindrical or carrot (spindle) shaped vestige. Its shape depends on the condition of projectiles; when impact velocity is so low that projectiles are intact, the depth increases with impact velocity, while it decreases or is constant with impact velocity when the impact velocity is so high that projectiles are broken (e.g., Kadono, Planet. Space Sci. 47, 305--318, 1999). On the other hand, as described by Summers (NASA TN D-94, 1959), crater shape with high density targets (comparable to projectile density) also changes with impact velocity. At low velocities, the strength of projectile's materials is greater than the dynamic impact pressure and the projectile penetrates the target intact. The crater produced is deep and narrow. With increase in impact velocity, a point is reached at which the impact pressure is sufficient to cause the projectile to fragment into a few large pieces at impact. Then as the impact velocity is increased further, the projectile shatters into numerous small pieces and the penetration actually decreases. Finally a velocity is reached at which the typical fluid impact occurs, the crater formed is nearly hemispherical in shape. It appears that the situation in cavity formation with low density targets is quite similar to that in cratering with high density targets at low impact velocity. This similarity allows us to discuss cavity formation and cratering in a unified view. As described above, the previous experiments clearly suggest that the condition of projectiles plays important roles in both cratering and cavity formation. Hence here, by introducing a parameter that characterizes the condition of projectiles at the instance of impact, cratering processes such as projectile penetration and shock wave

  6. The missing large impact craters on Ceres

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marchi, S.; Ermakov, A.; Raymond, C.A.; Fu, R.R.; O'Brien, D.P.; Bland, Michael; Ammannito, E.; De Sanctis, M.C.; Bowling, Tim; Schenk, P.; Scully, J.E.C.; Buczkowski, D.L.; Williams, D.A.; Hiesinger, H.; Russell, C.T.

    2016-01-01

    Asteroids provide fundamental clues to the formation and evolution of planetesimals. Collisional models based on the depletion of the primordial main belt of asteroids predict 10–15 craters >400 km should have formed on Ceres, the largest object between Mars and Jupiter, over the last 4.55 Gyr. Likewise, an extrapolation from the asteroid Vesta would require at least 6–7 such basins. However, Ceres’ surface appears devoid of impact craters >~280 km. Here, we show a significant depletion of cerean craters down to 100–150 km in diameter. The overall scarcity of recognizable large craters is incompatible with collisional models, even in the case of a late implantation of Ceres in the main belt, a possibility raised by the presence of ammoniated phyllosilicates. Our results indicate that a significant population of large craters has been obliterated, implying that long-wavelength topography viscously relaxed or that Ceres experienced protracted widespread resurfacing.

  7. Craters near the south pole of Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image of the south polar region of the Jovian satellite Callisto was taken in twilight by the Galileo spacecraft on its eighth orbit around Jupiter. Craters ranging in size from 60 kilometers (36 miles) down to the limit of resolution are visible in this image. Scientists count the number of craters on a planetary surface to estimate its relative (and sometimes absolute) age. Note that many of the craters are not as sharp in appearance as the two large craters near the bottom of the image. This is an indication that some process has eroded the craters since their formation.

    This image is centered at 82.5 south latitude and 62.6 west longitude, and covers an area approximately 370 kilometers (220 miles) by 280 kilometers (170 miles). North is toward the top of the image. This image was taken on May 6, 1997 by the Solid State Imaging system (CCD) on board NASA's Galileo spacecraft at a resolution of 676 meters (417 feet) per picture element.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  8. The missing large impact craters on Ceres

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, S.; Ermakov, A. I.; Raymond, C. A.; Fu, R. R.; O'Brien, D. P.; Bland, M. T.; Ammannito, E.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Bowling, T.; Schenk, P.; Scully, J. E. C.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Williams, D. A.; Hiesinger, H.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Asteroids provide fundamental clues to the formation and evolution of planetesimals. Collisional models based on the depletion of the primordial main belt of asteroids predict 10–15 craters >400 km should have formed on Ceres, the largest object between Mars and Jupiter, over the last 4.55 Gyr. Likewise, an extrapolation from the asteroid Vesta would require at least 6–7 such basins. However, Ceres' surface appears devoid of impact craters >∼280 km. Here, we show a significant depletion of cerean craters down to 100–150 km in diameter. The overall scarcity of recognizable large craters is incompatible with collisional models, even in the case of a late implantation of Ceres in the main belt, a possibility raised by the presence of ammoniated phyllosilicates. Our results indicate that a significant population of large craters has been obliterated, implying that long-wavelength topography viscously relaxed or that Ceres experienced protracted widespread resurfacing. PMID:27459197

  9. Remote Sensing Studies of Lunar Crater Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawke, B. R.; Blewett, D. T.; Bell, J. F., III; Lucey, P. G.; Campbell, B. A.; Robinson, M. S.

    1996-03-01

    The nature and origin of lunar crater rays has long been the source of major controversy. Some lunar scientists have proposed that rays are dominated by primary crater ejecta, while others have emphasized the role of secondary craters in producing rays. Pieters et al. (1985) presented the results of a remote sensing study of a portion of the ray system north of Copernicus. They provided evidence that the present brightness of the Copernicus rays in this sector is due largely to the presence of a component of highland ejecta intimately mixed with local mare basalt and that an increasing component of local material is observed in the rays at progressively greater radial distances from the parent crater. These results have been questioned and the origin of lunar rays is still uncertain [e.g., Schultz and Gault (1985)]. In an effort to better understand the processes responsible for the formation of lunar rays, we have utilized a variety of remote sensing data to study selected rays associated with Olbers A, the Messier crater complex, and Tycho. The data include near-IR reflectance spectra (0.6-2.5 um) and 3.8- and 70-cm radar maps.

  10. Impact Craters on Titan? Cassini RADAR View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles A.; Lopes, Rosaly; Stofan, Ellen R.; Paganelli, Flora; Elachi, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Titan is a planet-size (diameter of 5,150 km) satellite of Saturn that is currently being investigated by the Cassini spacecraft. Thus far only one flyby (Oct. 26, 2004; Ta) has occurred when radar images were obtained. In February, 2005, and approximately 20 more times in the next four years, additional radar swaths will be acquired. Each full swath images about 1% of Titan s surface at 13.78 GHz (Ku-band) with a maximum resolution of 400 m. The Ta radar pass [1] demonstrated that Titan has a solid surface with multiple types of landforms. However, there is no compelling detection of impact craters in this first radar swath. Dione, Tethys and other satellites of Saturn are intensely cratered, there is no way that Titan could have escaped a similar impact cratering past; thus there must be ongoing dynamic surface processes that erase impact craters (and other landforms) on Titan. The surface of Titan must be very young and the resurfacing rate must be significantly higher than the impact cratering rate.

  11. Martian cratering. II - Asteroid impact history.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, W. K.

    1971-01-01

    This paper considers the extent to which Martian craters can be explained by considering asteroidal impact. Sections I, II, and III of this paper derive the diameter distribution of hypothetical asteroidal craters on Mars from recent Palomar-Leiden asteroid statistics and show that the observed Martian craters correspond to a bombardment by roughly 100 times the present number of Mars-crossing asteroids. Section IV discusses the early bombardment history of Mars, based on the capture theory of Opik and probable orbital parameters of early planetesimals. These results show that the visible craters and surface of Mars should not be identified with the initial, accreted surface. A backward extrapolation of the impact rates based on surviving Mars-crossing asteroids can account for the majority of Mars craters over an interval of several aeons, indicating that we see back in time no further than part-way into a period of intense bombardment. An early period of erosion and deposition is thus suggested. Section V presents a comparison with results and terminology of other authors.

  12. Implications of crater distributions on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaula, W. M.

    1993-01-01

    The horizontal locations of craters on Venus are consistent with randomness. However, (1) randomness does not make crater counts useless for age indications; (2) consistency does not imply necessity or optimality; and (3) horizontal location is not the only reference frame against which to test models. Re (1), the apparent smallness of resurfacing areas means that a region on the order of one percent of the planet with a typical number of craters, 5-15, will have a range of feature ages of several 100 My. Re (2), models of resurfacing somewhat similar to Earth's can be found that are also consistent and more optimal than random: i.e., resurfacing occurring in clusters, that arise and die away in lime intervals on the order of 50 My. These agree with the observation that there are more areas of high crater density, and fewer of moderate density, than optimal for random. Re (3), 799 crater elevations were tested; there are more at low elevations and fewer at high elevations than optimal for random: i.e., 54.6 percent below the median. Only one of 40 random sets of 799 was as extreme.

  13. Curved Lobate Scarp on Crater Floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A broadly curved lobate scarp (running from left to right in the large crater to the right of center in this image) is restricted to the floor of a crater 85 kilometers in diameter. The rim of this crater and the rims of those north of it have been disrupted by the process which caused the hilly and lineated terrain. This process has not affected the smooth plains on their floors, indicating that the floor materials post date the formation of the craters. In this case, the scarp on the crater floor may be a flow front formed during emplacement of the floor material.

    This image (FDS 27379) was acquired during the spacecraft's first encounter with Mercury.

    The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

    Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

  14. The missing large impact craters on Ceres.

    PubMed

    Marchi, S; Ermakov, A I; Raymond, C A; Fu, R R; O'Brien, D P; Bland, M T; Ammannito, E; De Sanctis, M C; Bowling, T; Schenk, P; Scully, J E C; Buczkowski, D L; Williams, D A; Hiesinger, H; Russell, C T

    2016-01-01

    Asteroids provide fundamental clues to the formation and evolution of planetesimals. Collisional models based on the depletion of the primordial main belt of asteroids predict 10-15 craters >400 km should have formed on Ceres, the largest object between Mars and Jupiter, over the last 4.55 Gyr. Likewise, an extrapolation from the asteroid Vesta would require at least 6-7 such basins. However, Ceres' surface appears devoid of impact craters >∼280 km. Here, we show a significant depletion of cerean craters down to 100-150 km in diameter. The overall scarcity of recognizable large craters is incompatible with collisional models, even in the case of a late implantation of Ceres in the main belt, a possibility raised by the presence of ammoniated phyllosilicates. Our results indicate that a significant population of large craters has been obliterated, implying that long-wavelength topography viscously relaxed or that Ceres experienced protracted widespread resurfacing. PMID:27459197

  15. Martian subsurface properties and crater formation processes inferred from fresh impact crater geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Sarah T.; Valiant, Gregory J.

    2006-10-01

    The geometry of simple impact craters reflects the properties of the target materials, and the diverse range of fluidized morphologies observed in Martian ejecta blankets are controlled by the near-surface composition and the climate at the time of impact. Using the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data set, quantitative information about the strength of the upper crust and the dynamics of Martian ejecta blankets may be derived from crater geometry measurements. Here, we present the results from geometrical measurements of fresh craters 3-50 km in rim diameter in selected highland (Lunae and Solis Plana) and lowland (Acidalia, Isidis, and Utopia Planitiae) terrains. We find large, resolved differences between the geometrical properties of the freshest highland and lowland craters. Simple lowland craters are 1.5-2.0 times deeper (≥5σo difference) with >50% larger cavities (≥2σo) compared to highland craters of the same diameter. Rim heights and the volume of material above the preimpact surface are slightly greater in the lowlands over most of the size range studied. The different shapes of simple highland and lowland craters indicate that the upper ˜6.5 km of the lowland study regions are significantly stronger than the upper crust of the highland plateaus. Lowland craters collapse to final volumes of 45-70% of their transient cavity volumes, while highland craters preserve only 25-50%. The effective yield strength of the upper crust in the lowland regions falls in the range of competent rock, approximately 9-12 MPa, and the highland plateaus may be weaker by a factor of 2 or more, consistent with heavily fractured Noachian layered deposits. The measured volumes of continuous ejecta blankets and uplifted surface materials exceed the predictions from standard crater scaling relationships and Maxwell's Z model of crater excavation by a factor of 3. The excess volume of fluidized ejecta blankets on Mars cannot be explained by concentration of ejecta through

  16. Girls and Boys Like to Read and Write Different Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merisuo-Storm, Tuula

    2006-01-01

    This study explored girls' and boys' (aged 10-11) attitudes towards reading and writing. Girls enjoyed reading significantly more than boys. Boys liked mostly comics and humorous books; adventure books were girls' favourites. Poetry did not appeal to pupils. Many boys did not enjoy typical school texts. Most pupils, especially boys, did not like…

  17. Are Boys Discriminated in Swedish High Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinnerich, Bjorn Tyrefors; Hoglin, Erik; Johannesson, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Girls typically have higher grades than boys in school and recent research suggests that part of this gender difference may be due to discrimination of boys in grading. We rigorously test this in a field experiment where a random sample of the same tests in the Swedish language is subject to blind and non-blind grading. The non-blind test score is…

  18. Role Calls for Boys & Girls Clubs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Allesandro, Lou

    2013-01-01

    The New Hampshire Alliance of Boys & Girls Clubs has come a long way since the inception of the state's first Club in Manchester more than 100 years ago. The goal of the Boys & Girls Clubs of America is to provide youth with programs and services that allow them to realize their full potential as productive members of society. State and federal…

  19. More Boys Wanted in Upstate New York

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Matt

    2010-01-01

    In spite of the popularity of TV shows like "American Idol" and "Glee," it can still be hard to convince boys that singing is cool. Therefore, choir directors who would like more boys to join their groups have their work cut out for them. Erin Belanger, music teacher at Stockbridge Valley central School in Munnsville, New York is a case in point.…

  20. Concern Over Gender Gaps Shifting to Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2006-01-01

    After years of efforts aimed at boosting girls' achievement in science and mathematics, researchers, writers, and educators are now expressing alarm about the plight of boys. Even boys themselves have jumped into the debate. In December 2006, Doug Anglin, a 17-year-old senior at Milton High School in Milton, Massachusetts, filed a federal civil…

  1. Failing Boys? Issues in Gender and Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Debbie, Ed.; Elwood, Jannette, Ed.; Hey, Valerie, Ed.; Maw, Janet, Ed.

    Issues surrounding boys'"underachievement" have been at the center of public debate about education and the raising of standards in recent years. Media and political responses to the "problem of boys" have tended to be simplistic, partial, and owe more to quick fixes than investigation and research. This book provides a detailed, nuanced case…

  2. Do We Really Have a "Boy Crisis"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins-Gough, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author presents the findings of "The Evidence Suggests Otherwise: The Truth About Boys and Girls," a report conducted by Education Sector senior policy analyst Sara Mead. This report examines trends in achievement and education attainment and concludes that the recent surge of concern about boys' academic performance has been…

  3. Developmental Pathways in Boys' Disruptive Delinquent Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Barbara Tatem; Loeber, Rolf; Keenan, Kate; DeLamatre, Mary

    1997-01-01

    Boys may follow various developmental pathways that lead to increasingly disruptive and delinquent behavior. To most parents, teachers, youth workers, mental health professionals, and juvenile justice practitioners, the development of disruptive and delinquent behavior in boys may appear erratic and unpredictable. This bulletin summarizes…

  4. Using Special Education to Destroy Black Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    Asks whether special education is designed to keep African-American boys out of the mainstream of education and also looks at questions of a passive conspiracy to destroy African-American males and the role of racism. Discusses special education legislation, and argues that African-American boys are not being adequately educated. (JB)

  5. Adolescent Boys' Friendships and Peer Group Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Judy Y.

    2005-01-01

    Adolescent boys perceive their male peer group culture--and their socialization toward masculine norms emphasized within this culture--as negatively influencing their abilities to develop close male friendships. Boys who manage to develop close, male friendships, however, draw strength from these relationships to resist the social pressures of…

  6. Boy Scouts, School Policies and the Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    The Boy Scouts of America's anti-gay and anti-atheist youth policies are forcing school districts to reconsider sponsoring troops and allowing meetings on campus. To most school boards, banning Boy Scouts organizations seems unthinkable. The meeting-space question boils down to existence of anti-discrimination policies. (MLH)

  7. Misreading Masculinity: Boys, Literacy, and Popular Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newkirk, Thomas

    This book takes an up-close and personal look at elementary school boys and their relationship to sports, movies, video games, and other avenues of popular culture. The book views these media not as enemies of literacy, but as resources "for" literacy. It contains a series of interviews with young boys and girls who describe the pleasure they take…

  8. A Radial Profile of Tycho Secondary Crater Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Kassandra; Campbell, D. B.; Campbell, B. A.; Carter, L. M.; Anderson, R. F.

    2009-09-01

    Determining the typical secondary crater production of individual primary events is an important step in gauging the extent of secondary crater contamination of crater-counting derived ages. Previous lunar observations of secondary crater production from individual primary events have focused on secondary craters near the parent primary and extrapolated to larger radial distances where morphological identification of secondaries is more difficult [Hirata and Nakamura, JGR, E03005, doi:10.1029/2005JE002484, 2006]. As some workers suggest that more distant secondaries may constitute much of the total secondary crater population [McEwen et al., Icarus, 176, 2005; Hirata and Nakamura, JGR, E03005, doi:10.1029/2005JE002484, 2006], lunar observational evidence in this regime is critical to building a robust picture of secondary crater production on the Moon. We present preliminary results of a survey of Tycho secondaries ranging in distance from 1-25 crater radii from the parent crater. Secondary craters in this study lie along a ray extending south from Tycho across Clavius crater and are identified by characteristic, asymmetric ejecta blankets visible in 2.38 GHz (12.6 cm) radar circular polarization ratio (CPR) images acquired during bi-static observations with the Arecibo and Green Bank telescopes. In addition to presenting the size-frequency distributions of these secondary craters and implications thereof, we compare the population of Tycho secondaries identified in the radar CPR near Pictet crater to that identified via morphology in optical images by Hirata and Nakamura, JGR, 2006.

  9. Genetic implications of the shapes of martian and lunar craters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pike, R.J.

    1971-01-01

    Craters on Mars and the Moon are alike in that larger craters differ in shape from smaller ones, and older craters differ in shape from younger ones. Smoothed depth-diameter curves for 41 large martian craters photographed by Mariner IV inflect at a crater diameter of 10-20km in a manner similar to curves for lunar craters. Below 10-20km, both depth-diameter curves are linear with a slope of roughly 1.0; above this threshold range, the curves assume a much lower slope. Diminution of lunar crater depth-diameter ratios with age indicates that the shapes of lunar and, by inference, martian craters have changed systematically since formation. Martian craters sampled here are shallower than most pre-Imbrian lunar craters. By analogy with the Moon, martian craters seem both to vary in initial shape according to the energy of the impact that formed them and to have been modified subsequently by endogenic and surface processes. A proposed model for the geologic development of large martian and lunar craters outlines a time- dependent sequence of events. Craters which have undergone rapid isostatic adjustment on the Moon have distinctive morphologies and occur preferentially along mare basin-upland margins. ?? 1972.

  10. Low-velocity impact craters in ice and ice-saturated sand with implications for Martian crater count ages.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croft, S.K.; Kieffer, S.W.; Ahrens, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    We produced a series of decimeter-sized impact craters in blocks of ice near 0oC and -70oC and in ice-saturated sand near -70oC as a preliminary investigation of cratering in materials analogous to those found on Mars and the outer solar satellites. Crater diameters in the ice-saturated sand were 2 times larger than craters in the same energy and velocity range in competent blocks of granite, basalt and cement. Craters in ice were c.3 times larger. Martian impact crater energy versus diameter scaling may thus be a function of latitude. -from Authors

  11. An investigation of the cratering-induced motions occurring during the formation of bowl-shaped craters. [using high explosive charges as the cratering source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piekutowski, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of the dynamic processes which occur during crater formation were examined using small hemispherical high-explosive charges detonated in a tank which had one wall constructed of a thick piece of clear plexiglas. Crater formation and the motions of numerous tracer particles installed in the cratering medium at the medium-wall interface were viewed through the wall of this quarter-space tank and recorded with high-speed cameras. Subsequent study and analysis of particle motions and events recorded on the film provide data needed to develop a time-sequence description of the formation of a bowl-shaped crater. Tables show the dimensions of craters produced in a quarter-space tank compared with dimensions of craters produced in normal half-space tanks. Crater growth rate summaries are also tabulated.

  12. Geological terrains and crater frequencies on Ariel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plescia, J. B.

    1987-05-01

    The geological terrain recognized on Ariel using Voyager data is briefly discussed. Crater-size frequency data and surface morphology indicate that Ariel has been completely resurfaced since its accretion. The cratered terrain, the oldest surface on Ariel, may have been the one formed during this initial global resurfacing. Subsequently, Ariel has been partly resurfaced, as reflected by the ridged terrains and the plains. Similar crater frequencies for terrains other than the plain indicate that they are of similar age and formed over a relatively brief period of time. The plains are the youngest unit observed on Ariel. Graben development began before plains formation, as indicated by the presence of plains material partially filling some grabens.

  13. Pressure versus drag effects on crater size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    The topic of atmospheric effects on crater formation is very complex because it includes not only pressure effects on excavation, but also drag effects on ejecta placement. Experiments have to be designed very carefully to allow isolation of the two phenomena. Historically, numerous investigators have shown an influence of atmospheric pressure. However, none have identified the scaling that correctly isolates pressure from drag effects. On-going work in explosive cratering has produced scaling paradigms for deeply buried explosive charges where drag effects are negligible. Here it was found that increased pressure caused significant induced strength effects that impeded crater excavation. The effect is more pronounced with increasing burial depth and less pronounced with increased yield.

  14. Experimental investigation of crater growth dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. M.; Housen, K. R.; Bjorkman, M. D.; Holsapple, K. A.

    1985-01-01

    This work is a continuation of an ongoing program whose objective is to perform experiments and to develop scaling relationships for large-body impacts onto planetary surfaces. The centrifuge technique is used to provide experimental data for actual target materials of interest. With both power and gas guns mounted on the rotor arm, it is possible to match various dimensionless similarity parameters, which have been shown to govern the behavior of large-scale impacts. The development of the centrifuge technique has been poineered by the present investigators and is documented by numerous publications, the most recent of which are listed below. Understanding the dependence of crater size upon gravity has been shown to be key to the complete determination of the dynamic and kinematic behavior of crater formation as well as ejecta phenomena. Three unique time regimes in the formation of an impact crater have been identified.

  15. Forty Meters from Entry to Victoria Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera during the rover's 1,278th Martian day, or sol, (Aug. 28, 2007) to take the images combined into this view. The rover was perched at the lip of Victoria Crater, which is about 800 meters (one-half mile) in diameter.

    After assessment of possible routes for Opportunity to descend into the crater, the rover team selected a site farther to the right along the rim. That selected entry point lies near the ripple of bright soil visible just outside the crater near the top center of this scene. The driving distance for Opportunity from the Sol 1,278 viewpoint to the selected entry point is about 40 meters (about 130 feet).

    This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  16. Meteoritic material at five large impact craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palme, H.; Janssens, M.-J.; Takahashi, H.; Anders, E.; Hertogen, J.

    1978-01-01

    The paper analyzes the meteoritic material at five multikilometer craters: Clearwater (Lac a l'Eau Claire) East and West (22 and 32 km), Manicouagan (70 km) and Mistastin (28 km), all in Canada; and Lake Bosumtwi (10.5 km), Ghana, which is associated with Ivory Coast tektites. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis is applied to 16 crater samples for the siderophile trace elements Ir, Os, Pd, Ni, Ge, and Re, which are depleted to varying degrees in the earth's crust but are abundant in all meteorites except achondrites. It is found that only two samples, both from Clearwater, exhibit a strong meteoritic signal. The remaining ones fall within or slightly above the range for terrestrial rocks, and therefore at best contain only small meteoritic components. Clearwater East is the first terrestrial impact crater to be associated with a stony meteorite (a C1 or C2 chondrite).

  17. Goat paddock cryptoexplosion crater, Western Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harms, J.E.; Milton, D.J.; Ferguson, J.; Gilbert, D.J.; Harris, W.K.; Goleby, B.

    1980-01-01

    Goat Paddock, a crater slightly over 5 km in diameter (18??20??? S, 126??40???E), lies at the north edge of the King Leopold Range/Mueller Range junction in the Kimberley district, Western Australia (Fig. 1). It was noted as a geological anomaly in 1964 during regional mapping by the Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics and the Geological Survey of Western Australia. The possibility of its being a meteorite impact crater has been discussed1, although this suggestion was subsequently ignored2. Two holes were drilled by a mining corporation in 1972 to test whether kimberlite underlay the structure. Here we report the findings of five days of reconnaissance in August 1979 which established that Goat Paddock is a cryptoexplosion crater containing shocked rocks and an unusually well exposed set of structural features. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

  18. Tempest in Vailulu'u Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, S. R.; Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A.; Young, C.; Baker, E.

    2005-12-01

    The summit crater of the Samoan submarine volcano, Vailulu'u, has been actively erupting since 2001. Based on water chemistry, CTD and temperature logger data from 2000 and 2001, we formulated a model for the hydrothermal system in the crater involving a tidally-modulated "breathing" (Staudigel et al., 2004). During low stands of internal waves (exterior to the crater), the crater exhales warm buoyant hydrothermal water that forms a "halo" around the crater rich in Mn, 3He, and particulates. During "high tides", cold dense external water is inhaled into the crater through the three breaches, and cascades to the crater floor. In April 2005, we used the HURL PISCES V submersible to deploy various temperature and particulate loggers and current meters in and around the crater; these were retrieved by Pisces V in July 2005. In addition, continuous CTD profiling was carried out over 12 hour tidal cycles at one location inside, and one outside, the crater. The accumulated data set fully reinforces our "breathing" model. An ADCP, deployed for 93 days in the NW breach at 752m, showed dominant easterly inflow currents and westerly outflow currents, with maximum velocities of approximately 25 cm/s. The flows were coherent for distances up to 50-60m above the ADCP; the mean inflow velocity and azimuth (20-40 m interval above the ADCP) was 7 cm/s due east; the mean outflow velocity and azimuth was 5 cm/s at 260 degrees. Mean inflows were consistently colder than outflows (5.00 C vs 5.20 C); the maximum observed range in temperature was 1.1 C, correlated with peak flow velocities. The coldest inflows would require very large regional internal wave amplitudes, up to 50-100 meters. A 2-D acoustic current meter was deployed on top of the west crater rim summit (582m) for 90 days, and in the S breach (697m) for 4 days. The summit flows are presumed to represent the regional scale currents; these were largely from the SW quadrant, with typical velocities of 8-15 cm/s, and peaks to

  19. Cratering motions and structural deformation in the rim of the Prairie Flat multiring explosion crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddy, D. J.; Ullrich, G. W.; Sauer, F. M.; Jones, G. H. S.

    1977-01-01

    Cratering motions and structural deformation are described for the rim of the Prairie Flat multiring crater, 85.5 m across and 5.3 m deep, which was formed by the detonation of a 500-ton TNT surface-tangent sphere. The terminal displacement and motion data are derived from marker cans and velocity gages emplaced in drill holes in a three-dimensional matrix radial to the crater. The integration of this data with a detailed geologic cross section, mapped from deep trench excavations through the rim, provides a composite view of the general sequence of motions that formed a transiently uplifted rim, overturned flap, inverted stratigraphy, downfolded rim, and deformed strata in the crater walls. Preliminary comparisons with laboratory experimental cratering and with numerical simulations indicate that explosion craters of the Prairie Flat-type generated by surface and near-surface energy sources tend to follow predictable motion sequences and produce comparable structural deformation. More specifically, central uplift and multiring impact craters with morphologies and structures comparable to Prairie Flat are inferred to have experienced similar deformational histories of the rim, such as uplift, overturning, terracing, and downfolding.

  20. Large impact crater histories of Mars: The effect of different model crater age techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Stuart J.; Hynek, Brian M.; Lillis, Robert J.; Bottke, William F.

    2013-07-01

    Impact events that produce large craters primarily occurred early in the Solar System's history because the largest bolides were remnants from planetary formation. Determining when large impacts occurred on a planetary surface such as Mars can yield clues to the flux of material in the early inner Solar System which, in turn, can constrain other planetary processes such as the timing and magnitude of resurfacing and the history of the martian core dynamo. We have used a large, global planetary database in conjunction with geomorphologic mapping to identify craters superposed on the rims of 78 larger craters with diameters D ⩾ 150 km on Mars, ≈78% of which have not been previously dated in this manner. The densities of superposed craters with diameters larger than 10, 16, 25, and 50 km, as well as isochron fits were used to derive model crater ages of these larger craters and basins from which we derived an impact flux. In discussing these ages, we point out several internal inconsistencies of crater-age modeling techniques and chronology systems and, all told, we explain why we think isochron-fitting is the most reliable indicator of an age. Our results point to a mostly obliterated crater record prior to ˜4.0 Ga with the oldest preserved mappable craters on Mars dating to ˜4.3-4.35 Ga. We have used our results to constrain the cessation time of the martian core dynamo which we found to have occurred between the formation of Ladon and Prometheus basins, approximately 4.06-4.09 Ga. We also show that, overall, surfaces on Mars older than ˜4.0-4.1 Ga have experienced >1 km of resurfacing, while those younger than ˜3.8-3.9 Ga have experienced significantly less.

  1. Impact Crater Size and Evolution: Expectations for Deep Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.; Anderson, J. L. B.; Heineck, J. T.

    2002-01-01

    Deep Impact will involve a unique cratering experiment designed to probe below the surface of a comet. Laboratory experiments provide critical data for crater scaling and evolution of the ejecta curtain. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Interpreting the cratering record - Mercury to Ganymede and Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronow, A.; Strom, R. G.; Gurnis, M.

    1982-01-01

    A first analysis is presented of what the Galilean satellites' crater production function is, along with some interpretations of the conclusion. The basic premise is that the larger crater population of the lunar highlands is not at saturation density. The saturation issue is addressed, showing why the concept of saturation of lunar highlands can no longer be regarded as the best hypothesis, at least for large craters. The cratering records of Mars, Mercury, and the moon are reviewed and synthesized, and crater characteristics and statistics for Callisto and Ganymede are discussed and interpreted. It is shown that even the very densely cratered lunar highlands still retain considerable information about their production function; that remarkable similarities exist among the cratering histories of all of the terrestrial planets, both in terms of their production functions and of their total crater densities; and that the Gallilean satellites seem to have experienced quite a different impact history from that of the terrestrial planets.

  3. 9. CRATER RIM DRIVE NEAR THURSTON LAVA TUBE. VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. CRATER RIM DRIVE NEAR THURSTON LAVA TUBE. VIEW OF CRENELATED LAVA STONE GUARD WALL AND ROCK CUT OPPOSITE. NOTE CATTLE GUARD ACROSS ROAD PARTIALLY PAVED OVER. - Crater Rim Drive, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  4. Gradational evolution of young, simple impact craters on the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J. A.; Schultz, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    From these three craters, a first order gradational evolutionary sequence can be proposed. As crater rims are reduced by backwasting and downwasting through fluvial and mass wasting processes, craters are enlarged by approx. 10 pct. Enlargement of drainages inside the crater eventually forms rim breaches, thereby capturing headward portions of exterior drainages. At the same time, the relative importance of gradational processes may reverse on the ejecta: aeolian activity may supersede fluvial incisement and fan formation at late stages of modification. Despite actual high drainage densities on the crater exterior during early stages of gradation, the subtle scale of these systems results in low density estimates from air photos and satellite images. Because signatures developed on surfaces around all three craters appear to be mostly gradient dependent, they may not be unique to simple crater morphologies. Similar signatures may develop on portions of complex craters as well; however, important differences may also occur.

  5. Igneous intrusion models for floor fracturing in lunar craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichman, R. W.; Schultz, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    Lunar floor-fractured craters are primarily located near the maria and frequently contain ponded mare units and dark mantling deposits. Fracturing is confined to the crater interior, often producing a moat-like feature near the floor edge, and crater depth is commonly reduced by uplift of the crater floor. Although viscous relaxation of crater topography can produce such uplift, the close association of modification with surface volcanism supports a model linking floor fracture to crater-centered igneous intrusions. The consequences of two intrusion models for the lunar interior are quantitatively explored. The first model is based on terrestrial laccoliths and describes a shallow intrusion beneath the crater. The second model is based on cone sheet complexes where surface deformation results from a deeper magma chamber. Both models, their fit to observed crater modifications and possible implications for local volcanism are described.

  6. MOLA Topography and Morphometry of Rampart and Pedestal Craters, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, D. E.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Garvin, J. B.

    2002-01-01

    Martian rampart and pedestal craters have characteristic geometric parameter ranges that are significantly different than fresh craters. Combined MOLA geometric measurements and MOC analyses can be used to constrain their modification. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. East Rim of Endeavour Crater on Horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    A high point on the distant eastern rim of Endeavour Crater is visible on the horizon in this image taken by the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on March 8, 2009, during the 1,821st Martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission on Mars.

    That portion of Endeavour's rim is about 34 kilometers (21 miles) away from Opportunity's position west of the crater when the image was taken. The width of the image covers approximately one degree of the horizon.

  8. North Rim of Endeavour Crater on Horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    A northern portion of the rim of Endeavour Crater is visible on the horizon of this image taken by the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on March 7, 2009, during the 1,820st Martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission on Mars.

    That portion of Endeavour's rim is about 20 kilometers (12 miles) away from Opportunity's position west of the crater when the image was taken. The width of the image covers approximately one degree of the horizon.

  9. The Variability of Crater Identification Among Expert and Community Crater Analysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, S. J.; Antonenko, I.; Kirchoff, M. R.; Chapman, C. R.; Fassett, C. I.; Herrick, R. R.; Singer, K.; Zanetti, M.; Lehan, C.; Huang, D.; Gay, P.

    2014-04-01

    Statistical studies of impact crater populations have been used to model ages of planetary surfaces for several decades [1]. This assumes that crater counts are approximately invariant and a "correct" population will be identified if the analyst is skilled and diligent. However, the reality is that crater identification is somewhat subjective, so variability between analysts, or even a single analyst's variation from day-to-day, is expected [e.g., 2, 3]. This study was undertaken to quantify that variability within an expert analyst population and between experts and minimally trained volunteers.

  10. Limits on large-crater production and obliteration on Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronow, A.; Strom, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    By comparing results of Monte Carlo simulations of the crater population on Callisto with the observed surface, it is demonstrated that the relative dearth of large craters on Ganymede and Callisto, compared with the terrestrial planets, can not be totally ascribed either to craters relaxing or to craters piercing a thin icy crust. Consequently, the population of objects responsible for the heavy bombardment of the Jovian system differed markedly from that responsible for the late heavy bombardment of the terrestrial planets.

  11. Comparative studies of lunar, Martian, and Mercurian craters and plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, V. R.; Arvidson, R. E.; Aggarwal, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    The spatial distribution of lunar smooth plains is not consistent with experimental simulations of melt rock emplacement during cratering in layered materials. Nor is it consistent with the location of melt rocks (suevite) near the Ries basin. Lunar smooth plains surrounding Imbrium are most extensive in areas where pre-existing craters are most degraded. This observation suggests that plains form by impact of basin and local primary crater ejecta, together with deposition of debris excavated by the resultant secondary cratering events. Craters within the belt of smooth plains surrounding the Caloris basin on Mercury are most degraded nearest the basin; this suggests that Mercurian smooth plains must, at least in part, be emplaced in a manner similar to plains surrounding the Imbrium basin. Mercurian uplands have a primary crater population deficient in small crater diameters (less than approximately 30 km). Lunar uplands far from major basins also have a crater population deficient in small crater sizes. Martian cratered terrain exhibits a similar crater deficiency, which was previously interpreted as due to obliteration of small craters (less than approximately 30 km) by some surface process. A crater size distribution deficient in small sizes (less than approximately 30 km) on the Mercurian, lunar, and Martian uplands has implications for the origin of debris bombarding the inner solar system during the period recorded by these surfaces. It is proposed that during late heavy bombardment, the inner solar system was inundated with bodies that broke up under tidal fission as they approached the planets. Such a mechanism would lend to production of a crater population deficient in small crater sizes, and it would also explain the large degree of spatial clustering of primary craters on Mercury, the moon, and Mars.

  12. Standardizing the nomenclature of Martian impact crater ejecta morphologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlow, Nadine G.; Boyce, Joseph M.; Costard, Francois M.; Craddock, Robert A.; Garvin, James B.; Sakimoto, Susan E.H.; Kuzmin, Ruslan O.; Roddy, David J.; Soderblom, Laurence A.

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Crater Morphology Consortium recommends the use of a standardized nomenclature system when discussing Martian impact crater ejecta morphologies. The system utilizes nongenetic descriptors to identify the various ejecta morphologies seen on Mars. This system is designed to facilitate communication and collaboration between researchers. Crater morphology databases will be archived through the U.S. Geological Survey in Flagstaff, where a comprehensive catalog of Martian crater morphologic information will be maintained.

  13. Goldilocks and the Three Complex Crater Scaling Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinnon, William B.; Schenk, Paul M.; Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2003-01-01

    Formed in the gravity regime, complex craters are larger than their simple crater equivalents, due to a combination of slumping and uplift. Just how much larger is a matter of great interest for, for example, age dating studies. We examine three empirical scaling laws for complex crater size, examining their strengths and weaknesses, as well as asking how well they accord with previously published and new data from lunar, terrestrial, and venusian craters.

  14. Goldilocks and the Three Complex Crater Scaling Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinnon, William B.; Schenk, Paul M.; Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2003-01-01

    Formed in the gravity regime, complex craters are larger than their simple crater equivalents, due to a combination of slumping and uplift. Just how much larger is a matter of great interest for, for example, age dating studies. We examine three empirical scaling laws for complex crater size, examining their strengths and weaknesses, as well as asking how well they accord with previously published and new data from lunar, terrestrial, and Venusian craters.

  15. Impact craters on Venus: An overview from Magellan observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaber, G. G.; Strom, R. G.; Moore, H. J.; Soderblom, L. A.; Kirk, R. L.; Chadwick, D. J.; Dawson, D. D.; Gaddis, L. R.; Boyce, J. M.; Russell, J.

    1992-01-01

    Magellan has revealed an ensemble of impact craters on Venus that is unique in many important ways. We have compiled a database describing 842 craters on 89 percent of the planet's surface mapped through orbit 2578 (the craters range in diameter from 1.5 to 280 km). We have studied the distribution, size-frequency, morphology, and geology of these craters both in aggregate and, for some craters, in more detail. We have found the following: (1) the spatial distribution of craters is highly uniform; (2) the size-density distribution of craters with diameters greater than or equal to 35 km is consistent with a 'production' population having a surprisingly young age of about 0.5 Ga (based on the estimated population of Venus-crossing asteroids); (3) the spectrum of crater modification differs greatly from that on other planets--62 percent of all craters are pristine, only 4 percent volcanically embayed, and the remainder affected by tectonism, but none are severely and progressively depleted based on size-density distribution extrapolated from larger craters; (4) large craters have a progression of morphologies generally similar to those on other planets, but small craters are typically irregular or multiple rather than bowl shaped; (5) diffuse radar-bright or -dark features surround some craters, and about 370 similar diffuse 'splotches' with no central crater are observed whose size-density distribution is similar to that of small craters; and (6) other features unique to Venus include radar-bright or -dark parabolic arcs opening westward and extensive outflows originating in crater ejecta.

  16. Lunar Crater Interiors with High Circular Polarization Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitz, C. M.; Campbell, B. A.; Morgan, G.

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed 12.6-cm Earth-based radar images of the Moon to search for older craters (pre-Copernican) that display high values of the circular polarization ratio (CPR) on their interior walls. These craters have highly eroded rims and ejecta, indicating that there must be a source exposed within the crater interior that is continuously creating a rougher surface. Of particular interest are craters between 10-25 km in diameter that occur in smooth plains in the highlands, where competent layers are not expected as they are for the mare. After identifying these high-CPR interiors in pre-Copernican craters, we studied LROC NAC and Kaguya TC images to search for possible albedo and layering on crater interior walls that might signal the presence of anomalous material. Our results indicate that high-CPR craters generally have boulder fields clustered around their upper interior walls. We divide the high-CPR craters into three types: (1) craters on the layered mare lava flows; (2) craters in the highlands that correlate to mapped locations of smooth plains; and (3) craters on the highlands that are not associated with smooth plains. Most of the high-CPR craters in the highlands are associated with Eratosthenian-period craters, and most of these are also on smooth plains, indicating that impact melt sheets are a likely source for the boulders exposed on their interior walls. Statistical analyses will be performed after incorporating multiple lunar datasets into GIS to quantify these preliminary interpretations. Figure 1. Example of high-CPR crater Zagut A located on smooth plains in the highlands. LROC images showing boulders on (a) northern crater interior wall and (b) southern crater interior wall. (c) Stronlgy enhanced values of CPR are observed for the interior of Zagut A.

  17. Formation age of the lunar crater Giordano Bruno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morota, Tomokatsu; Haruyama, Junichi; Miyamoto, Hideaki; Honda, Chikatoshi; Ohtake, Makiko; Yokota, Yasuhiro; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Hirata, Naru; Demura, Hirohide; Takeda, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Yoshiko; Kimura, Jun

    2009-08-01

    Using the Terrain Camera onboard the Japanese lunar explorer, SELENE (Kaguya), we obtained new high-resolution images of the 22-kilometer-diameter lunar crater Giordano Bruno. Based on crater size-frequency measurements of small craters (<200 m in diameter) superposed on its continuous ejecta, the formation age of Giordano Bruno is estimated to be 1 to 10 Ma. This is constructive evidence against the crater's medieval age formation hypothesis.

  18. The group of Macha craters in western Yakutia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurov, E. P.; Gurova, E. P.

    1998-02-01

    The group of Macha impact craters in western Yakutia is represented by five crateriform structures from 60 to 300 m in diameter. The craters were formed in sandy strata of the Quaternary period and in underlying sedimentary rocks of Late Proterozoic ages. Shock metamorphic effects including planar features in quartz were established in the rocks from the craters. The age of the craters is 7315 ± 80 yr. The nature of the projectiles is not totally clear, although they might be iron meteoritic.

  19. A Fresh Crater Drills to Tharsis Bedrock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) took this image of a newly formed impact crater in the Tharsis region of Mars at 1316 UTC (8:16 a.m. EST) on Jan. 13, 2007, near 17.0 degrees north latitude, 246.4 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 20 meters (66 feet) across. The region covered by the image is just over 10 kilometers (6 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    The Tharsis region is a high volcanic plateau that stands about 5 kilometers (3 miles) above the surrounding plains. The rocks forming Tharsis are younger than in most parts of mars, as evidenced by their low density of craters. The best estimate of their age is comparable to the age of Shergotty-class meteorites thought to originate from Mars. However, Tharsis is covered by a nearly unbroken, meters-thick layer of dust that has frustrated all attempts to measure its bedrock composition remotely, and to determine if it matches the composition of Shergotty-class meteorites.

    The recent discovery of dark, newly formed impact craters on Mars has provided the CRISM team a chance, finally, to measure the rocks that make up Tharsis. Over the lifetime of the Mars Global Surveyor mission, its high-resolution Mars Orbiter Camera monitored the surface and documented the very recent formation of some two dozen small impact craters. Several of them are in Tharsis and pierce the plateau's dust blanket to expose bedrock. MRO's instruments have been trained on these 'drill holes' into Mars' volcanic crust, including the crater shown here.

    The top image was constructed from three infrared wavelengths that usually highlight compositional variations. This image shows the impact crater, a ring of dark, excavated rock (inset), and a surrounding system of rays. Crater rays are common around young impact craters, and they form when ejected boulders reimpact the surface and stir up the local rock

  20. Impact and cratering rates onto Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenstreet, Sarah; Gladman, Brett; McKinnon, William B.

    2015-09-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft fly-through of the Pluto system in July 2015 will provide humanity's first data for the crater populations on Pluto and its binary companion, Charon. In principle, these surfaces could be dated in an absolute sense, using the observed surface crater density (# craters/km2 larger than some threshold crater diameter D). Success, however, requires an understanding of both the cratering physics and absolute impactor flux. The Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS) L7 synthetic model of classical and resonant Kuiper belt populations (Petit, J.M. et al. [2011]. Astron. J. 142, 131-155; Gladman, B. et al. [2012]. Astron. J. 144, 23-47) and the scattering object model of Kaib et al. (Kaib, N., Roškar, R., Quinn, T. [2011]. Icarus 215, 491-507) calibrated by Shankman et al. (Shankman, C. et al. [2013]. Astrophys. J. 764, L2-L5) provide such impact fluxes and thus current primary cratering rates for each dynamical sub-population. We find that four sub-populations (the q < 42AU hot and stirred main classicals, the classical outers, and the plutinos) dominate Pluto's impact flux, each providing ≈ 15-25 % of the total rate. Due to the uncertainty in how the well-characterized size distribution for Kuiper belt objects (with impactor diameter d > 100km) connects to smaller projectiles, we compute cratering rates using five model impactor size distributions: a single power-law, a power-law with a knee, a power-law with a divot, as well as the "wavy" size distributions described in Minton et al. (Minton, D.A. et al. [2012]. Asteroids Comets Meteors Conf. 1667, 6348) and Schlichting et al. (Schlichting, H.E., Fuentes, C.I., Trilling, D.E. [2013]. Astron. J. 146, 36-42). We find that there is only a small chance that Pluto has been hit in the past 4 Gyr by even one impactor with a diameter larger than the known break in the projectile size distribution (d ≈ 100km) which would create a basin on Pluto (D ⩾ 400km in diameter). We show that due to

  1. Impact Materials of Takamatsu Crater in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Y.; Okamoto, M.; Fukuchi, T.

    1995-09-01

    Shocked quartz materials have been found in Japanese K.T boundary (Hokkaido) and mountains of middle main-islands of Japan, though there are few direct evidence of "natural circular structure" on the surface in Japan. However circular structure has been recently found as a buried crater(up to 150m deep) [1] which is ca. 4km in diameter with -10 mgal of Bouguer gravity anomaly from surrounding Rhyoke granitic region of the southern part of Takamatsu City, Kagawa Prefecture, northeast Shikoku, Japan [1,2,3]. Two boring cores of 300m deep near small mountains inside the crater could not reach the bottom of the crater so far. From model calculation of the negative gravity anomaly, the Takamatsu crater shows deep basin structure up to 1.4km. If the Takamatsu crater is considered to be only impact crater, it is difficult to discuss only surface materials on the crater. But anomalous minerals are found only around small volcanic intrusions inside the crater, which the mixed minerals are clearly different with those of other volcanic intrusions of the Yashima and Goshikidai outside the crater [1,2,3]. The small volcanic intrusions are not origin of large Takamatsu crater, because the small volcanic intrusions are found on whole areas of Kagawa Prefecture. Major different activity of the small intrusions inside the crater is to bring the brecciated materials of the interior (esp. crater sediments). The xenolith materials around only volcanic intrusion of andesite are divided into the following four major mineral materials:(a) round pebble fragments from the Rhyoke granitic basement (Sampling No.15), (b) rock fragments from intruded biotite andesites (Nos. 2,15), (c) impact-induced fragments of shocked Quartz grains (Nos. 2,3,6,15), diaplectic feldspars (Nos. 2,3,6,15), silica glasses (Nos. 2,15) and small Fe-Ni metallic grains (No.15), and (d) small sedimentary fragments of halite and mordenite, as listed in Table 1. Table I, showing the characterization of surface samples

  2. Cratering on Small Bodies: Lessons from Eros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. R.

    2003-01-01

    Cratering and regolith processes on small bodies happen continuously as interplanetary debris rains down on asteroids, comets, and planetary satellites. Butthey are very poorly observed and not well understood. On the one hand, we have laboratory experimentation at small scales and we have examination of large impact craters (e.g. Meteor Crater on Earth and imaging of abundant craters on terrestrial planets and outer planet moons). Understanding cratering on bodies of intermediate scales, tens of meters to hundreds of km in size, involves either extrapolation from our understanding of cratering phenomena at very different scales or reliance on very preliminary, incomplete examination of the observational data we now have for a few small bodies. I review the latter information here. It has been generally understood that the role of gravity is greatly diminished for smaller bodies, so a lot of cratering phenomena studied for larger bodies is less applicable. But it would be a mistake to imagine that laboratory experiments on gravitationless rocks (usually at 1 g) are directly applicable, except perhaps to those monolithic Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs) some tens of meters in size that spin very rapidly and can be assumed to be "large bare rocks" with "negative gravity". Whereas it had once been assumed that asteroids smaller than some tens of km diameter would retain little regolith, it is increasingly apparent that regolith and megoregolith processes extend down to bodies only hundreds of meters in size, perhaps smaller. Yet these processes are very different from those that pertain to the Moon, which is our chief prototype of regolith processes. The NEAR Shoemaker spacecraft's studies of Eros provide the best evidence to date about small-body cratering processes, as well as a warning that our theoretical understanding requires anchoring by direct observations. Eros: "Ponds", Paucity of Small Craters, and Other Mysteries. Although Eros is currently largely detached

  3. 36 CFR 7.2 - Crater Lake National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Crater Lake National Park. 7... SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.2 Crater Lake National Park. (a) Fishing. Fishing in Crater Lake and park streams is permitted from May 20 through October 31. (b) Boating....

  4. 36 CFR 7.2 - Crater Lake National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Crater Lake National Park. 7... SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.2 Crater Lake National Park. (a) Fishing. Fishing in Crater Lake and park streams is permitted from May 20 through October 31. (b) Boating....

  5. 36 CFR 7.2 - Crater Lake National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Crater Lake National Park. 7... SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.2 Crater Lake National Park. (a) Fishing. Fishing in Crater Lake and park streams is permitted from May 20 through October 31. (b) Boating....

  6. Coesite from Wabar crater, near Al Hadida, Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, E.C.T.; Fahey, J.J.; Littler, J.

    1961-01-01

    The third natural occurrence of coesite, the high pressure polymorph of silica, is found at the Wabar meteorite crater, Arabia. The Wabar crater is about 300 feet in diameter and about 40 feet deep. It is the smallest of three craters where coesite has been found.

  7. 36 CFR 7.2 - Crater Lake National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Crater Lake National Park. 7... SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.2 Crater Lake National Park. (a) Fishing. Fishing in Crater Lake and park streams is permitted from May 20 through October 31. (b) Boating....

  8. 36 CFR 7.2 - Crater Lake National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Crater Lake National Park. 7... SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.2 Crater Lake National Park. (a) Fishing. Fishing in Crater Lake and park streams is permitted from May 20 through October 31. (b) Boating....

  9. The nomogram of density distribution of lunar craters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, S. G.; Bolkhovitinov, I. S.

    1994-12-01

    Least-square fits to the density of the distribution of lunar craters described by the approximating function are found for craters larger then 10 km in diamater. The nomogram of parameters of the approximating function is given for the estimate of density of primary, secondary and tertiary craters over an area of 104km2.

  10. Calculational investigation of impact cratering dynamics - Material motions during the crater growth period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, M. G.; Thomsen, J. M.; Ruhl, S. F.; Orphal, D. L.; Schultz, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    The considered investigation was conducted in connection with studies which are to provide a better understanding of the detailed dynamics of impact cratering processes. Such an understanding is vital for a comprehension of planetary surfaces. The investigation is the continuation of a study of impact dynamics in a uniform, nongeologic material at impact velocities achievable in laboratory-scale experiments conducted by Thomsen et al. (1979). A calculation of a 6 km/sec impact of a 0.3 g spherical 2024 aluminum projectile into low strength (50 kPa) homogeneous plasticene clay has been continued from 18 microseconds to past 600 microseconds. The cratering flow field, defined as the material flow field in the target beyond the transient cavity but well behind the outgoing shock wave, has been analyzed in detail to see how applicable the Maxwell Z-Model, developed from analysis of near-surface explosion cratering calculations, is to impact cratering

  11. Martian impact cratering rate over the last 3 billions years derived from layered ejecta craters dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagain, Anthony; Bouley, Sylvain; Costard, François; Baratoux, David

    2016-04-01

    All chronology models used in dating planetary surfaces are based on the lunar chronology system. The cratering density of the Moon has been calibrated with absolute ages from Apollo lunar samples. However, there are no lunar samples between 3 Gy and 800 My and only four samples have been dated between 800 My and present. Therefore, the evolution of the cratering rate after the LHB and before 3 Gy is well constrained. The cratering rate between 3 Gy and present has been assumed to be constant [1, 2]. Nevertheless, this assumption is challenged by the analysis of the geological record, such as the frequency of landslide on Mars as a function of time [3, 4]. It is therefore necessary to re-examine the validity of this assumption and place constraints on the cratering rate since the last 3 Gy. For this purpose, we study the rate of impact cratering using small craters on a set of 53 layered ejecta craters larger than 5 km in diameter in Acidalia Planitia, Mars. LECs larger than 5km have large enough surfaces to date their formation by counting craters larger than 100m present on their blankets. Furthermore, limits of their ejecta blankets are clearly defined by a terminal bead. In order to determine the crater emplacement ages, we have applied the methodology dating described in our previous study [6] on all ejecta layers. Errors on measured ages were calculated following [7]. The age of the study area is 2.8±0.2 Gy. Our crater counts on distal ejecta blankets reveal ages younger than the age of the surrounding surface, as expected. It is essential to take into account errors on measured ages. The statistical sample used to build this emplacement frequency distribution and our dating methodology are sufficiently reliable to deduce that a constant impact cratering rate over the last 3 Gy is not a correct approximation. The excessive number of craters emplaced 1Gy ago compared to the cratering rate used suggests a decreased impact cratering rate over the last 1Gy and

  12. Primary Ediacaran Ooid Formation Texture Changes as an Indicator of Shifts in Local Shallow-Sea Chemistry: Exploring Diagenetic Effects on Preservation of Carbonate Associated Nitrate in the Johnnie Formation, Death Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, D. A.; Prokopenko, M. G.; Bergmann, K.; Gaines, R. R.; Corsetti, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    We examined a stratigraphic section of the Johnnie Oolite containing a large Ediacaran negative d13C excursion to evaluate potential effects of diagenesis on Carbonate Associated Nitrate (CAN). Previously, high concentrations of CAN have been determined in this carbonate sequence, potentially pointing to a large perturbation in the marine nitrogen cycle prior to the onset of the d13C excursion. The main source of nitrate within the ocean comes from oxidation of biologically fixed nitrogen. Nitrate enters the carbonate mineral lattice in trace quantities, and may serve as a proxy for the degree of ocean oxygenation as well as for the concentration of fixed nitrogen in the environment. Until now no work has been done to address potential diagenetic alteration of the CAN concentrations. Here we conducted a comparative study between a set of redox-sensitive trace metals, carbonate textures and CAN concentrations in order to place some initial constraints on the extent of diagenetic processes, and in doing so to determine whether the CAN signal within the Johnnie Oolite is primary. We found no clear relationship between CAN and any considered diagenetic markers, pointing to a likely primary nature of the CAN signature. Furthermore, examination of the properties of the ooids that form the rock revealed potential indications of primary environmental changes recorded within the Johnnie Oolite. Ooids are known to form by two distinct mechanisms, which produce either tangential-concentric ooids or radial. Focusing on a single ~3 m stratigraphic section, the North Springs Mountains area, we found a clear shift from tangential-concentric formation at the base to radial formation near the top, with a distinct change occurring between 2-2.5 m. The distinction between ooid formation mechanisms is often thought to be governed by changes in the turbidity of their shallow depositional environments; however, the lack of any marked changes in sedimentary sorting point to a chemical

  13. Speciation: Genomic Archipelagos in a Crater Lake.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Fabrizia; Salzburger, Walter

    2016-03-01

    The opening stages of speciation remain poorly understood, especially from a genomic perspective. The genomes of newly discovered crater-lake cichlid fish shed light on the early phases of diversification and suggest that selection acts on multiple genomic regions. PMID:26954438

  14. Molecular Depth Profiling by Wedged Crater Beveling

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Dan; Lu, Caiyan; Winograd, Nicholas; Wucher, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy are employed to characterize a wedge-shaped crater eroded by a 40keV C60+ cluster ion beam on an organic film of Irganox 1010 doped with Irganox 3114 delta layers. From an examination of the resulting surface, the information about depth resolution, topography and erosion rate can be obtained as a function of crater depth for every depth in a single experiment. It is shown that when measurements are performed at liquid nitrogen temperature, a constant erosion rate and reduced bombardment induced surface roughness is observed. At room temperature, however, the erosion rate drops by ~1/3 during the removal of the 400 nm Irganox film and the roughness gradually increased to from 1 nm ~4 nm. From SIMS lateral images of the beveled crater and AFM topography results, depth resolution was further improved by employing glancing angles of incidence and lower primary ion beam energy. Sub-10 nm depth resolution was observed under the optimized conditions on a routine basis. In general, we show that the wedge-crater beveling is an important tool for elucidating the factors that are important for molecular depth profiling experiments. PMID:21744861

  15. The Large Crater Origin of SNC Meteorites.

    PubMed

    Vickery, A M; Melosh, H J

    1987-08-14

    A large body of evidence strongly suggests that the shergottite, nakhlite, and Chassigny (SNC) meteorites are from Mars. Various mechanisms for the ejection of large rocks at martian escape velocity (5 kilometers per second) have been investigated, but none has proved wholly satisfactory. This article examines a number of possible ejection and cosmic-ray exposure histories to determine which is most plausible. For each possible history, the Melosh spallation model is used to estimate the size of the crater required to produce ejecta fragments of the required size with velocities >/=5 kilometers per second and to produce a total mass of solid ejecta consistent with the observed mass flux of SNC meteorites. Estimates of crater production rates on Mars are then used to evaluate the probability that sufficiently large craters have formed during the available time. The results indicate that the SNC meteorites were probably ejected from a very large crater (> 100 kilometers in diameter) about 200 million years ago, and that cosmic-ray exposure of the recovered meteorites was initiated after collisional fragmentation of the original ejecta in space at much later times (0.5 to 10 million years ago). PMID:17751563

  16. Geological terrains and crater frequencies on Ariel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plescia, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The southern hemisphere of Ariel, a satellite of Uranus, can be divided into several terrain types. Data on the size-frequency distribution of craters for those different terrain types indicate that these terrains formed over a relatively short period of time. Much information on Ariel's geological history can be gained from these data. ?? 1987 Nature Publishing Group.

  17. Winter Frosted Dunes in Kaiser Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    As the Mars Global Surveyor Primary Mission draws to an end, the southern hemisphere of Mars is in the depths of winter. At high latitudes, it is dark most, if not all, of the day. Even at middle latitudes, the sun shines only thinly through a veil of water and carbon dioxide ice clouds, and the ground is so cold that carbon dioxide frosts have formed. Kaiser Crater (47oS, 340oW) is one such place. At a latitude comparable to Seattle, Washington, Duluth, Minnesota, or Helena, Montana, Kaiser Crater is studied primarily because of the sand dune field found within the confines of its walls (lower center of the Mars Orbiter Camera image, above). The normally dark-gray or blue-black sand can be seen in this image to be shaded with light-toned frost. Other parts of the crater are also frosted. Kaiser Crater and its dunes were the subject of an earlier presentation of results. Close-up pictures of these and other dunes in the region show details of their snow-cover, including small avalanches. The two Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera images that comprise this color view (M23-01751 and M23-01752) were acquired on January 26, 2001.

  18. Signs of Landscape Modifications at Martian Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for larger version

    The lower portion of this image from the Thermal Emission Imaging System camera (THEMIS) on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter shows a crater about 16 kilometers (10 miles) in diameter with features studied as evidence of deposition or erosion. The crater is centered at 40.32 degrees south latitude and 132.5 degrees east longitude, in the eastern portion of the Hellas basin on Mars. It has gullies and arcuate ridges on its north, pole-facing interior wall. This crater is in the center of a larger (60-kilometer or 37-mile diameter) crater with lobate flows on its north, interior wall. The image, number V07798008 in the THEMIS catalog, covers a swath of ground 17.4 kilometers (10.8 miles) wide.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science. THEMIS was developed by Arizona State University in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Dust Devil in Gusev Crater, Sol 445

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This movie clip shows a single dust devil -- a whirlwind that lofts dust into the air -- about 2 kilometers (1 mile) away, moving across a plain inside Mars' Gusev Crater for several minutes. The dust devil appears in 21 frames. The number of seconds elapsed since the first frame is indicated at lower left of the images, typically 20 seconds between frames. The navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took these images on the rover's 445th martian day, or sol (April 14, 2005.) Contrast has been enhanced for anything in the images that changes from frame to frame, that is, for the dust devil.

    Scientists expected dust devils since before Spirit landed. The landing area inside Gusev Crater is filled with dark streaks left behind when dust devils pick dust up from an area. It is also filled with bright 'hollows,' which are dust-filled miniature craters. Dust covers most of the terrain. Winds flow into and out of Gusev crater every day. The Sun heats the surface so that the surface is warm to the touch even though the atmosphere at 2 meters (6 feet) above the surface would be chilly. That temperature contrast causes convection. Mixing the dust, winds, and convection can trigger dust devils.

  20. Venusian impact basins and cratered terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Warren B.

    1992-01-01

    The consensus regarding interpretation of Magellan radar imagery assigns Venus a young volcanic surface subjected in many areas to moderate crustal shortening. I infer that, on the contrary, ancient densely cratered terrain and large impact basins may be preserved over more than half the planet and that crustal shortening has been much overestimated. I see wind erosion and deposition as far more effective in modifying old structures. Integration with lunar chronology suggests that most of the surface of Venus may be older than 3.0 Ga and much may be older than 3.8 Ga. Broad volcanos, hug volcanic domes, plains preserving lobate flow patterns, and numerous lesser volcanic features, pocked sparsely by impact craters, are indeed obvious on Magellan imagery. Some of these postvolcanic impact craters have been slightly extended, but only a small portion has been flooded by still younger lavas. Relative ages of the young craters are indicated by the varying eolian removal of their forms and ejecta blankets and flow lobes, and the oldest are much subdued. If these young impact craters, maximum diameter 275 km, include all preserved impact structures, then their quantity and distribution indicate that Venus was largely resurfaced by volcanism approx. 0.5 Ga, subsequent eruptions having been at a much reduced rate. Away from the approx. 0.5 Ga volcanic features, much of Venus is, however, dominated by circular and subcircular features, 50-2000 km in diameter, many of them multiring, that may be mostly older impact and impact-melt structures substantially modified by wind action. Eolian erosion scoured to bedrock old ridges and uplands, including those that may be cratered terrains and the rims and outer-ring depressions of large impact basins, and removed all surficial deposits to the limits of resolution of the imagery. The complementary eolian deposits form not only dunes, wind streaks, and small plains, but also broad radar-dark plains, commonly assumed to be volcanic

  1. 'Lyell' Panorama inside Victoria Crater (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    During four months prior to the fourth anniversary of its landing on Mars, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity examined rocks inside an alcove called 'Duck Bay' in the western portion of Victoria Crater. The main body of the crater appears in the upper right of this stereo panorama, with the far side of the crater lying about 800 meters (half a mile) away. Bracketing that part of the view are two promontories on the crater's rim at either side of Duck Bay. They are 'Cape Verde,' about 6 meters (20 feet) tall, on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' about 15 meters (50 feet) tall, on the right. The rest of the image, other than sky and portions of the rover, is ground within Duck Bay.

    Opportunity's targets of study during the last quarter of 2007 were rock layers within a band exposed around the interior of the crater, about 6 meters (20 feet) from the rim. Bright rocks within the band are visible in the foreground of the panorama. The rover science team assigned informal names to three subdivisions of the band: 'Steno,' 'Smith,' and 'Lyell.'

    This view combines many images taken by Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) from the 1,332nd through 1,379th Martian days, or sols, of the mission (Oct. 23 to Dec. 11, 2007). Images taken through Pancam filters centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers, 535 nanometers and 432 nanometers were mixed to produce this view, which is presented in a false-color stretch to bring out subtle color differences in the scene. Some visible patterns in dark and light tones are the result of combining frames that were affected by dust on the front sapphire window of the rover's camera.

  2. IS THE LARGE CRATER ON THE ASTEROID (2867) STEINS REALLY AN IMPACT CRATER?

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, A. J. W.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    The large crater on the asteroid (2867) Steins attracted much attention when it was first observed by the Rosetta spacecraft in 2008. Initially, it was widely thought to be unusually large compared to the size of the asteroid. It was quickly realized that this was not the case and there are other examples of similar (or larger) craters on small bodies in the same size range; however, it is still widely accepted that it is a crater arising from an impact onto the body which occurred after its formation. The asteroid (2867) Steins also has an equatorial bulge, usually considered to have arisen from redistribution of mass due to spin-up of the body caused by the YORP effect. Conversely, it is shown here that, based on catastrophic disruption experiments in laboratory impact studies, a similarly shaped body to the asteroid Steins can arise from the break-up of a parent in a catastrophic disruption event; this includes the presence of a large crater-like feature and equatorial bulge. This suggests that the large crater-like feature on Steins may not be a crater from a subsequent impact, but may have arisen directly from the fragmentation process of a larger, catastrophically disrupted parent.

  3. Impact fragmentation of Lonar Crater, India: Implications for impact cratering processes in basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil Kumar, P.; Prasanna Lakshmi, K. J.; Krishna, N.; Menon, R.; Sruthi, U.; Keerthi, V.; Senthil Kumar, A.; Mysaiah, D.; Seshunarayana, T.; Sen, M. K.

    2014-09-01

    Impact fragmentation is an energetic process that has affected all planetary bodies. To understand its effects in basalt, we studied Lonar Crater, which is a rare terrestrial simple impact crater in basalt and analogues to kilometer-scale simple craters on Mars. The Lonar ejecta consists of basaltic fragments with sizes ranging from silt to boulder. The cumulative size and mass frequency distributions of these fragments show variation of power index for different size ranges, suggesting simple and complex fragmentation. The general shape of the fragments is compact, platy, bladed, and elongated with an average edge angle of 100°. The size distribution of cobble- to boulder-sized fragments is similar to the fracture spacing distribution in the upper crater wall, indicating the provenance of those large fragments. Its consistency with a theoretical spallation model suggests that the large fragments were ejected from near surface of the target, whereas the small fragments from deeper level. The petrophysical properties of the ejecta fragments reflect the geophysical heterogeneity in the target basalt that significantly reduced the original size of spall fragments. The presence of Fe/Mg phyllosilicates (smectites) both in the ejecta and wall indicates the role of impact in excavating the phyllosilicates from the interior of basaltic target affected by aqueous alteration. The seismic images reveal a thickness variation in the ejecta blanket, segregation of boulders, fractures, and faults in the bedrock beneath the crater rim. The fracturing, fragmentation, and fluvial degradation of Lonar Crater have important implications for Mars.

  4. The Origin of Lunar Crater Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawke, B. R.; Blewett, D. T.; Lucey, P. G.; Peterson, C. A.; Bell, J. F., III; Campbell, B. A.; Robinson, M. S.

    2000-10-01

    The nature and origin of lunar crater rays have long been the source of major controversy. Some lunar scientists have proposed that rays are dominated by primary crater ejecta, while others have emphasized the role of secondary cratering or even more exotic processes in producing rays. In an effort to better understand the processes responsible for the formation of rays, we have utilized a variety of remote sensing data to study selected rays associated with Olbers A, Lichtenberg, the Messier crater complex, and Tycho. These data include near-IR reflectance spectra, radar images, and FeO, TiO2, and maturity maps produced from Clementine UV-VIS images. Messier (14 km) and Messier A (11 km) are located in Mare Fecunditatis. Spectra were obtained for portions of the rays west and south of the crater complex, as well as for Messier A and nearby mature mare regions. The spectrum of Messier A exhibits an extremely deep ferrous iron absorption; a fresh mare composition is indicated. Near-IR spectra as well as the FeO, TiO2, and maturity maps indicate that the rays west and south of the Messier complex are also dominated by immature mare material. Lichtenberg is a Copernican-aged impact structure that displays a relatively high-albedo ray system to the north and northwest but is embayed by basalt in the south. The FeO map indicates that ejecta and rays exhibit low FeO abundances and are dominated by highlands debris. The maturity image demonstrates that these highlands-rich ejecta and rays are fully mature. Hence, the Lichtenberg rays exhibit a high albedo because of their composition. Remote sensing data suggest that the Tycho ray in Mare Nectaris is dominated by fresh mare material excavated and emplaced by Tycho secondaries.

  5. Comprehensive analysis of glaciated martian crater Greg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, William K.; Ansan, Veronique; Berman, Daniel C.; Mangold, Nicolas; Forget, François

    2014-01-01

    The 66-km diameter martian crater, Greg, east of Hellas, hosts various distinctive features, including dendritic valleys filled with chevron-textured masses (south wall), and lobate tongues a few kilometers long (north wall). We analyze these features by various quantitative techniques to illuminate martian geologic and climatic history. Crater retention model ages indicate that Greg is at least 1-3 Gy old, but surface layers of mantles and glacial features are orders of magnitude younger. Properties of the dendritic valleys, combined with climate models, suggest that fluvial activity began under a thicker, warmer atmosphere, soon after the crater's formation. The oldest exposed fluvial systems have surface crater retention ages of a few hundred My, indicating runoff in recent geologic time. Much of Greg is covered by ice-rich mantle deposits, for which we infer gradual accumulation and depths of order 30-85 m; they mask pre-existing landforms. The lobate tongues are interpreted as glaciers with mean slope of 10.2 ± 2.3° and average thickness of 33 ± 19 m. Our calculations and data suggest that these glaciers were originally ice-rich and that their surface layers have been depleted by volatile loss. The glaciers probably formed when ice-rich mantle deposits reached critical thickness and flowed downhill. The top 5-10 m of the mantle and glaciers show crater survival times of order a few My to ˜15 My, which, remarkably, is the time since the last 1-4 episodes of obliquity >45°. Global climate models affirm that Greg lies in one of two non-polar areas with extremes of ice deposition during high-obliquity epochs. This match with observations supports the use of such models in studies of planetary climate change.

  6. Cratering Studies in Thin Plastic Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Anthony; Bugiel, S.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Munsat, T.; Srama, R.; Colorado CenterLunar Dust; Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) Team

    2013-10-01

    Thin plastic films, such as Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF), have been used as protective coatings or dust detectors on a number of missions including the Dust Counter and Mass Analyzer (DUCMA) instrument on Vega 1 and 2, the High Rate Detector (HRD) on the Cassini Mission, and the Student Dust Counter (SDC) on New Horizons. These types of detectors can be used on the lunar surface or in lunar orbit to detect dust grain size distributions and velocities. Due to their low power requirements and light weight, large surface area detectors can be built for observing low dust fluxes. The SDC dust detector is made up of a permanently polarized layer of PVDF coated on both sides with a thin layer (≈ 1000 Å) of aluminum nickel. The operation principle is that a micrometeorite impact removes a portion of the metal surface layer exposing the permanently polarized PVDF underneath. This causes a local potential near the crater changing the surface charge of the metal layer. The dimensions of the crater determine the strength of the potential and thus the signal generated by the PVDF. The theoretical basis for signal interpretation uses a crater diameter scaling law which was not intended for use with PVDF. In this work, a crater size scaling law has been experimentally determined, and further simulation work is being done to enhance our understanding of the mechanisms of crater formation. Two Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) codes are being evaluated for use as a simulator for hypervelocity impacts: Ansys Autodyn and LS-Dyna from the Livermore Software Technology Corp. SPH is known to be well suited to the large deformities found in hypervelocity impacts. It is capable of incorporating key physics phenomena, including fracture, heat transfer, melting, etc. Furthermore, unlike Eulerian methods, SPH is gridless allowing large deformities without the inclusion of unphysical erosion algorithms. Experimental results and preliminary simulation results and conclusions will be

  7. The Wabar impact craters, Saudi Arabia, revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnos, E.; Hofmann, B. A.; Halawani, M. A.; Tarabulsi, Y.; Hakeem, M.; Al Shanti, M.; Greber, N. D.; Holm, S.; Alwmark, C.; Greenwood, R. C.; Ramseyer, K.

    2013-10-01

    The very young Wabar craters formed by impact of an iron meteorite and are known to the scientific community since 1933. We describe field observations made during a visit to the Wabar impact site, provide analytical data on the material collected, and combine these data with poorly known information discovered during the recovery of the largest meteorites. During our visit in March 2008, only two craters (Philby-B and 11 m) were visible; Philby-A was completely covered by sand. Mapping of the ejecta field showed that the outcrops are strongly changing over time. Combining information from different visitors with our own and satellite images, we estimate that the large seif dunes over the impact site migrate by approximately 1.0-2.0 m yr-1 southward. Shock lithification took place even at the smallest, 11 m crater, but planar fractures (PFs) and undecorated planar deformation features (PDFs), as well as coesite and stishovite, have only been found in shock-lithified material from the two larger craters. Shock-lithified dune sand material shows perfectly preserved sedimentary structures including cross-bedding and animal burrows as well as postimpact structures such as open fractures perpendicular to the bedding, slickensides, and radiating striation resembling shatter cones. The composition of all impact melt glasses can be explained as mixtures of aeolian sand and iron meteorite. We observed a partial decoupling of Fe and Ni in the black impact glass, probably due to partitioning of Ni into unoxidized metal droplets. The absence of a Ca-enriched component demonstrates that the craters did not penetrate the bedrock below the sand sheet, which has an estimated thickness of 20-30 m.

  8. On the scaling of crater dimensions. II - Impact processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holsapple, K. A.; Schmidt, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    Holsapple and Schmidt (1980) previously addressed the problem of the scaling of explosive cratering. Their analysis included results which show under which conditions the scaling can be bounded between quarter-root and cube-root rules. The present investigation is an extension of the earlier analysis and approaches the case of impact cratering. More restrictive bounds are found for impact cratering than for the explosive case. These stronger results come from considering the role of the impactor momentum as an independent variable for impact cratering. Attention is given to impact cratering variables, general scaling rules, the bounds on scaling rules, a generalization to more variables, and previous scaling rules and results.

  9. Ganymede and Callisto - Complex crater formation and planetary crusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, Paul M.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented on measurements of crater depths and other morphological parameters (such as central peak and terrace frequency) of fresh craters on Ganymede and Callisto, two geophysically very similar but geologically divergent large icy satellites of Jupiter. These data were used to investigate the crater mechanics on icy satellites and the intersatellite crater scaling and crustal properties. The morphological transition diameters of and complex crater depths on Ganymede and Callisto were found to be similar, indicating that the crusts of both satellites are dominated by water ice with only a minor rocky component.

  10. Exploration of Victoria crater by the mars rover opportunity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Squyres, S. W.; Knoll, A.H.; Arvidson, R. E.; Ashley, James W.; Bell, J.F., III; Calvin, W.M.; Christensen, P.R.; Clark, B. C.; Cohen, B. A.; De Souza, P.A., Jr.; Edgar, L.; Farrand, W. H.; Fleischer, I.; Gellert, Ralf; Golombek, M.P.; Grant, J.; Grotzinger, J.; Hayes, A.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Jolliff, B.; Klingelhofer, G.; Knudson, A.; Li, R.; McCoy, T.J.; McLennan, S.M.; Ming, D. W.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Morris, R.V.; Rice, J. W., Jr.; Schroder, C.; Sullivan, R.J.; Yen, A.; Yingst, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars rover Opportunity has explored Victoria crater, a ???750-meter eroded impact crater formed in sulfate-rich sedimentary rocks. Impact-related stratigraphy is preserved in the crater walls, and meteoritic debris is present near the crater rim. The size of hematite-rich concretions decreases up-section, documenting variation in the intensity of groundwater processes. Layering in the crater walls preserves evidence of ancient wind-blown dunes. Compositional variations with depth mimic those ???6 kilometers to the north and demonstrate that water-induced alteration at Meridiani Planum was regional in scope.

  11. Height-depth ratios of lunar and terrestrial craters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of Gilbert's (1893) observation regarding the surface geometry of lunar craters and terrestrial calderas. Topographic measurements were made using the ratio of exterior rim height to interior crater depth, and then extended to other types of crater. The morphometric data obtained as well as those presented elsewhere (Murray et al., 1970; Guest and Murray, 1969) verify Gilbert's contention that terrestrial calderas and most rimmed lunar craters are entirely unrelated phenomena. Auxiliary characteristics previously interpreted in terms of primary volcanic cratering on the moon are either of nonendogenic origin or are secondary endogenic features superposed on initial impact landforms (Pike, 1967).

  12. Formation of the central uplift in meteoric craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, B. A.; Bazilevskiy, A. T.; Sazonova, L. V.

    1986-01-01

    Data are presented on the sizes of impact craters with central uplifts on the earth, moon, and terrestrial planets. It is proposed that the central uplift of the Kara crater in the USSR was formed by impact metamorphism of rocks along a crater having a depth of about 600 meters. A theoretical analysis of the mechanics of hypervelocity impact cratering is used to investigate the features of shock-wave attenuation in the depths of the target and the amount of impact melt formed during this process. An attempt is made to determine the velocity of rock motion during the formation of central uplifts in terrestrial craters.

  13. Exploration of Victoria Crater by the Mars Rover Opportunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squyres, S. W.; Knoll, A. H.; Arvidson, R. E.; Ashley, J. W.; Bell, J. F.; Calvin, W. M.; Christensen, P. R.; Clark, B. C.; Cohen, B. A.; de Souza, P. A.; Edgar, L.; Farrand, W. H.; Fleischer, I.; Gellert, R.; Golombek, M. P.; Grant, J.; Grotzinger, J.; Hayes, A.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Jolliff, B.; Klingelhöfer, G.; Knudson, A.; Li, R.; McCoy, T. J.; McLennan, S. M.; Ming, D. W.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Rice, J. W.; Schröder, C.; Sullivan, R. J.; Yen, A.; Yingst, R. A.

    2009-05-01

    The Mars rover Opportunity has explored Victoria crater, a ~750-meter eroded impact crater formed in sulfate-rich sedimentary rocks. Impact-related stratigraphy is preserved in the crater walls, and meteoritic debris is present near the crater rim. The size of hematite-rich concretions decreases up-section, documenting variation in the intensity of groundwater processes. Layering in the crater walls preserves evidence of ancient wind-blown dunes. Compositional variations with depth mimic those ~6 kilometers to the north and demonstrate that water-induced alteration at Meridiani Planum was regional in scope.

  14. [13-Year old boy with abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Irene; Klinkhamer, Paul J J M; van de Poll, Marcel C G

    2012-01-01

    A 13-year old boy presents with pain in the lower right abdomen, showing clinical signs of appendicitis. During McBurney' incision an appendix sana was seen. Histologic examination showed penetrating enterobiasis. This was treated with mebendazol. PMID:22551758

  15. Cryptorchidism in boys with posterior urethral valves.

    PubMed

    Krueger, R P; Hardy, B E; Churchill, B M

    1980-07-01

    A review of 207 male children with poterior urethral valves revealed an over-all incidence of cryptorchidism of 12 per cent. This association of cryptorchidism in boys with posterior urethral valves has not been described previously. PMID:6106069

  16. Depression in Diagnostic Subtypes of Delinquent Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kashani, Javad H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Delinquent boys (18 percent of 120) were found to be depressed when DSM III criteria for Major Depressive Disorder were utilized. Results indicated the prevalence of depression was not significantly more frequent among socialized, undersocialized, aggressive or nonaggressive subtypes. (Author)

  17. On the Rim of 'Victoria Crater' (Vertical Projection)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mars rover Opportunity reached the rim of 'Victoria Crater' in Mars' Meridiani Planum region with a 26-meter (85-foot) drive during the rover's 951st Martian day, or sol (Sept. 26, 2006). After the drive, the rover's navigation camera took the three exposures combined into this view of the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

    A half mile in the distance one can see about 20 percent of the far side of the crater framed by the rocky cliffs in the foreground to the left and right of the image. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind.

    The position at the end of the sol 951 drive is about six meters from the lip of an alcove called 'Duck Bay.' The rover team planned a drive for sol 952 that would move a few more meters forward, plus more imaging of the near and far walls of the crater.

    Victoria Crater is about five times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than 'Eagle Crater,' where Opportunity first landed.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

  18. On the Rim of 'Victoria Crater' (Polar Projection)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Mars rover Opportunity reached the rim of 'Victoria Crater' in Mars' Meridiani Planum region with a 26-meter (85-foot) drive during the rover's 951st Martian day, or sol (Sept. 26, 2006). After the drive, the rover's navigation camera took the three exposures combined into this view of the crater's interior. This crater has been the mission's long-term destination for the past 21 Earth months.

    A half mile in the distance one can see about 20 percent of the far side of the crater framed by the rocky cliffs in the foreground to the left and right of the image. The rim of the crater is composed of alternating promontories, rocky points towering approximately 70 meters (230 feet) above the crater floor, and recessed alcoves. The bottom of the crater is covered by sand that has been shaped into ripples by the Martian wind.

    The position at the end of the sol 951 drive is about six meters from the lip of an alcove called 'Duck Bay.' The rover team planned a drive for sol 952 that would move a few more meters forward, plus more imaging of the near and far walls of the crater.

    Victoria Crater is about five times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' which Opportunity spent six months examining in 2004, and about 40 times wider than 'Eagle Crater,' where Opportunity first landed.

    This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction.

  19. Boys and Girls: Join the Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Allesandro, Lou; Wool, Michael; McKenzie, Mary Alice

    2012-01-01

    Boys & Girls Clubs of America count 4,000 community-based clubs serving more than 4 million young people through membership and community outreach. They provide a safe place to spend time during non-school hours and the summer as an alternative to the streets or being home alone--a place to play, have fun and learn. Boys & Girls Clubs began in New…

  20. Little Boy replication: justification and construction

    SciTech Connect

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    A reconstruction of the Little Boy weapon allowed experiments to evaluate yield, leakage measurements for comparison with calculations, and phenomenological measurements to evaluate various in-situ dosimeters. The reconstructed weapon was operated at sustained delayed critical at the Los Alamos Critical Assembly Facility. The present experiments provide a wealth of information to benchmark calculations and demonstrate that the 1965 measurements on the Ichiban assembly (a spherical mockup of Little Boy) were in error.