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Sample records for johnson creek idaho

  1. Status and Monitoring of Natural and Supplemented Chinook Salmon in Johnson Creek, Idaho, 2006-2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rabe, Craig D.; Nelson, Douglas D.

    2008-11-17

    The Nez Perce Tribe Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement Project (JCAPE) has conducted juvenile and adult monitoring and evaluation studies for its 10th consecutive year. Completion of adult and juvenile Chinook salmon studies were conducted for the purpose of evaluating a small-scale production initiative designed to increase the survival of a weak but recoverable spawning aggregate of summer Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. The JCAPE program evaluates the life cycle of natural origin (NOR) and hatchery origin (HOR) supplementation fish to quantify the key performance measures: abundance, survival-productivity, distribution, genetics, life history, habitat, and in-hatchery metrics. Operation of a picket style weir and intensive multiple spawning ground surveys were completed to monitor adult Chinook salmon and a rotary screw trap was used to monitor migrating juvenile Chinook salmon in Johnson Creek. In 2007, spawning ground surveys were conducted on all available spawning habitat in Johnson Creek and one of its tributaries. A total of 63 redds were observed in the index reach and 11 redds for all other reaches for a combined count of 74 redds. Utilization of carcass recovery surveys and adult captures at an adult picket weir yielded a total estimated adult escapement to Johnson Creek of 438 Chinook salmon. Upon deducting fish removed for broodstock (n=52), weir mortality/ known strays (n=12), and prespawning mortality (n=15), an estimated 359 summer Chinook salmon were available to spawn. Estimated total migration of brood year 2005 NOR juvenile Chinook salmon at the rotary screw trap was calculated for three seasons (summer, fall, and spring). The total estimated migration was 34,194 fish; 26,671 of the NOR migrants left in the summer (July 1 to August 31, 2005) as fry/parr, 5,852 left in the fall (September 1 to November 21, 2005) as presmolt, and only 1,671 NOR fish left in the spring (March 1 to June 30, 2006) as smolt. In addition, there

  2. Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation and Enhancement Project Operations and Maintenance Program; Brood Year 1998: Johnson Creek Chinook Salmon Supplementation, Biennial Report 1998-2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Mitch; Gebhards, John

    2003-05-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration, has implemented a small scale chinook salmon supplementation program on Johnson Creek, a tributary in the South Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement project was established to enhance the number of threatened Snake River summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to Johnson Creek through artificial propagation. Adult chinook salmon collection and spawning began in 1998. A total of 114 fish were collected from Johnson Creek and 54 fish (20 males and 34 females) were retained for Broodstock. All broodstock were transported to Lower Snake River Compensation Plan's South Fork Salmon River adult holding and spawning facility, operated by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. The remaining 60 fish were released to spawn naturally. An estimated 155,870 eggs from Johnson Creek chinook spawned at the South Fork Salmon River facility were transported to the McCall Fish Hatchery for rearing. Average fecundity for Johnson Creek females was 4,871. Approximately 20,500 eggs from females with high levels of Bacterial Kidney Disease were culled. This, combined with green-egg to eyed-egg survival of 62%, resulted in about 84,000 eyed eggs produced in 1998. Resulting juveniles were reared indoors at the McCall Fish Hatchery in 1999. All of these fish were marked with Coded Wire Tags and Visual Implant Elastomer tags and 8,043 were also PIT tagged. A total of 78,950 smolts were transported from the McCall Fish Hatchery and released directly into Johnson Creek on March 27, 28, 29, and 30, 2000.

  3. Brood Year 2004: Johnson Creek Chinook Salmon Supplementation Report, June 2004 through March 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Gebhards, John S.; Hill, Robert; Daniel, Mitch

    2009-02-19

    The Nez Perce Tribe, through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration, has implemented a small scale chinook salmon supplementation program on Johnson Creek, a tributary in the South Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement project was established to enhance the number of threatened Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to Johnson Creek to spawn through artificial propagation. This was the sixth season of adult chinook broodstock collection in Johnson Creek following collections in 1998, 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2003. Weir installation was completed on June 21, 2004 with the first chinook captured on June 22, 2004 and the last fish captured on September 6, 2004. The weir was removed on September 18, 2004. A total of 338 adult chinook, including jacks, were captured during the season. Of these, 211 were of natural origin, 111 were hatchery origin Johnson Creek supplementation fish, and 16 were adipose fin clipped fish from other hatchery operations and therefore strays into Johnson Creek. Over the course of the run, 57 natural origin Johnson Creek adult chinook were retained for broodstock, transported to the South Fork Salmon River adult holding and spawning facility and held until spawned. The remaining natural origin Johnson Creek fish along with all the Johnson Creek supplementation fish were released upstream of the weir to spawn naturally. Twenty-seven Johnson Creek females were artificially spawned with 25 Johnson Creek males. Four females were diagnosed with high bacterial kidney disease levels resulting in their eggs being culled. The 27 females produced 116,598 green eggs, 16,531 green eggs were culled, with an average eye-up rate of 90.6% resulting in 90,647 eyed eggs. Juvenile fish were reared indoors at the McCall Fish Hatchery until November 2005 and then transferred to the outdoor rearing facilities during the Visual Implant Elastomer tagging operation

  4. Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation and Enhancement Project Operations and Maintenance Program; Brood Year 2000: Johnson Creek Chinook Salmon Supplementation, Biennial Report 2000-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Mitch; Gebhards, John; Hill, Robert

    2003-05-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration, has implemented a small scale chinook salmon supplementation program on Johnson Creek, a tributary in the South Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement project was established to enhance the number of threatened Snake River summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to Johnson Creek through artificial propagation. Adult chinook salmon trapping, broodstock selection, and spawning was first implemented in 1998, did not occur in 1999, and was resumed in 2000. A total of 152 salmon were trapped in Johnson Creek in 2000, of which 73 (25 males, 16 females, and 32 jacks) fish were transported to Idaho Fish and Game=s South Fork Salmon River adult holding and spawning facility for artificial propagation purposes. The remaining 79 (29 males, 16 females, and 24 jacks) fish were released above the weir to spawn naturally. A total of 65,060 green eggs were taken from 16 female salmon and transported to the McCall Fish Hatchery for incubation and rearing. Egg counts indicated an average eye-up rate of 86.0% for 55,971 eyed eggs. Average fecundity for Johnson Creek females was 4,066 eggs per female. Juvenile fish were reared indoors at the McCall Fish Hatchery through November 2001. These fish were transferred to outdoor rearing facilities in December 2001 where they remained until release in March 2002. All of these fish were marked with Coded Wire Tags and Visual Implant Elastomer tags. In addition 9,987 were also PIT tagged. Hand counts provided by marking crews were used to amend the number of juvenile salmon released from the original egg count. A total of 57,392 smolts were released into a temporary acclimation channel in Johnson Creek on March 18, 19, 20, 2002. These fish were held in this facility until a fish screen was removed on March 22, 2002 and the fish were allowed to emigrate.

  5. Panther Creek, Idaho, Habitat Rehabilitation, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Dudley W.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to achieve full chinook salmon and steelhead trout production in the Panther Creek, Idaho, basin. Plans were developed to eliminate the sources of toxic effluent entering Panther Creek. Operation of a cobalt-copper mine since the 1930's has resulted in acid, metal-bearing drainage entering the watershed from underground workings and tailings piles. The report discusses plans for eliminating and/or treating the effluent to rehabilitate the water quality of Panther Creek and allow the reestablishment of salmon and trout spawning runs. (ACR)

  6. CAMAS CREEK STUDY, CAMAS COUNTY, IDAHO. 1979

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Eutrophication Survey on Magic Reservoir determined that Camas Creek in Camas County, Idaho (17040220) contributed roughly 45% of the total phosphorus load and 34% of the total nitrogen load into Magic Reservoir. From this finding, a water quality study was conducte...

  7. OROFINO CREEK STUDY, CLEARWATER COUNTY IDAHO, 1979

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Water Year 1979, a water quality study was conducted on Orofino Creek in Clearwater County, Idaho (17060306) to determine the present condition of the stream and to assess the impact of point and nonpoint sources. The study involved approximately bi-monthly monitoring for the...

  8. BILLINGSLEY CREEK, GOODING COUNTY, IDAHO. WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, 1984

    EPA Science Inventory

    Billingsley Creek in Gooding County, Idaho (17040212) has been identified as a stream where fish farm discharges and other land use practices are degrading water quality. The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, Division of Environment sampled Billingsley Creek to assess in-s...

  9. MIDDLE POTLATCH CREEK, LATAH COUNTY, IDAHO - PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION REPORT, 1993

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1992 Idaho Water Quality Status Report listed the Middle Potlatch Creek (17060306) as an Idaho Impaired Stream Segment Requiring Further Assessment and listed the creek as a water body not fully supporting at least one beneficial use. This preliminary resource assessment foc...

  10. Effects of wastewater effluent discharge on stream quality in Indian Creek, Johnson County, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, Jennifer L.; Foster, Guy M.

    2014-01-01

    Contaminants from point and other urban sources affect stream quality in Indian Creek, which is one of the most urban drainage basins in Johnson County, Kansas. The Johnson County Douglas L. Smith Middle Basin and Tomahawk Creek Wastewater Treatment Facilities discharge to Indian Creek. Data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Johnson County Wastewater, during June 2004 through June 2013 were used to evaluate stream quality in Indian Creek. This fact sheet summarizes the effects of wastewater effluent discharge on physical, chemical, and biological conditions in Indian Creek downstream from the Douglas L. Smith Middle Basin and Tomahawk Creek Wastewater Treatment Facilities.

  11. LIGHTNING CREEK, PACK RIVER, AND SAND CREEK, BONNER COUNTY, IDAHO - WATER QUALITY SUMMARY, 1978

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Water Year 1978, water quality studies were conducted on Lightning Creek, Pack River, and Sand Creek in Bonner County, Idaho (17010214, 17010213) to determine the present status of the streams. Water quality in Lightning Creek was generally very high. No violations of standa...

  12. DEEP CREEK AND MUD CREEK, TWIN FALLS, IDAHO. WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, 1986

    EPA Science Inventory

    Deep Creek and Mud Creek are located in Twin Falls County near Buhl, Idaho (17040212). From April through October, these creeks convey irrigation drainage water from the western part of the Twin Falls irrigation tract to the Snake River. During 1986, water quality surveys were ...

  13. DRY CREEK, IDAHO WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, 1976-1977

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water quality samples were collected monthly at one station in Water Year 1977 to determine the water quality status of Dry Creek in Twin Falls and Cassia Counties, Idaho (17040212). The stream was sampled near the mouth upstream from Murtaugh Lake. The section of Dry Creek abo...

  14. ROCK CREEK, IDAHO WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, 1970-1984

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study was designed to determine the characteristics and amounts of industrial and municipal wastes discharged to Rock Creek, Idaho (17040212) and subsequently into the Snake River and to evaluate the effects of these wastes on the biota and water quality of Rock Creek. Indus...

  15. DEEP CREEK, LATAH COUNTY, IDAHO - WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, 1988

    EPA Science Inventory

    Deep Creek, Idaho (17060108) had been identified as a first priority stream segment in the Nonpoint Source Pollution Abatement program. Current designated uses for Deep Creek are as a domestic and agricultural water supply, primary and secondary contact recreation, as well as co...

  16. RILEY CREEK, IDAHO WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, 1975-1976

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents a review of Riley Creek, Idaho (17040212) water quality data collected from September 1975 through September 1976. The creek meets all water quality standards except for total and fecal coliform bacteria. Sources of coliform bacteria include fish hatcheries,...

  17. WILLOW CREEK IDAHO, WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, 1980

    EPA Science Inventory

    Willow Creek, Idaho (17040201) was identified in the Idaho Agricultural Abatement Plant (1979) as having severe pollution due to dryland farming erosion. A water quality survey began in April 1980 to provide some baseline information on the watershed. Nearly 45 tons of sediment...

  18. Assessment of surface-water quality and water-quality control alternatives, Johnson Creek Basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, T.K.

    1994-01-01

    Johnson Creek flows through a basin of approximately 51 square miles with mixed land uses over a reach of approximately 24 river miles from southeast of Gresham, Oregon, to its confluence with the Willamette River in Milwaukie, Oregon. Land uses within the basin include forested and agricultural lands, suburban residential, urban, and light industrial. Surface runoff and ground-water flow from the basin's areas of various land-use contain concentrations of some nutrients, trace elements, and organic compounds at levels exceeding U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) criteria. Concentrations of dissolved cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and silver, total recoverable chlordane, dieldrin, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) plus metabolites indicate that sources of at least one or more of these constituents exist in virtually every reach of Johnson Creek. Crystal Springs Creek is a major source of nutrients in lower Johnson Creek. Concentrations of dissolved nitrate and orthophosphorus in Johnson Creek are elevated at low flow, and are reduced by dilution when urban runoff flows into the creek during storms. Total-phosphorus concentrations exceed USEPA criteria at several sites in Johnson Creek during low flow, and at all sites during periods of storm runoff. The low-flow concentration of dissolved silver exceeded the USEPA Fresh Water Chronic Toxicity (FWCT) criterion only in Crystal Springs Creek. Concentrations of dissolved cadmium, copper, lead, and mercury exceeded FWCT criteria at selected sites in Johnson creek basin during storm runoff.

  19. Flood-inundation maps for Indian Creek and Tomahawk Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Arin J.; Studley, Seth E.

    2015-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.4-mile upper reach of Indian Creek from College Boulevard to the confluence with Tomahawk Creek, a 3.9-mile reach of Tomahawk Creek from 127th Street to the confluence with Indian Creek, and a 1.9-mile lower reach of Indian Creek from the confluence with Tomahawk Creek to just beyond the Kansas/Missouri border at State Line Road in Johnson County, Kansas, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the city of Overland Park, Kansas. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the U.S. Geological Survey Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgages on Indian Creek at Overland Park, Kansas; Indian Creek at State Line Road, Leawood, Kansas; and Tomahawk Creek near Overland Park, Kansas. Near real time stages at these streamgages may be obtained on the Web from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis or the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at these sites.Flood profiles were computed for the stream reaches by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated for each reach by using the most current stage-discharge relations at the streamgages. The hydraulic models were then used to determine 15 water-surface profiles for Indian Creek at Overland Park, Kansas; 17 water-surface profiles for Indian Creek at State Line Road, Leawood, Kansas; and 14 water-surface profiles for Tomahawk Creek near Overland Park, Kansas, for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the next interval above the 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability flood level (500-year recurrence interval). The

  20. 78 FR 12714 - Intermountain Region, Payette National Forest, New Meadows Ranger District, Idaho; Lost Creek...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... District, Idaho; Lost Creek-Boulder Creek Landscape Restoration Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... Creek-Boulder Creek Landscape Restoration Project. The Lost Creek- Boulder Creek Landscape Restoration... converted to ATV trails; restoration of 90 miles of unauthorized roads; and relocation of 1\\ 1/2\\ half...

  1. Indian Education; State of Idaho Johnson-O'Malley Program. Annual Report, 1970-1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Max

    The 1970-71 report to the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) contains information relative to the contract of the State of Idaho with the United States Government for Johnson-O'Malley (JOM) funds to educate American Indians in Idaho. The methods of financing are given, and the State Foundation Program is described. JOM funds and the Indian Education…

  2. LAPWAI CREEK STUDY, LEWIS AND NEZ PERCE COUNTIES, IDAHO. 1979

    EPA Science Inventory

    During Water Year 1979, a water quality study was conducted on the Lapwai Creek in Nez Perce and Lewis Counties, Idaho (17060306) to obtain background information on nonpoint source pollution impacts and for effluent limitation development. The study involved approximately bi-mo...

  3. LAKE CREEK, KOOTENAI COUNTY, IDAHO - WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, 1989

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lake Creek watershed (17010303) drains 5,722 acres of primarily woodland in Washington with 19,134 acres in Idaho devoted to agriculture. Watershed efficiency combined with deep, highly erodible soils produce severe soil erosion potential. A trend in increasing sediment loa...

  4. JIM FORD CREEK STUDY, CLEARWATER COUNTY IDAHO. 1979

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Water Year 1979, a water quality study was conducted on Jim Ford Creek in Clearwater County, Idaho (17060306) to assess the impact of the City of Weippe and Timberline High School discharges, to assess nonpoint source impacts, and to determine the present water quality of the ...

  5. WARM SPRINGS CREEK GEOTHERMAL STUDY, BLAIN COUNTY IDAHO, 1987

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the Warm Springs Creek drainage near Ketchum, Idaho (17040219), a leaking pipeline coveys geothermal water through the valley to heat nearby homes as well as to supply a resorts swimming pool. Several domestic wells in close proximity to this line have exhibited increasing fl...

  6. WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, STOCKNEY CREEK, IDAHO COUNTY, IDAHO. 1986

    EPA Science Inventory

    A water quality monitoring study was conducted on Stockney Creek (17060305) for the following purposes: 1) to determine baseline water quality; 2) to document water quality effects of spring and storm agricultural runoff; and 3) to determine whether implementation of Best Manage...

  7. ROCK CREEK, IDAHO RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM TEN YEAR REPORT. 1981-1991

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prior to this program, water quality of Rock Creek, Idaho (170040212) was severely impacted by irrigated agriculture. Impairments included phosphate, organic nitrogen, suspended solids, turbidity, bacteria, and toxic chemicals. The uses of Rock Creek for recreation, drinking wa...

  8. Indian Education; State of Idaho Johnson-O'Malley Program. Annual Report, 1972-73.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise.

    The State of Idaho submitted this 1972-73 annual report to the Bureau of Indian Affairs in compliance with Federal regulations governing Johnson-O'Malley (JOM) funding. There has been a drastic decrease in the use of JOM funds for basic school support due to P.L. 874 and local funds provided for Indian education. District administrators, working…

  9. Indian Education; State of Idaho Johnson-O'Malley Program. Annual Report, 1971-1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Max

    In compliance with Federal regulations, the State of Idaho submitted this 1971-72 annual report to the Bureau of Indian Affairs regarding their educational funds under the Johnson-O'Malley (JOM) program. Support for the education of public school students is provided by the State Foundation Program. JOM funds and the Indian Education Program…

  10. Valuing water quality in urban watersheds: A comparative analysis of Johnson Creek, Oregon, and Burnt Bridge Creek, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netusil, Noelwah R.; Kincaid, Michael; Chang, Heejun

    2014-05-01

    This study uses the hedonic price method to investigate the effect of five water quality parameters on the sale price of single-family residential properties in two urbanized watersheds in the Portland, Oregon-Vancouver, Washington metropolitan area. Water quality parameters include E. coli or fecal coliform, which can affect human health, decrease water clarity and generate foul odors; pH, dissolved oxygen, and stream temperature, which can impact fish and wildlife populations; and total suspended solids, which can affect water clarity, aquatic life, and aesthetics. Properties within ¼ mile, ½, mile, one mile, or more than one mile from Johnson Creek are estimated to experience an increase in sale price of 13.71%, 7.05%, 8.18%, and 3.12%, respectively, from a one mg/L increase in dissolved oxygen levels during the dry season (May-October). Estimates for a 100 count per 100 mL increase in E. coli during the dry season are -2.81% for properties within ¼ mile of Johnson Creek, -0.86% (½ mile), -1.19% (one mile), and -0.71% (greater than one mile). Results for properties in Burnt Bridge Creek include a significantly positive effect for a one mg/L increase in dissolved oxygen levels during the dry season for properties within ½ mile (4.49%), one mile (2.95%), or greater than one mile from the creek (3.17%). Results for other water quality parameters in Burnt Bridge Creek are generally consistent with a priori expectations. Restoration efforts underway in both study areas might be cost justified based on their estimated effect on property sale prices.

  11. Bear Valley Creek, Idaho Mining Enhancement: Fifteen Years Later

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, H. L.; Bacon, K. L.; Wadsworth, P. R.

    2005-05-01

    In 1988-89 an enhancement effort was initiated by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and Bonneville Power Administration in a mined section of Bear Valley Creek, Idaho. Monitoring and evaluation conducted between 1984 and 2004 above, within, and below the enhancement area included; changes in densities of non-anadromous salmonids, natural production of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, recovery of the macroinvertebrates, changes in surface and benthic sediment, and visual vegetation progression. Mean densities of non-anadromous salmonids in pools showed a significant increase from pre to post enhancement within and below the enhancement area. Chinook salmon parr numbers were significantly related to the number of redds the previous year. Preliminary results indicate that the macroinvertebrate community within the enhancement area may be recovering. Percent surface fine sediment decreased significantly from pre to post enhancement within and below the enhancement area. Trends in cumulative percent benthic fine sediment were similar above within and below the enhancement area indicating no new additional incorporation of fine sediment to the benthos. Photo point monitoring in 1989 and 2004 shows progression of vegetation development within the enhancement area with good cover achieved. Long term monitoring of Bear Valley Creek indicates recovery from the mining impact and successful enhancement effort.

  12. Atmospheric Mercury near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir in Southern Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Abbott; Jeffrey J. Einerson

    2007-12-01

    Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) were measured over two-week seasonal field campaigns near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir in south-central Idaho from the summer of 2005 through the fall of 2006 and over the entire summer of 2006 using automated Tekran mercury analyzers. GEM, RGM, and particulate mercury (HgP) were also measured at a secondary site 90 km to the west in southwestern Idaho during the summer of 2006. The study was performed to characterize mercury air concentrations in the southern Idaho area for the first time, estimate mercury dry deposition rates, and investigate the source of observed elevated concentrations. High seasonal variability was observed with the highest GEM (1.91 ± 0.9 ng m-3) and RGM (8.1 ± 5.6 pg m-3) concentrations occurring in the summer and lower values in the winter (1.32 ± 0.3 ng m-3, 3.2 ± 2.9 pg m-3 for GEM, RGM respectively). The summer-average HgP concentrations were generally below detection limit (0.6 ± 1 pg m-3). Seasonally-averaged deposition velocities calculated using a resistance model were 0.034 ± 0.032, 0.043 ± 0.040, 0.00084 ± 0.0017 and 0.00036 ± 0.0011 cm s-1 for GEM (spring, summer, fall, and winter, respectively) and 0.50 ± 0.39, 0.40 ± 0.31, 0.51 ± 0.43 and 0.76 ± 0.57 cm s-1 for RGM. The total annual RGM + GEM dry deposition estimate was calculated to be 11.9 ± 3.3 µg m-2, or about 2/3 of the total (wet + dry) deposition estimate for the area. Periodic elevated short-term GEM (2.2 – 12 ng m-3) and RGM (50 - 150 pg m-3) events were observed primarily during the warm seasons. Back-trajectory modeling and PSCF analysis indicated predominant source directions from the southeast (western Utah, northeastern Nevada) through the southwest (north-central Nevada) with fewer inputs from the northwest (southeastern Oregon and southwestern Idaho).

  13. WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, INDIAN CREEK (CANYON COUNTY), IDAHO 1976-1977

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Indian Creek drainage (17050114) is located in the Boise River Basin of Southwest Idaho. This study was concerned with the portion of Indian Creek near the Nampa and Caldwell urban areas. Major land uses in the area are associated with urban development and irrigated agricu...

  14. ROCK CREEK, IDAHO RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM, 1987 ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Goals of the Rock Creek, Idaho (17040212) Rural Clean Water Program are to significantly reduce the amount of sediment, sediment related pollutants, and animal waste discharging into Rock Creek. Weekly water quality sampling was done through the irrigation season (April - Octobe...

  15. ROCK CREEK, IDAHO RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM COMPREHENSIVE WATER QUALITY MONITORING ANNUAL REPORT 1989

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents progress on for the Rock Creek Rural Clean Water Program, Twin Falls County, Idaho (17040212), initiated in 1981. Results through 1988 suggest that Best Management Practices (BMPs) implemented under the program have improved water quality in the creek. BMP...

  16. Suspended-sediment characteristics for the Johnson Creek basin, Oregon, water years 2007-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stonewall, Adam J.; Bragg, Heather M.

    2012-01-01

    Significant Findings An analysis of suspended-sediment transport in the Johnson Creek basin, Oregon, during water years 2007–10 indicated that: Streamflow characteristics for the 4 years of study were not extremely dry or wet, and represented near-average conditions. Computed average annual suspended-sediment loads were 1,890 and 4,640 tons at the Gresham and Milwaukie stations, respectively. More than 70 percent of suspended-sediment transport in the watershed occurred during the high-flow months of November, December, and January. Less than 10 percent of suspended-sediment transport in the watershed occurred during April–October. About 50 percent of all suspended-sediment load is transported during the highest 1 percent of streamflows. The January 2009 streamflow peak was the third highest in the 70-year record for Johnson Creek. About 50 percent of suspended-sediment transport in water year 2009 occurred in January. The drainage area upstream of the Gresham streamflow-gaging station constitutes about 30 percent of the drainage area at the Milwaukie station, but accounted for about 40 percent of the suspended sediment and 45 percent of the streamflow at the Milwaukie station. On an annual basis, most of the higher sediment yield at the Gresham station, relative to the Milwaukie station, can be explained by the higher streamflow yield at the Gresham station rather than by higher suspended-sediment concentration.

  17. WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, VINYARD CREEK, JEROME COUNTY, IDAHO. 1986

    EPA Science Inventory

    During 1986, a survey was done on Vinyard Creek (17040212) to assess water quality conditions and beneficial use impairment due to agricultural pollutants. During the 1986 irrigation season, Vinyard Creek transported an estimated 780 tons of sediment to the Snake River. Most of...

  18. ROCK CREEK, POWER COUNTY, IDAHO. WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, 1977-1979

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey was conducted on Rock Creek, Power County, Idaho (17040209) to assess the levels of transported sediment, various chemical and physical parameters, and macroinvertebrate fauna during base and peak flow periods. The survey was initiated in October 1977 and sampling was c...

  19. WEST FORK OF LITTLE BEAR CREEK, LATAH COUNTY, IDAHO - WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, 1985

    EPA Science Inventory

    The intent of this study was to determine if designated current and future uses of Little Bear Creek, Idaho (17060306) are appropriate. At the Troy wastewater facility, BOD, coliform, and flow limitations have been frequently violated. Restrictions on suspended solids were narr...

  20. CANYON CREEK, MADISON AND TETON COUNTIES, IDAHO WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT 1987

    EPA Science Inventory

    Canyon Creek, Idaho (17040204) was identified in the Agricultural Pollution Abatement Plans as a second priority stream segment for the reduction of agriculture related pollutants. A water quality study was conducted as a part of the planning process from November 26, 1986 to Ju...

  1. ANTELOPE-PINE CREEK AREA, IDAHO - WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT. 1988-1989

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Antelope-Pine Creek study area consists of the drainage which flows into the portion of the South Fork, Snake River between Heise and the Palisades Dam, Idaho (17040104). The South Fork of the Snake River was identified in the Agricultural Nonpoint Pollution Abatement Plan a...

  2. LITTLE POTLATCH CREEK, LATAH COUNTY, IDAHO - WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, 1979

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little Potlatch Creek (17060306) is a second order tributary to the Potlatch River in north-central Idaho. Beneficial uses were identified as agricultural water supply, contact recreation, anadromous fish habitat, and cold water biota. This study sampled 5 sites during the spri...

  3. LAPWAI/MISSION CREEK, LEWIS COUNTY, IDAHO - WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, 1986

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lapwai Creek, Idaho (17060306) was identified in the Agricultural Nonpoint Source Pollution Abatement Program as a first priority stream segment for reduction of agriculture related pollutants. A water quality study was conducted on the Mission/Lapwai drainage from February 25, ...

  4. BEDROCK CREEK, NEZ PERCE AND CLEARWATER COUNTIES, IDAHO - WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, 1985

    EPA Science Inventory

    A water quality monitoring study was conducted on Bedrock Creek (17060306), a third order tributary to the Clearwater River in north-central Idaho. Objectives of the study were to assess water quality of the stream and its major tributary; to document the effects of storm runoff...

  5. BIG CANYON CREEK, CLEARWATER, LEWIS, AND NEZ PERCE COUNTIES, IDAHO - WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, 1988

    EPA Science Inventory

    A water quality study of Big Canyon Creek, Idaho (17060306) was conducted from February 3, 1987 to February 23, 1988. Objectives of the study were to determine water quality in various reaches and subwatersheds and to document the effects of snowmelt and storm event runoff on w...

  6. BIG CANYON CREEK STUDY, LEWIS AND NEZ PERCE COUNTIES, IDAHO, 1979

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the 1979 water year, a water quality study was completed on Big Canyon Creek in Lewis and Nez Perce Counties, Idaho (17060306). The study was conducted to obtain background information for development of effluent limitations for the Cities of Peck and Nezperce and to determin...

  7. 75 FR 31418 - Intermountain Region, Payette National Forest, Council Ranger District; Idaho; Mill Creek-Council...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    ...--Council Mountain Landscape Restoration Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to... Landscape Restoration Project. The approximate 51,900 acre project area is located about two miles east of Council, Idaho. The Mill Creek--Council Mountain Landscape Restoration Project proposes to...

  8. MICA CREEK, FISH CREEK, AND FREEMAN LAKE, IDAHO. STREAM AND LAKE NUTRIENT LOADING FROM BURNED LOGGING SLASH, BONNER AND KOOTENAI COUNTIES. 1989-1990

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three monitoring sites in Bonner and Kootenai Counties, Idaho (17010304) were chosen to give some insight into the question of nutrient contribution from logging slash. The sites were a Class II tributary to Mica Creek, a Class I tributary to Fish Creek, and a wet draw that flow...

  9. Uranium-bearing coal and carbonaceous rocks in the Fall Creek area, Bonneville County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vine, James D.; Moore, George Winfred

    1952-01-01

    Uraniferous coal, carbonaceous shale, and carbonaceous limestone occur in the Bear River formation of Early Cretaceous age at the Fall Creek prospect, in the Fall Creek area, Bonneville County, Idaho. The uranium compounds are believed to have been derived from mildly radioactive silicic volcanic rocks of Tertiary age that rest unconformably on all older rocks and once overlay the Bear River formation and its coal. Meteoric water, percolating downward through the silicic volcanic rocks and into the older rocks along joints and faults, is believed to have brought the uranium compounds into contact with the coal and carbonaceous rocks in which the uranium was absorbed.

  10. Geomorphic Function and Restoration Potential of Spring Creeks in Southeastern Idaho: Analysis and Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanrahan, T. P.; Hill, Z.; Levell, A.; Maguire, T.; Risso, D.

    2014-12-01

    A large wetland and floodplain complex adjacent to the Snake River in southeastern Idaho, USA, encompasses numerous spring-fed creeks that originate on the floodplain and discharge at their confluence with the Snake River and American Falls Reservoir. Resource managers are implementing a program to restore these spring creeks for the recovery of Yellowstone cutthroat trout and ecosystem health. Our objectives were to evaluate the physical characteristics of these spring creeks, develop a conceptual model of their geomorphic function, compare the restoration potential of individual reaches, and communicate our findings to a broad audience of resource managers and regional stakeholders in order to foster restoration planning. A geomorphic assessment along 38 km of three spring creeks was completed by collecting data at several transects within distinct geomorphic reaches, and by collecting data continuously throughout all reaches. These data were summarized in a GIS database and used to quantify the overall geomorphic functioning of each reach. The geomorphic functional scores were scaled from 0% (non-functional) to 100% (fully functional). Among all three spring creeks, geomorphic function ranged from 29% to 63%, with bank conditions and riparian vegetation being the primary causes of overall channel degradation. Results from the geomorphic assessment fostered the development of a conceptual model for spring creek function, whereby degraded bank conditions represent the primary controlling factor of decreased geomorphic function and fish habitat quality. The reach-based geomorphic functional scoring provides an indicator of relative restoration potential for each reach, and is one of the factors used in determining site-specific priorities for protecting, enhancing, and restoring spring creeks on the Fort Hall Bottoms. The study results, conceptual model and restoration strategy were communicated to resource managers and regional stakeholders through a graphically

  11. Analytical results and sample locality maps of stream-sediment, heavy-mineral-concentrate, and rock samples from the Little Jacks Creek (ID-111-006), Big Jacks Creek (ID-111-007C), Duncan Creek (ID-111-0007B), and Upper Deep Creek (ID-111-044) Wilderness Study Areas, Owyhee County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, M.S.; Gent, C.A.; Bradley, L.A.; King, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    A U.S. Geological Survey report detailing the analytical results and sample locality maps of stream-sediment, heavy-mineral-concentrate, and rock samples from the Little Jacks Creek, Big Jacks Creek, Duncan Creek, and Upper Deep Creek Wilderness Study Areas, Owyhee County, Idaho

  12. Diel fluctuations in summer discharge at 2 sets of nested watersheds: Dry and Reynolds Creek, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, C. B.; McNamara, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    Diel fluctuations in summer streamflow have been observed in small and medium size catchments for nearly 100 years. The observed fluctuations are thought to be driven by evapotranspiration in the riparian area and adjacent hillslopes. Key characteristics of these diel signals are decreasing amplitude throughout the summer, accompanied by an increasing lag between the time of minimum streamflow and the peak evapotranspiration demand. Competing hypotheses have been presented to explain the evolution of the amplitude and lag, including variations in stream velocity, water stress induced decreases in ET, and gradual disconnection of signal areas with the stream zone. These competing hypotheses suggest greatly different mechanisms for hydrological connection of vegetation in hillslopes with riparian and stream areas. Using data from the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System, we examine summer recessions in streamflow from a series of nested catchments at two, distinct research watersheds in semiarid Southern Idaho: Dry Creek and Reynolds Creek. Analyzed catchments range from less than 1 km2 to over 50 km2. Both the Dry Creek and Reynolds Creek watersheds have long data records, allowing for analysis of patterns of diel fluctuations of up to 50 years of record. We show that the rate of amplitude decline and lag increase vary from year to year, and with catchment scale. We propose a new perceptual model of the controls of diel recession fluctuations for these two distinct

  13. Salmon Supplementation Studies in Idaho Rivers; Field Activities Conducted on Clear and Pete King Creeks, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bretz, Justin K.; Olson, Jill M.

    2003-03-01

    In 2002 the Idaho Fisheries Resource Office continued working as a cooperator on the Salmon Supplementation Studies in Idaho Rivers (ISS) project on Pete King and Clear creeks. Data relating to supplementation treatment releases, juvenile sampling, juvenile PIT tagging, broodstock spawning and rearing, spawning ground surveys, and snorkel surveys were used to evaluate the project data points and augment past data. Supplementation treatments included the release of 51,329 left ventral-clipped smolts into Clear Creek (750 were PIT tagged), and 12,000 unmarked coded-wire tagged parr into Pete King Creek (998 were PIT tagged). Using juvenile collection methods, Idaho Fisheries Resource Office staff PIT tagged and released 579 naturally produced spring chinook juveniles in Clear Creek, and 54 on Pete King Creek, for minimum survival estimates to Lower Granite Dam. For Clear Creek, minimum survival estimates to Lower Granite Dam of hatchery produced supplementation and naturally produced PIT tagged smolts, were 36.0%, and 53.1%, respectively. For Pete King Creek, minimum survival estimates to Lower Granite Dam, of hatchery produced supplementation smolts and naturally produced smolts PIT tagged as parr and presmolts, were 18.8%, and 8.3%, respectively. Adults collected for broodstock in 2002 represented the final adult broodstock group collected for the ISS project. Twenty-six ventral clipped, and 28 natural adult spring chinook were transported above the weir. Monitoring and evaluation of spawning success was continued on Clear and Pete King creeks. A total of 69 redds were counted and 79 carcasses were recovered on Clear Creek. Two redds were observed and no carcasses were collected on Pete King Creek.

  14. Simulation of water-surface elevations for a hypothetical 100-year peak flow in Birch Creek at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Berenbrock, C.; Kjelstrom, L.C.

    1997-10-01

    Delineation of areas at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory that would be inundated by a 100-year peak flow in Birch Creek is needed by the US Department of Energy to fulfill flood-plain regulatory requirements. Birch Creek flows southward about 40 miles through an alluvium-filled valley onto the northern part of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental laboratory site on the eastern Snake River Plain. The lower 10-mile reach of Birch Creek that ends in Birch Creek Playa near several Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory facilities is of particular concern. Twenty-six channel cross sections were surveyed to develop and apply a hydraulic model to simulate water-surface elevations for a hypothetical 100-year peak flow in Birch Creek. Model simulation of the 100-year peak flow (700 cubic feet per second) in reaches upstream from State Highway 22 indicated that flow was confined within channels even when all flow was routed to one channel. Where the highway crosses Birch Creek, about 315 cubic feet per second of water was estimated to move downstream--115 cubic feet per second through a culvert and 200 cubic feet per second over the highway. Simulated water-surface elevation at this crossing was 0.8 foot higher than the elevation of the highway. The remaining 385 cubic feet per second flowed southwestward in a trench along the north side of the highway. Flow also was simulated with the culvert removed. The exact location of flood boundaries on Birch Creek could not be determined because of the highly braided channel and the many anthropogenic features (such as the trench, highway, and diversion channels) in the study area that affect flood hydraulics and flow. Because flood boundaries could not be located exactly, only a generalized flood-prone map was developed.

  15. Salmon Supplementation Studies in Idaho Rivers; Field Activities Conducted on Clear and Pete King Creeks, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Gass, Carrie; Olson, Jim M.

    2004-11-01

    In 2001 the Idaho Fisheries Resource Office continued as a cooperator on the Salmon Supplementation Studies in Idaho Rivers (ISS) project on Pete King and Clear creeks. Data relating to supplementation treatment releases, juvenile sampling, juvenile PIT tagging, brood stock spawning and rearing, spawning ground surveys, and snorkel surveys were used to evaluate project data points and augment past data. Due to low adult spring Chinook returns to Kooskia National Fish Hatchery (KNFH) in brood year 1999 there was no smolt supplementation treatment release into Clear Creek in 2001. A 17,014 spring Chinook parr supplementation treatment (containing 1000 PIT tags) was released into Pete King Creek on July 24, 2001. On Clear Creek, there were 412 naturally produced spring Chinook parr PIT tagged and released. Using juvenile collection methods, Idaho Fisheries Resource Office staff PIT tagged and released 320 naturally produced spring Chinook pre-smolts on Clear Creek, and 16 natural pre-smolts on Pete King Creek, for minimum survival estimates to Lower Granite Dam. There were no PIT tag detections of brood year 1999 smolts from Clear or Pete King creeks. A total of 2261 adult spring Chinook were collected at KNFH. Forty-three females were used for supplementation brood stock, and 45 supplementation (ventral fin-clip), and 45 natural (unmarked) adults were released upstream of KNFH to spawn naturally. Spatial and temporal distribution of 37 adults released above the KNFH weir was determined through the use of radio telemetry. On Clear Creek, a total of 166 redds (8.2 redds/km) were observed and data was collected from 195 carcasses. Seventeen completed redds (2.1 redds/km) were found, and data was collected data from six carcasses on Pete King Creek.

  16. Adult Chinook Salmon Abundance Monitoring in the Secesh River and Lake Creek, Idaho, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Faurot, Dave; Kucera, Paul A.

    2001-05-01

    Underwater time-lapse video technology has been used to monitor adult spring and summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) escapement into the Secesh River and Lake Creek, Idaho, since 1998. Underwater time-lapse videography is a passive methodology that does not trap or handle this Endangered Species Act listed species. Secesh River chinook salmon represent a wild spawning aggregate that has not been directly supplemented with hatchery fish. The Secesh River is also a control population under the Idaho Salmon Supplementation study. This project has demonstrated the successful application of underwater video adult salmon abundance monitoring technology in Lake Creek in 1998 and 1999. Emphasis of the project in 2000 was to determine if the temporary fish counting station could be installed early enough to successfully estimate adult spring and summer chinook salmon abundance in the Secesh River (a larger stream). Snow pack in the drainage was 93% of the average during the winter of 1999/2000, providing an opportunity to test the temporary count station structure. The temporary fish counting station was not the appropriate technology to determine adult salmon spawner abundance in the Secesh River. Due to its temporary nature it could not be installed early enough, due to high stream discharge, to capture the first upstream migrating salmon. A more permanent structure used with underwater video, or other technology needs to be utilized for accurate salmon escapement monitoring in the Secesh River. A minimum of 813 adult chinook salmon spawners migrated upstream past the Secesh River fish counting station to spawning areas in the Secesh River drainage. Of these fish, more than 324 migrated upstream into Lake Creek. The first upstream migrating adult chinook salmon passed the Secesh River and Lake Creek sites prior to operation of the fish counting stations on June 22. This was 17 and 19 days earlier than the first fish arrival at Lake Creek in 1998 and 1999

  17. Adult Chinook Salmon Abundance Monitoring in Lake Creek, Idaho, Annual Report 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Faurot, Dave

    2002-12-01

    Underwater time-lapse video technology has been used to monitor adult spring and summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) escapement into the Secesh River and Lake Creek, Idaho, since 1998. Underwater time- lapse videography is a passive methodology that does not trap or handle this Endangered Species Act listed species. Secesh River chinook salmon represent a wild spawning aggregate that has not been directly supplemented with hatchery fish. The Secesh River is also a control stream under the Idaho Salmon Supplementation study. This project has successfully demonstrated the application of underwater video monitoring to accurately quantify chinook salmon abundance in Lake Creek in 1998, 1999 and 2001. The adult salmon spawner escapement estimate into Lake Creek in 2001 was 697 fish, the largest escapement since the project began. Jack salmon comprised 10% of the spring migration. Snow pack in the drainage was 38% of the average during the winter of 2000/2001. The first fish passage on Lake Creek was recorded on June 9, 19 days after installation of the fish counting station and two weeks earlier than previously reported. Peak net upstream movement of 52 adults occurred on June 22. Peak of total movement activity was July 3. The last fish passed through the Lake Creek fish counting station on September 6. Redd count expansion methods were compared to underwater video determined salmon spawner abundance in Lake Creek in 2001. Expanded index area redd count point estimates and intensive area redd counts in 2001, estimated from 1.3 percent fewer to 56 percent greater number of spawners than underwater video determined spawner abundance. Redd count expansion values had unknown variation associated with the point estimates. Fish per redd numbers in Lake Creek have varied widely. In 2001 there were 2.07 fish per redd. In 1999, there were 3.58 fish per redd, and in 1998, with no jacks returning to spawn, there were 1.02 fish per redd. Migrating salmon in Lake Creek

  18. Chinook Salmon Adult Abundance Monitoring in Lake Creek, Idaho, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Faurot, Dave; Kucera, Paul

    2003-11-01

    Underwater time- lapse video technology has been used to monitor adult spring and summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) escapement into the Secesh River and Lake Creek, Idaho, since 1998. Underwater time-lapse videography is a passive methodology that does not trap or handle this Endangered Species Act listed species. Secesh River chinook salmon represent a wild spawning aggregate that has not been directly supplemented with hatchery fish. The Secesh River is also a control stream under the Idaho Salmon Supplementation study. This project has successfully demonstrated the application of underwater video monitoring to accurately quantify chinook salmon abundance in Lake Creek in 1998, 1999, 2001 and 2002. The adult salmon spawner escapement into Lake Creek in 2002 was 410 fish. Jack salmon comprised 7.1 percent of the run. Estimated hatchery composition was 6.1 percent of the spawning run. The first fish passage on Lake Creek was recorded on June 26, 15 days after installation of the fish counting station. Peak net upstream movement of 41 adults occurred on July 8. Peak of total movement activity was August 18. The last fish passed through the Lake Creek fish counting station on September 2. Snow pack in the drainage was 91% of the average during the winter of 2001/2002. Video determined salmon spawner abundance was compared to redd count expansion method point estimates in Lake Creek in 2002. Expanded index area redd count and extensive area redd count point estimates in 2002, estimated from one percent fewer to 56 percent greater number of spawners than underwater video determined spawner abundance. Redd count expansion methods varied from two percent fewer to 55 percent greater in 2001, 11 to 46 percent fewer in 1999 and 104 to 214 percent greater in 1998. Redd count expansion values had unknown variation associated with the point estimates. Fish per redd numbers determined by video abundance and multiple pass redd counts of the larger extensive survey

  19. Use of the sediment quality triad to evaluate metal constituents in Soda Creek, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C.; Simpson, J.; Kovats, Z.; Geddes, B.

    1995-12-31

    Sediments from Soda Creek were evaluated using the Sediment Quality Triad as part of investigations being conducted at the Monsanto Company plant in Soda Springs, Idaho. Information collected by an ecological assessment included metal concentrations (arsenic, cadmium, copper, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, silver, and vanadium), benthic fauna community structure, and sediment toxicity. The collected sediments were composed of sandy-silt sized particles, with 2.4% to 9.1% organic carbon. Metal concentrations at sample stations were elevated relative to sediments collected from reference stations. For example, average cadmium concentrations ranged from 13 to 48 mg/kg at sample stations and 0.72 to 3.2 mg/kg at reference stations; selenium concentrations ranged from 4.7 to 91 mg/kg at sample stations and 0.82 to 2.7 mg/kg at reference stations. Soda Creek has a relatively low flow gradient and the benthic fauna at both reference and sample stations was dominated by oligochaete worms and chironomid midge larvae. Taxonomic richness at individual sites ranged from 4.3 to 6.7 and 6 to 10.3 at reference and sample sites, respectively. There was no significant evidence of toxicity at any location sampled. Cluster analysis showed that the benthic community structure of many of the sample stations could not be distinguished from the reference stations. Canonical correlation analysis showed there was a significant relationship between benthic fauna and metal concentration, but there was not a consistent difference between sample and reference stations. For Soda Creek, local phenomena were more significant to benthic community structure than large-scale patterns of metal accumulation. Using the Triad approach, the authors concluded there has been no adverse effect of metal concentrations on the benthic community of Soda Creek.

  20. Long-term snow, climate and streamflow trends from at the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed, Owyhee Mountains, Idaho, United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forty-five water years (1962 – 2006) of carefully measured data on temperature, precipitation, snow, and streamflow for valley bottom, mid-elevation, and high elevation sites within the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW), located in the state of Idaho, USA, were analyzed to evaluate the ex...

  1. Forest inventory: Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit, Craig Mountain, Idaho. Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Narolski, Steven W.

    1996-12-01

    The primary objective of this report is to determine the quantity and quality of existing forest habitat types on the 59,991-acre Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit (WMU). Products from this effort include a description of the ecological condition, a map of habitat types, and an inventory of forest resources on the WMU lands. The purpose of this and other resource inventories (plant and wildlife) is to assess the current resources condition of the WMU and to provide necessary information to generate a long-term management for this area.

  2. Model documentation for relations between continuous real-time and discrete water-quality constituents in Indian Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, June 2004 through May 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Mandy L.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Johnson County is the fastest growing county in Kansas, with a population of about 560,000 people in 2012. Urban growth and development can have substantial effects on water quality, and streams in Johnson County are affected by nonpoint-source pollutants from stormwater runoff and point-source discharges such as municipal wastewater effluent. Understanding of current (2014) water-quality conditions and the effects of urbanization is critical for the protection and remediation of aquatic resources in Johnson County, Kansas and downstream reaches located elsewhere. The Indian Creek Basin is 194 square kilometers and includes parts of Johnson County, Kansas and Jackson County, Missouri. Approximately 86 percent of the Indian Creek Basin is located in Johnson County, Kansas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Johnson County Wastewater, operated a series of six continuous real-time water-quality monitoring stations in the Indian Creek Basin during June 2011 through May 2013; one of these sites has been operating since February 2004. Five monitoring sites were located on Indian Creek and one site was located on Tomahawk Creek. The purpose of this report is to document regression models that establish relations between continuously measured water-quality properties and discretely collected water-quality constituents. Continuously measured water-quality properties include streamflow, specific conductance, pH, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, and nitrate. Discrete water-quality samples were collected during June 2011 through May 2013 at five new sites and June 2004 through May 2013 at a long-term site and analyzed for sediment, nutrients, bacteria, and other water-quality constituents. Regression models were developed to establish relations between discretely sampled constituent concentrations and continuously measured physical properties to estimate concentrations of those constituents of interest that are not easily measured in real time

  3. Stream Restoration Monitoring Utilizing an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, Teton Creek, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegman, T.

    2014-12-01

    Stream restoration is a growing field in fluvial geomorphology. As demands on water resources increase the need for sustainable and healthy waterways becomes even more essential. This research investigates how an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) can be utilized for data collection necessary in stream restoration design and evaluation. UAV's offer an inexpensive method to collect information on channel geometry and map grain size distributions of the bed material. This data is critical in hydraulic flow modeling and engineering plans needed to create a restoration design, as well as evaluate if an implemented project has met its goals. This research utilized a UAV and structure-from-motion photogrammetry to monitor a recent stream restoration project designed to reduce erosion on a 1.9 km reach of Teton Creek in Eastern Idaho. A digital elevation model of difference was created from an as-built field survey and a UAV derived terrain model to identify areas of erosion and deposition in the restoration reach. The data has shown relatively small areas of channel instability in the restoration reach, and has also identified sections which may require additional restoration activities in Teton Creek. The grain size distribution of Teton Creek was also mapped utilizing a UAV and digital photosieving techniques, for use in sediment transport equations in the restoration reach. Data collected quickly and inexpensively from a UAV is valuable to river managers to monitor restoration work. This research identifies the methods and materials needed for river managers to conduct UAV surveys of streams for use in restoration design and monitoring.

  4. 40 CFR 131.33 - Idaho.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 160., or, although not so designated, are waters of the United States as defined at 40 CFR 122.2. ... Creek, Fox Creek, Gass Creek, Gold Creek, Ham Creek, Handy Creek, Hard Creek, Haskell Creek, Heather..., East Fork, East Fork Creek, East Forkast Fork Creek, Gold Creek, Johnson Creek, Lightning...

  5. 40 CFR 131.33 - Idaho.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 160., or, although not so designated, are waters of the United States as defined at 40 CFR 122.2. ... Creek, Fox Creek, Gass Creek, Gold Creek, Ham Creek, Handy Creek, Hard Creek, Haskell Creek, Heather..., East Fork, East Fork Creek, East Forkast Fork Creek, Gold Creek, Johnson Creek, Lightning...

  6. 40 CFR 131.33 - Idaho.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 160., or, although not so designated, are waters of the United States as defined at 40 CFR 122.2. ... Creek, Fox Creek, Gass Creek, Gold Creek, Ham Creek, Handy Creek, Hard Creek, Haskell Creek, Heather..., East Fork, East Fork Creek, East Forkast Fork Creek, Gold Creek, Johnson Creek, Lightning...

  7. Analytical results and sample locality map of stream-sediment, heavy-mineral-concentrate, and rock samples from the King Hill Creek Wilderness Study Area, Elmore County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, M.S.; King, H.D.; Bradley, L.; Gent, C.

    1989-01-01

    A U.S. Geological report is presented detailing analytical results and sample locality map of stream-sediment, heavy-mineral-concentrate, and rock samples from the King Hill Creek Wilderness Study Area, Elmore County, Idaho.

  8. Geology and phosphate resources of the Hawley Creek area, Lemhi County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberlindacher, Peter; Hovland, Robert David

    1979-01-01

    Phosphate resources occur within the Retort Phosphatic Shale Member of the Permian Phosphoria Formation in the Hawley Creek area, near Leadore, in east-central Idaho. About 12 square miles (31 km2 ) of the Retort Member and enclosing rocks were mapped at a scale of 1:12,000 to evaluate the leasable Federal mineral resources. The Retort has an average thickness of 73 feet (22.3 m) and 12.9 linear miles (20.8 linear km) of outcrop within the area mapped. Rock samples taken from a bulldozer trench were analyzed for phosphate content and for minor trace elements. Analyses show a cumulative thickness of 8.7 feet ( 2.7 m) of medium-grade phosphate rock ( 24 to 31 percent P2O5) and 33.4 feet (10.2 m) of low-grade phosphate rock (16 to 24 percent P2O5). Minor elements in the Retort include uranium, vanadium, fluorine, cadmium, chromium, nickel, molybdenum, silver, and rare earths. These minor elements are potential byproducts of any future phosphate production in the Hawley Creek area. In addition, analyses of six phosphate rock samples taken from a prospect trench show a cumulative thickness of 14.9 ft (4.5 m) at 17.6 percent P2O5. Indicated phosphate resources are calculated for phosphate beds under less than 600 feet (183.0 m) of overburden. Approximately 36.5 feet (11.1 m), representing 50 percent of the total Retort Member, were measured in trench CP-71. There are 80.42 million short tons (72.96 million metric tons) of medium-grade phosphate rock, and 308.76 million short tons ( 280.10 million metric tons) of low-grade phosphate rock in the Retort Member within the map area. Because the thickness and grade of the phosphate beds for each block are based on the recovered section from CP-71, the calculated phosphate resource estimates represent a minimum. Other mineral resources in the area are thorium (35 ppm) in a Precambrian (?) granite body located immediately west of the Hawley Creek area; oil and gas accumulations may occur beneath the Medicine Lodge thrust system

  9. Occurrence of uranium-bearing coal, carbonaceous shale, and carbonaceous limestone in the Fall Creek area, Bonneville County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vine, James D.; Moore, George W.

    1952-01-01

    Uraniferous coal, carbonaceous shale, and carbonaceous limestone occur in the Bear River formation of Upper Crestaceous age at the Fall Creek prospect, in the Fall Creek area, Bonneville County, IDaho. The uranium compounds are believed to have been derived from mildly radioactive silicic volcanic rocks of the Tertiary age that rest unconformably on all older rocks and once overlay the Bear River formation and its coal. Meteoric water, percolating downward through the silicic volcanic rocks and into the older rocks along joints and faults, is believed to have brought the uranium compounds into contact with the coal and carbonaceous rocks in which the uranium was absorbed.

  10. Uranium in spring water and bryophytes at basin creek in central idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shacklette, H.T.; Erdman, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Arkosic sandstones and conglomerates of Tertiary age beneath the Challis Volcanics of Eocene age at Basin Creek, 10 km northeast of Stanley, Idaho, contain uranium-bearing vitrainized carbon fragments. The economic potential of these sandstones and conglomerates is currently being assessed. Springs abound at the contacts of rock units, and water from these springs supports abundant growths of bryophytes (mosses and liverworts). Water from 22 springs and associated bryophytes were sampled; two springs were found to contain apparently anomalous concentrations (normalized) of uranium - as much as 6.5 ??g/L (ppb) in water and 1800 ??g/g (ppm) in ash of mosses. Moss samples from both springs also contained anomalous concentrations of arsenic, and one contained highly anomalous amounts of beryllium. Water from a third spring contained slightly anomalous amounts of uranium, and two species of mosses at the spring contained anomalous uranium (400 and 700 ??g/g) and high levels of both cadmium and lead. Water from a fourth spring was normal for uranium (0.18 ??g/L), but the moss from the water contained a moderate uranium level and highly anomalous concentrations of lead, germanium, and thallium. These results suggest that, in the Basin Creek area, moss sampling at springs may give a more reliable indication of uranium occurrence than would water sampling. The reason for this may be the ability of mosses to concentrate uranium and its associated pathfinder elements and to integrate uranium fluctuations that occur in the spring water over any period of time. ?? 1982.

  11. Understanding Stream Channel Sediment Source Contributions For The Paradise Creek Watershed In Northern Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittenburg, R.; Boll, J.; Brooks, E. S.

    2013-12-01

    Excess sediment from agricultural areas has been a major source of impairment for water bodies, resulting in the implementation of mitigation measures across landscapes. Watershed scale reductions often target upland erosion as key non-point sources for sediment loading. Stream channel dynamics, however, also play a contributing role in sediment loading in the form of legacy sediments, channel erosion and deposition, and buffering during storm events. In-stream contributions are not well understood, and are a potentially important consideration for Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs). The objective of this study is to differentiate stream bank and stream bed sediment contributions and better understand the role of legacy sediments. The study area is the Paradise Creek Watershed in northern Idaho. We modeled sediment yield to the channel system using the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model, and subsequent channel erosion and deposition using CONCEPTs. Field observations of cross-sections along the channel system over a 5-year period were collected to verify model simulations and to test the hypothesis that the watershed load was composed predominantly of legacy sediments. Our modeling study shows that stream channels contributed to 39% of the total annual sediment load for the basin, with a 19-year time lag between sediments entering the stream to leaving the watershed outlet. Observations from long-term cross sectional data in the watershed, and a sediment fingerprinting analysis will be presented to better understand sediment contributions from within the stream channel system.

  12. Ground-water reconnaissance of the Sailor Creek area, Owyhee, Elmore, and Twin Falls Counties, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crosthwaite, E.G.

    1962-01-01

    This reports evaluates the ground-water resources of about 1,000 square miles in the semiarid uplands south of the Snake River between Bruneau River and Salmon Falls Creek. The outcropping rocks are the Idavada Volcanics of Pliocene age, and the Idaho Group of Pliocene and Plieistocene age, consisting of the Banbury Basalt of middle Pliocene age and overlying predominantly sedimentary deposits of middle Pliocene through middle Pleistocene age. These rocks dip gently northward. The volcanic rocks are the best aquifers, but the yield of water from the sedimentary deposits is adequate for domestic and stock use. About 6,000 acre-feet of water is withdrawn annually from the Idavada Volcanics by 9 irrigation wells to irrigate about 3,000 acres. Only a few tends of acre-feet of water withdrawn from the other formations. The regional dip of the rocks induces weak artesian conditions in the volcanic rocks and somewhat higher artesian head in the sedimentary rocks. Estimated depth to water ranges from less than 250 feet to more than 750 feet, as shown in an accompanying map. The eastern part of the area appears to be more favorable for the development of ground water for irrigation than the western part because of better aquifers at shallower depth.

  13. Impact and recovery of freshwater algae and bacteria to mine stress in Iron Creek, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Genter, R.; Lehman, R.M.; O`Connell, S.P.

    1995-12-31

    Benthic algal population abundances and the metabolic diversity of the benthic and suspended (seston) microbial heterotrophic communities were used to assess the impact and trends in recovery downstream from a point source flowing from an abandoned mine. Benthic algae and microbes were sampled by brushing a confined area on naturally-colonized rocks in Iron Creek, Idaho, and whole-water samples were collected for seston. Algae were counted microscopically. Microbial community metabolic diversity was determined by simultaneously measuring short-term heterotrophic utilization of 94 different carbon sources. Benthic algal populations shifted from a community dominated by diatoms and filamentous blue-green algae in the two upstream references sites to a community dominated by the unicellular blue-green alga Entophysalis rivals (Chamaesiphon) on rocks below the point source. Community composition of benthic algae in the furthest downstream sites increased in similarity to reference sites, but complete recovery was not observed. Microbial community metabolic diversity of the seston and benthic communities along the stream transect followed a similar pattern; the seston metabolic diversity nearly recovered and the benthic metabolic diversity did not recover when compared to the reference sites. The results suggest that benthic algae and microbial metabolic diversity are useful as structural and functional measures of environmental stress and recovery.

  14. Physical Volcanology and Geochemistry of the Brown's Creek Rhyolite Lava in the Western Snake River Plain, Idaho.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenberg, L.; Gruber, B.; Boroughs, S.; Wolff, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Brown's Creek rhyolite (BCR), ~70 km south of Boise, Idaho, erupted during a period of widespread rhyolitic volcanism in southwestern Idaho during the middle Miocene. However, the Brown's Creek unit has several characteristics that are unusual relative to near contemporaneous units in the Central Snake Rive Plain (CSRP) and units in the Western Snake River Plain (WSRP). The BCR can contain up to 40% phenocrysts, with some feldspar and quartz crystals in excess of 2 cm in diameter. A proximal vent location is particularly well exposed in the BCR, and appears as an elongated topographic "dome" with pervasive, chaotic and steep flow banding, ramp structures, and breccias. Evidence of dome building activity is also represented by a matrix supported deposit of ash and poorly sorted, angular, rhyolite clasts up to boulder size; which crops out in a small area near the vent. The BCR is among numerous units in the CSRP and WSRP that show evidence of interaction with ancient Lake Idaho (e.g. silicification, opalized zones, pepperites, etc), but the unconformity with the sedimentary rocks of the lake and its feeder streams, is extremely well preserved in the Brown's Creek rhyolite. Geochemically, the Brown's Creek rhyolite shows greater compositional variation in comparison to other individual units in the region. This variation (e.g. Ba/Sr and Zr/Nb) may be a result of variable crystal cargo in hand samples, but could potentially represent a zoned magma body, which is also extremely rare in the CSRP or WSRP. A limited number of samples have trace element concentrations/ratios (e.g. Rb, U, and Th) that may indicate the presence of a second unit underlying the dominant outcrops of BCR, but Nb/Ta ratios are relatively invariant across the entire BCR suite; if there are two units in the BCR, their sources are the same or very similar.

  15. Effects of wastewater effluent discharge and treatment facility upgrades on environmental and biological conditions of Indian Creek, Johnson County, Kansas, June 2004 through June 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, Jennifer L.; Stone, Mandy L.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Foster, Guy M.; Poulton, Barry C.; Paxson, Chelsea R.; Harris, Theodore D.

    2014-01-01

    Indian Creek is one of the most urban drainage basins in Johnson County, Kansas, and environmental and biological conditions of the creek are affected by contaminants from point and other urban sources. The Johnson County Douglas L. Smith Middle Basin (hereafter referred to as the “Middle Basin”) and Tomahawk Creek Wastewater Treatment Facilities (WWTFs) discharge to Indian Creek. In summer 2010, upgrades were completed to increase capacity and include biological nutrient removal at the Middle Basin facility. There have been no recent infrastructure changes at the Tomahawk Creek facility; however, during 2009, chemically enhanced primary treatment was added to the treatment process for better process settling before disinfection and discharge with the added effect of enhanced phosphorus removal. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Johnson County Wastewater, assessed the effects of wastewater effluent on environmental and biological conditions of Indian Creek by comparing two upstream sites to four sites located downstream from the WWTFs using data collected during June 2004 through June 2013. Environmental conditions were evaluated using previously and newly collected discrete and continuous data and were compared with an assessment of biological community composition and ecosystem function along the upstream-downstream gradient. This study improves the understanding of the effects of wastewater effluent on stream-water and streambed sediment quality, biological community composition, and ecosystem function in urban areas. After the addition of biological nutrient removal to the Middle Basin WWTF in 2010, annual mean total nitrogen concentrations in effluent decreased by 46 percent, but still exceeded the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) wastewater effluent permit concentration goal of 8.0 milligrams per liter (mg/L); however, the NPDES wastewater effluent permit total phosphorus concentration goal of 1.5 mg/L or less was

  16. Geochemical results of a hydrothermally altered area at Baker Creek, Blaine County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erdman, James A.; Moye, Falma J.; Theobald, Paul K.; McCafferty, Anne E.; Larsen, Richard K.

    2001-01-01

    The area immediately east of Baker Creek, Blaine County, Idaho, is underlain by a thick section of mafic to intermediate lava flows of the Eocene Challis Volcanic Group. Widespread propylitic alteration surrounds a zone of argillic alteration and an inner core of phyllic alteration. Silicified breccia is present along an east-trending fault within the zone of phyllic alteration. As part of a reconnaissance geochemical survey, soils and plants were sampled. Several species of plants (Douglas-fir [ Pseudotsuga menziesii ], mountain big sagebrush [ Artemisia tridentata ssp. vaseyana ], and elk sedge [ Carex geyerii ]) were collected from 10 upland localities and stream sediments, panned concentrates, and aquatic mosses were collected from 16 drainage basin localities all of which were generally within the area of alteration. Geochemical results yielded anomalous concentrations of molybenum, zinc, silver, and lead in at least half of the seven different sample media and of gold, thallium, arsenic, antimony, manganese, boron, cadmium, bismuth, copper, and beryllium in from one to four of the various media. Part of this suite of elements? silver, gold, arsenic, antimony, thallium, and manganese? suggests that the mineralization in the area is epithermal. Barite and pyrite (commonly botryoidal-framboidal) are widespread throughout the area sampled. Visible gold and pyromorphite (a secondary lead mineral) were identified in only one small drainage basin, but high levels of gold were detected in aquatic mosses over a larger area. Data from the upland and stream sampling indicate two possible mineralized areas. The first mineralized area was identified by a grab sample from an outcrop of quartz stockwork that contained 50 ppb Au, 1.5 ppm Ag, and 50 ppm Mo. Although the soil and plant species that were sampled in the area indicated mineralized bedrock, the Douglas-fir samples were the best indicators of the silver anomaly. The second possible mineralized area centers on the

  17. Geochemistry of Groundwater in the Beaver and Camas Creek Drainage Basins, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rattray, G.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, is studying the fate and transport of waste solutes in the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in eastern Idaho. This effort requires an understanding of the natural and anthropogenic geochemistry of groundwater at the INL and of the important physical and chemical processes controlling the geochemistry. In this study, the USGS applied geochemical modeling to investigate the geochemistry of groundwater in the Beaver and Camas Creek drainage basins, which provide groundwater recharge to the ESRP aquifer underlying the northeastern part of the INL. Data used in this study include petrology and mineralogy from two sediment and three rock samples and water-quality analyses from four surface-water and 18 groundwater samples. The mineralogy of the sediment and rock samples was analyzed with X-ray diffraction and the mineralogy and petrology of the rock samples were examined in thin sections. The water samples were analyzed for field parameters, major ions, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, trace elements, tritium, and the stable isotope ratios of hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen. The groundwater geochemistry was influenced by reactions with rocks of the geologic terranes--carbonate rocks, rhyolite, basalt, evaporite deposits, and sediment comprised of all of these rocks. Agricultural practices near and south of Dubois and application of road anti-icing liquids on U.S. Interstate Highway15 were a source of nitrate, chloride, calcium, and magnesium to groundwater. Groundwater geochemistry was successfully modeled in the alluvial aquifer in Camas Meadows and the ESRP aquifer using the geochemical modeling code PHREEQC. The primary geochemical processes appear to be precipitation of calcite and dissolution of silicate minerals. Dissolution of evaporite minerals, associated with Pleistocene Lake Terreton, is an important contributor of

  18. Geochemistry of groundwater in the Beaver and Camas Creek drainage basins, eastern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattray, Gordon W.; Ginsbach, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, is studying the fate and transport of waste solutes in the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in eastern Idaho. This effort requires an understanding of the natural and anthropogenic geochemistry of groundwater at the INL and of the important physical and chemical processes controlling the geochemistry. In this study, the USGS applied geochemical modeling to investigate the geochemistry of groundwater in the Beaver and Camas Creek drainage basins, which provide groundwater recharge to the ESRP aquifer underlying the northeastern part of the INL. Data used in this study include petrology and mineralogy from 2 sediment and 3 rock samples, and water-quality analyses from 4 surface-water and 18 groundwater samples. The mineralogy of the sediment and rock samples was analyzed with X-ray diffraction, and the mineralogy and petrology of the rock samples were examined in thin sections. The water samples were analyzed for field parameters, major ions, silica, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, trace elements, tritium, and the stable isotope ratios of hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen. Groundwater geochemistry was influenced by reactions with rocks of the geologic terranes—carbonate rocks, rhyolite, basalt, evaporite deposits, and sediment comprised of all of these rocks. Agricultural practices near and south of Dubois and application of road anti-icing liquids on U.S. Interstate Highway 15 were likely sources of nitrate, chloride, calcium, and magnesium to groundwater. Groundwater geochemistry was successfully modeled in the alluvial aquifer in Camas Meadows and the ESRP fractured basalt aquifer using the geochemical modeling code PHREEQC. The primary geochemical processes appear to be precipitation or dissolution of calcite and dissolution of silicate minerals. Dissolution of evaporite minerals, associated with Pleistocene Lake

  19. Modified level II streambed-scour analysis for structure I-65-85-5527 crossing Sugar Creek in Johnson County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, B.A.; Voelker, D.C.; Miller, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Level II scour evaluations follow a process in which hydrologic, hydraulic, and sediment transport data are evaluated to calculate the depth of scour that may result when a given discharge is routed through a bridge opening. The results of the modified Level II analysis for structure 1-65-85-5527 on Interstate 65 crossing Sugar Creek in Johnson County, Indiana, are presented. The site is near the town of Amity in the southeastern part of Johnson County. Scour depths were computed with the Water Surface PROfile model, version V050196, which incorporates the scour-calculation procedures outlined in Hydraulic Engineering Circular No. 18. Total scour depths at the piers were approximately 26.8 feet for the modeled discharge of 26,000 cubic feet per second and approximately 30.8 feet for the modeled discharge of 34,100 cubic feet per second

  20. Analysis of geothermal electric-power generation at Big Creek Hot Springs, Lemhi County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Struhsacker, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    Big Creek Hot Springs was evaluated as a source of electrical power for the Blackbird Cobalt Mine, approximately 13 miles south of the hot spring. An evaluaton of the geothermal potential of Big Creek Hot Springs, a suggested exploration program and budget, an engineering feasibility study of power generation at Big Creek Hot Springs, an economic analysis of the modeled power generating system, and an appraisal of the institutional factors influencing development at Big Creek Hot Springs are included.

  1. Modeling ecohydrological impacts of land management and water use in the Silver Creek basin, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loinaz, Maria C.; Gross, Dayna; Unnasch, Robert; Butts, Michael; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2014-03-01

    A number of anthropogenic stressors, including land use change and intensive water use, have caused stream habitat deterioration in arid and semiarid climates throughout the western U.S. These often contribute to high stream temperatures, a widespread water quality problem. Stream temperature is an important indicator of stream ecosystem health and is affected by catchment-scale climate and hydrological processes, morphology, and riparian vegetation. To properly manage affected systems and achieve ecosystem sustainability, it is important to understand the relative impact of these factors. In this study, we predict relative impacts of different stressors using an integrated catchment-scale ecohydrological model that simulates hydrological processes, stream temperature, and fish growth. This type of model offers a suitable measure of ecosystem services because it provides information about the reproductive capability of fish under different conditions. We applied the model to Silver Creek, Idaho, a stream highly valued for its world-renowned trout fishery. The simulations indicated that intensive water use by agriculture and climate change are both major contributors to habitat degradation in the study area. Agricultural practices that increase water use efficiency and mitigate drainage runoff are feasible and can have positive impacts on the ecosystem. All of the mitigation strategies simulated reduced stream temperatures to varying degrees; however, not all resulted in increases in fish growth. The results indicate that temperature dynamics, rather than point statistics, determine optimal growth conditions for fish. Temperature dynamics are influenced by surface water-groundwater interactions. Combined restoration strategies that can achieve ecosystem stability under climate change should be further explored.

  2. Biogeochemical mercury methylation influenced by reservoir eutrophication, Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir, Idaho, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, J.E.; Hines, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir (SFCR) in southern Idaho has been under a mercury (Hg) advisory since 2001 as fish in this reservoir contain elevated concentrations of Hg. Concentrations of total Hg (HgT) and methyl-Hg (MeHg) were measured in reservoir water, bottom sediment, and porewater to examine processes of Hg methylation at the sediment/water interface in this reservoir. Rates of Hg methylation and MeHg demethylation were also measured in reservoir bottom sediment using isotopic tracer techniques to further evaluate methylation of Hg in SFCR. The highest concentrations for HgT and MeHg in sediment were generally found at the sediment/water interface, and HgT and MeHg concentrations declined with depth. Porewater extracted from bottom sediment contained highly elevated concentrations of HgT ranging from 11-230??ng/L and MeHg ranging from 0.68-8.5??ng/L. Mercury methylation was active at all sites studied. Methylation rate experiments carried out on sediment from the sediment/water interface show high rates of Hg methylation ranging from 2.3-17%/day, which is significantly higher than those reported in other Hg contaminant studies. Using porewater MeHg concentrations, we calculated an upward diffusive MeHg flux of 197??g/year for the entire reservoir. This sediment derived MeHg is delivered to the overlying SFCR water column, and eventually transferred to biota, such as fish. This study indicates that methylation of Hg is highly influenced by the hypolimnetic and eutrophic conditions in SFCR.

  3. Additional mineral resources assessment of the Battle Creek, Bruneau River, Deep Creek-Owyhee River, Jarbidge River, Juniper Creek, Little Owyhee River, North Fork Owyhee River, Owyhee River Canyon, South Fork Owyhee River, Upper Deep Creek, and Yatahoney Creek Wilderness Study Areas, Owyhee County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diggles, Michael F.; Berger, Byron R.; Vander Meulen, Dean B.; Minor, Scott A.; Ach, Jay A.; Sawlan, Michael G.

    1989-01-01

    From 1984 to 1986, studies were conducted to assess the potential for undiscovered mineral resources in wilderness study areas on the Owyhee Plateau. The results of these studies have been published in a series of U.S. Geological Survey Bulletins. Since that time, low-grade, high-tonnage epithermal hot-spring gold-silver deposits have been recognized in the region north of the wilderness study areas. The recognition that this mineral-deposit model is applicable in the region, coupled with new data that has become available to the U.S. Geological Survey, reinterpretation of existing geochemical data, and known-deposit data suggest that similar deposits may be present elsewhere on the Owyhee Plateau. This report is an additional assessment of the Battle Creek, Bruneau River, Deep Creek-Owyhee River, Jarbidge River, Juniper Creek, Little Owyhee River, North Fork Owyhee River, Owyhee River Canyon, South Fork Owyhee River (ID-016-053), Upper Deep Creek, and Yatahoney Creek Wilderness Study Areas in Idaho Wilderness Study Areas in Idaho in light of those new data.

  4. PINE CREEK, NEZ PERCE COUNTY, IDAHO - WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, 1986

    EPA Science Inventory

    A water quality monitoring study was conducted on Pine Creek (17060306), from February 20, 1985 to February 23, 1986. Objectives of the study were to determine baseline water quality of Pine Creek and its tributaries and to document the effects of storm runoff on water quality. ...

  5. 75 FR 25198 - Intermountain Region, Boise National Forest, Emmett Ranger District; Idaho Scriver Creek...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... Integrated Restoration Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an... environmental impact statement (EIS) for the integrated restoration project in the Scriver Creek subwatershed... Integrated Restoration Project proposes to undertake vegetation condition restoration, improve...

  6. Escapement Monitoring of Adult Chinook Salmon in the Secesh River and Lake Creek, Idaho, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Faurot, Dave; Kucera, Paul A.

    2001-04-01

    Underwater time-lapse video technology was used to monitor adult spring and summer chinook salmon abundance in spawning areas in Lake Creek and the Secesh River, Idaho, in 1999. This technique is a passive methodology that does not trap or handle this Endangered Species Act listed species. This was the third year of testing the remote application of this methodology in the Secesh River drainage. Secesh River chinook salmon represent a wild salmon spawning aggregate that has not been directly supplemented with hatchery fish. Adult chinook salmon spawner abundance was estimated in Lake Creek with the remote time-lapse video application. Adult spawner escapement into Lake Creek in 1999 was 67 salmon. Significant upstream and downstream spawner movement affected the ability to determine the number of fish that contributed to the spawning population. The first passage on Lake Creek was recorded on July 11, two days after installation of the fish counting station. Peak net upstream adult movement occurred at the Lake Creek site on July 20, peak of total movement activity was August 19 with the last fish observed on August 26. A minimum of 133 adult chinook salmon migrated upstream past the Secesh River fish counting station to spawning areas in the Secesh River drainage. The first upstream migrating adult chinook salmon passed the Secesh River site prior to the July 15 installation of the fish counting station. Peak net upstream adult movement at the Secesh River site occurred July 19, peak of total movement was August 15, 17 and 18 and the last fish passed on September 10. Migrating salmon in the Secesh River and Lake Creek exhibited two behaviorally distinct segments of fish movement. Mainly upstream only, movement characterized the first segment. The second segment consisted of upstream and downstream movement with very little net upstream movement. Estimated abundance was compared to single and multiple-pass redd count surveys within the drainage. There were

  7. 77 FR 775 - Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests; Idaho; Clear Creek Integrated Restoration Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... Restoration Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an environmental impact... Statement for the Clear Creek Integrated Restoration Project. The Proposed action would use a combination of... landscape pattern across the forested portions of the project area. Road decommissioning,...

  8. Landslide Investigations at Salmon Falls Creek Canyon in Idaho Using Satellite-Based Multitemporal Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Necsoiu, M.; Hooper, D. M.; Mcginnis, R. N.

    2014-12-01

    Landslides are a common worldwide natural hazard. Due to the difficulties of preventing landslides or mitigating their impacts, it is vital to know the locations of potential slide areas and their states of activity, especially for those situations where property, infrastructure, and human lives are at risk. This study improves understanding of the rate of movement and the lateral extent of the active domain of a landslide complex within Salmon Falls Creek Canyon near Twin Falls, Idaho. The research investigates the feasibility of (i) using high-resolution multitemporal Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) techniques to detect slow, nonlinear landslide displacement, and (ii) developing a work-flow that maximizes the accuracy of InSAR techniques while minimizing the number of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) datasets. The results provide (i) new insights into landslide displacement and rate of change over two decades; (ii) an assessment of change at a finer spatial resolution with similar or greater accuracy than previous studies that incorporated field and optical-based remote sensing; and (iii) improved geostatistical analysis of two separate landslides within the Salmon Falls Creek Canyon complex. These InSAR results show that the headwall block and transverse scarp had the highest mean annual velocity in the radar line-of-site direction. Line-of-site movement velocity in the toe and body of the landslide was less. Additionally, we interpret that lateral translation may have been greater in the body and toe compared to the headwall region due to the curved shape of the landside detachment surface.

  9. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement Idaho: Lolo Creek and Upper Lochsa, Clearwater National Forest.

    SciTech Connect

    Espinosa, F.A. Jr.; Lee, Kristine M.

    1991-01-01

    In 1983, the Clearwater National Forest and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) entered into a contractual agreement to improve anadromous fish habitat in selected tributaries of the Clearwater River Basin. This agreement was drawn under the auspices of the Northwest Power Act of 1980 and the Columbia River basin Fish and Wildlife Program (section 700). The Program was completed in 1990 and this document constitutes the Final Report'' that details all project activities, costs, accomplishments, and responses. The overall goal of the Program was to enhance spawning, rearing, and riparian habitats of Lolo Creek and major tributaries of the Lochsa River so that their production systems could reach full capability and help speed the recovery of salmon and steelhead within the basin.

  10. Comparison of Dissolved and Suspended Matter Transport in the Mica Creek Experimental Watershed, Northern Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karwan, D. L.; Saiers, J. E.; Gravelle, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    Transport of suspended particulate material (SPM) plays a fundamental role in biogeochemical cycling within forested watershed and is a primary water quality concern in managed forests. When present in excess, SPM can degrade aquatic habitat for fish communities and disrupt the connection between surface and ground water. Although monthly and annual suspended loads are often monitored, little is known about the hydrologic transport of these particles from suspension to monitoring location. The downstream transport of suspended particles can be influenced by transient storage mechanisms, such as settling and resuspension, stagnation in side pools, exchange with the streambed or hyporheic zone, and entrapment on stream vegetation and coarse woody debris. A tracer injection experiment was performed in order to compare transport and transient storage of suspended clay-sized particles, comprised of titanium dioxide (1 - 2 μm diameter), with that of a conservative solute, bromide, under baseflow conditions. The solute and particle tracers were applied to a second-order North Idaho stream for four hours and water samples were collected at four locations downstream before, during, and after the tracer injections for analysis of bromide and TiO2 concentrations. A one- dimensional numerical model was applied in inverse mode to the measured breakthrough curve data to quantify the processes that governed solute and particle transport. The results of this analysis indicate that transient- storage processes exerted only a minor influence on the advective-dispersive transport of bromide, while TiO2 transport was influenced by advection, dispersion, sedimentation (on the stream bed and on aquatic vegetation), and slow resuspension. Results of our analysis illustrate the mechanisms and timescale of SPM transport in this watershed and provide insight into the potential response of SPM concentrations to elevated sediment inputs.

  11. Long-term water quality and biological responses to multiple best management practices in Rock Creek, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maret, T.R.; MacCoy, D.E.; Carlisle, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    Water quality and macroinvertebrate assemblage data from 1981 to 2005 were assessed to evaluate the water quality and biological responses of a western trout stream to the implementation of multiple best management practices (BMPs) on irrigated cropland. Data from Rock Creek near Twin Falls, Idaho, a long-term monitoring site, were assembled from state and federal sources to provide the evaluation. Seasonal loads of the nonpoint source pollutants suspended sediment (SS), total phosphorus (TP), and nitrate-nitrite (NN) were estimated using a regression model with time-series streamflow data and constituent concentrations. Trends in the macroinvertebrate assemblages were evaluated using a number of biological metrics and nonmetric multidimensional scaling ordination. Regression analysis found significant annual decreases in TP and SS flow-adjusted concentrations during the BMP implementation period from 1983 to 1990 of about 7 and 10%, respectively. These results are coincident with the implementation of multiple BMPs on about 75% of the irrigated cropland in the watershed. Macroinvertebrate assemblages during this time also responded with a change in taxa composition resulting in improved biotic index scores. Taxon specific TP and SS optima, empirically derived from a large national dataset, predicted a decrease in SS concentrations of about 37% (52 to 33 mg/l) and a decrease in TP concentrations of about 50% (0.20 to 0.10 mg/l) from 1981 to 1987. Decreasing trends in TP, SS, and NN pollutant loads were primarily the result of naturally low streamflow conditions during the BMP post-implementation period from 1993 to 2005. Trends in macroinvertebrate responses during 1993 to 2005 were confounded by the introduction of the New Zealand mudsnail (Potamopyrgus antipodarum), which approached densities of 100,000 per m 2 in riffle habitat. The occurrence of this invasive species appears to have caused a major shift in composition and function of the macroinvertebrate

  12. An evaluation of seepage gains and losses in Indian Creek Reservoir, Ada County, Idaho, April 2010–November 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Marshall L.; Etheridge, Alexandra B.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Water Resources, conducted an investigation on Indian Creek Reservoir, a small impoundment in east Ada County, Idaho, to quantify groundwater seepage into and out of the reservoir. Data from the study will assist the Idaho Water Resources Department’s Comprehensive Aquifer Management Planning effort to estimate available water resources in Ada County. Three independent methods were utilized to estimate groundwater seepage: (1) the water-budget method; (2) the seepage-meter method; and (3) the segmented Darcy method. Reservoir seepage was quantified during the periods of April through August 2010 and February through November 2011. With the water-budget method, all measureable sources of inflow to and outflow from the reservoir were quantified, with the exception of groundwater; the water-budget equation was solved for groundwater inflow to or outflow from the reservoir. The seepage-meter method relies on the placement of seepage meters into the bottom sediments of the reservoir for the direct measurement of water flux across the sediment-water interface. The segmented-Darcy method utilizes a combination of water-level measurements in the reservoir and in adjacent near-shore wells to calculate water-table gradients between the wells and the reservoir within defined segments of the reservoir shoreline. The Darcy equation was used to calculate groundwater inflow to and outflow from the reservoir. Water-budget results provided continuous, daily estimates of seepage over the full period of data collection, while the seepage-meter and segmented Darcy methods provided instantaneous estimates of seepage. As a result of these and other difference in methodologies, comparisons of seepage estimates provided by the three methods are considered semi-quantitative. The results of the water-budget derived estimates of seepage indicate seepage to be seasonally variable in terms of the direction and magnitude

  13. Biological and Physical Inventory of Clear Creek, Orofino Creek, and the Potlatch River, Tributary Streams of the Clearwater River, Idaho, 1984 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, David B.

    1985-05-01

    Clear Creek, Orofino Creek, and Potlatch Creek, three of the largest tributaries of the lower Clearwater River Basin, were inventoried during 1984. The purpose of the inventory was to identify where anadromous salmonid production occurs and to recommend enhancement alternatives to increase anadromous salmonid habitat in these streams. Anadromous and fluvial salmonids were found in all three drainages. The lower reach of Clear Creek supported a low population of rainbow-steelhead, while the middle reach supported a much greater population of rainbow-steelhead. Substantial populations of cutthroat trout were also found in the headwaters of Clear Creek. Rainbow-steelhead and brook trout were found throughout Orofino Creek. A predominant population of brook trout was found in the headwaters while a predominant population of rainbow-steelhead was found in the mainstem and lower tributaries of Orofino Creek. Rainbow-steelhead and brook trout were also found in the Potlatch River. Generally, the greatest anadromous salmonid populations in the Potlatch River were found within the middle reach of this system. Several problems were identified which would limit anadromous salmonid production within each drainage. Problems affecting Clear Creek were extreme flows, high summer water temperature, lack of riparian habitat, and high sediment load. Gradient barriers prevented anadromous salmonid passage into Orofino Creek and they are the main deterrent to salmonid production in this system. Potlatch River has extreme flows, high summer water temperature, a lack of riparian habitat and high sediment loads. Providing passage over Orofino Falls is recommended and should be considered a priority for improving salmonid production in the lower Clearwater River Basin. Augmenting flows in the Potlatch River is also recommended as an enhancement measure for increasing salmonid production in the lower Clearwater River Basin. 18 refs., 5 figs., 85 tabs.

  14. 76 FR 17341 - Idaho Roadless Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ... administrative corrections affecting Big Creek Fringe, French Creek, Placer Creek, Secesh, and Smith Creek Idaho... regulatory classifications involving two Forest Plan Special Areas (Big Creek and French Creek) and a mapping... Chief provided a 30-day public notice and opportunity to comment (75 FR 54542). A total of 13...

  15. Ordovician and Silurian Phi Kappa and Trail Creek formations, Pioneer Mountains, central Idaho; stratigraphic and structural revisions, and new data on graptolite faunas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dover, James H.; Berry, William B.N.; Ross, Reuben James, Jr.

    1980-01-01

    clastic rocks reported in previously measured sections of the Phi Kappa, as well as the sequence along Phi Kappa Creek from which the name originates, are excluded from the Phi Kappa as revised and are reassigned to two structural plates of Mississippian Copper Basin Formation; other strata now excluded from the formation are reassigned to the Trail Creek Formation and to an unnamed Silurian and Devonian unit. As redefined, the Phi Kappa Formation is only about 240 m thick, compared with the 3,860 m originally estimated, and it occupies only about 25 percent of the outcrop area previously mapped in 1930 by H. G. Westgate and C. P. Ross. Despite this drastic reduction in thickness and the exclusion of the rocks along Phi Kappa Creek, the name Phi Kappa is retained because of widely accepted prior usage to denote the Ordovician graptolitic shale facies of central Idaho, and because the Phi Kappa Formation as revised is present in thrust slices on Phi Kappa Mountain, at the head of Phi Kappa Creek. The lithic and faunal consistency of this unit throughout the area precludes the necessity for major facies telescoping along individual faults within the outcrop belt. However, tens of kilometers of tectonic shortening seems required to juxtapose the imbricated Phi Kappa shale facies with the Middle Ordovician part of the carbonate and quartzite shale sequence of east central Idaho. The shelf rocks are exposed in the Wildhorse structural window of the northeastern Pioneer Mountains, and attain a thickness of at least 1,500 m throughout the region north and east of the Pioneer Mountains. The Phi Kappa is in direct thrust contact on intensely deformed medium- to high-grade metamorphic equivalents of the same shelf sequence in the Pioneer window at the south end of the Phi Kappa-Trail Creek outcrop belt. Along East Pass, Big Lake, and Pine Creeks, north of the Pioneer Mountains, some rocks previously mapped as Ramshorn Slate are lithologically and faunally equivalent to the P

  16. Analytical results and sample locality map of stream-sediment, heavy-mineral-concentrate, and rock samples from the Bruneau River, Jarbidge River, and Sheep Creek West Wilderness Study Areas, Owyhee County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, M.S.; Bradley, L.A.; Gent, C.A.; King, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    A U.S. Geological Survey report is presented giving the analytical results and sample locality map of stream-sediment, heavy-mineral-concentrate, and rock samples from the Bruneau River, Jarbidge River, and Sheep Creek West Wilderness Study Areas, Owyhee County, Idaho.

  17. Stream-sediment geochemistry in mining-impacted streams: Prichard, Eagle, and Beaver creeks, northern Coeur d'Alene Mining District, northern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Box, Stephen E.; Wallis, John C.; Briggs, Paul H.; Brown, Zoe Ann

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the results of one aspect of an integrated watershed-characterization study that was undertaken to assess the impacts of historical mining and milling of silver-lead-zinc ores on water and sediment composition and on aquatic biota in streams draining the northern part of the Coeur d?Alene Mining District in northern Idaho. We present the results of chemical analyses of 62 samples of streambed sediment, 19 samples of suspended sediment, 23 samples of streambank soil, and 29 samples of mine- and mill-related artificial- fill material collected from the drainages of Prichard, Eagle, and Beaver Creeks, all tributaries to the North Fork of the Coeur d?Alene River. All samples were sieved into three grain-size fractions (<0.063, 0.063?0.25, and 0.25?1.0 mm) and analyzed for 40 elements after four-acid digestion by inductively coupled plasma atomic-emission spectrometry and for mercury by continuous- flow cold-vapor atomic-absorption spectrometry in the U.S. Geological Survey laboratory in Denver, Colo. Historical mining of silver-lead-zinc ores in the headwater reaches of the Prichard Creek, Eagle Creek, and Beaver Creek drainages has resulted in enrichments of lead, zinc, mercury, arsenic, cadmium, silver, copper, cobalt, and, to a lesser extent, iron and manganese in streambed sediment. Using samples collected from the relatively unimpacted West Fork of Eagle Creek as representative of background compositions, streambed sediment in the vicinity of the mines and millsites has Pb and Zn contents of 20 to 100 times background values, decreasing to 2 to 5 times background values at the mouth of the each stream, 15 to 20 km downstream. Lesser enrichments (<10 times background values) of mercury and arsenic also are generally associated with, and decrease downstream from, historical silver-lead-zinc mining in the drainages. However, enrichments of arsenic and, to a lesser extent, mercury also are areally associated with the lode gold deposits along

  18. Estimated 100-year peak flows and flow volumes in the Big Lost River and Birch Creek at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Kjelstrom, L.C.; Berenbrock, C.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to provide estimates of the 100-year peak flows and flow volumes that could enter the INEL area from the Big Lost River and Brich Creek are needed as input data for models that will be used to delineate the extent of the 100-year flood plain at the INEL. The methods, procedures and assumptions used to estimate the 100-year peak flows and flow volumes are described in this report.

  19. Geochemical Evolution of Groundwater in the Medicine Lodge Creek Drainage Basin with Implications for the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer, Eastern Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsbach, M. L.; Rattray, G. W.; McCurry, M. O.; Welhan, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The eastern Snake River Plain aquifer (ESRPA) is an unconfined, continuous aquifer located in a northeast-trending structural basin filled with basaltic lava flows and sedimentary interbeds in eastern Idaho. The ESPRA is not an inert transport system, as it acts as both a sink and source for solutes found in the water. More than 90% of the water recharged naturally to the ESRPA is from the surrounding mountain drainage basins. Consequently, in order to understand the natural geochemistry of water within the ESRPA, the chemistry of the groundwater from the mountain drainage basins must be characterized and the processes that control the chemistry need to be understood. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy and Idaho State University, has been studying these mountain drainage basins to help understand the movement of waste solutes in the ESRPA at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in eastern Idaho. This study focuses on the Medicine Lodge Creek drainage basin, which originates in the Beaverhead Mountains, extends onto the eastern Snake River Plain, and contributes recharge to the ESRPA beneath the INL as underflow along the northeastern INL boundary. Water and rock samples taken from the Medicine Lodge Creek drainage basin were analyzed to better understand water/rock interactions occurring in this system and to define the groundwater geochemistry of this drainage basin. Water samples were collected at 10 locations in the drainage basin during June 2012: 6 groundwater wells used for agricultural irrigation or domestic use and 4 springs. These water samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, trace metals, isotopes, and dissolved gasses. Samples of rock representative of the basalt, rhyolite, and sediments that occur within the drainage basin also were collected. These samples were analyzed using x-ray diffraction and petrographic study to determine the mineralogical constituents of the rock and the presence and

  20. Paleontology, paleoclimatology and paleoecology of the late middle miocene Musselshell Creek flora, Clearwater County Idaho. A preliminary study of a new fossil flora

    SciTech Connect

    Baghai, N.L.; Jorstad, R.B.

    1995-10-01

    The Musselshell Creek flora (12.0-10.5 Ma) of northern Idaho is used to reconstruct paleoclimatic and paleoecologic parameters of the Pacific Northwest during the late Middle Miocene. Other megafossil and microfossil floral records spanning 12.0-6.4 Ma are unknown from this region. The Musselshell Creek fossil flora, previously undescribed, is preserved in lacustrine clays and sediments that accumulated in a narrow valley surrounded by rugged terrain. Dominant taxa include dicotyledons and conifers. Most of the leaves are preserved as impressions or compressions. Some fossil leaves retained their original pigmentation, cellular anatomy, and organic constituents. Other fossils include excellent remains of pollen and spores, dispersed leaf cuticle, pyritized wood, and disarticulated fish bones. A destructive statistical analysis of one block of sediment, approximately 30 cm x 45 cm (1.5 sq. ft) recovered 14 orders, 23 families, and 34 genera of spermatophyte plant fossils. These floral elements are compared with two other earlier Miocene floras which were similarly sampled. Common megafossil genera include Quercus, Zizy-phoides, Taxodium, Alnus, Castanea, Magnolia, Acer, Ex-bucklandia, Sequoia, Populus, and Betula. The rare occurrence of Ginkgo leaves is a first record of this taxon in the Idaho Miocene. Additional plant taxa, are represented by palynomorphs. Common pollen taxa are Pinus, Abies, Carya, Quercus, and Tilia. Most of the megafossil and microfossil flora assemblage is characteristic of a streambank to floodplain environment that existed in a warm to cool temperate climate similar to the modern Mid-Atlantic coast of the United States. 47 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Statistical tables and charts showing geochemical variation in the Mesoproterozoic Big Creek, Apple Creek, and Gunsight formations, Lemhi group, Salmon River Mountains and Lemhi Range, central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, David A.; Tysdal, Russell G.; Taggart, Joseph E., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    The principal purpose of this report is to provide a reference archive for results of a statistical analysis of geochemical data for metasedimentary rocks of Mesoproterozoic age of the Salmon River Mountains and Lemhi Range, central Idaho. Descriptions of geochemical data sets, statistical methods, rationale for interpretations, and references to the literature are provided. Three methods of analysis are used: R-mode factor analysis of major oxide and trace element data for identifying petrochemical processes, analysis of variance for effects of rock type and stratigraphic position on chemical composition, and major-oxide ratio plots for comparison with the chemical composition of common clastic sedimentary rocks.

  2. The timing of tertiary metamorphism and deformation in the Albion-Raft River-Grouse Creek metamorphic core complex, Utah and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strickland, A.; Miller, E.L.; Wooden, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    The Albion-Raft River-Grouse Creek metamorphic core complex of southern Idaho and northern Utah exposes 2.56-Ga orthogneisses and Neoproterozoic metasedimentary rocks that were intruded by 32-25-Ma granitic plutons. Pluton emplacement was contemporaneous with peak metamorphism, ductile thinning of the country rocks, and top-to-thewest, normal-sense shear along the Middle Mountain shear zone. Monazite and zircon from an attenuated stratigraphic section in the Middle Mountain were dated with U-Pb, using a SHRIMP-RG (reverse geometry) ion microprobe. Zircons from the deformed Archean gneiss preserve a crystallization age of 2532 ?? 33 Ma, while monazites range from 32.6 ?? 0.6 to 27.1 ?? 0.6 Ma. In the schist of the Upper Narrows, detrital zircons lack metamorphic overgrowths, and monazites produced discordant U-Pb ages that range from 52.8 ?? 0.6 to 37.5 ?? 0.3 Ma. From the structurally and stratigraphically highest unit sampled, the schist of Stevens Spring, narrow metamorphic rims on detrital zircons yield ages from 140-110 Ma, and monazite grains contained cores that yield an age of 141 ??2 Ma, whereas rims and some whole grains ranged from 35.5 ?? 0.5 to 30.0 ?? 0.4 Ma. A boudinaged pegmatite exposed in Basin Creek is deformed by the Middle Mountains shear zone and yields a monazite age of 27.6 ?? 0.2 Ma. We interpret these data to indicate two periods of monazite and metamorphic zircon growth: a poorly preserved Early Cretaceous period (???140 Ma) that is strongly overprinted by Oligocene metamorphism (???32-27 Ma) related to regional plutonism and extension. ?? 2011 by The University of Chicago.

  3. Clinoptilolite and associated authigenic minerals in Miocene tuffaceous rocks in the Goose Creek Basin, Cassia County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Brownfield, M.E.; Hildebrand, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    Miocene tuffaceous fluviolacustrine deposits in the southeastern part of the Goose Creek basin contain a variety of authigenic minerals, including clinoptilolite, smectite, pyrite, gypsum, and calcite. Clinoptilolite is the primary mineral in the diagenetically altered rhyolitic vitric tuffs in the study area. These zeolitic tuffs locally attain thicknesses of as much as 30 meters. Examinations of samples of the altered tuff beds using the scanning electron microscope reveal that the clinoptilolite usually occurs as clean, well-formed tabular crystals about 0.005 mm across in a matrix of smectite. Prismatic clinoptilolite crystals, as much as 0.06 mm long, are present in the larger vugs. During the Miocene, thick beds of air-fall rhyolitic vitric volcanic ash accumulated in the Goose Creek basin in a coalescing fluviolacustrine depositional setting. In the southeastern part of the basin, the volcanic ash was deposited in a lacustrine fan delta, where it was partly reworked and interbedded with sandstone and siltstone. Diagenetic alteration of the ash beds proceeded in an open hydrologic system. Solution and hydrolysis by ground water initially altered the glass shards to form smectite and silica gel. Clinoptilolite subsequently precipitated on the altered shard surfaces. The paragenesis of pyrite, gypsum, and calcite in the zeolitic tuffs is uncertain.

  4. 78 FR 23522 - Idaho Roadless Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ...Pursuant to 36 CFR 294.27 the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), is proposing to modify Idaho Roadless Area boundaries for the Big Creek, Grandmother Mountain, Pinchot Butte, Roland Point, Wonderful Peak Idaho Roadless Areas on the Idaho Panhandle National Forests to reflect lands acquired within and/or adjacent to these roadless areas. In addition, modifications to correct......

  5. Boulder Creek Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingaman, Deirdre; Eitel, Karla Bradley

    2010-01-01

    Boulder Creek runs literally in the backyard of Donnelly Elementary School and happens to be on the EPA list of impaired water bodies. Therefore, a unique opportunity for problem solving opened the door to an exciting chance for students to become scientists, while also becoming active in their community. With the help of the Idaho Department of…

  6. Post-fire debris-flow hazard assessment of the area burned by the 2013 Beaver Creek Fire near Hailey, central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skinner, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    A preliminary hazard assessment was developed for debris-flow hazards in the 465 square-kilometer (115,000 acres) area burned by the 2013 Beaver Creek fire near Hailey in central Idaho. The burn area covers all or part of six watersheds and selected basins draining to the Big Wood River and is at risk of substantial post-fire erosion, such as that caused by debris flows. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned basins throughout the Intermountain Region in Western United States were used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence, potential volume of debris flows, and the combined debris-flow hazard ranking along the drainage network within the burn area and to estimate the same for analyzed drainage basins within the burn area. Input data for the empirical models included topographic parameters, soil characteristics, burn severity, and rainfall totals and intensities for a (1) 2-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, referred to as a 2-year storm (13 mm); (2) 10-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, referred to as a 10-year storm (19 mm); and (3) 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, referred to as a 25-year storm (22 mm). Estimated debris-flow probabilities for drainage basins upstream of 130 selected basin outlets ranged from less than 1 to 78 percent with the probabilities increasing with each increase in storm magnitude. Probabilities were high in three of the six watersheds. For the 25-year storm, probabilities were greater than 60 percent for 11 basin outlets and ranged from 50 to 60 percent for an additional 12 basin outlets. Probability estimates for stream segments within the drainage network can vary within a basin. For the 25-year storm, probabilities for stream segments within 33 basins were higher than the basin outlet, emphasizing the importance of evaluating the drainage network as well as basin outlets. Estimated debris-flow volumes for the three modeled storms range

  7. Dubin-Johnson syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Dubin-Johnson syndrome is a disorder passed down through families (inherited) in which a person has mild jaundice throughout ... Dubin-Johnson syndrome is a very rare genetic disorder. In order to inherit the condition, a child must get ...

  8. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Search How We Work Our Focus Areas About RWJF Search Menu How We Work Grants and Grant ... more For Grantees and Grantseekers The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation supports a wide array of research and ...

  9. Dubin-Johnson syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000242.htm Dubin-Johnson syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dubin-Johnson syndrome is a disorder passed down through families ( ...

  10. Baseline geochemical data for stream sediment and surface water samples from Panther Creek, the Middle Fork of the Salmon River, and the Main Salmon River from North Fork to Corn Creek, collected prior to the severe wildfires of 2000 in central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eppinger, Robert G.; Briggs, Paul H.; Brown, Zoe Ann; Crock, James G.; Meier, Allen; Theodorakos, Peter M.; Wilson, Stephen A.

    2001-01-01

    In 1996, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a reconnaissance baseline geochemical study in central Idaho. The purpose of the baseline study was to establish a 'geochemical snapshot' of the area, as a datum for monitoring future change in the geochemical landscape, whether natural or human-induced. This report presents the methology, analytical results, and sample descriptions for water, sediment, and heavy-mineral concentrate samples collected during this geochemical investigation. In the summer of 2000, the Clear Creek, Little Pistol, and Shellrock wildfires swept across much of the area that was sampled. Thus, these data represent a pre-fire baseline geochemical dataset. A 2001 post- fire study is planned and will involve re-sampling of the pre-fire baseline sites, to allow for pre- and post-fire comparison.

  11. Why has streamflow in a northern Idaho creek increased while flows from many other watersheds in the US Pacific Northwest have decreased over the past sixty years?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, L.; Hudak, A. T.; Link, T. E.; Marshall, J. D.; Kavanagh, K.; Zhou, H.; Abatzoglou, J. T.; Pangle, R. E.; Flerchinger, G. N.; Denner, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    As global warming proceeds, evapotranspiration demand will increase, the precipitation regime may change, and water cycling in many ecosystems may be affected. Streamflow in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) region of the USA decreased in the last ~60 year possibly due to decreasing precipitation at high elevations and/or increasing evapotranspiration. However, an increasing trend of streamflow was observed at a 4km2 watershed in the Priest River Experimental Forest (PREF) in northern Idaho. We used the process-based soil-vegetation-atmosphere Simultaneous Heat and Water (SHAW) model, to simulate the changes in the water cycle at PREF. Independent measurements were used to parameterize the model, including forest transpiration, stomatal responses to vapor pressure, forest properties (height, leaf area index, and biomass), soil properties, soil moisture, snow depth, and snow water equivalent. The model reasonably simulated the streamflow dynamics during the evaluation period from 2003 to 2010, which verified the ability of SHAW to simulate the water cycle at PREF. We then ran the model using historical vegetation cover and climate data to reveal the drivers of the changes in water budget of PREF over the past 60 years. Historical vegetation cover was obtained from a 1939 digitized historical vegetation map. The biggest change was the decline of western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl. ex D. Don), a fast growing and deep rooted species with high transpiration rates, which was once a predominant species in PREF in the early 20th century. This was followed by a subsequent increase and decrease in fir species, followed by the emergence of western red cedar (Thuja plicata) as the current dominant tree species. The tree species shifts under this successional trajectory would have produced continually decreasing transpiration rates, which may explain the steady increase in observed runoff over the last ~60 years, which was likewise simulated with the SHAW model.

  12. Ames Fellows Award - Johnson

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Wayne Johnson is a rotorcraft pioneer and visionary. His legacy of rotorcraft research at NASA Ames continues to be of fundamental importance to the U.S. Army and to the international rotorcraf...

  13. Johnson Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston is NASA's lead center for the space shuttle and the International Space Station programs and for biomedical research. Areas of study include Earth sciences and solar system exploration, astromaterials and space medicine. About 14 000 people, including 3000 civil servants, work at JSC....

  14. Johnson Space Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gafka, Tammy; Terrier, Doug; Smith, James

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation is a review of the work of Johnson Space Center. It includes a section on technology development areas, (i.e., composite structures, non-destructive evaluation, applied nanotechnology, additive manufacturing, and fracture and fatigue analytical methods), a section on structural analysis capabilities within NASA/JSC and a section on Friction stir welding and laser peening.

  15. Lyndon Johnson's Press Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Stephen

    Because President Lyndon Johnson understood well the publicity value of the American news media, he sought to exploit them. He saw reporters as "torch bearers" for his programs and policies and used the presidential press conference chiefly for promotional purposes. Although he met with reporters often, his press conferences were usually…

  16. Idaho Habitat Evaluation for Off-Site Mitigation Record : Annual Report 1987.

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosky, Charles E.; Holubetz, Terry B.

    1988-04-01

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game has been monitoring and evaluating existing and proposed habitat improvement projects for steelhead (Salmo gairdneri) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Clearwater and Salmon River drainages over the last four years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. A mitigation record is being developed to use increased smolt production at full seeding as the best measure of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed nature of upriver anadromous stocks have precluded attainment of full benefit of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit will be credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration. According to the BPA Work Plan, project implementors have the primary responsibility for measuring physical habitat and estimating habitat change. To date, Idaho habitat projects have been implemented primarily by the US Forest Service (USFS). The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) have sponsored three projects (Bear Valley Mine, Yankee Fork, and the proposed East Fork Salmon River projects). IDFG implemented two barrier-removal projects (Johnson Creek and Boulder Creek) that the USFS was unable to sponsor at that time. The role of IDFG in physical habitat monitoring is primarily to link habitat quality and habitat change to changes in actual, or potential, fish production. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

  17. Bridge 223, view looking east up Rock Creek Canyon at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bridge 22-3, view looking east up Rock Creek Canyon at Milepost 22.82. The line passes through tunnel 4 onto Bridge 22-3 and heads eastward up Rock Creek Canyon out onto the Camas Prairie - Camas Prairie Railroad, Second Subdivision, From Spalding in Nez Perce County, through Lewis County, to Grangeville in Idaho County, Spalding, Nez Perce County, ID

  18. 111. ROCK CREEK SIPHON LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    111. ROCK CREEK SIPHON LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY IDAHO; OVERALL VIEW OF SIPHON, EAST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  19. Optical Johnson noise thermometry

    DOEpatents

    Shepard, Robert L.; Blalock, Theron V.; Roberts, Michael J.; Maxey, Lonnie C.

    1992-01-01

    Method and device for direct, non-contact temperature measure of a body. A laser beam is reflected from the surface of the body and detected along with the Planck radiation. The detected signal is analyzed using signal correlation technique to generate an output signal proportional to the Johnson noise introduced into the reflected laser beam as a direct measure of the absolute temperature of the body.

  20. Optical Johnson noise thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, R. L.; Blalock, T. V.; Maxey, L. C.; Roberts, M. J.; Simpson, M. L.

    1989-01-01

    A concept is being explored that an optical analog of the electrical Johnson noise may be used to measure temperature independently of emissivity. The concept is that a laser beam may be modulated on reflection from a hot surface by interaction of the laser photons with the thermally agitated conduction electrons or the lattice phonons, thereby adding noise to the reflected laser beam. If the reflectance noise can be detected and quantified in a background of other noise in the optical and signal processing systems, the reflectance noise may provide a noncontact measurement of the absolute surface temperature and may be independent of the surface's emissivity.

  1. Idaho Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ...     View Larger Image Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) image of smoke plumes ... Idaho was acquired on August 5, 2000 (Terra orbit 3370). The body of water to the left of image center is the Cascade Reservoir, located ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Dubin-Johnson syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions Dubin-Johnson syndrome Dubin-Johnson syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Dubin-Johnson syndrome is a condition characterized by jaundice, which ...

  3. Dan Johnson the mentor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinley, Richard

    2003-04-01

    I first met Dan Johnson in early 1975 as I was interviewing for an engineering job with Henning von Gierke's bioengineering and bionics laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. From the very beginning Dan was always direct and forthright. Over the ensuing next 27 years my knowledge and respect of Dan constantly grew. This presentation will review Dan's technical and personal contributions while at the laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. He was instrumental in the development of a national noise exposure criteria with the equal-energy-rule, an accurate single number hearing protector attenuation measure based on ``C-A,'' an impulse noise exposure criteria, a longitudinal study of hearing loss in children, development of noise dosimeters, and description of hearing damage risk from nonoccupational noise exposures such as disco's, bowling alleys, lawn mowers, and school buses. Dan has had a significant effect on my career. I and the many people who knew him at the laboratory miss him greatly.

  4. Johnson Space Center 2012 Highlights

    NASA Video Gallery

    The year has seen many highlights at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Houston in the realm of human spaceflight exploration, international and commercial partnerships, and research and technology dev...

  5. Water information bulletin No. 30 geothermal investigations in Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.C.; Johnson, L.L.; Anderson, J.E.; Spencer, S.G.; Sullivan, J.F.

    1980-06-01

    There are 899 thermal water occurrences known in Idaho, including 258 springs and 641 wells having temperatures ranging from 20 to 93/sup 0/C. Fifty-one cities or towns in Idaho containing 30% of the state's population are within 5 km of known geothermal springs or wells. These include several of Idaho's major cities such as Lewiston, Caldwell, Nampa, Boise, Twin Falls, Pocatello, and Idaho Falls. Fourteen sites appear to have subsurface temperatures of 140/sup 0/C or higher according to the several chemical geothermometers applied to thermal water discharges. These include Weiser, Big Creek, White Licks, Vulcan, Roystone, Bonneville, Crane Creek, Cove Creek, Indian Creek, and Deer Creek hot springs, and Raft River, Preston, and Magic Reservoir areas. These sites could be industrial sites, but several are in remote areas away from major transportation and, therefore, would probably be best utilized for electrical power generation using the binary cycle or Magma Max process. Present uses range from space heating to power generation. Six areas are known where commercial greenhouse operations are conducted for growing cut and potted flowers and vegetables. Space heating is substantial in only two places (Boise and Ketchum) although numerous individuals scattered throughout the state make use of thermal water for space heating and private swimming facilities. There are 22 operating resorts using thermal water and two commercial warm-water fish-rearing operations.

  6. 9. Photocopy of photograph (from booklet by Endicott Johnson: EndecottJohnson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photocopy of photograph (from booklet by Endicott Johnson: Endecott-Johnson Workers, Tanners and Shoemakers, May 1, 1939, pg. 58, Recreation Section) showing VIEW OF POOL FROM THE SOUTH - Charles F. Johnson Pool, Charles F. Johnson Park, Johnson City, Broome County, NY

  7. Bridge 17, view looking east at Milepost 17.14. Rock Creek ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bridge 17, view looking east at Milepost 17.14. Rock Creek is in the foreground. The grade loops back north and climbs east up Rock Creek Canyon - Camas Prairie Railroad, Second Subdivision, From Spalding in Nez Perce County, through Lewis County, to Grangeville in Idaho County, Spalding, Nez Perce County, ID

  8. IMPACTS OF GEOTHERMAL WATERS ON SELECTED STREAMS IN SOUTHERN IDAHO, 1984-1985

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four drainage areas were studies in Southern Idaho (17040212, 17040213) to determine the impact of geothermal discharges on area streams. Areas studied included Big Wood River near Ketchum, Mud Creek near Buhl, Salmon Falls Creek near Castleford, and the Snake River from Twin Fa...

  9. LOWER PORTNEUF RIVER, IDAHO - WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, 1977

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the results of a 12 month, bi-weekly water quality sampling program on the Lower Portneuf River, Idaho (17040208). Samples were collected at 7 river stations, 5 effluents, and a major stream. The results indicate that Marsh Creek, a major tributary draining...

  10. James Johnson on Asteroid Mission Simulation Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean talks to James Johnson, the test director for a simulated mission to an asteroid taking place at the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at the Johnson Space Cente...

  11. NASA Johnson Style (Gangnam Style Parody)

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Johnson Style is a volunteer outreach video project created by the students of NASA's Johnson Space Center. It was created as an educational parody of Psy's Gangnam Style. The lyrics and scene...

  12. 1. EAGLE CREEK RECREATION AREA, VIEW OF EAGLE CREEK TRAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EAGLE CREEK RECREATION AREA, VIEW OF EAGLE CREEK TRAIL REGISTRY BOOTH. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Eagle Creek Recreation Area, Historic Columbia River Highway at Eagle Creek, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  13. Structural cross section and petroleum potential of the central Idaho thrust belt

    SciTech Connect

    Link, P.K.; Rodgers, D.W. ); Burton, B.R. )

    1991-06-01

    The central Idaho thrust belt comprises several major thrust plates, including, from west to east, the Pioneer, Glide Mountain, Copper Basin, Hawley Creek, Fritz Creek, and Cabin-Medicine Lodge plates. Petroleum source rocks exist in several stratigraphic and geographic settings, though in many cases they are overmature. The Atlanta lobe of the Cretaceous Idaho batholith intrudes the western Pioneer plate, and hypabyssal dikes and stocks associated with the Eocene Challis magmatic episode locally intrude the Pioneer, Glide Mountain, Copper Basin, and western Hawley Creek plates. The Devonian Jefferson Formation, Mississippian McGowan Creek Formation, and overlying carbonate platform strata of the Hawley Creek plate are the most prospective for petroleum resources. Neogene extension has produced the present-day topography of Basin and Range and formed deep Tertiary basins which contain coal deposits and possibly natural gas resources.

  14. Idaho Steelhead Monitoring and Evaluation Studies : Annual Progress Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Timothy; Putnam, Scott

    2008-12-01

    The goal of Idaho Steelhead Monitoring and Evaluation Studies is to collect monitoring data to evaluate wild and natural steelhead populations in the Clearwater and Salmon river drainages. During 2007, intensive population data were collected in Fish Creek (Lochsa River tributary) and Rapid River (Little Salmon River tributary); extensive data were collected in other selected spawning tributaries. Weirs were operated in Fish Creek and Rapid River to estimate adult escapement and to collect samples for age determination and genetic analysis. Snorkel surveys were conducted in Fish Creek, Rapid River, and Boulder Creek (Little Salmon River tributary) to estimate parr density. Screw traps were operated in Fish Creek, Rapid River, Secesh River, and Big Creek to estimate juvenile emigrant abundance, to tag fish for survival estimation, and to collect samples for age determination and genetic analysis. The estimated wild adult steelhead escapement in Fish Creek was 81 fish and in Rapid River was 32 fish. We estimate that juvenile emigration was 24,127 fish from Fish Creek; 5,632 fish from Rapid River; and 43,674 fish from Big Creek. The Secesh trap was pulled for an extended period due to wildfires, so we did not estimate emigrant abundance for that location. In cooperation with Idaho Supplementation Studies, trap tenders PIT tagged 25,618 steelhead juveniles at 18 screw trap sites in the Clearwater and Salmon river drainages. To estimate age composition, 143 adult steelhead and 5,082 juvenile steelhead scale samples were collected. At the time of this report, 114 adult and 1,642 juvenile samples have been aged. Project personnel collected genetic samples from 122 adults and 839 juveniles. We sent 678 genetic samples to the IDFG Eagle Fish Genetics Laboratory for analysis. Water temperature was recorded at 37 locations in the Clearwater and Salmon river drainages.

  15. 5. Photocopy of photograph (from booklet by Endicott Johnson: 70 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photocopy of photograph (from booklet by Endicott Johnson: 70 Years of Mutual Respect and Confidence) showing SEVERAL SEVERAL PHOTOS OF POOL ACTIVITIES - Charles F. Johnson Pool, Charles F. Johnson Park, Johnson City, Broome County, NY

  16. 4. Photocopy of photograph (from booklet by Endicott Johnson: 70 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photocopy of photograph (from booklet by Endicott Johnson: 70 Years of Mutual Respect and Confidence) showing VIEW OF POOL LOOKING EAST, 1948 - Charles F. Johnson Pool, Charles F. Johnson Park, Johnson City, Broome County, NY

  17. Restoring Fossil Creek

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaccus, Kathleen; Vlieg, Julie; Marks, Jane C.; LeRoy, Carri J.

    2004-01-01

    Fossil Creek had been dammed for the past 90 years, and plans were underway to restore the stream. The creek runs through Central Arizona and flows from the high plateaus to the desert, cutting through the same formations that form the Grand Canyon. This article discusses the Fossil Creek monitoring project. In this project, students and teachers…

  18. Idaho Geothermal Commercialization Program. Idaho geothermal handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, G.D.; Esposito, L.; Montgomery, M.

    1980-03-01

    The following topics are covered: geothermal resources in Idaho, market assessment, community needs assessment, geothermal leasing procedures for private lands, Idaho state geothermal leasing procedures - state lands, federal geothermal leasing procedures - federal lands, environmental and regulatory processes, local government regulations, geothermal exploration, geothermal drilling, government funding, private funding, state and federal government assistance programs, and geothermal legislation. (MHR)

  19. Salmon Supplementation Studies in Idaho Rivers; Idaho Supplementation Studies, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Beasley, Chris; Tabor, R.A.; Kinzer, Ryan

    2003-04-01

    This report summarizes brood year 1999 juvenile production and emigration data and adult return information for 2000 for streams studied by the Nez Perce Tribe for the cooperative Idaho Salmon Supplementation Studies in Idaho Rivers (ISS) project. In order to provide inclusive juvenile data for brood year 1999, we include data on parr, presmolt, smolt and yearling captures. Therefore, our reporting period includes juvenile data collected from April 2000 through June 2001 for parr, presmolts, and smolts and through June 2002 for brood year 1999 yearling emigrants. Data presented in this report include; fish outplant data for treatment streams, snorkel and screw trap estimates of juvenile fish abundance, juvenile emigration profiles, juvenile survival estimates to Lower Granite Dam (LGJ), redd counts, and carcass data. There were no brood year 1999 treatments in Legendary Bear or Fishing Creek. As in previous years, snorkeling methods provided highly variable population estimates. Alternatively, rotary screw traps operated in Lake Creek and the Secesh River provided more precise estimates of juvenile abundance by life history type. Juvenile fish emigration in Lake Creek and the Secesh River peaked during July and August. Juveniles produced in this watershed emigrated primarily at age zero, and apparently reared in downstream habitats before detection as age one or older fish at the Snake and Columbia River dams. Over the course of the ISS study, PIT tag data suggest that smolts typically exhibit the highest relative survival to Lower Granite Dam (LGJ) compared to presmolts and parr, although we observed the opposite trend for brood year 1999 juvenile emigrants from the Secesh River. SURPH2 survival estimates for brood year 1999 Lake Creek parr, presmolt, and smolt PIT tag groups to (LGJ) were 27%, 39%, and 49% respectively, and 14%, 12%, and 5% for the Secesh River. In 2000, we counted 41 redds in Legendary Bear Creek, 4 in Fishing Creek, 5 in Slate Creek, 153 in the

  20. Johnson Noise Thermometry System Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Britton Jr, Charles L; Roberts, Michael; Ezell, N Dianne Bull; Qualls, A L; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2013-01-01

    This document is intended to capture the requirements for the architecture of the developmental electronics for the ORNL-lead drift-free Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) project conducted under the Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) research pathway of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Research and Development (R&D) program. The requirements include not only the performance of the system but also the allowable measurement environment of the probe and the allowable physical environment of the associated electronics. A more extensive project background including the project rationale is available in the initial project report [1].

  1. Hydrologic data for North Creek, Trinity River basin, Texas, 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carillo, E.R.

    1980-01-01

    This report is a compilation of runoff and storage data collected during the 1978 water year in the Mountain Creek basin. Mountain Creek drains the northeast corner of Johnson County, the northwest corner of Ellis County, the southeast corner of Tarrant County, and part of the southwest corner of Dallas County, Tex. The basin is 30 miles long and averages 10 miles in width. The total drainage area at the mouth is 304 square miles. Basin outflow for the 1978 water year was 3,520 acre-feet which is only 5% of the 18-year (1960-78) average of 76,070 acre-feet. Storage in Mountain Creek Lake showed a net loss of 890 acre-feet during the water year. Rainfall over the study area for the 1978 water year was about 24 inches, which is about 10 inches below the mean annual rainfall for the area. (USGS)

  2. Water Quality of Peralta and Courtland Creek Oakland, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahumada, A.; Zhen, K. L.; Ponce, X.; Johnson, A.; Varela, N.; Quintero, D.; Hernandez, G.; Oghogho, E.

    2014-12-01

    Authors: Allan Ahumada, Aminah Butler, Mellany Davis, Yarely Guzman, Micah Johnson, Xochitl Ponce, Kim Zhen Abstract: Beginning in the summer of 2012 and continuing to the present time our group has been assessing the water quality of Courtland Creek, which flows from Northeast to Southwest in East Oakland, California. During the summer of 2014 we began assessing the water quality at nearby Peralta Creek to compare the health of Courtland Creek with another one within the same watershed. In making our assessment we have analyzed samples collected from three different sites along both creeks for Nitrate, Phosphate, and Ammonia concentration levels. Additionally, we conducted benthic macroinvertebrate surveys at one site along each creek. Preliminary results indicate that nitrate levels in Courtland Creek waters are very high, which we believe is the result of human and animal waste entering into the creek. There were also unusually high levels of Phosphate and Ammonia detected in creek waters. Such high concentrations were noted in a past study and in an attempt to address this problem we initiated a native plant restoration project at one particular site located at the intersection of Courtland and Thompson avenues. This effort has resulted in a reduction in levels of Nitrate, Phosphate and Ammonia. The average levels of these compounds in waters collected near the restoration site were lower than those found in samples collected at other sites. However, they are still well above levels that are harmful to invertebrates and fish. Nitrate, Phosphate and Ammonia concentration levels in samples collected from Peralta Creek were significantly lower than those collected from Courtland Creek. For example, the maximum level of nitrate detected in Courtland Creek waters was 50 PPM while the maximum found in Peralta Creek waters was 15 PPM. We have concluded that the observed high levels of various compounds are the result of animal waste and human feces spilling directly

  3. The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson. Web Lesson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constitutional Rights Foundation, Los Angeles, CA.

    This lesson presents the historical background of Abraham Lincoln's selection of Andrew Johnson as his running mate in the election of 1864. The lesson considers the climate in the U.S. Congress after President Lincoln's assassination. The details of the impeachment and trial of President Andrew Johnson are given. The lesson presents three…

  4. Idaho GPW Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2001-10-01

    Idaho holds enormous resources - among the largest in theUnited States - of this clean, reliable form of energy that to date have barely been tapped. According to U.S. Geological Survey estimates, Idaho ranks seventh among the 50 states in developable geothermal energy. These resources could provide up to 20% of Idaho's heat and power needs. W h y G e o t h e r m a l ?Homegrown Energy It's here, right beneath our feet! No need to import! Current Development Idaho already boasts 70 direct-use g..

  5. Shell Creek Summers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seier, Mark; Goedeken, Suzy

    2005-01-01

    In 2002 Shell Creek Watershed Improvement Group turned to the Newman Grove Public Schools' science department to help educate the public on water quality in the watershed and to establish a monitoring system that would be used to improve surface and groundwater quality in the creek's watershed. Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality provided…

  6. History and Evolution of the Johnson Criteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Sjaardema, Tracy A.; Smith, Collin S.; Birch, Gabriel Carisle

    2015-07-01

    The Johnson Criteria metric calculates probability of detection of an object imaged by an optical system, and was created in 1958 by John Johnson. As understanding of target detection has improved, detection models have evolved to better model additional factors such as weather, scene content, and object placement. The initial Johnson Criteria, while sufficient for technology and understanding at the time, does not accurately reflect current research into target acquisition and technology. Even though current research shows a dependence on human factors, there appears to be a lack of testing and modeling of human variability.

  7. ARS-BLM COOPERATIVE STUDIES, REYNOLDS CREEK WATERSHED, IDAHO, 1975

    EPA Science Inventory

    This interim report summarizes progress and results of cooperative watershed research between the Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Dept. Of Agriculture and the Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Dept of the Interior. Work was initiated in 1968. This report covers January 1 thro...

  8. Station Robotics Testing at Johnson Space Center

    NASA Video Gallery

    At the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at Johnson Space Center, NASA tests the Japanese Experiment Module ORU Transfer Interface, or JOTI. This device would allow astronauts to transfer orbital repla...

  9. Fire protection review, Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Idaho Falls, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, P.H.

    1990-10-01

    A fire protection survey was conducted for the Department of Energy at the Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, INC., Idaho Falls, Idaho, on April 24--27, April 30--May 4, June 4--8, and June 11--15, 1990. The purpose of the survey was to review the facility's fire protection program and to make recommendations according to the following criteria established by the Department of Energy: (1) Recommendations which would be made as the result of an improved risk or Highly Protected Risk (HPR) fire inspection of an industrial insured facility. (2) Identification of areas which are presently not protected or are inadequately protected where provision of automatic protection would reduce a fire or explosion loss to less than $1 million. (3) Identification of areas where loss potentials exceed $50 million assuming a failure of automatic protection systems and subsequent reliance only on separation and fire walls. (4) Evaluation of adequacy of compliance with recommendations made in prior surveys. Findings and recommendations in this report reflect to some degree the relative importance of the operation and the time to restore it to useful condition in the event that a loss were to occur.

  10. Depth to water, 1991, in the Rathdrum Prairie, Idaho; Spokane River valley, Washington; Moscow-Lewiston-Grangeville area, Idaho; and selected intermontane valleys, east-central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berenbrock, Charles E.; Bassick, M.D.; Rogers, T.L.; Garcia, S.P.

    1995-01-01

    This map report illustrates digitally generated depth-to-water zones for the Rathdrum Prairie in Idaho; part of the Spokane River Valley in eastern Washington; and the intermontane valleys of the upper Big Wood, Big Lost, Pahsimeroi, Little Lost, and Lemhi Rivers and Birch Creek in Idaho. Depth to water is 400 to 500 feet below land surface in the northern part of Rathdrum Prairie, 100 to 200 feet below land surface at the Idaho-Washington State line, and 0 to 250 feet below land surface in the Spokane area. Depth to water in the intermontane valleys in east-central Idaho is least (usually less than 50 feet) near streams and increases toward valley margins where mountain-front alluvial fans have formed. Depths to water shown in the Moscow-Lewiston-Grangeville area in Idaho are limited to point data at individual wells because most of the water levels measured were not representative of levels in the uppermost aquifer but of levels in deeper aquifers.

  11. WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, LOWER WEISER RIVER, WASHINGTON COUNTY, IDAHO, 1983 - 1984

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lower Weiser River, Crane Creek to the mouth at Weiser (17050124), Washington County, Idaho and its tributaries and selected irrigation inflows were the subject of a water quality survey for one year during 1983-84. The Weiser River contributes nearly 260,000 tons of annual ...

  12. POTLATCH RIVER WATERSHED, LATAH, CLEARWATER, AND NEZ PERCE COUNTIES, IDAHO - BENEFICIAL USE RECONNAISSANCE PROJECT, 1994

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted during the 1994 summer to determine the beneficial uses and status of those uses in the Potlatch River watershed, Idaho (17060306). Data were collected on the mainstem, East Fork and West Fork Potlatch River, Little Potlatch and Middle Potlatch Creeks, B...

  13. Neogene fallout tuffs from the Yellowstone hotspot in the Columbia Plateau region, Oregon, Washington and Idaho, USA.

    PubMed

    Nash, Barbara P; Perkins, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Sedimentary sequences in the Columbia Plateau region of the Pacific Northwest ranging in age from 16-4 Ma contain fallout tuffs whose origins lie in volcanic centers of the Yellowstone hotspot in northwestern Nevada, eastern Oregon and the Snake River Plain in Idaho. Silicic volcanism began in the region contemporaneously with early eruptions of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG), and the abundance of widespread fallout tuffs provides the opportunity to establish a tephrostratigrahic framework for the region. Sedimentary basins with volcaniclastic deposits also contain diverse assemblages of fauna and flora that were preserved during the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum, including Sucker Creek, Mascall, Latah, Virgin Valley and Trout Creek. Correlation of ashfall units establish that the lower Bully Creek Formation in eastern Oregon is contemporaneous with the Virgin Valley Formation, the Sucker Creek Formation, Oregon and Idaho, Trout Creek Formation, Oregon, and the Latah Formation in the Clearwater Embayment in Washington and Idaho. In addition, it can be established that the Trout Creek flora are younger than the Mascall and Latah flora. A tentative correlation of a fallout tuff from the Clarkia fossil beds, Idaho, with a pumice bed in the Bully Creek Formation places the remarkably well preserved Clarkia flora assemblage between the Mascall and Trout Creek flora. Large-volume supereruptions that originated between 11.8 and 10.1 Ma from the Bruneau-Jarbidge and Twin Falls volcanic centers of the Yellowstone hotspot in the central Snake River Plain deposited voluminous fallout tuffs in the Ellensberg Formation which forms sedimentary interbeds in the CRBG. These occurrences extend the known distribution of these fallout tuffs 500 km to the northwest of their source in the Snake River Plain. Heretofore, the distal products of these large eruptions had only been recognized to the east of their sources in the High Plains of Nebraska and Kansas. PMID:23071494

  14. Neogene Fallout Tuffs from the Yellowstone Hotspot in the Columbia Plateau Region, Oregon, Washington and Idaho, USA

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Barbara P.; Perkins, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Sedimentary sequences in the Columbia Plateau region of the Pacific Northwest ranging in age from 16–4 Ma contain fallout tuffs whose origins lie in volcanic centers of the Yellowstone hotspot in northwestern Nevada, eastern Oregon and the Snake River Plain in Idaho. Silicic volcanism began in the region contemporaneously with early eruptions of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG), and the abundance of widespread fallout tuffs provides the opportunity to establish a tephrostratigrahic framework for the region. Sedimentary basins with volcaniclastic deposits also contain diverse assemblages of fauna and flora that were preserved during the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum, including Sucker Creek, Mascall, Latah, Virgin Valley and Trout Creek. Correlation of ashfall units establish that the lower Bully Creek Formation in eastern Oregon is contemporaneous with the Virgin Valley Formation, the Sucker Creek Formation, Oregon and Idaho, Trout Creek Formation, Oregon, and the Latah Formation in the Clearwater Embayment in Washington and Idaho. In addition, it can be established that the Trout Creek flora are younger than the Mascall and Latah flora. A tentative correlation of a fallout tuff from the Clarkia fossil beds, Idaho, with a pumice bed in the Bully Creek Formation places the remarkably well preserved Clarkia flora assemblage between the Mascall and Trout Creek flora. Large-volume supereruptions that originated between 11.8 and 10.1 Ma from the Bruneau-Jarbidge and Twin Falls volcanic centers of the Yellowstone hotspot in the central Snake River Plain deposited voluminous fallout tuffs in the Ellensberg Formation which forms sedimentary interbeds in the CRBG. These occurrences extend the known distribution of these fallout tuffs 500 km to the northwest of their source in the Snake River Plain. Heretofore, the distal products of these large eruptions had only been recognized to the east of their sources in the High Plains of Nebraska and Kansas. PMID:23071494

  15. Steelhead Supplementation in Idaho Rivers : 2001 Project Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Alan

    2002-03-01

    In 2001, Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) continued an assessment of the Sawtooth Hatchery steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss stock to reestablish natural populations in Beaver and Frenchman creeks in the upper Salmon River. Crews stocked both streams with 20 pair of hatchery adults, and I estimated the potential smolt production from the 2000 adult outplants. n the Red River drainage, IDFG stocked Dworshak hatchery stock fingerlings and smolts from 1993 to 1999 to assess which life stage produces more progeny when the adults return to spawn. In 2001, IDFG operated the Red River weir to trap adults that returned from these stockings, but none were caught from either group. Wild steelhead populations in the Lochsa and Selway river drainages were assessed and the chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha escapement was enumerated in Fish Creek. I estimated that 75 wild adult steelhead and 122 adult chinook salmon returned to Fish Creek in 2001. I estimated that slightly more than 30,000 juvenile steelhead migrated out of Fish Creek. This is the largest number of steelhead to migrate out of Fish Creek in a single year since I began estimating the yearly migration in 1994. Juvenile steelhead densities in Lochsa and Selway tributaries were somewhat higher in 2001 than those observed in 2000. Crews from IDFG collected over 4,800 fin samples from wild steelhead in 74 streams of the Clearwater, Snake, and Salmon river drainages and from five hatchery stocks during the summer of 2000 for a DNA analysis to assess Idaho's steelhead stock structure. The DNA analysis was subcontracted to Dr. Jennifer Nielsen, Alaska Biological Science Center, Anchorage. Her lab developed protocols to use for the analysis in 2001 and is continuing to analyze the samples. Dr. Nielsen plans to have the complete set of wild and hatchery stocks analyzed in 2002.

  16. Stevens Johnson Syndrome associated with Lamotrigine

    PubMed Central

    Parveen, Shama; Javed, M. Afzal

    2013-01-01

    Stevens-Johnsons Syndrome (SJS) is an immune-complex-mediated hypersensitivity reaction and has been linked as an adverse side effects to many drugs. Lamotrigine, an anticonvulsive medication and also a commonly used mood stabiliser, can be associated with this adverse reaction. Although this has not been reported very commonly , SJS has high mortality and morbidity and requires careful attention as the use of Lamotrigine is increasing in clinical practice. We present a case where the patient developed Stevens - Johnson Syndrome three weeks after being started on Lamotrigine. The case is discussed for its relevance to the use of Lamotrigine which is currently prescribed very commonly in psychiatric practices. PMID:24550973

  17. Stevens Johnson Syndrome associated with Lamotrigine.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Shama; Javed, M Afzal

    2013-11-01

    Stevens-Johnsons Syndrome (SJS) is an immune-complex-mediated hypersensitivity reaction and has been linked as an adverse side effects to many drugs. Lamotrigine, an anticonvulsive medication and also a commonly used mood stabiliser, can be associated with this adverse reaction. Although this has not been reported very commonly , SJS has high mortality and morbidity and requires careful attention as the use of Lamotrigine is increasing in clinical practice. We present a case where the patient developed Stevens - Johnson Syndrome three weeks after being started on Lamotrigine. The case is discussed for its relevance to the use of Lamotrigine which is currently prescribed very commonly in psychiatric practices. PMID:24550973

  18. Hydrologic data for Mountain Creek, Trinity River Basin, Texas, 1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckner, H.D.

    1977-01-01

    Mountain Creek drains the northeast corner of Johnson County, the northwest corner of Ellis County, the southeast corner of Tarrant County, and part of the southwest corner of Dallas County, Tex. The basin is 30 miles long and averages 10 miles in width. The total drainage area at the mouth is 304 sq mi. Basin outflow for the 1975 water year was 146,400 acre-feet which is 68,880 acre-feet above the 15-year (1960-75) average of 77,520 acre-feet. Storage in Mountain Creek Lake showed a net loss of 150 acre-feet during the water year. Rainfall over the study area for the 1975 water year was about 39 inches, which is about 5 inches above the 15-year mean for the area. (Woodard-USGS)

  19. Beaver Creek Wilderness, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Englund, K.J.; Hammack, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The Beaver Creek Wilderness, Kentucky, was studied in 1980 by the USGS and USBM. Coal is the most important mineral resource in the Beaver Creek Wilderness. The coal is tentatively ranked as high-volatile A bituminous, and like coal of this rank in nearby mining areas, it is primarily suitable for use as steam coal. The coal resources are estimated to total 8.31 million short tons in beds greater than 14 in. thick. Nonmetallic minerals present in the Wilderness include limestone, shale, clay, and sandstone; these commodities are abundant outside the wilderness. The information available is not adequate for the assessment of the oil and gas resource potential of the Beaver Creek Wilderness. There is little likelihood for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources.

  20. BEAVER CREEK WILDERNESS, KENTUCKY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Englund, K.J.; Hammack, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The Beaver Creek Wilderness, Kentucky, was studied. Coal is the most important mineral resource in the Beaver Creek Wilderness. The coal is tentatively ranked as high-volatile A bituminous, and like coal of this rank in nearby mining areas, it is primarily suitable for use as steam coal. The coal resources are estimated to total 8. 31 million short tons in beds greater than 14 in. thick. Nonmetallic minerals present in the Wilderness include limestone, shale, clay, and sandstone; these commodities are abundant outside the wilderness. The information available is not adequate for the assessment of the oil and gas resource potential of the Beaver Creek Wilderness. There is little likelihood for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources.

  1. Hydrogeologic framework and ground-water resources at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardinell, A.P.; Howe, S.S.

    1997-01-01

    A preliminary hydrogeologic framework of the Seymour Johnson Air Force Base was constructed from published data, available well data, and reports from Air Base files, City of Goldsboro and Wayne County records, and North Carolina Geological Survey files. Borehole geophysical logs were run in selected wells; and the surficial, Black Creek, and upper Cape Fear aquifers were mapped. Results indicate that the surficial aquifer appears to have the greatest lateral variability of clay units and aquifer material of the three aquifers. A surficial aquifer water-level surface map, constructed from selected monitoring wells screened exclusively in the surficial aquifer, indicates the general direction of ground-water movement in this mostly unconfined aquifer is toward the Neuse River and Stoney Creek. However, water-level gradient data from a few sites in the surficial aquifer did not reflect this trend, and there are insufficient hydrologic and hydrogeologic data to determine the cause of these few anamalous measurements. The Black Creek aquifer underlies the surficial aquifer and is believed to underlie most of Wayne County, including the Air Base where the aquifer and overlying confining unit are estimated from well log data to be as much as 100 feet thick. The Black Creek confining unit ranges in thickness from less than 8 feet to more than 20 feet. There are currently no accessible wells screened exclusively in the Black Creek aquifer from which to measure water levels. The upper Cape Fear aquifer and confining unit are generally found at depths greater than 80 feet below land surface at the Air Base, and are estimated to be as much as 70 feet thick. Hydrologic and hydrogeologic data are insufficient to determine localized surficial aquifer hydrogeology, ground-water movement at several sites, or hydraulic head differences between the three aquifers.

  2. Speaking Personally--With Larry Johnson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Distance Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Larry Johnson has been the CEO of the New Media Consortium (NMC) for nearly a decade, and he has worked in higher education for more than twenty-five years. Before joining NMC, he served in roles that include faculty member, dean, provost, and president. In this interview, he talks about the position of NMC in distance education and the challenges…

  3. Telerobotic activities at Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Charles R.

    1989-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center telerobotic efforts span three major thrusts: (1) sustaining and expanding the capability of the Shuttle manipulator; (2) developing and integrating the multiple telerobotic system of the Space Station; and (3) fostering and applying research in all areas of telerobotics technology within the government, private, and academic sectors.

  4. Charles Johnson's "Middle Passage" as Historiographic Metafiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thaden, Barbara Z.

    1997-01-01

    Suggests that what makes Charles Johnson's "Middle Passage" significant and eminently teachable is that it is an accessible example of "historiographic metafiction"--bestselling postmodern novels set in the past. Notes that students find the novel "easy" and enjoyable and that teaching the novel with some of its intertexts, such as H. Melville's…

  5. Solving the Housing Equation: Michael P. Johnson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    Dr. Michael P. Johnson, an associate professor of management science and urban affairs at the H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, is taking management science tools and innovative information technology applications to the housing field. Concerned that organizations that develop and…

  6. JOHNSON-MATTHEY DIFFUSER CHARACTERIZATION TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, P; James Klein, J; Henry Sessions, H; Gregg Morgan, G

    2007-08-02

    A diffuser/permeator commercially fabricated by Johnson-Matthey was purchased for characterization testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). A test system was fabricated to not only feed and bleed flows and pressures, but also permeate pressure for flows up to 20 SLPM.

  7. Networking at NASA. Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garman, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A series of viewgraphs on computer networks at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) are given. Topics covered include information resource management (IRM) at JSC, the IRM budget by NASA center, networks evolution, networking as a strategic tool, the Information Services Directorate charter, and SSC network requirements, challenges, and status.

  8. The Paint Creek Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northrop, David; Vonck, Beth

    1998-01-01

    Describes a summer program project designed and conducted by a mixed-age group of elementary children. Students collected data to determine whether a local stream was polluted, and interpretations of the data varied. An informational video about the project and the creek was produced. (PVD)

  9. WILLOW CREEK RECLAMATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Working in cooperation with the EPA, Colorado Division of Minerals and Geology, and others, the Willow Creek Reclamation Committee (WCRC) will investigate the sources and character of water entering the mine workings on the Amethyst vein near the town of Creede, Colorado. Activi...

  10. Idaho's Energy Options

    SciTech Connect

    Robert M. Neilson

    2006-03-01

    This report, developed by the Idaho National Laboratory, is provided as an introduction to and an update of the status of technologies for the generation and use of energy. Its purpose is to provide information useful for identifying and evaluating Idaho’s energy options, and for developing and implementing Idaho’s energy direction and policies.

  11. Idaho's Library Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Library, Boise.

    In l998, Idahoans gathered in a series of six Regional Futures Conferences to identify what they thought was probable during the next ten years, what was possible for libraries to do and be, and what a preferred future of Idaho libraries might be. Participants from the regional conferences then convened to refine and focus descriptions of the…

  12. Idaho Safety Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This manual is intended to help teachers, administrators, and local school boards develop and institute effective safety education as a part of all vocational instruction in the public schools of Idaho. This guide is organized in 13 sections that cover the following topics: introduction to safety education, legislation, levels of responsibility,…

  13. IDAHO FLUVIAL GEOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Restricted availability. Major Attributes: Polygons described by geologic type codes & descriptions. May be incorporated into maps at the state/county/basin scale. Probably too coarse for use at the site scale. Scale: 1:500:000. Extent: Idaho. Projection: Albers. Source: ...

  14. The Idaho Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaird, James H.

    The Idaho Consortium was established by the state board of education to remedy perceived needs involving insufficient certificated teachers, excessive teacher mobility, shortage of teacher candidates, inadequate inservice training, a low level of administrative leadership, and a lack of programs in special education, early childhood education,…

  15. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Seigfreid, Johnson, Edwards, Architects 1978 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Seigfreid, Johnson, Edwards, Architects 1978 BRICKWORK DETAILS from the collection of Seigfreid, Johnson, Edwards, AIA Architects - Barrows-Coatsworth Building, 122 Main Street, Galena, Jo Daviess County, IL

  16. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Seigfreid, Johnson, Edwards, Architects 1978 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Seigfreid, Johnson, Edwards, Architects 1978 NORTHWEST ELEVATION from the collection of Seigfreid, Johnson, Edwards, AIA Architects - Barrows-Coatsworth Building, 122 Main Street, Galena, Jo Daviess County, IL

  17. SALMON RIVER BREAKS PRIMITIVE AREA AND VICINITY, IDAHO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiilsgaard, Thor H.; Tuchek, Ernest T.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Salmon River Breaks Primitive Area and vicinity in Idaho confirmed a substantiated gold resource potential in placer deposits along the Salmon River but determined that large-scale mining of the deposits probably would not be feasible. Except for demonstrated fluorspar resources at the Big Squaw Creek deposit, no other mineral resources were found in the area. The geologic environment, geochemical findings, and geophysical data all suggest little likelihood for the occurrence of additional mineral resources in the area. No energy resources were identified in this study.

  18. Quantum walk search on Johnson graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas G.

    2016-05-01

    The Johnson graph J(n,k) is defined by n symbols, where vertices are k-element subsets of the symbols, and vertices are adjacent if they differ in exactly one symbol. In particular, J(n,1) is the complete graph K n , and J(n,2) is the strongly regular triangular graph T n , both of which are known to support fast spatial search by continuous-time quantum walk. In this paper, we prove that J(n,3), which is the n-tetrahedral graph, also supports fast search. In the process, we show that a change of basis is needed for degenerate perturbation theory to accurately describe the dynamics. This method can also be applied to general Johnson graphs J(n,k) with fixed k.

  19. Chronic Conditions: Beckett, Bergson and Samuel Johnson.

    PubMed

    Maude, Ulrika

    2016-06-01

    This article analyses the work of the twentieth-century late modernist Samuel Beckett, in light of the turn-of-the-century anti-rationalist Henri Bergson (1859-1941) and the eighteenth-century neoclassicist Samuel Johnson (1709-1784). What unites these three very different thinkers is a concern over habitual, automatic and involuntary behavior, which in all three cases has a distinctly neurological dimension. Beckett's writing explores the Bergsonian notion, informed by medicine and experimental psychology, of the limitations of agency, of "the deep-seated recalcitrance of matter," and of the human as always already inflicted by the mechanical, a fact that is poignantly highlighted by the case of Samuel Johnson. Through his encounter with Johnson, Beckett registers a paradigm shift in the understanding of subjectivity. Whereas Bergson aims, throughout his career, to contest the mechanical, habitual and automatic that threaten to encrust themselves upon the living, in Beckett's often uncannily Johnsonian writing, the habitual and the automatic become progressively more central, until in the late works, habit and mechanical behavior constitute a tenuous, fraught and primitive ontology, the residues of an agential self. PMID:26748648

  20. Climate Change Adaptation Science Activities at NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanov, William L.; Lulla, Kamlesh

    2012-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC), located in the southeast metropolitan region of Houston, TX is the prime NASA center for human spaceflight operations and astronaut training, but it also houses the unique collection of returned extraterrestrial samples, including lunar samples from the Apollo missions. The Center's location adjacent to Clear Lake and the Clear Creek watershed, an estuary of Galveston Bay, puts it at direct annual risk from hurricanes, but also from a number of other climate-related hazards including drought, floods, sea level rise, heat waves, and high wind events all assigned Threat Levels of 2 or 3 in the most recent NASA Center Disaster/Risk Matrix produced by the Climate Adaptation Science Investigator Working Group. Based on prior CASI workshops at other NASA centers, it is recognized that JSC is highly vulnerable to climate-change related hazards and has a need for adaptation strategies. We will present an overview of prior CASI-related work at JSC, including publication of a climate change and adaptation informational data brochure, and a Resilience and Adaptation to Climate Risks Workshop that was held at JSC in early March 2012. Major outcomes of that workshop that form a basis for work going forward are 1) a realization that JSC is embedded in a regional environmental and social context, and that potential climate change effects and adaptation strategies will not, and should not, be constrained by the Center fence line; 2) a desire to coordinate data collection and adaptation planning activities with interested stakeholders to form a regional climate change adaptation center that could facilitate interaction with CASI; 3) recognition that there is a wide array of basic data (remotely sensed, in situ, GIS/mapping, and historical) available through JSC and other stakeholders, but this data is not yet centrally accessible for planning purposes.

  1. CANEY CREEK WILDERNESS, ARKANSAS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ericksen, George E.; Dunn, Maynard L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Metallic and nonmetallic mineral resources identified in the Caney Creek Wilderness, Arkansas, include many small manganese deposits in areas of novaculite, tripoli, shale, and slate. Small amounts of hand-sorted manganese-oxide ore have been recovered from several of the manganese deposits during sporadic mining activity. Additional manganese resources remain in the known deposits, but the amount in any given deposit is small.

  2. Idaho Explosives Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Edward L. Reber; Larry G. Blackwood; Andrew J. Edwards; J. Keith Jewell; Kenneth W. Rohde; Edward H. Seabury; Jeffery B. Klinger

    2005-12-01

    The Idaho Explosives Detection System was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to respond to threats imposed by delivery trucks potentially carrying explosives into military bases. A full-scale prototype system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. The system consists of two racks, one on each side of a subject vehicle. Each rack includes a neutron generator and an array of NaI detectors. The two neutron generators are pulsed and synchronized. A laptop computer controls the entire system. The control software is easily operable by minimally trained staff. The system was developed to detect explosives in a medium size truck within a 5-min measurement time. System performance was successfully demonstrated with explosives at the INL in June 2004 and at Andrews Air Force Base in July 2004.

  3. Copper-silver deposits of the Revett Formation, Montana and Idaho: origin and resource potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frost, Thomas P.; Zientek, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    The Revett Formation of northern Idaho and western Montana contains major stratabound copper-silver deposits near Troy, Rock Creek, and Rock Lake, Montana. To help the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) meet its goal of integrating geoscience information into the land-planning process, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists recently completed a compilation of regional stratigraphy and mineralogy of the Revett Formation and a mineral resource assessment of Revett-type copper-silver deposits. The USGS assessment indicates that a large area of USFS-administered land in northwestern Montana and northern Idaho may contain significant undiscovered Revett-type copper-silver deposits.

  4. Idaho Higher Education: 1994 Fact Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Board of Education, Boise.

    This fact book presents information about Idaho's public four-year college, Lewis-Clark State College, and the three universities: Boise State University, Idaho State University, and the University of Idaho. The book also provides selected data on vocational education and Idaho's two community colleges: North Idaho College and the College of…

  5. Mineralogy of selected sedimentary interbeds at or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, M.F.; Bartholomay, R.C.

    1994-08-01

    The US Geological Survey`s (USGS) Project Office at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) analyzed 66 samples from sedimentary interbed cores during a 38-month period beginning in October 1990 to determine bulk and clay mineralogy. These cores had been collected from 19 sites in the Big Lost River Basin, 2 sites in the Birch Creek Basin, and 1 site in the Mud Lake Basin, and were archived at the USGS lithologic core library at the INEL. Mineralogy data indicate that core samples from the Big Lost River Basin have larger mean and median percentages of quartz, total feldspar, and total clay minerals, but smaller mean and median percentages of calcite than the core samples from the Birch Creek Basin. Core samples from the Mud Lake Basin have abundant quartz, total feldspar, calcite, and total clay minerals. Identification of the mineralogy of the Snake River Plain is needed to aid in the study of the hydrology and geochemistry of subsurface waste disposal.

  6. 216. Construction of the Back Creek Bridge over Back Creek ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    216. Construction of the Back Creek Bridge over Back Creek and Virginia Route 613. This is a good example of a precast concrete girder bridge. Note the fallen beam at the far end. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  7. Johnson-Matthey diffuser characterization testing

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, P. J.; Klein, J. E.; Sessions, H. T.; Morgan, G. A.

    2008-07-15

    A diffuser/permeator commercially fabricated by Johnson-Matthey was purchased for characterization testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). A test system was fabricated to test not only feed and bleed flows and pressures, but also permeate pressure for flows up to 20 sLPM. The tests described in this paper consider the effect of various inert gas types, feed gas compositions, methods for temperature control, and varying tube pressure on permeation of H{sub 2} through the Pd/Ag tubes. (authors)

  8. Imatinib-induced Stevens-Johnsons syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jha, Praveen; Himanshu, D; Jain, Nirdesh; Singh, Ajay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor used widely as the first-line treatment for chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). The side-effect profile of this drug includes fluid retention, muscle cramps, diarrhoea, myelosuppression and skin rashes. Of these, rashes of the type maculo-papular eruptions and oedema developed most commonly. The cutaneous adverse reactions other than maculo-papular eruptions are rare with imatinib. Severe and life-threatening cutaneous reactions can occur in 5% cases. Here, the author reports a case of newly diagnosed CML that developed Steven-Johnsons syndrome due to imatinib therapy. Patient responded and discharged successfully on withdrawal of the culminating drug. PMID:23349042

  9. Imatinib-induced Stevens-Johnsons syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Praveen; D, Himanshu; Jain, Nirdesh; Singh, Ajay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor used widely as the first-line treatment for chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). The side-effect profile of this drug includes fluid retention, muscle cramps, diarrhoea, myelosuppression and skin rashes. Of these, rashes of the type maculo-papular eruptions and oedema developed most commonly. The cutaneous adverse reactions other than maculo-papular eruptions are rare with imatinib. Severe and life-threatening cutaneous reactions can occur in 5% cases. Here, the author reports a case of newly diagnosed CML that developed Steven-Johnsons syndrome due to imatinib therapy. Patient responded and discharged successfully on withdrawal of the culminating drug. PMID:23349042

  10. NASA Johnson Space Center Biomedical Research Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, W. H.

    1999-01-01

    Johnson Space Center (JSC) medical sciences laboratories constitute a national resource for support of medical operations and life sciences research enabling a human presence in space. They play a critical role in evaluating, defining, and mitigation the untoward effect of human adaption to space flight. Over the years they have developed the unique facilities and expertise required to perform: biomedical sample analysis and physiological performance tests supporting medical evaluations of space flight crew members and scientific investigations of the operationally relevant medical, physiological, cellular, and biochemical issues associated with human space flight. A general overview of these laboratories is presented in viewgraph form.

  11. The Beaver Creek story

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, W.H., Jr.; Whitworth, B.G.; Smith, G.F.; Byl, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    Beaver Creek watershed in West Tennessee includes about 95,000 acres of the Nation's most productive farmland and most highly erodible soils. In 1989 the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Agriculture, began a study to evaluate the effect of agricultural activities on water quality in the watershed and for best management practices designed to reduce agricultural nonpoint-source pollution. Agrichemical monitoring included testing the soils, ground water, and streams at four farm sites ranging from 27 to 420 acres. Monitoring stations were operated downstream to gain a better understanding of the water chemistry as runoff moved from small ditches into larger streams to the outlet of the Beaver Creek watershed. Prior to the implementation of best management practices at one of the farm study sites, some storms produced an average suspended-sediment concentration of 70,000 milligrams per liter. After the implementation of BMP's, however, the average value never exceeded 7,000 milligrams per liter. No-till crop production was the most effective best management practice for conserving soil on the farm fields tested. A natural bottomland hardwood wetland and a constructed wetland were evaluated as instream resource-management systems. The wetlands improved water quality downstream by acting as a filter and removing a significant amount of nonpoint-source pollution from the agricultural runoff. The constructed wetland reduced the sediment, pesticide, and nutrient load by approximately 50 percent over a 4-month period. The results of the Beaver Creek watershed study have increased the understanding of the effects of agriculture on water resources. Study results also demonstrated that BMP's do protect and improve water quality.

  12. Thrusting Rates in the Early Eocene from the Sevier Hinterland, Idaho, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasio, D. J.; Latta, D.; Kodama, K. P.; Idleman, B. D.

    2011-12-01

    The terminal motion on the Wildhorse thrust system was reconstructed from the Smiley Creek Formation in eastern Idaho, USA (UTM coordinates 11T 739950 m E, 4865190 m N). During the last 100 m of fault slip the calculated slip rate varied between 0.05 to 1.2 mm/yr averaged over time intervals of 300-800 kyrs. The emergent thrust fault overrode proximal fault scarp colluvium deposited as water poor debris flows and was buried by braided stream sheet flood facies sourced by out-of-sequence thrust motion further west. Paleomagnetic data (~100 cores from 27 horizons spaced ~5-60 m apart) showed both normal and reversed directions during progressive step-wise thermal demagnetization to 670° C. Principal component analysis was used to calculate characteristic remanent magnetization directions from which sample polarities were assigned. Correlation of the Smiley Creek Formation to the Geomagnetic Polarity Timescale requires an age older than 49.39±0.27 (n=7) Ma determined by 40Ar/39Ar dating of overlying Challis Volcanic samples and younger than 57±9 Ma, the youngest U/Pb zircon age from an included andesite cobble from a near by Smiley Creek conglomerate exposure (11T 766548 m E, 4874382 m N). The favored magnetostratigraphic correlation is most consistent with expected terrestrial fan facies accumulation rates, the reversal pattern, and calculated paleopole positions. The 183 m of Smiley Creek Formation west of Stag Creek, Idaho was deposited in 4.48 myrs during polarity chrons 24.3n to 23n2n. The terminal emplacement of the Wildhorse thrust was associated with the development of the Pioneer Metamorphic Core complex in the hinterland of the Montana Recess of the Idaho-Wyoming-Montana thrust belt.

  13. Ship Creek bioassessment investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Cushing, C.E.; Mueller, R.P.; Murphy, M.T.

    1995-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was asked by Elmendorf Air Force Base (EAFB) personnel to conduct a series of collections of macroinvertebrates and sediments from Ship Creek to (1) establish baseline data on these populations for reference in evaluating possible impacts from Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) activities at two operable units, (2) compare current population indices with those found by previous investigations in Ship Creek, and (3) determine baseline levels of concentrations of any contaminants in the sediments associated with the macroinvertebrates. A specific suite of indices established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was requested for the macroinvertebrate analyses; these follow the Rapid Bioassessment Protocol developed by Plafkin et al. (1989) and will be described. Sediment sample analyses included a Microtox bioassay and chemical analysis for contaminants of concern. These analyses included, volatile organic compounds, total gasoline and diesel hydrocarbons (EPA method 8015, CA modified), total organic carbon, and an inductive-coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) metals scan. Appendix A reports on the sediment analyses. The Work Plan is attached as Appendix B.

  14. Kiowa Creek Switching Station

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to construct, operate, and maintain a new Kiowa Creek Switching Station near Orchard in Morgan County, Colorado. Kiowa Creek Switching Station would consist of a fenced area of approximately 300 by 300 feet and contain various electrical equipment typical for a switching station. As part of this new construction, approximately one mile of an existing 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line will be removed and replaced with a double circuit overhead line. The project will also include a short (one-third mile) realignment of an existing line to permit connection with the new switching station. In accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations for implementing the procedural provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 40 CFR Parts 1500--1508, the Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required for the proposed project. This determination is based on the information contained in this environmental assessment (EA) prepared by Western. The EA identifies and evaluates the environmental and socioeconomic effects of the proposed action, and concludes that the advance impacts on the human environment resulting from the proposed project would not be significant. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Map showing geologic terranes of the Hailey 1 degree x 2 degrees quadrangle and the western part of the Idaho Falls 1 degree x 2 degrees quadrangle, south-central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worl, R.G.; Johnson, K.M.

    1995-01-01

    The paper version of Map Showing Geologic Terranes of the Hailey 1x2 Quadrangle and the western part of the Idaho Falls 1x2 Quadrangle, south-central Idaho was compiled by Ron Worl and Kate Johnson in 1995. The plate was compiled on a 1:250,000 scale topographic base map. TechniGraphic System, Inc. of Fort Collins Colorado digitized this map under contract for N.Shock. G.Green edited and prepared the digital version for publication as a geographic information system database. The digital geologic map database can be queried in many ways to produce a variety of geologic maps.

  16. Emergency Operations Center at Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caylor, Gary C.

    1997-01-01

    In June 1966, at the start of the Gulf Coast hurricane season, the Johnson Space Center (JSC) celebrated the opening of its new 4,000-square foot, state-of-the-art Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The new EOC has been upgraded and enhanced to support a wide spectrum of emergencies affecting JSC and neighboring communities. One of the main features of the EOC is its premier computerized dispatch center. The new system unites many of JSC's critical emergency functions into one integrated network. It automatically monitors fire alarms, security entrances, and external cameras. It contains the JSC inventory of hazardous materials, by building and room, and can call up Material Safety Data Sheets for most of the generic hazardous materials used on-site. The EOC is available for community use during area emergencies such as hurricanes and is a welcome addition to the Clear Lake/Galveston Bay Area communities' emergency response resources.

  17. Operation and performance of the solar steam system at the Johnson & Johnson plant in Sherman, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, D. F.; Youngblood, S. B.

    1982-08-01

    A solar system that produces 174 C (345 F) steam is in operation at the Johnson and Johnson manufacturing plant in Sherman, Texas. The system uses parabolic trough collectors to heat pressurized water which then flashes to steam in a flash boiler; this steam is fed into the plant steam main for use in several manufacturing processes. The facility's performance has been monitored continuously since it began operation in January 1980. The collector field typically has delivered energy to the flash boiler at an average daily efficiency of 30 to 40 percent, with an hourly average efficiency ranging from 38 to 42 percent at peak insolation periods. The daily and hourly values for energy collected and steam generated on a clear day in September are presented, as well as a monthly summary for the first 13 months of operation.

  18. WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, CROOKED RIVER, IDAHO COUNTY IDAHO, 1987

    EPA Science Inventory

    Crooked River (17060305), a primary anadromous fisheries resource, is located approximately 120 miles southeast of Lewiston, Idaho. Dredging operations between 1936 and 1948 left large piles of gravel in the natural watercourse, causing the river to meander. Impoundments of wat...

  19. 50 CFR 226.213 - Critical habitat for Johnson's seagrass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Critical habitat for Johnson's seagrass... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT § 226.213 Critical habitat for Johnson's seagrass. Critical habitat is designated to include substrate and water...

  20. 50 CFR 226.213 - Critical habitat for Johnson's seagrass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Critical habitat for Johnson's seagrass... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT § 226.213 Critical habitat for Johnson's seagrass. Critical habitat is designated to include substrate and water...

  1. Steven-Johnson syndrome due to ayurvedic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Shivamurthy, Raghu Prasada M.; Kallappa, Ravindra; Reddy, Shashikala G. H.; Rangappa, Druva Kumar B.

    2012-01-01

    Steven–Johnson syndrome may be considered as a cytotoxic immune reaction to drugs, infections etc. This is a case report of Steven–Johnson syndrome due to an ayurvedic preparation which was used in the treatment of mental retardation in a young girl. PMID:22345890

  2. Sir William Johnson and the Indians of New York.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Milton W.

    In order to make the vast literature about the history of Indian and white relations in New York readily accessible to teachers, students, and general readers, this booklet brings together the main points of the relationship between the Indians and Sir William Johnson. Johnson is a key figure in the Indian story of New York state during the 1770s.…

  3. Marcia K. Johnson: 2006 award for distinguished scientific contributions.

    PubMed

    2006-11-01

    Presents the citation to Marcia K. Johnson, who received the Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions "for raising and illuminating fundamental questions about the cognitive and neural processes that constitute the subjective experience of mental life." A brief profile and a selected bibliography, as well as Johnson's award address, entitled Memory and Reality, accompany the citation. ((c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:17115807

  4. Bed plate for rail bending machine, Johnson Company, Johnstown, Pa. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bed plate for rail bending machine, Johnson Company, Johnstown, Pa. Scale 3 inches - 1 ft, Jan 30th 1893, drawing number 14929. (Photograph of drawing held at the Johnstown Corporation General Office,Johnstown, Pennsylvania) - Johnson Steel Street Rail Company, 525 Central Avenue, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  5. General plan, bending machinge, Johnson Company, Johnstown, Pa. Scale 3 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General plan, bending machinge, Johnson Company, Johnstown, Pa. Scale 3 inches - 1 ft, March 13th 1893, drawing number 15384 (photograph of drawing of rail bending machine held at the Johnstown Corporation General Office, Johnstown, Pennsylvania) - Johnson Steel Street Rail Company, 525 Central Avenue, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  6. Tool nos. 277 and 2201, details for bending machine, Johnson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Tool nos. 277 and 2201, details for bending machine, Johnson Company, Johnstown, Pa. Scale 3 inches - 1 ft, Feb 13th 1893, drawing number 15098. (Photograph of drawing held at the Johnstown Corporation General Office, Johnstown, Pennsylvania) - Johnson Steel Street Rail Company, 525 Central Avenue, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  7. 50 CFR 226.213 - Critical habitat for Johnson's seagrass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Critical habitat for Johnson's seagrass... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT § 226.213 Critical habitat for Johnson's seagrass. Critical habitat is designated to include substrate and water...

  8. 50 CFR 226.213 - Critical habitat for Johnson's seagrass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Critical habitat for Johnson's seagrass... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT § 226.213 Critical habitat for Johnson's seagrass. Critical habitat is designated to include substrate and water...

  9. 50 CFR 226.213 - Critical habitat for Johnson's seagrass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Critical habitat for Johnson's seagrass... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT § 226.213 Critical habitat for Johnson's seagrass. Critical habitat is designated to include substrate and water...

  10. Survey, applications, and prospects of Johnson noise thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Blalock, T.V.; Shepard, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Significant progress in the field of Johnson noise thermometry has occurred since the 1971 survey of Kamper. This paper will review the foundation work of Johnson noise thermometry, survey the basic methods which do not utilize quantum devices for noise thermometry for industrial temperatures, and present some applications of noise thermometry in temperature scale metrology and process temperature instrumentation. 35 references.

  11. Steelhead Supplementation in Idaho Rivers, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Alan

    2001-01-01

    In 2000, we continued our assessment of the Sawtooth Hatchery steelhead stock to reestablish natural populations in Beaver and Frenchman creeks in the upper Salmon River. We stocked both streams with 15 pair of hatchery adults and estimated the potential smolt production from the 1999 outplant. I estimated that about nine smolts per female could be produced in both streams from the 1999 outplant. The smolt-to-adult return would need to exceed 20% to return two adults at this level of production. In the Red River drainage, we stocked Dworshak hatchery stock fingerlings and smolts, from 1993 to 1999, to assess which life-stage produces more progeny when the adults return to spawn. In 2000, we operated the Red River weir to trap adults that returned from these stockings, but none were caught from either group. We continued to monitor wild steelhead populations in the Lochsa and Selway river drainages. We estimated that 26 wild adult steelhead returned to Fish Creek. This is the lowest adult escapement we have documented (when the weir was intact all spring) since we began monitoring Fish Creek in 1992. I estimated that nearly 25,000 juvenile steelhead migrated out of Fish Creek this year. Juvenile steelhead densities in Lochsa and Selway tributaries were similar to those observed in 1999. In 2000, we obtained funding for a DNA analysis to assess Idaho's steelhead stock structure. We collected fin samples from wild steelhead in 70 streams of the Clearwater, Snake, and Salmon River drainages and from our five hatchery stocks. The DNA analysis was subcontracted to Dr. Jennifer Nielsen, Alaska Biological Science Center, Anchorage, and will be completed in 2001.

  12. Assessment of Biological Conditions at Selected Stream Sites in Johnson County, Kansas, and Cass and Jackson Counties, Missouri, 2003 and 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poulton, Barry C.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Lee, Casey J.

    2007-01-01

    Macroinvertebrate samples were collected at 15 stream sites representing 11 different watersheds in Johnson County, Kansas, in 2003 and 2004 to assess biological conditions in streams and relations to environmental variables. Published data from an additional seven stream sites, one in Johnson County, Kansas, and six others in adjacent Cass and Jackson Counties in Missouri also were evaluated. Multimetric scores, which integrated a combination of measures that describe various aspects of biological community abundance and diversity, were used to evaluate and compare the biological health of streams. In addition, for 15 of 16 Johnson County stream sites, environmental data (streamflow, precipitation, and land use) and water- and sediment-quality data (primarily nutrients, indicator bacteria, and organic wastewater compounds) were used in statistical analyses to evaluate relations between macroinvertebrate metrics and variables that may affect them. The information is useful for defining current conditions, evaluating conditions relative to State aquatic-life support and total maximum daily load requirements, evaluating effects of urbanization, developing effective water-quality management plans, and documenting changes in biological condition and water quality. Biological conditions in selected Johnson County streams generally reflected a gradient in the degree of human disturbances upstream from the sites, including percentage of urban and agricultural land use as well as the presence, absence, and proximity of wastewater treatment discharges. In this report, the term gradient is used to describe a continuum in the conditions (biological, environmental, or land use) observed at the study sites. Upstream Blue River sites, downstream from primarily agricultural land use, consistently scored among the sites least impacted by human disturbance, and in some metrics these sites scored higher than the State reference site (Captain Creek). The term impact, as used in this

  13. Underside of span over Pickering Creek, showing highly skewed piers, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Underside of span over Pickering Creek, showing highly skewed piers, looking south. - Pennsylvania Railroad, Pickering Creek Trestle, Spanning Pickering Creek, south of Buckwalter Road, Pickering, Chester County, PA

  14. 5. VIEW OF MOSIER CREEK BRIDGE, NORTH ELEVATION. Historic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF MOSIER CREEK BRIDGE, NORTH ELEVATION. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Mosier Creek Bridge, Spanning Mosier Creek carrying Historic Columbia River Highway, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  15. EAGLE CREEK BRIDGE, WEST ELEVATION LOOKING 55 DEGREES NORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAGLE CREEK BRIDGE, WEST ELEVATION LOOKING 55 DEGREES NORTHEAST - Historic Columbia River Highway, Eagle Creek Bridge, Spanning Eagle Creek on Historic Columbia River Highway, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  16. 2. MOSIER CREEK BRIDGE LOOKING NORTHWEST AT SOUTH ELEVATION. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. MOSIER CREEK BRIDGE LOOKING NORTHWEST AT SOUTH ELEVATION. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Mosier Creek Bridge, Spanning Mosier Creek carrying Historic Columbia River Highway, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  17. 2. EAGLE CREEK RECREATION AREA, VIEW OF COMMUNITY KITCHEN. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EAGLE CREEK RECREATION AREA, VIEW OF COMMUNITY KITCHEN. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Eagle Creek Recreation Area, Historic Columbia River Highway at Eagle Creek, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  18. Perspective view of span over French Creek and east abutment, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of span over French Creek and east abutment, looking NW. - Pennsylvania Railroad, French Creek Trestle, Spanning French Creek, north of Paradise Street, Phoenixville, Chester County, PA

  19. 76 FR 16447 - ETHICON, a Subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson Including On-Site Leased Workers From Kelly Temporary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... Register on September 3, 2010 (75 FR 54186). At the request of the State Agency, the Department reviewed... February 1, 2010. The notice was published in the Federal Register on February 13, 2008 (73 FR 8369). In... Employment and Training Administration ETHICON, a Subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson Including On-Site...

  20. Distributed Wind Energy in Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, John; Johnson, Kathryn; Haynes, Todd; Seifert, Gary

    2009-01-31

    This project is a research and development program aimed at furthering distributed wind technology. In particular, this project addresses some of the barriers to distributed wind energy utilization in Idaho.

  1. Water-quality variability and constituent transport and processes in streams of Johnson County, Kansas, using continuous monitoring and regression models, 2003-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Teresa; Gatotho, Jackline

    2014-01-01

    The population of Johnson County, Kansas increased by about 24 percent between 2000 and 2012, making it one of the most rapidly developing areas of Kansas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Johnson County Stormwater Management Program, began a comprehensive study of Johnson County streams in 2002 to evaluate and monitor changes in stream quality. The purpose of this report is to describe water-quality variability and constituent transport for streams representing the five largest watersheds in Johnson County, Kansas during 2003 through 2011. The watersheds ranged in urban development from 98.3 percent urban (Indian Creek) to 16.7 percent urban (Kill Creek). Water-quality conditions are quantified among the watersheds of similar size (50.1 square miles to 65.7 square miles) using continuous, in-stream measurements, and using regression models developed from continuous and discrete data. These data are used to quantify variability in concentrations and loads during changing streamflow and seasonal conditions, describe differences among sites, and assess water quality relative to water-quality standards and stream management goals. Water quality varied relative to streamflow conditions, urbanization in the upstream watershed, and contributions from wastewater treatment facilities and storm runoff. Generally, as percent impervious surface (a measure of urbanization) increased, streamflow yield increased. Water temperature of Indian Creek, the most urban site which is also downstream from wastewater facility discharges, was higher than the other sites about 50 percent of the time, particularly during winter months. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were less than the Kansas Department of Health and Environment minimum criterion of 5 milligrams per liter about 15 percent of the time at the Indian Creek site. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were less than the criterion about 10 percent of the time at the rural Blue River and Kill Creek sites, and less than

  2. Tertiary epizonal plutonic rocks of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness, Idaho County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Motzer, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    Geologic mapping in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness identified approximately 731 kmS of epizonal plutonic granitic rocks within the Bitterroot lobe of the Idaho batholith. From north to south, the intrusions are the Rock Lake Creek stock and the Whistling Pig, Running Creek, Bad Luck and Painted Rocks plutons. The stock and plutons consist of medium- to coarse-grained biotite and hornblende-biotite syenorgranite to monzogranite and quartz syenite capped by fine-grained biotite leucogranite. These rocks are intruded by late-synplutonic leucogranite dikes and post plutonic porphyritic rhyolite to rhyodacite and basalt dikes. The medium-grained granitic rocks are high in SiO2, K2O, Na2O, Ga, Th, U, W and Zr, but low in Al7O3, CaO, MgO, Cr, Ni, Co and V. Most of the granites are peraluminous. Rare-earth element (REE) plots (rock sample/chondrite) show enrichment in light REE over heavy REE with strong EU depletions. K-Ar biotite radiometric age determinations for medium-grained granites in all of the plutons range from approximately 51 Ma (Whistling Pig pluton) to 43.7 Ma (Painted Rocks pluton). Petrogenetic studies suggest that the plutons were rapidly emplaced to within 3.0 km of the paleosurface. The types, textures and color of the rocks result from devolatilization of the crystallizing melt and very low-grade hydrothermal alteration. The fluorine-rich melts are the fractionated with accumulate residue; they are considered to be anorogenic (A-type) granites intruded into the center of a metamorphic core complex.

  3. Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek Watershed Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon; Smith, J.G.

    1999-03-01

    Biological monitoring of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, which border the Paducah Site, has been conducted since 1987. Biological monitoring was conducted by University of Kentucky from 1987 to 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 through March 1999. In March 1998, renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permits were issued to the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Enrichment Corporation. The renewed DOE permit requires that a watershed monitoring program be developed for the Paducah Site within 90 days of the effective date of the renewed permit. This plan outlines the sampling and analysis that will be conducted for the watershed monitoring program. The objectives of the watershed monitoring are to (1) determine whether discharges from the Paducah Site and the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) associated with the Paducah Site are adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assess the ecological health of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, (3) assess the degree to which abatement actions ecologically benefit Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek, (4) provide guidance for remediation, (5) provide an evaluation of changes in potential human health concerns, and (6) provide data which could be used to assess the impact of inadvertent spills or fish kill. According to the cleanup will result in these watersheds [Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks] achieving compliance with the applicable water quality criteria.

  4. Dan Johnson's impact on hearing research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shotland, Lawrence I.

    2003-04-01

    Daniel L. Johnson is well known for his many technical contributions to noise research. Throughout a long and distinguished career at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dan published the results of several significant experiments, including his landmark experiments on asymptotic threshold shift and exposure to impulse noise. His work in the area of noise exposure laid much of the groundwork for a greater understanding of the physiologic response to hazardous noise, much of which has since been incorporated in national and international standards. Dan is highly regarded for his tireless work on technical and advisory committees in noise, and most recently, ototoxicity. Throughout his career, Dan has adhered to a self-imposed standard of intellectual honesty and discovery. Dan's most recent endeavor, the development of a personal noise dosimeter designed for self-monitoring by the employee, is characteristic of his creativity and energy. Perhaps less well known are his contributions over the years to the success of his younger colleagues. He has accomplished this in an unselfish and egalitarian manner, oftentimes challenging and even contradicting his own research. The focus of this talk will elaborate on these facets of Dan's professional contributions.

  5. Johnson Space Center Research and Technology Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pido, Kelle; Davis, Henry L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    As the principle center for NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Enterprise, the Johnson Space Center (JSC) leads NASA's development of human spacecraft, human support systems, and human spacecraft operations. To implement this mission, JSC has focused on developing the infrastructure and partnerships that enable the technology development for future NASA programs. In our efforts to develop key technologies, we have found that collaborative relationships with private industry and academia strengthen our capabilities, infuse innovative ideas, and provide alternative applications for our development projects. The American public has entrusted NASA with the responsibility for space--technology development, and JSC is committed to the transfer of the technologies that we develop to the private sector for further development and application. It is our belief that commercialization of NASA technologies benefits both American industry and NASA through technology innovation and continued partnering. To this end, we present the 1998-1999 JSC Research and Technology Report. As your guide to the current JSC technologies, this report showcases the projects in work at JSC that may be of interest to U.S. industry, academia, and other government agencies (federal, state, and local). For each project, potential alternative uses and commercial applications are described.

  6. NASA Johnson Space Center: Total quality partnership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harlan, Charlie; Boyd, Alfred A.

    1992-01-01

    The development of and benefits realized from a joint NASA, support contractor continuous improvement process at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is traced. The joint effort described is the Safety, Reliability, and Quality Assurance Directorate relationship with its three support contractors which began in early 1990. The Continuous Improvement effort started in early 1990 with an initiative to document and simplify numerous engineering change evaluation processes. This effort quickly grew in scope and intensity to include process improvement teams, improvement methodologies, awareness, and training. By early 1991, the support contractor had teams in place and functioning, program goals established and a cultural change effort underway. In mid-l991 it became apparent that a major redirection was needed to counter a growing sense of frustration and dissatisfaction from teams and managers. Sources of frustration were isolated to insufficient joint participation on teams, and to a poorly defined vision. Over the next year, the effort was transformed to a truly joint process. The presentation covers the steps taken to define vision, values, goals, and priorities and to form a joint Steering Committee and joint process improvement teams. The most recent assessment against the President's award criteria is presented as a summary of progress. Small, but important improvement results have already demonstrated the value of the joint effort.

  7. 5. EAGLE CREEK RECREATION AREA, EXTERIOR VIEW OF PORTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. EAGLE CREEK RECREATION AREA, EXTERIOR VIEW OF PORTION OF EAGLE CREEK OVERLOOK. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Eagle Creek Recreation Area, Historic Columbia River Highway at Eagle Creek, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  8. 6. EAGLE CREEK RECREATION AREA, INTERIOR VIEW OF PORTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. EAGLE CREEK RECREATION AREA, INTERIOR VIEW OF PORTION OF EAGLE CREEK OVERLOOK. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Eagle Creek Recreation Area, Historic Columbia River Highway at Eagle Creek, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  9. HELL'S CANYON STUDY, IDAHO AND NEZ PERCE COUNTIES, IDAHO, 1977

    EPA Science Inventory

    In September of 1975 and again in March and June of 1976, water quality survey runs were made in Hells Canyon (17060103, 17060101) to obtain information on the Snake River and its major tributaries within the area. The surveys included 5 Snake River stations from above Johnson B...

  10. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Wells Quadrangle, Nevada, Idaho, and Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Proffitt, J.L.; Mayerson, D.L.; Parker, D.P.; Wolverson, N.; Antrim, D.; Berg, J.; Witzel, F.

    1982-08-01

    The Wells 2/sup 0/ Quadrangle, Nevada, Idaho, and Utah, was evaluated using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria to delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits. Our investigation has resulted in the delineation of areas that contain Tertiary sedimentary rocks favorable for hydroallogenic deposits in the Mountain City area (Favorable Area A) and in the Oxley Peak area north of Wells (Favorable Area B). Environments considered to be unfavorable for uranium deposits include Tertiary felsic volcanic, felsic plutonic, intermediate to mafic volcanic, Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, Precambrian rocks, and most Tertiary sedimentary rocks located outside the favorable areas. Present-day basins are unevaluated environments because of a paucity of adequate outcrop and subsurface data. However, the scarce data indicate that some characteristics favorable for uranium deposits are present in the Susie Creek-Tule Valley-Wild Horse basin, the Contact-Granite Range-Tijuana John stocks area, the Charleston Reservoir area, and the Wells-Marys River basin.

  11. Health assessment for Clear Creek/Central City, Clear Creek and Gilpin Counties, Colorado, Region 8. CERCLIS No. COD980717557. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-11

    Clear Creek/Central City is a National Priorities List site located within the communities of Idaho Springs, Central City and Black Hawk, Colorado. The site consists of abandoned mill tailings and waste-rock piles with numerous open mining tunnels and shafts. Site contaminants consist of a variety of heavy metals, sulfur, radionuclides, and acid-mine discharges. The site is of public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by probable human exposure to hazardous substances at levels that may result in adverse human health effects over time.

  12. Les Johnson Views Interstellar Sail Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Interstellar Propulsion Research department are proposing different solutions to combustion propellants for future space travel. One alternative being tested is the solar sail. The idea is, once deployed, the sail will allow solar winds to propel a spacecraft away from Earth and towards its destination. This would allow a spacecraft to travel indefinitely without the need to refuel during its ong journey. Thin reflective sails could be propelled through space by sunlight, microwave beams, or laser beams, just as the wind pushes sailboats on Earth. The sail will be the largest spacecraft ever built, sparning 440 yards, twice the diameter of the Louisiana Super Dome. Construction materials are being tested in a simulated space environment, where they are exposed to harsh conditions to test their performance and durability in extremely hot and cold temperatures. A leading candidate for the construction material is a carbon fiber material whose density is less than 1/10 ounce per square yard, the equivalent of flattening one raisin to the point that it covers a square yard. In space, the material would unfurl like a fan when it is deployed from an expendable rocket. This photo shows Les Johnson, manager of MSFC's Interstellar Propulsion Research Center holding the rigid, lightweight carbon fiber. An artist's concept of the sail is on the right. Mankind's first venture outside of our solar system is proposed for launch in a 2010 timeframe. An interstellar probe, powered by the fastest spacecraft ever flown, will zoom toward the stars at 58 miles per second. It will cover the distance from New York to Los Angeles in less than a minute and will travel over 23 billion miles beyond the edge of the solar system.

  13. Tuned-circuit Johnson noise thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.J.; Blalock, T.V.; Shepard, R.L.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1989-01-01

    Three tuned circuits that can be used in Johnson noise thermometry have been analyzed; series resistance-inductance-capacitance (RLC), parallel RLC, and transformer coupled. Tuned circuits allow the temperature of the sensor to be determined by a single noise voltage, which is ideally independent of the resistance of the sensor, thereby reducing the complexity of temperature-measuring systems for space applications. Direct-coupled and transformer-coupled tuned circuits may offer advantage to the SP-100 system designer interfacing with data systems. A study was performed to establish whether the advantages of the ideal tuned circuits would be obtained with real, lossy inductive components and would provide a measurement system independent of aging and temperature effects on sensor resistance. Theoretical mean-squared output voltage dependence on sensor temperature and resistance, output capacitor value, and inductor temperature and resistance are derived for the series and parallel RLC cases. It is shown for tuned circuits using lossless inductors that the mean squared voltage is kT{sub R}/C, where T{sub R} is the sensor temperature and C is the capacitance of the capacitor. For lossy inductors and transformers, the mean-squared capacitor voltage is a function of sensor resistance, which may change in an unknown manner during an extended mission. Experiments were performed using a low-loss magnetic core as the core material of an inductor and also of a transformer. These results show that the effects of core loss on temperature accuracy are roughly the same in both cases. Experiments also show that for a sensor resistance of 100{Omega} at 1375K and for appropriate choices of inductance and capacitance values, the temperature measurement error due to an unknown sensor resistance change is in the range of 0.3 to 1 K/{Omega}, depending on the circuit used. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Water quality study at the Congaree Swamp National monument of Myers Creek, Reeves Creek and Toms Creek. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Rikard, M.

    1991-11-01

    The Congaree Swamp National Monument is one of the last significant near virgin tracts of bottom land hardwood forests in the Southeast United States. The study documents a water quality monitoring program on Myers Creek, Reeves Creek and Toms Creek. Basic water quality parameters were analyzed. High levels of aluminum and iron were found, and recommendations were made for further monitoring.

  15. 77 FR 42714 - Eagle Creek Hydropower, LLC, Eagle Creek Land Resources, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Creek Hydropower, LLC, Eagle Creek Land Resources, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Motions To Intervene, Protests, and Comments Take notice that...

  16. Renewable Energy at NASA's Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowall, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Johnson Space Center has implemented a great number of renewable energy systems. Renewable energy systems are necessary to research and implement if we humans are expected to continue to grow and thrive on this planet. These systems generate energy using renewable sources - water, wind, sun - things that we will not run out of. Johnson Space Center is helping to pave the way by installing and studying various renewable energy systems. The objective of this report will be to examine the completed renewable energy projects at NASA's Johnson Space Center for a time span of ten years, beginning in 2003 and ending in early 2014. This report will analyze the success of each project based on actual vs. projected savings and actual vs. projected efficiency. Additionally, both positive and negative experiences are documented so that lessons may be learned from past experiences. NASA is incorporating renewable energy wherever it can, including into buildings. According to the 2012 JSC Annual Sustainability Report, there are 321,660 square feet of green building space on JSC's campus. The two projects discussed here are major contributors to that statistic. These buildings were designed to meet various Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Certification criteria. LEED Certified buildings use 30 to 50 percent less energy and water compared to non-LEED buildings. The objectives of this project were to examine data from the renewable energy systems in two of the green buildings onsite - Building 12 and Building 20. In Building 12, data was examined from the solar photovoltaic arrays. In Building 20, data was examined from the solar water heater system. By examining the data from the two buildings, it could be determined if the renewable energy systems are operating efficiently. Objectives In Building 12, the data from the solar photovoltaic arrays shows that the system is continuously collecting energy from the sun, as shown by the graph below. Building 12

  17. PECONIC ESTUARY PROGRAM TIDAL CREEK STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    EEA evaluated ten tidal creeks throughout the Peconic Estuary representing a wide range of watershed variables. Primary focus was directed towards the collection and analysis of the macrobenthic invertebrate communities of these ten tidal creeks. Analysis of the macrobenthic comm...

  18. 78 FR 62616 - Salmon Creek Hydroelectric Company, Salmon Creek Hydroelectric Company, LLC; Notice of Transfer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Salmon Creek Hydroelectric Company, Salmon Creek Hydroelectric Company, LLC; Notice of Transfer of Exemption 1. By letter filed September 23, 2013, Salmon Creek Hydroelectric Company informed the Commission that they have changed its name to Salmon Creek Hydroelectric Company, LLC for...

  19. Suddenly, tomorrow came... A history of the Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dethloff, Henry C.

    1993-01-01

    This book chronicles the history of the Johnson Space Center into 17 chapters with a forward written by Donald K. Slayton. Photographs and illustrations are provided. This book becomes part of the NASA history series.

  20. Phenytoin induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome exacerbated by cefepime

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Varsha A.; Doddapaneni, Sahiti; Thunga, Girish; Thiyagu, Rajakannan; Prabhu, M. Mukyaprana; Naha, Kushal

    2013-01-01

    Steven Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a rare drug induced mucocutaneous reaction. Here, we present an elaborate report of a 28-year-old female patient who developed Phenytoin induced SJS, which was exacerbated by cefepime. PMID:24250210

  1. The visual impairment and inscrutable disease of Samuel Johnson.

    PubMed

    Margo, Curtis E; Harman, Lynn E

    2012-01-01

    Samuel Johnson, the acclaimed author of the Dictionary of the English Language, survived childhood scrofula with impaired sight and hearing. The cause of his scrofula has been attributed to bovine tuberculosis, but mycobacterial infection does not satisfactorily account for the peculiar features of Johnson's eye disorder or his hearing loss. The subject of numerous biographies, Johnson may have the most scrutinized medical history of all time. Medical detectives, hampered by the vagueness of 18(th)-century diagnosis, suspect that phlyctenular eye disease related to tuberculosis was the reason for his visual impairment. Pediatric brucellosis can also explain childhood scrofula associated with visual and auditory disabilities, but it may be difficult to reconcile any single diagnosis given the uncertainties surrounding Johnson's medical and ocular histories. PMID:22019375

  2. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS - Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Welp Riparian Enhancement Fence

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2004-08-04

    The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the installation of approximately 1.5 miles of post and wire fence along Valley Creek in Stanley, Idaho. The proposed fence will meet or exceed BPA's minimum requirement of a 35-foot setback from the stream. Fence posts will be driven into the ground with a post ponder. The goal of this project is to enhance salmon and steelhead rearing and migration habitat through exclusion fencing.

  3. Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, D.; Holzmiller, J.; Koch, F.; Polumsky, S.; Schlee, D.; Thiessen, G.; Johnson, C.

    1995-04-01

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon``. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity. The watershed coordinator for the Asotin County Conservation District led a locally based process that combined local concerns and knowledge with technology from several agencies to produce the Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan.

  4. Research and technology of the Lyndon Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Johnson Space Center accomplishments in new and advanced concepts during 1988 are highlighted. This year, reports are grouped in sections Space System Technology, Solar System Sciences, Space Transportation Technology, and Medical Sciences. Summary sections describing the role of Johnson Space Center in each program are followed by descriptions of significant tasks. Descriptions are suitable for external consumption, free of technical jargon, and illustrated to increase ease of comprehension.

  5. Late onset imatinib-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bois, Evan; Holle, Lisa M; Farooq, Umar

    2014-12-01

    Imatinib, a BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is known to cause mild to moderate cutaneous reactions in up to approximately 20% of patients. It rarely causes severe reactions, such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome, which can be life threatening. Typically, these rashes occur within two months of initiating therapy. We report a case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome induced by imatinib after several years of therapy, but later successfully was treated with nilotinib therapy. PMID:24399835

  6. Mineralogical correlation of surficial sediment from area drainages with selected sedimentary interbeds at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomay, R.C.

    1990-08-01

    Ongoing research by the US Geological Survey at the INEL involves investigation of the migration of radioactive elements contained in low-level radioactive waste, hydrologic and geologic factors affecting waste movement, and geochemical factors that influence the chemical composition of the waste. Identification of the mineralogy of the Snake River Plain is needed to aid in the study of the hydrology and geochemistry of subsurface waste disposal. The US Geological Surveys project office at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, used mineralogical data to correlate surficial sediment samples from the Big Lost River, Little Lost River, and Birch Greek drainages with selected sedimentary interbed core samples taken from test holes at the RWMC (Radioactive Waste Management Complex), TRA (Test Reactors Area), ICPP (Idaho Chemical Processing Plant), and TAN (Test Area North). Correlating the mineralogy of a particular present-day drainage area with a particular sedimentary interbed provides information on historical source of sediment for interbeds in and near the INEL. Mineralogical data indicate that surficial sediment samples from the Big Lost River drainage contained a larger amount of feldspar and pyroxene and a smaller amount of calcite and dolomite than samples from the Little Lost River and Birch Creek drainages. Mineralogical data from sedimentary interbeds at the RWMC, TRA, and ICPP correlate with surficial sediment of the present-day big Lost River drainage. Mineralogical data from a sedimentary interbed at TAN correlate with surficial sediment of the present-day Birch Creek drainage. 13 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Libraries in Idaho: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/idaho.html Libraries in Idaho To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. Boise Saint Alphonsus Health System - Boise Kissler Library and Research Center 1055 North Curtis Road Boise, ...

  8. Atmospheric Mercury Concentrations Near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir - Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    M. L. Abbott

    2005-10-01

    Elemental and reactive gaseous mercury (EGM/RGM) were measured in ambient air concentrations over a two-week period in July/August 2005 near Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir, a popular fishery located 50 km southwest of Twin Falls, Idaho. A fish consumption advisory for mercury was posted at the reservoir in 2002 by the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare. The air measurements were part of a multi-media (water, sediment, precipitation, air) study initiated by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 10 to identify potential sources of mercury contamination to the reservoir. The sampling site is located about 150 km northeast of large gold mining operations in Nevada, which are known to emit large amounts of mercury to the atmosphere (est. 2,200 kg/y from EPA 2003 Toxic Release Inventory). The work was co-funded by the Idaho National Laboratory’s Community Assistance Program and has a secondary objective to better understand mercury inputs to the environment near the INL, which lies approximately 230 km to the northeast. Sampling results showed that both EGM and RGM concentrations were significantly elevated (~ 30 – 70%, P<0.05) compared to known regional background concentrations. Elevated short-term RGM concentrations (the primary form that deposits) were likely due to atmospheric oxidation of high EGM concentrations, which suggests that EGM loading from upwind sources could increase Hg deposition in the area. Back-trajectory analyses indicated that elevated EGM and RGM occurred when air parcels came out of north-central and northeastern Nevada. One EGM peak occurred when the air parcels came out of northwestern Utah. Background concentrations occurred when the air was from upwind locations in Idaho (both northwest and northeast). Based on 2003 EPA Toxic Release Inventory data, it is likely that most of the observed peaks were from Nevada gold mine sources. Emissions from known large natural mercury

  9. Norine G. Johnson (1935-2011).

    PubMed

    Cantor, Dorothy W; Goodheart, Carol D

    2012-04-01

    On November 19, 2011, Norine G. Johnson, the ninth woman to serve as president of the American Psychological Association (APA), lost a valiant battle with cancer. Norine's curiosity about her grandmother's strength led to much of her later work on the development of strength and resiliency in adolescent girls and in women. She received her doctorate in 1972, with a minor in child development, and she became one of the first to be considered a pediatric psychologist, a newly emerging specialty. Norine became involved in organized psychology as her children got older. When she learned there had not been a woman president of the Massachusetts Psychological Association (MPA) for almost 50 years, she was appalled. An ardent feminist, who had served on MPA's Board of Directors, she could not let the situation remain that way. She ran for president and won, serving from 1981 to 1983, and then mentored many women colleagues into the role. MPA sent her to the Council of the APA as one of their representatives, and she immediately ran for a seat on the Finance Committee, later serving as chair of the committee. During her tenure on the Finance Committee, she helped create financial policy that changed APA from an organization whose assets were threatened and shrinking to a financially solid association. Norine considered Division 35 (Psychology of Women) to be her home in APA, a place filled with warmth, collegiality, and shared values. She and Judith Worell spearheaded the extremely important and successful 1993 National Conference on Education and Training in Feminist Practice. Norine was elected to the APA Board of Directors in 1997, where she served with distinction, continuing to focus on the financial well-being of the Association. Not surprisingly, she went from that role to being elected APA president. Her focus as president was on the changes in the health care delivery system in the United States. She was a staunch champion of the biopsychosocial model of health

  10. OXYGEN AERATION AT NEWTOWN CREEK

    EPA Science Inventory

    A successful initial feasibility investigation of oxygen aeration at the 0.11-cu m/sec (2.5-mgd) municipal wastewater treatment plant in Batavia, New York, prompted a larger demonstration at New York City's 13.6-cu m/sec (310-mgd) Newtown Creek Plant. A 34-mo evaluation was perfo...