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Sample records for joint disease osteoarthritis

  1. Osteoarthritis Basics: The Joint and Its Parts

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis Basics: The Joint and Its Parts Past Issues / Winter 2013 Table of Contents ... type of arthritis. More common in older people, it is sometimes called degenerative joint disease. Osteoarthritis most ...

  2. Joint instability and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA. PMID:25741184

  3. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA. PMID:25741184

  4. Imaging the hip joint in osteoarthritis: A place for ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Sudula, S N

    2016-05-01

    Osteoarthritis has traditionally been imaged with conventional radiographs; this has been regarded as the reference technique in osteoarthritis for a long time. However, in recent years, innovative imaging techniques such as ultrasonography have been used to obtain a better understanding of this disease. This is mainly due to tremendous technical advances and progressive developments of ultrasound equipment occurring over the past decade. Ultrasonography has been demonstrated to be a valuable imaging technique in the diagnosis and management of osteoarthritis of the hip joint. Application of this imaging methodology for osteoarthritis has improved the understanding of the disease process and may aid in the assessment of the efficacy of future therapies. The execution of ultrasound-guided procedures with safety and reliability has a relevant significance in patient management of osteoarthritis of the hip joint. This paper reviews the use of ultrasound as an imaging technique for the evaluation and treatment of osteoarthritis hip joint. PMID:27482280

  5. Mosaic chromosomal aberrations in synovial fibroblasts of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and other inflammatory joint diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kinne, Raimund W; Liehr, Thomas; Beensen, Volkmar; Kunisch, Elke; Zimmermann, Thomas; Holland, Heidrun; Pfeiffer, Robert; Stahl, Hans-Detlev; Lungershausen, Wolfgang; Hein, Gert; Roth, Andreas; Emmrich, Frank; Claussen, Uwe; Froster, Ursula G

    2001-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations were comparatively assessed in nuclei extracted from synovial tissue, primary-culture (P-0) synovial cells, and early-passage synovial fibroblasts (SFB; 98% enrichment; P-1, P-4 [passage 1, passage 4]) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 21), osteoarthritis (OA; n = 24), and other rheumatic diseases. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and skin fibroblasts (FB) (P-1, P-4) from the same patients, as well as SFB from normal joints and patients with joint trauma (JT) (n = 4), were used as controls. Analyses proceeded by standard GTG-banding and interphase centromere fluorescence in situ hybridization. Structural chromosomal aberrations were observed in SFB (P-1 or P-4) from 4 of 21 RA patients (19%), with involvement of chromosome 1 [e.g. del(1)(q12)] in 3 of 4 cases. In 10 of the 21 RA cases (48%), polysomy 7 was observed in P-1 SFB. In addition, aneusomies of chromosomes 4, 6, 8, 9, 12, 18, and Y were present. The percentage of polysomies was increased in P-4. Similar chromosomal aberrations were detected in SFB of OA and spondylarthropathy patients. No aberrations were detected in i) PBL or skin FB from the same patients (except for one OA patient with a karyotype 45,X[10]/46,XX[17] in PBL and variable polysomies in long-term culture skin FB); or ii) synovial tissue and/or P-1 SFB of normal joints or of patients with joint trauma. In conclusion, qualitatively comparable chromosomal aberrations were observed in synovial tissue and early-passage SFB of patients with RA, OA, and other inflammatory joint diseases. Thus, although of possible functional relevance for the pathologic role of SFB in RA, these alterations probably reflect a common response to chronic inflammatory stress in rheumatic diseases. PMID:11549374

  6. Osteoarthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... thumb joint also is commonly affected by osteoarthritis. Knees The knees are among the joints most commonly affected by osteoarthritis. Symptoms of knee osteoarthritis include stiffness, swelling, and pain, which make ...

  7. Acupuncture for peripheral joint osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Manheimer, Eric; Cheng, Ke; Linde, Klaus; Lao, Lixing; Yoo, Junghee; Wieland, Susan; van der Windt, Daniëlle AWM; Berman, Brian M; Bouter, Lex M

    2011-01-01

    Background Peripheral joint osteoarthritis is a major cause of pain and functional limitation. Few treatments are safe and effective. Objectives To assess the effects of acupuncture for treating peripheral joint osteoarthritis. Search strategy We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 1), MEDLINE, and EMBASE (both through December 2007), and scanned reference lists of articles. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing needle acupuncture with a sham, another active treatment, or a waiting list control group in people with osteoarthritis of the knee, hip, or hand. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. We calculated standardized mean differences using the differences in improvements between groups. Main results Sixteen trials involving 3498 people were included. Twelve of the RCTs included only people with OA of the knee, 3 only OA of the hip, and 1 a mix of people with OA of the hip and/or knee. In comparison with a sham control, acupuncture showed statistically significant, short-term improvements in osteoarthritis pain (standardized mean difference -0.28, 95% confidence interval -0.45 to -0.11; 0.9 point greater improvement than sham on 20 point scale; absolute percent change 4.59%; relative percent change 10.32%; 9 trials; 1835 participants) and function (-0.28, -0.46 to -0.09; 2.7 point greater improvement on 68 point scale; absolute percent change 3.97%; relative percent change 8.63%); however, these pooled short-term benefits did not meet our predefined thresholds for clinical relevance (i.e. 1.3 points for pain; 3.57 points for function) and there was substantial statistical heterogeneity. Additionally, restriction to sham-controlled trials using shams judged most likely to adequately blind participants to treatment assignment (which were also the same shams judged most

  8. Expression of adhesion molecules on synovial fluid and peripheral blood monocytes in patients with inflammatory joint disease and osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Koller, M; Aringer, M; Kiener, H; Erlacher, L; Machold, K; Eberl, G; Studnicka-Benke, A; Graninger, W; Smolen, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the presence of adhesion molecules on monocytes/macrophages (Mϕ) from peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and inflammatory joint diseases (rheumatoid (RA) and reactive arthritis (ReA)) in order to improve our understanding of the possible mechanisms underlying the inflammatory process.
METHODS—Whole blood and SF cells were stained with monoclonal antibodies against CD11a (LFA-1), CD15 s (sialyl-Lewis X), CD44, CD54, VLA-4, and HLA-DR counterstained with anti-CD14 antibodies as a Mϕ marker for dual fluorescence analysis by flowcytometry. 
RESULTS—On PB-Mϕ, CD15s was markedly increased in both RA as well as ReA compared with OA. Furthermore, in the PB LFA-1, CD44, and HLA-DR showed a higher surface density on Mϕ in ReA than in OA. Comparison between SF and PB showed significantly higher CD44 and CD54 expression on SF-Mϕ. These molecules play an important part in lymphocyte-Mϕ interaction.
CONCLUSION—In PB from patients with inflammatory joint diseases, Mϕ are activated, allowing recruitment into the synovial compartment. These disorders, in contrast with OA seem to be "systemic" in nature. Within the SF, different adhesion molecules are expressed on CD14+ Mϕ as compared with PB.

 PMID:10531076

  9. Osteoarthritis: What is Osteoarthritis? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis Basics: The Joint and Its Parts Past Issues / ... and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) A Joint With Severe Osteoarthritis With osteoarthritis, the cartilage wears away. Spurs grow ...

  10. Osteoarthritis, a disease bridging development and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lories, Rik J U; Luyten, Frank P

    2012-01-01

    The osteoarthritic diseases are common disorders characterized by progressive destruction of the articular cartilage in the joints, and associated with remodeling of the subchondral bone, synovitis and the formation of bone outgrowths at the joint margins, osteophytes. From the clinical perspective, osteoarthritis leads to joint pain and loss of function. Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of progressive disability. New data from genetic, translational and basic research have demonstrated that pathways with essential roles in joint and bone development also contribute to the postnatal homeostasis of the articular cartilage and are involved in osteoarthritis, making these potential therapeutic targets. Other systems of interest are the tissue-destructive enzymes that break down the extracellular matrix of the cartilage as well as mediators of inflammation that contribute to synovitis. However, the perspective of a durable treatment over years to decades highlights the need for a personalized medicine approach encompassing a global view on the disease and its management, thereby including nonpharmaceutical approaches such as physiotherapy and advanced surgical methods. Integration of novel strategies based on their efficacy and safety with the identification of individuals at risk and optimal individual rehabilitation management remains a major challenge for the medical community in particular, as the incidence of osteoarthritis is likely to further increase with the overall aging of the population. PMID:23951516

  11. Osteoarthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. It causes pain, swelling, and reduced motion in your ... it affects your hands, knees, hips or spine. Osteoarthritis breaks down the cartilage in your joints. Cartilage ...

  12. Osteoarthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes pain, swelling, and reduced motion in your joints. It can occur in any joint, but usually it affects your hands, knees, hips ... spine. Osteoarthritis breaks down the cartilage in your joints. Cartilage is the slippery tissue that covers the ...

  13. Osteoarthritis

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... osteoarthritis include loss of flexibility, limited movement, and pain and swelling within the joint. The condition results ... the margins of the joint. Part of the pain results from these bone spurs, which can restrict ...

  14. Three-Dimensional Quantitative Morphometric Analysis (QMA) for In Situ Joint and Tissue Assessment of Osteoarthritis in a Preclinical Rabbit Disease Model

    PubMed Central

    Stok, Kathryn S.; Besler, Bryce A.; Steiner, Thomas H.; Villarreal Escudero, Ana V.; Zulliger, Martin A.; Wilke, Markus; Atal, Kailash; Quintin, Aurelie; Koller, Bruno; Müller, Ralph; Nesic, Dobrila

    2016-01-01

    This work utilises advances in multi-tissue imaging, and incorporates new metrics which define in situ joint changes and individual tissue changes in osteoarthritis (OA). The aims are to (1) demonstrate a protocol for processing intact animal joints for microCT to visualise relevant joint, bone and cartilage structures for understanding OA in a preclinical rabbit model, and (2) introduce a comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) quantitative morphometric analysis (QMA), including an assessment of reproducibility. Sixteen rabbit joints with and without transection of the anterior cruciate ligament were scanned with microCT and contrast agents, and processed for histology. Semi-quantitative evaluation was performed on matching two-dimensional (2D) histology and microCT images. Subsequently, 3D QMA was performed; including measures of cartilage, subchondral cortical and epiphyseal bone, and novel tibio-femoral joint metrics. Reproducibility of the QMA was tested on seven additional joints. A significant correlation was observed in cartilage thickness from matching histology-microCT pairs. The lateral compartment of operated joints had larger joint space width, thicker femoral cartilage and reduced bone volume, while osteophytes could be detected quantitatively. Measures between the in situ tibia and femur indicated an altered loading scenario. High measurement reproducibility was observed for all new parameters; with ICC ranging from 0.754 to 0.998. In conclusion, this study provides a novel 3D QMA to quantify macro and micro tissue measures in the joint of a rabbit OA model. New metrics were established consisting of: an angle to quantitatively measure osteophytes (σ), an angle to indicate erosion between the lateral and medial femoral condyles (ρ), a vector defining altered angulation (λ, α, β, γ) and a twist angle (τ) measuring instability and tissue degeneration between the femur and tibia, a length measure of joint space width (JSW), and a slope and intercept

  15. Three-Dimensional Quantitative Morphometric Analysis (QMA) for In Situ Joint and Tissue Assessment of Osteoarthritis in a Preclinical Rabbit Disease Model.

    PubMed

    Stok, Kathryn S; Besler, Bryce A; Steiner, Thomas H; Villarreal Escudero, Ana V; Zulliger, Martin A; Wilke, Markus; Atal, Kailash; Quintin, Aurelie; Koller, Bruno; Müller, Ralph; Nesic, Dobrila

    2016-01-01

    This work utilises advances in multi-tissue imaging, and incorporates new metrics which define in situ joint changes and individual tissue changes in osteoarthritis (OA). The aims are to (1) demonstrate a protocol for processing intact animal joints for microCT to visualise relevant joint, bone and cartilage structures for understanding OA in a preclinical rabbit model, and (2) introduce a comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) quantitative morphometric analysis (QMA), including an assessment of reproducibility. Sixteen rabbit joints with and without transection of the anterior cruciate ligament were scanned with microCT and contrast agents, and processed for histology. Semi-quantitative evaluation was performed on matching two-dimensional (2D) histology and microCT images. Subsequently, 3D QMA was performed; including measures of cartilage, subchondral cortical and epiphyseal bone, and novel tibio-femoral joint metrics. Reproducibility of the QMA was tested on seven additional joints. A significant correlation was observed in cartilage thickness from matching histology-microCT pairs. The lateral compartment of operated joints had larger joint space width, thicker femoral cartilage and reduced bone volume, while osteophytes could be detected quantitatively. Measures between the in situ tibia and femur indicated an altered loading scenario. High measurement reproducibility was observed for all new parameters; with ICC ranging from 0.754 to 0.998. In conclusion, this study provides a novel 3D QMA to quantify macro and micro tissue measures in the joint of a rabbit OA model. New metrics were established consisting of: an angle to quantitatively measure osteophytes (σ), an angle to indicate erosion between the lateral and medial femoral condyles (ρ), a vector defining altered angulation (λ, α, β, γ) and a twist angle (τ) measuring instability and tissue degeneration between the femur and tibia, a length measure of joint space width (JSW), and a slope and intercept

  16. Obstetric and gynaecological factors in susceptibility to peripheral joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Silman, A J; Newman, J

    1996-01-01

    There is clear evidence that the age period coinciding with the peak age of the menopause is associated with an increased prevalence of osteoarthritis and this fits in with clinical observation of high likelihood of presentation at this age. A number of pieces of biological evidence also support the notion that changes in sex hormone status might influence risk of degenerative disease at peripheral joint sites. There do not appear, however, to be any important epidemiological predictors based on menstrual or obstetric history that might be useful in predicting who these women might be. PMID:8882147

  17. Etiology of osteoarthritis: genetics and synovial joint development.

    PubMed

    Sandell, Linda J

    2012-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) has a considerable hereditary component and is considered to be a polygenic disease. Data derived from genetic analyses and genome-wide screening of individuals with this disease have revealed a surprising trend: genes associated with OA tend to be related to the process of synovial joint development. Mutations in these genes might directly cause OA. In addition, they could also determine the age at which OA becomes apparent, the joint sites involved, the severity of the disease and how rapidly it progresses. In this Review, I propose that genetic mutations associated with OA can be placed on a continuum. Early-onset OA is caused by mutations in matrix molecules often associated with chondrodysplasias, whereas less destructive structural abnormalities or mutations confer increased susceptibility to injury or malalignment that can result in middle-age onset. Finally, mutations in molecules that regulate subtle aspects of joint development and structure lead to late-onset OA. In this Review, I discuss the genetics of OA in general, but focus on the potential effect of genetic mutations associated with OA on joint structure, the role of joint structure in the development of OA--using hip abnormalities as a model--and how understanding the etiology of the disease could influence treatment. PMID:22231237

  18. Translating genomics into mechanisms of disease: Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bomer, Nils; den Hollander, Wouter; Ramos, Yolande F M; Meulenbelt, Ingrid

    2015-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common age-related arthritic disorder and is characterized by aberrant extracellular matrix (ECM) content and surface disruptions that range from fibrillation, clefting and delamination, leading to articular surface erosion. Worldwide, over 20% of the population is affected with OA and 80% of these patients have limitations in movement, whereas 25% experience inhibition in major daily activities of life. OA is the most common disabling arthritic disease; nevertheless, no disease-modifying treatment is available except for the expensive total joint replacement surgery at end-stage disease. Lack of insight into the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of OA has considerably contributed to the inability of the scientific community to develop disease-modifying drugs. To overcome this critical barrier, focus should be on translation of identified robust gene deviations towards the underlying biological mechanisms. PMID:27107506

  19. Osteoarthritis accelerates and exacerbates Alzheimer's disease pathology in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate whether localized peripheral inflammation, such as osteoarthritis, contributes to neuroinflammation and neurodegenerative disease in vivo. Methods We employed the inducible Col1-IL1βXAT mouse model of osteoarthritis, in which induction of osteoarthritis in the knees and temporomandibular joints resulted in astrocyte and microglial activation in the brain, accompanied by upregulation of inflammation-related gene expression. The biological significance of the link between peripheral and brain inflammation was explored in the APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) whereby osteoarthritis resulted in neuroinflammation as well as exacerbation and acceleration of AD pathology. Results Induction of osteoarthritis exacerbated and accelerated the development of neuroinflammation, as assessed by glial cell activation and quantification of inflammation-related mRNAs, as well as Aβ pathology, assessed by the number and size of amyloid plaques, in the APP/PS1; Col1-IL1βXAT compound transgenic mouse. Conclusion This work supports a model by which peripheral inflammation triggers the development of neuroinflammation and subsequently the induction of AD pathology. Better understanding of the link between peripheral localized inflammation, whether in the form of osteoarthritis, atherosclerosis or other conditions, and brain inflammation, may prove critical to our understanding of the pathophysiology of disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21899735

  20. Osteoarthritis

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... with the aging process. Osteoarthritis is a chronic disease causing the deterioration of the cartilage within a ... is roughened and becomes worn down. As the disease progresses, the cartilage becomes completely worn down and ...

  1. Characterization of subchondral bone histopathology of facet joint osteoarthritis in lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Netzer, Cordula; Urech, Karin; Hügle, Thomas; Benz, Robyn Melanie; Geurts, Jeroen; Schären, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Facet joint osteoarthritis may be a cause of low back pain in degenerative spine diseases including lumbar spinal stenosis. Subchondral bone is regarded as a potential therapeutic target for osteoarthritis treatment. The goal of this study was to characterize subchondral bone histopathology in osteoarthritic facet joints from lumbar spinal stenosis patients. Fifteen patients with degenerative spinal stenosis scheduled for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion surgery were recruited for this study. Osteoarthritis severity was graded on T1- and T2-weighted MRI images using Weishaupt scoring system. Dissected osteoarthritic facet joints were subjected to histological and immunohistochemistry analyses to study relative abundance of osteoblast, osteoclasts, and macrophages using van Gieson's, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and CD68-antibody staining, respectively. Presence of nerve fibers was evaluated by PGP9.5-antibody staining. Differential bone histopathology, independent from radiological osteoarthritis grade, was observed in facet joints. Extensive de novo bone formation was found in subchondral bone tissues of eight of fifteen specimens. Regions of bone formation showed high abundance of blood vessels and CD68-positive macrophages, but were devoid of multinucleated osteoclasts. Additional pathological changes in subchondral marrow spaces, including inflammatory infiltration and enhanced osteoclast activity, were characterized by macrophage-rich tissues. PGP9.5-positive nerve fibers were detected near arterioles, but not in regions displaying bone pathology. Individual histopathological parameters did not associate with clinical features or radiological osteoarthritis severity. Subchondral bone histopathology of facet joint osteoarthritis in lumbar spinal stenosis is characterized by marrow infiltration by macrophage-rich tissues and enhanced de novo bone formation. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34

  2. Spontaneously developed osteoarthritis in the temporomandibular joint in STR/ort mice

    PubMed Central

    KUMAGAI, KENICHI; SUZUKI, SATSUKI; KANRI, YORIAKI; MATSUBARA, RYOTA; FUJII, KEISUKE; WAKE, MASAHIRO; SUZUKI, RYUJI; HAMADA, YOSHIKI

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis is typically a slowly progressive asymmetric disease. Little is known regarding the natural destruction of TMJ articular tissues. The aim of the present study was to investigate morphological changes in the TMJ of STR/ort mice, known to be the model for spontaneous osteoarthritis in the knee joint, and to evaluate STR/ort mice as a suitable animal model for TMJ osteoarthritis. TMJs from 32 STR/ort mice euthanized at 30, 40, 50 or 60 weeks of age, and from 6 CBA mice euthanized at 30, 40 or 60 weeks of age were examined. Toluidine blue and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining were used to assess histological changes in the articular cartilage. Morphological changes in the articular cartilage of the TMJ were evaluated using microcomputed tomography. At the age of 40–50 weeks, 17 (68%) of the 25 STR/ort mice had loss of articular cartilage on histology, with cavitation and erosion of the exposed bone and gradual changes in condylar shape. Furthermore, osteoarthritic morphological changes, and structural alterations were observed by microcomputed tomography. The STR/ort mouse strain appears to develop spontaneous osteoarthritis-like lesions in the TMJ with age, and would be a useful model to study the pathogenesis of TMJ osteoarthritis. PMID:26171147

  3. Keratan sulphate in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Spector, T D; Woodward, L; Hall, G M; Hammond, A; Williams, A; Butler, M G; James, I T; Hart, D J; Thompson, P W; Scott, D L

    1992-01-01

    Serum concentrations of antigenic keratan sulphate determined by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with a monoclonal antibody were studied in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, other inflammatory diseases, and a large control group of women without arthritis. Mean keratan sulphate concentrations were low in 117 women with RA compared with 227 female control subjects matched for age drawn from a community survey. There were significant correlations between serum keratan sulphate concentrations in patients with RA and serum C reactive protein and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Serum keratan sulphate concentrations were also low in 29 men and women with ankylosing spondylitis and 29 patients with arthritis and high concentrations of C reactive protein. In 98 women undergoing an operation for benign breast disease there were decreases in serum keratan sulphate concentrations after the operation which correlated with doses in serum C reactive protein. No differences were found in keratan sulphate concentrations in 137 women with osteoarthritis compared with controls. Within the group with osteoarthritis there were no differences for the various joint groups and there was no obvious correlation with radiographic severity or progression. These findings suggest serum keratan sulphate is unlikely to be useful as a diagnostic marker in osteoarthritis or RA but indicate a role for inflammation in the regulation of cartilage loss. PMID:1444626

  4. Bone alterations are associated with ankle osteoarthritis joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yukio; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Kamimura, Mikio; Komatsu, Masatoshi; Ikegami, Shota; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of ankle osteoarthritis (OA) is largely unknown. We analyzed 24 ankle OA of 21 patients diagnosed by plain radiographs using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ankle joint pain disappeared in 22 out of 24 joints by conservative treatment. MRI bone signal changes in and around the ankle joints were observed in 22 of 24 joints. Bone signal changes along the joint line were seen in 10 of 11 joints as a Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grade of II to IV. Such signal changes were witnessed in only 4 of 13 joints with KL grade 0 or I. In the talocrural joint, bone alterations occurred in both tibia and talus bones through the joint line in cases of KL grade III or IV, while focal bone alterations were present in the talus only in KL grade I or II cases. Sixteen of 24 joints exhibited intraosseous bone signal changes, which tended to correspond to joint pain of any ankle OA stage. Our results suggest that bone alterations around the ankle joint might be one of the etiologies of OA and associated with ankle joint pain. PMID:26776564

  5. Effects of osteoarthritis on radiographic measures of laxity and congruence in hip joints of Labrador Retrievers.

    PubMed

    Gold, Randi M; Gregor, Thomas P; Huck, Jennifer L; McKelvie, Pamela J; Smith, Gail K

    2009-06-15

    OBJECTIVE- To determine effects of hip joint osteoarthritis on radiographic measures of hip joint laxity and congruence. DESIGN- Longitudinal study. ANIMALS- 40 Labrador Retrievers. PROCEDURES- Dogs were assigned to 2 groups based on radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis. Dogs in the osteoarthritis group were free of osteoarthritis at initial radiographic evaluation (t(1)) and developed osteoarthritis by a subsequent radiographic evaluation (t(2)). Dogs in the nonosteoarthritis group had no radiographic osteoarthritis at either evaluation. Hip joint laxity was quantified by use of the distraction index (DI) from a distraction radiographic view and use of the Norberg angle (NA) from a ventrodorsal hip-extended radiographic view. The compression index (CI) from a compression radiographic view was used as a measure of joint congruence (concentricity). RESULTS- Hip joint laxity (NA or DI) did not change over time in the nonosteoarthritis group. Mean hip joint laxity (NA and DI) for the osteoarthritis group was greater at t(1) than for the nonosteoarthritis group. With the onset of osteoarthritis, mean NA decreased significantly and mean CI increased significantly, but mean DI remained unchanged. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE- No radiographic evidence for compensatory hip joint tightening associated with osteoarthritis was detected. Hip-extended radiography revealed that hip joints got looser with osteoarthritis and NA decreased. Hip joint laxity (DI) on distraction radiographs was unchanged by the onset of osteoarthritis and remained constant in the osteoarthritis and nonosteoarthritis groups at both evaluations. However, the CI increased with osteoarthritis, as reflected in nonzero indices (incongruence). The CI may be a valid marker for early hip joint osteoarthritis. PMID:19527128

  6. The spatial organisation of joint surface chondrocytes: review of its potential roles in tissue functioning, disease and early, preclinical diagnosis of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Aicher, Wilhelm K; Rolauffs, Bernd

    2014-04-01

    Chondrocytes display within the articular cartilage depth-dependent variations of their many properties that are comparable to the depth-dependent changes of the properties of the surrounding extracellular matrix. However, not much is known about the spatial organisation of the chondrocytes throughout the tissue. Recent studies revealed that human chondrocytes display distinct spatial patterns of organisation within the articular surface, and each joint surface is dominated in a typical way by one of four basic spatial patterns. The resulting complex spatial organisations correlate with the specific diarthrodial joint type, suggesting an association of the chondrocyte organisation within the joint surface with the occurring biomechanical forces. In response to focal osteoarthritis (OA), the superficial chondrocytes experience a destruction of their spatial organisation within the OA lesion, but they also undergo a defined remodelling process distant from the OA lesion in the remaining, intact cartilage surface. One of the biological insights that can be derived from this spatial remodelling process is that the chondrocytes are able to respond in a generalised and coordinated fashion to distant focal OA. The spatial characteristics of this process are tremendously different from the cellular aggregations typical for OA lesions, suggesting differences in the underlying mechanisms. Here we summarise the available information on the spatial organisation of chondrocytes and its potential roles in cartilage functioning. The spatial organisation could be used to diagnose early OA onset before manifest OA results in tissue destruction and clinical symptoms. With further development, this concept may become clinically suitable for the diagnosis of preclinical OA. PMID:24363359

  7. A Dual Role for NOTCH Signaling in Joint Cartilage Maintenance and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhaoyang; Chen, Jianquan; Mirando, Anthony; Wang, Cuicui; Zuscik, Michael J.; O’Keefe, Regis J.; Hilton, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of NOTCH signaling in postnatal murine joints results in osteoarthritis (OA), indicating a requirement for NOTCH during joint cartilage maintenance. Unexpectedly, NOTCH components are significantly up-regulated in human and murine post-traumatic OA, suggesting either a reparative or pathological role for NOTCH activation in OA. Here we investigated the potential dual role for NOTCH in joint maintenance and OA by generating two mouse models overexpressing the NOTCH1 intracellular domain within postnatal joint cartilage; one with sustained NOTCH activation that likely resembles pathological NOTCH signaling and one with transient NOTCH activation that more closely reflects physiological NOTCH signaling. Sustained NOTCH signaling in joint cartilage leads to an early and progressive OA pathology, while on the contrary, transient NOTCH activation enhances cartilage matrix synthesis and promotes joint maintenance under normal physiological conditions. Using RNA-seq, immunohistochemical, and biochemical approaches we identified several novel targets potentially responsible for NOTCH-mediated cartilage degradation, fibrosis, and OA progression, including components of the IL6/STAT3 and ERK/p38 MAPK pathways; factors that may also contribute to post-traumatic OA development. Collectively, these data demonstrate a dual role for the NOTCH pathway in joint cartilage and identify important downstream NOTCH effectors as potential targets for disease modifying osteoarthritis drugs (DMOADs). PMID:26198357

  8. [Osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Seizo

    2014-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common cause of arthritis, and is associated with significant pain and disability. Epidemiological study showed a large number of the eldery in Japan suffered OA, especially OA of the knee. Rapid diagnosis and conservative treatments those includes patient education, weight loss, exercise, physical and occupational therapy are effective at early stage. Pharmacologic treatment are acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective agents. Surgery of the joint arthroplasty significantly reduces knee and hip pain, and restores the functions of the patient at the end stage. PMID:25509795

  9. Knee osteoarthritis affects the distribution of joint moments during gait.

    PubMed

    Zeni, Joseph A; Higginson, Jill S

    2011-06-01

    Alterations in lower extremity kinetics have been shown to exist in persons with knee osteoarthritis (OA), however few investigations have examined how the intersegmental coordination of the lower extremity kinetic chain varies in the presence of knee joint pathology. The objective of this study was to evaluate how knee OA and walking speed affect total support moment and individual joint contributions to the total support moment. Fifteen healthy subjects and 30 persons with knee OA participated in 3D walking analysis at constrained (1.0 m/s), self-selected and fastest tolerable walking speeds. Individual joint contributions to total support moment were analyzed using separate ANOVAs with one repeated measure (walking speed). Linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between walking speed and joint contribution. Persons with knee OA reduced the contribution of the knee joint when walking at constrained (p = 0.04) and self-selected walking speeds (p = 0.009). There was a significant increase in the ankle contribution and a significant decrease in the hip contribution when walking speed was increased (p < 0.004), however individual walking speeds were not significantly related to joint contributions. This suggests that the relationship between walking speed and joint contribution is dependent on the individual's control strategy and we cannot estimate the joint contribution solely based on walking speed. The slower gait speed observed in persons with knee OA is not responsible for the reduction in knee joint moments, rather this change is likely due to alterations in the neuromuscular strategy of the lower extremity kinetic chain in response to joint pain or muscle weakness. PMID:20510618

  10. What role do periodontal pathogens play in osteoarthritis and periprosthetic joint infections of the knee?

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Garth D; Hu, Fen Z; Sotereanos, Nicholas; Sewicke, Jeffrey; Parvizi, Javad; Nara, Peter L; Arciola, Carla Renata

    2014-01-01

    Through the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-electron spray ionization (ESI)-time of flight (TOF)-mass spectrometry (MS), we identified multiple periodontal pathogens within joint tissues of individuals undergoing replacement arthroplasties of the knee. The most prevalent of the periodontal pathogens were Treponema denticola and Enterococcus faecalis, the latter of which is commonly associated with apical periodontitis. These findings were unique to periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) of the knee and were never observed for PJIs of other lower extremity joints (hip and ankle) or upper extremity joints (shoulder and elbow). These data were confirmed by multiple independent methodologies including fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) which showed the bacteria deeply penetrated inside the diseased tissues, and 454-based deep 16S rDNA sequencing. The site-specificity, the tissue investment, and the identical findings by multiple nucleic-acid-based techniques strongly suggests the presence of infecting bacteria within these diseased anatomic sites. Subsequently, as part of a control program using PCR-ESI-TOF-MS, we again detected these same periodontal pathogens in aspirates from patients with osteoarthritis who were undergoing primary arthroplasty of the knee and thus who had no history of orthopedic implants. This latter finding raises the question of whether hematogenic spread of periodontal pathogens to the knee play a primary or secondary-exacerbatory role in osteoarthritis. PMID:24921460

  11. Role of Agnikarma in Sandhigata Vata (osteoarthritis of knee joint)

    PubMed Central

    Jethava, Nilesh G.; Dudhamal, Tukaram S.; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sandhigata Vata is one of Vata Vyadhi characterized by the symptoms such as Sandhishoola (joint pain) and Sandhishopha (swelling of joint). Osteoarthritis (OA) is degenerative joint disorder, represents failure of the diarthrodial (movable, synovial-lined) joint. OA of knee joint comes under the inflammatory group which is almost identical to Sandhigata Vata described in Ayurveda with respect to etiology, pathology, and clinical features. Agnikarma (therapeutic heat burn) is one which gives instant relief from pain by balancing local Vata and Kapha Dosha without any untoward effects. Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of Agnikarma with Rajata and Loha Dhatu Shalaka in the management of Janugata Sandhivata (OA of knee joint). Materials and Methods: A total of 28 diagnosed patients of Janugata Sandhivata were registered and randomly divided into two groups. In Group-A, Agnikarma was done with Rajata Shalaka while in Group-B Agnikarma was performed by Loha Shalaka in four sittings. Assessment in relief of signs and symptoms was done by weekly interval, and Student's t-test was applied for statistical analysis. Results: Group-A provided 76.31% relief in pain while Group-B provided 83.77% relief. Relief from crepitus was observed in 57.13% of patients of Group-A, while 57.92% of patients of Group-B. There was statistically insignificant difference between both the groups. Loha Shalaka provided better result in pain relief than Rajata Shalaka. Conclusion: Agnikarma is effective nonpharmacological, parasurgical procedure for pain management in Sandhigata Vata (OA of knee joint). PMID:26730134

  12. Hylan G-F 20: Review of its Safety and Efficacy in the Management of Joint Pain in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Migliore, A.; Giovannangeli, F.; Granata, M.; Laganà, B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative joint disease that is a clinically and economically important disease. The increased prevalence of OA with aging, coupled to the demographics of aging populations, make OA a high priority health care problem. Viscosupplementation (VS) is a well-established treatment option in knee OA that is included in the professional guidelines for treatment of this joint disease, and could potentially provide a useful alternative in treating such patients with painful OA. Theoretically VS is an approach that should apply to all synovial joints. Objectives: The aim of this review is to assess the efficacy and safety of viscosupplementation with Hylan GF-20 (Synvisc®) in the management of joint pain in osteoarthritis. Methods: The following databases were searched: Medline, Database of Abstract on Reviews and Effectiveness, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Furthermore, the lists of references of retrieved publications were manually checked for additional references. The search terms Review, Viscosupplementation, Osteoarthritis, Hyaluronic acid, Hyaluronan, Sodium Hyaluronate, Hylan GF-20, Synvisc, intra-articular injection were used to identify all studies relating to the use of Synvisc® viscosupplementation therapy in OA. Results: Hylan GF-20 is a safe and effective treatment for decreasing pain and improving function in patients suffering from knee and hip OA but new evidences are emerging for its use in other joints. PMID:21151854

  13. Altered joint tribology in osteoarthritis: Reduced lubricin synthesis due to the inflammatory process. New horizons for therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Szychlinska, M A; Leonardi, R; Al-Qahtani, M; Mobasheri, A; Musumeci, G

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of joint disease. This review aimed to consolidate the current evidence that implicates the inflammatory process in the attenuation of synovial lubrication and joint tissue homeostasis in OA. Moreover, with these findings, we propose some evidence for novel therapeutic strategies for preventing and/or treating this complex disorder. The studies reviewed support that inflammatory mediators participate in the onset and progression of OA after joint injury. The flow of pro-inflammatory cytokines following an acute injury seems to be directly associated with altered lubricating ability in the joint tissue. The latter is associated with reduced level of lubricin, one of the major joint lubricants. Future research should focus on the development of new therapies that attenuate the inflammatory process and restore lubricin synthesis and function. This approach could support joint tribology and synovial lubrication leading to improved joint function and pain relief. PMID:27118399

  14. Early osteoarthritis of the trapeziometacarpal joint is not associated with joint instability during typical isometric loading.

    PubMed

    Halilaj, Eni; Moore, Douglas C; Patel, Tarpit K; Ladd, Amy L; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C; Crisco, Joseph J

    2015-11-01

    The saddle-shaped trapeziometacarpal (TMC) joint contributes importantly to the function of the human thumb. A balance between mobility and stability is essential in this joint, which experiences high loads and is prone to osteoarthritis (OA). Since instability is considered a risk factor for TMC OA, we assessed TMC joint instability during the execution of three isometric functional tasks (key pinch, jar grasp, and jar twist) in 76 patients with early TMC OA and 44 asymptomatic controls. Computed tomography images were acquired while subjects held their hands relaxed and while they applied 80% of their maximum effort for each task. Six degree-of-freedom rigid body kinematics of the metacarpal with respect to the trapezium from the unloaded to the loaded task positions were computed in terms of a TMC joint coordinate system. Joint instability was expressed as a function of the metacarpal translation and the applied force. We found that the TMC joint was more unstable during a key pinch task than during a jar grasp or a jar twist task. Sex, age, and early OA did not have an effect on TMC joint instability, suggesting that instability during these three tasks is not a predisposing factor in TMC OA. PMID:25941135

  15. An in Silico Analysis of Ankle Joint Loads in Secondary Ankle Osteoarthritis. Case Study.

    PubMed

    Lorkowski, Jacek; Mrzygłód, Mirosław W; Grzegorowska, Oliwia; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2015-01-01

    Secondary, post-traumatic, degenerative lesions of the ankle joint remain a serious clinical challenge. This paper presents the case of a 66-year-old patient with secondary, post-traumatic ankle osteoarthritis and subchondral cysts. The use of rapid computer modelling FEM 2D enabled optimization of surgical treatment. A FEM 2D model of biomechanical changes in bones may help in streamlining treatment as well as improve our understanding of the pathomechanism of osteoarthritis. PMID:26248632

  16. Osteoarthritis disease progression model using six year follow-up data from the osteoarthritis initiative.

    PubMed

    Passey, Chaitali; Kimko, Holly; Nandy, Partha; Kagan, Leonid

    2015-03-01

    The objective was to develop a quantitative model of disease progression of knee osteoarthritis over 6 years using the total WOMAC score from patients enrolled into the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) study. The analysis was performed using data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative database. The time course of the total WOMAC score of patients enrolled into the progression cohort was characterized using non-linear mixed effect modeling in NONMEM. The effect of covariates on the status of the disease and the progression rate was investigated. The final model provided a good description of the experimental data using a linear progression model with a common baseline (19 units of the total WOMAC score). The WOMAC score decreased by 1.77 units/year in 89% of the population or increased by 1.74 units/year in 11% of the population. Multiple covariates were found to affect the baseline and the rate of progression, including BMI, sex, race, the use of pain medications, and the limitation in activity due to symptoms. A mathematical model to describe the disease progression of osteoarthritis in the studied population was developed. The model identified two sub-populations with increasing or decreasing total WOMAC score over time, and the effect of important covariates was quantified. PMID:25212288

  17. Abnormal loading of the major joints in knee osteoarthritis and the response to knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Andrew; Stewart, Caroline; Postans, Neil; Barlow, David; Dodds, Alexander; Holt, Cathy; Whatling, Gemma; Roberts, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is common and patients frequently complain that they are 'overloading' the joints of the opposite leg when they walk. However, it is unknown whether moments or co-contractions are abnormal in the unaffected joints of patients with single joint knee osteoarthritis, or how they change following treatment of the affected knee. Twenty patients with single joint medial compartment knee osteoarthritis were compared to 20 asymptomatic control subjects. Gait analysis was performed for normal level gait and surface EMG recordings of the medial and lateral quadriceps and hamstrings were used to investigate co-contraction. Patients were followed up 12 months post-operatively and the analysis was repeated. Results are presented for the first 14 patients who have attended follow-up. Pre-operatively, adduction moment impulses were elevated at both knees and the contra-lateral hip compared to controls. Co-contraction of hamstrings and quadriceps was elevated bilaterally. Post-operatively, moment waveforms returned to near-normal levels at the affected knee and co-contraction fell in the majority of patients. However, abnormalities persisted in the contra-lateral limb with partial or no recovery of both moment waveforms and co-contraction in the majority. Patients with knee osteoarthritis do experience abnormal loads of their major weight bearing joints bilaterally, and abnormalities persist despite treatment of the affected limb. Further treatment may be required if we are to protect the other major joints following joint arthroplasty. PMID:22841587

  18. Association between facet joint osteoarthritis and the Oswestry Disability Index

    PubMed Central

    Maataoui, Adel; Vogl, Thomas J; Middendorp, Marcus; Kafchitsas, Konstantinos; Khan, M Fawad

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the correlation of facet joint osteoarthritis (FJOA) at lumbar levels L4/L5 and L5/S1 and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). METHODS: The study involved lumbar MRIs of 591 patients with a mean age of 47.3 years. The MRIs of the lumbar spine were performed on a 1.5 Tesla scanner (Magnetom® Avanto, Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany) using a dedicated receive only spine coil. After initial blinding, each dataset was evaluated by 2 board certified radiologist with more than 5 years experience in musculoskeletal imaging. In total 2364 facet joints were graded. Degenerative changes of the facet joints were evaluated according to the 4-point scale as proposed by Weishaupt et al Functional status was assessed using the ODI. The index is scored from 0 to 100 and interpreted as follows: 0%-20%, minimal disability; 20%-40%, moderate disability; 40%-60%, severe disability; 60%-80%, crippled; 80%-100%, patients are bedbound. Spearman’s coefficient of rank correlation was used for statistical analysis, with significance set at P < 0.05. RESULTS: In total 2364 facet joints at lumbar levels L4/5 and L5/S1 were analysed in 591 individuals. FJOA was present in 97% (L4/L5) and 98% (L5/S1). At level L4/5 (left/right) 17/15 (2.9%/2.5%) were described as grade 0, 146/147 (24.7%/24.9%) as grade 1, 290/302 (49.1%/51.1%) as grade 2 and 138/127 (23.4%/21.5%) as grade 3. At level L5/S1 (left/right) 10/11 (1.7%/1.9%) were described as grade 0, 136/136 (23.0%/23.0%) as grade 1, 318/325 (53.8%/55.0%) as grade 2 and 127/119 (21.5%/20.1%) as grade 3. Regarding the ODI scores, patients’ disability had a minimum of 0% and a maximum of 91.11% with an arithmetic mean of 32.77% ± 17.02%. The majority of patients (48.39%) had moderate functional disability (21%-40%). There was no significant correlation between FJOA and ODI on both sides of lumbar level L4/5 and on the left side of lumbar level L5/S1. A weak positive correlation was evaluated between ODI and FJOA on the right

  19. Utilisation of joint movement range in arboreal primates compared with human subjects: an evolutionary frame for primary osteoarthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, C J

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether an arboreal lifestyle required full use of movement ranges underutilised in nine joint groups in humans, because under-utilisation of available movement range may be associated with susceptibility to primary osteoarthritis. METHODS--Utilisation of the nine joint groups was studied in two species of primate exercising in a simulated arboreal environment, using 'focal animal' observation techniques supplemented by telephoto photography and by review of archival material from other sources. Fifteen apes were observed over a total observation period of 20.2 man-hours and 152 films were analysed for utilisation of movement range. RESULTS--With one exception, all the movement ranges reported to be under-utilised in humans were fully utilised by the apes in climbing activities. The exception, metacarpophalangeal extension, was an essential component of the chimpanzee ground progression mode of knuckle walking. CONCLUSIONS--The underused movement range in several human joints is explicable as residual capacity from a semiarboreal lifestyle. If the correlation with primary osteoarthritis is confirmed, it suggests that the disease may reflect a disparity between inherited capacity and current need. The significance of the result lies in its implication that primary osteoarthritis may be preventable. Images PMID:7826133

  20. Osteoarthritis of the hip: an occupational disease in farmers.

    PubMed Central

    Croft, P.; Coggon, D.; Cruddas, M.; Cooper, C.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To test the hypothesis that farmers are at high risk of hip osteoarthritis and to investigate possible causes for such a hazard. DESIGN--Cross sectional survey. SETTING--Five rural general practices. SUBJECTS--167 male farmers aged 60-76 and 83 controls from mainly sedentary jobs. All those without previous hip replacement underwent radiography of the hip. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Hip replacement for osteoarthritis or radiological evidence of hip osteoarthritis. RESULTS--Prevalence of hip osteoarthritis was higher in farmers than controls and especially in those who had farmed for over 10 years (odds ratio 9.3, 95% confidence interval 1.9 to 44.5). The excess could not be attributed to any one type of farming, and heavy lifting seems the likely explanation. CONCLUSIONS--Manual handling in agriculture should be limited where possible. Consideration should be given to making hip osteoarthritis a prescribed industrial disease in farmers. There may be wider implications for the prevention of hip osteoarthritis in the general population. PMID:1606427

  1. CT Images of a Severe TMJ Osteoarthritis and Differential Diagnosis with Other Joint Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ferrazzo, K. L.; Osório, L. B.; Ferrazzo, V. A.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common arthritis which affects the human body and can affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The diagnosis of TMJ OA is essentially based on clinical examination. However, laboratory tests and radiographic exams are also useful to exclude other diseases. The diagnosis of OA may be difficult because of other TMJ pathologies that can have similar clinical and radiographic aspects. The purpose of this study was to describe an unusual case of bilateral TMJ OA in an advanced stage and discuss its most common clinical, laboratory, and radiographic findings, focusing on their importance in the differential diagnosis with other TMJ diseases. Erosion, sclerosis, osteophytes, flattening, subchondral cysts, and a reduced joint space were some of the radiographic findings in TMJ OA. We concluded that, for the correct differential diagnosis of TMJ OA, it is necessary to unite medical history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and radiographic findings. Computed tomography is the test of choice for evaluating bone involvement and for diagnosing and establishing the degree of the disease. PMID:24381768

  2. Osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint: nonsurgical treatment options.

    PubMed

    Carfagno, David G; Ellenbecker, Todd S

    2002-04-01

    Glenohumeral osteoarthritis is a relatively uncommon type of osteoarthritis characterized by loss of anterior or forward flexion. Assessing range of motion, impingement, and strength, combined with radiologic imaging, can help determine the extent of damage. Published studies focus primarily on surgical treatment, but commonly used nonsurgical approaches include anti-inflammatory medications, oral and injectable viscosupplementation, and physical therapy. These conservative measures can be very effective for active patients and also appeal to their physicians who consider shoulder surgery as a last resort. PMID:20086520

  3. Osteoarthritis in the XXIst Century: Risk Factors and Behaviours that Influence Disease Onset and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Aiello, Flavia Concetta; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Di Rosa, Michelino; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Mobasheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a growing public health problem across the globe, affecting more than half of the over 65 population. In the past, OA was considered a wear and tear disease, leading to the loss of articular cartilage and joint disability. Nowadays, thanks to advancements in molecular biology, OA is believed to be a very complex multifactorial disease. OA is a degenerative disease characterized by “low-grade inflammation” in cartilage and synovium, resulting in the loss of joint structure and progressive deterioration of cartilage. Although the disease can be dependent on genetic and epigenetic factors, sex, ethnicity, and age (cellular senescence, apoptosis and lubricin), it is also associated with obesity and overweight, dietary factors, sedentary lifestyle and sport injuries. The aim of this review is to highlight how certain behaviors, habits and lifestyles may be involved in the onset and progression of OA and to summarize the principal risk factors involved in the development of this complicated joint disorder. PMID:25785564

  4. Can pain intensity in osteoarthritis joint be indicator of the impairment of endothelial function?

    PubMed

    Laskarin, Gordana; Persic, Viktor; Kukic, Sandra Rusac; Massari, Drazen; Legovic, Anita; Boban, Marko; Miskulin, Rajko; Rogoznica, Marija; Kehler, Tatjana

    2016-09-01

    We propose that pathological remodeling in joint tissues of osteoarthritis (OA) patients persistently stimulates local secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators, which overflow into the blood, activating leukocytes that impair endothelial function and accelerate the atherosclerotic process. During periods of pain, endothelial dysfunction progresses more aggressively due to elevated secretion of these pro-inflammatory mediators, which are involved in both atherosclerosis and the sensation of pain. Concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines and their antagonists, activating and decoy receptors of the broad interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-17 families, IL-15, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 should be measured in peripheral blood samples of OA patients and compared with (I) OA clinical severity; (II) subclinical parameters of atherosclerosis; (III) ischemic heart disease risk factors; (IV) soluble factors indicating endothelial dysfunction; (V) degree of bone destruction; and (VI) results of a six-minute walk test. Arthroscopy and joint replacement surgery provide an opportunity to estimate mRNA and protein expression of inflammatory mediators in specimens of synovial fluid, synovial membrane, cartilage, and/or subarticular bone. A range of methods, including questionnaires, X-ray, computed tomography, ultrasound, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunohistology, immunofluorescence, and reverse transcription and in situ polymerase chain reaction are available. Understanding the inflammatory and immune mechanisms underlying OA may allow the early identification of patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease, independently of classical coronary risk factors. Pain may constitute an extrinsic indicator of currently worsening endothelial function. PMID:27515191

  5. Electromyographic power spectrum of jaw muscles during clenching in unilateral temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Park, I H; McCall, W D; Chung, J W

    2012-09-01

    The relationship between temporomandibular joints (TMJ) osteoarthritis and masticatory muscle disorders is poorly understood. The data are sparse, the results are conflicting, and electromyographic (EMG) power spectrum analysis has not been used. The aims of this study were to compare the differences in EMG power spectrum during, and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) before and after, sustained clenching in patients with unilateral TMJ osteoarthritis and healthy control subjects. Nineteen patients with unilateral TMJ osteoarthritis without masticatory muscle pain and 20 control subjects were evaluated. We measured EMG amplitudes at maximum voluntary contraction, median frequency from the EMG power spectrum during sustained clenching at 70% and PPTs before and after the clenching in both temporalis and masseter muscles. There were no significant differences in PPT decrease between muscles or between groups during sustained clenching. There were no significant differences in maximum voluntary contraction EMG activity ratios of affected to unaffected sides between groups, or of masseter to temporalis muscles between affected and unaffected side of patients with TMJ osteoarthritis. Median frequencies decreased from the beginning to the end of the sustained clench, and the interaction between group and clench was significant: the median frequency decrease was larger in the osteoarthritis group. Our results suggested that masticatory muscles of patients with unilateral TMJ osteoarthritis are more easily fatigued during sustained clenching than normal subjects. PMID:22672238

  6. Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis: cone beam computed tomography findings, clinical features, and correlations.

    PubMed

    Cömert Kiliç, S; Kiliç, N; Sümbüllü, M A

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of and associations between clinical signs and symptoms and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) findings of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA). Seventy-six patients (total 117 TMJ) with osteoarthritis were included in this study. Clinical signs and symptoms and CBCT findings were reviewed retrospectively. A considerable decrease in mandibular motions and mastication efficiency, and considerable increase in joint sounds and general pain complaints were observed. The most frequent condylar bony changes were erosion (110 joints, 94.0%), followed by flattening (108 joints, 92.3%), osteophytes (93 joints, 79.5%), hypoplasia (22 joints, 18.8%), sclerosis (14 joints, 12.0%), and subchondral cyst (four joints, 3.4%). Flattening of the articular eminence and pneumatization were each observed in five joints. Forty-one patients had bilateral degeneration and 35 had unilateral degeneration. Hypermobility was detected in 47 degenerative joints. Masticatory efficiency was negatively correlated with both condylar flattening and sclerosis, and general pain complaints was positively correlated with condylar flattening. Condylar erosion, flattening, osteophytes, pain, joint sounds, reduced jaw movements, and worsened mastication were common findings in TMJ-OA in the present study. Poor correlations were found between osseous changes and clinical signs and symptoms of TMJ-OA. CBCT is a powerful diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of TMJ-OA. PMID:26194774

  7. Glenohumeral Joint Preservation: A Review of Management Options for Young, Active Patients with Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    van der Meijden, Olivier A.; Gaskill, Trevor R.; Millett, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The management of osteoarthritis of the shoulder in young, active patients is a challenge, and the optimal treatment has yet to be completely established. Many of these patients wish to maintain a high level of activity, and arthroplasty may not be a practical treatment option. It is these patients who may be excellent candidates for joint-preservation procedures in an effort to avoid or delay joint replacement. Several palliative and restorative techniques are currently optional. Joint debridement has shown good results and a combination of arthroscopic debridement with a capsular release, humeral osteoplasty, and transcapsular axillary nerve decompression seems promising when humeral osteophytes are present. Currently, microfracture seems the most studied reparative treatment modality available. Other techniques, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation and osteochondral transfers, have reportedly shown potential but are currently mainly still investigational procedures. This paper gives an overview of the currently available joint preserving surgical techniques for glenohumeral osteoarthritis. PMID:22536514

  8. Osteoarthritis of the Manubriosternal Joint: An Uncommon Cause of Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul; Rai, Bibek K

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis of the manubriosternal joint is a rare cause of chest pain. The diagnosis is difficult, and other serious causes of chest pain have to be ruled out first. We report one case that was treated with fusion of the manubriosternal joint using an iliac crest bone graft with a cervical locking plate and screws with excellent results. Preoperative CT scan images were used to measure the screw length and the drill stop depth. In this case report, we have shown that arthrodesis can be an effective way of treating osteoarthritis of the manubriosternal joint when other measures fail. Furthermore, the use of a cervical locking plate with appropriate and careful preoperative planning affords a safe surgical technique, rapid pain relief, and ultimately, sound and asymptomatic union of the joint. PMID:26677420

  9. Osteoarthritis of the Manubriosternal Joint: An Uncommon Cause of Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Rai, Bibek K

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis of the manubriosternal joint is a rare cause of chest pain. The diagnosis is difficult, and other serious causes of chest pain have to be ruled out first. We report one case that was treated with fusion of the manubriosternal joint using an iliac crest bone graft with a cervical locking plate and screws with excellent results. Preoperative CT scan images were used to measure the screw length and the drill stop depth. In this case report, we have shown that arthrodesis can be an effective way of treating osteoarthritis of the manubriosternal joint when other measures fail. Furthermore, the use of a cervical locking plate with appropriate and careful preoperative planning affords a safe surgical technique, rapid pain relief, and ultimately, sound and asymptomatic union of the joint. PMID:26677420

  10. Is running associated with degenerative joint disease

    SciTech Connect

    Panush, R.S.; Schmidt, C.; Caldwell, J.R.; Edwards, N.L.; Longley, S.; Yonker, R.; Webster, E.; Nauman, J.; Stork, J.; Pettersson, H.

    1986-03-07

    Little information is available regarding the long-term effects, if any, of running on the musculoskeletal system. The authors compared the prevalence of degenerative joint disease among 17 male runners with 18 male nonrunners. Running subjects (53% marathoners) ran a mean of 44.8 km (28 miles)/wk for 12 years. Pain and swelling of hips, knees, ankles and feet and other musculoskeletal complaints among runners were comparable with those among nonrunners. Radiologic examinations (for osteophytes, cartilage thickness, and grade of degeneration) also were without notable differences among groups. They did not find an increased prevalence of osteoarthritis among the runners. Our observations suggest that long-duration, high-mileage running need to be associated with premature degenerative joint disease in the lower extremities.

  11. Arthroscopic Treatment of Subchondral Bony Cyst in Early Osteoarthritis of the Hip Joint Using Allogeneic Bone Graft: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gi-Soo; Kang, Chan; Lee, Jung-Bum; Noh, Chang-Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Subchondral bony cyst, large solitary or multiple cysts in acetabular dome usually exacerbate progression to degenerative osteoarthritis in the hip joint. But it can be treated through arthroscopic intervention. We report two cases that treated by arthroscopic curettage and bone graft for subchondral bony cysts in early osteoarthritis of the hip joint, and it may delay progression to moderate osteoarthritis.

  12. Osteoarthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read More Ankle replacement Arthritis Chronic Elbow replacement Hip joint replacement Knee joint replacement Knee microfracture surgery Overweight Shoulder arthroscopy Shoulder replacement Spinal fusion Systemic Patient ... replacement - discharge Elbow replacement - discharge Hip or knee replacement - after - what to ask your ...

  13. Increased joint loads during walking--a consequence of pain relief in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Marius; Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjaer, Tine; Lund, Hans; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bliddal, Henning

    2006-12-01

    Joint pain is a primary symptom in knee osteoarthritis (OA), but the effect of pain and pain relief on the knee joint mechanics of walking is not clear. In this study, the effects of local knee joint analgesia on knee joint loads during walking were studied in a group of knee osteoarthritis patients. A group of healthy subjects was included as a reference group. The joint loads were calculated from standard gait analysis data obtained with standardised walking speed (4 km/h). The gait analyses were performed before and after pain relief by intra-articular injections of 10 mL lidocaine (1%). Pre-injection measurements revealed lower joint loads in the OA group compared to the reference group. Following injections pain during walking decreased significantly and the joint loads increased in the OA group during the late single support phase to a level comparable to the reference group. Although the patients walked with less compressive knee joint forces compared to the reference group, the effects of pain relief may accelerate the degenerative changes. PMID:17011194

  14. Osteoarthritis of the temporo-mandibular joint in free-living Soay sheep on St Kilda.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Colin; Watt, Kathryn; Nussey, Daniel H; Pemberton, Josephine M; Pilkington, Jill G; Herman, Jeremy S; Timmons, Zena L; Clements, Dylan N; Scott, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative disease of synovial joints with the potential to cause pathology and welfare issues in both domestic and wild ruminants. Previous work has identified OA of the elbow joint in domestic sheep, but the prevalence of OA of the jaw and in particular the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has not been previously reported. Following up a previous report of a single case of TMJ OA in a free-living population of Soay sheep on St Kilda in the Outer Hebrides, an archive of 2736 jaw bones collected from this population between 1985 and 2010 was surveyed. Evidence of TMJ OA was found in 35 sheep. Of these, 15 cases were unilateral (11 right side, 4 left side) and the remaining 20 were bilateral. TMJ pathology was much more common in females than males: only 3/35 cases were in males, with overall prevalence at 2.3% for females and 0.2% in males. Radiographic examination of TMJ with OA revealed extensive bone re-modelling with osteophytosis, particularly of the condyle of the mandible. There was a highly significant age-dependence in TMJ OA incidence among age classes: 30/35 cases occurred in geriatric sheep (aged 7 years or more; 11.1% prevalence within this age class), four in adults (2-6 years old; 0.9% prevalence), one in yearlings (0.3% prevalence) and none in lambs. The low incidence in males was confounded by sex differences in longevity: while 18% of females sampled died in the geriatric age class, only 2% of males did so. Although the low prevalence of the pathology limited the ability to test its association with other traits, it was possible to examine relationships with reproductive performance measures amongst geriatric females with and without TMJ OA. Although there were trends towards lower fecundity and lower lamb birth weight in the breeding season prior to death, these were not statistically significant. PMID:25458883

  15. TRPV4 as a Therapeutic Target for Joint Diseases

    PubMed Central

    McNulty, Amy L.; Leddy, Holly A.; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanical factors play a critical role in regulating the physiology as well as the pathology of multiple joint tissues, and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis. Therefore, the mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to mechanical signals may provide novel targets for the development of disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs (DMOADs). Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is a Ca2+-permeable cation channel that serves as a sensor of mechanical or osmotic signals in several musculoskeletal tissues, including cartilage, bone, and synovium. The importance of TRPV4 in joint homeostasis is apparent in patients harboring TRPV4 mutations, which result in the development of a spectrum of skeletal dysplasias and arthropathies. In addition, the genetic knockout of Trpv4 results in the development of osteoarthritis and decreased osteoclast function. In engineered cartilage replacements, chemical activation of TRPV4 can reproduce many of the anabolic effects of mechanical loading to accelerate tissue growth and regeneration. Overall, TRPV4 plays a key role in transducing mechanical, pain, and inflammatory signals within joint tissues, and thus is an attractive therapeutic target to modulate the effects of joint diseases. In pathological conditions in the joint, when the delicate balance of TRPV4 activity is altered, a variety of different tools could be utilized to directly or indirectly target TRPV4 activity. PMID:25519495

  16. Multimodal Ayurvedic management for Sandhigatavata (Osteoarthritis of knee joints)

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manisha R.; Mehta, Charmi S.; Shukla, Dipali J.; Patel, Kalapi B.; Patel, Manish V.; Gupta, Shiv Narayan

    2013-01-01

    Vata is the governing factor in the maintenance of equilibrium in the universe as well as in the body. As age advances, the influence of Vata Dosha progresses, resulting in the process of gradual degeneration of the body. Sandhigatavata (osteoarthritis) is one of the consequences of this process, which is common in the elderly people. This is one of the major causes of chronic disability, affecting the quality of life. Prevalence of osteoarthritis in India is more among menopausal women. This study has been conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Ayurvedic multimodal management in Sandhigatavata and to provide better options to Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs). In present clinical trial, 50 patients of Sandhigatavata have been registered and have been given Snehana, Svedana, Mriduvirechana, Matrabasti, and Jalaukavacharana, along with oral medications like Yogaraja Guggulu and Ashvagandha Churna. This multimodal therapy is being used in P.D. Patel Ayurved Hospital, Nadiad, since years, providing good relief to patients with Sandhigatavata. The results have been analyzed statistically by using the Student paired‘t’ test. The therapy showed highly significant (P < 0.001) beneficial effect on the clinical features of Sandhigatavata. On overall effect of therapy, 4% of the patients were relieved completely, while 24% have shown marked improvement, 50% moderate improvement, and 22% mild improvement. Results of follow-up showed that marked improvement decreased, but moderate improvement was steady. Continuing the study on a larger number of patients, with inclusion of more objective parameters to get better conclusions is suggested at the end of the study. PMID:24049405

  17. The prevalence of erosive osteoarthritis in carpometacarpal joints and its clinical burden in symptomatic community-dwelling adults

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, W.Y.; Kloppenburg, M.; Marshall, M.; Nicholls, E.; Rosendaal, F.R.; Peat, G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective To estimate the prevalence of erosive disease in first carpometacarpal joints (CMCJs) and investigate its clinical impact compared with radiographic thumb base (TB) osteoarthritis (OA). Patient and methods Standardized assessments with hand radiographs were performed in participants of two population-based cohort studies in North Staffordshire with hand symptoms lasting ≥1 day in the past month. Erosive disease was defined as the presence of eroded or remodeled phase in ≥1 interphalangeal joint (IPJ) or first CMCJ following the Verbruggen–Veys classification. Hand pain and function were assessed with Australian/Canadian Hand Osteoarthritis Index (AUSCAN). Prevalence was estimated by dividing the number of persons with erosive lesions by population size. Linear and logistic regression analyses were used to contrast clinical determinants between persons with erosions and with radiographic TB OA. Results were presented as mean differences and odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), adjusted for age, sex and radiographic severity. Results 1,076 participants were studied (60% women, mean age 64.7 years (SD 8.3); 24 persons had erosive disease in the TB. The prevalence of erosive disease in first CMCJs was 2.2% (95% CI 1.4, 3.3). Only 0.5% (95% CI 0.2, 1.2) had erosive disease affecting IPJs and first CMCJs combined. More persons with erosive disease of first CMCJs reported pain in their TB than persons with radiographic TB OA, AUSCAN pain and function scores were similar. Conclusion Erosive disease of first CMCJs was present in 2.2% of subjects with hand pain and was often not accompanied by erosions in IPJs. Erosive disease was associated with TB pain, but not with the level of pain, when compared with radiographic TB OA. PMID:24680934

  18. Osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

    PubMed

    Arzi, B; Winer, J N; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    2013-11-01

    Museum skull specimens (n = 1,008) of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) were examined macroscopically according to defined criteria for the presence, severity and characteristics of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA). The specimens were from stranded young adult to adult animals. Overall, 4.1% of the specimens had findings consistent with TMJ-OA. Of these, 61.0% were from females and 39.0% were from males. In addition, 85.4% of the affected specimens were from adults and 14.6% were from young adults. However, there was no significant association between age and sex with the presence or severity of TMJ-OA. Lesion severity was mild in 41.5%, moderate in 19.5% and severe in 39.0% of affected specimens. The most prominent changes were the presence of osteophytes and subchondral bone defects and porosity. The mandibular condylar process and fossa were affected equally. The lengths of the right and left mandibular heads were significantly associated with age (P = 0.002 and P = 0.003, respectively) and sex (P = 0.0009 and P = 0.001, respectively), but not with the presence of TMJ-OA. The significance of this disease in sea otters remains elusive, but this condition may play an important role in survival of these animals. PMID:23721871

  19. Regulation and Role of TGFβ Signaling Pathway in Aging and Osteoarthritis Joints

    PubMed Central

    Baugé, Catherine; Girard, Nicolas; Lhuissier, Eva; Bazille, Celine; Boumediene, Karim

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) is a major signalling pathway in joints. This superfamilly is involved in numerous cellular processes in cartilage. Usually, they are considered to favor chondrocyte differentiation and cartilage repair. However, other studies show also deleterious effects of TGFβ which may induce hypertrophy. This may be explained at least in part by alteration of TGFβ signaling pathways in aging chondrocytes. This review focuses on the functions of TGFβ in joints and the regulation of its signaling mediators (receptors, Smads) during aging and osteoarthritis. PMID:25489490

  20. Effects of Specialized Footwear on Joint Loads in Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Shakoor, Najia; Lidtke, Roy H.; Sengupta, Mondira; Fogg, Louis F.; Block, Joel A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Elevated dynamic joint loads have been associated with the severity and progression of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. This study compared the effects of a specialized shoe (the mobility shoe) designed to lower dynamic loads at the knee with self-chosen conventional walking shoes and with a commercially available walking shoe as a control. Methods Subjects with knee OA were evaluated in 2 groups. Group A (n = 28) underwent gait analyses with both their self-chosen walking shoes and the mobility shoes. Group B (n = 20) underwent gait analyses with a control shoe and the mobility shoe. Frontal plane knee loads were compared between the different footwear conditions. Results Group A demonstrated an 8% reduction in the peak external knee adduction moment with the mobility shoe compared with self-chosen walking shoes (mean ± SD 49 ± 0.80 versus 2.71 ± 0.84 %BW × H; P < 0.05). Group B demonstrated a 12% reduction in the peak external knee adduction moment with the mobility shoe compared with the control shoe (mean ± SD 2.66 ± 0.69 versus 3.07 ± 0.75 %BW × H; P < 0.05). Conclusion Specialized footwear can effectively reduce joint loads in subjects with knee OA, compared with self-chosen shoes and control walking shoes. Footwear may represent a therapeutic target for the treatment of knee OA. The types of shoes worn by subjects with knee OA should be evaluated more closely in terms of their effects on the disease. PMID:18759313

  1. Accurate joint space quantification in knee osteoarthritis: a digital x-ray tomosynthesis phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewell, Tanzania S.; Piacsek, Kelly L.; Heckel, Beth A.; Sabol, John M.

    2011-03-01

    The current imaging standard for diagnosis and monitoring of knee osteoarthritis (OA) is projection radiography. However radiographs may be insensitive to markers of early disease such as osteophytes and joint space narrowing (JSN). Relative to standard radiography, digital X-ray tomosynthesis (DTS) may provide improved visualization of the markers of knee OA without the interference of superimposed anatomy. DTS utilizes a series of low-dose projection images over an arc of +/-20 degrees to reconstruct tomographic images parallel to the detector. We propose that DTS can increase accuracy and precision in JSN quantification. The geometric accuracy of DTS was characterized by quantifying joint space width (JSW) as a function of knee flexion and position using physical and anthropomorphic phantoms. Using a commercially available digital X-ray system, projection and DTS images were acquired for a Lucite rod phantom with known gaps at various source-object-distances, and angles of flexion. Gap width, representative of JSW, was measured using a validated algorithm. Over an object-to-detector-distance range of 5-21cm, a 3.0mm gap width was reproducibly measured in the DTS images, independent of magnification. A simulated 0.50mm (+/-0.13) JSN was quantified accurately (95% CI 0.44-0.56mm) in the DTS images. Angling the rods to represent knee flexion, the minimum gap could be precisely determined from the DTS images and was independent of flexion angle. JSN quantification using DTS was insensitive to distance from patient barrier and flexion angle. Potential exists for the optimization of DTS for accurate radiographic quantification of knee OA independent of patient positioning.

  2. Hedgehog inhibits β-catenin activity in synovial joint development and osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rockel, Jason S.; Yu, Chunying; Whetstone, Heather; Craft, April M.; Reilly, Katherine; Ma, Henry; Tsushima, Hidetoshi; Puviindran, Vijitha; Al-Jazrawe, Mushriq; Keller, Gordon M.; Alman, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    Both the WNT/β-catenin and hedgehog signaling pathways are important in the regulation of limb development, chondrocyte differentiation, and degeneration of articular cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA). It is not clear how these signaling pathways interact in interzone cell differentiation and synovial joint morphogenesis. Here, we determined that constitutive activation of hedgehog signaling specifically within interzone cells induces joint morphological changes by selectively inhibiting β-catenin–induced Fgf18 expression. Stabilization of β-catenin or treatment with FGF18 rescued hedgehog-induced phenotypes. Hedgehog signaling induced expression of a dominant negative isoform of TCF7L2 (dnTCF7L2) in interzone progeny, which may account for the selective regulation of β-catenin target genes observed. Knockdown of TCF7L2 isoforms in mouse chondrocytes rescued hedgehog signaling–induced Fgf18 downregulation, while overexpression of the human dnTCF7L2 orthologue (dnTCF4) in human chondrocytes promoted the expression of catabolic enzymes associated with OA. Similarly, expression of dnTCF4 in human chondrocytes positively correlated with the aggrecanase ADAMTS4. Consistent with our developmental findings, activation of β-catenin also attenuated hedgehog-induced or surgically induced articular cartilage degeneration in mouse models of OA. Thus, our results demonstrate that hedgehog inhibits selective β-catenin target gene expression to direct interzone progeny fates and articular cartilage development and disease. Moreover, agents that increase β-catenin activity have the potential to therapeutically attenuate articular cartilage degeneration as part of OA. PMID:27018594

  3. Clinical effects of an avocado-soybean unsaponifiable extract on arthralgia and osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Catunda, I S; Vasconcelos, B C do E; Andrade, E S de S; Costa, D F N

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present preliminary study was to investigate the effectiveness of an avocado-soybean unsaponifiable extract (ASU) in patients with arthralgia and osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was carried out. Fourteen women diagnosed with arthralgia and osteoarthritis of the TMJ using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders were included in the statistical analysis. The women were allocated randomly to two groups: ASU group and placebo group. Pain was measured using a visual analogue scale and pressure algometer. Mandibular function was evaluated through measurement of mandibular movements. Quality of life was measured using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14). The medication (ASU capsules or placebo capsules) was used for 4 months and the total follow-up was 6 months. Those taking the ASU extract had a decrease in pain symptoms and an improvement in quality of life. Moreover, a significant reduction in the use of rescue medication was found in the ASU group compared to the placebo group. This preliminary study provides strong evidence of the effectiveness of an avocado-soybean unsaponifiable extract in patients with degenerative joint diseases and arthralgia in the TMJ. Further studies with larger samples should be performed. PMID:27026059

  4. Joint sparing treatments in early ankle osteoarthritis: current procedures and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Castagnini, Francesco; Pellegrini, Camilla; Perazzo, Luca; Vannini, Francesca; Buda, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    Ankle osteoarthritis (AOA) is a severe pathology, mostly affecting a post-traumatic young population. Arthroscopic debridement, arthrodiastasis, osteotomy are the current joint sparing procedures, but, in the available studies, controversial results were achieved, with better outcomes in case of limited degeneration. Only osteotomy in case of malalignment is universally accepted as a joint sparing procedure in case of partial AOA. Recently, the biological mechanism of osteoarthritis has been intensively studied: it is a whole joint pathology, affecting cartilage, bone and synovial membrane. In particular, the first stage is characterized by a reversible catabolic activity with a state of chondropenia. Thus, biological procedures for early AOA were proposed in order to delay or to avoid end stage procedures. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may be a good solution to prevent or reverse degeneration, due to their immunomodulatory features (able to control the catabolic joint environment) and their regenerative osteochondral capabilities (able to treat the chondral defects). In fact, MSCs may regulate the cytokine cascade and the metalloproteinases release, restoring the osteochondral tissue as well. After interesting reports of mesenchymal stem cells seeded on scaffold and applied to cartilage defects in non-degenerated joints, bone marrow derived cells transplantation appears to be a promising technique in order to control the degenerative pathway and restore the osteochondral defects. PMID:26915003

  5. Osteoarthritis of weight bearing joints of lower limbs in former élite male athletes.

    PubMed Central

    Kujala, U. M.; Kaprio, J.; Sarna, S.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare the cumulative 21 year incidence of admission to hospital for osteoarthritis of the hip, knee, and ankle in former élite athletes and control subjects. DESIGN--National population based study. SETTING--Finland. SUBJECTS--2049 male athletes who had represented Finland in international events during 1920-65 and 1403 controls who had been classified healthy at the age of 20. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Hospital admissions for osteoarthritis of the hip, knee, and ankle joints identified from the national hospital discharge registry between 1970 and 1990. RESULTS--Athletes doing endurance sports, mixed sports, and power sports all had higher incidences of admission to hospital for osteoarthritis than controls. Age adjusted odds ratios compared with controls were 1.73 (95% confidence interval 0.99 to 3.01, P = 0.063) in endurance, 1.90 (1.24 to 2.92, P = 0.003) in mixed sports athletes, and 2.17 (1.41 to 3.32, P = 0.0003) in power sports athletes. The mean age at first admission to hospital was higher in endurance athletes (70.6) than in other groups (58.2 in mixed sports, 61.9 in power sports, and 61.2 in controls). Among the 2046 respondents to a questionnaire in 1985, the odds ratios for admission to hospital were similar in all three groups after adjusting for age, occupation, and body mass index at 20 (2.37, 2.42, 2.68). CONCLUSIONS--Athletes from all types of competitive sports are at slightly increased risk of requiring hospital care because of osteoarthritis of the hip, knee, or ankle. Mixed sports and power sports lead to increased admissions for premature osteoarthritis, but in endurance athletes the admissions are at an older age. PMID:8111258

  6. Non-terminal animal model of post-traumatic osteoarthritis induced by acute joint injury

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Mary K.; Trumble, Troy N.; Carlson, Cathy S.; Groschen, Donna M.; Merritt, Kelly A.; Brown, Murray P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Develop a non-terminal animal model of acute joint injury that demonstrates clinical and morphological evidence of early post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Methods An osteochondral (OC) fragment was created arthroscopically in one metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint of 11 horses and the contralateral joint was sham operated. Eleven additional horses served as unoperated controls. Every 2 weeks, force plate analysis, flexion response, joint circumference, and synovial effusion scores were recorded. At weeks 0 and 16, radiographs (all horses) and arthroscopic videos (OC injured and sham joints) were graded. At week 16, synovium and cartilage biopsies were taken arthroscopically from OC injured and sham joints for histologic evaluation and the OC fragment was removed. Results Osteochondral fragments were successfully created and horses were free of clinical lameness after fragment removal. Forelimb gait asymmetry was observed at week 2 (P=0.0012), while joint circumference (P<0.0001) and effusion scores (P<0.0001) were increased in injured limbs compared to baseline from weeks 2 to 16. Positive flexion response of injured limbs was noted at multiple time points. Capsular enthesophytes were seen radiographically in injured limbs. Articular cartilage damage was demonstrated arthroscopically as mild wear-lines and histologically as superficial zone chondrocyte death accompanied by mild proliferation. Synovial hyperemia and fibrosis were present at the site of OC injury. Conclusion Acute OC injury to the MCP joint resulted in clinical, imaging, and histologic changes in cartilage and synovium characteristic of early PTOA. This model will be useful for defining biomarkers of early osteoarthritis and for monitoring response to therapy and surgery. PMID:23467035

  7. SYNOVITIS IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: A PRECURSOR OF DISEASE?

    PubMed Central

    Atukorala, I.; Kwoh, C. K.; Guermazi, A.; Roemer, F. W.; Boudreau, R. M.; Hannon, M. J.; Hunter, D. J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It is unknown whether joint inflammation precedes other articular tissue damage in osteoarthritis. Therefore, this study aims to determine if synovitis precedes the development of radiographic knee OA (ROA). Methods The participants in this nested case-control study were selected from knees in the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) that had a Kellgren Lawrence grading (KLG)=0 baseline (BL). These knees were evaluated annually with radiography and non contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over 4-years. MRIs were assessed for effusion-synovitis and Hoffa-synovitis. Case knees were defined by radiographic knee osteoarthritis (ROA) (KLG >=2) on the postero-anterior knee radiographs at any assessment after baseline. Radiographs were assessed at P0 (time of onset of radiographic knee OA), 1 year prior to P0 (P-1) and at BL. Controls were participants who did not develop incident ROA (iROA) from baseline to 48 months). Results 133 knees of 120 persons with ROA (83 females) were matched to 133 control knees (83 females). Odds ratios (OR) for occurrence of iROA associated with the presence of effusion-synovitis at BL, P-1 and PO were 1.56 (95% CI 0.86–2.81), 3.23 (1.72–6.06) and 4.7(1.10–2.95), respectively. The ORs for the occurrence of iROA associated with the presence of Hoffa-synovitis at BL, P-1 and P0 were 1.80 (1.1–2.95), 2.47 (1.45–4.23) and 2.40 (1.43–4.04), respectively. Conclusions Effusion-synovitis and Hoffa-synovitis strongly predicted the development of incident ROA. PMID:25488799

  8. Establishment of a rat model of adjuvant-induced osteoarthritis of the lumbar facet joint.

    PubMed

    Shuang, Feng; Zhu, Jialiang; Song, Keran; Hou, Shuxun; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chunli; Tang, Jiaguang

    2014-12-01

    To study the establishment of adjuvant-induced osteoarthritis of the lumbar facet joint in a rat model. Complete Freund's adjuvant (experimental group) and saline (control group) were randomly injected into the right and left side of rat, respectively. The rats were killed, and degeneration of lumbar facet joint was evaluated at macroscopic level and scored based on OARSI scores system. Moreover, Interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α levels in the synovium were measured. The macroscopic scores and OARSI scores of experimental group were higher than the control group (P < 0.05). The concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α was significantly increased only on 3- and 7-day post-surgery when compared with controls, and interleukin-1β was increased on days 3,7 and 14 post-surgery (P < 0.05). The rat model of adjuvant can induce degeneration of the lumbar facet joint. It can be useful for studies on mechanisms and treatment of lumbar facet joint osteoarthritis. PMID:24973958

  9. Primary osteoarthritis of the hip: a genetic disease caused by European genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Hoaglund, Franklin T

    2013-03-01

    Primary osteoarthritis of the hip is a separate phenotype that occurs at a rate of 3% to 6% in the populations of the world with European ancestry. In all non-European populations, there is a consistent rarity of primary osteoarthritis that suggests a different etiology for these few patients. Family, sibling, and twin studies prove primary osteoarthritis to be a genetic disease with a 50% heritability caused by European genetic variants. The genetic basis is reinforced by the lower rate of primary osteoarthritis in American minorities consistent with their degree of European gene admixture. Whether the mechanism of degeneration of primary osteoarthritis may be secondary through a morphologic deformity, such as femoroacetabular impingement, remains unknown. The virtual absence of the disease in non-Europeans indicates that the European gene component is necessary for the expression of this separate phenotype of osteoarthritis. PMID:23467870

  10. Stem cell application for osteoarthritis in the knee joint: A minireview.

    PubMed

    Uth, Kristin; Trifonov, Dimitar

    2014-11-26

    Knee osteoarthritis is a chronic, indolent disease that will affect an ever increasing number of patients, especially the elderly and the obese. It is characterized by degeneration of the cartilage substance inside the knee which leads to pain, stiffness and tenderness. By some estimations in 2030, only in the United States, this medical condition will burden 67 million people. While conventional treatments like physiotherapy or drugs offer temporary relief of clinical symptoms, restoration of normal cartilage function has been difficult to achieve. Moreover, in severe cases of knee osteoarthritis total knee replacement may be required. Total knee replacements come together with high effort and costs and are not always successful. The aim of this review is to outline the latest advances in stem cell therapy for knee osteoarthritis as well as highlight some of the advantages of stem cell therapy over traditional approaches aimed at restoration of cartilage function in the knee. In addition to the latest advances in the field, challenges associated with stem cell therapy regarding knee cartilage regeneration and chondrogenesis in vitro and in vivo are also outlined and analyzed. Furthermore, based on their critical assessment of the present academic literature the authors of this review share their vision about the future of stem cell applications in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. PMID:25426260

  11. Osteoarthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... these medicines without a prescription. Most doctors recommend acetaminophen (Tylenol) first. DO NOT take more then 3 grams ( ... liver disease, talk with your doctor before taking acetaminophen. If your pain continues, your doctor may recommend ...

  12. Noninvasive imaging of hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation for detection of osteoarthritis in the finger joints using multispectral three-dimensional quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yao; Sobel, Eric; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-05-01

    We present quantitative imaging of hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation in in vivo finger joints and evaluate the feasibility of detecting osteoarthritis (OA) in the hand using three-dimensional (3D) multispectral quantitative photoacoustic tomography (3D qPAT). The results show that both the anatomical structures and quantitative chromophore concentrations (oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin) of different joint tissues (hard phalanges and soft cartilage/synovial fluid between phalanges) can be imaged in vivo with the multispectral 3D qPAT. Enhanced hemoglobin concentrations and dropped oxygen saturations in osteoarthritic phalanges and soft joint tissues in joint cavities have been observed. This study indicates that the multispectral 3D qPAT is a promising approach to detect the angiogenesis and hypoxia associated with OA disease and a potential clinical tool for early OA detection in the finger joints.

  13. The Effects of Common Footwear on Joint Loading in Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Shakoor, Najia; Sengupta, Mondira; Foucher, Kharma C.; Wimmer, Markus A.; Fogg, Louis F.; Block, Joel A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Elevated joint loads during walking have been associated with the severity and progression of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Footwear may have the potential to alter these loads. This study compared the effects of several common shoe types on knee loading in subjects with OA of the knee. Methods 31 subjects (10 men, 21 women) with radiographic and symptomatic knee OA underwent gait analyses using an optoelectronic camera system and multi-component force plate. In each case, gait was evaluated barefoot and while wearing 4 different shoes: 1) clogs (Dansko®), 2) stability shoes (Brooks Addiction®), 3) flat walking shoes (Puma H Street®), and 4) flip-flops. Peak knee loads were compared between the different footwear conditions. Results Overall, the clogs and stability shoes, resulted in a significantly higher peak knee adduction moment (3.1±0.7 and 3.0±0.7 %BW*ht, respectively, ~15% higher, p<0.05)) compared with that of flat walking shoes (2.8±0.7%BW*ht), flip-flops (2.7±0.8%BW*ht) and barefoot walking (2.7±0.7%BW*ht). There were no statistically significant differences in knee loads with the flat walking shoes and flip-flops compared to barefoot walking. Conclusions These data confirm that footwear may have significant effects on knee loads during walking in subjects with OA of the knee. Flexibility and heel height may be important differentiating characteristics of shoes which affect knee loads. In light of the strong relationship between knee loading and OA, the design and biomechanical effects of modern footwear should be more closely evaluated in terms of their effects on the disease. PMID:20191571

  14. New developments in osteoarthritis. Sex differences in magnetic resonance imaging-based biomarkers and in those of joint metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Sex differences in the prevalence, incidence, and severity of osteoarthritis (OA) have long been known. Some differences in the evaluation of this issue across studies may be related to differences in study design, sampling, study size, study populations, targeted joint sites, and definitions of OA. This report highlights recent studies of sex differences in individual joint components imaged by magnetic resonance imaging and in systemic biomarkers of joint metabolism. Particularly important are those studies that examine this issue in young unaffected adults and children before the development of disease. Despite some variation across studies, women appear for the most part to have a thinner and more reduced volume of cartilage in the knee than men, and this may occur from early childhood. It is not clear whether women have a more accelerated rate of cartilage volume loss than men. Few data exist on sex differences in systemic biomarkers of joint metabolism. In these studies, it is critically important to characterize the total body burden of OA and the presence of comorbid conditions likely to influence a given biomarker. Lastly, future research should dovetail studies of sex differences in imaging and biochemical biomarkers with genetics to maximize insight into the mechanisms behind observed sex differences. PMID:20701741

  15. Differential levels of synovial fluid aggrecan aggregate components in experimental osteoarthritis and joint disuse.

    PubMed

    Ratcliffe, A; Beauvais, P J; Saed-Nejad, F

    1994-07-01

    The levels of proteoglycan aggregate components (link protein, keratan sulfate epitope, and total sulfated glycosaminoglycan) were determined in the synovial fluid lavages of dogs with experimental osteoarthritis or disuse atrophy. A model of experimental osteoarthritis was created by transection of the anterior cruciate ligament of the right knee; studies were carried out 6 and 12 weeks after surgery. Joint disuse was studied at 4 and 8 weeks after initiation of the disuse. Recovery after disuse also was studied in joints that had 3 weeks of remobilization after 4 or 8 weeks of disuse. Synovial fluid lavages from the right knee joints of untreated animals were used as controls. The concentrations of keratan sulfate epitope, sulfated glycosaminoglycan, and link protein in the synovial fluid lavages at 6 and 12 weeks after transection of the anterior cruciate were elevated compared with the control values. Similar analysis of the fluid after disuse showed that the levels of keratan sulfate epitope and sulfated glycosaminoglycan were increased compared with the control levels and the levels after transection. However, the concentration of link protein in the fluid after disuse was not significantly different from the control level. The levels of keratan sulfate epitope and sulfated glycosaminoglycan in the synovial fluid lavages after disuse with recovery were high, but the levels of link protein remained low. The results indicate that the catabolism of proteoglycan aggregates in articular cartilage during early osteoarthritis and disuse is different. The determination of keratan sulfate epitope in synovial fluid lavages appears to provide a relatively general indication of proteoglycan catabolism, whereas increased levels of link protein may be more indicative of cartilage degeneration. PMID:7520485

  16. Recent advances and future directions in the management of knee osteoarthritis: Can biological joint reconstruction replace joint arthroplasty and when?

    PubMed Central

    Paschos, Nikolaos K

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a concise description of the recent advances in the field of osteoarthritis management is presented. The main focus is to highlight the most promising techniques that emerge in both biological joint replacement and artificial joint arthroplasty. A critical view of high quality evidence regarding outcome and safety profile of these techniques is presented. The potential role of kinematically aligned total knee replacement, navigation, and robotic-assisted surgery is outlined. A critical description of both primary and stem cell-based therapies, the cell homing theory, the use of biologic factors and recent advancements in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is provided. Based on the current evidence, some thoughts on a realistic approach towards answering these questions are attempted. PMID:26495242

  17. Recent advances and future directions in the management of knee osteoarthritis: Can biological joint reconstruction replace joint arthroplasty and when?

    PubMed

    Paschos, Nikolaos K

    2015-10-18

    In this article, a concise description of the recent advances in the field of osteoarthritis management is presented. The main focus is to highlight the most promising techniques that emerge in both biological joint replacement and artificial joint arthroplasty. A critical view of high quality evidence regarding outcome and safety profile of these techniques is presented. The potential role of kinematically aligned total knee replacement, navigation, and robotic-assisted surgery is outlined. A critical description of both primary and stem cell-based therapies, the cell homing theory, the use of biologic factors and recent advancements in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is provided. Based on the current evidence, some thoughts on a realistic approach towards answering these questions are attempted. PMID:26495242

  18. Increased function of pronociceptive TRPV1 at the level of the joint in a rat model of osteoarthritis pain

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, S; Chapman, R J; Woodhams, S; Sagar, D R; Turner, J; Burston, J J; Bullock, C; Paton, K; Huang, J; Wong, A; McWilliams, D F; Okine, B N; Barrett, D A; Hathway, G J; Walsh, D A; Chapman, V

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Blockade of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) with systemic antagonists attenuates osteoarthritis (OA) pain behaviour in rat models, but on-target-mediated hyperthermia has halted clinical trials. The present study investigated the potential for targeting TRPV1 receptors within the OA joint in order to produce analgesia. Methods The presence of TRPV1 receptors in human synovium was detected using western blotting and immunohistochemistry. In a rat model of OA, joint levels of an endogenous ligand for TRPV1, 12-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE), were quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Effects of peripheral administration of the TRPV1 receptor antagonist JNJ-17203212 on afferent fibre activity, pain behaviour and core body temperature were investigated. Effects of a spinal administration of JNJ-17203212 on dorsal horn neuronal responses were studied. Results We demonstrate increased TRPV1 immunoreactivity in human OA synovium, confirming the diseased joint as a potential therapeutic target for TRPV1-mediated analgesia. In a model of OA pain, we report increased joint levels of 12-HETE, and the sensitisation of joint afferent neurones to mechanical stimulation of the knee. Local administration of JNJ-17203212 reversed this sensitisation of joint afferents and inhibited pain behaviour (weight-bearing asymmetry), to a comparable extent as systemic JNJ-17203212, in this model of OA pain, but did not alter core body temperature. There was no evidence for increased TRPV1 function in the spinal cord in this model of OA pain. Conclusions Our data provide a clinical and mechanistic rationale for the future investigation of the therapeutic benefits of intra-articular administration of TRPV1 antagonists for the treatment of OA pain. PMID:24152419

  19. Joint-dependent response to impact and implications for post-traumatic osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Novakofski, K.D.; Berg, L.C.; Bronzini, I.; Bonnevie, E.D.; Poland, S.G.; Bonassar, L.J.; Fortier, L.A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) varies between joints. Cartilage in eight different joints was evaluated to elucidate the disparate susceptibilities between joints to post-traumatic OA (PTOA) and provide evidence for joint specific clinical treatments. The hypothesis was that cartilage in different joints would have varying cell death and anabolic gene expression profiles after injury. Methods Adult equine cartilage explants were harvested from shoulder (SH), elbow (EL), carpal (CA), metacarpophalangeal (MC), patellofemoral (FP), tarsal (TA), metatarsophalangeal (MT), and proximal interphalangeal (PP) joints, and were injured by loading with 30 MPa within 1 second. Fractional dissipated energy, cell density, cell death, and gene expression were quantified. Results PP had the highest fractional dissipated energy (94%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 88–101%). Cell density was most dense in superficial zone in all samples, with MC and MT having the highest peak density. Injured samples had significantly higher cell death (13.5%, 95% CI 9.1–17.9%) than non-injured samples (6.8%, 95% CI 2.5–11.1%, p=0.016); however, cell death after injury was not significantly different between joints. Gene expression was significantly different between joints. CD-RAP expression in normal cartilage was lowest in FP (Cp=21, 95% CI −80–122). After injury, the change in CD-RAP expression increased and was highest in FP (147% relative increase after injury, 95% CI 64–213). Conclusion Different joints have different baseline characteristics, including cell density and gene expression, and responses to injury, including energy dissipation and gene expression. These unique characteristics may explain differences in OA prevalence and suggest differences in susceptibility to PTOA. Clinical Relevance Understanding differences in the response to injury and potential susceptibility of OA can lead to the development of preventative or treatment strategies. PMID:25725390

  20. The Roles of Mechanical Stresses in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis: Implications for Treatment of Joint Injuries.

    PubMed

    Buckwalter, Joseph A; Anderson, Donald D; Brown, Thomas D; Tochigi, Yuki; Martin, James A

    2013-10-01

    Excessive joint surface loadings, either single (acute impact event) or repetitive (cumulative contact stress), can cause the clinical syndrome of osteoarthritis (OA). Despite advances in treatment of injured joints, the risk of OA following joint injuries has not decreased in the last 50 years. Cumulative excessive articular surface contact stress that leads to OA results from post-traumatic joint incongruity and instability, and joint dysplasia, but also may cause OA in patients without known joint abnormalities. In vitro investigations show that excessive articular cartilage loading triggers release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from mitochondria, and that these ROS cause chondrocyte death and matrix degradation. Preventing release of ROS or inhibiting their effects preserves chondrocytes and their matrix. Fibronectin fragments released from articular cartilage subjected to excessive loads also stimulate matrix degradation; inhibition of molecular pathways initiated by these fragments prevents this effect. Additionally, injured chondrocytes release alarmins that activate chondroprogentior cells in vitro that propogate and migrate to regions of damaged cartilage. These cells also release chemokines and cytokines that may contribute to inflammation that causes progressive cartilage loss. Distraction and motion of osteoarthritic human ankles can promote joint remodeling, decrease pain and improve joint function in patients with end-stage post-traumatic OA. These advances in understanding of how altering mechanical stresses can lead to remodeling of osteoarthritic joints and how excessive stress causes loss of articular cartilage, including identification of mechanically induced mediators of cartilage loss, provide the basis for new biologic and mechanical approaches to the prevention and treatment of OA. PMID:25067995

  1. The rate of joint replacement in osteoarthritis depends on the patient’s socioeconomic status

    PubMed Central

    Wetterholm, Malin; Turkiewicz, Aleksandra; Stigmar, Kjerstin; Hubertsson, Jenny; Englund, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Assessment of potential disparities in access to care is a vital part of achieving equity in health and healthcare. We have therefore studied the effect of socioeconomic status (SES) on the rates of knee and hip replacement due to osteoarthritis. Methods This was a cohort study in Skåne, Sweden. We included all residents aged ≥ 35 years with consultations between 2004 and 2013 for hip or knee osteoarthritis. We retrieved individual information on income, education, and occupation and evaluated the rates of knee and hip replacement according to SES, with adjustment for age and sex. Professionals, legislators, senior officials, and managers, and individuals with the longest education, served as the reference group. Results We followed 50,498 knee osteoarthritis patients (59% women) and 20,882 hip osteoarthritis patients (58% women). The mutually adjusted rate of knee replacement was lower in those with an elementary occupation (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.72–0.92), in craft workers and those with related trades (HR = 0.88, CI: 0.79–0.98), and in skilled agricultural/fishery workers (HR = 0.83, CI: 0.72–0.96), but higher in the 2 least educated groups (HR = 1.2 in both). The rate of hip replacement was lower in those with an elementary occupation (HR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.68–0.87), in plant and machine operators/assemblers (HR = 0.83, CI: 0.75–0.93), and service workers/shop assistants (HR = 0.88, CI: 0.80–0.96). The rate of hip replacement was higher in the highest income group (HR = 1.1, 95% CI: 1.0–1.2). Interpretation There was a lower rate of joint replacement in osteoarthritis patients working in professions often associated with lower socioeconomic status, suggesting inequity in access to care. However, the results are not unanimous, as the rate of knee replacement was higher in the least educated groups. PMID:26982799

  2. The rate of joint replacement in osteoarthritis depends on the patient's socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Wetterholm, Malin; Turkiewicz, Aleksandra; Stigmar, Kjerstin; Hubertsson, Jenny; Englund, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Assessment of potential disparities in access to care is a vital part of achieving equity in health and healthcare. We have therefore studied the effect of socioeconomic status (SES) on the rates of knee and hip replacement due to osteoarthritis. Methods - This was a cohort study in Skåne, Sweden. We included all residents aged ≥ 35 years with consultations between 2004 and 2013 for hip or knee osteoarthritis. We retrieved individual information on income, education, and occupation and evaluated the rates of knee and hip replacement according to SES, with adjustment for age and sex. Professionals, legislators, senior officials, and managers, and individuals with the longest education, served as the reference group. Results - We followed 50,498 knee osteoarthritis patients (59% women) and 20,882 hip osteoarthritis patients (58% women). The mutually adjusted rate of knee replacement was lower in those with an elementary occupation (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.72-0.92), in craft workers and those with related trades (HR = 0.88, CI: 0.79-0.98), and in skilled agricultural/fishery workers (HR = 0.83, CI: 0.72-0.96), but higher in the 2 least educated groups (HR = 1.2 in both). The rate of hip replacement was lower in those with an elementary occupation (HR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.68-0.87), in plant and machine operators/assemblers (HR = 0.83, CI: 0.75-0.93), and service workers/shop assistants (HR = 0.88, CI: 0.80-0.96). The rate of hip replacement was higher in the highest income group (HR = 1.1, 95% CI: 1.0-1.2). Interpretation - There was a lower rate of joint replacement in osteoarthritis patients working in professions often associated with lower socioeconomic status, suggesting inequity in access to care. However, the results are not unanimous, as the rate of knee replacement was higher in the least educated groups. PMID:26982799

  3. Neuromuscular exercise prior to joint arthroplasty in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee.

    PubMed

    Villadsen, Allan

    2016-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease affecting the whole joint and peri-articular structures like the muscles. The hallmark of OA is cartilage loss. The main symptoms are pain and decreased physical function leading to a reduced quality of life. OA ranks eight in leading causes of disability worldwide and it generates a heavy economic burden for society. The prevalence of OA increases with age and 10-18% aged above 60 years are affected. Currently there is no cure for OA and the various treatment modalities aim at addressing symptoms, i.e. reducing pain, improving physical function and preventing further progression of the disease. Exercise has proven to be a viable treatment option with regard to reducing pain and improving physical function in patients with mild to moderate knee OA and is today regarded a cornerstone in the treatment. The documentation is less clear for hip OA. Patients with severe OA of the hip or knee are treated with total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Although, in general, it is a very successful procedure, there are still challenges to overcome in this patient group, as approximately 10% of those having hip arthroplasty and 20% of those having knee arthroplasty have persistent symptoms. The evidence on the efficacy of exercise prior to TJA is sparse. It is based on insufficiently powered trials and with interventions of questionable validity. Two recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses reach conflicting conclusions and highlight the need for high quality trials with sufficient sample sizes. In this dissertation, I wanted to evaluate the effects of an individualised neuromuscular exercise programme (NEMEX-TJR) when administered prior to joint arthroplasty in patients with severe OA of the hip or knee joint. This intervention was previously found to be feasible with regard to pain level during exercise and it was possible to progress the training level in this patient group. The main question asked was: Does the addition of

  4. Osteoarthritis and meniscus disorders of the knee as occupational diseases of miners

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, G; Nichols, L

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether kneeling or squatting for prolonged periods is sufficiently causally associated with an increased risk of injury or degenerative disease of the knee joint as to meet the classic criteria to be considered an occupational disease of coal miners for whom these are or have been routine working postures. Method: Systematic literature searches were made for studies relating to kneeling and squatting as part of the working environment of coal mines and the role of these postures in causation of knee disorders in coal miners, analogous occupations, populations, and communities. The working environment and potentially damaging forces on the knee when kneeling or squatting were described. Papers on the incidence or prevalence of knee disorders in occupational and other groups were scored against five criteria independently by each author, and from this a single consensus score representing the overall strength of evidence given by the research was awarded. The evidence was then weighed against the criteria for an occupational disease. Results: Nineteen published papers were scored, the majority of which focussed on osteoarthritis as the outcome of interest. Few of the studies found focussed specifically on miners, and those that did tended to involve small numbers of subjects and were carried out before 1960, when the mining population was at its largest but epidemiological evidence of the risk factors for knee disorders was not well established. The non-mining studies in the review represent groups of workers with a similar or lesser kneeling content in their work. Conclusion: The papers reviewed provide sufficient evidence to conclude that work involving kneeling and/or squatting is causally associated with an increased risk of osteoarthritis of the knee. In some of the more recent epidemiologically sound studies, frequent or prolonged kneeling or squatting doubles the general risk of osteoarthritis of the knees found in the general population

  5. Arthroscopic resection of the distal clavicle in osteoarthritis of the acromioclavicular joint

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae-Soo; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background: Symptomatic acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) lesions are a common cause of shoulder complaints that can be treated successfully with both conservative and surgical methods. There are several operative techniques, including both open and arthroscopic surgery, for excising the distal end of the clavicle. Here, we present a new modified arthroscopic technique for painful osteoarthritis of the ACJ and evaluate its clinical outcomes. Our hypothesis was that 4- to 7-mm resection of the distal clavicle in an en bloc fashion would have several advantages, including no bony remnants, maintenance of stability of the ACJ, and reduced prevalence of heterotopic ossification, in addition to elimination of the pathologic portion of the distal clavicle. Materials and Methods: 20 shoulders of 20 consecutive patients with painful and isolated osteoarthritis of the ACJ who were treated by arthroscopic en bloc resection of the distal clavicle were included in the study. There were 10 males and 10 females with an average age of 56 years (range 42–70 years). The mean duration of followup was 6 years and 2 months (range 4–8 years 10 months). The results were evaluated using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating score. Results: The overall UCLA score was 13.7 preoperatively, which improved to 33.4 postoperatively. All subscores were improved significantly (P < 0.001). There were no specific complications at the latest followup. Conclusion: It is critical in this procedure to resect the distal clavicle evenly from superior to inferior in an en bloc fashion without any small bony remnants and to preserve the capsule and acromioclavicular ligament superoposteriorly. This arthroscopic procedure is a reliable and reproducible technique for painful osteoarthritis of the ACJ lesions in active patients engaged in overhead throwing sports and heavy labor. PMID:27512219

  6. Non-invasive Loading Model of Murine Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Poulet, Blandine

    2016-07-01

    Osteoarthritis is the commonest degenerative joint disease, leading to joint pain and disability. The mouse has been the primary animal used for research, due to its size, relatively short lifespan, and the availability of genetically modified animals. Importantly, they show pathogenesis similar to osteoarthritis in humans. Mechanical loading is a major risk factor for osteoarthritis, and various mouse models have been developed to study the role and effects of mechanics on health and disease in various joints. This review describes the main mouse models used to non-invasively apply mechanical loads on joints. Most of the mouse models of osteoarthritis target the knee, including repetitive loading and joint injury such as ligament rupture, but a few studies have also characterised models for elbow, temporomandibular joint, and whole-body vibration spinal loading. These models are a great opportunity to dissect the influences of various types of mechanical input on joint health and disease. PMID:27177901

  7. Osteoarthritis: understanding the pathophysiology, genetics, and treatments.

    PubMed Central

    Sinkov, Vladamir; Cymet, Tyler

    2003-01-01

    Risk factors for developing osteoarthritis include age, previous joint injury, obesity, and a genetic predisposition. An imbalance of joint functioning initiates the disease process, which is then worsened through biochemical changes in the collagen in the joint. Joint pain is the cardinal clinical presentation. Radiographic and lab testing do not correlate well with the disease; therefore, diagnosis is made by clinical findings. Treatment focuses on maintaining joint function through the use of directed activity, physical therapy, and medications. PMID:12856913

  8. Reduced rates of primary joint replacement for osteoarthritis in Italian and Greek migrants to Australia: the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Simpson, Julie A; Wluka, Anita E; Urquhart, Donna M; English, Dallas R; Giles, Graham G; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Racial and ethnic disparities in rates of total joint replacement have been described, but little work has been done in well-established migrant groups. The aim of this study was to compare the rates of primary joint replacement for osteoarthritis for Italian and Greek migrants to Australia and Australian-born individuals. Methods Eligible participants (n = 39,023) aged 27 to 75 years, born in Italy, Greece, Australia and the United Kingdom, were recruited for the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study between 1990 and 1994. Primary hip and knee replacement for osteoarthritis between 2001 and 2005 was determined by data linkage to the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Results Participants born in Italy and Greece had a lower rate of primary joint replacement compared with those born in Australia (hazard ratio [HR] 0.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.26 to 0.39, P < 0.001), independent of age, gender, body mass index, education level, and physical functioning. This lower rate was observed for joint replacements performed in private hospitals (HR 0.17, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.23), but not for joint replacements performed in public hospitals (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.72 to 1.29). Conclusions People born in Italy and Greece had a lower rate of primary joint replacement for osteoarthritis in this cohort study compared with Australian-born people, which could not simply be explained by factors such as education level, physical functioning, and weight. Although differential access to health care found in the population may explain the different rates of joint replacement, it may be that social factors and preferences regarding treatment or different rates of progression to end-stage osteoarthritis in this population are important to ethnic disparity. PMID:19505315

  9. Inflammatory response to therapeutic gold bead implantation in canine hip joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lie, K-I; Jæger, G; Nordstoga, K; Moe, L

    2011-11-01

    Inflammatory changes associated with periarticular pure gold bead implants were studied in dogs involved in a clinical trial investigating motor dysfunction and chronic pain owing to hip joint dysplasia and osteoarthritis. Gold beads were percutaneously implanted via a needle into different locations surrounding the greater trochanter of the femur. Nine dogs with implants were necropsied. In all examined animals, characteristic histologic lesions were observed in the tissue surrounding the gold implants--namely, a fibrous capsule composed of concentric fibroblasts intermixed with a variable number of inflammatory cells and a paucicellular innermost layer of collagen with a few fibrocyte-like cells in empty lacunae. Lymphocytes dominated the inflammatory infiltrate, with rarely observed macrophages present in close proximity to the implant site. No giant cells were observed. Immunohistochemistry showed mixed populations of lymphocytes, both CD3 positive (T cells) and CD79a positive (B cells), which in some cases formed lymphoid follicles. Diffuse inflammatory changes were present to a minor extent in the perimysium and surrounding fascia. The inflammation observed in dogs is similar to that observed with gold implants in humans. It is possible that the clinically beneficial effect of gold beads for chronic osteoarthritis depends on sustained localized inflammation with localized release of soluble mediators. The encapsulation of the implant by a paucicellular and poorly vascularized fibrous capsule may help prevent an exaggerated inflammatory reaction by sequestering the gold bead from the surrounding tissue. PMID:20861497

  10. Messenger RNA delivery of a cartilage-anabolic transcription factor as a disease-modifying strategy for osteoarthritis treatment

    PubMed Central

    Aini, Hailati; Itaka, Keiji; Fujisawa, Ayano; Uchida, Hirokuni; Uchida, Satoshi; Fukushima, Shigeto; Kataoka, Kazunori; Saito, Taku; Chung, Ung-il; Ohba, Shinsuke

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative joint disease and a major health problem in the elderly population. No disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug (DMOAD) has been made available for clinical use. Here we present a disease-modifying strategy for OA, focusing on messenger RNA (mRNA) delivery of a therapeutic transcription factor using polyethylene glycol (PEG)-polyamino acid block copolymer-based polyplex nanomicelles. When polyplex nanomicelles carrying the cartilage-anabolic, runt-related transcription factor (RUNX) 1 mRNA were injected into mouse OA knee joints, OA progression was significantly suppressed compared with the non-treatment control. Expressions of cartilage-anabolic markers and proliferation were augmented in articular chondrocytes of the RUNX1-injected knees. Thus, this study provides a proof of concept of the treatment of degenerative diseases such as OA by the in situ mRNA delivery of therapeutic transcription factors; the presented approach will directly connect basic findings on disease-protective or tissue-regenerating factors to disease treatment. PMID:26728350

  11. Decreased Knee Joint Loading Associated With Early Knee Osteoarthritis After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wellsandt, Elizabeth; Gardinier, Emily S.; Manal, Kurt; Axe, Michael J.; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury predisposes individuals to early-onset knee joint osteoarthritis (OA). Abnormal joint loading is apparent after ACL injury and reconstruction. The relationship between altered joint biomechanics and the development of knee OA is unknown. Hypothesis Altered knee joint kinetics and medial compartment contact forces initially after injury and reconstruction are associated with radiographic knee OA 5 years after reconstruction. Study Design Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods Individuals with acute, unilateral ACL injury completed gait analysis before (baseline) and after (posttraining) preoperative rehabilitation and at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after reconstruction. Surface electromyographic and knee biomechanical data served as inputs to an electromyographically driven musculoskeletal model to estimate knee joint contact forces. Patients completed radiographic testing 5 years after reconstruction. Differences in knee joint kinetics and contact forces were compared between patients with and those without radiographic knee OA. Results Patients with OA walked with greater frontal plane interlimb differences than those without OA (nonOA) at baseline (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.00 ± 0.08 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.15 ± 0.09 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .014; peak knee adduction moment impulse difference: −0.001 ± 0.032 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.048 ± 0.031 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .042). The involved limb knee adduction moment impulse of the group with osteoarthritis was also lower than that of the group without osteoarthritis at baseline (0.087 ± 0.023 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs 0.049 ± 0.018 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .023). Significant group differences were absent at posttraining but reemerged 6 months after reconstruction (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.02 ± 0.04 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.06 ± 0.11 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .043). In addition, the OA group walked with lower peak

  12. Early knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Favero, Marta; Ramonda, Roberta; Goldring, Mary B; Goldring, Steven R; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Concepts regarding osteoarthritis, the most common joint disease, have dramatically changed in the past decade thanks to the development of new imaging techniques and the widespread use of arthroscopy that permits direct visualisation of intra-articular tissues and structure. MRI and ultrasound allow the early detection of pre-radiographic structural changes not only in the peri-articular bone but also in the cartilage, menisci, synovial membrane, ligaments and fat pad. The significance of MRI findings such as cartilage defects, bone marrow lesions, synovial inflammation/effusions and meniscal tears in patients without radiographic signs of osteoarthritis is not fully understood. Nevertheless, early joint tissue changes are associated with symptoms and, in some cases, with progression of disease. In this short review, we discuss the emerging concept of early osteoarthritis localised to the knee based on recently updated knowledge. We highlight the need for a new definition of early osteoarthritis that will permit the identification of patients at high risk of osteoarthritis progression and to initiate early treatment interventions. PMID:26557380

  13. A computer-based image analysis method for assessing the severity of hip joint osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boniatis, Ioannis; Costaridou, Lena; Cavouras, Dionisis; Panagiotopoulos, Elias; Panayiotakis, George

    2006-12-01

    A computer-based image analysis method was developed for assessing the severity of hip osteoarthritis (OA). Eighteen pelvic radiographs of patients with verified unilateral hip OA, were digitized and enhanced employing custom developed software. Two ROIs corresponding to osteoarthritic and contralateral-physiological radiographic Hip Joint Spaces (HJSs) were determined on each radiograph. Textural features were extracted from the HJS-ROIs utilizing the run-length matrices and Laws textural measures. A k-Nearest Neighbour based hierarchical tree structure was designed for classifying hips into three OA severity categories labeled as "Normal", "Mild/Moderate", and "Severe". Employing the run-length features, the overall classification accuracy of the hierarchical tree structure was 86.1%. The utilization of Laws' textural measures improved the system classification performance, providing an overall classification accuracy of 94.4%. The proposed method maybe of value to physicians in assessing the severity of hip OA.

  14. The role of meniscal tissue in joint protection in early osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Verdonk, Rene; Madry, Henning; Shabshin, Nogah; Dirisamer, Florian; Peretti, Giuseppe M; Pujol, Nicolas; Spalding, Tim; Verdonk, Peter; Seil, Romain; Condello, Vincenzo; Di Matteo, Berardo; Zellner, Johannes; Angele, Peter

    2016-06-01

    It is widely accepted that partial meniscectomy leads to early onset of osteoarthritis (OA). A strong correlation exists between the amount and location of the resected meniscus and the development of degenerative changes in the knee. On the other hand, osteoarthritic changes of the joint alter the structural and functional integrity of meniscal tissue. These alterations might additionally compromise the limited healing capacity of the meniscus. In young, active patients without cartilage damage, meniscus therapy including partial meniscectomy, meniscus suture, and meniscus replacement has proven beneficial effects in long-term studies. Even in an early osteoarthritic milieu, there is a relevant regenerative potential of the meniscus and the surrounding cartilage. This potential should be taken into account, and meniscal surgery can be performed with the correct timing and the proper indication even in the presence of early OA. PMID:27085362

  15. Applications of Proteomics to Osteoarthritis, a Musculoskeletal Disease Characterized by Aging

    PubMed Central

    Mobasheri, Ali

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of age-related musculoskeletal impairment is steadily rising throughout the world. Musculoskeletal conditions are closely linked with aging and inflammation. They are leading causes of morbidity and disability in man and beast. Aging is a major contributor to musculoskeletal degeneration and the development of osteoarthritis (OA). OA is a degenerative disease that involves structural changes to joint tissues including synovial inflammation, catabolic destruction of articular cartilage and alterations in subchondral bone. Cartilage degradation and structural changes in subchondral bone result in the production of fragments of extracellular matrix molecules. Some of these biochemical markers or “biomarkers” can be detected in blood, serum, synovial fluid, and urine and may be useful markers of disease progression. The ability to detect biomarkers of cartilage degradation in body fluids may enable clinicians to diagnose sub-clinical OA as well as determining the course of disease progression. New biomarkers that indicate early responses of the joint cartilage to degeneration will be useful in detecting early, pre-radiographic changes. Systems biology is increasingly applied in basic cartilage biology and OA research. Proteomic techniques have the potential to improve our understanding of OA physiopathology and its underlying mechanisms. Proteomics can also facilitate the discovery of disease-specific biomarkers and help identify new therapeutic targets. Proteomic studies of cartilage and other joint tissues may be particularly relevant in diagnostic orthopedics and therapeutic research. This perspective article discusses the relevance and potential of proteomics for studying age-related musculoskeletal diseases such as OA and reviews the contributions of key investigators in the field. PMID:22207853

  16. Osteoprotegerin reduces the development of pain behaviour and joint pathology in a model of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Devi Rani; Ashraf, Sadaf; Xu, Luting; Burston, James J; Menhinick, Matthew R; Poulter, Caroline L; Bennett, Andrew J; Walsh, David A; Chapman, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Background Increased subchondral bone turnover may contribute to pain in osteoarthritis (OA). Objectives To investigate the analgesic potential of a modified version of osteoprotegerin (osteoprotegerin-Fc (OPG-Fc)) in the monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) model of OA pain. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats (140–260 g) were treated with either OPG-Fc (3 mg/kg, subcutaneously) or vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline) between days 1 and 27 (pre-emptive treatment) or days 21 and 27 (therapeutic treatment) after an intra-articular injection of MIA (1 mg/50 µl) or saline. A separate cohort of rats received the bisphosphonate zoledronate (100 µg/kg, subcutaneously) between days 1 and 25 post-MIA injection. Incapacitance testing and von Frey (1–15 g) hind paw withdrawal thresholds were used to assess pain behaviour. At the end of the study, rats were killed and the knee joints and spinal cord removed for analysis. Immunohistochemical studies using Iba-1 and GFAP quantified levels of activation of spinal microglia and astrocytes, respectively. Joint sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin or Safranin-O fast green and scored for matrix proteoglycan and overall joint morphology. The numbers of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts were quantified. N=10 rats/group. Results Pre-emptive treatment with OPG-Fc significantly attenuated the development of MIA-induced changes in weightbearing, but not allodynia. OPG-Fc decreased osteoclast number, inhibited the formation of osteophytes and improved structural pathology within the joint similarly to the decrease seen after pretreatment with the bisphosphonate, zoledronate. Therapeutic treatment with OPG-Fc decreased pain behaviour, but did not improve pathology in rats with established joint damage. Conclusions Our data suggest that early targeting of osteoclasts may reduce pain associated with OA. PMID:23723320

  17. Managing osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kodadek, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease that affects 27 million American women. All body joints can be affected. OA is more prevalent in women than men. Most women, with a diagnosis of OA report discomfort in the knee, hip, back and wrist joints. The discomforts of OA can be managed with life style changes before over the counter medications are introduced. Surgical interventions should be considered as the last treatment choice. Once a medication choice has been introduced, nurses can review methods to women that will improve their ability to continue activities of daily living and decrease the impact of the discomforts of OA. Nurses can be instrumental in the management of OA by providing education about different intervention choices for the management of OA symptoms. PMID:25690818

  18. Joint unloading implant modifies subchondral bone trabecular structure in medial knee osteoarthritis: 2-year outcomes of a pilot study using fractal signature analysis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Larry E; Sode, Miki; Fuerst, Thomas; Block, Jon E

    2015-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is largely attributable to chronic excessive and aberrant joint loading. The purpose of this pilot study was to quantify radiographic changes in subchondral bone after treatment with a minimally invasive joint unloading implant (KineSpring® Knee Implant System). Methods Nine patients with unilateral medial knee OA resistant to nonsurgical therapy were treated with the KineSpring System and followed for 2 years. Main outcomes included Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain, function, and stiffness subscores and independent core laboratory determinations of joint space width and fractal signature of the tibial cortex. Results WOMAC scores, on average, improved by 92% for pain, 91% for function, and 79% for stiffness over the 2-year follow-up period. Joint space width in the medial compartment of the treated knee significantly increased from 0.9 mm at baseline to 3.1 mm at 2 years; joint space width in the medial compartment of the untreated knee was unchanged. Fractal signatures of the vertically oriented trabeculae in the medial compartment decreased by 2.8% in the treated knee and increased by 2.1% in the untreated knee over 2 years. No statistically significant fractal signature changes were observed in the horizontally oriented trabeculae in the medial compartment or in the horizontal or vertical trabeculae of the lateral compartment in the treated knee. Conclusion Preliminary evidence suggests that the KineSpring System may modify knee OA disease progression by increasing joint space width and improving subchondral bone trabecular integrity, thereby reducing pain and improving joint function. PMID:25670891

  19. Potential role of the posterior cruciate ligament synovio-entheseal complex in joint effusion in early osteoarthritis: a magnetic resonance imaging and histological evaluation of cadaveric tissue and data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Binks, D.A.; Bergin, D.; Freemont, A.J.; Hodgson, R.J.; Yonenaga, T.; McGonagle, D.; Radjenovic, A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective This study explored posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) synovio-entheseal complex (SEC) microanatomy to determine whether it may participate in the early osteoarthritis (OA) disease process. Methods SEC microanatomy and OA features were evaluated in 14 non-arthritic cadaveric knees (mean age = 69.9) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology. MRI images of 49 subjects selected from the progression cohort of the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) were evaluated by a musculoskeletal radiologist using an original semi-quantitative method for features associated with OA at the PCL tibial enthesis. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests to evaluate associations between SEC configuration and OA features. Results The PCL formed a SEC-like structure encompassing bone- and ligament-lining intra-articular cartilages to which the posterior root of the medial meniscus contributed. Degenerative features at the PCL-SEC included: neovascularisation (44%), enthesis chondrocyte clustering (44%), collagen matrix fissuring at the enthesis (56%) and in the PCL itself (67%), tidemark duplication (44%), bone remodelling (44%) and microscopic inflammatory changes (33%). In the OAI cohort, SEC-related pathology included bone marrow lesions (BMLs) (69%) and osteophytosis (94%) at locations that corresponded to SEC-related cartilages. Posterior joint recess effusion (49%) was linked to MRI abnormalities at PCL-SEC cartilages (χ2 = 7.27, P = 0.007). Conclusions The PCL has a prominent SEC configuration that is associated with microscopic OA changes in aged clinically non-diseased joints. MRI determined knee OA commonly exhibited pathological features at this site which was associated with adjacent joint effusion. Thus, the PCL-SEC could play a hitherto unappreciated role in the early OA disease process. PMID:25008208

  20. [Amyloid deposition in chronic joint disease].

    PubMed

    Saitou, H

    1994-07-01

    As a screening procedure for the detection of amyloidosis secondary to rheumatoid arthritis, abdominal subcutaneous fat tissues were aspirated, and were examined after Congo red staining by polarized microscopy. Positive amyloid deposits were found in 7.1 percent of the rheumatoid patients, and the amyloid in the subcutaneous fat was determined to be AA type by permanganate oxidation. The occurrence of amyloid deposition was significantly correlated with the duration of the articular symptoms, the progression of the class, and also with proteinuria. Additionally the joint capsules, including the synovium and synovial fluid sediment, from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis were examined for amyloid deposition. Deposits of amyloid in the hip and knee joints were found more frequently in those with rheumatoid arthritis than in those with osteoarthritis. In osteoarthritis, the frequency of amyloid deposition tended to increase with advancing age. However these amyloid deposits in the joint structure were discovered to be resistant to permanganate oxidation. Therefore it was suspected that these amyloid deposits were of a type different from AA amyloid. PMID:8071579

  1. Perspectives on the future of bone and joint diseases.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Joan A

    2003-08-01

    The diseases of bones, joints, and muscles are common, chronic, and very costly to society. While the impact of these diseases falls across the age spectrum, the worldwide growth in the percentage of elderly in the population makes attention to musculoskeletal disorders and conditions particularly critical. An effective prevention strategy, driven by an understanding of the fundamental biology of bone and connective tissue, can only result from an upshift in the efforts of many sectors--public and private, academic, scientific, and patient-based--with new opportunities for partnerships and collaborative efforts flourishing. The Decade of the Bone and Joint can serve as a catalyst in this effort. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) are pleased to join with other national and international organizations to promote new activities and initiatives during the next decade. The NIH Osteoarthritis Initiative is highlighted as an example of a public-private partnership to develop resources and information on the natural history of the disease process that can drive new clinical intervention studies in osteoarthritis. Hopefully, this initiative and others will pave the way for important, scientifically driven prevention strategies during the next decade. PMID:12926660

  2. Association of GDF5, SMAD3 and RUNX2 polymorphisms with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis in female Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J-L; Meng, J-H; Gan, Y-H; Zhou, C-Y; Ma, X-C

    2015-07-01

    Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJOA) is a complex disease and has a strong genetic component in its pathogenesis. Experimental evidence suggests the involvement of biological pathway in the disease. This case-control study was designed to investigate whether five common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GDF5, SMAD3, RUNX2, TGFβ1 and CHST11, respectively, are associated with TMJOA in female Han Chinese patients. A total of 240 participants were evaluated comprising 114 female patients diagnosed with TMJOA based on Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders and 126 healthy female controls. The SNPs of the five genes in the genomic DNA were examined by sequencing, and their allelic, genotypic and carriage rate frequency distributions, as well as the triple combination of the risk genotypes, were analysed using the logistic regression model. The SNP in GDF5 or SMAD3 showed significant association with TMJOA, a relatively weak association was observed in RUNX2. In the triple combinational analysis, the risk of TMJOA grew 5·09 times in the patients with five or six risk alleles (P < 0·01). This is the first study to evaluate the association of GDF5, SMAD3, RUNX2, TGFβ1 and CHST11 with TMJOA in female Han Chinese. Our study suggests that the SNPs of genes related to TGFβ family might contribute to the risk of TMJOA. PMID:25757091

  3. Dietary polyphenols and mechanisms of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chwan-Li; Smith, Brenda J; Lo, Di-Fan; Chyu, Ming-Chien; Dunn, Dale M; Chen, Chung-Hwan; Kwun, In-Sook

    2012-11-01

    Osteoarthritis is a condition caused in part by injury, loss of cartilage structure and function, and an imbalance in inflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways. It primarily affects the articular cartilage and subchondral bone of synovial joints and results in joint failure, leading to pain upon weight bearing including walking and standing. There is no cure for osteoarthritis, as it is very difficult to restore the cartilage once it is destroyed. The goals of treatment are to relieve pain, maintain or improve joint mobility, increase the strength of the joints and minimize the disabling effects of the disease. Recent studies have shown an association between dietary polyphenols and the prevention of osteoarthritis-related musculoskeletal inflammation. This review discusses the effects of commonly consumed polyphenols, including curcumin, epigallocatechin gallate and green tea extract, resveratrol, nobiletin and citrus fruits, pomegranate, as well as genistein and soy protein, on osteoarthritis with an emphasis on molecular antiosteoarthritic mechanisms. PMID:22832078

  4. Meat consumption and risk of primary hip and knee joint replacement due to osteoarthritis: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is emerging evidence for a beneficial effect of meat consumption on the musculoskeletal system. However, whether it affects the risk of knee and hip osteoarthritis is unknown. We performed a prospective cohort study to examine the relationship between meat consumption and risk of primary hip and knee replacement for osteoarthritis. Methods Eligible 35,331 participants were selected from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study recruited during 1990-1994. Consumption of fresh red meat, processed meat, chicken, and fish was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. Primary hip and knee replacement for osteoarthritis during 2001-2005 was determined by linking the cohort records to the Australian National Joint Replacement Registry. Results There was a negative dose-response relationship between fresh red meat consumption and the risk of hip replacement (hazard ratio (HR) 0.94 per increase in intake of one time/week, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89-0.98). In contrast, there was no association with knee replacement risk (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.94-1.02). Consumption of processed meat, chicken and fish were not associated with risk of hip or knee replacement. Conclusion A high level consumption of fresh red meat was associated with a decreased risk of hip, but not knee, joint replacement for osteoarthritis. One possible mechanism to explain these differential associations may be via an effect of meat intake on bone strength and hip shape. Further confirmatory studies are warranted. PMID:21235820

  5. Effect of Sri Lankan traditional medicine and Ayurveda on Sandhigata Vata (osteoarthritis of knee joint).

    PubMed

    Perera, Pathirage Kamal; Perera, Manaram; Kumarasinghe, Nishantha

    2014-01-01

    Reported case was a 63-year-old female with end-stage osteoarthritis (OA) (Sandhigata Vata) of the left knee joint accompanied by exostoses. Radiology (X-ray) report confirmed it as a Kellgren-Lawrence grade III or less with exostoses. At the beginning, the Knee Society Rating System scores of pain, movement and stability were poor, and function score was fair. Srilankan traditional and Ayurveda medicine treatment was given in three regimens for 70 days. After 70 days, external treatment of oleation and 2 capsules of Shallaki (Boswellia serrata Triana and Planch) and two tablets of Jeewya (comprised of Emblica officinalis Gaertn., Tinospora cordifolia [Willd.] Millers. and Terminalia chebula Retz.), twice daily were continued over 5 months. Visual analogue scale for pain, knee scores in the Knee Society online rating system and a Ayurveda clinical assessment criteria was used to evaluate the effects of treatments in weekly basis. After treatment for 70 days, the Knee Society Rating System scores of pain, movement and stability were also improved up to good level and function score was improved up to excellent level. During the follow-up period, joint symptoms and signs and the knee scores were unchanged. In conclusion, this OA patient's quality of life was improved by the combined treatment of Sri Lankan traditional medicine and Ayurveda. PMID:26195904

  6. Evaluation of the Degree of Knee Joint Osteoarthritis in Patients with Early Gray Hair

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Behrooz; Ashraf, Alireza; Namazi, Mohammad Reza; Zarei, Fariba; Foruzi, Shima

    2013-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and one of the causes of pain and disability. The hair graying characteristic correlates strictly with chronological aging and take places to varying degrees in all individuals, disregarding gender or race. Aims: Comparison of the degrees of clinical and radiologic severity of the knee OA in individuals with early hair graying compared to ordinary individuals. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients with knee OA and similar demographic characteristics were enrolled in this study. All patients were classified in to 3 age subgroups in each of the case and control groups (30-40 year, 41-50 year, 51-60 year). In the case group, the patients must had early hair graying, too. Knee OA were classified using the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grading scale. Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) was applied to assess clinical severity of the knee OA. Results: The mean ± SD of WOMAC index in the case group was 60.7 ± 15.9 and in the control group was 55.3 ± 15.3 (P = 0.1). The mean rank of KL scale in case group was 35.3 and in the control group was 25.6 (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Even at the same age of OA onset, the rate of progression of radiological findings and the grade of joint destruction in individuals with early hair graying are greater than normal individuals. However, clinical and functional relevant remain unclear. PMID:24403769

  7. Novel therapeutic targets in osteoarthritis: Narrative review on knock-out genes involved in disease development in mouse animal models.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Francesca; Della Bella, Elena; Cepollaro, Simona; Brogini, Silvia; Martini, Lucia; Fini, Milena

    2016-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) can affect every joint, especially the knee. Given the complexity of this pathology, OA is difficult to treat with current therapies, which only relieve pain and inflammation and are not capable of restoring tissues once OA has started. Currently, researchers focus on finding a therapeutic strategy that may help to arrest disease progression. The present narrative review gives an overview of the genes involved in the development and progression of OA, assessing in vivo studies performed in knock-out mice affected by OA, to suggest new therapeutic strategies. The article search was performed on the PubMed database and www.webofknowledge.com website with the following keywords: "knee osteoarthritis" AND "knockout mice". The included studies were in English and published from 2005 to 2015. Additional papers were found within the references of the selected articles. In the 55 analyzed in vivo studies, genes mainly affected chondrocyte homeostasis, inflammatory processes, extracellular matrix and the relationship between obesity and OA. Genes are defined as inducing, preventing and not influencing OA. This review shows that joint homeostasis depends on a variety of genetic factors, and preventing or restoring the loss of a gene encoding for protective proteins, or inhibiting the expression of proteins that induce OA, might be a potential therapeutic approach. However, conclusions cannot be drawn because of the wide variability concerning the technique used for OA induction, the role of the genes, the method for tissue evaluations and the lack of assessments of all joint tissues. PMID:27059198

  8. Assessment of safety and efficacy of methylsulfonylmethane on bone and knee joints in osteoarthritis animal model.

    PubMed

    Ezaki, Junko; Hashimoto, Miyuki; Hosokawa, Yu; Ishimi, Yoshiko

    2013-01-01

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), which is one of the popular ingredients of so-called health foods in Japan, is expected to relieve inflammation in arthritis and allergies. However, there is no scientific evidence to confirm the efficacy and safety of MSM in detail. In this study, we examined the effects of MSM on cartilage formation in growing rats (G) and cartilage degradation in STR/Ort mice (A), an accepted human osteoarthritis (OA) model. For cartilage formation study, 6-week-old growing male Wister rats were assigned to four groups to receive a control or MSM-containing diet. To examine the efficacy of MSM on the cartilage of OA model mouse, 10-week-old male STR/OrtCrlj mice were assigned to three groups to receive a control or MSM-containing diet. The dosages used were amounts equal to the recommended supplements for humans [0.06 g/kg body weight (BW)/day: MSM1G and MSM1A], 10 fold higher (0.6 g/kg BW/day: MSM10G and MSM10A), and 100 fold higher (6 g/kg BW/day: MSM100G). Intake of MSM for 4 weeks did not affect cartilage formation in the knee joint in growing rats. Body, liver, and spleen weight in the MSM100G group were significantly lower than those in the control group. Intake of MSM for 13 weeks decreased degeneration of the cartilage at the joint surface in the knee joints in STR/Ort mice in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that appropriate intake of MSM is possibly effective in OA model mice; however, intake of large amounts of MSM induced atrophy of several organs. PMID:23011466

  9. KNEE-JOINT LOADING IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: INFLUENCE OF ABDOMINAL AND THIGH FAT

    PubMed Central

    Messier, Stephen P.; Beavers, Daniel P.; Loeser, Richard F.; Carr, J. Jeffery; Khajanchi, Shubham; Legault, Claudine; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Hunter, David J.; DeVita, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Using three separate models that included total body mass, total lean and total fat mass, and abdominal and thigh fat as independent measures, we determined their association with knee-joint loads in older overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Fat depots were quantified using computed tomography and total lean and fat mass determined with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in 176 adults (age = 66.3 yr., BMI = 33.5 kg·m−2) with radiographic knee OA. Knee moments and joint bone-on-bone forces were calculated using gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. Results Higher total body mass was significantly associated (p ≤ 0.0001) with greater knee compressive and shear forces, compressive and shear impulses (p < 0.0001), patellofemoral forces (p< 0.006), and knee extensor moments (p = 0.003). Regression analysis with total lean and total fat mass as independent variables revealed significant positive associations of total fat mass with knee compressive (p = 0.0001), shear (p < 0.001), and patellofemoral forces (p = 0.01) and knee extension moment (p = 0.008). Gastrocnemius and quadriceps forces were positively associated with total fat mass. Total lean mass was associated with knee compressive force (p = 0.002). A regression model that included total thigh and total abdominal fat found both were significantly associated with knee compressive and shear forces (p ≤ 0.04). Thigh fat was associated with the knee abduction (p = 0.03) and knee extension moment (p = 0.02). Conclusions Thigh fat, consisting predominately of subcutaneous fat, had similar significant associations with knee joint forces as abdominal fat despite its much smaller volume and could be an important therapeutic target for people with knee OA. PMID:25133996

  10. [Old age and joint disease].

    PubMed

    d'Harcourt, G; Meignan-Debray, S; Mémin, Y

    1987-01-01

    The seriousness of articular diseases in old persons is related to the loss of function and the rapid way this can lead to them being bed ridden. Rheumatoid polyarthritis is often difficult to distinguish from rhizomelic pseudopolyarthritis, these two diseases resemble each other at this age with the asthenia and loss of general health, the inflammatory pains which are peripheral and of nerve root origin. Among the metabolic arthropathies, articular chondrocalcinosis is frequent, and often latent, but sometimes it is destructive in particular in the hips and knees; septic arthritis today mainly occurs in the elderly, and the algoneurodystrophies are more frequent in old persons than in young subjects, following trauma or a hemiplegia. Arthrosis is obviously the main articular disease of senescence especially involving the joints of the lower limb, hip disease being less incapacitating than knee disease where surgical treatment is less often considered. The arthroses of the upper limbs especially of the shoulder are well tolerated. Osteochondromatosis, osteonecrosis of the internal condyle of the knee, the rapidly destructive arthropathies and hemarthrosis can develop as a complication of a simple arthrosis. In the spine vertebral hyperostosis is especially a disease of the elderly, it can occur alone or with an arthrosis of the posterior vertebral joints, a narrow spinal canal straight or narrowed. Medical treatment, physiotherapy, and finally surgery can give very satisfactory results in an old patient, avoiding loss of function, a miserable existence and becoming bed ridden. PMID:3496925

  11. Osteoarthritis: From Palliation to Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Constance R.; Millis, Michael B.; Olson, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a leading cause of disability. The traditional focus on late-stage osteoarthritis has not yielded effective disease-modifying treatments. Consequently, current clinical care focuses on palliation until joint replacement is indicated. A symposium format was used to examine emerging strategies that support the transformation of the clinical approach to osteoarthritis from palliation to prevention. Central to this discussion are concepts for diagnosis and treatment of pre-osteoarthritis, meaning joint conditions that increase the risk of accelerated development of osteoarthritis. The presentation of translational and clinical research on three common orthopaedic conditions—anterior cruciate ligament tear, intra-articular fracture, and hip dysplasia—were used to illustrate these ideas. New information regarding the use of novel quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the form of ultrashort echo time enhanced T2* (UTE-T2*) mapping to evaluate the potential for articular cartilage to heal subsurface damage in a mechanically sound environment was presented. These data indicate that improved diagnostics can both identify cartilage at risk and evaluate the effectiveness of early treatment strategies. With use of a new mouse model for intra-articular fracture, it was shown that inflammation correlated to fracture severity and that super-healer mice avoided early posttraumatic osteoarthritis in part through an enhanced ability to dampen inflammation. These findings suggest that there is a role for acute and sustained anti-inflammatory treatment in the prevention of osteoarthritis. For long-term treatment, contemporary gene-therapy approaches may offer an effective means for sustained intra-articular delivery of anti-inflammatory and other bioactive agents to restore joint homeostasis. To illustrate the potential of early treatment to prevent or delay the onset of disabling osteoarthritis, the positive clinical effects on articular cartilage and

  12. Conditional Deletion of Fgfr3 in Chondrocytes leads to Osteoarthritis-like Defects in Temporomandibular Joint of Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Siru; Xie, Yangli; Li, Wei; Huang, Junlan; Wang, Zuqiang; Tang, Junzhou; Xu, Wei; Sun, Xianding; Tan, Qiaoyan; Huang, Shuo; Luo, Fengtao; Xu, Meng; Wang, Jun; Wu, Tingting; Chen, Liang; Chen, Hangang; Su, Nan; Du, Xiaolan; Shen, Yue; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a common degenerative disease in adult, which is characterized by progressive destruction of the articular cartilage. To investigate the role of FGFR3 in the homeostasis of TMJ cartilage during adult stage, we generated Fgfr3(f/f); Col2a1-CreER(T2) (Fgfr3 cKO) mice, in which Fgfr3 was deleted in chondrocytes at 2 months of age. OA-like defects were observed in Fgfr3 cKO TMJ cartilage. Immunohistochemical staining and quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant increase in expressions of COL10, MMP13 and AMAMTS5. In addition, there was a sharp increase in chondrocyte apoptosis at the Fgfr3 cKO articular surface, which was accompanied by a down-regulation of lubricin expression. Importantly, the expressions of RUNX2 and Indian hedgehog (IHH) were up-regulated in Fgfr3 cKO TMJ. Primary Fgfr3 cKO chondrocytes were treated with IHH signaling inhibitor, which significantly reduced expressions of Runx2, Col10, Mmp13 and Adamts5. Furthermore, the IHH signaling inhibitor partially alleviated OA-like defects in the TMJ of Fgfr3 cKO mice, including restoration of lubricin expression and improvement of the integrity of the articular surface. In conclusion, our study proposes that FGFR3/IHH signaling pathway plays a critical role in maintaining the homeostasis of TMJ articular cartilage during adult stage. PMID:27041063

  13. Grading and quantification of hip osteoarthritis severity by analyzing the spectral energy distribution of radiographic hip joint space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boniatis, I.; Costaridou, L.; Panagiotopoulos, E.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2009-08-01

    An image analysis system is proposed for the assessment of hip osteoarthritis (OA) severity. Sixty four hips (18 normal, 46 osteoarthritic), corresponding to 32 patients of unilateral or bilateral hip OA were studied. Employing custom developed software, 64 Region Of Interest (ROI) images of Hip Joint Spaces (HJSs) were delineated on patients' digitized radiographs. The Fourier spectrum of each HJS-ROI was computed and expressed in polar coordinates. Spectral signatures, quantifying the radial and angular distribution of HJS spectral energy were formed. Signature descriptors were generated and utilized in the design of a two-level hierarchical decision tree, used for the grading of the severity of the disease. Accordingly, at Level 1, implemented by a multiple classifier system, the discrimination between normal and osteoarthritic hips was performed. At Level 2, the hips that had been successfully characterized as osteoarthritic at Level 1, were further characterized as of ``Mild / Moderate'' or ``Severe'' OA, by the Bayes classifier. A signature descriptors based regression model was designed, so as to quantify OA-severity. The system graded OA reliably, given that the accomplished classification accuracies for Level 1 and Level 2 were 98.4% and 100%, respectively. OA-severity values, expressed by HJS-narrowing, correlated highly (r = 0.9, p < 0.001) with values predicted by the model. The system may contribute to OA-patient management.

  14. Conditional Deletion of Fgfr3 in Chondrocytes leads to Osteoarthritis-like Defects in Temporomandibular Joint of Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Siru; Xie, Yangli; Li, Wei; Huang, Junlan; Wang, Zuqiang; Tang, Junzhou; Xu, Wei; Sun, Xianding; Tan, Qiaoyan; Huang, Shuo; Luo, Fengtao; Xu, Meng; Wang, Jun; Wu, Tingting; chen, Liang; Chen, Hangang; Su, Nan; Du, Xiaolan; Shen, Yue; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a common degenerative disease in adult, which is characterized by progressive destruction of the articular cartilage. To investigate the role of FGFR3 in the homeostasis of TMJ cartilage during adult stage, we generated Fgfr3f/f; Col2a1-CreERT2 (Fgfr3 cKO) mice, in which Fgfr3 was deleted in chondrocytes at 2 months of age. OA-like defects were observed in Fgfr3 cKO TMJ cartilage. Immunohistochemical staining and quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant increase in expressions of COL10, MMP13 and AMAMTS5. In addition, there was a sharp increase in chondrocyte apoptosis at the Fgfr3 cKO articular surface, which was accompanied by a down-regulation of lubricin expression. Importantly, the expressions of RUNX2 and Indian hedgehog (IHH) were up-regulated in Fgfr3 cKO TMJ. Primary Fgfr3 cKO chondrocytes were treated with IHH signaling inhibitor, which significantly reduced expressions of Runx2, Col10, Mmp13 and Adamts5. Furthermore, the IHH signaling inhibitor partially alleviated OA-like defects in the TMJ of Fgfr3 cKO mice, including restoration of lubricin expression and improvement of the integrity of the articular surface. In conclusion, our study proposes that FGFR3/IHH signaling pathway plays a critical role in maintaining the homeostasis of TMJ articular cartilage during adult stage. PMID:27041063

  15. Orthopedic Health: Healthy Joints for a Lifetime / Keep Your Moving Parts Moving

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetes. The most common form of arthritis is osteoarthritis. It is seen especially among older people and is sometimes called degenerative joint disease. In osteoarthritis, the surface layer of cartilage (the hard but ...

  16. Injecting vascular endothelial growth factor into the temporomandibular joint induces osteoarthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Pei; Jiao, ZiXian; Zheng, Ji Si; Xu, Wei Feng; Zhang, Shang Yong; Qin, An; Yang, Chi

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can initiate osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this study we evaluated the effects of intra-articular injection of exogenous VEGF in the TMJ in mice on the early stage. Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley mice were equally divided into 3 groups. In the vegf group, the mice received an injection of VEGF solution (50 μL) in the TMJ once a week over a period of 4 weeks. In the sham group, the mice received an injection of saline (50 μL). The control group did not receive any injection. Four mice from each group were sacrificed at 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks. Gradual prominent cartilage degeneration was observed in the vegf group. Additionally, this group showed higher expressions of metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-13, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa-B ligand (RANKL), and a higher number of apoptotic chondrocytes and VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-positive chondrocytes. Micro-computed tomography (CT) revealed prominent subchondral bone resorption in the vegf group, with a high number of osteoclasts in the subchondral bone. In vitro study demonstrated that VEGF can promote osteoclast differentiation. In conclusion, our study found that VEGF can initiate TMJ OA by destroying cartilage and subchondral bone. PMID:26531672

  17. Early-onset osteoarthritis of mouse temporomandibular joint induced by partial discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, L.; Polur, I.; Lim, C.; Servais, J. M.; Dobeck, J.; Li, Y.; Olsen, B. R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objective The objective of this study is to characterize mouse temporomandibular joint (TMJ) following partial discectomy, since there is no documentation of whether or not partial discectomy can induce early-onset osteoarthritis (OA) in mouse TMJ. Methods Partial discs of TMJ in mice were removed by microsurgery. Histology was performed to characterize articular cartilages from the TMJ of mice. The morphology of the articular cartilages was evaluated using a modified Mankin scoring system. Immunohistostaining was carried out to examine the expression of discoidin domain receptor 2 (Ddr2), a type II collagen receptor, matrix metalloproteinase 13 (Mmp-13), and Mmp-derived type II collagen fragments in the articular cartilage of condyles from the mouse TMJ. Results Articular cartilage degeneration was seen in the mouse TMJ post discectomy, including increased proteoglycan staining in the extracellular matrix at 4 weeks, the appearance of chondrocyte clusters at 8 weeks, reduced proteoglycan staining and fibrillation at 12 weeks and the loss of articular cartilage at 16 weeks. Increased immunostaining for Ddr2, Mmp-13, and Mmp-derived type II collagen fragments was detected. Conclusion Results indicate that partial discectomy induces early-onset OA in mouse TMJ and that increased expression of Mmp-13, likely due to the elevated expression of Ddr2, may be one of the factors responsible for the early-onset OA in mouse TMJ. PMID:19230720

  18. Corroboration of in vivo cartilage pressures with implications for synovial joint tribology and osteoarthritis causation

    PubMed Central

    Morrell, Kjirste C.; Hodge, W. Andrew; Krebs, David E.; Mann, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    Pressures on normal human acetabular cartilage have been collected from two implanted instrumented femoral head hemipros-theses. Despite significant differences in subjects' gender, morphology, mobility, and coordination, in vivo pressure measurements from both subjects covered similar ranges, with maximums of 5-6 MPa in gait, and as high as 18 MPa in other movements. Normalized for subject weight and height (nMPa), for free-speed walking the maximum pressure values were 25.2 for the female subject and 24.5 for the male subject. The overall maximum nMPa values were 76.2 for the female subject during rising from a chair at 11 months postoperative and 82.3 for the male subject while descending steps at 9 months postoperative. These unique in vivo data are consistent with corresponding cadaver experiments and model analyses. The collective results, in vitro data, model studies, and now corroborating in vivo data support the self-pressurizing “weeping” theory of synovial joint lubrication and provide unique information to evaluate the influence of in vivo pressure regimes on osteoarthritis causation and the efficacy of augmentations to, and substitutions for, natural cartilage. PMID:16203974

  19. Upregulation of lncRNA HOTAIR contributes to IL-1β-induced MMP overexpression and chondrocytes apoptosis in temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunping; Wang, Peng; Jiang, Pengfei; Lv, Yongbin; Dong, Changxia; Dai, Xiuyu; Tan, Lixia; Wang, Zhenlin

    2016-07-25

    Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ OA) is a common and heterogeneous disease that causes painful and progressive joint degeneration, which restricts daily activities, including talking and chewing. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are an important class of genes involved in various physiological and pathological functions, including osteoarthritis (OA).The present study aimed to identify the lncRNAs that are important in TMJ OA and their potential functions. Here, we found that HOTAIR was significantly upregulated in the synovial fluid of TMJ OA patients compared with that of normal controls. Increased HOTAIR was similarly observed in the synovial fluid of TMJ OA rabbits as compared to control rabbits. Furthermore, in interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced TMJ OA in vitro model (primary rabbit condylar chondrocytes), the expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP3, MMP9 and HOTAIR were all dramatically increased. Most importantly, knockdown of HOTAIR in IL-1β-induced TMJ OA in vitro model could not only reverse the IL-1β-stimulated expressions of MMP1, MMP3 and MMP9, but also significantly decrease the apoptosis rate induced by IL-1β in primary rabbit condylar chondrocytes. Our data provides new insight into the mechanisms of chondrocytes destruction in TMJ OA. PMID:27063559

  20. Depression and the Overall Burden of Painful Joints: An Examination among Individuals Undergoing Hip and Knee Replacement for Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Rajiv; Zywiel, Michael G; Mahomed, Nizar N; Perruccio, Anthony V

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) report one or more symptomatic joints apart from the one targeted for surgical care. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between the burden of multiple symptomatic joints and self-reported depression in patients awaiting joint replacement for OA. Four hundred and seventy-five patients at a single centre were evaluated. Patients self-reported joints that were painful and/or symptomatic most days of the previous month on a homunculus, with nearly one-third of the sample reporting 6 or more painful joints. The prevalence of depression was 12.2% (58/475). When adjusted for age, sex, education level, hip or knee OA, body mass index, chronic condition count, and joint-specific WOMAC scores, each additional symptomatic joint was associated with a 19% increased odds (odds ratio: 1.19 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.31, P < 0.01)) of self-reported depression. Individuals reporting 6 or more painful joints had 2.5-fold or greater odds of depression when compared to those patients whose symptoms were limited to the surgical joint. A focus on the surgical joint alone is likely to miss a potentially important determinant of postsurgical patient-reported outcomes in patients undergoing hip or knee replacement. PMID:25861476

  1. Depression and the Overall Burden of Painful Joints: An Examination among Individuals Undergoing Hip and Knee Replacement for Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Rajiv; Zywiel, Michael G.; Mahomed, Nizar N.; Perruccio, Anthony V.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) report one or more symptomatic joints apart from the one targeted for surgical care. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between the burden of multiple symptomatic joints and self-reported depression in patients awaiting joint replacement for OA. Four hundred and seventy-five patients at a single centre were evaluated. Patients self-reported joints that were painful and/or symptomatic most days of the previous month on a homunculus, with nearly one-third of the sample reporting 6 or more painful joints. The prevalence of depression was 12.2% (58/475). When adjusted for age, sex, education level, hip or knee OA, body mass index, chronic condition count, and joint-specific WOMAC scores, each additional symptomatic joint was associated with a 19% increased odds (odds ratio: 1.19 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.31, P < 0.01)) of self-reported depression. Individuals reporting 6 or more painful joints had 2.5-fold or greater odds of depression when compared to those patients whose symptoms were limited to the surgical joint. A focus on the surgical joint alone is likely to miss a potentially important determinant of postsurgical patient-reported outcomes in patients undergoing hip or knee replacement. PMID:25861476

  2. Three year joint space narrowing predicts long term incidence of knee surgery in patients with osteoarthritis: an eight year prospective follow up study

    PubMed Central

    Bruyere, O; Richy, F; Reginster, J

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical relevance of mean and minimum femorotibial joint space narrowing (JSN) for predicting future osteoarthritis related surgery in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: 126 subjects with primary knee osteoarthritis were followed prospectively for a mean eight years. Minimum and mean joint space width (JSW) were assessed from standard x rays at baseline and after a follow up of three years. The rate of knee osteoarthritis related surgery was recorded for the following five years. Results: After a mean follow up of eight years, 16 patients (12.7%) had received osteoarthritis related joint surgery. The areas under the curves (AUC) resulting from the receiver operating characteristic curve analyses for predicting osteoarthritis surgery were 0.73 (p = 0.006) for minimum JSN and 0.55 (p = 0.54) for mean JSN. The cut off for minimum JSN maximising sensitivity and specificity for predicting future surgery was a change of 0.7 mm or more in minimum joint space width over a period of three years. However, no meaningful differences were observed for cut off values between 0.5 and 0.8 mm The relative risk (adjusted for age, body mass index, baseline symptoms, and baseline JSW) of experiencing osteoarthritis related surgery during the eight year of follow up was 5.15 (95% confidence interval, 1.70 to 15.60) (p = 0.004) in patients with a minimum joint space narrowing of 0.7 mm or more during the first three years of the study. Conclusions: A cut off of 0.5 to 0.8 mm in minimum JSN, measured on standard x rays, reflects a clinically relevant progression in patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:15843444

  3. An Orthopedic Perspective. Does Running Cause Osteoarthritis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascale, Mark; Grana, William A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the development of osteoarthritis and whether running and other impact loading sports promote it. Although these sports do not cause arthritis in normal weight bearing limbs, they can accelerate it in damaged joints. It is important to identify people with preeexisting joint disease so they can choose nonimpact-loading aerobic exercise.…

  4. Self-perceived weather sensitivity and joint pain in older people with osteoarthritis in six European countries: results from the European Project on OSteoArthritis (EPOSA)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background People with osteoarthritis (OA) frequently report that their joint pain is influenced by weather conditions. This study aimed to examine whether there are differences in perceived joint pain between older people with OA who reported to be weather-sensitive versus those who did not in six European countries with different climates and to identify characteristics of older persons with OA that are most predictive of perceived weather sensitivity. Methods Baseline data from the European Project on OSteoArthritis (EPOSA) were used. ACR classification criteria were used to determine OA. Participants with OA were asked about their perception of weather as influencing their pain. Using a two-week follow-up pain calendar, average self-reported joint pain was assessed (range: 0 (no pain)-10 (greatest pain intensity)). Linear regression analyses, logistic regression analyses and an independent t-test were used. Analyses were adjusted for several confounders. Results The majority of participants with OA (67.2%) perceived the weather as affecting their pain. Weather-sensitive participants reported more pain than non-weather-sensitive participants (M = 4.1, SD = 2.4 versus M = 3.1, SD = 2.4; p < 0.001). After adjusting for several confounding factors, the association between self-perceived weather sensitivity and joint pain remained present (B = 0.37, p = 0.03). Logistic regression analyses revealed that women and more anxious people were more likely to report weather sensitivity. Older people with OA from Southern Europe were more likely to indicate themselves as weather-sensitive persons than those from Northern Europe. Conclusions Weather (in)stability may have a greater impact on joint structures and pain perception in people from Southern Europe. The results emphasize the importance of considering weather sensitivity in daily life of older people with OA and may help to identify weather-sensitive older people with OA. PMID:24597710

  5. Safe pharmacologic treatment strategies for osteoarthritis pain in African Americans with hypertension, and renal and cardiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jerry; Weinryb, Joan

    2006-01-01

    Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States. Osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis, is a degenerative joint disease affecting both whites and African Americans similarly. African Americans have a high incidence rate of comorbidities, including hypertension, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and diabetes. Treatment of osteoarthritic pain in patients with comorbidities is often complicated by potential safety concerns. Traditional nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) specific NSAIDs have been shown to increase blood pressure in hypertensive patients taking antihypertensive medications. Patients with CVD risk factors taking low-dose aspirin for secondary prevention may be at increased risk for gastrointestinal bleeding with NSAIDs. Diabetics face an increased risk of renal complications. Because NSAIDs are associated with adverse renal effects, they should be used cautiously in patients with advanced renal disease. Acetaminophen is the most appropriate initial analgesic for African Americans with chronic osteoarthritic pain and concurrent hypertension, CVD risk factors or diabetes, and is recommended by the American College of Rheumatology as first-line treatment. Many of the adverse effects commonly associated with NSAIDs are not associated with acetaminophen. Safety concerns surrounding pharmacologic treatment of osteoarthritis in African Americans are reviewed. PMID:16895283

  6. Picking a bone with WISP1 (CCN4): new strategies against degenerative joint disease

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    As the world’s population continues to age, it is estimated that degenerative joint disease disorders such as osteoarthritis will impact at least 130 million individuals throughout the globe by the year 2050. Advanced age, obesity, genetics, gender, bone density, trauma, and a poor level of physical activity can lead to the onset and progression of osteoarthritis. However, factors that lead to degenerative joint disease and involve gender, genetics, epigenetic mechanisms, and advanced age are not within the control of an individual. Furthermore, current therapies including pain management, improved nutrition, and regular programs for exercise do not lead to the resolution of osteoarthritis. As a result, new avenues for targeting the treatment of osteoarthritis are desperately needed. Wnt1 inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (WISP1), a matricellular protein and a downstream target of the wingless pathway Wnt1, is one such target to consider that governs cellular protection, stem cell proliferation, and tissue regeneration in a number of disorders including bone degeneration. However, increased WISP1 expression also has been associated with the progression of osteoarthritis. WISP1 has an intricate relationship with a number of proliferative and protective pathways that include phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K), protein kinase B (Akt), nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), interleukin -6 (IL-6), transforming growth factor-β, matrix metalloproteinase, small non-coding ribonucleic acids (RNAs), sirtuin silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (SIRT1), and the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). Taken together, this complex association WISP1 holds with these signaling pathways necessitates a fine biological regulation of WISP1 activity that can offset the progression of degenerative joint disease, but not limit the cellular protective capabilities of the WISP1 pathway. PMID:26893943

  7. Developments in the scientific understanding of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Steven B; Attur, Mukundan

    2009-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is often a progressive and disabling disease, which occurs in the setting of a variety of risk factors – such as advancing age, obesity, and trauma – that conspire to incite a cascade of pathophysiologic events within joint tissues. An important emerging theme in osteoarthritis is a broadening of focus from a disease of cartilage to one of the 'whole joint'. The synovium, bone, and cartilage are each involved in pathologic processes that lead to progressive joint degeneration. Additional themes that have emerged over the past decade are novel mechanisms of cartilage degradation and repair, the relationship between biomechanics and biochemical pathways, the importance of inflammation, and the role played by genetics. In this review we summarize current scientific understanding of osteoarthritis and examine the pathobiologic mechanisms that contribute to progressive disease. PMID:19519925

  8. Detection of calcium phosphate crystals in the joint fluid of patients with osteoarthritis – analytical approaches and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Yavorskyy, Alexander; Hernandez-Santana, Aaron; McCarthy, Geraldine

    2008-01-01

    Clinically, osteoarthritis (OA) is characterised by joint pain, stiffness after immobility, limitation of movement and, in many cases, the presence of basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals in the joint fluid. The detection of BCP crystals in the synovial fluid of patients with OA is fraught with challenges due to the submicroscopic size of BCP, the complex nature of the matrix in which they are found and the fact that other crystals can co-exist with them in cases of mixed pathology. Routine analysis of joint crystals still relies almost exclusively on the use of optical microscopy, which has limited applicability for BCP crystal identification due to limited resolution and the inherent subjectivity of the technique. The purpose of this Critical Review is to present an overview of some of the main analytical tools employed in the detection of BCP to date and the potential of emerging technologies such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman microspectroscopy for this purpose. PMID:18299743

  9. The Pathophysiology of Osteoarthritis: A Mechanical Perspective on the Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Kevin R.; Conrad, Bryan P.; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Vincent, Heather K.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent cause of disability in the United States, with the medial compartment of the knee being the most commonly affected.1 The initiation and progression of knee OA is influenced by many factors including kinematics. In response to loading during weight bearing, cartilage in healthy knees demonstrates spatial adaptations in morphology and mechanical properties. These adaptations allow certain regions of the cartilage to respond to loading while other regions are less well suited to accommodate loading. Alterations in normal knee kinematics shift loading from those cartilage regions adapted for loading to regions less well suited. This leads to the initiation and progression of degenerative processes consistent with knee OA. Kinematic variables associated with the development, progression and severity of knee OA are the adduction moment (Madd) and tibiofemoral rotation. Due to its strong correlation with disease progression and pain, the peak Madd during gait has been identified as a target for treatment design. Gait modification offers a non-invasive option for seeking significant reductions. Gait modification has the potential to reduce pain and slow the progression of medial compartment knee OA. PMID:22632700

  10. Characterization of 3D Joint Space Morphology Using an Electrostatic Model (with Application to Osteoarthritis)

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Qian; Thawait, Gaurav; Gang, Grace J.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Reigel, Thomas; Brown, Tyler; Corner, Brian; Demehri, Shadpour; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    Joint space morphology can be indicative of the risk, presence, progression, and/or treatment response of disease or trauma. We describe a novel methodology of characterizing joint space morphology in high-resolution 3D images [e.g., cone-beam CT (CBCT)] using a model based on elementary electrostatics that overcomes a variety of basic limitations of existing 2D and 3D methods. The method models each surface of a joint as a conductor at fixed electrostatic potential and characterizes the intra-articular space in terms of the electric field lines resulting from the solution of Gauss’ Law and the Laplace equation. As a test case, the method was applied to discrimination of healthy and osteoarthritic subjects (N = 39) in 3D images of the knee acquired on an extremity CBCT system. The method demonstrated improved diagnostic performance (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, AUC > 0.98) compared to simpler methods of quantitative measurement and qualitative image-based assessment by three expert musculoskeletal radiologists (AUC = 0.87, p-value = 0.007). The method is applicable to simple (e.g., the knee or elbow) or multi-axial joints (e.g., the wrist or ankle) and may provide a useful means of quantitatively assessing a variety of joint pathologies. PMID:25575100

  11. Characterization of 3D joint space morphology using an electrostatic model (with application to osteoarthritis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qian; Thawait, Gaurav; Gang, Grace J.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Reigel, Thomas; Brown, Tyler; Corner, Brian; Demehri, Shadpour; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2015-02-01

    Joint space morphology can be indicative of the risk, presence, progression, and/or treatment response of disease or trauma. We describe a novel methodology of characterizing joint space morphology in high-resolution 3D images (e.g. cone-beam CT (CBCT)) using a model based on elementary electrostatics that overcomes a variety of basic limitations of existing 2D and 3D methods. The method models each surface of a joint as a conductor at fixed electrostatic potential and characterizes the intra-articular space in terms of the electric field lines resulting from the solution of Gauss’ Law and the Laplace equation. As a test case, the method was applied to discrimination of healthy and osteoarthritic subjects (N = 39) in 3D images of the knee acquired on an extremity CBCT system. The method demonstrated improved diagnostic performance (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, AUC > 0.98) compared to simpler methods of quantitative measurement and qualitative image-based assessment by three expert musculoskeletal radiologists (AUC = 0.87, p-value = 0.007). The method is applicable to simple (e.g. the knee or elbow) or multi-axial joints (e.g. the wrist or ankle) and may provide a useful means of quantitatively assessing a variety of joint pathologies.

  12. Altered swelling and ion fluxes in articular cartilage as a biomarker in osteoarthritis and joint immobilization: a computational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, Sara; Manzano, Raquel; Doblaré, Manuel; Doweidar, Mohamed Hamdy

    2015-01-01

    In healthy cartilage, mechano-electrochemical phenomena act together to maintain tissue homeostasis. Osteoarthritis (OA) and degenerative diseases disrupt this biological equilibrium by causing structural deterioration and subsequent dysfunction of the tissue. Swelling and ion flux alteration as well as abnormal ion distribution are proposed as primary indicators of tissue degradation. In this paper, we present an extension of a previous three-dimensional computational model of the cartilage behaviour developed by the authors to simulate the contribution of the main tissue components in its behaviour. The model considers the mechano-electrochemical events as concurrent phenomena in a three-dimensional environment. This model has been extended here to include the effect of repulsion of negative charges attached to proteoglycans. Moreover, we have studied the fluctuation of these charges owning to proteoglycan variations in healthy and pathological articular cartilage. In this sense, standard patterns of healthy and degraded tissue behaviour can be obtained which could be a helpful diagnostic tool. By introducing measured properties of unhealthy cartilage into the computational model, the severity of tissue degeneration can be predicted avoiding complex tissue extraction and subsequent in vitro analysis. In this work, the model has been applied to monitor and analyse cartilage behaviour at different stages of OA and in both short (four, six and eight weeks) and long-term (11 weeks) fully immobilized joints. Simulation results showed marked differences in the corresponding swelling phenomena, in outgoing cation fluxes and in cation distributions. Furthermore, long-term immobilized patients display similar swelling as well as fluxes and distribution of cations to patients in the early stages of OA, thus, preventive treatments are highly recommended to avoid tissue deterioration. PMID:25392400

  13. Morphological and biomechanical analyses of the subchondral mineralized zone in human sacral facet joints: Application to improved diagnosis of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Berteau, Jean-Philippe; Mielke, Gabriela; Morlock, Michael M; Huber, Gerd

    2015-05-01

    The anatomy of the facet joint subchondral mineralized zone (SMZ) is the main parameter used in diagnosing osteoarthritis. Usually, a single CT scan slice is used to measure the thickness, but the measurement is highly location-dependent. Bone mineral density (BMD) and porosity could be more reliable than thickness for detecting SMZ sclerosis, and linking them to stiffness can provide insights into the mechanism of osteoarthritis progression. The goal of this study was two-fold: (1) to assess spatial heterogeneity in thickness, BMD, and porosity within the non-pathological human facet joint SMZ; (2) to correlate these measurements with the static modulus of elasticity (MOEsta ). Four non-pathological facet joints were excised and imaged using micro-computed tomography (µCT) to measure SMZ thickness, BMD, and porosity. A total of eight parallelepiped SMZ samples were similarly analyzed and then mechanically tested. The mean SMZ BMD, porosity, and thickness (± Standard Deviation) of the whole facet joints were 611 ± 35 mgHA/cc, 9.8 ± 1.3%, and 1.39 ± 0.41 mm, respectively. The mean BMD, porosity, and MOEsta of the eight SMZ samples were 479 ± 23 mgHA/cc, 12 ± 0.01%, and 387 ± 138 MPa, respectively, with a positive rank correlation between BMD and porosity. BMD and porosity were more homogeneous within the facet joint than thickness and they could be more reliable parameters than thickness for detecting SMZ sclerosis. The values for the physiological SMZ and MOEsta of human facets joints obtained here were independent of BMD. SMZ BMD and porosity were related to each other. PMID:25716678

  14. Targets, models and challenges in osteoarthritis research

    PubMed Central

    Thysen, Sarah; Luyten, Frank P.; Lories, Rik J. U.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic degenerative disorder of the joint and represents one of the most common diseases worldwide. Its prevalence and severity are increasing owing to aging of the population, but treatment options remain largely limited to painkillers and anti-inflammatory drugs, which only provide symptomatic relief. In the late stages of the disease, surgical interventions are often necessary to partially restore joint function. Although the focus of osteoarthritis research has been originally on the articular cartilage, novel findings are now pointing to osteoarthritis as a disease of the whole joint, in which failure of different joint components can occur. In this Review, we summarize recent progress in the field, including data from novel ‘omics’ technologies and from a number of preclinical and clinical trials. We describe different in vitro and in vivo systems that can be used to study molecules, pathways and cells that are involved in osteoarthritis. We illustrate that a comprehensive and multisystem approach is necessary to understand the complexity and heterogeneity of the disease and to better guide the development of novel therapeutic strategies for osteoarthritis. PMID:25561745

  15. Relationship between foot function and medial knee joint loading in people with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dynamic joint loading, particularly the external knee adduction moment (KAM), is an important surrogate measure for the medio-lateral distribution of force across the knee joint in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Foot motion may alter the load on the medial tibiofemoral joint and hence affect the KAM. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the relationship between tibia, rearfoot and forefoot motion in the frontal and transverse planes and the KAM in people with medial compartment knee OA. Method Motion of the knee, tibia, rearfoot and forefoot and knee moments were evaluated in 32 patients with clinically and radiographically-confirmed OA, predominantly in the medial compartment. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to investigate the association between peak values of tibia, rearfoot and forefoot motion in the frontal and transverse planes and 1st peak KAM, 2nd peak KAM, and the knee adduction angular impulse (KAAI). Results Lateral tilt of the tibia was significantly associated with increased 1st peak KAM (r = 0.60, p < 0.001), 2nd peak KAM (r = 0.67, p = 0.001) and KAAI (r = 0.82, p = 0.001). Increased peak rearfoot eversion was significantly correlated with decreased 2nd peak KAM (r = 0.59, p < 0.001) and KAAI (r = 0.50, p = 0.004). Decreased rearfoot internal rotation was significantly associated with increased 2nd peak KAM (r = −0.44, p = 0.01) and KAAI (r = −0.38, p = 0.02), while decreased rearfoot internal rotation relative to the tibia was significantly associated with increased 2nd peak KAM (r = 0.43, p = 0.01). Significant negative correlations were found between peak forefoot eversion relative to the rearfoot and 2nd peak KAM (r = −0.53, p = 0.002) and KAAI (r = −0.51, p = 0.003) and between peak forefoot inversion and 2nd peak KAM (r = −0.54, p = 0.001) and KAAI (r = −0.48, p = 0.005). Conclusion Increased rearfoot

  16. Emerging drugs for osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA), the most prevalent form of joint disease, affecting as much as 13% of the world’s population. In the United States, it is the leading cause of disability in people over age 65 and is characterized by progressive cartilage loss, bone remodeling, osteophyte formation and synovial inflammation with resultant joint pain and disability. There are no treatments marketed for structural disease modification; current treatments mainly target symptoms, with >75% of patients reporting need for additional symptomatic treatment. Areas covered Drugs in later development (Phase II-III) for osteoarthritis pain and joint structural degeneration are reviewed. Not covered are procedural (e.g. arthrocentesis, physical therapy), behavioral (e.g. weight loss, pain coping techniques) or device (e.g. knee braces, surgical implants) based treatments. Expert opinion More in depth understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease, as well as elucidation of the link between clinical symptomatology and structural changes in the joint will likely lead to development of novel target classes with promising efficacy in the future. Efficacy notwithstanding, there remain significant hurdles to overcome in clinical development of these therapeutics, inherent in the progression pattern of the disease as well as challenges with readouts for both pain and structure modification trials. PMID:21542666

  17. Knee osteoarthritis: a review of management options.

    PubMed

    Hussain, S M; Neilly, D W; Baliga, S; Patil, S; Meek, Rmd

    2016-02-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee is a complex peripheral joint disorder with multiple risk factors. The molecular basis of osteoarthritis has been generally accepted; however, the exact pathogenesis is still not known. Management of patients with osteoarthritis involves a comprehensive history, thorough physical examination and appropriate radiological investigation. The relative slow progress in the disease allows a stepwise algorithmic approach in treatment. Non-surgical treatment involves patient education, lifestyle modification and the use of orthotic devises. These can be achieved in the community. Surgical options include joint sparing procedures such as arthroscopyando osteotomy or joint-replacing procedures. Joint-replacing procedures can be isolated to a single compartment such as patellofemoral arthroplasty or unicompartmental knee replacement or total knee arthroplasty. The key to a successful long-term outcome is optimal patient selection, preoperative counselling and good surgical technique. PMID:27330013

  18. How to define responders in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Cyrus; Adachi, Jonathan D.; Bardin, Thomas; Berenbaum, Francis; Flamion, Bruno; Jonsson, Helgi; Kanis, John A.; Pelousse, Franz; Lems, Willem F.; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Reiter, Susanne; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Rizzoli, René; Bruyère, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis is a clinical syndrome of failure of the joint accompanied by varying degrees of joint pain, functional limitation, and reduced quality of life due to deterioration of articular cartilage and involvement of other joint structures. Scope Regulatory agencies require relevant clinical benefit on symptoms and structure modification for registration of a new therapy as a disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug (DMOAD). An international Working Group of the European Society on Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) and International Osteoporosis Foundation was convened to explore the current burden of osteoarthritis, review current regulatory guidelines for the conduct of clinical trials, and examine the concept of responder analyses for improving drug evaluation in osteoarthritis. Findings The ESCEO considers that the major challenges in DMOAD development are the absence of a precise definition of the disease, particularly in the early stages, and the lack of consensus on how to detect structural changes and link them to clinically meaningful endpoints. Responder criteria should help identify progression of disease and be clinically meaningful. The ideal criterion should be sensitive to change over time and should predict disease progression and outcomes such as joint replacement. Conclusion The ESCEO considers that, for knee osteoarthritis, clinical trial data indicate that radiographic joint space narrowing >0.5 mm over 2 or 3 years might be a reliable surrogate measure for total joint replacement. On-going research using techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and biochemical markers may allow the identification of these patients earlier in the disease process. PMID:23557069

  19. Tumour necrosis factor blockade for the treatment of erosive osteoarthritis of the interphalangeal finger joints: a double blind, randomised trial on structure modification

    PubMed Central

    Verbruggen, Gust; Wittoek, Ruth; Cruyssen, Bert Vander; Elewaut, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Background Adalimumab blocks the action of tumor necrosis factor-α and reduces disease progression in rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. The effects of adalimumab in controlling progression of structural damage in erosive hand osteoarthritis (HOA) were assessed. Methods Sixty patients with erosive HOA on radiology received 40 mg adalimumab or placebo subcutaneously every two weeks during a 12-month randomized double-blind trial. Response was defined as the reduction in progression of structural damage according to the categorical anatomic phase scoring system. Furthermore, subchondral bone, bone plate erosion, and joint-space narrowing were scored according to the continuous Ghent University Score System (GUSSTM). Results The disease appeared to be active since 40.0% and 26,7% of patients out of the placebo and adalimumab group, respectively, showed at least one new interphalangeal (IP) joint that became erosive during the 12 months follow-up. These differences were not significant and the overall results showed no effect of adalimumab. Risk factors for progression were then identified and the presence of palpable soft tissue swelling at baseline was recognized as the strongest predictor for erosive progression. In this subpopulation at risk, statistically significant less erosive evolution on the radiological image (3.7%) was seen in the adalimumab treated group compared to the placebo group (14.5%) (P = 0.009). GUSSTM scoring confirmed a less rapid rate of mean increase in the erosion scores during the first 6 months of treatment in patients in adalimumab-treated patients. Conclusion Palpable soft tissue swelling in IP joints in patients with erosive HOA is a strong predictor for erosive progression. In these joints adalimumab significantly halted the progression of joint damage compared to placebo. PMID:22128078

  20. Idiopathic osteoarthritis and contracture: causal implications

    PubMed Central

    Jones, P; Alexander, C; Stewart, J; Lynskey, N

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To use the known association of idiopathic osteoarthritis with contracture as a means of searching for its cause. There are currently two theories concerning this association, one assuming that the contracture is a consequence of the osteoarthritis and the other that it precedes and causes the osteoarthritis. This study tested both theories. Methods: Flexion ranges in the 12 finger joints were obtained by goniometric measurement in two samples of normal female subjects, one group with a mean age of 22 years (25 subjects) and one with a mean age of 45 years (50 subjects). The results were compared with the known regional prevalence of osteoarthritis in the finger joints of women. Results: The older group showed evidence of reduced flexion range consistent with development of contracture in the extensor mechanism of the fingers. The distribution of the contracture showed a strong negative correlation with the regional prevalence of osteoarthritis. Conclusions: An early dorsal contracture develops in the fingers of normal subjects, but it is neither a consequence of nor the cause of digital osteoarthritis. The most parsimonious explanation for the association is that both contracture and idiopathic osteoarthritis are independent consequences of failure to use the full movement range. If this hypothesis is correct, the disease could be preventable. PMID:15647431

  1. Indian Hedgehog signaling pathway members are associated with magnetic resonance imaging manifestations and pathological scores in lumbar facet joint osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuang, Feng; Zhou, Ying; Hou, Shu-Xun; Zhu, Jia-Liang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chun-Li; Tang, Jia-Guang

    2015-05-01

    Indian Hedgehog (HH) has been shown to be involved in osteoarthritis (OA) in articular joints, where there is evidence that Indian HH blockade could ameliorate OA. It seems to play a prominent role in development of the intervertebral disc (IVD) and in postnatal maintenance. There is little work on IHH in the IVD. Hence the aim of the current study was to investigate the role of Indian Hedgehog in the pathology of facet joint (FJ) OA. 24 patients diagnosed with lumbar intervertebral disk herniation or degenerative spinal stenosis were included. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) histopathology grading system was correlated to the mRNA levels of GLI1, PTCH1, and HHIP in the FJs. The Weishaupt grading and OARSI scores showed high positive correlation (r = 0.894) (P < 0.01). MRI Weishaupt grades showed positive correlation with GLI1 (r = 0.491), PTCH1 (r = 0.444), and HHIP (r = 0.654) mRNA levels (P < 0.05 in each case). OARSI scores were also positively correlated with GLI1 (r = 0. 646), PTCH1 (r = 0. 518), and HHIP (r = 0.762) mRNA levels (P < 0.01 in each case). Cumulatively our findings indicate that Indian HH signaling is increased in OA and is perhaps a key component in OA pathogenesis and progression.

  2. Indian Hedgehog signaling pathway members are associated with magnetic resonance imaging manifestations and pathological scores in lumbar facet joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Shuang, Feng; Zhou, Ying; Hou, Shu-Xun; Zhu, Jia-Liang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chun-Li; Tang, Jia-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Indian Hedgehog (HH) has been shown to be involved in osteoarthritis (OA) in articular joints, where there is evidence that Indian HH blockade could ameliorate OA. It seems to play a prominent role in development of the intervertebral disc (IVD) and in postnatal maintenance. There is little work on IHH in the IVD. Hence the aim of the current study was to investigate the role of Indian Hedgehog in the pathology of facet joint (FJ) OA. 24 patients diagnosed with lumbar intervertebral disk herniation or degenerative spinal stenosis were included. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) histopathology grading system was correlated to the mRNA levels of GLI1, PTCH1, and HHIP in the FJs. The Weishaupt grading and OARSI scores showed high positive correlation (r = 0.894) (P < 0.01). MRI Weishaupt grades showed positive correlation with GLI1 (r = 0.491), PTCH1 (r = 0.444), and HHIP (r = 0.654) mRNA levels (P < 0.05 in each case). OARSI scores were also positively correlated with GLI1 (r = 0. 646), PTCH1 (r = 0. 518), and HHIP (r = 0.762) mRNA levels (P < 0.01 in each case). Cumulatively our findings indicate that Indian HH signaling is increased in OA and is perhaps a key component in OA pathogenesis and progression. PMID:25992955

  3. Indian Hedgehog signaling pathway members are associated with magnetic resonance imaging manifestations and pathological scores in lumbar facet joint osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shuang, Feng; Zhou, Ying; Hou, Shu-Xun; Zhu, Jia-Liang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chun-Li; Tang, Jia-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Indian Hedgehog (HH) has been shown to be involved in osteoarthritis (OA) in articular joints, where there is evidence that Indian HH blockade could ameliorate OA. It seems to play a prominent role in development of the intervertebral disc (IVD) and in postnatal maintenance. There is little work on IHH in the IVD. Hence the aim of the current study was to investigate the role of Indian Hedgehog in the pathology of facet joint (FJ) OA. 24 patients diagnosed with lumbar intervertebral disk herniation or degenerative spinal stenosis were included. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) histopathology grading system was correlated to the mRNA levels of GLI1, PTCH1, and HHIP in the FJs. The Weishaupt grading and OARSI scores showed high positive correlation (r = 0.894) (P < 0.01). MRI Weishaupt grades showed positive correlation with GLI1 (r = 0.491), PTCH1 (r = 0.444), and HHIP (r = 0.654) mRNA levels (P < 0.05 in each case). OARSI scores were also positively correlated with GLI1 (r = 0. 646), PTCH1 (r = 0. 518), and HHIP (r = 0.762) mRNA levels (P < 0.01 in each case). Cumulatively our findings indicate that Indian HH signaling is increased in OA and is perhaps a key component in OA pathogenesis and progression. PMID:25992955

  4. Mobilization with movement and elastic tape application for the conservative management of carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Villafañe, Jorge Hugo; Valdes, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Carpometacarpal osteoarthritis can limit a person's ability to engage in desired activities. Many therapists utilize conservative approaches to assist these patients. These authors describe utilizing a combination of mobilization with movement and the use of elastic tape for patients with this arthritis. - Victoria Priganc, PhD, OTR, CHT, CLT, Practice Forum Editor. PMID:25287671

  5. Hydroxyapatite deposition disease of the joint.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Eamonn S; McCarthy, Geraldine M

    2003-06-01

    Basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals include partially carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite, octacalcium phosphate, and tricalcium phosphate. They may form deposits, which are frequently asymptomatic but may give rise to a number of clinical syndromes including calcific periarthritis, Milwaukee shoulder syndrome, and osteoarthritis, in and around joints. Recent data suggest that magnesium whitlockite, another form of BCP, may play a pathologic role in arthritis. Data from the past year have provided further understanding of the mechanisms by which BCP crystals induce inflammation and degeneration. There remains no specific treatment to modify the effects of BCP crystals. Although potential drugs are being identified as the complex pathophysiology of BCP crystals is unraveled, much work remains to be done in order to translate research advances to date into tangible clinical benefits. PMID:12744814

  6. OARSI/OMERACT Initiative to Define States of Severity and Indication for Joint Replacement in Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis. An OMERACT 10 Special Interest Group

    PubMed Central

    GOSSEC, LAURE; PATERNOTTE, SIMON; BINGHAM, CLIFTON O.; CLEGG, DANIEL O.; COSTE, PHILIPPE; CONAGHAN, PHILIP G.; DAVIS, AILEEN M.; GIACOVELLI, GIAMPAOLO; GUNTHER, KLAUS-PETER; HAWKER, GILLIAN; HOCHBERG, MARC C.; JORDAN, JOANNE M.; KATZ, JEFFREY N.; KLOPPENBURG, MARGREET; LANZAROTTI, ARTURO; LIM, KEITH; LOHMANDER, L. STEFAN; MAHOMED, NIZAR N.; MAILLEFERT, JEAN FRANCIS; MANNO, REBECCA L.; MARCH, LYN M.; MAZZUCA, STEVEN A.; PAVELKA, KAREL; PUNZI, LEONARDO; ROOS, EWA M.; ROVATI, LUCIO C.; SHI, HELEN; SINGH, JASVINDER A.; SUAREZ-ALMAZOR, MARIA E.; TAJANA-MESSI, ELEONORA; DOUGADOS, MAXIME

    2012-01-01

    Objective To define pain and physical function cutpoints that would, coupled with structural severity, define a surrogate measure of “need for joint replacement surgery,” for use as an outcome measure for potential structure-modifying interventions for osteoarthritis (OA). Methods New scores were developed for pain and physical function in knee and hip OA. A cross-sectional international study in 1909 patients was conducted to define data-driven cutpoints corresponding to the orthopedic surgeons’ indication for joint replacement. A post hoc analysis of 8 randomized clinical trials (1379 patients) evaluated the prevalence and validity of cutpoints, among patients with symptomatic hip/knee OA. Results In the international cross-sectional study, there was substantial overlap in symptom levels between patients with and patients without indication for joint replacement; indeed, it was not possible to determine cutpoints for pain and function defining this indication. The post hoc analysis of trial data showed that the prevalence of cases that combined radiological progression, high level of pain, and high degree of function impairment was low (2%–12%). The most discriminatory cutpoint to define an indication for joint replacement was found to be [pain (0–100) + physical function (0–100) > 80]. Conclusion These results do not support a specific level of pain or function that defines an indication for joint replacement. However, a tentative cutpoint for pain and physical function levels is proposed for further evaluation. Potentially, this symptom level, coupled with radiographic progression, could be used to define “nonresponders” to disease-modifying drugs in OA clinical trials. PMID:21807799

  7. Enteral sesame oil therapeutically relieves disease severity in rat experimental osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Dur-Zong; Chu, Pei-Yi; Jou, I-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common cause of joint pain, affecting approximately 15% of the population. Recent studies indicate that quadriceps muscle weakness is directly involved in the pathogenesis of OA-associated joint pain. Oxidative stress plays an important role in skeletal muscle dysfunction. Sesame oil is a natural product with excellent antioxidative property. However, whether sesame oil can decrease OA-induced joint pain has never been investigated. Objective The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of sesame oil on OA-induced joint pain in rats. Design OA-associated joint pain in rats was induced by medial meniscal transection in rats. Sesame oil (0, 1, 2, or 4 ml/kg/day, orally) was given to rats 7 days after OA induction, while the parameters were determined 7 days after sesame oil administration. Results Daily sesame oil treatment for 7 days significantly decreased OA-associated joint pain. Sesame oil decreased muscular interleukin-6 and increased citrate synthase activity and myosin heavy chain IIa mRNA expression. Furthermore, sesame oil decreased muscular lipid peroxidation, nuclear Nrf2 protein expression, and reactive oxygen species generations as well as increased glutathione production and glutathione peroxidase activity in OA rats. Conclusions Sesame oil may relieve OA-associated joint pain by inhibiting quadriceps muscular oxidative stress, at least partially, in rats. PMID:27032670

  8. Development of an Experimental Animal Model for Lower Back Pain by Percutaneous Injury-Induced Lumbar Facet Joint Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Ahmadinia, Kasra; Li, Xin; Hamilton, John L; Andrews, Steven; Haralampus, Chris A; Xiao, Guozhi; Sohn, Hong-Moon; You, Jae-Won; Seo, Yo-Seob; Stein, Gary S; Van Wijnen, Andre J; Kim, Su-Gwan; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2015-11-01

    We report generation and characterization of pain-related behavior in a minimally invasive facet joint degeneration (FJD) animal model in rats. FJD was produced by a non-open percutaneous puncture-induced injury on the right lumbar FJs at three consecutive levels. Pressure hyperalgesia in the lower back was assessed by measuring the vocalization response to pressure from a force transducer. After hyperalgesia was established, pathological changes in lumbar FJs and alterations of intervertebral foramen size were assessed by histological and imaging analyses. To investigate treatment options for lumber FJ osteoarthritis-induced pain, animals with established hyperalgesia were administered with analgesic drugs, such as morphine, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) (ketorolac), or pregabalin. Effects were assessed by behavioral pain responses. One week after percutaneous puncture-induced injury of the lumbar FJs, ipsilateral primary pressure hyperalgesia developed and was maintained for at least 12 weeks without foraminal stenosis. Animals showed decreased spontaneous activity, but no secondary hyperalgesia in the hind paws. Histopathological and microfocus X-ray computed tomography analyses demonstrated that the percutaneous puncture injury resulted in osteoarthritis-like structural changes in the FJs cartilage and subchondral bone. Pressure hyperalgesia was completely reversed by morphine. The administration of celecoxib produced moderate pain reduction with no statistical significance while the administration of ketorolac and pregabalin produced no analgesic effect on FJ osteoarthritis-induced back pain. Our animal model of non-open percutanous puncture-induced injury of the lumbar FJs in rats shows similar characteristics of low back pain produced by human facet arthropathy. PMID:25858171

  9. Expression of vaspin in the joint and the levels in the serum and synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Jia-Peng; Jiang, Li-Feng; Chen, Wei-Ping; Hu, Peng-Fei; Wu, Li-Dong

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the expression of vaspin in the joint and investigate the distribution between paired serum and synovial fluid (SF) in osteoarthritis (OA) patients, and serum in healthy controls. The gene expression of vaspin was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in the OA joint tissues. The vaspin protein expression in the cartilage, synovium and osteophyte from OA patients who required total knee replacement (TKR) were detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Levels of vaspin in serum and SF were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), including 26 OA patients and 23 healthy controls. All the joint tissues including cartilage, synovium, meniscus, infrapatellar fat pad and osteophyte from OA patients expressed vaspin messenger RNA (mRNA), and the expression of vaspin protein was observed in OA cartilage, synovium and osteophyte. Furthermore, serum vaspin was reduced in OA patients compared to healthy controls, and serum vaspin levels from OA patients exceed those in the paired SF. Serum or SF vaspin were not related to age, gender, or body mass index (BMI). These results suggest that vaspin may be involved in the pathophysiology of OA and may have local effects in the joint during the process of OA. PMID:25419381

  10. Cathepsin K inhibition reduces CTXII levels and joint pain in the guinea pig model of spontaneous osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    McDougall, J J; Schuelert, N; Bowyer, J

    2010-10-01

    Cathepsin K is a cysteine proteinase which is believed to contribute to osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis. This brief report evaluates the effect of the novel selective cathepsin K inhibitor AZ12606133 on cartilage metabolism in the Dunkin-Hartley guinea pig model of spontaneous OA. In parallel, electrophysiological studies were performed to determine whether acute and chronic treatment with the cathepsin K inhibitor could alter joint nociception. Acute treatment of OA knees with AZ12606133 had no effect on joint afferent nerve activity; however, prolonged (1 month) administration of the cathepsin K inhibitor delivered via a chronically implanted osmotic pump significantly reduced mechanosensitivity in response to both non-noxious and noxious joint movements. Urinal concentrations of the cartilage breakdown products cross-linked C-telopeptides of type II collagen (CTXII) were also reduced by chronic cathepsin K inhibition. These data suggest that prolonged AZ12606133 administration can reduce cartilage turnover and joint nociception in the Dunkin-Hartley guinea pig model of spontaneous OA. PMID:20692355

  11. Paget's Disease of Bone and Osteoarthritis: Different Yet Related

    MedlinePlus

    ... about Paget’s disease , contact: NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center Website: http://www.bones.nih. ... Pub. No. 15-7919 NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center 2 AMS Circle Bethesda, MD ...

  12. A Systems Biology Approach to Synovial Joint Lubrication in Health, Injury, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Alexander Y.; McCarty, William J.; Masuda, Koichi; Firestein, Gary S.; Sah, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The synovial joint contains synovial fluid (SF) within a cavity bounded by articular cartilage and synovium. SF is a viscous fluid that has lubrication, metabolic, and regulatory functions within synovial joints. SF contains lubricant molecules, including proteoglycan-4 and hyaluronan. SF is an ultrafiltrate of plasma with secreted contributions from cell populations lining and within the synovial joint space, including chondrocytes and synoviocytes. Maintenance of normal SF lubricant composition and function are important for joint homeostasis. In osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and joint injury, changes in lubricant composition and function accompany alterations in the cytokine and growth factor environment and increased fluid and molecular transport through joint tissues. Thus, understanding the synovial joint lubrication system requires a multi-faceted study of the various parts of the synovial joint and their interactions. Systems biology approaches at multiple scales are being used to describe the molecular, cellular, and tissue components and their interactions that comprise the functioning synovial joint. Analyses of the transcriptome and proteome of SF, cartilage, and synovium suggest that particular molecules and pathways play important roles in joint homeostasis and disease. Such information may be integrated with physicochemical tissue descriptions to construct integrative models of the synovial joint that ultimately may explain maintenance of health, recovery from injury, or development and progression of arthritis. PMID:21826801

  13. Severity of Coexisting Patellofemoral Disease is Associated with Increased Impairments and Functional Limitations in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Piva, Sara R.; Gil, Alexandra B.; Oddis, Chester V.; Brooks, Maria M.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between severity of coexisting patellofemoral (PF) disease with lower limb impairments and functional limitations in patients with tibiofemoral (TF) osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Radiographic views of the TF and PF compartments, knee extension strength and knee range of motion were obtained for 167 patients with knee OA. Additionally, knee-specific symptoms and functional limitations were assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and Activities of Daily Living Scale (ADLS). Results “Moderate/Severe PFOA” was associated with lower knee extension strength (1.4±0.5 Nm/BW) compared to “No PFOA” (1.8±0.5 Nm/BW). Additionally, total knee range of motion was significantly lower for patients with “Moderate/Severe PFOA” (120.8°±14.4°) compared to “No PFOA” (133.5°±10.7°) and “Mild PFOA” (125.8°±13.0°). “Moderate/Severe PFOA” and “Mild PFOA” were also associated with less pain while standing (OR= 0.2; 95% CI: 0.1,0.7 and OR= 0.2; 95% CI: 0.1,0.6, respectively) on the WOMAC and “Moderate/Severe PFOA” was associated with greater difficulty with going downstairs (OR=2.9; 95% CI: 1.0,8.1) on the ADLS. Conclusion It appears that knees with more severe coexisting PF disease demonstrate features distinct from those observed in TFOA in isolation or in combination with mild PF disease. Treatment strategies targeting the PF joint may be warranted to mitigate the specific lower limb impairments and functional problems present in this patient population. PMID:23045243

  14. Assay of synovial fluid parameters: hyaluronan concentration as a potential marker for joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Praest, B M; Greiling, H; Kock, R

    1997-10-31

    Synovial fluids from the knees of patients with degenerative joint disease (n = 29), osteoarthritis (n = 16), diabetic arthropathy (n = 12), gout (n = 7) and acute inflammatory joint disease (n = 7) were investigated by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography combined with multiangle laser light scattering detection and differential refractometry. These data were compared with the viscosities of the same samples measured by rotation viscometry with one low shear rate, as well as with C reactive protein. The median value of the weight-average molecular weight of hyaluronan in synovial fluids, which differed less than the viscosity of these groups, varied between 1.09 x 10(6) g/mol (range 0.849-1.63 x 10(6) g/mol) (acute-inflammatory joint disease) and 1.91 x 10(6) g/mol (range 1.06-3.48 x 10(6) g/mol) (degenerative joint disease). The correlation between viscosity and hyaluronan concentration was much better than between viscosity and weight-average molecular weight. Changes in C reactive protein concentration were correlated with the disease activity. The concentration of hyaluronan was significantly higher in the cases of degenerative joint disease and diabetic arthropathy. These results suggest that synovial fluid concentration of hyaluronan is appropriate as a prognostic value in the evaluation of different kinds of joint diseases. PMID:9437540

  15. Osteoarthritis-like pathologic changes in the knee joint induced by environmental disruption of circadian rhythms is potentiated by a high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Kc, Ranjan; Li, Xin; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Robin M.; Summa, Keith C.; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Tryniszewska, Beata; Keshavarzian, Ali; Turek, Fred W.; Meng, Qing-Jun; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    A variety of environmental factors contribute to progressive development of osteoarthritis (OA). Environmental factors that upset circadian rhythms have been linked to various diseases. Our recent work establishes chronic environmental circadian disruption - analogous to rotating shiftwork-associated disruption of circadian rhythms in humans - as a novel risk factor for the development of OA. Evidence suggests shift workers are prone to obesity and also show altered eating habits (i.e., increased preference for high-fat containing food). In the present study, we investigated the impact of chronic circadian rhythm disruption in combination with a high-fat diet (HFD) on progression of OA in a mouse model. Our study demonstrates that when mice with chronically circadian rhythms were fed a HFD, there was a significant proteoglycan (PG) loss and fibrillation in knee joint as well as increased activation of the expression of the catabolic mediators involved in cartilage homeostasis. Our results, for the first time, provide the evidence that environmental disruption of circadian rhythms plus HFD potentiate OA-like pathological changes in the mouse joints. Thus, our findings may open new perspectives on the interactions of chronic circadian rhythms disruption with diet in the development of OA and may have potential clinical implications. PMID:26584570

  16. Current concepts in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    de Rezende, Márcia Uchôa; de Campos, Gustavo Constantino; Pailo, Alexandre Felício

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of joint disease, affects mainly the hips, knees, hands and feet, leading to severe disability and loss of quality of life, particularly in the elderly population. Its importance grows every year with the aging of the population, with a large increase in the elderly population compared to younger patients. The progressive understanding of the pathophysiology of OA, the perception that the process is not purely mechanical and / or aging, and clarification of the inflammatory pathways involved led recently to the clinical application of various drugs and other measures. This update aims to expose the current concepts on the pathophysiology and treatment of OA. PMID:24453655

  17. Establishment of a rat model of lumbar facet joint osteoarthritis using intraarticular injection of urinary plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Shuang, Feng; Hou, Shu-Xun; Zhu, Jia-Liang; Liu, Yan; Zhou, Ying; Zhang, Chun-Li; Tang, Jia-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar facet joint (LFJ) osteoarthritis (OA) is an important etiology of low back pain. Several animal models of LFJ OA have been established using intraarticular injection of various chemicals. This study aimed to establish a rat model of LFJ OA using urinary plasminogen activator (uPA). Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with intraarticular injection in the L5-L6 facet joints with uPA (OA group, n = 40) or normal saline (vehicle group, n = 40). Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral hind paws were evaluated using von Frey hairs and a thermoalgesia instrument, respectively. Toluidine blue staining, hematoxylin-eosin staining, and immunohistochemical examination of the LFJ was performed. Treatment with uPA induced cartilage damage, synovitis, and proliferation of synovial cells in the fact joints. The OA group showed significantly higher hyperalgesia in the hind paws in comparison with the vehicle group and normal controls (P < 0.05). Expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and iNOS in the LFJ cartilage in the OA group was significantly increased (P < 0.05). A rat model of LFJ OA was successfully established using intraarticular injection of uPA. This animal model is convenient and shows good resemblance to human OA pathology. PMID:25892493

  18. Self management, joint protection and exercises in hand osteoarthritis: a randomised controlled trial with cost effectiveness analyses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is limited evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of occupational therapy (OT) approaches in the management of hand osteoarthritis (OA). Joint protection and hand exercises have been proposed by European guidelines, however the clinical and cost effectiveness of each intervention is unknown. This multicentre two-by-two factorial randomised controlled trial aims to address the following questions: • Is joint protection delivered by an OT more effective in reducing hand pain and disability than no joint protection in people with hand OA in primary care? • Are hand exercises delivered by an OT more effective in reducing hand pain and disability than no hand exercises in people with hand OA in primary care? • Which of the four management approaches explored within the study (leaflet and advice, joint protection, hand exercise, or joint protection and hand exercise combined) provides the most cost-effective use of health care resources Methods/Design Participants aged 50 years and over registered at three general practices in North Staffordshire and Cheshire will be mailed a health survey questionnaire (estimated mailing sample n = 9,500). Those fulfilling the eligibility criteria on the health survey questionnaire will be invited to attend a clinical assessment to assess for the presence of hand or thumb base OA using the ACR criteria. Eligible participants will be randomised to one of four groups: leaflet and advice; joint protection (looking after your joints); hand exercises; or joint protection and hand exercises combined (estimated n = 252). The primary outcome measure will be the OARSI/OMERACT responder criteria combining hand pain and disability (measured using the AUSCAN) and global improvement, 6 months post-randomisation. Secondary outcomes will also be collected for example pain, functional limitation and quality of life. Outcomes will be collected at baseline and 3, 6 and 12 months post-randomisation. The main analysis will

  19. Equine rehabilitation therapy for joint disease.

    PubMed

    Porter, Mimi

    2005-12-01

    The principles of physical rehabilitation therapy can be applied to the horse to provide a reduction in discomfort and dysfunction associated with the various forms of joint disease. Physical agents,such as ice, heat, electricity, sound, light, magnetic fields, compression, and movement, can be used by the rehabilitation therapist to attempt to control pain, reduce swelling, and restore optimal movement and function in the affected joint. The equine therapist's attention is focused not only on the affected joint but on the body as a whole to manage secondary or compensatory problems. PMID:16297723

  20. Evaluation of Glucosamine sulfate and Ibuprofen effects in patients with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis symptom

    PubMed Central

    Haghighat, Abbas; Behnia, Ali; Kaviani, Naser; Khorami, Behnam

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Ibuprofen – a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)- and glucosamine sulfate – a natural compound and a food supplement- are two therapeutic agents which have been widely used for treatment of patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. This study was aimed to compare the effectiveness and safety of these two medications in the treatment of patients suffering from TMJ disorders. Methods: After obtaining informed consent, 60 patients were randomly allocated to two groups. Patients with painful TMJ, TMJ crepitation or limitation of mouth opening entered the study. Exclusion criteria were history of depressive disorders, cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disorders, asthma, gastrointestinal problems, kidney or liver dysfunction or diabetes mellitus, dental diseases needing ongoing treatment; taking aspirin or warfarin, or concomitant treatment of TMJ disorder with other agents or methods. Thirty patients were treated with ibuprofen 400 mg twice a day, (mean age 27.12 ± 10.83 years) and 30 patients (mean age 26.60 ± 10) were treated with glucosamine sulfate 1500 mg daily. Patients were visited 30, 60 and 90 days after starting the treatment, pain and mandibular opening were checked and compared within and between two groups. Findings: Comparing with baseline measures, both groups had significantly improved post-treatment pain (P < 0.0001 for both groups) and mandibular opening (P value: 0.001 for glucosamine sulfate and 0.03 for ibuprofen). Post treatment pain and mandibular opening showed significantly more improvement in the glucosamine treated patients (P < 0.0001 and 0.01 respectively). Rate of adverse events was significantly lower in the P value glucosamine sulfate group (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: This investigation demonstrated that comparing with a commonly prescribed NSAID – ibuprofen-, glucosamine sulfate is a more effective and safer therapeutic agent for treatment of patients with TMJ degenerative join disorder. PMID

  1. Effects of AR7 Joint Complex on arthralgia for patients with osteoarthritis: Results of a three-month study in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qingwen; Shi, Rong; Xu, Gang; Cheng, Lifu; Shao, Liyun; Rao, Jianyu

    2008-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis-induced arthralgia is a common cause of morbidity in both men and women worldwide. AR7 Joint Complex is a nutritional supplement containing various ingredients including sternum collagen II and methylsulfonylmethane. The product has been marketed in United States for over a decade, but clinical data measuring the effectiveness of this supplement in relieving arthralgia is lacking. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of AR7 Joint Complex on osteoarthritis. Methods A total of 100 patients over the age of 50 who had osteoarthritis were recruited to the double-blind study and randomly assigned into either treatment or placebo control groups. The patients in the treatment group were given AR7 Joint Complex orally, 1 capsule daily for 12 weeks, while the patients in the control group were given a placebo for the same period of time. Prior to and at the end of the study, data including Quality of Life questionnaires (SF-36), visual analog scales (1 to 100 mm), and X-rays of affected joints were collected. Results A total of 89 patients completed the study: 44 from the treatment group and 45 from the control group. No significant change in X-ray results was found in either group after the study. However, there was a significant decrease in patients complaining of arthralgia and tenderness (P < 0.01) in the treatment group and there was also a significant difference between the treatment and control groups at the end of the study. In addition, for Quality of Life data, the body pain index (BP) in the treatment group was significantly improved (P < 0.05) compared to the control group. No significant toxicity was noted in either group. Conclusion AR7 Joint Complex appears to have short-term effects in relieving pain in patients with osteoarthritis. Whether such an effect is long-lasting remains to be seen. PMID:18954461

  2. What Is Osteoarthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... wide range of treatment strategies.  Medicines to prevent, slow down, or reverse joint damage.  Complementary and alternative therapies.  Vitamins and other supplements.  Education to help people manage their osteoarthritis better.  Exercise ...

  3. The effect of osteoarthritis of the knee on the biomechanics of other joints in the lower limbs.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, A J; Stewart, C; Postans, N; Dodds, A L; Holt, C A; Roberts, A P

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the loading of the other joints of the lower limb in patients with unilateral osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. We recruited 20 patients with no other symptoms or deformity in the lower limbs from a consecutive cohort of patients awaiting knee replacement. Gait analysis and electromyographic recordings were performed to determine moments at both knees and hips, and contraction patterns in the medial and lateral quadriceps and hamstrings bilaterally. The speed of gait was reduced in the group with OA compared with the controls, but there were only minor differences in stance times between the limbs. Patients with OA of the knee had significant increases in adduction moment impulse at both knees and the contralateral hip (adjusted p-values: affected knee: p < 0.01, unaffected knee p = 0.048, contralateral hip p = 0.03), and significantly increased muscular co-contraction bilaterally compared with controls (all comparisons for co-contraction, p < 0.01). The other major weight-bearing joints are at risk from abnormal biomechanics in patients with unilateral OA of the knee. PMID:23450019

  4. β2-adrenergic signal transduction plays a detrimental role in subchondral bone loss of temporomandibular joint in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Kai; Niu, Li-Na; Li, Qi-hong; Ren, Gao-tong; Zhao, Chang-ming; Liu, Yun-dong; Tay, Franklin R.; Wang, Mei-qing

    2015-01-01

    The present study tested whether activation of the sympathetic tone by aberrant joint loading elicits abnormal subchondral bone remodeling in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis. Abnormal dental occlusion was created in experimental rats, which were then intraperitoneally injected by saline, propranolol or isoproterenol. The norepinephrine contents, distribution of sympathetic nerve fibers, expression of β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) and remodeling parameters in the condylar subchondral bone were investigated. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from condylar subchondral bones were harvested for comparison of their β-ARs, pro-osteoclastic gene expressions and pro-osteoclastic function. Increases in norepinephrine level, sympathetic nerve fiber distribution and β2-AR expression were observed in the condylar subchondral bone of experimental rats, together with subchondral bone loss and increased osteoclast activity. β-antagonist (propranolol) suppressed subchondral bone loss and osteoclast hyperfunction while β-agonist (isoproterenol) exacerbated those responses. MSCs from experimental condylar subchondral bone expressed higher levels of β2-AR and RANKL; norepinephrine stimulation further increased their RANKL expression and pro-osteoclastic function. These effects were blocked by inhibition of β2-AR or the PKA pathway. RANKL expression by MSCs decreased after propranolol administration and increased after isoproterenol administration. It is concluded that β2-AR signal-mediated subchondral bone loss in TMJ osteoarthritisis associated with increased RANKL secretion by MSCs. PMID:26219508

  5. Effects of Nordic walking on pelvis motion and muscle activities around the hip joints of adults with hip osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Daisuke; Jigami, Hirofumi; Sato, Naritoshi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Increased compensatory pelvic movement is remarkable in limping patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA). However, a method of improving limping has not been established. The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of two types of Nordic walking by analyzing the pelvic movement and muscle activities of adults with hip OA. [Subjects and Methods] Ten patients with OA of the hip performed Japanese-style Nordic walking (JS NW), European-style Nordic walking (ES NW), and Ordinary walking (OW), and the muscle activities around the hip joint and pelvic movements were analyzed. [Results] The pelvic rotation angle was significantly larger in ES NW than in JS NW. In the stance phase, hip abductor muscle activity was significantly decreased in JS NW compared to both OW and ES NW. In the swing phase, rectus abdominis muscle activity was significantly increased in both JS NW and ES NW compared to OW and lumbar erector spinae activity was significantly lower in JS NW than in OW. [Conclusion] JS NW style may reduce the compensatory pelvic rotation in patients with hip OA. JS NW might be better for joint protection and prevention of secondary disorders of the hip in OA patients. PMID:27190455

  6. High-resolution x-ray guided three-dimensional diffuse optical tomography of joint tissues in hand osteoarthritis: Morphological and functional assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Zhen; Zhang Qizhi; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang Huabei

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the potential use of multimodality functional imaging techniques to identify the quantitative optical findings that can be used to distinguish between osteoarthritic and normal finger joints. Methods: Between 2006 and 2009, the distal interphalangeal finger joints from 40 female subjects including 22 patients and 18 healthy controls were examined clinically and scanned by a hybrid imaging system. This system integrated x-ray tomosynthetic setup with a diffuse optical imaging system. Optical absorption and scattering images were recovered based on a regularization-based hybrid reconstruction algorithm. A receiver operating characteristic curve was used to calculate the statistical significance of specific optical features obtained from osteoarthritic and healthy joints groups. Results: The three-dimensional optical and x-ray images captured made it possible to quantify optical properties and joint space width of finger joints. Based on the recovered optical absorption and scattering parameters, the authors observed statistically significant differences between healthy and osteoarthritis finger joints. Conclusions: The statistical results revealed that sensitivity and specificity values up to 92% and 100%, respectively, can be achieved when optical properties of joint tissues were used as classifiers. This suggests that these optical imaging parameters are possible indicators for diagnosing osteoarthritis and monitoring its progression.

  7. Application of Computational Lower Extremity Model to Investigate Different Muscle Activities and Joint Force Patterns in Knee Osteoarthritis Patients during Walking

    PubMed Central

    Nha, Kyung Wook; Shin, Jun Ho; Kim, Jong In; Kwon, Jae Ho; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    Many experimental and computational studies have reported that osteoarthritis in the knee joint affects knee biomechanics, including joint kinematics, joint contact forces, and muscle activities, due to functional restriction and disability. In this study, differences in muscle activities and joint force patterns between knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients and normal subjects during walking were investigated using the inverse dynamic analysis with a lower extremity musculoskeletal model. Extensor/flexor muscle activations and torque ratios and the joint contact forces were compared between the OA and normal groups. The OA patients had higher extensor muscle forces and lateral component of the knee joint force than normal subjects as well as force and torque ratios of extensor and flexor muscles, while the other parameters had little differences. The results explained that OA patients increased the level of antagonistic cocontraction and the adduction moment on the knee joint. The presented findings and technologies provide insight into biomechanical changes in OA patients and can also be used to evaluate the postoperative functional outcomes of the OA treatments. PMID:24302973

  8. Effects of exercise on knee joints with osteoarthritis: a pilot study of biologic markers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautch, J. C.; Malone, D. G.; Vailas, A. C.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of low intensity weight-bearing exercise on osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. METHODS: Synovial fluid keratan sulfate (KS) and hydroxyproline were measured as markers of cartilage degradation. The Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales (AIMS) were used to measure health status, and a visual analog scale for pain assessment was used before and after intervention. An exercise (EX) group (n = 15) received a thrice-weekly 12-week low intensity exercise program and a weekly educational program, and a minimal treatment (Min RX) group (n = 15) received only the education program. RESULTS: Pain levels declined in the EX group, and the Min RX group showed improvement on the AIMS. Synovial fluid was obtained in 11 subjects before and after the intervention. Levels of KS and hydroxyproline did not change. CONCLUSION: Further study of exercise effects should include both clinical and biologic parameters to examine the outcome of exercise as a therapeutic intervention in OA of the knee.

  9. Identifying compositional and structural changes in spongy and subchondral bone from the hip joints of patients with osteoarthritis using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwald, Tomasz; Niciejewski, Krzysztof; Kozielski, Marek; Szybowicz, Mirosław; Siatkowski, Marcin; Krauss, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy was used to examine the biochemical composition and molecular structure of extracellular matrix in spongy and subchondral bone collected from patients with clinical and radiological evidence of idiopathic osteoarthritis of the hip and from patients who underwent a femoral neck fracture, as a result of trauma, without previous clinical and radiological evidence of osteoarthritis. The objectives of the study were to determine the levels of mineralization, carbonate accumulation and collagen quality in bone tissue. The subchondral bone from osteoarthritis patients in comparison with control subject is less mineralized due to a decrease in the hydroxyapatite concentration. However, the extent of carbonate accumulation in the apatite crystal lattice increases, most likely due to deficient mineralization. The alpha helix to random coil band area ratio reveals that collagen matrix in subchondral bone is more ordered in osteoarthritis disease. The hydroxyapatite to collagen, carbonate apatite to hydroxyapatite and alpha helix to random coil band area ratios are not significantly changed in the differently loaded sites of femoral head. The significant differences also are not visible in mineral and organic constituents' content in spongy bone beneath the subchondral bone in osteoarthritis disease.

  10. Lessons from a non-domestic canid: joint disease in captive raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides).

    PubMed

    Lawler, Dennis F; Evans, Richard H; Nieminen, Petteri; Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Smith, Gail K

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe pathological changes of the shoulder, elbow, hip and stifle joints of 16 museum skeletons of the raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides). The subjects had been held in long-term captivity and were probably used for fur farming or research, thus allowing sufficient longevity for joint disease to become recognisable. The prevalence of disorders that include osteochondrosis, osteoarthritis and changes compatible with hip dysplasia, was surprisingly high. Other changes that reflect near-normal or mild pathological conditions, including prominent articular margins and mild bony periarticular rim, were also prevalent. Our data form a basis for comparing joint pathology of captive raccoon dogs with other mammals and also suggest that contributing roles of captivity and genetic predisposition should be explored further in non-domestic canids. PMID:23277118

  11. Design and construction of custom-made neoprene thumb carpo-metacarpal orthosis with thermoplastic stabilization for first carpo-metacarpal joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bani, Monireh Ahmadi; Arazpour, Mokhtar; Curran, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with first carpo-metacarpal (CMC) osteoarthritis (OA) often experience pain and difficulty with functional activities. Thus, designing orthotics to improve function and decrease pain is common practice. These therapists designed an orthosis using a combination of neoprene and thermoplastic materials to create a soft orthosis that provides support to the first CMC joint - Victoria Priganc, PhD, OTR, CHT, CLT. PMID:23523512

  12. Mechanisms of quadriceps muscle weakness in knee joint osteoarthritis: the effects of prolonged vibration on torque and muscle activation in osteoarthritic and healthy control subjects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction A consequence of knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) is an inability to fully activate the quadriceps muscles, a problem termed arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI). AMI leads to marked quadriceps weakness that impairs physical function and may hasten disease progression. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether γ-loop dysfunction contributes to AMI in people with knee joint OA. Methods Fifteen subjects with knee joint OA and 15 controls with no history of knee joint pathology participated in this study. Quadriceps and hamstrings peak isometric torque (Nm) and electromyography (EMG) amplitude were collected before and after 20 minutes of 50 Hz vibration applied to the infrapatellar tendon. Between-group differences in pre-vibration torque were analysed using a one-way analysis of covariance, with age, gender and body mass (kg) as the covariates. If the γ-loop is intact, vibration should decrease torque and EMG levels in the target muscle; if dysfunctional, then torque and EMG levels should not change following vibration. One-sample t tests were thus undertaken to analyse whether percentage changes in torque and EMG differed from zero after vibration in each group. In addition, analyses of covariance were utilised to analyse between-group differences in the percentage changes in torque and EMG following vibration. Results Pre-vibration quadriceps torque was significantly lower in the OA group compared with the control group (P = 0.005). Following tendon vibration, quadriceps torque (P < 0.001) and EMG amplitude (P ≤0.001) decreased significantly in the control group but did not change in the OA group (all P > 0.299). Hamstrings torque and EMG amplitude were unchanged in both groups (all P > 0.204). The vibration-induced changes in quadriceps torque and EMG were significantly different between the OA and control groups (all P < 0.011). No between-group differences were observed for the change in hamstrings torque or EMG (all P > 0

  13. New developments in osteoarthritis and cartilage biology.

    PubMed

    Poulet, Blandine; Staines, Katherine A

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease and the most common form of arthritis. Characterised by articular cartilage loss, subchondral bone thickening and osteophyte formation, the OA joint afflicts much pain and disability. Whilst OA has been associated with many contributing factors, its underpinning molecular mechanisms are, nevertheless, not fully understood. Clinical management of OA is largely palliative and there is an ever growing need for an effective disease modifying treatment. This review discusses some of the recent progress in OA therapies in the different joint tissues affected by OA pathology. PMID:26921602

  14. Joint Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... ankles and toes. Other types of arthritis include gout or pseudogout. Sometimes, there is a mechanical problem ... for more information on osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and gout. How Common are Joint Problems? Osteoarthritis, which affects ...

  15. Imaging for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, D; Roemer, F W; Guermazi, A

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a widely prevalent disease worldwide and, with an increasing ageing society, is a challenge for the field of physical and rehabilitation medicine. Technologic advances and implementation of sophisticated post-processing instruments and analytic strategies have resulted in imaging playing a more and more important role in understanding the disease process of OA. Radiography is still the most commonly used imaging modality for establishing an imaging-based diagnosis of OA. The need for an effective non-surgical OA treatment is highly desired, but despite on-going research efforts no disease-modifying OA drugs have been discovered or approved to date. MR imaging-based studies have revealed some of the limitations of radiography. The ability of MR to image all relevant joint tissues within the knee and to visualize cartilage morphology and composition has resulted in MRI playing a key role in understanding the natural history of the disease and in the search for new therapies. Our review will focus on the roles and limitations of radiography and MRI with particular attention to knee OA. The use of other modalities (e.g. ultrasound, nuclear medicine, computed tomography (CT), and CT/MR arthrography) in clinical practice and OA research will also be briefly described. Ultrasound may be useful to evaluate synovial pathology in osteoarthritis, particularly in the hand. PMID:26797169

  16. Osteoarthritis of the Distal Interphalangeal and First Carpometacarpal Joints is Associated with High Bone Mass in Women and Small Bone Size and Low Lean Mass in Men

    PubMed Central

    von Schewelov, Thord; Magnusson, Håkan; Cöster, Maria; Karlsson, Caroline; Rosengren, Björn E

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine if primary hand osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with abnormal bone and anthropometric traits. Methods: We used DXA to measure total body bone mineral density (BMD), femoral neck width (bone size) and total body lean and fat mass in 39 subjects with hand OA (primary DIP and/or CMC I) and 164 controls. Data are presented as mean Z-scores or Odds Ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals. Results: Women with hand OA had (compared to controls) higher BMD (0.5(0.1,0.9)) but similar bone size (-0.3(-0.8,0.2)), lean mass (0.3(-0.3,0.9)), fat mass (-0.1(-0.6,0.5)) and BMI (0.0(-0.6,0.6)). Men with hand OA had (compared to controls) similar BMD (-0.1(-0.7,0.6)), smaller bone size (-0.5(-1.1,-0.01)), lower lean mass (-0.6(-1.1,-0.04)), and similar fat mass (-0.2(-0.7,0.4)) and BMI -0.1(-0.6,0.6). In women, each SD higher BMD was associated with an OR of 1.8 (1.03, 3.3) for having hand OA. In men each SD smaller bone size was associated with an OR of 1.8 (1.02, 3.1) and each SD lower proportion of lean body mass with an OR of 1.9 (1.1, 3.3) for having hand OA. Conclusion: Women with primary DIP finger joint and/or CMC I joint OA have a phenotype with higher BMD while men with the disease have a smaller bone size and lower lean body mass. PMID:26401163

  17. Burden of Restraint, Disablement and Ethnic Identity: A Case Study of Total Joint Replacement for Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Tracie

    2010-01-01

    Health disparities in total joint replacement have been documented based on gender and ethnicity in multiple countries. Absent are studies exploring the meaning of the procedures among diverse women, which is necessary to fully understand the impact of the disparity. Drawing on ethnographic data from a life course exploration of disablement among Mexican American women with mobility impairments, one woman’s reasons for forgoing a joint replacement are considered. It is suggested that inequalities in disablement cannot be understood without considering the mulitple cultural conflicts and loyalties that push and pull women in multiple directions. PMID:21767094

  18. Management of open bite that developed during treatment for internal derangement and osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Won; Nakaoka, Kazutoshi; Hamada, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the orthodontic treatment performed for open bite caused by internal derangement (ID) and osteoarthritis (OA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A Japanese woman, aged 31 years and 11 months, referred to our department by an oral surgeon had an open bite with clockwise rotation of the mandible and degeneration of the condyle. The overbite was corrected through intrusion of the maxillary and mandibular molars using mini-screw implants to induce counterclockwise rotation of the mandible. Then, the mandibular second premolars were extracted and comprehensive orthodontic treatment was performed to establish a Class I molar relationship with distalization of the maxillary arch and to eliminate anterior crowding. Following treatment, her facial profile improved and a functional and stable occlusion was achieved without recurrence of the TMJ symptoms. These results suggest that orthodontic intrusion of the molars is one of the safer and less stressful alternatives for the management of open bite due to degeneration of the condyles caused by ID and OA of TMJ. PMID:26023542

  19. Management of open bite that developed during treatment for internal derangement and osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Arai, Chihiro; Choi, Jae Won; Nakaoka, Kazutoshi; Hamada, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2015-05-01

    This case report describes the orthodontic treatment performed for open bite caused by internal derangement (ID) and osteoarthritis (OA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A Japanese woman, aged 31 years and 11 months, referred to our department by an oral surgeon had an open bite with clockwise rotation of the mandible and degeneration of the condyle. The overbite was corrected through intrusion of the maxillary and mandibular molars using mini-screw implants to induce counterclockwise rotation of the mandible. Then, the mandibular second premolars were extracted and comprehensive orthodontic treatment was performed to establish a Class I molar relationship with distalization of the maxillary arch and to eliminate anterior crowding. Following treatment, her facial profile improved and a functional and stable occlusion was achieved without recurrence of the TMJ symptoms. These results suggest that orthodontic intrusion of the molars is one of the safer and less stressful alternatives for the management of open bite due to degeneration of the condyles caused by ID and OA of TMJ. PMID:26023542

  20. Plantar pressure distribution in older people with osteoarthritis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (hallux limitus/rigidus).

    PubMed

    Zammit, Gerard V; Menz, Hylton B; Munteanu, Shannon E; Landorf, Karl B

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences in dynamic plantar pressure distribution between older people with and without radiographically confirmed osteoarthritis (OA) of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (first MPJ) of the foot. Dynamic plantar pressure recordings using the TekScan MatScan system were obtained during barefoot level walking in 40 older participants; 20 with radiographically confirmed OA of the first MPJ displaying less than 55 degrees of passive dorsiflexion, and 20 with no evidence of OA in the first MPJ displaying greater than 55 degrees of passive dorsiflexion. Group comparisons between the variables maximum force and peak pressure were made for seven different regions underneath the right foot (heel, midfoot, first MPJ, second MPJ, third to fifth MPJs, hallux, and lesser toes). Compared to the control group, participants with OA of the first MPJ exhibited 34% greater maximum force (7.9 +/- 2.5 vs. 5.9 +/- 1.7 kg, p = 0.005) and 23% higher peak pressure (1.6 +/- 0.3 vs. 1.3 +/- 0.3 kg/cm(2), p = 0.001) under the hallux. Similar results were also found under the lesser toes with 43% greater maximum force (5.0 +/- 1.9 vs. 3.5 +/- 1.4 kg; p = 0.006) and 29% higher peak pressure (0.9 +/- 0.2 vs. 0.7 +/- 0.2 kg/cm(2), p = 0.018). No significant differences were found to exist between groups for any other plantar region. These findings indicate that OA of the first MPJ is associated with significant changes in load-bearing function of the foot, which may contribute to the development of secondary pathological changes associated with the condition, such as plantar callus formation and hyperextension of the hallux interphalangeal joint. PMID:18634037

  1. Obesity versus osteoarthritis: beyond the mechanical overload

    PubMed Central

    Sartori-Cintra, Angélica Rossi; Aikawa, Priscila; Cintra, Dennys Esper Correa

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is currently considered a major public health problem in the world, already reaching epidemic characteristics, according to the World Health Organization. Excess weight is the major risk factor associated with various diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia and osteometabolic diseases, including osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is the most prevalent rheumatic disease and the leading cause of physical disability and reduced quality of life of the population over 65 years. It mainly involves the joints that bear weight - knees and hips. However, along with the cases of obesity, its prevalence is increasing, and even in other joints, such as hands. Thus, it is assumed that the influence of obesity on the development of OA is beyond mechanical overload. The purpose of this review was to correlate the possible mechanisms underlying the genesis and development of these two diseases. Increased fat mass is directly proportional to excessive consumption of saturated fatty acids, responsible for systemic low-grade inflammation condition and insulin and leptin resistance. At high levels, leptin assumes inflammatory characteristics and acts in the articular cartilage, triggering the inflammatory process and changing homeostasis this tissue with consequent degeneration. We conclude that obesity is a risk factor for osteoarthritis and that physical activity and changes in diet composition can reverse the inflammatory and leptin resistance, reducing progression or preventing the onset of osteoarthritis. PMID:25184806

  2. Chronic joint pain in the lower body is associated with gait differences independent from radiographic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    de Kruijf, Marjolein; Verlinden, Vincentius J A; Huygen, Frank J P M; Hofman, Albert; van der Geest, Jos N; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Ikram, M Arfan; van Meurs, Joyce B J

    2015-09-01

    Gait is an important indicator of health. Chronic lower body pain may impair gait and lead to morbidity and mortality. We investigated the associations between lower body pain and gait in community-dwelling individuals, independent from osteoarthritis (OA). This population based cohort study included 2304 Rotterdam Study participants who underwent electronic walkway gait assessment. Thirty different variables resulting from gait assessment were summarized into seven gait domains using principle components analysis: i.e. Rhythm, Variability, Phases, Pace, Tandem, Turning, and Base of Support. Chronic lower body pain was assessed using pain drawings. OA was defined as a Kellgren & Lawrence score of 2 or higher on radiographs of the hip and/or knee. Linear regression analysis was used to study associations. Participants with chronic pain in the leg and hip, had lower Rhythm, Phases, and Pace, independent from OA. Additionally, we found unilateral pain to associate with larger gait asymmetry. No associations were found between chronic pain and the other gait domains, including gait variability. However, within individuals with hip pain, gait variability was higher in individuals with radiographic OA compared to those without OA. This is the first population based study showing chronic lower body pain associates with gait differences independent from OA. Participants with pain were found to walk with slower and smaller steps, longer double support and more asymmetry. Proper care and treatment of chronic pain could be a way of reducing gait problems and thereby fall risk and associated mortality. In addition, gait assessment may help identifying individuals with OA from those having pain due to other causes. PMID:26210905

  3. Revealed aspect of metabolic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Rishmeen

    2016-12-01

    In current scenario there is an emerging trend to consider osteoarthritis (OA) phenotypes based on their risk factors and therefore offering potential for targeted therapies. OA prevalence with other coexistence diseases, such as systemic arterial hypertension, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and dyslipidemia are increasing. Majority of OA associated with MetS, despite overweight of patients, the occurrence of OA in joints do not bear load suggest, the chronic inflammation status existing in patients with MetS can alter the metabolism of cartilage, regardless of excessive weight. This paper indicates that factors responsible for metabolic syndrome has clear role in cartilage degeneration and further degradation. PMID:27453640

  4. Increased osteoarthritis in moose from Isle Royale.

    PubMed

    Peterson, R O

    1988-07-01

    Over the past 30 yr, moose (Alces alces) in Isle Royale National Park (Michigan, USA) exhibited a several-fold increase in the prevalence of osteoarthritis, or degenerative joint disease (DJD). Available evidence points to an environmental explanation for this change. Greater physical activity among afflicted moose is not a likely contributing factor, nor is genetic change in the population. The possible introduction of an unspecified disease agent cannot be dismissed at this time. Moose exhibiting the highest prevalence of DJD were those born during a period of severe undernutrition, and it is hypothesized that nutritional stress early in life was responsible for increased joint disease during senescence. Such an etiology for osteoarthritis has not been suggested previously for any species. PMID:3411702

  5. Emerging Targets in Osteoarthritis Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goldring, Mary B.; Berenbaum, Francis

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a destructive joint disease in which the initiation may be attributed to direct injury and mechanical disruption of joint tissues, but the progressive changes are dependent on active cell-mediated processes that can be observed or inferred during the generally long time-course of the disease. Based on clinical observations and experimental studies, it is now recognized a that it is possible for individual patients to exhibit common sets of symptoms and structural abnormalities due to distinct pathophysiological pathways that act independently or in combination. Recent research that has focused on the underlying mechanisms involving biochemical cross talk among the cartilage, synovium, bone, and other joint tissues within a background of poorly characterized genetic factors will be addressed in this review. PMID:25863583

  6. Cellular ageing mechanisms in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Sacitharan, P K; Vincent, T L

    2016-08-01

    Age is the strongest independent risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis (OA) and for many years this was assumed to be due to repetitive microtrauma of the joint surface over time, the so-called 'wear and tear' arthritis. As our understanding of OA pathogenesis has become more refined, it has changed our appreciation of the role of ageing on disease. Cartilage breakdown in disease is not a passive process but one involving induction and activation of specific matrix-degrading enzymes; chondrocytes are exquisitely sensitive to changes in the mechanical, inflammatory and metabolic environment of the joint; cartilage is continuously adapting to these changes by altering its matrix. Ageing influences all of these processes. In this review, we will discuss how ageing affects tissue structure, joint use and the cellular metabolism. We describe what is known about pathways implicated in ageing in other model systems and discuss the potential value of targeting these pathways in OA. PMID:27215642

  7. [Treatment of patients with osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Vargas Negrín, Francisco; Medina Abellán, María D; Hermosa Hernán, Juan Carlos; de Felipe Medina, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic management of patients with osteoarthritis aims to decrease pain and inflammation, improve physical function, and to apply safe and effective treatments. A patient-centered approach implies the active participation of the patient in the design of the treatment plan and in timely and informed decision-making at all stages of the disease. The nucleus of treatment is patient education, physical activity and therapeutic exercise, together with weight control in overweight or obese patients. Self-care by the individual and by the family is fundamental in day-to-day patient management. The use of physical therapies, technical aids (walking sticks, etc.) and simple analgesics, opium alkaloids, and antiinflammatory drugs have demonstrated effectiveness in controlling pain, improving physical function and quality of life and their use is clearly indicated in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Conservative surgery and joint replacement is indicated when treatment goals are not achieved in specific patients. PMID:24467960

  8. Can we identify patients with high risk of osteoarthritis progression who will respond to treatment? A focus on epidemiology and phenotype of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bruyère, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Arden, Nigel; Branco, Jaime; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel; Berenbaum, Francis; Dennison, Elaine; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Hochberg, Marc; Kanis, John; Laslop, Andrea; McAlindon, Tim; Reiter, Susanne; Richette, Pascal; Rizzoli, René; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2015-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is a syndrome affecting a variety of patient profiles. A European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis and the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society working meeting explored the possibility of identifying different patient profiles in osteoarthritis. The risk factors for the development of osteoarthritis include systemic factors (e.g., age, sex, obesity, genetics, race, and bone density) and local biomechanical factors (e.g., obesity, sport, joint injury, and muscle weakness); most also predict disease progression, particularly joint injury, malalignment, and synovitis/effusion. The characterization of patient profiles should help to better orientate research, facilitate trial design, and define which patients are the most likely to benefit from treatment. There are a number of profile candidates. Generalized, polyarticular osteoarthritis and local, monoarticular osteoarthritis appear to be two different profiles; the former is a feature of osteoarthritis co-morbid with inflammation or the metabolic syndrome, while the latter is more typical of post-trauma osteoarthritis, especially in cases with severe malalignment. Other biomechanical factors may also define profiles, such as joint malalignment, loss of meniscal function, and ligament injury. Early- and late-stage osteoarthritis appear as separate profiles, notably in terms of treatment response. Finally, there is evidence that there are two separate profiles related to lesions in the subchondral bone, which may determine benefit from bone-active treatments. Decisions on appropriate therapy should be made considering clinical presentation, underlying pathophysiology, and stage of disease. Identification of patient profiles may lead to more personalized healthcare, with more targeted treatment for osteoarthritis. PMID:25701074

  9. Regenerative Injection Therapy with Whole Bone Marrow Aspirate for Degenerative Joint Disease: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Ross A.; Orlofsky, Amos

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative therapeutic strategies for joint diseases usually employ either enriched concentrates of bone marrow-derived stem cells, chondrogenic preparations such as platelet-rich plasma, or irritant solutions such as hyperosmotic dextrose. In this case series, we describe our experience with a simple, cost-effective regenerative treatment using direct injection of unfractionated whole bone marrow (WBM) into osteoarthritic joints in combination with hyperosmotic dextrose. Seven patients with hip, knee or ankle osteoarthritis (OA) received two to seven treatments over a period of two to twelve months. Patient-reported assessments were collected in interviews and by questionnaire. All patients reported improvements with respect to pain, as well as gains in functionality and quality of life. Three patients, including two whose progress under other therapy had plateaued or reversed, achieved complete or near-complete symptomatic relief, and two additional patients achieved resumption of vigorous exercise. These preliminary findings suggest that OA treatment with WBM injection merits further investigation. PMID:24046512

  10. Surgical treatments for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    de l'Escalopier, Nicolas; Anract, Philippe; Biau, David

    2016-06-01

    There are two main surgical treatments for osteoarthritis: conservative treatments, where the damaged cartilage is left in place, and radical treatments, where the cartilage is replaced by an artificial endoprosthesis; this latter procedure is termed joint arthroplasty. These treatments are only offered to symptomatic patients. Arthrodesis is yet another surgical intervention in cases of osteoarthritis. It will sacrifice the joint's articular function and is performed on small osteoarthritic joints, such as wrists and ankles, for instance. Osteoarthritis symptoms are usually the consequence of an imbalance between the load applied to a joint and the surface available to support that load. Therefore, conservative treatments will either tend to decrease the load exerted on the joint, such as in a tibial valgus osteotomy for instance, or to improve the articular surface supporting that load. Sometimes, both can be provided at the same time; the peri-acetabular osteotomy for hip dysplasia is an example of such a procedure. Conservative treatments are usually offered to young patients in order to delay, if not avoid, the need for a joint prosthesis. They are usually performed before osteoarthritis appears or at an early stage. Joint arthroplasties have overwhelmingly excellent functional results and today's research is directed towards providing rapid recovery, very long-term stability, and the assurance of a good functionality in extreme conditions. However, complications with joint arthroplasties can be serious with little, if any, reasonable salvage solution. Therefore, these procedures are offered to patients who have failed adequate medical treatment measures. PMID:27185463

  11. Rocker-sole footwear versus prefabricated foot orthoses for the treatment of pain associated with first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis affecting the first metatarsophalangeal joint of the foot is a common condition which results in pain, stiffness and impaired ambulation. Footwear modifications and foot orthoses are widely used in clinical practice to treat this condition, but their effectiveness has not been rigorously evaluated. This article describes the design of a randomised trial comparing the effectiveness of rocker-sole footwear and individualised prefabricated foot orthoses in reducing pain associated with first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis. Methods Eighty people with first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis will be randomly allocated to receive either a pair of rocker-sole shoes (MBT® Matwa, Masai Barefoot Technology, Switzerland) or a pair of individualised, prefabricated foot orthoses (Vasyli Customs, Vasyli Medical™, Queensland, Australia). At baseline, the biomechanical effects of the interventions will be examined using a wireless wearable sensor motion analysis system (LEGSys™, BioSensics, Boston, MA, USA) and an in-shoe plantar pressure system (Pedar®, Novel GmbH, Munich, Germany). The primary outcome measure will be the pain subscale of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire (FHSQ), measured at baseline and 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measures will include the function, footwear and general foot health subscales of the FHSQ, severity of pain and stiffness at the first metatarsophalangeal joint (measured using 100 mm visual analog scales), global change in symptoms (using a 15-point Likert scale), health status (using the Short-Form-12® Version 2.0 questionnaire), use of rescue medication and co-interventions to relieve pain, the frequency and type of self-reported adverse events and physical activity levels (using the Incidental and Planned Activity Questionnaire). Data will be analysed using the intention to treat principle. Discussion This study is the first randomised trial to compare the effectiveness of rocker

  12. [Bone and Joint Involvement in Celiac Disease].

    PubMed

    Hoffmanová, I; Sánchez, D; Džupa, V

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (gluten-sensitive enteropathy) is currently regarded as a multisystem autoimmune disorder; its clinical signs and symptoms do not involve merely the gastrointestinal tract but are associated with several other medical specialties, including orthopaedics and traumatology. In orthopaedic and trauma patients, celiac disease should be suspected in the following diagnoses: osteomalacia, premenopausal osteoporosis, post-menopausal osteoporosis more severe than expected and refractory to medication, osteoporosis in men under 55 years of age, recurrent bone fractures in the limbs, large joint arthralgia or arthritis of unclear aetiology, erosive spondyloarthropathy particularly in patients with the history of chronic diarrhoea, anaemia or associated autoimmune disorders (type 1 diabetes mellitus or autoimmune thyreopathy), and in women with secondary amenorrhea or early menopause. The orthopaedist or trauma surgeon should be aware of suspected celiac disease in patients who do not respond adequately to the standard treatment of pain related to the musculoskeletal system, in patients with recurrent fractures of the limb bones and in young patients with suspected secondary osteoporosis. With the use of appropriate screening methods, celiac disease as-yet undiagnosed can be revealed. A long-life gluten-free diet in these patients results in the alleviation of metabolic osteopathy and joint and muscle problems, in reduced requirements of analgesic and antiphlogistic drugs as well as in reduced risks of fracture. PMID:26516737

  13. Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid as a disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Savarino, Lucia; Fioravanti, Antonella; Leo, Graziana; Aloisi, Ruggero; Mian, Maurizio

    2007-08-01

    Pharmacologic treatment of osteoarthritis has been confined mostly to analgesic or nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs that only modify the symptoms. We asked whether anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid might act as a disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug. We evaluated the in vitro inhibitory effect of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid on cathepsin B activity and proteoglycan release from cultured rabbit cartilage challenged with interleukin-1beta in comparison with diacerhein, the prodrug of rhein. We studied the in vivo activity in an experimental osteoarthritis model induced by medial monolateral meniscectomy in rabbits. After 3 months of treatment with oral anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid or diacerhein at 25 mg/kg/day, the animals were sacrificed and the knees were retrieved; cluster chondrocytes, fibrillations, fissures, and osteophytes were studied on cartilage biopsies. The evidence for disease-modifying activity of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid was (1) the in vitro dose-dependent inhibition of cathepsin B activity, (2) the in vitro time- and dose-dependent inhibition of interleukin-1beta-stimulated proteoglycan release from the cartilage matrix, and (3) the in vivo reduction of all cartilage degeneration parameters. Our data suggest anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid is worth exploring for treating osteoarthritis. PMID:17806152

  14. Effects of administration of adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction and platelet-rich plasma to dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joints.

    PubMed

    Upchurch, David A; Renberg, Walter C; Roush, James K; Milliken, George A; Weiss, Mark L

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate effects of simultaneous intra-articular and IV injection of autologous adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joints. ANIMALS 22 client-owned dogs (12 placebo-treated [control] dogs and 10 treated dogs). PROCEDURES Dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joints that caused signs of lameness or discomfort were characterized on the basis of results of orthopedic examination, goniometry, lameness score, the Canine Brief Pain Inventory (CBPI), a visual analogue scale, and results obtained by use of a pressure-sensing walkway at week 0 (baseline). Dogs received a simultaneous intraarticular and IV injection of SVF and PRP or a placebo. Dogs were examined again 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks after injection. RESULTS CBPI scores were significantly lower for the treatment group at week 24, compared with scores for the control group. Mean visual analogue scale score for the treatment group was significantly higher at week 0 than at weeks 4, 8, or 24. Dogs with baseline peak vertical force (PVF) in the lowest 25th percentile were compared, and the treatment group had a significantly higher PVF than did the control group. After the SVF-PRP injection, fewer dogs in the treated group than in the control group had lameness confirmed during examination. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE For dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joints treated with SVF and PRP, improvements in CBPI and PVF were evident at some time points, compared with results for the control group. PMID:27580105

  15. Partial arthroscopic trapeziectomy with ligament reconstruction to treat primary thumb basal joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Desmoineaux, P; Delaroche, C; Beaufils, P

    2012-11-01

    Since the outcome of partial trapeziectomy is not always satisfactory, we proposed using arthroscopy to perform partial trapeziectomy and to perform ligament reconstruction with the abductor pollicis longus tendon. A tendon strip was left intact at its insertion at the base of the first metacarpal and then slipped into the trapeziectomy space. It was fixed into a blind tunnel at the base of the second metacarpal with a bioabsorbable interference screw. Forty-nine patients were surgically treated between 2006 and 2009. With an average follow-up of 3.6 years, 83.5% of patients were satisfied with the procedure; 96% of thumbs were stable and 74% were pain free. The average recovery time was 4.5 months. There were four cases of radial nerve branch irritation and one case of flexor carpi radialis tendinitis; there were no cases of complex regional pain syndrome. This minimally-invasive technique is a less-aggressive treatment approach for thumb carpometacarpal joint arthritis, which simplify postoperative recovery. PMID:23098774

  16. Disease-modifying drugs for knee osteoarthritis: can they be cost-effective?

    PubMed Central

    Losina, Elena; Daigle, Meghan E.; Reichmann, William M.; Suter, Lisa G.; Hunter, David J.; Solomon, Daniel H.; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Jordan, Joanne M.; Burbine, Sara A.; Paltiel, A. David; Katz, Jeffrey N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs (DMOADs) are under development. Our goal was to determine efficacy, toxicity, and cost thresholds under which DMOADs would be a cost-effective knee OA treatment. Design We used the Osteoarthritis Policy Model, a validated computer simulation of knee OA, to compare guideline-concordant care to strategies that insert DMOADs into the care sequence. The guideline-concordant care sequence included conservative pain management, corticosteroid injections, total knee replacement (TKR), and revision TKR. Base case DMOAD characteristics included: 50% chance of suspending progression in the first year (resumption rate of 10% thereafter) and 30% pain relief among those with suspended progression; 0.5%/year risk of major toxicity; and costs of $1,000/year. In sensitivity analyses, we varied suspended progression (20–100%), pain relief (10–100%), major toxicity (0.1–2%), and cost ($1,000–$7,000). Outcomes included costs, quality-adjusted life expectancy, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs), and TKR utilization. Results Base case DMOADs added 4.00 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and $230,000 per 100 persons, with an ICER of $57,500/QALY. DMOADs reduced need for TKR by 15%. Cost-effectiveness was most sensitive to likelihoods of suspended progression and pain relief. DMOADs costing $3,000/year achieved ICERs below $100,000/QALY if the likelihoods of suspended progression and pain relief were 20% and 70%. At a cost of $5,000, these ICERs were attained if the likelihoods of suspended progression and pain relief were both 60%. Conclusions Cost, suspended progression, and pain relief are key drivers of value for DMOADs. Plausible combinations of these factors could reduce need for TKR and satisfy commonly cited cost-effectiveness criteria. PMID:23380251

  17. Increased Chondrocyte Apoptosis Is Associated with Progression of Osteoarthritis in Spontaneous Guinea Pig Models of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zamli, Zaitunnatakhin; Adams, Michael A.; Tarlton, John F.; Sharif, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease characterised by degradation of articular cartilage and bone remodelling. For almost a decade chondrocyte apoptosis has been investigated as a possible mechanism of cartilage damage in OA, but its precise role in initiation and/or progression of OA remains to the determined. The aim of this study is to determine the role of chondrocyte apoptosis in spontaneous animal models of OA. Right tibias from six male Dunkin Hartley (DH) and Bristol Strain 2 (BS2) guinea pigs were collected at 10, 16, 24 and 30 weeks of age. Fresh-frozen sections of tibial epiphysis were microscopically scored for OA, and immunostained with caspase-3 and TUNEL for apoptotic chondrocytes. The DH strain had more pronounced cartilage damage than BS2, especially at 30 weeks. At this time point, the apoptotic chondrocytes were largely confined to the deep zone of articular cartilage (AC) with a greater percentage in the medial side of DH than BS2 (DH: 5.7%, 95% CI: 4.2–7.2), BS2: 4.8%, 95% CI: 3.8–5.8), p > 0.05). DH had a significant progression of chondrocyte death between 24 to 30 weeks during which time significant changes were observed in AC fibrillation, proteoglycan depletion and overall microscopic OA score. A strong correlation (p ≤ 0.01) was found between chondrocyte apoptosis and AC fibrillation (r = 0.3), cellularity (r = 0.4) and overall microscopic OA scores (r = 0.4). Overall, the rate of progression in OA and apoptosis over the study period was greater in the DH (versus BS2) and the medial AC (versus lateral). Chondrocyte apoptosis was higher at the later stage of OA development when the cartilage matrix was hypocellular and highly fibrillated, suggesting that chondrocyte apoptosis is a late event in OA. PMID:23994836

  18. Effectiveness and utility of hyaluronic acid in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Migliore, Alberto; Procopio, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative joint disease characterized by pain and progressive functional limitation. Viscosupplementation with intra-articular hyaluronic acid is a treatment option in knee OA that is included in the professional guidelines for treatment of this joint disease, but potentially should apply to all synovial joints in order to reduce pain and improve joint lubrication. Exogenous HA can enhance chondrocyte HA synthesis, prevent the degradation of cartilage and promote its regeneration. Moreover it can reduce the production of proinflammatory mediators and matrix metalloproteinases involved in OA pathogenesis. This mini review highlights the evidence of hyaluronic acid in reducing osteoarthritis symptoms and structural damage, as well as its ability to delay prosthetic surgery. Viscosupplementation should be considered as a long-term therapy. PMID:26136793

  19. Genetics in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Moreno, Mercedes; Rego, Ignacio; Carreira-Garcia, Vanessa; Blanco, Francisco J

    2008-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative articular disease with complex pathogeny because diverse factors interact causing a process of deterioration of the cartilage. Despite the multifactorial nature of this pathology, from the 50’s it´s known that certain forms of osteoarthritis are related to a strong genetic component. The genetic bases of this disease do not follow the typical patterns of mendelian inheritance and probably they are related to alterations in multiple genes. The identification of a high number of candidate genes to confer susceptibility to the development of the osteoarthritis shows the complex nature of this disease. At the moment, the genetic mechanisms of this disease are not known, however, which seems clear is that expression levels of several genes are altered, and that the inheritance will become a substantial factor in future considerations of diagnosis and treatment of the osteoarthritis. PMID:19516961

  20. Osteoarthritis: new insights. Part 2: treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Felson, D T; Lawrence, R C; Hochberg, M C; McAlindon, T; Dieppe, P A; Minor, M A; Blair, S N; Berman, B M; Fries, J F; Weinberger, M; Lorig, K R; Jacobs, J J; Goldberg, V

    2000-11-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting millions of people in the United States. It is a complex disease whose etiology bridges biomechanics and biochemistry. Evidence is growing for the role of systemic factors, such as genetics, diet, estrogen use, and bone density, and local biomechanical factors, such as muscle weakness, obesity, and joint laxity. These risk factors are particularly important in the weight-bearing joints, and modifying them may help prevent osteoarthritis-related pain and disability. Major advances in management to reduce pain and disability are yielding a panoply of available treatments ranging from nutriceuticals to chondrocyte transplantation, new oral anti-inflammatory medications, and health education. This article is part 2 of a two-part summary of a National Institutes of Health conference that brought together experts in osteoarthritis from diverse backgrounds and provided a multidisciplinary and comprehensive summary of recent advances in the prevention of osteoarthritis onset, progression, and disability. Part 2 focuses on treatment approaches; evidence for the efficacy of commonly used oral therapies is reviewed and information on alternative therapies, including nutriceuticals and acupuncture, is presented. Biomechanical interventions, such as exercise and bracing, and behavioral interventions directed toward enhancing self-management are reviewed. Current surgical approaches are described and probable future biotechnology-oriented approaches to treatment are suggested. PMID:11074906

  1. Vitamin E slows down the progression of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    LI, XI; DONG, ZHONGLI; ZHANG, FUHOU; DONG, JUNJIE; ZHANG, YUAN

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic degenerative joint disorder with the characteristics of articular cartilage destruction, subchondral bone alterations and synovitis. Clinical signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis include pain, stiffness, restricted motion and crepitus. It is the major cause of joint dysfunction in developed nations and has enormous social and economic consequences. Current treatments focus on symptomatic relief, however, they lack efficacy in controlling the progression of this disease, which is a leading cause of disability. Vitamin E is safe to use and may delay the progression of osteoarthritis by acting on several aspects of the disease. In this review, how vitamin E may promote the maintenance of skeletal muscle and the regulation of nucleic acid metabolism to delay osteoarthritis progression is explored. In addition, how vitamin E may maintain the function of sex organs and the stability of mast cells, thus conferring a greater resistance to the underlying disease process is also discussed. Finally, the protective effect of vitamin E on the subchondral vascular system, which decreases the reactive remodeling in osteoarthritis, is reviewed. PMID:27347011

  2. Knee muscle strength correlates with joint cartilage T2 relaxation time in young participants with risk factors for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Macías-Hernández, Salvador Israel; Miranda-Duarte, Antonio; Ramírez-Mora, Isabel; Cortés-González, Socorro; Morones-Alba, Juan Daniel; Olascoaga-Gómez, Andrea; Coronado-Zarco, Roberto; Soria-Bastida, María de Los Angeles; Nava-Bringas, Tania Inés; Cruz-Medina, Eva

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study is to correlate T2 relaxation time (T2RT), measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with quadriceps and hamstring strength in young participants with risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA). A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted with participants between 20 and 40 years of age, without diagnosis of knee OA. Their T2 relaxation time was measured through MRI, and their muscle strength (MS) was measured with an isokinetic dynamometer. Seventy-one participants were recruited, with an average age of 28.3 ± 5.5 years; 39 (55 %) were females. Negative correlations were found between T2RT and quadriceps peak torque (QPT) in males in the femur r = -0.46 (p = 0.01), tibia r = -0.49 (p = 0.02), and patella r = -0.44 (p = 0.01). In women, correlations were found among the femur r = -0.43 (p = 0.01), tibia r = -0.61 (p = 0.01), and patella r = -0.32 (p = 0.05) and among hamstring peak torque (HPT), in the femur r = -0.46 (p = 0.01), hamstring total work (HTW) r = -0.42 (p = 0.03), and tibia r = -0.33 (p = 0.04). Linear regression models showed good capacity to predict T2RT through QPT in both genders. The present study shows that early changes in femoral, tibial, and patellar cartilage are significantly correlated with MS, mainly QPT, and that these early changes might be explained by MS, which could play an important role in pre-clinical phases of the disease. PMID:27334115

  3. Knee osteoarthritis image registration: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galván-Tejada, Jorge I.; Celaya-Padilla, José M.; Treviño, Victor; Tamez-Peña, José G.

    2015-03-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a very common disease, in early stages, changes in joint structures are shown, some of the most common symptoms are; formation of osteophytes, cartilage degradation and joint space reduction, among others. Based on a joint space reduction measurement, Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale, is a very extensive used tool to asses radiological OA knee x-ray images, based on information obtained from these assessments, the objective of this work is to correlate the Kellgren-Lawrence score to the bilateral asymmetry between knees. Using public data from the Osteoarthritis initiative (OAI), a set of images with different Kellgren-Lawrencescores were used to determine a relationship of Kellgren-Lawrence score and the bilateral asymmetry, in order to measure the asymmetry between the knees, the right knee was registered to match the left knee, then a series of similarity metrics, mutual information, correlation, and mean squared error where computed to correlate the deformation (mismatch) of the knees to the Kellgren-Lawrence score. Radiological information was evaluated and scored by OAI radiologist groups. The results of the study suggest an association between Radiological Kellgren-Lawrence score and image registration metrics, mutual information and correlation is higher in the early stages, and mean squared error is higher in advanced stages. This association can be helpful to develop a computer aided grading tool.

  4. Comparison of Venous Thromboembolism after Total Artificial Joint Replacement between Musculoskeletal Tumors and Osteoarthritis of the Knee by a Single Surgeon

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Dong; Zhao, Yiqiong; Shen, Jiakang; Cai, Zhengdong; Hua, Yingqi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare and evaluate the event of VTE (Venous Thromboembolism Event) after total artificial joint replacement between two groups diagnosed with either musculoskeletal tumors or osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. From 2004 to 2014, a total of 1,402 patients (308 in tumor group, 1,094 in OA group) were involved in this study. The rate of asymptomatic DVT (Deep vein thrombosis) was significantly higher in tumor group when compared with OA group. Though both the incidence of symptomatic DVT and PE (Pulmonary embolism) were slightly higher in tumor group, no significant difference was detected. Tumor patients suffered an almost equal risk of VTE compared with OA patients except a higher rate of asymptomatic DVT after total artificial joint replacement. For patients with tumor, no significant association was observed between any potential risk factor and DVT. PMID:27352130

  5. DNA Methylation in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    den Hollander, Wouter; Meulenbelt, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent disease of articular joints and primarily characterized by degradation and calcification of articular cartilage. Presently, no effective treatment other than pain relief exists and patients ultimately need to undergo replacement surgery of the affected joint. During disease progression articular chondrocytes, the single cell type present in articular cartilage, show altered transcriptional profiles and undergo phenotypic changes that resemble the terminal differentiation route apparent in growth plate chondrocytes. Hence, given its prominent function in both regulating gene expression and maintaining cellular phenotypes, DNA methylation of CpG dinucleotides is intensively studied in the context of OA. An increasing number of studies have been published that employed a targeted approach on genes known to play a role in OA pathophysiology. As of such, it has become clear that OA responsive DNA methylation changes seem to mediate disease associated aberrant gene expression. Furthermore, established OA susceptibility alleles such as GDF5 and DIO2 appear to confer OA risk via DNA methylation and respective pathophysiological expression changes. In more recent years, genome wide profiling of DNA methylation in OA affected articular cartilage has emerged as a powerful tool to address the epigenetic changes in their entirety, which has resulted in the identification of putative patient subgroups as well as generic OA associated pathways. PMID:27019616

  6. DNA Methylation in Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    den Hollander, Wouter; Meulenbelt, Ingrid

    2015-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent disease of articular joints and primarily characterized by degradation and calcification of articular cartilage. Presently, no effective treatment other than pain relief exists and patients ultimately need to undergo replacement surgery of the affected joint. During disease progression articular chondrocytes, the single cell type present in articular cartilage, show altered transcriptional profiles and undergo phenotypic changes that resemble the terminal differentiation route apparent in growth plate chondrocytes. Hence, given its prominent function in both regulating gene expression and maintaining cellular phenotypes, DNA methylation of CpG dinucleotides is intensively studied in the context of OA. An increasing number of studies have been published that employed a targeted approach on genes known to play a role in OA pathophysiology. As of such, it has become clear that OA responsive DNA methylation changes seem to mediate disease associated aberrant gene expression. Furthermore, established OA susceptibility alleles such as GDF5 and DIO2 appear to confer OA risk via DNA methylation and respective pathophysiological expression changes. In more recent years, genome wide profiling of DNA methylation in OA affected articular cartilage has emerged as a powerful tool to address the epigenetic changes in their entirety, which has resulted in the identification of putative patient subgroups as well as generic OA associated pathways. PMID:27019616

  7. Managing Osteoarthritis Pain with Medicines: A Review of the Research for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... a> Consumer Summary – Feb. 15, 2012 Managing Osteoarthritis Pain With Medicines: A Review of the Research for ... or have injured a joint. Why manage the pain of osteoarthritis? Osteoarthritis can be very painful and ...

  8. Emerging patterns in wrist osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Oron, Amir; Wollstein, Ronit

    2014-01-01

    The human wrist is a composite joint which incorporates multiple smaller joints. The biomechanics of the wrist are dependent on its bony structure but also on the ligamentous constitution of its joints. This increases the complexity of the joint and reduces our ability to understand its anatomy, mechanics and pathology. Therefore, our understanding and treatment of osteoarthritis in the wrist lags behind that of other joints in the body such as the knee. We discuss some of the recent directions in the comprehension and treatment of wrist osteoarthritis. PMID:25599683

  9. What's new in osteoarthritis pathogenesis?

    PubMed

    Jones, G

    2016-02-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading musculoskeletal cause of disability in the Western society. Despite this, it is still difficult to gain a precise definition of what osteoarthritis actually is. The methods used for the study are narrative review and viewpoint focussing on the knee. It is well known that there is a modest correlation between X-ray changes and pain. Improvements in imaging have shown that osteoarthritis should be regarded as an umbrella term for a number of pathophysiological processes leading to pain and/or cartilage loss. If these are inside the joint (such as bone marrow lesions, cartilage defects or meniscal tear) then they can be considered osteoarthritis, while those outside the joint (such as obesity, weak muscles and vitamin D deficiency) could be considered the osteoarthritis syndrome. These improvements in basic science are leading to lesion-specific therapies indicating the importance of trying to pinpoint causes of pain in the individual. PMID:26899891

  10. Joint aging and chondrocyte cell death

    PubMed Central

    Grogan, Shawn P; D’Lima, Darryl D

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage extracellular matrix and cell function change with age and are considered to be the most important factors in the development and progression of osteoarthritis. The multifaceted nature of joint disease indicates that the contribution of cell death can be an important factor at early and late stages of osteoarthritis. Therefore, the pharmacologic inhibition of cell death is likely to be clinically valuable at any stage of the disease. In this article, we will discuss the close association between diverse changes in cartilage aging, how altered conditions influence chondrocyte death, and the implications of preventing cell loss to retard osteoarthritis progression and preserve tissue homeostasis. PMID:20671988

  11. [Pathobiochemistry of joint destruction in inflammatory and degenerative joint diseases].

    PubMed

    Greiling, H; Kleesiek, K; Reinards, R

    1987-08-01

    While the biochemical mechanism which leads to the destruction of joints in the course of degenerative and inflammatory arthropathies has not been cleared up completely to this day, basic differences have been noted in the way the two types of arthropathy affect the articular cartilage. The differences are described from the viewpoint of pathobiochemistry as they are fundamental to causal therapy. PMID:3314203

  12. Altered Frontal and Transverse Plane Tibiofemoral Kinematics and Patellofemoral Malalignments During Downhill Gait in Patients with Mixed Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Meholic, Brad; Chuang, Wei-Neng; Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Tashman, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Patients with knee osteoarthritis often present with signs of mixed tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joint disease. It has been suggested that altered frontal and transverse plane knee joint mechanics play a key role in compartment-specific patterns of knee osteoarthritis, but invivo evidence in support of this premise remains limited. Using Dynamic Stereo X-ray techniques, the aim of this study was to compare the frontal and transverse plane tibiofemoral kinematics and patellofemoral malalignments during the loading response phase of downhill gait in three groups of older adults: patients with medial tibiofemoral compartment and coexisting patellofemoral osteoarthritis (n=11); patients with lateral tibiofemoral compartment and coexisting patellofemoral osteoarthritis (n=10); and an osteoarthritis-free control group (n=22). Patients with lateral compartment osteoarthritis walked with greater and increasing degrees of tibiofemoral abduction compared to the medial compartment osteoarthritis and the control groups who walked with increasing degrees of tibiofemoral adduction. Additionally, the medial and lateral compartment osteoarthritis groups demonstrated reduced degrees of tibiofemoral internal rotation compared to the control group. Both medial and lateral compartment osteoarthritis groups also walked with increasing degrees of lateral patella tilt and medial patella translation during the loading response phase of downhill gait. Our findings suggest that despite the differences in frontal and transverse plane tibiofemoral kinematics between patients with medial and lateral compartment osteoarthritis, the malalignments of their arthritic patellofemoral joint appears to be similar. Further research is needed to determine if these kinematic variations are relevant targets for interventions to reduce pain and disease progression in patients with mixed disease. PMID:26087880

  13. Treating Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... osteotomy may need knee replacement surgery in the future. Arthroplasty is also called joint or knee replacement therapy. A surgeon removes the part of the knee damaged by osteoarthritis and replaces it with an artificial joint made from metals and plastic. All or part of the knee joint may ...

  14. Epigenetics and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingcai; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of joint disease and the leading cause of chronic disability in middle-aged and older populations. The development of disease-modifying therapy for OA currently faces major obstacles largely because the regulatory mechanisms for the function of joint tissue cells remain unclear. Previous studies have found that the alterations in gene expression of specific transcription factors (TFs), pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokines, matrix proteinases and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in articular cartilage may be involved in the development of OA. However, the regulatory mechanisms for the expression of those genes in OA chondrocytes are largely unknown. The recent advances in epigenetic studies have shed lights on the importance of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the development of OA. In this review, we summarize and discuss the recent studies on the regulatory roles of various epigenetic mechanisms in the expression of genes for specific TFs, cytokines, ECM proteins and matrix proteinases, as well the significance of these epigenetic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of OA. PMID:25961070

  15. Biomarkers of (osteo)arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mobasheri, Ali; Henrotin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Arthritic diseases are a major cause of disability and morbidity, and cause an enormous burden for health and social care systems globally. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis. The key risk factors for the development of OA are age, obesity, joint trauma or instability. Metabolic and endocrine diseases can also contribute to the pathogenesis of OA. There is accumulating evidence to suggest that OA is a whole-organ disease that is influenced by systemic mediators, inflammaging, innate immunity and the low-grade inflammation induced by metabolic syndrome. Although all joint tissues are implicated in disease progression in OA, articular cartilage has received the most attention in the context of aging, injury and disease. There is increasing emphasis on the early detection of OA as it has the capacity to target and treat the disease more effectively. Indeed it has been suggested that this is the era of “personalized prevention” for OA. However, the development of strategies for the prevention of OA require new and sensitive biomarker tools that can detect the disease in its molecular and pre-radiographic stage, before structural and functional alterations in cartilage integrity have occurred. There is also evidence to support a role for biomarkers in OA drug discovery, specifically the development of disease modifying osteoarthritis drugs. This Special Issue of Biomarkers is dedicated to recent progress in the field of OA biomarkers. The papers in this Special Issue review the current state-of-the-art and discuss the utility of OA biomarkers as diagnostic and prognostic tools. PMID:26954784

  16. Biomarkers of (osteo)arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mobasheri, Ali; Henrotin, Yves

    2015-12-01

    Arthritic diseases are a major cause of disability and morbidity, and cause an enormous burden for health and social care systems globally. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis. The key risk factors for the development of OA are age, obesity, joint trauma or instability. Metabolic and endocrine diseases can also contribute to the pathogenesis of OA. There is accumulating evidence to suggest that OA is a whole-organ disease that is influenced by systemic mediators, inflammaging, innate immunity and the low-grade inflammation induced by metabolic syndrome. Although all joint tissues are implicated in disease progression in OA, articular cartilage has received the most attention in the context of aging, injury and disease. There is increasing emphasis on the early detection of OA as it has the capacity to target and treat the disease more effectively. Indeed it has been suggested that this is the era of "personalized prevention" for OA. However, the development of strategies for the prevention of OA require new and sensitive biomarker tools that can detect the disease in its molecular and pre-radiographic stage, before structural and functional alterations in cartilage integrity have occurred. There is also evidence to support a role for biomarkers in OA drug discovery, specifically the development of disease modifying osteoarthritis drugs. This Special Issue of Biomarkers is dedicated to recent progress in the field of OA biomarkers. The papers in this Special Issue review the current state-of-the-art and discuss the utility of OA biomarkers as diagnostic and prognostic tools. PMID:26954784

  17. HIP osteoarthritis and work.

    PubMed

    Harris, E Clare; Coggon, David

    2015-06-01

    Epidemiological evidence points strongly to a hazard of hip osteoarthritis from heavy manual work. Harmful exposures may be reduced by the elimination or redesign of processes and the use of mechanical aids. Reducing obesity might help to protect workers whose need to perform heavy lifting cannot be eliminated. Particularly high relative risks have been reported in farmers, and hip osteoarthritis is a prescribed occupational disease in the UK for long-term employees in agriculture. Even where it is not attributable to employment, hip osteoarthritis impacts importantly on the capacity to work. Factors that may influence work participation include the severity of disease, the physical demands of the job, age and the size of the employer. Published research does not provide a strong guide to the timing of return to work following hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, and it is unclear whether patients should avoid heavy manual tasks in their future employment. PMID:26612242

  18. HIP OSTEOARTHRITIS AND WORK

    PubMed Central

    Harris, E Clare; Coggon, David

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence points strongly to a hazard of hip osteoarthritis from heavy manual work. Harmful exposures may be reduced by elimination or redesign of processes and use of mechanical aids. Reducing obesity might help to protect workers whose need to perform heavy lifting cannot be eliminated. Particularly high relative risks have been reported in farmers, and hip osteoarthritis is a prescribed occupational disease in the UK for long-term employees in agriculture. Even where it is not attributable to employment, hip osteoarthritis impacts importantly on capacity to work. Factors that may influence work participation include the severity of disease, the physical demands of the job, age, and the size of the employer. Published research does not provide a strong guide to the timing of return to work following hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, and it is unclear whether patients should avoid heavy manual tasks in their future employment. PMID:26612242

  19. Disordered glycometabolism involved in pathogenesis of Kashin–Beck disease, an endemic osteoarthritis in China

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Cuiyan; Lei, Ronghui; Tiainen, Mika; Wu, Shixun; Zhang, Qiang; Pei, Fuxing; Guo, Xiong

    2014-08-15

    Kashin–Beck disease (KBD) is a chronic endemic osteoarthritis in China. Previous studies have suggested a role of metabolic dysfunction in causation of this disease. In this investigation, the metabolomics approach and cell experiments were used to discover the metabolic changes and their effects on KBD chondrocytes. Nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR) spectroscopy was used to examine serum samples from both the KBD patients and normal controls. The pattern recognition multivariate analysis (OSC–PLS) and quantitative analysis (QMTLS iterator) revealed altered glycometabolism in KBD, with increased glucose and decreased lactate and citrate levels. IPA biological analysis showed the centric location of glucose in the metabolic network. Massive glycogen deposits in chondrocytes and increased uptake of glucose by chondrocytes further confirmed disordered glycometabolism in KBD. An in vitro study showed the effects of disordered glycometabolism in chondrocytes. When chondrocytes were treated with high glucose, expression of type II collagen and aggrecan were decreased, while TNF-α expression, the level of cellular reactive oxygen species and cell apoptosis rates all were increased. Therefore, our results demonstrated that disordered glycometabolism in patients with KBD was linked to the damage of chondrocytes. This may provide a new basis for understanding the pathogenesis of KBD. - Highlights: • Disordered glycometabolism in KBD was demonstrated by combining serum metabolomics and chondrocyte studies. • Glucose and TNF-α were key molecules linked to altered metabolism and inflammation in the pathophysiology of KBD. • The glycometabolism disorder was linked to expression of type II collagen and aggrecan, ROS and apoptosis of KBD chondrocytes.

  20. Therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cell based therapy for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Burke, John; Hunter, Monte; Kolhe, Ravindra; Isales, Carlos; Hamrick, Mark; Fulzele, Sadanand

    2016-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative disease affecting articular cartilage in joints, and it is a leading cause of disability in the United States. Current pharmacological treatment strategies are ineffective to prevent the OA progression; however, cellular therapies have the potential to regenerate the lost cartilage, combat cartilage degeneration, provide pain relief, and improve patient mobility. One of the most promising sources of cellular regenerative medicine is from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSCs can be isolated from adipose tissue, bone marrow, synovial tissue, and other sources. The aim of this review is to compile recent advancement in cellular based therapy more specifically in relation to MSCs in the treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:27510262

  1. Long term evaluation of disease progression through the quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis patients: correlation with clinical symptoms and radiographic changes

    PubMed Central

    Raynauld, Jean-Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Berthiaume, Marie-Josée; Beaudoin, Gilles; Choquette, Denis; Haraoui, Boulos; Tannenbaum, Hyman; Meyer, Joan M; Beary, John F; Cline, Gary A; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to further explore the cartilage volume changes in knee osteoarthritis (OA) over time using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI). These were correlated with demographic, clinical, and radiological data to better identify the disease risk features. We selected 107 patients from a large trial (n = 1,232) evaluating the effect of a bisphosphonate on OA knees. The MRI acquisitions of the knee were done at baseline, 12, and 24 months. Cartilage volume from the global, medial, and lateral compartments was quantified. The changes were contrasted with clinical data and other MRI anatomical features. Knee OA cartilage volume losses were statistically significant compared to baseline values: -3.7 ± 3.0% for global cartilage and -5.5 ± 4.3% for the medial compartment at 12 months, and -5.7 ± 4.4% and -8.3 ± 6.5%, respectively, at 24 months. Three different populations were identified according to cartilage volume loss: fast (n = 11; -13.2%), intermediate (n = 48; -7.2%), and slow (n = 48; -2.3%) progressors. The predictors of fast progressors were the presence of severe meniscal extrusion (p = 0.001), severe medial tear (p = 0.005), medial and/or lateral bone edema (p = 0.03), high body mass index (p < 0.05, fast versus slow), weight (p < 0.05, fast versus slow) and age (p < 0.05 fast versus slow). The loss of cartilage volume was also slightly associated with less knee pain. No association was found with other Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores, joint space width, or urine biomarker levels. Meniscal damage and bone edema are closely associated with more cartilage volume loss. These data confirm the significant advantage of qMRI for reliably measuring knee structural changes at as early as 12 months, and for identifying risk factors associated with OA progression. PMID:16507119

  2. Knee Joint Distraction Compared to Total Knee Arthroplasty for Treatment of End Stage Osteoarthritis: Simulating Long-Term Outcomes and Cost-Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    van der Woude, J. A. D.; Nair, S. C.; Custers, R. J. H.; van Laar, J. M.; Kuchuck, N. O.; Lafeber, F. P. J. G.; Welsing, P. M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective In end-stage knee osteoarthritis the treatment of choice is total knee arthroplasty (TKA). An alternative treatment is knee joint distraction (KJD), suggested to postpone TKA. Several studies reported significant and prolonged clinical improvement of KJD. To make an appropriate decision regarding the position of this treatment, a cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis from healthcare perspective for different age and gender categories was performed. Methods A treatment strategy starting with TKA and a strategy starting with KJD for patients of different age and gender was simulated. To extrapolate outcomes to long-term health and economic outcomes a Markov (Health state) model was used. The number of surgeries, QALYs, and treatment costs per strategy were calculated. Costs-effectiveness is expressed using the cost-effectiveness plane and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Results Starting with KJD the number of knee replacing procedures could be reduced, most clearly in the younger age categories; especially revision surgery. This resulted in the KJD strategy being dominant (more effective with cost-savings) in about 80% of simulations (with only inferiority in about 1%) in these age categories when compared to TKA. At a willingness to pay of 20.000 Euro per QALY gained, the probability of starting with KJD to be cost-effective compared to starting with a TKA was already found to be over 75% for all age categories and over 90–95% for the younger age categories. Conclusion A treatment strategy starting with knee joint distraction for knee osteoarthritis has a large potential for being a cost-effective intervention, especially for the relatively young patient. PMID:27171268

  3. Articular chondrocyte metabolism and osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Leipold, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    The three main objectives of this study were: (1) to determine if depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage matrix that occurs during osteoarthritis causes a measurable increase of cartilage proteoglycan components in the synovial fluid and sera, (2) to observe what effect intracellular cAMP has on the expression of matrix components by chondrocytes, and (3) to determine if freshly isolated chondrocytes contain detectable levels of mRNA for fibronectin. Canine serum keratan sulfate and hyaluronate were measured to determine if there was an elevation of these serum glycosaminoglycans in a canine model of osteoarthritis. A single intra-articular injection of chymopapain into a shoulder joint increased serum keratan sulfate 10 fold and hyaluronate less than 2 fold in 24 hours. Keratan sulfate concentrations in synovial fluids of dogs about one year old were unrelated to the presence of spontaneous cartilage degeneration in the joints. High keratan sulfate in synovial fluids correlated with higher keratan sulfate in serum. The mean keratan sulfate concentration in sera of older dogs with osteoarthritis was 37% higher than disease-free controls, but the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. Treatment of chondrocytes with 0.5 millimolar (mM) dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) caused the cells to adopt a more rounded morphology. There was no difference between the amount of proteins synthesized by cultures treated with DBcAMP and controls. The amount of fibronectin (FN) in the media of DBcAMP treated cultures detected by an ELISA was specifically reduced, and the amount of {sup 35}S-FN purified by gelatin affinity chromatography decreased. Moreover, the percentage of FN containing the extra domain. A sequence was reduced. Concomitant with the decrease in FN there was an increase in the concentration of keratan sulfate.

  4. Role of Vitamin D in Osteoarthritis: Molecular, Cellular, and Clinical Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mabey, Thomas; Honsawek, Sittisak

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a debilitating and degenerative disease which affects millions of people worldwide. The causes and mechanisms of osteoarthritis remain to be fully understood. Vitamin D has been hypothesised to play essential roles in a number of diseases including osteoarthritis. Many cell types within osteoarthritic joints appear to experience negative effects often at increased sensitivity to vitamin D. These findings contrast clinical research which has identified vitamin D deficiency to have a worryingly high prevalence among osteoarthritis patients. Randomised-controlled trial is considered to be the most rigorous way of determining the effects of vitamin D supplementation on the development of osteoarthritis. Studies into the effects of low vitamin D levels on pain and joint function have to date yielded controversial results. Due to the apparent conflicting effects of vitamin D in knee osteoarthritis, further research is required to fully elucidate its role in the development and progression of the disease as well as assess the efficacy and safety of vitamin D supplementation as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:26229532

  5. Efficacy and Safety of Zhuanggu Joint Capsules in Combination with Celecoxib in Knee Osteoarthritis: A Multi-center, Randomized, Double-blind, Double-dummy, and Parallel Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xian-Long; Yang, Jing; Yang, Liu; Liu, Jian-Guo; Cai, Xin-Yu; Fan, Wei-Ming; Yun, Xue-Qing; Ma, Jin-Zhong; Weng, Xi-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is a chronic joint disease that manifests as knee pain as well as different degrees of lower limb swelling, stiffness, and movement disorders. The therapeutic goal is to alleviate or eliminate pain, correct deformities, improve or restore joint functions, and improve the quality of life. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Zhuanggu joint capsules combined with celecoxib and the benefit of treatment with Zhuanggu alone for KOA. Methods: This multi-center, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, parallel controlled trial, started from December 2011 to May 2014, was carried out in 6 cities, including Beijing, Shanghai, Chongqing, Changchun, Chengdu, and Nanjing. A total of 432 patients with KOA were divided into three groups (144 cases in each group). The groups were treated, respectively, with Zhuanggu joint capsules combined with celecoxib capsule simulants, Zhuanggu joint capsules combined with celecoxib capsules, and celecoxib capsules combined with Zhuanggu joint capsule simulants for 4 weeks consecutively. The improvement of Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) index and the decreased rates in each dimension of WOMAC were evaluated before and after the treatment. Intergroup and intragroup comparisons of quantitative indices were performed. Statistically significant differences were evaluated with pairwise comparisons using Chi-square test (or Fisher's exact test) and an inspection level of α = 0.0167. Results: Four weeks after treatment, the total efficacies of Zhuanggu group, combination group, and celecoxib group were 65%, 80%, and 64%, respectively, with statistically significant differences among the three groups (P = 0.005). Intergroup pairwise comparisons showed that the total efficacy of the combination group was significantly higher than that of the Zhuanggu (P = 0.005) and celecoxib (P = 0.003) groups. The difference between the latter two groups was not statistically

  6. [Osteoarthritis of the thumb and fingers].

    PubMed

    Waris, Eero; Waris, Ville; Konttinen, Yrjö T

    2012-01-01

    Most commonly affected joints of the hand in osteoarthritis include the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb (CMC 1) and the distal (DIP) and proximal (PIP) interphalangeal joints. Ageing, female gender, genotype, heavy work causing pressure on the hands, and injuries predispose to osteoarthritis in the hand. The pain is likely to be due to secondary synovitis caused by molecules released from the joint cartilage. Initial treatment of osteoarthritis is always conservative: analgesic medication, splint and physiotherapy. Surgery is considered for severe symptoms. The most common procedures include arthrodeses and arthroplasties with autogenous grafts or implants. PMID:22448556

  7. The Content of the 14 Metals in Cancellous and Cortical Bone of the Hip Joint Affected by Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Dąbrowski, Mikołaj; Kowalski, Artur; Rogala, Piotr; Strzyżewski, Wojciech; Łabędź, Wojciech; Uklejewski, Ryszard; Novotny, Karel; Kanicky, Viktor; Frankowski, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the content of particular elements Ca, Mg, P, Na, K, Zn, Cu, Fe, Mo, Cr, Ni, Ba, Sr, and Pb in the proximal femur bone tissue (cancellous and cortical bone) of 96 patients undergoing total hip replacement for osteoarthritis using ICP-AES and FAAS analytical techniques. The interdependencies among these elements and their correlations depended on factors including age, gender, place of residence, tobacco consumption, alcohol consumption, exposure to environmental pollution, physical activity, and type of degenerative change which were examined by statistical and chemometric methods. The factors that exerted the greatest influence on the elements in the femoral head and neck were tobacco smoking (higher Cr and Ni content in smokers), alcohol consumption (higher concentrations of Ni, Cu in people who consume alcohol), and gender (higher Cu, Zn, and Ni concentrations in men). The factors influencing Pb accumulation in bone tissue were tobacco, alcohol, gender, and age. In primary and secondary osteoarthritis of the hip, the content and interactions of elements are different (mainly those of Fe and Pb). There were no significant differences in the concentrations of elements in the femoral head and neck that could be attributed to residence or physical activity. PMID:26357659

  8. The Content of the 14 Metals in Cancellous and Cortical Bone of the Hip Joint Affected by Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Dąbrowski, Mikołaj; Kowalski, Artur; Rogala, Piotr; Strzyżewski, Wojciech; Łabędź, Wojciech; Uklejewski, Ryszard; Novotny, Karel; Kanicky, Viktor; Frankowski, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the content of particular elements Ca, Mg, P, Na, K, Zn, Cu, Fe, Mo, Cr, Ni, Ba, Sr, and Pb in the proximal femur bone tissue (cancellous and cortical bone) of 96 patients undergoing total hip replacement for osteoarthritis using ICP-AES and FAAS analytical techniques. The interdependencies among these elements and their correlations depended on factors including age, gender, place of residence, tobacco consumption, alcohol consumption, exposure to environmental pollution, physical activity, and type of degenerative change which were examined by statistical and chemometric methods. The factors that exerted the greatest influence on the elements in the femoral head and neck were tobacco smoking (higher Cr and Ni content in smokers), alcohol consumption (higher concentrations of Ni, Cu in people who consume alcohol), and gender (higher Cu, Zn, and Ni concentrations in men). The factors influencing Pb accumulation in bone tissue were tobacco, alcohol, gender, and age. In primary and secondary osteoarthritis of the hip, the content and interactions of elements are different (mainly those of Fe and Pb). There were no significant differences in the concentrations of elements in the femoral head and neck that could be attributed to residence or physical activity. PMID:26357659

  9. Recognition of Immune Response for the Early Diagnosis and Treatment of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kandahari, Adrese M.; Yang, Xinlin; Dighe, Abhijit S.; Pan, Dongfeng; Cui, Quanjun

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common and debilitating joint disease that affects up to 30 million Americans, leading to significant disability, reduction in quality of life, and costing the United States tens of billions of dollars annually. Classically, osteoarthritis has been characterized as a degenerative, wear-and-tear disease, but recent research has identified it as an immunopathological disease on a spectrum between healthy condition and rheumatoid arthritis. A systematic literature review demonstrates that the disease pathogenesis is driven by an early innate immune response which progressively catalyzes degenerative changes that ultimately lead to an altered joint microenvironment. It is feasible to detect this infiltration of cells in the early, and presumably asymptomatic, phase of the disease through noninvasive imaging techniques. This screening can serve to aid clinicians in potentially identifying high-risk patients, hopefully leading to early effective management, vast improvements in quality of life, and significant reductions in disability, morbidity, and cost related to osteoarthritis. Although the diagnosis and treatment of osteoarthritis routinely utilize both invasive and non-invasive strategies, imaging techniques specific to inflammatory cells are not commonly employed for these purposes. This review discusses this paradigm and aims to shift the focus of future osteoarthritis-related research towards early diagnosis of the disease process. PMID:26064995

  10. Physical activity at leisure and risk of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, N E

    1996-01-01

    A summary of the evidence linking exercise and osteoarthritis is given in the table. In summary, normal joints appear to tolerate prolonged vigorous low impact exercise without accelerated development of osteoarthritis. The risk of developing osteoarthritis appears to be increased in sporting activities that continually expose normal joints to high levels of impact or torsional loading and in individuals who continue sporting activities after they have injured supporting structures in the joint (like ligaments, tendons, and menisci). The hypothesis that high impact loads to joints over time will accelerate the development of osteoarthritis in exposed joints must now be examined in a longitudinal study. PMID:8882151

  11. Demographic and clinical factors associated with radiographic severity of first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis: cross-sectional findings from the Clinical Assessment Study of the Foot

    PubMed Central

    Menz, H.B.; Roddy, E.; Marshall, M.; Thomas, M.J.; Rathod, T.; Myers, H.; Thomas, E.; Peat, G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To explore demographic and clinical factors associated with radiographic severity of first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis (OA) (First MTPJ OA). Design Adults aged ≥50 years registered with four general practices were mailed a Health Survey. Responders reporting foot pain within the last 12 months were invited to undergo a clinical assessment and weight-bearing dorso-plantar and lateral radiographs of both feet. Radiographic first MTPJ OA in the most severely affected foot was graded into four categories using a validated atlas. Differences in selected demographic and clinical factors were explored across the four radiographic severity subgroups using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and ordinal regression. Results Clinical and radiographic data were available from 517 participants, categorised as having no (n = 105), mild (n = 228), moderate (n = 122) or severe (n = 62) first MTPJ OA. Increased radiographic severity was associated with older age and lower educational attainment. After adjusting for age, increased radiographic first MTPJ OA severity was significantly associated with an increased prevalence of dorsal hallux and first MTPJ pain, hallux valgus, first interphalangeal joint (IPJ) hyperextension, keratotic lesions on the dorsal aspect of the hallux and first MTPJ, decreased first MTPJ dorsiflexion, ankle/subtalar joint eversion and ankle joint dorsiflexion range of motion, and a trend towards a more pronated foot posture. Conclusions This cross-sectional study has identified several dose–response associations between radiographic severity of first MTPJ OA and a range of demographic and clinical factors. These findings highlight the progressive nature of first MTPJ OA and provide insights into the spectrum of presentation of the condition in clinical practice. PMID:25450852

  12. Arthritis at the shoulder joint.

    PubMed

    Sankaye, Prashant; Ostlere, Simon

    2015-07-01

    The shoulder is a complex joint with numerous structures contributing to mobility and stability. Shoulder pain is a common clinical complaint that may be due to a wide spectrum of disorders including rotator cuff disease, instability, and arthropathy. Primary osteoarthritis of the shoulder joint is uncommon because it is a non-weight-bearing joint. Significant osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint is unusual in the absence of trauma, and the detection of advanced degenerative changes in patients without a known history of trauma should alert the clinician to search for other disorders. This article reviews the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and key imaging findings of the common categories of the arthritis affecting the glenohumeral joint. PMID:26021591

  13. Association between Wnt inhibitory factor-1 expression levels in articular cartilage and the disease severity of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    GAO, SHU-GUANG; ZENG, CHAO; LIU, JUN-JIE; TIAN, JIAN; CHENG, CHAO; ZHANG, FANG-JIE; XIONG, YI-LIN; PAN, DING; XIAO, YONG-BING; LEI, GUANG-HUA

    2016-01-01

    Wnt inhibitory factor (WIF)-1 is a potent extracellular Wnt antagonist which may be used as a potential molecular therapy for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Although previous studies have demonstrated that WIF-1 has a protective role in experimental studies of arthritis, its role in the various disease grades of osteoarthritis (OA) remains unclear. A total of 40 patients with various stages of primary OA of the knee and 10 control subjects were enrolled in the present study. Articular cartilage specimens were harvested from subjects following total knee arthroplasty or knee above amputation. Disease severity was determined according to Modified Mankin score and cartilage tissues were ascribed to four groups: Normal, mild, moderate and severe lesions. WIF-1 expression levels in articular cartilage were measured using immunohistochemical techniques. WIF-1 expression levels were detected in all cartilage tissues. As compared with the controls, patients with OA exhibited significantly decreased WIF-1 expression levels in the articular cartilage (0.19±0.05 vs. 0.26±0.04; P<0.01). Furthermore, articular cartilage WIF-1 expression levels in the moderate and severe lesion groups were significantly reduced, as compared with the controls (P<0.01) and mild lesion group (P<0.05). Subsequent analysis demonstrated that articular cartilage WIF-1 expression levels were negatively correlated with the severity of disease (r=−0.896, P<0.001). In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that WIF-1 expression levels in articular cartilage may be negatively associated with progressive joint damage in patients with OA of the knee; therefore, WIF-1 expression may be a potential indictor for monitoring OA disease severity. PMID:27073457

  14. The relation of MRI-detected structural damage in the medial and lateral patellofemoral joint to knee pain: The Multicenter and Framingham Osteoarthritis Studies

    PubMed Central

    Stefanik, Joshua J.; Gross, K. Douglas; Guermazi, Ali; Felson, David T.; Roemer, Frank W.; Zhang, Yuquing; Niu, Jingbo; Segal, Neil A.; Lewis, Cora E.; Nevitt, Michael; Neogi, Tuhina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the relation of cartilage loss and bone marrow lesions (BMLs) in the medial and lateral patellofemoral joint (PFJ) to knee pain. Methods We categorized the location of full-thickness cartilage loss and BMLs in the PFJ on knee MRIs from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis (MOST) and Framingham Osteoarthritis (FOA) Studies as no damage, isolated medial, isolated lateral, or both medial and lateral (mixed). We determined the relation of MRI lesions in each PFJ region to prevalent knee pain. Differences in knee pain severity were compared among categories of PFJ full-thickness cartilage loss and BMLs using quantile regression. Results In MOST (n=1137 knees), compared with knees without full-thickness cartilage loss, knees with isolated lateral or mixed PFJ full-thickness cartilage loss had 1.9 (1.3, 2.8) and 1.9 (1.2, 2.9) times the odds of knee pain, respectively, while isolated medial cartilage loss had no association with knee pain.. BMLs in both the medial and lateral PFJ had 1.5 (1.1, 2.0) times the odds of knee pain compared with knees without BMLs. Knee pain severity was lowest in knees with isolated medial PFJ cartilage loss or BMLs. In FOA (n=934 knees), neither isolated medial nor lateral cartilage loss was associated with knee pain, whereas isolated BMLs in either region were associated with pain. Conclusions Results were not completely concordant but suggest that knee pain risk and severity is greatest with cartilage loss isolated to (MOST) or inclusive of (MOST and FOA) the lateral PFJ. While BMLs in either the medial or lateral PFJ are related to pain. PMID:25575967

  15. Early and stable upregulation of collagen type II, collagen type I and YKL40 expression levels in cartilage during early experimental osteoarthritis occurs independent of joint location and histological grading

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Helga; Wenz, Wolfram; Ivancic, Mate; Steck, Eric; Richter, Wiltrud

    2005-01-01

    While morphologic and biochemical aspects of degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis [OA]) have been elucidated by numerous studies, the molecular mechanisms underlying the progressive loss of articular cartilage during OA development remain largely unknown. The main focus of the present study was to gain more insight into molecular changes during the very early stages of mechanically induced cartilage degeneration and to relate molecular alterations to histological changes at distinct localizations of the joint. Studies on human articular cartilage are hampered by the difficulty of obtaining normal tissue and early-stage OA tissue, and they allow no progressive follow-up. An experimental OA model in dogs with a slow natural history of OA (Pond–Nuki model) was therefore chosen. Anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) was performed on 24 skeletally mature dogs to induce joint instability resulting in OA. Samples were taken from different joint areas after 6, 12, 24 and 48 weeks, and gene expression levels of common cartilage molecules were quantified in relation to the histological grading (modified Mankin score) of adjacent tissue. Histological changes reflected early progressive degenerative OA. Soon after ACLT, chondrocytes responded to the altered mechanical conditions by significant and stable elevation of collagen type II, collagen type I and YKL40 expression, which persisted throughout the study. In contrast to the mild to moderate histological alterations, these molecular changes were not progressive and were independent of the joint localization (tibia, femur, lateral, medial) and the extent of matrix degeneration. MMP13 remained unaltered until 24 weeks, and aggrecan and tenascinC remained unaltered until 48 weeks after ACLT. These findings indicate that elevated collagen type II, collagen type I and YKL40 mRNA expression levels are early and sensitive measures of ACLT-induced joint instability independent of a certain grade of morphological

  16. Trapeziectomy and tendon suspension with or without a mitek anchor fixation in the thumb basal joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Nordback, S; Erba, P; Wehrli, L; Raffoul, W; Egloff, D V

    2012-09-01

    Partial trapeziectomy with suspension ligamentoplasty is a commonly performed treatment of thumb osteoarthritis. Nevertheless, the post-operative recovery remains long and critical reason for which different modifications of the surgical technique have been proposed. To compare two suspension ligamentoplasty techniques, one with a mitek anchor and another without, a retrospective study of 55 consecutive operated patients was performed. A detailed clinical analysis of pain, function and a radiologic assessment of the trapeziometacarpal space were performed. Mitek anchor fixation was associated with a shorter convalescence period. However, in spite of an improved radiological maintenance of the scaphometacarpal space, mitek anchor fixation was associated with an impaired postoperative function and residual pain when compared with the conventional suspension ligamentoplasty procedure. Patient's satisfaction was comparable in both groups. In our series stabilization of the suspension ligamentoplasty procedure by the insertion of a mitek anchor did not bring the hoped benefits to the patients with a trapeziometacarpal arthritis. PMID:22415426

  17. Innate Immunity Sensors Participating in Pathophysiology of Joint Diseases: A Brief Overview

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Jiri; Raska, Milan; Konttinen, Yrjö T.; Nich, Christophe; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system consists of functionally specialized “modules” that are activated in response to a particular set of stimuli via sensors located on the surface or inside the tissue cells. These cells screen tissues for a wide range of exogenous and endogenous danger/damage-induced signals with the aim to reject or tolerate them and maintain tissue integrity. In this line of thinking, inflammation evolved as an adaptive tool for restoring tissue homeostasis. A number of diseases are mediated by a maladaptation of the innate immune response, perpetuating chronic inflammation and tissue damage. Here, we review recent evidence on the cross talk between innate immune sensors and development of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and aseptic loosening of total joint replacements. In relation to the latter topic, there is a growing body of evidence that aseptic loosening and periprosthetic osteolysis results from long-term maladaptation of periprosthetic tissues to the presence of by-products continuously released from an artificial joint. PMID:25747032

  18. Evidence of changes to skeletal muscle contractile properties during the initiation of disease in the ageing guinea pig model of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disorder in the world and represents the leading cause of pain and disability in the elderly population. Advancing age remains the single greatest risk factor for OA. Several studies have characterised disease development in the guinea pig ageing model of OA in terms of its joint histopathology and inflammatory cytokine profile. However, the quadriceps muscle has yet to be studied in relation to age-related disease onset or early disease progression. Therefore, we examined whether the initiation of OA in the Dunkin Hartley guinea pig is associated with changes in the quadriceps skeletal muscle. Male Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs (N = 24) were group housed with free access to standard guinea pig chow and water. At 2, 3, 5 and 7 months of age, six animals were selected based on their proximity to the median weight of the cohort. OA severity was graded at each time point by the assessment of toluidine blue stained step coronal sections of the total knee joint. Serum CTX II was measured as a potential biomarker of OA severity. Myosin Heavy Chain (MHC) isoforms were determined by a validated real-time PCR assay. Oxidative and glycolytic potential was determined in quadriceps homogenates via the measurement of ICDH and LDH activity. Results Initiation of OA in the DH strain guinea pig occurred between 2 and 3 months of age and progressed until 7 months when the final analyses were conducted. Serum CTX II significantly decreased during this early period of OA initiation and levels were unrelated to the histopathological severity of knee OA at any of the time points assessed. MHC mRNA measurements revealed a significant elevation in MHC IIX mRNA (associated with fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibres) coincident with the initiation of OA at 3 months of age, with preliminary findings suggestive of a positive correlation to OA severity at this time point. Conclusions These preliminary findings suggest that disease

  19. Treatment of Nongout Joint Deposition Diseases: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Richette, Pascal; Flipo, René-Marc

    2014-01-01

    This update develops the actual therapeutic options in the management of the joint involvement of calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD), basic calcium phosphate (BCP) deposition disease, hemochromatosis (HH), ochronosis, oxalosis, and Wilson's disease. Conventional pharmaceutical treatment provides benefits for most diseases. Anti-interleukine-1 (IL-1) treatment could provide similar results in CPPD than in gout flares. There is only limited evidence about the efficacy of preventive long-term colchicine intake, methotrexate, and hydroxychloroquine in chronic CPPD. Needle aspiration and lavage have satisfactory short and midterm results in BCP. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy has also proved its efficacy for high-doses regimes. Phlebotomy does not seem to have shown real efficacy on joint involvement in HH so far. Iron chelators' effects have not been assessed on joint involvement either, while IL-1 blockade may prove useful. NSAIDs have limited efficacy on joint involvement of oxalosis, while colchicine and steroids have not been assessed either. The use of nitisinone for ochronotic arthropathy is still much debated, but it could provide beneficial effects on joint involvement. The effects of copper chelators have not been assessed either in the joint involvement of Wilson's disease. NSAIDs should be avoided because of the liver affection they may worsen. PMID:24895535

  20. Treatment of nongout joint deposition diseases: an update.

    PubMed

    Pascart, Tristan; Richette, Pascal; Flipo, René-Marc

    2014-01-01

    This update develops the actual therapeutic options in the management of the joint involvement of calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD), basic calcium phosphate (BCP) deposition disease, hemochromatosis (HH), ochronosis, oxalosis, and Wilson's disease. Conventional pharmaceutical treatment provides benefits for most diseases. Anti-interleukine-1 (IL-1) treatment could provide similar results in CPPD than in gout flares. There is only limited evidence about the efficacy of preventive long-term colchicine intake, methotrexate, and hydroxychloroquine in chronic CPPD. Needle aspiration and lavage have satisfactory short and midterm results in BCP. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy has also proved its efficacy for high-doses regimes. Phlebotomy does not seem to have shown real efficacy on joint involvement in HH so far. Iron chelators' effects have not been assessed on joint involvement either, while IL-1 blockade may prove useful. NSAIDs have limited efficacy on joint involvement of oxalosis, while colchicine and steroids have not been assessed either. The use of nitisinone for ochronotic arthropathy is still much debated, but it could provide beneficial effects on joint involvement. The effects of copper chelators have not been assessed either in the joint involvement of Wilson's disease. NSAIDs should be avoided because of the liver affection they may worsen. PMID:24895535

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in the treatment of osteoarthritis: reparative pathways, safety and efficacy - a review.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Julien; Bates, Dan; Boyd, Richard; Shah, Kiran; Barnard, Adele; Huguenin, Leesa; Tenen, Abi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a leading cause of pain and disability across the world. With an aging population its prevalence is likely to further increase. Current accepted medical treatment strategies are aimed at symptom control rather than disease modification. Surgical options including joint replacement are not without possible significant complications. A growing interest in the area of regenerative medicine, led by an improved understanding of the role of mesenchymal stem cells in tissue homeostasis and repair, has seen recent focused efforts to explore the potential of stem cell therapies in the active management of symptomatic osteoarthritis. Encouragingly, results of pre-clinical and clinical trials have provided initial evidence of efficacy and indicated safety in the therapeutic use of mesenchymal stem cell therapies for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. This paper explores the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis and how mesenchymal stem cells may play a role in future management strategies of this disabling condition. PMID:27229856

  2. Premature development of erosive osteoarthritis of hands in patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, I J; Hurst, N P; Sebben, R; Milazzo, S C; Disney, A

    1990-01-01

    The prevalence of grade III or IV osteoarthritis was determined in 210 patients with chronic renal failure, of whom 94 were receiving chronic haemodialysis and 116 had functioning renal transplants. The prevalence of grade III or IV osteoarthritis was three times greater in patients under 65 than in a control population, and all but two affected patients also had erosion of subchondral bone in at least one affected joint. The excess of osteoarthritis was apparent in both the transplant recipients and those receiving haemodialysis. Over the age of 65 there was no significant difference in prevalence. Metabolic bone disease, including osteopenia, might contribute to the development of erosive osteoarthritis in chronic renal failure. Images PMID:2383060

  3. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) in Persian Speaking Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Makhmalbaf, Hadi; Birjandinejad, Ali; Keshtan, Farideh Golhasani; Hoseini, Hosein A; Mazloumi, Seyed Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis of the knee is the most common chronic joint disease that involves middle aged and elderly persons. There are different clinical instruments to quantify the health status of patients with knee osteoarthritis and one example is the WOMAC score that has been translated and adapted into different languages. The purpose of this study was cultural adaptation, validation and reliability testing of the Persian version of the WOMAC index in Iranians with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: We translated the original WOMAC questionnaire into Persian by the forward and backward technique, and then its psychometric study was done on 169 native Persian speaking patients with knee degenerative joint disease. Mean age of patients was 53.9 years. The SF-36 and KOOS were used to assess construct validity. Results: Reliability testing resulted in a Cronbach’s alpha of 0.917, showing the internal consistency of the questionnaire to be a reliable tool. Inter-correlation matrix among different scales of the Persian WOMAC index yielded a highly significant correlation between all subscales including stiffness, pain, and physical function. In terms of validity, Pearson`s correlation coefficient was significant between three domains of the WOMAC with PF, RP, BP, GH, VT, and PCS dimensions of the SF-36 health survey (P<0.005) and KOOS (P<0.0001) . Conclusions: The Persian WOMAC index is a valid and reliable patient- reported clinical instrument for knee osteoarthritis. PMID:25207315

  4. Epigenetic and microRNA regulation during osteoarthritis development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Di; Shen, Jie; Hui, Tianqian

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative joint disease, the pathological mechanism of which is currently unknown. Genetic alteration is one of the key contributing factors for OA pathology. Recent evidence suggests that epigenetic and microRNA regulation of critical genes may contribute to OA development. In this article, we review the epigenetic and microRNA regulations of genes related to OA development. Potential therapeutic strategies may be developed on the basis of novel findings.

  5. Synovial fluid hyaluronan mediates MSC attachment to cartilage, a potential novel mechanism contributing to cartilage repair in osteoarthritis using knee joint distraction

    PubMed Central

    Mastbergen, Simon C; Jones, Elena; Calder, Stuart J; Lafeber, Floris P J G; McGonagle, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Knee joint distraction (KJD) is a novel, but poorly understood, treatment for osteoarthritis (OA) associated with remarkable ‘spontaneous’ cartilage repair in which resident synovial fluid (SF) multipotential mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) may play a role. We hypothesised that SF hyaluronic acid (HA) inhibited the initial interaction between MSCs and cartilage, a key first step to integration, and postulate that KJD environment favoured MSC/cartilage interactions. Methods Attachment of dual-labelled SF-MSCs were assessed in a novel in vitro human cartilage model using OA and rheumatoid arthritic (RA) SF. SF was digested with hyaluronidase (hyase) and its effect on adhesion was observed using confocal microscopy. MRI and microscopy were used to image autologous dual-labelled MSCs in an in vivo canine model of KJD. SF-HA was investigated using gel electrophoresis and densitometry. Results Osteoarthritic-synovial fluid (OA-SF) and purified high molecular weight (MW) HA inhibited SF-MSC adhesion to plastic, while hyase treatment of OA-SF but not RA-SF significantly increased MSC adhesion to cartilage (3.7-fold, p<0.05) These differences were linked to the SF mediated HA-coat which was larger in OA-SF than in RA-SF. OA-SF contained >9 MDa HA and this correlated with increases in adhesion (r=0.880). In the canine KJD model, MSC adhesion to cartilage was evident and also dependent on HA MW. Conclusions These findings highlight an unappreciated role of SF-HA on MSC interactions and provide proof of concept that endogenous SF-MSCs are capable of adhering to cartilage in a favourable biochemical and biomechanical environment in OA distracted joints, offering novel one-stage strategies towards joint repair. PMID:25948596

  6. [Concomitant diseases in primary joint hypermobility syndrome].

    PubMed

    Skoumal, Martin; Haberhauer, Günther; Mayr, Hans

    2004-10-15

    The primary joint hypermobility syndrome (pJH) is an overlap disorder of connective-tissue dysplasias, which incorporates features seen in the Marfan syndromes (MFS), Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS), and osteogenesis imperfecta. Patients with pJH usually present arthralgia, back pain, soft-tissue lesions, recurrent joint dislocation, or subluxation. Extraarticular features may include, e. g., striae cutis, keratoconus, easy bruising, mitral valve prolapse, aortic incompetence, aneurysms, pneumothorax, hernia, urinary incontinence, and pelvic floor prolapse. Due to the high frequency of critical dissection and rupture, the early recognition of rare life-threatening complications such as dilatation of the aortic root and aneurysms is important. Therefore, patients (and their family members) with pJH should also be examined for life-threatening features seen in MFS and EDS. PMID:15490074

  7. Joint hypermobility: emerging disease or illness behaviour?

    PubMed

    Grahame, Rodney

    2013-12-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome is a common clinical entity which is much misunderstood, overlooked, misdiagnosed and mistreated. It was first described in the 1960s as a purely musculoskeletal condition due to joint laxity and hypermobility occurring in otherwise healthy individuals. Some four decades later it is now perceived to be a multi-systemic heritable disorder of connective tissue with manifestations occurring far beyond the confines of the locomotor system and with ramifications potentially affecting most, if not all, of the bodily systems in one way or another. Most authorities in the field find it clinically indistinguishable from the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome--hypermobility type (formerly, EDS type III). In >50% of patients the diagnosis is delayed for ≥10 years. Failure to diagnose and treat the condition correctly results in needless pain and suffering and in many patients to a progressive decline in their quality of life and in some to a loss of independence. PMID:24298184

  8. Arthrodiatasis for management of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Aly, Tarek A; Hafez, Kamal; Amin, Osama

    2011-08-01

    Osteoarthritic disease is the result of mechanical and biological events that destabilize the normal processes of degradation and synthesis of articular cartilage chondrocytes, extracellular matrix, and subchondral bone. Osteoarthritis of the knee can cause symptoms ranging from mild to disabling. Initial management of most patients should be nonoperative, but because of the progressive nature of the disease, many patients with osteoarthritis of the knee eventually benefit from operative treatment. Various procedures have been described for treatment of the osteoarthritic knee, ranging from arthroscopic lavage and debridement to total knee arthroplasty. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical results of distraction arthroplasty combined with arthroscopic lavage and drilling of cartilage defects for treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee. Nineteen patients (15 women and 4 men; age range, 39-65 years) were operated on. Pre- and postoperative findings were compared. A control group comprising 42 patients treated with only arthroscopic procedures was evaluated for comparison. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 5 years. Results were evaluated both clinically and radiologically postoperatively and throughout the follow-up period. Clinically, pain and walking capacity improved in most patients. Radiologically, joint space widening and improvement of the tibiofemoral angle was noted in nearly all patients. PMID:21815573

  9. Risk factors and burden of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Clémence; Nguyen, Christelle; Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Rannou, François; Poiraudeau, Serge

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common joint disorders worldwide. Its prevalence is increasing because of the growing aging of the population in developed and developing countries as well as an increase in risk factors leading to OA, particularly obesity and a sedentary lifestyle. Risk factors of OA can be divided into person-level factors (age, gender, obesity, genetics and diet) and joint-level factors (injury, malalignment and abnormal loading of the joints) that interact in a complex manner. OA is the 11th cause of disability in the world. It is responsible for activity limitations, particularly walking, and affects participation and quality of life. Patients with OA are at greater risk of all-cause mortality, particularly for cardiovascular diseases, than the general population. This excess mortality is closely associated with disability level. Consequently, strategies to reduce burden through primary and secondary prevention programs are increasingly important. PMID:26904959

  10. Characterization of joint disease in mucopolysaccharidosis type I mice

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Patricia G; Baldo, Guilherme; Mayer, Fabiana Q; Martinelli, Barbara; Meurer, Luise; Giugliani, Roberto; Matte, Ursula; Xavier, Ricardo M

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are lysosomal storage disorders characterized by mutations in enzymes that degrade glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Joint disease is present in most forms of MPS, including MPS I. This work aimed to describe the joint disease progression in the murine model of MPS I. Normal (wild-type) and MPS I mice were sacrificed at different time points (from 2 to 12 months). The knee joints were collected, and haematoxylin–eosin staining was used to evaluate the articular architecture. Safranin-O and Sirius Red staining was used to analyse the proteoglycan and collagen content. Additionally, we analysed the expression of the matrix-degrading metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-2 and MMP-9, using immunohistochemistry. We observed progressive joint alterations from 6 months, including the presence of synovial inflammatory infiltrate, the destruction and thickening of the cartilage extracellular matrix, as well as proteoglycan and collagen depletion. Furthermore, we observed an increase in the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9, which could conceivably explain the degenerative changes. Our results suggest that the joint disease in MPS I mice may be caused by a degenerative process due to increase in proteases expression, leading to loss of collagen and proteoglycans. These results may guide the development of ancillary therapies for joint disease in MPS I. PMID:23786352

  11. β2-Adrenergic agonist-induced hypertrophy of the quadriceps skeletal muscle does not modulate disease severity in the rodent meniscectomy model of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tonge, D.P.; Jones, S.W.; Parr, T.; Bardsley, R.; Doherty, M.; Maciewicz, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objective To examine whether β2-adrenergic agonist-induced hypertrophy of the quadriceps skeletal muscle can modulate the severity of osteoarthritis (OA) in the rodent meniscectomy (MNX) model. Methods Male Lewis rats were subcutaneously administered with 1.5 mg/kg/day clenbuterol hydrochloride (n = 15) or saline vehicle (n = 20) for 14 days. Following pre-treatment, five animals from each group were sacrificed to assess the immediate effects of clenbuterol. The remaining animals underwent either invasive knee surgery (clenbuterol pre-treated n = 10; saline pre-treated n = 10) or a sham control surgical procedure (saline pre-treated n = 5). During disease initiation and progression, weight bearing was assessed by hindlimb loading. Myosin heavy chain (MHC) protein isoforms were quantified by silver stained SDS PAGE. OA severity was graded by assessment of toluidine blue stained step coronal sections of the total knee joint. Results Clenbuterol treatment resulted in an increase in total bodyweight, growth rate and in quadriceps skeletal muscle mass. Meniscal surgery resulted in the development of OA-like lesions, changes to weight bearing, and changes in MHC protein expression in the quadriceps. Clenbuterol-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy had no effect on either weight bearing or articular pathology following MNX surgery. Conclusions Our data reveal that clenbuterol-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy is unable to mimic the beneficial clinical effects of increased musculature derived through targeted strength training in humans, in a rodent model of MNX-induced OA. In addition we observed fibre-type switching to “slow twitch” in the quadriceps muscle during the induction of OA that warrants further investigation as to its relationship to joint stability. PMID:20060953

  12. Basic science of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cucchiarini, Magali; de Girolamo, Laura; Filardo, Giuseppe; Oliveira, J Miguel; Orth, Patrick; Pape, Dietrich; Reboul, Pascal

    2016-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent, disabling disorder of the joints that affects a large population worldwide and for which there is no definitive cure. This review provides critical insights into the basic knowledge on OA that may lead to innovative end efficient new therapeutic regimens. While degradation of the articular cartilage is the hallmark of OA, with altered interactions between chondrocytes and compounds of the extracellular matrix, the subchondral bone has been also described as a key component of the disease, involving specific pathomechanisms controlling its initiation and progression. The identification of such events (and thus of possible targets for therapy) has been made possible by the availability of a number of animal models that aim at reproducing the human pathology, in particular large models of high tibial osteotomy (HTO). From a therapeutic point of view, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent a promising option for the treatment of OA and may be used concomitantly with functional substitutes integrating scaffolds and drugs/growth factors in tissue engineering setups. Altogether, these advances in the fundamental and experimental knowledge on OA may allow for the generation of improved, adapted therapeutic regimens to treat human OA. PMID:27624438

  13. Age-Related Changes in Strength, Joint Laxity, and Walking Patterns: Are They Related to Knee Osteoarthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Katherine S; Schmitt, Laura C; Lewek, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose Aging is associated with musculoskeletal changes and altered walking patterns. These changes are common in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and may precipitate the development of OA. We examined age-related changes in musculoskeletal structures and walking patterns to better understand the relationship between aging and knee OA. Methods Forty-four individuals without OA (15 younger, 15 middle-aged, 14 older adults) and 15 individuals with medial knee OA participated. Knee laxity, quadriceps femoris muscle strength (force-generating capacity), and gait were assessed. Results Medial laxity was greater in the OA group, but there were no differences between the middle-aged and older control groups. Quadriceps femoris strength was less in the older control group and in the OA group. During the stance phase of walking, the OA group demonstrated less knee flexion and greater knee adduction, but there were no differences in knee motion among the control groups. During walking, the older control group exhibited greater quadriceps femoris muscle activity and the OA group used greater muscle co-contraction. Discussion and Conclusion Although weaker, the older control group did not use truncated motion or higher co-contraction. The maintenance of movement patterns that were similar to the subjects in the young control group may have helped to prevent development of knee OA. Further investigation is warranted regarding age-related musculoskeletal changes and their influence on the development of knee OA. PMID:17785376

  14. Progressive Change in Joint Degeneration in Patients with Knee or Hip Osteoarthritis Treated with Fentanyl in a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Tatsuya; Takana, Koshi; Orita, Sumihisa; Inoue, Gen; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Kubota, Gou; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Toyone, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Junichi; Kishida, Shunji; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Opioids improve pain from knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) and decrease the functional impairment of patients. However, there is a possibility that opioids induce analgesia and suppress the physiological pain of OA in patients, thereby inducing the progression of OA changes in these patients. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the possibility of progressive changes in OA among patients using opioids. Materials and Methods Two hundred knee or hip OA patients were evaluated in the current prospective, randomized, active-controlled study. Patients were randomized 1:1:1 into three parallel treatment groups: loxoprofen, tramadol/acetaminophen, and transdermal fentanyl groups. Medication was administered for 12 weeks. Pain scores and progressive OA changes on X-ray films were evaluated. Results Overall, pain relief was obtained by all three groups. Most patients did not show progressive OA changes; however, 3 patients in the transdermal fentanyl group showed progressive OA changes during the 12 weeks of treatment. These 3 patients used significantly higher doses than others in the transdermal fentanyl group. Additionally, the average pain score for these 3 patients was significantly lower than the average pain score for the other patients in the transdermal fentanyl group. Conclusion Fentanyl may induce progressive changes in knee or hip OA during a relatively short period, compared with oral Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs or tramadol. PMID:25048500

  15. Femoral neck erosions: sign of hip joint synovial disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, R.P.; Weissman, B.N.; Naimark, A.

    1983-07-01

    Pathologic synovial processes in the hip joint can cause characteristic extrinsic erosions of the femoral neck, which in extreme cases produce an ''apple core'' appearance. Nine such cases of synovial diseases, including synovial osteochondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and amyloidosis, that demonstrate this radiographic finding are presented. The anatomic relations of the hip joint that result in theis appearance, differential diagnosis, and radiographic techniques useful in diagnosis are discussed.

  16. Benefits of antioxidant supplements for knee osteoarthritis: rationale and reality.

    PubMed

    Grover, Ashok Kumar; Samson, Sue E

    2016-01-01

    Arthritis causes disability due to pain and inflammation in joints. There are many forms of arthritis, one of which is osteoarthritis whose prevalence increases with age. It occurs in various joints including hip, knee and hand with knee osteoarthritis being more prevalent. There is no cure for it. The management strategies include exercise, glucosamine plus chondroitin sulfate and NSAIDs. In vitro and animal studies provide a rationale for the use of antioxidant supplements for its management. This review assesses the reality of the benefits of antioxidant supplements in the management of knee osteoarthritis. Several difficulties were encountered in examining this issue: poorly conducted studies, a lack of uniformity in disease definition and diagnosis, and muddling of conclusions from attempts to isolate the efficacious molecules. The antioxidant supplements with most evidence for benefit for pain relief and function in knee osteoarthritis were based on curcumin and avocado-soya bean unsaponifiables. Boswellia and some herbs used in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine may also be useful. The benefits of cuisines with the appropriate antioxidants should be assessed because they may be more economical and easier to incorporate into the lifestyle. PMID:26728196

  17. Interpositional arthroplasty with Gore-Tex, Marlex or tendon for osteoarthritis of the trapeziometacarpal joint. A retrospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Muermans, S; Coenen, L

    1998-02-01

    In this retrospective study of 26 patients with arthritis of the thumb carpometacarpal joint, we report the use of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) (Gore-Tex) and polypropylene (Marlex) as interpositional materials for resection arthroplasty of the trapeziometacarpal joint. We have compared the results with those of "conventional" tendon interposition and those in the literature. In three patients the use of ePTFE (Gore-Tex) was complicated by marked clinical synovitis, resembling findings in silicone synovitis. Therefore, the use of ePTFE has been discontinued. Polypropylene seems to be a valuable alternative to tendon interposition arthroplasty. PMID:9571484

  18. Isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Poolman, Rudolf W; van Kampen, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose The optimal treatment for isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis is unclear at present. We systematically reviewed the highest level of available evidence on the nonoperative and operative treatment of isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis to develop an evidenced-based discussion of treatment options. Methods A systematic computerized database search (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE (PubMed), and EMBASE) was performed in March 2009. The quality of the studies was assessed independently by two authors using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Results We extracted data from 44 articles. The best available evidence for treatment of isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis is sparse and of generally low methodological quality. Nonoperative treatment using physiotherapy (GRADE: high quality, weak recommendation for use), taping (GRADE: moderate quality, weak recommendation for use), or injection therapy (GRADE: very low quality, weak recommendation for use) may result in short-term relief. Joint-preserving surgical treatment may result in insufficient, unpredictable, or only short-term improvement (GRADE: low quality, weak recommendation against use). Total knee replacement with patellar resurfacing results in predictable and good, durable results (GRADE: low quality, weak recommendation for use). Outcome after patellofemoral arthroplasty in selected patients is good to excellent (GRADE: low quality, weak recommendation for use). Interpretation Methodologically good quality comparative studies, preferably using a patient-relevant outcome instrument, are needed to establish the optimal treatment strategy for patients with isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis. PMID:20175647

  19. Single Molecule Microscopy Reveals an Increased Hyaluronan Diffusion Rate in Synovial Fluid from Knees Affected by Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kohlhof, Hendrik; Gravius, Sascha; Kohl, Sandro; Ahmad, Sufian S.; Randau, Thomas; Schmolders, Jan; Rommelspacher, Yorck; Friedrich, Max; Kaminski, Tim P.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common and progressive joint disorder. Despite its widespread, in clinical practice only late phases of osteoarthritis that are characterized by severe joint damage are routinely detected. Since osteoarthritis cannot be cured but relatively well managed, an early diagnosis and thereby early onset of disease management would lower the burden of osteoarthritis. Here we evaluated if biophysical parameters of small synovial fluid samples extracted by single molecule microscopy can be linked to joint damage. In healthy synovial fluid (ICRS-score < 1) hyaluronan showed a slower diffusion (2.2 μm2/s, N = 5) than in samples from patients with joint damage (ICRS-score > 2) (4.5 μm2/s, N = 16). More strikingly, the diffusion coefficient of hyaluronan in healthy synovial fluid was on average 30% slower than expected by sample viscosity. This effect was diminished or missing in samples from patients with joint damage. Since single molecule microscopy needs only microliters of synovial fluid to extract the viscosity and the specific diffusion coefficient of hyaluronan this method could be of use as diagnostic tool for osteoarthritis. PMID:26868769

  20. Cartilage tissue engineering for degenerative joint disease.

    PubMed

    Nesic, Dobrila; Whiteside, Robert; Brittberg, Mats; Wendt, David; Martin, Ivan; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre

    2006-05-20

    Pain in the joint is often due to cartilage degeneration and represents a serious medical problem affecting people of all ages. Although many, mostly surgical techniques, are currently employed to treat cartilage lesions, none has given satisfactory results in the long term. Recent advances in biology and material science have brought tissue engineering to the forefront of new cartilage repair techniques. The combination of autologous cells, specifically designed scaffolds, bioreactors, mechanical stimulations and growth factors together with the knowledge that underlies the principles of cell biology offers promising avenues for cartilage tissue regeneration. The present review explores basic biology mechanisms for cartilage reconstruction and summarizes the advances in the tissue engineering approaches. Furthermore, the limits of the new methods and their potential application in the osteoarthritic conditions are discussed. PMID:16574268

  1. Mild Joint Symptoms Are Associated with Lower Risk of Falls than Asymptomatic Individuals with Radiological Evidence of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chin Teck; Fadzli, Farhana; Rozalli, Faizatul I.; Khoo, Ee Ming; Hill, Keith D.; Tan, Maw Pin

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) exacerbates skeletal muscle functioning, leading to postural instability and increased falls risk. However, the link between impaired physical function, OA and falls have not been elucidated. We investigated the role of impaired physical function as a potential mediator in the association between OA and falls. This study included 389 participants [229 fallers (≥2 falls or one injurious fall in the past 12 months), 160 non-fallers (no history of falls)], age (≥65 years) from a randomized controlled trial, the Malaysian Falls Assessment and Intervention Trial (MyFAIT). Physical function was assessed using Timed Up and Go (TUG) and Functional Reach (FR) tests. Knee and hip OA were diagnosed using three methods: Clinical, Radiological and Self-report. OA symptom severity was assessed using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC). The total WOMAC score was categorized to asymptomatic, mild, moderate and severe symptoms. Individuals with radiological OA and ‘mild’ overall symptoms on the WOMAC score had reduced risk of falls compared to asymptomatic OA [OR: 0.402(0.172–0.940), p = 0.042]. Individuals with clinical OA and ‘severe’ overall symptoms had increased risk of falls compared to those with ‘mild’ OA [OR: 4.487(1.883–10.693), p = 0.005]. In individuals with radiological OA, mild symptoms appear protective of falls while those with clinical OA and severe symptoms have increased falls risk compared to those with mild symptoms. Both relationships between OA and falls were not mediated by physical limitations. Larger prospective studies are needed for further evaluation. PMID:26491868

  2. Joint protection and hand exercises for hand osteoarthritis: an economic evaluation comparing methods for the analysis of factorial trials

    PubMed Central

    Oppong, Raymond; Nicholls, Elaine; Whitehurst, David G. T.; Hill, Susan; Hammond, Alison; Hay, Elaine M.; Dziedzic, Krysia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Evidence regarding the cost-effectiveness of joint protection and hand exercises for the management of hand OA is not well established. The primary aim of this study is to assess the cost-effectiveness (cost-utility) of these management options. In addition, given the absence of consensus regarding the conduct of economic evaluation alongside factorial trials, we compare different analytical methodologies. Methods. A trial-based economic evaluation to assess the cost-utility of joint protection only, hand exercises only and joint protection plus hand exercises compared with leaflet and advice was undertaken over a 12 month period from a UK National Health Service perspective. Patient-level mean costs and mean quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were calculated for each trial arm. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were estimated and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves were constructed. The base case analysis used a within-the-table analysis methodology. Two further methods were explored: the at-the-margins approach and a regression-based approach with or without an interaction term. Results. Mean costs (QALYs) were £58.46 (s.d. 0.662) for leaflet and advice, £92.12 (s.d. 0.659) for joint protection, £64.51 (s.d. 0.681) for hand exercises and £112.38 (s.d. 0.658) for joint protection plus hand exercises. In the base case, hand exercises were the cost-effective option, with an ICER of £318 per QALY gained. Hand exercises remained the most cost-effective management strategy when adopting alternative methodological approaches. Conclusion. This is the first trial evaluating the cost-effectiveness of occupational therapy-supported approaches to self-management for hand OA. Our findings showed that hand exercises were the most cost-effective option. PMID:25339642

  3. Genetic influences on osteoarthritis in women: a twin study.

    PubMed Central

    Spector, T. D.; Cicuttini, F.; Baker, J.; Loughlin, J.; Hart, D.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To assess the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors to common forms of osteoarthritis of the hands and knees. DESIGN--Classic twin study with unselected twins who were screened radiologically for osteoarthritis. SUBJECTS--130 identical and 120 non-identical female twins aged 48-70 recruited from a London based twin register and through a national media campaign. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Similarity in identical compared with non-identical twin pairs for radiographic changes at the interphalangeal and first carpometacarpal joints of the hands and the tibiofemoral joint and patellofemoral joint of the knee expressed as intraclass correlations. RESULTS--The intraclass correlations of radiographic osteophytes and narrowing at most sites and the presence of Heberden's nodes and knee pain were higher in the identical pairs. The intraclass correlation of the total radiographic osteoarthritis score in identical pairs (rMZ) was 0.64 (SE 0.05) compared with 0.38 (0.08) in non-identical pairs. The proportion of genetic variance of total osteoarthritis score (osteophytes and narrowing) with modelling techniques was estimated at 0.54 (95% confidence interval 0.43 to 0.65) and ranged from 0.39 to 0.65 for different sites and features (p < 0.001) after adjustment for age and weight. CONCLUSIONS--These results demonstrate for the first time a clear genetic effect for radiographic osteoarthritis of the hand and knee in women, with a genetic influence ranging from 39-65%, independent of known environmental or demographic confounders. The results of this study should lead to further work on isolating the gene or genes involved in the pathogenesis of the common disabling disease. PMID:8616305

  4. Identification of DIO2 as a new susceptibility locus for symptomatic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Min, Josine L; Bos, Steffan; Riyazi, Naghmeh; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; van der Wijk, Henk-Jan; Kroon, Herman M; Nakajima, Masahiro; Ikegawa, Shiro; Uitterlinden, André G; van Meurs, Joyce B J; van der Deure, Wendy M; Visser, Theo J; Seymour, Albert B; Lakenberg, Nico; van der Breggen, Ruud; Kremer, Dennis; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Loughlin, John; Slagboom, P Eline

    2008-06-15

    Osteoarthritis [MIM 165720] is a common late-onset articular joint disease for which no pharmaceutical intervention is available to attenuate the cartilage degeneration. To identify a new osteoarthritis susceptibility locus, a genome-wide linkage scan and combined linkage association analysis were applied to 179 affected siblings and four trios with generalized osteoarthritis (The GARP study). We tested, for confirmation by association, 1478 subjects who required joint replacement and 734 controls in a UK population. Additional replication was tested in 1582 population-based females from the Rotterdam study that contained 94 cases with defined hip osteoarthritis and in 267 Japanese females with symptomatic hip osteoarthritis and 465 controls. Suggested evidence for linkage in the GARP study was observed on chromosome 14q32.11 (log of odds = 3.03, P = 1.9 x 10(-4)). Genotyping tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms covering three important candidate genes revealed a common coding variant (rs225014; Thr92Ala) in the iodothyronine-deiodinase enzyme type 2 (D2) gene (DIO2 [MIM 601413]) which significantly explained the linkage signal (P = 0.006). Confirmation and replication by association in the additional osteoarthritis studies indicated a common DIO2 haplotype, exclusively containing the minor allele of rs225014 and common allele of rs12885300, with a combined recessive odds ratio of 1.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.37-2.34 with P = 2.02 x 10(-5) in female cases with advanced/symptomatic hip osteoarthritis. The gene product of this DIO2 converts intracellular pro-hormone-3,3',5,5'-tetraiodothyronine (T4) into the active thyroid hormone 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3) thereby regulating intracellular levels of active T3 in target tissues such as the growth plate. Our results indicate a new susceptibility gene (DIO2) conferring risk to osteoarthritis. PMID:18334578

  5. Syndecan-4 regulates ADAMTS-5 activation and cartilage breakdown in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Echtermeyer, Frank; Bertrand, Jessica; Dreier, Rita; Meinecke, Ingmar; Neugebauer, Katja; Fuerst, Martin; Lee, Yun Jong; Song, Yeong Wook; Herzog, Christine; Theilmeier, Gregor; Pap, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    Aggrecan cleavage by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 5 (ADAMTS-5) is crucial for the breakdown of cartilage matrix during osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease that leads to the progressive destruction of articular structures. The mechanisms of ADAMTS-5 activation and their links to the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis remain poorly understood, but syndecans have been shown to be involved in the activation of ADAMTS-4 (ref. 3). Here we show that syndecan-4 is specifically induced in type X collagen-producing chondrocytes both in human osteoarthritis and in murine models of the disease. The loss of syndecan-4 in genetically modified mice and intra-articular injections of syndecan-4-specific antibodies into wild-type mice protect from proteoglycan loss and thereby prevent osteoarthritic cartilage damage in a surgically induced model of osteoarthritis. The occurrence of less severe osteoarthritis-like cartilage destruction in both syndecan-4-deficient mice and syndecan-4-specific antibody-treated wild-type mice results from a marked decrease in ADAMTS-5 activity. Syndecan-4 controls the activation of ADAMTS-5 through direct interaction with the protease and through regulating mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent synthesis of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3). Our data suggest that strategies aimed at the inhibition of syndecan-4 will be of great value for the treatment of cartilage damage in osteoarthritis. PMID:19684582

  6. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction in various rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Aceves-Avila, F J; Chávez-López, M; Chavira-González, J R; Ramos-Remus, C

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is an inclusive term in which those conditions disturbing the masticatory function are embraced. It has been estimated that 33% of the population have signs of TMD, but less than 5% of the population will require treatment. The objective of this study was to measure the frequency of TMD in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthrosis (OA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and systemic lupus erythematosus, and to define the limitations in everyday's life that patients perceive when present. A six-month survey of consecutive outpatients in a rheumatology clinic in a teaching hospital in Mexico was carried out. We defined TMD as: 1) the presence of pain; 2) difficulty on mouth opening, chewing or speaking; 3) the presence of non-harmonic movements of the temporomaxilar joints. All three characteristics had to be present. Z test was used to define differences between proportions. We present the results of 171 patients. Overall, 50 patients had TMD according to our operational definition (29.24%). Up to 76% of the sample had symptoms associated with the condition. TMD is more frequent in OA and in AS (29.24% vs 38% OA, P=0.009; 39% AS; P=0.005). We found no association between the severity of TMD and the request for specific attention for the discomfort produced by the condition. Only 8 of 50 (16%) patients with TMD had requested medical help for their symptoms, and they were not the most severe cases. TMD is more frequent in RA and OA. Although it may produce severe impairment, patients seem to adapt easily. PMID:23884028

  7. Individuals with Primary Osteoarthritis Have Different Phenotypes Depending on the Affected Joint - A Case Control Study from Southern Sweden Including 514 Participants

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Magnus K; Karlsson, Caroline; Magnusson, Håkan; Cöster, Maria; von Schewelov, Tord; Nilsson, Jan Åke; Brudin, Lars; Rosengren, Björn E

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether primary osteoarthritis (OA), independent of affected joint, is associated with a phenotype that is different from the phenotype in a normative cohort. Material and Methods: We included 274 patients with primary OA, 30 women and 32 men (mean age 66 years, range 42-84) with primary hip OA, 38 women and 74 men (mean age 61 years; range 34-85) with primary knee OA, 42 women and 19 men (men age 64 years, range 42-87) with primary ankle or foot OA and 20 women and 19 men (mean age 66 years, range 47-88) with primary hand or finger OA. Of all patients included with OA, 23% had hip OA, 41% knee OA, 22% ankle or foot OA and 14% hand or finger OA. Serving as references were 122 women and 118 men of the same ages who were population-based, included as a control cohort. We measured total body BMD (g/cm2) and proportion of fat and lean mass (%) with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Height, weight and BMI (kg/m2) were also assessed. We then calculated Z-scores (number of standard deviations difference from the mean value of the control cohort) in the OA patients and compared these between the groups. Results: Individuals with hand OA and controls had similar phenotype. Individuals with lower extremity OA, irrespective of the affected joint, had similar weight, BMI and BMD, but higher than in individuals with hand OA and controls (all p<0.05). Individuals with lower extremity OA had higher fat and lower lean mass than individuals with hand OA and controls (all p<0.001). Conclusion: Individuals with primary OA in the lower extremity have a phenotype with higher BMD, higher BMI, proportionally higher fat content and lower lean body mass content. The different skeletal phenotypes in our patients with OA in the lower extremity and patients with hand OA indicate that separate pathophysiologic pathways may be responsible for primary OA in different joints PMID:25614774

  8. The radiology of joint disease. Volume 2. Third edition

    SciTech Connect

    Forrester, D.M.; Brown, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book explains the diagnostic criteria and radiologic appearance of joint disease - principally arthritis. It covers the soft tissues, alignment abnormalities, bony mineralization, and abnormalities of the cartilage space of the hand; arthritis from head to foot; and the differential diagnosis of arthritis.

  9. Osteopenia of the pelvis associated with Mseleni joint disease. Radiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, C M; Solomon, L; Botha, J L; McLaren, P

    1987-10-01

    Mseleni joint disease, an endemic form of osteoarthritis (OA), is associated with osteopenia (OP). In a detailed investigation of the disorder, the degree of OP was assessed in 593 radiographs of the pelvis which were taken during surveys of four populations: rural blacks from Mseleni, rural blacks from Manguzi (a similar population to Mseleni), a black control group of rural Tswanas and a white control group from Johannesburg. Only females were included because the number of males in the rural populations was too small. The radiographic trabecular pattern was assessed at four sites: sacrum, ilium, pubis and ischium. Four grades were used: O = normal bone, 1 = minimal OP, 2 = definite OP, 3 = severe OP. The sum of the grades at the four sites made up the OP score for the individual. The OP scores increased with age in all groups, the age-specific mean OP scores did not differ in the non-OA subgroups of all four populations, and subgroups with OA had significantly higher age-specific mean OP scores than those without OA. PMID:3660151

  10. Proteases involved in cartilage matrix degradation in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Troeberg, Linda; Nagase, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common joint disease for which there are currently no disease-modifying drugs available. Degradation of the cartilage extracellular matrix is a central feature of the disease and is widely though to be mediated by proteinases that degrade structural components of the matrix, primarily aggrecan and collagen. Studies on transgenic mice have confirmed the central role of Adamalysin with Thrombospondin Motifs 5 (ADAMTS-5) in aggrecan degradation, and the collagenolytic matrix metalloproteinase MMP-13 in collagen degradation. This review discusses recent advances in current understanding of the mechanisms regulating expression of these key enzymes, as well as reviewing the roles of other proteinases in cartilage destruction. PMID:21777704

  11. Development and validation of a computational model of the knee joint for the evaluation of surgical treatments for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Mootanah, R; Imhauser, C W; Reisse, F; Carpanen, D; Walker, R W; Koff, M F; Lenhoff, M W; Rozbruch, S R; Fragomen, A T; Dewan, Z; Kirane, Y M; Cheah, K; Dowell, J K; Hillstrom, H J

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) knee joint computational model was developed and validated to predict knee joint contact forces and pressures for different degrees of malalignment. A 3D computational knee model was created from high-resolution radiological images to emulate passive sagittal rotation (full-extension to 65°-flexion) and weight acceptance. A cadaveric knee mounted on a six-degree-of-freedom robot was subjected to matching boundary and loading conditions. A ligament-tuning process minimised kinematic differences between the robotically loaded cadaver specimen and the finite element (FE) model. The model was validated by measured intra-articular force and pressure measurements. Percent full scale error between FE-predicted and in vitro-measured values in the medial and lateral compartments were 6.67% and 5.94%, respectively, for normalised peak pressure values, and 7.56% and 4.48%, respectively, for normalised force values. The knee model can accurately predict normalised intra-articular pressure and forces for different loading conditions and could be further developed for subject-specific surgical planning. PMID:24786914

  12. Anti-inflammatory response of dietary vitamin E and its effects on pain and joint structures during early stages of surgically induced osteoarthritis in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Rhouma, Mohamed; de Oliveira El Warrak, Alexander; Troncy, Eric; Beaudry, Francis; Chorfi, Younès

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence that vitamin E (VE) has anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties in human osteoarthritis (OA). This double-blinded and randomized pilot study used a broad spectrum of clinical and laboratory parameters to investigate whether such beneficial effects could be detected in a canine experimental OA model. Dogs were divided into 2 groups: control (n = 8), which received a placebo, and test group (n = 7), which received 400 IU/animal per day of VE for 55 d, starting the day after transection of the cranial cruciate ligament. Lameness and pain were assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS), numerical rating scale (NRS), and electrodermal activity (EDA) at day 0, day 28, and day 55. Cartilage and synovial inflammation lesions were assessed. One-side comparison was conducted at an alpha-threshold of 10%. At day 56, dogs were euthanized and concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) were measured in synovial fluid. Concentrations of NOx and PGE2 in synovial fluid were lower in the test group (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.03, respectively). Values of VAS, NRS, and EDA showed a consistent trend to be lower in the test group than in the control, while statistical significance was reached for VAS at day 55 and for EDA at day 28 (adjusted P = 0.07 in both cases). Histological analyses of cartilage showed a significant reduction in the scores of lesions in the test group. This is the first time that a study in dogs with OA using a supplement with a high dose of vitamin E showed a reduction in inflammation joint markers and histological expression, as well as a trend to improving signs of pain. PMID:24101795

  13. Pain, disability and health-related quality of life in osteoarthritis-joint matters: an observational, multi-specialty trans-national follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Montero, Antonio; Mulero, Juan-Francisco; Tornero, Carlos; Guitart, Jordi; Serrano, Mar

    2016-09-01

    The authors aimed to test potential relations between osteoarthritis (OA) features, disability and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) at different body locations. Outpatients consulting for pain associated to self-reported OA at varied healthcare settings were evaluated in a 3-month observational non-controlled follow-up study. Socio-demographic/anthropometric and medical data were collected at three time points. Lequesne's indices, quick-disabilities of arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) and Oswestry questionnaires provided measures of physical function and disability. HR-QoL measures were obtained with EuroQol-5 Dimensions. Multivariate analyses were used to evaluate the differences of pain severity across body regions and the correlates of disability and HR-QoL. Six thousand patients were evaluated. Pain lasted 2 years or more in 3995 patients. The mean pain severity at baseline was moderate (6.4 points). On average, patients had pain in 1.9 joints/areas. The pain was more severe when OA involved the spine or all body regions. Pain severity explained much of the variance in disability and HR-QoL; this association was less relevant in patients with OA in the upper limbs. There were considerable improvements at follow up. Pain severity improved as did disability, which showed particularly strong associations with HR-QoL improvements. Pain severity is associated with functional limitations, disability and poor HR-QoL in patients with self-reported OA. Functional limitations might have particular relevance when OA affects the upper limbs. Improvements are feasible in many patients who consult because of their pain. PMID:27068737

  14. Osteoarthritis Pathogenesis: A Review of Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Bingjiang; Chen, Di; Zhang, Jushi; Hu, Songfeng; Jin, Hongting; Tong, Peijian

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the most prevalent chronic joint disease, increases in prevalence with age, and affects majority of individuals over the age of 65 and is a leading musculoskeletal cause of impaired mobility in the elderly. Because the precise molecular mechanisms which are involved in the degradation of cartilage matrix and development of OA are poorly understood and there are currently no effective interventions to decelerate the progression of OA or retard the irreversible degradation of cartilage except for total joint replacement surgery. In this paper, the important molecular mechanisms related to OA pathogenesis will be summarized and new insights into potential molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of OA will be provided. PMID:25311420

  15. Metabolic analysis of osteoarthritis subchondral bone based on UPLC/Q-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gang; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Tingmei; Zhu, Weiwen; Ding, Shijia; Xu, Kaiming; Xu, Zhongwei; Guo, Yanlei; Zhang, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), one of the most widespread musculoskeletal joint diseases among the aged, is characterized by the progressive loss of articular cartilage and continuous changes in subchondral bone. The exact pathogenesis of osteoarthritis is not completely clear. In this work, ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/Q-TOF-MS) in combination with multivariate statistical analysis was applied to analyze the metabolic profiling of subchondral bone from 42 primary osteoarthritis patients. This paper described a modified two-step method for extracting the metabolites of subchondral bone from primary osteoarthritis patients. Finally, 68 metabolites were identified to be significantly changed in the sclerotic subchondral bone compared with the non-sclerotic subchondral bone. Taurine and hypotaurine metabolism and beta-alanine metabolism were probably relevant to the sclerosis of subchondral bone. Taurine, L-carnitine, and glycerophospholipids played a vital regulation role in the pathological process of sclerotic subchondral bone. In the sclerotic process, beta-alanine and L-carnitine might be related to the increase of energy consumption. In addition, our findings suggested that the intra-cellular environment of sclerotic subchondral bone might be more acidotic and hypoxic compared with the non-sclerotic subchondral bone. In conclusion, this study provided a new insight into the pathogenesis of subchondral bone sclerosis. Our results indicated that metabolomics could serve as a promising approach for elucidating the pathogenesis of subchondral bone sclerosis in primary osteoarthritis. Graphical Abstract Metabolic analysis of osteoarthritis subchondral bone. PMID:27074781

  16. Effects of low-level laser therapy on joint pain, synovitis, anabolic, and catabolic factors in a progressive osteoarthritis rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pu; Liu, Chuan; Yang, Xiaotian; Zhou, Yujing; Wei, Xiaofei; Ji, Qiaodan; Yang, Lin; He, Chengqi

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on short-term and long-term joint pain, synovitis, anabolic, and catabolic factors in the cartilage of a rabbit model with progressive osteoarthritis (OA) induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT). A total of 160 New Zealand white rabbits were randomly assigned into two groups (ACLT group and LLLT group). All rabbits received ACLT surgery, and 2-, 4-, 6-, and 8-week treatment after the surgery, with 20 rabbits being tested biweekly over every study period. The LLLT group received LLLT with a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser (830 nm) of 1.5 J/cm(2) three times per week, and the ACLT group received placebo LLLT with the equipment switched off. Long-term and short-term pain was tested via weight-bearing asymmetry; synovitis was assessed histologically; and knee joint cartilage was evaluated by gross morphology, histology, and gene expression analysis of anabolic and catabolic factors. The histological assessment of pain and synovitis showed that at least 6-week intermittent irradiation of LLLT could relief knee pain and control synovium inflammation. Gross morphologic inspection and histological evaluation showed that 6 weeks of LLLT could decrease cartilage damage of medical femoral condyle and 8 weeks of LLLT could decrease cartilage damage of medical and lateral femoral condyles and medical tibial plateau. Gene expression analysis revealed two results: At least 6 weeks of LLLT could decrease production of catabolic factors, for example, interleukin 1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and MMP-3, and slow down the loss of anabolic factors, mainly TIMP-1. Eight weeks of LLLT treatment could slow down the loss of collagen II, aggrecan, and anabolic factors, mainly transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). The study suggests that LLLT plays a protective role against cartilage degradation and synovitis in rabbits with progressive OA by virtue of the regulation

  17. Factors Important for Work Participation Among Older Workers with Depression, Cardiovascular Disease, and Osteoarthritis: A Mixed Method Study.

    PubMed

    Boot, Cécile R L; de Kruif, Anja Th C M; Shaw, William S; van der Beek, Allard J; Deeg, Dorly J; Abma, Tineke

    2016-06-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to gain insight into differences and similarities in factors important for work participation in older (58-65 years) workers among three different chronic diseases: depression (D), cardiovascular disease (C), and osteoarthritis (O). Methods A mixed method design was used, with a qualitative part (in-depth interviews) with 14 patients with D, C or O and a quantitative part based on the 2002-2003 cohort of the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam. We analysed and compared 3-year (response 93 %) predictors of paid work in 239 participants with D, C, or O using regression analyses. The qualitative findings were integrated with the quantitative findings aiming at complementarity. Results Common factors important for work participation were: working at baseline; male gender; lower age; partner with paid work; better physical and mental health; and higher mastery scores. The qualitative analyses added autonomy in work and provided contextual information regarding the perceived importance of working as factors important for participation in paid work. For D and C, work gave purpose in life and enhanced social contacts. Participation in work was perceived as necessary to structure life only for D. Conclusion Most factors important for work participation were similar for D, C, and O. However, the interviews revealed that for D, the context and the meaning attributed to these factors differed. PMID:26210996

  18. Cost-effectiveness analysis for joint pain treatment in patients with osteoarthritis treated at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS): Comparison of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) vs. cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Hernández, Iris; Mould-Quevedo, Joaquín F; Torres-González, Rubén; Goycochea-Robles, María Victoria; Pacheco-Domínguez, Reyna Lizette; Sánchez-García, Sergio; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel; Garduño-Espinosa, Juan

    2008-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the main causes of disability worldwide, especially in persons >55 years of age. Currently, controversy remains about the best therapeutic alternative for this disease when evaluated from a cost-effectiveness viewpoint. For Social Security Institutions in developing countries, it is very important to assess what drugs may decrease the subsequent use of medical care resources, considering their adverse events that are known to have a significant increase in medical care costs of patients with OA. Three treatment alternatives were compared: celecoxib (200 mg twice daily), non-selective NSAIDs (naproxen, 500 mg twice daily; diclofenac, 100 mg twice daily; and piroxicam, 20 mg/day) and acetaminophen, 1000 mg twice daily. The aim of this study was to identify the most cost-effective first-choice pharmacological treatment for the control of joint pain secondary to OA in patients treated at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS). Methods A cost-effectiveness assessment was carried out. A systematic review of the literature was performed to obtain transition probabilities. In order to evaluate analysis robustness, one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted. Estimations were done for a 6-month period. Results Treatment demonstrating the best cost-effectiveness results [lowest cost-effectiveness ratio $17.5 pesos/patient ($1.75 USD)] was celecoxib. According to the one-way sensitivity analysis, celecoxib would need to markedly decrease its effectiveness in order for it to not be the optimal treatment option. In the probabilistic analysis, both in the construction of the acceptability curves and in the estimation of net economic benefits, the most cost-effective option was celecoxib. Conclusion From a Mexican institutional perspective and probably in other Social Security Institutions in similar developing countries, the most cost-effective option for treatment of knee and/or hip OA would be celecoxib. PMID

  19. What Is Osteoarthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Articles Osteoarthritis PDF Version 55 KB Audio Version Time: 09:59 Size: 9.4 MB November 2014 What Is Osteoarthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of Publications for the Public Osteoarthritis is a ...

  20. MR imaging in osteoarthritis: hardware, coils, and sequences.

    PubMed

    Link, Thomas M

    2009-07-01

    Whole-organ assessment of a joint with osteoarthritis (OA) requires tailored MR imaging hardware and imaging protocols to diagnose and monitor degenerative disease of the cartilage, menisci, bone marrow, ligaments, and tendons. Image quality benefits from increased field strength, and 3.0-T MR imaging is used increasingly for assessing joints with OA. Dedicated surface coils are required for best visualization of joints affected by OA, and the use of multichannel phased-array coils with parallel imaging improves image quality and/or shortens acquisition times. Sequences that best show morphologic abnormalities of the whole joint include intermediate-weighted fast-spin echo sequences. Also quantitative sequences have been developed to assess cartilage volume and thickness and to analyze cartilage biochemical composition. PMID:19631072

  1. MR imaging in osteoarthritis: hardware, coils, and sequences.

    PubMed

    Link, Thomas M

    2010-02-01

    Whole-organ assessment of a joint with osteoarthritis (OA) requires tailored MR imaging hardware and imaging protocols to diagnose and monitor degenerative disease of the cartilage, menisci, bone marrow, ligaments, and tendons. Image quality benefits from increased field strength, and 3.0-T MR imaging is used increasingly for assessing joints with OA. Dedicated surface coils are required for best visualization of joints affected by OA, and the use of multichannel phased-array coils with parallel imaging improves image quality and/or shortens acquisition times. Sequences that best show morphologic abnormalities of the whole joint include intermediate-weighted fast-spin echo sequences. Also quantitative sequences have been developed to assess cartilage volume and thickness and to analyze cartilage biochemical composition. PMID:19962095

  2. Assessment of synovitis with contrast-enhanced MRI using a whole-joint semiquantitative scoring system in people with, or at high risk of, knee osteoarthritis: the MOST study

    PubMed Central

    Guermazi, Ali; Roemer, Frank W; Hayashi, Daichi; Crema, Michel D; Niu, Jingbo; Zhang, Yuqing; Marra, Monica D; Katur, Avinash; Lynch, John A; El-Khoury, George Y; Baker, Kristin; Hughes, Laura B; Nevitt, Michael C; Felson, David T

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To introduce a comprehensive and reliable scoring system for the assessment of whole-knee joint synovitis based on contrast-enhanced (CE) MRI. Methods Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST) is a cohort study of people with, or at high risk of, knee osteoarthritis (OA). Subjects are an unselected subset of MOST who volunteered for CE-MRI. Synovitis was assessed at 11 sites of the joint. Synovial thickness was scored semiquantitatively: grade 0 (<2 mm), grade 1 (2–4 mm) and grade 2 (>4 mm) at each site. Two musculoskeletal radiologists performed the readings and inter- and intrareader reliability was evaluated. Whole-knee synovitis was assessed by summing the scores from all sites. The association of Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index pain score with this summed score and with the maximum synovitis grade for each site was assessed. Results 400 subjects were included (mean age 58.8±7.0 years, body mass index 29.5±4.9 kg/m2, 46% women). For individual sites, intrareader reliability (weighted κ) was 0.67–1.00 for reader 1 and 0.60–1.00 for reader 2. Inter-reader agreement (κ) was 0.67–0.92. For the summed synovitis scores, intrareader reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)) was 0.98 and 0.96 for each reader and inter-reader agreement (ICC) was 0.94. Moderate to severe synovitis in the parapatellar subregion was associated with the higher maximum pain score (adjusted OR (95% CI), 2.8 (1.4 to 5.4) and 3.1 (1.2 to 7.9), respectively). Conclusions A comprehensive semiquantitative scoring system for the assessment of whole-knee synovitis is proposed. It is reliable and identifies knees with pain, and thus is a potentially powerful tool for synovitis assessment in epidemiological OA studies. PMID:21187293

  3. The prevalence of chondrocalcinosis (CC) of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint on chest radiographs and correlation with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Guillermo; Baynes, Keith; Mautz, Alan; DuBois, Melissa; Cerniglia, Ross; Ryan, Lawrence M.

    2016-01-01

    Digital imaging combined with picture archiving and communication system (PACS) access allows detailed image retrieval and magnification. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals preferentially deposit in fibrocartilages, the cartilage of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint being one such structure. We sought to determine if examination of the AC joints on magnified PACS imaging of chest films would be useful in identifying chondrocalcinosis (CC). Retrospective radiographic readings and chart reviews involving 1,920 patients aged 50 or more who had routine outpatient chest radiographs over a 4-month period were performed. Knee radiographs were available for comparison in 489 patients. Medical records were reviewed to abstract demographics, chest film reports, and diagnoses. AC joint CC was identified in 1.1 % (21/1,920) of consecutive chest films. Patients with AC joint CC were 75 years of age versus 65.4 in those without CC (p<0.0002). Four hundred eighty-nine patients had knee films. Six of these patients had AC joint CC, and of these, five also had knee CC (83 %). Of the 483 without AC joint CC, 62 (12 %) had knee CC (p=0.002). Patients with AC joint CC were more likely to have a recorded history of CPPD crystal deposition disease than those without AC joint CC (14 versus 1 %, p=0.0017). The prevalence of AC joint CC increases with age and is associated with knee CC. A finding of AC joint CC should heighten suspicion of pseudogout or secondary osteoarthritis in appropriate clinical settings and, in a young patient, should alert the clinician to the possibility of an associated metabolic condition. PMID:23609408

  4. Nutraceuticals for the treatment of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Olsen, N J

    2011-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a highly prevalent human condition which is becoming an even greater health problem in an aging global population. Existing treatments for OA provide pain relief and some anti-inflammatory effects, but no truly disease-modifying treatments are available for this disease. Furthermore, the generally advanced age and frequent comorbid conditions present in OA patients limit safety of many available drugs. Treatments with enhanced safety margins and that offer chondroprotective effects are unmet needs. Nutraceuticals derived from foods and herbs have been long used in traditional medicine, and many have wide-ranging biologic effects suggesting novel mechanisms of action. Some of these have shown promise in controlled clinical trials in OA patients. Whether these approaches could offer safe symptom relief and possibly mediate beneficial joint remodeling in early OA are possibilities that merit further investigation. PMID:21317847

  5. Knee osteoarthritis related pain: a narrative review of diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alshami, Ali M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis is a common progressive joint disease, involving not only the joint lining but also cartilage, ligaments, and bone. For the last ten years, majority of published review articles were not specific to osteoarthritis of the knee, and strength of evidence and clinical guidelines were not appropriately summarized. Objectives To appraise the literature by summarizing the findings of current evidence and clinical guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of knee osteoarthritis pain. Methodology English journal articles that focused on knee osteoarthritis related pain were searched via PubMed (1 January 2002 – 26 August 2012) and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) databases, using the terms ‘knee’, ‘osteoarthritis’ and ‘pain’. In addition, reference lists from identified articles and related book chapters were included as comprehensive overviews. Results For knee osteoarthritis, the highest diagnostic accuracy can be achieved by presence of pain and five or more clinical or laboratory criteria plus osteophytes. Some inconsistencies in the recommendations and findings were found between the clinical guidelines and systematic reviews. Generally, paracetamol, oral and topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, corticosteroid injections and physical therapy techniques, such as therapeutic exercises, joint manual therapy and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, can help reduce pain and improve function. Patient education programs and weight reduction for overweight patients are important to be considered. Conclusions Some inconsistencies in the recommendations and findings were found between the clinical guidelines and systematic reviews. However, it is likely that a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments is most effective in treating patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:24899883

  6. Managing lifestyle factors in adults with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sarah

    2015-07-15

    Osteoarthritis is a major cause of disability in older people in the UK. The symptoms of joint pain and stiffness can lead to reduced joint function and deformity. Addressing lifestyle factors, namely exercise and maintaining an optimum weight, can reduce pain and improve joint function. This article focuses on how, by using the concept of goal setting, nurses can work with patients to develop a plan for becoming more active and for losing weight - if the patient is overweight - to reduce the symptoms of osteoarthritis. PMID:26174284

  7. Strategies for the prevention of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Roos, Ewa M; Arden, Nigel K

    2016-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) has been thought of as a disease of cartilage that can be effectively treated surgically at severe stages with joint arthroplasty. Today, OA is considered a whole-organ disease that is amenable to prevention and treatment at early stages. OA develops slowly over 10-15 years, interfering with activities of daily living and the ability to work. Many patients tolerate pain, and many health-care providers accept pain and disability as inevitable corollaries of OA and ageing. Too often, health-care providers passively await final 'joint death', necessitating knee and hip replacements. Instead, OA should be viewed as a chronic condition, where prevention and early comprehensive-care models are the accepted norm, as is the case with other chronic diseases. Joint injury, obesity and impaired muscle function are modifiable risk factors amenable to primary and secondary prevention strategies. The strategies that are most appropriate for each patient should be identified, by selecting interventions to correct--or at least attenuate--OA risk factors. We must also choose the interventions that are most likely to be acceptable to patients, to maximize adherence to--and persistence with--the regimes. Now is the time to begin the era of personalized prevention for knee OA. PMID:26439406

  8. Synovial fluid analyses detect and differentiate proteoglycan metabolism in canine experimental models of osteoarthritis and disuse atrophy.

    PubMed

    Ratcliffe, A; Beauvais, P J; Saed-Nejad, F; Shurety, W; Caterson, B

    1993-01-01

    Canine experimental models of osteoarthritis (OA) and disuse atrophy were used to study cartilage metabolism. The synovial fluids from the OA joints showed elevated levels of keratan sulfate (KS) epitope and link protein, indicating increased catabolism. Analysis of fluids from joints with disuse atrophy showed high levels of KS epitope, but no increase in link protein. Quantitation of a novel chondroitin sulfate (3B3) epitope showed it to be present only in the synovial fluids and articular cartilage of the OA joints. The results indicate that these may be important indicators, or markers, of degenerative joint disease. PMID:8456644

  9. Dance between biology, mechanics, and structure: A systems-based approach to developing osteoarthritis prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Chu, Constance R; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2015-07-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of human suffering and disability for which disease-modifying treatments are lacking. OA occurs through complex and dynamic interplays between diverse factors over long periods of time. The traditional research and clinical focus on OA, the end stage disease, obscured understanding pathogenesis prior to reaching a common pathway defined by pain and functional deficits, joint deformity, and radiographic changes. To emphasize disease modification and prevention, we describe a multi-disciplinary systems-based approach encompassing biology, mechanics, and structure to define pre-osteoarthritic disease processes. Central to application of this model is the concept of "pre-osteoarthritis," conditions where clinical OA has not yet developed. Rather, joint homeostasis has been compromised and there are potentially reversible markers for heightened OA risk. Key messages from this perspective are (i) to focus research onto defining pre-OA through identifying and validating biological, mechanical, and imaging markers of OA risk, (ii) to emphasize multi-disciplinary approaches, and (iii) to propose that developing personalized interventions to address reversible markers of OA risk in healthy joints may be the key to prevention. Ultimately, a systems-based analysis of OA pathogenesis shows potential to transform clinical practice by facilitating development and testing of new strategies to prevent or delay the onset of osteoarthritis. PMID:25639920

  10. Cellular Phone Overuse as A Cause for Trapeziometacarpal Osteoarthritis: A Two Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Canillas, Fernando; Colino, Alvaro; Menéndez, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: New technologies have been related to upper limb diseases Trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis in young patients has not been described yet as one of these “overuse pathologies”. Case Report: We present two cases. A 33 and a 32 year-old women, right handed, suffering from trapeziometacarpal pain. Neither previous trauma nor rheumatic disease was reported. Excessive use of last generation cellular phone was the only background reported. Pain and joint crepitation were found on physical examination and osteoarthritis signs were seen on MRI scans. One of the patients improved after using a cast, physical activity restrictions and a specific rehabilitation program; whilst the other required a corticosteroid joint injection. Conclusion: We warn about the potential growth of these pathologies caused by an indiscriminate use (or abuse) of touch-screen cellular phones. PMID:27298990

  11. The radiology of joint disease. 3rd Ed

    SciTech Connect

    Forrester, D.M.; Brown, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The book is a systematic radiographic approach to the arthritides. Part one deals with hand abnormalities ''to facilitate the teaching of basic principles and to dramatize the differences between radiographic features of various arthritides,'' as stated in the forward of the first edition. Part two, ''Arthritis from Head to Foot,'' illustrates the same diseases as they affect other joints. The ABCs (alignment, bone mineralization, cartilage space, soft tissue) approach is followed throughout the book. For example, reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome is dealt with in six different locations, and metatarsal stress fractures are mentioned in a chapter on erosions in rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. An increased rate of falling leads to a rise in fracture risk in postmenopausal women with self-reported osteoarthritis: a prospective multinational cohort study (GLOW)

    PubMed Central

    Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Nogues, Xavier; Javaid, M Kassim; Wyman, Allison; Arden, Nigel K; Azagra, Rafael; Cooper, Cyrus; Adachi, Jonathan D; Boonen, Steven; Chapurlat, Roland D; Compston, Juliet E; Gehlbach, Stephen H; Greenspan, Susan L; Hooven, Frederick H; Netelenbos, J Coen; Pfeilschifter, Johannes; Rossini, Maurizio; Sambrook, Philip N; Silverman, Stuart; Siris, Ethel S; Watts, Nelson B; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with osteoarthritis have increased bone mass, but no decrease in fractures. We studied the association between self-reported osteoarthritis and incident falls and fractures in postmenopausal women. Methods GLOW is a prospective, multinational cohort of 60 393 non-institutionalised women aged ≥55 years who had visited primary care practices within the previous 2 years. Questionnaires were mailed at yearly intervals. Patients were classified as osteoarthritic if they answered yes to the question “Has a doctor or other health provider ever said that you had osteoarthritis or degenerative joint disease?”, and this was validated against primary care records. Information on incident falls, fractures, and covariates was self-reported. Cox and Poisson models were used for incident fractures and number of falls, respectively, to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and rate ratios (RRs) for baseline osteoarthritis status. Results Of 51 386 women followed for a median of 2.9 (interquartile range 2.1 to 3.0) years, 20 409 (40%) reported osteoarthritis. The adjusted HR for osteoarthritis predicting fracture was 1.21 (95% CI 1.13 to 1.30; p<0.0001) and the adjusted RR for falls was 1.24 (95% CI 1.22 to 1.26; p<0.0001). However, the association between osteoarthritis and fracture was not significant after adjustment for incident falls: HR 1.06 (95% CI 0.98 to 1.15; p=0.13). Conclusion Postmenopausal women with self-reported osteoarthritis have a 20% increased risk of fracture and experience 25% more falls than osteoarthritis-free peers. Our data suggest that increased falls are the causal pathway of the association between osteoarthritis and fractures. PMID:22730372

  13. Perceptions of coping with non-disease-related life stress for women with osteoarthritis: a qualitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Melissa L; Byles, Julie E; Townsend, Natalie; Loxton, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Objective Coping with arthritis-related stress has been extensively studied. However, limited evidence exists regarding coping with stress extraneous to the disease (life stress). This study explored life stress and coping in a subset of older women with osteoarthritis from a larger longitudinal study. Setting An Australian regional university. Design This qualitative study involved semistructured telephone interviews. Potential participants were mailed a letter of invitation/participant information statement by the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH). Invitations were sent out in small batches (primarily 10). Interviews were conducted until data saturation was achieved using a systematic process (n=19). Digitally recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim and deidentified. Data were thematically analysed. Participants Women who indicated being diagnosed or treated for arthritis in the previous 3 years in the fifth survey of the ALSWH (conducted in 2007) provided the sampling frame. Potential participants were randomly sampled by a blinded data manager using a random number generator. Results Coping with life stress involved both attitudinal coping processes developed early in life (ie, stoicism) and transient cognitive and support-based responses. Women also described a dualistic process involving a reduction in the ability to cope with ongoing stress over time, coupled with personal growth. Conclusions This is the first study to examine how individuals cope with non-arthritis-related stress. The findings add to the current understanding of stress and coping, and have implications regarding the prevention of arthritis in women. Importantly, this study highlighted the potential detrimental impact of persistent coping patterns developed early in life. Public health campaigns aimed at stress mitigation and facilitation of adaptive coping mechanisms in childhood and adolescence may assist with arthritis prevention. PMID:27188808

  14. Strontium ranelate in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: new insights and emerging clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Reginster, Jean-Yves; Beaudart, Charlotte; Neuprez, Audrey; Bruyère, Olivier

    2013-10-01

    Osteoarthritis is a primary cause of disability and functional incapacity. Pharmacological treatment is currently limited to symptomatic management, and in advanced stages, surgery remains the only solution. The therapeutic armamentarium for osteoarthritis remains poor in treatments with an effect on joint structure, that is, disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs (DMOADs). Glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate are the only medications for which some conclusive evidence for a disease-modifying effect is available. Strontium ranelate is currently indicated for the prevention of fracture in severe osteoporosis. Its efficacy and safety as a DMOAD in knee osteoarthritis has recently been explored in the SEKOIA trial, a 3-year randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Outpatients with knee osteoarthritis, Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 or 3, and joint space width (JSW) of 2.5-5 mm received strontium ranelate 1 g/day (n = 558) or 2 g/day (n = 566), or placebo (n = 559). This sizable population was aged 62.9 years and had a JSW of 3.50 ± 0.84 mm. Treatment with strontium ranelate led to significantly less progression of knee osteoarthritis: estimates for annual difference in joint space narrowing versus placebo were 0.14 mm [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.05-0.23 mm; p < 0.001] for 1 g/day and 0.10 mm (95% CI 0.02-0.19 mm; p = 0.018) for 2 g/day, with no difference between strontium ranelate groups. Radiological progression was less frequent with strontium ranelate (22% with 1 g/day and 26% with 2 g/day versus 33% with placebo, both p < 0.05), as was radioclinical progression (8% and 7% versus 12%, both p < 0.05). Symptoms also improved with strontium ranelate 2 g/day only in terms of total WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index) score (p = 0.045), and its components for pain (p = 0.028) and physical function (p = 0.099). Responder analyses using a range of criteria for symptoms indicated that the effect of strontium ranelate

  15. TGF-β signaling and the development of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Li, Shan; Chen, Di

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common joint degenerative disease affecting the whole joint structure, including articular cartilage, subchondral bone and synovial tissue. Although extensive work has been done in recent years to explore the molecular mechanism underlying this disease, the pathogenesis of OA is still poorly understood and currently, there is no effective disease-modifying treatment for OA. Recently, both in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that confirmed (TGF-β)/SMAD pathway plays a critical role during OA development. This short review will focus on the function and signaling mechanisms of TGF-β/SMAD pathway in articular chondrocytes, mesenchymal progenitor cells of subchondral bone and synovial lining cells during OA development. PMID:25541594

  16. Regenerative therapies for equine degenerative joint disease: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Broeckx, Sarah; Zimmerman, Marieke; Crocetti, Sara; Suls, Marc; Mariën, Tom; Ferguson, Stephen J; Chiers, Koen; Duchateau, Luc; Franco-Obregón, Alfredo; Wuertz, Karin; Spaas, Jan H

    2014-01-01

    Degenerative joint disease (DJD) is a major cause of reduced athletic function and retirement in equine performers. For this reason, regenerative therapies for DJD have gained increasing interest. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were isolated from a 6-year-old donor horse. MSCs were either used in their native state or after chondrogenic induction. In an initial study, 20 horses with naturally occurring DJD in the fetlock joint were divided in 4 groups and injected with the following: 1) PRP; 2) MSCs; 3) MSCs and PRP; or 4) chondrogenic induced MSCs and PRP. The horses were then evaluated by means of a clinical scoring system after 6 weeks (T1), 12 weeks (T2), 6 months (T3) and 12 months (T4) post injection. In a second study, 30 horses with the same medical background were randomly assigned to one of the two combination therapies and evaluated at T1. The protein expression profile of native MSCs was found to be negative for major histocompatibility (MHC) II and p63, low in MHC I and positive for Ki67, collagen type II (Col II) and Vimentin. Chondrogenic induction resulted in increased mRNA expression of aggrecan, Col II and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) as well as in increased protein expression of p63 and glycosaminoglycan, but in decreased protein expression of Ki67. The combined use of PRP and MSCs significantly improved the functionality and sustainability of damaged joints from 6 weeks until 12 months after treatment, compared to PRP treatment alone. The highest short-term clinical evolution scores were obtained with chondrogenic induced MSCs and PRP. This study reports successful in vitro chondrogenic induction of equine MSCs. In vivo application of (induced) MSCs together with PRP in horses suffering from DJD in the fetlock joint resulted in a significant clinical improvement until 12 months after treatment. PMID:24465787

  17. Joint Modeling of Transitional Patterns of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Zhiwei; Zhou, Xiao-Hua

    2013-01-01

    While the experimental Alzheimer's drugs recently developed by pharmaceutical companies failed to stop the progression of Alzheimer's disease, clinicians strive to seek clues on how the patients would be when they visit back next year, based upon the patients' current clinical and neuropathologic diagnosis results. This is related to how to precisely identify the transitional patterns of Alzheimer's disease. Due to the complexities of the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, the condition of the disease is usually characterized by multiple clinical and neuropathologic measurements, including Clinical Dementia Rating (CDRGLOB), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), a score derived from the clinician judgement on neuropsychological tests (COGSTAT), and Functional Activities Questionnaire (FAQ). In this research article, we investigate a class of novel joint random-effects transition models that are used to simultaneously analyze the transitional patterns of multiple primary measurements of Alzheimer's disease and, at the same time, account for the association between the measurements. The proposed methodology can avoid the bias introduced by ignoring the correlation between primary measurements and can predict subject-specific transitional patterns. PMID:24073268

  18. Unraveling the role of Mg(++) in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaqiang; Yue, Jiaji; Yang, Chunxi

    2016-02-15

    Mg(++) is widely involved in human physiological processes that may play key roles in the generation and progression of diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex joint disorder characterized by articular cartilage degradation, abnormal mineralization and inflammation. Magnesium deficiency is considered to be a major risk factor for OA development and progression. Magnesium deficiency is active in several pathways that have been implicated in OA, including increased inflammatory mediators, cartilage damage, defective chondrocyte biosynthesis, aberrant calcification and a weakened effect of analgesics. Abundant in vitro and in vivo evidence in animal models now suggests that the nutritional supplementation or local infiltration of Mg(++) represent effective therapies for OA. The goal of this review is to summarize the current understanding of the role of Mg(++) in OA with particular emphasis on the related molecular mechanisms involved in OA progression. PMID:26800786

  19. Effects of Intensive Diet and Exercise on Knee Joint Loads, Inflammation, and Clinical Outcomes Among Overweight and Obese Adults With Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Messier, Stephen P.; Mihalko, Shannon L.; Legault, Claudine; Miller, Gary D.; Nicklas, Barbara J.; DeVita, Paul; Beavers, Daniel P.; Hunter, David J.; Lyles, Mary F.; Eckstein, Felix; Williamson, Jeff D.; Carr, J. Jeffery; Guermazi, Ali; Loeser, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Knee osteoarthritis (OA), a common cause of chronic pain and disability, has biomechanical and inflammatory origins and is exacerbated by obesity. OBJECTIVE To determine whether a ≥10% reduction in body weight induced by diet, with or without exercise, would improve mechanistic and clinical outcomes more than exercise alone. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Single-blind, 18-month, randomized clinical trial at Wake Forest University between July 2006 and April 2011. The diet and exercise interventions were center-based with options for the exercise groups to transition to a home-based program. Participants were 454 overweight and obese older community-dwelling adults (age ≥55 years with body mass index of 27–41) with pain and radiographic knee OA. INTERVENTIONS Intensive diet-induced weight loss plus exercise, intensive diet-induced weight loss, or exercise. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Mechanistic primary outcomes: knee joint compressive force and plasma IL-6 levels; secondary clinical outcomes: self-reported pain (range, 0–20), function (range, 0–68), mobility, and health-related quality of life (range, 0–100). RESULTS At 18 months, 399 participants (88%) completed the study. Compared with exercise participants, knee compressive forces were lower in diet participants and IL-6 levels were lower in diet and diet + exercise participants. 18-mo Outcomes, Mean (95% CI) Exercise(E) Diet (D) D + E Difference,E vs D Difference, Evs D+E Weight loss, kg −1.8(−5.7to1.8) −8.9(−12.4 to −5.3) −10.6(−14.1 to −7.1) Knee compressiveforces, N 2687(2590 to 2784) 2487(2393 to 2581) 2543(2448 to 2637) 200(55 to 345)a 144(1 to 287) IL-6, pg/mL 3.1(2.9 to 3.4) 2.7(2.4 to 3.0) 2.7(2.5 to 3.0) 0.43(0.01 to 0.85)a 0.39(−0.03 to 0.81)a Pain 4.7(4.2 to 5.1) 4.8(4.3 to 5.2) 3.6(3.2 to 4.1) −0.11(−0.81 to 0.59) 1.02(0.33 to 1.71)a Function 18.4(16.9 to 19.9) 17.4(15.9 to 18.9) 14.1(12.6 to 15.6) 0.98(−1.24 to 3.20) 4.29(2.07 to 6.50)a SF-36

  20. Effects of Diagnostic Label and Disease Information on Emotions, Beliefs, and Willingness to Help Older Parents with Osteoarthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Kali S.; McIlvane, Jessica M.; Haley, William E.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the impact of the diagnostic label of osteoarthritis and educational information on family members' attributions, perceptions, and willingness to help older parents with pain. Undergraduate students (N = 636) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions where they read vignettes about an older mother with chronic pain, which varied…

  1. External Knee Adduction and Flexion Moments during Gait and Medial Tibiofemoral Disease Progression in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alison H.; Moisio, Kirsten C.; Chmiel, Joan S.; Eckstein, Felix; Guermazi, Ali; Prasad, Pottumarthi V.; Zhang, Yunhui; Almagor, Orit; Belisle, Laura; Hayes, Karen; Sharma, Leena

    2015-01-01

    Objective Test the hypothesis that greater baseline peak external knee adduction moment (KAM), KAM impulse, and peak external knee flexion moment (KFM) during the stance phase of gait are associated with baseline-to-2-year medial tibiofemoral cartilage damage and bone marrow lesion progression, and cartilage thickness loss. Methods Participants all had knee OA in at least one knee. Baseline peak KAM, KAM impulse, and peak KFM (normalized to body weight and height) were captured and computed using a motion analysis system and 6 force plates. Participants underwent MRI of both knees at baseline and two years later. To assess the association between baseline moments and baseline-to-2-year semiquantitative cartilage damage and bone marrow lesion progression and quantitative cartilage thickness loss, we used logistic regression with generalized estimating equations (GEE), adjusting for gait speed, age, gender, disease severity, knee pain severity, and medication use. Results The sample consisted of 391 knees (204 persons): mean age 64.2 years (SD 10.0); BMI 28.4 kg/m2 (5.7); 156 (76.5%) women. Greater baseline peak KAM and KAM impulse were each associated with worsening of medial bone marrow lesions, but not cartilage damage. Higher baseline KAM impulse was associated with 2-year medial cartilage thickness loss assessed both as % loss and as a threshold of loss, whereas peak KAM was related only to % loss. There was no relationship between baseline peak KFM and any medial disease progression outcome measures. Conclusion Findings support targeting KAM parameters in an effort to delay medial OA disease progression. PMID:25677110

  2. Osteoarthritis year 2011 in review: biology

    PubMed Central

    Lotz, M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY This review is focused on advances in understanding the biology of joint homeostasis and osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis mechanisms that have led to proof of concept studies on new therapeutic approaches. The three selected topics include angiogenesis in joint tissues, biomechanics and joint lubrication and mitochondrial dysfunction. This new information represents progress in the integration of mechanisms that control multiple aspects of OA pathophysiology. PMID:22179031

  3. Pre-Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Brittberg, Mats; Eriksson, Karl; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Lindahl, Anders; Marlovits, Stefan; Möller, Per; Richardson, James B.; Steinwachs, Matthias; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy

    2015-01-01

    Objective An attempt to define pre-osteoarthritis (OA) versus early OA and definitive osteoarthritis. Methods A group of specialists in the field of cartilage science and treatment was formed to consider the nature of OA onset and its possible diagnosis. Results Late-stage OA, necessitating total joint replacement, is the end stage of a biological process, with many previous earlier stages. Early-stage OA has been defined and involves structural changes identified by arthroscopy or radiography. The group argued that before the “early-stage OA” there must exist a stage where cellular processes, due to the presence of risk factors, have kicked into action but have not yet resulted in structural changes. The group suggested that this stage could be called “pre-osteoarthritis” (pre-OA). Conclusions The group suggests that defining points of initiation for OA in the knee could be defined, for example, by traumatic episodes or surgical meniscectomy. Such events may set in motion metabolic processes that could be diagnosed by modern MRI protocols or arthroscopy including probing techniques before structural changes of early OA have developed. Preventive measures should preferably be applied at this pre-OA stage in order to stop the projected OA “epidemic.” PMID:26175861

  4. Animal models of osteoarthritis for the understanding of the bone contribution

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Solal, Martine; Funck-Brentano, Thomas; Hay, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis characterizes the joint disease that results in cartilage damage accompanied by bone lesions and synovial inflammation. Joint integrity results from physiological interactions between all these tissues. Local factors such as cytokines and growth factors regulate cartilage remodeling and metabolism as well as chondrocyte differentiation and survival. Tremendous progress has been made through the use of animal models and provided insight for the mechanism of cartilage loss and chondrocyte functions. Surgical, chemical or genetic models have been developed to investigate the role of molecules in the pathogenesis or treatment of osteoarthritis. Indeed, the animal models are helpful to investigate the cartilage changes in relation to changes in bone remodeling. Increased bone resorption occurs at early stage of the development of osteoarthritis, the inhibition of which prevents cartilage damage, confirming the role of bone factors in the crosstalk between both tissues. Among these numerous molecules, some participate in the imbalance in cartilage homeostasis and in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis. These local factors are potential candidates for new drug targets. PMID:24422124

  5. Imaging Approach to Temporomandibular Joint Disorders.

    PubMed

    Morales, H; Cornelius, R

    2016-03-01

    Internal derangement is the most common temporomandibular joint disorder. Degenerative osteoarthritis and trauma are next in frequency. Less common pathology includes rheumatoid arthritis, synovial chondromatosis, calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate deposition disease, pigmented villonodular synovitis, tumors, infection, and osteonecrosis. We provide a systematic approach to facilitate interpretation based on major anatomic structures: disc-attachments, joint space, condyle, and lateral pterygoid muscle. Relevant graphic anatomy and state of the art imaging are discussed in correlation with current clinical and therapeutic highlights of pathologic entities affecting the joint. PMID:26374243

  6. Joint Leveling for Advanced Kienbock’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Calfee, Ryan P.; Van Steyn, Marlo O.; Gyuricza, Cassie; Adams, Amelia; Weiland, Andrew J.; Gelberman, Richard H.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The use of joint leveling procedures to treat Kienbock’s disease has been limited by the degree of disease advancement. This study was designed to compare clinical and radiographic outcomes of wrists with more advanced Kienbock’s disease (stage IIIB) to wrists with less advanced disease (stage II/IIIA) following radius shortening osteotomy. METHODS This retrospective study enrolled 31 adult wrists (30 patients, mean age 39 years), treated by radius shortening osteotomy between two institutions for either stage IIIB (n=14) or stage II/IIIA (n=17) disease. Evaluation was carried out at a mean of 74 months (IIIB, 77 months; II/IIIA, 72 months). Radiographic assessment determined disease progression. Clinical outcomes were determined by validated patient-based and objective measures. RESULTS Patient-based outcome ratings of wrists treated for stage IIIB were similar to those with stage II/IIIA [QuickDASH (15 vs 12:p=.63), MMWS (84 vs 87:p=.59), VAS pain (1.2 vs 1.7:p=.45), VAS function (2.6 vs 2.1:p=.59)]. The average flexion/extension arc was 102° for wrists with stage IIIB and 106° for wrists with stage II/IIIA Kienbock’s (p=.70). Grip strength was 77% of the opposite side for stage IIIB wrists versus 85% for stage II/IIIA (p=.25). Postoperative carpal height ratio and radioscaphoid angle were worse (p<.05) for wrists treated for stage IIIB (0.46:65°) than stage II/IIIA (0.53:53°) disease. Radiographic disease progression occurred in 7 wrists (6 stage II/IIIA: 1 stage IIIB). The one stage IIIB wrist that progressed underwent wrist arthrodesis. CONCLUSIONS In this limited series, clinical outcomes of radius shortening using validated, patient-based assessment instruments and objective measures failed to demonstrate predicted “clinically relevant” differences between stage II/IIIA and IIIB Kienbock’s. Provided the high percentage successful clinical outcomes in this case series of 14 stage IIIB wrists, we believe that static carpal malalignment

  7. Evidence from Raman Spectroscopy of a Putative Link Between Inherent Bone Matrix Chemistry and Degenerative Joint Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kerns, Jemma G; Gikas, Panagiotis D; Buckley, Kevin; Shepperd, Adam; Birch, Helen L; McCarthy, Ian; Miles, Jonathan; Briggs, Timothy W R; Keen, Richard; Parker, Anthony W; Matousek, Pavel; Goodship, Allen E

    2014-01-01

    Objective Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common debilitating disease that results in degeneration of cartilage and bone in the synovial joints. Subtle changes in the molecular structure of the subchondral bone matrix occur and may be associated with cartilage changes. The aim of this study was to explore whether the abnormal molecular changes observed in the matrix of OA subchondral bone can be identified with Raman spectroscopy. Methods Tibial plateaus from patients undergoing total knee replacement for OA (n = 10) were compared with healthy joints from patients undergoing leg amputation (n = 5; sex- and laterality-matched) and with non-OA cadaveric knee specimens (n = 5; age-matched). The samples were analyzed with Raman spectroscopy, peripheral quantitative computed tomography, and chemical analysis to compare changes in defined load-bearing sites in both the medial and lateral compartments. Results OA subchondral bone matrix changes were detected by Raman spectroscopy. Within each cohort, there was no spectral difference in bone matrix chemistry between the medial and lateral compartments, whereas a significant spectral difference (P < 0.001) was observed between the non-OA and OA specimens. Type I collagen chain ratios were normal in the non-OA specimens but were significantly elevated in the OA specimens. Conclusion In comparing the results of Raman spectroscopy with those obtained by other standard techniques, these findings show, for the first time, that subchondral bone changes, or inherent differences, exist in both the medial and lateral (beneath intact cartilage) compartments of OA knees. The development of Raman spectroscopy as a screening tool, based on molecular-specific modifications in bone, would facilitate the identification of clinical disease, including early molecular changes. PMID:24470432

  8. Relationship between pelvic incidence and osteoarthritis of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, D. S.; Bohl, M. S.; Liu, R. W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Sagittal alignment of the lumbosacral spine, and specifically pelvic incidence (PI), has been implicated in the development of spine pathology, but generally ignored with regards to diseases of the hip. We aimed to determine if increased PI is correlated with higher rates of hip osteoarthritis (HOA). The effect of PI on the development of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) was used as a negative control. Methods We studied 400 well-preserved cadaveric skeletons ranging from 50 to 79 years of age at death. Each specimen’s OA of the hip and knee were graded using a previously described method. PI was measured from standardised lateral photographs of reconstructed pelvises. Multiple regression analysis was performed to determine the relationship between age and PI with HOA and KOA. Results The mean age was 60.2 years (standard deviation (sd) 8.1), and the mean PI was 46.7° (sd 10.7°). Multiple regression analysis demonstrated a significant correlation between increased PI and HOA (standardised beta = 0.103, p = 0.017). There was no correlation between PI and KOA (standardised beta = 0.003, p = 0.912). Conclusion Higher PI in the younger individual may contribute to the development of HOA in later life. Cite this article: Dr J. J. Gebhart. Relationship between pelvic incidence and osteoarthritis of the hip. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:66–72. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.52.2000552. PMID:26912384

  9. Osteoarthritis: Research Findings

    MedlinePlus

    ... studying: Tools to detect osteoarthritis earlier Genes Tissue engineering—special ways to grow cartilage to replace damaged ... athletes from these injuries. Discovery of the various genetic mutations leading to osteoarthritis could lead to new ...

  10. Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic inflammatory joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Agca, R; Heslinga, S C; van Halm, V P; Nurmohamed, M T

    2016-05-15

    Inflammatory joint disorders (IJD), including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (ASp) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), are prevalent conditions worldwide with a considerable burden on healthcare systems. IJD are associated with increased cardiovascular (CV) disease-related morbidity and mortality. In this review, we present an overview of the literature. Standardised mortality ratios are increased in IJD compared with the general population, that is, RA 1.3-2.3, ASp 1.6-1.9 and PsA 0.8-1.6. This premature mortality is mainly caused by atherosclerotic events. In RA, this CV risk is comparable to that in type 2 diabetes. Traditional CV risk factors are more often present and partially a consequence of changes in physical function related to the underlying IJD. Also, chronic systemic inflammation itself is an independent CV risk factor. Optimal control of disease activity with conventional synthetic, targeted synthetic and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs decreases this excess risk. High-grade inflammation as well as anti-inflammatory treatment alter traditional CV risk factors, such as lipids. In view of the above-mentioned CV burden in patients with IJD, CV risk management is necessary. Presently, this CV risk management is still lacking in usual care. Patients, general practitioners, cardiologists, internists and rheumatologists need to be aware of the substantially increased CV risk in IJD and should make a combined effort to timely initiate CV risk management in accordance with prevailing guidelines together with optimal control of rheumatic disease activity. CV screening and treatment strategies need to be implemented in usual care. PMID:26888573

  11. The evolution and concepts of joint-preserving surgery of the hip.

    PubMed

    Leunig, M; Ganz, R

    2014-01-01

    The use of joint-preserving surgery of the hip has been largely abandoned since the introduction of total hip replacement. However, with the modification of such techniques as pelvic osteotomy, and the introduction of intracapsular procedures such as surgical hip dislocation and arthroscopy, previously unexpected options for the surgical treatment of sequelae of childhood conditions, including developmental dysplasia of the hip, slipped upper femoral epiphysis and Perthes' disease, have become available. Moreover, femoroacetabular impingement has been identified as a significant aetiological factor in the development of osteoarthritis in many hips previously considered to suffer from primary osteoarthritis. As mechanical causes of degenerative joint disease are now recognised earlier in the disease process, these techniques may be used to decelerate or even prevent progression to osteoarthritis. We review the recent development of these concepts and the associated surgical techniques. PMID:24395304

  12. The bone-cartilage unit in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lories, Rik J; Luyten, Frank P

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) refers to a group of mechanically-induced joint disorders to which both genetic and acquired factors contribute. Current pathophysiological concepts focus on OA as a disease of the whole joint. Within these models, the functional unit formed by the articular cartilage and the subchondral bone seems to be of particular interest. Cartilage and bone receive and dissipate the stress associated with movement and loading, and are therefore continuously challenged biomechanically. Recent data support the view that cartilage and bone can communicate over the calcified tissue barrier; vessels reach out from bone into the cartilage zone, patches of uncalcified cartilage are in contact with bone, and microcracks and fissures further facilitate transfer of molecules. Several molecular signaling pathways such as bone morphogenetic proteins and Wnts are hypothesized to have a role in OA and can activate cellular and molecular processes in both cartilage and bone cells. In addition, intracellular activation of different kinase cascades seems to be involved in the molecular crosstalk between cartilage and bone cells. Further research is required to integrate these different elements into a comprehensive approach that will increase our understanding of the disease processes in OA, and that could lead to the development of specific therapeutics or treatment strategies. PMID:21135881

  13. Microhardness of human cancellous bone tissue in progressive hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Tomanik, Magdalena; Nikodem, Anna; Filipiak, Jarosław

    2016-12-01

    Bone tissue is a biological system in which the dynamic processes of, among others, bone formation or internal reconstruction will determine the spatial structure of the tissue and its mechanical properties. The appearance of a factor disturbing the balance between biological processes, e.g. a disease, will cause changes in the spatial structure of bones, thus affecting its mechanical properties. One of the bone diseases most common in an increasingly ageing population is osteoarthritis, also referred to as degenerative joint disease. It is estimated that in 2050 about 1300 million people will show symptoms of OA. The appearance of a pathological stimulus disturbs the balance of the processes of degradation and synthesis of articular cartilage, chondrocytes and the extracellular matrix, and the subchondral bone layer. As osteoarthritis progresses, study of the epiphysis reveals increasingly widespread changes of the articular surface and the internal structure of bone tissue. In this paper, the authors point out the differences in the mechanical properties of cancellous bone tissue forming the proximal epiphysis of the femoral bone during the progressive stages of OA. In order to determine microproperties of bone trabeculae, specimens from different stages of the disease (N=9) were subjected to microindentation testing, which made it possible to determine the material properties of bone tissue, such as microhardness HV and Young׳s modulus E. In addition, mechanical tests were supplemented with Raman spectroscopy, which determine the degree of bone mineralization, and measurements of structural properties based on analysis using microCT. The conducted tests were used to establish both quantitative and quantitative description of changes in the structural and mechanical properties connected with reorganization of trabeculae making up the bone in the various stages of osteoarthritis. The proposed description will supplement existing knowledge in the literature about

  14. Validation of an algofunctional index for osteoarthritis of the hand.

    PubMed

    Dreiser, R L; Maheu, E; Guillou, G B; Caspard, H; Grouin, J M

    1995-06-01

    Although hand osteoarthritis is common, it has been the focus of few therapeutic trials. In addition to the problems raised by clinical trials in osteoarthritis in general and to the difficulties due to the unforeseeable course of osteoarthritis of the trapezometacarpal and finger joints, the lack of a clinical tool for assessing pain and function over time is an additional obstacle. We propose an algofunctional index designed for evaluation and symptomatic follow-up of patients with digital osteoarthritis. The index is based on a physician-administered questionnaire on 10 daily activities involving the hands. The patient is asked to answer each item using a 4-point verbal scale, from "possible without difficulty" (0) to "impossible" (3 points); thus, total scores range from 0 to 30. This index has been used in a few clinical placebo-controlled trials and was found sensitive to change. The aim of this study was to assess the metrological qualities of this index, including consistency (internal and external), sensitivity and specificity (by scoring the index in different groups of subjects), intra-observer reproducibility, and ease of use. Three hundred patients were recruited by 25 rheumatologists: 100 had a painful attack of digital and/or trapezometacarpal osteoarthritis (mean age: 64.9 years) with a score of more than 40 mm on a visual analog scale for overall pain severity (mean: 57.3 +/- 14 mm), 100 had "inactive" hand osteoarthritis (mean age 67.0 years), and 100 had no diseases of the upper limbs. Specificity/sensitivity: the mean index score was 12.41 +/- 5.41 in patients with painful OA, 4.28 +/- 3.87 in "inactive" cases, and 0.59 +/- 1.23 in controls. External consistency: the overall mean score was well correlated with pain severity: r = 0.49 (p < 0.001). Internal consistency: principal component analysis identified a primary axis responsible for 44.2% of the variance and two secondary axes each responsible for slightly more than 9% of the variance. None

  15. The Complexity of Human Walking: A Knee Osteoarthritis Study

    PubMed Central

    Kotti, Margarita; Duffell, Lynsey D.; Faisal, Aldo A.; McGregor, Alison H.

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes a framework for deconstructing complex walking patterns to create a simple principal component space before checking whether the projection to this space is suitable for identifying changes from the normality. We focus on knee osteoarthritis, the most common knee joint disease and the second leading cause of disability. Knee osteoarthritis affects over 250 million people worldwide. The motivation for projecting the highly dimensional movements to a lower dimensional and simpler space is our belief that motor behaviour can be understood by identifying a simplicity via projection to a low principal component space, which may reflect upon the underlying mechanism. To study this, we recruited 180 subjects, 47 of which reported that they had knee osteoarthritis. They were asked to walk several times along a walkway equipped with two force plates that capture their ground reaction forces along 3 axes, namely vertical, anterior-posterior, and medio-lateral, at 1000 Hz. Data when the subject does not clearly strike the force plate were excluded, leaving 1–3 gait cycles per subject. To examine the complexity of human walking, we applied dimensionality reduction via Probabilistic Principal Component Analysis. The first principal component explains 34% of the variance in the data, whereas over 80% of the variance is explained by 8 principal components or more. This proves the complexity of the underlying structure of the ground reaction forces. To examine if our musculoskeletal system generates movements that are distinguishable between normal and pathological subjects in a low dimensional principal component space, we applied a Bayes classifier. For the tested cross-validated, subject-independent experimental protocol, the classification accuracy equals 82.62%. Also, a novel complexity measure is proposed, which can be used as an objective index to facilitate clinical decision making. This measure proves that knee osteoarthritis subjects exhibit more

  16. Rabbit model for osteoarthrosis of the temporomandibular joint as a basis for assessment of outcomes after intervention.

    PubMed

    Artuzi, Felipe Ernesto; Langie, Renan; Abreu, Maíra Cavallet de; Quevedo, Alexandre Silva; Corsetti, Adriana; Ponzoni, Deise; Puricelli, Edela

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis can be induced in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by primary or secondary trauma, or overloading of the joint. We have therefore systematically evaluated the histological progression of experimental osteoarthritis induced by a high concentration of monosodium iodoacetate into the rabbit TMJ. These findings may contribute to the establishment of a protocol to investigate the benefits of treatment of osteoarthritis of the TMJ. We used 21 male New Zealand rabbits; the 15 in the test group were given an intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate 10mg/ml into the right TMJ and were killed after 60 (n=5), 80 (n=5), and 100 days (n=5). The six in the control group were given an injection of saline into the right TMJ. The assessment system for osteoarthritis based on six grades was used for the histological analysis of severity. The model was effective in producing histological changes in the cartilage consistent with those found in osteoarthritis at all time points. The within-group analysis indicated that the disease did not progress after 60 days. The successful induction of osteoarthritis in this way, its stabilisation after 60 days, and the appropriate size of the animal suggest that this experimental model is ideal for future studies of the effectiveness of treatment in osteoarthritis of the TMJ. PMID:26872897

  17. Correlation of CD₄⁺ CD₂₅⁺ Foxp₃⁺ Treg with the recovery of joint function after total knee replacement in rats with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Guo, S-Y; Ding, Y-J; Li, L; Zhang, T; Zhang, Z-Z; Zhang, E-S

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we observed changes in CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Treg expression in rats with osteoarthritis (OA) to explore the role that CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Treg plays in the decline in the condition of OA rats. Thirty rats were randomly divided into 2 groups equally and OA was induced in rats in the model group by injection of papain and l-cysteine into the right knee joint. Cartilage lesions were scored by the modified Mankin scale; pulmonary function was assessed by spirometry; interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-4 levels were evaluated by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; and the levels of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Treg in peripheral blood were measured by flow cytometry. The left knee joints of the model rats appeared palpable swelling and osteophytes, while the body weight, heart and lung function of these rats decreased. The serum IL-4 level was lower, whereas the serum IL-17 level was higher in the model group (P < 0.05). The peripheral blood CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Treg of CD4(+)T cells was significantly lower. Correlation of the changes in the levels of IL-4, IL-17, and Treg suggests that the underlying mechanism may be a reduction of the regulatory effect of Treg. The specific mechanism still requires further study. PMID:26214407

  18. Osteoarthritis year in review 2015: biology.

    PubMed

    Malfait, A M

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights a selection of recently published literature in the area of osteoarthritis biology. Major themes transpiring from a PubMed search covering the year between the 2014 and the 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) World Congress are explored. Inflammation emerged as a significant theme, revealing complex pathways that drive dramatic changes in cartilage homeostasis and in the synovium. Highlights include a homeostatic role for CXC chemokines in cartilage, identification of the zinc-ZIP8-MTF1 axis as an essential regulator of cartilage catabolism, and the discovery that a small aggrecan fragment can have catabolic and pro-inflammatory effects through Toll-like receptor 2. Synovitis can promote joint damage, partly through alarmins such as S100A8. Synovitis and synovial expression of the pro-algesic neurotrophin, Nerve Growth Factor, are associated with pain. Increasingly, researchers are considering specific pathogenic pathways that may operate in distinct subsets of osteoarthritis associated with distinct risk factors, including obesity, age, and joint injury. In obesity, the contribution of metabolic factors and diet is under intense investigation. The role of autophagy and oxidative stress in age-related osteoarthritis has been further explored. This approach may open avenues for targeted treatment of distinct phenotypes of osteoarthritis. Finally, a small selection of novel analgesic targets in the periphery is briefly discussed, including calcitonin gene-related peptide and the neuronal sodium voltage-gated channels, Nav1.7 and Nav1.8. PMID:26707989

  19. Obtain osteoarthritis related molecular signature genes through regulation network.

    PubMed

    Li, Yawei; Wang, Bing; Lv, Guohua; Xiong, Guangzhong; Liu, Wei Dong; Li, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), also known as degenerative joint disease or osteoarthrosis, is the most common form of arthritis. OA occurs when cartilage in the joints wears down over time. We used the GSE1919 series to identify potential genes that correlated to OA. The aim of our study was to obtain a molecular signature of OA through the regulation network based on differentially expressed genes. From the result of regulation network construction in OA, a number of transcription factors (TFs) and pathways closely related to OA were linked by our method. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ also arises as hub nodes in our transcriptome network and certain TFs containing CEBPD, EGR2 and ETS2 were shown to be related to OA by a previous study. PMID:21946934

  20. Exploring the mechanisms behind S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) in the treatment of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hosea Blewett, Heather Joy

    2008-05-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic joint disease characterized by pain and immobility due to a gradual loss of cartilage. Current treatments are palliative; there is no cure. With a growing interest in alternative therapies, due in part to safety issues regarding pharmacological treatments like Celebrex, safe dietary compounds that help the body regenerate cartilage tissue are of great clinical importance. The dietary supplement S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) shows such potential. Clinical trials have shown reduced pain and stiffness while in vitro and animal studies have shown SAMe can stimulate the production of cartilage which is critical in reversing the disease process. The author examines many potential mechanisms of action including: reduction of inflammatory mediators; increasing levels of glutathione; direct or indirect signaling of cartilage synthesis or survival; maintenance of DNA methylation. Research into the mechanisms of supplemental SAMe in osteoarthritis is necessary to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of this dietary supplement. PMID:18464034

  1. What about strontium ranelate in osteoarthritis? Doubts and securities.

    PubMed

    Tenti, Sara; Cheleschi, Sara; Guidelli, Giacomo Maria; Galeazzi, Mauro; Fioravanti, Antonella

    2014-11-01

    Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common disabling joint disease worldwide and its treatment is based on a combination of non-pharmacological and pharmacological modalities. Commonly prescribed OA medications include symptomatic drugs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, analgesics, locally administered corticosteroids, viscosupplementation) and new compounds that are potentially able to reduce or stop the disease progression, called "Disease Modifying Osteoarthritis Drugs (DMOADs)". Strontium ranelate (SR) is an anti-osteoporotic treatment that increases bone formation, while decreasing bone resorption and it potentially acts as a new DMOAD. The objective of this review is to summarize the currently available information on clinical effects and mechanism of action of SR in OA. We have examined two post hoc analysis conducted on the large, randomized Treatment of Peripheral Osteoporosis study and the double-blind, randomized, controlled trial about SR in knee OA. Furthermore, we analyzed three studies in animal models and two in vitro experiments to better understand the mechanism of action of SR in OA. The available data demonstrate that SR could be considered a new promising symptomatic and disease-modifying agent in the treatment of OA and was safe and well tolerated. Additionally, there is a need for further investigations to establish the optimal dosage and to better clarify the mechanism of action of SR in OA. PMID:24645726

  2. Efficacy of Platelet-Rich Plasma versus Hyaluronic Acid for treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sadabad, Hassan Niroomand; Behzadifar, Masoud; Arasteh, Farzad; Behzadifar, Meysam; Dehghan, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Knee osteoarthritis is a very common chronic degenerative disease that could impose significant costs to the health system. Although osteoarthritis can affect all joints, knee osteoarthritis is the most common type among adolescents. Non-surgical treatments include corticosteroids injection, hyaluronic acid, and platelet-rich plasma. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of platelet-rich plasma versus hyaluronic acid for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. Methods Pubmed, Cochran library, Scopus and Ovid databases were investigated to identify related studies from 2000 through August 2015. To study the efficiency, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) outcome using the Standard Mean Difference (SMD) index was calculated using a random model and a confidence interval of 95%. In addition, sensitivity and cumulative analysis were conducted. The data were analyzed using RevMan 5.3.5 and Stata 12 software. Results Seven studies with 722 subjects (364 participants in PRP and 358 participants in the HA group) were analyzed. The WOMAC PRP compared to HA, SMD = −0.75 (95% CI: −1.33 to −0.18, I2 = 92.6%) in treatment of knee osteoarthritis was statistically significant and PRP was more effective. Conclusion The results of this meta-analysis two years after PRP injection showed the efficacy of PRP versus HA. However, further studies are required to determine the longer-term effects. PMID:27123220

  3. Efficacy of intra-articular hyaluronan (Synvisc®) for the treatment of osteoarthritis affecting the first metatarsophalangeal joint of the foot (hallux limitus): study protocol for a randomised placebo controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Munteanu, Shannon E; Menz, Hylton B; Zammit, Gerard V; Landorf, Karl B; Handley, Christopher J; ElZarka, Ayman; DeLuca, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) of the foot, termed hallux limitus, is common and painful. Numerous non-surgical interventions have been proposed for this disorder, however there is limited evidence for their efficacy. Intra-articular injections of hyaluronan have shown beneficial effects in case-series and clinical trials for the treatment of osteoarthritis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint. However, no study has evaluated the efficacy of this form of treatment using a randomised placebo controlled trial. This article describes the design of a randomised placebo controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of intra-articular hyaluronan (Synvisc®) to reduce pain and improve function in people with hallux limitus. Methods One hundred and fifty community-dwelling men and women aged 18 years and over with hallux limitus (who satisfy inclusion and exclusion criteria) will be recruited. Participants will be randomised, using a computer-generated random number sequence, to receive a single intra-articular injection of up to 1 ml hyaluronan (Synvisc®) or sterile saline (placebo) into the first MPJ. The injections will be performed by an interventional radiologist using fluoroscopy to ensure accurate deposition of the hyaluronan in the joint. Participants will be given the option of a second and final intra-articular injection (of Synvisc® or sterile saline according to the treatment group they are in) either 1 or 3 months post-treatment if there is no improvement in pain and the participant has not experienced severe adverse effects after the first injection. The primary outcome measures will be the pain and function subscales of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire. The secondary outcome measures will be pain at the first MPJ (during walking and at rest), stiffness at the first MPJ, passive non-weightbearing dorsiflexion of the first MPJ, plantar flexion strength of the toe-flexors of the hallux, global satisfaction with the

  4. Higher Knee Flexion Moment During the Second Half of the Stance Phase of Gait Is Associated With the Progression of Osteoarthritis of the Patellofemoral Joint on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Hsiang-Ling; Macleod, Toran D.; Link, Thomas M.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Souza, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Controlled laboratory study, longitudinal design. OBJECTIVE To examine whether baseline knee flexion moment or impulse during walking is associated with the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) with magnetic resonance imaging of the patellofemoral joint (PFJ) at 1 year. BACKGROUND Patellofemoral joint OA is highly prevalent and a major source of pain and dysfunction. The biomechanical factors associated with the progression of PFJ OA remain unclear. METHODS Three-dimensional gait analyses were performed at baseline. Magnetic resonance imaging of the knee (high-resolution, 3-D, fast spin-echo sequence) was used to identify PFJ cartilage and bone marrow edema–like lesions at baseline and a 1-year follow-up. The severity of PFJ OA progression was defined using the modified Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score when new or increased cartilage or bone marrow edema–like lesions were observed at 1 year. Peak external knee flexion moment and flexion moment impulse during the first and second halves of the stance phase of gait were compared between progressors and nonprogressors, and used to predict progression after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, and presence of baseline PFJ OA. RESULTS Sixty-one participants with no knee OA or isolated PFJ OA were included. Patellofemoral joint OA progressors (n = 10) demonstrated significantly higher peak knee flexion moment (P = .01) and flexion moment impulse (P = .04) during the second half of stance at baseline compared to nonprogressors. Logistic regression showed that higher peak knee flexion moment during the second half of the stance phase was significantly associated with progression at 1 year (adjusted odds ratio = 3.3, P = .01). CONCLUSION Peak knee flexion moment and flexion moment impulse during the second half of stance are related to the progression of PFJ OA and may need to be considered when treating individuals who are at risk of or who have PFJ OA. PMID:26161626

  5. Early detection of aging cartilage and osteoarthritis in mice and patient samples using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, Martin; Gottardi, Riccardo; Raiteri, Roberto; Miot, Sylvie; Martin, Ivan; Imer, Raphaël; Staufer, Urs; Raducanu, Aurelia; Düggelin, Marcel; Baschong, Werner; Daniels, A. U.; Friederich, Niklaus F.; Aszodi, Attila; Aebi, Ueli

    2009-03-01

    The pathological changes in osteoarthritis-a degenerative joint disease prevalent among older people-start at the molecular scale and spread to the higher levels of the architecture of articular cartilage to cause progressive and irreversible structural and functional damage. At present, there are no treatments to cure or attenuate the degradation of cartilage. Early detection and the ability to monitor the progression of osteoarthritis are therefore important for developing effective therapies. Here, we show that indentation-type atomic force microscopy can monitor age-related morphological and biomechanical changes in the hips of normal and osteoarthritic mice. Early damage in the cartilage of osteoarthritic patients undergoing hip or knee replacements could similarly be detected using this method. Changes due to aging and osteoarthritis are clearly depicted at the nanometre scale well before morphological changes can be observed using current diagnostic methods. Indentation-type atomic force microscopy may potentially be developed into a minimally invasive arthroscopic tool to diagnose the early onset of osteoarthritis in situ.

  6. Does platelet-rich plasma have a role in the treatment of osteoarthritis?

    PubMed

    Ornetti, Paul; Nourissat, Geoffroy; Berenbaum, Francis; Sellam, Jérémie; Richette, Pascal; Chevalier, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been generating considerable attention as an intra-articular treatment to alleviate the symptoms of osteoarthritis. Activated platelets release a host of soluble mediators such as growth factors and cytokines, thereby inducing complex interactions that vary across tissues within the joint. In vivo, PRP may promote chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. The available data are somewhat conflicting regarding potential effects on synovial cells and angiogenesis modulation. PRP probably exerts an early anti-inflammatory effect, which may be chiefly mediated by inhibition of the NF-κB pathway, a hypothesis that requires confirmation by proof-of-concept studies. It is far too early to draw conclusions about the efficacy of PRP as a treatment for hip osteoarthritis. The only randomized trial versus hyaluronic acid showed no significant difference in effects, and no placebo-controlled trials are available. Most of the randomized trials in knee osteoarthritis support a slightly greater effect in alleviating the symptoms compared to visco-supplementation, most notably at the early stages of the disease, although only medium-term data are available. Many uncertainties remain, however, regarding the best administration regimen. Serious adverse effects, including infections and allergies, seem rare, although post-injection pain is more common than with other intra-articular treatments for osteoarthritis. PMID:26162636

  7. Management of knee osteoarthritis by combined stromal vascular fraction cell therapy, platelet-rich plasma, and musculoskeletal exercises: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Nathan; Diamond, Rod; Sekyere, Eric O; Thomas, Wayne D

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Knee osteoarthritis is associated with persistent joint pain, stiffness, joint deformities, ligament damage, and surrounding muscle atrophy. The complexity of the disease makes treatment difficult. There are no therapeutic drugs available to halt the disease progression, leaving patients dependent on pain medication, anti-inflammatory drugs, or invasive joint replacement surgery. Case presentations Four patients with a history of unresolved symptomatic knee osteoarthritis were investigated for the therapeutic outcome of combining an exercise rehabilitation program with intra-articular injections of autologous StroMed (ie, stromal vascular fraction cells concentrated by ultrasonic cavitation from lipoaspirate) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score questionnaire (KOOS) was administered along with physical function tests over a 12-month period. The first patient achieved a maximum therapeutic outcome of 100 in all five KOOS subscales (left knee), and 100 for four subscales (right knee). The second patient scored 100 in all five KOOS subscales (left knee), and greater than 84 in all subscales (right knee). Treatment of the third patient resulted in improved outcomes in both knees of >93 for four KOOS subscales, and 60 for the Function in Sport and Recreation subscale. The fourth patient improved to 100 in all five KOOS subscales. In all patients, the physical function “Get-up and Go” test and “Stair Climbing Test” returned to normal (a value of zero). Conclusion This case series indicates that improved outcomes may be obtained when autologous stromal vascular fraction (StroMed) cell therapy is combined with traditional exercise practices and PRP for osteoarthritis. Of the seven joints treated: all patients’ scores of pain improved to >96; and quality of life scores to >93. Functional performance measures of mobility returned to normal. This simple treatment appears to be extremely effective for

  8. Role of vasoactive intestinal peptide in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Hua; Li, Yu-Sheng; Luo, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) plays important roles in many biological functions, such as, stimulation of contractility in the heart, vasodilation, promoting neuroendocrine-immune communication, lowering arterial blood pressure, and anti-inflammatory and immune-modulatory activity. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic and degenerative bone disease, which is one of the most common causes of disability and most common in both sexes as people become older. Interestingly VIP can prevent chronic cartilage damage and joint remodeling. This review article provides update information on the association of VIP and OA and its treatment. Evidences suggest that VIP is down-regulated in synovial fluid of OA, and VIP down-regulation leads to increase in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines that might contribute to the pathogenesis of OA; however contradictory reports also exist suggesting that accumulation of VIP in joints can also contribute OA. A number of studies indicated that up-regulation of VIP can counteract the action of pro-inflammatory stimuli and alleviate the pain in OA. More clinical investigations are necessary to determine the biology of VIP and its therapeutic potential in OA that might represent the future standards of care for OA. PMID:27553659

  9. Novel Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein (COMP) Neoepitopes Identified in Synovial Fluids from Patients with Joint Diseases Using Affinity Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Åhrman, Emma; Lorenzo, Pilar; Holmgren, Kristin; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Dahlberg, Leif E.; Saxne, Tore; Heinegård, Dick; Önnerfjord, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    To identify patients at risk for progressive joint damage, there is a need for early diagnostic tools to detect molecular events leading to cartilage destruction. Isolation and characterization of distinct cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) fragments derived from cartilage and released into synovial fluid will allow discrimination between different pathological conditions and monitoring of disease progression. Early detection of disease and processes in the tissue as well as an understanding of the pathologic mechanisms will also open the way for novel treatment strategies. Disease-specific COMP fragments were isolated by affinity chromatography of synovial fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, or acute trauma. Enriched COMP fragments were separated by SDS-PAGE followed by in-gel digestion and mass spectrometric identification and characterization. Using the enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin, and Asp-N for the digestions, an extensive analysis of the enriched fragments could be accomplished. Twelve different neoepitopes were identified and characterized within the enriched COMP fragments. For one of the neoepitopes, Ser77, an inhibition ELISA was developed. This ELISA quantifies COMP fragments clearly distinguishable from total COMP. Furthermore, fragments containing the neoepitope Ser77 were released into the culture medium of cytokine (TNF-α and IL-6/soluble IL-6 receptor)-stimulated human cartilage explants. The identified neoepitopes provide a complement to the currently available commercial assays for cartilage markers. Through neoepitope assays, tools to pinpoint disease progression, evaluation methods for therapy, and means to elucidate disease mechanisms will be provided. PMID:24917676

  10. Genetics of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Fontenla, Cristina; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex disease caused by the interaction of multiple genetic and environmental factors. This review focuses on the studies that have contributed to the discovery of genetic susceptibility factors in OA. The most relevant associations discovered until now are discussed in detail: GDF-5, 7q22 locus, MCF2L, DOT1L, NCOA3 and also some important findings from the arcOGEN study. Moreover, the different approaches that can be used to minimize the specific problems of the study of OA genetics are discussed. These include the study of microsatellites, phenotype standardization and other methods such as meta-analysis of GWAS and gene-based analysis. It is expected that these new approaches contribute to finding new susceptibility genetic factors for OA. PMID:24992825

  11. The Expression of Osteopontin and Wnt5a in Articular Cartilage of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis and Its Correlation with Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wenfeng; Deng, Zhenhan; Zeng, Chao; Li, Hui; Yang, Tuo; Li, Liangjun; Luo, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study is undertaken to investigate the relation between osteopontin (OPN) and Wnt5a expression in the progression and pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. 50 cartilage tissues from knee OA patients and normal controls were divided into four groups of severe, moderate, minor, and normal lesions based on the modified grading system of Mankin. Immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR were utilized to analyze the OPN and Wnt5a expression in articular cartilage. Besides, the relations between OPN and Wnt5a expression and the severity of OA were explored. Results. OPN and Wnt5a could be identified in four groups' tissues. Amongst the groups, the intercomparisons of OPN expression levels showed statistical differences (P < 0.01). Besides, the intercomparisons of Wnt5a expression degrees showed statistical differences (P < 0.05), except that between the minor and normal groups (P > 0.05). The scores of Mankin were demonstrated to relate to OPN expression (r = −0.847, P < 0.01) and Wnt5a expression in every group (r = −0.843, P < 0.01). Also, a positive correlation can be observed between the OPN and Wnt5a expression (r = 0.769, P < 0.01). Conclusion. In articular cartilage, the expressions of OPN and Wnt5a are positively related to progressive damage of knee OA joint. The correlation between Wnt5a and OPN might be important to the progression and pathogenesis of knee OA. PMID:27556044

  12. The Expression of Osteopontin and Wnt5a in Articular Cartilage of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis and Its Correlation with Disease Severity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yusheng; Xiao, Wenfeng; Sun, Minghua; Deng, Zhenhan; Zeng, Chao; Li, Hui; Yang, Tuo; Li, Liangjun; Luo, Wei; Lei, Guanghua

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study is undertaken to investigate the relation between osteopontin (OPN) and Wnt5a expression in the progression and pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. 50 cartilage tissues from knee OA patients and normal controls were divided into four groups of severe, moderate, minor, and normal lesions based on the modified grading system of Mankin. Immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR were utilized to analyze the OPN and Wnt5a expression in articular cartilage. Besides, the relations between OPN and Wnt5a expression and the severity of OA were explored. Results. OPN and Wnt5a could be identified in four groups' tissues. Amongst the groups, the intercomparisons of OPN expression levels showed statistical differences (P < 0.01). Besides, the intercomparisons of Wnt5a expression degrees showed statistical differences (P < 0.05), except that between the minor and normal groups (P > 0.05). The scores of Mankin were demonstrated to relate to OPN expression (r = -0.847, P < 0.01) and Wnt5a expression in every group (r = -0.843, P < 0.01). Also, a positive correlation can be observed between the OPN and Wnt5a expression (r = 0.769, P < 0.01). Conclusion. In articular cartilage, the expressions of OPN and Wnt5a are positively related to progressive damage of knee OA joint. The correlation between Wnt5a and OPN might be important to the progression and pathogenesis of knee OA. PMID:27556044

  13. Post-operative rehabilitation and nutrition in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Mobasheri, Ali; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Imbesi, Rosa; Castrogiovanni, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative process involving the progressive loss of articular cartilage, synovial inflammation and structural changes in subchondral bone that lead to loss of synovial joint structural features and functionality of articular cartilage. OA represents one of the most common causes of physical disability in the world. Different OA treatments are usually considered in relation to the stage of the disease. In the early stages, it is possible to recommend physical activity programs that can maintain joint health and keep the patient mobile, as recommended by OA Research Society International (OARSI) and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR). In the most severe and advanced cases of OA, surgical intervention is necessary. After, in early postoperative stages, it is essential to include a rehabilitation exercise program in order to restore the full function of the involved joint. Physical therapy is crucial for the success of any surgical procedure and can promote recovery of muscle strength, range of motion, coordinated walking, proprioception and mitigate joint pain. Furthermore, after discharge from the hospital, patients should continue the rehabilitation exercise program at home associated to an appropriate diet. In this review, we analyze manuscripts from the most recent literature and provide a balanced and comprehensive overview of the latest developments on the effect of physical exercise on postoperative rehabilitation in OA. The literature search was conducted using PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar, using the keywords 'osteoarthritis', 'rehabilitation', 'exercise' and 'nutrition'. The available data suggest that physical exercise is an effective, economical and accessible to everyone practice, and it is one of the most important components of postoperative rehabilitation for OA. PMID:26962431

  14. Easing Arthritis: Research offers new hope for people with common joint disease.

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Easing Arthritis: Research offers new hope for people with common joint disease Past ... knees, pain plagued her every step. Living in New York City, Saisselin relied on walking and public ...

  15. Susceptibility to large-joint osteoarthritis (hip and knee) is associated with BAG6 rs3117582 SNP and the VNTR polymorphism in the second exon of the FAM46A gene on chromosome 6.

    PubMed

    Etokebe, Godfrey E; Jotanovic, Zdravko; Mihelic, Radovan; Mulac-Jericevic, Biserka; Nikolic, Tamara; Balen, Sanja; Sestan, Branko; Dembic, Zlatko

    2015-01-01

    Family with sequence similarity 46, member A (FAM46A) gene VNTR and BCL2-Associated Athanogene 6 (BAG6) gene rs3117582 polymorphisms were genotyped in a case-control study with 474 large-joint (hip and knee) osteoarthritis (OA) patients and 568 controls in Croatian population by candidate-gene approach for association with OA. We found that BAG6 rs3117582 SNP genotypes were associated with protection (major allele homozygote) and susceptibility (major-minor allele heterozygote) to OA. BAG6 rs3117582 major allele (A) was associated with reduced risk to OA while the minor allele (C) was associated with increased risk to OA. We identified 6 alleles harboring 2 to 7 repeats making 20 genotypes for FAM46A. A rare FAM46A VNTR genotype comprising VNTR alleles with four and seven repeats (c/f) was associated with increased OA risk in both genders. The genotype with four and six repeats (c/e) was also associated with increased risk to OA in males. A polymorphic FAM46A allele with six repeats (e) was associated with reduced risk to OA in females. Our results suggest association between the FAM46A gene, BAG6 gene and OA in Croatian population, respectively. This is the first study to show associations between these genetic loci and OA. PMID:25231575

  16. Morbid anatomy of ‘erosive osteoarthritis’ of the interphalangeal finger joints: an optimised scoring system to monitor disease progression in affected joints

    PubMed Central

    Verbruggen, Gust; Wittoek, Ruth; Cruyssen, Bert Vander; Elewaut, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To develop and validate a quantitative radiographic scoring system, the Ghent University Scoring System (GUSS), with better ability to detect progression over a shorter period of time in erosive osteoarthritis (OA) of the interphalangeal (IP) finger joints compared with the existing anatomic phase scoring system. Methods Thirty IP finger joints showing erosive features at baseline or follow-up were selected from 18 patients with erosive hand OA. Posteroanterior radiographs of these joints obtained at baseline, 6 and 12 months—totalling 90 images—were used for the study. All joints were first scored according to the original anatomic phase scoring system. Erosive progression and signs of repair or remodelling were then scored by indicating the proportion of normal subchondral bone, subchondral plate and joint space on an 11-point rating scale (range 0–100 with 10 unit increases). Inter- and intrareader reproducibility was studied using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Based on the within-variance of two readers, the smallest detectable change (SDC) was calculated and allowed identification of joints with changes above the SDC as ‘progressors’. Results Longitudinal inter-reader ICC scores rated well for all variables and the total score (ICC 0.86–0.93). To identify ‘real’ change over background noise, a change of at least 40 units on the total score (range 0–300) over 12 months (SDC 0–12:36.0), and 50 units over 6 months (SDC 0–6:47.6) had to be present. 60% of the 30 joints were identified as ‘progressors’ over 6 months compared with 33.3% with the classical anatomical scoring system, and 70% versus 56.6%, respectively, over 12 months. Conclusion GUSS, is a reliable method to score radiographic change over time in erosive IP OA and detects more progression over a shorter period of time than the classical scoring system. PMID:19948521

  17. What's new in mycotic bone and joint diseases?

    PubMed

    Schwarz, J

    1984-07-01

    Deep fungi exhibit different degrees of aggressiveness toward joints and bone, most likely depending on the individual make-up of the respective organism. Immunodepressed patients have a propensity to bone and joint involvement by sporotrichosis, cryptococcosis and candidiasis. African histoplasmosis, blastomycosis and coccidioidomycosis are the main mycoses to produce osteoarthritic complications. Arthralgias as part of primary mycotic infection are seen in histoplasmosis capsulati and in coccidioidomycosis. The recognition of the specific agent by morphologic, cultural and serologic methods changes potentially the prognosis and treatment of patients. PMID:6483686

  18. Assessment of glycosaminoglycan concentration in equine synovial fluid as a marker of joint disease.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, J L; Bertone, A L; McClain, H

    1995-01-01

    A modification of a colorimetric assay was used to determine synovial fluid total and individual sulphated-glycosaminoglycan concentration in various clinical presentations of joint disease in horses. Concentrations of synovial fluid and serum sulphated-glycosaminoglycan (GAG) were measured by the 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) dye assay in normal horses (n = 49), horses with acute (n = 26) or chronic (n = 27) joint disease (defined by clinical, radiographic, and clinicopathological parameters), and horses with cartilaginous lesions at diagnostic arthroscopy, but with normal radiographs and synovial fluid (n = 9). Horses with acute joint disease were subdivided into moderate acute (n = 21) and severe acute (n = 5) joint disease on the basis of synovial fluid analysis and clinical examination. Horses with chronic joint disease were subdivided into mild chronic (n = 9), moderate chronic (n = 10), and severe chronic (n = 8) joint disease on the basis of synovial fluid analysis, clinical examination, and radiographic findings. The concentrations of chondroitin sulphate (CS) and keratan sulphate (KS) were analyzed in each sample following sequential enzymatic digestion of the sample with chondroitinase or keratanase. In addition, the concentration of hyaluronate (HA) in each sample was determined by a colorimetric assay following digestion of the sample with microbial hyaluronidase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8521354

  19. Establishment of a rat model for osteoarthritis resulting from anterior cruciate ligament rupture and its significance

    PubMed Central

    OUYANG, XIAO; WANG, JIAN; HONG, SHI DONG; XIN, FENG; WANG, LIN; YANG, XIAO WEI; WANG, JING RONG; WANG, LI MING; WEI, BO; WANG, QING; CUI, WEI DING

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the establishment of a model concerned with osteoarthritis resulting from the anterior cruciate ligament rupture of rats and investigate the associated mechanism, as well as provide a theoretical basis for clinical treatment of the disease. Forty Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided into two groups of 20 rats each and the anterior cruciate ligament transaction model and knee joint brake model were successfully established. Two rats in the anterior cruciate ligament transection group (10%) and 3 rats in the knee joint brake group (15.0%) died. The survival rate of the two groups was not statistically significant (χ2<0.001, P=1.000). Swelling of the knee joint and synovium of rats in the two experimental groups was aggravated. The Mankin score was significantly higher in the anterior cruciate ligament transection group than that in the experimental group and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). By contrast, no significant difference was observed for osteoarthritis severity for the two experimental groups (P>0.05). Analysis of the subgroups showed that the proportion of the anterior cruciate ligament in the experimental group was significantly higher than that of the knee joint brake group, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). By contrast, the difference was not statistically significant in the comparison of the medium and early proportion (P>0.05). The content of protein polysaccharide and II collagen fiber in the experimental group of the anterior cruciate ligament transection was lower than that of the knee joint brake group, and this difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Thus the mechanism of osteoarthritis may be associated with the decrease in the content of protein and II collagen fibers. PMID:26668592

  20. Body mass indices in patients with disabling hip osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Ray; Allegrante, John P

    2002-01-01

    Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease that results in substantial morbidity. The disease may be preventable in some instances by reducing risk factors associated with the disease. We undertook a study to determine whether being overweight or obese, a health risk that applies to younger and older age groups, is commonly associated with hip joint OA. The body mass indices (BMIs) of 1021 males and females ranging in age from 23 to 94 years and requiring surgery for end-stage hip joint OA were analyzed to find the prevalence of high body weights at the time of surgery. Being overweight was defined as having a BMI of 25–29.9 kg/m2 and being obese as having a BMI >30 kg/m2. BMIs indicative of overweight were recorded for 68% of the patients surveyed. Of 35 patients aged 30–39 years, 53.3% had BMIs >25, with a mean of 28.8, which nearly reaches the lower limit defined for obesity. On average, patients who had had previous surgery and complications warranting reimplantation of new surgical devices had BMIs in the obese range. Our findings suggest that a high percentage of patients with end-stage hip OA are overweight, including younger adults and those with symptoms of 3–6 months' duration. Moreover, patients whose BMIs are in the obese range may be at increased risk for removal and reimplantation of their prosthesis. PMID:11879546

  1. Molecular targets in osteoarthritis: metalloproteinases and their inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Burrage, P S; Brinckerhoff, C E

    2007-02-01

    The debilitating destruction of joint tissues seen in osteoarthritis (OA) is due, in large part, to the degradative activity of metalloproteinase (MP) enzymes that target extracellular matrix (ECM) components within articular cartilage. Although successful in suppressing the pain and inflammation associated with this disease, conventional OA therapeutics do not inhibit the underlying tissue catabolism, allowing the disease to progress into irreversible ECM loss and chronic disability. Therapeutic inhibition of metalloproteinase activity is not a new concept, however, its transfer into clinical use has been frustrating. Disappointing results from clinical trials with small molecule inhibitors of metalloproteinases have highlighted the critical importance of inhibitor specificity, and the need to identify the individual metalloproteinases responsible for joint destruction. We discuss strategies of inhibition using small molecule inhibitors and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) engineered to increase inhibitory specificity, and present new data using of new reagents such as ribozymes and inhibitory RNAs that repress expression of specific enzymes. Recent data has implicated the disease stage-dependent involvement of matrix metalloproteinase-1, -2, -3, -9, -13, ADAM-17/TACE (tumor-necrosis factor-alpha converting enzyme), and ADAMTS-5 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin 1 motifs) as major in vivo mediators of the ECM degradation seen in OA, and as such, they represent promising therapeutic targets. We conclude that the concept of molecular polypharmacy, in which the relevant enzymes are selectively targeted with multiple directed therapies, may offer a new therapeutic strategy that prevents joint destruction and minimizes toxicities. PMID:17305507

  2. Trichostatin A increases the TIMP-1/MMP ratio to protect against osteoarthritis in an animal model of the disease

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Hao; Li, Jin; Wu, Li-Dong; Chen, Wei-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) has been demonstrated to alleviate certain symptoms associated with osteoarthritis (OA). However, the exact mechanisms underlying this protective effect remain to be elucidated. The present study therefore examined the effects of TSA on the expression levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to investigate alterations in mRNA expression levels in TSA-treated chondrocytes in the presence or absence of IL-1β; in addition, protein expression and acetylation levels were assessed by western blotting. In vivo, TSA was administered to rats by intra-articular injection, following which the mRNA and protein expression levels were analyzed. In addition, macroscopic and histological observations were conducted. Chondrocytes treated with IL-1β demonstrated increased mRNA and protein expression levels of MMP-1, MMP-3 and MMP-13, and decreased expression levels of TIMP-1 mRNA and protein; these alterations were significantly attenuated by TSA treatment. In addition, increased MMPs and decreased TIMP-1 expression levels were observed in vivo in the OA rat model. TSA treatment demonstrated in vivo efficacy through the attenuation of various OA-associated molecular and physiological changes. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that TSA has potential therapeutic value for the treatment of OA. PMID:27431944

  3. Osteoarthritis year in review 2015: mechanics.

    PubMed

    Varady, N H; Grodzinsky, A J

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the conceptual framework of multi-scale biomechanics, this narrative review highlights recent major advances with a focus on gait and joint kinematics, then tissue-level mechanics, cell mechanics and mechanotransduction, matrix mechanics, and finally the nanoscale mechanics of matrix macromolecules. A literature review was conducted from January 2014 to April 2015 using PubMed to identify major developments in mechanics related to osteoarthritis (OA). Studies of knee adduction, flexion, rotation, and contact mechanics have extended our understanding of medial compartment loading. In turn, advances in measurement methodologies have shown how injuries to both the meniscus and ligaments, together, can alter joint kinematics. At the tissue scale, novel findings have emerged regarding the mechanics of the meniscus as well as cartilage superficial zone. Moving to the cell level, poroelastic and poro-viscoelastic mechanisms underlying chondrocyte deformation have been reported, along with the response to osmotic stress. Further developments have emerged on the role of calcium signaling in chondrocyte mechanobiology, including exciting findings on the function of mechanically activated cation channels newly found to be expressed in chondrocytes. Finally, AFM-based nano-rheology systems have enabled studies of thin murine tissues and brush layers of matrix molecules over a wide range of loading rates including high rates corresponding to impact injury. With OA acknowledged to be a disease of the joint as an organ, understanding mechanical behavior at each length scale helps to elucidate the connections between cell biology, matrix biochemistry and tissue structure/function that may play a role in the pathomechanics of OA. PMID:26707990

  4. Chondroitin for osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasvinder A.; Noorbaloochi, Shahrzad; MacDonald, Roderick; Maxwell, Lara J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis, a common joint disorder, is one of the leading causes of disability. Chondroitin has emerged as a new treatment. Previous meta-analyses have shown contradictory results on the efficacy of chondroitin. This, in addition to the publication of more trials, necessitates a systematic review. Objectives To evaluate the benefit and harm of oral chondroitin for treating osteoarthritis compared with placebo or a comparator oral medication including, but not limited to, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), analgesics, opioids, and glucosamine or other “herbal” medications. Search methods We searched seven databases up to November 2013, including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Science Citation Index (Web of Science) and Current Controlled Trials. We searched the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMEA) websites for adverse effects. Trial registers were not searched. Selection criteria All randomized or quasi-randomized clinical trials lasting longer than two weeks, studying adults with osteoarthritis in any joint, and comparing chondroitin with placebo, an active control such as NSAIDs, or other “herbal” supplements such as glucosamine. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently performed all title assessments, data extractions, and risk of bias assessments. Main results Forty-three randomized controlled trials including 4,962 participants treated with chondroitin and 4,148 participants given placebo or another control were included. The majority of trials were in knee OA, with few in hip and hand OA. Trial duration varied from 1 month to 3 years. Participants treated with chondroitin achieved statistically significantly and clinically meaningful better pain scores (0–100) in studies less than 6 months than those given placebo with an absolute risk difference of 10% lower (95% confidence interval (CI), 15% to 6% lower

  5. Effect of integrated yoga therapy on pain, morning stiffness and anxiety in osteoarthritis of the knee joint: A randomized control study

    PubMed Central

    Ebnezar, John; Nagarathna, Raghuram; Yogitha, Bali; Nagendra, Hongasandra Ramarao

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of integrated yoga on pain, morning stiffness and anxiety in osteoarthritis of knees. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and fifty participants with OA knees (35–80 years) were randomly assigned to yoga or control group. Both groups had transcutaneous electrical stimulation and ultrasound treatment followed by intervention (40 min) for two weeks with follow up for three months. The integrated yoga consisted of yogic loosening and strengthening practices, asanas, relaxation, pranayama and meditation. The control group had physiotherapy exercises. Assessments were done on 15th (post 1) and 90th day (post 2). Results: Resting pain (numerical rating scale) reduced better (P<0.001, Mann–Whitney U test) in yoga group (post 1=33.6% and post 2=71.8%) than control group (post 1=13.4% and post 2=37.5%). Morning stiffness decreased more (P<0.001) in yoga (post 1=68.6% and post 2=98.1%) than control group (post 1=38.6% and post 2=71.6%). State anxiety (STAI-1) reduced (P<0.001) by 35.5% (post 1) and 58.4% (post 2) in the yoga group and 15.6% (post 1) and 38.8% (post 2) in the control group; trait anxiety (STAI 2) reduced (P<0.001) better (post 1=34.6% and post 2=57.10%) in yoga than control group (post 1=14.12% and post 2=34.73%). Systolic blood pressure reduced (P<0.001) better in yoga group (post 1=−7.93% and post 2=−15.7%) than the control group (post 1=−1.8% and post 2=−3.8%). Diastolic blood pressure reduced (P<0.001) better in yoga group (post 1=−7.6% and post 2=−16.4%) than the control group (post 1=−2.1% and post 2=−5.0%). Pulse rate reduced (P<0.001) better in yoga group (post 1=−8.41% and post 2=−12.4%) than the control group (post 1=−5.1% and post 2=−7.1%). Conclusion: Integrated approach of yoga therapy is better than physiotherapy exercises as an adjunct to transcutaneous electrical stimulation and ultrasound treatment in reducing pain, morning stiffness, state and trait anxiety, blood pressure and pulse rate in

  6. Current Evidence for Osteoarthritis Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Anandacoomarasamy, Ananthila; March, Lyn

    2010-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and the leading cause of chronic disability among older people. The burden of the disease is expected to rise with an aging population and the increasing prevalence of obesity. Despite this, there is as yet no cure for OA. However, in recent years, a number of potential therapeutic advances have been made, in part due to improved understanding of the underlying pathophysiology. This review provides the current evidence for symptomatic management of OA including nonpharmacological, pharmacological and surgical approaches. The current state of evidence for disease-modifying therapy in OA is also reviewed. PMID:22870434

  7. Trichostatin A increases the TIMP-1/MMP ratio to protect against osteoarthritis in an animal model of the disease.

    PubMed

    Qu, Hao; Li, Jin; Wu, Li-Dong; Chen, Wei-Ping

    2016-09-01

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) has been demonstrated to alleviate certain symptoms associated with osteoarthritis (OA). However, the exact mechanisms underlying this protective effect remain to be elucidated. The present study therefore examined the effects of TSA on the expression levels of interleukin‑1β (IL‑1β)-induced matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to investigate alterations in mRNA expression levels in TSA-treated chondrocytes in the presence or absence of IL‑1β; in addition, protein expression and acetylation levels were assessed by western blotting. In vivo, TSA was administered to rats by intra‑articular injection, following which the mRNA and protein expression levels were analyzed. In addition, macroscopic and histological observations were conducted. Chondrocytes treated with IL‑1β demonstrated increased mRNA and protein expression levels of MMP‑1, MMP‑3 and MMP-13, and decreased expression levels of TIMP‑1 mRNA and protein; these alterations were significantly attenuated by TSA treatment. In addition, increased MMPs and decreased TIMP‑1 expression levels were observed in vivo in the OA rat model. TSA treatment demonstrated in vivo efficacy through the attenuation of various OA‑associated molecular and physiological changes. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that TSA has potential therapeutic value for the treatment of OA. PMID:27431944

  8. Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly-regulated, active process of cell death involved in development, homeostasis and aging. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to pathological states, such as cancer, developmental anomalies and degenerative diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic joint disease in the elderly population, is characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage, resulting in significant disability. Because articular cartilage depends solely on its resident cells, the chondrocytes, for the maintenance of extracellular matrix, the compromising of chondrocyte function and survival would lead to the failure of the articular cartilage. The role of subchondral bone in the maintenance of proper cartilage matrix has been suggested as well, and it has been proposed that both articular cartilage and subchondral bone interact with each other in the maintenance of articular integrity and physiology. Some investigators include both articular cartilage and subchondral bone as targets for repairing joint degeneration. In late-stage OA, the cartilage becomes hypocellular, often accompanied by lacunar emptying, which has been considered as evidence that chondrocyte death is a central feature in OA progression. Apoptosis clearly occurs in osteoarthritic cartilage; however, the relative contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA is difficult to evaluate, and contradictory reports exist on the rate of apoptotic chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage. It is not clear whether chondrocyte apoptosis is the inducer of cartilage degeneration or a byproduct of cartilage destruction. Chondrocyte death and matrix loss may form a vicious cycle, with the progression of one aggravating the other, and the literature reveals that there is a definite correlation between the degree of cartilage damage and chondrocyte apoptosis. Because current treatments for OA act only on symptoms and do not prevent or cure OA, chondrocyte apoptosis would be a valid

  9. Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly-regulated, active process of cell death involved in development, homeostasis and aging. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to pathological states, such as cancer, developmental anomalies and degenerative diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic joint disease in the elderly population, is characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage, resulting in significant disability. Because articular cartilage depends solely on its resident cells, the chondrocytes, for the maintenance of extracellular matrix, the compromising of chondrocyte function and survival would lead to the failure of the articular cartilage. The role of subchondral bone in the maintenance of proper cartilage matrix has been suggested as well, and it has been proposed that both articular cartilage and subchondral bone interact with each other in the maintenance of articular integrity and physiology. Some investigators include both articular cartilage and subchondral bone as targets for repairing joint degeneration. In late-stage OA, the cartilage becomes hypocellular, often accompanied by lacunar emptying, which has been considered as evidence that chondrocyte death is a central feature in OA progression. Apoptosis clearly occurs in osteoarthritic cartilage; however, the relative contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA is difficult to evaluate, and contradictory reports exist on the rate of apoptotic chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage. It is not clear whether chondrocyte apoptosis is the inducer of cartilage degeneration or a byproduct of cartilage destruction. Chondrocyte death and matrix loss may form a vicious cycle, with the progression of one aggravating the other, and the literature reveals that there is a definite correlation between the degree of cartilage damage and chondrocyte apoptosis. Because current treatments for OA act only on symptoms and do not prevent or cure OA, chondrocyte apoptosis would be a valid

  10. Lubricin protects the temporomandibular joint surfaces from degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hill, Adele; Duran, Juanita; Purcell, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a specialized synovial joint essential for the mobility and function of the mammalian jaw. The TMJ is composed of the mandibular condyle, the glenoid fossa of the temporal bone, and a fibrocartilagenous disc interposed between these bones. A fibrous capsule, lined on the luminal surface by the synovial membrane, links these bones and retains synovial fluid within the cavity. The major component of synovial fluid is lubricin, a glycoprotein encoded by the gene proteoglycan 4 (Prg4), which is synthesized by chondrocytes at the surface of the articular cartilage and by synovial lining cells. We previously showed that in the knee joint, Prg4 is crucial for maintenance of cartilage surfaces and for regulating proliferation of the intimal cells in the synovium. Consequently, the objective of this study was to determine the role of lubricin in the maintenance of the TMJ. We found that mice lacking lubricin have a normal TMJ at birth, but develop degeneration resembling TMJ osteoarthritis by 2 months, increasing in severity over time. Disease progression in Prg4-/- mice results in synovial hyperplasia, deterioration of cartilage in the condyle, disc and fossa with an increase in chondrocyte number and their redistribution in clusters with loss of superficial zone chondrocytes. All articular surfaces of the joint had a prominent layer of protein deposition. Compared to the knee joint, the osteoarthritis-like phenotype was more severe and manifested earlier in the TMJ. Taken together, the lack of lubricin in the TMJ causes osteoarthritis-like degeneration that affects the articular cartilage as well as the integrity of multiple joint tissues. Our results provide the first molecular evidence of the role of lubricin in the TMJ and suggest that Prg4-/- mice might provide a valuable new animal model for the study of the early events of TMJ osteoarthritis. PMID:25188282

  11. Predicting Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Bruce S; Woodhouse, Francis G; Besier, Thor F; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Lloyd, David G; Zhang, Lihai; Smith, David W

    2016-01-01

    Treatment options for osteoarthritis (OA) beyond pain relief or total knee replacement are very limited. Because of this, attention has shifted to identifying which factors increase the risk of OA in vulnerable populations in order to be able to give recommendations to delay disease onset or to slow disease progression. The gold standard is then to use principles of risk management, first to provide subject-specific estimates of risk and then to find ways of reducing that risk. Population studies of OA risk based on statistical associations do not provide such individually tailored information. Here we argue that mechanistic models of cartilage tissue maintenance and damage coupled to statistical models incorporating model uncertainty, united within the framework of structural reliability analysis, provide an avenue for bridging the disciplines of epidemiology, cell biology, genetics and biomechanics. Such models promise subject-specific OA risk assessment and personalized strategies for mitigating or even avoiding OA. We illustrate the proposed approach with a simple model of cartilage extracellular matrix synthesis and loss regulated by daily physical activity. PMID:26206679

  12. Lack of Detection of Human Retrovirus-5 Proviral DNA in Synovial Tissue and Blood Specimens From Individuals With Rheumatoid Arthritis or Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    PIPER, KERRYL E.; HANSSEN, ARLEN D.; LEWALLEN, DAVID G.; MATTESON, ERIC L.; OSMON, DOUGLAS R.; DUFFY, MARY C.; HAGAN, ROCHELLE A.; STECKELBERG, JAMES M.; PATEL, ROBIN

    2006-01-01

    Objective Prior studies have suggested an association of human retrovirus 5 with rheumatoid arthritis. The purpose of this study was to determine if human retrovirus-5 proviral DNA is present in synovial tissue and blood specimens from patients with rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis, or those without joint disease. Methods Synovial tissue and whole blood from 75 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 75 patients with osteoarthritis, and 50 patients without a primary arthritis diagnosis were assayed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers that amplify a 186-bp fragment of human retrovirus-5 proviral DNA. Results A total of 200 tissue specimens, 200 mononuclear cells, and 196 of 200 granulocyte specimens tested negative for human retrovirus-5 proviral DNA. No association between human retrovirus 5 and rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis (P = 0.516) was identified. Granulocyte specimens from 4 patients, 2 with rheumatoid arthritis and 2 with osteoarthritis, yielded a low positive human retrovirus-5 proviral DNA signal (83–1,365 copies of human retrovirus-5 proviral DNA/ml blood). Conclusion Contrary to prior reports, we did not find an association between human retrovirus 5 and rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis using a real-time PCR assay. Our findings are consistent with the recent finding that human retrovirus 5 is actually rabbit endogenous retrovirus H. PMID:16463423

  13. Modification of Osteoarthritis in the Guinea Pig with Pulsed Low-Intensity Ultrasound Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gurkan, Ilksen; Ranganathan, Archana; Yang, Xu; Horton, Walter E.; Todman, Martin; Huckle, James; Pleshko, Nancy; Spencer, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The Hartley guinea pig develops articular cartilage degeneration similar to that seen in idiopathic human osteoarthritis. We investigated whether the application of pulsed low-intensity ultrasound (PLIUS) to the Hartley guinea pig joint would prevent or attenuate the progression of this degenerative process. Methods Treatment of male Hartley guinea pigs was initiated at the onset of degeneration (8 weeks of age) to assess the ability of PLIUS to prevent osteoarthritis, or at a later age (12 months) to assess the degree to which PLIUS acted to attenuate the progression of established disease. PLIUS (30 mW/cm2) was applied to stifle joints for 20 minutes per day over periods ranging from three to ten months, with contralateral limbs serving as controls. Joint cartilage histology was graded according to a modified Mankin scale to evaluate treatment effect. Immunohistochemical staining for IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), MMP-3, MMP-13, and TGF-β1 was performed on the cartilage to evaluate patterns of expression of these proteins. Results PLIUS did not fully prevent cartilage degeneration in the prevention groups, but diminished the severity of the disease, with the treated joints showing markedly decreased surface irregularities and a much smaller degree of loss of matrix staining as compared to controls. PLIUS also attenuated disease progression in the groups with established disease, although to a somewhat lesser extent as compared to the prevention groups. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated a markedly decreased degree of TGF-β1 production in the PLIUS-treated joints. This indicates less active endogenous repair, consistent with the marked reduction in cartilage degradation. Conclusions PLIUS exhibits the ability to attenuate the progression of cartilage degeneration in an animal model of idiopathic human OA. The effect was greater in the treatment of early, rather than established, degeneration. PMID:20175971

  14. Patient education, disease activity and physical function: can we be more targeted? A cross sectional study among people with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and hand osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In order to target educational needs of patients more effectively, an Austrian-German educational needs assessment tool (OENAT) was developed, the educational needs of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and hand osteoarthritis (HOA) were described and the relationships between educational needs, gender, disease activity and function were explored. Methods The English ENAT was adapted into Austrian-German using Beaton's cross-cultural adaptation process. Internal construct validity was assessed by Rasch analysis. Educational needs across diagnostic groups and subgroups of patients were summarized descriptively and their relationship with disease activity and physical functioning explored. Results The sample comprised 130 RA, 125 PsA and 48 HOA patients. Their mean ages ± SD were 56 ± 14, 51 ± 11 and 64 ± 7 years for RA, PsA and HOA; disease duration was 11 ± 9, 11 ± 11 and 14 ± 9 years, respectively. More than 70% in each patient group expressed interest in receiving education about their disease. The educational needs differed significantly between women and men in all 3 groups. In RA and PsA, female patients expressed significantly higher educational needs than men in 'movements’ and 'feelings’ domains (p=0.04 and p=0.03 for RA and p<0.01 and p=0.01 for PsA). Female patients in the HOA group had significantly higher scores on all domains except for the 'movements’. Older patients with PsA scored significantly higher than their younger counterparts in the 'pain’ domain (p=0.05). RA patients with disease duration >5 years), expressed higher educational needs in 'movements’ (p<0.01). Educational background had effects in the PsA group only, patients with basic education had greater scores than those with higher education on 'movements’ and 'arthritis process’ (p=0.01). In the RA group, DAS28 correlated significantly with 'movements’ (r=0.24, p=0.01), 'feelings’ (r=0.22, p

  15. Functional genomics in osteoarthritis: Past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Julia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common complex disease of high public health burden. OA is characterized by the degeneration of affected joints leading to pain and reduced mobility. Over the last few years, several studies have focused on the genomic changes underpinning OA. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of genome‐wide, non‐hypothesis‐driven functional genomics (methylation, gene, and protein expression) studies of knee and hip OA in humans. Individual studies have generally been limited in sample size and hence power, and have differed in their approaches; nonetheless, some common themes have started to emerge, notably the role played by biological processes related to the extracellular matrix, immune response, the WNT pathway, angiogenesis, and skeletal development. Larger‐scale studies and streamlined, robust methodologies will be needed to further elucidate the biological etiology of OA going forward. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1105–1110, 2016. PMID:27176659

  16. Detecting early stage osteoarthritis by optical coherence tomography?

    PubMed Central

    Jahr, Holger; Brill, Nicolai; Nebelung, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common chronic disease of our joints, manifested by a dynamically increasing degeneration of hyaline articular cartilage (AC). While currently no therapy can reverse this process, the few available treatment options are hampered by the inability of early diagnosis. Loss of cartilage surface, or extracellular matrix (ECM), integrity is considered the earliest sign of OA. Despite the increasing number of imaging modalities surprisingly few imaging biomarkers exist. In this narrative review, recent developments in optical coherence tomography are critically evaluated for their potential to assess different aspects of AC quality as biomarkers of OA. Special attention is paid to imaging surface irregularities, ECM organization and the evaluation of posttraumatic injuries by light-based modalities. PMID:26862954

  17. Gait Analysis Methods for Rodent Models of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Brittany Y.; Kloefkorn, Heidi E.; Allen, Kyle D.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) primarily seek treatment due to pain and disability, yet the primary endpoints for rodent OA models tend to be histological measures of joint destruction. The discrepancy between clinical and preclinical evaluations is problematic, given that radiographic evidence of OA in humans does not always correlate to the severity of patient-reported symptoms. Recent advances in behavioral analyses have provided new methods to evaluate disease sequelae in rodents. Of particular relevance to rodent OA models are methods to assess rodent gait. While obvious differences exist between quadrupedal and bipedal gait sequences, the gait abnormalities seen in humans and in rodent OA models reflect similar compensatory behaviors that protect an injured limb from loading. The purpose of this review is to describe these compensations and current methods used to assess rodent gait characteristics, while detailing important considerations for the selection of gait analysis methods in rodent OA models. PMID:25160712

  18. Estrogens, cartilage, and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Richette, Pascal; Corvol, Maïté; Bardin, Thomas

    2003-08-01

    A role for estrogens in osteoarthritis is consistent with the larger increases in women than in men in the incidence and prevalence of hip, knee, and finger osteoarthritis after 50 years of age. Furthermore, hormone replacement therapy for the menopause seems to be associated with a decrease in the prevalence of symptoms and radiological alterations related to hip and knee osteoarthritis. The two estrogen receptors alpha and beta (ERalpha and Erbeta) have been identified in normal and osteoarthritic cartilage, indicating that cartilage can respond to estrogens. Finally, in vivo experiments in animals and in vitro studies have shed light on the mechanisms by which estrogens may influence chondrocyte metabolism. PMID:12951307

  19. Detection of degenerative disease of the temporomandibular joint by bone scintigraphy: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Bloom, C.Y.

    1980-10-01

    Nine patients with facial pain were evaluated with limited bone scans. The scintigrams correlated with microscopy in all patients, although radiographs correlated with microscopy in only five patients. The degenerative disease process in the temporomandibular joint was more extensive in the patients with radiographic and scintigraphic abnormalities than in those with scintigraphic abnormalities alone. The limited bone scan appears useful in detecting early degenerative changes in the temporomandibular joint.

  20. Correlation between Gene Expression and Osteoarthritis Progression in Human.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Leilei; Huang, Xiaobin; Karperien, Marcel; Post, Janine N

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease characterized by gradual degradation of joint cartilage. This study aimed to quantify major pathogenetic factors during OA progression in human cartilage. Cartilage specimens were isolated from OA patients and scored 0-5 according to the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) guidelines. Protein and gene expressions were measured by immunohistochemistry and qPCR, respectively. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays were used to detect apoptotic cells. Cartilage degeneration in OA is a gradual progress accompanied with gradual loss of collagen type II and a gradual decrease in mRNA expression of SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1. Expression of WNT antagonists DKK1 and FRZB was lost, while hypertrophic markers (RUNX2, COL10A1 and IHH) increased during OA progression. Moreover, DKK1 and FRZB negatively correlated with OA grading, while RUNX2 and IHH showed a significantly positive correlation with OA grading. The number of apoptotic cells was increased with the severity of OA. Taken together, our results suggested that genetic profiling of the gene expression could be used as markers for staging OA at the molecular level. This helps to understand the molecular pathology of OA and may lead to the development of therapies based on OA stage. PMID:27428952

  1. Correlation between Gene Expression and Osteoarthritis Progression in Human

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Leilei; Huang, Xiaobin; Karperien, Marcel; Post, Janine N.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease characterized by gradual degradation of joint cartilage. This study aimed to quantify major pathogenetic factors during OA progression in human cartilage. Cartilage specimens were isolated from OA patients and scored 0–5 according to the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) guidelines. Protein and gene expressions were measured by immunohistochemistry and qPCR, respectively. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays were used to detect apoptotic cells. Cartilage degeneration in OA is a gradual progress accompanied with gradual loss of collagen type II and a gradual decrease in mRNA expression of SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1. Expression of WNT antagonists DKK1 and FRZB was lost, while hypertrophic markers (RUNX2, COL10A1 and IHH) increased during OA progression. Moreover, DKK1 and FRZB negatively correlated with OA grading, while RUNX2 and IHH showed a significantly positive correlation with OA grading. The number of apoptotic cells was increased with the severity of OA. Taken together, our results suggested that genetic profiling of the gene expression could be used as markers for staging OA at the molecular level. This helps to understand the molecular pathology of OA and may lead to the development of therapies based on OA stage. PMID:27428952

  2. Proteomic analysis of human osteoarthritis synovial fluid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis is a chronic musculoskeletal disorder characterized mainly by progressive degradation of the hyaline cartilage. Patients with osteoarthritis often postpone seeking medical help, which results in the diagnosis being made at an advanced stage of cartilage destruction. Sustained efforts are needed to identify specific markers that might help in early diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and in improving therapeutic outcomes. We employed a multipronged proteomic approach, which included multiple fractionation strategies followed by high resolution mass spectrometry analysis to explore the proteome of synovial fluid obtained from osteoarthritis patients. In addition to the total proteome, we also enriched glycoproteins from synovial fluid using lectin affinity chromatography. Results We identified 677 proteins from synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis of which 545 proteins have not been previously reported. These novel proteins included ADAM-like decysin 1 (ADAMDEC1), alanyl (membrane) aminopeptidase (ANPEP), CD84, fibulin 1 (FBLN1), matrix remodelling associated 5 (MXRA5), secreted phosphoprotein 2 (SPP2) and spondin 2 (SPON2). We identified 300 proteins using lectin affinity chromatography, including the glycoproteins afamin (AFM), attractin (ATRN), fibrillin 1 (FBN1), transferrin (TF), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) and vasorin (VSN). Gene ontology analysis confirmed that a majority of the identified proteins were extracellular and are mostly involved in cell communication and signaling. We also confirmed the expression of ANPEP, dickkopf WNT signaling pathway inhibitor 3 (DKK3) and osteoglycin (OGN) by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) analysis of osteoarthritis synovial fluid samples. Conclusions We present an in-depth analysis of the synovial fluid proteome from patients with osteoarthritis. We believe that the catalog of proteins generated in this study will further enhance our knowledge regarding the

  3. Long-Term Follow-Up of the Cheilectomy for Degenerative Joint Disease of the First Metatarsophalangeal Joint.

    PubMed

    Nicolosi, Nicole; Hehemann, Chris; Connors, James; Boike, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Cheilectomy is the surgical resection of 20% to 30% of the dorsal metatarsal head and proximal phalanx. The present retrospective study evaluated the long-term efficacy of aggressive cheilectomy to address degenerative joint disease of the first metatarsophalangeal joint. To our knowledge, this is the second longest duration study to date to evaluate the long-term efficacy of the cheilectomy procedure, with a mean follow-up period of 7.14 years (range 39 weeks to 14.87 years). The mean patient age was 55.71 ± 9.51 years, and 37 (65%) of the patients were female. Age, sex, foot type, and preoperative radiographic parameters of hallux rigidus were also evaluated and correlated. The mean percentage of success with this operation was 87.69%. Of the 58 patients, 51 (87.93%) experienced no limitations in their daily activities. Only 2 patients (3.33%) subsequently required subsequent arthrodesis. The results of the present study suggest that cheilectomy offers long-term satisfaction for patients with hallux rigidus and is an acceptable alternative to the joint destructive procedure of first metatarsophalangeal arthrodesis. PMID:25981441

  4. EULAR report on the use of ultrasonography in painful knee osteoarthritis. Part 1: Prevalence of inflammation in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    D'Agostino, M; Conaghan, P; Le Bars, M; Baron, G; Grassi, W; Martin-Mola, E; Wakefield, R; Brasseur, J; So, A; Backhaus, M; Malaise, M; Burmester, G; Schmidely, N; Ravaud, P; Dougados, M; Emery, P

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the prevalence of inflammation in subjects with chronic painful knee osteoarthritis (OA), as determined by the presence of synovitis or joint effusion at ultrasonography (US); and to evaluate the correlation between synovitis, effusion, and clinical parameters. Methods: A cross sectional, multicentre, European study was conducted under the umbrella of EULAR-ESCISIT. Subjects had primary chronic knee OA (ACR criteria) with pain during physical activity ⩾30 mm for at least 48 hours. Clinical parameters were collected by a rheumatologist and an US examination of the painful knee was performed by a radiologist or rheumatologist within 72 hours of the clinical examination. Ultrasonographic synovitis was defined as synovial thickness ⩾4 mm and diffuse or nodular appearance, and a joint effusion was defined as effusion depth ⩾4 mm. Results: 600 patients with painful knee OA were analysed. At US 16 (2.7%) had synovitis alone, 85 (14.2%) had both synovitis and effusion, 177 (29.5%) had joint effusion alone, and 322 (53.7%) had no inflammation according to the definitions employed. Multivariate analysis showed that inflammation seen by US correlated statistically with advanced radiographic disease (Kellgren-Lawrence grade ⩾3; odds ratio (OR) = 2.20 and 1.91 for synovitis and joint effusion, respectively), and with clinical signs and symptoms suggestive of an inflammatory "flare", such as joint effusion on clinical examination (OR = 1.97 and 2.70 for synovitis and joint effusion, respectively) or sudden aggravation of knee pain (OR = 1.77 for joint effusion). Conclusion: US can detect synovial inflammation and effusion in painful knee OA, which correlate significantly with knee synovitis, effusion, and clinical parameters suggestive of an inflammatory "flare". PMID:15878903

  5. Osteoarthritis of the Foot and Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size Print Bookmark Osteoarthritis of the Foot and Ankle What Is Osteoarthritis? Osteoarthritis is a condition characterized ... is also often found in the midfoot and ankle. Causes Osteoarthritis is considered a “wear and tear” ...

  6. Obesity and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Kunal; Karssiens, Timothy; Kumar, Vijay; Pandit, Hemant

    2016-07-01

    This paper provides an up-to-date review of obesity and lower limb osteoarthritis (OA). OA is a major global cause of disability, with the knee being the most frequently affected joint. There is a proven association between obesity and knee OA, and obesity is suggested to be the main modifiable risk factor. Obese patients (Body Mass Index, BMI, over 30kg/m(2)) are more likely to require total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The global prevalence of obesity has doubled since 1980; by 2025, 47% of UK men and 36% of women are forecast to be obese. This rising global burden is a key factor in the growing rise in the use of TKA. It is therefore important to appreciate the outcomes of surgery in patients with end-stage OA and a high BMI. This review found that while OA is felt to contribute to weight gain, it is unclear whether TKA facilitates weight reduction. Surgery in obese patients is more technically challenging. This is reflected in the evidence, which suggests higher rates of short- to medium-term complications following TKA, including wound infection and medical complications, resulting in longer hospital stay, and potentially higher rates of malalignment, dislocation, and early revision. However, despite slower initial recovery and possibly lower functional scores and implant survival in the longer term, obese patients can still benefit from TKA in terms of improved function, quality of life and satisfaction. In conclusion, despite higher risks and more uncertain outcomes of surgery, higher BMI in itself should not be a contraindication to TKA; instead, each patient's individual circumstances should be considered. PMID:27180156

  7. Inflammatory joint disease and human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Forster, S M; Seifert, M H; Keat, A C; Rowe, I F; Thomas, B J; Taylor-Robinson, D; Pinching, A J; Harris, J R W

    1988-01-01

    Nine men positive for antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who developed peripheral, non-erosive arthritis were followed up. The clinical features were compatible with reactive arthritis but were atypical in several respects: the joint symptoms were generally severe, persistent, and unresponsive to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The onset of arthritis was associated with various infections, none of which are known to be associated with the development of reactive arthritis. HLA typing was performed for three patients, all of whom were positive for HLA-B27. HIV was isolated from the synovial fluid of one patient. No patient had AIDS before developing arthritis, but four progressed to having AIDS after a mean of 7·5 months, and two died. Arthritis resolved in only one patient. The possibility of HIV infection should be considered in all patients with conditions suggesting reactive arthritis. Synovitis in patients with severe immunodeficiency has important pathogenetic implications. PMID:3135044

  8. [SECOT consensus on medial femorotibial osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; Silvestre, A; Carpintero, P

    2013-01-01

    A consensus, prepared by SECOT, is presented on the management of medial knee compartment osteoarthritis, in order to establish clinical criteria and recommendations directed at unifying the criteria in its management, dealing with the factors involved in the pathogenesis of medial femorotibial knee osteoarthritis, the usefulness of diagnostic imaging techniques, and the usefulness of arthroscopy. Conservative and surgical treatments are also analysed. The experts consulted showed a consensus (agreed or disagreed) in 65.8% of the items considered, leaving 14items where no consensus was found, which included the aetiopathogenesis of the osteoarthritis, the value of NMR in degenerative disease, the usefulness of COX-2 and the chondroprotective drugs, as well as on the ideal valgus tibial osteotomy technique. PMID:24169227

  9. Serum Levels of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Painful Knee Osteoarthritis and Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Marta; Ezquerro, Fernando; Marcon Alfieri, Fábio; Vilas Boas, Lucy; Tozetto-Mendoza, Tania Regina; Chen, Janini; Özçakar, Levent; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disorder in the world. Among the mechanisms involved in osteoarthritis, biomarkers (cytokines profile) may be related to pain and pain intensity, functional capacity, and pressure pain thresholds (PPT). Thus, the study of these relationships may offer useful information about pathophysiology and associated mechanisms involved in osteoarthritis. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the seric concentration of pro (IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis and to correlate the levels of these biomarkers with the patients' functional capacity and pressure pain threshold (PPT) values. PMID:25821631

  10. Intra-articular therapy in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Uthman, I; Raynauld, J; Haraoui, B

    2003-01-01

    The medical literature was reviewed from 1968–2002 using Medline and the key words "intra-articular" and "osteoarthritis" to determine the various intra-articular therapies used in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid are the most frequently used intra-articular therapies in osteoarthritis. Other intra-articular substances such as orgotein, radiation synovectomy, dextrose prolotherapy, silicone, saline lavage, saline injection without lavage, analgesic agents, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, glucosamine, somatostatin, sodium pentosan polysulfate, chloroquine, mucopolysaccharide polysulfuric acid ester, lactic acid solution, and thiotepa cytostatica have been investigated as potentially therapeutic in the treatment of arthritic joints. Despite the lack of strong, convincing, and reproducible evidence that any of the intra-articular therapies significantly alters the progression of osteoarthritis, corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid are widely used in patients who have failed other therapeutic modalities for lack of efficacy or toxicity. As a practical approach for a knee with effusion, steroid injections should be considered while the presence of symptomatic "dry" knees may favour the hyaluronic acid approach. The virtual absence of serious side effects, coupled with the perceived benefits, make these approaches attractive. PMID:12954956

  11. The neuropathic joint.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, W

    1994-01-01

    Neuropathic arthritis is a destructive arthropathy frequently associated with loss of proprioception. A third of patients, however, may have no demonstrable neurological deficit. Patients with diabetes, syphilis, syringomyelia and other neuropathies are particularly prone to developing this joint disease. The diagnosis of Charcot's joints should be considered in anyone who develops what appears to be a severe osteoarthritis or a transverse fracture of the tibia or fibula after minor trauma. Scoliosis with particularly destructive changes on radiography should prompt a search for syringomyelia or syphilis. The most common radiographic abnormalities are those of distension in 3D (Dislocation, Destruction and Degeneration). An atrophic form with resorption of the proximal humerus, most frequently described in syringomyelia, has been observed in diabetes. Loss of the distal end of the clavicle has not been described before in the neuropathies. These changes coupled with speckled calcification or shards of bone in the periarticular soft tissue confirm the diagnosis. Infection and CPPD crystal disease can be difficult to exclude. The joint fluid may be inflammatory and infection may be a complication. Treatment includes anti-inflammatories and splinting. Indications for surgery are limited. PMID:8070170

  12. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chong, Elaine W; Wang, Yuanyuan; Robman, Liubov D; Aung, Khin Zaw; Makeyeva, Galina A; Giles, Graham G; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Guymer, Robyn H

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003-2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001-2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00-1.49). Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25-12.02). The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur may be

  13. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Elaine W.; Wang, Yuanyuan; Robman, Liubov D.; Aung, Khin Zaw; Makeyeva, Galina A.; Giles, Graham G.; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M.; Guymer, Robyn H.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003–2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001–2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00–1.49). Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25–12.02). The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur

  14. Proteinases in the joint: clinical relevance of proteinases in joint destruction

    PubMed Central

    Rengel, Yvonne; Ospelt, Caroline; Gay, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    Proteinases are involved in essential steps in cartilage and bone homeostasis. Consequently, efforts have been made to establish their potential role in the pathology of rheumatic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and spondyloarthritis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are sensitive markers of disease severity and response to treatment, and therefore they have potential in the assessment of rheumatic diseases. Despite disappointing early results with synthetic inhibitors of MMPs, there is still much scope for developing effective and safe MMPs inhibitors, and consequently to deliver new options to inhibit joint destruction. PMID:18001502

  15. [Pain control of bone and joint diseases in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Soen, Satoshi

    2014-10-01

    The decline of multiple physiological processes, even in the absence of disease, combined should logically influence treatment options. Decreased gastric secretions, intestinal motility, and vitamin D receptors lead to loss of appetite, malnutrition. Increased arterial thickening and rigidity elevate cardiac risk, while decreased elasticity in the lungs potentially exacerbates breathing disorders. Memory impairment and cognitive decline progress as neurons become less resilient to stress over time. Reduced hepatic and renal blood flow limit metabolism and filtration, increasing the risk for accumulation of toxic substances. Physiologic changes, drug-drug interactions resulting from polypharmacy, and drug-disease interactions combine to make elderly patients more sensitive to the AEs of medications. Effective pain management in the elderly is challenging. The purpose of this review is to highlight the use of several treatment options for elderly patients. PMID:25509813

  16. Relationship of orthopedic examination, goniometric measurements, and radiographic signs of degenerative joint disease in cats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Available information suggests a mismatch between radiographic and orthopedic examination findings in cats with DJD. However, the extent of the discrepancy between clinical and radiographic signs of OA in companion animals has not been described in detail. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between orthopedic examination findings, joint goniometry, and radiographic signs of DJD in 100 cats, in a prospective observational design. Cat temperament, pain response to palpation, joint crepitus, effusion and thickening were graded. Radiographs of appendicular joints and the axial skeleton were made under sedation. Joint motion was measured by use of a plastic goniometer before and after sedation. Associations between radiographic degenerative joint disease (DJD) and examination findings were assessed to determine sensitivity, specificity and likelihood estimations. Results Pain response to palpation was elicited in 0-67% of the joints with DJD, with a specificity ranging from 62-99%; crepitus was detected in 0-56% of the joints and its specificity varied between 87 and 99%; for effusion, values ranged between 6 and 38% (specificity, 82-100%), and thickening, 0-59% (specificity, 74-99%). Joints with DJD tended to have a decreased range of motion. The presence of pain increased the odds of having DJD in the elbow (right: 5.5; left: 4.5); the presence of pain in the lower back increased the odds of spinal DJD being present (2.97 for lumbar; 4.67 for lumbo-sacral). Conclusions Radiographic DJD cannot be diagnosed with certainty using palpation or goniometry. However, negative findings tend to predict radiographically normal joints. Palpation and goniometry may be used as a tool to help to screen cats, mostly to rule out DJD. PMID:22281125

  17. Radiological and Radionuclide Imaging of Degenerative Disease of the Facet Joints.

    PubMed

    Shur, Natalie; Corrigan, Alexis; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Desai, Amidevi; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    The facet joint has been increasingly implicated as a potential source of lower back pain. Diagnosis can be challenging as there is not a direct correlation between facet joint disease and clinical or radiological features. The purpose of this article is to review the diagnosis, treatment, and current imaging modality options in the context of degenerative facet joint disease. We describe each modality in turn with a pictorial review using current evidence. Newer hybrid imaging techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) provide additional information relative to the historic gold standard magnetic resonance imaging. The diagnostic benefits of SPECT/CT include precise localization and characterization of spinal lesions and improved diagnosis for lower back pain. It may have a role in selecting patients for local therapeutic injections, as well as guiding their location with increased precision. PMID:26170560

  18. Radiological and Radionuclide Imaging of Degenerative Disease of the Facet Joints

    PubMed Central

    Shur, Natalie; Corrigan, Alexis; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Desai, Amidevi; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    The facet joint has been increasingly implicated as a potential source of lower back pain. Diagnosis can be challenging as there is not a direct correlation between facet joint disease and clinical or radiological features. The purpose of this article is to review the diagnosis, treatment, and current imaging modality options in the context of degenerative facet joint disease. We describe each modality in turn with a pictorial review using current evidence. Newer hybrid imaging techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) provide additional information relative to the historic gold standard magnetic resonance imaging. The diagnostic benefits of SPECT/CT include precise localization and characterization of spinal lesions and improved diagnosis for lower back pain. It may have a role in selecting patients for local therapeutic injections, as well as guiding their location with increased precision. PMID:26170560

  19. Association of hip pain with radiographic evidence of hip osteoarthritis: diagnostic test study

    PubMed Central

    Nevitt, Michael C; Niu, Jingbo; Clancy, Mary M; Lane, Nancy E; Link, Thomas M; Vlad, Steven; Tolstykh, Irina; Jungmann, Pia M.; Felson, David T; Guermazi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Study question Is there concordance between hip pain and radiographic hip osteoarthritis? Methods In this diagnostic test study, pelvic radiographs were assessed for hip osteoarthritis in two cohorts: the Framingham Osteoarthritis Study (community of Framingham, Massachusetts) and the Osteoarthritis Initiative (a multicenter longitudinal cohort study of osteoarthritis in the United States). Using visual representation of the hip joint, participants reported whether they had hip pain on most days and the location of the pain: anterior, groin, lateral, buttocks, or low back. In the Framingham study, participants with hip pain were also examined for hip pain with internal rotation. The authors analysed the agreement between radiographic hip osteoarthritis and hip pain, and for those with hip pain suggestive of hip osteoarthritis they calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of radiographs as the diagnostic test. Study answer and limitations In the Framingham study (n=946), only 15.6% of hips in patients with frequent hip pain showed radiographic evidence of hip osteoarthritis, and 20.7% of hips with radiographic hip osteoarthritis were frequently painful. The sensitivity of radiographic hip osteoarthritis for hip pain localised to the groin was 36.7%, specificity 90.5%, positive predictive value 6.0%, and negative predictive value 98.9%. Results did not differ much for hip pain at other locations or for painful internal rotation. In the Osteoarthritis Initiative study (n=4366), only 9.1% of hips in patients with frequent pain showed radiographic hip osteoarthritis, and 23.8% of hips with radiographic hip osteoarthritis were frequently painful. The sensitivity of definite radiographic hip osteoarthritis for hip pain localised to the groin was 16.5%, specificity 94.0%, positive predictive value 7.1%, and negative predictive value 97.6%. Results also did not differ much for hip pain at other locations. What this

  20. Comparative study of hamstring and quadriceps strengthening treatments in the management of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Al-Johani, Ahmed H; Kachanathu, Shaji John; Ramadan Hafez, Ashraf; Al-Ahaideb, Abdulaziz; Algarni, Abdulrahman D; Meshari Alroumi, Abdulmohesn; Alanezi, Aqeel M

    2014-06-01

    [Purpose] Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is the most common form of joint disease. It is one of the major causes of impaired function that reduces quality of life (QOL) worldwide. The purpose of this study was to compare exercise treatments for hamstring and quadriceps strength in the management of knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Forty patients with OA knee, aged 50-65 years were divided into 2 groups. The first group (57.65±4.78 years) received hot packs and performed strengthening exercises for the quadriceps and hamstring, and stretching exercises for the hamstring. The second group (58.15±5.11 years) received hot packs and performed strengthening exercises for only the quadriceps, and stretching exercise for the hamstring. Outcome measures were the WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities OA index questionnaire), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) assessment of pain, the Fifty-Foot Walk Test (FWS), and Handheld dynamometry. [Results] There was a significant difference between the groups. The first group showed a more significant result than the second group. [Conclusion] Strengthening of the hamstrings in addition to strengthening of the quadriceps was shown to be beneficial for improving subjective knee pain, range of motion and decreasing the limitation of functional performance of patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:25013274

  1. [Is knee osteotomy still indicated in knee osteoarthritis?].

    PubMed

    Antonescu, D N

    2000-12-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate whether high tibial osteotomy (HTO) still had a role in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee joint. The author has performed photoelasticity studies which confirmed abnormal stress distribution over the joint, as soon as its mechanical axis was deviated and the joint line had an obliquity over 10 degrees. High tibial osteotomy to correct varus or valgus deformity restores a symmetrical stress distribution and represents the only etiological treatment of secondary osteoarthritis of the knee. Two hundred and fifty HTO's were performed between 1971 and 1985 for osteoarthritis of the knee. The short-term result was good or very good in 75%, fair in 20% and poor in 5%. Fair and poor results were related to insufficient correction, to infection or mostly to incorrect indications. In 152 cases with a good or very good short term result, a further evaluation was made between 8 years and 15 years after operation. It was noted that osteoarthritis had been arrested in 105 cases (69%) whereas it had deteriorated in 47 cases. The main factors associated with further deterioration were insufficient correction and persistence of joint line obliquity. Provided on optimal correction is achieved (3 degrees to 6 degrees hypercorrection in valgus osteotomy, 0 degree in varus osteotomy) and provided a horizontal joint line is restored, HTO performed in good indications (Ahlback grade I or II) may provide good results for at least 10 to 15 years. PMID:11196365

  2. Glucosamine and Chondroitin for Osteoarthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... sheet Osteoarthritis and Complementary Health Approaches . What the Science Says About Glucosamine and Chondroitin for Osteoarthritis For ... months as those who received placebo. What the Science Says About Safety and Side Effects No serious ...

  3. Validating a new computed tomography atlas for grading ankle osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael M; Vela, Nathan D; Levine, Jason E; Barnoy, Eran A

    2015-01-01

    As the most common joint disease, osteoarthritis (OA) poses a significant source of pain and disability. It can be defined by classic radiographic findings, particular symptoms, or a combination of the 2. Although specific grading scales have been developed to evaluate OA in various joints, such as the shoulder, hip, and knee, no definitive classification system is available for grading OA in the ankle. The purpose of the present study was to create and validate a standardized atlas for grading (or staging) ankle osteoarthritis using computed tomography (CT) and "hallmark" findings noted on coronal, sagittal, and axial views extrapolated from the Kellgren-Lawrence radiographic scale. The CT scans of 226 patients at the Miami Veterans Affairs Medical Center were reviewed. An atlas was derived from a retrospective review of 30 remaining CT scans taken from July 2008 to November 2011. After this review, 3 orthogonal static CT images, obtained from 11 remaining patients, were chosen to represent the various stages on the OA scale and were used to test the validity of the atlas developed by 2 of us (M.M.C. and N.D.V.). A multispecialty panel of 9 examiners, excluding ourselves, independently rated the 11 CT scan subjects. The differences among examiners and specialties were calculated, including an intra-examiner agreement for 2 separate readings spaced 9 months apart. Although the small number of subspecialty examiners made the intraspecialty comparisons difficult to validate, the findings nevertheless indicated excellent agreement among all specialty groups, with good intra-investigational (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.962 and 1) inter-investigational (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.851) values. These results appeared to validate the CT ankle OA atlas, which we believe will be a valuable clinical and research tool, one that will likely be more beneficial than less relevant generalized OA grading scales in use today. PMID:25135101

  4. Granulocyte elastase as a new biochemical marker in the diagnosis of chronic joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Kleesiek, K; Reinards, R; Brackertz, D; Neumann, S; Lang, H; Greiling, H

    1986-01-01

    Human granulocyte elastase (EC 3.4.21.37) is released from granulocytes in large amounts in chronic inflammatory joint diseases and is therefore of special pathogenic and diagnostic importance. In order to examine the diagnostic significance of this enzyme as a clinico-chemical parameter, we determined the concentration of granulocyte elastase in complex with alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by an enzyme immunoassay in synovial fluids and plasma of patients with chronic joint diseases. In inflammatory synovial fluids the concentration of complexed elastase correlates well with the granulocyte number and may increase to an extremely high level. In 90% of patients with manifest rheumatoid arthritis increased elastase levels are also observed in the plasma, probably due to the large gradient between the synovial fluid and plasma concentration, whereas in osteoarthrosis normal plasma concentrations were observed. Thus, these results indicate that normal plasma concentrations in patients with chronic joint diseases exclude the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis with high probability. The simultaneous determination of complexed elastase in plasma and synovial fluid improves the nosological differentiation of chronic joint diseases. Elastase activity on a specific chromogenic substrate, which was found in many inflammatory synovial fluids, is mainly attributed to elastase alpha 2-macroglobulin complexes. In some purulent synovial fluids, however, we were able to detect free elastase, which has been shown to play an important role in the destruction of articular cartilage. PMID:2431451

  5. Effect of alcoholic extract of Entada pursaetha DC on monosodium iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Rashmi R.; More, Amar S.; Gupta, Gaurav; Lingaraju, Madhu C.; Balaganur, Venkanna; Kumar, Pankaj; Kumar, Dinesh; Sharma, Anil K.; Mishra, Santosh K.; Tandan, Surendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease characterized by joint pain and progressive loss of articular cartilage. Entada pursaetha has been traditionally used in the treatment of inflammatory disease, liver ailment, etc. In this study we investigated suppressive effect of ethanolic extract of E. pursaetha (EPE) on monosodium iodoacetate (MIA)-induced osteoarthritis pain and disease progression by histopathological changes in joints in a rat model. Methods: OA was induced in right knee of rat by intra-articular injection of 3 mg of MIA and characterized by pathological progression of disease and pain of affected joint. Spontaneous movements, mechanical, thermal and cold sensitivity were monitored at days 0 (before drug and MIA injection), 7, 14 and 21 of MIA administration. EPE (30, 100 and 300 mg/kg), vehicle or etoricoxib (10 mg/kg; reference drug) were administered daily for 21 days by oral route. Results: EPE at various doses significantly reduced mechanical, heat, cold hyperalgesia and increased the horizontal and vertical movements in intra-articular MIA injected rats. EPE prevented the damage to cartilage structure and reduced the cellular abnormalities. Articular cartilage of rats treated with EPE at 300 mg/kg group was almost normal with well-developed smooth surface and chondrocytes were distributed individually or arranged in column. Interpretation & conclusions: The present findings showed that the EPE was not only able to mitigate pain and hyperalgesia but also inhibited MIA-induced cartilage degeneration in vivo. EPE may have the potential to become therapeutic modality in the treatment of osteoarthritis. However, further studies need to be done to confirm these findings in other models and clinical trials. PMID:26112847

  6. Long-distance running, bone density, and osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, N.E.; Bloch, D.A.; Jones, H.H.; Marshall, W.H. Jr.; Wood, P.D.; Fries, J.F.

    1986-03-07

    Forty-one long-distance runners aged 50 to 72 years were compared with 41 matched community controls to examine associations of repetitive, long-term physical impact (running) with osteoarthritis and osteoporosis. Roentgenograms of hands, lateral lumbar spine, and knees were assessed without knowledge of running status. A computed tomographic scan of the first lumbar vertebra was performed to quantitate bone mineral content. Runners, both male and female, have approximately 40% more bone mineral than matched controls. Female runners, but not male runners, appear to have somewhat more sclerosis and spur formation in spine and weight-bearing knee x-ray films, but not in hand x-ray films. There were no differences between groups in joint space narrowing, crepitation, joint stability, or symptomatic osteoarthritis. Running is associated with increased bone mineral but not, in this cross-sectional study, with clinical osteoarthritis.

  7. Surgical treatment of an aseptic fistulized acromioclavicular joint cyst: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Murena, Luigi; D’angelo, Fabio; Falvo, Daniele A

    2009-01-01

    An acromioclavicular joint cyst is an uncommonly reported condition, which seems to result from a massive rotator cuff tear and degenerative osteoarthritis of the acromioclavicular joint. We present the case of an 81-year-old man affected by an acromioclavicular joint cyst, associated to a massive rotator cuff tear, proximal migration of the humeral head and osteoarthritis of the gleno-humeral joint. The mass was 7 × 2.5 cm in size and the overlying skin presented a fistula that drained clear synovial-like fluid. Plain X-ray examination of the left shoulder showed proximal migration of the humeral head migration and osteoarthritis of the gleno-humeral joint, and further MRI evaluation confirmed the clinical diagnosis of a complete rotator cuff tear and observed a large subcutaneous cyst in communication with the degenerative acromioclavicular joint. The patient underwent surgical excision of the cyst and lateral resection of the clavicle to prevent disease recurrence. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an acromioclavicular joint cyst complicated by an aseptic fistula resulting from multiple aspirations. PMID:19918423

  8. A comparison of radiographic, arthroscopic and histological measures of articular pathology in the canine elbow joint.

    PubMed

    Goldhammer, Marc A; Smith, Sionagh H; Fitzpatrick, Noel; Clements, Dylan N

    2010-10-01

    Validation of radiographic and arthroscopic scoring of joint pathology requires their comparison with histological measures of disease from the same joint. Fragmentation of the medial coronoid process (FMCP) is a naturally occurring disease of the canine elbow joint that results in osteoarthritis, and the objectives of this study were to compare the severity of histopathological changes in the medial coronoid process (MCP) and medial articular synovial membrane with gross radiographic scoring of elbow joint osteophytosis and the arthroscopic assessment of the MCP articular cartilage surface. Radiographic scoring of osteophytosis and the arthroscopic scoring of visual cartilage pathology of the MCP correlated moderately well with the histopathological evaluation of cartilage damage on the MCP and synovial inflammation in the medial part of the joint, but not with bone pathology in the MCP. Marked cartilage pathology on the MCP was identified in joints with either no radiographic evidence of osteophytosis or with mild cartilage damage that was evident arthroscopically. PMID:19716324

  9. Galectin-1 Couples Glycobiology to Inflammation in Osteoarthritis through the Activation of an NF-κB-Regulated Gene Network.

    PubMed

    Toegel, Stefan; Weinmann, Daniela; André, Sabine; Walzer, Sonja M; Bilban, Martin; Schmidt, Sebastian; Chiari, Catharina; Windhager, Reinhard; Krall, Christoph; Bennani-Baiti, Idriss M; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2016-02-15

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease that ranks among the leading causes of adult disability. Mechanisms underlying osteoarthritis pathogenesis are not yet fully elucidated, putting limits to current disease management and treatment. Based on the phenomenological evidence for dysregulation within the glycome of chondrocytes and the network of a family of adhesion/growth-regulatory lectins, that is, galectins, we tested the hypothesis that Galectin-1 is relevant for causing degeneration. Immunohistochemical analysis substantiated that Galectin-1 upregulation is associated with osteoarthritic cartilage and subchondral bone histopathology and severity of degeneration (p < 0.0001, n = 29 patients). In vitro, the lectin was secreted and it bound to osteoarthritic chondrocytes inhibitable by cognate sugar. Glycan-dependent Galectin-1 binding induced a set of disease markers, including matrix metalloproteinases and activated NF-κB, hereby switching on an inflammatory gene signature (p < 10(-16)). Inhibition of distinct components of the NF-κB pathway using dedicated inhibitors led to dose-dependent impairment of Galectin-1-mediated transcriptional activation. Enhanced secretion of effectors of degeneration such as three matrix metalloproteinases underscores the data's pathophysiological relevance. This study thus identifies Galectin-1 as a master regulator of clinically relevant inflammatory-response genes, working via NF-κB. Because inflammation is critical to cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis, this report reveals an intimate relation of glycobiology to osteoarthritic cartilage degeneration. PMID:26792806

  10. Erosive osteoarthritis, psoriatic arthritis and pseudogout; a casual association?

    PubMed

    Hoxha, Ariela; Ruffatti, Amelia; Alberioli, Enrico; Lorenzin, Mariagrazia; Oliviero, Francesca; Mattia, Elena; Punzi, Leonardo; Ramonda, Roberta

    2016-07-01

    According to recent hypothesis, the inflammation has a pivotal role in the onset and progression of erosive hand osteoarthritis (EHOA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and chondrocalcinosis (CC)/pseudogout. Albeit, it has been recognised for years as an association between EHOA and radiographic evidence of CC, but there are few reports of coexistence of microcrystalline arthritis and PsA. This is the first report that described a clinical experience concerning two consecutive cases of patients presented with EHOA, PsA and pseudogout. Two Caucasian women of 71 and 85 years old with a history of OA and mild psoriasis are presented with tenderness and swelling of first interphalangeal (IP) and wrist joint, respectively. Arthrocentesis performed at the first IP and wrist joint, respectively, showed an inflammatory synovial fluid with presence of calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals. X-rays of hands, feet and knees showed characteristic features of EHOA, PsA and CC. Furthermore, HLA typing evinces the presence of HLA C*06; DRB*01 07 and HLA C*07; DRB*01 *11 alleles, respectively, predisposing factors of these inflammatory diseases. The relationship between these aggressive rheumatic diseases along with their clinical, radiographic, laboratory and genetic features is discussed. PMID:25833145

  11. Knee stabilization in patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lewek, Michael D.; Ramsey, Dan K.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Rudolph, Katherine S.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis (MKOA) experience knee laxity and instability. Muscle stabilization strategies may influence the long term integrity of the joint. In this study we determined how individuals with medial knee OA respond to a rapid valgus knee movement to investigate the relationship between muscle stabilization strategies and knee instability. METHODS Twenty one subjects with MKOA and genu varum, and 19 control subjects were tested. Subjects stood with the test limb on a moveable platform that translated laterally to rapidly stress the knee’s medial periarticular structures and create a potentially destabilizing feeling at the knee joint. Knee motion and muscle responses were recorded. Subjects rated their knee instability with a self-report questionnaire about knee instability during daily activities. RESULTS Prior to plate movement the OA subjects demonstrated more medial muscle co-contraction (p=0.014). Following plate movement the OA subjects shifted less weight off the test limb (p = 0.013) and had more medial co-contraction (p=0.037). Those without instability had higher VMMH co-contraction than those who reported more instability (p=0.038). Knee stability correlated positively with VMMH co-contraction prior to plate movement (r = 0.459; p = 0.042). CONCLUSION This study demonstrates that individuals with MKOA attempt to stabilize the knee with greater medial muscle co-contraction in response to laxity that appears on only the medial side of the joint. This strategy presumably contributes to higher joint compression and could exacerbate joint destruction and needs to be altered to slow or stop the progression of the OA disease process. PMID:16142714

  12. A Review of Translational Animal Models for Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Martin H.; Capito, Nicholas; Kuroki, Keiichi; Stoker, Aaron M.; Cook, James L.; Sherman, Seth L.

    2012-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis remains a tremendous public health concern, both in terms of health-related quality of life and financial burden of disease. Translational research is a critical step towards understanding and mitigating the long-term effects of this disease process. Animal models provide practical and clinically relevant ways to study both the natural history and response to treatment of knee osteoarthritis. Many factors including size, cost, and method of inducing osteoarthritis are important considerations for choosing an appropriate animal model. Smaller animals are useful because of their ease of use and cost, while larger animals are advantageous because of their anatomical similarity to humans. This evidence-based review will compare and contrast several different animal models for knee osteoarthritis. Our goal is to inform the clinician about current research models, in order to facilitate the transfer of knowledge from the “bench” to the “bedside.” PMID:23326663

  13. Applying computation biology and “big data” to develop multiplex diagnostics for complex chronic diseases such as osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Guomin; Krawetz, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The data explosion in the last decade is revolutionizing diagnostics research and the healthcare industry, offering both opportunities and challenges. These high-throughput “omics” techniques have generated more scientific data in the last few years than in the entire history of mankind. Here we present a brief summary of how “big data” have influenced early diagnosis of complex diseases. We will also review some of the most commonly used “omics” techniques and their applications in diagnostics. Finally, we will discuss the issues brought by these new techniques when translating laboratory discoveries to clinical practice. PMID:26809774

  14. Simvastatin Effect on Calcium and Silicon Plasma Levels in Postmenopausal Women with Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Horecka, Anna; Hordyjewska, Anna; Blicharski, Tomasz; Kocot, Joanna; Żelazowska, Renata; Lewandowska, Anna; Kurzepa, Jacek

    2016-05-01

    Postmenopausal women more often suffered from knee osteoarthritis and its pathogenesis still remains unclear. Calcium and silicon are significant elements involved in bone and joint metabolism, especially in older people. Cardiovascular diseases are common worldwide and simvastatin is the most prescribed drug in such population of patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of simvastatin administration on calcium and silicon concentration in the plasma of postmenopausal women with osteoarthritis. Sixty postmenopausal mild hypercholesterolemic women (mean age 61.4 years, range 54-68) were enrolled. Thirty patients received simvastatin (20 or 40 mg/day) for at least 1 year before being enrolled (simvastatin "+" group). Control group consists of remaining 30 women (simvastatin "-"group). Silicon and calcium concentrations were measured spectrophotometrically. Plasma simvastatin level was determined 3 h after the drug administration using HPLC-UV-Vis. Calcium but not silicon level was significantly lower in patients receiving simvastatin in comparison with non-statin group (1.91 ± 0.32 vs. 2.33 ± 0.19 mmol/l, p < 0.05). A weak but significant positive correlation between plasma silicon and simvastatin levels (r = 0.3, p < 0.05) was observed; this may be due to the fact that simvastatin contains silicon dioxide as an inactive ingredient. The mean simvastatin concentration was 9.02 ng/ml. All hypotheses were verified at the significance level of p < 0.05. A statistically significant decrease in the plasma calcium concentration of postmenopausal women, treated with simvastatin suggests that simvastatin may play a role in calcium metabolism in postmenopausal women with osteoarthritis. Positive correlation of simvastatin concentration with silicon level in the plasma suggests that both might prompt the positive effect of osteoarthritis treatment. PMID:26858096

  15. Social determinants and osteoarthritis outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Luong, My-Linh N; Cleveland, Rebecca J; Nyrop, Kirsten A; Callahan, Leigh F

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most frequently occurring musculoskeletal diseases, posing a significant public health problem due to its impact on pain and disability. Traditional risk factors fail to account for all of the risk observed for OA outcomes. In recent years, our view of disease causation has broadened to include health risks that are created by an individual’s socioeconomic circumstances. Early research into social determinants has focused on social position and explored factors related to the individual such as education, income and occupation. Results from these investigations suggest that low education attainment and nonprofessional occupation are associated with poorer arthritis outcomes. More recently, research has expanded to examine how one’s neighborhood socioeconomic environment may be relevant to OA outcomes. This narrative review proposes a framework to help guide our understanding of how social context may interact with pathophysiological processes and individual-level variables to influence health outcomes in those living with OA. PMID:23243459

  16. Sacroiliac joint imaging.

    PubMed

    Tuite, Michael J

    2008-03-01

    The sacroiliac (SI) joint has several unique anatomical features that make it one of the more challenging joints to image. The joint is difficult to profile well on radiographic views, and therefore the radiographic findings of sacroiliitis are often equivocal. Computed tomography images can usually show the findings of sacroiliitis and osteoarthritis earlier than radiographs. Magnetic resonance imaging performed with proper sequences is excellent for diagnosing even very early sacroiliitis and for following treatment response. The SI joint is often involved in patients with osteoarthritis or one of the inflammatory spondyloarthritides, most notably ankylosing spondylitis. Ankylosing spondylitis often presents with sacroiliitis, which appears as erosions, sclerosis, and joint space narrowing, eventually leading to ankylosis. Several disorders can cause sacroiliitis-like changes of the joint, including hyperparathyroidism and repetitive shear-stress injuries in athletes. The joint can become painful during pregnancy as it widens and develops increased motion, and some postpartum women develop iliac sclerosis adjacent to the joint termed osteitis condensans ilii. Another cause of SI joint pain is a disorder called sacroiliac joint dysfunction, which typically has few abnormal imaging findings. Patients with SI joint dysfunction, as well as sacroiliitis, often get relief from image-guided SI joint therapeutic injections. PMID:18382946

  17. Joint and fascial chronic graft-vs-host disease: correlations with clinical and laboratory parameters

    PubMed Central

    Vukić, Tamara; Smith, Sean Robinson; Ljubas Kelečić, Dina; Desnica, Lana; Prenc, Ema; Pulanić, Dražen; Vrhovac, Radovan; Nemet, Damir; Pavletic, Steven Z.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To determine if there are correlations between joint and fascial chronic graft-vs-host disease (cGVHD) with clinical findings, laboratory parameters, and measures of functional capacity. Methods 29 patients were diagnosed with cGVHD based on National Institutes of Health (NIH) Consensus Criteria at the University Hospital Centre Zagreb from October 2013 to October 2015. Physical examination, including functional measures such as 2-minute walk test and hand grip strength, as well as laboratory tests were performed. The relationship between these evaluations and the severity of joint and fascial cGVHD was tested by logistical regression analysis. Results 12 of 29 patients (41.3%) had joint and fascial cGVHD diagnosed according to NIH Consensus Criteria. There was a significant positive correlation of joint and fascial cGVHD and skin cGVHD (P < 0.001), serum C3 complement level (P = 0.045), and leukocytes (P = 0.032). There was a significant negative correlation between 2-minute walk test (P = 0.016), percentage of cytotoxic T cells CD3+/CD8+ (P = 0.022), serum albumin (P = 0.047), and Karnofsky score (P < 0.001). Binary logistic regression model found that a significant predictor for joint and fascial cGVHD was cGVHD skin involvement (odds ratio, 7.79; 95 confidence interval 1.87-32.56; P = 0.005). Conclusion Joint and fascial cGVHD manifestations correlated with multiple laboratory measurements, clinical features, and cGVHD skin involvement, which was a significant predictor for joint and fascial cGVHD. PMID:27374828

  18. Animal Models of Osteoarthritis: Comparisons and Key Considerations.

    PubMed

    McCoy, A M

    2015-09-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is unquestionably one of the most important chronic health issues in humans, affecting millions of individuals and costing billions of dollars annually. Despite widespread awareness of this disease and its devastating impact, the pathogenesis of early OA is not completely understood, hampering the development of effective tools for early diagnosis and disease-modifying therapeutics. Most human tissue available for study is obtained at the time of joint replacement, when OA lesions are end stage and little can be concluded about the factors that played a role in disease development. To overcome this limitation, over the past 50 years, numerous induced and spontaneous animal models have been utilized to study disease onset and progression, as well as to test novel therapeutic interventions. Reflecting the heterogeneity of OA itself, no single "gold standard" animal model for OA exists; thus, a challenge for researchers lies in selecting the most appropriate model to answer a particular scientific question of interest. This review provides general considerations for model selection, as well as important features of species such as mouse, rat, guinea pig, sheep, goat, and horse, which researchers should be mindful of when choosing the "best" animal model for their intended purpose. Special consideration is given to key variations in pathology among species as well as recommended guidelines for reporting the histologic features of each model. PMID:26063173

  19. Nutraceuticals: Potential for Chondroprotection and Molecular Targeting of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Daniel J.; Choudhury, Marwa; Hirsh, David M.; Hardin, John A.; Cobelli, Neil J.; Sun, Hui B.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease and a leading cause of adult disability. There is no cure for OA, and no effective treatments which arrest or slow its progression. Current pharmacologic treatments such as analgesics may improve pain relief but do not alter OA disease progression. Prolonged consumption of these drugs can result in severe adverse effects. Given the nature of OA, life-long treatment will likely be required to arrest or slow its progression. Consequently, there is an urgent need for OA disease-modifying therapies which also improve symptoms and are safe for clinical use over long periods of time. Nutraceuticals—food or food products that provide medical or health benefits, including the prevention and/or treatment of a disease—offer not only favorable safety profiles, but may exert disease- and symptom-modification effects in OA. Forty-seven percent of OA patients use alternative medications, including nutraceuticals. This review will overview the efficacy and mechanism of action of commonly used nutraceuticals, discuss recent experimental and clinical data on the effects of select nutraceuticals, such as phytoflavonoids, polyphenols, and bioflavonoids on OA, and highlight their known molecular actions and limitations of their current use. We will conclude with a proposed novel nutraceutical-based molecular targeting strategy for chondroprotection and OA treatment. PMID:24284399

  20. Three-dimensional osteochondral microtissue to model pathogenesis of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lozito, Thomas P; Alexander, Peter G; Lin, Hang; Gottardi, Riccardo; Cheng, Anthony Wai-Ming; Tuan, Rocky S

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the most prevalent form of arthritis, affects up to 15% of the adult population and is principally characterized by degeneration of the articular cartilage component of the joint, often with accompanying subchondral bone lesions. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of OA is important for the rational development of disease-modifying OA drugs. While most studies on OA have focused on the investigation of either the cartilage or the bone component of the articular joint, the osteochondral complex represents a more physiologically relevant target because the disease ultimately is a disorder of osteochondral integrity and function. In our current investigation, we are constructing an in vitro three-dimensional microsystem that models the structure and biology of the osteochondral complex of the articular joint. Osteogenic and chondrogenic tissue components are produced using adult human mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and adipose seeded within biomaterial scaffolds photostereolithographically fabricated with defined internal architecture. A three-dimensional-printed, perfusion-ready container platform with dimensions to fit into a 96-well culture plate format is designed to house and maintain the osteochondral microsystem that has the following features: an anatomic cartilage/bone biphasic structure with a functional interface; all tissue components derived from a single adult mesenchymal stem cell source to eliminate possible age/tissue-type incompatibility; individual compartments to constitute separate microenvironment for the synovial and osseous components; accessible individual compartments that may be controlled and regulated via the introduction of bioactive agents or candidate effector cells, and tissue/medium sampling and compositional assays; and compatibility with the application of mechanical load and perturbation. The consequences of mechanical injury, exposure to inflammatory cytokines, and

  1. Sport and early osteoarthritis: the role of sport in aetiology, progression and treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Vannini, F; Spalding, T; Andriolo, L; Berruto, M; Denti, M; Espregueira-Mendes, J; Menetrey, J; Peretti, G M; Seil, R; Filardo, G

    2016-06-01

    Sports activities are considered favourable for general health; nevertheless, a possible influence of sports practice on the development of early osteoarthritis (OA) is a cause for concern. A higher incidence of OA in knees and ankles of former high-impact sports players than in those of the normal population has been shown and it is still debatable whether the cause is either to be recognized generically in the higher number of injuries or in a joint overload. The possibility to address knee OA in its early phases may be strictly connected to the modification of specific extrinsic or intrinsic factors, related to the patient in order to save the joint from further disease progression; these include sport practice, equipment and load. Non-surgical therapies such as continuative muscles reinforce and training play a strong role in the care of athletes with early OA, particularly if professional. There is an overall agreement on the need of an early restoring of a proper meniscal, ligament and cartilage integrity in order to protect the knee and resume sports safely, whereas alignment is a point still strongly debatable especially for professional athletes. Remaining questions still to be answered are the risks of different sports in relation to one another, although an actual protective effect of low-impact sports, such as walking, swimming or cycling, has been recognized on the appearance or worsening of OA, the effect of continuing or ceasing to practice a sport on the natural history of early OA, and even following appropriate treatment is still unknown. PMID:27043343

  2. Gla-rich protein is involved in the cross-talk between calcification and inflammation in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cavaco, Sofia; Viegas, Carla S B; Rafael, Marta S; Ramos, Acácio; Magalhães, Joana; Blanco, Francisco J; Vermeer, Cees; Simes, Dina C

    2016-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a whole-joint disease characterized by articular cartilage loss, tissue inflammation, abnormal bone formation and extracellular matrix (ECM) mineralization. Disease-modifying treatments are not yet available and a better understanding of osteoarthritis pathophysiology should lead to the discovery of more effective treatments. Gla-rich protein (GRP) has been proposed to act as a mineralization inhibitor and was recently shown to be associated with OA in vivo. Here, we further investigated the association of GRP with OA mineralization-inflammation processes. Using a synoviocyte and chondrocyte OA cell system, we showed that GRP expression was up-regulated following cell differentiation throughout ECM calcification, and that inflammatory stimulation with IL-1β results in an increased expression of COX2 and MMP13 and up-regulation of GRP. Importantly, while treatment of articular cells with γ-carboxylated GRP inhibited ECM calcification, treatment with either GRP or GRP-coated basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals resulted in the down-regulation of inflammatory cytokines and mediators of inflammation, independently of its γ-carboxylation status. Our results strengthen the calcification inhibitory function of GRP and strongly suggest GRP as a novel anti-inflammatory agent, with potential beneficial effects on the main processes responsible for osteoarthritis progression. In conclusion, GRP is a strong candidate target to develop new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26337479

  3. The sternocostoclavicular joint: normal and abnormal features.

    PubMed

    Le Loët, Xavier; Vittecoq, Olivier

    2002-03-01

    Many physicians are unfamiliar with the characteristics of the sternocostoclavicular joint (SCCJ). Disorders of the SCCJ, although common, frequently escape recognition. Computed tomography (CT) with thin slices and no gap is at presentthe best means of investigating the SCCJ. CTfeatures in normal subjects have been described in detail; some are misleading. The most common SCCJ disorder is degenerative disease manifesting as osteoarthritis or as periarticular lesions causing antero-medial dislocation of the clavicle. Septic arthritis is the most severe disorder and can lead to mediastinitis. All inflammatory joint diseases, including spondyloarthropathies, can affect the SCCJ. SCCJ involvement is a typical component of the osteoarticular manifestations seen in patients with palmoplantar pustulosis. PMID:12027306

  4. The Role of Inflammatory and Anti-Inflammatory Cytokines in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Poniatowski, Łukasz A.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common chronic disease of human joints. The basis of pathologic changes involves all the tissues forming the joint; already, at an early stage, it has the nature of inflammation with varying degrees of severity. An analysis of the complex relationships indicates that the processes taking place inside the joint are not merely a set that (seemingly) only includes catabolic effects. Apart from them, anti-inflammatory anabolic processes also occur continually. These phenomena are driven by various mediators, of which the key role is attributed to the interactions within the cytokine network. The most important group controlling the disease seems to be inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, TNFα, IL-6, IL-15, IL-17, and IL-18. The second group with antagonistic effect is formed by cytokines known as anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13. The role of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of OA with respect to inter- and intracellular signaling pathways is still under investigation. This paper summarizes the current state of knowledge. The cytokine network in OA is put in the context of cells involved in this degenerative joint disease. The possibilities for further implementation of new therapeutic strategies in OA are also pointed. PMID:24876674

  5. The ABJS 2005 Nicolas Andry Award: osteoarthritis and injury at the base of the human thumb: survival of the fittest?

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Vincent D

    2005-09-01

    The basal joint complex, consisting of four trapezial articulations providing a foundation for the thumb, defines our anatomic evolution from a Simian ancestry by providing an opposable member. Ironically, the trapeziometacarpal joint also is responsible for the most common malady leading to operative reconstruction in the upper limb for arthritic disease. The paradoxic relationship between these two facts has stimulated investigation that has defined the scientific basis for common surgical procedures and provided a foundation for the development of novel treatments for conditions at the base of the thumb. Patterns of articular surface degeneration are determined by areas of contact loading in the joint. Ligament reconstruction, metacarpophalangeal joint flexion splinting, and extension metacarpal osteotomy for early disease resulting from instability all have biomechanical justification for their clinical application. Likewise, percutaneous pinning of Bennett's fracture dislocation is predicated on reestablishing functional continuity of the beak ligament and unloading the palmar joint surfaces. For advanced disease, ligament reconstruction has become the cornerstone of arthroplasty. Perhaps most importantly, the trapeziometacarpal joint as an instability model can provide insight into the interplay of mechanical and biological factors in producing the primary lesion associated with osteoarthritis. PMID:16131901

  6. Biological Basis for the Use of Botanicals in Osteoarthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee and hip is a debilitating disease affecting more women than men and the risk of developing OA increases precipitously with aging. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the most common form of inflammatory joint diseases, is a disease of unknown etiology and affects ∼1% of the population worldwide, and unlike OA, generally involves many joints because of the systemic nature of the disease. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the first drugs of choice for the symptomatic treatment of both OA and RA. Because of the risks associated with the use of NSAIDs and other limitations, the use of alternative therapies, such as acupuncture and medicinal herbs, is on the rise and according to reports ∼60–90% of dissatisfied arthritis patients are likely to seek the option of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). This paper reviews the efficacy of some of the common herbs that have a history of human use and their anti-inflammatory or antiarthritic properties have been evaluated in animal models of inflammatory arthritis, in studies employing well defined and widely accepted in vitro models that use human chondrocytes/cartilage explants or in clinical trials. Available data suggests that the extracts of most of these herbs or compounds derived from them may provide a safe and effective adjunctive therapeutic approach for the treatment of OA and RA. This, in turn, argues for trials to establish efficacy and optimum dosage of these compounds for treating human inflammatory and degenerative joint diseases. PMID:16136208

  7. Short-term consolidation of articular cartilage in the long-term context of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Woodhouse, Francis G; Gardiner, Bruce S; Smith, David W

    2015-03-01

    Over ten percent of the population are afflicted by osteoarthritis, a chronic disease of diarthrodial joints such as the knees and hips, costing hundreds of billions of dollars every year. In this condition, the thin layers of articular cartilage on the bones degrade and weaken over years, causing pain, stiffness and eventual immobility. The biggest controllable risk factor is long-term mechanical overloading of the cartilage, but the disparity in time scales makes this process a challenge to model: loading events can take place every second, whereas degradation occurs over many months. Therefore, a suitable model must be sufficiently simple to permit evaluation over long periods of variable loading, yet must deliver results sufficiently accurate to be of clinical use, conditions unmet by existing models. To address this gap, we construct a two-component poroelastic model endowed with a new flow restricting boundary condition, which better represents the joint space environment compared to the typical free-flow condition. Under both static and cyclic loading, we explore the rate of gradual consolidation of the medium. In the static case, we analytically characterise the duration of consolidation, which governs the duration of effective fluid-assisted lubrication. In the oscillatory case, we identify a region of persistent strain oscillations in otherwise consolidated tissue, and derive estimates of its depth and magnitude. Finally, we link the two cases through the concept of an equivalent static stress, and discuss how our results help explain the inexorable cartilage degeneration of osteoarthritis. PMID:25591888

  8. Development of an equine groove model to induce metacarpophalangeal osteoarthritis: a pilot study on 6 horses.

    PubMed

    Maninchedda, Ugo; Lepage, Olivier M; Gangl, Monika; Hilairet, Sandrine; Remandet, Bernard; Meot, Francoise; Penarier, Geraldine; Segard, Emilie; Cortez, Pierre; Jorgensen, Christian; Steinberg, Régis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop an equine metacarpophalangeal joint model that induces osteoarthritis that is not primarily mediated by instability or inflammation. The study involved six Standardbred horses. Standardized cartilage surface damage or "grooves" were created arthroscopically on the distal dorsal aspect of the lateral and medial metacarpal condyles of a randomly chosen limb. The contralateral limb was sham operated. After 2 weeks of stall rest, horses were trotted 30 minutes every other day for 8 weeks, then evaluated for lameness and radiographed. Synovial fluid was analyzed for cytology and biomarkers. At 10 weeks post-surgery, horses were euthanized for macroscopic and histologic joint evaluation. Arthroscopic grooving allowed precise and identical damage to the cartilage of all animals. Under the controlled exercise regime, this osteoarthritis groove model displayed significant radiographic, macroscopic, and microscopic degenerative and reactive changes. Histology demonstrated consistent surgically induced grooves limited to non-calcified cartilage and accompanied by secondary adjacent cartilage lesions, chondrocyte necrosis, chondrocyte clusters, cartilage matrix softening, fissuring, mild subchondral bone inflammation, edema, and osteoblastic margination. Synovial fluid biochemistry and cytology demonstrated significantly elevated total protein without an increase in prostaglandin E2, neutrophils, or chondrocytes. This equine metacarpophalangeal groove model demonstrated that standardized non-calcified cartilage damage accompanied by exercise triggered altered osteochondral morphology and cartilage degeneration with minimal or inefficient repair and little inflammatory response. This model, if validated, would allow for assessment of disease processes and the effects of therapy. PMID:25680102

  9. Development of an Equine Groove Model to Induce Metacarpophalangeal Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study on 6 Horses

    PubMed Central

    Maninchedda, Ugo; Lepage, Olivier M.; Gangl, Monika; Hilairet, Sandrine; Remandet, Bernard; Meot, Francoise; Penarier, Geraldine; Segard, Emilie; Cortez, Pierre; Jorgensen, Christian; Steinberg, Régis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop an equine metacarpophalangeal joint model that induces osteoarthritis that is not primarily mediated by instability or inflammation. The study involved six Standardbred horses. Standardized cartilage surface damage or “grooves” were created arthroscopically on the distal dorsal aspect of the lateral and medial metacarpal condyles of a randomly chosen limb. The contralateral limb was sham operated. After 2 weeks of stall rest, horses were trotted 30 minutes every other day for 8 weeks, then evaluated for lameness and radiographed. Synovial fluid was analyzed for cytology and biomarkers. At 10 weeks post-surgery, horses were euthanized for macroscopic and histologic joint evaluation. Arthroscopic grooving allowed precise and identical damage to the cartilage of all animals. Under the controlled exercise regime, this osteoarthritis groove model displayed significant radiographic, macroscopic, and microscopic degenerative and reactive changes. Histology demonstrated consistent surgically induced grooves limited to non-calcified cartilage and accompanied by secondary adjacent cartilage lesions, chondrocyte necrosis, chondrocyte clusters, cartilage matrix softening, fissuring, mild subchondral bone inflammation, edema, and osteoblastic margination. Synovial fluid biochemistry and cytology demonstrated significantly elevated total protein without an increase in prostaglandin E2, neutrophils, or chondrocytes. This equine metacarpophalangeal groove model demonstrated that standardized non-calcified cartilage damage accompanied by exercise triggered altered osteochondral morphology and cartilage degeneration with minimal or inefficient repair and little inflammatory response. This model, if validated, would allow for assessment of disease processes and the effects of therapy. PMID:25680102

  10. Osteoarthritis year in review 2015: clinical.

    PubMed

    Sharma, L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight clinical research in osteoarthritis (OA). A literature search was conducted using PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) with the search terms "osteoarthritis [All Fields] AND treatment [All Fields]" and the following limits activated: humans, English language, all adult 19+ years, published between April 1, 2014 and April 1, 2015. A second literature search was then conducted with the search terms "osteoarthritis [All Fields] AND epidemiology [All Fields]", with the same limits. Reports of surgical outcome, case series, surgical technique, tissue sample or culture studies, trial protocols, and pilot studies were excluded. Of 1523, 150 were considered relevant. Among epidemiologic and observational clinical studies, themes included physical activity, early knee OA, and confidence/instability/falls. Symptom outcomes of pharmacologic treatments were reported for methotrexate, adalimumab, anti-nerve growth factor monoclonal antibodies, strontium ranelate, bisphosphonates, glucosamine, and chondroitin sulfate, and structural outcomes of pharmacologic treatments for strontium ranelate, recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 18, and glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate. Symptom outcomes of non-pharmacologic interventions were reported for: neuromuscular exercise, quadriceps strengthening, weight reduction and maintenance, TENS, therapeutic ultrasound, stepped care strategies, cognitive behavior therapy for sleep disturbance, acupuncture, gait modification, booster physical therapy, a web-based therapeutic exercise resource center for knee OA; hip physical therapy for hip OA; and joint protection and hand exercises for hand OA. Structure outcomes of non-pharmacologic interventions were reported for patellofemoral bracing. PMID:26707991

  11. A 12 year follow up study in the general population on prognostic factors of cartilage loss in osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed Central

    Schouten, J S; van den Ouweland, F A; Valkenburg, H A

    1992-01-01

    The natural history and prognostic factors of cartilage loss in osteoarthritis of the knee were studied in subjects from a general population survey on rheumatic diseases in 1975-8. Baseline data were collected by questionnaire, physical examination, and weightbearing anteroposterior knee radiographs. Follow up of the subjects aged 46-68 years with radiological osteoarthritis grade 2-4 (Kellgren) took place in 1988-9. Cartilage loss was assessed by two observers who scored the change in joint space width between two radiographs. Thirty four per cent had cartilage loss. Prognostic factors and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) (95% confidence intervals) were: body mass index OR = 11.1 (3.3 to 37.3) fourth v first quartile; body weight OR = 7.9 (2.6 to 24.0) third v first tertile; age OR = 3.8 (1.1 to 13.4) > 60 v < or = 49 years; Heberden's nodes OR = 6.0 (1.5 to 23.1); clinical diagnosis of generalised osteoarthritis OR = 3.3 (1.3 to 8.3); and previous bow legs or knock knees OR = 5.1 (1.1 to 23.1). The relation of age with cartilage loss was also confounded by the presence of Heberden's nodes or a diagnosis of generalised osteoarthritis. There was no statistically significant relation for gender, meniscectomy, injury, uric acid concentration, chondrocalcinosis, smoking, and occupation related factors, except possibly standing. PMID:1417116

  12. Controlling joint pain in older people.

    PubMed

    Paisley, Peter; Serpell, Mick

    2016-01-01

    Jont pain in oldder people The prevalence of chronic pain in older people in the community ranges from 25 to 76% and for those in residential care, it is even higher at 83 to 93%. The most common sites affected are the back, hip, or knee, and other joints. There is increased reporting of pain in women (79%) compared with men (53%). Common conditions include osteoarthritis and, to a lesser extent, the inflammatory arthropathies such as rheumatoid arthritis. The differential diagnosis includes non-articular pain such as vascular limb pain and nocturnal cramp, some neuropathic pain conditions (such as compressive neuropathies and postherpetic neuralgia), soft tissue disorders such as fibromyalgia and myofascial pain syndromes. In addition to an assessment of pain intensity, a biopsychosocial model should be adopted to ascertain the effect of the pain on the patient's degree of background pain at rest. The disease is often localised to the large load-bearing joints, predominantly the hips and knees. In contrast to osteoarthritis, the inflammatory arthritides typically present with symmetrical swollen, stiff, and painful small joints of the hands and feet, usually worse in the morning. PMID:27180497

  13. [Primary and secondary prevention procedures of temporo-mandibular joint disease in the evolutive age].

    PubMed

    Ciavarella, D; Mastrovincenzo, M; Sabatucci, A; Campisi, G; Di Cosola, M; Suriano, M; Lo Muzio, L

    2009-02-01

    In the last years prevention of temporomandiboular joint (TMJ) disease had acquired great importance. According to the neuro-occlusal rehabilitation (RNO) it is possible to say that TMJ disease starts since first years of life. So it is important both for dentist and for pediatric know what are the conditions and the atypical functions which predispose to this pathology. The aim of this work was to show how it is possible to intercept since primary teeth and the correct norms of primary and secondary prevention. PMID:19180004

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wyles, Cody C; Houdek, Matthew T; Behfar, Atta; Sierra, Rafael J

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a painful chronic condition with a significant impact on quality of life. The societal burden imposed by OA is increasing in parallel with the aging population; however, no therapies have demonstrated efficacy in preventing the progression of this degenerative joint disease. Current mainstays of therapy include activity modification, conservative pain management strategies, weight loss, and if necessary, replacement of the affected joint. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a multipotent endogenous population of progenitors capable of differentiation to musculoskeletal tissues. MSCs have a well-documented immunomodulatory role, managing the inflammatory response primarily through paracrine signaling. Given these properties, MSCs have been proposed as a potential regenerative cell therapy source for patients with OA. Research efforts are focused on determining the ideal source for derivation, as MSCs are native to several tissues. Furthermore, optimizing the mode of delivery remains a challenge both for appropriate localization of MSCs and for directed guidance toward stemming the local inflammatory process and initiating a regenerative response. Scaffolds and matrices with growth factor adjuvants may prove critical in this effort. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current state of MSC-based therapeutics for OA and discuss potential barriers that must be overcome for successful implementation of cell-based therapy as a routine treatment strategy in orthopedics. PMID:26357483

  15. Current nutraceuticals in the management of osteoarthritis: a review.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Nahid; Haqqi, Tariq M

    2012-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive degenerative joint disease that has a major impact on joint function and quality of life. Nutraceuticals and dietary supplements derived from herbs have long been used in traditional medicine and there is considerable evidence that nutraceuticals may play an important role in inflammation and joint destruction in OA. We review the biological effects of some medicinal fruits and herbs - pomegranate, green tea, cat's claw, devil's claw, ginger, Indian olibaum, turmeric and ananas - in an attempt to understand the pivotal molecular targets involved in inflammation and the joint destruction process and to summarize their toxicities and efficacy for OA management. So far there is insufficient reliable evidence on the effectiveness of ginger, turmeric and ananas. Pomegranate and green tea only have preclinical evidence of efficacy due to the lack of clinical data. In vivo and clinical studies are required to understand their targets and efficacy in OA. Limited in vitro and in vivo evidence is available for cat's claw and Indian olibaum. More extensive studies are required before long-term controlled trials of whole cat's claw and Indian olibaum extracts, or isolated active compounds, are carried out in patients with OA to determine their long-term efficacy and safety. Devil's claw has not been rigorously tested to determine its antiarthritic potential in in vitro and in vivo models. There is strong clinical evidence of the effectiveness of devil's claw in pain reduction. However, high-quality clinical trials are needed to determine its effectiveness. No serious side effects have been reported for any fruits and herbs. Overall, these studies identify and support the use of nutraceuticals to provide symptomatic relief to patients with OA and to be used as adjunct therapy for OA management. More high-quality trials are needed to provide definitive answers to questions related to their efficacy and safety for OA prevention and

  16. Current nutraceuticals in the management of osteoarthritis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Nahid

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive degenerative joint disease that has a major impact on joint function and quality of life. Nutraceuticals and dietary supplements derived from herbs have long been used in traditional medicine and there is considerable evidence that nutraceuticals may play an important role in inflammation and joint destruction in OA. We review the biological effects of some medicinal fruits and herbs – pomegranate, green tea, cat’s claw, devil’s claw, ginger, Indian olibaum, turmeric and ananas – in an attempt to understand the pivotal molecular targets involved in inflammation and the joint destruction process and to summarize their toxicities and efficacy for OA management. So far there is insufficient reliable evidence on the effectiveness of ginger, turmeric and ananas. Pomegranate and green tea only have preclinical evidence of efficacy due to the lack of clinical data. In vivo and clinical studies are required to understand their targets and efficacy in OA. Limited in vitro and in vivo evidence is available for cat’s claw and Indian olibaum. More extensive studies are required before long-term controlled trials of whole cat’s claw and Indian olibaum extracts, or isolated active compounds, are carried out in patients with OA to determine their long-term efficacy and safety. Devil’s claw has not been rigorously tested to determine its antiarthritic potential in in vitro and in vivo models. There is strong clinical evidence of the effectiveness of devil’s claw in pain reduction. However, high-quality clinical trials are needed to determine its effectiveness. No serious side effects have been reported for any fruits and herbs. Overall, these studies identify and support the use of nutraceuticals to provide symptomatic relief to patients with OA and to be used as adjunct therapy for OA management. More high-quality trials are needed to provide definitive answers to questions related to their efficacy and safety for OA prevention

  17. Post-operative rehabilitation and nutrition in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Mobasheri, Ali; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Imbesi, Rosa; Castrogiovanni, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative process involving the progressive loss of articular cartilage, synovial inflammation and structural changes in subchondral bone that lead to loss of synovial joint structural features and functionality of articular cartilage. OA represents one of the most common causes of physical disability in the world. Different OA treatments are usually considered in relation to the stage of the disease. In the early stages, it is possible to recommend physical activity programs that can maintain joint health and keep the patient mobile, as recommended by OA Research Society International (OARSI) and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR). In the most severe and advanced cases of OA, surgical intervention is necessary. After, in early postoperative stages, it is essential to include a rehabilitation exercise program in order to restore the full function of the involved joint. Physical therapy is crucial for the success of any surgical procedure and can promote recovery of muscle strength, range of motion, coordinated walking, proprioception and mitigate joint pain. Furthermore, after discharge from the hospital, patients should continue the rehabilitation exercise program at home associated to an appropriate diet. In this review, we analyze manuscripts from the most recent literature and provide a balanced and comprehensive overview of the latest developments on the effect of physical exercise on postoperative rehabilitation in OA. The literature search was conducted using PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar, using the keywords ‘osteoarthritis’, ‘rehabilitation’, ‘exercise’ and ‘nutrition’. The available data suggest that physical exercise is an effective, economical and accessible to everyone practice, and it is one of the most important components of postoperative rehabilitation for OA. PMID:26962431

  18. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Won; Cho, Jin-Yong; Kim, Hyeon-Min

    2016-08-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease. The most common symptoms of this disease are acute malocclusion, limited mouth opening, swelling, and tenderness of affected TMJ. These symptoms are often confused with internal derangement of the articular disc, rheumatoid arthritis, retrodiscitis, or osteoarthritis. Therefore, differential diagnosis by image examination is required. Usually, antimicrobial treatment and surgical drainage by needle aspiration, arthroscopy, or arthrotomy are effective treatment approaches. In this study, a patient who was diagnosed with septic arthritis was treated with arthrocentesis and antibiotics without significant complications. We present a case report with a review of the literature. PMID:27595091

  19. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease. The most common symptoms of this disease are acute malocclusion, limited mouth opening, swelling, and tenderness of affected TMJ. These symptoms are often confused with internal derangement of the articular disc, rheumatoid arthritis, retrodiscitis, or osteoarthritis. Therefore, differential diagnosis by image examination is required. Usually, antimicrobial treatment and surgical drainage by needle aspiration, arthroscopy, or arthrotomy are effective treatment approaches. In this study, a patient who was diagnosed with septic arthritis was treated with arthrocentesis and antibiotics without significant complications. We present a case report with a review of the literature. PMID:27595091

  20. Early osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Madry, Henning; Kon, Elizaveta; Condello, Vincenzo; Peretti, Giuseppe M; Steinwachs, Matthias; Seil, Romain; Berruto, Massimo; Engebretsen, Lars; Filardo, Giuseppe; Angele, Peter

    2016-06-01

    There is an increasing awareness on the importance in identifying early phases of the degenerative processes in knee osteoarthritis (OA), the crucial period of the disease when there might still be the possibility to initiate treatments preventing its progression. Early OA may show a diffuse and ill-defined involvement, but also originate in the cartilage surrounding a focal lesion, thus necessitating a separate assessment of these two entities. Early OA can be considered to include a maximal involvement of 50 % of the cartilage thickness based on the macroscopic ICRS classification, reflecting an OARSI grade 4. The purpose of this paper was to provide an updated review of the current status of the diagnosis and definition of early knee OA, including the clinical, radiographical, histological, MRI, and arthroscopic definitions and biomarkers. Based on current evidence, practical classification criteria are presented. As new insights and technologies become available, they will further evolve to better define and treat early knee OA. PMID:27000393

  1. Psoriatic nail involvement and its relationship with distal interphalangeal joint disease.

    PubMed

    Lai, T L; Pang, H T; Cheuk, Y Y; Yip, M L

    2016-08-01

    Psoriatic nail disease and distal interphalangeal (DIP) arthritis both are common manifestations of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Several clinical characteristics are allegedly associated with DIP joint damage, particularly nail psoriasis. However, there is little evidence to substantiate this phenomenon. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between DIP involvement, nail psoriasis and other parameters. A cross-sectional study involved 45 patients from local rheumatology clinic. Four hundred fifty psoriatic fingernails scored, and the radiographs of all these fingers were reviewed to define PsA DIP arthritic changes. 64.4 % patients had nail psoriasis and 35.6 % had DIP arthritis. Univariate analysis identified that swollen joint-count, digits with chronic dactylitis, HLA-B27 status and nail psoriasis were associated with DIP arthritis. Regression model supported that nail disease was the most significant associated factor of DIP arthritis (OR 9.7, p = 0.05). Nail psoriasis was identified in 40.2 % of digits. Pitting (29.6 %), onycholysis (15.1 %), crumbling (8.2 %), nail bed hyperkeratosis (2.0 %) were noted with the mean modified Nail Psoriasis Severity Index of 0.95 +/-1.68. Among all digits, 57 had DIP arthritis while 393 did not. Within DIP joints with PsA radiological change, 59.6 % had nail disease. Chi-square test with the Bonferroni correction further supported an association between nail psoriasis and DIP involvement with p value of 0.001. Two specific nail subtypes-crumbling and onycholysis-were found to be significantly associated with DIP disease. A significant proportion of PsA patients had nail involvement and DIP arthritis. PsA patients with nail changes may be more susceptible to DIP disease. PMID:27251673

  2. Pterosin B prevents chondrocyte hypertrophy and osteoarthritis in mice by inhibiting Sik3

    PubMed Central

    Yahara, Yasuhito; Takemori, Hiroshi; Okada, Minoru; Kosai, Azuma; Yamashita, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Tomohito; Fujita, Kaori; Itoh, Yumi; Nakamura, Masahiro; Fuchino, Hiroyuki; Kawahara, Nobuo; Fukui, Naoshi; Watanabe, Akira; Kimura, Tomoatsu; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common debilitating joint disorder. Risk factors for osteoarthritis include age, which is associated with thinning of articular cartilage. Here we generate chondrocyte-specific salt-inducible kinase 3 (Sik3) conditional knockout mice that are resistant to osteoarthritis with thickened articular cartilage owing to a larger chondrocyte population. We also identify an edible Pteridium aquilinum compound, pterosin B, as a Sik3 pathway inhibitor. We show that either Sik3 deletion or intraarticular injection of mice with pterosin B inhibits chondrocyte hypertrophy and protects cartilage from osteoarthritis. Collectively, our results suggest Sik3 regulates the homeostasis of articular cartilage and is a target for the treatment of osteoarthritis, with pterosin B as a candidate therapeutic. PMID:27009967

  3. Influence of osteoarthritis grade on molecular signature of human cartilage.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuanhu; Thornhill, Thomas S; Meng, Fangang; Xie, Li; Wright, John; Glowacki, Julie

    2016-03-01

    Articular chondrocytes maintain cartilage matrix turnover and have the capacity for anabolic and catabolic activities that can be influenced by injury and disease. This study tested the hypothesis that catabolic genes are upregulated with regional osteoarthritis (OA) disease severity within a joint. With IRB approval, specimens of knee cartilage obtained as discarded tissues from subjects undergoing arthroplasty were partitioned for each subject by OA disease severity and evaluated for gene expression by RT-PCR. There was regional OA grade-associated upregulation of expected inflammatory mediators TNF-α, TNF receptors, IFN-γ, and interleukins as well as genes encoding proteolytic enzymes, including Adamts-5 and MMPs. Osteoclast-related genes, cathepsin K, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), RANKL, RANK, M-CSF, and c-fms, but not osteoprotegerin, were induced in advanced grades. In vitro treatment of normal human chondrocytes with interleukin-1β upregulated similar genes; this provides evidence that chondrocytes per se can be the source of osteoclast-related factors. Immunohistochemical staining showed that RANK- and RANKL-positive cells were abundant in advanced grades, especially in chondrocyte clusters. This suggests a possible autocrine mechanism by which an osteoclast phenotype is induced in articular chondrocytes. In sum, these studies identified gene expression signatures in human OA cartilage based upon regional disease severity within a joint. There was an effect of OA Grade on expression of osteoclastic lytic enzymes and regulatory factors in human articular chondrocytes. Induction of an osteoclast-like phenotype in chondrocytes may be part of OA progression and suggests specific therapeutic approaches. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:454-462, 2016. PMID:26336057

  4. A Rare Case of Tumoral Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate Crystal Deposition Disease of the Wrist Joint

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Osamu; Kaji, Yoshio; Yamagami, Yoshiki; Yamaguchi, Kounosuke; Nishimura, Hideki; Fukuoka, Natsuko; Yamamoto, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Tumoral calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease (CPPDCD), also known as tophaceous calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPDD), is a tumorlike lesion, and it should be distinguished from usual CPDD that causes severe joint inflammation and arthralgia. A case of tumoral CPPDCD of the wrist joint that required differentiation from synovial osteochondromatosis is described. Case Presentation. The patient was a 78-year-old woman with a 5-year history of nodular lesions at the right wrist that had gradually increased in size. An excisional biopsy and a histological examination of the excised nodular lesions by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining were performed, demonstrating numerous polarizable, rhabdoid, and rectangular crystals, surrounded by fibroblasts, macrophages, and foreign body-type giant cells, consistent with tumoral CPPDCD. Conclusion. Tumoral CPPDCD, especially at the wrist joint, is rare, and, to the best of our knowledge, only 2 articles have been published. This case seems to need further follow-up for recurrence, because tumoral CPPDCD may recur after complete or incomplete surgical excision. PMID:26783477

  5. Musculoskeletal Disease in Aged Horses and Its Management.

    PubMed

    van Weeren, Paul René; Back, Willem

    2016-08-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are the most prevalent health problem in aging horses. They are not life threatening, but are painful and an important welfare issue. Chronic joint disease (osteoarthritis) and chronic laminitis are the most prevalent. Treating osteoarthritis in the elderly horse is similar to treating performance horses, but aims at providing a stable situation with optimal comfort. Immediate medical treatment of flare-ups, long-term pain management, and adaptation of exercise and living conditions are the mainstays of treatment. Laminitis in the geriatric horse is related often to pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction, which may be treated with additional pergolide. PMID:27449390

  6. Linkage of early-onset osteoarthritis and chondrocalcinosis to human chromosome 8q

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, C.T.; Farrer, L.A.; Adair, R.; Dharmavaram, R.; Jimenez, S.; Anderson, L.

    1995-03-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate-deposition disease (CPDD), also called {open_quotes}chondrocalcinosis{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}pseudogout{close_quotes}, is a disorder characterized by the deposition of calcium-containing crystals in joint tissue, which leads to arthritis-like symptoms. The presence of these crystals in joint tissue is a common finding in the elderly, and, in this population, there is a poor correlation with joint pain. In contrast, early-onset CPDD has been described in several large families in which the disease progresses to severe degenerative osteoarthritis (OA). In these families, an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance is observed, with an age at onset between the 2nd and 5th decades of life. In this report, we describe a large New England family with early-onset CPDD and severe degenerative OA. We found genetic linkage between the disease in this family and chromosome 8q, with a multipoint lod score of 4.06. These results suggest that a defective gene at this location causes the disease in this family. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Interplay between Cartilage and Subchondral Bone Contributing to Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashish R.; Jagga, Supriya; Lee, Sang-Soo; Nam, Ju-Suk

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common debilitating joint disorder, affecting large sections of the population with significant disability and impaired quality of life. During OA, functional units of joints comprising cartilage and subchondral bone undergo uncontrolled catabolic and anabolic remodeling processes to adapt to local biochemical and biological signals. Changes in cartilage and subchondral bone are not merely secondary manifestations of OA but are active components of the disease, contributing to its severity. Increased vascularization and formation of microcracks in joints during OA have suggested the facilitation of molecules from cartilage to bone and vice versa. Observations from recent studies support the view that both cartilage and subchondral bone can communicate with each other through regulation of signaling pathways for joint homeostasis under pathological conditions. In this review we have tried to summarize the current knowledge on the major signaling pathways that could control the cartilage-bone biochemical unit in joints and participate in intercellular communication between cartilage and subchondral bone during the process of OA. An understanding of molecular communication that regulates the functional behavior of chondrocytes and osteoblasts in both physiological and pathological conditions may lead to development of more effective strategies for treating OA patients. PMID:24084727

  8. Interplay between cartilage and subchondral bone contributing to pathogenesis of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashish R; Jagga, Supriya; Lee, Sang-Soo; Nam, Ju-Suk

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common debilitating joint disorder, affecting large sections of the population with significant disability and impaired quality of life. During OA, functional units of joints comprising cartilage and subchondral bone undergo uncontrolled catabolic and anabolic remodeling processes to adapt to local biochemical and biological signals. Changes in cartilage and subchondral bone are not merely secondary manifestations of OA but are active components of the disease, contributing to its severity. Increased vascularization and formation of microcracks in joints during OA have suggested the facilitation of molecules from cartilage to bone and vice versa. Observations from recent studies support the view that both cartilage and subchondral bone can communicate with each other through regulation of signaling pathways for joint homeostasis under pathological conditions. In this review we have tried to summarize the current knowledge on the major signaling pathways that could control the cartilage-bone biochemical unit in joints and participate in intercellular communication between cartilage and subchondral bone during the process of OA. An understanding of molecular communication that regulates the functional behavior of chondrocytes and osteoblasts in both physiological and pathological conditions may lead to development of more effective strategies for treating OA patients. PMID:24084727

  9. [Hematogenous pubic osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Cabo Cabo, J; Morales de Cano, J J; Fernández Sabate, A; Torrents Orrit, R; Viñals, J M

    1993-01-01

    Pubic osteoarthritis is a little known pathological entity with a very controversial etiology. We present four cases of public osteoarthritis in which the infectious etiology was hematogeneous. The causal germs were: Staphilococcus aureus, Pseudomona aeruginosa, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Brucella melitensis. In the first three cases, a surgical approach was used, allowing us to establish the etiological diagnosis of the process and to perform the local debridement. In the case of brucellar etiology, an isolated medical treatment was applied, according to the therapeutical guidelines recommended for brucellar bone infections. We have not observed recurrence of the septic process in any of the four cases, with a follow-up period ranging from one to three years. PMID:8448328

  10. Photoacoustic tomography of the human finger: towards the assessment of inflammatory joint diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Es, P.; Biswas, S. K.; Bernelot Moens, H. J.; Steenbergen, W.; Manohar, S.

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory arthritis is often manifested in finger joints. The growth of new or withdrawal of old blood vessels can be a sensitive marker for these diseases. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has great potential in this respect since it allows the sensitive and highly resolved visualization of blood. We systematically investigated PA imaging of finger vasculature in healthy volunteers using a newly developed PA tomographic system. We present the PA results which show excellent detail of the vasculature. Vessels with diameters ranging between 100 μm and 1.5 mm are visible along with details of the skin, including the epidermis and the subpapillary plexus. The focus of all the studies is at the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints, and in the context of ultimately visualizing the inflamed synovial membrane in patients. This work is important in laying the foundation for detailed research into PA imaging of the phalangeal vasculature in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis.

  11. Evaluation of risk factors for degenerative joint disease associated with hip dysplasia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Smith, G K; Popovitch, C A; Gregor, T P; Shofer, F S

    1995-03-01

    Passive coxofemoral joint laxity of dogs, as quantitated by a distraction-stress radiographic method, may have important prognostic value in determining susceptibility to hip dysplasia. Data from 151 dogs, representing 13 breeds, were included in a logistic regression model to evaluate the contribution of factors such as age, breed, weight, sex, distraction index, and Norberg angle to the risk of developing degenerative joint disease (DJD) of the coxofemoral joint. Of the factors studied, the amount of passive hip laxity, as quantitated by the distraction index, was the most significant (P < 0.0001) determinant of the risk to develop DJD of the coxofemoral joint. In the longitudinal and cross-sectional components of the study, distraction index was a significant (P < 0.001) risk factor for DJD, irrespective of age at evaluation (4, 12, or 24 months). The strength of the hip laxity:DJD correlation increased with the age of dog. In contrast, the Norberg angle, a measure of hip laxity on the standard hip-extended radiograph, was not found to be a significant risk factor for DJD, either in the longitudinal or cross-sectional analyses. Breed-specific probability curves of DJD susceptibility indicated that German Shepherd Dogs had a significantly (P < 0.05) greater risk of developing DJD than did the pool of non-German Shepherd Dogs. The information derived from this statistical model will help to scientifically characterize the role of passive hip laxity as a component in the pathogenesis of DJD of the coxofemoral joint. PMID:7744684

  12. The potential utility of high-intensity ultrasound to treat osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, H J; Salmi, A; Karppinen, P; Hæggström, E; Hacking, S A

    2014-11-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a widespread musculoskeletal disease that reduces quality of life and for which there is no cure. The treatment of OA is challenging since cartilage impedes the local and systemic delivery of therapeutic compounds (TCs). This review identifies high-intensity ultrasound (HIU) as a non-contact technique to modify articular cartilage and subchondral bone. HIU enables new approaches to overcome challenges associated with drug delivery to cartilage and new non-invasive approaches for the treatment of joint disease. Specifically, HIU has the potential to facilitate targeted drug delivery and release deep within cartilage, to repair soft tissue damage, and to physically alter tissue structures including cartilage and bone. The localized, non-invasive ultrasonic delivery of TCs to articular cartilage and subchondral bone appears to be a promising technique in the immediate future. PMID:25106678

  13. Changes in Membrane Receptors and Ion Channels as Potential Biomarkers for Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), a degenerative joint condition, is currently difficult to detect early enough for any of the current treatment options to be completely successful. Early diagnosis of this disease could increase the numbers of patients who are able to slow its progression. There are now several diseases where membrane protein biomarkers are used for early diagnosis. The numbers of proteins in the membrane is vast and so it is a rich source of potential biomarkers for OA but we need more knowledge of these before they can be considered practical biomarkers. How are they best measured and are they selective to OA or even certain types of OA? The first step in this process is to identify membrane proteins that change in OA. Here, we summarize several ion channels and receptors that change in OA models and/or OA patients, and may thus be considered candidates as novel membrane biomarkers of OA. PMID:26648874

  14. Comparison of the outcomes of three surgical treatments for end-stage temporomandibular joint disease.

    PubMed

    Dimitroulis, G

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there are any differences between condylectomy, rib grafts, and prosthetic joints (Biomet TMJ stock prosthesis) with regard to outcomes for patients with end-stage temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disease. Fifty-six of a total 127 patients who presented with category 5 end-stage TMJ disease over 3 years (2010-2013) agreed to participate in this retrospective, comparative, cohort study. Patients were divided into four groups: preoperative (n=16), condylectomy (n=8), rib graft (n=16), and prosthetic joint (n=16). They were assessed for major postoperative complications (i.e., return to theatre) and maximum range of mandibular motion, and all completed a specific quality of life (QOL) questionnaire. Whilst the condylectomy group demonstrated the best mandibular range of motion (P<0.01), rib graft patients were more likely to experience complications (43.8%) necessitating a return to theatre. The prosthesis group recorded the best mean aggregate QOL score, but the difference compared to the rib graft and condylectomy groups was not statistically significant. The results of this study suggest that for dentate patients, prosthetic joints are highly dependable with no returns to theatre and favourable QOL outcomes. For edentulous patients, condylectomies alone also appear to work well. Future TMJ prosthetic designs should focus on improving mandibular range of motion, as the current stock prosthesis allows only a restricted range, no better than that achieved with rib graft (P>0.05) and far less than that achieved with condylectomy (P<0.01). PMID:24629849

  15. [Progress of research in osteoarthritis. Gene expression and its regulatory mechanisms in the degenerative cartilage in osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ken; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2009-11-01

    Spatiotemporal variations of pathological changes were observed in the osteoarthritis joints. Gene expressions vary depending on the zones in the cartilage. For example, the expressions of degradative enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases were enhanced in the superficial zone whereas the expression of matrix proteins enhanced at the deep zone. Many factors such as mechanical stress, aging, genetic background, inflammation and phenotypic changes of chondrocytes influence the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis, suggesting the involvement of many regulatory mechanisms in the gene expression. However, discoveries of regulatory factors that provide common pathways for the various phenomenon observed in the osteoarthritis cartilage suggest the interaction and co-operation of these important factors to conduct the pathology of degenerative cartilage. PMID:19880989

  16. PROTEOGLYCAN 4 EXPRESSION PROTECTS AGAINST THE DEVELOPMENT OF OSTEOARTHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Merry ZC; Erez, Ayelet; Guse, Kilian; Dawson, Brian; Bertin, Terry; Chen, Yuqing; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Yustein, Jason; Gannon, Francis; Lee, Brendan HL

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative condition that afflicts more than 70% of the population between 55 and 77 years of age (1). Although its prevalence is rising globally with aging of the population, current therapy is limited to symptomatic relief and in severe cases, joint replacement surgery. Here we report intra-articular expression of proteoglycan 4 (Prg4) in mice protects against development of osteoarthritis. Long-term Prg4 expression under the type II collagen promoter (Col2a1) does not adversely affect skeletal development but protects from developing signs of age-related osteoarthritis. The protective effect is also shown in a model of post-traumatic osteoarthritis created by cruciate ligament transection (CLT)(2). Moreover, intra-articular injection of helper-dependent adenoviral virus (HDV) expressing Prg4 protected against the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis when administered either before or after injury. Gene expression profiling of mouse articular cartilage and in vitro cell studies show that Prg4 expression inhibits the transcriptional programs that promote cartilage catabolism and hypertrophy through the up-regulation of hypoxia inducible factor 3α (HIF3α). Analyses of available human OA datasets are consistent with the predictions of this model. Hence, our data provide insight into the mechanisms for OA development and offer a potential chondroprotective approach to its treatment. PMID:23486780

  17. Bilateral lipoma arborescens with osteoarthritis knee: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Kamran, Farooque; Kavin, Khatri; Vijay, Sharma; Shivanand, Gamangatti

    2015-01-01

    Lipoma arborescens is villous proliferation of synovium and is often unilateral in the absence of any systemic disease. We report a case of 54 year old male presenting with bilateral lipoma arborescens associated with osteoarthritis. The diagnosis is often difficult due to similar symptomatology of lipoma arborescens and osteoarthritis. PMID:25983521

  18. Variations in C-reactive protein, plasma free radicals and fibrinogen values in patients with osteoarthritis treated with Pycnogenol.

    PubMed

    Belcaro, G; Cesarone, M R; Errichi, S; Zulli, C; Errichi, B M; Vinciguerra, G; Ledda, A; Di Renzo, A; Stuard, S; Dugall, M; Pellegrini, L; Gizzi, G; Ippolito, E; Ricci, A; Cacchio, M; Cipollone, G; Ruffini, I; Fano, F; Hosoi, M; Rohdewald, P

    2008-01-01

    In a previous, double-blind, placebo-controlled study we evaluated the efficacy of a 3-month treatment with Pycnogenol for 156 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Pycnogenol significantly decreased joint pain and improved joint function as evaluated using the WOMAC score and walking performance of patients on a treadmill. In this study, we further investigated the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of Pycnogenol in a subset of the osteoarthritis patients presenting with elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) and plasma-free radicals. Elevated CRP levels have been suggested to be associated with disease progression in osteoarthritis. In our study, 29 subjects of the Pycnogenol group and 26 patients in the placebo group showed CRP levels higher than 3 mg/l at baseline. Comparison of blood specimens drawn at baseline and after 3-month treatment showed that Pycnogenol significantly decreased plasma free radicals to 70.1% of baseline values. Plasma CRP levels decreased from baseline 3.9 mg/l to 1.1 mg/l in the Pycnogenol group whereas the control group had initial values of 3.9 mg/l which decreased to 3.6 mg/l. The CRP decrease in the Pycnogenol was statistical significant as compared to the control group (P < 0.05). Fibrinogen levels were found to be lowered to 62.8% of initial values (P < 0.05) in response to Pycnogenol. No significant changes for plasma free radicals, CRP and fibrinogen were found in the placebo-treated group. The decrease of systemic inflammatory markers suggests that Pycnogenol may exert anti-inflammatory activity in osteoarthritic joints and patients did not present with other ailments or infections. The nature of the anti-inflammatory effects of Pycnogenol with regard to CRP warrants further investigation. PMID:19017467

  19. Hallux rigidus: Joint preserving alternatives to arthrodesis - a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Polzer, Hans; Polzer, Sigmund; Brumann, Mareen; Mutschler, Wolf; Regauer, Markus

    2014-01-18

    Hallux rigidus describes the osteoarthritis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint. It was first mentioned in 1887. Since then a multitude of terms have been introduced referring to the same disease. The main complaints are pain especially during movement and a limited range of motion. Radiographically the typical signs of osteoarthritis can be observed starting at the dorsal portion of the joint. Numerous classifications make the comparison of the different studies difficult. If non-operative treatment fails to resolve the symptoms operative treatment is indicated. The most studied procedure with reproducible results is the arthrodesis. Nevertheless, many patients refuse this treatment option, favouring a procedure preserving motion. Different motion preserving and joint sacrificing operations such as arthroplasty are available. In this review we focus on motion and joint preserving procedures. Numerous joint preserving osteotomies have been described. Most of them try to relocate the viable plantar cartilage more dorsally, to decompress the joint and to increase dorsiflexion of the first metatarsal bone. Multiple studies are available investigating these procedures. Most of them suffer from low quality, short follow up and small patient numbers. Consequently the grade of recommendation is low. Nonetheless, joint preserving procedures are appealing because if they fail to relief the symptoms an arthrodesis or arthroplasty can still be performed thereafter. PMID:24649409

  20. Hallux rigidus: Joint preserving alternatives to arthrodesis - a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Polzer, Hans; Polzer, Sigmund; Brumann, Mareen; Mutschler, Wolf; Regauer, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Hallux rigidus describes the osteoarthritis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint. It was first mentioned in 1887. Since then a multitude of terms have been introduced referring to the same disease. The main complaints are pain especially during movement and a limited range of motion. Radiographically the typical signs of osteoarthritis can be observed starting at the dorsal portion of the joint. Numerous classifications make the comparison of the different studies difficult. If non-operative treatment fails to resolve the symptoms operative treatment is indicated. The most studied procedure with reproducible results is the arthrodesis. Nevertheless, many patients refuse this treatment option, favouring a procedure preserving motion. Different motion preserving and joint sacrificing operations such as arthroplasty are available. In this review we focus on motion and joint preserving procedures. Numerous joint preserving osteotomies have been described. Most of them try to relocate the viable plantar cartilage more dorsally, to decompress the joint and to increase dorsiflexion of the first metatarsal bone. Multiple studies are available investigating these procedures. Most of them suffer from low quality, short follow up and small patient numbers. Consequently the grade of recommendation is low. Nonetheless, joint preserving procedures are appealing because if they fail to relief the symptoms an arthrodesis or arthroplasty can still be performed thereafter. PMID:24649409

  1. New findings in osteoarthritis pathogenesis: therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Pulsatelli, Lia; Addimanda, Olga; Brusi, Veronica; Pavloska, Branka

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the new perspectives which can provide insight into the crucial pathways that drive cartilage-bone physiopathology. In particular, we discuss the critical signaling and effector molecules that can activate cellular and molecular processes in both cartilage and bone cells and which may be relevant in cross talk among joint compartments: growth factors (bone morphogenetic proteins and transforming growth factor), hypoxia-related factors, cell–matrix interactions [discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) and syndecan 4], signaling molecules [WNT, Hedgehog (Hh)]. With the continuous progression of our knowledge on the molecular pathways involved in cartilage and bone changes in osteoarthritis (OA), an increasing number of potentially effective candidates for OA therapy are already under scrutiny in clinical trials to ascertain their possible safe use in an attempt to identify molecules active in slowing or halting OA progression and reducing joint pain. We then review the principal molecules currently under clinical investigation. PMID:23342245

  2. Extracellular matrix and pathogenic mechanisms in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hardingham, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a heterogeneous condition of joint degeneration characterized by structural changes in extracellular matrices such as subchondral bone and cartilage. Research has identified many diverse ways of initiating OA, varying from mechanical disruption to gene mutations in structural proteins. A frequent end point is cartilage loss, which can occur irrespective of the initiating mechanism. Of the mechanisms responsible for cartilage matrix damage, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS)-5 was identified as of key importance in knockout mice, but work with human cartilage has suggested that ADAMTS-4 was also involved. A transgenic mouse expressing aggrecan lacking a key aggrecanase site clearly showed that loss of aggrecan from cartilage was an important step in both inflammatory and trauma-induced joint degeneration. In OA, cartilage chondrocytes show changes in gene expression, and it remains to be resolved if this reflects adaptive responses to changes in biological, physical, and mechanical signaling rather than any form of differentiation. PMID:18457609

  3. Inflammatory Pathways in Knee Osteoarthritis: Potential Targets for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Or, David; Rael, Leonard T.; Thomas, Gregory W.; Brody, Edward N.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is a wide-spread, debilitating disease that is prominent in Western countries. It is associated with old age, obesity, and mechanical stress on the knee joint. By examining the recent literature on the effect of the anti-inflammatory prostaglandins 15d-PGJ2 and Δ12-PGJ2, we propose that new therapeutic agents for this disease could facilitate the transition from the COX-2-dependent pro-inflammatory synthesis of the prostaglandin PGE2 (catalyzed by mPGES-1), to the equally COX-2-dependent synthesis of the aforementioned anti-inflammatory prostaglandins. This transition could be instrumental in halting the breakdown of cartilage via matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and aggrecanases, as well as promoting the matrix regeneration and synthesis of cartilage by chondrocytes. Another desirable property of new OA therapeutics could involve the recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells to the damaged cartilage and bone, possibly resulting in the generation of chondrocytes, synoviocytes, and, in the case of bone, osteoblasts. Moreover, we propose that research promoting this transition from pro-inflammatory to anti-inflammatory prostaglandins could aid in the identification of new OA therapeutics.

  4. Relative contribution of contact and complement activation to inflammatory reactions in arthritic joints.

    PubMed Central

    Abbink, J J; Kamp, A M; Nuijens, J H; Erenberg, A J; Swaak, A J; Hack, C E

    1992-01-01

    Although both the complement and contact system are thought to contribute to the inflammatory reaction in arthritic joints, only activation of complement has so far been well established, whereas contact activation and its contribution to arthritis has not been systematically explored. Complement and contact activation were assessed in 71 patients with inflammatory arthropathies and 11 with osteoarthritis using sensitive assays for C3a, and C1-inhibitor (C1INH)-kallikrein and C1INH-factor XIIa complexes respectively. Increased plasma concentrations of kallikrein-and factor XIIa-C1INH complexes were found in two and seven of the 71 patients with inflammatory arthropathies, respectively, and in none of the patients with osteoarthritis. Increased synovial fluid concentrations of kallikrein and factor XIIa complexes occurred in 13 and 15 patients with inflammatory joint diseases respectively, and in two patients with osteoarthritis. Contact system parameters did not correlate with clinical symptoms, local activity, or neutrophil activation. In contrast, synovial fluid concentrations of C3a and C1INH-C1 complexes were increased in all patients and in 20 patients with inflammatory arthropathies respectively, and were higher in patients with a higher local activity score. Synovial fluid C3a correlated with parameters of neutrophil activation such as lactoferrin. Increased plasma concentrations of C3a and C1INH-C1 complexes occurred in 13 and 11 patients with inflammatory joint diseases, and in one and two patients with osteoarthritis respectively. Plasma concentrations of C3a correlated with the number of painful joints. Thus contact activation occurs only sporadically in patients with arthritis and contributes little if anything to the local inflammatory reaction and neutrophil activation. These latter events are significantly related to the extent of complement activation. PMID:1444625

  5. Joint Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    A joint is where two or more bones come together, like the knee, hip, elbow, or shoulder. Joints can be damaged by many types of injuries or diseases, including Arthritis - inflammation of a joint. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling. Over time, ...

  6. Effectiveness of diclofenac versus acetaminophen in primary care patients with knee osteoarthritis: [NTR1485], DIPA-Trial: design of a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis is the most frequent chronic joint disease which causes pain and disability of especially hip and knee. According to international guidelines and the Dutch general practitioners guidelines for non-traumatic knee symptoms, acetaminophen should be the pain medication of first choice for osteoarthritis. However, of all prescribed pain medication in general practice, 90% consists of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs compared to 10% of acetaminophen. Because general practitioners may lack evidence showing a similar efficacy of acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, we present the design of a randomized open-label trial to investigate the efficacy of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (diclofenac) compared with acetaminophen in new consulters with knee osteoarthritis in general practice. Methods/Design Patients aged 45 years or older consulting their general practitioner with non-traumatic knee pain, meeting the clinical American College of Rheumatology criteria, and with a pain severity score of 2 or higher (on a 0-10 scale), will be randomly allocated to either diclofenac (maximum daily dose of 150 mg) or acetaminophen (maximum daily dose of 3000 mg) for 2 weeks and, if required, an additional 1-2 weeks, with a total follow-up period of 12 weeks. The primary outcomes are knee pain measured with a daily diary, and pain and function measured with the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) at baseline, and at 3, 6, 9, and 12-weeks follow-up. Secondary outcomes are patients' perceived recovery, quality of life, medical, patient, and productivity costs, compliance to therapy, co-interventions, and adverse reactions. Discussion The successful completion of this trial would lead to a better understanding of which medication should be used in the treatment of primary care patients with mild knee osteoarthritis. Trial registration Dutch trial registry NTR1485. PMID:20067607

  7. Quantitative three-dimensional photoacoustic tomography of the finger joints: an in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yao; Sobel, Eric; Jiang, Huabei

    2009-11-01

    We present for the first time in vivo full three-dimensional (3-D) photoacoustic tomography (PAT) of the distal interphalangeal joint in a human subject. Both absorbed energy density and absorption coefficient images of the joint are quantitatively obtained using our finite-element-based photoacoustic image reconstruction algorithm coupled with the photon diffusion equation. The results show that major anatomical features in the joint along with the side arteries can be imaged with a 1-MHz transducer in a spherical scanning geometry. In addition, the cartilages associated with the joint can be quantitatively differentiated from the phalanx. This in vivo study suggests that the 3-D PAT method described has the potential to be used for early diagnosis of joint diseases such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. Canonical feature selection for joint regression and multi-class identification in Alzheimer's disease diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Suk, Heung-Il; Lee, Seong-Whan; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-09-01

    Fusing information from different imaging modalities is crucial for more accurate identification of the brain state because imaging data of different modalities can provide complementary perspectives on the complex nature of brain disorders. However, most existing fusion methods often extract features independently from each modality, and then simply concatenate them into a long vector for classification, without appropriate consideration of the correlation among modalities. In this paper, we propose a novel method to transform the original features from different modalities to a common space, where the transformed features become comparable and easy to find their relation, by canonical correlation analysis. We then perform the sparse multi-task learning for discriminative feature selection by using the canonical features as regressors and penalizing a loss function with a canonical regularizer. In our experiments on the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset, we use Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images to jointly predict clinical scores of Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and also identify multi-class disease status for Alzheimer's disease diagnosis. The experimental results showed that the proposed canonical feature selection method helped enhance the performance of both clinical score prediction and disease status identification, outperforming the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26254746

  9. Preliminary results of automated removal of degenerative joint disease in bone scan lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Gregory H.; Lo, Pechin; Kim, Hyun J.; Auerbach, Martin; Goldin, Jonathan; Henkel, Keith; Banola, Ashley; Morris, Darren; Coy, Heidi; Brown, Matthew S.

    2013-03-01

    Whole-body bone scintigraphy (or bone scan) is a highly sensitive method for visualizing bone metastases and is the accepted standard imaging modality for detection of metastases and assessment of treatment outcomes. The development of a quantitative biomarker using computer-aided detection on bone scans for treatment response assessment may have a significant impact on the evaluation of novel oncologic drugs directed at bone metastases. One of the challenges to lesion segmentation on bone scans is the non-specificity of the radiotracer, manifesting as high activity related to non-malignant processes like degenerative joint disease, sinuses, kidneys, thyroid and bladder. In this paper, we developed an automated bone scan lesion segmentation method that implements intensity normalization, a two-threshold model, and automated detection and removal of areas consistent with non-malignant processes from the segmentation. The two-threshold model serves to account for outlier bone scans with elevated and diffuse intensity distributions. Parameters to remove degenerative joint disease were trained using a multi-start Nelder-Mead simplex optimization scheme. The segmentation reference standard was constructed manually by a panel of physicians. We compared the performance of the proposed method against a previously published method. The results of a two-fold cross validation show that the overlap ratio improved in 67.0% of scans, with an average improvement of 5.1% points.

  10. Bone-cartilage interface crosstalk in osteoarthritis: potential pathways and future therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Yuan, X L; Meng, H Y; Wang, Y C; Peng, J; Guo, Q Y; Wang, A Y; Lu, S B

    2014-08-01

    Currently, osteoarthritis (OA) is considered a disease of the entire joint, which is not simply a process of wear and tear but rather abnormal remodelling and joint failure of an organ. The bone-cartilage interface is therefore a functioning synergistic unit, with a close physical association between subchondral bone and cartilage suggesting the existence of biochemical and molecular crosstalk across the OA interface. The crosstalk at the bone-cartilage interface may be elevated in OA in vivo and in vitro. Increased vascularisation and formation of microcracks associated with abnormal bone remodelling in joints during OA facilitate molecular transport from cartilage to bone and vice versa. Recent reports suggest that several critical signalling pathways and biological factors are key regulators and activate cellular and molecular processes in crosstalk among joint compartments. Therapeutic interventions including angiogenesis inhibitors, agonists/antagonists of molecules and drugs targeting bone remodelling are potential candidates for this interaction. This review summarised the premise for the presence of crosstalk in bone-cartilage interface as well as the current knowledge of the major signalling pathways and molecular interactions that regulate OA progression. A better understanding of crosstalk in bone-cartilage interface may lead to development of more effective strategies for treating OA patients. PMID:24928319

  11. Leg length discrepancy and osteoarthritis in the knee, hip and lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Kelvin J.; Azari, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is an extremely common condition that creates substantial personal and health care costs. An important recognised risk factor for OA is excessive or abnormal mechanical joint loading. Leg length discrepancy (LLD) is a common condition that results in uneven and excessive loading of not only knee joints but also hip joints and lumbar motion segments. Accurate imaging methods of LLD have made it possible to study the biomechanical effects of mild LLD (LLD of 20mm or less). This review examines the accuracy of these methods compared to clinical LLD measurements. It then examines the association between LLD and OA of the joints of the lower extremity. More importantly, it addresses the largely neglected association between LLD and degeneration of lumbar motion segments and the patterns of biomechanical changes that accompany LLD. We propose that mild LLD may be an important instigator or contributor to OA of the hip and lumbar spine, and that it deserves to be rigorously studied in order to decrease OA’s burden of disease. PMID:26500356

  12. Acquired conditions that lead to osteoarthritis in the dog.

    PubMed

    Martinez, S A; Coronado, G S

    1997-07-01

    There are many acquired arthopathies that will result in some degree of osteoarthritis, even after proper management. Once the articular cartilage is damaged, it is unlikely that the architecture of the original cartilage surface will return to the normal conditions that existed prior to injury. The purpose of timely and meticulous management of traumatic joint events is to stop the progression of osteoarthritic development. When dealing with articular fractures or other forms of trauma to articular cartilage, three important principles to remember are anatomic reduction of the articular surfaces, stable fixation, and limited weight bearing on the affected limb as soon as possible after surgery. Even after strict adherence to these principles, the pet owner should always be warned that the animal will develop some degree of osteoarthritis in the affected joint at some future time; at that time, chronic medical management may be indicated. PMID:9243780

  13. The chondroprotective effects of intraarticular application of statin in osteoarthritis: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Bayyurt, Sarp; Küçükalp, Abdullah; Bilgen, Muhammed Sadik; Bilgen, Ömer Faruk; Çavuşoğlu, İlkin; Yalçınkaya, Ulviye

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent chronic joint disease causing pain and disability. Recent reports have shown that statin may have the potential to inhibit osteoarthritis. This study of early stage OA developed in an experimental rabbit model, aimed to evaluate the chondroprotective effects of intraarticularly applied atorvastatin on cartilage tissue macroscopically and histopathologically by examining intracellular and extracellular changes by light and electron microscope. Materials and Methods: The experimental knee OA model was created by cutting the anterior cruciate ligament of the 20 mature New Zealand rabbits. The rabbits were randomly allocated into two groups of 10. Study group: The group that received intraarticular statin therapy; Control group: The group that did not receive any intraarticular statin therapy. The control group received an intraarticular administration of saline and the study group atorvastatin from the 1st week postoperatively, once a week for 3 weeks. The knee joints were removed including the femoral and tibial joint surfaces for light and electron microscopic studies of articular cartilages. Results: The mean total points obtained from the evaluation of the lesions that developed in the medial femoral condyle were 11.33 ± 0.667 for the control group and 1.5 ± 0.687 for the study group. The mean total points obtained from the evaluation of the lesions that developed in medial tibial plateau cartilage tissue were 11.56 ± 0.709 for the control group and 1.40 ± 0.618 for the study group. Electron microscopic evaluation revealed healthy cartilage tissue with appropriate chondrocyte and matrix structure in study group and impaired cartilage tissue in control group. Conclusion: Chondroprotective effect of statin on cartilage tissue was determined in this experimental OA model evaluated macroscopically and by light and electron microscope. There are some evidences to believe that the chondroprotective effect of the

  14. Effects of Native Type II Collagen Treatment on Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bakilan, Fulya; Armagan, Onur; Ozgen, Merih; Tascioglu, Funda; Bolluk, Ozge; Alatas, Ozkan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this randomized controlled study was to evaluate the efficacy of oral native type II collagen treatment on the symptoms and biological markers of cartilage degradation, when given concomitantly with acetaminophen in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods: Thirty-nine patients diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were included and randomly distributed into two groups: one treated with 1500 mg/day of acetaminophen (group AC; n=19) and the other treated with 1500 mg/day of acetaminophen plus 10 mg/day of native type II collagen (group AC+CII; n=20) for 3 months. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) at rest and during walking, Western Ontario McMaster (WOMAC) pain, WOMAC function, and Short Form-36 (SF-36) scores, were recorded. Coll2-1, Coll2-1NO2 and Fibulin-3 levels were quantified in urine as biomarkers of disease progression. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02237989. Results: After 3 months of treatment, significant improvements compared to baseline were reported in joint pain (VAS walking), function (WOMAC) and quality of life (SF-36) in the AC+CII group, while only improvements in some subscales of the SF-36 survey and VAS walking were detected in the AC group. Comparisons between the groups revealed a significant difference in VAS walking score in favour of the AC+CII group as compared to AC group. Biochemical markers of cartilage degradation in urine did not significantly improve in any of the groups. Conclusion: All in all, these results suggest that native type II collagen treatment combined with acetaminophen is superior to only acetaminophen for symptomatic treatment of patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:27551171

  15. Average symptom trajectories following incident radiographic knee osteoarthritis: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, Rebecca; Jordan, Kelvin P; Thomas, Elaine; Peat, George

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Previous research has identified the existence of a prodromal phase of symptom worsening beginning on average 2–3 years prior to the first appearance of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). The current study extends these observations to investigate the trajectory of self-reported pain, stiffness, function and other symptoms following the incidence of radiographic OA. Methods Data were from the incidence cohort of the Osteoarthritis Initiative public use data sets. Cases were defined as knees without symptoms at enrolment, which developed incident radiographic OA (Kellgren and Lawrence grade ≥2) at any of the first 4 annual follow-up visits. Symptoms investigated were knee-specific Western Ontario & McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score subscale scores and individual items, available up to 3 years before and 5 years after the incidence of radiographic OA. Trajectories of having at least one of the symptoms from a subscale, and for each individual symptom over time, were fitted using multilevel logistic regression models. Results The probability of symptoms following the initial prodromal phase generally stabilised, whereas the probability of moderate, severe or extreme symptoms was consistently low. Two exceptions were pain frequency, which increased greatly in the lead up to incidence, then decreased slightly, and audible joint sounds, which had a much higher overall probability, and after increasing prior to incident radiographic OA, stabilised then started to increase again at 5 years. Conclusions Following an increase in the risk of symptoms during the prodromal phase, this risk does not continue to increase in the period up to 5 years after the incidence of radiographic OA. PMID:27486528

  16. Relationship between the shape of the central and third tarsal bones and the presence of tarsal osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Sprackman, Lucy; Dakin, Stephanie G; May, Stephen A; Weller, Renate

    2015-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the low motion joints of the tarsus, commonly termed 'bone spavin', is common in horses. Whilst the aetiology of this condition is multifactorial, it has been suggested that dorsal wedging of the central tarsal bone (CTB) and third tarsal bone (TTB) may predispose to the development of this disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between tarsal bone conformation and osteoarthritis of the proximal intertarsal (PIT), distal intertarsal (DIT) and tarsometatarsal (TMT) joints. It was hypothesised that wedging of the CTB and TTB would be associated with OA in these joints. Multiplanar reconstructions based on computed tomographic (CT) images were used to measure the height of the central and third tarsal bones at their dorsal and plantar aspects in three parasagittal planes in cadaver specimens. A wedging index was calculated as the ratio between the dorsal and plantar measurements. All tarsal bones were graded for OA on CT images. There was a significant moderate negative correlation between the wedging index of the CTB and OA of the DIT (ρ = -0.45, P <0.01), TMT (ρ = -0.49, P <0.01) and PIT joints (ρ = -0.43, P <0.01). Dorsal wedging of the TTB was seen in mild and moderate grades of OA, but severe cases of OA were associated with plantar wedging. Our study suggests that wedging of the small tarsal bones is associated with OA in the associated joints and hence care should be taken in foals to prevent the development of wedging. PMID:25792180

  17. Knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis: the effect of self-reported instability

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Robinson, Megan E.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Tashman, Scott; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis has been previously associated with a stereotypical knee-stiffening gait pattern and reduced knee joint motion variability due to increased antagonist muscle co-contractions and smaller utilized arc of motion during gait. However, episodic self-reported instability may be a sign of excessive motion variability for a large subgroup of patients with knee osteoarthritis. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in knee joint motion variability during gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis with and without self-reported instability compared to a control group of older adults with asymptomatic knees. Methods Forty-three subjects, 8 with knee osteoarthritis but no reports of instability (stable), 11 with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported instability (unstable), and 24 without knee osteoarthritis or instability (control) underwent Dynamic Stereo X-ray analysis during a decline gait task on a treadmill. Knee motion variability was assessed using parametric phase plots during the loading response phase of decline gait. Findings The stable group demonstrated decreased sagittal-plane motion variability compared to the control group (p=0.04), while the unstable group demonstrated increased sagittal-plane motion variability compared to the control (p=0.003) and stable groups (p<0.001). The unstable group also demonstrated increased anterior-posterior joint contact point motion variability for the medial tibiofemoral compartment compared to the control (p=0.03) and stable groups (p=0.03). Interpretation The finding of decreased knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis without self-reported instability supports previous research. However, presence of self-reported instability is associated with increased knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis and warrants further investigation. PMID:25796536

  18. The treatment of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A C; Doherty, M

    1992-01-01

    1. The treatment of osteoarthritis is currently purely symptomatic. To enable rational therapy, careful clinical assessment is necessary to identify the origin of symptoms. Often, effective therapy can result from a biomechanical approach such as surgery, orthotics, physiotherapy and dieting. If drugs are required, there is little evidence that the current over-reliance on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is justified. Full dose regular paracetamol should be the first line of analgesic therapy. In the majority of patients, simple analgesics are probably as effective as NSAIDs. If NSAIDs are used it is necessary to review regularly their use and to be aware of potential toxicity. 2. Many alternative strategies of pain management such as topical preparations, intra-articular steroid injections, acupuncture, radiosynovectomy, transcutaneous nerve stimulation and anti-depressants, may be effective but their precise place in the armamentarium is not yet fully established. 3. The realisation that osteoarthritis is not a passive 'wear and tear' phenomenon but an active process that may be potentially modified, has led to interest in 'chondroprotective' agents, which may beneficially affect the osteoarthritic process. To date there are no convincing data available that such agents are, in fact, chondroprotective in humans. PMID:1576063

  19. Temporomandibular joint diagnostics using CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamsson, A-K; Kristensen, M; Arvidsson, L Z

    2015-01-01

    The present review will give an update on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) imaging using CBCT. It will focus on diagnostic accuracy and the value of CBCT compared with other imaging modalities for the evaluation of TMJs in different categories of patients; osteoarthritis (OA), juvenile OA, rheumatoid arthritis and related joint diseases, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and other intra-articular conditions. Finally, sections on other aspects of CBCT research related to the TMJ, clinical decision-making and concluding remarks are added. CBCT has emerged as a cost- and dose-effective imaging modality for the diagnostic assessment of a variety of TMJ conditions. The imaging modality has been found to be superior to conventional radiographical examinations as well as MRI in assessment of the TMJ. However, it should be emphasized that the diagnostic information obtained is limited to the morphology of the osseous joint components, cortical bone integrity and subcortical bone destruction/production. For evaluation of soft-tissue abnormalities, MRI is mandatory. There is an obvious need for research on the impact of CBCT examinations on patient outcome. PMID:25369205

  20. Managing Osteoarthritis and Other Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain Disorders.

    PubMed

    Dubin, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common problem in society and can lead to significant disability and impairment of a patient's capacity to perform activities of daily living. The focus of this article is various treatment options for the management of OA, with emphasis on conservative management. The emphasis is on the role of exercise, pharmacology, intra-articular joint injections, and bracing options in the management of OA. PMID:26614724

  1. Recent advances in the understanding of molecular mechanisms of cartilage degeneration, synovitis and subchondral bone changes in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yingliang; Bai, Lunhao

    2016-07-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of degenerative joint disease, is linked to high morbidity. It is predicted to be the single greatest cause of disability in the general population by 2030. The development of disease-modifying therapy for OA currently face great obstacle mainly because the onset and development of the disease involve complex molecular mechanisms. In this review, we will comprehensively summarize biological and pathological mechanisms of three key aspects: degeneration of articular cartilage, synovial immunopathogenesis, and changes in subchondral bone. For each tissue, we will focus on the molecular receptors, cytokines, peptidases, related cell, and signal pathways. Agents that specifically block mechanisms involved in synovial inflammation, degeneration of articular cartilage, and subchondral bone remodeling can potentially be exploited to produce targeted therapy for OA. Such new comprehensive agents will benefit affected patients and bring exciting new hope for the treatment of OA. PMID:27285430

  2. Roles of microRNA and signaling pathway in osteoarthritis pathogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bin; Li, Yao-yao; Ma, Jun; Pei, Fu-xing

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common chronic degenerative joint disease, with complicated pathogenic factors and undefined pathogenesis. Various signaling pathways play important roles in OA pathogenesis, including genetic expression, matrix synthesis and degradation, cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and so on. MicroRNA (miRNA) is a class of non-coding RNA in Eukaryon, regulating genetic expression on the post-transcriptional level. A great number of miRNAs are involved in the development of OA, and are closely associated with different signaling pathways. This article reviews the roles of miRNAs and signaling pathways in OA, looking toward having a better understanding of its pathogenesis mechanisms and providing new therapeutic targets for its treatment. PMID:26984840

  3. Therapeutic Potential of Differentiated Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Treatment of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Onju; Lee, Chang Youn; Kim, Ran; Lee, Jihyun; Oh, Sekyung; Lee, Min Young; Kim, Jongmin; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Maeng, Lee-So; Chang, Woochul

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic, progressive, and irreversible degenerative joint disease. Conventional OA treatments often result in complications such as pain and limited activity. However, transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has several beneficial effects such as paracrine effects, anti-inflammatory activity, and immunomodulatory capacity. In addition, MSCs can be differentiated into several cell types, including chondrocytes, osteocytes, endothelia, and adipocytes. Thus, transplantation of MSCs is a suggested therapeutic tool for treatment of OA. However, transplanted naïve MSCs can cause problems such as heterogeneous populations including differentiated MSCs and undifferentiated cells. To overcome this problem, new strategies for inducing differentiation of MSCs are needed. One possibility is the application of microRNA (miRNA) and small molecules, which regulate multiple molecular pathways and cellular processes such as differentiation. Here, we provide insight into possible strategies for cartilage regeneration by transplantation of differentiated MSCs to treat OA patients. PMID:26147426

  4. Tissue engineering in the rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ringe, Jochen; Sittinger, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Diseases such as degenerative or rheumatoid arthritis are accompanied by joint destruction. Clinically applied tissue engineering technologies like autologous chondrocyte implantation, matrix-assisted chondrocyte implantation, or in situ recruitment of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells target the treatment of traumatic defects or of early osteoarthritis. Inflammatory conditions in the joint hamper the application of tissue engineering during chronic joint diseases. Here, most likely, cartilage formation is impaired and engineered neocartilage will be degraded. Based on the observations that mesenchymal stem cells (a) develop into joint tissues and (b) in vitro and in vivo show immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory qualities indicating a transplant-protecting activity, these cells are prominent candidates for future tissue engineering approaches for the treatment of rheumatic diseases. Tissue engineering also provides highly organized three-dimensional in vitro culture models of human cells and their extracellular matrix for arthritis research. PMID:19232063

  5. Cartilage tissue engineering: From biomaterials and stem cells to osteoarthritis treatments.

    PubMed

    Vinatier, C; Guicheux, J

    2016-06-01

    Articular cartilage is a non-vascularized and poorly cellularized connective tissue that is frequently damaged as a result of trauma and degenerative joint diseases such as osteoarthrtis. Because of the absence of vascularization, articular cartilage has low capacity for spontaneous repair. Today, and despite a large number of preclinical data, no therapy capable of restoring the healthy structure and function of damaged articular cartilage is clinically available. Tissue-engineering strategies involving the combination of cells, scaffolding biomaterials and bioactive agents have been of interest notably for the repair of damaged articular cartilage. During the last 30 years, cartilage tissue engineering has evolved from the treatment of focal lesions of articular cartilage to the development of strategies targeting the osteoarthritis process. In this review, we focus on the different aspects of tissue engineering applied to cartilage engineering. We first discuss cells, biomaterials and biological or environmental factors instrumental to the development of cartilage tissue engineering, then review the potential development of cartilage engineering strategies targeting new emerging pathogenic mechanisms of osteoarthritis. PMID:27079583

  6. Del1 Knockout Mice Developed More Severe Osteoarthritis Associated with Increased Susceptibility of Chondrocytes to Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Tran, Misha C.; Bhatia, Namrata J.; Hsing, Alexander W.; Chen, Carol; LaRussa, Marie F.; Fattakhov, Ernst; Rashidi, Vania; Jang, Kyu Yun; Choo, Kevin J.; Nie, Xingju; Mathy, Jonathan A.; Longaker, Michael T.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.; Helms, Jill A.; Yang, George P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We identified significant expression of the matricellular protein, DEL1, in hypertrophic and mature cartilage during development. We hypothesized that this tissue-specific expression indicated a biological role for DEL1 in cartilage biology. Methods Del1 KO and WT mice had cartilage thickness evaluated by histomorphometry. Additional mice underwent medial meniscectomy to induce osteoarthritis, and were assayed at 1 week for apoptosis by TUNEL staining and at 8 weeks for histology and OA scoring. In vitro proliferation and apoptosis assays were performed on primary chondrocytes. Results Deletion of the Del1 gene led to decreased amounts of cartilage in the ears and knee joints in mice with otherwise normal skeletal morphology. Destabilization of the knee led to more severe OA compared to controls. In vitro, DEL1 blocked apoptosis in chondrocytes. Conclusion Osteoarthritis is among the most prevalent diseases worldwide and increasing in incidence as our population ages. Initiation begins with an injury resulting in the release of inflammatory mediators. Excessive production of inflammatory mediators results in apoptosis of chondrocytes. Because of the limited ability of chondrocytes to regenerate, articular cartilage deteriorates leading to the clinical symptoms including severe pain and decreased mobility. No treatments effectively block the progression of OA. We propose that direct modulation of chondrocyte apoptosis is a key variable in the etiology of OA, and therapies aimed at preventing this important step represent a new class of regenerative medicine targets. PMID:27505251

  7. Circulating T helper 9 cells and increased serum interleukin-9 levels in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Changlin; Shan, Yuxing; Wang, Jing; Ding, Fupeng; Zhao, Ding; Yang, Teng; Jiang, Yanfang

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the roles of T helper 9 (Th9) cells and the serum interleukin (IL)-9 level in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). The numbers of IL-9(+)  CD4(+)  CD8(-) T cells, interferon (IFN)-γ+ CD4(+)  CD8(-) T cells, IL-4(+) CD4(+)  CD8(-) T cells, and IL-17A(+ ) CD4(+ ) CD8(-) T cells in 25 OA patients and 13 healthy controls (HC) were examined by flow cytometry. The serum concentrations of IL-9, IL-4, IL-17A, and IFN-γ were also determined. The numbers of CD4(+) CD45RO(+) T cells, Th9 cells, Th1 cells, and Th17 cells in OA patients were significantly higher than those in HCs. Furthermore, serum IL-9, IL-17A, and IFN-γ levels in OA patients were higher than those in HCs. The number of Th9 cells was positively correlated with the number of Th17 cells in OA patients. Furthermore, greater numbers of Th9 cells were positively associated with elevated C-reactive protein, and both Th9 cells and IL-9 levels were positively correlated with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index in OA patients. Th9 cell numbers and IL-9 levels are correlated with OA patient symptoms and joint functionality and may be a marker of disease activity. PMID:26926842

  8. Current concepts in the therapeutic management of osteoarthritis with glucosamine.

    PubMed

    Reginster, Jean-Yves; Bruyere, Olivier; Fraikin, Genevieve; Henrotin, Yves

    2005-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, several studies have investigated the ability of glucosamine sulfate to improve the symptoms (pain and function) and to delay the structural progression of osteoarthritis. There is now a large, convergent body of evidence that glucosamine sulfate, given at a daily oral dose of 1,500 mg, is able to significantly reduce the symptoms of osteoarthritis in the lower limbs and spine. This effect is usually seen with a minimal time for the onset of significant action - around 2 weeks. A similar dose of glucosamine sulfate has also been shown, in two independent studies, to prevent the joint space narrowing observed at the femorotibial compartment in patients with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis. This effect, which is not affected by the radiographic technique used for the assessment of joint space width, also translated into a 50% reduction in the incidence of osteoarthritis-related surgery of the lower limbs during a 5-year period following the withdrawal of the treatment. There is a high degree of consistency in the literature showing that when glucosamine sulfate is used for the treatment of osteoarthritis, an efficacious response with minimum side effects can be expected. Since some discrepancies have been described between the results of studies performed with a patent-protected formulation of glucosamine sulfate distributed as a drug and those having used glucosamine preparations purchased from global suppliers, packaged, and sold over-the-counter as nutritional supplements (not regulated as drugs and with some potential issues concerning the reliability of their content), caution should be used when extrapolating conclusive results obtained with prescription drugs to over-the-counter or food supplements. PMID:16536216

  9. Translation of clinical problems in osteoarthritis into pathophysiological research goals

    PubMed Central

    Berenbaum, Francis; Blanco, Francisco J; Cosimo, de Bari; Lafeber, Floris; Hauge, Ellen; Higginbottom, Adele; Ioan-Facsinay, Andreea; Loughlin, John; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Moilanen, Eeva; Pitsillidou, Irene; Tsezou, Aspasia; van Meurs, Joyce; Vincent, Tonia; Wittoek, Ruth; Lories, Rik

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) accounts for more disability among the elderly than any other disease and is associated with an increased mortality rate. The prevalence in Europe will rise in the future since this continent has a strongly ageing population and an obesity epidemic; obesity and age both being major risk factors for OA. No adequate therapeutic options, besides joint replacement, are available, although they are greatly needed and should be acquired by adequate research investments. However, the perspective on OA from a researcher's point of view is not always aligned with the perspective of a patient with OA. Researchers base their views on OA mainly on abnormalities in structure and function while patients consider OA as a collection of symptoms. In this viewpoint paper, we discuss the possibility of translating the most important clinical problems into pathophysiological research goals to facilitate the translation from bench to bedside and vice versa. This viewpoint is the outcome of a dialogue within the ‘European League Against Rheumatism study group on OA’ and People with Arthritis/Rheumatism across Europe (PARE) representatives. PMID:27252894

  10. Current research on pharmacologic and regenerative therapies for osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Ouyang, Hongwei; Dass, Crispin R; Xu, Jiake

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disorder commonly encountered in clinical practice, and is the leading cause of disability in elderly people. Due to the poor self-healing capacity of articular cartilage and lack of specific diagnostic biomarkers, OA is a challenging disease with limited treatment options. Traditional pharmacologic therapies such as acetaminophen, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and opioids are effective in relieving pain but are incapable of reversing cartilage damage and are frequently associated with adverse events. Current research focuses on the development of new OA drugs (such as sprifermin/recombinant human fibroblast growth factor-18, tanezumab/monoclonal antibody against β-nerve growth factor), which aims for more effectiveness and less incidence of adverse effects than the traditional ones. Furthermore, regenerative therapies (such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), new generation of matrix-induced ACI, cell-free scaffolds, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells or iPSCs), and endogenous cell homing) are also emerging as promising alternatives as they have potential to enhance cartilage repair, and ultimately restore healthy tissue. However, despite currently available therapies and research advances, there remain unmet medical needs in the treatment of OA. This review highlights current research progress on pharmacologic and regenerative therapies for OA including key advances and potential limitations. PMID:26962464

  11. Biomarkers of early stage osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and musculoskeletal health

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Usman; Anwar, Attia; Savage, Richard S.; Costa, Matthew L.; Mackay, Nicola; Filer, Andrew; Raza, Karim; Watts, Richard A.; Winyard, Paul G.; Tarr, Joanna; Haigh, Richard C.; Thornalley, Paul J.; Rabbani, Naila

    2015-01-01

    There is currently no biochemical test for detection of early-stage osteoarthritis (eOA). Tests for early-stage rheumatoid arthritis (eRA) such as rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti–cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies require refinement to improve clinical utility. We developed robust mass spectrometric methods to quantify citrullinated protein (CP) and free hydroxyproline in body fluids. We detected CP in the plasma of healthy subjects and surprisingly found that CP was increased in both patients with eOA and eRA whereas anti–CCP antibodies were predominantly present in eRA. A 4-class diagnostic algorithm combining plasma/serum CP, anti-CCP antibody and hydroxyproline applied to a cohort gave specific and sensitive detection and discrimination of eOA, eRA, other non-RA inflammatory joint diseases and good skeletal health. This provides a first-in-class plasma/serum-based biochemical assay for diagnosis and type discrimination of early-stage arthritis to facilitate improved treatment and patient outcomes, exploiting citrullinated protein and related differential autoimmunity. PMID:25788417

  12. Pharmacologic treatment of hand-, knee- and hip-osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bobacz, Klaus

    2013-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease of high prevalence and affects > 90 % of the population, depending on several risk factors. Symptomatic OA is less frequent, but requires an individually tailored therapeutic regimen consisting of non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment modalities. Pharmacologic therapy, however, is mainly limited to analgetic and anti-inflammatory agents; structure modifying remedies do not exist. The therapeutic approach to hand-, knee- and hip-OA is basically similar and differs only at some minor points. Generally, topical agents or paracetamol are recommended as first-line agents. If unsuccessful oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or COX-2-selctive inhibitors should be introduced. Tramadol is an option in the case patients will not respond satisfactorily to NSAIDs. Glucosamine and chondroitine sulphate are no longer recommended in knee and hip OA, but chondroitine might be efficient in treating hand OA. Oral NSAIDs should be prescribed with caution due to potential side effects. Opioids are not recommended as their benefits are outweighed