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1

Vascular Disease is Associated with Facet Joint Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Objective Epidemologic studies have demonstrated associations between vascular disease and spinal degeneration. We sought to examine whether vascular disease was associated with lumbar spine facet joint osteoarthritis (OA) in a community-based population. Design 441 participants from the Framingham Heart Study multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) Study were included in this ancillary study. We used a quantitative summary measure of abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) from the parent study as a marker for vascular disease. AAC was categorized into tertiles of ‘no’ (reference), ‘low’, and ‘high’ calcification. Facet joint (FJ) OA was evaluated on CT scans using a 4-grade scale. For analytic purposes, FJ OA was dichotomized as moderate FJ OA of at least one joint from L2-S1 vs. no moderate FJ OA. We examined the association of AAC and FJ OA using logistic regression before and after adjusting for age, sex and BMI. Furthermore, we examined the independent effect of AAC on FJ OA after including the known cardiovascular risk factors diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and smoking. Results Low AAC (OR 3.84 [2.33-6.34]; p=<0.0001) and high AAC (9.84 [5.29-18.3]; =<0.0001) were strongly associated with FJ OA, compared with the reference group. After adjusting for age, sex, and BMI, the association with FJ OA was attenuated for both low AAC (1.81 [1.01-3.27]; p=0.05) and high AAC (2.63 [0.99-5.23]; p=0.05). BMI and age were independently and significantly associated with FJ OA. The addition of cardiovascular risk factors to the model did not substantially change parameter estimates for either AAC tertile. Conclusions Abdominal aortic calcifications were associated with FJ OA in this community-based population, when adjusting for epidemiologic factors associated with spinal degeneration, and cardiovascular risk factors. Potentially modifiable risk factors for facet degeneration unrelated to conventional biomechanical paradigms may exist. This study is limited by cross-sectional design; longitudinal studies are needed.

Suri, Pradeep; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Rainville, James; Kalichman, Leonid; Guermazi, Ali; Hunter, David J

2010-01-01

2

Osteoarthritis — an untreatable disease?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis is a painful and disabling disease that affects millions of patients. Its aetiology is largely unknown, but is most likely multi-factorial. Osteoarthritis poses a dilemma: it often begins attacking different joint tissues long before middle age, but cannot be diagnosed until it becomes symptomatic decades later, at which point structural alterations are already quite advanced. In this review, osteoarthritis

Martin Michaelis; Bernhard J. Kirschbaum; Karl A. Rudolphi; Heike A. Wieland

2005-01-01

3

Relationships of hip joint volume ratios with degrees of joint laxity and degenerative disease from youth to maturity in a canine population predisposed to hip joint osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess relationships of acetabular volume (AV), femoral head volume (FV), and portion of the femoral head within in the acetabulum (FVIA) with each other and with degrees of hip joint laxity and degenerative joint disease from youth to maturity in dogs predisposed to developing hip joint osteoarthritis (OA). Animals 46 mixed-breed half- or full-sibling hound-type dogs. Procedures The distraction index (DI), AV, FV, FVIA, and degree of osteoarthritis (OA score) were quantified in 1 hip joint at 16, 32, and 104 weeks of age. Relationships among variables were evaluated within and between ages. Ratios corresponding to OA scores were compared within ages. Differences among 16-week ratios corresponding to 32-week OA scores and among 16- and 32-week ratios corresponding to 104-week OA scores were evaluated. Results Significant positive relationships existed between FV and AV across ages as well as between FVIA/FV and FVIA/AV and between DI and OA score across and within most ages. Such relationships also existed within these variables across most ages. Negative relationships of DI and OA scores with FVIA/FV and FVIA/AV within and among all ages were significant. Sixteen-week AVs, FVs, and FVIAs were greater and FV/AVs and OA scores were less than 32- and 104-week values. The 32-week FVIA/FV was less than 16- and 104-week values, and the 32-week FVIA/AV was less than the 104-week value. The FVIA/FV and FVIA/AV were lower and the DI was higher with higher OA scores within and among most ages. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Structural volumes in lax canine hip joints changed predictably relative to each other during growth, despite degenerative changes. Measures developed in this study may augment current diagnosis and treatment strategies for hip dysplasia in dogs.

D'Amico, Laura L.; Xie, Lin; Abell, Lindsey K.; Brown, Katherine T.; Lopez, Mandi J.

2013-01-01

4

Apoptosis and inflammatory disease: osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease characterized by progressive erosion of articular cartilage as well as\\u000a thickening of subchondral bone. Almost 30% of the US population between the ages of 25–74 have radiographic OA of the hand\\u000a and over 30% of the population aged 63–93 have radiographic OA of the knee [25, 41]. Currently, the disease is treated with

Mark E. Nuttall; Maxine Gowen; Michael W. Lark

5

Acupuncture for peripheral joint osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Background Peripheral joint osteoarthritis is a major cause of pain and functional limitation. Few treatments are safe and effective. Objectives To assess the effects of acupuncture for treating peripheral joint osteoarthritis. Search strategy We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 1), MEDLINE, and EMBASE (both through December 2007), and scanned reference lists of articles. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing needle acupuncture with a sham, another active treatment, or a waiting list control group in people with osteoarthritis of the knee, hip, or hand. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. We calculated standardized mean differences using the differences in improvements between groups. Main results Sixteen trials involving 3498 people were included. Twelve of the RCTs included only people with OA of the knee, 3 only OA of the hip, and 1 a mix of people with OA of the hip and/or knee. In comparison with a sham control, acupuncture showed statistically significant, short-term improvements in osteoarthritis pain (standardized mean difference -0.28, 95% confidence interval -0.45 to -0.11; 0.9 point greater improvement than sham on 20 point scale; absolute percent change 4.59%; relative percent change 10.32%; 9 trials; 1835 participants) and function (-0.28, -0.46 to -0.09; 2.7 point greater improvement on 68 point scale; absolute percent change 3.97%; relative percent change 8.63%); however, these pooled short-term benefits did not meet our predefined thresholds for clinical relevance (i.e. 1.3 points for pain; 3.57 points for function) and there was substantial statistical heterogeneity. Additionally, restriction to sham-controlled trials using shams judged most likely to adequately blind participants to treatment assignment (which were also the same shams judged most likely to have physiological activity), reduced heterogeneity and resulted in pooled short-term benefits of acupuncture that were smaller and non-significant. In comparison with sham acupuncture at the six-month follow-up, acupuncture showed borderline statistically significant, clinically irrelevant improvements in osteoarthritis pain (-0.10, -0.21 to 0.01; 0.4 point greater improvement than sham on 20 point scale; absolute percent change 1.81%; relative percent change 4.06%; 4 trials;1399 participants) and function (-0.11, -0.22 to 0.00; 1.2 point greater improvement than sham on 68 point scale; absolute percent change 1.79%; relative percent change 3.89%). In a secondary analysis versus a waiting list control, acupuncture was associated with statistically significant, clinically relevant short-term improvements in osteoarthritis pain (-0.96, -1.19 to -0.72; 14.5 point greater improvement than sham on 100 point scale; absolute percent change 14.5%; relative percent change 29.14%; 4 trials; 884 participants) and function (-0.89, -1.18 to -0.60; 13.0 point greater improvement than sham on 100 point scale; absolute percent change 13.0%; relative percent change 25.21%). In the head-on comparisons of acupuncture with the ‘supervised osteoarthritis education’ and the ‘physician consultation’ control groups, acupuncture was associated with clinically relevant short- and long-term improvements in pain and function. In the head on comparisons of acupuncture with ‘home exercises/advice leaflet’ and ‘supervised exercise’, acupuncture was associated with similar treatment effects as the controls. Acupuncture as an adjuvant to an exercise based physiotherapy program did not result in any greater improvements than the exercise program alone. Information on safety was reported in only 8 trials and even in these trials there was limited reporting and heterogeneous methods. Authors' conclusions Sham-controlled trials show statistically significant benefits; however, these benefits are small, do not meet our pre-defined

Manheimer, Eric; Cheng, Ke; Linde, Klaus; Lao, Lixing; Yoo, Junghee; Wieland, Susan; van der Windt, Danielle AWM; Berman, Brian M; Bouter, Lex M

2011-01-01

6

Prospects for disease modification in osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis (OA) can be a progressive, disabling disease, leading to diminished quality of life, and, for over 500,000 individuals annually in the US, total joint replacement. The etiology of OA will vary among individuals, with potential roles for systemic factors (such as genetics and obesity) as well as for local biomechanical factors (such as muscle weakness, joint laxity and traumatic

Steven B Abramson; Mukundan Attur; Yusuf Yazici

2006-01-01

7

[Joint-preserving surgical options in osteoarthritis].  

PubMed

Joint-preserving surgery aims to correct the mechanical disbalances leading to the inhomogenous load distribution across joint lines, potentially leading to osteoarthritis. The possibilities of axial corrections at the knee have been known for years. A better pathophysiologic understanding of the disbalances leading to coxarthrosis has, more recently, allowed for the development of joint-preserving approaches, for instance in situations of excessive (impingement) or insufficient (dysplastic) femoro-acetabular coverage. On the opposite, in the absence of a mechanical defect, or if osteoarthritis is already present, joint-preserving surgery has little chances of success. PMID:22455151

Peter, R; Christofilopoulos, P

2012-03-14

8

Selective joint denervation promotes knee osteoarthritis in the aging rat  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis is the most common joint disorder with aging, but its cause is unknown. Mice lose joint afferents with aging, and this loss precedes development of osteoarthritis. We hypothesized a loss of joint afferents is involved in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis.To test this hypothesis, we denervated knee joints of 16 rats at age 2 months, by intra-articular injection of an

Paul T. Salo; Tom Hogervorst; Ruth A. Seerattan; Diana Rucker; Robert C. Bray

2002-01-01

9

Hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes in osteoarthritis: the developmental aspect of degenerative joint disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: Osteoarthritis is characterized by a progressive degradation of articular cartilage leading to loss of joint function. The molecular mechanisms regulating pathogenesis and progression of osteoarthritis are poorly understood. Remarkably, some characteristics of this joint disease resemble chondrocyte differentiation processes during skeletal development by endochondral ossification. In healthy articular cartilage, chondrocytes resist proliferation and terminal differentiation. By contrast, chondrocytes in

Rita Dreier

2010-01-01

10

Clinical features of symptomatic patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Introduction Patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis (OA) is common and leads to pain and disability. However, current classification criteria do not distinguish between patellofemoral and tibiofemoral joint OA. The objective of this study was to provide empirical evidence of the clinical features of patellofemoral joint OA (PFJOA) and to explore the potential for making a confident clinical diagnosis in the community setting. Methods This was a population-based cross-sectional study of 745 adults aged ?50 years with knee pain. Information on risk factors and clinical signs and symptoms was gathered by a self-complete questionnaire, and standardised clinical interview and examination. Three radiographic views of the knee were obtained (weight-bearing semi-flexed posteroanterior, supine skyline and lateral) and individuals were classified into four subsets (no radiographic OA, isolated PFJOA, isolated tibiofemoral joint OA, combined patellofemoral/tibiofemoral joint OA) according to two different cut-offs: 'any OA' and 'moderate to severe OA'. A series of binary logistic and multinomial regression functions were performed to compare the clinical features of each subset and their ability in combination to discriminate PFJOA from other subsets. Results Distinctive clinical features of moderate to severe isolated PFJOA included a history of dramatic swelling, valgus deformity, markedly reduced quadriceps strength, and pain on patellofemoral joint compression. Mild isolated PFJOA was barely distinguished from no radiographic OA (AUC 0.71, 95% CI 0.66, 0.76) with only difficulty descending stairs and coarse crepitus marginally informative over age, sex and body mass index. Other cardinal signs of knee OA - the presence of effusion, bony enlargement, reduced flexion range of movement, mediolateral instability and varus deformity - were indicators of tibiofemoral joint OA. Conclusions Early isolated PFJOA is clinically manifest in symptoms and self-reported functional limitation but has fewer clear clinical signs. More advanced disease is indicated by a small number of simple-to-assess signs and the relative absence of classic signs of knee OA, which are predominantly manifestations of tibiofemoral joint OA. Confident diagnosis of even more advanced PFJOA may be limited in the community setting.

2012-01-01

11

Diacerein: A New Disease Modulating Agent in Osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diacerein is a new anti-inflammatory analgesics and antipyretic drug, developed specially for the treatment of osteoarthritis which is one of the most prevalent degenerative joint disease. It is highly effective in relieving the symptoms of osteoarthritis and may be able to modify the course of the disease condition. Diacerein acts by inhibiting the production of IL-1â by human monocytes. It

B Medhi; Ramesh Sen; Sanjay Wadhwa

12

Osteoarthritis, a disease bridging development and regeneration  

PubMed Central

The osteoarthritic diseases are common disorders characterized by progressive destruction of the articular cartilage in the joints, and associated with remodeling of the subchondral bone, synovitis and the formation of bone outgrowths at the joint margins, osteophytes. From the clinical perspective, osteoarthritis leads to joint pain and loss of function. Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of progressive disability. New data from genetic, translational and basic research have demonstrated that pathways with essential roles in joint and bone development also contribute to the postnatal homeostasis of the articular cartilage and are involved in osteoarthritis, making these potential therapeutic targets. Other systems of interest are the tissue-destructive enzymes that break down the extracellular matrix of the cartilage as well as mediators of inflammation that contribute to synovitis. However, the perspective of a durable treatment over years to decades highlights the need for a personalized medicine approach encompassing a global view on the disease and its management, thereby including nonpharmaceutical approaches such as physiotherapy and advanced surgical methods. Integration of novel strategies based on their efficacy and safety with the identification of individuals at risk and optimal individual rehabilitation management remains a major challenge for the medical community in particular, as the incidence of osteoarthritis is likely to further increase with the overall aging of the population.

Lories, Rik J U; Luyten, Frank P

2012-01-01

13

Release of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) into joint fluid after knee injury and in osteoarthritis.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE--The release of fragments of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and aggrecan into knee joint fluid and serum after joint injury and in post-traumatic and primary osteoarthritis was monitored in a cross-sectional study. METHODS--Samples of joint fluid and serum were obtained from healthy volunteers and from patients with arthroscopically verified injury to anterior cruciate ligament and or meniscus of the knee at different times after injury and with different degrees of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Samples were also obtained from patients with primary osteoarthritis. Fragments of COMP were quantified in joint fluid and in serum by enzyme-linked immunoassay. Fragments of aggrecan were quantified in joint fluid by enzyme-linked immunoassay. RESULTS--Concentrations of COMP and aggrecan fragments in joint fluid in the study groups were increased over the reference levels of 47 (range 10-109) and 34 (range 6-59) micrograms/mL, respectively, in the volunteers with healthy knees. The ratios (w/w) of aggrecan to COMP fragments in joint fluid were also increased in all study groups over that in the reference group. Average concentrations of COMP in joint fluid were high shortly after injury and decreased with time but remained increased over reference levels for many years. Joint fluid COMP concentrations were also increased in early stage post-traumatic and primary osteoarthritis, but not in advanced osteoarthritis. CONCLUSION--Increased amounts of aggrecan and COMP fragments are released into joint fluid after joint injury and in early stage osteoarthritis. The ratios of aggrecan to COMP in joint fluid vary with time after injury and with osteoarthritis disease stage. Although both molecules are sensitive to the agents active in matrix breakdown in joint disease, differences may thus exist in the release mechanisms and attempted repair. The concentrations of the individual markers in body fluids and their ratios may serve to monitor treatment efficacy, disease progression and repair in osteoarthritis and other joint diseases. Images

Lohmander, L S; Saxne, T; Heinegard, D K

1994-01-01

14

Osteoarthritis  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... To diagnose osteoarthritis, the doctor will perform a physical examination and a variety of diag X-rays ... order to keep the affected joints in shape, physical therapy may also be used to treat osteoarthr ...

15

Selective joint denervation promotes knee osteoarthritis in the aging rat.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis is the most common joint disorder with aging, but its cause is unknown. Mice lose joint afferents with aging, and this loss precedes development of osteoarthritis. We hypothesized a loss of joint afferents is involved in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis. To test this hypothesis, we denervated knee joints of 16 rats at age 2 months, by intra-articular injection of an immunotoxin. The immunotoxin killed neurons after retrograde axonal transport to the cell body. At 16 or 24 months follow-up, each joint was histologically assessed and assigned an osteoarthritis score. At follow-up, the number of joint afferents had spontaneously decreased by 42% in control knees and 69% in denervated knees. We found that control knees developed osteoarthritic changes with aging. However, denervated knees had far more severe changes, as evidenced by a 54% higher average osteoarthritis score than control knees (P = 0.0016, both groups 16 knees). These results suggest a loss of afferents predisposes a joint to osteoarthritis. We propose the spontaneous loss of neurons with aging may be a normal developmental process. To explain the mechanism causing osteoarthritis, we suggest denervation permits aberrant joint loading, either by disturbing neuromuscular joint control, or by inducing joint laxity after neurogenic loss of tissue homeostasis. PMID:12472238

Salo, Paul T; Hogervorst, Tom; Seerattan, Ruth A; Rucker, Diana; Bray, Robert C

2002-11-01

16

[Features of regeneration of joint cartilage during osteoarthritis].  

PubMed

In order to define the features of regeneration of joint cartilage during osteoarthritis, morphological study of surgical material, obtained from 50 patients, has been performed with the help of histological, histochemical and morphometric methods. In the joint cartilage, alongside with the alteration, there is also the cellular regeneration expressing in the intensive proliferation of cartilaginous cells. However, maturing of the regenerated cells proceeds defectively and consequently regenerate loses ability to be differentiated in hyaline, joint cartilage that specifies the phase of differentiation. Hence, the specified process should be qualified as not reparation, but as a pathological regeneration. Cartilaginous regenerate is not capable to carry out amortization and protective functions of an articulate cartilage and is exposed to secondary alteration. The last, in turn, aggravates arthroses changes and causes progressing disease. PMID:16444044

Chikhladze, R T; Chkhaidze, M I

2005-12-01

17

Joint involvement patterns in nodal versus erosive osteoarthritis of the hands.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate the joint count for affected joints and involvement distribution in erosive osteoarthritis (EOA) versus nodal osteoarthritis (NOA) of the hands in patients matched for sex, age, and disease duration. After recruitment of 101 consecutive outpatients affected with EOA, 101 patients affected by NOA were selected and matched for age, sex, and disease duration. Joint count for distal interphalangeal (DIP), proximal interphalangeal (PIP), and first carpo-metacarpal (CMC-1) joints, presenting Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2-4 OA, was performed. In our study, the number of affected joints was higher in NOA, with significant differences for some articular districts, especially in PIP joints of the fourth finger, and DIP joints of the second, third and fourth fingers. PMID:15573691

Rovetta, G; Monteforte, P; Baratto, L; Franchin, F

2004-01-01

18

Distinguishing erosive osteoarthritis and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease  

PubMed Central

Erosive osteoarthritis is a term utilized to describe a specific inflammatory condition of the interphalangeal and first carpal metacarpal joints of the hands. The term has become a part of medical philosophical semantics and paradigms, but the issue is actually more complicated. Even the term osteoarthritis (non-erosive) has been controversial, with some suggesting osteoarthrosis to be more appropriate in view of the perspective that it is a non-inflammatory process undeserving of the “itis” suffix. The term “erosion” has also been a source of confusion in osteoarthritis, as it has been used to describe cartilage, not bone lesions. Inflammation in individuals with osteoarthritis actually appears to be related to complicating phenomena, such as calcium pyrophosphate and hydroxyapatite crystal deposition producing arthritis. Erosive osteoarthritis is the contentious term. It is used to describe a specific form of joint damage to specific joints. The damage has been termed erosions and the distribution of the damage is to the interphalangeal joints of the hand and first carpal metacarpal joint. Inflammation is recognized by joint redness and warmth, while X-rays reveal alteration of the articular surfaces, producing a smudged appearance. This ill-defined, joint damage has a crumbling appearance and is quite distinct from the sharply defined erosions of rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthropathy. The appearance is identical to those found with calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease, both in character and their unique responsiveness to hydroxychloroquine treatment. Low doses of the latter often resolve symptoms within weeks, in contrast to higher doses and the months required for response in other forms of inflammatory arthritis. Reconsidering erosive osteoarthritis as a form of calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease guides physicians to more effective therapeutic intervention.

Rothschild, Bruce M

2013-01-01

19

Humoral immunity to link protein in patients with inflammatory joint disease, osteoarthritis, and in non-arthritic controls.  

PubMed Central

Cartilage link protein of high purity was prepared and used in an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Antibodies to link protein were sought in the sera of 98 patients with rheumatic disorders; 38 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 29 with osteoarthritis (OA), 13 with psoriatic arthritis (PA), nine with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), nine with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and in 83 healthy controls. Antibodies were detected in all groups with the following prevalences: 21/83 normals, 9/38 RA, 7/29 OA, 7/13 PA, 3/9 AS, and 4/9 SLE. No statistically significant differences existed between the groups with regard to either prevalence or mean titre of anti-link antibodies. Serum antibodies to proteoglycan link protein appear to be no more common in patients with rheumatic disorders than in healthy controls. Images

Austin, A K; Hobbs, R N; Anderson, J C; Butler, R C; Ashton, B A

1988-01-01

20

Osteoarthritis accelerates and exacerbates Alzheimer's disease pathology in mice  

PubMed Central

Background The purpose of this study was to investigate whether localized peripheral inflammation, such as osteoarthritis, contributes to neuroinflammation and neurodegenerative disease in vivo. Methods We employed the inducible Col1-IL1?XAT mouse model of osteoarthritis, in which induction of osteoarthritis in the knees and temporomandibular joints resulted in astrocyte and microglial activation in the brain, accompanied by upregulation of inflammation-related gene expression. The biological significance of the link between peripheral and brain inflammation was explored in the APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) whereby osteoarthritis resulted in neuroinflammation as well as exacerbation and acceleration of AD pathology. Results Induction of osteoarthritis exacerbated and accelerated the development of neuroinflammation, as assessed by glial cell activation and quantification of inflammation-related mRNAs, as well as A? pathology, assessed by the number and size of amyloid plaques, in the APP/PS1; Col1-IL1?XAT compound transgenic mouse. Conclusion This work supports a model by which peripheral inflammation triggers the development of neuroinflammation and subsequently the induction of AD pathology. Better understanding of the link between peripheral localized inflammation, whether in the form of osteoarthritis, atherosclerosis or other conditions, and brain inflammation, may prove critical to our understanding of the pathophysiology of disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases.

2011-01-01

21

Neuropathic pain in patients with osteoarthritis of hip joint  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives  The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between neuropathic pain and pain deriving from osteoarthritis\\u000a of the hip joint, using painDETECT, a self-report questionnaire.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Patients with osteoarthritis of the hip joint referred to the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Chiba University Hospital\\u000a were eligible for participation in the study. All the patients completed painDETECT and visual

Tomonori Shigemura; Seiji Ohtori; Shunji Kishida; Junichi Nakamura; Munenori Takeshita; Makoto Takazawa; Yoshitada Harada; Kazuhisa Takahashi

22

What Is Osteoarthritis?  

MedlinePLUS

... on the joints from certain jobs and playing sports. How Is Osteoarthritis Diagnosed? Osteoarthritis can occur in ... Reduce pain while staying active Cope with their body, mind, and emotions Have more control over the disease ...

23

What Is Osteoarthritis?  

MedlinePLUS

... on the joints from certain jobs and playing sports. How Is Osteoarthritis Diagnosed? Osteoarthritis can occur in ... Reduce pain while staying active. ? Cope with their body, mind, and emotions. ? Have more control over the disease. ? ...

24

Short-term results of the Ascension™ pyrolytic carbon metacarpophalangeal Joint replacement arthroplasty for osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction. – Osteoarthritis of the metacarpophalangeal joints is difficult to manage due to the high demands placed on any prosthesis. We report the preliminary results of our experience using the Ascension™ pyrolytic carbon implant.Method. – A pyrocarbon metacarpophalangeal joint replacement was implanted into seven patients (10 metacarpophalangeal joints) with osteoarthritis. Patients were reviewed both clinically and radiologically.Results. – At a

V. A. Nuñez; N. D. Citron

2005-01-01

25

Keratan sulphate in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and inflammatory diseases.  

PubMed Central

Serum concentrations of antigenic keratan sulphate determined by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with a monoclonal antibody were studied in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, other inflammatory diseases, and a large control group of women without arthritis. Mean keratan sulphate concentrations were low in 117 women with RA compared with 227 female control subjects matched for age drawn from a community survey. There were significant correlations between serum keratan sulphate concentrations in patients with RA and serum C reactive protein and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Serum keratan sulphate concentrations were also low in 29 men and women with ankylosing spondylitis and 29 patients with arthritis and high concentrations of C reactive protein. In 98 women undergoing an operation for benign breast disease there were decreases in serum keratan sulphate concentrations after the operation which correlated with doses in serum C reactive protein. No differences were found in keratan sulphate concentrations in 137 women with osteoarthritis compared with controls. Within the group with osteoarthritis there were no differences for the various joint groups and there was no obvious correlation with radiographic severity or progression. These findings suggest serum keratan sulphate is unlikely to be useful as a diagnostic marker in osteoarthritis or RA but indicate a role for inflammation in the regulation of cartilage loss.

Spector, T D; Woodward, L; Hall, G M; Hammond, A; Williams, A; Butler, M G; James, I T; Hart, D J; Thompson, P W; Scott, D L

1992-01-01

26

Autophagy and Cartilage Homeostasis Mechanisms in Joint Health, Aging and Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Osteoarthritis (OA) represents the most prevalent joint disease but neither preventive measures nor disease-modifying OA drugs (DMOADs) are available and a continuing need exists for safe and more effective symptom-modifying therapies. Failures of previous clinical trials on DMOADs in patients with established or advanced disease motivate investigation of mechanisms that maintain joint health. Enhancing such mechanisms may be a novel approach to OA risk reduction. Aging is one of its most important OA risk factors. However, aging of joint cartilage is a process that is distinct from the subsequent cartilage changes that develop as OA is initiated. This review is focused on mechanisms that maintain cell and tissue homeostasis, and how these mechanisms fail during the aging process. Augmentation of homeostasis mechanisms will be discussed as a novel avenue to delay joint aging and reduce OA risk.

Lotz, Martin; Carames, Beatriz

2011-01-01

27

Validity of summing painful joint sites to assess joint-pain comorbidity in hip or knee osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Background Previous studies in patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) have advocated the relevance of assessing the number of painful joint sites, other than the primary affected joint, in both research and clinical practice. However, it is unclear whether joint-pain comorbidities can simply be summed up. Methods A total of 401 patients with hip or knee OA completed questionnaires on demographic variables and joint-pain comorbidities. Rasch analysis was performed to evaluate whether a sum score of joint-pain comorbidities can be calculated. Results Self-reported joint-pain comorbidities showed a good fit to the Rasch model and were not biased by gender, age, disease duration, BMI, or patient group. As a group, joint-pain comorbidities covered a reasonable range of severity levels, although the sum score had rather low reliability levels suggesting it cannot discriminate well among patients. Conclusions Joint-pain comorbidities, in other than the primary affected joints, can be summed into a joint pain comorbidity score. Nevertheless, its use is discouraged for individual decision making purposes since its lacks discriminative power in patients with minimal or extreme joint pain.

2013-01-01

28

Are the Kinematics of the Knee Joint Altered during the Loading Response Phase of Gait in Individuals with Concurrent Knee Osteoarthritis and Complaints of Joint Instability? A Dynamic Stereo X-ray Study  

PubMed Central

Background Joint instability has been suggested as a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis and a cause of significant functional declines in those with symptomatic disease. However, the relationship between altered knee joint mechanics and self-reports of instability in individuals with knee osteoarthritis remains unclear. Methods Fourteen subjects with knee osteoarthritis and complaints of joint instability and 12 control volunteers with no history of knee disease were recruited for this study. Dynamic stereo X-ray technology was used to assess the three-dimensional kinematics of the knee joint during the loading response phase of gait. Findings Individuals with concurrent knee osteoarthritis and joint instability demonstrated significantly reduced flexion and internal/external rotation knee motion excursions during the loading response phase of gait (P < 0.01), while the total abduction/adduction range of motion was increased (P < 0.05). In addition, the coronal and transverse plane alignment of the knee joint at initial contact was significantly different (P < 0.05) for individuals with concurrent knee osteoarthritis and joint instability. However, the anteroposterior and mediolateral tibiofemoral joint positions at initial contact and the corresponding total joint translations were similar between groups during the loading phase of gait. Interpretations The rotational patterns of tibiofemoral joint motion and joint alignments reported for individuals with concurrent knee osteoarthritis and joint instability are consistent with those previously established for individuals with knee osteoarthritis. Furthermore, the findings of similar translatory tibiofemoral motion between groups suggest that self-reports of episodic joint instability in individuals with knee osteoarthritis may not necessarily be associated with adaptive alterations in joint arthrokinematics.

Farrokhi, Shawn; Tashman, Scott; Gil, Alexandra B.; Klatt, Brian A.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley

2011-01-01

29

Measurement of structure (disease) modification in osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis (OA) research is beginning to focus on developing structure (disease) modifying treatments that will stabilize or reverse morphological changes, thereby altering the underlying pathologic process. The ability of anti-arthritic agents to modify the course of disease has been investigated in a limited number of clinical trials. Agents studied in published clinical trials include glycosaminoglycan-peptide complex (GP-C), glycosaminoglycan polysulfate (GAGPS),

R. D. Altman

2004-01-01

30

Managing joint pain in osteoarthritis: safety and efficacy of hylan G-F 20  

PubMed Central

The use of intra-articular viscosupplementation in the nonoperative management of patients with osteoarthritis has become quite popular. Recent clinical data have demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory and chondroprotective actions of hyaluronic acid viscosupplementation reduce pain while improving patient function. We review the basic science and development of viscosupplementation and discuss the mounting evidence in support of the efficacy and safety profile of hylan G-F 20. Recent evidence suggesting a disease-modifying effect of hylan G-F 20 is also assessed. Furthermore, although the primary focus of this article is on treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee, we also discuss the use of viscosupplementation in other joints, such as the hip, ankle, and shoulder.

Conduah, Augustine H; Baker, Champ L; Baker, Champ L

2009-01-01

31

Surgical treatment for acromioclavicular joint osteoarthritis: patient selection, surgical options, complications, and outcome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis is one of the most common causes of pain originating from the acromioclavicular (AC) joint. An awareness of\\u000a appropriate diagnostic techniques is necessary in order to localize clinical symptoms to the AC joint. Initial treatments\\u000a for AC joint osteoarthritis, which include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) and corticosteroids, are recommended\\u000a prior to surgical interventions. Distal clavicle excision, the main surgical

Salvatore Docimo Jr; Dellene Kornitsky; Bennett Futterman; David E. Elkowitz

2008-01-01

32

Imaging osteoarthritis in the knee joints using x-ray guided diffuse optical tomography  

Microsoft Academic Search

In our previous studies, near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography (DOT) had been successfully applied to imaging osteoarthritis (OA) in the finger joints where significant difference in optical properties of the joint tissues was evident between healthy and OA finger joints. Here we report for the first time that large joints such as the knee can also be optically imaged especially

Qizhi Zhang; Zhen Yuan; Eric S. Sobel; Huabei Jiang

2010-01-01

33

State-of-the-art disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Significant advances have occurred in the symptomatic management of osteoarthritis over the past several decades. However,\\u000a the development of so called disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs is in a more formative stage. Although increased knowledge\\u000a of osteoarthritis pathophysiologic pathways provides more rational opportunity for targeting specific elements of the degenerative\\u000a process, limitations in our ability to measure disease progression\\/regression hamper assessment. Development

Roland W. Moskowitz; Michele Hooper

2005-01-01

34

Intraarticular gene transfer of thrombospondin-1 suppresses the disease progression of experimental osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

In osteoarthritis, angiogenesis, which occurs in the osteochondral junction and synovium, may accelerate inflammation and contribute to the severity of the disease. We used anterior cruciate ligament-transection (ACLT) to investigate the therapeutic effect of an angiogenesis inhibitor, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), in a rat model of osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis was induced in Wistar rats in the knee of one hind leg. After ACLT, AdTSP-1 (adenoviral vector encoding mouse TSP-1) was intraarticularly injected into the knee joints. Transgene expression, angiogenesis, and inflammatory responses in the knee joints were examined. They were also assessed morphologically, radiographically, and histologically for manifestations of disease. The levels of TSP-1 peaked on day 3 and were substantially maintained for at least 9 days after AdTSP-1 infection. Adenovirus-mediated gene expression was detected in the synovial membrane and chondrocytes. TSP-1 gene transfer induced transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) production, but it reduced microvessel density, macrophage infiltration, and interleukin-1? (IL-1?) levels. Gross morphological and histopathological examinations revealed that rats treated with AdTSP-1 had less severe osteoarthritis than controls. In vivo adenovirus-mediated TSP-1 gene transfer significantly reduced microvessel density, inflammation, and suppressed the progression of osteoarthritis. This study provides potential applications of TSP-1 gene delivery for treating osteoarthritis. PMID:20309955

Hsieh, Jeng-Long; Shen, Po-Chuan; Shiau, Ai-Li; Jou, I-Ming; Lee, Che-Hsin; Wang, Chrong-Reen; Teo, Min-Li; Wu, Chao-Liang

2010-10-01

35

Osteoarthritis: New Insights Part 1: The Disease and Its Risk Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting millions of people in the United States. It is a complex disease whose etiology bridges biomechanics and biochemistry. Evidence is growing for the role of systemic factors (such as genetics, dietary intake, estrogen use, and bone density) and of local bio- mechanical factors (such as muscle weakness, obesity, and joint laxity).

David T. Felson; Reva C. Lawrence; Paul A. Dieppe; Rosemarie Hirsch; Charles G. Helmick; Joanne M. Jordan; Raynard S. Kington; Michael C. Nevitt; Yuqing Zhang; MaryFran Sowers; Timothy McAlindon; Tim D. Spector; A. Robin Poole; Susan Z. Yanovski; Gerard Ateshian; Leena Sharma; Joseph A. Buckwalter; Kenneth D. Brandt; James F. Fries

2000-01-01

36

Management of hyperextension of the metacarpophalangeal joint in association with trapeziometacarpal joint osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

This study investigates the management of metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP) hyperextension in patients undergoing trapeziectomy for thumb base osteoarthritis. A total of 297 thumbs with painful trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis were assessed on pain and thumb key and tip pinch preoperatively and at 1 year. Before surgery 101 had no MCP hyperextension, 168 had hyperextension ? 30° and 28 had hyperextension ? 35°. Of these 157 hyperextension deformities ? 30° and eight ? 35° were not treated. The others were treated by temporary insertion of a Kirschner wire (n = 9), MCP fusion (n = 6), sesamoid bone tethering to the MC head (n = 5) and palmar capsulodesis using a bone anchor (n = 11). Untreated MCP hyperextension deformities < 30° did not influence the outcome of trapeziectomy. MCP hyperextension deformities ? 35° can be improved by capsulodesis or MCP fusion but this may not improve the clinical outcome. PMID:21372052

Poulter, R J; Davis, T R C

2011-03-03

37

Pi2 spacer pyrocarbon arthroplasty technique for thumb basal joint osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Trapeziectomy associated with a pyrocarbon implant is a recent procedure for thumb basal joint osteoarthritis. The investigators report Pi pyrocarbon implant technique (Tornier Bioprofile, Grenoble, France) for primary thumb basal joint osteoarthritis. The key points of the procedure are preservation of the soft tissue environment during the trapeziectomy, partial trapezoidectomy to medialize the implant, and careful capsuloplasty and ligamentoplasty to stabilize the implant. PMID:22105638

Bellemère, Philippe; Ardouin, Ludovic

2011-12-01

38

Quantitative Assessment of Improvement with Single Corticosteroid Injection in Thumb CMC Joint Osteoarthritis?  

PubMed Central

We present a unique prospective study to estimate the median sustained stage-related improvement in pain and hand function in patients with trapezio-metacarpal joint osteoarthritis after administration of a single corticosteroid injection. Response to the corticosteroid injection was assessed using Disability of Arm Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain scores. Self assessment scores revealed a reduction in pain and improvement in hand function. All patients reported a significant improvement in pain and hand function (p ? 0.05), regardless of the disease stage. Additionally, we observed a marked difference in the duration of improvement in hand function between early and late stages of the disease (p = 0.0046). In conclusion, it is possible to predict the period of symptomatic improvement at each of the four radiological stages of the disease. This would allow the treating clinician to judge the outcome of treatment with reasonable accuracy.

Khan, Munir; Waseem, Mohammad; Raza, Ali; Derham, Damjana

2009-01-01

39

Quantitative Assessment of Improvement with Single Corticosteroid Injection in Thumb CMC Joint Osteoarthritis?  

PubMed

We present a unique prospective study to estimate the median sustained stage-related improvement in pain and hand function in patients with trapezio-metacarpal joint osteoarthritis after administration of a single corticosteroid injection. Response to the corticosteroid injection was assessed using Disability of Arm Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain scores. Self assessment scores revealed a reduction in pain and improvement in hand function. All patients reported a significant improvement in pain and hand function (p disease stage. Additionally, we observed a marked difference in the duration of improvement in hand function between early and late stages of the disease (p = 0.0046). In conclusion, it is possible to predict the period of symptomatic improvement at each of the four radiological stages of the disease. This would allow the treating clinician to judge the outcome of treatment with reasonable accuracy. PMID:19572034

Khan, Munir; Waseem, Mohammad; Raza, Ali; Derham, Damjana

2009-06-19

40

Radiographic patterns of osteoarthritis of the knee joint in the community: the importance of the patellofemoral joint  

Microsoft Academic Search

The intimate relation which the patella has with the knee joint and quadriceps muscle suggests that patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis is likely to be an important cause of knee pain and disability. Two hundred and seventy three subjects who reported knee pain in a postal questionnaire survey and 240 control subjects consented to have anteroposterior weightbearing and lateral knee radiographs. Each

T E McAlindon; S Snow; C Cooper; P A Dieppe

1992-01-01

41

Associations Between Frontal Plane Joint Stiffness and Proprioceptive Acuity in Knee Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Objective It has been proposed that proprioceptive impairments observed in knee osteoarthritis (OA) may be associated with disease-related changes in joint mechanics. The aim of this study was to quantify joint proprioception and stiffness in the frontal plane of the knee in persons with and without knee OA and to report the associations between these two metrics. Methods Thirteen persons with knee OA and fourteen healthy age-matched subjects participated. Proprioceptive acuity was assessed in varus and valgus using the threshold to detection of movement (TDPM). Passive joint stiffness was estimated as the slope of the normalized torque-angle relationship at 0° joint rotation (neutral) and several rotations in varus and valgus. Analyses of variance were performed to determine the effect of OA and gender on each metric. Linear regression was used to assess the correlation between TDPM and joint stiffness. Results TDPM was significantly higher (P<0.05) in the OA group compared to controls for both varus and valgus, but significant gender differences were observed. Passive joint stiffness was significantly reduced (P<0.05) in OA participants compared to the control group in neutral and valgus, but not varus, and significantly reduced in females compared to males. A weak negative correlation was observed between TDPM and stiffness estimates, suggesting that poorer proprioception was associated with less joint stiffness. Conclusions While both joint stiffness and proprioception were reduced in the OA population, they were only weakly correlated. This suggests that other neurophysiological factors play a larger role in the proprioceptive deficits in knee OA.

Cammarata, Martha L; Dhaher, Yasin Y

2012-01-01

42

Comparison of quantitative and semiquantitative indicators of joint space narrowing in subjects with knee osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To compare quantitative estimates of change in joint space width (JSW) with semiquantitative ratings of the progression of joint space narrowing (JSN) with respect to sensitivity to change over time.Methods: 431 obese women 45 to 64 years old with unilateral radiographic knee osteoarthritis were randomised to 30 months’ treatment with doxycycline 100 mg twice daily or placebo. Quantitative estimates

S A Mazzuca; K D Brandt; B P Katz; K A Buckwalter

2006-01-01

43

High Loosening Rate of the Moje Acamo Prosthesis for Treating Osteoarthritis of the Trapeziometacarpal Joint  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Moje Acamo carpometacarpal (CMC) implant is an uncemented large ball-and-socket joint made of a ceramic material coated with a bioactive substance (Bioverit) for osseous fixation. Nine Moje Acamo CMC prostheses were implanted into nine patients with primary osteoarthritis of the thumb CMC joint. At 12 months, three implants had been revised because of progressing pain and osteolysis. In the

T. B. HANSEN; D. VAINORIUS

2008-01-01

44

Propensity for osteoarthritis and lower limb joint pain in retired professional soccer players  

PubMed Central

Objective—To quantify the prevalence of osteoarthritis and the severity of pain in the lower limb joints of players retired from English professional soccer. Method—An anonymous self administered questionnaire was distributed to 500 former players registered with the English Professional Footballers' Association. The questionnaire was designed to gather information on personal details, physical activity loading patterns, history of lower limb joint injury, and current medical condition of the lower limb joints. Results—Of 500 questionnaires distributed, 185 (37%) were returned. Nearly half of the respondents (79: 47%) retired because of injury; 42% (33) were acute injuries and 58% (46) chronic injuries. Most of the acute injuries that led to early retirement were of the knee (15: 46%), followed by the ankle (7: 21%) and lower back (5: 15%). Most of the chronic injuries that led to early retirement were also of the knee (17: 37%), followed by the lower back (10: 22%) and the hip (4: 9%). Of all respondents, 32% (59) had been medically diagnosed with osteoarthritis in at least one of the lower limb joints. More respondents had been diagnosed with osteoarthritis in the knee joints than either the ankle or the hip joints. Significantly (p<0.001) more respondents reported pain in one lower extremity joint during one or more daily activities than those who did not (joint pain: 137, 80%; no joint pain: 35, 20%). Conclusion—The risk for professional soccer players of osteoarthritis in at least one of the lower extremity joints is very high and significantly greater than for the general population. The results support the suggestion that professional soccer players should be provided with health surveillance during their playing career. Key Words: soccer; osteoarthritis; joint pain; health surveillance

Drawer, S; Fuller, C

2001-01-01

45

Bone and joint symptoms in Paget's disease.  

PubMed Central

Fifty patients with Paget's disease of bone were reviewed with regard to the basis of their symptoms and the long-term results of treatment. Twenty-four patients (48%) presented with pain localised within bone, while 17 (34%) presented with symptoms of degenerative joint disease. Three patients presented with bone pain and arthritis and the remaining six with fractures, ataxia, or painless deformity. Symptomatic osteoarthritis of the hip (OA) developed in 25 patients (50%) with approximately half developing radiological changes identical to those of idiopathic OA. Among the other patients those with coxa vara tended to show medial (rather than superior) joint space narrowing and severe Paget's disease on both sides of the joint. Arthritic pain, stiffness, and reduced mobility in other joints (knee, ankle, and wrist) were associated clinically with bone deformity adjacent to the affected joint and radiologically with distorted articular surfaces and narrowed joint spaces; sclerosis, subarticular cyst formation, and osteophytosis were usually absent. Fifteen patients were treated with calcitonin for bone pain alone; all claimed long-term 'good to complete' relief. By contrast, none of the 14 with arthritic symptoms responded to calcitonin when assessed retrospectively. Results of surgical and other medical treatment were analysed. Careful clinical evaluation is a prerequisite for optimal treatment in Paget's disease. Images

Winfield, J; Stamp, T C

1984-01-01

46

Is osteoarthritis a heterogeneous disease that can be stratified into subsets?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis is a heterogeneous disease characterized by variable clinical features, biochemical\\/genetic characteristics,\\u000a and responses to treatments. To optimize palliative effects of current treatments and develop efficacious disease-modifying\\u000a interventions, treatments may need to be tailored to the individual or a subset of osteoarthritic joints. The purpose of this\\u000a review is to explore the current literature on the clinical and physiological variability

Jeffrey B. Driban; Michael R. Sitler; Mary F. Barbe; Easwaran Balasubramanian

2010-01-01

47

Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a modulator of joint pain in a rat model of osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating disease in which primarily weight-bearing joints undergo progressive degeneration. Despite the widespread prevalence of OA in the adult population, very little is known about the factors responsible for the generation and maintenance of OA pain. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was identified in the synovial fluid of arthritis patients nearly 20 years ago and the aim of this study was to examine whether VIP could be involved in the generation of OA pain. Hindlimb weight bearing was used as a measure of joint pain, while von Frey hair algesiometry applied to the plantar surface of the ipsilateral hindpaw tested for secondary mechanical hyperalgesia. Intra-articular injection of VIP into normal rat knee joints caused a significant shift in weight bearing in favour of the contralateral non-injected hindlimb as well as causing a reduction in ipsilateral paw withdrawal threshold. These pain responses were blocked by co-administration of the VPAC receptor antagonist VIP6-28. Induction of OA by intra-articular sodium monoiodoacetate injection resulted in a reduction in weight bearing on the affected leg, but no evidence of secondary hyperalgesia in the paw. Treatment of OA knees with a single injection of VIP6-28 diminished hindlimb incapacitance while increasing paw withdrawal threshold. This study showed for the first time that peripheral application of VIP causes increased knee joint allodynia and secondary hyperalgesia. Furthermore, antagonists that inhibit VIP activity may prove beneficial in the alleviation of OA pain. PMID:16564620

McDougall, Jason J; Watkins, Lisa; Li, Zongming

2006-03-27

48

Ochronotic arthropathy: Rapid destructive hip osteoarthritis associated with metabolic disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Ochronosis is a musculoskeletal manifestation of alkaptonuria, an inherited metabolic disorder associated with various systemic abnormalities related to the deposition of homogentisic acid pigment in connective tissues. This report describes a 58-year-old woman with ochronotic arthropathy who, in addition to the typical clinical features of the disorder, presented with rapidly progressive hip osteoarthritis. The destruction of the joint architecture

T. Corrà; M. Zaccala; M. Galante

1995-01-01

49

MMP protein and activity levels in synovial fluid from patients with joint injury, inflammatory arthritis, and osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Objective: To determine protein and activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 3 (MMP-1 and MMP-3) in synovial fluid of patients with knee joint injury, primary osteoarthritis, and acute pyrophosphate arthritis (pseudogout). Methods: Measurements were done on knee synovial fluid obtained in a cross sectional study of cases of injury (n = 283), osteoarthritis (n = 105), and pseudogout (n = 65), and in healthy controls (n = 35). Activity of MMP-1 and MMP-3 in ?2 macroglobulin complexes was measured using specific low molecular weight fluorogenic substrates. ProMMP-1, proMMP-3, and TIMP-1 (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1) were quantified by immunoassay. Results: Mean levels of proMMP-1, proMMP-3, and TIMP-1 were increased in injury, osteoarthritis, and pseudogout compared with controls. MMP-1 activity was increased in pseudogout and injury groups over control levels, whereas MMP-3 activity was increased only in the pseudogout group. The increase in MMP-1 activity coincided with a decrease in TIMP-1 levels in the injury group. Conclusions: Patients with joint injury have a persistent increase in proMMP-1 and proMMP-3 in synovial fluid and an increase in activated MMPs, which are not inhibited by TIMP. The differences in activation and inhibition patterns between the study groups are consistent with disease specific patterns of MMP activation and/or inhibition in joint pathology.

Tchetverikov, I; Lohmander, L; Verzijl, N; Huizinga, T; TeKoppele, J; Hanemaaijer, R; DeGroot, J

2005-01-01

50

Analgesic effect of etidronate on degenerative joint disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present study, 80 patients with degenerative joint disease, spondylosis deformans, and\\/or osteoarthritis of the knee\\u000a with back or joint pain, especially on movement and strain, were randomly divided into four groups. Group A received no etidronate,\\u000a while groups B, C and D received 66, 133 and 200 mg\\/day etidronate, respectively, for 12 months. Every 3 months, after evaluating

Takuo Fujita; Yoshio Fujii; Seiko F. Okada; Akimitsu Miyauchi; Yasuyuki Takagi

2001-01-01

51

Is running associated with degenerative joint disease  

SciTech Connect

Little information is available regarding the long-term effects, if any, of running on the musculoskeletal system. The authors compared the prevalence of degenerative joint disease among 17 male runners with 18 male nonrunners. Running subjects (53% marathoners) ran a mean of 44.8 km (28 miles)/wk for 12 years. Pain and swelling of hips, knees, ankles and feet and other musculoskeletal complaints among runners were comparable with those among nonrunners. Radiologic examinations (for osteophytes, cartilage thickness, and grade of degeneration) also were without notable differences among groups. They did not find an increased prevalence of osteoarthritis among the runners. Our observations suggest that long-duration, high-mileage running need to be associated with premature degenerative joint disease in the lower extremities.

Panush, R.S.; Schmidt, C.; Caldwell, J.R.; Edwards, N.L.; Longley, S.; Yonker, R.; Webster, E.; Nauman, J.; Stork, J.; Pettersson, H.

1986-03-07

52

Differences in multi-joint radiographic osteoarthritis phenotypes among African Americans and Caucasians: The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project  

PubMed Central

Objective To define and contrast multiple joint radiographic osteoarthritis (rOA) phenotypes describing hand and whole-body rOA among African Americans and Caucasians. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional analysis in the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project, using radiographic data for the hands, tibiofemoral (TFJ) and patellofemoral joints, hips, and lumbosacral spine (LS). Films were read for rOA by a single radiologist using standard atlases. Sixteen mutually exclusive hand (n=2083) and 32 whole-body rOA phenotypes (n=1419) were identified. Fisher’s exact tests, corrected for multiple comparisons, were used to compare phenotype frequencies by race and gender. Logistic regression was used to provide odds ratios adjusted for gender, age, and body mass index (BMI). Results Hand rOA phenotypes: African Americans compared with Caucasians had significantly less frequent rOA of the distal interphalangeal joints, in isolation and in combination with other hand joint sites, but comparable frequencies of rOA for other hand joint sites. Whole-body rOA phenotypes: African Americans compared with Caucasians had less frequent Hand rOA, in isolation and in combination with other joint sites. In contrast, African Americans compared with Caucasians had more than twice the odds of isolated TFJ rOA and 77% higher odds of TFJ and LS rOA together. Conclusions Even after adjustment for gender, age, and BMI, African Americans compared to Caucasians were less likely to have hand rOA phenotypes, but more likely to have knee rOA phenotypes involving the TFJ. African Americans may have a higher burden of multiple large joint OA involvement not captured by most definitions of “generalized OA.”

Nelson, Amanda E.; Renner, Jordan B.; Schwartz, Todd A.; Kraus, Virginia B.; Helmick, Charles G.; Jordan, Joanne M.

2011-01-01

53

Biomechanical factors influencing the beginning and development of osteoarthritis in the hip joint.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (OA) can be used as a common name for a group of overlapping pathological conditions when the balance between the processes of degradation and synthesis, in individual parts of the cartilage, is disturbed and leads to gradual cartilage destruction. A preventive approach toward OA helps with a timely diagnosis and subsequent treatment of this disease. One of the significant risk factors affecting development of hip joint OA is the mechanism and magnitude of mechanical loading on the joint. The main motivation for this work was to verify the hypothesis involving a pathologic cycle (overloading - change of locomotion - overloading) as contributory to the development of OA and whether it can be stopped, or at least partly decelerated, by a suitable change of movement stereotypes. Providing that there is a natural balance of muscular action, from the beginning of OA, the development of OA can be significantly decelerated. The return to a natural force balance can be achieved using suitable exercise and strengthening of muscular structures. In order to verify the hypothesis, we undertook experimental measurements of gait kinematics and a computational analysis of the hip joint using the Finite Element Method. PMID:21792526

Horak, Zdenek; Kubovy, Petr; Stupka, Martin; Horakova, Jitka

2011-07-29

54

Review of the evidence: Surgical management of 4th and 5th tarsometatarsal joint osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis of the lateral tarsometatarsal joints is less common than that which is seen in the 1st-3rd tarsometatarsal joints. Despite a suspected increase in incidence of tarsometatarsal arthritis and consequently the burden of disability and economic impact, guidelines for treatment and decision making remain scarce. When conservative treatment fails, lateral column osteoarthritis can severely limit a patient's mobility, lifestyle, and present a difficult management problem for the foot and ankle specialist. Evidence for the surgical techniques used in treatment of lateral column osteoarthritis is limited and sporadic within the literature. This article aims to summarise and compare the evidence for these surgical management options. This article looks at aetiology and epidemiology, with a summary of the biomechanics of the region and a comprehensive review of the literature regarding surgical treatment options. PMID:24095225

Russell, David F; Ferdinand, Rupert D

2013-07-08

55

Glenohumeral Joint Preservation: A Review of Management Options for Young, Active Patients with Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

The management of osteoarthritis of the shoulder in young, active patients is a challenge, and the optimal treatment has yet to be completely established. Many of these patients wish to maintain a high level of activity, and arthroplasty may not be a practical treatment option. It is these patients who may be excellent candidates for joint-preservation procedures in an effort to avoid or delay joint replacement. Several palliative and restorative techniques are currently optional. Joint debridement has shown good results and a combination of arthroscopic debridement with a capsular release, humeral osteoplasty, and transcapsular axillary nerve decompression seems promising when humeral osteophytes are present. Currently, microfracture seems the most studied reparative treatment modality available. Other techniques, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation and osteochondral transfers, have reportedly shown potential but are currently mainly still investigational procedures. This paper gives an overview of the currently available joint preserving surgical techniques for glenohumeral osteoarthritis.

van der Meijden, Olivier A.; Gaskill, Trevor R.; Millett, Peter J.

2012-01-01

56

Osteoarthritis of the hip and Heberden's nodes.  

PubMed

One hundred consecutive patients with proved osteoarthritis were assessed for the presence of terminal interphalangeal joint disease. There was a significant association found between the presence of Heberden's nodes and primary (axillary) arthritis. Secondary osteoarthritis was relatively free of nodal involvement. It is suggested that Heberden's nodes are a helpful clinical marker in differentiating between the two major groups of osteoarthritis. PMID:2923505

McGoldrick, F; O'Brien, T M

1989-01-01

57

Confirmation of two major polyarticular osteoarthritis (POA) phenotypes – differentiation on the basis of joint topography  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: Previous studies of patients with primary hand and ankle osteoarthritis (OA) have suggested the presence of two major polyarticular OA (POA) phenotypes, designated Type 1 and Type 2. The former, characterised by sentinel distal interphalangeal (IP) (DIP) or proximal IP (PIP) joint OA resembles generalised OA (GOA), whereas the latter characterised by sentinel metacarpophalangeal (MCP)2,3 OA, resembles the arthropathy

Graeme J Carroll; W. H. Breidahl; J. Jazayeri

2009-01-01

58

Prediction of the progression of joint space narrowing in osteoarthritis of the knee by bone scintigraphy  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES--To test the hypothesis that bone scintigraphy will predict the outcome of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee joint. METHODS--Ninety four patients (65 women, 29 men; mean age 64.2 years) with established OA of one or both knee joints were examined in 1986, when radiographs and bone scan images (early and late phase) were also obtained. The patients were recalled, re-examined,

P Dieppe; J Cushnaghan; P Young; J Kirwan

1993-01-01

59

Intra-articular injection of collagenase induced experimental osteoarthritis of the lumbar facet joint in rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

We aimed to establish an animal model to investigate primary osteoarthritis of the lumbar facet joints after collagenase injection\\u000a in rats and its effects on chondrocyte apoptosis. We hypothesized that osteoarthritic-like changes would be induced by collagenase\\u000a injection and that apoptosis of chondrocytes would increase. Collagenase (1, 10, or 50 U) or saline (control) was injected\\u000a into the lumbar facet joints.

Tsu-Te Yeh; Zhi-Hong Wen; Herng-Sheng Lee; Chian-Her Lee; Zhi Yang; Yen-Hsuan Jean; Shing-Sheng Wu; Marcel E. Nimni; Bo Han

2008-01-01

60

Primary Osteoarthritis in the Ankle Joint Is Associated With Finger Metacarpophalangeal Osteoarthritis and the H63D Mutation in the HFE Gene: Evidence for a Hemochromatosis-Like Polyarticular Osteoarthritis Phenotype  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Aim: Osteoarthritis (OA) can occur in the ankle joint. It also occurs in an appreciable proportion of subjects with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH). Might these conditions have common genetic characteristics? The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that HFE gene mutations are associated with primary osteoarthritis in the ankle joint.\\u000aMethods: Consecutive referred patients who had

Graeme J. Carroll

2006-01-01

61

Failed joint unloading implant system in the treatment of medial knee osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

In the setting of end-stage osteoarthritis of the knee, total knee arthroplasty is the gold-standard treatment. Recently, a minimally invasive, joint preserving treatment option in the treatment of medial osteoarthritis of the knee has been developed. It is called the KineSpring(®) (Moximed(®) International GmbH, Zurich, Switzerland). The goal of this novel device is to reduce medial compartment loading without significantly affecting the loading of the lateral compartment. In this context, the current authors present a case of device failure using these new implants, which at 7 months post-op necessitated revision surgery with complete removal of the device. PMID:23912420

Citak, Mustafa; Kendoff, Daniel; O Loughlin, Padhraig F; Klatte, Till O; Gebauer, Matthias; Gehrke, Thorsten; Haasper, Carl

2013-08-03

62

Chondroprotective drugs in degenerative joint diseases.  

PubMed

Catabolic cytokine and anabolic growth factor pathways control destruction and repair in osteoarthritis (OA). A unidirectional TNF-alpha/IL-1-driven cytokine cascade disturbs the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix of articular cartilage in OA. Although chondrocytes in OA cartilage overexpress anabolic insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and its specific receptor (IGFRI) autocrine TNF-alpha released by apoptotic articular cartilage cells sets off an auto/paracrine IL-1-driven cascade that overrules the growth factor activities that sustain repair in degenerative joint disease. Chondroprotection with reappearance of a joint space that had disappeared has been documented unmistakably in peripheral joints of patients suffering from spondyloarthropathy when treated with TNF-alpha-blocking agents that repressed the unidirectional TNF-alpha/IL-1-driven cytokine cascade. A series of connective tissue structure-modifying agents (CTSMAs) that directly affect IL-1 synthesis and release in vitro and down-modulate downstream IL-1 features, e.g. collagenase, proteoglycanase and matrix metalloproteinase activities, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, the increased release of nitric oxide, and the secretion of prostaglandin E(2), IL-6 and IL-8, have been shown to possess disease-modifying OA drug (DMOAD) activities in experimental models of OA and in human subjects with finger joint and knee OA. Examples are corticosteroids, some sulphated polysaccharides, chemically modified tetracyclines, diacetylrhein/rhein, glucosamine and avocado/soybean unsaponifiables. PMID:16278282

Verbruggen, G

2005-11-08

63

Multimodal Ayurvedic management for Sandhigatavata (Osteoarthritis of knee joints).  

PubMed

Vata is the governing factor in the maintenance of equilibrium in the universe as well as in the body. As age advances, the influence of Vata Dosha progresses, resulting in the process of gradual degeneration of the body. Sandhigatavata (osteoarthritis) is one of the consequences of this process, which is common in the elderly people. This is one of the major causes of chronic disability, affecting the quality of life. Prevalence of osteoarthritis in India is more among menopausal women. This study has been conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Ayurvedic multimodal management in Sandhigatavata and to provide better options to Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs). In present clinical trial, 50 patients of Sandhigatavata have been registered and have been given Snehana, Svedana, Mriduvirechana, Matrabasti, and Jalaukavacharana, along with oral medications like Yogaraja Guggulu and Ashvagandha Churna. This multimodal therapy is being used in P.D. Patel Ayurved Hospital, Nadiad, since years, providing good relief to patients with Sandhigatavata. The results have been analyzed statistically by using the Student paired't' test. The therapy showed highly significant (P < 0.001) beneficial effect on the clinical features of Sandhigatavata. On overall effect of therapy, 4% of the patients were relieved completely, while 24% have shown marked improvement, 50% moderate improvement, and 22% mild improvement. Results of follow-up showed that marked improvement decreased, but moderate improvement was steady. Continuing the study on a larger number of patients, with inclusion of more objective parameters to get better conclusions is suggested at the end of the study. PMID:24049405

Sharma, Manisha R; Mehta, Charmi S; Shukla, Dipali J; Patel, Kalapi B; Patel, Manish V; Gupta, Shiv Narayan

2013-01-01

64

Multimodal Ayurvedic management for Sandhigatavata (Osteoarthritis of knee joints)  

PubMed Central

Vata is the governing factor in the maintenance of equilibrium in the universe as well as in the body. As age advances, the influence of Vata Dosha progresses, resulting in the process of gradual degeneration of the body. Sandhigatavata (osteoarthritis) is one of the consequences of this process, which is common in the elderly people. This is one of the major causes of chronic disability, affecting the quality of life. Prevalence of osteoarthritis in India is more among menopausal women. This study has been conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Ayurvedic multimodal management in Sandhigatavata and to provide better options to Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs). In present clinical trial, 50 patients of Sandhigatavata have been registered and have been given Snehana, Svedana, Mriduvirechana, Matrabasti, and Jalaukavacharana, along with oral medications like Yogaraja Guggulu and Ashvagandha Churna. This multimodal therapy is being used in P.D. Patel Ayurved Hospital, Nadiad, since years, providing good relief to patients with Sandhigatavata. The results have been analyzed statistically by using the Student paired‘t’ test. The therapy showed highly significant (P < 0.001) beneficial effect on the clinical features of Sandhigatavata. On overall effect of therapy, 4% of the patients were relieved completely, while 24% have shown marked improvement, 50% moderate improvement, and 22% mild improvement. Results of follow-up showed that marked improvement decreased, but moderate improvement was steady. Continuing the study on a larger number of patients, with inclusion of more objective parameters to get better conclusions is suggested at the end of the study.

Sharma, Manisha R.; Mehta, Charmi S.; Shukla, Dipali J.; Patel, Kalapi B.; Patel, Manish V.; Gupta, Shiv Narayan

2013-01-01

65

Pattern of joint damage in persons with knee osteoarthritis and concomitant ACL tears  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are known to be a risk factor for incident knee osteoarthritis (OA). At the present\\u000a time, it is unknown whether an incidental ACL tear in those with established knee OA alters the pattern of synovial joint\\u000a damage. Therefore, our aim was to assess whether ACL tears in persons with knee OA are associated with specific

Verena Stein; Ling Li; Grace Lo; Ali Guermazi; Yuqing Zhang; C. Kent Kwoh; Charles B. Eaton; David J. Hunter

66

Osteoarthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint in Southern Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).  

PubMed

Museum skull specimens (n = 1,008) of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) were examined macroscopically according to defined criteria for the presence, severity and characteristics of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA). The specimens were from stranded young adult to adult animals. Overall, 4.1% of the specimens had findings consistent with TMJ-OA. Of these, 61.0% were from females and 39.0% were from males. In addition, 85.4% of the affected specimens were from adults and 14.6% were from young adults. However, there was no significant association between age and sex with the presence or severity of TMJ-OA. Lesion severity was mild in 41.5%, moderate in 19.5% and severe in 39.0% of affected specimens. The most prominent changes were the presence of osteophytes and subchondral bone defects and porosity. The mandibular condylar process and fossa were affected equally. The lengths of the right and left mandibular heads were significantly associated with age (P = 0.002 and P = 0.003, respectively) and sex (P = 0.0009 and P = 0.001, respectively), but not with the presence of TMJ-OA. The significance of this disease in sea otters remains elusive, but this condition may play an important role in survival of these animals. PMID:23721871

Arzi, B; Winer, J N; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

2013-05-27

67

High loosening rate of the Moje Acamo prosthesis for treating osteoarthritis of the trapeziometacarpal joint.  

PubMed

The Moje Acamo carpometacarpal (CMC) implant is an uncemented large ball-and-socket joint made of a ceramic material coated with a bioactive substance (Bioverit) for osseous fixation. Nine Moje Acamo CMC prostheses were implanted into nine patients with primary osteoarthritis of the thumb CMC joint. At 12 months, three implants had been revised because of progressing pain and osteolysis. In the remaining six patients, radiographs have shown progressive osteolysis around both implants in five patients. These poor results mean that we no longer perform this operation and we recommend close follow-up of all cases that have been performed. PMID:18694921

Hansen, T B; Vainorius, D

2008-08-11

68

Osteoarthritis  

MedlinePLUS

... that cause bleeding in the joint, such as hemophilia Disorders that block the blood supply near a joint and lead to avascular necrosis Other types of arthritis, such as chronic gout , pseudogout , or rheumatoid arthritis

69

Disease severity and knee extensor force in knee osteoarthritis: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine whether the method of disease severity measurement influences the magnitude of knee extensor force deficits in knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (n = 659) were analyzed. Knee extensor force was assessed with isometric contractions. Clinical severity was measured with the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Patients were stratified into tertiles of severity (i.e. moderate, mild and severe OA), based on lowest, middle and highest WOMAC scores. Kellgren-Lawrence grading (KLG) was used to assess radiographic severity of the tibiofemoral compartment and patients were again stratified into mild (KLG<2), moderate (KLG = 2) and severe (KLG>2) knee OA. Results When stratifying with WOMAC, force was significantly lower in severe compared to mild (~18% lower, p<0.001) and moderate (~9% lower, p = 0.03) groups and in moderate compared to mild group (~10% lower, p = 0.03). When stratifying with KLG, small, non-significant differences were observed in the severe (~7% lower, p = 0.19) and moderate (~8% lower, p = 0.08) compared to mild group. Large intra-group variability was observed when comparing WOMAC score across radiographic severity (coefficients of variation were 79.3%, 74.6% and 61.6% for KLG<2, KLG = 2 and KLG>2, respectively). Conclusion The method of disease severity stratification influences the magnitude of knee extensor force deficits as no difference in force between disease subgroups was observed when stratifying with KLG. Furthermore, there was large variability in WOMAC score within each radiographic subgroup, highlighting the limitations in using radiographic measures to reflect symptom severity.

Berger, Michael J.; Kean, Crystal O.; Goela, Aashish; Doherty, Timothy J.

2012-01-01

70

Diacerein as a disease-modulating agent in osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the most recent clinical and experimental studies on diacerein, both of which are under investigation.\\u000a Diacerein could be a disease-modulating agent in osteoarthritis because structural benefits have been reported in recent trials.\\u000a Moreover, after an empirical use, studies return to the experimental field to understand the mechanism of action of this molecule.\\u000a However, clinical trials using new

Géraldine Falgarone; Maxime Dougados

2001-01-01

71

Recommendations for the use of new methods to assess the efficacy of disease-modifying drugs in the treatment of osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Recent innovations in the pharmaceutical drug discovery environment have generated new chemical entities with the potential to become disease modifying drugs for osteoarthritis (DMOAD’s). Regulatory agencies acknowledge that such compounds may be granted a DMOAD indication, providing they demonstrate that they can slow down disease progression; progression would be calibrated by a surrogate for structural change, by measuring joint

Eric Abadie; Dominique Ethgen; Bernard Avouac; Gilles Bouvenot; Jaime Branco; Olivier Bruyere; Gonzalo Calvo; Jean-Pierre Devogelaer; Renee Lilianee Dreiser; Gabriel Herrero-Beaumont; Andre Kahan; Godfried Kreutz; Andrea Laslop; Ernst Martin Lemmel; George Nuki; Leo Van De Putte; Luc Vanhaelst; Jean-Yves Reginster

2004-01-01

72

A randomised controlled trial of intra-articular corticosteroid injection of the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb in osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To investigate the efficacy of corticosteroid injections into the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb (CMCJ) in patients with osteoarthritis.Design: A double blind, randomised controlled trial using 40 hospital referred patients with CMCJ osteoarthritis who received intra-articular injections of 5 mg triamcinolone hexacetonide (0.25 ml) or sterile 0.9% saline (0.25 ml). Injections were given under imaging control.Main outcome measures: The

G K Meenagh; J Patton; C Kynes; G D Wright

2004-01-01

73

The effect of the thermal mineral water of Nagybaracska on patients with knee joint osteoarthritis—a double blind study  

Microsoft Academic Search

To study the effect of thermal mineral water of Nagybaracska (Hungary) on patients with primary knee osteoarthritis in a randomized,\\u000a double-blind clinical trial, 64 patients with nonsurgical knee joint osteoarthritis were randomly selected either into the\\u000a thermal mineral water or into the tap water group in a non-spa resort village. The patients of both groups received 30-min\\u000a sessions of bathing,

Géza P. Bálint; W. Watson Buchanan; András Ádám; István Ratkó; László Poór; Péter V. Bálint; Éva Somos; Ildikó Tefner; Tamás Bender

2007-01-01

74

Local ASIC3 modulates pain and disease progression in a rat model of osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Background Recent data have suggested a relationship between acute arthritic pain and acid sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) on primary afferent fibers innervating joints. The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of ASIC3 in a rat model of osteoarthritis (OA) which is considered a degenerative rather than an inflammatory disease. Methods We induced OA via intra-articular mono-iodoacetate (MIA) injection, and evaluated pain-related behaviors including weight bearing measured with an incapacitance tester and paw withdrawal threshold in a von Frey hair test, histology of affected knee joint, and immunohistochemistry of knee joint afferents. We also assessed the effect of ASIC3 selective peptide blocker (APETx2) on pain behavior, disease progression, and ASIC3 expression in knee joint afferents. Results OA rats showed not only weight-bearing pain but also mechanical hyperalgesia outside the knee joint (secondary hyperalgesia). ASIC3 expression in knee joint afferents was significantly upregulated approximately twofold at Day 14. Continuous intra-articular injections of APETx2 inhibited weight distribution asymmetry and secondary hyperalgesia by attenuating ASIC3 upregulation in knee joint afferents. Histology of ipsilateral knee joint showed APETx2 worked chondroprotectively if administered in the early, but not late phase. Conclusions Local ASIC3 immunoreactive nerve is strongly associated with weight-bearing pain and secondary hyperalgesia in MIA-induced OA model. APETx2 inhibited ASIC3 upregulation in knee joint afferents regardless of the time-point of administration. Furthermore, early administration of APETx2 prevented cartilage damage. APETx2 is a novel, promising drug for OA by relieving pain and inhibiting disease progression.

2012-01-01

75

Ultrasonic and photoacoustic imaging of knee joints in normal and osteoarthritis rats.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common joint disorder and estimated to cause symptoms in 20-40% of the elderly population. 532 nm laser is much absorbed in developed vascular network in the spongy bone which is one of the main characteristics of OA. In this study, a photoacoustic (PA) imaging system with 532 nm laser and 50 MHz US (ultrasound) transducer was developed. Normal and OA knee joints were observed by US and PA imaging. PA signal from the spongy bone was strong where US reflection was very weak. PA signal from the spongy bone was significantly strong in OA compared with that in normal knee while US showed similar low intensity echo in normal and OA. Detailed structure and information on vascular density of spongy bone in rat knee joint were successfully obtained with US / PA combined imaging. US / PA imaging should be useful for early diagnosis of OA. PMID:24109888

Izumi, Takuya; Sato, Mika; Yabe, Yutaka; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Saijo, Yoshifumi

2013-07-01

76

Osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Key Points\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Although there are numerous mechanisms by which micronutrients can be expected to influence the development of osteoarthritis\\u000a (OA), there has been insufficient research to draw definitive conclusions.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a The strongest evidence points to a possible protective effect of vitamin D in the development of hip OA and the progression\\u000a of knee OA.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a One observational study suggested

Timothy E. McAlindon

77

GUEST COMMENTARY Cellular Immunity in Osteoarthritis: Novel Concepts for an Old Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common chronic joint dis- ease. A vast majority of the elderly have radiographic signs of OA, and the majority of those experience clinical manifesta- tions such as pain, joint destruction, and long-term disability. There is little disagreement that OA is a heterogeneous dis- ease. In some cases, joint trauma can lead to accelerated or premature

STAMATIS-NICK C. LIOSSIS; GEORGE C. TSOKOS

1998-01-01

78

Contact sport and osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease in the world and the single largest cause of disability for those over 18 years. It affects more than twice as many people as does cardiac disease, and increases in incidence and prevalence with age. Animal and human studies have shown no evidence of increased risk of hip or knee OA with

Michael G Molloy; Catherine B Molloy

2011-01-01

79

The Effects of Various Kinds of Lateral Wedge Insoles on Performance of Individuals with Knee Joint Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Background: Knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most incapacitating diseases affecting older population, which is associated with pain and functional limitation. Various kinds of conservative treatment have been used to decrease knee pain and to improve the quality of life of the subjects suffering from this disease. There are discrepancies in the clinical effects reported for the use of lateral wedge insole in spite of being used as one of the first conservative mechanical treatments for patients with medial compartments of knee OA. Methods: A total of 36 subjects with medial knee compartment OA were recruited in this research project. Subjects were randomized into two groups to receive 3- and 7-mm lateral wedge insoles based on the date of birth of the participants. Some parameters such as severity of knee pain, Tibiofemoral angle (TFA), severity of OA, and quality of life were selected in this research project. Results: The use of both 3-mm and 7-mm lateral wedge insole improves the quality of life and decreases knee joint pain. However, the effect of 7 mm lateral wedge insole was more than that of 3 mm. Conclusion: Using lateral wedge insole is a simple, inexpensive therapy for decreasing pain and improving quality of life; however, most research must be carried out to find the effects of lateral wedge on severity of knee joint OA and aligning TFA.

Rafiaee, Masoud; Karimi, Mohammad T

2012-01-01

80

The use of allograft in joint-preserving surgery for ankle osteochondral lesions and osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

The surgical management of young patients with large osteochondral lesions of the talus or end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle joint presents a challenge to the orthopedic surgeon because these are well-recognized sources of pain and dysfunction. Procedures designed to address these disorders either have a limited role because of poor success rates or have significant implications, such as with the total ankle arthroplasty. Fresh osteochondral allografts allow defective tissue to be anatomically matched and reconstructed through transplantation. This article presents an overview of fresh osteochondral allografts, as well as potential concerns with their use, and summarizes the current literature. PMID:24008217

Winters, Brian S; Raikin, Steven M

2013-08-02

81

Grading of monosodium iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis reveals a concentration-dependent sensitization of nociceptors in the knee joint of the rat.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease characterized by joint pain for which there is currently no effective treatment. Previous studies have found that intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) caused a dose-dependent destruction of rat knees with concomitant increased pain. In this study, varying degrees of OA were induced by intra-articular injection of 0.1 mg, 0.3 mg and 3 mg MIA. Electrophysiological recordings were made from knee joint primary afferents in response to rotation of the joint and firing frequencies were determined and compared to saline-injected control joints. The analgesic effect of local application of the classic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) diclofenac (0.1 mg/0.1 ml bolus) was also determined in each group. Joint afferent firing frequency was significantly enhanced in OA knees compared to saline injected control joints and the magnitude of this sensitization showed a direct relationship with increasing dose of MIA. Diclofenac reduced nociception significantly in the 3 mg MIA treated joint, but had no effect on nerve mechanosensitivity in rats with milder OA. This study shows for the first time that MIA produces a graded sensitization of joint nociceptors making this a useful model for the study of pain mechanisms in joints with progressive OA severity. The anti-nociceptive effect of diclofenac further indicates that the MIA model offers an attractive means of objectively testing potential therapeutic agents. PMID:19716399

Schuelert, Niklas; McDougall, Jason J

2009-08-27

82

Femoral Offset (3D) in Patients without Osteoarthritis - Index Values from 200 Hip Joints  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Femoral offset (FO) is a crucial parameter for hip joint biomechanics. Reference values for FO are particularly important when joint geometry has to be reconstructed during surgical interventions. Such reference values are scarce in literature and have mainly been obtained from osteoarthritis (OA) patients. The aim of this study was to conduct a patient-specific study of FO without osteoarthritis and to create a dataset of FO index values. Materials and Methodology: One hundred (49 female, 51 male; mean age: 59 (18 - 83) years) pelvic computed tomography (CT) scans were analyzed to determine FO in each patient. Bilateral symmetry and correlation between demographic data and FO were analyzed. Results: The mean FO ± SD was different for male (4.36 ± 0.56 cm) and female patients (3.95 ± 0.35 cm) (p <.0001). No Side differences of FO were observed in male and female patients. Significant correlation between height and FO was only observed in male patients. Conclusion: The values obtained in this study can be used as index values for the restoration and evaluation of hip geometry. For men, FO can be approximated using the correlation between FO and height.

Preininger, Bernd; Schmorl, Kathrin; von Roth, Philipp; Winkler, Tobias; Matziolis, Georg; Perka, Carsten; Tohtz, Stephan

2012-01-01

83

Disease modifying osteoarthritis drugs: facing development challenges and choosing molecular targets.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a slowly, progressive, ultimately degenerative disorder of movable joints, mainly characterized by joint pain and functional limitation and affecting all joint structures not just articular cartilage, but also the subchondral bone, ligaments, capsule, synovial membrane, and menisci. OA occurs when the equilibrium between breakdown and repair of the joint tissues becomes unbalanced. There are currently no pharmacological interventions available to patients for modifying the underlying disease (DMOADs) in relation to major drug development challenges. The current regulatory draft guidances for clinical development programs for DMOAD agents suggest radiographic joint space narrowing (JSN) as a primary endpoint. However, research efforts must continue to characterize imaging alternatives with greater sensitivity to change to enable development of new DMOADs. Past experience with DMOAD clinical trials indicate that pharmacologic agents must demonstrate pristine safety, and that consideration for special populations is important to avoid failed studies. More research is needed to determine what constitutes clinically meaningfulness for DMOAD activity in particular as it relates to OA progression. Current research pursues a variety of molecular targets including anti-catabolic agents to slow or halt OA progression and anabolic drugs to induce cartilage re-growth. PMID:20199396

Le Graverand-Gastineau, Marie-Pierre Hellio

2010-05-01

84

Osteoarthritis of the hip and Heberden's nodes  

Microsoft Academic Search

One hundred consecutive patients with proved osteoarthritis were assessed for the presence of terminal interphalangeal joint disease. There was a significant association found between the presence of Heberden's nodes and primary (axillary) arthritis. Secondary osteoarthritis was relatively free of nodal involvement. It is suggested that Heberden's nodes are a helpful clinical marker in differentiating between the two major groups of

F McGoldrick; T M OBrien

1989-01-01

85

The disease modifying osteoarthritis drug (DMOAD): Is it in the horizon?  

PubMed

Till date, the pharmaceutical industry has failed to bring effective and safe disease modifying osteoarthritic drugs (DMOADs) to the millions of patients suffering from this serious and deliberating disease. We provide a review of recent data reported on the investigation of DMOADs in clinical trials, including compounds inhibiting matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs), bisphosphonates, cytokine blockers, calcitonin, inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), doxycycline, glucosamine, and diacereine. We discuss the challenges associated with the drug development process in general and with DMOADs in particular, and we advance the need for a new development paradigm for DMOADs. Two central elements in this paradigm are a stronger focus on the biology of the joint and the application of new and more sensitive biomarkers allowing redesign of clinical trials in osteoarthritis. PMID:18590824

Qvist, Per; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Christiansen, Claus; Dam, Erik B; Pastoureau, Philippe; Karsdal, Morten A

2008-06-08

86

Joint space width measures cartilage thickness in osteoarthritis of the knee: high resolution plain film and double contrast macroradiographic investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To test reliability of joint space width (JSW) measurements as a predictor of cartilage thickness in knees of patients with osteoarthritis (OA), using high definition microfocal radiography. METHOD--JSW was measured from weight bearing plain film macroradiographs taken in the tunnel view and compared with the sum of femoral and tibial cartilage thicknesses measured from double contrast macroarthrograms of the same

J C Buckland-Wright; D G Macfarlane; J A Lynch; M K Jasani; C R Bradshaw

1995-01-01

87

Interleukin 1? and stromelysin (MMP3) activity of synovial fluid as possible markers of osteoarthritis in the temporomandibular joint  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: This study investigated the early signs of synovitis and cartilage degradation by means of synovial fluid analysis in temporomandibular joints (TMJs) with internal derangement (closed lock) or osteoarthritis (OA).Patients and Methods: Synovial fluid was obtained from 25 TMJs in 22 patients diagnosed with closed lock and from 15 asymptomatic TMJs of 12 normal controls. IL-1? concentrations were measured using

Eiro Kubota; Hideo Imamura; Takao Kubota; Takanori Shibata; Ken-Ichiro Murakami

1997-01-01

88

Osteoarthritis and synovitis as major pathoses of the temporomandibular joint: Comparison of clinical diagnosis with arthroscopic morphology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: The purposes of this investigation were to determine how common osteoarthritis and synovitis are in patients with severe, recalcitrant temporomandibular joint (TMJ) symptoms using clinical diagnostic criteria as well as arthroscopic examination, and to compare the accuracy of the clinical and arthroscopic diagnoses with respect to specificity and sensitivity.Patients and Methods: Clinical and arthroscopic diagnoses were established in 126

Howard A Israel; Beverly Diamond; Fatemah Saed-Nejad; Anthony Ratcliffe

1998-01-01

89

Wnt-related genes and large-joint osteoarthritis: association study and replication.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (OA) has a strong genetic component, and experimental evidence suggests the involvement of the Wnt pathway in its pathogenesis. Hence, we explored the association of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to the Wnt pathway with hip and knee OA. Seventy-eight SNPs were analyzed in 606 patients undergoing joint replacement and in 680 control subjects. SNPs were located in WNT1, WNT10A, WNT16, DVL2, FZD5, BCL9, SFRP1, TCF7L1 and SFRP4 genes. SNPs significantly associated with OA were genotyped in an independent group of 369 patients and 407 controls. One SNP in WNT10A, rs3806557, was associated with hip OA in men (OR 0.65, 95 % CI 0.46-0.93; p = 0.017), but the association was not confirmed in the replication phase. The TCF7L1 polymorphism rs11547160 was also associated with hip OA in the discovery set, but not in the replication set. Similarly, the SFRP4 SNP rs1052981 was associated with knee OA in women with OR of 2.73 (95 % CI 1.29-5.8; p = 0.006), but the association was not replicated. The BCL9 polymorphism rs2353525 was associated with knee OA in women, both in the unadjusted and in the age- and BMI-adjusted analysis (OR 2.01; 95 % CI 1.34-2.98; p = 0.0006). A similar, but not statistically significant, trend was observed in the replication phase. In the combined analysis, OR was 3.13 (1.34-7.28; p = 0.009). These data suggest that some SNPs of genes related to the Wnt pathway and, specifically BCL9, influence the genetic predisposition to osteoarthritis of the large joints in a sex- and joint-specific way. PMID:23864140

García-Ibarbia, Carmen; Pérez-Castrillón, José L; Ortiz, Fernando; Velasco, Javier; Zarrabeitia, María T; Sumillera, Manuel; Riancho, José A

2013-07-18

90

Intra-articular injection of collagenase induced experimental osteoarthritis of the lumbar facet joint in rats.  

PubMed

We aimed to establish an animal model to investigate primary osteoarthritis of the lumbar facet joints after collagenase injection in rats and its effects on chondrocyte apoptosis. We hypothesized that osteoarthritic-like changes would be induced by collagenase injection and that apoptosis of chondrocytes would increase. Collagenase (1, 10, or 50 U) or saline (control) was injected into the lumbar facet joints. The histology and histochemistry of cartilage, synovium, and subchondral bone were examined at 1, 3, and 6 weeks after surgery. Apoptotic cells induced by 1 U of collagenase were quantified using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) assay. Degeneration of the cartilage and changes to the synovium and subchondral bone were dependent on both the doses of collagenase and the time after surgery. There were significantly more apoptotic chondrocytes in collagenase-treated joints than in control (P < 0.001 at 1 and 3 weeks and P < 0.05 at 6 weeks). Thus, lumbar facet joints subjected to collagenase developed osteoarthritic-like changes that could be quantified and compared. This model provides a useful tool for further study on the effects of compounds that have the potential to inhibit enzyme-associated damage to cartilage. PMID:18224353

Yeh, Tsu-Te; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Lee, Herng-Sheng; Lee, Chian-Her; Yang, Zhi; Jean, Yen-Hsuan; Wu, Shing-Sheng; Nimni, Marcel E; Han, Bo

2008-01-26

91

Tramadol for the treatment of joint pain associated with osteoarthritis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Results from short-term, non—placebo-controlled clinical trials suggest that tramadol is effective as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of joint pain associated with osteoarthritis (OA).Objective: We assessed the efficacy and tolerability of tramadol monotherapy versus placebo in the treatment of joint pain associated with OA.Methods: Patients with symptomatic OA of the knee and at least moderate pain at the end

Roy M. Fleischmann; Jacques R. Caldwell; Sanford H. Roth; John R. P. Tesser; William Olson; Marc Kamin

2001-01-01

92

Effects of methods of descending stairs forwards versus backwards on knee joint force in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: a clinical controlled study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the kinetic characteristics of compensatory backward descending movement performed by patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. METHODS: Using a three-dimensional motion analysis system, we investigated lower extremity joint angles, joint moments, joint force of the support leg in forward and backward descending movements on stairs, and joint force of the leading

Masaki Hasegawa; Takaaki Chin; Sadaaki Oki; Shusaku Kanai; Koji Shimatani; Tomoaki Shimada

2010-01-01

93

Synovial fluid cytokines and proteinases as markers of temporomandibular joint disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: In this article, biochemical markers in the synovial fluid (SF) for detecting intraarticular inflammation and early cartilage degradation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disease were examined.Patients and Methods: SF was obtained from 25 TMJs in 22 patients with internal derangement (ID) or osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA), 15 asymptomatic TMJs in 11 normal volunteers, and 10 osteoarthritic knee joints (KNEE-OA). Cytokine levels

Eiro Kubota; Takao Kubota; Jun Matsumoto; Takanori Shibata; Ken-Ichiro Murakami

1998-01-01

94

Breathing and temporomandibular joint disease.  

PubMed

Temporomandibular joint disease (TMD) refers to a collection of pain related conditions in the masticatory muscles and temporomandibular joint. Occlusal factors have been implicated in TMD pathogenesis, yet despite decades of research no causal relationship between occlusion and TMD has been found. The significance of psychosocial factors in both the assessment and the long-term management of patients with TMD is receiving increased recognition. The teaching of relaxation skills and coping strategies are effective, proven TMD therapies. The role of breathing re-education in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders is rarely mentioned. A focus on breathing patterns and their disorders potentially explains how biomechanical factors associated with psychosocial influences might lead to pathophysiological changes within the TMJ as well as in the associated muscles. Attention to factors such as breathing and postural rehabilitation provides health professionals valuable, additional tools to help care for patients with TMD. PMID:21665104

Bartley, Jim

2010-06-25

95

Long term results of surgical intervention for osteoarthritis of the trapeziometacarpal joint  

PubMed Central

Trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis is a common entity, often bilateral and predominantly affecting postmenopausal women. In the case of failure of conservative treatment, surgery is a good option. The aim of this study was to compare three surgical procedures. 63 patients (74 thumbs) with osteoarthritis of the trapezio-metacarpal joint were surgically treated; 54 patients were seen for follow-up, 7 had died and 2 were lost to follow-up. The patients were stratified according to treatment; resection arthroplasty (the joint surface’s of the metacarpal and the trapezium are resected) (18 thumbs), trapeziectomy with tendon interposition (17 thumbs) or trapezio-metacarpal arthrodesis (28 thumbs). Baseline characteristics were comparable in the three groups for mean age at operation, Eaton classification, left right distribution and dominant hands operated. The average follow-up was 13 years for the resection group, 8 years for the trapeziectomy group and 9 years for the arthrodesis group. No statistically significant difference between the three groups was found for the visual analogue pain and satisfaction scale, pain frequency nor DASH score. Patients in the trapeziectomy group had significantly less pain compared to the arthrodesis group (p=0.025). Statistically, radial abduction was significantly better after trapeziectomy compared to resection arthroplasty (p<0.01) or arthrodesis (p=0.01). There was no difference among the three groups in grip and tip pinch strength nor in pain on palpation. None of the patients in the trapeziectomy group needed a re-operation, one patient in the resection arthroplasty group had a re-operation, and 22 patients in the arthrodesis group had one or more re-operations for hardware removal or because of a complication. This study shows that the resection arthroplasty has equally good long term results compared to trapeziectomy combined with tendon interposition or arthrodesis. Resection arthroplasty is performed through a single incision and is technically simple. In our clinic resection arthroplasty is therefore the preferred technique for the treatment of osteoarthritis of the trapeziometacarpal joint.

Kerkhoffs, G. M.M.J.; Rutten, S.; Marsman, A. J.W.; Marti, R. K.; Albers, G. H.R.

2006-01-01

96

A randomised controlled trial of intra-articular corticosteroid injection of the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb in osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Objective: To investigate the efficacy of corticosteroid injections into the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb (CMCJ) in patients with osteoarthritis. Design: A double blind, randomised controlled trial using 40 hospital referred patients with CMCJ osteoarthritis who received intra-articular injections of 5 mg triamcinolone hexacetonide (0.25 ml) or sterile 0.9% saline (0.25 ml). Injections were given under imaging control. Main outcome measures: The primary outcome was improvement in a pain visual analogue score (VAS) of 20% at 24 weeks. In addition patients were assessed at 4, 12, and 24 weeks for joint stiffness, joint tenderness, and physician and patient global assessments. Hand radiographs were evaluated for the degree of CMC joint space narrowing and marginal osteophytes according to the OARSI atlas. Results: Baseline clinical variables were not significantly different between the two treatment groups. There was no improvement in the VAS of pain at 24 weeks. At each assessment point there was no significant difference between the steroid and placebo groups in median values for joint stiffness, joint tenderness, or patient and physician global assessments. Non-parametric analysis of each group individually revealed statistically significant improvements in patient and physician global assessments at weeks 4, 12, and 24 in the placebo group and at weeks 4 and 12 in the steroid group. Conclusions: No clinical benefit was gained from intra-articular steroid injection to the CMCJ in moderate to severe osteoarthritis compared with placebo injection.

Meenagh, G; Patton, J; Kynes, C; Wright, G

2004-01-01

97

Inflammatory response to therapeutic gold bead implantation in canine hip joint osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Inflammatory changes associated with periarticular pure gold bead implants were studied in dogs involved in a clinical trial investigating motor dysfunction and chronic pain owing to hip joint dysplasia and osteoarthritis. Gold beads were percutaneously implanted via a needle into different locations surrounding the greater trochanter of the femur. Nine dogs with implants were necropsied. In all examined animals, characteristic histologic lesions were observed in the tissue surrounding the gold implants--namely, a fibrous capsule composed of concentric fibroblasts intermixed with a variable number of inflammatory cells and a paucicellular innermost layer of collagen with a few fibrocyte-like cells in empty lacunae. Lymphocytes dominated the inflammatory infiltrate, with rarely observed macrophages present in close proximity to the implant site. No giant cells were observed. Immunohistochemistry showed mixed populations of lymphocytes, both CD3 positive (T cells) and CD79a positive (B cells), which in some cases formed lymphoid follicles. Diffuse inflammatory changes were present to a minor extent in the perimysium and surrounding fascia. The inflammation observed in dogs is similar to that observed with gold implants in humans. It is possible that the clinically beneficial effect of gold beads for chronic osteoarthritis depends on sustained localized inflammation with localized release of soluble mediators. The encapsulation of the implant by a paucicellular and poorly vascularized fibrous capsule may help prevent an exaggerated inflammatory reaction by sequestering the gold bead from the surrounding tissue. PMID:20861497

Lie, K-I; Jæger, G; Nordstoga, K; Moe, L

2010-09-22

98

Follistatin-like protein 1: a serum biochemical marker reflecting the severity of joint damage in patients with osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Introduction Follistatin-like protein 1 (FSTL1) is a secreted glycoprotein that has been implicated in arthritis pathogenesis in a mouse model. The aim of this study is to detect FSTL1 expression and to further assess its potential utility as a biomarker of joint damage in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Methods FSTL1 expression was detected by real-time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in the synovial tissues (STs) and by IHC in the articular cartilage from OA patients and control trauma patients. The serum and synovial fluid (SF) FSTL1 concentrations were measured by ELISA in OA patients and control individuals. Linear regression analyses were used to assess correlations between the serum FSTL1 levels and the clinical characteristics in OA patients. Results The FSTL1 mRNA and protein levels were substantially elevated in the STs from OA patients compared with those from control trauma patients. The FSTL1 expression was strong in the cytoplasm of the synovial and capillary endothelial cells of the STs, but weak in the chondrocytes of the articular cartilage from OA patients. Furthermore, the serum and SF FSTL1 concentrations were significantly higher in OA patients than in respective control subjects. Interestingly, the serum and SF FSTL1 levels were markedly higher in female OA patients than in males. Importantly, bivariate regression analysis revealed that the serum FSTL1 levels in female OA patients had significant correlations with Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) grade, joint space narrowing (JSN) and the Western Ontario McMaster and Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) stiffness subscale, an inverse correlation with height, and marginal correlations with the total WOMAC score and the WOMAC function subscale. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that the serum FSTL1 levels correlated independently with KL grade in female OA patients. Bivariate analysis also revealed that the serum FSTL1 levels correlated significantly with age and disease duration, and they correlated marginally with high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and KL grade in male OA patients. Conclusions Increased FSTL1 expression may be a characteristic of OA patients. FSTL1 is a potential serum biomarker that may reflect the severity of joint damage, and further studies are required to evaluate its potential application for monitoring the course of the disease and the efficacy of therapies in OA patients.

2011-01-01

99

Is Lifelong Knee Joint Force from Work, Home, and Sport Related to Knee Osteoarthritis?  

PubMed Central

Purpose. To investigate the association of cumulative lifetime knee joint force on the risk of self-reported medically-diagnosed knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. Exposure data on lifetime physical activity type (occupational, household, sport/recreation) and dose (frequency, intensity, duration) were collected from 4,269 Canadian men and women as part of the Physical Activity and Joint Heath cohort study. Subjects were ranked in terms of the “cumulative peak force index”, a measure of lifetime mechanical knee force. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to obtain adjusted effects for mean lifetime knee force on the risk of knee OA. Results. High levels of total lifetime, occupational and household-related force were associated with an increased in risk of OA, with odds ratio's ranging from approximately 1.3 to 2. Joint injury, high BMI and older age were related to risk of knee OA, consistent with previous studies. Conclusions. A newly developed measure of lifetime mechanical knee force from physical activity was employed to estimate the risk of self-reported, medically-diagnosed knee OA. While there are limitations, this paper suggests that high levels of total lifetime force (all domains combined), and occupational force in men and household force in women were risk factors for knee OA.

Ratzlaff, Charles R.; Koehoorn, Mieke; Cibere, Jolanda; Kopec, Jacek A.

2012-01-01

100

Use of autologous conditioned serum (Orthokine(R)) for the treatment of the dege-nerative osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint. Review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) using autologous conditioned serum (ACS) has become in recent years an alternative to consider in the approach of the degenerative joint disease of the knee. There is no support in the literature for the use of ACS for the treatment of OA of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), although the promising results obtained in human patients with knee joint disease as well as in animal studies are opening the way for its use at the TMJ. The aim of this paper is to conduct a review of the published literature regarding the use of the ACS for the treatment of OA in humans, considering the level of scientific evidence, and following the principles of the evidence-based medicine and dentistry. Material and Methods: A PubMed-MEDLINE search was carried out of articles published between 1980 and 2011. After an initial search, a total of 102 articles were obtained, followed by a selection of the most relevant articles according to the topic; a total of 8 articles were selected, which were stratified according to their level of scientific evidence using SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy). Results: At the time of this review, there is no available literature referring the use of ACS at the TMJ. However, the use of the ACS in other joints is well documented, both experimentally and clinically, in humans and animals. The reviewed articles, with a level of evidence 1 and 2 according to the SORT criteria, have generally promising results. Discussion and Conclusions: The use of ACS in the treatment of OA in joints other than the TMJ, is endorsed by the level of evidence found in the literature, which opens the door to future studies to determine the feasibility of the use of the ACS in the treatment of degenerative OA that affects TMJ. Key words:Osteoarthritis, temporomandibular joint, autologous conditioned serum.

Alvarez-Camino, Juan C.; Vazquez-Delgado, Eduardo

2013-01-01

101

Osteoarthritis and meniscus disorders of the knee as occupational diseases of miners  

PubMed Central

Aim: To determine whether kneeling or squatting for prolonged periods is sufficiently causally associated with an increased risk of injury or degenerative disease of the knee joint as to meet the classic criteria to be considered an occupational disease of coal miners for whom these are or have been routine working postures. Method: Systematic literature searches were made for studies relating to kneeling and squatting as part of the working environment of coal mines and the role of these postures in causation of knee disorders in coal miners, analogous occupations, populations, and communities. The working environment and potentially damaging forces on the knee when kneeling or squatting were described. Papers on the incidence or prevalence of knee disorders in occupational and other groups were scored against five criteria independently by each author, and from this a single consensus score representing the overall strength of evidence given by the research was awarded. The evidence was then weighed against the criteria for an occupational disease. Results: Nineteen published papers were scored, the majority of which focussed on osteoarthritis as the outcome of interest. Few of the studies found focussed specifically on miners, and those that did tended to involve small numbers of subjects and were carried out before 1960, when the mining population was at its largest but epidemiological evidence of the risk factors for knee disorders was not well established. The non-mining studies in the review represent groups of workers with a similar or lesser kneeling content in their work. Conclusion: The papers reviewed provide sufficient evidence to conclude that work involving kneeling and/or squatting is causally associated with an increased risk of osteoarthritis of the knee. In some of the more recent epidemiologically sound studies, frequent or prolonged kneeling or squatting doubles the general risk of osteoarthritis of the knees found in the general population. This may be of particular importance in welfare and medico-legal situations. There was also evidence to suggest that lifting, in combination with kneeling/squatting, an activity also performed by miners in the course of their work, is associated with an excess risk of osteoarthritis above that attributed to kneeling/squatting alone.

McMillan, G; Nichols, L

2005-01-01

102

[Conservative therapy of osteoarthritis].  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis of the knee is a degenerative joint disease with progressive degradation of articular cartilage and subchondral bone. Symptoms may include joint pain, tenderness, stiffness, locking and joint effusion depending on the stage of the disease. In an effort to delay major surgery, patients with knee osteoarthritis are offered a variety of nonsurgical modalities, such as weight loss, exercise, physiotherapy, bracing, orthoses, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and intra-articular viscosupplementation or corticosteroid injection. In general, the goals of these therapeutic options are to decrease pain and improve function. Some of these modalities may also have a disease-modifying effect by altering the mechanical environment of the knee. Chondroprotective substances, such as lucosamine, chondroitin sulphate and hyaluronic acid are safe and provide short-term symptomatic relief while the therapeutic effects remain uncertain. PMID:23370727

Diehl, P; Gerdesmeyer, L; Schauwecker, J; Kreuz, P C; Gollwitzer, H; Tischer, T

2013-02-01

103

Degenerative joint disease in captive waterfowl  

Microsoft Academic Search

A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate degenerative joint disease (DJD) in captive waterfowl that died or were euthanized at Fresno's Chaffee Zoo in Fresno, California, USA from 2001 to 2005. Of these, 16 out of 33 birds (48%) had DJD in one or both stifle (femoral–tibiotarsal joint; n = 13), hock (tibiotarsal–tarsometatarsal joint; n = 4), or toe joints

L. A. Degernes; P. S. Lynch; H. L. Shivaprasad

2011-01-01

104

Bone mineral density and joint cartilage: four clinical settings of a complex relationship in osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experimental and clinical data support the hypothesis that both high and low bone mineral density (BMD) conditions, including osteoporosis, may induce osteoarthritis. However, these conditions do not always predispose to osteoarthritis progression. Four clinical settings could arise from this relationship, and furthermore two phenotypes may be identified whether early osteoarthritis coexists with high or low BMD.

Gabriel Herrero-Beaumont; Jorge A Roman-Blas; Raquel Largo; Francis Berenbaum; Santos Castañeda

2011-01-01

105

Urinary levels of type II collagen C-telopeptide crosslink are unrelated to joint space narrowing in patients with knee osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine whether urinary concentrations of the cross linked C?telopeptide of type II collagen (CTx?II) distinguish subjects with progressive radiographic or symptomatic knee osteoarthritis from those with stable disease. Methods Subjects were 120 obese women with unilateral knee osteoarthritis who participated in a 30 month, randomised, placebo controlled trial of structure modification by doxycycline, in which a standardised semiflexed anteroposterior view of the knee was obtained at baseline and 30?months. Subjects were selected from a larger sample to permit comparisons of urinary CTx?II levels between 60 progressors and 60 non?progressors with respect to medial joint space narrowing. Each group contained 30 subjects who, across five semi?annual assessments, reported on at least two occasions an increase of ?20% in 50 ft walk pain (minimum?=?1?cm on a 10 cm visual analogue scale), relative to the previous visit. The remainder reported no increases in knee pain. Urine samples were obtained semi?annually for determination of the CTx?II and creatinine concentrations. Results In an analysis of the placebo group only, the frequency of radiographic progressors in the upper and middle tertiles (48% and 60%, respectively) of the baseline CTx?II distribution was not significantly different than that in the lower tertile (64%). These results were unchanged after inclusion of data from subjects in the doxycycline group. Furthermore, serial CTx?II levels did not distinguish subjects with progressive radiographic or symptomatic knee osteoarthritis from those with stable disease. Conclusions In this pilot study, urinary CTx?II concentration was not a useful biomarker of osteoarthritis progression.

Mazzuca, S A; Brandt, K D; Eyre, D R; Katz, B P; Askew, J; Lane, K A

2006-01-01

106

Does joint alignment affect the T2 values of cartilage in patients with knee osteoarthritis?  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the relationship between T2 values of femorotibial cartilage and knee alignment in patients with clinical symptoms of medial osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Twenty-four patients (mean age ± standard deviation, 62.5±9.9 years) with clinical symptoms of medial knee OA, 12 with varus and 12 with valgus alignment of the femorotibial joint, were investigated on 3T MR using a 2D multi-echo spin echo (MESE) sequence for T2 mapping. Analysis of covariance, Spearman correlation coefficients, exact Mann-Whitney tests, and Fisher's exact tests were used for statistical analysis. Results Overall the T2 values of cartilage in the medial compartment (median ± interquartile-range, 49.44±6.58) were significantly higher (P=0.0043) than those in the lateral compartment (47.15±6.87). Patients with varus alignment (50.83±6.30 ms) had significantly higher T2 values of cartilage (P<0.0001) than patients with valgus alignment (46.20±6.00 ms). No statistically significant association between the T2 values of cartilage (in either location) and the Kellgren Lawrence score was found in the varus or in the valgus group. Conclusion T2 measurements were increased in medial knee OA patients with varus alignment, adding support to the theory of an association of OA and joint alignment.

Shepard, Timothy; Chang, Gregory; Wang, Ligong; Babb, James S.; Schweitzer, Mark; Regatte, Ravinder

2013-01-01

107

Dietary polyphenols and mechanisms of osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis is a condition caused in part by injury, loss of cartilage structure and function, and an imbalance in inflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways. It primarily affects the articular cartilage and subchondral bone of synovial joints and results in joint failure, leading to pain upon weight bearing including walking and standing. There is no cure for osteoarthritis, as it is very difficult to restore the cartilage once it is destroyed. The goals of treatment are to relieve pain, maintain or improve joint mobility, increase the strength of the joints and minimize the disabling effects of the disease. Recent studies have shown an association between dietary polyphenols and the prevention of osteoarthritis-related musculoskeletal inflammation. This review discusses the effects of commonly consumed polyphenols, including curcumin, epigallocatechin gallate and green tea extract, resveratrol, nobiletin and citrus fruits, pomegranate, as well as genistein and soy protein, on osteoarthritis with an emphasis on molecular antiosteoarthritic mechanisms. PMID:22832078

Shen, Chwan-Li; Smith, Brenda J; Lo, Di-Fan; Chyu, Ming-Chien; Dunn, Dale M; Chen, Chung-Hwan; Kwun, In-Sook

2012-07-23

108

Phellodendron and Citrus extracts benefit joint health in osteoarthritis patients: a pilot, double-blind, placebo-controlled study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The objective of this clinical study was to assess the potential benefit of a dietary supplement, NP 06-1, on joint health in overweight and normal weight adults diagnosed with osteoarthritis. METHODS: An 8-week placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind study was conducted with four groups comparing the effects of NP 06-1 to placebo on overweight and normal weight subjects diagnosed with primary

Julius Oben; Ebangha Enonchong; Shil Kothari; Walter Chambliss; Robert Garrison; Deanne Dolnick

2009-01-01

109

P38 MAP kinase inhibitors as potential therapeutics for the treatment of joint degeneration and pain associated with osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Evaluate the potential role of p38 inhibitors for the treatment of osteoarthritis using an animal model of joint degeneration (iodoacetate-induced arthritis) and a pain model (Hargraeves assay). METHODS: P38 kinase activity was evaluated in a kinase assay by measuring the amount of phosphorylated substrate ATF2 using a phosphoATF2 (Thr71) specific primary antibody and an alkaline phosphate coupled secondary antibody

Kimberly K Brown; Sandra A Heitmeyer; Erin B Hookfin; Lily Hsieh; Maria Buchalova; Yetunde O Taiwo; Michael J Janusz

2008-01-01

110

Population Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Blood and Joint Synovial Fluid Concentrations of Robenacoxib from Healthy Dogs and Dogs with Osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  The purpose of this population analysis was to characterize the pharmacokinetic properties of robenacoxib in blood and stifle\\u000a joint synovial fluid of dogs.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Data were obtained from two studies: 1) 8 healthy Beagle dogs in which an acute inflammation was induced by injection of urate\\u000a crystals into one joint; 2) 95 dogs from various breeds diagnosed with osteoarthritis (OA). Robenacoxib

Hanna E. Silber; Claudia Burgener; Ingrid M. Letellier; Mathieu Peyrou; Martin Jung; Jonathan N. King; Philippe Gruet; Jerome M. Giraudel

2010-01-01

111

Corroboration of in vivo cartilage pressures with implications for synovial joint tribology and osteoarthritis causation  

PubMed Central

Pressures on normal human acetabular cartilage have been collected from two implanted instrumented femoral head hemipros-theses. Despite significant differences in subjects' gender, morphology, mobility, and coordination, in vivo pressure measurements from both subjects covered similar ranges, with maximums of 5-6 MPa in gait, and as high as 18 MPa in other movements. Normalized for subject weight and height (nMPa), for free-speed walking the maximum pressure values were 25.2 for the female subject and 24.5 for the male subject. The overall maximum nMPa values were 76.2 for the female subject during rising from a chair at 11 months postoperative and 82.3 for the male subject while descending steps at 9 months postoperative. These unique in vivo data are consistent with corresponding cadaver experiments and model analyses. The collective results, in vitro data, model studies, and now corroborating in vivo data support the self-pressurizing “weeping” theory of synovial joint lubrication and provide unique information to evaluate the influence of in vivo pressure regimes on osteoarthritis causation and the efficacy of augmentations to, and substitutions for, natural cartilage.

Morrell, Kjirste C.; Hodge, W. Andrew; Krebs, David E.; Mann, Robert W.

2005-01-01

112

Palmar plate capsulodesis for thumb metacarpophalangeal joint hyperextension in association with trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Hyperextension of the thumb metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint is frequently seen with trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis, but there is no consensus on the indication for, or type of, treatment. We re-examined 12 thumbs at a mean of 9 (range 6-13) years following MCP capsulodesis using a suture anchor performed with trapeziectomy. Mean MCP hyperextension improved from 45° pre-operatively to 19° at 1 year post-operatively. At 9 years follow-up, it had increased to 30° but was still significantly better than pre-operatively (p = 0.007). Mean MCP flexion was 37° and near normal opposition was retained. The median pain score had improved from 5.5 to 1 (p = 0.002). Thumb key and tip pinch and hand grip strength showed no significant change from pre-operative values. No thumb MCP had symptomatic radiological degeneration. Our results suggest that MCP capsulodesis preserves a useful range of MCP flexion but stretches out over time. However, this did not result in increased pain or thumb weakness. PMID:23783806

Miller, N J K; Davis, T R C

2013-06-19

113

Management of acquired open bite associated with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis using miniscrew anchorage.  

PubMed

This article reports the orthodontic treatment of a patient with skeletal mandibular retrusion and an anterior open bite due to temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) using miniscrew anchorage. A 46-year-old woman had a Class II malocclusion with a retropositioned mandible. Her overjet and overbite were 7.0 mm and -1.6 mm, respectively. She had limited mouth opening, TMJ sounds, and pain. Condylar resorption was observed in both TMJs. Her TMJ pain was reduced by splint therapy, and then orthodontic treatment was initiated. Titanium miniscrews were placed at the posterior maxilla to intrude the molars. After 2 years and 7 months of orthodontic treatment, an acceptable occlusion was achieved without any recurrence of TMJ symptoms. The retropositioned mandible was considerably improved, and the lips showed less tension upon lip closure. The maxillary molars were intruded by 1.5 mm, and the mandible was subsequently rotated counterclockwise. Magnetic resonance imaging of both condyles after treatment showed avascular necrosis-like structures. During a 2-year retention period, an acceptable occlusion was maintained without recurrence of the open bite. In conclusion, correction of open bite and clockwise-rotated mandible through molar intrusion using titanium miniscrews is effective for the management of TMJ-OA with jaw deformity. PMID:23112945

Tanaka, Eiji; Yamano, Eizo; Inubushi, Toshihiro; Kuroda, Shingo

2012-06-28

114

Clinical and radiographic disease course of hand osteoarthritis and determinants of outcome after 6 years  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveTo investigate the long-term clinical and radiographic disease course of hand osteoarthritis (OA) and determinants of outcome.MethodsClinical and radiographic measures were obtained at baseline and after 6 years in 289 patients with hand OA (mean age 59.5 years, 83.0% women). Clinical outcomes were self-reported pain and functional limitations assessed with the Australian\\/Canadian Osteoarthritis Hand Index (AUSCAN). Poor clinical outcome was

J. Bijsterbosch; I. Watt; I. Meulenbelt; F. R. Rosendaal; T. W. J. Huizinga; M. Kloppenburg

2011-01-01

115

Design and evaluation of a new type of knee orthosis to align the mediolateral angle of the knee joint with osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Background. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease which influences the performance of the knee joint. Moreover, the force and moments applied on the joint increase in contrast to normal subjects. Various types of knee orthoses have been designed to solve the mentioned problems. However, there are other problems in terms of distal migration during walking and the alignment of the orthosis which cannot be changed following the use of brace. Therefore, the main aim of the research was to design an orthosis to solve the aforementioned problems. Method. A new type of knee orthosis was designed with a modular structure. Two patients with knee OA participated in this research project. The force applied on the foot, moment transmitted through the knee joint, and spatiotemporal gait parameters were measured by use of a motion analysis system. Results. The results of the research showed that the adduction moment applied on the knee joint decreased while subjects walked with the new knee orthosis (P-value < 0.05). Conclusion. The new design of the knee brace can be used as an effective treatment to decrease the loads applied on the knee joint and to improve the alignment whilst walking. PMID:22577565

Esrafilian, Amir; Karimi, Mohammad Taghi; Eshraghi, Arezoo

2012-04-19

116

Joint Pain Undergoes a Transition in Accordance with Signal Changes of Bones Detected by MRI in Hip Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Objectives: In this study, we aimed to investigate whether joint pain is derived from cartilage or bone alterations. Methods: We reviewed 23 hip joints of 21 patients with primary hip osteoarthritis (OA), which were classified into Kellgren–Laurence (KL) grading I to IV. Plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were obtained from all of the 23 joints. Two of the 21 patients had bilateral hip OA. Pain was assessed based on the pain scale of Denis. A Welch t test was performed for age, height, weight, body mass index, bone mineral density, and a Mann–Whitney U test was performed for KL grading. Results: Four of 8 hip joints with pain and OA showed broad signal changes detected by MRI. Fourteen hip joints without pain, but with OA did not show broad signal changes by MRI. Collectively, MRI analyses showed that broad signal changes in OA cases without joint pain or with a slight degree of joint pain were not observed, while broad signal changes were observed in OA cases with deteriorated joint pain. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that hip joint pain might be associated with bone signal alterations in the hips of OA patients.

Kamimura, Mikio; Nakamura, Yukio; Ikegami, Shota; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Kato, Hiroyuki

2013-01-01

117

Mesenchymal stem cells in joint disease and repair.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (OA), a prevalent chronic condition with a striking impact on quality of life, represents an enormous societal burden that increases greatly as populations age. Yet no approved pharmacological intervention, biologic therapy or procedure prevents the progressive destruction of the OA joint. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-multipotent precursors of connective tissue cells that can be isolated from many adult tissues, including those of the diarthrodial joint-have emerged as a potential therapy. Endogenous MSCs contribute to maintenance of healthy tissues by acting as reservoirs of repair cells or as immunomodulatory sentinels to reduce inflammation. The onset of degenerative changes in the joint is associated with aberrant activity or depletion of these cell reservoirs, leading to loss of chondrogenic potential and preponderance of a fibrogenic phenotype. Local delivery of ex vivo cultures of MSCs has produced promising outcomes in preclinical models of joint disease. Mechanistically, paracrine signalling by MSCs might be more important than differentiation in stimulating repair responses; thus, paracrine factors must be assessed as measures of MSC therapeutic potency, to replace traditional assays based on cell-surface markers and differentiation. Several early-stage clinical trials, initiated or underway in 2013, are testing the delivery of MSCs as an intra-articular injection into the knee, but optimal dose and vehicle are yet to be established. PMID:23881068

Barry, Frank; Murphy, Mary

2013-07-23

118

Treatment of advanced CMC joint disease: trapeziectomy and implant arthroplasty (silastic-metal-synthetic allograft).  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis of the basal joint of the thumb is a common and frequently debilitating condition, most often affecting middle-aged women. Nonoperative treatment with activity modification, splinting, oral anti-inflammatory medication, and intraarticular steroid injection frequently leads to acceptable control of symptoms. If nonoperative treatment fails, many surgical techniques have been described for management of symptomatic advanced degenerative joint changes. This article reviews the literature related to various arthroplasty options for advanced disease. Treatment decisions must clearly be tempered by the surgeon's experience, the patient's goals and expectations, and the extent of degenerative disease. PMID:18675719

Earp, Brandon E

2008-08-01

119

Bilateral osteoarthritis of the trapeziometacarpal joint treated by bilateral tendon interposition arthroplasty  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty-four flexor carpi radialis (FCR) tendon interposition arthroplasties of the trapezium for bilateral trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis were reviewed. Pain was reduced in all cases. Function was improved in all right hands and in 92% of the left hands. FCR tendon interposition arthroplasty for bilateral trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis yields satisfactory long-term results on both sides.

A. Damen; B. Van Der Lei; P. H. Robinson

1997-01-01

120

Imaging of osteoarthritis using a hand-held terahertz probe  

Microsoft Academic Search

A hand-held terahertz (THz) probe system is being developed for medical use by Teraview Ltd. We use this prototype system to investigate the terahertz characteristics of osteoarthritis (OA). Excised femoral knee joints with symptoms of osteoarthritis were measured. In this paper we analyze the typical terahertz response of the diseased samples and explain how the reflected terahertz pulse could be

K. W. C. Kan; Wing-Sze Lee; W. H. Cheung; E. Pickwell-MacPherson

2009-01-01

121

Knee lavage and physiotherapy: cost effective management for early osteoarthritis knees in sports persons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis, the degenerative joint disease, most commonly affects the knee joint. Age and improper loading are the most important risk factors for osteoarthritis. Among the sports persons, runners, joggers, jumpers and the persons training by squatting exercises are the most prone to such changes. The biggest challenge in the management of osteoarthritic knees is to relieve pain and to retard

Rakesh Sharma

2010-01-01

122

An Orthopedic Perspective. Does Running Cause Osteoarthritis?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the development of osteoarthritis and whether running and other impact loading sports promote it. Although these sports do not cause arthritis in normal weight bearing limbs, they can accelerate it in damaged joints. It is important to identify people with preeexisting joint disease so they can choose nonimpact-loading aerobic exercise.…

Pascale, Mark; Grana, William A.

1989-01-01

123

The bone–cartilage unit in osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis (OA) refers to a group of mechanically-induced joint disorders to which both genetic and acquired factors contribute. Current pathophysiological concepts focus on OA as a disease of the whole joint. Within these models, the functional unit formed by the articular cartilage and the subchondral bone seems to be of particular interest. Cartilage and bone receive and dissipate the stress

Frank P. Luyten; Rik J. Lories

2010-01-01

124

[Syringomyelia and associated bone and joint diseases].  

PubMed

Syringomyelia can occur in patients presenting bone and joint diseases of various origins. When joint destruction of the shoulder or elbow produces little pain, a neurological cause might be involved. In this case, the disease history can be of utmost importance because an initial diagnosis of rheumatoid polyarthritis, polyosteoarthritis, or destructive joint disease can be misleading before the syringomyelic origin of the bone and joint disease becomes patent. We report two cases illustrating this association and the diagnostic pitfalls which can delay recognition of the syringomyelia. Better awareness of the prevalence of this condition should be helpful in establishing the diagnosis and in selecting patients who can benefit from neurosurgical treatment. The two cases presented here suggest that syringomyelia could be underdiagnosed in certain patients with an initially atypical presentation. A review of the current knowledge of syringomyelia suggests that arthroplasty is generally not advisable for destroyed dislocated syringomyelic joints. PMID:17534210

Alnot, J-Y; Rossarie, R; Welby, F

2007-05-01

125

Relationships amongst osteoarthritis biomarkers, dynamic knee joint load, and exercise: results from a randomized controlled pilot study  

PubMed Central

Background Little is known about the relationships of circulating levels of biomarkers of cartilage degradation with biomechanical outcomes relevant to knee osteoarthritis (OA) or biomarker changes following non-pharmacological interventions. The objectives of this exploratory, pilot study were to: 1) examine relationships between biomarkers of articular cartilage degradation and synthesis with measures of knee joint load during walking, and 2) examine changes in these biomarkers following 10 weeks of strengthening exercises. Methods Seventeen (8 male, 9 female; 66.1 +/- 11.3 years of age) individuals with radiographically-confirmed medial tibiofemoral OA participated. All participants underwent a baseline testing session where serum and urine samples were collected, followed by a three-dimensional motion analysis. Motion analysis was used to calculate the external knee adduction moment (KAM) peak value and impulse. Following baseline testing, participants were randomized to either 10 weeks of: 1) physiotherapist-supervised lower limb muscle strengthening exercises, or 2) no exercises (control). Identical follow-up testing was conducted 11 weeks after baseline. Biomarkers included: urinary C-telopeptide of type II collagen (uCTX-II) and type II collagen cleavage neoepitope (uC2C), serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (sCOMP), serum hyaluronic acid (sHA) and serum C-propeptide of type II procollagen (sCPII). Linear regression analysis was used to examine relationships between measures of the KAM and biomarker concentrations as baseline, as well as between-group differences following the intervention. Results KAM impulse predicted significant variation in uCTX-II levels at baseline (p?=?0.04), though not when controlling for disease severity and walking speed (p?=?0.33). KAM impulse explained significant variation in the ratio uCTX-II;sCPII even when controlling for additional variables (p?=?0.04). Following the intervention, changes in sCOMP were significantly greater in the exercise group compared to controls (p?=?0.04). On average those in the control group experienced a slight increase in sCOMP and uCTX-II, while those in the exercise group experienced a reduction. No other significant findings were observed. Conclusions This research provides initial evidence of a potential relationship between uCTX-II and knee joint load measures in patients with medial tibiofemoral knee OA. However, this relationship became non-significant after controlling for disease severity and walking speed, suggesting further research is necessary. It also appears that sCOMP is amenable to change following a strengthening intervention, suggesting a potential beneficial role of exercise on cartilage structure. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01241812

2013-01-01

126

Tomographic x-ray guided three-dimensional diffuse optical imaging of osteoarthritis in the finger joints: a clinical study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To investigate the typical optical findings that can be used to characterize osteoarthritis, the distal interphalangeal finger joints from 40 subjects including 22 patients and 18 healthy controllers were examined clinically and scanned by a novel hybrid imaging system. The hybrid imaging platform integrated a C-arm based x-ray tomosynthetic system with a multi-channel optic-fiber based diffuse optical imaging system. Optical images were recovered qualitatively and quantitatively based on a regularization-based reconstruction algorithm that can incorporate the fine structural maps obtained from x-ray as a priori spatial information into diffuse optical tomography reconstruction procedures. Our findings suggest statistically significant differences between healthy and osteoarthritis finger joints. X-ray guided diffuse optical imaging may not only detect radiologic features supporting the development of an inflammatory disorder but may also help discriminate specific optical features that differ between osteoarthritic and healthy joints. These quantitative optical features are also potentially important for a better understanding of inflammatory arthritis in humans.

Yuan, Zhen; Jiang, Huizhu; Zhang, Qizhi; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang, Huabei

2009-02-01

127

Arthritis in new world monkeys: Osteoarthritis, calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease, and spondyloarthropathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analyses of New World skeletal populations for the presence of erosions and other osseous alterations and their character, distribution, and radiologic appearance shows that osteoarthritis is predominantly a disease of animals raised in artificially constrained environments. Primary calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD) was also found only in artificially constrained animals, although hyperparathyroidism (overproduction of parathyroid hormone) may have been responsible.

Bruce M. Rothschild; Robert J. Woods

1993-01-01

128

An adult case of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis treated with splint therapy and the subsequent orthodontic occlusal reconstruction.  

PubMed

Herein we report treatment for a 19-year-old female patient with severe osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint. The patient had severe open bite with a Class II molar relationship. She had limited mouth opening and pain. Clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging revealed that she had anterior disc displacement without reduction. By splint therapy, limited mouth opening and pain was eliminated, but an anterior open bite developed after the treatment. By orthodontic treatment, an acceptable occlusion was achieved with a Class I molar relationship. PMID:22346169

Kurt, Hanefi; Ozta?, Evren; Gençel, Burç; Ta?an, Demet Ataman; Ozta?, Derya

2011-10-01

129

Meloxicam and surgical denervation of the coxofemoral joint for the treatment of degenerative osteoarthritis in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris).  

PubMed

An adult male white Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) with pronounced atrophy of the pelvic musculature was diagnosed with degenerative osteoarthritis of the coxofemoral joints. Initial management with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug meloxicam and a semisynthetic sodium pentosan polysulfate resulted in clinical improvement and radiographic stabilization of the arthritic condition over several months. However, because pain was still evident, bilateral denervation of the coxofemoral joints was performed, successfully ameliorating the signs of osteoarthritic pain in the tiger. Meloxicam has shown good clinical efficacy for the treatment of osteoarthritis and other painful conditions in large felids. Coxofemoral joint denervation offers many advantages for the treatment of osteoarthritis in exotic carnivore species, and should be considered a viable treatment modality. PMID:17319147

Whiteside, Douglas P; Remedios, Audrey M; Black, Sandra R; Finn-Bodner, Susan T

2006-09-01

130

Safe pharmacologic treatment strategies for osteoarthritis pain in African Americans with hypertension, and renal and cardiac disease.  

PubMed

Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in the United States. Osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis, is a degenerative joint disease affecting both whites and African Americans similarly. African Americans have a high incidence rate of comorbidities, including hypertension, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and diabetes. Treatment of osteoarthritic pain in patients with comorbidities is often complicated by potential safety concerns. Traditional nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) specific NSAIDs have been shown to increase blood pressure in hypertensive patients taking antihypertensive medications. Patients with CVD risk factors taking low-dose aspirin for secondary prevention may be at increased risk for gastrointestinal bleeding with NSAIDs. Diabetics face an increased risk of renal complications. Because NSAIDs are associated with adverse renal effects, they should be used cautiously in patients with advanced renal disease. Acetaminophen is the most appropriate initial analgesic for African Americans with chronic osteoarthritic pain and concurrent hypertension, CVD risk factors or diabetes, and is recommended by the American College of Rheumatology as first-line treatment. Many of the adverse effects commonly associated with NSAIDs are not associated with acetaminophen. Safety concerns surrounding pharmacologic treatment of osteoarthritis in African Americans are reviewed. PMID:16895283

Johnson, Jerry; Weinryb, Joan

2006-07-01

131

Developments in the scientific understanding of osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Osteoarthritis is often a progressive and disabling disease, which occurs in the setting of a variety of risk factors – such as advancing age, obesity, and trauma – that conspire to incite a cascade of pathophysiologic events within joint tissues. An important emerging theme in osteoarthritis is a broadening of focus from a disease of cartilage to one of the 'whole joint'. The synovium, bone, and cartilage are each involved in pathologic processes that lead to progressive joint degeneration. Additional themes that have emerged over the past decade are novel mechanisms of cartilage degradation and repair, the relationship between biomechanics and biochemical pathways, the importance of inflammation, and the role played by genetics. In this review we summarize current scientific understanding of osteoarthritis and examine the pathobiologic mechanisms that contribute to progressive disease.

Abramson, Steven B; Attur, Mukundan

2009-01-01

132

Joint Involvement Associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Joint involvement associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) belongs to the concept of spondyloarthritis (SpA) and includes two types of arthritis: a peripheral arthritis characterized by the presence of pauciarticular asymmetrical arthritis affecting preferentially joints of lower extremities and an axial arthropathy including inflammatory back pain, sacroiliitis and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Treatment of arthritis includes a short-term use of NSAIDs

M. De Vos

2009-01-01

133

A Systems Biology Approach to Synovial Joint Lubrication in Health, Injury, and Disease  

PubMed Central

The synovial joint contains synovial fluid (SF) within a cavity bounded by articular cartilage and synovium. SF is a viscous fluid that has lubrication, metabolic, and regulatory functions within synovial joints. SF contains lubricant molecules, including proteoglycan-4 and hyaluronan. SF is an ultrafiltrate of plasma with secreted contributions from cell populations lining and within the synovial joint space, including chondrocytes and synoviocytes. Maintenance of normal SF lubricant composition and function are important for joint homeostasis. In osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and joint injury, changes in lubricant composition and function accompany alterations in the cytokine and growth factor environment and increased fluid and molecular transport through joint tissues. Thus, understanding the synovial joint lubrication system requires a multi-faceted study of the various parts of the synovial joint and their interactions. Systems biology approaches at multiple scales are being used to describe the molecular, cellular, and tissue components and their interactions that comprise the functioning synovial joint. Analyses of the transcriptome and proteome of SF, cartilage, and synovium suggest that particular molecules and pathways play important roles in joint homeostasis and disease. Such information may be integrated with physicochemical tissue descriptions to construct integrative models of the synovial joint that ultimately may explain maintenance of health, recovery from injury, or development and progression of arthritis.

Hui, Alexander Y.; McCarty, William J.; Masuda, Koichi; Firestein, Gary S.; Sah, Robert L.

2013-01-01

134

The association between patella alta and the prevalence and worsening of structural features of patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis: The Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine the relationship between patella alta and the prevalence and worsening at follow-up of structural features of patellofemoral joint (PFJ) osteoarthritis (OA) on MRI. Methods The Multicenter Osteoarthritis (MOST) Study is a cohort study of persons aged 50-79 years with or at risk for knee OA. Patella alta was measured using the Insall-Salvati ratio (ISR) on the baseline lateral radiograph and cartilage damage, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), and subchondral bone attrition (SBA) were graded on MRI at baseline and at 30 months follow-up in the PFJ. We examined the association of the ISR with the prevalence and worsening of cartilage damage, BMLs, and SBA in the PFJ using logistic regression. Results 907 knees were studied (mean age 62, BMI 30, ISR 1.10), 63% from female subjects. Compared with knees in the lowest ISR quartile at baseline, those in the highest had 2.4 (95% CI 1.7, 3.3), 2.9 (2.0, 4.3), and 3.5 (2.3, 5.5) times the odds of having lateral PFJ cartilage damage, BMLs, and SBA respectively, and 1.5 (95% CI 1.1, 2.0), 1.3 (0.9, 1.8), and 2.2 (1.4, 3.4) times the odds of having medial PFJ cartilage damage, BMLs, and SBA respectively. Similarly, those with high ISRs were also at risk for worsening of cartilage damage and BMLs over time than those with low ISRs. Conclusion A high ISR, indicative of patella alta, is associated with structural features of OA in the PFJ. Additionally, the same knees have increased risk of worsening of these same features over time.

Stefanik, J.J.; Zhu, Y.; Zumwalt, A.C.; Gross, K.D.; Clancy, M.; Lynch, J. A.; Frey Law, L.A.; Lewis, C.E.; Roemer, F.W.; Powers, C.M.; Guermazi, A.; Felson, D.T.

2010-01-01

135

Nutraceutical Therapies for Degenerative Joint Diseases: A Critical Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is growing recognition of the importance of nutritional factors in the maintenance of bone and joint health, and that nutritional imbalance combined with endocrine abnormalities may be involved in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) and osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). Despite this, dietary programs have played a secondary role in the management of these connective tissue disorders. Articular cartilage is critically

Robert Goggs; Anne Vaughan-Thomas; Peter D. Clegg; Stuart D. Carter; John F. Innes; Ali Mobasheri; Mehdi Shakibaei; Wolfgang Schwab; Carolyn A. Bondy

2005-01-01

136

Comorbidity Cohort (2C) study: Cardiovascular disease severity and comorbid osteoarthritis in primary care  

PubMed Central

Background Two of the commonest chronic diseases experienced by older people in the general population are cardiovascular diseases and osteoarthritis. These conditions also commonly co-occur, which is only partly explained by age. Yet, there have been few studies investigating specific a priori hypotheses in testing the comorbid interaction between two chronic diseases and related health and healthcare outcomes. It is also unknown whether the stage or severity of the chronic disease influences the comorbidity impact. The overall plan is to investigate the interaction between cardiovascular severity groups (hypertension, ischaemic heart disease and heart failure) and osteoarthritis comorbidity, and their longitudinal impact on health and healthcare outcomes relative to either condition alone. Methods From ten general practices participating in a research network, adults aged 40?years and over were sampled to construct eight exclusive cohort groups (n?=?9,676). Baseline groups were defined on the basis of computer clinical diagnostic data in a 3-year time-period (between 2006 and 2009) as: (i) without cardiovascular disease or osteoarthritis (reference group), (ii) index cardiovascular disease groups (hypertension, ischaemic heart disease and heart failure) without osteoarthritis, (iii) index osteoarthritis group without cardiovascular disease, and (vi) index cardiovascular disease groups comorbid with osteoarthritis. There were three main phases to longitudinal follow-up. The first (survey population) was to invite cohorts to complete a baseline postal health questionnaire, with 10 monthly brief interval health questionnaires, and a final 12-month follow-up questionnaire. The second phase (linkage population) was to link the collected survey data to patient clinical records with consent for the 3-year time-period before baseline, during the 12-month survey period and the 12?months after final questionnaire (total 5?years). The third phase (denominator population) was to construct an anonymised clinical data archive for the study five year period for the total baseline cohorts, linking clinical information such as diagnosis, prescriptions and referrals. Discussion The outcomes of the study will result in the determination of the specific interaction between cardiovascular severity and osteoarthritis comorbidity on the change and progression of physical health status in individuals and on the linked and associated clinical-decision making process in primary care.

2012-01-01

137

Changes in urinary bone resorption markers (pyridinoline, deoxypyridinoline) resulting from experimentally-induced osteoarthritis in the temporomandibular joint of rats.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to quantify the urinary bone resorption markers, pyridinoline (Pyr) and deoxypyridinoline (Dpyr), excreted from experimentally-induced osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of rats. Osteoarthritic lesions were induced by intra-articular injection of collagenase into the right TMJs of 16-week-old male rats. The whole day's urine was collected from each animal one day before the injection and 5, 7, 11 and 14 days after the injection. Urine samples were analyzed by high-perfomance liquid chromatography and fluorescence spectroscopy. Histological changes in condyle were examined by using paraffin sections with toluidine blue staining. Degenerative changes were observed in the articular cartilage of the experimental group on day 7 and day 14 after the injection of collagenase. The concentration of Pyr was remarkably high in the experimental group, and consequently the Pyr to Dpyr ratio was significantly higher (p<0.05) in the experimental group than in the control group from 7-14 days after the injection. These findings suggest that a urinary Pyr/Dpyr ratio would be available for the detection of degenerative changes in condyle relevant to temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ OA). PMID:12555930

Imada, Masae; Tanimoto, Kotaro; Ohno, Shigeru; Sasaki, Akiko; Sugiyama, Hiroki; Tanne, Kazuo

2003-01-01

138

Emerging drugs for osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA), the most prevalent form of joint disease, affecting as much as 13% of the world’s population. In the United States, it is the leading cause of disability in people over age 65 and is characterized by progressive cartilage loss, bone remodeling, osteophyte formation and synovial inflammation with resultant joint pain and disability. There are no treatments marketed for structural disease modification; current treatments mainly target symptoms, with >75% of patients reporting need for additional symptomatic treatment. Areas covered Drugs in later development (Phase II-III) for osteoarthritis pain and joint structural degeneration are reviewed. Not covered are procedural (e.g. arthrocentesis, physical therapy), behavioral (e.g. weight loss, pain coping techniques) or device (e.g. knee braces, surgical implants) based treatments. Expert opinion More in depth understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease, as well as elucidation of the link between clinical symptomatology and structural changes in the joint will likely lead to development of novel target classes with promising efficacy in the future. Efficacy notwithstanding, there remain significant hurdles to overcome in clinical development of these therapeutics, inherent in the progression pattern of the disease as well as challenges with readouts for both pain and structure modification trials.

Matthews, Gloria

2013-01-01

139

Arthroscopy vs. MRI for a detailed assessment of cartilage disease in osteoarthritis: diagnostic value of MRI in clinical practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: In patients with osteoarthritis, a detailed assessment of degenerative cartilage disease is important to recommend adequate treatment. Using a representative sample of patients, this study investigated whether MRI is reliable for a detailed cartilage assessment in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. METHODS: In a cross sectional-study as a part of a retrospective case-control study, 36 patients (mean age

Lars V von Engelhardt; Matthias Lahner; André Klussmann; Bertil Bouillon; Andreas Dàvid; Patrick Haage; Thomas K Lichtinger

2010-01-01

140

Is Osteoarthritis an Infection-Associated Disease and a Target for Chemotherapy?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) continues to be a challenge, and current treatment modalities are disappointing. New approaches in therapy may be developed as a result of evidence of the involvement of inflammatory cytokines in the progression of OA. Cotrimoxazole (sulfamethoxazole\\/trimethoprim) was noted to have anti-inflammatory properties and has been used in the therapy of several autoimmune diseases. Analyzing our

Alexander Rozin

2007-01-01

141

Early diagnosis to enable early treatment of pre-osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Osteoarthritis is a prevalent and disabling disease affecting an increasingly large swathe of the world population. While clinical osteoarthritis is a late-stage condition for which disease-modifying opportunities are limited, osteoarthritis typically develops over decades, offering a long window of time to potentially alter its course. The etiology of osteoarthritis is multifactorial, showing strong associations with highly modifiable risk factors of mechanical overload, obesity and joint injury. As such, characterization of pre-osteoarthritic disease states will be critical to support a paradigm shift from palliation of late disease towards prevention, through early diagnosis and early treatment of joint injury and degeneration to reduce osteoarthritis risk. Joint trauma accelerates development of osteoarthritis from a known point in time. Human joint injury cohorts therefore provide a unique opportunity for evaluation of pre-osteoarthritic conditions and potential interventions from the earliest stages of degeneration. This review focuses on recent advances in imaging and biochemical biomarkers suitable for characterization of the pre-osteoarthritic joint as well as implications for development of effective early treatment strategies.

2012-01-01

142

Mono-iodoacetate-induced histologic changes in subchondral bone and articular cartilage of rat femorotibial joints: an animal model of osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease characterized by joint pain and a progressive loss of articular cartilage. Studies to elucidate the pathophysiology of OA have been hampered by the lack of a rapid, reproducible animal model that mimics both the histopathology and symptoms associated with the disease. Injection of mono-iodoacetate (MIA), an inhibitor of glycolysis, into the femorotibial joint of rodents promotes loss of articular cartilage similar to that noted in human OA. Here, we describe the histopathology in the subchondral bone and cartilage of rat (Wistar) knee joints treated with a single intra articular injection of MIA (1 mg) and sacrificed at 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, 28, and 56 days postinjection. Histologically, the early time points (days 1-7) were characterized by areas of chondrocyte degeneration/necrosis sometimes involving the entire thickness of the articular cartilage in the tibial plateaus and femoral condyles. Changes to the subchondral bone, as evidenced by increased numbers of osteoclasts and osteoblasts, were noted at by day 7. By 28 days, there was focal fragmentation and collapse of bony trabeculae with fibrosis and increased osteoclastic activity. By 56 days there were large areas of bone remodeling evidenced by osteoclastic bone resorption and newly formed trabeculae with loss of marrow hematopoietic cells. Subchondral cysts and subchondral sclerosis were present in some rats. In conclusion, intra-articular injection of MIA induces loss of articular cartilage with progression of subchondral bone lesions that mimic those of OA. This model offers a rapid and minimally invasive method to reproduce OA-like lesions in a rodent species. PMID:14585729

Guzman, Roberto E; Evans, Mark G; Bove, Susan; Morenko, Brandy; Kilgore, Kenneth

143

Clinical predictors of elective total joint replacement in persons with end-stage knee osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Arthritis is a leading cause of disability in the United States. Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has become the gold standard to manage the pain and disability associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Although more than 400 000 primary TKA surgeries are performed each year in the United States, not all individuals with knee OA elect to undergo the procedure. No

Joseph A Zeni Jr; Michael J Axe; Lynn Snyder-Mackler

2010-01-01

144

International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Sets for osteoarthritis. A useful tool in the follow-up of patients after joint arthroplasty  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim. The first aim of this study was to verify the applic- ability of the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) core set for osteoarthritis (OA) as an outcome tool after the total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA), in order to follow the changes of the profile of functioning after joint arthroplasty. Methods. Seventy-two OA

C. PISONI; A. GIARDINI; G. MAJANI; M. MAINI

145

Effects on osteoclast and osteoblast activities in cultured mouse calvarial bones by synovial fluids from patients with a loose joint prosthesis and from osteoarthritis patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aseptic loosening of a joint prosthesis is associated with remodelling of bone tissue in the vicinity of the prosthesis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of synovial fluid (SF) from patients with a loose prosthetic component and periprosthetic osteolysis on osteoclast and osteoblast activities in vitro and made comparisons with the effects of SF from patients with osteoarthritis

Martin K Andersson; Pernilla Lundberg; Acke Ohlin; Mark J Perry; Anita Lie; André Stark; Ulf H Lerner

2007-01-01

146

Radiographic joint space narrowing in osteoarthritis of the knee: relationship to meniscal tears and duration of pain  

PubMed Central

Objective The objective of this study was to assess, with knee radiography, joint space narrowing (JSN) and its relationship to meniscal tears, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures, articular cartilage erosion, and duration of pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Materials and methods A total of 140 patients who had knee osteoarthritis and underwent primary total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, with unicompartmental medial tibiofemoral JSN (grade 1 or greater) and normal lateral compartments, were recruited. Polytomous logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between JSN and risk factors. Results All patients with JSN were categorized as grade 1 (n?=?14, 10.0%), grade 2 (n?=?64, 45.7%), or grade 3 (n?=?62, 44.3%). Women presented with indications for a TKR at a younger age than men (mean age, 69 vs 73 years, P?osteoarthritis.

Huang, Guo-Shu; Hsu, Shu-Mei; Chang, Yue-Cune; Ho, Wei-Pin

2008-01-01

147

Effects of exercise therapy on knee joint function and synovial fluid cytokine levels in patients with knee osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

The aims of this study were to observe the effect of exercise therapy on the function of the knee joint and the levels of cytokines and cytokine-related genes, specifically tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), in the synovial joints of patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA) and to explore its mechanism of action. A total of 100 KOA patients were divided into a treatment group (n=50) and a control group (n=50) according to the order of admission. The patients in the treatment group were treated with diclofenac sodium combined with exercise therapy and the patients in the control group were treated with diclofenac sodium only. The function of the knee joint and the therapeutic efficacy was evaluated and the TNF-?, hs-CRP and MMP-3 levels in the synovial fluid were measured following 4 weeks of treatment. The results revealed that the knee joint index score and the TNF-?, hs-CRP and MMP-3 levels in the synovial fluid decreased significantly in the KOA patients of the two groups following treatment (P<0.05). Compared with the control group, the knee joint index score and the TNF-?, hs-CRP and MMP-3 levels in the synovial joints were lower and the therapeutic efficacy was increased in the patients of the treatment group (P<0.05). In brief, exercise therapy may decrease cytokine and cytokine-related gene levels in the synovial fluid and inhibit inflammatory factor-mediated cartilage degradation in KOA patients, thus, effectively improving the clinical symptoms of KOA. PMID:23135204

Zhang, Shao-Lan; Liu, Hong-Qi; Xu, Xiao-Zu; Zhi, Juan; Geng, Jiao-Jiao; Chen, Jin

2012-11-07

148

Somatomedin activity in synovial fluid from patients with joint diseases.  

PubMed Central

The somatomedin activity in synovial fluids from 50 patients with a variety of joint diseases has been studied and compared with the activity in each of the patient's own serum and a standard reference serum (SRS). The porcine costal cartilage bioassay of Van den Brande and Du Caju (1974a) has been used with the isotopes 3H-thymidine and 35S-sulphate. Synovial fluids from most patients with post-traumatic and post-operative effusions, osteoarthritis and arthritis associated with psoriasis, Reiter's disease, and ankylosing spondylitis stimulated the synthesis of DNA and proteoglycans in cartilage. Synovial fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis either had impaired capacity to stimulate DNA synthesis, or they inhibited it; a similar, but less evident pattern was observed for proteoglycan synthesis. Some synovial fluids from patients with miscellaneous synovitides stimulated, while others inhibited cartilage metabolism. It is concluded that the synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and from some patients with miscellaneous synovitides contained an inhibitor(s) to DNA and possibly proteoglycan synthesis. The sera from nearly all the patients stimulated both DNA and proteoglycan synthesis, but the somatomedin potency ratios for serum in terms of SRS were generally less than 1.0. There was a significant inverse correlation between the serum somatomedin potency ratio and the age of the patient.

Coates, C L; Burwell, R G; Lloyd-Jones, K; Swannell, A J; Walker, G; Selby, C

1978-01-01

149

The role of the cartilage matrix in osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis (OA) involves all the structures of the joint. How the disease is initiated and what factors trigger the disease process remain unclear, although the mechanical environment seems to have a role. Our understanding of the biology of the disease has been hampered by the lack of access to tissue samples from patients with early stage disease, because clinically recognizable

Tore Saxne; Dick Heinegård

2010-01-01

150

Relation between synovial fluid C3 degradation products and local joint inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and crystal associated arthropathy.  

PubMed Central

C3 degradation products (C3dg/d) were estimated in 288 synovial fluid (SF) samples (rheumatoid arthritis (RA) 93, osteoarthritis (OA) 68, chronic pyrophosphate arthropathy 80, acute pseudogout 20, others 27) from knees of 138 patients (bilateral 67, serial sampling on two to six occasions 40). At each aspiration knees were defined as 'active' or 'inactive' by single observer global assessment using six clinical parameters of inflammation. Lack of correlation between paired SF and plasma C3dg/d implied local C3 activation within joints. Raised SF C3d levels were found in active compared with inactive RA joints (mean (range) 51 (15-105) and 6 (0-15) units/ml respectively). Low SF C3dg/d levels were found in OA (mean (range) 0.8 (0-7) units/ml) and chronic pyrophosphate arthropathy (mean (range) 4 (0-16) units/ml), irrespective of clinical activity. In contrast, very high levels (mean (range) 61 (16-126) units/ml) were present in all cases of pseudogout. These differences remained after correction for SF C3 or albumin. This study is the first to show a positive correlation between SF C3dg/d and local inflammation in RA joints. It further suggests that C3 activation is a constant feature of pseudogout but not an accompaniment of inflammation associated with chronic crystal associated synovitis or OA.

Doherty, M; Richards, N; Hornby, J; Powell, R

1988-01-01

151

Myeloperoxidase and Chlorinated Peptides in Osteoarthritis: Potential Biomarkers of the Disease  

PubMed Central

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disabling condition in which multiple initiating events or conditions (heritable and nonheritable) result in eventual loss of articular cartilage. However, the etiology of OA remains poorly understood, and diagnosis of early disease is difficult due to the lack of specific identifiers. Recent literature suggests that a series of inflammatory processes may be involved in initiating and propagating OA. We hypothesized that products of neutrophils and macrophages, namely myeloperoxidase (MPO), a specific enzyme responsible for the production of both highly reactive hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) and chlorinated peptides, may be present in the synovial fluid of patients with OA. We examined the synovial fluid from 30 patients to identify and profile the presence of MPO. We divided the samples into three groups using radiographic and clinical assessment: (1) control, patients with acute knee injury with no history of OA and no radiographic evidence of OA; (2) early OA, patients with a mild OA based on radiographs; and (3) late OA, patients with a longstanding history of OA and with radiographic evidence of complete joint loss. Patients with early OA demonstrated significantly elevated levels of MPO. We also demonstrated the presence of HOCl and Cl2 modified proteins (Cl-peptides) in early OA synovial fluid samples by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Patients in the control and advanced OA groups demonstrated little elevation in MPO levels and Cl-peptides were undetectable. These results indicate that MPO and Cl-peptides may serve as diagnostic markers for the detection of early OA.

Steinbeck, Marla J.; Nesti, Leon J.; Sharkey, Peter F.; Parvizi, Javad

2010-01-01

152

Osteoarthritis of the knee  

PubMed Central

Introduction Osteoarthritis of the knee affects about 10% of adults aged over 60 years, with risk increased in those with obesity, and joint damage or abnormalities. Progression of disease on x rays is commonplace, but x ray changes don’t correlate well with clinical symptoms. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of non-surgical treatments for osteoarthritis of the knee? What are the effects of surgical treatments for osteoarthritis of the knee? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to October 2006 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 74 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, capsaicin, chondroitin, education to aid self-management, exercise and physiotherapy, glucosamine, insoles, intra-articular corticosteroids, intra-articular hyaluronan, joint bracing, knee replacement, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (including topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), opioid analgesics, osteotomy, simple analgesics, and taping.

2007-01-01

153

Effect of a natural extract of chicken combs with a high content of hyaluronic acid (Hyal-Joint®) on pain relief and quality of life in subjects with knee osteoarthritis: a pilot randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Intra-articular hyaluronic acid represents a substantive addition to the therapeutic armamentarium in knee osteoarthritis. We examined the effect of dietary supplementation with a natural extract of chicken combs with a high content of hyaluronic acid (60%) (Hyal-Joint®) (active test product, AP) on pain and quality of life in subjects with osteoarthritis of the knee. METHODS: Twenty subjects aged ?40

Douglas S Kalman; Maria Heimer; Anita Valdeon; Howard Schwartz; Eric Sheldon

2008-01-01

154

Lessons from a non-domestic canid: joint disease in captive raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides).  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to describe pathological changes of the shoulder, elbow, hip and stifle joints of 16 museum skeletons of the raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides). The subjects had been held in long-term captivity and were probably used for fur farming or research, thus allowing sufficient longevity for joint disease to become recognisable. The prevalence of disorders that include osteochondrosis, osteoarthritis and changes compatible with hip dysplasia, was surprisingly high. Other changes that reflect near-normal or mild pathological conditions, including prominent articular margins and mild bony periarticular rim, were also prevalent. Our data form a basis for comparing joint pathology of captive raccoon dogs with other mammals and also suggest that contributing roles of captivity and genetic predisposition should be explored further in non-domestic canids. PMID:23277118

Lawler, Dennis F; Evans, Richard H; Nieminen, Petteri; Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Smith, Gail K

155

Hand osteoarthritis—a heterogeneous disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent disorder. Hand OA is not one single disease, but a heterogeneous group of disorders. Radiographic signs of hand OA, such as osteophytes or joint space narrowing, can be found in up to 81% of the elderly population. Several hand OA subsets—such as nodal interphalangeal OA, thumb base OA and erosive OA—can be discriminated. Furthermore,

Wing-Yee Kwok; Margreet Kloppenburg

2011-01-01

156

Estrogens, osteoarthritis and inflammation.  

PubMed

Estrogens participate in several biological processes through different molecular mechanisms. Their final actions consist of a combination of both direct and indirect effects on different organ and tissues. Estrogen may have pro- and anti-inflammatory properties depending on the situation and the involved tissue. In general, acute loss of estrogens increases the levels of reactive oxygen species and activates nuclear factor-?B and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, indicating their predominant anti-inflammatory properties. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression has been shown to be attenuated by estrogen replacement. Osteoarthritis and cardiovascular disease are two of the more prevalent diseases once menopause is established, which has suggested the link between estrogens and both processes. In addition, deletion of estrogen receptors in female mice results in cartilage damage, osteophytosis and changes in the subchondral bone of the joints suggesting that estrogens have a protective role on the maintenance of joint homeostasis. Furthermore, in spite of the negative effect of estrogen replacement reported in 2002 by the Women's Health Initiative study, several works published afterwards have explored the potential protective effect of estrogen supplementation in animal models and have postulated that these actions may justify a beneficial role of estrogens in different diseases where inflammation is the major feature. In this review, we will analyze the effects of estrogens on certain pathological situations such as osteoarthritis, some autoimmune diseases and coronary heart disease, especially in postmenopausal women. PMID:23352515

Martín-Millán, Marta; Castañeda, Santos

2013-01-23

157

Vacuum phenomenon in osteoarthritis of the atlanto-odontoid joint: CT findings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Out of 620 consecutive examinations of the atlanto-odontoid joint in patients referred for computed tomography (CT) of the brain or paranasal sinuses, gas collection within the atlanto-odontoid joint was observed in 12 (1.9%). Degenerative abnormalities at the atlanto-odontoid joint were significantly more frequent in patients with a gas-induced vacuum phenomenon than in an age-matched control group. The CT findings and

Jiri Zapletal; Ruben E. M. Hekster; Jan T. Wilmink; Jo Hermans

1995-01-01

158

Tibial plateau size is related to grade of joint space narrowing and osteophytes in healthy women and in women with osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Objective: To determine the relation of bone size to radiographic severity in knee osteoarthritis. Methods: 149 women (81 healthy and 68 with knee osteoarthritis) underwent knee radiography and magnetic resonance imaging on their symptomatic or dominant knee. Tibial plateau bone area was measured at baseline and at follow up. Results: Women with osteoarthritis had larger medial and lateral tibial plateau bone area (mean (SD): 1850 (240) mm2 and 1279 (220) mm2, respectively) than healthy women (1670 (200) mm2 and 1050 (130) mm2) (p<0.001 for both differences). For each increase in grade of osteophyte, an increase in bone area was seen of 146 mm2 in the medial compartment and 102 mm2 in the lateral compartment. Similarly, for each increase in grade of joint space narrowing, tibial plateau bone area increased by 160 mm2 in the medial compartment and 131 mm2 in the lateral compartment (significance of regression coefficients all p<0.001). These relations persisted after adjusting for potential confounders, with the exception of the association between grade of medial osteophytes and medial plateau area. Conclusions: With increasing severity of radiographic knee osteoarthritis, tibial plateau size increases. Whether this bone increase plays a role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis remains to be determined.

Wluka, A; Wang, Y; Davis, S; Cicuttini, F

2005-01-01

159

Prevalence of generalised osteoarthritis in patients with advanced hip and knee osteoarthritis: The Ulm Osteoarthritis Study  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES—Different prevalences of generalised osteoarthritis (GOA) in patients with knee and hip OA have been reported. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate radiographic and clinical patterns of disease in a hospital based population of patient subgroups with advanced hip and knee OA and to compare the prevalence of GOA in patients with hip or knee OA, taking potential confounding factors into account.?METHODS—420 patients with hip OA and 389 patients with knee OA scheduled for unilateral total joint replacement in four hospitals underwent radiographic analysis of ipsilateral and contralateral hip or knee joint and both hands in addition to a standardised interview and clinical examination. According to the severity of radiographic changes in the contralateral joints (using Kellgren-Lawrence ? grade 2 as case definition) participants were classified as having either unilateral or bilateral OA. If radiographic changes of two joint groups of the hands (first carpometacarpal joint and proximal/distal interphalangeal joints defined as two separate joint groups) were present, patients were categorised as having GOA.?RESULTS—Patients with hip OA were younger (mean age 60.4 years) and less likely to be female (52.4%) than patients with knee OA (66.3 years and 72.5% respectively). Intensity of pain and functional impairment at hospital admission was similar in both groups, while patients with knee OA had a longer symptom duration (median 10 years) compared with patients with hip OA (5 years). In 41.7% of patients with hip OA and 33.4% of patients with knee OA an underlying pathological condition could be observed in the replaced joint, which allowed a classification as secondary OA. Some 82.1% of patients with hip and 87.4% of patients with knee OA had radiographic changes in their contralateral joints (bilateral disease). The prevalence of GOA increased with age and was higher in female patients. GOA was observed more often in patients with knee OA than in patients with hip OA (34.9% versus 19.3%; OR=2.24; 95% CI: 1.56, 3.21). Adjustment for the different age and sex distribution in both patient groups, however, takes away most of the difference (OR=1.32; 95% CI: 0.89, 1.96).?CONCLUSION—The crude results confirm previous reports as well as the clinical impression of GOA being more prevalent in patients with advanced knee OA than in patients with advanced hip OA. However, these different patterns might be attributed to a large part to a different distribution of age and sex in these hospital based populations.?? Keywords: hip osteoarthritis; knee osteoarthritis; hand osteoarthritis; generalised osteoarthritis

Gunther, K; Sturmer, T; Sauerland, S; Zeissig, I; Sun, Y; Kessler, S; Scharf, H; Brenner, H; Puhl, W

1998-01-01

160

The relation between total joint arthroplasty and risk for serious cardiovascular events in patients with moderate-severe osteoarthritis: propensity score matched landmark analysis  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine whether total joint arthroplasty of the hip and knee reduces the risk for serious cardiovascular events in patients with moderate-severe osteoarthritis. Design Propensity score matched landmark analysis. Setting Ontario, Canada. Participants 2200 adults with hip or knee osteoarthritis aged 55 or more at recruitment (1996-98) and followed prospectively until death or 2011. Main outcome measure Rates of serious cardiovascular events for those who received a primary total joint arthroplasty compared with those did not within an exposure period of three years after baseline assessment. Results The propensity score matched cohort consisted of 153 matched pairs of participants with moderate-severe arthritis. Over a median follow-up period of seven years after the landmark date (start of the study), matched participants who underwent a total joint arthroplasty during the exposure period were significantly less likely than those who did not to experience a cardiovascular event (hazards ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.43 to 0.74, P<0.001). Within seven years of the exposure period the absolute risk reduction was 12.4% (95% confidence interval 1.7% to 23.1%) and number needed to treat was 8 (95% confidence interval 4 to 57 patients). Conclusions Using a propensity matched landmark analysis in a population cohort with advanced hip or knee osteoarthritis, this study found a cardioprotective benefit of primary elective total joint arthroplasty.

2013-01-01

161

Pattern of osteoarthritis in a West African teaching hospital.  

PubMed Central

The study of the pattern of osteoarthritis in different populations may yield valuable aetiological clues and also allow subtypes to be defined. Over one year 252 osteoarthritic joints from 140 patients seen at a West African teaching hospital were prospectively reviewed. The knee was the joint most often affected. Hip and hand disease, as well as Heberden's nodes, were uncommon. Joint disease was predominantly monoarticular; no patient had three or more sites affected.

Adebajo, A O

1991-01-01

162

High-resolution x-ray guided three-dimensional diffuse optical tomography of joint tissues in hand osteoarthritis: Morphological and functional assessments  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the potential use of multimodality functional imaging techniques to identify the quantitative optical findings that can be used to distinguish between osteoarthritic and normal finger joints. Methods: Between 2006 and 2009, the distal interphalangeal finger joints from 40 female subjects including 22 patients and 18 healthy controls were examined clinically and scanned by a hybrid imaging system. This system integrated x-ray tomosynthetic setup with a diffuse optical imaging system. Optical absorption and scattering images were recovered based on a regularization-based hybrid reconstruction algorithm. A receiver operating characteristic curve was used to calculate the statistical significance of specific optical features obtained from osteoarthritic and healthy joints groups. Results: The three-dimensional optical and x-ray images captured made it possible to quantify optical properties and joint space width of finger joints. Based on the recovered optical absorption and scattering parameters, the authors observed statistically significant differences between healthy and osteoarthritis finger joints. Conclusions: The statistical results revealed that sensitivity and specificity values up to 92% and 100%, respectively, can be achieved when optical properties of joint tissues were used as classifiers. This suggests that these optical imaging parameters are possible indicators for diagnosing osteoarthritis and monitoring its progression.

Yuan Zhen; Zhang Qizhi; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang Huabei [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Division of Rheumatology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

2010-08-15

163

High-resolution x-ray guided three-dimensional diffuse optical tomography of joint tissues in hand osteoarthritis: Morphological and functional assessments  

PubMed Central

Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the potential use of multimodality functional imaging techniques to identify the quantitative optical findings that can be used to distinguish between osteoarthritic and normal finger joints. Methods: Between 2006 and 2009, the distal interphalangeal finger joints from 40 female subjects including 22 patients and 18 healthy controls were examined clinically and scanned by a hybrid imaging system. This system integrated x-ray tomosynthetic setup with a diffuse optical imaging system. Optical absorption and scattering images were recovered based on a regularization-based hybrid reconstruction algorithm. A receiver operating characteristic curve was used to calculate the statistical significance of specific optical features obtained from osteoarthritic and healthy joints groups. Results: The three-dimensional optical and x-ray images captured made it possible to quantify optical properties and joint space width of finger joints. Based on the recovered optical absorption and scattering parameters, the authors observed statistically significant differences between healthy and osteoarthritis finger joints. Conclusions: The statistical results revealed that sensitivity and specificity values up to 92% and 100%, respectively, can be achieved when optical properties of joint tissues were used as classifiers. This suggests that these optical imaging parameters are possible indicators for diagnosing osteoarthritis and monitoring its progression.

Yuan, Zhen; Zhang, Qizhi; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang, Huabei

2010-01-01

164

Vibration Arthrography as a Diagnostic Method for Osteoarthritis of the Knee joint  

Microsoft Academic Search

The technique of vibration arthrography (VAG) permits the non-invasive evaluation of internal derangements of the knee. In this method, the delicate sounds emitted from a joint are recorded by a sensitive detector which is placed on a joint, and the resultant signals are depicted by an oscilloscope. The primary objective in this study was to examine the vibration signal patterns

Pooneh Afkari

165

Efficacy of intra-articular hyaluronan (Synvisc®) for the treatment of osteoarthritis affecting the first metatarsophalangeal joint of the foot (hallux limitus): study protocol for a randomised placebo controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) of the foot, termed hallux limitus, is common and painful. Numerous non-surgical interventions have been proposed for this disorder, however there is limited evidence for their efficacy. Intra-articular injections of hyaluronan have shown beneficial effects in case-series and clinical trials for the treatment of osteoarthritis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint. However, no

Shannon E Munteanu; Hylton B Menz; Gerard V Zammit; Karl B Landorf; Christopher J Handley; Ayman ElZarka; Jason DeLuca

2009-01-01

166

Does long-distance running cause osteoarthritis?  

PubMed

There is a dose-response relationship between physical activity and the reduced risk of some diseases (eg, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus). At a certain "dose," however, the reduced risk of some diseases may be offset by an increased risk of injury and osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis can be caused by trauma to, or overuse of, the joints. Sports injuries often occur as a result of dysfunctions in balance or the musculoskeletal system operating in nonneutral mechanics. It is unclear if long-distance running causes the knee and hip joints to deteriorate. The results of animal studies reveal a pattern of increased incidence of arthritis in these joints when there is a history of injury or use in atypical environments (eg, laboratory settings). Human studies show an increase in radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis in endurance sports athletes, but no related increase in symptoms reported. Although there are not currently enough data to give clear recommendations to long-distance runners, it appears that long-distance running does not increase the risk of osteoarthritis of the knees and hips for healthy people who have no other counterindications for this kind of physical activity. Long-distance running might even have a protective effect against joint degeneration. The authors recommend further study. PMID:16790540

Cymet, Tyler Childs; Sinkov, Vladimir

2006-06-01

167

Progression of Cartilage Degradation, Bone Resorption and Pain in Rat Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthritis Induced by Injection of Iodoacetate  

PubMed Central

Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is an important subtype of temporomandibular disorders. A simple and reproducible animal model that mimics the histopathologic changes, both in the cartilage and subchondral bone, and clinical symptoms of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJOA) would help in our understanding of its process and underlying mechanism. Objective To explore whether injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) into the upper compartment of rat TMJ could induce OA-like lesions. Methods Female rats were injected with varied doses of MIA into the upper compartment and observed for up to 12 weeks. Histologic, radiographic, behavioral, and molecular changes in the TMJ were evaluated by light and electron microscopy, MicroCT scanning, head withdrawal threshold test, real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and TUNEL assay. Results The intermediate zone of the disc loosened by 1 day post-MIA injection and thinned thereafter. Injection of an MIA dose of 0.5 mg or higher induced typical OA-like lesions in the TMJ within 4 weeks. Condylar destruction presented in a time-dependent manner, including chondrocyte apoptosis in the early stages, subsequent cartilage matrix disorganization and subchondral bone erosion, fibrosis, subchondral bone sclerosis, and osteophyte formation in the late stages. Nociceptive responses increased in the early stages, corresponding to severe synovitis. Furthermore, chondrocyte apoptosis and an imbalance between anabolism and catabolism of cartilage and subchondral bone might account for the condylar destruction. Conclusions Multi-level data demonstrated a reliable and convenient rat model of TMJOA could be induced by MIA injection into the upper compartment. The model might facilitate TMJOA related researches.

Wang, Xue-Dong; Kou, Xiao-Xing; He, Dan-Qing; Zeng, Min-Min; Meng, Zhen; Bi, Rui-Yun; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Jie-Ni; Gan, Ye-Hua; Zhou, Yan-Heng

2012-01-01

168

Obesity & osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

The most significant impact of obesity on the musculoskeletal system is associated with osteoarthritis (OA), a disabling degenerative joint disorder characterized by pain, decreased mobility and negative impact on quality of life. OA pathogenesis relates to both excessive joint loading and altered biomechanical patterns together with hormonal and cytokine dysregulation. Obesity is associated with the incidence and progression of OA of both weight-bearing and non weight-bearing joints, to rate of joint replacements as well as operative complications. Weight loss in OA can impart clinically significant improvements in pain and delay progression of joint structural damage. Further work is required to determine the relative contributions of mechanical and metabolic factors in the pathogenesis of OA. PMID:24056594

King, Lauren K; March, Lyn; Anandacoomarasamy, Ananthila

2013-08-01

169

Obesity & osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

The most significant impact of obesity on the musculoskeletal system is associated with osteoarthritis (OA), a disabling degenerative joint disorder characterized by pain, decreased mobility and negative impact on quality of life. OA pathogenesis relates to both excessive joint loading and altered biomechanical patterns together with hormonal and cytokine dysregulation. Obesity is associated with the incidence and progression of OA of both weight-bearing and non weight-bearing joints, to rate of joint replacements as well as operative complications. Weight loss in OA can impart clinically significant improvements in pain and delay progression of joint structural damage. Further work is required to determine the relative contributions of mechanical and metabolic factors in the pathogenesis of OA.

King, Lauren K.; March, Lyn; Anandacoomarasamy, Ananthila

2013-01-01

170

Athletics and Osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Athletes, and an increasing number of middle aged and older people who want to participate in athletics, may question whether regular vigorous physical activ ity increases their risk of developing osteoarthritis. To answer this, the clinical syndrome of osteoarthritis must be distinguished from periarticular soft tissue pain associated with activity and from the development of osteophytes. Sports that subject joints

Joseph A. Buckwalter

1997-01-01

171

Is running associated with degenerative joint disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little information is available regarding the long-term effects, if any, of running on the musculoskeletal system. The authors compared the prevalence of degenerative joint disease among 17 male runners with 18 male nonrunners. Running subjects (53% marathoners) ran a mean of 44.8 km (28 miles)\\/wk for 12 years. Pain and swelling of hips, knees, ankles and feet and other musculoskeletal

R. S. Panush; C. Schmidt; J. R. Caldwell; N. L. Edwards; S. Longley; R. Yonker; E. Webster; J. Nauman; J. Stork; H. Pettersson

1986-01-01

172

Spontaneous osteo-arthritis of the knee-joint in C57BL mice receiving chronic oral treatment with NSAID's or prednisone  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a statistically planned study based on quantitative radiography, treatment for 25–26 weeks with the 2 NSAIDs, diclofenac sodium, or indomethacin (both 0.5 and 1.5 mg\\/kg p.o. daily), or prednisone (6 mg\\/kg p.o.) had no influence on the progression of spontaneous osteo-arthritis of the knee-joint of the C57BL mouse, by comparison with placebo-treated controls.

A. Pataki; H. P. Graf; E. Witzemann

1990-01-01

173

Mechanisms of quadriceps muscle weakness in knee joint osteoarthritis: the effects of prolonged vibration on torque and muscle activation in osteoarthritic and healthy control subjects  

PubMed Central

Introduction A consequence of knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) is an inability to fully activate the quadriceps muscles, a problem termed arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI). AMI leads to marked quadriceps weakness that impairs physical function and may hasten disease progression. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether ?-loop dysfunction contributes to AMI in people with knee joint OA. Methods Fifteen subjects with knee joint OA and 15 controls with no history of knee joint pathology participated in this study. Quadriceps and hamstrings peak isometric torque (Nm) and electromyography (EMG) amplitude were collected before and after 20 minutes of 50 Hz vibration applied to the infrapatellar tendon. Between-group differences in pre-vibration torque were analysed using a one-way analysis of covariance, with age, gender and body mass (kg) as the covariates. If the ?-loop is intact, vibration should decrease torque and EMG levels in the target muscle; if dysfunctional, then torque and EMG levels should not change following vibration. One-sample t tests were thus undertaken to analyse whether percentage changes in torque and EMG differed from zero after vibration in each group. In addition, analyses of covariance were utilised to analyse between-group differences in the percentage changes in torque and EMG following vibration. Results Pre-vibration quadriceps torque was significantly lower in the OA group compared with the control group (P = 0.005). Following tendon vibration, quadriceps torque (P < 0.001) and EMG amplitude (P ?0.001) decreased significantly in the control group but did not change in the OA group (all P > 0.299). Hamstrings torque and EMG amplitude were unchanged in both groups (all P > 0.204). The vibration-induced changes in quadriceps torque and EMG were significantly different between the OA and control groups (all P < 0.011). No between-group differences were observed for the change in hamstrings torque or EMG (all P > 0.554). Conclusions ?-loop dysfunction may contribute to AMI in individuals with knee joint OA, partially explaining the marked quadriceps weakness and atrophy that is often observed in this population.

2011-01-01

174

Burden of restraint, disablement, and ethnic identity: a case study of total joint replacement for osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Health disparities in total joint replacement have been documented based on gender and ethnicity in multiple countries. Absent are studies exploring the meaning of the procedures among diverse women, which is necessary to fully understand the impact of the disparity. Drawing on ethnographic data from a life course exploration of disablement among Mexican American women with mobility impairments, one woman's reasons for forgoing a joint replacement are considered. It is suggested that inequalities in disablement cannot be understood without considering the multiple cultural conflicts and loyalties that push and pull women in multiple directions. PMID:21767094

Harrison, Tracie

2011-08-01

175

Burden of Restraint, Disablement and Ethnic Identity: A Case Study of Total Joint Replacement for Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Health disparities in total joint replacement have been documented based on gender and ethnicity in multiple countries. Absent are studies exploring the meaning of the procedures among diverse women, which is necessary to fully understand the impact of the disparity. Drawing on ethnographic data from a life course exploration of disablement among Mexican American women with mobility impairments, one woman’s reasons for forgoing a joint replacement are considered. It is suggested that inequalities in disablement cannot be understood without considering the mulitple cultural conflicts and loyalties that push and pull women in multiple directions.

Harrison, Tracie

2010-01-01

176

Regenerative Injection Therapy with Whole Bone Marrow Aspirate for Degenerative Joint Disease: A Case Series  

PubMed Central

Regenerative therapeutic strategies for joint diseases usually employ either enriched concentrates of bone marrow-derived stem cells, chondrogenic preparations such as platelet-rich plasma, or irritant solutions such as hyperosmotic dextrose. In this case series, we describe our experience with a simple, cost-effective regenerative treatment using direct injection of unfractionated whole bone marrow (WBM) into osteoarthritic joints in combination with hyperosmotic dextrose. Seven patients with hip, knee or ankle osteoarthritis (OA) received two to seven treatments over a period of two to twelve months. Patient-reported assessments were collected in interviews and by questionnaire. All patients reported improvements with respect to pain, as well as gains in functionality and quality of life. Three patients, including two whose progress under other therapy had plateaued or reversed, achieved complete or near-complete symptomatic relief, and two additional patients achieved resumption of vigorous exercise. These preliminary findings suggest that OA treatment with WBM injection merits further investigation.

Hauser, Ross A.; Orlofsky, Amos

2013-01-01

177

Regenerative injection therapy with whole bone marrow aspirate for degenerative joint disease: a case series.  

PubMed

Regenerative therapeutic strategies for joint diseases usually employ either enriched concentrates of bone marrow-derived stem cells, chondrogenic preparations such as platelet-rich plasma, or irritant solutions such as hyperosmotic dextrose. In this case series, we describe our experience with a simple, cost-effective regenerative treatment using direct injection of unfractionated whole bone marrow (WBM) into osteoarthritic joints in combination with hyperosmotic dextrose. Seven patients with hip, knee or ankle osteoarthritis (OA) received two to seven treatments over a period of two to twelve months. Patient-reported assessments were collected in interviews and by questionnaire. All patients reported improvements with respect to pain, as well as gains in functionality and quality of life. Three patients, including two whose progress under other therapy had plateaued or reversed, achieved complete or near-complete symptomatic relief, and two additional patients achieved resumption of vigorous exercise. These preliminary findings suggest that OA treatment with WBM injection merits further investigation. PMID:24046512

Hauser, Ross A; Orlofsky, Amos

2013-09-04

178

Trapeziectomy for trapeziometacarpal joint osteoarthritis: is ligament reconstruction and temporary stabilisation of the pseudarthrosis with a Kirschner wire important?  

PubMed

This randomised prospective study compared two operations for trapeziometacarpal joint osteoarthritis: trapeziectomy with Flexor carpi radialis ligament reconstruction, tendon interposition and Kirschner wire insertion followed by splintage for 6 weeks (T+LRTI) and excision of the trapezium with no Kirschner wire and immobilisation of the thumb in a soft bandage for only 3 weeks (T). Sixty-seven thumbs with trapeziectomy (T) and 61 with trapeziectomy and ligament reconstruction and tendon interposition (T+LRTI) were assessed preoperatively and at 3-months and 1-year after surgery. Forty-seven percent and 73% of patients reported no pain or only aching after use at 3-months and 1-year respectively and the DASH and Patient Evaluation Measure (PEM) outcome scores reduced postoperatively indicating improved function. However the pain, DASH and PEM scores, and also key and tip thumb pinch and all the other clinical outcome measures, did not differ significantly between the two groups at either 3-months or 1-year after surgery. PMID:19321528

Davis, T R C; Pace, A

2009-03-25

179

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Changes in Human Joint in Aging and Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Objective The development and patterns of spontaneous aging-related changes in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and their relationship to articular cartilage degeneration are not well characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate the types and temporal sequence of aging-related ACL changes and establish the correlation with cartilage lesion patterns at all stages of OA development in human knee joints without prior joint trauma. Methods Human knee joints (n=120; 65 donors; age 23-92) were obtained at autopsy and ACL and cartilage were graded macroscopically and histologically. Inflammation surrounding the ACL was assessed separately. Results Histological ACL substance scores and ligament sheath inflammation scores increased with aging. Collagen fiber disorganization was the earliest and most prevalent change. The severity of mucoid degeneration and chondroid metaplasia in the ACL increased with development of cartilage lesions. A correlation between ACL and cartilage degeneration was observed, especially in the medial compartment of the knee joint. Conclusion ACL degeneration is highly prevalent in knees with cartilage defects, and may even precede cartilage changes. Hence, ACL deficiencies may not only be important in post-traumatic OA, but also a feature associated with knee OA pathogenesis in general.

Hasegawa, Akihiko; Otsuki, Shuhei; Pauli, Chantal; Miyaki, Shigeru; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Kinoshita, Mitsuo; Koziol, James; D'Lima, Darryl D.; Lotz, Martin K.

2011-01-01

180

Ligament Injury, Reconstruction and Osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The recent literature on the factors that initiate and accelerate the progression of osteoarthritis following ligament injuries and their treatment is reviewed. RECENT FINDINGS: The ligament-injured joint is at high risk for osteoarthritis. Current conservative (e.g. rehabilitation) and surgical (e.g. reconstruction) treatment options appear not to reduce osteoarthritis following ligament injury. The extent of osteoarthritis does not appear dependent on which joint is affected, or the presence of damage to other tissues within the joint. Mechanical instability is the likely initiator of osteoarthritis in the ligament-injured patient. SUMMARY: The mechanism osteoarthritis begins with the injury rendering the joint unstable. The instability increases the sliding between the joint surfaces and reduces the efficiency of the muscles, factors that alter joint contact mechanics. The load distribution in the cartilage and underlying bone is disrupted, causing wear and increasing shear, which eventually leads to the osteochondral degeneration. The catalyst to the mechanical process is the inflammation response induced by the injury and sustained during healing. In contrast, the inflammation could be responsible for onset, while the mechanical factors accelerate progression. The mechanisms leading to osteoarthritis following ligament injury have not been fully established. A better understanding of these mechanisms should lead to alternative surgical, drug, and tissue-engineering treatment options, which could eliminate osteoarthritis in these patients. Progress is being made on all fronts. Considering that osteoarthritis is likely to occur despite current treatment options, the best solution may be prevention. PMID:17710194

Fleming, Braden C; Hulstyn, Michael J; Oksendahl, Heidi L; Fadale, Paul D

2005-10-01

181

Ligament Injury, Reconstruction and Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Purpose of Review The recent literature on the factors that initiate and accelerate the progression of osteoarthritis following ligament injuries and their treatment is reviewed. Recent Findings The ligament-injured joint is at high risk for osteoarthritis. Current conservative (e.g. rehabilitation) and surgical (e.g. reconstruction) treatment options appear not to reduce osteoarthritis following ligament injury. The extent of osteoarthritis does not appear dependent on which joint is affected, or the presence of damage to other tissues within the joint. Mechanical instability is the likely initiator of osteoarthritis in the ligament-injured patient. Summary The mechanism osteoarthritis begins with the injury rendering the joint unstable. The instability increases the sliding between the joint surfaces and reduces the efficiency of the muscles, factors that alter joint contact mechanics. The load distribution in the cartilage and underlying bone is disrupted, causing wear and increasing shear, which eventually leads to the osteochondral degeneration. The catalyst to the mechanical process is the inflammation response induced by the injury and sustained during healing. In contrast, the inflammation could be responsible for onset, while the mechanical factors accelerate progression. The mechanisms leading to osteoarthritis following ligament injury have not been fully established. A better understanding of these mechanisms should lead to alternative surgical, drug, and tissue-engineering treatment options, which could eliminate osteoarthritis in these patients. Progress is being made on all fronts. Considering that osteoarthritis is likely to occur despite current treatment options, the best solution may be prevention.

Fleming, Braden C.; Hulstyn, Michael J.; Oksendahl, Heidi L.; Fadale, Paul D.

2007-01-01

182

Molecular monitoring of equine joint homeostasis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diseases affecting synovial joints are a major cause of chronic disability both in humans and in companion animal species, most notably dogs and horses. As progressive deterioration of the articular cartilage is the hallmark of degenerative joint disease or osteoarthritis, research efforts traditionally tended to focus primarily on cartilage pathology. However, in recent years it has become clear that synovial

Janny C. de Grauw

2011-01-01

183

Erosive osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Erosive osteoarthritis (EOA) is believed to be a clinically uncommon subset of generalized osteoarthritis (OA) characterized by a clinical course, which is frequently aggressive. The diagnosis of EOA is accepted only for patients meeting American College of Rheumatology clinical criteria for OA of the hand and showing radiographic aspects of articular surface erosions. Conditions to be considered in the differential diagnosis include primarily nodal generalized OA, psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. It is possible to find erosive changes resembling EOA in endocrine diseases, microcrystal-induced diseases, chronic renal diseases, autoimmune diseases and others. Despite the absence of a clear etiology, immunogenetic studies are useful in identifying a possible predisposition to developing EOA in some subjects. No definitive therapeutic approach to EOA has been reported. It is reasonable to assume that in the presence of a symptomatic EOA our therapeutic approach should differ from that used for common, nodal, non-EOA. PMID:15454130

Punzi, Leonardo; Ramonda, Roberta; Sfriso, Paolo

2004-10-01

184

PA01.70. A clinical study on the efficacy of Jalaukawacharana in the management of janu sandhigata vata w.s.r. To osteoarthritis of knee joint  

PubMed Central

Purpose: The sandhigata vata described in Ayurveda causes the symptomatology such as shula, sotha, stambhana, sparsha asahyata, sputana, akunchana prasarana vedana etc. whereas the osteoarthritis described in modern science can be correlated with sandhigata vata because it also produces the features such as inflammation, pain, stiffness, limited movements and deformity in severe cases. Osteoarthritis is the 2nd most common illness with 22 29% of prevalence in global population. Presently available modern medication is causing many side and toxic effects which sometimes may need hospitalization also. Hence it requires the need to find such a therapy which gives better relief without any side or toxic effects and also natural, cost effective and easily available. Hence the non surgical biological therapeutic means such jalaukawacharana was selected. Method: Total of 20 patients were selected on the basis of selection criteria (inclusion and exclusion criteria) and then they are grouped into two i.e. 10 each in Jalukawacharana and Yogaraja guggulu group. The jalukawacharana was done with 7 day interval for about 6 sittings in 1st group where as in 2nd group yogaraja guggulu 125mg thrice a day was given for 6 weeks. For assessment, the Koos was taken as subjective and range of motion was taken as objective parameter for proper assessment and they are subjected for statistical validity. Result: After analyzing, the jalukawacharana shown significant and remarkable result in comparison with Yogaraja guguulu. The symptomatology was reduced to great extent and range of motion is also improved a lot by jalukawacharana than with yogaraja guggulu. Conclusion: The janu sandhi gata vata can correlate or compared with osteoarthritis of knee joint. The non surgical, biological therapeutic means i.e. jalukawacharana shown good result in treating with janu sandhigata vata i.e. osteoarthritis of knee joint in comparison with standard group i.e. yogaraja guggulu.

Vardhan, S Ashok; Balakrishnan, T. V.; Rao, S Dattatreya; Rao, M Bhaskar; Kumar, K Srinivasa; Bhaskara Reddy, K. V. V. Vijaya

2012-01-01

185

?-Endorphin, Met-enkephalin and corresponding opioid receptors within synovium of patients with joint trauma, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

Objective Intra?articularly applied opioid agonists or antagonists modulate pain after knee surgery and in chronic arthritis. Therefore, the expression of ??endorphin (END), Met?enkephalin (ENK), and ? and ? opioid receptors (ORs) within synovium of patients with joint trauma (JT), osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were examined. Methods Synovial samples were subjected to double immunohistochemical analysis of opioid peptides with immune cell markers, and of ORs with the neuronal markers calcitonin gene?related peptide (CGRP) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Results END and ENK were expressed by macrophage?like (CD68+) and fibroblast?like (CD68?) cells within synovial lining layers of all disorders. In the sublining layers, END and ENK were mostly expressed by granulocytes in patients with JT, and by macrophages/monocytes, lymphocytes and plasma cells in those with OA and RA. Overall, END? and ENK?immunoreactive (IR) cells were more abundant in patients with RA than in those with OA and JT. ORs were found on nerve fibres and immune cells in all patients. OR?IR nerve fibres were significantly more abundant in patients with RA than in those with OA and JT. ?ORs and ?ORs were coexpressed with CGRP but not with TH. Conclusions Parallel to the severity of inflammation, END and ENK in immune cells and their receptors on sensory nerve terminals are more abundant in patients with RA than in those with JT and OA. These findings are consistent with the notion that, with prolonged and enhanced inflammation, the immune and peripheral nervous systems upregulate sensory nerves expressing ORs and their ligands to counterbalance pain and inflammation.

Mousa, Shaaban A; Straub, Rainer H; Schafer, Michael; Stein, Christoph

2007-01-01

186

[Osteoarthritis of the trapeziometacarpal joint in men: different stakes. Results of three surgical techniques].  

PubMed

Basal thumb arthritis is less common in men, but the functional implication is different in this manual worker or active retired population. The objective was to analyse the results of three surgical procedure in an exclusively men's population. Twenty-eight patients (19 partial trapeziectomy with interposition of a chondrocostal autograft, seven total trapeziectomy and two prosthesis), with a mean age of 69 years old, were reviewed at a mean follow-up of 71 months. Mobility and pain were similar in the three populations. But the strength and Dash scores were better in the cartilage group. Radiologically the length of the thumb ray was greater in the cartilage group and no signs of loosening were observed in the prosthesis group. The surgery of reference in this population is the arthrodesis of the trapeziometacarpal joint. But the lack of mobility is disabling, the strength is questionable and painlessness varies due to high rates of non-union. Only one study compared four surgical procedures in an exclusively male population and total trapeziectomy seemed to give the best results. But this technique carries risk of shortening of the thumb ray. Even if the comparison is difficult, the association of partial trapeziectomy with interposition of costal cartilage graft seems to give better stability to the thumb column by preserving length as well as greater strength compared to total trapeziectomy. We advocate this procedure for basal thumb arthritis in men. PMID:21084209

Gallinet, D; Gasse, N; Blanchet, N; Tropet, Y; Obert, L

2010-11-16

187

S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine for Treatment of Depression, Osteoarthritis, and Liver Disease. Evidence Report/Technology Assessment Number 64.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective of this report was to conduct a search of the published literature on the use of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) for the treatment of osteoarthritis, depression, and liver disease, and on the basis of that search, to evaluate the evidence for...

M. Hardy

2002-01-01

188

Joint Leveling for Advanced Kienbock's Disease  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE The use of joint leveling procedures to treat Kienbock’s disease has been limited by the degree of disease advancement. This study was designed to compare clinical and radiographic outcomes of wrists with more advanced Kienbock’s disease (stage IIIB) to wrists with less advanced disease (stage II/IIIA) following radius shortening osteotomy. METHODS This retrospective study enrolled 31 adult wrists (30 patients, mean age 39 years), treated by radius shortening osteotomy between two institutions for either stage IIIB (n=14) or stage II/IIIA (n=17) disease. Evaluation was carried out at a mean of 74 months (IIIB, 77 months; II/IIIA, 72 months). Radiographic assessment determined disease progression. Clinical outcomes were determined by validated patient-based and objective measures. RESULTS Patient-based outcome ratings of wrists treated for stage IIIB were similar to those with stage II/IIIA [QuickDASH (15 vs 12:p=.63), MMWS (84 vs 87:p=.59), VAS pain (1.2 vs 1.7:p=.45), VAS function (2.6 vs 2.1:p=.59)]. The average flexion/extension arc was 102° for wrists with stage IIIB and 106° for wrists with stage II/IIIA Kienbock’s (p=.70). Grip strength was 77% of the opposite side for stage IIIB wrists versus 85% for stage II/IIIA (p=.25). Postoperative carpal height ratio and radioscaphoid angle were worse (p<.05) for wrists treated for stage IIIB (0.46:65°) than stage II/IIIA (0.53:53°) disease. Radiographic disease progression occurred in 7 wrists (6 stage II/IIIA: 1 stage IIIB). The one stage IIIB wrist that progressed underwent wrist arthrodesis. CONCLUSIONS In this limited series, clinical outcomes of radius shortening using validated, patient-based assessment instruments and objective measures failed to demonstrate predicted “clinically relevant” differences between stage II/IIIA and IIIB Kienbock’s. Provided the high percentage successful clinical outcomes in this case series of 14 stage IIIB wrists, we believe that static carpal malalignment does not preclude radius shortening osteotomy. Level of Evidence IV; retrospective case series

Calfee, Ryan P.; Van Steyn, Marlo O.; Gyuricza, Cassie; Adams, Amelia; Weiland, Andrew J.; Gelberman, Richard H.

2010-01-01

189

Hematic levels of type I collagen C-telopeptide in erosive versus nonerosive osteoarthritis of the hands.  

PubMed

C-telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX I) is considered to be a specific marker sensitive to bone resorption; conversely, type II collagen C-telopeptide (CTX II) is considered to be a useful cartilage marker. CTX I assays in serum and urine samples of patients with various metabolic bone disorders, such as osteoporosis and Paget's disease, have been reported to show increased levels of this collagen fragment. In patients with knee osteoarthritis, a decrease in CTX I and an increase in CTX II were found. Osteoarthritis of the hands is one of the most common forms of osteoarthritis. Erosive osteoarthritis of the hands is a variant entity in which, as a consequence of rapid chondrolysis, bone involvement occurs very early in the process. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare CTX I assays in patients with erosive osteoarthritis of the hands versus those with nonerosive osteoarthritis of the hands. From a group of over 200 patients fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology's criteria for hand osteoarthritis, we considered the first 21 consecutive postmenopausal women with hand nodal osteoarthritis and disease duration of > or = 5 years and the first 21 consecutive postmenopausal women additionally presenting central joint erosions and disease duration of > or = 5 years. Our results show that in patients with erosive osteoarthritis, CTX I values are much higher than those in patients with nonerosive osteoarthritis. PMID:12854884

Rovetta, G; Monteforte, P; Grignolo, M C; Brignone, A; Buffrini, L

2003-01-01

190

Advances in osteoarthritis genetics.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, is a highly debilitating disease of the joints and can lead to severe pain and disability. There is no cure for OA. Current treatments often fail to alleviate its symptoms leading to an increased demand for joint replacement surgery. Previous epidemiological and genetic research has established that OA is a multifactorial disease with both environmental and genetic components. Over the past 6 years, a candidate gene study and several genome-wide association scans (GWAS) in populations of Asian and European descent have collectively established 15 loci associated with knee or hip OA that have been replicated with genome-wide significance, shedding some light on the aetiogenesis of the disease. All OA associated variants to date are common in frequency and appear to confer moderate to small effect sizes. Some of the associated variants are found within or near genes with clear roles in OA pathogenesis, whereas others point to unsuspected, less characterised pathways. These studies have also provided further evidence in support of the existence of ethnic, sex, and joint specific effects in OA and have highlighted the importance of expanded and more homogeneous phenotype definitions in genetic studies of OA. PMID:23868913

Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Zeggini, Eleftheria

2013-07-18

191

Animal models of osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Animal models of osteoarthritis are used to study the pathogenesis of cartilage degeneration and to evaluate potential antiarthritic drugs for clinical use. Animal models of naturally occurring osteoarthritis (OA) occur in knee joints of guinea pigs, mice and other laboratory animal species. Transgenic models have been developed in mice. Commonly utilized surgical instability models include medial meniscal tear in guinea pigs and rats, medial or lateral partial meniscectomy in rabbits, medial partial or total meniscectomy or anterior cruciate transection in dogs. Additional models of cartilage degeneration can be induced by intra-articular iodoacetate injection or by administration of oral or parenteral quinolone antibiotics. None of these models have a proven track record of predicting efficacy in human disease since there are no agents that have been proven to provide anything other than symptomatic relief in human OA. However, agents that are active in these models are currently in clinical trials. Methodologies, gross and histopathologic features and comparisons to human disease will be discussed for the various models. PMID:15758487

Bendele, A M

2001-06-01

192

[Clinical presentation imaging and treatment of digital osteoarthritis].  

PubMed

Digital osteoarthritis relates to primarily the distal interphalangeal (DIP) and first carpometacarpal (CMC-I) joints. Heberden's nodes often accompany osteoarthritis of the DIP joints. Osteoarthritis of the PIP joints can be more painful and more inflammatory. It can be at the origin of Bouchard's nodes. The DIP and the PIP joints can be the seat of erosive lesions. Osteoarthritis of the MCP joints is rare. Osteoarthritis of the CMC-I joint is sometimes at the origin of a deformity of the thumb impairing its function and an atrophy of the thenar muscles. Treatment includes non-pharmacological and pharmacological modalities. Surgery is proposed after failure of the conservative approach. PMID:20408461

Van Linthoudt, Daniel

2010-03-17

193

Reappraising metalloproteinases in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis: destruction or repair?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Metalloproteinases such as the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and disintegrin-metalloproteinases with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTSs) have been implicated in the pathological destruction of joint tissues in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. These enzymes degrade extracellular matrix macromolecules and modulate factors governing cell behavior. They may also be involved in tissue repair, but become a part of the destructive disease process due to overexpression.

Gillian Murphy; Hideaki Nagase

2008-01-01

194

Chondroitin sulphation patterns in synovial fluid in osteoarthritis subsets  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVESTo determine concentrations of chondroitin sulphate (CS) disaccharides in knee synovial fluid (SF) from normal subjects and patients with osteoarthritis (OA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA), to test whether these variables differ between different diseases and subsets of OA.METHODSOA was subdivided into large joint OA (LJOA), nodal generalised OA (NGOA), and OA with calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition (CPA), with 25, 9,

Samantha Lewis; Margot Crossman; Joanne Flannelly; Carolyn Belcher; Michael Doherty; Michael T Bayliss; Roger M Mason

1999-01-01

195

Shoulder Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent cause of disability in the USA, affecting up to 32.8% of patients over the age of sixty. Treatment of shoulder OA is often controversial and includes both nonoperative and surgical modalities. Nonoperative modalities should be utilized before operative treatment is considered, particularly for patients with mild-to-moderate OA or when pain and functional limitations are modest despite more advanced radiographic changes. If conservative options fail, surgical treatment should be considered. Although different surgical procedures are available, as in other joints affected by severe OA, the most effective treatment is joint arthroplasty. The aim of this work is to give an overview of the currently available treatments of shoulder OA.

2013-01-01

196

Osteoarthritis year 2013 in review: clinical.  

PubMed

Some major themes over the past year in clinical research of osteoarthritis (OA) include obesity, muscle strength, pain mechanisms, novel disease modifying drugs, and risk factors for poor outcomes of joint replacement surgery. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed from January 2012 to December 2012. The articles selected for this review represent topics the authors thought best highlight recent clinical OA research. PMID:23831667

Arden, N K; Leyland, K M

2013-07-04

197

Efficacy of leech therapy in the management of osteoarthritis (Sandhivata).  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease) is the most common joint disorder. It mostly affects cartilage. The top layer of cartilage breaks down and wears away. Osteoarthritis is of two types, primary (idiopathic) and secondary. In idiopathic osteoarthritis, the most common form of the disease, no predisposing factor is apparent. Secondary OA is pathologically indistinguishable from idiopathic OA but is attributable to an underlying cause. In Ayurveda the disease Sandhivata resembles with osteoarthritis which is described under Vatavyadhi. The NSAIDs are the main drugs of choice in modern medicine which have lots of side effects and therefore are not safe for long-term therapy. Raktamokshan, i.e., blood letting is one of the ancient and important parasurgical procedures described in Ayurveda for treatment of various diseases. Of them, Jalaukavacharana or leech therapy has gained greater attention globally, because of its medicinal values. The saliva of leech contains numerous biologically active substances, which have antiinflammatory as well as anesthetic properties. Keeping this view in mind we have started leech therapy in the patients of osteoarthritis and found encouraging results. PMID:22408305

Rai, P K; Singh, A K; Singh, O P; Rai, N P; Dwivedi, A K

2011-04-01

198

Efficacy of leech therapy in the management of osteoarthritis (Sandhivata)  

PubMed Central

Osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease) is the most common joint disorder. It mostly affects cartilage. The top layer of cartilage breaks down and wears away. Osteoarthritis is of two types, primary (idiopathic) and secondary. In idiopathic osteoarthritis, the most common form of the disease, no predisposing factor is apparent. Secondary OA is pathologically indistinguishable from idiopathic OA but is attributable to an underlying cause. In Ayurveda the disease Sandhivata resembles with osteoarthritis which is described under Vatavyadhi. The NSAIDs are the main drugs of choice in modern medicine which have lots of side effects and therefore are not safe for long-term therapy. Raktamokshan, i.e., blood letting is one of the ancient and important parasurgical procedures described in Ayurveda for treatment of various diseases. Of them, Jalaukavacharana or leech therapy has gained greater attention globally, because of its medicinal values. The saliva of leech contains numerous biologically active substances, which have antiinflammatory as well as anesthetic properties. Keeping this view in mind we have started leech therapy in the patients of osteoarthritis and found encouraging results.

Rai, P. K.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, O. P.; Rai, N. P.; Dwivedi, A. K.

2011-01-01

199

Increased Chondrocyte Apoptosis Is Associated with Progression of Osteoarthritis in Spontaneous Guinea Pig Models of the Disease  

PubMed Central

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease characterised by degradation of articular cartilage and bone remodelling. For almost a decade chondrocyte apoptosis has been investigated as a possible mechanism of cartilage damage in OA, but its precise role in initiation and/or progression of OA remains to the determined. The aim of this study is to determine the role of chondrocyte apoptosis in spontaneous animal models of OA. Right tibias from six male Dunkin Hartley (DH) and Bristol Strain 2 (BS2) guinea pigs were collected at 10, 16, 24 and 30 weeks of age. Fresh-frozen sections of tibial epiphysis were microscopically scored for OA, and immunostained with caspase-3 and TUNEL for apoptotic chondrocytes. The DH strain had more pronounced cartilage damage than BS2, especially at 30 weeks. At this time point, the apoptotic chondrocytes were largely confined to the deep zone of articular cartilage (AC) with a greater percentage in the medial side of DH than BS2 (DH: 5.7%, 95% CI: 4.2–7.2), BS2: 4.8%, 95% CI: 3.8–5.8), p > 0.05). DH had a significant progression of chondrocyte death between 24 to 30 weeks during which time significant changes were observed in AC fibrillation, proteoglycan depletion and overall microscopic OA score. A strong correlation (p ? 0.01) was found between chondrocyte apoptosis and AC fibrillation (r = 0.3), cellularity (r = 0.4) and overall microscopic OA scores (r = 0.4). Overall, the rate of progression in OA and apoptosis over the study period was greater in the DH (versus BS2) and the medial AC (versus lateral). Chondrocyte apoptosis was higher at the later stage of OA development when the cartilage matrix was hypocellular and highly fibrillated, suggesting that chondrocyte apoptosis is a late event in OA.

Zamli, Zaitunnatakhin; Adams, Michael A.; Tarlton, John F.; Sharif, Mohammed

2013-01-01

200

Counterpoint: Hydroxyapatite crystal deposition is not intimately involved in the pathogenesis and progression of human osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The association of hydroxyapatite deposition with osteoarthritis pathogenesis and progression remains controversial, even\\u000a after decades of study. Hydroxyapatite crystals are found in osteoarthritis in advanced disease only. Even then, hydroxyapatite\\u000a crystals are found in such small amounts that special analytical techniques are required to detect the crystals. Further,\\u000a the osteoarthritic joint fluid appears noninflammatory, suggesting that such hydroxyapatite crystals have

Kenneth P. H. Pritzker

2009-01-01

201

Comparison of the effect of 99mTc-DPD and 99mTc-MDP on experimentally-induced osteoarthritis in the stifle joint of the dog.  

PubMed

This study was designed to evaluate the effect of 99mTechnetium-dicarboxypropane diphosphonate (99mTc-DPD) and 99mTechnetium-methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) on bone scan image quality and time in dogs with osteoarthritis. The left cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) in ten healthy adult Beagle dogs was transected under general anesthesia. The dogs were assigned to 99mTc-DPD-injected or 99mTc-MDP-injected groups. Stifle joint scintigraphy was performed after intravenous injection of 10 mCi 99mTc-DPD or 99mTe-MDP. Scintigraphy was conducted before CrCL transection and 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 weeks after the procedure. There were no significant differences in density, sensitivity and pathological foci between the 99mTc-DPD and 99mTc-MDP groups of experimentally-transected CrCL dogs. A comparison of the images obtained with Pinhole type and low energy general purpose type collimators of the stifle joint of normal dogs and after CrCL transaction revealed no significant differences in bone radioactivity. Scintigraphs were obtained 3 h after 99mTc-MDP and 2 h after 99mTc-DPD injection. In conclusion, application of 99mTc-DPD and 99mTc-MDP in experimentally-induced osteoarthritis of the stifle joint in dogs results in similar effects on radioactive uptake ratio and image quality. 99mTc-DPD is more efficient than 99mTc-MDP in reducing the overall time of scintigraphy. PMID:15999549

Lee, Jae Yeong; Lee, Won Guk; Kim, Joong-Hyun; Kang, Seong Soo; Bae, Chun Sik; Koong, Sung-Soo; Choi, Seok Hwa

202

STR/ort mice, a model for spontaneous osteoarthritis, exhibit elevated levels of both local and systemic inflammatory markers.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis is a common joint disease that currently lacks disease-modifying treatments. Development of therapeutic agents for osteoarthritis requires better understanding of the disease and cost-effective in vivo models that mimic the human disease. Here, we analyzed the joints of STR/ort mice, a model for spontaneous osteoarthritis, for levels of inflammatory and oxidative stress markers and measured serum cytokines to characterize the local and systemic inflammatory status of these mice. Markers of low-grade inflammatory and oxidative stress-RAGE, AGE, S100A4, and HMGB1-were evaluated through immunohistochemistry. Of these, AGE and HMGB1 levels were elevated strongly in hyperplastic synovium, cartilage, meniscus, and ligaments in the joints of STR/ort mice compared with CBA mice, an osteoarthritis-resistant mouse strain. These increases (particularly in the synovium, meniscus, and ligaments) correlated with increased histopathologic changes in the cartilage. Serum analysis showed higher concentrations of several cytokines including IL1?, IL12p70, MIP1?, and IL5 in STR/ort mice, and these changes correlated with worsened joint morphology. These results indicate that STR/ort mice exhibited local and systemic proinflammatory conditions, both of which are present in human osteoarthritis. Therefore, the STR/ort mouse model appears to be a clinically relevant and cost-effective small animal model for testing osteoarthritis therapeutics. PMID:22330250

Kyostio-Moore, Sirkka; Nambiar, Bindu; Hutto, Elizabeth; Ewing, Patty J; Piraino, Susan; Berthelette, Patricia; Sookdeo, Cathleen; Matthews, Gloria; Armentano, Donna

2011-08-01

203

STR/ort Mice, a Model for Spontaneous Osteoarthritis, Exhibit Elevated Levels of Both Local and Systemic Inflammatory Markers  

PubMed Central

Osteoarthritis is a common joint disease that currently lacks disease-modifying treatments. Development of therapeutic agents for osteoarthritis requires better understanding of the disease and cost-effective in vivo models that mimic the human disease. Here, we analyzed the joints of STR/ort mice, a model for spontaneous osteoarthritis, for levels of inflammatory and oxidative stress markers and measured serum cytokines to characterize the local and systemic inflammatory status of these mice. Markers of low-grade inflammatory and oxidative stress—RAGE, AGE, S100A4, and HMGB1—were evaluated through immunohistochemistry. Of these, AGE and HMGB1 levels were elevated strongly in hyperplastic synovium, cartilage, meniscus, and ligaments in the joints of STR/ort mice compared with CBA mice, an osteoarthritis-resistant mouse strain. These increases (particularly in the synovium, meniscus, and ligaments) correlated with increased histopathologic changes in the cartilage. Serum analysis showed higher concentrations of several cytokines including IL1?, IL12p70, MIP1?, and IL5 in STR/ort mice, and these changes correlated with worsened joint morphology. These results indicate that STR/ort mice exhibited local and systemic proinflammatory conditions, both of which are present in human osteoarthritis. Therefore, the STR/ort mouse model appears to be a clinically relevant and cost-effective small animal model for testing osteoarthritis therapeutics.

Nambiar, Bindu; Hutto, Elizabeth; Ewing, Patty J; Piraino, Susan; Berthelette, Patricia; Sookdeo, Cathleen; Matthews, Gloria; Armentano, Donna

2011-01-01

204

Long term results of surgical intervention for osteoarthritis of the trapeziometacarpal joint : comparison of resection arthroplasty, trapeziectomy with tendon interposition and trapezio-metacarpal arthrodesis.  

PubMed

Trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis is a common entity, often bilateral and predominantly affecting postmenopausal women. In the case of failure of conservative treatment, surgery is a good option. The aim of this study was to compare three surgical procedures. 63 patients (74 thumbs) with osteoarthritis of the trapezio-metacarpal joint were surgically treated; 54 patients were seen for follow-up, 7 had died and 2 were lost to follow-up. The patients were stratified according to treatment; resection arthroplasty (the joint surface's of the metacarpal and the trapezium are resected) (18 thumbs), trapeziectomy with tendon interposition (17 thumbs) or trapezio-metacarpal arthrodesis (28 thumbs). Baseline characteristics were comparable in the three groups for mean age at operation, Eaton classification, left right distribution and dominant hands operated. The average follow-up was 13 years for the resection group, 8 years for the trapeziectomy group and 9 years for the arthrodesis group. No statistically significant difference between the three groups was found for the visual analogue pain and satisfaction scale, pain frequency nor DASH score. Patients in the trapeziectomy group had significantly less pain compared to the arthrodesis group (p=0.025). Statistically, radial abduction was significantly better after trapeziectomy compared to resection arthroplasty (p<0.01) or arthrodesis (p=0.01). There was no difference among the three groups in grip and tip pinch strength nor in pain on palpation. None of the patients in the trapeziectomy group needed a re-operation, one patient in the resection arthroplasty group had a re-operation, and 22 patients in the arthrodesis group had one or more re-operations for hardware removal or because of a complication. This study shows that the resection arthroplasty has equally good long term results compared to trapeziectomy combined with tendon interposition or arthrodesis. Resection arthroplasty is performed through a single incision and is technically simple. In our clinic resection arthroplasty is therefore the preferred technique for the treatment of osteoarthritis of the trapeziometacarpal joint. PMID:17021835

Raven, E E J; Kerkhoffs, G M M J; Rutten, S; Marsman, A J W; Marti, R K; Albers, G H R

2006-09-22

205

Transglutaminase2 differently regulates cartilage destruction and osteophyte formation in a surgical model of osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis is a progressive joint disease characterized by cartilage degradation and bone remodeling. Transglutaminases\\u000a catalyze a calcium-dependent transamidation reaction that produces covalent cross-linking of available substrate glutamine\\u000a residues and modifies the extracellular matrix. Increased transglutaminases-mediated activity is reported in osteoarthritis,\\u000a but the relative contribution of transglutaminases-2 (TG2) is uncertain. We describe TG2 expression in human femoral osteoarthritis\\u000a and in wild-type

A. Orlandi; F. Oliva; G. Taurisano; E. Candi; A. Di Lascio; G. Melino; L. G. Spagnoli; U. Tarantino

2009-01-01

206

Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor is a key mediator in experimental osteoarthritis pain and disease development  

PubMed Central

Introduction Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been shown to be important in the development of inflammatory models of rheumatoid arthritis and there is encouraging data that its blockade may have clinical relevance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The aims of the current study were to determine whether GM-CSF may also be important for disease and pain development in a model of osteoarthritis. Methods The role of GM-CSF was investigated using the collagenase-induced instability model of osteoarthritis. We studied both GM-CSF-/- mice and wild-type (C57BL/6) mice treated prophylactically or therapeutically with a monoclonal antibody to GM-CSF. Disease development (both early and late) was evaluated by histology and knee pain development was measured by assessment of weight distribution. Results In the absence of GM-CSF, there was less synovitis and matrix metalloproteinase-mediated neoepitope expression at week 2 post disease induction, and less cartilage damage at week 6. GM-CSF was absolutely required for pain development. Therapeutic neutralization of GM-CSF not only abolished the pain within 3 days but also led to significantly reduced cartilage damage. Conclusions GM-CSF is key to the development of experimental osteoarthritis and its associated pain. Importantly, GM-CSF neutralization by a therapeutic monoclonal antibody-based protocol rapidly and completely abolished existing arthritic pain and suppressed the degree of arthritis development. Our results suggest that it would be worth exploring the importance of GM-CSF for pain and disease in other osteoarthritis models and perhaps clinically for this form of arthritis.

2012-01-01

207

Genetics in Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Osteoarthritis is a degenerative articular disease with complex pathogeny because diverse factors interact causing a process of deterioration of the cartilage. Despite the multifactorial nature of this pathology, from the 50’s it´s known that certain forms of osteoarthritis are related to a strong genetic component. The genetic bases of this disease do not follow the typical patterns of mendelian inheritance and probably they are related to alterations in multiple genes. The identification of a high number of candidate genes to confer susceptibility to the development of the osteoarthritis shows the complex nature of this disease. At the moment, the genetic mechanisms of this disease are not known, however, which seems clear is that expression levels of several genes are altered, and that the inheritance will become a substantial factor in future considerations of diagnosis and treatment of the osteoarthritis.

Fernandez-Moreno, Mercedes; Rego, Ignacio; Carreira-Garcia, Vanessa; Blanco, Francisco J

2008-01-01

208

Tophaceous calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease of the temporomandibular joint.  

PubMed

Tophaceous pseudogout is a rare manifestation of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) deposition disease that particularly affects the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). We describe a case of tophaceous pseudogout and review the literature. Thirty-four cases of chronic CPPD deposition disease affecting the TMJ are described. Symptoms usually included pain and swelling. Most patients required surgery because of extensive crystal deposits, usually localized to the joint and adjacent structures but occasionally invasive. For many patients, malignancy was the preoperative diagnosis. Although patients with acute pseudogout of the TMJ may have involvement of other joints, tophaceous pseudogout was predominantly isolated to the TMJ. PMID:18398950

Reynolds, Jennifer L; Matthew, Ian R; Chalmers, Andrew

2008-04-01

209

Development and pharmacological characterization of a rat model of osteoarthritis pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis (OA) is an age-related joint disease characterized by degeneration of articular cartilage and is associated with chronic pain. Although several experimental models of OA have been employed to investigate the underlying etiologies of the disease, there has been relatively little investigation into development of animal models of OA to study the pain associated with the condition. In the present

James D. Pomonis; Jamie M. Boulet; Susan L. Gottshall; Steve Phillips; Rani Sellers; Tracie Bunton; Katharine Walker

2005-01-01

210

Deletion of active ADAMTS5 prevents cartilage degradation in a murine model of osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human osteoarthritis is a progressive disease of the joints characterized by degradation of articular cartilage. Although disease initiation may be multifactorial, the cartilage destruction appears to be a result of uncontrolled proteolytic extracellular matrix destruction. A major component of the cartilage extracellular matrix is aggrecan, a proteoglycan that imparts compressive resistance to the tissue. Aggrecan is cleaved at a specific

Sonya S. Glasson; Roger Askew; Barbara Sheppard; Brenda Carito; Tracey Blanchet; Hak-Ling Ma; Carl R. Flannery; Diane Peluso; Kim Kanki; Zhiyong Yang; Manas K. Majumdar; Elisabeth A. Morris

2005-01-01

211

Mapping joint grey and white matter reductions in Alzheimer's disease using joint independent component analysis.  

PubMed

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease concomitant with grey and white matter damages. However, the interrelationship of volumetric changes between grey and white matter remains poorly understood in AD. Using joint independent component analysis, this study identified joint grey and white matter volume reductions based on structural magnetic resonance imaging data to construct the covariant networks in twelve AD patients and fourteen normal controls (NC). We found that three networks showed significant volume reductions in joint grey-white matter sources in AD patients, including (1) frontal/parietal/temporal-superior longitudinal fasciculus/corpus callosum, (2) temporal/parietal/occipital-frontal/occipital, and (3) temporal-precentral/postcentral. The corresponding expression scores distinguished AD patients from NC with 85.7%, 100% and 85.7% sensitivity for joint sources 1, 2 and 3, respectively; 75.0%, 66.7% and 75.0% specificity for joint sources 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Furthermore, the combined source of three significant joint sources best predicted the AD/NC group membership with 92.9% sensitivity and 83.3% specificity. Our findings revealed joint grey and white matter loss in AD patients, and these results can help elucidate the mechanism of grey and white matter reductions in the development of AD. PMID:23123779

Guo, Xiaojuan; Han, Yuan; Chen, Kewei; Wang, Yan; Yao, Li

2012-11-02

212

Antioxidant to treat osteoarthritis: dream or reality?  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis is one of the most common chronic diseases that causes pain and physical disability in patient. Although OA is considered as a global disease affecting all joint tissues, cartilage degradation is the end point. The degradation of cartilage results of the combination of mechanical stress and biochemical factors, mainly metalloproteinases and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The activity of reactive oxygen species is balanced by enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, that act by inhibiting oxidative enzymes, scavenging free radicals or chelating ion metals. Until now, few information is available on the antioxidative status of chondrocytes. Further, the modification of the antioxidative system in osteoarthritis remains unknown. Some antioxidant supplements or drugs with antioxidant properties have been developed to reinforce the cellular antioxidant status. However, until now, there is no consistent evidence that additional antioxidant supply is efficient to relieve OA symptoms or to prevent structural changes in OA cartilage. PMID:17305512

Henrotin, Y; Kurz, B

2007-02-01

213

Characterization of joint disease in mucopolysaccharidosis type I mice.  

PubMed

Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are lysosomal storage disorders characterized by mutations in enzymes that degrade glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Joint disease is present in most forms of MPS, including MPS I. This work aimed to describe the joint disease progression in the murine model of MPS I. Normal (wild-type) and MPS I mice were sacrificed at different time points (from 2 to 12 months). The knee joints were collected, and haematoxylin-eosin staining was used to evaluate the articular architecture. Safranin-O and Sirius Red staining was used to analyse the proteoglycan and collagen content. Additionally, we analysed the expression of the matrix-degrading metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-2 and MMP-9, using immunohistochemistry. We observed progressive joint alterations from 6 months, including the presence of synovial inflammatory infiltrate, the destruction and thickening of the cartilage extracellular matrix, as well as proteoglycan and collagen depletion. Furthermore, we observed an increase in the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9, which could conceivably explain the degenerative changes. Our results suggest that the joint disease in MPS I mice may be caused by a degenerative process due to increase in proteases expression, leading to loss of collagen and proteoglycans. These results may guide the development of ancillary therapies for joint disease in MPS I. PMID:23786352

de Oliveira, Patricia G; Baldo, Guilherme; Mayer, Fabiana Q; Martinelli, Barbara; Meurer, Luise; Giugliani, Roberto; Matte, Ursula; Xavier, Ricardo M

2013-06-21

214

Is there still a place for arthrodesis in the surgical treatment of basal joint osteoarthritis of the thumb?  

PubMed

Despite the obvious success of arthroplasty trapeziectomy with or without interposition and prosthesis--in the treatment for trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis, one may question the value of an arthrodesis in particular situations. In most reported series the outcome is reasonably successful, but when comparing the results of arthrodesis with arthroplasty, there is convincing evidence that the latter gives better outcomes. Considering the overall complication rate, and more specifically the incidence of nonunion after trapeziometacarpal fusion, it can be reasonably concluded that the latter should be reserved for specific indications. PMID:21302567

De Smet, Luc; Van Meir, Nathalie; Verhoeven, Nele; Degreef, Ilse

2010-12-01

215

Degenerative joint disease. Part I: Diagnosis and management considerations.  

PubMed

Degenerative joint disease, primarily in the form of osteoarthrosis, affects the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) with symptoms similar to those found in other body joints. These symptoms include stiffness, pain, restriction of movement, inflammation, crepitus and radiographic changes. Symptoms can occur in both males and females at any age, starting with pre-adolescent, but most often occur in females age 30 and over. Most symptoms will last nine to 18 months (followed by remission) and are managed using anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy, occlusal splints and dietary changes. Major areas for consideration in this article include epidemiology, signs and symptoms, radiography, etiopathology and symptom management. PMID:8118899

Bates, R E; Gremillion, H A; Stewart, C M

1993-10-01

216

Femoral neck erosions: sign of hip joint synovial disease  

SciTech Connect

Pathologic synovial processes in the hip joint can cause characteristic extrinsic erosions of the femoral neck, which in extreme cases produce an ''apple core'' appearance. Nine such cases of synovial diseases, including synovial osteochondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and amyloidosis, that demonstrate this radiographic finding are presented. The anatomic relations of the hip joint that result in theis appearance, differential diagnosis, and radiographic techniques useful in diagnosis are discussed.

Goldberg, R.P.; Weissman, B.N.; Naimark, A.

1983-07-01

217

Long term evaluation of disease progression through the quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis patients: correlation with clinical symptoms and radiographic changes  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study was to further explore the cartilage volume changes in knee osteoarthritis (OA) over time using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI). These were correlated with demographic, clinical, and radiological data to better identify the disease risk features. We selected 107 patients from a large trial (n = 1,232) evaluating the effect of a bisphosphonate on OA knees. The MRI acquisitions of the knee were done at baseline, 12, and 24 months. Cartilage volume from the global, medial, and lateral compartments was quantified. The changes were contrasted with clinical data and other MRI anatomical features. Knee OA cartilage volume losses were statistically significant compared to baseline values: -3.7 ± 3.0% for global cartilage and -5.5 ± 4.3% for the medial compartment at 12 months, and -5.7 ± 4.4% and -8.3 ± 6.5%, respectively, at 24 months. Three different populations were identified according to cartilage volume loss: fast (n = 11; -13.2%), intermediate (n = 48; -7.2%), and slow (n = 48; -2.3%) progressors. The predictors of fast progressors were the presence of severe meniscal extrusion (p = 0.001), severe medial tear (p = 0.005), medial and/or lateral bone edema (p = 0.03), high body mass index (p < 0.05, fast versus slow), weight (p < 0.05, fast versus slow) and age (p < 0.05 fast versus slow). The loss of cartilage volume was also slightly associated with less knee pain. No association was found with other Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores, joint space width, or urine biomarker levels. Meniscal damage and bone edema are closely associated with more cartilage volume loss. These data confirm the significant advantage of qMRI for reliably measuring knee structural changes at as early as 12 months, and for identifying risk factors associated with OA progression.

Raynauld, Jean-Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Berthiaume, Marie-Josee; Beaudoin, Gilles; Choquette, Denis; Haraoui, Boulos; Tannenbaum, Hyman; Meyer, Joan M; Beary, John F; Cline, Gary A; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre

2006-01-01

218

Value of biomarkers in osteoarthritis: current status and perspectives.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis affects the whole joint structure with progressive changes in cartilage, menisci, ligaments and subchondral bone, and synovial inflammation. Biomarkers are being developed to quantify joint remodelling and disease progression. This article was prepared following a working meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis convened to discuss the value of biochemical markers of matrix metabolism in drug development in osteoarthritis. The best candidates are generally molecules or molecular fragments present in cartilage, bone or synovium and may be specific to one type of joint tissue or common to them all. Many currently investigated biomarkers are associated with collagen metabolism in cartilage or bone, or aggrecan metabolism in cartilage. Other biomarkers are related to non-collagenous proteins, inflammation and/or fibrosis. Biomarkers in osteoarthritis can be categorised using the burden of disease, investigative, prognostic, efficacy of intervention, diagnostic and safety classification. There are a number of promising candidates, notably urinary C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type II and serum cartilage oligomeric protein, although none is sufficiently discriminating to differentiate between individual patients and controls (diagnostic) or between patients with different disease severities (burden of disease), predict prognosis in individuals with or without osteoarthritis (prognostic) or perform so consistently that it could function as a surrogate outcome in clinical trials (efficacy of intervention). Future avenues for research include exploration of underlying mechanisms of disease and development of new biomarkers; technological development; the 'omics' (genomics, metabolomics, proteomics and lipidomics); design of aggregate scores combining a panel of biomarkers and/or imaging markers into single diagnostic algorithms; and investigation into the relationship between biomarkers and prognosis. PMID:23897772

Lotz, M; Martel-Pelletier, J; Christiansen, C; Brandi, M-L; Bruyère, O; Chapurlat, R; Collette, J; Cooper, C; Giacovelli, G; Kanis, J A; Karsdal, M A; Kraus, V; Lems, W F; Meulenbelt, I; Pelletier, J-P; Raynauld, J-P; Reiter-Niesert, S; Rizzoli, R; Sandell, L J; Van Spil, W E; Reginster, J-Y

2013-07-29

219

Value of biomarkers in osteoarthritis: current status and perspectives  

PubMed Central

Osteoarthritis affects the whole joint structure with progressive changes in cartilage, menisci, ligaments and subchondral bone, and synovial inflammation. Biomarkers are being developed to quantify joint remodelling and disease progression. This article was prepared following a working meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis convened to discuss the value of biochemical markers of matrix metabolism in drug development in osteoarthritis. The best candidates are generally molecules or molecular fragments present in cartilage, bone or synovium and may be specific to one type of joint tissue or common to them all. Many currently investigated biomarkers are associated with collagen metabolism in cartilage or bone, or aggrecan metabolism in cartilage. Other biomarkers are related to non-collagenous proteins, inflammation and/or fibrosis. Biomarkers in osteoarthritis can be categorised using the burden of disease, investigative, prognostic, efficacy of intervention, diagnostic and safety classification. There are a number of promising candidates, notably urinary C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type II and serum cartilage oligomeric protein, although none is sufficiently discriminating to differentiate between individual patients and controls (diagnostic) or between patients with different disease severities (burden of disease), predict prognosis in individuals with or without osteoarthritis (prognostic) or perform so consistently that it could function as a surrogate outcome in clinical trials (efficacy of intervention). Future avenues for research include exploration of underlying mechanisms of disease and development of new biomarkers; technological development; the ‘omics’ (genomics, metabolomics, proteomics and lipidomics); design of aggregate scores combining a panel of biomarkers and/or imaging markers into single diagnostic algorithms; and investigation into the relationship between biomarkers and prognosis.

Lotz, M; Martel-Pelletier, J; Christiansen, C; Brandi, M-L; Bruyere, O; Chapurlat, R; Collette, J; Cooper, C; Giacovelli, G; Kanis, J A; Karsdal, M A; Kraus, V; Lems, W F; Meulenbelt, I; Pelletier, J-P; Raynauld, J-P; Reiter-Niesert, S; Rizzoli, R; Sandell, L J; Van Spil, W E; Reginster, J-Y

2013-01-01

220

Hyaluronic acid attenuates osteoarthritis development in the anterior cruciate ligament-transected knee: Association with excitatory amino acid release in the joint dialysate.  

PubMed

We previously reported increased release of the excitatory amino acid (EAA) neurotransmitters, glutamate and aspartate, during the early stage of experimental osteoarthritis (OA). Our present objective was to study the effect of intraarticular injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) on OA development, and to analyze concomitant changes in EAA levels in dialysates of anterior cruciate ligament-transected (ACLT) knee joints. OA was induced in Wistar rats by ACLT of one hindlimb; the knee of the other hindlimb was used as the sham-operated control. HA group (n = 12) were injected intraarticularly in the ACLT knee with 1 mg of HA once a week for 5 consecutive weeks, starting at 8 weeks after surgery. Saline group (n = 12) were injected as above with normal saline. The sham-operated group, underwent arthrotomy, but not ACLT, and received no treatment (n = 14). Twenty weeks after surgery, knee joint dialysates were collected by microdialysis and EAA levels assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography, and gross morphological examination and histopathological evaluation were performed on the medial femoral condyles and synovia. Rats receiving intraarticular HA injections showed a significantly lower degree of cartilage degeneration on the medial femoral condyle at both the macroscopic level and on the Mankin grading scale than rats receiving saline injections. Intraarticular HA treatment also suppressed synovitis. Moreover, glutamate and aspartate levels were significantly reduced in the HA group compared to the saline group. Intraarticular injection of HA limits articular cartilage and synovium damage and OA formation, and, in parallel, reduces EAA levels in ACLT joint dialysates. This study suggests that the underlying mechanism of the anti-inflammatory effect of HA is to inhibit glutamate and aspartate release in ACLT knee joints, which attenuates the early development of OA. PMID:16583446

Jean, Yen-Hsuan; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Chang, Yi-Chen; Lee, Herng-Sheng; Hsieh, Shih-Peng; Wu, Ching-Tang; Yeh, Chun-Chang; Wong, Chih-Shung

2006-05-01

221

Articular chondrocyte metabolism and osteoarthritis  

SciTech Connect

The three main objectives of this study were: (1) to determine if depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage matrix that occurs during osteoarthritis causes a measurable increase of cartilage proteoglycan components in the synovial fluid and sera, (2) to observe what effect intracellular cAMP has on the expression of matrix components by chondrocytes, and (3) to determine if freshly isolated chondrocytes contain detectable levels of mRNA for fibronectin. Canine serum keratan sulfate and hyaluronate were measured to determine if there was an elevation of these serum glycosaminoglycans in a canine model of osteoarthritis. A single intra-articular injection of chymopapain into a shoulder joint increased serum keratan sulfate 10 fold and hyaluronate less than 2 fold in 24 hours. Keratan sulfate concentrations in synovial fluids of dogs about one year old were unrelated to the presence of spontaneous cartilage degeneration in the joints. High keratan sulfate in synovial fluids correlated with higher keratan sulfate in serum. The mean keratan sulfate concentration in sera of older dogs with osteoarthritis was 37% higher than disease-free controls, but the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. Treatment of chondrocytes with 0.5 millimolar (mM) dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) caused the cells to adopt a more rounded morphology. There was no difference between the amount of proteins synthesized by cultures treated with DBcAMP and controls. The amount of fibronectin (FN) in the media of DBcAMP treated cultures detected by an ELISA was specifically reduced, and the amount of {sup 35}S-FN purified by gelatin affinity chromatography decreased. Moreover, the percentage of FN containing the extra domain. A sequence was reduced. Concomitant with the decrease in FN there was an increase in the concentration of keratan sulfate.

Leipold, H.R.

1989-01-01

222

CRYSTALS, INFLAMMATION, AND OSTEOARTHRITIS  

PubMed Central

Purpose Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) and basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals are common components of osteoarthritic joint fluids and tissues. Why these crystals form and how they contribute to joint damage in osteoarthritis (OA) remains unclear. With renewed interest in inflammation as a key component of OA the role of calcium-containing crystals in this common disease warrants re-examination. Recent Findings There is ample evidence supporting a pathogenic role for inflammation in OA, and the innate immune system likely participates in this inflammatory process. Recent work reinforces the almost universal existence of calcium-containing crystals in tissues from patients with end-stage OA. Calcium-containing crystals may contribute to inflammation in OA tissues through their direct interactions with components of the innate immune system, as well as by inducing or amplifying other inflammatory signals. Summary There is increasing evidence that calcium-containing crystals contribute to OA and their inflammatory properties may mediate detrimental effects through innate immunity signals. Calcium-containing crystals may thus represent important therapeutic targets in OA.

Rosenthal, Ann K.

2011-01-01

223

Whole blood lead levels are associated with biomarkers of joint tissue metabolism in African American and White men and women: The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project  

PubMed Central

Purpose To examine associations between biomarkers of joint tissue metabolism and whole blood lead (Pb), separately for men and women in an African American and Caucasian population, which may reflect an underlying pathology. Methods Participants in the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project Metals Exposure Sub-study (329 men and 342 women) underwent assessment of whole blood Pb and biochemical biomarkers of joint tissue metabolism. Urinary cross-linked N telopeptide of type I collagen (uNTX-I) and C-telopeptide fragments of type II collagen (uCTX-II), and serum cleavage neoepitope of type II collagen (C2C), serum type II procollagen synthesis C-propeptide (CPII), and serum hyaluronic acid (HA) were measured using commercially available kits; the ratio of [C2C:CPII] was calculated. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) was measured by an in-house assay. Multiple linear regression models were used to examine associations between continuous blood Pb and biomarker outcomes, adjusted for age, race, current smoking status, and body mass index. Results are reported as estimated change in biomarker level for a 5-unit change in Pb level. Results The median Pb level among men and women was 2.2 and 1.9 µg/dL, respectively. Correlations were noted between Pb levels and the biomarkers uNTX-I, uCTX-II, and COMP in women, and between Pb and uCTX-II, COMP, CPII, and the ratio [C2C:CPII] in men. In adjusted models among women, a 5-unit increase in blood Pb level was associated with a 28% increase in uCTX-II and a 45% increase in uNTX-I levels (uCTX-II: 1.28 [95%CI: 1.04–1.58], uNTX-I: 1.45 [95%CI:1.21–1.74]). Among men, levels of Pb and COMP showed a borderline positive association (8% increase in COMP for a 5-unit change in Pb: 1.08 [95% CI: 1.00–1.18])); no other associations were significant after adjustment. Conclusions Based upon known biomarker origins, the novel associations between blood Pb and biomarkers appear to be primarily reflective of relationships to bone and calcified cartilage turnover among women and cartilage metabolism among men, suggesting a potential gender-specific effect of Pb on joint tissue metabolism that may be relevant to osteoarthritis.

Nelson, Amanda E.; Chaudhary, Sanjay; Kraus, Virginia B.; Fang, Fang; Chen, Jiu-Chiuan; Schwartz, Todd A.; Shi, Xiaoyan A.; Renner, Jordan B.; Stabler, Thomas V.; Helmick, Charles G.; Caldwell, Kathleen; Poole, A. Robin; Jordan, Joanne M.

2011-01-01

224

Taping for knee osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Taping can be used to reduce pain in knee osteoarthritis. There are different methods of taping, but the common effect is to exert a medially directed force on the patella to increase the patellofemoral contact area, thereby decreasing joint stress and reducing pain. Taping can be performed by a physiotherapist, but self taping can be taught, which enhances self management. Taping for knee osteoarthritis has National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Level I evidence of efficacy for pain relief and is associated with negligible adverse effects that generally include minor skin irritation. PMID:24130976

2013-10-01

225

The Effects of a Moderate Exercise Program on Knee Osteoarthritis in Male Wistar Rats  

PubMed Central

Objective(s): Osteoarthritis (OA) or degenerative joint disease is the commonest form of arthritis and can lead to joint pain, decrease in joint’s range of motion, loss of function, and ultimately disability. Exercise is considered as one of the non-pharmacological treatments of OA. But the effects of exercise on knee joint cartilage remain ambiguous. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of a four-week moderate treadmill exercise on rats’ knee osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods: Eighteen male Wistar rats (173 ± 1 g, 8 weeks old) were randomly divided into three groups (n = 6): Intact control, monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) only (OA), and training. The osteoarthritis model was induced by intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA). Subjects followed a moderate-intensity exercise program for 28 days. Rats were killed after 28 days and histological assessment was done on their knee joints. One-way ANOVA (P<0.05) and post-hoc Tukey test was used for the statistical analysis. Results: Histological assessment on 3 measurements of, depth ratio of lesions (P=0.001), total cartilage degeneration width (P=0.001), and significant cartilage degeneration width (P=0.001), demonstrated that moderate exercise for 4 weeks could surprisingly almost treat OA symptoms of rats’ knee joints. Conclusion: The findings of the present study indicate that a moderate treadmill exercise program exert a beneficial influence on rats’ knee osteoarthritis.

Fallah Mohammadi, Mohammad; Hajizadeh Moghaddam, Akbar; Mirkarimpur, Hosein

2013-01-01

226

Temporomandibular joint arthritis in sickle cell disease: a case report.  

PubMed

We report a rare case of aseptic arthritis in the temporomandibular joint of a patient with sickle cell anemia. A 22-year-old woman with sickle cell disease, in the 18th week of gestation, was referred by her hematologist to investigate a sudden mouth opening limitation and severe pain on her left cheek. The patient received a standard pain assessment protocol, clinical examination, and complementary exams (complete blood count, hemoglobin electrophoresis, blood solubility test, panoramic radiograph, and magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]). The blood results were consistent with a sickle cell crisis and the MRI showed an inflammatory process around the left temporomandibular joint. Treatment with opioid analgesics and blood transfusion provided good results. Sickle cell anemia is a disease that can cause arthritis of the temporomandibular joint, and although it is rare, clinicians should be attentive to the differential diagnosis in patients with this disease. PMID:23021926

Caracas, Maíra da Silva; Jales, Sumatra P; Jales Neto, Levi H; da Silva Castro, Joice Carla; Suganuma, Liliana Mitie; Fonseca, Guilherme Henrique Hencklain; Gualandro, Sandra Fatima Menosi; de Siqueira, José Tadeu Tesseroli

2012-09-28

227

Regulatory gene networks and signaling pathways from primary osteoarthritis and Kashin-Beck disease, an endemic osteoarthritis, identified by three analysis software.  

PubMed

Three new software systems, Ingenuity pathway analysis(IPA, TranscriptomeBrowser and MetaCore, were compared by analyzing chondrocyte microarray data of Kashin-Beck disease (KBD) and primary knee osteoarthritis(OA) to understand the pathway or network analysis software which has a superior function to identify target genes with easy operation and effective for differential diagnosis and treatment of KBD and OA. RNA was isolated from cartilage samples taken from KBD patients and OA ones. Agilent 44K human whole genome oligonucleotide microarrays were used to detect differentially expressed genes. From IPA, we identified one significant canonical pathway and two significant networks. From GeneHub analysis, we got three networks. One significant canonical pathway and one significant network were obtained from TranscriptomeBrowser analysis. POSTN and LEF1 which were got from IPA, RAC2 which was identified by both of the IPA and TranscriptomeBrowser may be most closely related to the etiopathogenesis of KBD. According to our data analysis, IPA and TranscriptomeBrowser are suitable for pathway analysis, while, TranscriptomeBrowser is suitable for network analysis. The significant genes obtained from IPA and TranscriptomeBrowser analysis may thus provide a better understanding of the molecular details in the pathogenesis of KBD and also provide useful pathways and network maps for future research in osteochondrosis. PMID:23069848

Wang, Sen; Duan, Chen; Zhang, Feng; Ma, Weijuan; Guo, Xiong

2012-10-13

228

Adenovirus-mediated kallistatin gene transfer ameliorates disease progression in a rat model of osteoarthritis induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection.  

PubMed

In osteoarthritis (OA), inflammation and apoptosis are two important factors contributing to disease progression. As kallistatin can suppress inflammatory responses and reduce cell apoptosis, we investigated the therapeutic effect of kallistatin gene transfer in the rat model of OA by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT). OA was induced in Wistar rats by ACLT in the knee of one hind limb. Adenoviral vector encoding human kallistatin (AdHKBP) was injected intraarticularly into the knee joints after ACLT. The viral effect on tissue was evaluated. The inflammatory responses and transgene expression were determined by immunoblot analysis, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunohistochemistry. Apoptosis of chondrocytes was quantified by TUNEL assay. The effects of kallistatin in combination with hyaluronic acid (HA) on the medial femoral condyles and synovia were also assessed histologically. Inflammation trigged by the vectors was limited. Expression of human kallistatin after intraarticular injection was identified. Kallistatin gene transfer reduced the levels of interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in joints. Examination of gross morphology revealed that rats treated with AdHKBP had reduced severity of OA compared with control rats treated with adenoviral vector encoding green fluorescent protein (AdGFP). The protective effect of kallistatin on cartilage was accompanied by a decrease in apoptotic cells. Intraarticular administration of AdHKBP, when in conjunction with HA, significantly improved knee joint histologic scores. These results suggest that local administration of adenoviral vectors encoding kallistatin significantly suppressed OA progression, accompanied by reduction of inflammatory response and apoptosis. Thus, kallistatin gene therapy may be a potential treatment for OA. PMID:20377366

Hsieh, Jeng-Long; Shen, Po-Chuan; Shiau, Ai-Li; Jou, I-Ming; Lee, Che-Hsin; Teo, Min-Li; Wang, Chrong-Reen; Chao, Julie; Chao, Lee; Wu, Chao-Liang

2009-02-01

229

Prognostic biomarkers in osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review Identification of patients at risk for incident disease or disease progression in osteoarthritis remains challenging, as radiography is an insensitive reflection of molecular changes that presage cartilage and bone abnormalities. Thus there is a widely appreciated need for biochemical and imaging biomarkers. We describe recent developments with such biomarkers to identify osteoarthritis patients who are at risk for disease progression. Recent findings The biochemical markers currently under evaluation include anabolic, catabolic, and inflammatory molecules representing diverse biological pathways. A few promising cartilage and bone degradation and synthesis biomarkers are in various stages of development, awaiting further validation in larger populations. A number of studies have shown elevated expression levels of inflammatory biomarkers, both locally (synovial fluid) and systemically (serum and plasma). These chemical biomarkers are under evaluation in combination with imaging biomarkers to predict early onset and the burden of disease. Summary Prognostic biomarkers may be used in clinical knee osteoarthritis to identify subgroups in whom the disease progresses at different rates. This could facilitate our understanding of the pathogenesis and allow us to differentiate phenotypes within a heterogeneous knee osteoarthritis population. Ultimately, such findings may help facilitate the development of disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs (DMOADs).

Attur, Mukundan; Krasnokutsky-Samuels, Svetlana; Samuels, Jonathan; Abramson, Steven B.

2013-01-01

230

Trapeziectomy and tendon suspension with or without a mitek anchor fixation in the thumb basal joint osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Partial trapeziectomy with suspension ligamentoplasty is a commonly performed treatment of thumb osteoarthritis. Nevertheless, the post-operative recovery remains long and critical reason for which different modifications of the surgical technique have been proposed. To compare two suspension ligamentoplasty techniques, one with a mitek anchor and another without, a retrospective study of 55 consecutive operated patients was performed. A detailed clinical analysis of pain, function and a radiologic assessment of the trapeziometacarpal space were performed. Mitek anchor fixation was associated with a shorter convalescence period. However, in spite of an improved radiological maintenance of the scaphometacarpal space, mitek anchor fixation was associated with an impaired postoperative function and residual pain when compared with the conventional suspension ligamentoplasty procedure. Patient's satisfaction was comparable in both groups. In our series stabilization of the suspension ligamentoplasty procedure by the insertion of a mitek anchor did not bring the hoped benefits to the patients with a trapeziometacarpal arthritis. PMID:22415426

Nordback, S; Erba, P; Wehrli, L; Raffoul, W; Egloff, D V

2012-03-13

231

Effect of an integrated approach of yoga therapy on quality of life in osteoarthritis of the knee joint: A randomized control study  

PubMed Central

Aim: This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of addition of integrated yoga therapy to therapeutic exercises in osteoarthritis (OA) of knee joints. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective randomized active control trial. A total of t participants with OA of knee joints between 35 and 80 years (yoga, 59.56 ± 9.54 and control, 59.42 ± 10.66) from the outpatient department of Dr. John's Orthopedic Center, Bengaluru, were randomly assigned to receive yoga or physiotherapy exercises after transcutaneous electrical stimulation and ultrasound treatment of the affected knee joints. Both groups practiced supervised intervention (40 min per day) for 2 weeks (6 days per week) with followup for 3 months. The module of integrated yoga consisted of shithilikaranavyayama (loosening and strengthening), asanas, relaxation techniques, pranayama, meditation and didactic lectures on yama, niyama, jnana yoga, bhakti yoga, and karma yoga for a healthy lifestyle change. The control group also had supervised physiotherapy exercises. A total of 118 (yoga) and 117 (control) were available for final analysis. Results: Significant differences were observed within (P < 0.001, Wilcoxon's) and between groups (P < 0.001, Mann–Whitney U-test) on all domains of the Short Form-36 (P < 0.004), with better results in the yoga group than in the control group, both at 15th day and 90th day. Conclusion: An integrated approach of yoga therapy is better than therapeutic exercises as an adjunct to transcutaneous electrical stimulation and ultrasound treatment in improving knee disability and quality of life in patients with OA knees.

Ebnezar, John; Nagarathna, Raghuram; Bali, Yogitha; Nagendra, Hongasandra Ramarao

2011-01-01

232

Osteoarthritis associated with estrogen deficiency  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis (OA) affects all articular tissues and finally leads to joint failure. Although articular tissues have long been considered unresponsive to estrogens or their deficiency, there is now increasing evidence that estrogens influence the activity of joint tissues through complex molecular pathways that act at multiple levels. Indeed, we are only just beginning to understand the effects of estrogen deficiency

Jorge A Roman-Blas; Santos Castañeda; Raquel Largo; Gabriel Herrero-Beaumont

2009-01-01

233

Selection of patients for inpatient rehabilitation or direct home discharge following total joint replacement surgery: a comparison of health status and out-of-pocket expenditure of patients undergoing hip and knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To analyse the differences in patient health outcomes and out-of-pocket costs following hip and knee joint replacement for osteoarthritis between patients who went home immediately after the acute care hospital stay and those who were admitted to inpatient rehabilitation care before going home.Methods: One hundred and eighteen patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement in Sydney, Australia completed cost

Kate L. Tribe; Helen M. Lapsley; Marita J. Cross; Brett G. Courtenay; Peter M. Brooks; Lyn M. March

2005-01-01

234

Mechanisms of Disease: role of chondrocytes in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis—structure, chaos and senescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The extracellular matrix of articular cartilage is the primary target of osteoarthritic cartilage degradation. However, cartilage cells have a pivotal role during osteoarthritis, as they are mainly responsible for the anabolic–catabolic balance required for matrix maintenance and tissue function. In addition to the severe changes in the extracellular matrix, the cells also display abnormalities during osteoarthritic cartilage degeneration, such as

Stefan Söder; Pia M Gebhard; Audrey McAlinden; Jochen Haag; Thomas Aigner

2007-01-01

235

Jellyfish mucin may have potential disease-modifying effects on osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: We aimed to study the effects of intra-articular injection of jellyfish mucin (qniumucin) on articular cartilage degeneration in a model of osteoarthritis (OA) created in rabbit knees by resection of the anterior cruciate ligament. Qniumucin was extracted from Aurelia aurita (moon jellyfish) and Stomolophus nomurai (Nomura's jellyfish) and purified by ion exchange chromatography. The OA model used 36 knees

Naoshi Ohta; Masato Sato; Kiminori Ushida; Mami Kokubo; Takayuki Baba; Kayoko Taniguchi; Makoto Urai; Koji Kihira; Joji Mochida

2009-01-01

236

Reactive oxygen species and superoxide dismutases: Role in joint diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced in many normal and abnormal processes in humans, including atheroma, asthma, joint diseases, aging, and cancer. The superoxide anion O2? is the main ROS. Increased ROS production leads to tissue damage associated with inflammation. Superoxide dismutases (SODs) convert superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, which is then removed by glutathione peroxidase or catalase. Thus, SODs prevent

Valéry Afonso; Romuald Champy; Dragoslav Mitrovic; Pascal Collin; Abderrahim Lomri

2007-01-01

237

Hemophilic joint disease – current perspective and potential future strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recurrent hemarthroses can lead to hemophilic joint disease (HJD), which is one of the most disabling complications of these X-linked recessive disorders characterized by a deficiency of clotting factors VIII\\/IX. The pathogenesis of HJD is not well understood and there is evidence to suggest that iron may play a central role in the pathogenetic process causing changes at the molecular

Suchitra S. Acharya

2008-01-01

238

Antioxidative effects of sulphurous water from macerata feltria thermal resort in patients with osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary It has been widely demonstrated that reactive oxygen species are implica- ted as the main causative factors of osteoarthritis (OA), a degenerative joint disease characterized by a progressive degradation of the articular cartilage. Sulphur thermal therapies are employed in the treatment of OA since ancient times; however, their mechanisms of action in the control of OA are only partially

2007-01-01

239

Future treatment of osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis represents an advanced stage of disease progression caused in part by injury, loss of cartilage structure and function, and an imbalance in inflammatory and noninflammatory pathways. The burden of this disease will increase in direct proportion to the increase in the older adult population. Research on current and experimental treatment protocols are reviewed, including the effect of hyaluronic acid in both in vitro and in vivo studies, autologous chondrocyte and osteochondral plug implantation, and gene therapy. Disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs and in vivo studies of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate are reviewed. PMID:15747611

Baker, Champ L; Ferguson, Cristin M

2005-02-01

240

CONTAGIOUS DISEASE MODULE FOR THE JOINT EFFECTS MODEL  

Microsoft Academic Search

This presentation describes an approach to modeling the spread of contagious diseases across a population-at-risk represented by the LandScan database used by the Joint Effects Model (JEM). We are implementing two models of disease transmission for this effort: 1) a cohort-based Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Removed (SEIR) model that uses historical epidemics and simulated outbreaks as the basis for its time-dependent transmission functions and

Brian Adams; Jaideep Ray

2008-01-01

241

The effects of a moderate exercise program on knee osteoarthritis in male wistar rats.  

PubMed

Objective(s): Osteoarthritis (OA) or degenerative joint disease is the commonest form of arthritis and can lead to joint pain, decrease in joint's range of motion, loss of function, and ultimately disability. Exercise is considered as one of the non-pharmacological treatments of OA. But the effects of exercise on knee joint cartilage remain ambiguous. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of a four-week moderate treadmill exercise on rats' knee osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods: Eighteen male Wistar rats (173 ± 1 g, 8 weeks old) were randomly divided into three groups (n = 6): Intact control, monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) only (OA), and training. The osteoarthritis model was induced by intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA). Subjects followed a moderate-intensity exercise program for 28 days. Rats were killed after 28 days and histological assessment was done on their knee joints. One-way ANOVA (P<0.05) and post-hoc Tukey test was used for the statistical analysis. Results: Histological assessment on 3 measurements of, depth ratio of lesions (P=0.001), total cartilage degeneration width (P=0.001), and significant cartilage degeneration width (P=0.001), demonstrated that moderate exercise for 4 weeks could surprisingly almost treat OA symptoms of rats' knee joints. Conclusion: The findings of the present study indicate that a moderate treadmill exercise program exert a beneficial influence on rats' knee osteoarthritis. PMID:23826489

Fallah Mohammadi, Mohammad; Hajizadeh Moghaddam, Akbar; Mirkarimpur, Hosein

2013-05-01

242

Characterization of articular cartilage and subchondral bone changes in the rat anterior cruciate ligament transection and meniscectomized models of osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic joint disease characterized by cartilage destruction, subchondral bone sclerosis, and osteophyte formation. Subchondral bone stiffness has been proposed to initiate and\\/or contribute to cartilage deterioration in OA. The purpose of this study was to characterize subchondral bone remodeling, cartilage damage, and osteophytosis during the disease progression in two models of surgically induced OA. Rat knee

Tadashi Hayami; Maureen Pickarski; Ya Zhuo; Gregg A. Wesolowski; Gideon A. Rodan; Le T. Duong

2006-01-01

243

[Foreign body reaction in osteoarthritis of the trapeziometacarpal joint treated by trapezectomy and interposition of a L-polylactic acid "anchovy" (Arex®615R). A series of eight cases].  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis of the trapeziometacarpal joint is a common pathology. When the trapezium is not large enough to allow using a total joint arthroplasty or in case of peritrapezial osteoarthrosis, the authors used a trapeziectomy with interposition of an absorbable L-polylactic acid anchovy (Arex(®)615R). This technique is simple and fast. From 2006 to 2010, out of 68 implants, nine displayed a prolonged inflammatory reaction, both clinically and radiologically abnormal, leading the patients to undergo revision surgery for removal of the implant before the end of the third postoperative year. Histological analysis highlighted in all the cases a resorptive gigantocellular immune foreign body reaction. PMID:23665309

Semere, A; Forli, A; Corcella, D; Mesquida, V; Loret, M G; Moutet, F

2013-04-18

244

Resistance Exercise for Knee Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

The initiation, progression, and severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA) has been associated with decreased muscular strength and alterations in joint biomechanics. Chronic OA pain may lead to anxiety, depression, fear of movement, and poor psychological outlook. The fear of movement may prevent participation in exercise and social events which could lead to further physical and social isolation. Resistance exercise (RX) has been shown to be an effective intervention both for decreasing pain and for improving physical function and self-efficacy. RX may restore muscle strength and joint mechanics while improving physical function. RX may also normalize muscle firing patterns and joint biomechanics leading to reductions in joint pain and cartilage degradation. These physical adaptations could lead to improved self-efficacy and decreased anxiety and depression. RX can be prescribed and performed by patients across the OA severity spectrum. When designing and implementing an RX program for a patient with knee OA, it is important to consider both the degree of OA severity as well as the level of pain. RX, either in the home or at a fitness facility, is an important component of a comprehensive regimen designed to offset the physical and psychological limitations associated with knee OA. Unique considerations for this population include: 1) monitoring pain during and after exercise, 2) providing days of rest when disease flares occur, and 3) infusing variety into the exercise regimen to encourage adherence.

Vincent, Kevin R.; Vincent, Heather K.

2013-01-01

245

Association of metalloproteinases, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases, and proteoglycans with development, aging, and osteoarthritis processes in mouse temporomandibular joint  

Microsoft Academic Search

The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is an important growth and articulation center in the craniofacial complex. In aging it develops spontaneous degenerative osteoarthritic (OA) lesions. Metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPS) play key roles in extracellular matrix remodeling and degradation. Gelatinase activities and immunohistochemical localization of MMP-2, -3, -8, -9, and -13 and TIMP-1 and -2 were examined in

Amira Gepstein; Gil Arbel; Israel Blumenfeld; Micha Peled; Erella Livne

2003-01-01

246

Presence of MRI-detected joint effusion and synovitis increases the risk of cartilage loss in knees without osteoarthritis at 30-month follow-up: the MOST study  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate if two different measures of synovial activation, baseline Hoffa-synovitis and effusion-synovitis, assessed by MRI, predict cartilage loss in the tibiofemoral joint at 30 months follow-up in subjects with neither cartilage damage nor tibiofemoral radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Methods Non-contrast enhanced MRI was performed using proton density-weighted fat-suppressed sequences in the axial and sagittal planes and a STIR sequence in the coronal plane. Hoffa-synovitis, effusion-synovitis and cartilage status were assessed semiquantitatively according to the WORMS scoring system. Included were knees that had neither radiographic OA nor MRI-detected tibio-femoral cartilage damage at the baseline visit. Presence of Hoffa-synovitis was defined as any grade ?2 (range from 0–3) and effusion-synovitis as any grade ?2 (range from 0–3). We performed logistic regression to examine the relation of presence of either measure to the risk of cartilage loss at 30 months adjusting for other potential confounders of cartilage loss. Results Of 514 knees included in the analysis, prevalence of Hoffa-synovitis and effusion-synovitis at the baseline visit was 8.4% and 10.3%, respectively. In the multivariable analysis, baseline effusion-synovitis was associated with an increased risk for cartilage loss (odds ratio (OR) = 2.7, 95% confidence intervals 1.4–5.1, p=0.002); however, no such an association was observed for baseline Hoffa-synovitis (OR =1.0, 95% confidence intervals 0.5–2.0). Conclusions Baseline effusion-synovitis, but not Hoffa-synovitis, predicted cartilage loss. Our findings suggest that effusion-synovitis, a reflection of inflammatory activity including joint effusion and synovitic thickening, may play a role in future development of cartilage lesions in knees without OA.

Roemer, Frank W.; Guermazi, Ali; Felson, David T.; Niu, Jingbo; Nevitt, Michael C.; Crema, Michel D.; Lynch, John A.; Lewis, Cora E.; Torner, James; Zhang, Yuqing

2012-01-01

247

Evaluating meridian-sinew release therapy for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Objective. In recent years, public health experts have concluded that the impact of osteoarthritis is equal in magnitude to that of cardiovascular disease. Osteoarthritis of the knee is prevalent in the elderly population; however, there are currently no effective treatments for this condition. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of "meridian-sinew release," a newly developed technique which entails using a meridian-sinew scope and a meridian-sinew knife to treat osteoarthritis of the knee. Methods. Patients (N = 90) with knee osteoarthritis were prospectively randomized to meridian-sinew release therapy, acupuncture therapy, or drug therapy groups, respectively. Outcome evaluation included pain, stiffness, physiological function, total symptom score, and overall changes in the condition. Results. After 12 weeks, patients' general assessment (GA) and doctors' general assessment (GA) of the condition were not significantly different among the three groups. However, significant differences in primary endpoint pain, joint stiffness, and total symptom score were found between the meridian-sinew group and the acupuncture group and between the meridian-sinew group and the control group (P < 0.05). No adverse events occurred during the trial. Conclusion. Our study suggests that meridian-sinew release therapy can improve knee osteoarthritis, alleviate joint pain, and improve functional movement disorder. It is a safe and effective treatment for knee osteoarthritis. PMID:23861698

Wei, Song; Chen, Zhi-Huang; Sun, Wei-Feng; Zhang, Geng-Peng; Li, Xiao-Hao; Hou, Chun-Fu; Lu, Liu-Dan; Zhang, Lu

2013-06-19

248

Efficacy of Intra-Articular Injection of Celecoxib in a Rabbit Model of Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. It is a slowly progressive joint disease typically seen in middle-age to elderly people. Intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid is a well-documented treatment for knee osteoarthritis. Celebrex® (celecoxib) is a novel nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, which could help to reduce inflammation and to reduce pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of intra-articular injection of celecoxib in a rabbit osteoarthritis model. Methods: Thirty New Zealand white rabbits underwent unilateral knee joint surgery using the Hulth technique. Six weeks post-surgery, the animals were randomly divided into three groups, and each group was respectively given weekly intra-articular injections with Celebrex®, hyaluronic acid and saline. On the sixth week, the results were assessed in rabbit models by gross observation, histological evaluation, and expression of IL-1?, TNF-?, MMP-3. Results: In the group given Celebrex® and hyaluronic acid, the pathological changes in the rabbit articular cartilage improved significantly, much more than in the saline group. The statistically significant suppression of IL-1?, TNF-?, MMP-3 was shown in the Celebrex group. No significant differences were detected between two treatment groups. Conclusions: Intra-articular injection of celecoxib is beneficial for knee osteoarthritis. It might repair and protect early osteoarthritis cartilage by delaying cartilage degeneration and impairing the function of inflammatory mediators, therefore, intra-articular injection of celecoxib can be used as an alternative to the current treatment of osteoarthritis.

Jiang, Dinghua; Zou, Jun; Huang, Lixin; Shi, Qin; Zhu, Xuesong; Wang, Genlin; Yang, Huilin

2010-01-01

249

Comparison of clinical results after pisiformectomy in patients with rheumatic versus posttraumatic osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Pisotriquetral osteoarthritis is important to consider in the differential diagnosis of chronic ulnar-sided wrist pain. It can develop following traumatic injury to the pisiform or in rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or psoriatic arthritis. It has been shown that pisiformectomy can relieve symptoms in cases that have not responded to nonoperative treatment, and the excision does not compromise the function or strength of the wrist. Most studies focus on posttraumatic causes of pisotriquetral osteoarthritis. In the current study, rheumatic causes are also considered and the outcomes are compared. This retrospective study included 35 patients who underwent pisiformectomy for pisotriquetral osteoarthritis. All patients underwent a thorough diagnostic evaluation to exclude other etiologies for ulnar-sided wrist pain. Radiological examinations including posteroanterior and lateral views of the wrist and a tangential view of the pisotriquetral joint were analyzed. All patients had excellent or very good results after pisiformectomy, with a significant reduction in pain. No significant difference was found in the outcomes for patients with rheumatic vs posttraumatic osteoarthritis. Patients with rheumatic causes of pisotriquetral osteoarthritis can be successfully treated with pisiformectomy. With respect to idiopathic causes, these patients need a longer postoperative period to gain full pain relief. It is important to consider the possibility of pisotriquetral osteoarthritis after excluding other diagnoses in patients with rheumatic osteoarthritis. PMID:24093697

Lautenbach, Martin; Eisenschenk, Andreas; Langner, Inga; Arntz, Ulrike; Millrose, Michael

2013-10-01

250

Erosive osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Erosive osteoarthritis (EOA) is believed to be a clinically uncommon subset of generalized osteoarthritis (OA) characterized by a clinical course, which is frequently aggressive. The diagnosis of EOA is accepted only for patients meeting American College of Rheumatology clinical criteria for OA of the hand and showing radiographic aspects of articular surface erosions. Conditions to be considered in the differential

Leonardo Punzi; Roberta Ramonda; Paolo Sfriso

2004-01-01

251

Arthrodiatasis for management of knee osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritic disease is the result of mechanical and biological events that destabilize the normal processes of degradation and synthesis of articular cartilage chondrocytes, extracellular matrix, and subchondral bone. Osteoarthritis of the knee can cause symptoms ranging from mild to disabling. Initial management of most patients should be nonoperative, but because of the progressive nature of the disease, many patients with osteoarthritis of the knee eventually benefit from operative treatment. Various procedures have been described for treatment of the osteoarthritic knee, ranging from arthroscopic lavage and debridement to total knee arthroplasty. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical results of distraction arthroplasty combined with arthroscopic lavage and drilling of cartilage defects for treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee. Nineteen patients (15 women and 4 men; age range, 39-65 years) were operated on. Pre- and postoperative findings were compared. A control group comprising 42 patients treated with only arthroscopic procedures was evaluated for comparison. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 5 years. Results were evaluated both clinically and radiologically postoperatively and throughout the follow-up period. Clinically, pain and walking capacity improved in most patients. Radiologically, joint space widening and improvement of the tibiofemoral angle was noted in nearly all patients. PMID:21815573

Aly, Tarek A; Hafez, Kamal; Amin, Osama

2011-08-08

252

Genetics of osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of morbidity, physical limitation, and health care use, including total joint arthroplasty.\\u000a That OA has a genetic component has been known for some time, but only recently has formal study of this occurred. Twin studies,\\u000a segregation analyses, linkage analyses, and candidate gene association studies have generated important information about\\u000a inheritance patterns and the location

Joanne M. Jordan; Virginia B. Kraus; Marc C. Hochberg

2004-01-01

253

Osteoarthritis gene therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the Western world's leading cause of disability. It is incurable, costly and responds poorly to treatment. This review discusses strategies for treating OA by gene therapy. As OA affects a limited number of weight-bearing joints and has no major extra-articular manifestations, it is well suited to local, intra-articular gene therapy. Possible intra-articular sites of gene transfer include

CH Evans; JN Gouze; E Gouze; PD Robbins; SC Ghivizzani

2004-01-01

254

99mTc HMDP bone scanning in generalised nodal osteoarthritis. II. The four hour bone scan image predicts radiographic change.  

PubMed

In 14 patients with generalised nodal osteoarthritis a four hour bone scan image was found to predict the changes that occur on the radiograph at follow up between three and five years later. The scan abnormality appeared to precede the development of radiographic signs, and joints abnormal on scintigraphy showed most progression. Normal joints and joints abnormal on x ray alone showed little progression, and those that did subsequently alter became abnormal on scan. Scanning may provide a sensitive technique for monitoring osteoarthritis, it may enable a greater understanding of the underlying disease process, and allow evaluation of modifying therapeutic procedures. PMID:3740991

Hutton, C W; Higgs, E R; Jackson, P C; Watt, I; Dieppe, P A

1986-08-01

255

Fractal Analysis of Trabecular Bone in Knee Osteoarthritis (OA) is a More Sensitive Marker of Disease Status than Bone Mineral Density (BMD)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to determine whether fractal analysis (FSA) of macroradiographs or bone mineral density (BMD) is more sensitive in detecting disease-related cancellous bone alterations in knee osteoarthritis (OA). Differences in BMD between 11 OA (6 females) and 11 non-OA reference (7 females) tibiae were compared with differences in trabecular organization measured by computerized method of fractal

E. A. Messent; J. C. Buckland-Wright; G. M. Blake

2005-01-01

256

Joint Injection/Aspiration  

MedlinePLUS

... osteoarthritis. What usually is injected into the joint space? Corticosteroids (such as methylprednisolone and triamcinolone formulated to ... for producing inflammation and pain within the joint space. Although corticosteroids may also be successfully used in ...

257

The retinoic acid binding protein CRABP2 is increased in murine models of degenerative joint disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating disease with poorly defined aetiology. Multiple signals are involved in directing the formation of cartilage during development and the vitamin A derivatives, the retinoids, figure prominently in embryonic cartilage formation. In the present study, we examined the expression of a retinoid-regulated gene in murine models of OA. METHODS: Mild and moderate forms of an

Ian D. Welch; Matthew F. Cowan; Frank Beier; Tully M. Underhill

2009-01-01

258

Joints  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Hinge joints move only in one direction, ball-and-socket joints are free to rotate in all directions, and gliding joints are able to move forward, backward, and side to side, but do not rotate freely.

Olivia Worland (Purdue University;Biological Sciences)

2008-06-06

259

Imaging of osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent joint disorder in the elderly, and there is no effective treatment. Imaging is essential for evaluating the synovial joint structures (including cartilage, meniscus, subchondral bone marrow and synovium) for diagnosis, prognosis, and follow-up. This article describes the roles and limitations of both conventional radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and considers the use of other modalities (eg, ultrasonography, nuclear medicine, computed tomography [CT], and CT/MR arthrography) in clinical practice and OA research. The emphasis throughout is on OA of the knee. This article emphasizes research developments and literature evidence published since 2008. PMID:23312411

Guermazi, Ali; Hayashi, Daichi; Eckstein, Felix; Hunter, David J; Duryea, Jeff; Roemer, Frank W

2013-02-01

260

Non-invasive investigation in patients with inflammatory joint disease  

PubMed Central

Gut inflammation can occur in 30%-60% of patients with spondyloarthropathies. However, the presence of such gut inflammation is underestimated, only 27% of patients with histological evidence of gut inflammation have intestinal symptoms, but subclinical gut inflammation is documented in two-thirds of patients with inflammatory joint disease. There are common genetic and immunological mechanisms behind concomitant inflammation in the joints and intestinal tract. A number of blood tests, e.g. erythrocyte sedimentation rate, orosomucoid, C-reactive protein, and white cell and platelet counts, are probably the most commonly used laboratory markers of inflammatory disease, however, these tests are difficult to interpret in arthropathies associated with gut inflammation, since any increases in their blood levels might be attributable to either the joint disease or to gut inflammation. Consequently, it would be useful to have a marker capable of separately identifying gut inflammation. Fecal proteins, which are indirect markers of neutrophil migration in the gut wall, and intestinal permeability, seem to be ideal for monitoring intestinal inflammation: they are easy to measure non-invasively and are specific for intestinal disease in the absence of gastrointestinal infections. Alongside the traditional markers for characterizing intestinal inflammation, there are also antibodies, in all probability generated by the immune response to microbial antigens and auto-antigens, which have proved useful in establishing the diagnosis and assessing the severity of the condition, as well as the prognosis and the risk of complications. In short, non-invasive investigations on the gut in patients with rheumatic disease may be useful in clinical practice for a preliminary assessment of patients with suspected intestinal disease.

Dal Pont, Elisabetta; D'Inca, Renata; Caruso, Antonino; Sturniolo, Giacomo Carlo

2009-01-01

261

Osteoarthritis, application of physical therapy proceduers.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a group of overlapping disorders, which may have different aetiology but similar biological, morphologic and clinical outcome. In osteoarthritis, process will not encompass the joint cartilage only, but the entire joint, including sub-hondral bone, ligaments, capsule, and sinovial membrane and surrounding muscles. Osteoarthritis is a multi-factor disorder of sinovial joints, which occurs as result of mechanical and biological factors, which destabilise normal hondrocyte function, partitioning of cartilage, extra-cellular matrix and sub-hondral bone. The earliest changes, which are restricted to the joint cartilage surface only, do not cause any subjective feeling. The pain in arthrosis occurs (or re-occurs) a bit later, Diagnosis will be determined based on clinical exam as well as signs and symptoms present. Symptomatic and functional treatment of osteoarthritis as one of rheumatic disorders must be taken throughout years, sometimes throughout a lifetime. It encompasses application of many medications and physical therapy procedures. PMID:16995855

Avdi?, Dijana; Pecar, Dzemal; Muji?-Skiki?, Emela; Pecar, Ehlimana

2006-08-01

262

Feline degenerative joint disease: a genomic and proteomic approach.  

PubMed

The underlying disease mechanisms for feline degenerative joint disease (DJD) are mostly unidentified. Today, most of what is published on mammalian arthritis is based on human clinical findings or on mammalian models of human arthritis. However, DJD is a common occurrence in the millions of domestic felines worldwide. To get a better understanding of the changes in biological pathways that are associated with feline DJD, this study employed a custom-designed feline GeneChip, and the institution's unique access to large sample populations to investigate genes and proteins from whole blood and serum that may be up- or down-regulated in DJD cats. The GeneChip results centered around three main pathways that were affected in DJD cats: immune function, apoptosis and oxidative phosphorylation. By identifying these key disease-associated pathways it will then be possible to better understand disease pathogenesis and diagnose it more easily, and to better target it with pharmaceutical and nutritional intervention. PMID:23295270

Gao, Xiangming; Lee, Junyu; Malladi, Sukhaswami; Melendez, Lynda; Lascelles, B Duncan X; Al-Murrani, Samer

2013-01-07

263

Syndecan-4 regulates ADAMTS-5 activation and cartilage breakdown in osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Aggrecan cleavage by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 5 (ADAMTS-5) is crucial for the breakdown of cartilage matrix during osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease that leads to the progressive destruction of articular structures. The mechanisms of ADAMTS-5 activation and their links to the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis remain poorly understood, but syndecans have been shown to be involved in the activation of ADAMTS-4 (ref. 3). Here we show that syndecan-4 is specifically induced in type X collagen-producing chondrocytes both in human osteoarthritis and in murine models of the disease. The loss of syndecan-4 in genetically modified mice and intra-articular injections of syndecan-4-specific antibodies into wild-type mice protect from proteoglycan loss and thereby prevent osteoarthritic cartilage damage in a surgically induced model of osteoarthritis. The occurrence of less severe osteoarthritis-like cartilage destruction in both syndecan-4-deficient mice and syndecan-4-specific antibody-treated wild-type mice results from a marked decrease in ADAMTS-5 activity. Syndecan-4 controls the activation of ADAMTS-5 through direct interaction with the protease and through regulating mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent synthesis of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3). Our data suggest that strategies aimed at the inhibition of syndecan-4 will be of great value for the treatment of cartilage damage in osteoarthritis. PMID:19684582

Echtermeyer, Frank; Bertrand, Jessica; Dreier, Rita; Meinecke, Ingmar; Neugebauer, Katja; Fuerst, Martin; Lee, Yun Jong; Song, Yeong Wook; Herzog, Christine; Theilmeier, Gregor; Pap, Thomas

2009-08-16

264

Osteoarthritis year 2011 in review: biology  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY This review is focused on advances in understanding the biology of joint homeostasis and osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis mechanisms that have led to proof of concept studies on new therapeutic approaches. The three selected topics include angiogenesis in joint tissues, biomechanics and joint lubrication and mitochondrial dysfunction. This new information represents progress in the integration of mechanisms that control multiple aspects of OA pathophysiology.

Lotz, M.

2012-01-01

265

Factors predicting health-related quality of life in knee osteoarthritis among community-dwelling women in Japan: the Hizen-Oshima study.  

PubMed

Knee osteoarthritis is the most common chronic joint disorder in elderly people. However, a population-based, longitudinal study on health-related quality of life in knee osteoarthritis has not been conducted in Japan. We studied 333 women aged 50 years and older at baseline, with 8 to 9 years of follow-up. Anteroposterior weight-bearing knee radiographs were obtained at baseline and graded according to the Kellgren-Lawrence criteria. Definite osteoarthritis was defined as Kellgren-Lawrence grade 2 or higher in at least 1 joint. At baseline, all participants were asked if they had knee pain and comorbidities (heart disease, lung disease, stroke, or diabetes mellitus). Height (m), weight (kg), and chair stand time were measured. At follow-up, quality of life in knee osteoarthritis was evaluated using the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure score. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that age, knee osteoarthritis, knee pain, comorbidity, and increasing chair stand time were independently related to subsequent health-related quality of life. These findings suggest that treating knee osteoarthritis and comorbidities, managing pain, and optimizing lower extremity muscle strength may be effective targets for intervention. PMID:21902153

Norimatsu, Takahiro; Osaki, Makoto; Tomita, Masato; Ye, Zhaojia; Abe, Yasuyo; Honda, Sumihisa; Kanagae, Mitsuo; Mizukami, Satoshi; Takamura, Noboru; Kusano, Yosuke; Shindo, Hiroyuki; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi

2011-09-09

266

Non-pharmacological therapies in osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Non-pharmacological therapies are very important in osteoarthritis. Each form of this treatment should be individually devised, taking into account the anatomical distribution, the phase and the progression rate of the disease. Indications, contraindications, dosage and precautions are as important in non-pharmacological therapy as they are in drug treatment. Therapeutic exercises decrease pain, increase muscle strength and range of joint motion as well as improve endurance and aerobic capacity. Exercise programmes should be designed, conducted and regularly supervised by professionally trained physiotherapists. Weight reduction is of proven benefit in obese patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Walking aids, crutches, shoe insoles, braces and patellar taping are useful tools in some form of osteoarthritis. Patient education and the management of the psychosocial consequences are priority tasks. Therapeutic heat and cold, electrotherapy, ultrasound, acupuncture, hydrotherapy and spa treatment are widely used, although the effects and benefits have not been fully established. Non-pharmacological therapies should undergo rigorous randomized controlled trials in a similar manner to pharmacological studies. PMID:9429737

Bálint, G; Szebenyi, B

1997-11-01

267

A histomorphometric analysis of synovial biopsies from individuals with Gulf War Veterans' Illness and joint pain compared to normal and osteoarthritis synovium.  

PubMed

We compared histologic, immunohistochemical, and vascular findings in synovial biopsies from individuals with Gulf War Veterans Illness and joint pain (GWVI) to findings in normal and osteoarthritis (OA) synovium. The following parameters were assessed in synovial biopsies from ten individuals with GWVI: lining thickness, histologic synovitis score, and vascular density in hematoxylin & eosin-stained sections; and CD68+ lining surface cells and CD15+, CD3+, CD8+, CD20+, CD38+, CD68+, and Ki-67+ subintimal cells and von Willebrand Factor+ vessels immunohistochemically. Comparisons were made to synovial specimens from healthy volunteers (n = 10) and patients with OA or RA (n = 25 each). Histologic appearance and quantitative assessments were nearly identical in the GWVI and normal specimens. Vascular density was between 25% (H & E stains; p = 0.003) and 31% (vWF immunostains; p = 0.02) lower in GWVI and normal specimens than in OA. CD68+ macrophages were the most common inflammatory cells in GWVI (45.3 +/- 10.1 SEM cells/mm(2)) and normal synovium (45.6 +/- 7.4) followed by CD3+ T cells (GWVI, 15.1 +/- 6.3; normal, 27.1 +/- 9.2), whereas there were practically no CD20+, CD38+, and CD15+ cells. All parameters except lining thickness and CD15 and CD20 expression were significantly higher in OA. Five (20%) OA specimens contained significant fractions of humoral immune cells in mononuclear infiltrates, although the overall differences in the relative composition of the OA mononuclear infiltrates did not reach statistical significance compared to GWVI and normal synovium. In summary, the GWVI and normal synovia were indistinguishable from each other and contained similar low-grade inflammatory cell populations consisting almost entirely of macrophages and T cells. PMID:18414968

Pessler, F; Chen, L X; Dai, L; Gomez-Vaquero, C; Diaz-Torne, C; Paessler, M E; Scanzello, C; Cakir, N; Einhorn, E; Schumacher, H R

2008-04-15

268

Whipple's disease with axial and peripheral joint destruction.  

PubMed

A seropositive white man had follow-up for 16 years with a diagnosis of palindromic rheumatism. Treatment had included parenteral gold, methotrexate, prednisone, hydroxychloroquine sulfate, and penicillamine before diarrhea led to a biopsy-proven diagnosis of Whipple's disease. Clinical and radiographic criteria for ankylosing spondylitis were met. In addition to classic Whipple's arthropathy, he had the combined but singular findings of pancarpal destruction and cervical apophyseal fusion. HLA typing revealed the B7 antigen. This case illustrates the pitfalls in diagnosis of a chronic polyarthritis that has, as a typical feature, a long latency before manifesting its more specific signs and symptoms (ie, diarrhea, malabsorption, and hyperpigmentation). Care should be taken during evaluation of any disease with atypical and nonspecific features (eg, positive rheumatoid factor in a patient with polyarthritis) and one should continue to reevaluate the original impression while confirmatory evidence is lacking. Moreover, the roentgenographic findings of pancarpal narrowing, apophyseal fusion, and advanced iliofemoral joint disease, in addition to sacroiliitis and syndesmophyte formation, challenge the generally held notion that Whipple's arthropathy is a nondestructive joint disease. PMID:1694047

Scheib, J S; Quinet, R J

1990-06-01

269

Nodal osteoarthritis and gout: a report of four new cases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently gout has been recognized as a cause of inflammation in patients with nodal osteoarthritis. We reviewed the clinical\\u000a data and radiographs of four patients with known osteoarthritis of the interphalangeal joints of the hands who developed gout.\\u000a Radiographic changes of osteoarthritis in the affected interphalangeal joint were present in all four patients. In our cases,\\u000a radiographic findings were typical

K. Foldes; C. A. Petersilge; M. H. Weisman; D. Resnick

1996-01-01

270

Variations in the pre-operative status of patients coming to primary hip replacement for osteoarthritis in European orthopaedic centres  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Total hip joint replacement (THR) is a high volume, effective intervention for hip osteoarthritis (OA). However, indications and determinants of outcome remain unclear. The 'EUROHIP consortium' has undertaken a cohort study to investigate these questions. This paper describes the variations in disease severity in this cohort and the relationships between clinical and radiographic severity, and explores some of the

Paul Dieppe; Andrew Judge; Susan Williams; Ifeoma Ikwueke; Klaus-Peter Guenther; Markus Floeren; Joerg Huber; Thorvaldur Ingvarsson; Ian Learmonth; L Stefan Lohmander; Anna Nilsdotter; Wofhart Puhl; David Rowley; Robert Thieler; Karsten Dreinhoefer

2009-01-01

271

Proteases involved in cartilage matrix degradation in osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Osteoarthritis is a common joint disease for which there are currently no disease-modifying drugs available. Degradation of the cartilage extracellular matrix is a central feature of the disease and is widely though to be mediated by proteinases that degrade structural components of the matrix, primarily aggrecan and collagen. Studies on transgenic mice have confirmed the central role of Adamalysin with Thrombospondin Motifs 5 (ADAMTS-5) in aggrecan degradation, and the collagenolytic matrix metalloproteinase MMP-13 in collagen degradation. This review discusses recent advances in current understanding of the mechanisms regulating expression of these key enzymes, as well as reviewing the roles of other proteinases in cartilage destruction.

Troeberg, Linda; Nagase, Hideaki

2011-01-01

272

The Natural History of Osteoarthritis and Potential Causes of ...  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

Text VersionPage 1. 1 The Natural History of Osteoarthritis and Potential Causes of Joint Destruction ... Page 4. 4 Potential Causes of Joint Destruction ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/advisorycommittees/committeesmeetingmaterials

273

Tackling obesity in knee osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Obesity and knee osteoarthritis (OA), two of the most common chronic diseases, are often comorbid. Obesity increases the risk of knee OA by a variety of mechanisms, such as increased joint loading and changes in body composition, with detrimental effects related to metainflammation and behavioural factors, including diminished physical activity and subsequent loss of protective muscle strength. These complex interactions present a challenge to the managing physician. The risk of knee OA related to weight gain and obesity begins from an early age. Weight loss reduces the risk of incident knee OA, and, in established disease, reduces symptoms, improves function and is likely to reduce disease progression. We review strategies to facilitate weight loss, with particular reference to their application in people with knee OA. Although knee OA presents intrinsic barriers to weight management, weight loss is possible at all stages of disease. Exercise or muscle strengthening are desirable for general health and to improve function, but are not essential to achieve weight loss and a successful symptomatic result. The degree of weight loss required to achieve benefit might be greater with increasing disease severity. Finally, we outline the need for a societal approach to tackle obesity-related OA. PMID:23247649

Wluka, Anita E; Lombard, Cate B; Cicuttini, Flavia M

2012-12-18

274

Osteoarthritis: current treatment and future prospects for surgical, medical, and biologic intervention.  

PubMed

The treatment of osteoarthritis includes a wide spectrum of approaches. This article reviews current practices in medical, pharmaceutical and surgical treatment with a perspective toward the immediate, distant and far distant future. At present, with the exception of surgery, all other treatments are palliative. That is to say that many of these treatments relieve pain and increase function. However, on the basis of medical evidence, these treatments do not change the course of the disease. Surgical interventions, including joint replacement and osteotomy, reverse the progress of osteoarthritis and provide long-term improved function and pain relief for specific joints. The goal of treating osteoarthritis is to arrest and reverse its progress regionally or globally through biologic methodology. Meaningful progress for biologic intervention accumulates annually. Pluripotent mesenchymal cells can be coaxed into chondrocytes or stem cells. Cytokines, growth factors, chemokines, protease inhibitors, kinases, apoptosis, mechanics, and genetics are increasingly recognized to play key roles in the control of the articular cartilage behavior. Knowledge of their roles and relationships advance toward solutions related to osteoarthritis. In the future, biologic control may be harnessed to regrow joints or limbs, as currently occurs naturally in newts and salamanders. Fortunately, until then we have ever improving joint replacement. PMID:15480065

Schurman, David J; Smith, R Lane

2004-10-01

275

Hip osteoarthritis: what the radiologist wants to know.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common disease of the hip joint seen in adults. The diagnosis of OA is based on a combination of radiographic findings of joint degeneration and characteristic subjective symptoms. The lack of a radiographic consensus definition has resulted in a variation of the published incidences and prevalence of OA. The chronological sequence of degeneration includes the following plain radiographic findings: joint space narrowing, development of osteophytes, subchondral sclerosis, and cyst formation. There are cases though, that plain radiographs show minor changes and the clinical suspicion of early disease can be confirmed with more sophisticated imaging methods, such as multi-detector computed tomography and MR imaging. The present article will review all the clinical information on the hip OA together with an updated radiological approach, with emphasis on the early depiction and the differential diagnosis of the disease. PMID:17555904

Karachalios, Theofilos; Karantanas, Apostolos H; Malizos, Konstantinos

2007-06-06

276

The radiology of joint disease. 3rd Ed  

SciTech Connect

The book is a systematic radiographic approach to the arthritides. Part one deals with hand abnormalities ''to facilitate the teaching of basic principles and to dramatize the differences between radiographic features of various arthritides,'' as stated in the forward of the first edition. Part two, ''Arthritis from Head to Foot,'' illustrates the same diseases as they affect other joints. The ABCs (alignment, bone mineralization, cartilage space, soft tissue) approach is followed throughout the book. For example, reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome is dealt with in six different locations, and metatarsal stress fractures are mentioned in a chapter on erosions in rheumatoid arthritis.

Forrester, D.M.; Brown, J.C.

1987-01-01

277

New horizons in osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (OA), also known as degenerative joint disease, is the most frequent chronic musculoskeletal disease and the leading cause of disability in elderly persons. There are currently at least 27 million persons afflicted with OA in the United States, and the annual cost to society in medical care and wage loss is expected to reach nearly $100 billion dollars by 2020, with consequent increased spending on its diagnosis and treatment, side effect prevention, and loss of productivity. Despite this enormous burden, many aspects of OA are still unknown, with implications not only in terms of diagnosis and assessment but also with regard to therapy. Awareness of this state of affairs has attracted many researchers to this field, making OA one of the most actively studied sectors of rheumatology. Although some clinicians are unaware of recent advances, there is a large body of publications indicating that much has been achieved. Major progress has been made in formulating better definitions of risk factors, in particular in indicating the responsibility of biomechanical and genetic factors, and, with regard to pathogenesis, underlining the role of subchondral bone, cytokines and proteinases. Assessment of OA activity and its progression has been improved with the advent of biomarkers and new imaging procedures, in particular sonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but also of better clinical instruments, including more reliable patient questionnaires. Information from ongoing studies may improve the to some extent incomplete definition of OA phenotypes. Finally, promising new horizons have been opened up even with regard to the treatment of OA, which is still for the most part unsatisfactory except for surgical replacement therapy. Numerous new substances have been formulated and the findings of trials studying their effects are encouraging, although much has yet to be done. PMID:20458653

Oliviero, F; Ramonda, R; Punzi, L

2010-09-17

278

Autophagy and cartilage homeostasis mechanisms in joint health, aging and OA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent joint disease, but neither preventive measures nor disease-modifying drugs are available and a continuing need exists for safe and effective symptom-modifying therapies. Clinical trials of candidate disease-modifying OA drugs in patients with established or advanced disease have not demonstrated their efficacy, but these failed trials have motivated investigation into the mechanisms that maintain joint

Beatriz Caramés; Martin K. Lotz

2011-01-01

279

The future of osteoarthritis therapeutics: targeted pharmacological therapy.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common forms of degenerative joint disease and a major cause of pain and disability affecting the aging population. It is estimated that more than 20 million Americans and 35 to 40 million Europeans suffer from OA. Analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the only therapeutic treatment options for OA. Effective pharmacotherapy for OA, capable of restoring the original structure and function of damaged cartilage and other synovial tissue, is urgently needed, and research into such disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs (DMOADs) is in progress. This is the first of three reviews focusing on OA therapeutics. This paper provides an overview of current research into potential structure-modifying drugs and more appropriately targeted pharmacological therapy. The challenges and opportunities in this area of research and development are reviewed, covering the most up-to-date initiatives, trends, and topics. PMID:24061701

Mobasheri, A

2013-10-01

280

Capillaroscopic findings in erosive and nodal osteoarthritis of the hands.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis of the hands is a very common disease that can present a large number of different clinic pictures, such as nodal (NOA) and erosive (EOA) forms. EOA in particular is a rare subset of hand osteoarthritis characterised by faster destructive changes involving the distal interphalangeal (DIP) and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints. In the early stages of the disease the differential diagnosis from other arthritides, such as rheumatoid or seronegative arthritis, may pose a challenge. Nailfold capillaroscopy is a non-invasive technique that allows the in vivo study of the microvascular environment. In this study the authors have compared the capillaroscopic microvascular patterns in 56 patients with EOA, in 46 patients with NOA, and in 50 normal controls. The abnormalities that could be found in EOA patients were similar to those described by some authors in patients with psoriatic arthritis. The authors discuss the significance of these abnormalities and the possible relationship between EOA and psoriatic arthritis. PMID:11434467

Fioravanti, A; Tofi, C; Cerase, A; Priolo, F; Marcolongo, R

2001-01-01

281

Inhibition of TGF-? signaling in mesenchymal stem cells of subchondral bone attenuates osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis is a highly prevalent and debilitating joint disorder. There is no effective medical therapy for the condition because of limited understanding of its pathogenesis. We show that transforming growth factor ?1 (TGF-?1) is activated in subchondral bone in response to altered mechanical loading in an anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) mouse model of osteoarthritis. TGF-?1 concentrations are also high in subchondral bone from humans with osteoarthritis. High concentrations of TGF-?1 induced formation of nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) clusters, leading to formation of marrow osteoid islets accompanied by high levels of angiogenesis. We found that transgenic expression of active TGF-?1 in osteoblastic cells induced osteoarthritis, whereas inhibition of TGF-? activity in subchondral bone attenuated the degeneration of articular cartilage. In particular, knockout of the TGF-? type II receptor (T?RII) in nestin-positive MSCs led to less development of osteoarthritis relative to wild-type mice after ACLT. Thus, high concentrations of active TGF-?1 in subchondral bone seem to initiate the pathological changes of osteoarthritis, and inhibition of this process could be a potential therapeutic approach to treating this disease. PMID:23685840

Zhen, Gehua; Wen, Chunyi; Jia, Xiaofeng; Li, Yu; Crane, Janet L; Mears, Simon C; Askin, Frederic B; Frassica, Frank J; Chang, Weizhong; Yao, Jie; Carrino, John A; Cosgarea, Andrew; Artemov, Dmitri; Chen, Qianming; Zhao, Zhihe; Zhou, Xuedong; Riley, Lee; Sponseller, Paul; Wan, Mei; Lu, William Weijia; Cao, Xu

2013-05-19

282

Prognostic factors affecting survival of 507 horses with joint disease: (1983 to 1990).  

PubMed Central

Between July 1, 1983 and December 31, 1990, risk factors were determined for all horses with joint disease presented to a referral center, of being discharged, of ever becoming sound, or of being alive at 3 mo follow-up. Logistic multiple-regression models were done separately for foals (< or = 4 mo), yearlings (> 4-24 mo) and racing or nonracing adult horses (> 24 mo). The breakdown in this study was 53 foals, 87 yearlings, 141 nonracing adults, and 226 racing adults. Thirty-one foals (58%), 68 yearlings (78%), 119 non-racing adults (84%), and 213 racing adults (94%) were discharged. Foals with a less severe lameness, duration of illness of > 1 d, and infectious arthritis had increased odds of discharge. At follow-up, 12 of 18 (67%) were alive, 10 (56%) of which were sound. Yearlings with osteochondrosis had higher odds of discharge; at follow-up, 38 of 49 (78%) were alive, 32 (65%) of which were sound. For non-racing adults, horses with less severe lameness, without a miscellaneous diagnosis, or intended for pleasure use had increased odds of discharge. At follow-up, 55 of 78 (70%) were alive and 33 of 58 (57%) with soundness data became sound. Risk factors for higher odds of being alive at follow-up were carpal lameness, arthroscopic surgery, a prognosis other than poor, became sound, above-median hospitalization costs, and duration of follow-up. The 161 racing adults (76% of discharges), with follow-up, were more likely to have had osteoarthritis, higher hospital costs, hospitalization > 1 d, and arthroscopy. Sixty-four (60%) of these became sound; the odds increased if the horse was not severely lame at admission or was hospitalized for > 1 d. Risk factors and prognosis differed by age-use group among horses seen at our hospital.

Fubini, S L; Erb, H N; Freeman, K P; Todhunter, R J

1999-01-01

283

Evidence for genetic anticipation in nodal osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE—Evidence was sought for genetic anticipation (disease occurring at an earlier age in subsequent generations, with increasing severity) in nodal osteoarthritis (NOA).?METHODS—Age at symptom onset and disease severity was compared within 30 parent/offspring pairs with NOA. Correlation between the offspring age of disease onset and the parental age at conception was also assessed.?RESULTS—The age at onset of nodal symptoms was earlier in the offspring (43 years (95% confidence intervals (CI) 38 to 47) v 61 (CI 58 to 65); mean difference 18 years (CI 13 to 22): p< 0.001) as was large joint symptom onset (48 years (CI 41 to 55) v 67 (CI 61 to 73); mean difference 20 years (CI 13 to 27): p< 0.01). A negative correlation existed between age of offspring symptom onset and parental age at conception. Fifteen (50%) offspring had similar or more extensive disease than their parents.?CONCLUSIONS—These results suggest genetic anticipation occurs in NOA and if confirmed a search for trinucleotide repeats is warranted.?? Keywords: nodal osteoarthritis; genetic anticipation; trinucleotide repeats

Wright, G.; Regan, M.; Deighton, C.; Wallis, G.; Doherty, M.

1998-01-01

284

Metacarpophalangeal joint arthritis.  

PubMed

Arthritis of the metacarpophalangeal joint can result in considerable disability and pain. Inflammatory, posttraumatic, crystalline, and osteoarthritis are common etiologies of joint disease. A variety of nonsurgical treatment options have been shown to be effective, including activity modification, anti-inflammatory medications, splinting, and cortisone injections. In addition, newer generation disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs geared toward the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis have shown promise in retarding the inflammatory process. Another, relatively newer, conservative treatment option includes topical anti-inflammatories such as diclofenac sodium that are now approved by the Federal Drug Administration. Surgical treatment options most commonly include arthroplasty and arthrodesis. In the treatment of thumb metacarpophalangeal arthritis, arthrodesis is a popular and generally reliable surgical solution. In the fingers, arthroplasty remains the most common treatment option. Traditional constrained silicone joint replacements remain the most commonly used. Newer generation, unconstrained, surface replacement arthroplasties have shown promise in the treatment of osteoarthritis and select cases of inflammatory arthritis in which there is good bone stock, no or minimal deformity, adequate supporting soft tissues, and good disease control. PMID:21276901

Rizzo, Marco

2011-02-01

285

Joint Modeling of Transitional Patterns of Alzheimer's Disease  

PubMed Central

While the experimental Alzheimer's drugs recently developed by pharmaceutical companies failed to stop the progression of Alzheimer's disease, clinicians strive to seek clues on how the patients would be when they visit back next year, based upon the patients' current clinical and neuropathologic diagnosis results. This is related to how to precisely identify the transitional patterns of Alzheimer's disease. Due to the complexities of the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, the condition of the disease is usually characterized by multiple clinical and neuropathologic measurements, including Clinical Dementia Rating (CDRGLOB), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), a score derived from the clinician judgement on neuropsychological tests (COGSTAT), and Functional Activities Questionnaire (FAQ). In this research article, we investigate a class of novel joint random-effects transition models that are used to simultaneously analyze the transitional patterns of multiple primary measurements of Alzheimer's disease and, at the same time, account for the association between the measurements. The proposed methodology can avoid the bias introduced by ignoring the correlation between primary measurements and can predict subject-specific transitional patterns.

Liu, Wei; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Zhiwei; Zhou, Xiao-Hua

2013-01-01

286

Erosive hand osteoarthritis: its prevalence and clinical impact in the general population and symptomatic hand osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveTo estimate the prevalence of erosive hand osteoarthritis (EOA) in the general population and its relation to symptomatic hand osteoarthritis (HOA), hand pain and disability.MethodsBaseline data of participants from a population-based study (age ?55 years) were used. Symptomatic HOA was defined as hand pain and in addition to radiographic HOA (at least one interphalangeal (IP) joint or 1st carpometacarpal joint

W Y Kwok; M Kloppenburg; F R Rosendaal; J B van Meurs; A Hofman; S M A Bierma-Zeinstra

2011-01-01

287

A 5-yr longitudinal study of type IIA collagen synthesis and total type II collagen degradation in patients with knee osteoarthritis--association with disease progression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. The 5-yr longitudinal study tested the hypothesis that serum and urinary markers of type II collagen metabolism would be associated with radiological progression of disease in patients with mild-to-moderate knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. Synthesis of type IIA collagen and degradation of total type II collagen were assessed in 135 patients with mild-to-moderate knee OA over 5 yrs using serum

M. Sharif; J. Kirwan; N. Charni; L. J. Sandell; C. Whittles; P. Garnero

2007-01-01

288

Health-related quality of life in patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis: comparison of generic and disease-specific instruments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health-related quality of life (HRQL) assessment is receiving increased attention as an outcome measure in osteoarthritis (OA). The aims of the study were to assess the health status impact of hip and knee OA in the general older population and to compare the metric properties of the WOMAC disease-specific questionnaire (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities) with generic measures [i.e., the

Fausto Salaffi; Marina Carotti; Walter Grassi

2005-01-01

289

Weight bearing as a measure of disease progression and efficacy of anti-inflammatory compounds in a model of monosodium iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To describe an in vivo model in the rat in which change in weight distribution is used as a measure of disease progression and efficacy of acetaminophen and two nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in a model of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA)-induced osteoarthritis (OA).Methods: Intra-articular injections of MIA and saline were administered to male Wistar rats (175–200g) into the right and

S. E Bove; S. L Calcaterra; R. M Brooker; C. M Huber; R. E Guzman; P. L Juneau; D. J Schrier; K. S Kilgore

2003-01-01

290

Can a disease-specific education program augment self-management skills and improve Health-Related Quality of Life in people with hip or knee osteoarthritis?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Patient education and self-management programs are offered in many countries to people with chronic conditions such as osteoarthritis (OA). The most well-known is the disease-specific Stanford Arthritis Self-Management Program (ASMP). While Australian and international clinical guidelines promote the concept of self-management for OA, there is currently little evidence to support the use of the ASMP. Several meta-analyses have reported

Richard H Osborne; Rachelle Buchbinder; Ilana N Ackerman

2006-01-01

291

Jellyfish mucin may have potential disease-modifying effects on osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Background We aimed to study the effects of intra-articular injection of jellyfish mucin (qniumucin) on articular cartilage degeneration in a model of osteoarthritis (OA) created in rabbit knees by resection of the anterior cruciate ligament. Qniumucin was extracted from Aurelia aurita (moon jellyfish) and Stomolophus nomurai (Nomura's jellyfish) and purified by ion exchange chromatography. The OA model used 36 knees in 18 Japanese white rabbits. Purified qniumucin extracts from S. nomurai or A. aurita were used at 1 mg/ml. Rabbits were divided into four groups: a control (C) group injected with saline; a hyaluronic acid (HA)-only group (H group); two qniumucin-only groups (M groups); and two qniumucin + HA groups (MH groups). One milligram of each solution was injected intra-articularly once a week for 5 consecutive weeks, starting from 4 weeks after surgery. Ten weeks after surgery, the articular cartilage was evaluated macroscopically and histologically. Results In the C and M groups, macroscopic cartilage defects extended to the subchondral bone medially and laterally. When the H and both MH groups were compared, only minor cartilage degeneration was observed in groups treated with qniumucin in contrast to the group without qniumucin. Histologically, densely safranin-O-stained cartilage layers were observed in the H and two MH groups, but cartilage was strongly maintained in both MH groups. Conclusion At the concentrations of qniumucin used in this study, injection together with HA inhibited articular cartilage degeneration in this model of OA.

2009-01-01

292

Erosive hand osteoarthritis and systemic sclerosis: a casual association?  

PubMed

To describe an unexpected association between a patient affected with erosive hand osteoarthritis (EHOA) and systemic sclerosis (SSc). We report a case of SSc presenting typical radiological findings of EHOA in a 60-year-old woman referred to our outpatient Rheumatology Unit. Physical examination revealed puffy hands with sclerodactyly and concomitant adduction of the thumb and subluxation of the first carpometacarpal (CMC) and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints bilaterally and nodose deformities of the distal interphalangeal (DIP). Hand X-rays showed joint space narrowing, osteophytosis and bone sclerosis of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints. The DIP joints showed central bone erosion, collapse of the subchondral bone plate and typical "gull-wing" type deformity. EHOA is a particularly aggressive subset of osteoarthritis (OA). In light of its still unclear pathogenesis, peculiarities in the disease characteristics may be useful to better define the EHOA patient profile. One of these is an unexpected association with some autoimmune diseases. EHOA and SSc in the same patient is not uncommon, and it could speculate that there may be a genetic and autoimmune involvement. PMID:22840479

Ramonda, Roberta; Del Ross, Teresa; Modesti, Valentina; Lorenzin, Mariagrazia; Campana, Carla; Punzi, Leonardo

2012-07-26

293

Joint infection, with consideration of underlying disease and sources of bacteremia in hematogenous infection.  

PubMed

Joint infection commonly results from hematogenous spread of infection from a distant site. Pre-existing joint disease increases the risk of joint infection during bacteremia. Most patients present with pain, swelling, heat, and limitation of motion of the affected joint, often with fever, but presentation may be atypical, especially in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic corticosteroid therapy, or infected prosthetic joints. Diagnosis is best made by analysis and culture of synovial fluid. The infecting microorganism often provides a clue to remote infection or underlying disease, which may require special attention. Therapy consists of high-dose parenteral antibiotics and adequate drainage. Outcome depends on early diagnosis and appropriate therapy. PMID:3288326

Klein, R S

1988-05-01

294

2-Butoxyethanol model of haemolysis and disseminated thrombosis in female rats: a preliminary study of the vascular mechanism of osteoarthritis in the temporomandibular joint  

Microsoft Academic Search

Female rats develop haemolytic anaemia and disseminated thrombosis and infarction in multiple organs, including bone, when exposed to 2-butoxyethanol (BE). There is growing evidence that vascular occlusion of the subchondral bone may play a part in some cases of osteoarthritis. The subchondral bone is the main weight bearer as well as the source of the blood supply to the mandibular

G. Amir; A. W. Goldfarb; M. Nyska; M. Redlich; A. Nyska; D. W. Nitzan

2011-01-01

295

Induction of osteoarthritis in the rat by surgical tear of the meniscus: Inhibition of joint damage by a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective Characterize a model of osteoarthritis (OA) induced by a surgically transecting the medial collateral ligament and meniscus. Evaluate the effectiveness of a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor in this model.Methods The medial collateral ligament of the right knee of rats was transected and a single full thickness cut was made through meniscus. Rats were sacrificed at various times after the

M. J. Janusz; A. M. Bendele; K. K. Brown; Y. O. Taiwo; L. Hsieh; S. A. Heitmeyer

2002-01-01

296

Capitate pyrocarbon prosthesis in radiocarpal osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Scapholunate dissociation or scaphoid pseudarthrosis may lead to osteoarthritis of the wrist. When osteoarthritis affects the midcarpal joint, proximal row carpectomy is no longer possible and only 4 corners fusion or capitolunate arthrodesis may be indicated. However, in some cases, osteoarthritis or bone necrosis may involve the lunatum, making partial arthrodeses impossible. Total arthrodesis may be proposed in such cases, but with a loss of range-of-motion. Total prosthesis may be considered but the results of this procedure are not always encouraging. Consequently, in these situations, we perform pyrocarbon prosthesis implant, replacing the head of the capitatum. This article describes the procedure and the results of a preliminary study. PMID:21358521

Goubier, Jean-Noël; Vogels, Jérome; Teboul, Frédéric

2011-03-01

297

Differential analgesic effects of morphine and gabapentin on behavioural measures of pain and disability in a model of osteoarthritis pain in rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with chronic debilitating joint pain. Pain is the result of an emotional and sensory experience and preclinical models of OA can thus be useful to better understand the underlying mechanisms of the disease and test new therapeutic options.We induced unilateral knee OA in Sprague-Dawley rats using monosodium iodoacetate (MIA), a glycolysis inhibitor and assessed the effects

Jean Laurent Vonsy; Javid Ghandehari; Anthony Henry Dickenson

2009-01-01

298

Anesthesia for joint replacement surgery: Issues with coexisting diseases  

PubMed Central

The first joint replacement surgery was performed in 1919. Since then, joint replacement surgery has undergone tremendous development in terms of surgical technique and anesthetic management. In this era of nuclear family and independent survival, physical mobility is of paramount importance. In recent years, with an increase in life expectancy, advances in geriatric medicine and better insurance coverage, the scenario of joint replacement surgery has changed significantly. Increasing number of young patients are undergoing joint replacement for pathologies like rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. The diverse pathologies and wide range of patient population brings unique challenges for the anesthesiologist. This article deals with anesthetic issues in joint replacement surgery in patients with comorbidities.

Kakar, P N; Roy, Preety Mittal; Pant, Vijaya; Das, Jyotirmoy

2011-01-01

299

Osteoarthritis: diagnosis and treatment.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis is a common degenerative disorder of the articular cartilage associated with hypertrophic bone changes. Risk factors include genetics, female sex, past trauma, advancing age, and obesity. The diagnosis is based on a history of joint pain worsened by movement, which can lead to disability in activities of daily living. Plain radiography may help in the diagnosis, but laboratory testing usually does not. Pharmacologic treatment should begin with acetaminophen and step up to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Exercise is a useful adjunct to treatment and has been shown to reduce pain and disability. The supplements glucosamine and chondroitin can be used for moderate to severe osteoarthritis when taken in combination. Corticosteroid injections provide inexpensive, short-term (four to eight weeks) relief of osteoarthritic flare-ups of the knee, whereas hyaluronic acid injections are more expensive but can maintain symptom improvement for longer periods. Total joint replacement of the hip, knee, or shoulder is recommended for patients with chronic pain and disability despite maximal medical therapy. PMID:22230308

Sinusas, Keith

2012-01-01

300

Presenting a successful stroke education model to meet the Joint Commission's Disease-Specific Care Certification.  

PubMed

Obtaining Joint Commission Disease-Specific Care Certification can be challenging for healthcare organizations. This article outlines the methodology for developing and implementing a comprehensive educational plan for a 560-bed academic teaching hospital. This information is valuable to any staff development educator who is leading the way to achieve Joint Commission Disease-Specific Care Certification. PMID:21430478

Daniels, Christine S; Johnson, Jennifer Ray; Mackovjak, Jennifer

301

Viscosupplementation in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is a chronic and progressive disease that is the product of failure of the joint to repair cartilage breakdown and wear. This article reviews the physiologic properties and pathological changes in the synovial fluid that occur in patients with OA. Exogenous hyaluronic acid (HA) has analgesic, chondroprotective, and disease-modifying effects. Viscosupplements of HA are useful in the treatment of OA in conjunction with other methods of conservative treatment. Viscosupplementation may be better tolerated than oral medication, which can have significant side effects and drug interactions. Unlike other OA treatments, viscosupplements do not carry precautions for comorbidities, such as diabetes or cardiovascular disease. A number of HA viscosupplements are available for intra-articular injection in the treatment of knee OA. These supplements vary in molecular weight, dosage per injection, residence time in the joint, and number of injections required for treatment. PMID:23391675

Cianflocco, A J

2013-01-01

302

The Role of Synovitis in Osteoarthritis pathogenesis  

PubMed Central

Research into the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis (OA) has focused on cartilage and peri-articular bone, but there is increasing recognition that OA affects all of the joint tissues, including the synovium (SM). Under normal physiological conditions the synovial lining consists of a thin layer of cells with phenotypic features of macrophages and fibroblasts. These cells and the underlying vascularized connective tissue stroma form a complex structure that is an important source of synovial fluid (SF) components that are essential for normal cartilage and joint function. The histological changes observed in the SM in OA generally include features indicative of an inflammatory “synovitis”; specifically they encompass a range of abnormalities, such as synovial lining hyperplasia, infiltration of macrophages and lymphocytes, neoangiogenesis and fibrosis. The pattern of synovial reaction varies with disease duration and associated metabolic and structural changes in other joint tissues. Imaging modalities including Magnetic Resonance (MRI) and ultrasound (US) have proved useful in detecting and quantifying synovial abnormalities, but individual studies have varied in their methods of evaluation. Despite these differences, most studies have concluded that the presence of synovitis in OA is associated with more severe pain and joint dysfunction. In addition, synovitis may be predictive of faster rates of cartilage loss in certain patient populations. Recent studies have provided insights into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the development of synovitis in OA. Available evidence suggests that the inflammatory process involves engagement of Toll-like receptors and activation of the complement cascade by degradation products of extracellular matrices of cartilage and other joint tissues. The ensuing synovial reaction can lead to synthesis and release of a wide variety of cytokines and chemokines. Some of these inflammatory mediators are detected in joint tissues and SF in OA and have catabolic effects on chondrocytes. These inflammatory mediators represent potential targets for therapeutic interventions designed to reduce both symptoms and structural joint damage in OA.

Scanzello, Carla R.; Goldring, Steven R.

2012-01-01

303

Analysis of osteoarthritis in a mouse model of the progeroid human DNA repair syndrome trichothiodystrophy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increasing average age in developed societies is paralleled by an increase in the prevalence of many age-related diseases\\u000a such as osteoarthritis (OA), which is characterized by deformation of the joint due to cartilage damage and increased turnover\\u000a of subchondral bone. Consequently, deficiency in DNA repair, often associated with premature aging, may lead to increased\\u000a pathology of these two tissues.

Sander M. Botter; Michel Zar; Gerjo J. V. M van Osch; Harry van Steeg; Martijn E. T. Dollé; Jan H. J. Hoeijmakers; Harrie Weinans

2010-01-01

304

High abundance synovial fluid proteome: distinct profiles in health and osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of increasingly high-throughput and sensitive mass spectroscopy-based proteomic techniques provides new opportunities to examine the physiology and pathophysiology of many biologic fluids and tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine protein expression profiles of high-abundance synovial fluid (SF) proteins in health and in the prevalent joint disease osteoarthritis (OA). A cross-sectional study of 62 patients with

Reuben Gobezie; Alvin Kho; Bryan Krastins; David A Sarracino; Thomas S Thornhill; Michael Chase; Peter J Millett; David M Lee

2007-01-01

305

Strontium ranelate in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: new insights and emerging clinical evidence  

PubMed Central

Osteoarthritis is a primary cause of disability and functional incapacity. Pharmacological treatment is currently limited to symptomatic management, and in advanced stages, surgery remains the only solution. The therapeutic armamentarium for osteoarthritis remains poor in treatments with an effect on joint structure, that is, disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs (DMOADs). Glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate are the only medications for which some conclusive evidence for a disease-modifying effect is available. Strontium ranelate is currently indicated for the prevention of fracture in severe osteoporosis. Its efficacy and safety as a DMOAD in knee osteoarthritis has recently been explored in the SEKOIA trial, a 3-year randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Outpatients with knee osteoarthritis, Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 or 3, and joint space width (JSW) of 2.5–5 mm received strontium ranelate 1 g/day (n = 558) or 2 g/day (n = 566), or placebo (n = 559). This sizable population was aged 62.9 years and had a JSW of 3.50 ± 0.84 mm. Treatment with strontium ranelate led to significantly less progression of knee osteoarthritis: estimates for annual difference in joint space narrowing versus placebo were 0.14 mm [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.05–0.23 mm; p < 0.001] for 1 g/day and 0.10 mm (95% CI 0.02–0.19 mm; p = 0.018) for 2 g/day, with no difference between strontium ranelate groups. Radiological progression was less frequent with strontium ranelate (22% with 1 g/day and 26% with 2 g/day versus 33% with placebo, both p < 0.05), as was radioclinical progression (8% and 7% versus 12%, both p < 0.05). Symptoms also improved with strontium ranelate 2 g/day only in terms of total WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index) score (p = 0.045), and its components for pain (p = 0.028) and physical function (p = 0.099). Responder analyses using a range of criteria for symptoms indicated that the effect of strontium ranelate 2 g/day on pain and physical function was clinically meaningful. Strontium ranelate was well tolerated. The observation of both structure and symptom modification with strontium ranelate 2 g/day makes SEKOIA a milestone in osteoarthritis research and treatment.

Beaudart, Charlotte; Neuprez, Audrey; Bruyere, Olivier

2013-01-01

306

The disease modifying osteoarthritis drug (DMOAD): Is it in the horizon?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Till date, the pharmaceutical industry has failed to bring effective and safe disease modifying osteoarthritic drugs (DMOADs) to the millions of patients suffering from this serious and deliberating disease. We provide a review of recent data reported on the investigation of DMOADs in clinical trials, including compounds inhibiting matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs), bisphosphonates, cytokine blockers, calcitonin, inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase

Per Qvist; Anne-Christine Bay-Jensen; Claus Christiansen; Erik B. Dam; Philippe Pastoureau; Morten A. Karsdal

2008-01-01

307

Constructing osteoarthritis through discourse - a qualitative analysis of six patient information leaflets on osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Background Health service policy in the United Kingdom emphasises the importance of self-care by patients with chronic conditions. Written information for patients about their condition is seen as an important aid to help patients look after themselves. From a discourse analysis perspective written texts such as patient information leaflets do not simply describe the reality of a medical condition and its management but by drawing on some sorts of knowledge and evidence rather than others help construct the reality of that condition. This study explored patient information leaflets on osteoarthritis (OA) to see how OA was constructed and to consider the implications for self-care. Methods Systematic and repeated readings of six patient information leaflets on osteoarthritis to look for similarities and differences across leaflets, contradictions within leaflets and the resources called on to make claims about the nature of OA and its management. Results Biomedical discourse of OA as a joint disease dominated. Only one leaflet included an illness discourse albeit limited, and was also the only one to feature patient experiences of living with OA. The leaflets had different views on the causes of OA including the role of lifestyle and ageing. Most emphasised patient responsibility for preventing the progression of OA. Advice about changing behaviour such as diet and exercise was not grounded in lived experience. There were inconsistent messages about using painkillers, exercise and the need to involve professionals when making changes to lifestyle. Conclusion The nature of the discourse impacted on how OA and the respective roles of patients and professionals were depicted. Limited discourse on illness meant that the complexity of living with OA and its consequences was underestimated. Written information needs to shift from joint biology to helping patients live with osteoarthritis. Written information should incorporate patient experience and value it alongside biomedical knowledge.

Grime, Janet C; Ong, Bie Nio

2007-01-01

308

Long-term durability of tendon arthroplasty with excision of the trapezium in stage 1 osteoarthritis of the thumb CMC joint.  

PubMed

Basal joint arthritis of the thumb is commonly treated surgically. Although the results are good, there is still controversy regarding the treatment of young people with low radiographic stages of disease. Our purpose was to evaluate the durability of a tendon arthroplasty procedure in this population. Thirty patients aged 55 years or under, with early stage arthritis, were evaluated. Eight patients were available for long-term (average 86 months) follow-up. No deterioration in the strength and mobility of the operated thumbs in the long-term was found. There was a significant increase in tip pinch strength between short- and long-term follow-up evaluations. This study supports the durability of this surgery in younger patients, potentially reducing the need for multiple surgeries. PMID:19325336

Wollstein, Ronit; Watson, H Kirk; Martin, Richard T; Taieb, Aurele; Pankonin, Deborah; Carlson, Lois

2009-04-01

309

More knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) in mice after inactivation of one allele of type II procollagen gene but less OA after lifelong voluntary wheel running exercise  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To investigate the incidence and severity of osteoarthritis (OA) and the effects of voluntary wheel running in normal mice and mice carrying either a targeted inactivation of one allele, heterozygous ‘knockout’, of Col2a1 gene or both alleles, homozygous ‘knockout’, of Col11a2 gene.Methods Mice lived until 15 months of age in individual cages. Running activity was recorded around the clock.

T. Lapveteläinen; M. Hyttinen; J. Lindblom; T. K. Långsjö; R. Sironen; S.-W. Li; M. Arita; D. J. Prockop; K. Puustjärvi; H. J. Helminen

2001-01-01

310

Cytokine Receptor-Like Factor 1 is Highly Expressed in Damaged Human Knee Osteoarthritic Cartilage and Involved in Osteoarthritis Downstream of TGF-?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent joint disease and is characterized by pain and functional loss of the joint. However,\\u000a the pathogenic mechanism of OA remains unclear, and no drug therapy for preventing its progress has been established. To identify\\u000a genes related to the progress of OA, the gene expression profiles of paired intact and damaged cartilage obtained from OA

Katsuki Tsuritani; Junko Takeda; Junko Sakagami; Aiko Ishii; Tore Eriksson; Toshifumi Hara; Hideaki Ishibashi; Yasuko Koshihara; Kiyofumi Yamada; Yukio Yoneda

2010-01-01

311

Osteoarthritis associated with estrogen deficiency  

PubMed Central

Osteoarthritis (OA) affects all articular tissues and finally leads to joint failure. Although articular tissues have long been considered unresponsive to estrogens or their deficiency, there is now increasing evidence that estrogens influence the activity of joint tissues through complex molecular pathways that act at multiple levels. Indeed, we are only just beginning to understand the effects of estrogen deficiency on articular tissues during OA development and progression, as well as on the association between OA and osteoporosis. Estrogen replacement therapy and current selective estrogen receptor modulators have mixed effectiveness in preserving and/or restoring joint tissue in OA. Thus, a better understanding of how estrogen acts on joints and other tissues in OA will aid the development of specific and safe estrogen ligands as novel therapeutic agents targeting the OA joint as a whole organ.

2009-01-01

312

Primary osteoarthritis of the elbow  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sixteen patients (14 male, two female; mean age 61, range 49-75 years) with elbow osteoarthritis (OA) unassociated with nodal or crystal related OA were studied. None had received obvious trauma. The dominant elbow was affected in 14, the other in 12 (mean symptom onset in these 26 elbows 53 years (range 31-63), mean symptom duration 7 year (range 1-20]. Joint

M Doherty; B Preston

1989-01-01

313

Monitoring osteoarthritis in the rat model using optical coherence tomography  

Microsoft Academic Search

A need exists for an animal model to assess therapeutics for osteoarthritis (OA) without sacrificing the animal. Our goal is to assess the progression of experimentally induced osteoarthritis in the rat knee joint by monitoring articular cartilage thickness, surface abnormalities, and collagen organization using a new technology known as optical coherence tomography (OCT). OA was generated in Wistar Hanover rats

Nirlep A. Patel; Jason Zoeller; Debra L. Stamper; James G. Fujimoto; Mark E. Brezinski

2005-01-01

314

A radiographic comparison of erosive osteoarthritis and idiopathic nodal osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Clinical, radiographic and histologic features suggest that inflammation is central to the pathogenesis of erosive osteoarthritis (OA). Since mediators of inflammation may activate osteoclasts and stimulate release of metalloproteinases in joint cartilage, we hypothesized that patients with erosive OA may have more joint space narrowing and less proliferative bone response (osteophytes, sclerosis) than those with idiopathic nodal OA. Hand radiographs of 33 patients with erosive OA and 33 age and sex matched patients with nodal OA were evaluated for prevalence and severity of joint space narrowing, osteophytes, subchondral sclerosis, subchondral cysts, erosions and subchondral collapse. While the prevalence and severity of OA was greater at each joint in erosive OA than in nodal OA, significant differences (p less than 0.05) were confined largely to the interphalangeal joints. Among patients with erosive OA, radiographic features of OA were more severe in joints with erosive changes than in joints that did not show erosive change (p less than 0.01 in most cases). Notably, when joints with erosive change were excluded, only joint space narrowing was more severe in patients with erosive OA than in the corresponding joints of patients with nodal OA (p less than 0.001). Our analysis did not support the hypothesis that inflammatory mediators modify chondro or osteoneogenesis in erosive OA. PMID:1404126

Smith, D; Braunstein, E M; Brandt, K D; Katz, B P

1992-06-01

315

Elevation of cartilage AGEs does not accelerate initiation of canine experimental osteoarthritis upon mild surgical damage.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis is a highly prevalent disease, age being the main risk factor. The age-related accumulation of advanced-glycation-endproducts (AGEs) adversely affects the mechanical and biochemical properties of cartilage. The hypothesis that accumulation of cartilage AGEs in combination with surgically induced damage predisposes to the development of osteoarthritis was tested in vivo in a canine model. To artificially increase cartilage AGEs, right knee joints of eight dogs were repeatedly injected with ribose/threose (AGEd-joints). Left joints with vehicle alone served as control. Subsequently, minimal surgically applied cartilage damage was induced and loading restrained as much as possible. Thirty weeks after surgery, joint tissues of all dogs were analyzed for biochemical and histological features of OA. Cartilage pentosidine levels were ?5-fold enhanced (p?=?0.001 vs. control-joints). On average, no statistically significant differences in joint degeneration were found between AGEd and control-joints. Enhanced cartilage pentosidine levels did correlate with less cartilage proteoglycan release (R?=?-0.762 and R?=?-0.810 for total and newly-formed proteoglycans, respectively; p?=?0.028 and 0.015 for both). The current data support the diminished cartilage turnover, but only a tendency towards enhanced cartilage damage in AGEd articular cartilage was observed. As such, elevated AGEs do not unambiguously accelerate the development of early canine OA upon minimal surgical damage. PMID:22388985

Vos, Petra A J M; DeGroot, Jeroen; Barten-van Rijbroek, Angelique D; Zuurmond, Anne-Marie; Bijlsma, Johannes W J; Mastbergen, Simon C; Lafeber, Floris P J G

2012-03-02

316

Excisional arthroplasty for scaphotrapeziotrapezoidal osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Symptomatic scaphotrapeziotrapezoidal (STT) joint osteoarthritis may occasionally require surgery. In the absence of dorsal midcarpal instability, acceptable results may be obtained by an excisional STT joint arthroplasty. After distal scaphoid resection, however, forces are no longer transmitted along the radial column of the wrist. This often results in slight malrotation of the proximal row into extension. To mitigate this problem, different strategies have been proposed (dorsal midcarpal capsulodesis, palmar radioscaphoid capsulodesis, tendon interposition, or pyrocarbon implant interposition). As compared to STT fusion, excisional arthroplasty is less technically demanding, requires less prolonged immobilization, and has fewer complications. PMID:21371628

Garcia-Elias, Marc

2011-03-01

317

Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease (pseudogout).  

PubMed

This report describes a very rare case of synovial chondromatosis with deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals (pseudogout) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of a 46-year-old male patient. Synovial chondromatosis is a non-neoplastic disease characterized by metaplasia of the connective tissue leading to chondrogenesis in the synovial membrane. Pseudogout is an inflammatory disease of the joints caused by the deposition of CPPD, producing similar symptoms to those observed in gout but not hyperuricaemia. Both diseases commonly affect the knee, hip and elbow joints, but rarely affect the TMJ. PMID:23166363

Matsumura, Y; Nomura, J; Nakanishi, K; Yanase, S; Kato, H; Tagawa, T

2012-12-01

318

Relationship of urinary pyridinium crosslinks to disease extent and activity in osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Urinary crosslinks, pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline, have been shown to be elevated in RA and OA. This study confirmed this elevation, with levels in patients with predominantly knee OA higher than those with nodal OA and hip OA. Intra-articular corticosteroid injection was followed by a significant fall in urinary crosslinks, which was associated with a corresponding improvement in articular index and pain score, although there was no overall correlation between crosslink levels and the clinical indices studied. Collagen crosslinks may be of value as markers of disease activity in OA. PMID:8162450

MacDonald, A G; McHenry, P; Robins, S P; Reid, D M

1994-01-01

319

Treatment of knee osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Knee osteoarthritis is a common disabling condition that affects more than one-third of persons older than 65 years. Exercise, weight loss, physical therapy, intra-articular corticosteroid injections, and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and braces or heel wedges decrease pain and improve function. Acetaminophen, glucosamine, ginger, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM-e), capsaicin cream, topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acupuncture, and tai chi may offer some benefit. Tramadol has a poor trade-off between risks and benefits and is not routinely recommended. Opioids are being used more often in patients with moderate to severe pain or diminished quality of life, but patients receiving these drugs must be carefully selected and monitored because of the inherent adverse effects. Intra-articular corticosteroid injections are effective, but evidence for injection of hyaluronic acid is mixed. Arthroscopic surgery has been shown to have no benefit in knee osteoarthritis. Total joint arthroplasty of the knee should be considered when conservative symptomatic management is ineffective. PMID:21661710

Ringdahl, Erika; Pandit, Sandesh

2011-06-01

320

Mixture of Arnebia euchroma and Matricaria chamomilla (Marhame-Mafasel) for pain relief of osteoarthritis of the knee - a two-treatment, two-period crossover trial  

PubMed Central

Introduction Osteoarthritis is the most prevalent chronic non-infective joint arthritis. Because of its chronic disease nature, local drugs are preferred due to lower complications. In the present study, the new herbal pomade Marhame-Mafasel for knee osteoarthritis was used in a double-blind crossover trial. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy and safety of Marhame-Mafasel pomade, which consists of several medical herbs including Arnebia euchroma and Matricaria chamomilla, in osteoarthritis of the knee. Material and methods This study was a placebo-controlled double-blind crossover trial. Forty-two patients with pain associated with osteoarthritis of the knee (diagnosed by criteria of the European League against Rheumatism and physical examination) were drawn from patients attending the Clinic of Mostafa-Khomeini Hospital. In this study we assessed efficacy (analgesic effect and improved function) of herbal pomade Marhame-Mafasel, which was used locally in patients with primary osteoarthritis of the knee over three weeks. The instrument of the study was the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) LK3.1 standard questionnaires. Results The participants in each group were 21 patients; 30 (71.4%) were women and 12 (28.6%) of them were men. The participants were between 40 and 76 years old. Six patients had mild arthritis, 15 had moderate arthritis and 21 had severe arthritis. The positive analgesic effect of the herbal pomade Marhame-Mafasel in primary knee osteoarthritis was proven. The herbal joint pomade Marhame-Mafasel had a significantly greater mean change in score compared to the placebo group for osteoarthritis severity (p < 0.05). Conclusions Herbal pomade Marhame-Mafasel in comparison to placebo has more effect on reduction of pain of primary knee osteoarthritis.

Soltanian, Ali Reza; Mehdibarzi, Dariush; Naseri, Mohsen; Gerami, Abbas

2010-01-01

321

[Basic research progress of knee osteoarthritis].  

PubMed

The exact etiology and pathogenesis of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) are still unknown and it is hard to treat the disease fundamentally. With new therapeutic methods and techniques appearing, the present situation of treating the disease will be changed in the near future. Basic research of knee osteoarthritis will contribute to clarifying the pathogenesis and exploring the therapeutic methods. This article makes a brief review on the up-to-date basic researches of knee osteoarthritis by reviewing literature concerned in recent years. PMID:22489534

Zhai, Yun; Gao, Gen-De; Xu, Shou-Yu

2012-01-01

322

Joint-specific disruption of control during arm movements in Parkinson's disease.  

PubMed

The leading joint hypothesis (LJH) suggests distinct types of control (leading and subordinate) at different joints during multi-joint movements. Taking into account specific features of movements in Parkinson's disease (PD), the LJH predicts distinct effect of PD on control of leading and subordinate joints: impaired interaction torque (INT) regulation should be emphasized at the subordinate joints, and impaired generation of muscle torque (MUS) magnitude should be more pronounced at the leading joint. This prediction was tested by studying three tasks of horizontal shoulder-elbow movements in PD patients and age-matched controls: cyclic line drawing, cyclic point-to-point, and discrete pointing movements. Each task included movements in different directions, providing both shoulder-lead and elbow-lead control patterns. Torque analysis supported the prediction, specifically for Tasks 2 and 3 in which movement targets were chosen to emphasize the shoulder- and elbow-lead control patterns. Patients did not exploit INT for motion generation as successfully as controls did, but only at the subordinate joint. Underproduction of MUS by PD patients was more apparent at the leading than subordinate joint. The results support joint-specific effect of PD on movement control. They also suggest that dyscoordination of joint motions in PD stems predominantly from impaired control of subordinate joints, while bradykinesia is associated more with control of the leading than subordinate joint. Possible contribution of the revealed impairments in joint control to some other movement features in PD is discussed. The study demonstrates the efficiency of the LJH application for revealing changes in joint control caused by motor disorders. PMID:19277617

Fradet, Laetitia; Lee, Gyusung; Stelmach, George; Dounskaia, Natalia

2009-03-11

323

Teriparatide, a Chondro-Regenerative Therapy for Injury-Induced Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

There is no disease-modifying therapy for osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease that is projected to afflict more than 67 million individuals in the US alone by 2030. As disease pathogenesis is associated with inappropriate articular chondrocyte maturation resembling that seen during normal endochondral ossification, pathways that govern the maturation of these cells are candidate therapeutic targets. It is well established that parathyroid hormone (PTH) induces matrix synthesis and suppresses maturation of chondrocytes via the type 1 PTH receptor. We have found that the PTH receptor is up-regulated in articular chondrocytes following meniscal injury and during osteoarthritis in humans and in a mouse model of injury-induced knee osteoarthritis. Thus, we hypothesized that recombinant human PTH(1–34) (teriparatide) would inhibit aberrant chondrocyte maturation and associated articular cartilage degeneration. To test this, we administered systemic teriparatide (Forteo), an FDA-approved treatment for osteoporosis, either immediately after or 8 weeks after meniscal/ligamentous injury in mice. Knee joints were harvested at 4, 8, or 12 weeks post-injury to examine the effects of teriparatide on cartilage degeneration and articular chondrocyte maturation. Confirming successful systemic delivery of the drug, micro-computed tomography revealed increased bone volume within joints from teriparatide-treated mice compared to saline-treated controls. Immediate systemic administration of teriparatide increased proteoglycan content and inhibited articular cartilage degeneration, whereas delayed treatment beginning 8 weeks post-injury induced a regenerative effect. The chondro-protective and chondro-regenerative effects of teriparatide correlated with decreased levels of type × collagen, Runx2, matrix metalloproteinase-13 and the c-terminal aggrecan cleavage product NITEGE. These preclinical findings provide proof-of-concept that teriparatide (Forteo) may be useful for decelerating cartilage degeneration and inducing matrix regeneration in osteoarthritis patients.

Sampson, Erik R.; Hilton, Matthew J.; Tian, Ye; Chen, Di; Schwarz, Edward M.; Mooney, Robert A.; Bukata, Susan V.; O'Keefe, Regis J.; Awad, Hani; Puzas, J. Edward; Rosier, Randy N.; Zuscik, Michael J.

2011-01-01

324

Pharmacological modulation of movement-evoked pain in a rat model of osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was conducted to characterize movement-induced pain in a rat model of knee joint osteoarthritis and validate this behavioral assessment by evaluating the effects of clinically used analgesic compounds. Unilateral intra-articular administration of a chondrocyte glycolytic inhibitor monoiodoacetate, was used to induce knee joint osteoarthritis in Sprague–Dawley rats. In this osteoarthritis model, histologically erosive disintegration of the articular surfaces

Prasant Chandran; Madhavi Pai; Eric A. Blomme; Gin C. Hsieh; Michael W. Decker; Prisca Honore

2009-01-01

325

Differential metabolic responses to local administration of TGF-? and IGF-1 in temporomandibular joint cartilage of aged mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease characterized by destruction of the articular cartilage in aging and senescence. The aim of this study was to study the possible treatment of this disease by intraarticular injection of growth factors to osteoarthritic joints of aged animals. 20-month-old female ICR mice were injected with insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) or TGF-?+IGF-1

Gil E Sviri; Israel Blumenfeld; Erella Livne

2000-01-01

326

Radiographic osteoarthritis in the hands of rock climbers.  

PubMed

Sixty-five rock climbers were radiographically evaluated for osteoarthritis of the finger joints. Only long-time climbers were chosen for this study. The average years of climbing experience of these subjects was 19.8 (range, 8 to 39). The majority of the subjects had climbed at an elite level for many years. Plain radiographs of the hands were scored using the Kellgren-Lawrence scale and were compared with scores of an age-matched control group. An increased rate of osteoarthritis for several joints was found in the climber group; however, no significant difference in the overall prevalence of osteoarthritis was found between the two groups. PMID:9839957

Rohrbough, J T; Mudge, M K; Schilling, R C; Jansen, C

1998-11-01

327

Bone Morphogenetic Protein signaling in joint homeostasis and disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite advances in therapies that target inflammation and tissue destruction in chronic arthritis, stimulation of tissue repair and restoration of joint function, the ultimate goal of treatment, is far from achieved. We introduce a new paradigm that may help to improve our understanding and management of chronic arthritis. The presence or absence of tissue responses distinguishes destructive arthritis, steady-state arthritis

Rik J. U. Lories; Frank P. Luyten

2005-01-01

328

Automatic radiographic quantification of hand osteoarthritis; accuracy and sensitivity to change in joint space width in a phantom and cadaver study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  To validate a newly developed quantification method that automatically detects and quantifies the joint space width (JSW)\\u000a in hand radiographs. Repeatability, accuracy and sensitivity to changes in JSW were determined. The influence of joint location\\u000a and joint shape on the measurements was tested.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A mechanical micrometer set-up was developed to define and adjust the true JSW in an acrylic phantom

Kasper Huétink; Ronald van ’t Klooster; Bart L. Kaptein; Iain Watt; Margreet Kloppenburg; Rob G. H. H. Nelissen; Johan H. C. Reiber; Berend C. Stoel

329

Osteoarthritis: New Insights in Animal Models  

PubMed Central

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent and symptomatic health problem in the middle-aged and elderly population, with over one-half of all people over the age of 65 showing radiographic changes in painful knees. The aim of the present study was to perform an overview on the available animal models used in the research field on the OA. Discrepancies between the animal models and the human disease are present. As regards human ‘idiopathic’ OA, with late onset and slow progression, it is perhaps wise not to be overly enthusiastic about animal models that show severe chondrodysplasia and very early OA. Advantage by using genetically engineered mouse models, in comparison with other surgically induced models, is that molecular etiology is known. Find potential molecular markers for the onset of the disease and pay attention to the role of gender and environmental factors should be very helpful in the study of mice that acquire premature OA. Surgically induced destabilization of joint is the most widely used induction method. These models allow the temporal control of disease induction and follow predictable progression of the disease. In animals, ACL transection and meniscectomy show a speed of onset and severity of disease higher than in humans after same injury.

Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Fumo, Caterina; Rizzello, Giacomo; Khan, Wasim Sardar; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

2012-01-01

330

Diet-induced obesity differentially regulates behavioral, biomechanical, and molecular risk factors for osteoarthritis in mice  

PubMed Central

Introduction Obesity is a major risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis in both weight-bearing and nonweight-bearing joints. The mechanisms by which obesity influences the structural or symptomatic features of osteoarthritis are not well understood, but may include systemic inflammation associated with increased adiposity. In this study, we examined biomechanical, neurobehavioral, inflammatory, and osteoarthritic changes in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet. Methods Female C57BL/6J mice were fed either a 10% kcal fat or a 45% kcal fat diet from 9 to 54 weeks of age. Longitudinal changes in musculoskeletal function and inflammation were compared with endpoint neurobehavioral and osteoarthritic disease states. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to determine independent associations with diet, percentage body fat, and knee osteoarthritis severity. We also examined healthy porcine cartilage explants treated with physiologic doses of leptin, alone or in combination with IL-1? and palmitic and oleic fatty acids, to determine the effects of leptin on cartilage extracellular matrix homeostasis. Results High susceptibility to dietary obesity was associated with increased osteoarthritic changes in the knee and impaired musculoskeletal force generation and motor function compared with controls. A high-fat diet also induced symptomatic characteristics of osteoarthritis, including hyperalgesia and anxiety-like behaviors. Controlling for the effects of diet and percentage body fat with a multivariate model revealed a significant association between knee osteoarthritis severity and serum levels of leptin, adiponectin, and IL-1?. Physiologic doses of leptin, in the presence or absence of IL-1? and fatty acids, did not substantially alter extracellular matrix homeostasis in healthy cartilage explants. Conclusions These results indicate that diet-induced obesity increases the risk of symptomatic features of osteoarthritis through changes in musculoskeletal function and pain-related behaviors. Furthermore, the independent association of systemic adipokine levels with knee osteoarthritis severity supports a role for adipose-associated inflammation in the molecular pathogenesis of obesity-induced osteoarthritis. Physiologic levels of leptin do not alter extracellular matrix homeostasis in healthy cartilage, suggesting that leptin may be a secondary mediator of osteoarthritis pathogenesis.

2010-01-01

331

Arthroscopic debridement of the shoulder for osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary: Twenty-five patients underwent arthroscopic debridement to treat early glenohumeral osteoarthritis. The group consisted of 19 men and 6 women with an average age of 46 years (range, 27 to 72 years.) The operative procedure consisted of lavage of the glenohumeral joint, debridement of labral tears and chondral lesions, loose body removal, and partial synovectomy and subacromial bursectomy. Follow-up averaged

David M. Weinstein; John S. Bucchieri; Roger G. Pollock; Evan L. Flatow; Louis U. Bigliani

2000-01-01

332

Long-term outcome of trapeziectomy with ligament reconstruction and tendon interposition (LRTI) versus prosthesis arthroplasty for basal joint osteoarthritis of the thumb.  

PubMed

Several surgical techniques are available to treat thumb basal joint arthritis. In this study, we compare the long-term results of a thumb basal joint prosthesis (de la Caffinière or Roseland type prosthesis) with those of trapeziectomy with ligament reconstruction and tendon interposition (LRTI). We could not find any difference between both techniques with respect to impairment, pain reduction, patient satisfaction and disability. PMID:23821964

De Smet, Luc; Vandenberghe, Lore; Degreef, Ilse

2013-04-01

333

Nodal osteoarthritis and gout: a report of four new cases.  

PubMed

Recently gout has been recognized as a cause of inflammation in patients with nodal osteoarthritis. We reviewed the clinical data and radiographs of four patients with known osteoarthritis of the interphalangeal joints of the hands who developed gout. Radiographic changes of osteoarthritis in the affected interphalangeal joint were present in all four patients. In our cases, radiographic findings were typical of gout in one patient, including the presence of large eccentric soft tissue masses and periarticular erosions. In three patients, radiographic findings were non-specific, including only a small eccentric nodule in one patient, diffuse soft tissue swelling in a second, and a large calcified soft tissue mass with bony erosions in a third. Whenever a patient with inter-phalangeal joint osteoarthritis presents with an acute episode of inflammation the possibility of gout should be considered. Recognition of gout will allow the timely initiation of appropriate therapy. PMID:8837272

Foldes, K; Petersilge, C A; Weisman, M H; Resnick, D

1996-07-01

334

Treatment of advanced carpometacarpal joint disease: trapeziectomy and hematoma arthroplasty.  

PubMed

Some surgical treatment options of painful basal joint arthritis do not require complex arthroplasty or suspensionplasty techniques. Simple trapeziectomy with temporary pinning of a slightly overdistracted thumb metacarpal can provide reliable pain relief, good motion, and functional stability. Recent literature supports alternative options when compared with formal ligament reconstruction or suspensionplasty procedures. Simple trapeziectomy is associated with less morbidity due to shorter operative times and the lack of need for graft harvest and ligament reconstruction. PMID:18675718

Fitzgerald, Brian T; Hofmeister, Eric P

2008-08-01

335

Degenerative joint disease. Part II: Symptoms and examination findings.  

PubMed

From a pool of 1,279 consecutive patients referred to the Parker E. Mahan Facial Pain Center for complaints of head/neck pain, a subset of 215 patients with the diagnosis of osteoarthrosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ-DJD) have been identified. Data regarding patient age and sex, reported symptoms and examination results are presented from this subset of TMJ-DJD patients. From this data, common signs and symptoms of TMJ-DJD are proposed. PMID:8055593

Bates, R E; Gremillion, H A; Stewart, C M

1994-04-01

336

Pretreatment with capsaicin in a rat osteoarthritis model reduces the symptoms of pain and bone damage induced by monosodium iodoacetate  

Microsoft Academic Search

A rat model of osteoarthritis was used to investigate the effect of pre-treatment with capsaicin on the symptoms of osteoarthritis induced by the injection of monosodium iodoacetate. This model mimics both histopathology and symptoms associated of human osteoarthritis. Injection of monosodium iodoacetate, an inhibitor of glycolysis, into the femorotibial joints of rodents promotes loss of articular trabecular bone and invokes

Karel-Martijn Kalff; Mohammed El Mouedden; Jan van Egmond; Jan Veening; L. A. B. Joosten; Gert Jan Scheffer; Theo Meert; Kris Vissers

2010-01-01

337

Nitric oxide synthases and osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The production of nitric oxide (NO) by chondrocytes is increased in human osteoarthritis. The excessive production of NO inhibits\\u000a matrix synthesis and promotes its degradation. Furthermore, by reacting with oxidants such as superoxide anion, NO promotes\\u000a cellular injury and renders the chondrocyte susceptible to cytokine-induced apoptosis. Thus, NO produced by activated chondrocytes\\u000a in diseased cartilage may modulate disease progression in

Jose U. Scher; Michael H. Pillinger; Steven B. Abramson

2007-01-01

338

Hand osteoarthritis--a heterogeneous disorder.  

PubMed

Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent disorder. Hand OA is not one single disease, but a heterogeneous group of disorders. Radiographic signs of hand OA, such as osteophytes or joint space narrowing, can be found in up to 81% of the elderly population. Several hand OA subsets--such as nodal interphalangeal OA, thumb base OA and erosive OA--can be discriminated. Furthermore, the experience of symptoms and the course of the disease differ between patients. Studies that used well-defined study populations with longitudinal follow-up have shown that similarities and differences can be observed in the pathogenesis, epidemiology and risk factors of the various hand OA subsets. Erosive OA in particular, characterized by erosive lesions on radiographical images, has a higher clinical burden and worse outcome than nonerosive hand OA. Imaging modalities (such as ultrasonography) have increased our knowledge of the role of inflammation of the disease. Our understanding of the heterogeneous nature of hand OA can eventually lead to increased knowledge of the pathogenesis of, and ultimately new treatment modalities for, this complex disease. PMID:22105244

Kloppenburg, Margreet; Kwok, Wing-Yee

2011-11-22

339

Activity and potential role of licofelone in the management of osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. It is a progressive joint disease associated with aging. It may be found in the knees, hips, or other joints. It is estimated that costs associated with osteoarthritis exceed 2% of the gross national product in developed countries. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a mainstay in the treatment of inflammatory disease and are among the most widely used drugs worldwide. The main limitation in using NSAIDs consists in their side-effects, including gastrointestinal ulcerogenic activity and bronchospasm. The mechanism of action of these drugs is attributed to the inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX), and, consequently, the conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandins. It is hypothesized that the undesirable side-effects of NSAIDs are due to the inhibition of COX-1 (constitutive isoform), whereas the beneficial effects are related to the inhibition of COX-2 (inducible isoform). Arachidonic acid can also be converted to leukotrienes (LTs) by the action of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX). Licofelone, a LOX/COX competitive inhibitor, decreases the production ofproinflammatory leukotrienes and prostaglandins (which are involved in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis and in gastrointestinal (GI) damage induced by NSAIDs) and has the potential to combine good analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects with excellent GI tolerability. Preliminary data with this drug seem promising, but further well-designed clinical trials of this agent in the elderly will be necessary before a final evaluation is possible. PMID:18044077

Cicero, Arrigo F G; Laghi, Luca

2007-01-01

340

Activity and potential role of licofelone in the management of osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. It is a progressive joint disease associated with aging. It may be found in the knees, hips, or other joints. It is estimated that costs associated with osteoarthritis exceed 2% of the gross national product in developed countries. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a mainstay in the treatment of inflammatory disease and are among the most widely used drugs worldwide. The main limitation in using NSAIDs consists in their side-effects, including gastrointestinal ulcerogenic activity and bronchospasm. The mechanism of action of these drugs is attributed to the inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX), and, consequently, the conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandins. It is hypothesized that the undesirable side-effects of NSAIDs are due to the inhibition of COX-1 (constitutive isoform), whereas the beneficial effects are related to the inhibition of COX-2 (inducible isoform). Arachidonic acid can also be converted to leukotrienes (LTs) by the action of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX). Licofelone, a LOX/COX competitive inhibitor, decreases the production of proinflammatory leukotrienes and prostaglandins (which are involved in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis and in gastrointestinal (GI) damage induced by NSAIDs) and has the potential to combine good analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects with excellent GI tolerability. Preliminary data with this drug seem promising, but further well-designed clinical trials of this agent in the elderly will be necessary before a final evaluation is possible.

Cicero, Arrigo FG; Laghi, Luca

2007-01-01

341

The relation between progressive osteoarthritis of the knee and long term progression of osteoarthritis of the hand, hip, and lumbar spine  

PubMed Central

Background The association between progression of knee osteoarthritis and progression of osteoarthritis at sites distant from the knee is unclear because of a lack of multisite longitudinal progression data. Objective To examine the association between radiological progression of knee osteoarthritis and osteoarthritis of the hands, hips, and lumbar spine in a population based cohort. Methods 914 women had knee x?rays taken 10 years apart, which were read for the presence of osteophytes and joint space narrowing (JSN). Progression status was available for hand, hip, and lumbar spine x?rays over the same 8 to 10 year period. The association between progression of knee osteoarthritis and osteoarthritis at other sites was analysed using odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) in logistic regression models. Results 89 of 133 women had progression of knee osteoarthritis based on osteophytes, and 51 of 148 based on JSN definition. Progression of JSN in the knee was predicted by progression in lumbar spine disc space narrowing (OR?=?2.9 (95% CI 1.2 to 7.5)) and hip JSN (OR?=?2.0 (1.0 to 4.2)). No consistent effects were seen for hand osteoarthritis. The associations remained after adjustment for age and body mass index. Conclusions Progression of knee osteoarthritis is associated with progression of lumbar spine and hip osteoarthritis. This may have implications for trial methodology, the selection of patients for osteoarthritis research, and advice for patients on prognosis of osteoarthritis.

Hassett, G; Hart, D J; Doyle, D V; March, L; Spector, T D

2006-01-01

342

New horizons in osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis worldwide and rapidly increasing with ageing populations. It is a major source of pain and disability for individuals and economic burden for health economies. Modern imaging, in particular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), has helped us to understand that OA is a dynamic remodelling process involving all the structures within the joint. Inflammation is common in OA, with a high prevalence of synovitis seen on imaging, and this has been associated with joint pain. MRI detected changes within the subchondral bone are also common and associated with pain and structural progression. Targeting individual pathologies may offer potential new therapeutic options for OA; this is particularly important given the current treatments are often limited by side effects or lack of efficacy. New approaches to understanding the pathology and pain pathways in OA offer hope of novel analgesic options, for example, monoclonal antibodies against nerve growth factor and centrally acting drugs such as duloxetine, tapentadol and bradykinin receptor antagonists have all recently undergone trials in OA. While treatment for OA has until now relied on symptom management, for the first time, recent trials suggest that structure modification may be possible by treating the subchondral bone. PMID:23568255

Wenham, Claire Y J; Conaghan, Philip G

2013-04-08

343

How antibodies to a ubiquitous cytoplasmic enzyme may provoke joint-specific autoimmune disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Arthritis in the K\\/BxN mouse model results from pathogenic immunoglobulins (Igs) that recognize the ubiquitous cytoplasmic enzyme glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI). But how is a joint-specific disease of autoimmune and inflammatory nature induced by systemic self-reactivity? No unusual amounts or sequence, splice or modification variants of GPI expression were found in joints. Instead, immunohistological examination revealed the accumulation of extracellular GPI

Isao Matsumoto; Mariana Maccioni; David M. Lee; Madelon Maurice; Barry Simmons; Michael Brenner; Diane Mathis; Christophe Benoist

2002-01-01

344

Lower extremity osteoarthritis management needs a paradigm shift  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current pre-eminent focus in osteoarthritis research and clinical practice is on persons with established radiographic disease. This is the very end-stage of disease genesis and modern therapies are thus largely palliative. A major shift in the focus of osteoarthritis research and clinical practice is critically needed if an impact is to be made for the millions living with the

David J Hunter

2011-01-01

345

Meniscus pathology, osteoarthritis and the treatment controversy.  

PubMed

The menisci are internal structures that are of central importance for a healthy knee joint; they have a key role in the structural progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA), and the risk of the disease dramatically increases if they are damaged by injury or degenerative processes. Meniscus damage might be considered a signifying feature of incipient OA in middle-aged and elderly people. As approximately every third knee of people in these groups has a damaged meniscus, tears are common incidental findings of knee MRI. However, as most tears do not cause symptoms, careful clinical evaluation is required to determine if a damaged meniscus is likely to directly impact a patient's symptoms. Conservative management of patients with knee pain and a degenerative meniscal tear should be considered as a first-line therapy before surgical treatment is contemplated. Patients with mechanical interference of joint movements, such as painful catching or locking, might need surgical treatment with meniscal repair if possible. In a subset of patients, meniscal resection might relieve pain and other symptoms that potentially originate directly from the torn meniscus. However, the possibility of an increased risk of OA if functional meniscal tissue is removed cannot be overlooked. PMID:22614907

Englund, Martin; Roemer, Frank W; Hayashi, Daichi; Crema, Michel D; Guermazi, Ali

2012-05-22

346

Histopathology of Naturally Occurring and Surgically Induced Osteoarthritis in Mice  

PubMed Central

Objective The morphology of lesions in mouse models of osteoarthritis (OA) has not been comprehensively characterized, in part because current histological assessments of OA focus primarily on articular cartilage. In the present study, sections of murine stifle joints with naturally occurring (aged animals) and surgically induced (destabilized medial meniscus, DMM) OA were examined using a newly developed histological grading scheme that includes quantitative measurements and semiquantitative grades to evaluate multiple joint tissues. Design The data collected was analyzed using Principal Components Analysis (PCA); factor scores for each joint were generated. Individual parameters and factor scores were compared between surgical groups and among age groups. For comparison, the original Mankin Histological-Histochemical Grading System (HHGS) also was applied. Results Overall, lesions were most severe in the medial tibial plateaus. Significant changes in articular cartilage and neighboring bone were identified in surgically induced models and in naturally occurring disease. Mean factor scores provided a comprehensive evaluation of joint changes. An important new finding was that chondrocyte cell death within the articular cartilage was a commonly identified lesion and its extent significantly increased with age. While the Mankin HHGS detected significant overall differences in OA severity between surgical groups, it was not sensitive in detecting age related differences, nor did it provide information regarding changes in individual tissues. Conclusion These results demonstrate the utility of this newly developed murine OA grading scheme in identifying lesions in articular cartilage and in other joint tissues. Surgically induced changes were similar to those occurring naturally with aging.

McNulty, Margaret A.; Loeser, Richard F.; Davey, Cynthia; Callahan, Michael F.; Ferguson, Cristin M.; Carlson, Cathy S.

2012-01-01

347

Non-invasive investigation in patients with inflammatory joint disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

have proved useful in establishing the diagnosis and assessing the severity of the condition, as well as the prognosis and the risk of complications. In short, non- invasive investigations on the gut in patients with rheumatic disease may be useful in clinical practice for a preliminary assessment of patients with suspected intestinal disease.

Elisabetta Dal Pont; Renata D'Incà; Antonino Caruso; Carlo Sturniolo

2009-01-01

348

Arthroscopic treatment of scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Scaphotrapeziotrapezoid (STT) joint osteoarthritis accounts for 13% of all wrist arthritis cases. The arthroscopic treatment combines radial midcarpal portal and STT portal called 1-2 midcarpal portal. We performed 13 isolated resections from the scaphoid distal pole. Patients were only women (average age, 58 years). Pain, mobility, and muscular strength improved significantly. At the same time, we fitted an interposition pyrocarbon implant after resection in 13 patients (average age, 67 years). We had 2 implant dislocations due to technical errors. Outcome quality optimized by the initial mini-invasive approach and arthroscopy should make selection of some treatment indications possible. PMID:21871354

Mathoulin, C; Darin, F

2011-08-01

349

Effect of iNOS inhibitor S-methylisothiourea in monosodium iodoacetate-induced osteoathritic pain: implication for osteoarthritis therapy.  

PubMed

Much information is available on the role of nitric oxide (NO) in osteoarthritis (OA). However, its role has not been studied in the monosodium iodoacetate (MIA)-induced model of osteoarthritic pain. The present study was undertaken in rats to investigate the effect of iNOS inhibitor S-methylisothiourea (SMT) in MIA-induced osteoathritic pain and disease progression in rats. Osteoarthritis was produced by single intra-articular injection of the MIA in the right knee joint on day 0. Treatment groups were orally gavazed with different doses of SMT (10, 30 and 100mg/kg) and etoricoxib (10mg/kg) daily for 21 days. On days 0, 3, 7, 14 and 21, pain was measured and histopathology of right knee joint was done on day 21. SMT produced analgesia in a dose-dependent manner as shown by mechanical, heat hyperalgesia, knee vocalization, knee squeeze test, and spontaneous motor activity test. SMT reduced NO production in synovial fluid. Histopathological findings indicated that SMT reduced disease progression as evident from complete cartilage formation in rats treated with SMT at 30 mg/kg. In conclusion, the results indicate that SMT attenuates the MIA-induced pain and histopathological changes in the knee joint. The antinociceptive and antiarthritic effects of SMT were mediated by inhibiting cartilage damage and suppression of NO in synovial fluid. It is suggested that SMT has potential as a therapeutic modality in the treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:23287799

More, Amar S; Kumari, Rashmi R; Gupta, Gaurav; Lingaraju, Madhu C; Balaganur, Venkanna; Pathak, Nitya N; Kumar, Dhirendra; Kumar, Dinesh; Sharma, Anil K; Tandan, Surendra K

2012-12-31

350

A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Medical Leech Therapy for Osteoarthritis of the Knee.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVES:: Osteoarthritis of the knee is a common chronic disease among older adults. Therapeutic approaches mainly consist of physiotherapy or pharmacological therapy, but these approaches are limited over time by their cost and/or side effects. This paper presents a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness of medical leech therapy for osteoarthritis of the knee. METHODS:: The PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Scopus, and CAMBASE databases were screened in August 2012 to identify randomized (RCTs) and nonrandomized controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing leech therapy to control conditions. Main outcome measures were pain, functional impairment, and joint stiffness. For each outcome, standardized mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. RESULTS:: Three RCTs and 1 CCT were found, in which a total of 237 patients with osteoarthritis were included. Three trials had a low risk of bias. There was strong overall evidence for immediate (SMD=-1.05; P<0.01) and short-term pain reduction (SMD=-1.00; P<0.01), immediate improvement in patients' physical function (SMD=-0.72; P<0.01), and both immediate (SMD=-0.88; P=0.04) and long-term improvement in their joint stiffness (SMD=-0.62; P<0.01). Moderate evidence was found for leech therapy's short-term effects on physical function (SMD=-0.46; P<0.01) and long-term effects on pain (SMD=-0.45; P<0.01). Leech therapy was not associated with any serious adverse events. DISCUSSION:: This systematic review found moderate to strong evidence for the reduction of pain, functional impairment, and joint stiffness after medical leech therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Given the low number of reported adverse events, leech therapy may be a useful approach in treating this condition. Further high-quality RCTs are required for the conclusive judgment of its effectiveness and safety. PMID:23446069

Lauche, Romy; Cramer, Holger; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav

2013-02-26

351

Animal models of osteoarthritis: challenges of model selection and analysis.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common musculoskeletal disease, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. New treatment approaches require an understanding of the pathophysiology of OA and its biomechanical, inflammatory, genetic, and environmental risk factors. The purpose of animal models of OA is to reproduce the pattern and progression of degenerative damage in a controlled fashion, so that opportunities to monitor and modulate symptoms and disease progression can be identified and new therapies developed. This review discusses the features, strengths, and weaknesses of the common animal models of OA; considerations to be taken when choosing a method for experimental induction of joint degeneration; and the challenges of measuring of OA progression and symptoms in these models. PMID:23329424

Teeple, Erin; Jay, Gregory D; Elsaid, Khaled A; Fleming, Braden C

2013-01-18

352

Stem cell therapy in a caprine model of osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. To explore the role that implanted mesenchymal stem cells may play in tissue repair or regeneration of the injured joint, by delivery of an autologous preparation of stem cells to caprine knee joints following induction of osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. Adult stem cells were isolated from caprine bone marrow, expanded in culture, and trans- duced to express green fluorescent protein.

J. Mary Murphy; David J. Fink; Ernst B. Hunziker; Frank P. Barry

2003-01-01

353

Neuromuscular alterations during walking in persons with moderate knee osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper compared the neuromuscular responses during walking between those with early-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA) to asymptomatic controls. The rationale for studying those with mild to moderate knee OA was to determine the alterations in response to dynamic loading that might be expected before severe pain, joint space narrowing and joint surface changes occur. We used pattern recognition techniques to

C. L. Hubley-Kozey; K. J. Deluzio; S. C. Landry; J. S. McNutt; W. D. Stanish

2006-01-01

354

Relationship of orthopedic examination, goniometric measurements, and radiographic signs of degenerative joint disease in cats  

PubMed Central

Background Available information suggests a mismatch between radiographic and orthopedic examination findings in cats with DJD. However, the extent of the discrepancy between clinical and radiographic signs of OA in companion animals has not been described in detail. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between orthopedic examination findings, joint goniometry, and radiographic signs of DJD in 100 cats, in a prospective observational design. Cat temperament, pain response to palpation, joint crepitus, effusion and thickening were graded. Radiographs of appendicular joints and the axial skeleton were made under sedation. Joint motion was measured by use of a plastic goniometer before and after sedation. Associations between radiographic degenerative joint disease (DJD) and examination findings were assessed to determine sensitivity, specificity and likelihood estimations. Results Pain response to palpation was elicited in 0-67% of the joints with DJD, with a specificity ranging from 62-99%; crepitus was detected in 0-56% of the joints and its specificity varied between 87 and 99%; for effusion, values ranged between 6 and 38% (specificity, 82-100%), and thickening, 0-59% (specificity, 74-99%). Joints with DJD tended to have a decreased range of motion. The presence of pain increased the odds of having DJD in the elbow (right: 5.5; left: 4.5); the presence of pain in the lower back increased the odds of spinal DJD being present (2.97 for lumbar; 4.67 for lumbo-sacral). Conclusions Radiographic DJD cannot be diagnosed with certainty using palpation or goniometry. However, negative findings tend to predict radiographically normal joints. Palpation and goniometry may be used as a tool to help to screen cats, mostly to rule out DJD.

2012-01-01

355

Current interventions in the management of knee osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Osteoarthritis (OA) is progressive joint disease characterized by joint inflammation and a reparative bone response and is one of the top five most disabling conditions that affects more than one-third of persons > 65 years of age, with an average estimation of about 30 million Americans currently affected by this disease. Global estimates reveal more than 100 million people are affected by OA. The financial expenditures for the care of persons with OA are estimated at a total annual national cost estimate of $15.5-$28.6 billion per year. As the number of people >65 years increases, so does the prevalence of OA and the need for cost-effective treatment and care. Developing a treatment strategy which encompasses the underlying physiology of degenerative joint disease is crucial, but it should be considerate to the different age ranges and different population needs. This paper focuses on different exercise and treatment protocols (pharmacological and non-pharmacological), the outcomes of a rehabilitation center, clinician-directed program versus an at home directed individual program to view what parameters are best at reducing pain, increasing functional independence, and reducing cost for persons diagnosed with knee OA.

Bhatia, Dinesh; Bejarano, Tatiana; Novo, Mario

2013-01-01

356

Effect of integrated yoga therapy on pain, morning stiffness and anxiety in osteoarthritis of the knee joint: A randomized control study  

PubMed Central

Aim: To study the effect of integrated yoga on pain, morning stiffness and anxiety in osteoarthritis of knees. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and fifty participants with OA knees (35–80 years) were randomly assigned to yoga or control group. Both groups had transcutaneous electrical stimulation and ultrasound treatment followed by intervention (40 min) for two weeks with follow up for three months. The integrated yoga consisted of yogic loosening and strengthening practices, asanas, relaxation, pranayama and meditation. The control group had physiotherapy exercises. Assessments were done on 15th (post 1) and 90th day (post 2). Results: Resting pain (numerical rating scale) reduced better (P<0.001, Mann–Whitney U test) in yoga group (post 1=33.6% and post 2=71.8%) than control group (post 1=13.4% and post 2=37.5%). Morning stiffness decreased more (P<0.001) in yoga (post 1=68.6% and post 2=98.1%) than control group (post 1=38.6% and post 2=71.6%). State anxiety (STAI-1) reduced (P<0.001) by 35.5% (post 1) and 58.4% (post 2) in the yoga group and 15.6% (post 1) and 38.8% (post 2) in the control group; trait anxiety (STAI 2) reduced (P<0.001) better (post 1=34.6% and post 2=57.10%) in yoga than control group (post 1=14.12% and post 2=34.73%). Systolic blood pressure reduced (P<0.001) better in yoga group (post 1=?7.93% and post 2=?15.7%) than the control group (post 1=?1.8% and post 2=?3.8%). Diastolic blood pressure reduced (P<0.001) better in yoga group (post 1=?7.6% and post 2=?16.4%) than the control group (post 1=?2.1% and post 2=?5.0%). Pulse rate reduced (P<0.001) better in yoga group (post 1=?8.41% and post 2=?12.4%) than the control group (post 1=?5.1% and post 2=?7.1%). Conclusion: Integrated approach of yoga therapy is better than physiotherapy exercises as an adjunct to transcutaneous electrical stimulation and ultrasound treatment in reducing pain, morning stiffness, state and trait anxiety, blood pressure and pulse rate in patients with OA knees.

Ebnezar, John; Nagarathna, Raghuram; Yogitha, Bali; Nagendra, Hongasandra Ramarao

2012-01-01

357

Medical management of osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common articular disease, and it continues to be a major public health problem related to pain, disability, loss of time from work, and economics. Most patients with OA seek medical attention because of pain. In the past few years, changes in the treatment of OA have been substantial. More effective nonnarcotic analgesics, cyclooxygenase-2-specific inhibitors, nutraceuticals, and intra-articular hyaluronates are some of the new medications and agents that are now available. The understanding and use of nonpharmacological interventions, including patient education, exercise programs, and weight reduction when appropriate, have also improved. Relief of pain and restoration of function can be accomplished in many patients, particularly with an integrated approach. This article focuses on medical treatment approaches for OA, both pharmacological and nonpharmacological. PMID:11357800

Manek, N J

2001-05-01

358

Pathobiology of obesity and osteoarthritis: integrating biomechanics and inflammation  

PubMed Central

Obesity is a significant risk factor for developing osteoarthritis in weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing joints. Although the pathogenesis of obesity-associated osteoarthritis is not completely understood, recent studies indicate that pro-inflammatory metabolic factors contribute to an increase in osteoarthritis risk. Adipose tissue, and in particular infrapatellar fat, is a local source of pro-inflammatory mediators that are increased with obesity and have been shown to increase cartilage degradation in cell and tissue culture models. One adipokine in particular, leptin, may be a critical mediator of obesity-associated osteoarthritis via synergistic actions with other inflammatory cytokines. Biomechanical factors may also increase the risk of osteoarthritis by activating cellular inflammation and promoting oxidative stress. However, some types of biomechanical stimulation, such as physiologic cyclic loading, inhibit inflammation and protect against cartilage degradation. A high percentage of obese individuals with knee osteoarthritis are sedentary, suggesting that a lack of physical activity may increase the susceptibility to inflammation. A more comprehensive approach to understanding how obesity alters daily biomechanical exposures within joint tissues may provide new insight into the protective and damaging effects of biomechanical factors on inflammation in osteoarthritis.

Issa, Rita I.; Griffin, Timothy M.

2012-01-01

359

Ginger compress therapy for adults with osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

therkleson t. (2010) Ginger compress therapy for adults with osteoarthritis. Journal of Advanced Nursing66(10), 2225–2233. Aim This paper is a report of a study to explicate the phenomenon of ginger compresses for people with osteoarthritis. Background Osteoarthritis is claimed to be the leading cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability in Western society. Management ideally combines non-pharmacological strategies, including complementary therapies and pain-relieving medication. Ginger has been applied externally for over a thousand years in China to manage arthritis symptoms. Method Husserlian phenomenological methodology was used and the data were collected in 2007. Ten purposively selected adults who had suffered osteoarthritis for at least a year kept daily diaries and made drawings, and follow-up interviews and telephone conversations were conducted. Findings Seven themes were identified in the data: (1) Meditative-like stillness and relaxation of thoughts; (2) Constant penetrating warmth throughout the body; (3) Positive change in outlook; (4) Increased energy and interest in the world; (5) Deeply relaxed state that progressed to a gradual shift in pain and increased interest in others; (6) Increased suppleness within the body and (7) More comfortable, flexible joint mobility. The essential experience of ginger compresses exposed the unique qualities of heat, stimulation, anti-inflammation and analgesia. Conclusion Nurses could consider this therapy as part of a holistic treatment for people with osteoarthritis symptoms. Controlled research is needed with larger numbers of older people to explore further the effects of the ginger compress therapy.

Therkleson, Tessa

2010-01-01

360

Validation of the Comprehensive ICF Core Set for Osteoarthritis: the perspective of physical therapists  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and purposeOsteoarthritis is a common chronic disease associated with functional impairments and activity limitations, as well as participation restrictions. The Comprehensive International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Set for Osteoarthritis is an application of the ICF and represents the typical spectrum of problems in functioning of patients with osteoarthritis.

Tanja Bossmann; Inge Kirchberger; Andrea Glaessel; Gerold Stucki; Alarcos Cieza

2011-01-01

361

Clinical significance of bone changes in osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, is now understood to involve all joint tissues, with active anabolic and catabolic processes. Knee OA in particular is considered to be a largely mechanically-driven disease. As bone adapts to loads by remodeling to meet its mechanical demands, bone alterations likely play an important role in OA development. Subchondral bone changes in bone turnover, mineralization, and volume result in altered apparent and material density of bone that may adversely affect the joint’s biomechanical environment. Subchondral bone alterations such as bone marrow lesions (BMLs) and subchondral bone attrition (SBA) both tend to occur more frequently in the more loaded knee compartments, and are associated with cartilage loss in the same region. Recently, MRI-based 3D bone shape has been shown to track concurrently with and predict OA onset. The contributions of structural abnormalities to the clinical manifestations of knee OA are becoming better understood as well. While a structure-symptom discordance in knee OA is thought to exist, such observations do not take into account all potential factors that can contribute to between-person differences in the pain experience. Using novel methodology, pain fluctuation has been associated with changes in BMLs, synovitis and effusion. SBA has also been associated with knee pain, but the relationship of osteophytes to pain has been conflicting. Understanding the pathophysiologic sequences and consequences of OA pathology will guide rational therapeutic targeting. Importantly, rational treatment targets require understanding what structures contribute to pain as pain is the reason patients seek medical care.

2012-01-01

362

Therapy Insight: how the gut talks to the joints—inflammatory bowel disease and the spondyloarthropathies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Axial and peripheral arthritis can occur in up to 30% of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Likewise, the presence of gut inflammation in primary spondyloarthropathies is underappreciated, with subclinical gut inflammation documented in up to two-thirds of patients with this group of inflammatory disorders. Common genetic and immunologic mechanisms underlie the coincidence of inflammation in the joints and the intestine.

Carmen Meier; Scott Plevy

2007-01-01

363

Segment-specific association between cervical pillar hyperplasia (CPH) and degenerative joint disease (DJD)  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Cervical pillar hyperplasia (CPH) is a recently described phenomenon of unknown etiology and clinical significance. Global assessment of pillar hyperplasia of the cervical spine as a unit has not shown a relationship with degenerative joint disease, but a more sensible explanation of the architectural influence of CPH on cervical spine biomechanics may be segment-specific. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this

Maja Stupar; Cynthia K Peterson

2006-01-01

364

Homeostatic mechanisms in articular cartilage and role of inflammation in osteoarthritis.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a whole joint disease, in which thinning and disappearance of cartilage is a critical determinant in OA progression. The rupture of cartilage homeostasis whatever its cause (aging, genetic predisposition, trauma or metabolic disorder) induces profound phenotypic modifications of chondrocytes, which then promote the synthesis of a subset of factors that induce cartilage damage and target other joint tissues. Interestingly, among these factors are numerous components of the inflammatory pathways. Chondrocytes produce cytokines, chemokines, alarmins, prostanoids, and adipokines and express numerous cell surface receptors for cytokines and chemokines, as well as Toll-like receptors. These receptors activate intracellular signaling pathways involved in inflammatory and stress responses of chondrocytes in OA joints. This review focuses on mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of cartilage homeostasis and highlights the role of inflammatory processes in OA progression. PMID:24072604

Houard, Xavier; Goldring, Mary B; Berenbaum, Francis

2013-11-01

365

EULAR report on the use of ultrasonography in painful knee osteoarthritis. Part 1: Prevalence of inflammation in osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To assess the prevalence of inflammation in subjects with chronic painful knee osteoarthritis (OA), as determined by the presence of synovitis or joint effusion at ultrasonography (US); and to evaluate the correlation between synovitis, effusion, and clinical parameters. Methods: A cross sectional, multicentre, European study was conducted under the umbrella of EULAR-ESCISIT. Subjects had primary chronic knee OA (ACR criteria) with pain during physical activity ?30 mm for at least 48 hours. Clinical parameters were collected by a rheumatologist and an US examination of the painful knee was performed by a radiologist or rheumatologist within 72 hours of the clinical examination. Ultrasonographic synovitis was defined as synovial thickness ?4 mm and diffuse or nodular appearance, and a joint effusion was defined as effusion depth ?4 mm. Results: 600 patients with painful knee OA were analysed. At US 16 (2.7%) had synovitis alone, 85 (14.2%) had both synovitis and effusion, 177 (29.5%) had joint effusion alone, and 322 (53.7%) had no inflammation according to the definitions employed. Multivariate analysis showed that inflammation seen by US correlated statistically with advanced radiographic disease (Kellgren-Lawrence grade ?3; odds ratio (OR) = 2.20 and 1.91 for synovitis and joint effusion, respectively), and with clinical signs and symptoms suggestive of an inflammatory "flare", such as joint effusion on clinical examination (OR = 1.97 and 2.70 for synovitis and joint effusion, respectively) or sudden aggravation of knee pain (OR = 1.77 for joint effusion). Conclusion: US can detect synovial inflammation and effusion in painful knee OA, which correlate significantly with knee synovitis, effusion, and clinical parameters suggestive of an inflammatory "flare".

D'Agostino, M; Conaghan, P; Le Bars, M; Baron, G; Grassi, W; Martin-Mola, E; Wakefield, R; Brasseur, J; So, A; Backhaus, M; Malaise, M; Burmester, G; Schmidely, N; Ravaud, P; Dougados, M; Emery, P

2005-01-01

366

Pharmaceutical and nutraceutical management of canine osteoarthritis: present and future perspectives.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common chronic musculoskeletal diseases and causes of lameness in the dogs. The osteoarthritic disease process involves the entire synovial joint, encompassing the synovium, cartilage and underlying bone. Joint failure results from an abnormal mechanical strain causing damage to normal tissue or failure of pathologically impaired articular cartilage and bone under the influence of normal physiological strain or a combination of both. In both cases, the end point is cartilage loss and joint impairment. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes show an altered phenotype characterised by an excess production of catabolic factors, including metalloproteinases and reactive oxygen species. These factors constitute potential therapeutic targets and some new drugs and nutraceuticals have been proposed to promote the return to homeostasis. Until now, the therapeutic management of OA in dogs has been dominated by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but some new compounds, including diacerhein, with potential structure-modifying effects, are already used to treat OA in humans and could be helpful to manage OA in the dog. In addition, novel nutraceuticals, such as avocado/soybean unsaponifiable substances, have shown symptomatic effects in knee OA in humans, and could offer an alternative to prevent OA progression. This paper provides an overview of recent discoveries in the pathophysiology and in the therapeutic management of osteoarthritis in dogs. PMID:15993795

Henrotin, Yves; Sanchez, Christelle; Balligand, Marc

2005-07-01

367

Patellofemoral Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Patellofemoral arthritis is a fairly common disease, and it has been gaining interest with increasing number of studies due to its diverse treatment methods. Patellofemoral arthritis has a broad range of management options according to the characteristics of individual diseases. Identifying whether patellofemoral arthritis is the primary cause of knee pain and is compartment arthritis is necessary for establishing an adequate treatment method. Through investigation of the literature, the issues of recent knowledge of femoropatella arthritis and the diagnosis and treatment of which were studied.

Joo, Yong-Bum

2012-01-01

368

New developments in osteoarthritis. Posttraumatic osteoarthritis: pathogenesis and pharmacological treatment options  

PubMed Central

Joint trauma can lead to a spectrum of acute lesions, including osteochondral fractures, ligament or meniscus tears and damage to the articular cartilage. This is often associated with intraarticular bleeding and causes posttraumatic joint inflammation. Although the acute symptoms resolve and some of the lesions can be surgically repaired, joint injury triggers a chronic remodeling process in cartilage and other joint tissues that ultimately manifests as osteoarthritis in a majority of cases. The objective of the present review is to summarize information on pathogenetic mechanisms involved in the acute and chronic consequences of joint trauma and discuss potential pharmacological interventions. The focus of the review is on the early events that follow joint trauma since therapies for posttraumatic joint inflammation are not available and this represents a unique window of opportunity to limit chronic consequences.

2010-01-01

369

Measurement of joint inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis with indium-111 chloride.  

PubMed Central

Studies in the collagen and rabbit models of arthritis have indicated that indium-111 chloride (111InCl3) scintigraphy objectively measures synovial inflammation. Indium-111 chloride scans, with imaging three days after 19 MBq intravenous injection, were performed on 21 patients with definite or classical rheumatoid arthritis (RA), all of whom were functional class II. Standard clinical indices of disease activity were recorded at the time of imaging by the same investigator, who was unaware of the results of joint scans. In addition, eight patients with severe osteoarthritis, four of whom were considered to need hip or knee joint replacement, were similarly scanned. In each patient 16 joints were graded as 0 to 5, based on increasing degrees of 111InCl3 uptake, by a single investigator blinded to the patient's diagnosis and clinical status. In the group with RA significant correlations were observed between individual joint uptake on scan and peripheral joints with swelling, joints reported to be painful, and joints with any abnormality on physical examination. In the group with osteoarthritis joints positive on scan correlated with the presence of pain. A total scan score (sum of individual joint scores) was calculated for each patient. In the patients with RA values ranged from 0 to 42 with a mean (SEM) of 20.7 (2.7) and correlated with the number of swollen joints and decreasing grip strength. In the group with osteoarthritis the mean total scan score (9.2 (1.5), range 3-14) was significantly lower than in the patients with RA. These data show that 111InCl3 scanning can measure joint involvement by RA. Images

Shmerling, R H; Parker, J A; Johns, W D; Trentham, D E

1990-01-01

370

Prevention and management of knee osteoarthritis and knee cartilage injury in sports.  

PubMed

Articular cartilage defects in the knee of young or active individuals remain a problem in orthopaedic practice. These defects have limited ability to heal and may progress to osteoarthritis. The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis among athletes is higher than in the non-athletic population. The clinical symptoms of osteoarthritis are joint pain, limitation of range of motion and joint stiffness. The diagnosis of osteoarthritis is confirmed by the symptoms and the radiological findings (narrowing joint space, osteophyte formation and subchondral sclerosis). There is no strong correlation between symptoms and radiographic findings. The aetiology of knee osteoarthritis is multifactorial. Excessive musculoskeletal loading (at work or in sports), high body mass index, previous knee injury, female gender and muscle weakness are well-known risk factors. The high-level athlete with a major knee injury has a high incidence of knee osteoarthritis. Cartilage injuries are frequently observed in young and middle-aged active athletes. Often this injury precedes osteoarthritis. Reducing risk factors can decrease the prevalence of knee osteoarthritis. The prevention of knee injury, especially anterior cruciate ligament and meniscus injury in sports, is important to avoid progression of knee osteoarthritis. PMID:21357577

Takeda, Hideki; Nakagawa, Takumi; Nakamura, Kozo; Engebretsen, Lars

2011-02-25

371

Patient and implant survival following joint replacement because of metastatic bone disease  

PubMed Central

Background Patients suffering from a pathological fracture or painful bony lesion because of metastatic bone disease often benefit from a total joint replacement. However, these are large operations in patients who are often weak. We examined the patient survival and complication rates after total joint replacement as the treatment for bone metastasis or hematological diseases of the extremities. Patients and methods 130 patients (mean age 64 (30–85) years, 76 females) received 140 joint replacements due to skeletal metastases (n = 114) or hematological disease (n = 16) during the period 2003–2008. 21 replaced joints were located in the upper extremities and 119 in the lower extremities. Clinical and survival data were extracted from patient files and various registers. Results The probability of patient survival was 51% (95% CI: 42–59) after 6 months, 39% (CI: 31–48) after 12 months, and 29% (CI: 21–37) after 24 months. The following surgical complications were seen (8 of which led to additional surgery): 2–5 hip dislocations (n = 8), deep infection (n = 3), peroneal palsy (n = 2), a shoulder prosthesis penetrating the skin (n = 1), and disassembly of an elbow prosthesis (n = 1). The probability of avoiding all kinds of surgery related to the implanted prosthesis was 94% (CI: 89–99) after 1 year and 92% (CI: 85–98) after 2 years. Conclusion Joint replacement operations because of metastatic bone disease do not appear to have given a poorer rate of patient survival than other types of surgical treatment, and the reoperation rate was low.

2013-01-01

372

Osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and exercise.  

PubMed

With the aging of the work force, occupational health nurses must prepare for encounters with clients who are challenged by osteoarthritis or osteoporosis. Clients should be encouraged to exercise safely to promote functioning at home and work. This article reviews recent literature on the benefits of exercise for workers with osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, or both. PMID:22938810

Garrison, Deborah

2012-09-01

373

The presence of total knee or hip replacements due to osteoarthritis enhances the positive association between hand osteoarthritis and atherosclerosis in women: the AGES–Reykjavik study  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThis study examines the relationship between total knee replacements (TKR), total hip replacements (THR) or replacements of either joint (total joint replacement; TJR) due to osteoarthritis and atherosclerosis in a large population-based study.MethodsThe participants were 2195 men and 2975 women, mean age 76±6 years. The osteoarthritis data were analysed in relation to measures of atherosclerosis, including carotid artery intima media

Helgi Jonsson; Gudrun P Helgadottir; Thor Aspelund; Gudny Eiriksdottir; Sigurdur Sigurdsson; Kristin Siggeirsdottir; Thorvaldur Ingvarsson; Tamara B Harris; Lenore Launer; Vilmundur Gudnason

2011-01-01

374

Genetics of osteoarthritis.  

PubMed Central

The available evidence suggests that genetic factors have a major role in osteoarthritis. It has been believed for over 50 years that a strong genetic component to certain forms of osteoarthritis is present. This genetic influence has now been estimated to be up to 65% in a recent twin study. The nature of the genetic influence in osteoarthritis is speculative and may involve either a structural defect (that is, collagen), alterations in cartilage or bone metabolism, or alternatively a genetic influence on a known risk factor for osteoarthritis such as obesity. Exciting work has showed that mutations in the collagen type 2 are important in some rare, familial forms of osteoarthritis. Further work is needed on isolating the gene or genes involved in the pathogenesis of this common, disabling condition.

Cicuttini, F M; Spector, T D

1996-01-01

375

Polyarticular osteoarthritis--two major phenotypes hypothesized.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis is the commonest form of arthritis, at least amongst Caucasians and is frequently polyarticular. Genetic factors are now considered pivotal in the aetiopathogenesis of polyarticular osteoarthritis (POA). This document proposes a nexus between the gene most commonly mutated amongst Caucasian peoples, notably the HFE gene and an appreciable subset of POA patients who have a clinically recognisable OA phenotype. It is hypothesised that there are at least 2 major POA phenotypes each of which is associated with discrete genotypes. Type 1 POA characterized by Heberden's or Bouchard's nodes with prominent DIP, PIP, knee joint (medial compartment) and Great toe MTP joint involvement corresponds to the putative nodal generalized form of OA or NGOA (proposed Type 1 POA phenotype). As yet no genetic marker has been defined for this POA subset. The second is a hitherto less well recognized phenotype characterized by involvement of the index and/or middle finger metacarpophalangeal (MCP2,3) joints and the elbows, ankles and possibly the intertarsal and tarsometatarsal joints. The hip and knee joints may sometimes also be involved. This different joint distribution corresponds closely to the pattern observed in the arthropathy that often accompanies hereditary haemochromatosis. It is predicted that mutations in the HFE gene will associate strongly with the proposed Type 2 POA phenotype and serve as a genetic marker for this clinically recognisable subset. PMID:16213101

Carroll, Graeme J

2005-10-05

376

Hard and soft osteo-arthritis  

PubMed Central

This short paper attempts to show how the X-ray appearance influences the choice and success of operative procedures performed on the hip and knee joints for osteo-arthritis. If the bones look ‘soft’ the only methods likely to succeed are those in which total replacement coupled with the use of cement ensure firm anchorage and wide distribution of stress. When bones look ‘hard’ simpler methods are usually satisfactory. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2

Broad, C. P.

1968-01-01

377

Relationship of angiogenesis factor in synovial fluid to various joint diseases.  

PubMed Central

A low-molecular-weight freely dialysable angiogenesis factor has been isolated from 49 synovial fluids obtained from patients with various joint diseases. An analysis of disease type and incidence of freely dialysable angiogenesis activity showed that the osteoarthrotic group had a significantly higher incidence than all the other groups (p = 0.0332). Angiogenesis factor has also been detected in a bound form in the retentates of fluids which gave positive results for dialysable factor. The possibility that an imbalance between carrier-bound and free factor may have a causative role in disease is discussed.

Brown, R A; Tomlinson, I W; Hill, C R; Weiss, J B; Phillips, P; Kumar, S

1983-01-01

378

Arthroscopic Lavage and Debridement for Osteoarthritis of the Knee  

PubMed Central

Executive Summary Objective The purpose of this review was to determine the effectiveness and adverse effects of arthroscopic lavage and debridement, with or without lavage, in the treatment of symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, and to conduct an economic analysis if evidence for effectiveness can be established. Questions Asked Does arthroscopic lavage improve motor function and pain associated with OA of the knee? Does arthroscopic debridement improve motor function and pain associated with OA of the knee? If evidence for effectiveness can be established, what is the duration of effect? What are the adverse effects of these procedures? What are the economic considerations if evidence for effectiveness can be established? Clinical Need Osteoarthritis, the most common rheumatologic musculoskeletal disorder, affects about 10% of the Canadian adult population. Although the natural history of OA is not known, it is a degenerative condition that affects the bone cartilage in the joint. It can be diagnosed at earlier ages, particularly within the sports injuries population, though the prevalence of non-injury-related OA increases with increasing age and varies with gender, with women being twice as likely as men to be diagnosed with this condition. Thus, with an aging population, the impact of OA on the health care system is expected to be considerable. Treatments for OA of the knee include conservative or nonpharmacological therapy, like physiotherapy, weight management and exercise; and more generally, intra-articular injections, arthroscopic surgery and knee replacement surgery. Whereas knee replacement surgery is considered an end-of-line intervention, the less invasive surgical procedures of lavage or debridement may be recommended for earlier and more severe disease. Both arthroscopic lavage and debridement are generally indicated in patients with knee joint pain, with or without mechanical problems, that are refractory to medical therapy. The clinical utility of these procedures is unclear, hence, the assessment of their effectiveness in this review. Lavage and Debridement Arthroscopic lavage involves the visually guided introduction of saline solution into the knee joint and removal of fluid, with the intent of extracting any excess fluids and loose bodies that may be in the knee joint. Debridement, in comparison, may include the introduction of saline into the joint, in addition to the smoothening of bone surface without any further intervention (less invasive forms of debridement), or the addition of more invasive procedures such as abrasion, partial or full meniscectomy, synovectomy, or osteotomy (referred to as debridement in combination with meniscectomy or other procedures). The focus of this health technology assessment is on the effectiveness of lavage, and debridement (with or without meniscal tear resection). Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat followed its standard procedures and searched these electronic databases: Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and The International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment. The keywords searched were: arthroscopy, debridement, lavage, wound irrigation, or curettage; arthritis, rheumatoid, osteoarthritis; osteoarthritis, knee; knee or knee joint. Time frame: Only 2 previous health technology assessments were identified, one of which was an update of the other, and included 3 of 4 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) from the first report. Therefore, the search period for inclusion of studies in this assessment was January 1, 1995 to April 24, 2005. Excluded were: case reports, comments, editorials, and letters. Identified were 335 references, including previously published health technology assessments, and 5 articles located through a manual search of references from published articles and health technology assessments. These were examined against the criteria, as described below, which resulted in the in

2005-01-01

379

Characterisation of a Peripheral Neuropathic Component of the Rat Monoiodoacetate Model of Osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Joint degeneration observed in the rat monoiodoacetate (MIA) model of osteoarthritis shares many histological features with the clinical condition. The accompanying pain phenotype has seen the model widely used to investigate the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis pain, and for preclinical screening of analgesic compounds. We have investigated the pathophysiological sequellae of MIA used at low (1 mg) or high (2 mg)

Matthew Thakur; Wahida Rahman; Carl Hobbs; Anthony H. Dickenson; David L. H. Bennett

2012-01-01

380

“Pursuing Balance”: Experiences of Occupational Adaptation in Women with Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoarthritis is commonly found in weight-bearing joints such as the hips and knees, and is the leading cause of disability among community-dwelling Canadian adults. Women are particularly affected by the symptoms of hip and knee osteoarthritis; they report more disability and difficulty with their activities of daily living than their male counterparts. Occupational adaptation allows the women to continue functioning

Gibbs Laura MSc; Klinger Lisa MSc OT; VandervoortAnthony; PolgarJan

2009-01-01

381

Is osteoarthritis in women affected by hormonal changes or smoking?  

PubMed

The influence of sex hormone related events and smoking on the development of OA in women was investigated in a case-controlled postal survey. One hundred and twenty-nine patients with nodal generalized osteoarthritis (NGOA) and 145 with non-nodal pauciarticular large joint osteoarthritis (LJOA) were identified from the database of a Nottingham OA clinic. For each patient, three age-matched controls were randomly selected from the same general practice. Sixty-three per cent of questionnaires (690/1096) were returned: NGOA, 95; NGOA controls, 226; LJOA, 113; LJOA controls, 256. There were no differences in age at menarche or menopause, rates of hysterectomy, oral contraceptive use, or hormone replacement use between cases and controls. Fewer OA patients had ever smoked [(Odds Ratio (OR) 0.65, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.45-0.95)] and subset analysis demonstrated that this negative association occurred only in the LJOA group (OR 0.43, CI 0.25-0.72), particularly in those with knee OA (OR 0.29, CI 0.14-0.62). A previous successful pregnancy was negatively associated with NGOA (OR 0.47, CI 0.24-0.95). This study demonstrates no association between oestrogen-related hormonal events and OA, but a negative association between smoking and LJOA. Such data supports the concept that OA is a heterogeneous disease and underlines the need to differentiate OA subsets. PMID:8495255

Samanta, A; Jones, A; Regan, M; Wilson, S; Doherty, M

1993-05-01

382

Role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis: latest findings and interpretations  

PubMed Central

Osteoarthritis (OA) has traditionally been classified as a noninflammatory arthritis; however, the dichotomy between inflammatory and degenerative arthritis is becoming less clear with the recognition of a plethora of ongoing immune processes within the OA joint and synovium. Synovitis is defined as inflammation of the synovial membrane and is characteristic of classical inflammatory arthritidies. Increasingly recognized is the presence of synovitis in a significant proportion of patients with primary OA, and based on this observation, further studies have gone on to implicate joint inflammation and synovitis in the pathogenesis of OA. However, clinical OA is not one disease but a final common pathway secondary to many predisposing factors, most notably age, joint trauma, altered biomechanics, and obesity. How such biochemical and mechanical processes contribute to the progressive joint failure characteristic of OA is tightly linked to the interplay of joint damage, the immune response to perceived damage, and the subsequent state of chronic inflammation resulting in propagation and progression toward the phenotype recognized as clinical OA. This review will discuss a wide range of evolving data leading to our current hypotheses regarding the role of immune activation and inflammation in OA onset and progression. Although OA can affect any joint, most commonly the knee, hip, spine, and hands, this review will focus primarily on OA of the knee as this is the joint most well characterized by epidemiologic, imaging, and translational studies investigating the association of inflammation with OA.

Lepus, Christin M.

2013-01-01

383

Inflammatory synovial fluid microenvironment drives primary human chondrocytes to actively take part in inflammatory joint diseases.  

PubMed

The role of human chondrocytes in the pathogenesis of cartilage degradation in rheumatic joint diseases has presently gained increasing interest. An active chondrocyte participation in local inflammation may play a role in the initiation and progression of inflammatory joint diseases and in a disruption of cartilage repair mechanisms resulting in cartilage degradation. In the present study, we hypothesized that inflammatory synovial fluid triggers human chondrocytes to actively take part in inflammatory processes in rheumatic joint diseases. Primary human chondrocytes were incubated in synovial fluids gained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis arthritis and reactive arthritis. The detection of vital cell numbers was determined by using Casy Cell Counter System. Apoptosis was measured by Annexin-V and 7AAD staining. Cytokine and chemokine secretion was determined by a multiplex suspension array. Detection of vital cells showed a highly significant decrease in chondrocyte numbers. Flow cytometry demonstrated a significant increase in apoptotic chondrocytes after the incubation. An active secretion of cytokines such as MCP-1 and MIF by chondrocytes was observed. The inflammatory synovial fluid microenvironment mediates apoptosis and cell death of chondrocytes. Moreover, in terms of cytokine secretion, it also induces an active participation of chondrocytes in ongoing inflammation. PMID:21979468

Röhner, Eric; Matziolis, Georg; Perka, Carsten; Füchtmeier, Bernd; Gaber, Timo; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Buttgereit, Frank; Hoff, Paula

2012-06-01

384

The Growing Array of Innate Inflammatory Ignition Switches in Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and is a major cause of chronic pain and disability. We currently lack disease-modifying OA medical therapeutics that effectively slow or halt the progression to destruction and failure of articular cartilage. Importantly, OA is a disease of the whole joint, including not only meniscal fibrocartilage and hyaline articular cartilage, but also subchondral bone, periarticular musculature, tendons and ligaments, articular adipose tissue, synovium, and synovial fluid (SF). Clinically, varying degrees of synovitis and joint effusion in OA contribute to signs and symptoms of inflammation (1). Multiple lines of evidence suggest that OA progression is promoted by low-grade innate articular inflammation and by synovitis (1,2). “Conventional” inflammatory cytokines expressed in cartilage and synovium likely play a role, and interleukin-1? (IL-1?), tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF?), IL-6, IL-8, and IL-17 are among the players in synovitis (1,2). The report by Nair et al in this issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism reveals increased levels of soluble CD14 (sCD14) in SF to be a biomarker of innate inflammation in patients undergoing arthroscopic knee meniscectomy for treatment of meniscal tears (3). Investigators in this group previously characterized this population as “enriched for patients with preradiographic disease” (4), given the associated symptoms, synovitis, and evidence of articular cartilage damage detected by arthroscopy.

Liu-Bryan, Ru; Terkeltaub, Robert

2013-01-01

385

Evaluating intra-articular drug delivery for the treatment of osteoarthritis in a rat model.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease that can result in joint pain, loss of joint function, and deleterious effects on activity levels and lifestyle habits. Current therapies for OA are largely aimed at symptomatic relief and may have limited effects on the underlying cascade of joint degradation. Local drug delivery strategies may provide for the development of more successful OA treatment outcomes that have potential to reduce local joint inflammation, reduce joint destruction, offer pain relief, and restore patient activity levels and joint function. As increasing interest turns toward intra-articular drug delivery routes, parallel interest has emerged in evaluating drug biodistribution, safety, and efficacy in preclinical models. Rodent models provide major advantages for the development of drug delivery strategies, chiefly because of lower cost, successful replication of human OA-like characteristics, rapid disease development, and small joint volumes that enable use of lower total drug amounts during protocol development. These models, however, also offer the potential to investigate the therapeutic effects of local drug therapy on animal behavior, including pain sensitivity thresholds and locomotion characteristics. Herein, we describe a translational paradigm for the evaluation of an intra-articular drug delivery strategy in a rat OA model. This model, a rat interleukin-1beta overexpression model, offers the ability to evaluate anti-interleukin-1 therapeutics for drug biodistribution, activity, and safety as well as the therapeutic relief of disease symptoms. Once the action against interleukin-1 is confirmed in vivo, the newly developed anti-inflammatory drug can be evaluated for evidence of disease-modifying effects in more complex preclinical models. PMID:19943805

Allen, Kyle D; Adams, Samuel B; Setton, Lori A

2010-02-01

386

EFFECTIVENESS OF THE TREATMENT OF DEGENERATIVE JOINT DISEASE WITH PERIARTICULAR, INTRAARTICULAR, AND INTRAMUSCULAR INJECTIONS OF ZEEL T  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Effectiveness of the treatment of degenerative joint disease by Zeel injections was assessed on the basis of published work and our own experience, including the results of a study carried out in a group of 523 patients. The solution was injected into the affected joints, periarticularly and intramuscularly. We also assessed the product's tolerability. Women were predominant (71%) in

Andrzej Lesiak; Rainer Gottwald; Michael Weiser

387

Host and parasite diversity jointly control disease risk in complex communities.  

PubMed

Host-parasite interactions are embedded within complex communities composed of multiple host species and a cryptic assemblage of other parasites. To date, however, surprisingly few studies have explored the joint effects of host and parasite richness on disease risk, despite growing interest in the diversity-disease relationship. Here, we combined field surveys and mechanistic experiments to test how transmission of the virulent trematode Ribeiroia ondatrae was affected by the diversity of both amphibian hosts and coinfecting parasites. Within natural wetlands, host and parasite species richness correlated positively, consistent with theoretical predictions. Among sites that supported Ribeiroia, however, host and parasite richness interacted to negatively affect Ribeiroia transmission between its snail and amphibian hosts, particularly in species-poor assemblages. In laboratory and outdoor experiments designed to decouple the relative contributions of host and parasite diversity, increases in host richness decreased Ribeiroia infection by 11-65%. Host richness also tended to decrease total infections by other parasite species (four of six instances), such that more diverse host assemblages exhibited ?40% fewer infections overall. Importantly, parasite richness further reduced both per capita and total Ribeiroia infection by 15-20%, possibly owing to intrahost competition among coinfecting species. These findings provide evidence that parasitic and free-living diversity jointly regulate disease risk, help to resolve apparent contradictions in the diversity-disease relationship, and emphasize the challenges of integrating research on coinfection and host heterogeneity to develop a community ecology-based approach to infectious diseases. PMID:24082092

Johnson, Pieter T J; Preston, Daniel L; Hoverman, Jason T; Lafonte, Bryan E

2013-09-30

388

Crystalline glucosamine sulfate in the management of knee osteoarthritis: efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetic properties  

PubMed Central

Glucosamine is an amino monosaccharide and a natural constituent of glycosaminoglycans in articular cartilage. When administered exogenously, it is used for the treatment of osteoarthritis as a prescription drug or a dietary supplement. The latter use is mainly supported by its perception as a cartilage building block, but it actually exerts specific pharmacologic effects, mainly decreasing interleukin 1-induced gene expression by inhibiting the cytokine intracellular signaling cascade in general and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) activation in particular. As a whole, the use of glucosamine in the management of osteoarthritis is supported by the clinical trials performed with the original prescription product, that is, crystalline glucosamine sulfate. This is the stabilized form of glucosamine sulfate, while other formulations or different glucosamine salts (e.g. hydrochloride) have never been shown to be effective. In particular, long-term pivotal trials of crystalline glucosamine sulfate 1500 mg once daily have shown significant and clinically relevant improvement of pain and function limitation (symptom-modifying effect) in knee osteoarthritis. Continuous administration for up to 3 years resulted in significant reduction in the progression of joint structure changes compared with placebo as assessed by measuring radiologic joint space narrowing (structure-modifying effect). The two effects combined may suggest a disease-modifying effect that was postulated based on an observed decrease in the risk of undergoing total joint replacement in the follow up of patients receiving the product for at least 12 months in the pivotal trials. The safety of the drug was good in clinical trials and in the postmarketing surveillance. Crystalline glucosamine sulfate 1500 mg once daily is therefore recommended in the majority of clinical practice guidelines and was found to be cost effective in pharmacoeconomic analyses. Compared with other glucosamine formulations, salts, or dosage forms, the prescription product achieves higher plasma and synovial fluid concentrations that are above the threshold for a pharmacologically relevant effect, and may therefore justify its distinct therapeutic characteristics.

Girolami, Federica; Persiani, Stefano

2012-01-01

389

Expression of collagen and aggrecan genes in normal and osteoarthritic murine knee joints  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective The STR\\/ort mouse strain develops osteoarthritis (OA) of the medial tibial cartilage whilst CBA mice do not develop this disease. We investigated whether changes occur in the expression of genes encoding major extracellular matrix proteins in the connective tissue of the murine knee joint in OA.Design Expression of the genes encoding collagens II (Col2?1), X (Col10?1), ?2(XI) (Col11?2) and

M. G Chambers; T Kuffner; S. K Cowan; K. S. E Cheah; R. M Mason

2002-01-01

390

The efficacy, accuracy and complications of corticosteroid injections of the knee joint  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Corticosteroid knee injections are being increasingly used in the conservative management of knee osteoarthritis. The procedure\\u000a is usually performed in secondary care by orthopaedic surgeons and rheumatologists, but as the role of general practitioners\\u000a in chronic disease management expands, joint injections are now frequently being performed in primary care. It is commonly\\u000a perceived amongst clinicians that the benefits of corticosteroid

James G. McGarryZubin; Zubin J. Daruwalla

391

Evidence for genetic anticipation in nodal osteoarthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVEEvidence was sought for genetic anticipation (disease occurring at an earlier age in subsequent generations, with increasing severity) in nodal osteoarthritis (NOA).METHODSAge at symptom onset and disease severity was compared within 30 parent\\/offspring pairs with NOA. Correlation between the offspring age of disease onset and the parental age at conception was also assessed.RESULTSThe age at onset of nodal symptoms was

Gary D Wright; Marian Regan; Chris M Deighton; Gillian Wallis; Michael Doherty

1998-01-01

392

A new approach for assessing early osteoarthritis in the rat  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several animal models have been developed to investigate osteoarthritis and potential disease-modifying therapeutics. However, early disease data from these models are limited by the resolution of current imaging modalities. In this in-vitro study, an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with an axial resolution of 15 µm was used to track sequential changes in osteoarthritic rat knees. Osteoarthritis was induced via transection

M. J. Roberts; S. B. Adams Jr; N. A. Patel; D. L. Stamper; M. S. Westmore; S. D. Martin; J. G. Fujimoto; M. E. Brezinski

2003-01-01

393

Muscle diseases with prominent joint contractures: Main entities and diagnostic strategy.  

PubMed

Muscle diseases may have various clinical manifestations including muscle weakness, atrophy or hypertrophy and joint contractures. A spectrum of non-muscular manifestations (cardiac, respiratory, cutaneous, central and peripheral nervous system…) may be associated. Few of these features are specific. Limb joint contractures or spine rigidity, when prevailing over muscle weakness in ambulant patients, are of high diagnostic value for diagnosis orientation. Within this context, among several disorders, four groups of diseases should systematically come to mind including the collagen VI-related myopathies, the Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophies, the SEPN1 and FHL1 related myopathies. More rarely other genetic or acquired myopathies may present with marked contractures. Diagnostic work-up should include a comprehensive assessment including family history, neurological, cardiologic and respiratory evaluations. Paraclinical investigations should minimally include muscle imaging and electromyography. Muscle and skin biopsies as well as protein and molecular analyses usually help to reach a precise diagnosis. We will first describe the main muscle and neuromuscular junction diseases where contractures are typically a prominent symptom of high diagnostic value for diagnosis orientation. In the following chapters, we will present clues for the diagnostic strategy and the main measures to be taken when, at the end of the diagnostic work-up, no definite muscular disease has been identified. PMID:24021317

Eymard, B; Ferreiro, A; Ben Yaou, R; Stojkovic, T

2013-09-07

394

Long-distance running, bone density, and osteoarthritis  

SciTech Connect

Forty-one long-distance runners aged 50 to 72 years were compared with 41 matched community controls to examine associations of repetitive, long-term physical impact (running) with osteoarthritis and osteoporosis. Roentgenograms of hands, lateral lumbar spine, and knees were assessed without knowledge of running status. A computed tomographic scan of the first lumbar vertebra was performed to quantitate bone mineral content. Runners, both male and female, have approximately 40% more bone mineral than matched controls. Female runners, but not male runners, appear to have somewhat more sclerosis and spur formation in spine and weight-bearing knee x-ray films, but not in hand x-ray films. There were no differences between groups in joint space narrowing, crepitation, joint stability, or symptomatic osteoarthritis. Running is associated with increased bone mineral but not, in this cross-sectional study, with clinical osteoarthritis.

Lane, N.E.; Bloch, D.A.; Jones, H.H.; Marshall, W.H. Jr.; Wood, P.D.; Fries, J.F.

1986-03-07

395

Technology insight: adult mesenchymal stem cells for osteoarthritis therapy.  

PubMed

Despite the high prevalence and morbidity of osteoarthritis (OA), an effective treatment for this disease is currently lacking. Restoration of the diseased articular cartilage in patients with OA is, therefore, a challenge of considerable appeal to researchers and clinicians. Techniques that cause multipotent adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to differentiate into cells of the chondrogenic lineage have led to a variety of experimental strategies to investigate whether MSCs instead of chondrocytes can be used for the regeneration and maintenance of articular cartilage. MSC-based strategies should provide practical advantages for the patient with OA. These strategies include use of MSCs as progenitor cells to engineer cartilage implants that can be used to repair chondral and osteochondral lesions, or as trophic producers of bioactive factors to initiate endogenous regenerative activities in the OA joint. Targeted gene therapy might further enhance these activities of MSCs. Delivery of MSCs might be attained by direct intra-articular injection or by graft of engineered constructs derived from cell-seeded scaffolds; this latter approach could provide a three-dimensional construct with mechanical properties that are congruous with the weight-bearing function of the joint. Promising experimental and clinical data are beginning to emerge in support of the use of MSCs for regenerative applications. PMID:18477997

Nöth, Ulrich; Steinert, Andre F; Tuan, Rocky S

2008-05-13

396

Ankle osteoarthritis is associated with knee osteoarthritis. Conclusions based on mechanical axis radiographs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Osteoarthritis (OA) of the ankle with an unknown etiology (primary OA) is rare, whereas a secondary OA due to a known cause\\u000a is not uncommon. OA of the knee can, when it progresses, change the alignment of the whole extremity including the ankle joint.\\u000a Since we had observed in patients coming for OA knee surgery coexisting OA in the ankle

Kaj Tallroth; Arsi Harilainen; Liisa Kerttula; Raafat Sayed

2008-01-01

397

Effects of laterally wedged insoles on symptoms and disease progression in medial knee osteoarthritis: a protocol for a randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Whilst laterally wedged insoles, worn inside the shoes, are advocated as a simple, inexpensive, non-toxic self-administered intervention for knee osteoarthritis (OA), there is currently limited evidence to support their use. The aim of this randomised, double-blind controlled trial is to determine whether laterally wedges insoles lead to greater improvements in knee pain, physical function and health-related quality of life, and slower structural disease progression as well as being more cost-effective, than control flat insoles in people with medial knee OA. Methods/Design Two hundred participants with painful radiographic medial knee OA and varus malalignment will be recruited from the community and randomly allocated to lateral wedge or control insole groups using concealed allocation. Participants will be blinded as to which insole is considered therapeutic. Blinded follow up assessment will be conducted at 12 months after randomisation. The outcome measures are valid and reliable measures recommended for OA clinical trials. Questionnaires will assess changes in pain, physical function and health-related quality-of-life. Magnetic resonance imaging will measure changes in tibial cartilage volume. To evaluate cost-effectiveness, participants will record the use of all health-related treatments in a log-book returned to the assessor on a monthly basis. To test the effect of the intervention using an intention-to-treat analysis, linear regression modelling will be applied adjusting for baseline outcome values and other demographic characteristics. Discussion Results from this trial will contribute to the evidence regarding the effectiveness of laterally wedged insoles for the management of medial knee OA. Trial registration ACTR12605000503628; NCT00415259.

Bennell, Kim; Bowles, Kelly-Ann; Payne, Craig; Cicuttini, Flavia; Osborne, Richard; Harris, Anthony; Hinman, Rana

2007-01-01

398

Joint modeling of multivariate longitudinal measurements and survival data with applications to Parkinson's disease.  

PubMed

In many clinical trials, studying neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD), multiple longitudinal outcomes are collected in order to fully explore the multidimensional impairment caused by these diseases. The follow-up of some patients can be stopped by some outcome-dependent terminal event, e.g. death and dropout. In this article, we develop a joint model that consists of a multilevel item response theory (MLIRT) model for the multiple longitudinal outcomes, and a Cox's proportional hazard model with piecewise constant baseline hazards for the event time data. Shared random effects are used to link together two models. The model inference is conducted using a Bayesian framework via Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation implemented in BUGS language. Our proposed model is evaluated by simulation studies and is applied to the DATATOP study, a motivating clinical trial assessing the effect of tocopherol on PD among patients with early PD. PMID:23592717

He, Bo; Luo, Sheng

2013-04-16

399

Novel hyaluronic acid–methotrexate conjugates for osteoarthritis treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyaluronic acid (HA) provides synovial fluid viscoelasticity and has a lubricating effect. Injections of HA preparations into the knee joint are widely used as osteoarthritis therapy. The current HA products reduce pain but do not fully control inflammation. Oral methotrexate (MTX) has anti-inflammatory efficacy but is associated with severe adverse events. Based on the rationale that a conjugation of HA

Akie Homma; Haruhiko Sato; Akira Okamachi; Takashi Emura; Takenori Ishizawa; Tatsuya Kato; Tetsu Matsuura; Shigeo Sato; Tatsuya Tamura; Yoshinobu Higuchi; Tomoyuki Watanabe; Hidetomo Kitamura; Kentaro Asanuma; Tadao Yamazaki; Masahisa Ikemi; Hironoshin Kitagawa; Tadashi Morikawa; Hitoshi Ikeya; Kazuaki Maeda; Koichi Takahashi; Kenji Nohmi; Noriyuki Izutani; Makoto Kanda; Ryochi Suzuki

2009-01-01

400

Cartilage biology in osteoarthritis—lessons from developmental biology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the initiation and progression of osteoarthritis (OA), and in particular cartilage degeneration in OA, are not completely understood. Increasing evidence implicates developmental processes in OA etiology and pathogenesis. Herein, we review this evidence. We first examine subtle changes in cartilage development and the specification and formation of joints, which predispose to OA development,

Frank Beier; Andrew A. Pitsillides

2011-01-01

401

Tumoral calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease of the temporomandibular joint: identification on crystallography.  

PubMed

This paper reports a case of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of a 59-year-old man with the chief complaint of severe pain in the left TMJ. On CT a radiopaque area was seen around the condylar process of the left TMJ with irregular destructive bony changes. A provisional diagnosis of crystalline-induced arthritis was made on histopathology of a biopsy specimen. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction showed both CPPD and hydroxyapatite (HA) in the crystalline materials. Identification of these two types of crystal in crystal deposition disease of TMJ, using crystallography, is discussed. PMID:18844939

Mikami, Toshinari; Takeda, Yasunori; Ohira, Akinori; Hoshi, Hideki; Sugiyama, Yoshiki; Yoshida, Yasuo; Ambo, Junichi

2008-11-01

402

Micro-CT Analysis of Experimental Candida Osteoarthritis in Rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experimental osteoarthritis induced by Candida albicans in rats was studied using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). When C. albicans cells at a nonlethal dose were intravenously injected into 40 rats, joint swelling was induced in 24 rats. Two or more joints\\u000a were affected in 10 of the 24 rats. Tarsal regions of the hind paw were affected most frequently, followed by elbows of

Takamasa Amanai; Yasunori Nakamura; Shigeji Aoki; Izumi Mataga

2008-01-01

403

Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in osteoarthritis: advanced tissue repair or intervention with smouldering synovial activation?  

PubMed Central

Although it is generally accepted that osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition of the cartilage, other tissues such as synovium in which immunological and inflammatory reactions occur contribute to the development of joint pathology. This sheds new light on the potential mechanism of action of mesenchymal stem cell therapy in osteoarthritis. Rather than tissue repair due to local transformation of injected mesenchymal stem cells to chondrocytes and filling defects in cartilage, such treatment might suppress synovial activation and indirectly ameliorate cartilage damage. Desando and co-workers report in Arthritis Research & Therapy that intra-articular delivery of adipose-derived stem cells attenuates progression of synovial activation and joint destruction in osteoarthritis in an experimental rabbit model. Clinical studies are warranted to see whether this approach might be a novel way to combat development of joint destruction in inflammatory subtypes of osteoarthritis.

2013-01-01

404

Nuclear medicine in diagnosis and therapy of bone and joint diseases.  

PubMed

Concerning bone and joint diseases therapy of rheumatic synovitis (= radiosynoviorthesis) was introduced in 1952 before clinically relevant diagnostic procedures were developed. Radionuclides of Sr and later on 99mTc phosphonates then started the wide use of bone scintigraphy since > 30 years. The diagnostic methods have an excellent sensitivity for detection of local abnormalities of bone metabolism, the specificity of such studies, however, is low. Modifications of the technique (3-phase-bone-scintigraphy, pinhole collimators, ROI-technique), increasing knowledge of pathological scan patterns and introduction of other radionuclide studies (67Ga, 201Tl, inflammation scans with 99mTc-leukocytes or 99mTc-HIG) as well as 18FDG-PET have increased the specificity significantly in recent years and improvements of imaging systems (SPECT) also increased the accuracy of diagnostic methods in diseases of bone and joints. Therapy of such diseases has made considerable progress: inflamed, swollen joints can effectively be treated with 90Y-, 186Re, 169Er-colloids or with 165Dy-particles by radiosynoviorthesis. Severe pain due to disseminated bone metastases of cancer or polyarthritis can be controlled by radionuclide therapy with 89Sr, 153Sm-EDTMP, 186Re- or 188Re-HEDP and possibly 117mSn-DTPA with an acceptable risk of myelodepression. Possibilities, technical details and limitations of radionuclide applications for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes must be considered if optimal benefit for individual patients should be achieved. Overall Nuclear Medicine can become an essential element in management of bone and joint diseases. The relationship of Nuclear Medicine to bone and joint pathology is peculiar: In 1952 treatment of rheumatic synovitis by radiosynoviorthesis with 198Au Colloid was started by Fellinger and Schmid before diagnostic approaches to bone pathology existed. Bone scintigraphy was introduced only in 1961 using 85Sr but obviously the unfavourable radiation characteristics of this radionuclide limited it's broad application and 87mSr did not improve this situation. Only when 99mTc phosphonates were developed by Subramanian the importance of bone scintigraphy became apparent: The excellent imaging properties of these radiotracers showed, that abnormal bone metabolism could be visualized even before morphological alterations in the skeleton become visible on radiographies or even CT-scans. Moreover, proposals made earlier to use 32P or 89Sr for palliation of pain in patients with disseminated skeletal metastases were picked up again and led also to other radiopharmaceuticals (186Re-HEDP, 153Sm-EDTMP, 117mSn-DTPA) which are applied today for the same purpose with very good success. Therefore Nuclear Medicine today has a broad program for diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to diseases of bone and joints. In bone scanning the high sensitivity led to inclusion of this method for routine staging and re-staging programs in a variety of cancer forms which have a trend to develop bone metastases (e.g. breast, lung, prostate, melanoma) but the low specificity of abnormal patterns on such scans can impair the diagnostic value of the technique. To increase specificity and to define inflammatory lesions, radiotracers used for "inflammation scanning" were introduced such as labeled granulocytes, 99mTc Human Immunoglobulin and others but also a simple modification of bone scanning--triple phase bone scintigraphy--was used. Recently the excellent properties of 18F for PET of the skeleton were rediscovered again and emission CT scanning--possibly with overlay with transmission CT or MRT pictures--can enhance the diagnostic impact of radionuclide bone studies. PMID:14601000

Riccabona, G

1999-01-01

405

Intra-Articular Hyaluronic Acid as Treatment in Elderly and Middle-Aged Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Osteoarthritis is the most common age-related degenerative joint disease. It affects all the joints containing hyaline cartilage. Knee osteoarthritis is the most cumbersome in terms of prevalence and disability. The aim of this study to evaluate the efficacy of intra-articular hyaluronic acid in patients with knee osteoarthritis with regard to joint pain and function, as well as patient satisfaction, assessed at one month and at one year, and by age group. Methods: In this prospective randomised study, 172 patients who were diagnosed knee OA and who received three consecutive intra-articular injections of HA weekly were included. Patients 65 years of age or older were accepted as the “elderly group”, and those under 65 were accepted as the “middle-aged group”. Clinical evaluations of efficacy and safety were conducted at the beginning of the study, one month after the third injection, and one year after the third injection. Results: In the two groups, the intragroup analysis revealed significant improvements following injection when compared with preinjection values. According to the last followup controls (after 12 months) in the middle-aged group, VAS activity pain, VAS rest pain, WOMAC physical function, and WOMAC pain values were found to be statistically lower when compared with pre-injection values. In the elderly group, no statistically significant differences were found between pre-injection and after 12 months. Conclusion: We can conclude that intra-articular joint HA injections are effective in both young and old patients with OA with regard to pain and functional status over a short-term period. Further, HA injections in patients younger than 65 years can be planned for a one-year period.

Ucar, Demet; D?racoglu, Demirhan; Suleyman, Turker; Capan, Nalan

2013-01-01

406

Recent progress in understanding molecular mechanisms of cartilage degeneration during osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a highly prevalent disease affecting more than 20% of American adults. Predispositions include joint injury, heredity, obesity, and aging. Biomechanical alterations are commonly involved. However, the molecular mechanisms of this disease are complex, and there is currently no effective disease-modifying treatment. The initiation and progression of OA subtypes is a complex process that at the molecular level probably involves many cell types, signaling pathways, and changes in extracellular matrix. Ex vivo studies with tissue derived from OA patients and in vivo studies with mutant mice have suggested that pathways involving receptor ligands such as TGF-?1, WNT3a, and Indian hedgehog; signaling molecules such as Smads, ?-catenin, and HIF-2a; and peptidases such as MMP13 and ADAMTS4/5 are probably involved to some degree. This review focuses on molecular mechanisms of OA development related to recent findings.

Wang, Meina; Shen, Jie; Jin, Hongting; Im, Hee-Jeong; Sandy, John; Chen, Di

2013-01-01

407