Science.gov

Sample records for joint geophysical imaging

  1. Enhanced Subsurface Fluid Characterization Using Joint Hydrological and Geophysical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commer, M.; Kowalsky, M. B.; Finsterle, S.; Newman, G. A.

    2010-12-01

    Quantitatively assessing and predicting physical and chemical processes that control subsurface flow systems requires highly parameterized process models, which in turn require high-resolution characterization data on multiple scales. In this study, we explore the value of adding geophysical surface and surface-to-borehole electrical resistivity data within a hydrogeophysical joint inversion framework. The resistivity data are inverted by a geophysical imaging method to obtain a three-dimensional electrical resistivity distribution. This resistivity map is then considered to be a set of “measured” geophysical data, to be used along with sets of hydrological measurements, in our case time-dependent borehole brine concentration measurements, in a joint inversion for the estimation of the subsurface permeability distribution. Within the hydrogeophysical joint inversion, a flow and transport simulator calculates an electrical resistivity field from the distribution of the two state variables fluid saturation and concentration, using a petrophysical model. We use the inverse modeling version of TOUGH2, a simulator for multiphase, multi-component, non-isothermal flows in porous media. The geophysical resistivity map enters as an additional input data set, and the objective function to be minimized contains the sum of weighted differences between hydrogeological and geophysical residuals. This inversion scheme uses nonlinear least-squares optimization, a modified Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, and geostatistical simulations together with the pilot point method to reduce the dimension of the parameter space. We are able to demonstrate that, provided the different data types are weighted properly, the geophysical image adds value in terms of improving the subsurface permeability image. Percentage difference between true permeability field and the field obtained from inverting hydrological data. Percentage difference between true permeability field and the field obtained

  2. Joint interpretation of geophysical data using Image Fusion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamitrou, A.; Tsokas, G.; Petrou, M.

    2013-12-01

    Joint interpretation of geophysical data produced from different methods is a challenging area of research in a wide range of applications. In this work we apply several image fusion approaches to combine maps of electrical resistivity, electromagnetic conductivity, vertical gradient of the magnetic field, magnetic susceptibility, and ground penetrating radar reflections, in order to detect archaeological relics. We utilize data gathered from Arkansas University, with the support of the U.S. Department of Defense, through the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP-CS1263). The area of investigation is the Army City, situated in Riley Country of Kansas, USA. The depth of the relics is estimated about 30 cm from the surface, yet the surface indications of its existence are limited. We initially register the images from the different methods to correct from random offsets due to the use of hand-held devices during the measurement procedure. Next, we apply four different image fusion approaches to create combined images, using fusion with mean values, wavelet decomposition, curvelet transform, and curvelet transform enhancing the images along specific angles. We create seven combinations of pairs between the available geophysical datasets. The combinations are such that for every pair at least one high-resolution method (resistivity or magnetic gradiometry) is included. Our results indicate that in almost every case the method of mean values produces satisfactory fused images that corporate the majority of the features of the initial images. However, the contrast of the final image is reduced, and in some cases the averaging process nearly eliminated features that are fade in the original images. Wavelet based fusion outputs also good results, providing additional control in selecting the feature wavelength. Curvelet based fusion is proved the most effective method in most of the cases. The ability of curvelet domain to unfold the image in

  3. Strategies for joint geophysical survey design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakas, Alexis; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, the use of multiple geophysical techniques to image the subsurface has become a popular option. Joint inversions of geophysical datasets are based on the assumption that the spatial variations of the different physical subsurface parameters exhibit structural similarities. In this work, we combine the benefits of joint inversions of geophysical datasets with recent innovations in optimized experimental design. These techniques maximize the data information content while minimizing the data acquisition costs. Experimental design has been used in geophysics over the last twenty years, but it has never been attempted to combine various geophysical imaging methods. We combine direct current geoelectrics, magnetotellurics and seismic refraction travel time tomography data to resolve synthetic 1D layered Earth models. An initial model for the subsurface structure can be taken from a priori geological information and an optimal joint geophysical survey can be designed around the initial model. Another typical scenario includes an existing data set from a past survey and a subsequent survey that is planned to optimally complement the existing data. Our results demonstrate that the joint design methodology provides optimized combinations of data sets that include only a few data points. Nevertheless, they allow constraining the subsurface models equally well as data from a densely sampled survey. Furthermore, we examine the dependency of optimized survey design on the a priori model assumptions. Finally, we apply the methodology to geoelectric and seismic field data collected along 2D profiles.

  4. Joint Hydrological-Geophysical Inversion for Soil StructureIdentification

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, Stefan; Kowalsky, Michael B.

    2006-05-01

    Reliable prediction of subsurface flow and contaminant transport depends on the accuracy with which the values and spatial distribution of process-relevant model parameters can be identified. Successful characterization methods for complex soil systems are based on (1) an adequate parameterization of the subsurface, capable of capturing both random and structured aspects of the heterogeneous system, and (2) site-specific data that are sufficiently sensitive to the processes of interest. We present a stochastic approach where the high-resolution imaging capability of geophysical methods is combined with the process-specific information obtained from the inversion of hydrological data. Geostatistical concepts are employed as a flexible means to describe and characterize subsurface structures. The key features of the proposed approach are (1) the joint inversion of geophysical and hydrological raw data, avoiding the intermediate step of creating a (non-unique and potentially biased) tomogram of geophysical properties, (2) the concurrent estimation of hydrological and petrophysical parameters in addition to (3) the determination of geostatistical parameters from the joint inversion of hydrological and geophysical data; this approach is fundamentally different from inference of geostatistical parameters from an analysis of spatially distributed property data. The approach has been implemented into the iTOUGH2 inversion code and is demonstrated for the joint use of synthetic time-lapse ground-penetrating radar (GPR) travel times and hydrological data collected during a simulated ponded infiltration experiment at a highly heterogeneous site.

  5. Geophysical imaging of alpine rock glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Hansruedi; Hauck, Christian

    Slope instabilities caused by the disappearance of ice within alpine rock glaciers are an issue of increasing concern. Design of suitable counter-measures requires detailed knowledge of the internal structures of rock glaciers, which can be obtained using geophysical methods. We examine benefits and limitations of diffusive electromagnetics, geoelectrics, seismics and ground-penetrating radar (georadar) for determining the depth and lateral variability of the active layer, the distributions of ice and water, the occurrence of shear horizons and the bedrock topography. In particular, we highlight new developments in data acquisition and data analysis that allow 2-D or even 3-D structures within rock glaciers to be imaged. After describing peculiarities associated with acquiring appropriate geophysical datasets across rock glaciers and emphasizing the importance of state-of-the-art tomographic inversion algorithms, we demonstrate the applicability of 2-D imaging techniques using two case studies of rock glaciers in the eastern Swiss Alps. We present joint interpretations of geoelectric, seismic and georadar data, appropriately constrained by information extracted from boreholes. A key conclusion of our study is that the different geophysical images are largely complementary, with each image resolving a different suite of subsurface features. Based on our results, we propose a general template for the cost-effective and reliable geophysical characterization of mountain permafrost.

  6. Geophysical monitoring using 3D joint inversion of multi-modal geophysical data with Gramian constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, M. S.; Gribenko, A.; Wilson, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    Geophysical monitoring of reservoir fluids and rock properties is relevant to oil and gas production, carbon sequestration, and enhanced geothermal systems. Different geophysical fields provide information about different physical properties of the earth. Multiple geophysical surveys spanning gravity, magnetic, electromagnetic, seismic, and thermal methods are often interpreted to infer geology from models of different physical properties. In many cases, the various geophysical data are complimentary, making it natural to consider a formal mathematical framework for their joint inversion to a shared earth model. We introduce a new approach to the 3D joint inversion of multiple geophysical datasets using Gramian spaces of model parameters and Gramian constraints, computed as determinants of the corresponding Gram matrices of the multimodal model parameters and/or their attributes. The basic underlying idea of this approach is that the Gramian provides a measure of correlation between the model parameters. By imposing an additional requirement of the minimum of the Gramian, we arrive at the solution of the joint multimodal inverse problem with the enhanced correlation between the different model parameters and/or their attributes. We demonstrate that this new approach is a generalized technique that can be applied to the simultaneous joint inversion of any number and combination of geophysical datasets. Our approach includes as special cases those extant methods based on correlations and/or structural constraints of different physical properties. We illustrate this approach by a model study of reservoir monitoring using different geophysical data.

  7. Joint Inversion Modelling of Geophysical Data From Lough Neagh Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vozar, J.; Moorkamp, M.; Jones, A. G.; Rath, V.; Muller, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-dimensional modelling of geophysical data collected in the Lough Neagh Basin is presented in the frame of the IRETHERM project. The Permo-Triassic Lough Neagh Basin, situated in the southeastern part of Northern Ireland, exhibits elevated geothermal gradient (~30 °C/km) in the exploratory drilled boreholes. This is taken to indicate good geothermal exploitation potential in the Sherwood Sandstone aquifer for heating, and possibly even electricity production, purposes. We have used a 3-D joint inversion framework for modelling the magnetotelluric (MT) and gravity data collected to the north of the Lough Neagh to derive robust subsurface geological models. Comprehensive supporting geophysical and geological data (e.g. borehole logs and reflection seismic images) have been used in order to analyze and model the MT and gravity data. The geophysical data sets were provided by the Geological Survey of Northern Ireland (GSNI). Considering correct objective function weighting in favor of noise-free MT response functions is particularly important in joint inversion. There is no simple way how to correct distortion effects the 3-D responses as can be done in 1-D or 2-D case. We have used the Tellus Project airborne EM data to constrain magnetotelluric data and correct them for near surface effects. The shallow models from airborne data are used to constrain the uppermost part of 3-D inversion model. Preliminary 3-D joint inversion modeling reveals that the Sherwood Sandstone Group and the Permian Sandstone Formation are imaged as a conductive zone at the depth range of 500 m to 2000 m with laterally varying thickness, depth, and conductance. The conductive target sediments become shallower and thinner to the north and they are laterally continuous. To obtain better characterization of thermal transport properties of investigated area we used porosity and resistivity data from the Annaghmore and Ballymacilroy boreholes to estimate the relations between porosity

  8. Sacroiliac joint imaging.

    PubMed

    Tuite, Michael J

    2008-03-01

    The sacroiliac (SI) joint has several unique anatomical features that make it one of the more challenging joints to image. The joint is difficult to profile well on radiographic views, and therefore the radiographic findings of sacroiliitis are often equivocal. Computed tomography images can usually show the findings of sacroiliitis and osteoarthritis earlier than radiographs. Magnetic resonance imaging performed with proper sequences is excellent for diagnosing even very early sacroiliitis and for following treatment response. The SI joint is often involved in patients with osteoarthritis or one of the inflammatory spondyloarthritides, most notably ankylosing spondylitis. Ankylosing spondylitis often presents with sacroiliitis, which appears as erosions, sclerosis, and joint space narrowing, eventually leading to ankylosis. Several disorders can cause sacroiliitis-like changes of the joint, including hyperparathyroidism and repetitive shear-stress injuries in athletes. The joint can become painful during pregnancy as it widens and develops increased motion, and some postpartum women develop iliac sclerosis adjacent to the joint termed osteitis condensans ilii. Another cause of SI joint pain is a disorder called sacroiliac joint dysfunction, which typically has few abnormal imaging findings. Patients with SI joint dysfunction, as well as sacroiliitis, often get relief from image-guided SI joint therapeutic injections. PMID:18382946

  9. Joint inversion of geophysical data for site characterization and restoration monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P. A.

    1998-05-28

    The purpose of this project is to develop a computer code for joint inversion of seismic and electrical data, to improve underground imaging for site characterization and remediation monitoring. The computer code developed in this project will invert geophysical data to obtain direct estimates of porosity and saturation underground, rather than inverting for seismic velocity and electrical resistivity or other geophysical properties. This is intended to be a significant improvement in the state-of-the-art of underground imaging, since interpretation of data collected at a contaminated site would become much less subjective. Potential users include DOE scientists and engineers responsible for characterizing contaminated sites and monitoring remediation of contaminated sites. In this three-year project, we use a multi-phase approach consisting of theoretical and numerical code development, laboratory investigations, testing on available laboratory and borehole geophysics data sets, and a controlled field experiment, to develop practical tools for joint electrical and seismic data interpretation.

  10. Imaging the temporomandibular joint

    SciTech Connect

    Katzberg, R.W.; Manzione, J.V.; Westesson, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    This book encompasses all imaging modalities as they apply to the Temporomandibular Joint and its disorders. The volume employs correlative line drawings to elaborate on diagnostic images. It helps teach methods of TMJ imaging and describes findings identified by different imaging modalities to both radiologists and dental clinicians.

  11. Joint inversion of geophysical data for site characterization and restoration monitoring. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P.A.; Roberts, J.J.; Berryman, J.G.; Wildenschild, D.

    1998-06-01

    'The purpose of this project is to develop a computer code for joint inversion of seismic and electrical data, to improve underground imaging for site characterization and remediation monitoring. The computer code developed in this project will invert geophysical data to obtain direct estimates of porosity and saturation underground, rather than inverting for seismic velocity and electrical resistivity or other geophysical properties. This is intended to be a significant improvement in the state-of-the-art of underground imaging, since interpretation of data collected at a contaminated site would become much less subjective. Potential users include DOE scientists and engineers responsible for characterizing contaminated sites and monitoring remediation of contaminated sites. In this three-year project, the authors use a multi-phase approach consisting of theoretical and numerical code development, laboratory investigations, testing on available laboratory and borehole geophysics data sets, and a controlled field experiment, to develop practical tools for joint electrical and seismic data interpretation. This report summarizes work after about 1.7 years of a 3-year project. Progress on laboratory measurements is described first, followed by progress on developing algorithms for the inversion code to relate geophysical data to porosity and saturation.'

  12. Geophysical imaging of subsalt geology

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliff, D.W.; Weber, D.J. )

    1996-01-01

    Exploration and production of huge subsalt hydrocarbon accumulations in the Gulf of Mexico has been an ambitious challenge for many explorationists throughout the industry. The complexities associated with the three dimensional nature of salt structures, as well as the highly deformed tops and bottoms of salt, demand 3-D Prestack Depth Migration (3-D PreSDM) technology in order to correctly stack and position reflectivity below salt. Application of [open quotes]large-volume[close quote] 3-D PreSDM techniques has been, and will continue to be, instrumental in unraveling the structural and stratigraphic complexities of the subsalt environment. [open quote]Large-volume[close quote] 3-D PreSDM technology allows the explorationist to better assess subsalt exploration and development risk, as well as improve subsalt exploration success. In this paper, we discuss a full-volume 3-D PreSDM case study that, to our knowledge, is the largest prestack depth imaging project ever attempted, to date. The 3-D PreSDM case study is centered over the Mahogany Discovery in the Gulf of Mexico's Ship Shoal South Addition Block 349 area. Information about input and output data coverage, computer run times and 3-D depth imaging strategies will be discussed. Numerous examples of closely spaced 3-D prestack depth migrated seismic data will also be shown in order to demonstrate how [open quote]large-volume[close quote] 3-D PreSDM technology improves subsalt imaging, (both structural and stratigraphic), as well as subsalt prospecting.

  13. Characterization of Sao Francisco basin, Brazil: joint inversion of multiple geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solon, F. F.; Fontes, S. L.

    2013-05-01

    The need to improve the characterization of the near surface and to generate consistent images of multiple geophysical data has led us to adopt a cross-gradient joint inversion methodology. We applied this method to characterize the basement fracture-zones and heterogeneous reservoir rocks underneath thick overburden at São Francisco basin in Brazil. The basin is mainly filled by Neoproterozoic clastic and carbonates rocks of the Bambui group formed in the Upper Proterozoic (Vendian) which makes the São Francisco basin interesting for hydrocarbon prospecting. Exploring the combined use of different geophysical methods will enhance the structural resemblance in the images that each one provides. The strategy explored in this work is to use a two-dimensional structured-coupled joint inversion from Gallardo and Meju (2003) applying to four data sets: land seismic reflection, magnetotelluric (MT), gravity and magnetic data sets along a 100 km profile across a region called Remanso do Fogo. For the joint inversion approach, we need to determine appropriate processing parameters to better estimate the individual contribution from each geophysical data type. A first experiment using three data sets (gravity, magnetic and MT) is shown in fig. 1. The evolution of the joint inversion showed that the solution is controlled by the development of common features in all models. The results of joint inversion using three and four models clearly mapped the compartmentation of the basement in this sector of São Francisco Basin. Also it is possible to identify the units of Bambui group, resulting in a constrained geological interpretation.; Fig. 1: Sections obtained in interaction 6 after joint inversion of gravity, magnetic and MT data.

  14. Geophysical Technologies to Image Old Mine Works

    SciTech Connect

    Kanaan Hanna; Jim Pfeiffer

    2007-01-15

    ZapataEngineering, Blackhawk Division performed geophysical void detection demonstrations for the US Department of Labor Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA). The objective was to advance current state-of-practices of geophysical technologies for detecting underground mine voids. The presence of old mine works above, adjacent, or below an active mine presents major health and safety hazards to miners who have inadvertently cut into locations with such features. In addition, the presence of abandoned mines or voids beneath roadways and highway structures may greatly impact the performance of the transportation infrastructure in terms of cost and public safety. Roads constructed over abandoned mines are subject to potential differential settlement, subsidence, sinkholes, and/or catastrophic collapse. Thus, there is a need to utilize geophysical imaging technologies to accurately locate old mine works. Several surface and borehole geophysical imaging methods and mapping techniques were employed at a known abandoned coal mine in eastern Illinois to investigate which method best map the location and extent of old works. These methods included: 1) high-resolution seismic (HRS) using compressional P-wave (HRPW) and S-wave (HRSW) reflection collected with 3-D techniques; 2) crosshole seismic tomography (XHT); 3) guided waves; 4) reverse vertical seismic profiling (RVSP); and 5) borehole sonar mapping. In addition, several exploration borings were drilled to confirm the presence of the imaged mine voids. The results indicated that the RVSP is the most viable method to accurately detect the subsurface voids with horizontal accuracy of two to five feet. This method was then applied at several other locations in Colorado with various topographic, geologic, and cultural settings for the same purpose. This paper presents the significant results obtained from the geophysical investigations in Illinois.

  15. Geophysical imaging of subsalt geology

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliff, D.W.; Weber, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    Exploration and production of huge subsalt hydrocarbon accumulations in the Gulf of Mexico has been an ambitious challenge for many explorationists throughout the industry. The complexities associated with the three dimensional nature of salt structures, as well as the highly deformed tops and bottoms of salt, demand 3-D Prestack Depth Migration (3-D PreSDM) technology in order to correctly stack and position reflectivity below salt. Application of {open_quotes}large-volume{close_quote} 3-D PreSDM techniques has been, and will continue to be, instrumental in unraveling the structural and stratigraphic complexities of the subsalt environment. {open_quote}Large-volume{close_quote} 3-D PreSDM technology allows the explorationist to better assess subsalt exploration and development risk, as well as improve subsalt exploration success. In this paper, we discuss a full-volume 3-D PreSDM case study that, to our knowledge, is the largest prestack depth imaging project ever attempted, to date. The 3-D PreSDM case study is centered over the Mahogany Discovery in the Gulf of Mexico`s Ship Shoal South Addition Block 349 area. Information about input and output data coverage, computer run times and 3-D depth imaging strategies will be discussed. Numerous examples of closely spaced 3-D prestack depth migrated seismic data will also be shown in order to demonstrate how {open_quote}large-volume{close_quote} 3-D PreSDM technology improves subsalt imaging, (both structural and stratigraphic), as well as subsalt prospecting.

  16. Geophysical data fusion for subsurface imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoekstra, P.; Vandergraft, J.; Blohm, M.; Porter, D.

    1993-08-01

    A geophysical data fusion methodology is under development to combine data from complementary geophysical sensors and incorporate geophysical understanding to obtain three dimensional images of the subsurface. The research reported here is the first phase of a three phase project. The project focuses on the characterization of thin clay lenses (aquitards) in a highly stratified sand and clay coastal geology to depths of up to 300 feet. The sensor suite used in this work includes time-domain electromagnetic induction (TDEM) and near surface seismic techniques. During this first phase of the project, enhancements to the acquisition and processing of TDEM data were studied, by use of simulated data, to assess improvements for the detection of thin clay layers. Secondly, studies were made of the use of compressional wave and shear wave seismic reflection data by using state-of-the-art high frequency vibrator technology. Finally, a newly developed processing technique, called 'data fusion' was implemented to process the geophysical data, and to incorporate a mathematical model of the subsurface strata. Examples are given of the results when applied to real seismic data collected at Hanford, WA, and for simulated data based on the geology of the Savannah River Site.

  17. On Optimizing Joint Inversion of Constrained Geophysical Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa Aguirre, U. A.; Velazquez, L.; Argaez, M.; Velasco, A. A.; Romero, R.

    2010-12-01

    We implemented a joint inversion least-squares (LSQ) algorithm to characterize 1-D crustal velocity Earth structure using geophysical data sets with two different optimization methods: truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD), and primal-dual interior-point (PDIP). We used receiver function and surface wave dispersion velocity observations, and created a framework to incorporate other data sets. An improvement in the final outcome (model) is expected by providing better physical constraints than using just one single data set. The TSVD and PDIP methods solve a regularized unconstrained and an inherent regularized constrained minimization problems, respectively. Both techniques implement the inclusion of bounds into the layered shear velocities in a different fashion. We conduct a numerical experimentation with synthetic data, and find that the PDID method’s solution was more robust in terms of satisfying geophysical constraints, accuracy, and efficiency than the TSVD approach. Finally, we apply the PDIP method for characterizing material properties of the Rio Grande Rift region using real recorded seismic data with promising numerical results.

  18. Geophysical imaging using trans-dimensional trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Rhys; Sambridge, Malcolm

    2015-11-01

    In geophysical inversion, inferences of Earth's properties from sparse data involve a trade-off between model complexity and the spatial resolving power. A recent Markov chain Monte Carlo (McMC) technique formalized by Green, the so-called trans-dimensional samplers, allows us to sample between these trade-offs and to parsimoniously arbitrate between the varying complexity of candidate models. Here we present a novel framework using trans-dimensional sampling over tree structures. This new class of McMC sampler can be applied to 1-D, 2-D and 3-D Cartesian and spherical geometries. In addition, the basis functions used by the algorithm are flexible and can include more advanced parametrizations such as wavelets, both in Cartesian and Spherical geometries, to permit Bayesian multiscale analysis. This new framework offers greater flexibility, performance and efficiency for geophysical imaging problems than previous sampling algorithms. Thereby increasing the range of applications and in particular allowing extension to trans-dimensional imaging in 3-D. Examples are presented of its application to 2-D seismic and 3-D teleseismic tomography including estimation of uncertainty.

  19. Joint geophysical data analysis for geothermal energy exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wamalwa, Antony Munika

    Geophysical data modelling often yields non-unique results and hence the interpretation of the resulting models in terms of underlying geological units and structures is not a straightforward problem. However, if multiple datasets are available for a region of study, an integrated interpretation of models for each of the geophysical data may results to a more realistic geological description. This study not only demonstrates the strength of resistivity analysis for geothermal fields but also the gains from interpreting resistivity data together with other geophysical data such as gravity and seismic data. Various geothermal fields have been examined in this study which includes Silali and Menengai geothermal fields in Kenya and Coso geothermal field in California, USA.

  20. Geophysical subsurface imaging and interface identification.

    SciTech Connect

    Pendley, Kevin; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Day, David Minot; Robinson, Allen Conrad; Weiss, Chester Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Electromagnetic induction is a classic geophysical exploration method designed for subsurface characterization--in particular, sensing the presence of geologic heterogeneities and fluids such as groundwater and hydrocarbons. Several approaches to the computational problems associated with predicting and interpreting electromagnetic phenomena in and around the earth are addressed herein. Publications resulting from the project include [31]. To obtain accurate and physically meaningful numerical simulations of natural phenomena, computational algorithms should operate in discrete settings that reflect the structure of governing mathematical models. In section 2, the extension of algebraic multigrid methods for the time domain eddy current equations to the frequency domain problem is discussed. Software was developed and is available in Trilinos ML package. In section 3 we consider finite element approximations of De Rham's complex. We describe how to develop a family of finite element spaces that forms an exact sequence on hexahedral grids. The ensuing family of non-affine finite elements is called a van Welij complex, after the work [37] of van Welij who first proposed a general method for developing tangentially and normally continuous vector fields on hexahedral elements. The use of this complex is illustrated for the eddy current equations and a conservation law problem. Software was developed and is available in the Ptenos finite element package. The more popular methods of geophysical inversion seek solutions to an unconstrained optimization problem by imposing stabilizing constraints in the form of smoothing operators on some enormous set of model parameters (i.e. ''over-parametrize and regularize''). In contrast we investigate an alternative approach whereby sharp jumps in material properties are preserved in the solution by choosing as model parameters a modest set of variables which describe an interface between adjacent regions in physical space. While

  1. Fusion of Geophysical Images in the Study of Archaeological Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamitrou, A. A.; Petrou, M.; Tsokas, G. N.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents results from different fusion techniques between geophysical images from different modalities in order to combine them into one image with higher information content than the two original images independently. The resultant image will be useful for the detection and mapping of buried archaeological relics. The examined archaeological area is situated in Kampana site (NE Greece) near the ancient theater of Maronia city. Archaeological excavations revealed an ancient theater, an aristocratic house and the temple of the ancient Greek God Dionysus. Numerous ceramic objects found in the broader area indicated the probability of the existence of buried urban structure. In order to accurately locate and map the latter, geophysical measurements performed with the use of the magnetic method (vertical gradient of the magnetic field) and of the electrical method (apparent resistivity). We performed a semi-stochastic pixel based registration method between the geophysical images in order to fine register them by correcting their local spatial offsets produced by the use of hand held devices. After this procedure we applied to the registered images three different fusion approaches. Image fusion is a relatively new technique that not only allows integration of different information sources, but also takes advantage of the spatial and spectral resolution as well as the orientation characteristics of each image. We have used three different fusion techniques, fusion with mean values, with wavelets by enhancing selected frequency bands and curvelets giving emphasis at specific bands and angles (according the expecting orientation of the relics). In all three cases the fused images gave significantly better results than each of the original geophysical images separately. The comparison of the results of the three different approaches showed that the fusion with the use of curvelets, giving emphasis at the features' orientation, seems to give the best fused image

  2. Joint inversion of geophysical data for site characterization and restoration monitoring. FY97 annual progress report for EMSP

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P.A.; Berryman, J.G.; Bonner, B.P.; Roberts, J.J.; Wildenschild, D.

    1997-01-01

    'The purpose of this project is to develop a computer code for joint in-version of seismic and electrical data, to improve underground imaging for site characterization and remediation monitoring. The computer code developed in this project will invert geophysical data to obtain direct estimates of porosity and saturation underground, rather than inverting for seismic velocity and electrical resistivity or other geophysical properties. This is intended to be a significant improvement in the state-of-the-art of under-ground imaging, since interpretation of data collected at a contaminated site would become much less subjective. The schedule of this project is as follows: In the first year, investigators perform laboratory measurements of elastic and electrical properties of sand-clay mixtures containing various fluids. Investigators also develop methods of relating measurable geophysical properties to porosity and saturation by using rock physics theories, geostatistical, and empirical techniques together with available laboratory measurements. In the second year, investigators finish any necessary laboratory measurements and apply the methods de-veloped in the first year to invert available borehole log data to predict measured properties of cores and sediments from a borehole. Investigators refine the inversion code in the third year and carry out a field experiment to collect seismic and electrical data. Investigators then use the inversion code to invert the field data to produce estimates of porosity and saturation in the field area where the data were collected. This report describes progress made in the first year of this three-year project.'

  3. Geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.; Cassen, P.

    1976-01-01

    Four areas of investigation, each dealing with the measurement of a particular geophysical property, are discussed. These properties are the gravity field, seismicity, magnetism, and heat flow. All are strongly affected by conditions, past or present, in the planetary interior; their measurement is the primary source of information about planetary interiors.

  4. Geophysical tomography imaging system. Final CRADA report

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, S.J.; Won, I.J.

    1998-05-20

    The Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., and Geophex, Ltd., was established to investigate high-resolution, shallow acoustic imaging of the subsurface. The primary objectives of the CRADA were accomplished, including the evaluation of a new tomographic imaging algorithm and the testing and comparison of two different acoustic sources, the hammer/plate source and an electromagnetic vibratory source. The imaging system was composed essentially of a linear array of geophones, a digital seismograph, and imaging software installed on a personal computer. Imaging was most successful using the hammer source, which was found to be less susceptible to ground roll (surface wave) interference. It is conjectured that the vibratory source will perform better for deeper targets for which ground roll is less troublesome. Potential applications of shallow acoustic imaging are numerous, including the detection and characterization of buried solid waste, unexploded ordnance, and clandestine man-made underground structures associated with treaty verification (e.g., tunnels, underground storage facilities, hidden bunkers).

  5. Structure-constrained image-guided inversion of geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jieyi

    The regularization term in the objective function of an inverse problem is equivalent to the "model covariance" in Tarantola's wording. It is not entirely reasonable to consider the model covariance to be isotropic and homogenous, as done in classical Tikhonov regularization, because the correlation relationships among model cells are likely to change with different directions and locations. The structure-constrained image-guided inversion method, presented in this thesis, aims to solve this problem, and can be used to integrate different types of geophysical data and geological information. The method is first theoretically developed and successfully tested with electrical resistivity data. Then it is applied to hydraulic tomography, and promising hydraulic conductivity models are obtained as well. With a correct guiding image, the image-guided inversion results not only follow the correct structure patterns, but also are closer to the true model in terms of parameter values, when compared with the conventional inversion results. To further account for the uncertainty in the guiding image, a Bayesian inversion scheme is added to the image-guided inversion algorithm. Each geophysical model parameter and geological (structure) model parameter is described by a probability density. Using the data misfit of image-guided inversion of the geophysical data as criterion, a stochastic (image-guided) inversion algorithm allows one to optimize both the geophysical model and the geological model at the same time. The last problem discussed in this thesis is, image-guided inversion and interpolation can help reduce non-uniqueness and improve resolution when utilizing spectral induced polarization data and petrophysical relationships to estimate permeability.

  6. Structure-coupled multiphysics imaging in geophysical sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, Luis A.; Meju, Max A.

    2011-03-01

    Multiphysics imaging or data inversion is of growing importance in many branches of science and engineering. In geophysical sciences, there is a need for combining information from multiple images acquired using different imaging devices and/or modalities because of the potential for accurate predictions. The major challenges are how to combine disparate data from unrelated physical phenomena, taking into account the different spatial scales of the measurement devices, model complexities, and how to quantify the associated uncertainties. This review paper summarizes the role played by the structural gradients-based approach for coupling fundamentally different physical fields in (mainly) geophysical inversion, develops further understanding of this approach to guide newcomers to the field, and defines the main challenges and directions for future research that may be useful in other fields of science and engineering.

  7. Imaging marine geophysical environments with vector acoustics.

    PubMed

    Lindwall, Dennis

    2006-09-01

    Using vector acoustic sensors for marine geoacoustic surveys instead of the usual scalar hydrophones enables one to acquire three-dimensional (3D) survey data with instrumentation and logistics similar to current 2D surveys. Vector acoustic sensors measure the sound wave direction directly without the cumbersome arrays that hydrophones require. This concept was tested by a scaled experiment in an acoustic water tank that had a well-controlled environment with a few targets. Using vector acoustic data from a single line of sources, the three-dimensional tank environment was imaged by directly locating the source and all reflectors. PMID:17004497

  8. HydroImage: A New Software for HydroGeophysical and BioGeophysical Data Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suribhatla, R. M.; Mok, C. M.; Kaback, D.; Chen, J.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogeophysical and biogeophysical data integration have recently emerged as cost-effective and rapid techniques for improving subsurface characterization and monitoring. In a Bayesian framework for integration, borehole based data provide prior distribution and geophysical information serve as data to update the prior through likelihood functions obtained from petrophysical models between borehole and cross-well data. We present the application of a Windows-based software called HydroImage that uses this Bayesian framework for data integration and visualization. HydroImage can be used for geostatistical estimation, geophysical tomographic inversion, petrophysical model development, and Bayesian integration. We demonstrate HydroImage using three different field datasets to estimate different subsurface states or parameters. The first example combines wellbore flowmeter test data and crosshole seismic and ground penetrating radar (GPR) data to estimate hydraulic conductivity at the DOE Bacterial Transport Site in Oyster, Virginia. The second example focuses on using time-lapse radar data to estimate moisture content dynamics associated with a desiccation test performed to remediate the deep vadose zone in Hanford, Washington. The third example demonstrates the use of spectral induced polarization data to estimate the spatial and temporal distribution of geochemical parameters that are indicative of the redox state of a contaminated aquifer.

  9. Application of Laser Imaging for Bio/geophysical Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummel, J. R.; Goltz, S. M.; Depiero, N. L.; Degloria, D. P.; Pagliughi, F. M.

    1992-01-01

    SPARTA, Inc. has developed a low-cost, portable laser imager that, among other applications, can be used in bio/geophysical applications. In the application to be discussed here, the system was utilized as an imaging system for background features in a forested locale. The SPARTA mini-ladar system was used at the International Paper Northern Experimental Forest near Howland, Maine to assist in a project designed to study the thermal and radiometric phenomenology at forest edges. The imager was used to obtain data from three complex sites, a 'seed' orchard, a forest edge, and a building. The goal of the study was to demonstrate the usefulness of the laser imager as a tool to obtain geometric and internal structure data about complex 3-D objects in a natural background. The data from these images have been analyzed to obtain information about the distributions of the objects in a scene. A range detection algorithm has been used to identify individual objects in a laser image and an edge detection algorithm then applied to highlight the outlines of discrete objects. An example of an image processed in such a manner is shown. Described here are the results from the study. In addition, results are presented outlining how the laser imaging system could be used to obtain other important information about bio/geophysical systems, such as the distribution of woody material in forests.

  10. Sinkhole Imaging With Multiple Geophysical Methods in Covered Karst Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, M.

    2005-05-01

    A suite of geophysical surveys was run at the Geopark at the University of South Florida campus in Tampa in attempt to determine the degree to which methods could image a collapsed sinkhole with a diameter of ~4m and maximum depth of ~2.5m. Geologically, the Geopark is part of a covered karst terrane, with collapsed sinkholes filled in by overlying unconsolidated sand separated from the weathered limestone beneath by a clayey sand layer. The sinkholes are hydrologically significant as they may serve as sites of concentrated recharge. The methods used during the study include: refraction seismics, resistivity, electromagnetics (TEM and EM), and ground penetrating radar (GPR). Geophysical data are compared against cores. The resistivity, GPR, and seismic refraction profiles yield remarkably consistent images of the clayey sand layer. EM-31 data revealed regional trends in subsurface geology, but could not delineate specific sinkhole features with the desired resolution.

  11. Joint inversion of geophysical data using petrophysical clustering and facies deformation wth the level set technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.

    2015-12-01

    Geological expertise and petrophysical relationships can be brought together to provide prior information while inverting multiple geophysical datasets. The merging of such information can result in more realistic solution in the distribution of the model parameters, reducing ipse facto the non-uniqueness of the inverse problem. We consider two level of heterogeneities: facies, described by facies boundaries and heteroegenities inside each facies determined by a correlogram. In this presentation, we pose the geophysical inverse problem in terms of Gaussian random fields with mean functions controlled by petrophysical relationships and covariance functions controlled by a prior geological cross-section, including the definition of spatial boundaries for the geological facies. The petrophysical relationship problem is formulated as a regression problem upon each facies. The inversion of the geophysical data is performed in a Bayesian framework. We demonstrate the usefulness of this strategy using a first synthetic case for which we perform a joint inversion of gravity and galvanometric resistivity data with the stations located at the ground surface. The joint inversion is used to recover the density and resistivity distributions of the subsurface. In a second step, we consider the possibility that the facies boundaries are deformable and their shapes are inverted as well. We use the level set approach to perform such deformation preserving prior topological properties of the facies throughout the inversion. With the help of prior facies petrophysical relationships and topological characteristic of each facies, we make posterior inference about multiple geophysical tomograms based on their corresponding geophysical data misfits. The method is applied to a second synthetic case showing that we can recover the heterogeneities inside the facies, the mean values for the petrophysical properties, and, to some extent, the facies boundaries using the 2D joint inversion of

  12. Geophysical imaging of root-zone, trunk, and moisture heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Attia Al Hagrey, Said

    2007-01-01

    The most significant biotic and abiotic stress agents of water extremity, salinity, and infection lead to wood decay and modifications of moisture and ion content, and density. This strongly influences the (di-)electrical and mechanical properties and justifies the application of geophysical imaging techniques. These are less invasive and have high resolution in contrast to classical methods of destructive, single-point measurements for inspecting stresses in trees and soils. This review presents some in situ and in vivo applications of electric, radar, and seismic methods for studying water status and movement in soils, roots, and tree trunks. The electrical properties of a root-zone are a consequence of their moisture content. Electrical imaging discriminates resistive, woody roots from conductive, soft roots. Both types are recognized by low radar velocities and high attenuation. Single roots can generate diffraction hyperbolas in radargrams. Pedophysical relationships of water content to electrical resistivity and radar velocity are established by diverse infiltration experiments in the field, laboratory, and in the full-scale 'GeoModel' at Kiel University. Subsurface moisture distributions are derived from geophysical attribute models. The ring electrode technique around trunks images the growth ring structure of concentric resistivity, which is inversely proportional to the fluid content. Healthy trees show a central high resistivity within the dry heartwood that strongly decreases towards the peripheral wet sapwood. Observed structural deviations are caused by infection, decay, shooting, or predominant light and/or wind directions. Seismic trunk tomography also differentiates between decayed and healthy woods. PMID:17229759

  13. Efficiency of Pareto joint inversion of 2D geophysical data using global optimization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernik, Katarzyna; Bogacz, Adrian; Kozubal, Adam; Danek, Tomasz; Wojdyła, Marek

    2016-04-01

    Pareto joint inversion of two or more sets of data is a promising new tool of modern geophysical exploration. In the first stage of our investigation we created software enabling execution of forward solvers of two geophysical methods (2D magnetotelluric and gravity) as well as inversion with possibility of constraining solution with seismic data. In the algorithm solving MT forward solver Helmholtz's equations, finite element method and Dirichlet's boundary conditions were applied. Gravity forward solver was based on Talwani's algorithm. To limit dimensionality of solution space we decided to describe model as sets of polygons, using Sharp Boundary Interface (SBI) approach. The main inversion engine was created using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm adapted to handle two or more target functions and to prevent acceptance of solutions which are non - realistic or incompatible with Pareto scheme. Each inversion run generates single Pareto solution, which can be added to Pareto Front. The PSO inversion engine was parallelized using OpenMP standard, what enabled execution code for practically unlimited amount of threads at once. Thereby computing time of inversion process was significantly decreased. Furthermore, computing efficiency increases with number of PSO iterations. In this contribution we analyze the efficiency of created software solution taking under consideration details of chosen global optimization engine used as a main joint minimization engine. Additionally we study the scale of possible decrease of computational time caused by different methods of parallelization applied for both forward solvers and inversion algorithm. All tests were done for 2D magnetotelluric and gravity data based on real geological media. Obtained results show that even for relatively simple mid end computational infrastructure proposed solution of inversion problem can be applied in practice and used for real life problems of geophysical inversion and interpretation.

  14. Geophysical imaging of a kaolinite deposit at Sylvan, Manitoba, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Ian J.; Ristau, Johannes P.; Maris, Virginia G.; Hosain, Ifti

    1999-02-01

    A geophysical survey was performed at Sylvan, Manitoba, Canada (51°5'N, 97°22'W) to investigate a Lower Cretaceous kaolinite deposit. The deposit consists of zones of kaolinite, silica sand, and lignitic clay located in a series of channels formed during karsting of the underlying Palaeozoic bedrock and is covered by 3 to 5 m of glacial drift. The aim of the study was to identify cost-efficient electrical and electromagnetic (EM) geophysical methods for locating, mapping, and assessing this target. Methods applied included terrain conductivity (EM31), VLF-EM, time-domain electromagnetics (TEM), DC-resistivity, and shallow seismic refraction. The survey showed that EM methods offer a viable alternative to more expensive seismic reflection surveys in the investigation of small industrial mineral deposits. Comparison of the geophysical survey results with those of a drilling program indicated that VLF-EM and TEM were the best methods for delineating the kaolinite deposit. VLF-EM was the most cost-efficient method for delineating the kaolinite deposit over a ca. 10 ha area and for exploring for further deposits within several kilometers of the main site. Joint interpretation of the in-phase and quadrature response is required for increased reliability in identifying the major kaolinite-filled channels. The TEM method provided more detailed resolution of the deposit than VLF-EM and was the optimal method for assessing its thickness. However, TEM data acquisition is too slow and inefficient for reconnaissance mapping of 10 ha sites. EM31 surveying is useful for defining the palaeokarst surface and overburden thickness in areas surrounding the deposit but cannot be used reliably for mapping the kaolinite deposit itself. The combined geophysical survey results show the kaolinite deposit at Sylvan to be located in a channel which is 100 m wide and about 25 m deep. The deposit has a bulk electrical conductivity between 13 mS m -1 and 25 mS m -1 consistent with low cation

  15. Imaging of the temporomandibular joint: An update

    PubMed Central

    Bag, Asim K; Gaddikeri, Santhosh; Singhal, Aparna; Hardin, Simms; Tran, Benson D; Medina, Josue A; Curé, Joel K

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is continuously evolving with advancement of imaging technologies. Many different imaging modalities are currently used to evaluate the TMJ. Magnetic resonance imaging is commonly used for evaluation of the TMJ due to its superior contrast resolution and its ability to acquire dynamic imaging for demonstration of the functionality of the joint. Computed tomography and ultrasound imaging have specific indication in imaging of the TMJ. This article focuses on state of the art imaging of the temporomandibular joint. Relevant normal anatomy and biomechanics of movement of the TMJ are discussed for better understanding of many TMJ pathologies. Imaging of internal derangements is discussed in detail. Different arthropathies and common tumors are also discussed in this article. PMID:25170394

  16. Joint inversion : Exploring the different ways of coupling geophysical and groundwater data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steklova, Klara; Haber, Eldad

    2015-04-01

    given by, (bsig,bom,{y}) =&& frac 12 |de - Qe ŭ(bsig)|2Sigmae-1+ hf |df - Qf bom|2Sigmaf-1 +βeR(bsig) + βfR(bom) && + {y}top(bsig- p(bom)) + {{ρ}2}/|bsig - p(bom)) |2, where {y} is the Lagrange multiplier and ρ is a parameter that can be chosen somewhat arbitrarily. At each iteration L(bsig,bom,{y}) is minimized with respect to bsig or bom and {y} is updated. This method provides a huge computational advantage since at each iteration we solve only a subproblem with one data misfit term, regularization term, and coupling terms where one of the variables is fixed. However, all the involved terms need to be differentiable in order to proceed with a Gauss - Newton type minimization method. The second approach can be followed if the empirical relationship between bom and bsig is unknown. In this case, the unknown relationship is replaced by some structure similarity mapping, e.g. joint total variation (JTV), JTV(bsig,bom) = int √{|nabla bsig)|2 + |nabla bom)|2} ds. JTV is differential w.r.t both bsig and bom and has also advantage of being convex. The objective function (Eq.1) then contains additional JTV term instead of the constraint and can be minimized by block coordinate descent method. Both geophysical and groundwater models were developed in Matlab, including sensitivities of data w.r.t bsig and bom based on a discretized system of equations. The joint inversion outlined above was tested on the synthetic case of seawater intrusion and a solute tracer test with promising results.

  17. Escript: Open Source Environment For Solving Large-Scale Geophysical Joint Inversion Problems in Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Lutz; Altinay, Cihan; Fenwick, Joel; Smith, Troy

    2014-05-01

    The program package escript has been designed for solving mathematical modeling problems using python, see Gross et al. (2013). Its development and maintenance has been funded by the Australian Commonwealth to provide open source software infrastructure for the Australian Earth Science community (recent funding by the Australian Geophysical Observing System EIF (AGOS) and the AuScope Collaborative Research Infrastructure Scheme (CRIS)). The key concepts of escript are based on the terminology of spatial functions and partial differential equations (PDEs) - an approach providing abstraction from the underlying spatial discretization method (i.e. the finite element method (FEM)). This feature presents a programming environment to the user which is easy to use even for complex models. Due to the fact that implementations are independent from data structures simulations are easily portable across desktop computers and scalable compute clusters without modifications to the program code. escript has been successfully applied in a variety of applications including modeling mantel convection, melting processes, volcanic flow, earthquakes, faulting, multi-phase flow, block caving and mineralization (see Poulet et al. 2013). The recent escript release (see Gross et al. (2013)) provides an open framework for solving joint inversion problems for geophysical data sets (potential field, seismic and electro-magnetic). The strategy bases on the idea to formulate the inversion problem as an optimization problem with PDE constraints where the cost function is defined by the data defect and the regularization term for the rock properties, see Gross & Kemp (2013). This approach of first-optimize-then-discretize avoids the assemblage of the - in general- dense sensitivity matrix as used in conventional approaches where discrete programming techniques are applied to the discretized problem (first-discretize-then-optimize). In this paper we will discuss the mathematical framework for

  18. The impact of approximations and arbitrary choices on geophysical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, Andrew P.; Trampert, Jeannot

    2016-01-01

    Whenever a geophysical image is to be constructed, a variety of choices must be made. Some, such as those governing data selection and processing, or model parametrization, are somewhat arbitrary: there may be little reason to prefer one choice over another. Others, such as defining the theoretical framework within which the data are to be explained, may be more straightforward: typically, an `exact' theory exists, but various approximations may need to be adopted in order to make the imaging problem computationally tractable. Differences between any two images of the same system can be explained in terms of differences between these choices. Understanding the impact of each particular decision is essential if images are to be interpreted properly-but little progress has been made towards a quantitative treatment of this effect. In this paper, we consider a general linearized inverse problem, applicable to a wide range of imaging situations. We write down an expression for the difference between two images produced using similar inversion strategies, but where different choices have been made. This provides a framework within which inversion algorithms may be analysed, and allows us to consider how image effects may arise. In this paper, we take a general view, and do not specialize our discussion to any specific imaging problem or setup (beyond the restrictions implied by the use of linearized inversion techniques). In particular, we look at the concept of `hybrid inversion', in which highly accurate synthetic data (typically the result of an expensive numerical simulation) is combined with an inverse operator constructed based on theoretical approximations. It is generally supposed that this offers the benefits of using the more complete theory, without the full computational costs. We argue that the inverse operator is as important as the forward calculation in determining the accuracy of results. We illustrate this using a simple example, based on imaging the

  19. JOINT INVERSION OF GEOPHYSICAL DATA FOR SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND RESTORATION MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Work will be carried out by Principal Investigator (PI) P. A. Berge and co-PIs J. G. Berryman, J.J. Roberts, and M. J. Wilt. Propose to develop a code for joint inversion of seismic and electrical data, to improve underground imaging for site characterization and remediation moni...

  20. Knee joint replacement prosthesis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A prosthesis is a device designed to replace a missing part of the body, or to make a part of the body work better. The metal prosthetic device in knee joint replacement surgery replaces cartilage and bone which is damaged from disease or aging.

  1. 3-D object-oriented image analysis of geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadel, I.; Kerle, N.; van der Meijde, M.

    2014-07-01

    Geophysical data are the main source of information about the subsurface. Geophysical techniques are, however, highly non-unique in determining specific physical parameters and boundaries of subsurface objects. To obtain actual physical information, an inversion process is often applied, in which measurements at or above the Earth surface are inverted into a 2- or 3-D subsurface spatial distribution of the physical property. Interpreting these models into structural objects, related to physical processes, requires a priori knowledge and expert analysis which is susceptible to subjective choices and is therefore often non-repeatable. In this research, we implemented a recently introduced object-based approach to interpret the 3-D inversion results of a single geophysical technique using the available a priori information and the physical and geometrical characteristics of the interpreted objects. The introduced methodology is semi-automatic and repeatable, and allows the extraction of subsurface structures using 3-D object-oriented image analysis (3-D OOA) in an objective knowledge-based classification scheme. The approach allows for a semi-objective setting of thresholds that can be tested and, if necessary, changed in a very fast and efficient way. These changes require only changing the thresholds used in a so-called ruleset, which is composed of algorithms that extract objects from a 3-D data cube. The approach is tested on a synthetic model, which is based on a priori knowledge on objects present in the study area (Tanzania). Object characteristics and thresholds were well defined in a 3-D histogram of velocity versus depth, and objects were fully retrieved. The real model results showed how 3-D OOA can deal with realistic 3-D subsurface conditions in which the boundaries become fuzzy, the object extensions become unclear and the model characteristics vary with depth due to the different physical conditions. As expected, the 3-D histogram of the real data was

  2. Fusion between Satellite and Geophysical images in the study of Archaeological Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamitrou, A. A.; Tsokas, G. N.; Petrou, M.; Maggidis, C.

    2012-12-01

    In this work various image fusion techniques are used between one satellite (Quickbird) and one geophysical (electric resistivity) image to create various combinations with higher information content than the two original images independently. The resultant images provide more information about possible buried archaeological relics. The examined archaeological area is located in mainland Greece near the city of Boetia at the acropolis of Gla. The acropolis was built on a flat-topped bedrock outcrop at the north-eastern edge of the Kopais basin. When Kopais was filled with water, Glas was emerging as an island. At the end of 14th century the two palaces of Thebes and Orchomenos jointly utilized a large scale engineering project in order to transform the Kopais basin into a fertile plain. They used the acropolis to monitor the project, and as a warehouse to storage the harvest. To examine the Acropolis for potential archaeological remnants we use one Quickbird satellite image that covers the surrounding area of Gla. The satellite image includes one panchromatic (8532x8528 pixels) and one multispectral (2133x2132 pixels) image, collected on 30th of August 2011, covering an area of 20 square kilometers. On the other hand, geophysical measurements were performed using the electric resistivity method to the south west part of the Acropolis. To combine these images we investigate mean-value fusion, wavelets fusion, and curvelet fusion. In the cases of wavelet and curvelet fusion we apply as the fusion criterion the maximum frequency rule. Furthermore, the two original images, and excavations near the area suggest that the dominant orientations of the buried features are north-south and east-west. Therefore, in curvelet fusion method, in curvelet domain we enhance the image details along these specific orientations, additionally to the fusion. The resultant fused images succeed to map linear and rectangular features that were not easily visible in the original images

  3. Final Report DOE Contract No. DE-FG36-04G014294 ICEKAP 2004: A Collaborative Joint Geophysical Imaging Project at Krafla and IDDP P.E. Malin, S.A. Onacha, E. Shalev Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences Nicholas School of the Environment Duke University Durham, NC 27708

    SciTech Connect

    Malin, Peter E.; Shalev, Eylon; Onacha, Stepthen A.

    2006-12-15

    In this final report, we discuss both theoretical and applied research resulting from our DOE project, ICEKAP 2004: A Collaborative Joint Geophysical Imaging Project at Krafla and IDDP. The abstract below begins with a general discussion of the problem we addressed: the location and characterization of “blind” geothermal resources using microearthquake and magnetotelluric measurements. The abstract then describes the scientific results and their application to the Krafla geothermal area in Iceland. The text following this abstract presents the full discussion of this work, in the form of the PhD thesis of Stephen A. Onacha. The work presented here was awarded the “Best Geophysics Paper” at the 2005 Geothermal Resources Council meeting, Reno. This study presents the modeling of buried fault zones using microearthquake and electrical resistivity data based on the assumptions that fluid-filled fractures cause electrical and seismic anisotropy and polarization. In this study, joint imaging of electrical and seismic data is used to characterize the fracture porosity of the fracture zones. P-wave velocity models are generated from resistivity data and used in locating microearthquakes. Fracture porosity controls fluid circulation in the hydrothermal systems and the intersections of fracture zones close to the heat source form important upwelling zones for hydrothermal fluids. High fracture porosity sites occur along fault terminations, fault-intersection areas and fault traces. Hydrothermal fault zone imaging using resistivity and microearthquake data combines high-resolution multi-station seismic and electromagnetic data to locate rock fractures and the likely presence fluids in high temperature hydrothermal systems. The depths and locations of structural features and fracture porosity common in both the MT and MEQ data is incorporated into a joint imaging scheme to constrain resistivity, seismic velocities, and locations of fracture systems. The imaging of the

  4. Imaging Approach to Temporomandibular Joint Disorders.

    PubMed

    Morales, H; Cornelius, R

    2016-03-01

    Internal derangement is the most common temporomandibular joint disorder. Degenerative osteoarthritis and trauma are next in frequency. Less common pathology includes rheumatoid arthritis, synovial chondromatosis, calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate deposition disease, pigmented villonodular synovitis, tumors, infection, and osteonecrosis. We provide a systematic approach to facilitate interpretation based on major anatomic structures: disc-attachments, joint space, condyle, and lateral pterygoid muscle. Relevant graphic anatomy and state of the art imaging are discussed in correlation with current clinical and therapeutic highlights of pathologic entities affecting the joint. PMID:26374243

  5. Final Report U.S. Department of Energy Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data for Site Characterization and Restoration Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P.A.; Berryman, J.G.; Bertete-Aguirre, H.; Bonner, B.P.; Roberts, J.J.; Wildenschild, D.

    2000-07-31

    The purpose of this project was to conduct basic research leading to significant improvements in the state-of-the-art of geophysical imaging of the shallow subsurface. Geophysical techniques are commonly used for underground imaging for site characterization and restoration monitoring. in order to improve subsurface imaging, the objective was to develop improved methods for interpreting geophysical data collected in the field, by developing better methods for relating measured geophysical properties, such as seismic velocity and electrical conductivity, to hydrogeology parameters of interest such as porosity, saturation, and soil composition. They met the objectives using an approach that combined laboratory experiments, comparison to available field data, rock physics theories, and modeling, to find relationships between geophysical measurements, hydrogeological parameters and soil composition. The primary accomplishments of this project in the last year (FY99) were that they completed the laboratory measurements of ultrasonic velocities in soils at low pressures and the measurements of complex electrical conductivity in those same soils; they used x-ray computed microtomography to image the microstructure of several soil samples; they used rock physics theories and modeling to relate the geophysical measurements to the microstructure and hydrological properties; they developed a theoretical technique for relating compressional and shear wave velocities to fluid distribution in porous media; they showed how electrical conductivity is related to clay content and microstructure; they developed an inversion algorithm for inferring soil composition given compressional and shear wave velocities and tested the algorithm on synthetic field seismic data; they completed two patent applications; they wrote three journal papers; and they made 15 presentations of their results at eight scientific meetings.

  6. Geophysical data fusion for subsurface imaging. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This report contains the results of a three year, three-phase project whose long-range goal has been to create a means for the more detailed and accurate definition of the near-surface (0--300 ft) geology beneath a site that had been subjected to environmental pollution. The two major areas of research and development have been: improved geophysical field data acquisition techniques; and analytical tools for providing the total integration (fusion) of all site data. The long-range goal of this project has been to mathematically, integrate the geophysical data that could be derived from multiple sensors with site geologic information and any other type of available site data, to provide a detailed characterization of thin clay layers and geological discontinuities at hazardous waste sites.

  7. Geophysical Imaging of Root Architecture and Root-soil Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Dafflon, B.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Roots play a critical role in controlling water and nutrient uptake, soil biogeochemical processes, as well as the physical anchorage for plants. While important processes, such as root hydraulic redistribution for optimal growth and survival have been recognized, representation of roots in climate models, e.g. its carbon storage, carbon resilience, root biomass, and role in regulating water and carbon fluxes across the rhizosphere and atmosphere interface is still challenging. Such a challenge is exacerbated because of the large variations of root architecture and function across species and locations due to both genetic and environmental controls and the lack of methods for quantifying root mass, distribution, dynamics and interaction with soils at field scales. The scale, complexity and the dynamic nature of plant roots call for minimally invasive methods capable of providing quantitative estimation of root architecture, dynamics over time and interactions with the soils. We present a study on root architecture and root-soil interactions using geophysical methods. Parameters and processes of interests include (1) moisture dynamics around root zone and its interaction with plant transpiration and environmental controls and (2) estimation of root structure and properties based on geophysical signals. Both pot and field scale studies were conducted. The pot scale experiments were conducted under controlled conditions and were monitored with cross-well electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), TDR moisture sensors and temperature probes. Pots with and without a tree were compared and the moisture conditions were controlled via a self regulated pumping system. Geophysical monitoring revealed interactions between roots and soils under dynamic soil moisture conditions and the role of roots in regulating the response of the soil system to changes of environmental conditions, e.g. drought and precipitation events. Field scale studies were conducted on natural trees using

  8. Radar image interpretation techniques applied to sea ice geophysical problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carsey, F. D.

    1983-01-01

    The geophysical science problems in the sea ice area which at present concern understanding the ice budget, where ice is formed, how thick it grows and where it melts, and the processes which control the interaction of air-sea and ice at the ice margins is discussed. The science problems relate to basic questions of sea ice: how much is there, thickness, drift rate, production rate, determination of the morphology of the ice margin, storms feeling for the ice, storms and influence at the margin to alter the pack, and ocean response to a storm at the margin. Some of these questions are descriptive and some require complex modeling of interactions between the ice, the ocean, the atmosphere and the radiation fields. All involve measurements of the character of the ice pack, and SAR plays a significant role in the measurements.

  9. Joint geophysical investigation of a small scale magnetic anomaly near Gotha, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queitsch, Matthias; Schiffler, Markus; Goepel, Andreas; Stolz, Ronny; Guenther, Thomas; Malz, Alexander; Meyer, Matthias; Meyer, Hans-Georg; Kukowski, Nina

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the multidisciplinary project INFLUINS (INtegrated FLUid Dynamics IN Sedimentary Basins) several airborne surveys using a full tensor magnetic gradiometer (FTMG) system were conducted in and around the Thuringian basin (central Germany). These sensors are based on highly sensitive superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) with a planar-type gradiometer setup. One of the main goals was to map magnetic anomalies along major fault zones in this sedimentary basin. In most survey areas low signal amplitudes were observed caused by very low magnetization of subsurface rocks. Due to the high lateral resolution of a magnetic gradiometer system and a flight line spacing of only 50m, however, we were able to detect even small magnetic lineaments. Especially close to Gotha a NW-SE striking strong magnetic anomaly with a length of 1.5 km was detected, which cannot be explained by the structure of the Eichenberg-Gotha-Saalfeld (EGS) fault zone and the rock-physical properties (low susceptibilities). Therefore, we hypothesize that the source of the anomaly must be related to an anomalous magnetization in the fault plane. To test this hypothesis, here we focus on the results of the 3D inversion of the airborne magnetic data set and compare them with existing structural geological models. In addition, we conducted several ground based measurements such as electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and frequency domain electromagnetics (FDEM) to locate the fault. Especially, the geoelectrical measurements were able to image the fault zone. The result of the 2D electrical resistivity tomography shows a lower resistivity in the fault zone. Joint interpretation of airborne magnetics, geoelectrical and geological information let us propose that the source of the magnetization may be a fluid-flow induced impregnation with iron-oxide bearing minerals in the vicinity of the EGS fault plane.

  10. River embankment characterization: The joint use of geophysical and geotechnical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, Maria Teresa; Boaga, Jacopo; Bersan, Silvia; Cassiani, Giorgio; Cola, Simonetta; Deiana, Rita; Simonini, Paolo; Patti, Salvatore

    2014-11-01

    Recent flood events in Northern Italy (particularly in the Veneto Region) have brought river embankments into the focus of public attention. Many of these embankments are more than 100 years old and have been repeatedly repaired, so that detailed information on their current structure is generally missing. The monitoring of these structures is currently based, for the most part, on visual inspection and localized measurements of the embankment material parameters. However, this monitoring is generally insufficient to ensure an adequate safety level against floods. For these reasons there is an increasing demand for fast and accurate investigation methods, such as geophysical techniques. These techniques can provide detailed information on the subsurface structures, are non-invasive, cost-effective, and faster than traditional methods. However, they need verification in order to provide reliable results, particularly in complex and reworked man-made structures such as embankments. In this paper we present a case study in which three different geophysical techniques have been applied: electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), frequency domain electromagnetic induction (FDEM) and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR). Two test sites have been selected, both located in the Province of Venice (NE Italy) where the Tagliamento River has large embankments. The results obtained with these techniques have been calibrated against evidence resolving from geotechnical investigations. The pros and cons of each technique, as well as their relative merit at identifying the specific features of the embankments in this area, are highlighted. The results demonstrate that geophysical techniques can provide very valuable information for embankment characterization, provided that the data interpretation is constrained via direct evidence, albeit limited in space.

  11. Constraining 3D Process Sedimentological Models to Geophysical Data Using Image Quilting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmasebi, P.; Da Pra, A.; Pontiggia, M.; Caers, J.

    2014-12-01

    3D process geological models, whether for carbonate or sedimentological systems, have been proposed for modeling realistic subsurface heterogeneity. The problem with such forward process models is that they are not constrained to any subsurface data whether to wells or geophysical surveys. We propose a new method for realistic geological modeling of complex heterogeneity by hybridizing 3D process modeling of geological deposition with conditioning by means of a novel multiple-point geostatistics (MPS) technique termed image quilting (IQ). Image quilting is a pattern-based techniques that stiches together patterns extracted from training images to generate stochastic realizations that look like the training image. In this paper, we illustrate how 3D process model realizations can be used as training images in image quilting. To constrain the realization to seismic data we first interpret each facies in the geophysical data. These interpretation, while overly smooth and not reflecting finer scale variation are used as auxiliary variables in the generation of the image quilting realizations. To condition to well data, we first perform a kriging of the well data to generate a kriging map and kriging variance. The kriging map is used as additional auxiliary variable while the kriging variance is used as a weight given to the kriging derived auxiliary variable. We present an application to a giant offshore reservoir. Starting from seismic advanced attribute analysis and sedimentological interpretation, we build the 3D sedimentological process based model and use it as non-stationary training image for conditional image quilting.

  12. Joint Image Clustering and Labeling by Matrix Factorization.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seunghoon; Choi, Jonghyun; Feyereisl, Jan; Han, Bohyung; Davis, Larry S

    2016-07-01

    We propose a novel algorithm to cluster and annotate a set of input images jointly, where the images are clustered into several discriminative groups and each group is identified with representative labels automatically. For these purposes, each input image is first represented by a distribution of candidate labels based on its similarity to images in a labeled reference image database. A set of these label-based representations are then refined collectively through a non-negative matrix factorization with sparsity and orthogonality constraints; the refined representations are employed to cluster and annotate the input images jointly. The proposed approach demonstrates performance improvements in image clustering over existing techniques, and illustrates competitive image labeling accuracy in both quantitative and qualitative evaluation. In addition, we extend our joint clustering and labeling framework to solving the weakly-supervised image classification problem and obtain promising results. PMID:26452250

  13. A Resolution Analysis of Two Geophysical Imaging Methods For Characterizing and Monitoring Hydrologic Conditions in the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Alumbaugh, D.; LaBreque, D.; Brainard, J.; Hammond, G.

    2006-08-02

    The objective of this research project was to analyze the resolution of two geophysical imaging techniques: electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and cross-borehole ground penetrating radar (XBGPR) for monitoring subsurface flow and transport processes within the vadose zone. This was accomplished through a coupled approach involving very fine-scale unsaturated flow forward modeling, conversion of the resultant flow and solute fields to geophysical property models, forward geophysical modeling using the property model obtained from the last step to obtain synthetic geophysical data, and finally inversion of this synthetic data. These geophysical property models were then compared to those derived from the conversion of the hydrologic forward modeling to provide an understanding of the resolution and limitations of the geophysical techniques.

  14. On the joint inversion of geophysical data for models of the coupled core-mantle system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1991-01-01

    Joint inversion of magnetic, earth rotation, geoid, and seismic data for a unified model of the coupled core-mantle system is proposed and shown to be possible. A sample objective function is offered and simplified by targeting results from independent inversions and summary travel time residuals instead of original observations. These data are parameterized in terms of a very simple, closed model of the topographically coupled core-mantle system. Minimization of the simplified objective function leads to a nonlinear inverse problem; an iterative method for solution is presented. Parameterization and method are emphasized; numerical results are not presented.

  15. Evaluation of geophysical logs, Phase II, at Willow Grove Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conger, Randall W.

    1999-01-01

    Between March and April 1998, the U.S. Navy contracted Tetra Tech NUS Inc., to drill two monitor wells in the Stockton Formation at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base, Horsham Township, Montgomery County, Pa. The wells MG-1634 and MG-1635 were installed to monitor water levels and sample contaminants in the shallow, intermediate, and deep water-producing zones of the fractured bedrock. Chemical analyses of the samples will help determine the horizontal and vertical distribution of any contaminated ground water migrating from known contaminant sources. Wells were drilled near the Fire Training Area (Site 5). Depths of all boreholes range from 69 to 149 feet below land surface. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted borehole geophysical logging and video surveys to identify water-producing zones in newly drilled monitor wells MG-1634 and MG-1635 and in wells MG-1675 and MG-1676. The logging was conducted from March 5, 1998, to April 16, 1998. This work is a continuation of the Phase I work. Caliper logs and video surveys were used to locate fractures; inflections on fluid-temperature and fluid-resistivity logs were used to locate possible water-producing fractures. Heatpulse-flowmeter measurements were used to verify the locations of water-producing or water-receiving zones and to measure rates of flow between water-bearing fractures. Single-point-resistance and natural-gamma logs provided information on stratigraphy. After interpretation of geophysical logs, video surveys, and driller's notes, wells MG-1634 and MG-1635 were screened such that water-levels fluctuations could be monitored and discrete water samples collected from one or more water-producing zones in each borehole.

  16. Case studies of geophysical imaging for road foundation design on soft soils and embankment risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteley, Robert J.; Kelly, Richard B.; Stewart, Simon B.

    2015-12-01

    Population growth along the coast of eastern Australia has increased demand for new and upgraded transport infrastructure within intervening coastal floodplains and steeper hinterland areas. This has created additional challenges for road foundation design. The floodplain areas in this region are underlain by considerable thicknesses of recently deposited alluvial and clayey marine sediments. If characterisation of these deposits is inadequate they can increase road construction costs and affect long-term road stability and serviceability. Case studies from a major coastal highway upgrade demonstrate how combining surface wave seismic and electrical geophysical imaging with conventional geotechnical testing enhances characterisation of these very soft and soft soils. The geophysical results also provide initial foundation design parameters such as void ratio and pre-consolidation pressure. A further significant risk issue for roads is potential embankment instability. This can occur during new road construction or when upgrades of existing embankments are required. Assessing the causes of instability of existing steeper embankments with drilling and probing is often difficult and costly due to access and safety problems. In these situations combinations of electrical, ground penetrating radar and P-wave seismic imaging technologies can rapidly provide information on the likely conditions below both the roadway and embankment. Case studies show the application of these technologies on two unstable road embankments. It is concluded that the application of both geophysical imaging and geotechnical testing is a cost-effective enhancement for site characterisation of soft soils and for risk assessment of potentially unstable embankments. This approach overcomes many of the current limitations of conventional methods of site investigation that provide point location data only. The incorporation of geophysics into a well crafted site investigation allows concentration on

  17. Joint model of motion and anatomy for PET image reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao Feng; Pan Tinsu; Clark, John W. Jr.; Mawlawi, Osama

    2007-12-15

    Anatomy-based positron emission tomography (PET) image enhancement techniques have been shown to have the potential for improving PET image quality. However, these techniques assume an accurate alignment between the anatomical and the functional images, which is not always valid when imaging the chest due to respiratory motion. In this article, we present a joint model of both motion and anatomical information by integrating a motion-incorporated PET imaging system model with an anatomy-based maximum a posteriori image reconstruction algorithm. The mismatched anatomical information due to motion can thus be effectively utilized through this joint model. A computer simulation and a phantom study were conducted to assess the efficacy of the joint model, whereby motion and anatomical information were either modeled separately or combined. The reconstructed images in each case were compared to corresponding reference images obtained using a quadratic image prior based maximum a posteriori reconstruction algorithm for quantitative accuracy. Results of these studies indicated that while modeling anatomical information or motion alone improved the PET image quantitation accuracy, a larger improvement in accuracy was achieved when using the joint model. In the computer simulation study and using similar image noise levels, the improvement in quantitation accuracy compared to the reference images was 5.3% and 19.8% when using anatomical or motion information alone, respectively, and 35.5% when using the joint model. In the phantom study, these results were 5.6%, 5.8%, and 19.8%, respectively. These results suggest that motion compensation is important in order to effectively utilize anatomical information in chest imaging using PET. The joint motion-anatomy model presented in this paper provides a promising solution to this problem.

  18. Joint Geophysical Assessments of Geothermal Potential from a Deep Borehole in the Canadian Shield Rocks of NE Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, J.; Schmitt, D. R.; Kueck, J.; Moeck, I. S.

    2012-12-01

    Part of the feasibility study for geothermal development in Northern Alberta consists of investigating the presence of subsurface fluid pathways in the crystalline basement rocks. The deepest borehole drilled in Northeastern Alberta has a depth of 2350 m and offers substantial depth coverage to study the basement rocks. Due to the limited cores available for this deep borehole, a comprehensive suite of geophysical logs and borehole seismic methods are used to provide subsurface characterization of the basement in addition to the existing surface seismic reflection data. Interpretation of the geophysical logs indicate potential fracture zones at different depths that could serve as zones with enhanced fluid potential - a necessary component for any geothermal systems to be viable. Fractures within the subsurface tend to be aligned by the deviatoric stress in the subsurface and their orientations can be imaged using the Formation MicroImager (FMI) log. Two sets of vertical seismic profiles (VSP) were acquired in the deep borehole in July 2011. First, a high resolution zero-offset VSP was acquired to measure the seismic responses at the borehole. Upgoing tube waves can be identified and attributed to fracture zones interpreted from the geophysical logs. Since VSP data contains higher frequency content, the final corridor stack from the zero-offset VSP offers greater resolution in correlating seismic reflections with the primary reflectors and multiples interpreted from the surface seismic reflection data. The second set of VSP data is a multi-azimuth, multi-depth walk-away VSP acquired using three-component receivers placed at depths of 800 and 1780 m. The degree of seismic anisotropy in the crystalline basement can be revealed by analyzing the first arrivals at different geophone depths. Using an assumption that the presence of fractures causes P-wave reflection anisotropy, interpretation from the walk-away VSP can be used as a method for gross fracture detection

  19. Sentinel-1 TOPS interferometry for geophysical applications: Dyke intrusion imaged during 2014 Pico do Fogo eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Pablo J.; Marinkovic, Petar; Samsonov, Sergey; Hooper, Andrew; Larsen, Yngvar; Wright, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Since the inception of the European Space Agency ERS Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mission in the 1990s, radar interferometry has become an indispensable geophysical tool for measuring surface ground deformation over wide areas with high precision. Ground deformation is a key observation to study and monitoring multiple applications in geophysics such as earthquake and tectonics, volcano, land subsidence and landslides study and monitoring. Therefore, the frequent acquisition of SAR data to compute differential interferograms is a long standing goal in observational geodesy. A new mission designed by ESA, the Sentinel-1 mission would provide routinely frequent acquisitions (every 12 days) over larger areas (250-350 km). In April 2014, the first of expected four successive and overlapping similar spacecrafts was launched to start a total 20-year continuous operational mission. Terrain observation by progressive scans (TOPS) is a new radar acquisition mode, which provides with high quality radiometric radar amplitude images. TOPS mode allows us to acquire radar data over much wider areas than previous classical stripmap mode, and it is the default mode of acquisition of ESA Sentinel-1 satellite. However, due to a variable steering (ground scanning) of the antenna pattern, the corregistration of TOPSAR images result in a much higher demanding processing step. The higher precision azimuth SAR image corregistration and variable line-of-sight along azimuth direction intersect with the fact that image disparities on the order to a thousand of a pixel size also characterizes multiple geophysical phenomena (such as landslide dynamics, coseismic earthquake, fault creep or volcanic intrusions). In this paper, we present the first results using Sentinel-1 TOPS interferometry to measure an important deformation event. We successfully compute Sentinel-1 TOPS-InSAR and tested the effect of variable line-of-sight in azimuth, during the estimation of geophysical parameters. We

  20. Looking into the Near Surface with More Data and Multiple Joint Imaging Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.

    2015-12-01

    While exploration geophysicists are making tremendous efforts to image the deep subsurface for hydrocarbon resources, the complex near surface structures often impose significant challenges. Unlike the subsurface, the near surface structures vary from region to region. Thus, it is difficult to develop any benchmark model that represents common issues worldwide. During past 20 years, near surface imaging technologies have been advanced from refraction traveltime analysis and inversion to waveform inversion. Immediate benefit is to resolve any complex velocity structure associated with low velocity hidden layers if such waveform inversion is properly handled. However, inverting seismic waveform often suffers from cycle-skipping due to poor starting model or missing of low frequency data. Jointly inverting traveltime, waveform envelope and waveform data seems stabilizing the solutions. With more data utilized for the near surface imaging, we are also able to infer anisotropic parameters, attenuation factors, density, and both Vp and Vs. Since the cross-gradient approach was introduced in 2005, the simultaneous inversion of multiple types of geophysical data has also been applied in the near surface imaging. That includes joint seismic, gravity and EM inversion for mapping seismic velocity, density, and resistivity into a near surface structure with consistent geology. I demonstrate the changes of the near surface structural images due to the progress of the imaging technology development and the transition to much more data included with five real data examples.

  1. Early magnetic resonance imaging control after temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis

    PubMed Central

    Ângelo, David Faustino; Sousa, Rita; Pinto, Isabel; Sanz, David; Gil, F. Monje; Salvado, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) lysis and lavage arthrocentesis with viscosupplementation are an effective treatment for acute disc displacement (DD) without reduction. Clinical success seems to be related to multiple factors despite the lack of understanding of its mechanisms. The authors present a case report of 17-year-old women with acute open mouth limitation (12 mm), right TMJ pain-8/10 visual analog scale, right deviation when opening her mouth. The clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis was acute DD without reduction of right TMJ. Right TMJ arthrocentesis was purposed to the patient with lysis, lavage, and viscosupplementation of the upper joint space. After 5 days, a new MRI was performed to confirm upper joint space distension and disc position. Clinical improvement was obtained 5 days and 1 month after arthrocentesis. Upper joint space increased 6 mm and the disc remained displaced. We report the first early TMJ MRI image postoperative, with measurable upper joint space. PMID:26981483

  2. Early magnetic resonance imaging control after temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis.

    PubMed

    Ângelo, David Faustino; Sousa, Rita; Pinto, Isabel; Sanz, David; Gil, F Monje; Salvado, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) lysis and lavage arthrocentesis with viscosupplementation are an effective treatment for acute disc displacement (DD) without reduction. Clinical success seems to be related to multiple factors despite the lack of understanding of its mechanisms. The authors present a case report of 17-year-old women with acute open mouth limitation (12 mm), right TMJ pain-8/10 visual analog scale, right deviation when opening her mouth. The clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis was acute DD without reduction of right TMJ. Right TMJ arthrocentesis was purposed to the patient with lysis, lavage, and viscosupplementation of the upper joint space. After 5 days, a new MRI was performed to confirm upper joint space distension and disc position. Clinical improvement was obtained 5 days and 1 month after arthrocentesis. Upper joint space increased 6 mm and the disc remained displaced. We report the first early TMJ MRI image postoperative, with measurable upper joint space. PMID:26981483

  3. An overview of joint inversion in earthquake source imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koketsu, Kazuki

    2016-06-01

    We reviewed joint inversion studies of the rupture processes of significant earthquakes, using the definition of a joint inversion in earthquake source imaging as a source inversion of multiple kinds of datasets (waveform, geodetic, or tsunami). Yoshida and Koketsu (Geophys J Int 103:355-362, 1990), and Wald and Heaton (Bull Seismol Soc Am 84:668-691, 1994) independently initiated joint inversion methods, finding that joint inversion provides more reliable rupture process models than single-dataset inversion, leading to an increase of joint inversion studies. A list of these studies was made using the finite-source rupture model database (Mai and Thingbaijam in Seismol Res Lett 85:1348-1357, 2014). Outstanding issues regarding joint inversion were also discussed.

  4. Imaging the hip joint in osteoarthritis: A place for ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Sudula, S N

    2016-05-01

    Osteoarthritis has traditionally been imaged with conventional radiographs; this has been regarded as the reference technique in osteoarthritis for a long time. However, in recent years, innovative imaging techniques such as ultrasonography have been used to obtain a better understanding of this disease. This is mainly due to tremendous technical advances and progressive developments of ultrasound equipment occurring over the past decade. Ultrasonography has been demonstrated to be a valuable imaging technique in the diagnosis and management of osteoarthritis of the hip joint. Application of this imaging methodology for osteoarthritis has improved the understanding of the disease process and may aid in the assessment of the efficacy of future therapies. The execution of ultrasound-guided procedures with safety and reliability has a relevant significance in patient management of osteoarthritis of the hip joint. This paper reviews the use of ultrasound as an imaging technique for the evaluation and treatment of osteoarthritis hip joint. PMID:27482280

  5. Quasi-3D Resistivity Imaging - Results from Geophysical Mapping and Forward Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwindt, D.; Kneisel, C.

    2009-04-01

    2D resistivity tomography has proven to be a reliable tool in detecting, characterizing and mapping of permafrost, especially in joint application with other geophysical methods, e.g. seismic refraction. For many permafrost related problems a 3D image of the subsurface is of interest. Possibilities of quasi-3D imaging by collating several 2D ERT files into one quasi-3D file were tested. Data acquisition took place on a vegetated scree slope with isolated permafrost lenses in the Bever Valley, Swiss Alps. 21 2D-electrical arrays were applied with an electrode spacing of 5 m and a parallel spacing of 20 and 30 m using the Wenner electrode configuration. Refraction seismic was applied parallel to every second ERT array, with a geophone spacing of 5 m for validation. Results of quasi-3D imaging indicate that the most important factors influencing data quality are parallel spacing and number of right-angled crossing profiles. While the quasi-3D images generated of 2D-files with a parallel spacing of 20 m provide an interpretable image, 30 m spacing results in a blurred illustration of resistivity structures. To test the influence of crossing profiles quasi-3D images were inverted using only parallel measured data files as well as images containing right-angled crossing transects. Application of crossing profiles is of great importance, because the number of model blocks with interpolated resistivity values between parallel profiles is minimized. In case of two adjacent high resistivity anomalies a quasi-3D image consisting of parallel measured transects only illustrates one anomaly. A crossing profile provides information to differentiate the anomalies. Forward modeling was used to prove these assumptions and to improve the application of 2D ERT with regard to quasi-3D imaging. Main focus was on electrode and parallel spacing, the influence of crossing transects and the applicability of different array types. A number of 2D ERT profiles were generated, using the forward

  6. Diffuse optical imaging of brain activation to joint attention experience.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Banghe; Yadav, Nitin; Rey, Gustavo; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2009-08-24

    In the early development of social cognition and language, infants tend to participate in face-to-face interactions engaging in joint attention exchanges. Joint attention is vital to social competence at all ages, lacking which is a primary feature to distinguish autistic from non-autistic population. In this study, diffuse optical imaging is used for the first time to investigate the joint attention experience in normal adults. Imaging studies were performed in the frontal regions of the brain (BA9 and BA10) in order to study the differences in the brain activation in response to video clips corresponding to joint attention based skills. The frontal regions of the brain were non-invasively imaged using a novel optical cap coupled to a frequency-domain optical imaging system. The statistical analysis from 11 normal adult subjects, with three repetitions from each subject, indicated that the averaged changes in the cerebral blood oxygenation levels were different under the joint and non-joint attention based stimulus. The preliminary studies demonstrate the feasibility of implementing diffuse optical imaging towards autism-related research to study the brain activation in response to socio-communication skills. PMID:19447278

  7. Identification of inflammation sites in arthritic joints using hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluchowski, Lukasz A.; Milanic, Matija; Bjorgan, Asgeir; Grandaunet, Berit; Dhainaut, Alvilde; Hoff, Mari; Randeberg, Lise L.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory arthritic diseases have prevalence between 2 and 3% and may lead to joint destruction and deformation resulting in a loss of function. Patient's quality of life is often severely affected as the disease attacks hands and finger joints. Pathology involved in arthritis includes angiogenesis, hyper-vascularization, hyper-metabolism and relative hypoxia. We have employed hyperspectral imaging to study the hemodynamics of affected- and non-affected joints and tissue. Two hyperspectral, push-broom cameras were used (VNIR-1600, SWIR-320i, Norsk Elektro Optikk AS, Norway). Optical spectra (400nm - 1700nm) of high spectral resolution were collected from 15 patients with visible symptoms of arthritic rheumatic diseases in at least one joint. The control group consisted of 10 healthy individuals. Concentrations of dominant chromophores were calculated based on analytical calculations of light transport in tissue. Image processing was used to analyze hyperspectral data and retrieve information, e.g. blood concentration and tissue oxygenation maps. The obtained results indicate that hyperspectral imaging can be used to quantify changes within affected joints and surrounding tissue. Further improvement of this method will have positive impact on diagnosis of arthritic joints at an early stage. Moreover it will enable development of fast, noninvasive and noncontact diagnostic tool of arthritic joints

  8. A robust method for estimating the multifractal wavelet spectrum in geophysical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolis, Orietta; Porro, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    The description of natural phenomena by an analysis of the statistical scaling laws is always a popular topic. Many studies aim to identify the fractal feature by estimating the self-similar parameter H, considered constant at different scales of observation. However, most real world data exhibit a multifractal structure, that is, the self-similarity parameter varies erratically with time. The multifractal spectrum provide an efficient tool for characterizing the scaling and singularity structures in signals and images, proving useful in numerous applications such as fluid dynamics, internet network traffic, finance, image analysis, texture synthesis, meteorology, and geophysics. In recent years, the multifractal formalism has been implemented with wavelets. The advantages of using the wavelet-based multifractal spectrum are: the availability of fast algorithms for wavelet transform, the locality of wavelet representations in both time and scale, and intrinsic dyadic self-similarity of basis functions. In this work we propose a robust Wavelet-based Multifractal Spectrum Estimator for the analysis of geophysical signals and satellite images. Finally, a simulation study and examples are considered to test the performances of the estimator.

  9. Digital image processing applied to analysis of geophysical and geochemical data for southern Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinness, E. A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Leff, C. E.; Edwards, M. H.; Bindschadler, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    Digital image-processing techniques have been used to analyze a variety of geophysical and geochemical map data covering southern Missouri, a region with important basement and strata-bound mineral deposits. Gravity and magnetic anomaly patterns, which have been reformatted to image displays, indicate a deep crustal structure cutting northwest-southeast through southern Missouri. In addition, geologic map data, topography, and Landsat multispectral scanner images have been used as base maps for the digital overlay of aerial gamma-ray and stream sediment chemical data for the 1 x 2-deg Rolla quadrangle. Results indicate enrichment of a variety of elements within the clay-rich alluvium covering many of the interfluvial plains, as well as a complicated pattern of enrichment for the sedimentary units close to the Precambrian rhyolites and granites of the St. Francois Mountains.

  10. Developing Training Image-Based Priors for Inversion of Subsurface Geophysical and Flow Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caers, J.

    2014-12-01

    Forecasting in subsurface formations, whether for groundwater, storage or oil & gas production, can rely on a wealth of geological information. Currently, most of this information remains underused in both the theory and practice of forecasting based on inverse models which heavily relies on spatial covariances and multi-Gaussian theory. By means of real field studies, I will provide an outline of how such geological information can be accounted through the construction and validation of a large set of training images and the generation of model realizations with MPS (multiple-point geostatistics). Often most critical in solving such inverse problems is the development of prior models that are later used for posterior sampling or stochastic search. I propose therefore a two-stage approach where the first stage consists of a validation of the training image-based prior with the geophysical and flow data. This stage will require only the generation of a few (100s) geological models and the forward modeling of the data response on these models. For geophysical data, the validation consists of comparing histograms of multi-scale wavelet transforms between the forward models and the field data. For flow data, the validation is based on a reduction of dimensionality of the forward response and the data using multi-dimensional scaling. The outcome of this validation is an estimate of the prior probability assigned to each training image, with several training images getting assigned zero probability (incompatible with field data). These prior probabilities are used in the second stage to actually invert for the data using stochastic search. In such stochastic search, I avoid parameterizing the model space and present methods that efficiently perform a direct search in the space of the validated training image-based prior model realizations.

  11. Joint Modeling of Imaging and Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Batmanghelich, Nematollah K.; Dalca, Adrian V.; Sabuncu, Mert R.; Golland, Polina

    2014-01-01

    We propose a unified Bayesian framework for detecting genetic variants associated with a disease while exploiting image-based features as an intermediate phenotype. Traditionally, imaging genetics methods comprise two separate steps. First, image features are selected based on their relevance to the disease phenotype. Second, a set of genetic variants are identified to explain the selected features. In contrast, our method performs these tasks simultaneously to ultimately assign probabilistic measures of relevance to both genetic and imaging markers. We derive an efficient approximate inference algorithm that handles high dimensionality of imaging genetic data. We evaluate the algorithm on synthetic data and show that it outperforms traditional models. We also illustrate the application of the method on ADNI data. PMID:24684016

  12. A resolution analysis of two geophysical imaging methods for characterizing and monitoring hydrologic conditions in the Vadose zone.

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, James Robert; Hammond, Gary.; Alumbaugh, David L.; La Brecque, D.J.

    2007-06-01

    This research project analyzed the resolution of two geophysical imaging techniques, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and cross-borehole ground penetrating radar (XBGPR), for monitoring subsurface flow and transport processes within the vadose zone. The study was based on petrophysical conversion of moisture contents and solute distributions obtained from unsaturated flow forward modeling. This modeling incorporated boundary conditions from a potable water and a salt tracer infiltration experiment performed at the Sandia-Tech Vadose Zone (STVZ) facility, and high-resolution spatial grids (6.25-cm spacing over a 1700-m domain) and incorporated hydraulic properties measured on samples collected from the STVZ. The analysis process involved petrophysical conversion of moisture content and solute concentration fields to geophysical property fields, forward geophysical modeling using the geophysical property fields to obtain synthetic geophysical data, and finally, inversion of this synthetic data. These geophysical property models were then compared to those derived from the conversion of the hydrologic forward modeling to provide an understanding of the resolution and limitations of the geophysical techniques.

  13. Joint focus stacking and high dynamic range imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Qinchun; Gunturk, Bahadir K.; Batur, Aziz U.

    2013-01-01

    Focus stacking and high dynamic range (HDR) imaging are two paradigms of computational photography. Focus stacking aims to produce an image with greater depth of field (DOF) from a set of images taken with different focus distances, whereas HDR imaging aims to produce an image with higher dynamic range from a set of images taken with different exposure settings. In this paper, we present an algorithm which combines focus stacking and HDR imaging in order to produce an image with both higher dynamic range and greater DOF than any of the input images. The proposed algorithm includes two main parts: (i) joint photometric and geometric registration and (ii) joint focus stacking and HDR image creation. In the first part, images are first photometrically registered using an algorithm that is insensitive to small geometric variations, and then geometrically registered using an optical flow algorithm. In the second part, images are merged through weighted averaging, where the weights depend on both local sharpness and exposure information. We provide experimental results with real data to illustrate the algorithm. The algorithm is also implemented on a smartphone with Android operating system.

  14. Photoacoustic imaging of inflammatory arthritis in human joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Xu, Guan; Marquardt, April; Francis, Sheeja; Yuan, Jie; Girish, Dhanuj; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2016-02-01

    The ducal imaging with photoacoustic imaging (PAI) that is an emerging technology and clinical ultrasound imaging that is an established modality is developed for the imaging of early inflammatory arthritis. PAI is sensitive to blood volume, not limited by flow like ultrasound, holding great promise for the earliest detection of increase in blood volume and angiogenesis - a key early finding inflammation PAI has the capability of assessing inflammation in superficial human soft tissues, offering potential benefits in diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. PAI combined with ultrasonography (US), is a real time dual-modality system developed and tested to identify active synovitis in metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of 10 arthritis patients and 10 normal volunteers. Photoacoustic images of the joints were acquired at 580-nm laser wavelength, which provided the desired balance between the optical contrast of hemoglobin over bone cortex and the imaging depth. Confirmed by US Doppler imaging, the results from ten patients and ten normal volunteers demonstrated satisfactory sensitivity of PAI in assessing enhanced blood flow due to active synovitis. This preliminary study suggests that photoacoustic imaging, by identifying early increase in blood volume, related to increased vascularity, a hallmark of joint inflammation, could be a valuable supplement to musculoskeletal US.

  15. Imaging of Temporomandibular Joint: Approach by Direct Volume Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Carola; Bruschetta, Daniele; Vaccarino, Gianluigi; Milardi, Demetrio

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to conduct a morphological analysis of the temporomandibular joint, a highly specialized synovial joint that permits movement and function of the mandible. Materials and Methods: We have studied the temporom-andibular joint anatomy, directly on the living, from 3D images obtained by medical imaging Computed Tomography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance acquisition, and subsequent re-engineering techniques 3D Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering. Data were analysed with the goal of being able to isolate, identify and distinguish the anatomical structures of the joint, and get the largest possible number of information utilizing software for post-processing work. Results: It was possible to reproduce anatomy of the skeletal structures, as well as through acquisitions of Magnetic Resonance Imaging; it was also possible to visualize the vascular, muscular, ligamentous and tendinous components of the articular complex, and also the capsule and the fibrous cartilaginous disc. We managed the Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering, not only to obtain three-dimensional images for colour and for resolution comparable to the usual anatomical preparations, but also a considerable number of anatomical, minuter details, zooming, rotating and cutting the same images with linking, graduating the colour, transparency and opacity from time to time. Conclusion: These results are encouraging to stimulate further studies in other anatomical districts. PMID:25664280

  16. Automatic Evaluation of Welded Joints Using Image Processing on Radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Ch.

    2003-03-01

    Radiography is frequently used to detect discontinuities in welded joints (porosity, cracks, lack of penetration). Perfect knowledge of the geometry of these defects is an important step which is essential to appreciate the quality of the weld. Because of this, an action improving the interpretation of radiographs by image processing has been undertaken. The principle consists in making a radiograph of the welded joint and of a depth step wedge penetrameter in the material. The radiograph is then finely digitized and an automatic processing of the radiograph of the penetrameter image allows the establishment of a correspondence between grey levels and material thickness. An algorithm based on image processing is used to localize defects in the welded joints and to isolate them from the original image. First, defects detected by this method are characterized in terms of dimension and equivalent thickness. Then, from the image of the healthy welded joint (that is to say without the detected defects), characteristic values of the weld are evaluated (thickness reduction, width).

  17. Directional Joint Bilateral Filter for Depth Images

    PubMed Central

    Le, Anh Vu; Jung, Seung-Won; Won, Chee Sun

    2014-01-01

    Depth maps taken by the low cost Kinect sensor are often noisy and incomplete. Thus, post-processing for obtaining reliable depth maps is necessary for advanced image and video applications such as object recognition and multi-view rendering. In this paper, we propose adaptive directional filters that fill the holes and suppress the noise in depth maps. Specifically, novel filters whose window shapes are adaptively adjusted based on the edge direction of the color image are presented. Experimental results show that our method yields higher quality filtered depth maps than other existing methods, especially at the edge boundaries. PMID:24971470

  18. Directional joint bilateral filter for depth images.

    PubMed

    Le, Anh Vu; Jung, Seung-Won; Won, Chee Sun

    2014-01-01

    Depth maps taken by the low cost Kinect sensor are often noisy and incomplete. Thus, post-processing for obtaining reliable depth maps is necessary for advanced image and video applications such as object recognition and multi-view rendering. In this paper, we propose adaptive directional filters that fill the holes and suppress the noise in depth maps. Specifically, novel filters whose window shapes are adaptively adjusted based on the edge direction of the color image are presented. Experimental results show that our method yields higher quality filtered depth maps than other existing methods, especially at the edge boundaries. PMID:24971470

  19. Synthetic aperture sonar imaging using joint time-frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Genyuan; Xia, Xiang-Gen

    1999-03-01

    The non-ideal motion of the hydrophone usually induces the aperture error of the synthetic aperture sonar (SAS), which is one of the most important factors degrading the SAS imaging quality. In the SAS imaging, the return signals are usually nonstationary due to the non-ideal hydrophone motion. In this paper, joint time-frequency analysis (JTFA), as a good technique for analyzing nonstationary signals, is used in the SAS imaging. Based on the JTFA of the sonar return signals, a novel SAS imaging algorithm is proposed. The algorithm is verified by simulation examples.

  20. Automatic finger joint synovitis localization in ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurzynska, Karolina; Smolka, Bogdan

    2016-04-01

    A long-lasting inflammation of joints results between others in many arthritis diseases. When not cured, it may influence other organs and general patients' health. Therefore, early detection and running proper medical treatment are of big value. The patients' organs are scanned with high frequency acoustic waves, which enable visualization of interior body structures through an ultrasound sonography (USG) image. However, the procedure is standardized, different projections result in a variety of possible data, which should be analyzed in short period of time by a physician, who is using medical atlases as a guidance. This work introduces an efficient framework based on statistical approach to the finger joint USG image, which enables automatic localization of skin and bone regions, which are then used for localization of the finger joint synovitis area. The processing pipeline realizes the task in real-time and proves high accuracy when compared to annotation prepared by the expert.

  1. Compressive SAR imaging with joint sparsity and local similarity exploitation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fangfang; Zhao, Guanghui; Shi, Guangming; Dong, Weisheng; Wang, Chenglong; Niu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Compressive sensing-based synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging has shown its superior capability in high-resolution image formation. However, most of those works focus on the scenes that can be sparsely represented in fixed spaces. When dealing with complicated scenes, these fixed spaces lack adaptivity in characterizing varied image contents. To solve this problem, a new compressive sensing-based radar imaging approach with adaptive sparse representation is proposed. Specifically, an autoregressive model is introduced to adaptively exploit the structural sparsity of an image. In addition, similarity among pixels is integrated into the autoregressive model to further promote the capability and thus an adaptive sparse representation facilitated by a weighted autoregressive model is derived. Since the weighted autoregressive model is inherently determined by the unknown image, we propose a joint optimization scheme by iterative SAR imaging and updating of the weighted autoregressive model to solve this problem. Eventually, experimental results demonstrated the validity and generality of the proposed approach. PMID:25686307

  2. Color image encryption based on joint fractional Fourier transform correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ding; Jin, Weimin

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, an optical color image encryption/decryption technology based on joint fractional Fourier transform correlator and double random phase encoding (DRPE) is developed. In this method, the joint fractional power spectrum of the image to be encrypted and the key codes is recorded as the encrypted data. Different from the case with classical DRPE, the same key code was used both in the encryption and decryption. The security of the system is enhanced because of the fractional order as a new added key. This method takes full advantage of the parallel processing features of the optical system, and could optically realize single-channel color image encryption. The experimental results indicate that the new method is feasible.

  3. Imaging technologies for preclinical models of bone and joint disorders

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Preclinical models for musculoskeletal disorders are critical for understanding the pathogenesis of bone and joint disorders in humans and the development of effective therapies. The assessment of these models primarily relies on morphological analysis which remains time consuming and costly, requiring large numbers of animals to be tested through different stages of the disease. The implementation of preclinical imaging represents a keystone in the refinement of animal models allowing longitudinal studies and enabling a powerful, non-invasive and clinically translatable way for monitoring disease progression in real time. Our aim is to highlight examples that demonstrate the advantages and limitations of different imaging modalities including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and optical imaging. All of which are in current use in preclinical skeletal research. MRI can provide high resolution of soft tissue structures, but imaging requires comparatively long acquisition times; hence, animals require long-term anaesthesia. CT is extensively used in bone and joint disorders providing excellent spatial resolution and good contrast for bone imaging. Despite its excellent structural assessment of mineralized structures, CT does not provide in vivo functional information of ongoing biological processes. Nuclear medicine is a very promising tool for investigating functional and molecular processes in vivo with new tracers becoming available as biomarkers. The combined use of imaging modalities also holds significant potential for the assessment of disease pathogenesis in animal models of musculoskeletal disorders, minimising the use of conventional invasive methods and animal redundancy. PMID:22214535

  4. Multinuclide digital subtraction imaging in symptomatic prostnetic joints

    SciTech Connect

    Chafetz, N.; Hattner, R.S.; Ruarke, W.C.; Helms, C.A.; Genant, H.K.; Murray, W.R.

    1985-06-01

    One hundred eleven patients with symptomatic prosthetic joints (86 hips, 23 knees, and two shoulders) were evaluated for prosthetic loosening and infection by combined technetium-99m-MDP/gallium-67 digital subtraction imaging. Clinical correlation was based on the assessment of loosening and bacterial cultures obtained at the time of surgery in 54 patients, joint aspiration cultures obtained in 37 patients, and long-term clinical follow-up for greater than 1.5 years in an additional 15 patients. Results revealed an 80-90% predictive value of a positive test for loosening, and a 95% predictive value of a negative test for infection. However, because of the low sensitivities and specificities observed, this approach to the evaluation of symptomatic prosthetic joints does not seem cost effective.

  5. Bayesian Joint Modelling for Object Localisation in Weakly Labelled Images.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhiyuan; Hospedales, Timothy M; Xiang, Tao

    2015-10-01

    We address the problem of localisation of objects as bounding boxes in images and videos with weak labels. This weakly supervised object localisation problem has been tackled in the past using discriminative models where each object class is localised independently from other classes. In this paper, a novel framework based on Bayesian joint topic modelling is proposed, which differs significantly from the existing ones in that: (1) All foreground object classes are modelled jointly in a single generative model that encodes multiple object co-existence so that "explaining away" inference can resolve ambiguity and lead to better learning and localisation. (2) Image backgrounds are shared across classes to better learn varying surroundings and "push out" objects of interest. (3) Our model can be learned with a mixture of weakly labelled and unlabelled data, allowing the large volume of unlabelled images on the Internet to be exploited for learning. Moreover, the Bayesian formulation enables the exploitation of various types of prior knowledge to compensate for the limited supervision offered by weakly labelled data, as well as Bayesian domain adaptation for transfer learning. Extensive experiments on the PASCAL VOC, ImageNet and YouTube-Object videos datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of our Bayesian joint model for weakly supervised object localisation. PMID:26340253

  6. Bayesian PET image reconstruction incorporating anato-functional joint entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Rahmim, Arman

    2009-12-01

    We developed a maximum a posterior (MAP) reconstruction method for positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction incorporating magnetic resonance (MR) image information, with the joint entropy between the PET and MR image features serving as the regularization constraint. A non-parametric method was used to estimate the joint probability density of the PET and MR images. Using realistically simulated PET and MR human brain phantoms, the quantitative performance of the proposed algorithm was investigated. Incorporation of the anatomic information via this technique, after parameter optimization, was seen to dramatically improve the noise versus bias tradeoff in every region of interest, compared to the result from using conventional MAP reconstruction. In particular, hot lesions in the FDG PET image, which had no anatomical correspondence in the MR image, also had improved contrast versus noise tradeoff. Corrections were made to figures 3, 4 and 6, and to the second paragraph of section 3.1 on 13 November 2009. The corrected electronic version is identical to the print version.

  7. Geophysical Imaging of the Stillwater and Bushveld Complexes and Relation to Platinum-group Element Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, C.; Bedrosian, P.; Zientek, M. L.; Cole, J.; Webb, S. J.; Bloss, B. R.

    2015-12-01

    Exploring for platinum-group elements (PGEs) relies on understanding the geophysical signature of the entire magmatic system in which they form, from bottom to top. New potential field and electromagnetic data and methods effectively map internal structures of layered intrusions that host PGE-bearing magmatic ore deposits, the volume of the intrusion and its extent under cover, and locations of sulfide mineralization. High resolution aeromagnetic data can image fine scale linear anomalies related to layering in the Stillwater and Bushveld Complexes. At Stillwater, the aeromagnetic anomalies relate to boundaries between major stratigraphic units and olivine-bearing rock layers altered to a mixture of serpentine and magnetite. The PGE-enriched sulfide mineralization hosted by olivine-bearing rocks in the Stillwater Complex produces a distinct linear magnetic high. In the Upper Zone of the Bushveld Complex, primary magnetite layers generate linear magnetic highs. Electromagnetic (EM) data over the Stillwater Complex highlight contact-type mineralization which contain low resistivity sulfide minerals. Stochastic inversions reveal a low resistivity zone along the southern edge of the Stillwater Complex corresponding to mineralization in banded iron formation or contact-type sulfide mineralization in the Basal zone. Gravity highs characterize the exposed and interpreted buried extent of the Stillwater and Bushveld complexes. A 3D inversion of gravity data of the Sillwater Complex indicates that the complex extends 30 km north and 40 km east of its outcrop beneath Phanerozoic cover. Geophysical models image the 3D geometry of the Bushveld Complex north of the Thabazimbi-Murchison Lineament (TML), critical for understanding the origin of the world's largest layered mafic intrusion and associated platinum- group element deposits, as a ~4 km thick, 160 km x ~125 km body underlying ~1-2 km of cover. Locally thick regions in the TML portion of the model may represent feeders

  8. Motion analysis of knee joint using dynamic volume images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haneishi, Hideaki; Kohno, Takahiro; Suzuki, Masahiko; Moriya, Hideshige; Mori, Sin-ichiro; Endo, Masahiro

    2006-03-01

    Acquisition and analysis of three-dimensional movement of knee joint is desired in orthopedic surgery. We have developed two methods to obtain dynamic volume images of knee joint. One is a 2D/3D registration method combining a bi-plane dynamic X-ray fluoroscopy and a static three-dimensional CT, the other is a method using so-called 4D-CT that uses a cone-beam and a wide 2D detector. In this paper, we present two analyses of knee joint movement obtained by these methods: (1) transition of the nearest points between femur and tibia (2) principal component analysis (PCA) of six parameters representing the three dimensional movement of knee. As a preprocessing for the analysis, at first the femur and tibia regions are extracted from volume data at each time frame and then the registration of the tibia between different frames by an affine transformation consisting of rotation and translation are performed. The same transformation is applied femur as well. Using those image data, the movement of femur relative to tibia can be analyzed. Six movement parameters of femur consisting of three translation parameters and three rotation parameters are obtained from those images. In the analysis (1), axis of each bone is first found and then the flexion angle of the knee joint is calculated. For each flexion angle, the minimum distance between femur and tibia and the location giving the minimum distance are found in both lateral condyle and medial condyle. As a result, it was observed that the movement of lateral condyle is larger than medial condyle. In the analysis (2), it was found that the movement of the knee can be represented by the first three principal components with precision of 99.58% and those three components seem to strongly relate to three major movements of femur in the knee bend known in orthopedic surgery.

  9. Pseudodynamic imaging of the temporomandibular joint: SE versus GE sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Masui, Takayuki; Isoda, Haruo; Mochizuki, Takao

    1996-05-01

    Pseudodynamic MR imaging of the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) has been used for the evaluation of the functional aspects of the TMJs. To evaluate the value of T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) and gradient-echo (GE) techniques, both techniques were performed in 9 asymptomatic (mean 25.7 years, 22-32 years), and 25 symptomatic (mean 44.9 years, 20-71 years) subjects with signs and symptoms of internal derangement or osteoarthrosis of the TMJs. The imaging time for the SE (180 ms / 15 ms / 110{degrees} repetition time / echo time /flip angle) and GE (fast low angle shot; FLASH, 90 ms / 12 ms / 40{degrees}) sequences was 27 and 28 s, respectively. In asymptomatic and symptomatic subjects, the confidence of the identification of the meniscal position was better on SE than GE images (3.6 {+-} 0.6 vs. 2.9 {+-} 0.9, p < 0.01, 3.2 {+-} 0.8 vs. 2.8 {+-} 0.8, p < 0.05), respectively and the sizes of the menisci were bigger on SE than GE images. The delineation of the condylar cortex was better on GE than SE images. For pseudodynamic imaging display of the TMJs, the SE images might be better than GE images to provide the stable recognition of the menisci. 17 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Signals and Images Foreground/Background Joint Estimation and Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait-El-Fquih, Boujemaa; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2011-03-01

    This paper is devoted to a foreground/background joint estimation and separation problem. We first observe that this problem is modeled by a conditionally linear and Gaussian hidden Markov chain (CLGHMC). We next propose a filtering algorithm in the general non-linear and non Gaussian conditionally hidden Markov chain (CHMC), allowing the propagation of the filtering densities associated to the foreground and the background. We then focus on the particular case of our CLGHMC in which these filtering densities are weighted sums of Gaussian distributions; the parameters of each Gaussian are computed by using the Kalman filter algorithm, while the weights are computed by using the particle filter algorithm. We finally perform some simulations to highlight the interest of our method in both signals and images foreground/backgound joint estimation and separation.

  11. On Earth's Mantle Constitution and Structure from Joint Analysis of Geophysical and Laboratory-Based Data: An Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Determining Earth's structure is a fundamental goal of Earth science, and geophysical methods play a prominent role in investigating Earth's interior. Geochemical, cosmochemical, and petrological analyses of terrestrial samples and meteoritic material provide equally important insights. Complementary information comes from high-pressure mineral physics and chemistry, i.e., use of sophisticated experimental techniques and numerical methods that are capable of attaining or simulating physical properties at very high pressures and temperatures, thereby allowing recovered samples from Earth's crust and mantle to be analyzed in the laboratory or simulated computationally at the conditions that prevail in Earth's mantle and core. This is particularly important given that the vast bulk of Earth's interior is geochemically unsampled. This paper describes a quantitative approach that combines data and results from mineral physics, petrological analyses of mantle minerals, and geophysical inverse calculations, in order to map geophysical data directly for mantle composition (major element chemistry and water content) and thermal state. We illustrate the methodology by inverting a set of long-period electromagnetic response functions beneath six geomagnetic stations that cover a range of geological settings for major element chemistry, water content, and thermal state of the mantle. The results indicate that interior structure and constitution of the mantle can be well-retrieved given a specific set of measurements describing (1) the conductivity of mantle minerals, (2) the partitioning behavior of water between major upper mantle and transition-zone minerals, and (3) the ability of nominally anhydrous minerals to store water in their crystal structures. Specifically, upper mantle water contents determined here bracket the ranges obtained from analyses of natural samples, whereas transition-zone water concentration is an order-of-magnitude greater than that of the upper

  12. On Different Techniques for the Calculation of Bougher Gravity Anomalies for Joint Inversion of Geophysical Data in the Rio Grande Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, A.; Hussein, M. J.; Velasco, A. A.

    2012-12-01

    Density variations in the Earth result from different material properties, which reflect the tectonic processess attributed to a region. Density variations can be identified through measurable material properties, such as seismic velocities, gravity field, magnetic field, etc. Gravity anomaly inversions are particularly sensitive to density variations but suffer from significant non-uniqueness. However, using inverse models with gravity Bougher anomalies and other geophysical data, we can determine three dimensional structural and geological properties of the given area. We explore different techniques for the calculation of Bougher gravity anomalies for their use in joint inversion of multiple geophysical data sets. Various 2- and 3-Dimensional (3-D) gravity profile forward modeling programs have been developed as variations of existing algorithms; these variations have similarities, differences, and strengths and weaknesses. The purpose of this study is to determine the most effective gravity forward modeling method that can be used to combine the information provided by complementary datasets, such as gravity and seismic information, to improve the accuracy and resolution of Earth models obtained for the underlying structure of the Rio Grande Rift. In an effort to determine the most appropriate method to use in a joint inversion algorithm and a data fusion approach currently in development, we test each approach by using a model of the Rio Grande Rift obtained from seismic surface wave dispersion and receiver functions. We find that there are different uncertainties associated with each methodology that affect the accuracy achieved by including gravity profile forward modeling. Moreover, there exists a bigger margin of error associated to the 2-D methods due to the simplification of calculations that do not take into account the 3-D characteristics of the Earth's structure.

  13. Hillslope characterization in terms of geophysical units based on the joint interpretation of electrical resistivity and seismic velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feskova, Tatiana; Dietrich, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Hydrological conditions in a catchment depend on many factors such as climatic, geological, geomorphological, biological and human, which interact with each other and influence water balance in a catchment. This interaction leads to the subordination in the landscape structure, namely the weak elements subordinate to the powerful elements. Thereby, geological and geomorphological factors play an essential role in catchment development and organization. A hillslope consequently can be allocated to one class of the representative units because the important flow processes run at the hillslope. Moreover, a hillslope can be subdivided into stratigraphic subsurface units and significant hillslope areas based on the lithological change of contrasting interfaces. The knowledge of subsurface structures is necessary to understand and predicate complex hydrological processes in a catchment. Geophysical techniques provide a good opportunity to explore the subsurface. A complete geophysical investigation of subsurface in a catchment with difficult environmental conditions never will be achieved because of large time effort in the field, equipment logistic, and ambiguity in the data interpretation. The case study demonstrates how a catchment can be investigated using geophysical methods in an effective manner in terms of characterization of representative units with respect to a functional role in the catchment. This case study aims to develop combined resistivity and seismic velocity hillslope subsurface models for the distinction of representative functional units. In order to identify the contrasting interfaces of the hillslope, to localize significant hillslope areas, and to address the ambiguity in the geophysical data interpretation, the case study combined resistivity surveys (vertical electrical soundings and electrical resistivity tomography) with refraction seismic method, and conducted these measurements at one single profile along the hillslope transect and

  14. Joint image reconstruction and sensitivity estimation in SENSE (JSENSE).

    PubMed

    Ying, Leslie; Sheng, Jinhua

    2007-06-01

    Parallel magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI) using multichannel receiver coils has emerged as an effective tool to reduce imaging time in various applications. However, the issue of accurate estimation of coil sensitivities has not been fully addressed, which limits the level of speed enhancement achievable with the technology. The self-calibrating (SC) technique for sensitivity extraction has been well accepted, especially for dynamic imaging, and complements the common calibration technique that uses a separate scan. However, the existing method to extract the sensitivity information from the SC data is not accurate enough when the number of data is small, and thus erroneous sensitivities affect the reconstruction quality when they are directly applied to the reconstruction equation. This paper considers this problem of error propagation in the sequential procedure of sensitivity estimation followed by image reconstruction in existing methods, such as sensitivity encoding (SENSE) and simultaneous acquisition of spatial harmonics (SMASH), and reformulates the image reconstruction problem as a joint estimation of the coil sensitivities and the desired image, which is solved by an iterative optimization algorithm. The proposed method was tested on various data sets. The results from a set of in vivo data are shown to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method, especially when a rather large net acceleration factor is used. PMID:17534910

  15. Geophysical Imaging of Near Surface Hydrostratigraphy in Arid Ephemeral Stream Systems Near Yuma, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harry, D. L.; Sutfin, N. A.; Shaw, J. R.; Faulconer, J.; Genco, A. J.; Wohl, E.; Kampf, S. K.; Cooper, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Ground penetrating radar and DC electrical resistivity profiles image the upper 4 m of the subsurface beneath ephemeral streams in Yuma and Mohave Washes in the Sonoran Desert, 30 km northeast of Yuma, Arizona. The geophysical data are tied to trenches to establish a lithostratigraphic interpretation. Archie's Law, calibrated to resistivity measurements on soil samples from each site, is used to estimate in-situ soil pore saturation. Three different stream types are surveyed. Increasing in stream order, these are incised bedrock with alluvium fill, incised alluvium, and braided streams. Three radar facies are identified on the basis of reflection amplitude, continuity, and dip. Near the surface, RF1 (0.5-1.5 m thick) contains laterally continuous sheetlike deposits interpreted to be active channel gravel, sand, and cobble deposits reworked during floods. Below, RF2 contains moderately continuous downlapping and onlapping reflections interpreted to be partially lithified Pleistocene gravel and cobble valley fill deposits. The underlying facies RF3 is nearly reflection free, but at the larger washes contains weak reflection similar in character to RF2. In the smaller washes, RF3 contains abundant diffractions. Two electrofacies are identified. The shallowest, EF1, extends from the surface to ~2.5 m deep. EF1 encompasses radar facies RF1 and RF2, with resistivity ranging from 250-1500 ohm-m. Estimated soil moisture in this facies ranges from 2-40%, and varies up to 20% laterally over 2-5 m distances in the smallest washes. Facies EF2 coincides with radar facies RF3, with resistivity ranging from 10-300 ohm-m and estimated pore saturation is estimated to exceed 70%. Electrofacies EF1 is inferred to represent a relatively dry surficial layer that includes the modern channel deposits and the upper ~1 m of the Pleistocene strata. At the larger washes, EF2 is interpreted to be Pleistocene valley fill, distinguishable from the overlying lithologically equivalent Pleistocene

  16. Imaging the seismic structure beneath oceanic spreading centers using ocean bottom geophysical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Yang

    This dissertation focuses on imaging the crustal and upper mantle seismic velocity structure beneath oceanic spreading centers. The goals are to provide a better understanding of the crustal magmatic system and the relationship between mantle melting processes, crustal architecture and ridge characteristics. To address these questions I have analyzed ocean bottom geophysical data collected from the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise and the back-arc Eastern Lau Spreading Center using a combination of ambient noise tomography and seafloor compliance analysis. To characterize the crustal melt distribution at fast spreading ridges, I analyze seafloor compliance - the deformation under long period ocean wave forcing - measured during multiple expeditions between 1994 and 2007 at the East Pacific Rise 9º - 10ºN segment. A 3D numerical modeling technique is developed and used to estimate the effects of low shear velocity zones on compliance measurements. The forward modeling suggests strong variations of lower crustal shear velocity along the ridge axis, with zones of possible high melt fractions beneath certain segments. Analysis of repeated compliance measurements at 9º48'N indicates a decrease of crustal melt fraction following the 2005 - 2006 eruption. This temporal variability provides direct evidence for short-term variations of the magmatic system at a fast spreading ridge. To understand the relationship between mantle melting processes and crustal properties, I apply ambient noise tomography of ocean bottom seismograph (OBS) data to image the upper mantle seismic structure beneath the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC). The seismic images reveal an asymmetric upper mantle low velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the ELSC, representing a zone of partial melt. As the ridge migrates away from the volcanic arc, the LVZ becomes increasingly offset and separated from the sub-arc low velocity zone. The separation of the ridge and arc low velocity zones is spatially coincident

  17. Basin characterisation by means of joint inversion of electromagnetic geophysical data: A case study from the Loop Head Peninsula, western Ireland, and the implications for onshore carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanyà, Joan; Ogaya, Xènia; Jones, Alan G.; Rath, Volker; McConnell, Brian; Haughton, Peter D. W.; Ledo, Juanjo

    2016-04-01

    The Science Foundation Ireland funded IRECCSEM project (www.ireccsem.ie) aims to evaluate Ireland's potential for onshore carbon sequestration in saline aquifers by integrating new electromagnetic geophysical data with existing geophysical and geological data. The main goal of this investigation is to characterise the subsurface beneath the Loop Head Peninsula (part of the Clare Basin, Co. Clare, Ireland) and in particular to identify the main geoelectrical structures that can guide an interpretation of the carbon sequestration potential of this area. During the summer of 2014, a magnetotelluric (MT) survey was carried out on the Loop Head Peninsula. Data from a total of 140 sites were acquired, including audio-magnetotelluric (AMT), broadband magnetotelluric (BBMT) and long period magnetotelluric (LMT) data. The dataset was used to generate four shallow three-dimensional (3-D) electrical resistivity models to constrain the subsurface to depths of up to 3 km, and an additional deep study to constrain the electrical resistivity values to depths of up to 30 km. Three-dimensional (3-D) joint inversion process was performed using three different types of electromagnetic data to improve the resolution of the electrical resistivity models: MT impedance tensor (Z), geomagnetic transfer functions (T) and inter-station horizontal magnetic transfer-functions (H). The interpretations of the resulting models were based on the geoelectrical results and compared with independent geological and geophysical data for a high-quality interpretation (i.e., deep borehole data from the peninsula, 2-D seismic reflection profiles, gravity data and geological structural information). Second-derivative models of the resulting MT models were used to define the main interfaces between the geoelectrical structures, facilitating superior comparison with geological and seismic results, and also reducing the influence of the colour scale on the interpretation of the results. Specific analysis was

  18. Kernel weighted joint collaborative representation for hyperspectral image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Qian; Li, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Collaborative representation classifier (CRC) has been applied to hyperspectral image classification, which intends to use all the atoms in a dictionary to represent a testing pixel for label assignment. However, some atoms that are very dissimilar to the testing pixel should not participate in the representation, or their contribution should be very little. The regularized version of CRC imposes strong penalty to prevent dissimilar atoms with having large representation coefficients. To utilize spatial information, the weighted sum of local spatial neighbors is considered as a joint spatial-spectral feature, which is actually for regularized CRC-based classification. This paper proposes its kernel version to further improve classification accuracy, which can be higher than those from the traditional support vector machine with composite kernel and the kernel version of sparse representation classifier.

  19. Measurement of micro weld joint position based on magneto-optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang-Dong; Chen, Zi-Qin

    2015-01-01

    In a laser butt joint welding process, it is required that the laser beam focus should be controlled to follow the weld joint path accurately. Small focus wandering off the weld joint may result in insufficient penetration or unacceptable welds. Recognition of joint position offset, which describes the deviation between the laser beam focus and the weld joint, is important for adjusting the laser beam focus and obtaining high quality welds. A new method based on the magneto-optical (MO) imaging is applied to measure the micro weld joint whose gap is less than 0.2 mm. The weldments are excited by an external magnetic field, and an MO sensor based on principle of Faraday magneto effect is used to capture the weld joint images. A sequence of MO images which are tested under different magnetic field intensities and different weld joint widths are acquired. By analyzing the MO image characteristics and extracting the weld joint features, the influence of magnetic field intensity and weld joint width on the MO images and detection of weld joint position is observed and summarized. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51175095), the Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. 10251009001000001), the Guangdong Provincial Project of Science and Technology Innovation of Discipline Construction, China (Grant No. 2013KJCX0063), and the Science and Technology Plan Project of Guangzhou City, China (Grant No. 1563000554).

  20. Detection of micro-weld joint by magneto-optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiangdong; Liu, Yonghua; You, Deyong

    2014-10-01

    It is required that the laser beam focus should be controlled to accurately follow the weld joint center during laser butt joint welding; therefore, the weld joint position must be detected automatically in real-time. An approach for detecting the micro-weld joint (weld gap less than 0.1 mm) based on magneto-optical (MO) imaging is investigated during laser butt-joint welding of low carbon steel. Magneto-optical sensor was used to capture the dynamic images of weld joint. Weld MO image gray distribution features were analyzed to extract the transition zone of weld joint. The influences of a different magnetic field intensity and the welding speed on detecting the weld joint position were mainly studied. Under different welding conditions where welding path, weld gap or welding speed varies, it has been found that using magneto-optic imaging technology could effectively detect the position of the micro-weld joint. Different weld joint positions in MO images have been detected with various magnetic field intensities. Experimental results show that the welding speed has little influence on the detection of weld joint position.

  1. Diffraction-Enhanced Computed Tomographic Imaging of Growing Piglet Joints by Using a Synchrotron Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, Glendon W; Belev, George S; Chapman, L Dean; Wiebe, Sheldon P; Cooper, David M; Wong, Adelaine TF; Rosenberg, Alan M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and test a new technology for imaging growing joints by means of diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) combined with CT and using a synchrotron radiation source. DEI–CT images of an explanted 4-wk-old piglet stifle joint were acquired by using a 40-keV beam. The series of scanned slices was later ‘stitched’ together, forming a 3D dataset. High-resolution DEI-CT images demonstrated fine detail within all joint structures and tissues. Striking detail of vasculature traversing between bone and cartilage, a characteristic of growing but not mature joints, was demonstrated. This report documents for the first time that DEI combined with CT and a synchrotron radiation source can generate more detailed images of intact, growing joints than can currently available conventional imaging modalities. PMID:26310464

  2. Assessment and interpretation of radiopharmaceutical joint imaging in an animal model of arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenspire, K.L.; Blau, M.; Kennedy, A.C.; Green, F.A.

    1981-05-01

    An animal model of arthritis in the rabbit was employed to assess the radioactivity contribution of joint tissues to externally monitored scintigram positivity. Bone contained the greatest total amount of radioactivity whether the imaging agent was technetium pertechnetate or pyrophosphate, although the greatest percent increase in the arthritis joints over control joints was seen in synovium. Mid-shaft bone in the same region as the arthritic joint also showed increased radioactivity compared with control.

  3. Joint time-frequency analysis of high-bandwidth low-resolution ISAR imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghogomu, Patrick; Testorf, Markus E.

    2003-09-01

    Joint time-frequency analysis is applied to radar imaging problems. Special attention is given to imaging applications, for which the resolution is severely limited due the available bandwidth of the radar signal both in range and cross-range. This includes the detection of landmines as well as foliage penetration radar imaging. Motivated by this type of imaging problem a new joint time-frequency method, the STPDFT algorithm is introduced and compared with existing methods. The performance of all methods is illustrated with synthetic test signals. In addition, preliminary results are presented which demonstrate the performance of joint-time frequency transforms, if applied to low resolution imaging problems.

  4. Imaging of the hip joint. Computed tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, P.; Genant, H. K.; Jergesen, H. E.; Murray, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    The authors reviewed the applications and limitations of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of the most common hip disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive technique in detecting osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Magnetic resonance reflects the histologic changes associated with osteonecrosis very well, which may ultimately help to improve staging. Computed tomography can more accurately identify subchondral fractures than MR imaging and thus remains important for staging. In congenital dysplasia of the hip, the position of the nonossified femoral head in children less than six months of age can only be inferred by indirect signs on CT. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates the cartilaginous femoral head directly without ionizing radiation. Computed tomography remains the imaging modality of choice for evaluating fractures of the hip joint. In some patients, MR imaging demonstrates the fracture even when it is not apparent on radiography. In neoplasm, CT provides better assessment of calcification, ossification, and periosteal reaction than MR imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging, however, represents the most accurate imaging modality for evaluating intramedullary and soft-tissue extent of the tumor and identifying involvement of neurovascular bundles. Magnetic resonance imaging can also be used to monitor response to chemotherapy. In osteoarthrosis and rheumatoid arthritis of the hip, both CT and MR provide more detailed assessment of the severity of disease than conventional radiography because of their tomographic nature. Magnetic resonance imaging is unique in evaluating cartilage degeneration and loss, and in demonstrating soft-tissue alterations such as inflammatory synovial proliferation.

  5. Near real-time imaging of molasses injections using time-lapse electrical geophysics at the Brandywine DRMO, Brandywine, Maryland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versteeg, R. J.; Johnson, T.; Major, B.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Lane, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Enhanced bioremediation, which involves introduction of amendments to promote biodegradation, increasingly is used to accelerate cleanup of recalcitrant compounds and has been identified as the preferred remedial treatment at many contaminated sites. Although blind introduction of amendments can lead to sub-optimal or ineffective remediation, the distribution of amendment throughout the treatment zone is difficult to measure using conventional sampling. Because amendments and their degradation products commonly have electrical properties that differ from those of ambient soil, time-lapse electrical geophysical monitoring has the potential to verify amendment emplacement and distribution. In order for geophysical monitoring to be useful, however, results of the injection ideally should be accessible in near real time. In August 2010, we demonstrated the feasibility of near real-time, autonomous electrical geophysical monitoring of amendment injections at the former Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) in Brandywine, Maryland. Two injections of about 1000 gallons each of molasses, a widely used amendment for enhanced bioremediation, were monitored using measurements taken with borehole and surface electrodes. During the injections, multi-channel resistance data were recorded; data were transmitted to a server and processed using a parallel resistivity inversion code; and results in the form of time-lapse imagery subsequently were posted to a website. This process occurred automatically without human intervention. The resulting time-lapse imagery clearly showed the evolution of the molasses plume. The delay between measurements and online delivery of images was between 45 and 60 minutes, thus providing actionable information that could support decisions about field procedures and a check on whether amendment reached target zones. This experiment demonstrates the feasibility of using electrical imaging as a monitoring tool both during amendment emplacement

  6. Geological modeling and infiltration pattern of a karstic system based upon crossed geophysical methods and image-guided inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran, Lea; Jardani, Abderrahim; Fournier, Matthieu; Massei, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Karstic aquifers represent an important part of the water resources worldwide. Though they have been widely studied on many aspects, their geological and hydrogeological modeling is still complex. Geophysical methods can provide useful subsurface information for the characterization and mapping of karstic systems, especially when not accessible by speleology. The site investigated in this study is a sinkhole-spring system, with small diameter conduits that run within a chalk aquifer (Norville, in Upper Normandy, France). This site was investigated using several geophysical methods: electrical tomography, self-potential, mise-à-la-masse methods, and electromagnetic method (EM34). Coupling those results with boreholes data, a 3D geological model of the hydrogeological basin was established, including tectonic features as well as infiltration structures (sinkhole, covered dolines). The direction of the karstic conduits near the main sinkhole could be established, and the major fault was shown to be a hydraulic barrier. Also the average concentration of dolines on the basin could be estimated, as well as their depth. At last, several hypotheses could be made concerning the location of the main conduit network between the sinkhole and the spring, using previous hydrodynamic study of the site along with geophysical data. In order to validate the 3D geological model, an image-guided inversion of the apparent resistivity data was used. With this approach it is possible to use geological cross sections to constrain the inversion of apparent resistivity data, preserving both discontinuities and coherences in the inversion of the resistivity data. This method was used on the major fault, enabling to choose one geological interpretation over another (fault block structure near the fault, rather than important folding). The constrained inversion was also applied on covered dolines, to validate the interpretation of their shape and depth. Key words: Magnetic and electrical

  7. Registration of knee joint surfaces for the in vivo study of joint injuries based on magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Rita W. T.; Habib, Ayman F.; Frayne, Richard; Ronsky, Janet L.

    2006-03-01

    In-vivo quantitative assessments of joint conditions and health status can help to increase understanding of the pathology of osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease that affects a large population each year. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a non-invasive and accurate means to assess and monitor joint properties, and has become widely used for diagnosis and biomechanics studies. Quantitative analyses and comparisons of MR datasets require accurate alignment of anatomical structures, thus image registration becomes a necessary procedure for these applications. This research focuses on developing a registration technique for MR knee joint surfaces to allow quantitative study of joint injuries and health status. It introduces a novel idea of translating techniques originally developed for geographic data in the field of photogrammetry and remote sensing to register 3D MR data. The proposed algorithm works with surfaces that are represented by randomly distributed points with no requirement of known correspondences. The algorithm performs matching locally by identifying corresponding surface elements, and solves for the transformation parameters relating the surfaces by minimizing normal distances between them. This technique was used in three applications to: 1) register temporal MR data to verify the feasibility of the algorithm to help monitor diseases, 2) quantify patellar movement with respect to the femur based on the transformation parameters, and 3) quantify changes in contact area locations between the patellar and femoral cartilage at different knee flexion angles. The results indicate accurate registration and the proposed algorithm can be applied for in-vivo study of joint injuries with MRI.

  8. High resolution three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging of human finger joints in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Lei; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-08-01

    We present a method for noninvasively imaging the hand joints using a three-dimensional (3D) photoacoustic imaging (PAI) system. This 3D PAI system utilizes cylindrical scanning in data collection and virtual-detector concept in image reconstruction. The maximum lateral and axial resolutions of the PAI system are 70 μm and 240 μm. The cross-sectional photoacoustic images of a healthy joint clearly exhibited major internal structures including phalanx and tendons, which are not available from the current photoacoustic imaging methods. The in vivo PAI results obtained are comparable with the corresponding 3.0 T MRI images of the finger joint. This study suggests that the proposed method has the potential to be used in early detection of joint diseases such as osteoarthritis.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Arthur B; Laor, Tal

    2013-12-01

    For more than a century, it has been known that juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) can affect the temporomandibular joint. With advances in medical imaging in more recent decades, there has been an increase in awareness of the spectrum of pathology that can affect the temporomandibular joint in children with JIA. This pathology can lead to symptoms ranging from decreased chewing ability, jaw and facial pain, headaches and malocclusion to craniofacial morphological changes such as a retrognathic mandible. The purpose of this review is to suggest an MR imaging protocol for the temporomandibular joint and to illustrate normal and abnormal appearances of the joint in children with JIA. PMID:24257698

  10. "Geophysical paleoseismology" through high resolution GPR data: A case of shallow faulting imaging in Central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercoli, Maurizio; Pauselli, Cristina; Frigeri, Alessandro; Forte, Emanuele; Federico, Costanzo

    2013-03-01

    In this work we report a GPR study across a tectonic discontinuity in Central Italy. The surveyed area is located in the Castelluccio depression, a tectonic basin in the Central Apennines, close to the western border of the Mt. Vettore. Its West flank is characterised by a set of W-dipping normal faults, considered active and capable of generating strong earthquakes (Mw = 6.5, Galli et al., 2008). A secondary fault strand, already studied with paleo-seismological analysis (Galadini and Galli, 2003), has been observed in the Quaternary deposits of the Prate Pala alluvial fan. We first defined the survey site using the data available in literature and referring to topographic and geological maps, evaluating also additional methodologies, such as orthophoto interpretation, geomorphologic analysis and integrating all the information in a GIS environment. In addition, we made extensive use of GPR modelling, reproducing the geometric characteristics of the inferred fault area and interpreting the synthetic profiles to recognise local geophysical indications of faulting on the radargrams. Finally, we performed a GPR survey employing antennas with different frequencies, to record both 2D Common Offset profiles and Common Mid Point (CMP) gathers for a more accurate velocity estimation of the investigated deposits. In this paper we focus on the evaluation of the most appropriated processing techniques and on data interpretation. Moreover we compare real and synthetic data, which allow us to better highlight some characteristic geophysical signatures of a shallow fault zone.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of hip joint cartilage and labrum

    PubMed Central

    Zilkens, Christoph; Miese, Falk; Jäger, Marcus; Bittersohl, Bernd; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2011-01-01

    Hip joint instability and impingement are the most common biomechanical risk factors that put the hip joint at risk to develop premature osteoarthritis. Several surgical procedures like periacetabular osteotomy for hip dysplasia or hip arthroscopy or safe surgical hip dislocation for femoroacetabular impingement aim at restoring the hip anatomy. However, the success of joint preserving surgical procedures is limited by the amount of pre-existing cartilage damage. Biochemically sensitive MRI techniques like delayed Gadolinium Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) might help to monitor the effect of surgical or non-surgical procedures in the effort to halt or even reverse joint damage. PMID:22053256

  12. Geophysical imaging of the inner structure of a lava dome and its environment through gravimetry and magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portal, A.; Gailler, L.-S.; Labazuy, P.; Lénat, J.-F.

    2016-06-01

    Volcanic lava domes are compound edifices resulting from complex growth processes including intrusion and extrusion phases, explosions and collapses. Here, we present the study of a complex volcanic system, located in the Chaîne des Puys volcanic field (French Massif Central, France) and centred on the Puy de Dôme volcano, an 11,000 years old volcano. Our approach is based on a morpho-structural analysis of a high resolution DTM (0.5 m) and geophysical imaging methods. Both gravity and magnetic high resolution surveys have been carried out on the lava dome and the nearby volcanic structures. We computed 3D inverse and 2D forwards models. Based on our current knowledges about volcanic dome structure, the geophysical models allow us to propose a synthetic geological model of the inner structure of the Puy de Dôme and surrounding areas. This model suggests a scenario for the formation of the lava dome and the inferred intrusions located on both sides. The Puy de Dôme could possibly be the southern tip of the northern intrusion.

  13. Optical imaging of the prefrontal activity in joint attention experience

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Lina; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) was used to measure the prefrontal activity in joint attention experience. 16 healthy adults participated in the experiment in which 42 optical channels were fixed over the anterior prefrontal cortex (aPFC), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and a small anterior portion of the superior temporal gyrus (STG). Video stimuli were used to engender joint or non-joint attention experience in observers. Cortical hemodynamic response and functional connectivity were measured and averaged across all subjects for each stimulus condition. Our data showed the activation in joint attention located in the aPFC and DLPFC bilaterally, but dominantly in the left hemisphere. This observation, together with the previous findings on infants and children, provides a clear developmental scenario on the prefrontal activation associated with joint attention process. In the case of non-joint attention condition, only a small region of the right DLPFC was activated. Functional connectivity was observed to be enhanced, but differently in joint and non-joint attention condition. PMID:26417513

  14. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Rajian, Justin R.; Girish, Gandikota; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Wang, Xueding

    2013-01-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) dual modality system, for imaging human peripheral joints, is introduced. The system utilizes a commercial US unit for both US control imaging and PA signal acquisition. Preliminary in vivo evaluation of the system, on normal volunteers, revealed that this system can recover both the structural and functional information of intra- and extra-articular tissues. Confirmed by the control US images, the system, on the PA mode, can differentiate tendon from surrounding soft tissue based on the endogenous optical contrast. Presenting both morphological and pathological information in joint, this system holds promise for diagnosis and characterization of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  15. Optical tomographic imaging of vascular and metabolic reactivity in rheumatoid joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasker, Joseph M.; Dwyer, Edward; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2005-04-01

    Our group has recently established that joints affected by Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) can be distinguished from healthy joints through measurements of the scattering coefficient. We showed that a high scattering coefficient in the center of the joint is indicative of a joint with RA. While these results were encouraging, data to date still suffers from low sensitivity and specificity. Possibly higher specificities and sensitivities can be achieved if dynamic measurements of hemodynamic and metabolic processes in the synovium are considered. Using our dual-wavelength imaging system together with previously implemented model-based iterative image reconstruction schemes, we have performed initial dynamic imaging studies involving healthy human volunteers and patients affected by RA. These case studies seem to confirm our hypothesis that differences in the vascular reactivity exist between affected and unaffected joints.

  16. Analysis of in-situ rock joint strength using digital borehole scanner images

    SciTech Connect

    Thapa, B.B.

    1994-09-01

    The availability of high resolution digital images of borehole walls using the Borehole Scanner System has made it possible to develop new methods of in-situ rock characterization. This thesis addresses particularly new approaches to the characterization of in-situ joint strength arising from surface roughness. An image processing technique is used to extract the roughness profile from joints in the unrolled image of the borehole wall. A method for estimating in-situ Rengers envelopes using this data is presented along with results from using the method on joints in a borehole in porphyritic granite. Next, an analysis of the joint dilation angle anisotropy is described and applied to the porphyritic granite joints. The results indicate that the dilation angle of the joints studied are anisotropic at small scales and tend to reflect joint waviness as scale increases. A procedure to unroll the opposing roughness profiles to obtain a two dimensional sample is presented. The measurement of apertures during this process is shown to produce an error which increases with the dip of the joint. The two dimensional sample of opposing profiles is used in a new kinematic analysis of the joint shear stress-shear deformation behavior. Examples of applying these methods on the porphyritic granite joints are presented. The unrolled opposing profiles were used in a numerical simulation of a direct shear test using Discontinuous Deformation Analysis. Results were compared to laboratory test results using core samples containing the same joints. The simulated dilatancy and shear stress-shear deformation curves were close to the laboratory curves in the case of a joint in porphyritic granite.

  17. Geophysical imaging reveals brine system beneath an ice-sealed Antarctic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugan, H.; Doran, P. T.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Mikucki, J.; Arcone, S. A.; Auken, E.; Schamper, C.; Virginia, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    The habitability of polar desert environments on Earth, and other neighboring planets, is dependent on the availability of liquid water. In areas where the surface is frozen, lenses of water present in the subsurface may act as microbial refugia. In the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica, the presence of highly saline brine in valley lakes raises the potential for the existence of a deep groundwater network. We report on a geophysical study that shows Lake Vida, in Victoria Valley, is nearly frozen, and the remaining brine is confined beneath thick ice. Near surface, bathymetric mapping of grounded lake ice was accomplished from a series of ground penetrating radar surveys. Radar penetration was limited to 20 m. An airborne transient electromagnetic survey (AEM) revealed a low resistivity zone at 30-100 m depth beneath the surface of the lake. Based on previous knowledge of brine chemistry and local geology, this zone is interpreted as brine saturated unconsolidated sediments with a porosity of 23-42%. Brine volume is calculated at 15 to 32 million cubic meters, which is of similar magnitude to the brine volume in nearby saline lakes. The AEM survey provided a means of quantifying the spatial extent of deep subsurface brine in this remote environment, and has provided a new perspective on the potential for subsurface habitats in areas often considered devoid of life.

  18. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  19. A photoacoustic tomography and ultrasound combined system for proximal interphalangeal joint imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Rajian, Justin R.; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2013-03-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) dual modality system for imaging human peripheral joints is introduced. The system utilizes a commercial US unit for both US control imaging and PA signal acquisition. Preliminary in vivo evaluation of the system on normal volunteers revealed that this system can recover both the structural and functional information of intra- and extra-articular tissues. Presenting both morphological and pathological information in joint, this system holds promise for diagnosis and characterization of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Automated extraction of absorption features from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer (GERIS) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, Fred A.; Calvin, Wendy M.; Seznec, Olivier

    1988-01-01

    Automated techniques were developed for the extraction and characterization of absorption features from reflectance spectra. The absorption feature extraction algorithms were successfully tested on laboratory, field, and aircraft imaging spectrometer data. A suite of laboratory spectra of the most common minerals was analyzed and absorption band characteristics tabulated. A prototype expert system was designed, implemented, and successfully tested to allow identification of minerals based on the extracted absorption band characteristics. AVIRIS spectra for a site in the northern Grapevine Mountains, Nevada, have been characterized and the minerals sericite (fine grained muscovite) and dolomite were identified. The minerals kaolinite, alunite, and buddingtonite were identified and mapped for a site at Cuprite, Nevada, using the feature extraction algorithms on the new Geophysical and Environmental Research 64 channel imaging spectrometer (GERIS) data. The feature extraction routines (written in FORTRAN and C) were interfaced to the expert system (written in PROLOG) to allow both efficient processing of numerical data and logical spectrum analysis.

  1. 4D rotational x-ray imaging of wrist joint dynamic motion

    SciTech Connect

    Carelsen, Bart; Bakker, Niels H.; Strackee, Simon D.; Boon, Sjirk N.; Maas, Mario; Sabczynski, Joerg; Grimbergen, Cornelis A.; Streekstra, Geert J.

    2005-09-15

    Current methods for imaging joint motion are limited to either two-dimensional (2D) video fluoroscopy, or to animated motions from a series of static three-dimensional (3D) images. 3D movement patterns can be detected from biplane fluoroscopy images matched with computed tomography images. This involves several x-ray modalities and sophisticated 2D to 3D matching for the complex wrist joint. We present a method for the acquisition of dynamic 3D images of a moving joint. In our method a 3D-rotational x-ray (3D-RX) system is used to image a cyclically moving joint. The cyclic motion is synchronized to the x-ray acquisition to yield multiple sets of projection images, which are reconstructed to a series of time resolved 3D images, i.e., four-dimensional rotational x ray (4D-RX). To investigate the obtained image quality parameters the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function (PSF) via the edge spread function and the contrast to noise ratio between air and phantom were determined on reconstructions of a bullet and rod phantom, using 4D-RX as well as stationary 3D-RX images. The CNR in volume reconstructions based on 251 projection images in the static situation and on 41 and 34 projection images of a moving phantom were 6.9, 3.0, and 2.9, respectively. The average FWHM of the PSF of these same images was, respectively, 1.1, 1.7, and 2.2 mm orthogonal to the motion and parallel to direction of motion 0.6, 0.7, and 1.0 mm. The main deterioration of 4D-RX images compared to 3D-RX images is due to the low number of projection images used and not to the motion of the object. Using 41 projection images seems the best setting for the current system. Experiments on a postmortem wrist show the feasibility of the method for imaging 3D dynamic joint motion. We expect that 4D-RX will pave the way to improved assessment of joint disorders by detection of 3D dynamic motion patterns in joints.

  2. Joint Probability Models of Radiology Images and Clinical Annotations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Corey Wells

    2009-01-01

    Radiology data, in the form of images and reports, is growing at a high rate due to the introduction of new imaging modalities, new uses of existing modalities, and the growing importance of objective image information in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. This increase has resulted in an enormous set of image data that is richly annotated…

  3. Creating a system for the geological exploitation of satellite images: Automatic mapping and geophysical data comparison. [in the Pyrenees and Alps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braconne, S.; Cavalier, M.; Dubesset, M.; Guillemot, J.; Guy, M.

    1975-01-01

    A method is presented for integrating satellite images into a geophysical data interpretation system. Aspects of the method include: an attempt to automatically interpret images by structural, mainly topological, methods for the mapping of geological contours; an analysis of the position relation of the contours gives a skeleton stratigraphy (order of succession); and a system combining some of the extracted elements with geographic data to make an objective search for an interpretation hypothesis. Some examples are presented.

  4. Agricultural Geophysics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The four geophysical methods predominantly used for agricultural purposes are resistivity, electromagnetic induction, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and time domain reflectometry (TDR). Resistivity and electromagnetic induction methods are typically employed to map lateral variations of apparent so...

  5. Exploration Geophysics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savit, Carl H.

    1978-01-01

    Expansion of activity and confirmation of new technological directions characterized several fields of exploration geophysics in 1977. Advances in seismic-reflection exploration have been especially important. (Author/MA)

  6. Exploration Geophysics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espey, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    Describes geophysical techniques such as seismic, gravity, and magnetic surveys of offshare acreage, and land-data gathering from a three-dimensional representation made from closely spaced seismic lines. (MLH)

  7. Integrated photoacoustic and diffuse optical tomography system for imaging of human finger joints in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xi, Lei; Jiang, Huabei

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we developed a dual-modality tomographic system that integrated photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and diffuse optical tomography (DOT) into a single platform for imaging human finger joints with fine structures and associated optical properties. In PAI, spherical focused transducers were utilized to collect acoustic signals, and the concept of virtual detector was applied in a conventional back-projection algorithm to improve the image quality. A finite-element based reconstruction algorithm was employed to quantitatively recover optical property distribution in the objects for DOT. The phantom results indicate that PAI has a maximum lateral resolution of 70 µm in resolving structures of targets. DOT was able to recover both optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of targets accurately. To validate the potential of this system in clinical diagnosis of joint diseases, the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints of 4 healthy female volunteers were imaged. We successfully obtained high-resolution images of the phalanx and the surrounding soft tissue via PAI, and recovered both optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of phalanx using DOT. The in vivo results suggest that this dual-modality system has the potential for the early diagnosis of joint diseases such as osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Integrated PAI/DOT imaging interface (top) and typical reconstruction of structures and associated optical properties of a female finger joint via PAI and DOT (bottom). PMID:26431473

  8. Joint demosaicking and integer-ratio downsampling algorithm for color filter array image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangyoon; Kang, Moon Gi

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a joint demosacking and integer-ratio downsampling algorithm for color filter array (CFA) images. Color demosaicking is a necessary part of image signal processing to obtain full color image for digital image recording system using single sensor. Also, such as mobile devices, the obtained image from sensor has to be downsampled to be display because the resolution of display is smaller than that of image. The conventional method is "Demosaicking first and downsampling later". However, this procedure requires a significant hardware resources and computational cost. In this paper, we proposed a method in which demosaicking and downsampling are working simultaneously. We analyze the Bayer CFA image in frequency domain, and then joint demosaicking and downsampling with integer-ratio scheme based on signal decomposition of luma and chrominance components. Experimental results show that the proposed method produces the high quality performance with much lower com putational cost and less hardware resources.

  9. 3D kinematics of the tarsal joints from magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Bruce E.; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Okereke, Enyi; Hillstrom, Howard J.; Siegler, Sorin; Ringleb, Stacie I.; Imhauser, Carl W.

    2001-09-01

    We have developed a method for analyzing motion at skeletal joints based on the 3D reconstruction of magnetic resonance (MR) image data. Since the information about each voxel in MR images includes its location in the scanner, it follows that information is available for each organ whose 3D surface is computed from a series of MR slices. In addition, there is information on the shape and orientation of each organ, and the contact areas of adjacent bones. By collecting image data in different positions we can calculate the motion of the individual bones. We have used this method to study human foot bones, in order to understand normal and abnormal foot function. It has been used to evaluate patients with tarsal coalitions, various forms of pes planus, ankle sprains, and several other conditions. A newly described feature of this system is the ability to visualize the contact area at a joint, as determined by the region of minimum distance. The display of contact area helps understand abnormal joint function. Also, the use of 3D imaging reveals motions in joints which cannot otherwise be visualized, such as the subtalar joint, for more accurate diagnosis of joint injury.

  10. Preserving the Illustrated Text. Report of the Joint Task Force on Text and Image.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Preservation and Access, Washington, DC.

    The mission of the Joint Task Force on Text and Image was to inquire into the problems, needs, and methods for preserving images in text that are important for scholarship in a wide range of disciplines and to draw from that exploration a set of principles, guidelines, and recommendations for a comprehensive national strategy for image…

  11. Geostatistical noise filtering of geophysical images : application to unexploded ordnance (UXO) sites.

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Hirotaka; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Coburn, Timothy C.

    2004-07-01

    Geostatistical and non-geostatistical noise filtering methodologies, factorial kriging and a low-pass filter, and a region growing method are applied to analytic signal magnetometer images at two UXO contaminated sites to delineate UXO target areas. Overall delineation performance is improved by removing background noise. Factorial kriging slightly outperforms the low-pass filter but there is no distinct difference between them in terms of finding anomalies of interest.

  12. A framework for joint image-and-shape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Tannenbaum, Allen; Bouix, Sylvain

    2014-03-01

    Techniques in medical image analysis are many times used for the comparison or regression on the intensities of images. In general, the domain of the image is a given Cartesian grids. Shape analysis, on the other hand, studies the similarities and differences among spatial objects of arbitrary geometry and topology. Usually, there is no function defined on the domain of shapes. Recently, there has been a growing needs for defining and analyzing functions defined on the shape space, and a coupled analysis on both the shapes and the functions defined on them. Following this direction, in this work we present a coupled analysis for both images and shapes. As a result, the statistically significant discrepancies in both the image intensities as well as on the underlying shapes are detected. The method is applied on both brain images for the schizophrenia and heart images for atrial fibrillation patients.

  13. MO-C-BRE-01: The WMIS-AAPM Joint Symposium: Advances in Molecular Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Contag, C; Pogue, B; Lewis, J

    2014-06-15

    This joint symposium of the World Molecular Imaging Society (WMIS) and the AAPM includes three luminary speakers discussing work in new paradigms of molecular imaging in cancer (Contag), applications of optical imaging technologies to radiation therapy (Pogue) and an update on PET imaging as a surrogate biomarker for cancer progression and response to therapy. Learning Objectives: Appreciate the current trends in molecular and systems imaging. Understand how optical imaging technologies, and particularly Cerenkov detectors, can be used in advancing radiation oncology. Stay current on new PET tracers - and targets - of interest in cancer treatment.

  14. ERS-1 Investigations of Southern Ocean Sea Ice Geophysics Using Combined Scatterometer and SAR Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, M.; Early, D.; Long, D.

    1994-01-01

    Coregistered ERS-1 SAR and Scatterometer data are presented for the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. Calibrated image backscatter statistics are extracted from data acquired in regions where surface measurements were made during two extensive international Weddell Sea experiments in 1992. Changes in summer ice-surface conditions, due to temperature and wind, are shown to have a large impact on observed microwave backscatter values. Winter calibrated backscatter distributions are also investigated as a way of describing ice thickness conditions in different location during winter. Coregistered SAR and EScat data over a manned drifting ice station are used to illustrate the seasonal signature changes occurring during the fall freeze-up transition.

  15. Segmentation of multifrequency polarimetric radar images to facilitate the inference of geophysical parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnette, C F.; Dubois, P. C.; Van Zyl, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    An unsupervised clustering algorithm is used to segment multifrequency polarimetric radar data from the NASA/JPL airborne SAR (synthetic aperture radar). Twenty-two parameters are evaluated for their discriminatory capability for each pixel of an image. A clustering analysis is then performed using different subsets of these parameters. This analysis relies on data taken as part of an intensive field experiment during the summer of 1988 in the vicinity of the Pisgah lava flow in the Mojave Desert in southern California. As part of the experiment, extensive ground truth was acquired, including dielectric constant and topography measurements. Segmentation results show good agreement with these measurements.

  16. Multispectral Joint Image Restoration via Optimizing a Scale Map.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaoyong; Yan, Qiong; Xu, Li; Ma, Lizhuang; Jia, Jiaya

    2015-12-01

    Color, infrared and flash images captured in different fields can be employed to effectively eliminate noise and other visual artifacts. We propose a two-image restoration framework considering input images from different fields, for example, one noisy color image and one dark-flashed near-infrared image. The major issue in such a framework is to handle all structure divergence and find commonly usable edges and smooth transitions for visually plausible image reconstruction. We introduce a novel scale map as a competent representation to explicitly model derivative-level confidence and propose new functions and a numerical solver to effectively infer it following our important structural observations. Multispectral shadow detection is also used to make our system more robust. Our method is general and shows a principled way to solve multispectral restoration problems. PMID:26539855

  17. Spatially distributed characterization of hyporheic solute transport during baseflow recession in a headwater mountain stream using electrical geophysical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Adam S.; Gooseff, Michael N.; Fitzgerald, Michael; Voltz, Thomas J.; Singha, Kamini

    2014-09-01

    The transport of solutes along hyporheic flowpaths is recognized as central to numerous biogeochemical cycles, yet our understanding of how this transport changes with baseflow recession, particularly in a spatially distributed manner, is limited. We conducted four steady-state solute tracer injections and collected electrical resistivity data to characterize hyporheic transport during seasonal baseflow recession in the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest (Oregon, USA). We used temporal moment analysis of pixels generated from inversion of electrical resistivity data to compress time-lapse data into descriptive statistics (mean arrival time, temporal variance, and temporal skewness) for each pixel. A spatial visualization of these temporal moments in the subsurface at each of five 2-D transects perpendicular to the stream was interpreted to inform transport processes. As baseflow recession progressed we found increasing first arrival times, persistence, mean arrival time, temporal variance, and coefficient of variation, and decreasing skewness. These trends suggest that changes in hydrologic forcing alter the relative influence of transport phenomena (e.g., advection vs. other transport processes such as dispersion) along flowpaths. Spatial coverage obtained from electrical resistivity images allowed for qualitative comparison of spatial patterns in temporal moments both at an individual cross-section as well as between cross sections. We found that geomorphologic controls (e.g., bedrock confinement vs. gravel wedge deposits) resulted in different distributions and metrics of hyporheic transport. Results of this study provide further evidence that hyporheic transport is highly variable both in space and through the baseflow recession period. Geophysical images differentiate advection-dominated flowpaths from those that are more affected by other transport processes (e.g., dispersion, mobile-immobile exchange).

  18. Blind image quality assessment using joint statistics of gradient magnitude and Laplacian features.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wufeng; Mou, Xuanqin; Zhang, Lei; Bovik, Alan C; Feng, Xiangchu

    2014-11-01

    Blind image quality assessment (BIQA) aims to evaluate the perceptual quality of a distorted image without information regarding its reference image. Existing BIQA models usually predict the image quality by analyzing the image statistics in some transformed domain, e.g., in the discrete cosine transform domain or wavelet domain. Though great progress has been made in recent years, BIQA is still a very challenging task due to the lack of a reference image. Considering that image local contrast features convey important structural information that is closely related to image perceptual quality, we propose a novel BIQA model that utilizes the joint statistics of two types of commonly used local contrast features: 1) the gradient magnitude (GM) map and 2) the Laplacian of Gaussian (LOG) response. We employ an adaptive procedure to jointly normalize the GM and LOG features, and show that the joint statistics of normalized GM and LOG features have desirable properties for the BIQA task. The proposed model is extensively evaluated on three large-scale benchmark databases, and shown to deliver highly competitive performance with state-of-the-art BIQA models, as well as with some well-known full reference image quality assessment models. PMID:25216482

  19. Radiological and Radionuclide Imaging of Degenerative Disease of the Facet Joints.

    PubMed

    Shur, Natalie; Corrigan, Alexis; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Desai, Amidevi; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    The facet joint has been increasingly implicated as a potential source of lower back pain. Diagnosis can be challenging as there is not a direct correlation between facet joint disease and clinical or radiological features. The purpose of this article is to review the diagnosis, treatment, and current imaging modality options in the context of degenerative facet joint disease. We describe each modality in turn with a pictorial review using current evidence. Newer hybrid imaging techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) provide additional information relative to the historic gold standard magnetic resonance imaging. The diagnostic benefits of SPECT/CT include precise localization and characterization of spinal lesions and improved diagnosis for lower back pain. It may have a role in selecting patients for local therapeutic injections, as well as guiding their location with increased precision. PMID:26170560

  20. Radiological and Radionuclide Imaging of Degenerative Disease of the Facet Joints

    PubMed Central

    Shur, Natalie; Corrigan, Alexis; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Desai, Amidevi; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    The facet joint has been increasingly implicated as a potential source of lower back pain. Diagnosis can be challenging as there is not a direct correlation between facet joint disease and clinical or radiological features. The purpose of this article is to review the diagnosis, treatment, and current imaging modality options in the context of degenerative facet joint disease. We describe each modality in turn with a pictorial review using current evidence. Newer hybrid imaging techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) provide additional information relative to the historic gold standard magnetic resonance imaging. The diagnostic benefits of SPECT/CT include precise localization and characterization of spinal lesions and improved diagnosis for lower back pain. It may have a role in selecting patients for local therapeutic injections, as well as guiding their location with increased precision. PMID:26170560

  1. Integrating multidisciplinary, multiscale geological and geophysical data to image the Castrovillari fault (Northern Calabria, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinti, F. R.; Pauselli, C.; Livio, F.; Ercoli, M.; Brunori, C. A.; Ferrario, M. F.; Volpe, R.; Civico, R.; Pantosti, D.; Pinzi, S.; De Martini, P. M.; Ventura, G.; Alfonsi, L.; Gambillara, R.; Michetti, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Castrovillari scarps (Cfs) are located in northern Calabria (Italy) and consist of three main WSW-dipping fault scarps resulting from multiple rupture events. At the surface, these scarps are defined by multiple breaks in slope. Despite its near-surface complexity, the faults likely merge to form a single normal fault at about 200 m depth, which we refer to as the Castrovillari fault. We present the results of a multidisciplinary and multiscale study at a selected site of the Cfs with the aim to (i) characterize the geometry at the surface and at depth and (ii) obtain constraints on the fault slip history. We investigate the site by merging data from quantitative geomorphological analyses, electrical resistivity and ground penetrating radar surveys, and palaeoseismological trenching along a ˜40 m high scarp. The closely spaced investigations allow us to reconstruct the shallow stratigraphy, define the fault locations, and measure the faulted stratigraphic offsets down to 20 m depth. Despite the varying resolutions, each of the adopted approaches suggests the presence of sub-parallel fault planes below the scarps at approximately the same location. The merged datasets permit the evaluation of the fault array (along strike for 220 m within a 370-m-wide zone). The main fault zone consists of two closely spaced NW-SE striking fault planes in the upper portion of the scarp slope and another fault at the scarp foot. The 3-D image of the fault surfaces shows west to southwest dipping planes with values between 70° and 80°; the two closely spaced planes join at about 200 m below the surface. The 8-to-12-m-high upper fault, which shows the higher vertical displacements, accommodated most of the deformation during the Holocene. Results from the trenching analysis indicate a minimum slip per event of 0.6 m and a maximum short-term slip rate of 0.6 mm yr-1 for the Cf. The shallow subsurface imaging techniques are particularly helpful in evaluating the possible field

  2. Holographic security system based on image domain joint transform correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Michael; Odinokov, Sergey B.; Bondarev, Leonid A.; Kurakin, Sergey V.; Matveyev, Sergey V.; Belyaev, V. S.

    2002-04-01

    We describe holographic security system providing machine reading of the holographic information and matching it with the reference one by optical means. The security holographic mark includes several test holograms and should be applied to a carrier: ID-card, paper seal etc. Each of the holograms stores a part of entire image, stored in the reference hologram. Image domain JTC is used to match the images retrieved from the holograms. Being recorded and retrieved, the images provides correlation peaks with special positions, with a strict dependence on the tested and reference holograms mutual shifts. The system proposed works like usual JTC with a few useful differences. The image domain recognizing is a result of Fresnel holographic technique of the images recording. It provides more effective usage of the light addressed SLM (LASLM) work pupil and resolution in more simple and compact device. Few correlation peaks enhances the device recognizing probability. We describe the real-time experimental arrangement based on LASLM. The experimental results are in a good correspondence with computer simulations. We also show in practice that good results may be obtained while using the image domain JTC technique in despite of the low LASLM resolution and the device compact size.

  3. Joint sparse coding based spatial pyramid matching for classification of color medical image.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jun; Li, Yi; Zhu, Jie; Sun, Haojie; Cai, Yin

    2015-04-01

    Although color medical images are important in clinical practice, they are usually converted to grayscale for further processing in pattern recognition, resulting in loss of rich color information. The sparse coding based linear spatial pyramid matching (ScSPM) and its variants are popular for grayscale image classification, but cannot extract color information. In this paper, we propose a joint sparse coding based SPM (JScSPM) method for the classification of color medical images. A joint dictionary can represent both the color information in each color channel and the correlation between channels. Consequently, the joint sparse codes calculated from a joint dictionary can carry color information, and therefore this method can easily transform a feature descriptor originally designed for grayscale images to a color descriptor. A color hepatocellular carcinoma histological image dataset was used to evaluate the performance of the proposed JScSPM algorithm. Experimental results show that JScSPM provides significant improvements as compared with the majority voting based ScSPM and the original ScSPM for color medical image classification. PMID:24976104

  4. Solid-state temporomandibular joint imaging: accuracy in detecting osseous changes of degenerative joint disease and determining condylar spatial relations.

    PubMed

    Scarfe, William C; Farman, Allan G; Silveira, Anibal; Fairbanks, Brandon W; Kelly, Paul J

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the off-label use of an intraoral charge-coupled device (CCD) for extraoral transcranial radiography of the temporomandibular joint. Corrected linear tomograms and transcranial images made with conventional screen-film combinations and a CCD detector were compared with sectioned cadaver specimens. Radiation dosage, qualitative assessment of condylar degenerative features, and condylar position within the glenoid fossa of the 3 modalities were assessed and compared. The CCD method required special adjustments to achieve adequate quality, and it involved greater exposure than the other methods. This use of this intraoral system for extraoral imaging cannot now be recommended, but future refinements might make it more viable. PMID:14560277

  5. Joint digital-optical design of imaging systems for grayscale objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, M. Dirk; Stork, David G.

    2008-09-01

    In many imaging applications, the objects of interest have broad range of strongly correlated spectral components. For example, the spectral components of grayscale objects such as media printed with black ink or toner are nearly perfectly correlated spatially. We describe how to exploit such correlation during the design of electro-optical imaging systems to achieve greater imaging performance and lower optical component cost. These advantages are achieved by jointly optimizing optical, detector, and digital image processing subsystems using a unified statistical imaging performance measure. The resulting optical systems have lower F# and greater depth-of-field than systems that do not exploit spectral correlations.

  6. Bayesian Gibbs Markov chain: MRF-based Stochastic Joint Inversion of Hydrological and Geophysical Datasets for Improved Characterization of Aquifer Heterogeneities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oware, E. K.

    2015-12-01

    Modeling aquifer heterogeneities (AH) is a complex, multidimensional problem that mostly requires stochastic imaging strategies for tractability. While the traditional Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (McMC) provides a powerful framework to model AH, the generic McMC is computationally prohibitive and, thus, unappealing for large-scale problems. An innovative variant of the McMC scheme that imposes priori spatial statistical constraints on model parameter updates, for improved characterization in a computationally efficient manner is proposed. The proposed algorithm (PA) is based on Markov random field (MRF) modeling, which is an image processing technique that infers the global behavior of a random field from its local properties, making the MRF approach well suited for imaging AH. MRF-based modeling leverages the equivalence of Gibbs (or Boltzmann) distribution (GD) and MRF to identify the local properties of an MRF in terms of the easily quantifiable Gibbs energy. The PA employs the two-step approach to model the lithological structure of the aquifer and the hydraulic properties within the identified lithologies simultaneously. It performs local Gibbs energy minimizations along a random path, which requires parameters of the GD (spatial statistics) to be specified. A PA that implicitly infers site-specific GD parameters within a Bayesian framework is also presented. The PA is illustrated with a synthetic binary facies aquifer with a lognormal heterogeneity simulated within each facies. GD parameters of 2.6, 1.2, -0.4, and -0.2 were estimated for the horizontal, vertical, NESW, and NWSE directions, respectively. Most of the high hydraulic conductivity zones (facies 2) were fairly resolved (see results below) with facies identification accuracy rate of 81%, 89%, and 90% for the inversions conditioned on concentration (R1), resistivity (R2), and joint (R3), respectively. The incorporation of the conditioning datasets improved on the root mean square error (RMSE

  7. Adaptation of DICOM 3.0 to jaw joint movement images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negishi, Tohru; Katoh, Tsuguhisa; Fukushi, Masahiro; Senoo, Atsushi; Nomura, Yukihiro; Shimanishi, Satoshi

    2000-05-01

    Kinetic MRI images has been developed and often applied to the diagnosis of soft tissues. The diagnosis of the temporomandibular joint seemed to be one of the typical application fields and has been already clinically performed in some hospitals. Kinetic MRI images cannot be dealt with by DICOM systems, since the information elements and transfer syntax has not been defined yet. We tried to define them and examined its performances. Several objects of temporomandibular joint kinetic MRI images in Quick TIME format were created using the newly defined information elements. The objects were transferred and stored to a DICOM image server using CTN software. The stored images were successfully reconstructed and replayed. The outline of the newly defined information elements, the procedures for making and reconstruction of the objects were discussed in this paper.

  8. Joint high dynamic range imaging and color demosaicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwig, Johannes; Pauli, Josef

    2011-11-01

    A non-parametric high dynamic range (HDR) fusion approach is proposed that works on raw images of single-sensor color imaging devices which incorporate the Bayer pattern. Thereby the non-linear opto-electronic conversion function (OECF) is recovered before color demosaicing, so that interpolation artifacts do not aect the photometric calibration. Graph-based segmentation greedily clusters the exposure set into regions of roughly constant radiance in order to regularize the OECF estimation. The segmentation works on Gaussian-blurred sensor images, whereby the articial gray value edges caused by the Bayer pattern are smoothed away. With the OECF known the 32-bit HDR radiance map is reconstructed by weighted summation from the dierently exposed raw sensor images. Because the radiance map contains lower sensor noise than the individual images, it is nally demosaiced by weighted bilinear interpolation which prevents the interpolation across edges. Here, the previous segmentation results from the photometric calibration are utilized. After demosaicing, tone mapping is applied, whereby remaining interpolation artifacts are further damped due to the coarser tonal quantization of the resulting image.

  9. Weakly supervised automatic segmentation and 3D modeling of the knee joint from MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amami, Amal; Ben Azouz, Zouhour

    2013-12-01

    Automatic segmentation and 3D modeling of the knee joint from MR images, is a challenging task. Most of the existing techniques require the tedious manual segmentation of a training set of MRIs. We present an approach that necessitates the manual segmentation of one MR image. It is based on a volumetric active appearance model. First, a dense tetrahedral mesh is automatically created on a reference MR image that is arbitrary selected. Second, a pairwise non-rigid registration between each MRI from a training set and the reference MRI is computed. The non-rigid registration is based on a piece-wise affine deformation using the created tetrahedral mesh. The minimum description length is then used to bring all the MR images into a correspondence. An average image and tetrahedral mesh, as well as a set of main modes of variations, are generated using the established correspondence. Any manual segmentation of the average MRI can be mapped to other MR images using the AAM. The proposed approach has the advantage of simultaneously generating 3D reconstructions of the surface as well as a 3D solid model of the knee joint. The generated surfaces and tetrahedral meshes present the interesting property of fulfilling a correspondence between different MR images. This paper shows preliminary results of the proposed approach. It demonstrates the automatic segmentation and 3D reconstruction of a knee joint obtained by mapping a manual segmentation of a reference image.

  10. Talbot phase-contrast x-ray imaging for the small joints of the hand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutman, Dan; Beck, Thomas J.; Carrino, John A.; Bingham, Clifton O.

    2011-09-01

    A high-resolution radiographic method for soft tissues in the small joints of the hand would aid in the study and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA), which often attacks these joints. Of particular interest would be imaging with <100 µm resolution the joint cartilage, whose integrity is a main indicator of disease. Differential phase-contrast (DPC) or refraction-based x-ray imaging with Talbot grating interferometers could provide such a method, since it enhances soft tissue contrast and can be implemented with conventional x-ray tubes. A numerical joint phantom was first developed to assess the angular sensitivity and spectrum needed for a hand DPC system. The model predicts that, due to quite similar refraction indexes for joint soft tissues, the refraction effects are very small, requiring high angular resolution. To compare our model to experiment we built a high-resolution bench-top interferometer using 10 µm period gratings, a W anode tube and a CCD-based detector. Imaging experiments on animal cartilage and on a human finger support the model predictions. For instance, the estimated difference between the index of refraction of cartilage and water is of only several percent at ~25 keV mean energy, comparable to that between the linear attenuation coefficients. The potential advantage of DPC imaging thus comes mainly from the edge enhancement at the soft tissue interfaces. Experiments using a cadaveric human finger are also qualitatively consistent with the joint model, showing that refraction contrast is dominated by tendon embedded in muscle, with the cartilage layer difficult to observe in our conditions. Nevertheless, the model predicts that a DPC radiographic system for the small hand joints of the hand could be feasible using a low energy quasi-monochromatic source, such as a K-edge filtered Rh or Mo tube, in conjunction with a ~2 m long 'symmetric' interferometer operated in a high Talbot order.

  11. dPIRPLE: A Joint Estimation Framework for Deformable Registration and Penalized-Likelihood CT Image Reconstruction using Prior Images

    PubMed Central

    Dang, H.; Wang, A. S.; Sussman, Marc S.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Stayman, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    Sequential imaging studies are conducted in many clinical scenarios. Prior images from previous studies contain a great deal of patient-specific anatomical information and can be used in conjunction with subsequent imaging acquisitions to maintain image quality while enabling radiation dose reduction (e.g., through sparse angular sampling, reduction in fluence, etc.). However, patient motion between images in such sequences results in misregistration between the prior image and current anatomy. Existing prior-image-based approaches often include only a simple rigid registration step that can be insufficient for capturing complex anatomical motion, introducing detrimental effects in subsequent image reconstruction. In this work, we propose a joint framework that estimates the 3D deformation between an unregistered prior image and the current anatomy (based on a subsequent data acquisition) and reconstructs the current anatomical image using a model-based reconstruction approach that includes regularization based on the deformed prior image. This framework is referred to as deformable prior image registration, penalized-likelihood estimation (dPIRPLE). Central to this framework is the inclusion of a 3D B-spline-based free-form-deformation model into the joint registration-reconstruction objective function. The proposed framework is solved using a maximization strategy whereby alternating updates to the registration parameters and image estimates are applied allowing for improvements in both the registration and reconstruction throughout the optimization process. Cadaver experiments were conducted on a cone-beam CT testbench emulating a lung nodule surveillance scenario. Superior reconstruction accuracy and image quality were demonstrated using the dPIRPLE algorithm as compared to more traditional reconstruction methods including filtered backprojection, penalized-likelihood estimation (PLE), prior image penalized-likelihood estimation (PIPLE) without registration

  12. Generating High resolution surfaces from images: when photogrammetry and applied geophysics meets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretar, F.; Pierrot-Deseilligny, M.; Schelstraete, D.; Martin, O.; Quernet, P.

    2012-04-01

    Airborne digital photogrammetry has been used for some years to create digital models of the Earth's topography from calibrated cameras. But, in the recent years, the use of non-professionnal digital cameras has become valuable to reconstruct topographic surfaces. Today, the multi megapixel resolution of non-professionnal digital cameras, either used in a close range configuration or from low altitude flights, provide a ground pixel size of respectively a fraction of millimeters to couple of centimeters. Such advances turned into reality because the data processing chain made a tremendous break through during the last five years. This study investigates the potential of the open source software MICMAC developed by the French National Survey IGN (http://www.micmac.ign.fr) to calibrate unoriented digital images and calculate surface models of extremely high resolution for Earth Science purpose. We would like to report two experiences performed in 2011. The first has been performed in the context of risk assessment of rock falls and landslides along the cliffs of Normandy seashore. The acquisition protocol for the first site of "Criel-sur-Mer" has been very simple: a walk along the chalk vertical cliffs taking photos with a focal of 18mm every approx. 50m with an overlap of 80% allowed to generate 2.5km of digital surface at centimeter resolution. The site of "Les Vaches Noires" has been more complicated to acquire because of both the geology (dark clays) and the geometry (the landslide direction is parallel to the seashore and has a high field depth from the shore). We therefore developed an innovative device mounted on board of an autogyre (in-between ultralight power driven aircraft and helicopter). The entire area has been surveyed with a focal of 70mm at 400m asl with a ground pixel of 3cm. MICMAC gives the possibility to directly georeference digital Model. Here, it has been performed by a net of wireless GPS called Geocubes, also developed at IGN. The second

  13. Integrated Geophysical Detection of DNAPL Source Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-11-01

    Identification of subsurface organic contamination, particularly dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) is one of the highest priorities - and among the most difficult - for remediation of numerous sites, including those of the DOD and DOE. Complex resistivity (CR) is the only geophysical method that has been demonstrated in the laboratory to have high sensitivity to organic compounds, by detecting responses indicative of clay-organic electrochemistry. However, direct detection of organics in the field has been elusive, in part due to the difficulty of obtaining robust measurements at very low contaminant levels in the presence of heterogeneous geological materials and cultural interference (such as metallic utilities and remediation plumbing). This project sought to improve the capability to detect DNAPL by (1) better geophysical imaging of geological pathways that control DNAPL movement and (2) direct detection by detailed comparison of CR lab to field data using this improved imaging. For the first goal, algorithms were developed for the joint tomographic imaging of seismic and resistivity data. The method requires that an empirical relationship can be established between seismic and resistivity; if values are ultimately tied to specific lithologies, then the final tomographic product can be an actual geological cross-section. Because shallow subsurface investigations are now commonly performed using a cone penetrometer (CPT) a new vibratory seismic source was developed to identify sites with clay-organic reactions measurable in the lab from core samples, perform reconnaissance field surveys, and proceed to detailed 2D or 3D cross-hole imaging.

  14. Comparison and evaluation of joint histogram estimation methods for mutual information based image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yongfang; Chen, Hua-mei

    2005-04-01

    Joint histogram is the only quantity required to calculate the mutual information (MI) between two images. For MI based image registration, joint histograms are often estimated through linear interpolation or partial volume interpolation (PVI). It has been pointed out that both methods may result in a phenomenon known as interpolation induced artifacts. In this paper, we implemented a wide range of interpolation/approximation kernels for joint histogram estimation. Some kernels are nonnegative. In this case, these kernels are applied in two ways as the linear kernel is applied in linear interpolation and PVI. In addition, we implemented two other joint histogram estimation methods devised to overcome the interpolation artifact problem. They are nearest neighbor interpolation with jittered sampling with/without histogram blurring and data resampling. We used the clinical data obtained from Vanderbilt University for all of the experiments. The objective of this study is to perform a comprehensive comparison and evaluation of different joint histogram estimation methods for MI based image registration in terms of artifacts reduction and registration accuracy.

  15. Classification of optical tomographic images of rheumatoid finger joints with support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanyam, Vivek; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2005-04-01

    Over the last years we have developed a sagittal laser optical tomographic (SLOT) imaging system for the diagnosis and monitoring of inflammatory processes in proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). While cross sectional images of the distribution of optical properties can now be generated easily, clinical interpretation of these images remains a challenge. In first clinical studies involving 78 finger joints, we compared optical tomographs to ultrasound images and clinical analyses. Receiver-operator curves (ROC) were generated using various image parameters, such as minimum and maximum scattering or absorption coefficients. These studies resulted in specificities and sensitivities in the range of 0.7 to 0.76. Recently, we have trained support vector machines (SVMs) to classify images of healthy and diseased joints. By eliminating redundancy using feature selection, we are achieving sensitivities of 0.72 and specificities up to 1.0. Studies with larger patient groups are necessary to validate these findings; but these initial results support the expectation that SVMs and other machine learning techniques can considerably improve image interpretation analysis in optical tomography.

  16. Joint graph cut and relative fuzzy connectedness image segmentation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Krzysztof Chris; Miranda, Paulo A V; Falcão, Alexandre X; Udupa, Jayaram K

    2013-12-01

    We introduce an image segmentation algorithm, called GC(sum)(max), which combines, in novel manner, the strengths of two popular algorithms: Relative Fuzzy Connectedness (RFC) and (standard) Graph Cut (GC). We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that GC(sum)(max) preserves robustness of RFC with respect to the seed choice (thus, avoiding "shrinking problem" of GC), while keeping GC's stronger control over the problem of "leaking though poorly defined boundary segments." The analysis of GC(sum)(max) is greatly facilitated by our recent theoretical results that RFC can be described within the framework of Generalized GC (GGC) segmentation algorithms. In our implementation of GC(sum)(max) we use, as a subroutine, a version of RFC algorithm (based on Image Forest Transform) that runs (provably) in linear time with respect to the image size. This results in GC(sum)(max) running in a time close to linear. Experimental comparison of GC(sum)(max) to GC, an iterative version of RFC (IRFC), and power watershed (PW), based on a variety medical and non-medical images, indicates superior accuracy performance of GC(sum)(max) over these other methods, resulting in a rank ordering of GC(sum)(max)>PW∼IRFC>GC. PMID:23880374

  17. Time-lapse integrated geophysical imaging of magmatic injections and fluid-induced fracturing causing Campi Flegrei 1983-84 Unrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Siena, Luca; Crescentini, Luca; Amoruso, Antonella; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Castellano, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Geophysical precursors measured during Unrest episodes are a primary source of geophysical information to forecast eruptions at the largest and most potentially destructive volcanic calderas. Despite their importance and uniqueness, these precursors are also considered difficult to interpret and unrepresentative of larger eruptive events. Here, we show how novel geophysical imaging and monitoring techniques are instead able to represent the dynamic evolution of magmatic- and fluid-induced fracturing during the largest period of Unrest at Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy (1983-1984). The time-dependent patterns drawn by microseismic locations and deformation, once integrated by 3D attenuation tomography and absorption/scattering mapping, model injections of magma- and fluid-related materials in the form of spatially punctual microseismic bursts at a depth of 3.5 km, west and offshore the city of Pozzuoli. The shallowest four kilometres of the crust work as a deformation-based dipolar system before and after each microseismic shock. Seismicity and deformation contemporaneously focus on the point of injection; patterns then progressively crack the medium directed towards the second focus, a region at depths 1-1.5 km south of Solfatara. A single high-absorption and high-scattering aseismic anomaly marks zones of fluid storage overlying the first dipolar centre. These results provide the first direct geophysical signature of the processes of aseismic fluid release at the top of the basaltic basement, producing pozzolanic activity and recently observed via rock-physics and well-rock experiments. The microseismicity caused by fluids and gasses rises to surface via high-absorption north-east rising paths connecting the two dipolar centres, finally beingq being generally expelled from the maar diatreme Solfatara structure. Geophysical precursors during Unrest depict how volcanic stress was released at the Campi Flegrei caldera during its period of highest recorded seismicity

  18. Imaging of hemodynamic effects in arthritic joints with dynamic optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hielscher, Andreas H.; Lasker, Joseph M.; Fong, Christopher J.; Dwyer, Edward

    2007-07-01

    Optical probing of hemodynamics is often employed in areas such as brain, muscular, and breast-cancer imaging. In these studies an external stimulus is applied and changes in relevant physiological parameters, e.g. oxy or deoxyhemoglobin concentrations, are determined. In this work we present the first application of this method for characterizing joint diseases, especially effects of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the proximal-interphalangeal (PIP) finger joints. Using a dual-wavelength tomographic imaging system together with previously implemented model-based iterative image reconstruction schemes, we have performed dynamic imaging case studies on a limited number of healthy volunteers and patients diagnosed with RA. Inflating a sphygmomanometer cuff placed around the forearm we elicited a controlled vascular response. We observed pronounced differences between the hemodynamic effect occurring in healthy volunteers and patients affected by RA.

  19. In Vivo Measurement of the Subchondral Bone Thickness of Lumbar Facet Joint Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Duan, C. Y.; Espinoza Orías, A. A.; Shott, S.; An, H. S.; Andersson, G.B.J.; Hu, J.Z.; Lu, H. B.; Inoue, N.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objective To measure in vivo thicknesses of the facet joint subchondral bone across genders, age groups, with or without low back pain symptom groups and spinal levels. Methods Lumbar (L1–L2 to L5-S1) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in 81 subjects (41 males and 40 females, mean age 37.6 years). Thicknesses of the subchondral bone were measured in 1,620 facet joints using the MR images with custom-written image processing algorithms together with a multi-threshold segmentation technique using each facet joint’s middle axial-slice. This method was validated with 12 cadaver facet joints, scanned with both MR and micro-computed tomography images. Results An overall average thickness value for the 1,620 analyzed joints was measured as 1.56 ± 0.01 mm. The subchondral bone thickness values showed significant increases with successive lower spinal levels in the subjects without low back pain. The facet joint subchondral bone thickness in asymptomatic females was much smaller than in asymptomatic males. Mean subchondral bone thickness in the superior facet was greater than that in the inferior facet in both female and male asymptomatic subjects. Conclusions This study is the first to quantitatively show subchondral bone thickness using a validated MR-based technique. The subchondral bone thickness was greater in asymptomatic males and increased with each successive lower spinal level. These findings may suggest that the subchondral bone thickness increases with loading. Furthermore, the superior facet subchondral bone was thicker than the inferior facet in all cases regardless of gender, age or spinal level in the subjects without low back pain. More research is needed to link subchondral bone microstructure to facet joint kinematics and spinal loads. PMID:21034837

  20. Three-Dimensional Imaging of the Temporomandibular Joint in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D.; Pettigrew, J.; Udupa, J.

    1983-01-01

    Interpretational difficulties experienced with currently used diagnostic radiation techniques can be reduced via the use of 3-D images constructed from conventional CT data. Each 1.5 mm CT section yields interpolated sections (6 or 8) containing cubile voxels. Structures to be imaged separately are masked in the interpolated sections prior to windowing for the appropriate tissue. A special algorithm detects the surface boundary of the selected structure. The surface pixels are assigned gray levels based on their distance and attitude from the observer. When displayed, this produces a simulated 3-D image. The image can be rotated and sectioned. Rotations permit otherwise hidden surfaces to be examined. Images of two temporomandibular joints are presented, a) bony components; b) bony components + meniscus. It is concluded that the 3-D imaging process is potentially useful in diagnosing TMJ pathology. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8

  1. A novel joint data-hiding and compression scheme based on SMVQ and image inpainting.

    PubMed

    Chuan Qin; Chin-Chen Chang; Yi-Ping Chiu

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel joint data-hiding and compression scheme for digital images using side match vector quantization (SMVQ) and image inpainting. The two functions of data hiding and image compression can be integrated into one single module seamlessly. On the sender side, except for the blocks in the leftmost and topmost of the image, each of the other residual blocks in raster-scanning order can be embedded with secret data and compressed simultaneously by SMVQ or image inpainting adaptively according to the current embedding bit. Vector quantization is also utilized for some complex blocks to control the visual distortion and error diffusion caused by the progressive compression. After segmenting the image compressed codes into a series of sections by the indicator bits, the receiver can achieve the extraction of secret bits and image decompression successfully according to the index values in the segmented sections. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. PMID:23649221

  2. Nonrigid registration of joint histograms for intensity standardization in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Florian; Hornegger, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    A major disadvantage of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared to other imaging modalities like computed tomography is the fact that its intensities are not standardized. Our contribution is a novel method for MRI signal intensity standardization of arbitrary MRI scans, so as to create a pulse sequence dependent standard intensity scale. The proposed method is the first approach that uses the properties of all acquired images jointly (e.g., T1- and T2-weighted images). The image properties are stored in multidimensional joint histograms. In order to normalize the probability density function (pdf) of a newly acquired data set, a nonrigid image registration is performed between a reference and the joint histogram of the acquired images. From this matching a nonparametric transformation is obtained, which describes a mapping between the corresponding intensity spaces and subsequently adapts the image properties of the newly acquired series to a given standard. As the proposed intensity standardization is based on the probability density functions of the data sets only, it is independent of spatial coherence or prior segmentations of the reference and current images. Furthermore, it is not designed for a particular application, body region or acquisition protocol. The evaluation was done using two different settings. First, MRI head images were used, hence the approach can be compared to state-of-the-art methods. Second, whole body MRI scans were used. For this modality no other normalization algorithm is known in literature. The Jeffrey divergence of the pdfs of the whole body scans was reduced by 45%. All used data sets were acquired during clinical routine and thus included pathologies. PMID:19116196

  3. Figures of merit for optimizing imaging systems on joint estimation/detection tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarkson, Eric

    2016-05-01

    Previously published work on joint estimation/detection tasks has focused on the area under the Estimation Receiver Operating Characteristic (EROC) curve as a figure of merit for these tasks in imaging. A brief discussion of this concept and the corresponding ideal observer is included here, but the main focus is on three new approaches for system optimization on these joint tasks. One of these approaches is a generalization of Shannon Task Specific Information (TSI) to this setting. The form of this TSI is used to show that a system optimized for the joint task will not in general be optimized for the detection task alone. Another figure of merit for these joint tasks is the Bayesian Risk, where a cost is assigned to all detection outcomes and to the estimation errors, and then averaged over all sources of randomness in the object ensemble and the imaging system. The ideal observer in this setting, which minimizes the risk, is shown to be the same as the ideal EROC observer, which maximizes the area under the EROC curve. It is also shown that scaling the estimation cost function upwards, i.e making the estimation task more important, degrades the performance of this ideal observer on the detection component of the joint task. Finally we generalize these concepts to the idea of Estimation/Detection Information Tradeoff (EDIT) curves which can be used to quantify the tradeof between estimation performance and detection performance in system design.

  4. Visualization of a newborn's hip joint using 3D ultrasound and automatic image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overhoff, Heinrich M.; Lazovic, Djordje; von Jan, Ute

    1999-05-01

    Graf's method is a successful procedure for the diagnostic screening of developmental dysplasia of the hip. In a defined 2-D ultrasound (US) scan, which virtually cuts the hip joint, landmarks are interactively identified to derive congruence indicators. As the indicators do not reflect the spatial joint structure, and the femoral head is not clearly visible in the US scan, here 3-D US is used to gain insight to the hip joint in its spatial form. Hip joints of newborns were free-hand scanned using a conventional ultrasound transducer and a localizer system fixed on the scanhead. To overcome examiner- dependent findings the landmarks were detected by automatic segmentation of the image volume. The landmark image volumes and an automatically determined virtual sphere approximating the femoral head were visualized color-coded on a computer screen. The visualization was found to be intuitive and to simplify the diagnostic substantially. By the visualization of the 3-D relations between acetabulum and femoral head the reliability of diagnostics is improved by finding the entire joint geometry.

  5. Broadband rotary joint for high speed ultrahigh resolution endoscopic OCT imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemohammad, Milad; Yuan, Wu; Mavadia-Shukla, Jessica; Liang, Wenxuan; Yu, Xiaoyun; Yu, Shaoyong; Li, Xingde

    2016-03-01

    Endoscopic OCT is a promising technology enabling noninvasive in vivo imaging of internal organs, such as the gastrointestinal tract and airways. The past few years have witnessed continued efforts to achieve ultrahigh resolution and speed. It is well-known that the axial resolution in OCT imaging has a quadratic dependence on the central wavelength. While conventional OCT endoscopes operate in 1300 nm wavelength, the second-generation endoscopes are designed for operation around 800 nm where turn-key, broadband sources are becoming readily available. Traditionally 1300 nm OCT endoscopes are scanned at the proximal end, and a broadband fiber-optic rotary joint as a key component in scanning endoscopic OCT is commercially available. Bandwidths in commercial 800 nm rotary joints are unfortunately compromised due to severe chromatic aberration, which limits the resolution afforded by the broadband light source. In the past we remedied this limitation by using a home-made capillary-tube-based rotary joint where the maximum reliable speed is ~10 revolutions/second. In this submission we report our second-generation, home-built high-speed and broadband rotary joint for 800 nm wavelength, which uses achromatic doublets in order achieve broadband achromatic operation. The measured one-way throughput of the rotary joint is >67 % while the fluctuation of the double-pass coupling efficiency during 360° rotation is less than +/-5 % at a speed of 70 revolutions/second. We demonstrate the operation of this rotary joint in conjunction with our ultrahigh-resolution (2.4 µm in air) diffractive catheter by three-dimensional full-circumferential endoscopic imaging of guinea pig esophagus at 70 frames per second in vivo.

  6. Brain connectivity study of joint attention using frequency-domain optical imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Ujwal; Zhu, Banghe; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2010-02-01

    Autism is a socio-communication brain development disorder. It is marked by degeneration in the ability to respond to joint attention skill task, from as early as 12 to 18 months of age. This trait is used to distinguish autistic from nonautistic populations. In this study, diffuse optical imaging is being used to study brain connectivity for the first time in response to joint attention experience in normal adults. The prefrontal region of the brain was non-invasively imaged using a frequency-domain based optical imager. The imaging studies were performed on 11 normal right-handed adults and optical measurements were acquired in response to joint-attention based video clips. While the intensity-based optical data provides information about the hemodynamic response of the underlying neural process, the time-dependent phase-based optical data has the potential to explicate the directional information on the activation of the brain. Thus brain connectivity studies are performed by computing covariance/correlations between spatial units using this frequency-domain based optical measurements. The preliminary results indicate that the extent of synchrony and directional variation in the pattern of activation varies in the left and right frontal cortex. The results have significant implication for research in neural pathways associated with autism that can be mapped using diffuse optical imaging tools in the future.

  7. Optical joint correlator for real-time image tracking and retinal surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method for tracking an object in a sequence of images is described. Such sequence of images may, for example, be a sequence of television frames. The object in the current frame is correlated with the object in the previous frame to obtain the relative location of the object in the two frames. An optical joint transform correlator apparatus is provided to carry out the process. Such joint transform correlator apparatus forms the basis for laser eye surgical apparatus where an image of the fundus of an eyeball is stabilized and forms the basis for the correlator apparatus to track the position of the eyeball caused by involuntary movement. With knowledge of the eyeball position, a surgical laser can be precisely pointed toward a position on the retina.

  8. Joint source-channel coding: secured and progressive transmission of compressed medical images on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Babel, Marie; Parrein, Benoît; Déforges, Olivier; Normand, Nicolas; Guédon, Jean-Pierre; Coat, Véronique

    2008-06-01

    The joint source-channel coding system proposed in this paper has two aims: lossless compression with a progressive mode and the integrity of medical data, which takes into account the priorities of the image and the properties of a network with no guaranteed quality of service. In this context, the use of scalable coding, locally adapted resolution (LAR) and a discrete and exact Radon transform, known as the Mojette transform, meets this twofold requirement. In this paper, details of this joint coding implementation are provided as well as a performance evaluation with respect to the reference CALIC coding and to unequal error protection using Reed-Solomon codes. PMID:18289830

  9. Time-Lapse Joint Inversion of Cross-Well DC Resistivity and Seismic Data: A Numerical Investigation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Time-lapse joint inversion of geophysical data is required to image the evolution of oil reservoirs during production and enhanced oil recovery, CO2 sequestration, geothermal fields during production, and to monitor the evolution of contaminant plumes. Joint inversion schemes red...

  10. A nonquadratic regularization-based technique for joint SAR imaging and model error correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Önhon, N. Özben; Çetin, Müjdat

    2009-05-01

    Regularization based image reconstruction algorithms have successfully been applied to the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging problem. Such algorithms assume that the mathematical model of the imaging system is perfectly known. However, in practice, it is very common to encounter various types of model errors. One predominant example is phase errors which appear either due to inexact measurement of the location of the SAR sensing platform, or due to effects of propagation through atmospheric turbulence. We propose a nonquadratic regularization-based framework for joint image formation and model error correction. This framework leads to an iterative algorithm, which cycles through steps of image formation and model parameter estimation. This approach offers advantages over autofocus techniques that involve post-processing of a conventionally formed image. We present results on synthetic scenes, as well as the Air Force Research Labarotory (AFRL) Backhoe data set, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  11. 3D object-oriented image analysis in 3D geophysical modelling: Analysing the central part of the East African Rift System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadel, I.; van der Meijde, M.; Kerle, N.; Lauritsen, N.

    2015-03-01

    Non-uniqueness of satellite gravity interpretation has traditionally been reduced by using a priori information from seismic tomography models. This reduction in the non-uniqueness has been based on velocity-density conversion formulas or user interpretation of the 3D subsurface structures (objects) based on the seismic tomography models and then forward modelling these objects. However, this form of object-based approach has been done without a standardized methodology on how to extract the subsurface structures from the 3D models. In this research, a 3D object-oriented image analysis (3D OOA) approach was implemented to extract the 3D subsurface structures from geophysical data. The approach was applied on a 3D shear wave seismic tomography model of the central part of the East African Rift System. Subsequently, the extracted 3D objects from the tomography model were reconstructed in the 3D interactive modelling environment IGMAS+, and their density contrast values were calculated using an object-based inversion technique to calculate the forward signal of the objects and compare it with the measured satellite gravity. Thus, a new object-based approach was implemented to interpret and extract the 3D subsurface objects from 3D geophysical data. We also introduce a new approach to constrain the interpretation of the satellite gravity measurements that can be applied using any 3D geophysical model.

  12. Segmentation of 3D holographic images using bivariate jointly distributed region snake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshpanah, Mehdi; Javidi, Bahram

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the bivariate jointly distributed region snake method in segmentation of microorganisms in Single Exposure On- Line (SEOL) holographic microscopy images. 3D images of the microorganisms are digitally reconstructed and numerically focused from any arbitrary depth from a single recorded digital hologram without mechanical scanning. Living organisms are non-rigid and they vary in shape and size. Moreover, they often do not exhibit clear edges in digitally reconstructed SEOL holographic images. Thus, conventional segmentation techniques based on the edge map may fail to segment these images. However, SEOL holographic microscopy provides both magnitude and phase information of the sample specimen, which could be helpful in the segmentation process. In this paper, we present a statistical framework based on the joint probability distribution of magnitude and phase information of SEOL holographic microscopy images and maximum likelihood estimation of image probability density function parameters. An optimization criterion is computed by maximizing the likelihood function of the target support hypothesis. In addition, a simple stochastic algorithm has been adapted for carrying out the optimization, while several boosting techniques have been employed to enhance its performance. Finally, the proposed method is applied for segmentation of biological microorganisms in SEOL holographic images and the experimental results are presented.

  13. Optical image encryption based on joint fractional transform correlator architecture and digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qu; Guo, Qing; Lei, Liang; Zhou, Jinyun

    2013-04-01

    We present a hybrid configuration of joint transform correlator (JTC) and joint fractional transform correlator (JFTC) for encryption purpose. The original input is encoded in the joint fractional power spectrum distribution of JFTC. In our experimental arrangement, an additional random phase mask (master key) is holographically generated beforehand by a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a JTC as the object arm. The fractional order of JFTC, together with the master key, can remarkably strengthen the safety level of encryption. Different from many previous digital-holography-based encryption schemes, the stability and alignment requirement for our system is not high, since the interferometric operation is only performed in the generation procedure of the master key. The advantages and feasibility of the proposed scheme have been verified by the experimental results. By combining with a multiplex technique, an application for multiple images encryption using the system is also given a detailed description.

  14. Joint-modeling of the Viscosity and the Electrical Conductivity of Silicate and Carbonatitic Melts and Implications for Geophysical Data Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommier, A.; Evans, R. L.; Key, K. W.

    2011-12-01

    We present an investigation of the relation between electrical conductivity (σ) and viscosity (η) of natural melts and its consequences for geophysical data interpretation. Both physicochemical properties are melt structure dependent and are very sensitive to even small changes in temperature and melt composition, including water content. Although many models have been developed for viscosity and for conductivity, attempts to combine both properties are scarce, particularly for complex natural systems. The interpretation of geophysical data can only be as good as our understanding of how physical properties such as conductivity and viscosity vary in the Earth's crust and mantle. Our conductivity-viscosity model is based on the optical basicity of silicate and carbonatitic compositions that count up to 10 oxides. From a structural point of view, the difference between viscosity and conductivity of melts lies in the fact that viscosity is mostly controlled by big network former anions (e.g. SiO44-) and conductivity by the mobility of smaller network modifier cations (e.g. Na+). By classifying each oxide as acidic, basic or amphoteric, optical basicity calculations of melt take into account the influence of forming and modifying species in the melt structure. This modeling approach is supported by recent findings showing that the optical basicity (Λ) of simple synthetic melts (CAS, CMAS systems) can be used to relate conductivity and viscosity [1]. Our model successfully reproduces experimental viscosity and electrical data from the literature over the temperature (T) range [800, 1400°C] by two simple semi-empirical equations in the form σ = f(log η, Λ, 1/T), with R2>0.84 for silicate melts and R2=0.98 for carbonatitic melts. At the scale of the field, the viscosity-conductivity model allows interpretation of conductive anomalies detected through electromagnetic soundings in terms of viscosity. Applications of this model will be presented for specific locations

  15. Optical clearing of human skin for the enhancement of optical imaging of proximal interphalangeal joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikova, Ekaterina A.; Kolesnikov, Aleksandr S.; Zabarylo, Urszula; Minet, Olaf; Genina, Elina A.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2014-01-01

    We are proposing a new method for enhancement of optical imaging of proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints in humans at skin using optical clearing technique. A set of illuminating laser diodes with the wavelengths 670, 820, and 904 nm were used as a light source. The laser diodes, monochromatic digital CCD camera and specific software allowed for detection of the finger joint image in a transillumination mode. The experiments were carried out in vivo with human fingers. Dehydrated glycerol and hand cream with urea (5%) were used as optical clearing agents (OCAs). The contrast of the obtained images was analyzed to determine the effect of the OCA. It was found that glycerol application to the human skin during 60 min caused the decrease of contrast in 1.4 folds for 670 nm and the increase of contrast in 1.5 and 1.7 folds for 820 nm and 904 nm, respectively. At the same time, the hand cream application to the human skin during 60 min caused the decrease of contrast in 1.1 folds for 670 nm and the increase of contrast in 1.3 and 1.1 folds for 820 nm and 904 nm, respectively. The results have shown that glycerol and the hand cream with 5% urea allow for obtaining of more distinct image of finger joint in the NIR. Obtained data can be used for development of optical diagnostic methods of rheumatoid arthritis.

  16. Joint image registration and fusion method with a gradient strength regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidong, Huang; Wei, Zhao; Jun, Wang

    2015-05-01

    Image registration is an essential process for image fusion, and fusion performance can be used to evaluate registration accuracy. We propose a maximum likelihood (ML) approach to joint image registration and fusion instead of treating them as two independent processes in the conventional way. To improve the visual quality of a fused image, a gradient strength (GS) regularization is introduced in the cost function of ML. The GS of the fused image is controllable by setting the target GS value in the regularization term. This is useful because a larger target GS brings a clearer fused image and a smaller target GS makes the fused image smoother and thus restrains noise. Hence, the subjective quality of the fused image can be improved whether the source images are polluted by noise or not. We can obtain the fused image and registration parameters successively by minimizing the cost function using an iterative optimization method. Experimental results show that our method is effective with transformation, rotation, and scale parameters in the range of [-2.0, 2.0] pixel, [-1.1 deg, 1.1 deg], and [0.95, 1.05], respectively, and variances of noise smaller than 300. It also demonstrated that our method yields a more visual pleasing fused image and higher registration accuracy compared with a state-of-the-art algorithm.

  17. Investigation of permeability anisotropy and polymodal fracture pattern development using a true-triaxial geophysical imaging cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasseri, M. B.; Goodfellow, S. D.; Peterson, K.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    To increase our understanding of 3-D fluid transportation and development of polymodal fault patterns under 3-D strain a true-triaxial geophysical imaging cell is used. We present the effect of stress ratio σ2/σ3 =5 with the magnitudes of σ2 = 35 and σ3 =5 MPa on 3-D stress-strain behaviour, 3-D directional permeabilities and its anisotropy and 3-D fracture growth and propagation using acoustic emission techniques. An 8x8x8 cm3 Fontainebleau sandstone specimen was subjected to hydrostatic (σ1 = σ2 = σ3) and conventional triaxial (σ1> σ2 = σ3) stresses followed by differential loading under true-triaxial (σ1 >σ2 >σ3) stress states upto failure. 3-D closure of pore spaces and intergranular cracks affect the shear wave velocities more than compressional wave velocities along all three axes under any given mean stress for the specimen. VP, VS1 and VS2 measured along the σ3 direction show a decreasing trend beyond 125 MPa of axial stress due to the initiation and coalescence of micro-fracture propagation parallel/sub parallel to the σ1-σ2 plane. Combined analysis of drained directional permeability measurements, with VP/VS2 ratio obtained from each axis as a function of applied mean stress, shows that expulsion of water along the σ2 axis happens at a faster rate than the other two directions and VP/VS diminishes 15% along this direction. The σ2 direction is sub parallel to depositional layering within the specimen and is also characterized with the highest drop in normalized permeability (25%) and is categorized as the dry drained direction [O'Connel and Budiansky, 1977]. The σ1 direction has a lower permeability when compaction effects, along σ1 axis, disturbs the communication of water fluid between the pore spaces and cracks. The σ3 direction shows higher permeability than the other two directions indicating that pore spaces and cracks stay saturated and interconnected and is isobaric. Number of acoustic emission activity in the specimen tested

  18. Joint Audio-Magnetotelluric and Passive Seismic Imaging of the Cerdanya Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabàs, A.; Macau, A.; Benjumea, B.; Queralt, P.; Ledo, J.; Figueras, S.; Marcuello, A.

    2016-06-01

    The structure of Cerdanya Basin (north-east of Iberian Peninsula) is partly known from geological cross sections, geological maps and vintage geophysical data. However, these data do not have the necessary resolution to characterize some parts of Cerdanya Basin such as the thickness of soft soil, geometry of bedrock or geometry of geological units and associated faults. For all these reasons, the main objective of this work is to improve this deficiency carrying out a detailed study in this Neogene basin applying jointly the combination of passive seismic methods (H/V spectral ratio and seismic array) and electromagnetic methods (audio-magnetotelluric and magnetotelluric method). The passive seismic techniques provide valuable information of geometry of basement along the profile. The maximum depth is located near Alp village with a bedrock depth of 500 m. The bedrock is located in surface at both sites of profile. The Neogene sediments present a shear-wave velocity between 400 and 1000 m/s, and the bedrock basement presents a shear-wave velocity values between 1700 and 2200 m/s. These results are used as a priori information to create a 2D resistivity initial model which constraints the inversion process of electromagnetic data. We have obtained a 2D resistivity model which is characterized by (1) a heterogeneous conductivity zone (<40 Ohm m) that corresponds to shallow part of the model up to 500 m depth in the centre of the profile. These values have been associated with Quaternary and Neogene sediments formed by silts, clays, conglomerates, sandstones and gravels, and (2) a deeper resistive zone (1000-3000 Ohm m) interpreted as Palaeozoic basement (sandstones, limestones and slates at NW and conglomerates and microconglomerates at SE). The resistive zone is truncated by a discontinuity at the south-east of the profile which is interpreted as the Alp-La Tet Fault. This discontinuity is represented by a more conductive zone (600 Ohm m approx.) and is explained as

  19. Joint Audio-Magnetotelluric and Passive Seismic Imaging of the Cerdanya Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabàs, A.; Macau, A.; Benjumea, B.; Queralt, P.; Ledo, J.; Figueras, S.; Marcuello, A.

    2016-09-01

    The structure of Cerdanya Basin (north-east of Iberian Peninsula) is partly known from geological cross sections, geological maps and vintage geophysical data. However, these data do not have the necessary resolution to characterize some parts of Cerdanya Basin such as the thickness of soft soil, geometry of bedrock or geometry of geological units and associated faults. For all these reasons, the main objective of this work is to improve this deficiency carrying out a detailed study in this Neogene basin applying jointly the combination of passive seismic methods ( H/V spectral ratio and seismic array) and electromagnetic methods (audio-magnetotelluric and magnetotelluric method). The passive seismic techniques provide valuable information of geometry of basement along the profile. The maximum depth is located near Alp village with a bedrock depth of 500 m. The bedrock is located in surface at both sites of profile. The Neogene sediments present a shear-wave velocity between 400 and 1000 m/s, and the bedrock basement presents a shear-wave velocity values between 1700 and 2200 m/s. These results are used as a priori information to create a 2D resistivity initial model which constraints the inversion process of electromagnetic data. We have obtained a 2D resistivity model which is characterized by (1) a heterogeneous conductivity zone (<40 Ohm m) that corresponds to shallow part of the model up to 500 m depth in the centre of the profile. These values have been associated with Quaternary and Neogene sediments formed by silts, clays, conglomerates, sandstones and gravels, and (2) a deeper resistive zone (1000-3000 Ohm m) interpreted as Palaeozoic basement (sandstones, limestones and slates at NW and conglomerates and microconglomerates at SE). The resistive zone is truncated by a discontinuity at the south-east of the profile which is interpreted as the Alp-La Tet Fault. This discontinuity is represented by a more conductive zone (600 Ohm m approx.) and is explained

  20. Joint Prior Learning for Visual Sensor Network Noisy Image Super-Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Bo; Wang, Shuang; Liang, Xuefeng; Jiao, Licheng; Xu, Caijin

    2016-01-01

    The visual sensor network (VSN), a new type of wireless sensor network composed of low-cost wireless camera nodes, is being applied for numerous complex visual analyses in wild environments, such as visual surveillance, object recognition, etc. However, the captured images/videos are often low resolution with noise. Such visual data cannot be directly delivered to the advanced visual analysis. In this paper, we propose a joint-prior image super-resolution (JPISR) method using expectation maximization (EM) algorithm to improve VSN image quality. Unlike conventional methods that only focus on upscaling images, JPISR alternatively solves upscaling mapping and denoising in the E-step and M-step. To meet the requirement of the M-step, we introduce a novel non-local group-sparsity image filtering method to learn the explicit prior and induce the geometric duality between images to learn the implicit prior. The EM algorithm inherently combines the explicit prior and implicit prior by joint learning. Moreover, JPISR does not rely on large external datasets for training, which is much more practical in a VSN. Extensive experiments show that JPISR outperforms five state-of-the-art methods in terms of both PSNR, SSIM and visual perception. PMID:26927114

  1. Joint Prior Learning for Visual Sensor Network Noisy Image Super-Resolution.

    PubMed

    Yue, Bo; Wang, Shuang; Liang, Xuefeng; Jiao, Licheng; Xu, Caijin

    2016-01-01

    The visual sensor network (VSN), a new type of wireless sensor network composed of low-cost wireless camera nodes, is being applied for numerous complex visual analyses in wild environments, such as visual surveillance, object recognition, etc. However, the captured images/videos are often low resolution with noise. Such visual data cannot be directly delivered to the advanced visual analysis. In this paper, we propose a joint-prior image super-resolution (JPISR) method using expectation maximization (EM) algorithm to improve VSN image quality. Unlike conventional methods that only focus on upscaling images, JPISR alternatively solves upscaling mapping and denoising in the E-step and M-step. To meet the requirement of the M-step, we introduce a novel non-local group-sparsity image filtering method to learn the explicit prior and induce the geometric duality between images to learn the implicit prior. The EM algorithm inherently combines the explicit prior and implicit prior by joint learning. Moreover, JPISR does not rely on large external datasets for training, which is much more practical in a VSN. Extensive experiments show that JPISR outperforms five state-of-the-art methods in terms of both PSNR, SSIM and visual perception. PMID:26927114

  2. A joint encryption/watermarking system for verifying the reliability of medical images.

    PubMed

    Bouslimi, Dalel; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Cozic, Michel; Roux, Christian

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a joint encryption/water-marking system for the purpose of protecting medical images. This system is based on an approach which combines a substitutive watermarking algorithm, the quantization index modulation, with an encryption algorithm: a stream cipher algorithm (e.g., the RC4) or a block cipher algorithm (e.g., the AES in cipher block chaining (CBC) mode of operation). Our objective is to give access to the outcomes of the image integrity and of its origin even though the image is stored encrypted. If watermarking and encryption are conducted jointly at the protection stage, watermark extraction and decryption can be applied independently. The security analysis of our scheme and experimental results achieved on 8-bit depth ultrasound images as well as on 16-bit encoded positron emission tomography images demonstrate the capability of our system to securely make available security attributes in both spatial and encrypted domains while minimizing image distortion. Furthermore, by making use of the AES block cipher in CBC mode, the proposed system is compliant with or transparent to the DICOM standard. PMID:22801525

  3. Terrestrial Planet Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    Terrestrial planet geophysics beyond our home sphere had its start arguably in the early 1960s, with Keith Runcorn contending that the second-degree shape of the Moon is due to convection and Mariner 2 flying past Venus and detecting no planetary magnetic field. Within a decade, in situ surface geophysical measurements were carried out on the Moon with the Apollo program, portions of the lunar magnetic and gravity fields were mapped, and Jack Lorell and his colleagues at JPL were producing spherical harmonic gravity field models for Mars using tracking data from Mariner 9, the first spacecraft to orbit another planet. Moreover, Mariner 10 discovered a planetary magnetic field at Mercury, and a young Sean Solomon was using geological evidence of surface contraction to constrain the thermal evolution of the innermost planet. In situ geophysical experiments (such as seismic networks) were essentially never carried out after Apollo, although they were sometimes planned just beyond the believability horizon in planetary mission queues. Over the last three decades, the discipline of terrestrial planet geophysics has matured, making the most out of orbital magnetic and gravity field data, altimetric measurements of surface topography, and the integration of geochemical information. Powerful constraints are provided by tectonic and volcanic information gleaned from surface images, and the engagement of geologists in geophysical exercises is actually quite useful. Accompanying these endeavors, modeling techniques, largely adopted from the Earth Science community, have become increasingly sophisticated and have been greatly enhanced by the dramatic increase in computing power over the last two decades. The future looks bright with exciting new data sets emerging from the MESSENGER mission to Mercury, the promise of the GRAIL gravity mission to the Moon, and the re-emergence of Venus as a worthy target for exploration. Who knows? With the unflagging optimism and persistence

  4. Imaging 4-D hydrogeologic processes with geophysics: an example using crosswell electrical measurements to characterize a tracer plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, K.; Gorelick, S. M.

    2005-05-01

    Geophysical methods provide an inexpensive way to collect spatially exhaustive data about hydrogeologic, mechanical or geochemical parameters. In the presence of heterogeneity over multiple scales of these parameters at most field sites, geophysical data can contribute greatly to our understanding about the subsurface by providing important data we would otherwise lack without extensive, and often expensive, direct sampling. Recent work has highlighted the use of time-lapse geophysical data to help characterize hydrogeologic processes. We investigate the potential for making quantitative assessments of sodium-chloride tracer transport using 4-D crosswell electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in a sand and gravel aquifer at the Massachusetts Military Reservation on Cape Cod. Given information about the relation between electrical conductivity and tracer concentration, we can estimate spatial moments from the 3-D ERT inversions, which give us information about tracer mass, center of mass, and dispersivity through time. The accuracy of these integrated measurements of tracer plume behavior is dependent on spatially variable resolution. The ERT inversions display greater apparent dispersion than tracer plumes estimated by 3D advective-dispersive simulation. This behavior is attributed to reduced measurement sensitivity to electrical conductivity values with distance from the electrodes and differential smoothing from tomographic inversion. The latter is a problem common to overparameterized inverse problems, which often occur when real-world budget limitations preclude extensive well-drilling or additional data collection. These results prompt future work on intelligent methods for reparameterizing the inverse problem and coupling additional disparate data sets.

  5. Imaging 3D geological structure of the Mygdonian basin (Northern Greece) with geological numerical modeling and geophysical methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cédric, Guyonnet-Benaize; Fabrice, Hollender; Maria, Manakou; Alexandros, Savvaidis; Elena, Zargli; Cécile, Cornou; Nikolaos, Veranis; Dimitrios, Raptakis; Artemios, Atzemoglou; Pierre-Yves, Bard; Nikolaos, Theodulidis; Kyriazis, Pitilakis; Emmanuelle, Chaljub

    2013-04-01

    The Mygdonian basin, located 30 km E-NE close to Thessaloniki, is a typical active tectonic basin, trending E-NW, filled by sediments 200 to 400 m thick. This basin has been chosen as a European experimental site since 1993 (European Commission research projects - EUROSEISTEST). It has been investigated for experimental and theoretical studies on site effects. The Mygdonian basin is currently covered by a permanent seismological network and has been mainly characterized in 2D and 3D with geophysical and geotechnical studies (Bastani et al, 2011; Cadet and Savvaidis, 2011; Gurk et al, 2007; Manakou et al, 2007; Manakou et al, 2010; Pitilakis et al, 1999; Raptakis et al, 2000; Raptakis et al, 2005). All these studies allowed understanding the influence of geological structures and local site conditions on seismic site response. For these reasons, this site has been chosen for a verification exercise for numerical simulations in the framework of an ongoing international collaborative research project (Euroseistest Verification and Validation Project - E2VP). The verification phase has been made using a first 3D geophysical and geotechnical model (Manakou, 2007) about 5 km wide and 15 km long, centered on the Euroseistest site. After this verification phase, it has been decided to update, optimize and extend this model in order to obtain a more detailed model of the 3D geometry of the entire basin, especially the bedrock 3D geometry which can affect drastically the results of numerical simulations for site effect studies. In our study, we build a 3D geological model of the present-day structure of the entire Mygdonian basin. This "precise" model is 12 km wide, 65 km long and is 400 m deep in average. It has been built using geophysical, geotechnical and geological data. The database is heterogeneous and composed of hydrogeological boreholes, seismic refraction surveys, array microtremor measurements, electrical and geotechnical surveys. We propose an integrated

  6. Infrared image detail enhancement approach based on improved joint bilateral filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Chen, Xiaohong

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we proposed a new infrared image detail enhancement approach. This approach could not only achieve the goal of enhancing the digital detail, but also make the processed image much closer to the real situation. Inspired by the joint-bilateral filter, two adjacent images were utilized to calculate the kernel functions in order to distinguish the detail information from the raw image. We also designed a new kernel function to modify the joint-bilateral filter and to eliminate the gradient reversal artifacts caused by the non-linear filtering. The new kernel is based on an adaptive emerge coefficient to realize the detail layer determination. The detail information was modified by the adaptive emerge coefficient along with two key parameters to realize the detail enhancement. Finally, we combined the processed detail layer with the base layer and rearrange the high dynamic image into monitor-suited low dynamic range to achieve better visual effect. Numerical calculation showed that this new technology has the best value compare to the previous research in detail enhancement. Figures and data flowcharts were demonstrated in the paper.

  7. Evaluation of the tarsometatarsal joint using conventional radiography, CT, and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Nasir A; Galizia, Mauricio S; Almusa, Emad; Omar, Imran M

    2014-01-01

    The tarsometatarsal, or Lisfranc, joint complex provides stability to the midfoot and forefoot through intricate osseous relationships between the distal tarsal bones and metatarsal bases and their connections with stabilizing ligamentous support structures. Lisfranc joint injuries are relatively uncommon, and their imaging findings can be subtle. These injuries have typically been divided into high-impact fracture-displacements, which are often seen after motor vehicle collisions, and low-impact midfoot sprains, which are more commonly seen in athletes. The injury mechanism often influences the imaging findings, and classification systems based primarily on imaging features have been developed to help diagnose and treat these injuries. Patients may have significant regional swelling and pain that prevent thorough physical examination or may have other more critical injuries at initial posttrauma evaluation. These factors may cause diagnostic delays and lead to subsequent morbidities, such as midfoot instability, deformity, and debilitating osteoarthritis. Missed Lisfranc ligament injuries are among the most common causes of litigation against radiologists and emergency department physicians. Radiologists must understand the pathophysiology of these injuries and the patterns of imaging findings seen at conventional radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging to improve injury detection and obtain additional information for referring physicians that may affect the selection of the injury classification system, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:24617695

  8. Fast prostate segmentation for brachytherapy based on joint fusion of images and labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouranian, Saman; Ramezani, Mahdi; Mahdavi, S. Sara; Spadinger, Ingrid; Morris, William J.; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2014-03-01

    Brachytherapy as one of the treatment methods for prostate cancer takes place by implantation of radioactive seeds inside the gland. The standard of care for this treatment procedure is to acquire transrectal ultrasound images of the prostate which are segmented in order to plan the appropriate seed placement. The segmentation process is usually performed either manually or semi-automatically and is associated with subjective errors because the prostate visibility is limited in ultrasound images. The current segmentation process also limits the possibility of intra-operative delineation of the prostate to perform real-time dosimetry. In this paper, we propose a computationally inexpensive and fully automatic segmentation approach that takes advantage of previously segmented images to form a joint space of images and their segmentations. We utilize joint Independent Component Analysis method to generate a model which is further employed to produce a probability map of the target segmentation. We evaluate this approach on the transrectal ultrasound volume images of 60 patients using a leave-one-out cross-validation approach. The results are compared with the manually segmented prostate contours that were used by clinicians to plan brachytherapy procedures. We show that the proposed approach is fast with comparable accuracy and precision to those found in previous studies on TRUS segmentation.

  9. A digital-signal-processor-based optical tomographic system for dynamic imaging of joint diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasker, Joseph M.

    joint diseases, especially effects of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the proximal interphalangeal finger joints. Using a dual-wavelength tomographic imaging system and previously implemented reconstruction scheme, I have performed initial dynamic imaging case studies on healthy volunteers and patients diagnosed with RA. These studies support our hypothesis that differences in the vascular and metabolic reactivity exist between affected and unaffected joints and can be used for diagnostic purposes.

  10. A joint source-channel distortion model for JPEG compressed images.

    PubMed

    Sabir, Muhammad F; Sheikh, Hamid Rahim; Heath, Robert W; Bovik, Alan C

    2006-06-01

    The need for efficient joint source-channel coding (JSCC) is growing as new multimedia services are introduced in commercial wireless communication systems. An important component of practical JSCC schemes is a distortion model that can predict the quality of compressed digital multimedia such as images and videos. The usual approach in the JSCC literature for quantifying the distortion due to quantization and channel errors is to estimate it for each image using the statistics of the image for a given signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This is not an efficient approach in the design of real-time systems because of the computational complexity. A more useful and practical approach would be to design JSCC techniques that minimize average distortion for a large set of images based on some distortion model rather than carrying out per-image optimizations. However, models for estimating average distortion due to quantization and channel bit errors in a combined fashion for a large set of images are not available for practical image or video coding standards employing entropy coding and differential coding. This paper presents a statistical model for estimating the distortion introduced in progressive JPEG compressed images due to quantization and channel bit errors in a joint manner. Statistical modeling of important compression techniques such as Huffman coding, differential pulse-coding modulation, and run-length coding are included in the model. Examples show that the distortion in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) can be predicted within a 2-dB maximum error over a variety of compression ratios and bit-error rates. To illustrate the utility of the proposed model, we present an unequal power allocation scheme as a simple application of our model. Results show that it gives a PSNR gain of around 6.5 dB at low SNRs, as compared to equal power allocation. PMID:16764262

  11. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of hip joint cartilage: pearls and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Zilkens, Christoph; Kim, Young-Jo; Werlen, Stefan; Siebenrock, Klaus A.; Mamisch, Tallal C.; Hosalkar, Harish S.

    2011-01-01

    With the increasing advances in hip joint preservation surgery, accurate diagnosis and assessment of femoral head and acetabular cartilage status is becoming increasingly important. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the hip does present technical difficulties. The fairly thin cartilage lining necessitates high image resolution and high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). With MR arthrography (MRA) using intraarticular injected gadolinium, labral tears and cartilage clefts may be better identified through the contrast medium filling into the clefts. However, the ability of MRA to detect varying grades of cartilage damage is fairly limited and early histological and biochemical changes in the beginning of osteoarthritis (OA) cannot be accurately delineated. Traditional MRI thus lacks the ability to analyze the biological status of cartilage degeneration. The technique of delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is sensitive to the charge density of cartilage contributed by glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), which are lost early in the process of OA. Therefore, the dGEMRIC technique has a potential to detect early cartilage damage that is obviously critical for decision-making regarding time and extent of intervention for joint-preservation. In the last decade, cartilage imaging with dGEMRIC has been established as an accurate and reliable tool for assessment of cartilage status in the knee and hip joint. This review outlines the current status of dGEMRIC for assessment of hip joint cartilage. Practical modifications of the standard technique including three-dimensional (3D) dGEMRIC and dGEMRIC after intra-articular gadolinium instead of iv-dGEMRIC will also be addressed. PMID:22053252

  12. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of hip joint cartilage: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Zilkens, Christoph; Kim, Young-Jo; Werlen, Stefan; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Mamisch, Tallal C; Hosalkar, Harish S

    2011-01-01

    With the increasing advances in hip joint preservation surgery, accurate diagnosis and assessment of femoral head and acetabular cartilage status is becoming increasingly important. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the hip does present technical difficulties. The fairly thin cartilage lining necessitates high image resolution and high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). With MR arthrography (MRA) using intraarticular injected gadolinium, labral tears and cartilage clefts may be better identified through the contrast medium filling into the clefts. However, the ability of MRA to detect varying grades of cartilage damage is fairly limited and early histological and biochemical changes in the beginning of osteoarthritis (OA) cannot be accurately delineated. Traditional MRI thus lacks the ability to analyze the biological status of cartilage degeneration. The technique of delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is sensitive to the charge density of cartilage contributed by glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), which are lost early in the process of OA. Therefore, the dGEMRIC technique has a potential to detect early cartilage damage that is obviously critical for decision-making regarding time and extent of intervention for joint-preservation. In the last decade, cartilage imaging with dGEMRIC has been established as an accurate and reliable tool for assessment of cartilage status in the knee and hip joint.This review outlines the current status of dGEMRIC for assessment of hip joint cartilage. Practical modifications of the standard technique including three-dimensional (3D) dGEMRIC and dGEMRIC after intra-articular gadolinium instead of iv-dGEMRIC will also be addressed. PMID:22053252

  13. Lateral impingements of the temporomandibular joint: a classification system and MRI imaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kirk, W S

    2013-02-01

    Finite element analysis of dynamic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) loading reveals a predominance of localization of loading laterally towards the collateral ligament regions and disc/capsule attachments to the mandibular condyle. A previous publication (Kirk, Kirk. OMS Clin North Am 2006;18:345-68) introduced biomechanical principles for surgeons to consider in the diagnostic phase of management as well as initial surgical procedure selection. The concept of impingements and their impact with development of derangement is presented in this paper with an expanded collection of imaging characteristics. Diagnostic coronal imaging using a dual photon imaging technique is presented. This technique is superior to traditional T1 and T2 weighted imaging sequences when sagittal imaging is employed. Coronal imaging using this technique adds a new dimension to preoperative imaging. Impingement presence and the discernment of early lateral disc/capsule rupture from the condyle of the mandible is superior with the dual photon technique. Images and a classification of degrees of impingement are presented. The biomechanical importance of diagnosis of impingement is discussed. PMID:23218512

  14. Hyporheic Geophysics: D.C. Resistivity Imaging of Valley-bottom Alluvium in a 3rd-order Mountain Stream, HJ Andrews Experimental Forest, Oregon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarnetske, J. P.; Haggerty, R.; Crook, N.; Robinson, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ) can serve as either a source or a sink for nutrients (e.g., nitrogen) and moderates biogeochemical and temperature signals in stream ecosystems. Understanding of the HZ is hampered by lack of subsurface images, particularly ones that are non-invasive and fast. Geophysical imaging, combined with extant empirical methods and hydrodynamic models provides an opportunity to improve precision in modeling HZ transport and nutrient retention. With the aid of CUAHSI HMF, we completed a d.c. resistivity survey of an existing stream denitrification study site (Mack Creek, H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, OR, a Long-term Ecological Research site) to quantify the geometry of the valley bottom alluvial aquifer and HZ. The non- invasive d.c. resistivity survey successfully produced a quantitative 3-dimensional image of the variable alluvial aquifer thickness below and adjacent to the stream channel. We extensively imaged one area, 50 m x 28 m with 10 transects, in an old growth Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) stand which incorporated a large woody debris log jam, to determine that alluvial thickness averages 4.1 m and varies between 0 m and 8 m. We completed a single 50 m longitudinal section in an adjacent downstream logged block (harvested 1964-65) to determine that alluvial thickness averages 0.3 m and varies between 0 m and 1 m. The presence of valley- bottom bedrock exposures at the study site helped to constrain and verify the d.c. resistivity interpretation of the bedrock-alluvium interface. Some d.c. survey challenges were encountered, including the confinement of electrode lines to the channel or near channel because dry organic layers or fallen trees across much of the forest floor prevented good electrode contact with the ground. Ultimately, this geophysics-enhanced knowledge of the stream-adjacent aquifer will allow for more accurate interpretation of hyporheic observations and parameterization of hyporheic hydraulic and denitrification

  15. Imaging of normal and pathologic joint synovium using nonlinear optical microscopy as a potential diagnostic tool

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Nivedan; Chabra, Sanjay; Mehdi, Sheherbano; Sweet, Paula; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Pool, Roy; Andrews, Brian; Peavy, George M.

    2010-01-01

    An estimated 1.3 million people in the United States suffer from rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA causes profound changes in the synovial membrane of joints, and without early diagnosis and intervention, progresses to permanent alterations in joint structure and function. The purpose of this study is to determine if nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) can utilize the natural intrinsic fluorescence properties of tissue to generate images that would allow visualization of the structural and cellular composition of fresh, unfixed normal and pathologic synovial tissue. NLOM is performed on rabbit knee joint synovial samples using 730- and 800-nm excitation wavelengths. Less than 30 mW of excitation power delivered with a 40×, 0.8-NA water immersion objective is sufficient for the visualization of synovial structures to a maximum depth of 70 μm without tissue damage. NLOM imaging of normal and pathologic synovial tissue reveals the cellular structure, synoviocytes, adipocytes, collagen, vascular structures, and differential characteristics of inflammatory infiltrates without requiring tissue processing or staining. Further study to evaluate the ability of NLOM to assess the characteristics of pathologic synovial tissue and its potential role for the management of disease is warranted. PMID:21054095

  16. Imaging of normal and pathologic joint synovium using nonlinear optical microscopy as a potential diagnostic tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Nivedan; Chabra, Sanjay; Mehdi, Sheherbano; Sweet, Paula; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Pool, Roy; Andrews, Brian; Peavy, George M.

    2010-09-01

    An estimated 1.3 million people in the United States suffer from rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA causes profound changes in the synovial membrane of joints, and without early diagnosis and intervention, progresses to permanent alterations in joint structure and function. The purpose of this study is to determine if nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) can utilize the natural intrinsic fluorescence properties of tissue to generate images that would allow visualization of the structural and cellular composition of fresh, unfixed normal and pathologic synovial tissue. NLOM is performed on rabbit knee joint synovial samples using 730- and 800-nm excitation wavelengths. Less than 30 mW of excitation power delivered with a 40×, 0.8-NA water immersion objective is sufficient for the visualization of synovial structures to a maximum depth of 70 μm without tissue damage. NLOM imaging of normal and pathologic synovial tissue reveals the cellular structure, synoviocytes, adipocytes, collagen, vascular structures, and differential characteristics of inflammatory infiltrates without requiring tissue processing or staining. Further study to evaluate the ability of NLOM to assess the characteristics of pathologic synovial tissue and its potential role for the management of disease is warranted.

  17. Multipixel system for gigahertz frequency-domain optical imaging of finger joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netz, Uwe J.; Beuthan, Jürgen; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2008-03-01

    Frequency-domain optical imaging systems have shown great promise for characterizing blood oxygenation, hemodynamics, and other physiological parameters in human and animal tissues. However, most of the frequency domain systems presented so far operate with source modulation frequencies below 150MHz. At these low frequencies, their ability to provide accurate data for small tissue geometries such as encountered in imaging of finger joints or rodents is limited. Here, we present a new system that can provide data up to 1GHz using an intensity modulated charged coupled device camera. After data processing, the images show the two-dimensional distribution of amplitude and phase of the light modulation on the finger surface. The system performance was investigated and test measurements on optical tissue phantoms were taken to investigate whether higher frequencies yield better signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). It could be shown that local changes in optical tissue properties, as they appear in the initial stages of rheumatoid arthritis in a finger joint, are detectable by simple image evaluation, with the range of modulation frequency around 500MHz proving to yield the highest SNR.

  18. Maximum-likelihood techniques for joint segmentation-classification of multispectral chromosome images.

    PubMed

    Schwartzkopf, Wade C; Bovik, Alan C; Evans, Brian L

    2005-12-01

    Traditional chromosome imaging has been limited to grayscale images, but recently a 5-fluorophore combinatorial labeling technique (M-FISH) was developed wherein each class of chromosomes binds with a different combination of fluorophores. This results in a multispectral image, where each class of chromosomes has distinct spectral components. In this paper, we develop new methods for automatic chromosome identification by exploiting the multispectral information in M-FISH chromosome images and by jointly performing chromosome segmentation and classification. We (1) develop a maximum-likelihood hypothesis test that uses multispectral information, together with conventional criteria, to select the best segmentation possibility; (2) use this likelihood function to combine chromosome segmentation and classification into a robust chromosome identification system; and (3) show that the proposed likelihood function can also be used as a reliable indicator of errors in segmentation, errors in classification, and chromosome anomalies, which can be indicators of radiation damage, cancer, and a wide variety of inherited diseases. We show that the proposed multispectral joint segmentation-classification method outperforms past grayscale segmentation methods when decomposing touching chromosomes. We also show that it outperforms past M-FISH classification techniques that do not use segmentation information. PMID:16350919

  19. Muon tomography of the Soufrière of Guadeloupe (Lesser Antilles): Comparison with other geophysical imaging methods and assessment of volcanic risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, D.; Lesparre, N.; Marteau, J.; Taisne, B.; Nicollin, F.; Coutant, O.

    2011-12-01

    Density tomography of rock with muons of cosmic origin measures the attenuation of the flux of particles crossing the object of interest to derive its opacity, i.e. the quantity of matter encountered by the particles along their trajectories. Recent progress in micro-electronics and particle detectors make field measurement possible and muon density tomography is gaining a growing interest (e.g. Tanaka et al., 2010; Gibert et al., 2010). We have constructed field telescopes based on the detectors of the OPERA experiment devoted to study neutrino oscillation (Lesparre et al., 2011a). Each telescope may be equipped with a variable number of detection matrices with 256 pixels. The spatial resolution is adaptable and is typically of about 20 meters (Lesparre et al., 2010). The telescopes are portable autonomous devices able to operate in harsh field conditions encountered on tropical volcanoes. The total power consumption is less than 40W, and an Ethernet link allows data downloading and remote control of the electronic devices and on-board computers. Larger high-resolution telescopes are under construction. The instruments have been successfully tested on the Etna and Soufrière of Guadeloupe volcanoes were a telescope is operating continuously since Summer 2010. Muon radiographies of the Soufrière lava dome reveal its very heterogeneous density structure produced by an intense hydrothermal circulation of acid fluids which alters its mechanical integrity leading to a high risk level of destabilisation. Small-size features are visible on the images and provide precious informations on the structure of the upper hydrothermal systems. Joined interpretation with other geophysical data available on the Soufrière - seismic tomography, electrical resistivity tomography, gravity data - is presented and discussed. Density muon tomography of the internal structure of volcanoes like the Soufrière brings important informations for the hazard evaluation an is particularly

  20. Time-reversal in geophysics: the key for imaging a seismic source, generating a virtual source or imaging with no source (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourin, A.; Fink, M.

    2010-12-01

    The concept of time-reversal (TR) focusing was introduced in acoustics by Mathias Fink in the early nineties: a pulsed wave is sent from a source, propagates in an unknown media and is captured at a transducer array termed a “Time Reversal Mirror (TRM)”. Then the waveforms received at each transducer are flipped in time and sent back resulting in a wave converging at the original source regardless of the complexity of the propagation medium. TRMs have now been implemented in a variety of physical scenarios from GHz microwaves to MHz ultrasonics and to hundreds of Hz in ocean acoustics. Common to this broad range of scales is a remarkable robustness exemplified by observations that the more complex the medium (random or chaotic), the sharper the focus. A TRM acts as an antenna that uses complex environments to appear wider than it is, resulting for a broadband pulse, in a refocusing quality that does not depend on the TRM aperture. We show that the time-reversal concept is also at the heart of very active research fields in seismology and applied geophysics: imaging of seismic sources, passive imaging based on noise correlations, seismic interferometry, monitoring of CO2 storage using the virtual source method. All these methods can indeed be viewed in a unified framework as an application of the so-called time-reversal cavity approach. That approach uses the fact that a wave field can be predicted at any location inside a volume (without source) from the knowledge of both the field and its normal derivative on the surrounding surface S, which for acoustic scalar waves is mathematically expressed in the Helmholtz Kirchhoff (HK) integral. Thus in the first step of an ideal TR process, the field coming from a point-like source as well as its normal derivative should be measured on S. In a second step, the initial source is removed and monopole and dipole sources reemit the time reversal of the components measured in the first step. Instead of directly computing

  1. Assessing the reliability of MRI-CBCT image registration to visualize temporomandibular joints

    PubMed Central

    Jaremko, J L; Alsufyani, N; Jibri, Z; Lai, H; Major, P W

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate image quality of two methods of registering MRI and CBCT images of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), particularly regarding TMJ articular disc–condyle relationship and osseous abnormality. Methods: MR and CBCT images for 10 patients (20 TMJs) were obtained and co-registered using two methods (non-guided and marker guided) using Mirada XD software (Mirada Medical Ltd, Oxford, UK). Three radiologists independently and blindly evaluated three types of images (MRI, CBCT and registered MRI-CBCT) at two times (T1 and T2) on two criteria: (1) quality of MRI-CBCT registrations (excellent, fair or poor) and (2) TMJ disc–condylar position and articular osseous abnormalities (osteophytes, erosions and subcortical cyst, surface flattening, sclerosis). Results: 75% of the non-guided registered images showed excellent quality, and 95% of the marker-guided registered images showed poor quality. Significant difference was found between the non-guided and marker-guided registration (χ2 = 108.5; p < 0.01). The interexaminer variability of the disc position in MRI [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.50 at T1, 0.56 at T2] was lower than that in MRI-CBCT registered images [ICC = 0.80 (0.52–0.92) at T1, 0.84 (0.62–0.93) at T2]. Erosions and subcortical cysts were noticed less frequently in the MRI-CBCT images than in CBCT images. Conclusions: Non-guided registration proved superior to marker-guided registration. Although MRI-CBCT fused images were slightly more limited than CBCT alone to detect osseous abnormalities, use of the fused images improved the consistency among examiners in detecting disc position in relation to the condyle. PMID:25734241

  2. A Description for Rock Joint Roughness Based on Terrestrial Laser Scanner and Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yunfeng; Tang, Huiming; Eldin, M. A. M. Ez; Chen, Pengyu; Wang, Liangqing; Wang, Jinge

    2015-11-01

    Shear behavior of rock mass greatly depends upon the rock joint roughness which is generally characterized by anisotropy, scale effect and interval effect. A new index enabling to capture all the three features, namely brightness area percentage (BAP), is presented to express the roughness based on synthetic illumination of a digital terrain model derived from terrestrial laser scanner (TLS). Since only tiny planes facing opposite to shear direction make contribution to resistance during shear failure, therefore these planes are recognized through the image processing technique by taking advantage of the fact that they appear brighter than other ones under the same light source. Comparison with existing roughness indexes and two case studies were illustrated to test the performance of BAP description. The results reveal that the rock joint roughness estimated by the presented description has a good match with existing roughness methods and displays a wider applicability.

  3. A Description for Rock Joint Roughness Based on Terrestrial Laser Scanner and Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yunfeng; Tang, Huiming; Eldin, M. A. M Ez; Chen, Pengyu; Wang, Liangqing; Wang, Jinge

    2015-01-01

    Shear behavior of rock mass greatly depends upon the rock joint roughness which is generally characterized by anisotropy, scale effect and interval effect. A new index enabling to capture all the three features, namely brightness area percentage (BAP), is presented to express the roughness based on synthetic illumination of a digital terrain model derived from terrestrial laser scanner (TLS). Since only tiny planes facing opposite to shear direction make contribution to resistance during shear failure, therefore these planes are recognized through the image processing technique by taking advantage of the fact that they appear brighter than other ones under the same light source. Comparison with existing roughness indexes and two case studies were illustrated to test the performance of BAP description. The results reveal that the rock joint roughness estimated by the presented description has a good match with existing roughness methods and displays a wider applicability. PMID:26585247

  4. A Description for Rock Joint Roughness Based on Terrestrial Laser Scanner and Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yunfeng; Tang, Huiming; Eldin, M A M Ez; Chen, Pengyu; Wang, Liangqing; Wang, Jinge

    2015-01-01

    Shear behavior of rock mass greatly depends upon the rock joint roughness which is generally characterized by anisotropy, scale effect and interval effect. A new index enabling to capture all the three features, namely brightness area percentage (BAP), is presented to express the roughness based on synthetic illumination of a digital terrain model derived from terrestrial laser scanner (TLS). Since only tiny planes facing opposite to shear direction make contribution to resistance during shear failure, therefore these planes are recognized through the image processing technique by taking advantage of the fact that they appear brighter than other ones under the same light source. Comparison with existing roughness indexes and two case studies were illustrated to test the performance of BAP description. The results reveal that the rock joint roughness estimated by the presented description has a good match with existing roughness methods and displays a wider applicability. PMID:26585247

  5. Inversion of data from diffraction-limited multiwavelength remote sensors. I - Linear case. [radiometric image filters for geophysical interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenkranz, P. W.

    1978-01-01

    The remote sensing inverse problem is considered in which the sensor does not necessarily view the same area on the earth at each wavelength, and spatial correlations of the geophysical parameters may be present. Under the conditions of linearity and stationary statistics, the minimum mean-square error solution to the problem of inverting such data is a spatial filter of the Wiener-Kolmogorov class. The resulting remote-sensing system can be characterized by an impulse response matrix in ordinary space or by a transfer matrix in frequency space. A signal-to-noise matrix for the geophysical parameters to be sensed is also defined; this matrix depends on the postulated a priori statistics and on the characteristics of the remote-sensing instrument. The system transfer matrix and the signal-to-noise matrix are simultaneously diagonalizable. The optimum transfer matrix filters out of the estimate vector those eigenparameters for which eigenvalues of the signal-to-noise matrix are less than unity.

  6. Imaging of in vitro and in vivo bones and joints with continuous-wave diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Jiang, Huabei; Lyndon Key, L.; Bolster, Marcy B.

    2001-03-01

    WWe present what is believed to be the first absorption and scattering images of in vitro and in vivo bones and joints from continuous-wave tomographic measurements. Human finger and chicken bones embedded in cylindrical scattering media were imaged at multiple transverse planes with Clemson multi-channel diffuse optical imager. Both absorption and scattering images were obtained using our nonlinear, finite element based reconstruction algorithm. This study shows that diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has the potential to be used for detection and monitoring of bone and joint diseases such as osteoporosis and arthritis.

  7. Practical implementation of the image domain joint transform correlator for holographic security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Michael V.; Odinokov, Sergey B.; Bondarev, Leonid A.; Kurakin, Sergey V.

    2003-05-01

    We describe the experimental setup of the image domain joint transform correlator intended for holographic security application. The security verification routine demands two channels. The first one corresponds to the reference hologram stored in the security device. The other is a security holographic mark with several test sub-holograms, applied to a carrier: ID-card, paper seal etc. Each of the holograms stores a part of entire image, stored in the reference hologram. Image domain JTC is used to match the images retrieved from the holograms. The images are recorded by a light addressed spatial light modulator (LASLM). Being recorded and retrieved, the images provides correlation peaks with special positions, with a strict dependence on the tested and reference holograms mutual shifts. We prove experimentally that the image domain recognizing provides as more effective usage of the LASLM work pupil and resolution as a less device size. The system also has a good tolerance to shift and rotation of the security holographic mark. Few correlation peaks respected to test holograms enhances the device recognizing probability. We provide computer simulations based on the mathematical analysis of the optical signal transforming. The real-time experimental results corresponded with computer simulations are presented.

  8. Objectively measuring signal detectability, contrast, blur and noise in medical images using channelized joint observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, Bart; Luong, Hiêp; Platiša, Ljiljana; Philips, Wilfried

    2013-03-01

    To improve imaging systems and image processing techniques, objective image quality assessment is essential. Model observers adopting a task-based quality assessment strategy by estimating signal detectability measures, have shown to be quite successful to this end. At the same time, costly and time-consuming human observer experiments can be avoided. However, optimizing images in terms of signal detectability alone, still allows a lot of freedom in terms of the imaging parameters. More specifically, fixing the signal detectability defines a manifold in the imaging parameter space on which different "possible" solutions reside. In this article, we present measures that can be used to distinguish these possible solutions from each other, in terms of image quality factors such as signal blur, noise and signal contrast. Our approach is based on an extended channelized joint observer (CJO) that simultaneously estimates the signal amplitude, scale and detectability. As an application, we use this technique to design k-space trajectories for MRI acquisition. Our technique allows to compare the different spiral trajectories in terms of blur, noise and contrast, even when the signal detectability is estimated to be equal.

  9. Analysis of 2-d ultrasound cardiac strain imaging using joint probability density functions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chi; Varghese, Tomy

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasound frame rates play a key role for accurate cardiac deformation tracking. Insufficient frame rates lead to an increase in signal de-correlation artifacts resulting in erroneous displacement and strain estimation. Joint probability density distributions generated from estimated axial strain and its associated signal-to-noise ratio provide a useful approach to assess the minimum frame rate requirements. Previous reports have demonstrated that bi-modal distributions in the joint probability density indicate inaccurate strain estimation over a cardiac cycle. In this study, we utilize similar analysis to evaluate a 2-D multi-level displacement tracking and strain estimation algorithm for cardiac strain imaging. The effect of different frame rates, final kernel dimensions and a comparison of radio frequency and envelope based processing are evaluated using echo signals derived from a 3-D finite element cardiac model and five healthy volunteers. Cardiac simulation model analysis demonstrates that the minimum frame rates required to obtain accurate joint probability distributions for the signal-to-noise ratio and strain, for a final kernel dimension of 1 λ by 3 A-lines, was around 42 Hz for radio frequency signals. On the other hand, even a frame rate of 250 Hz with envelope signals did not replicate the ideal joint probability distribution. For the volunteer study, clinical data was acquired only at a 34 Hz frame rate, which appears to be sufficient for radio frequency analysis. We also show that an increase in the final kernel dimensions significantly affect the strain probability distribution and joint probability density function generated, with a smaller effect on the variation in the accumulated mean strain estimated over a cardiac cycle. Our results demonstrate that radio frequency frame rates currently achievable on clinical cardiac ultrasound systems are sufficient for accurate analysis of the strain probability distribution, when a multi-level 2-D

  10. Joint reconstruction of non-overlapping magnetic particle imaging focus-field data.

    PubMed

    Knopp, T; Them, K; Kaul, M; Gdaniec, N

    2015-04-21

    The focus field is a key component to enable clinical applications in magnetic particle imaging (MPI). Due to physiological constraints, the method of choice is to place the focus of a small acquisition volume at various static positions in space and acquire the full field-of-view using a multi-station approach. In the first experiments, overlapping drive-field patches were used and boundary artifacts between drive-field patches were reduced using image processing. In this work we show that artifact-free reconstruction of non-overlapping focus-field data is feasible by using a joint reconstruction algorithm. This enables maximum scanning efficiency in multi-station focus-field experiments, which is key for reaching sufficiently short acquisition times to image the human heart. PMID:25803656

  11. Joint reconstruction of non-overlapping magnetic particle imaging focus-field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopp, T.; Them, K.; Kaul, M.; Gdaniec, N.

    2015-04-01

    The focus field is a key component to enable clinical applications in magnetic particle imaging (MPI). Due to physiological constraints, the method of choice is to place the focus of a small acquisition volume at various static positions in space and acquire the full field-of-view using a multi-station approach. In the first experiments, overlapping drive-field patches were used and boundary artifacts between drive-field patches were reduced using image processing. In this work we show that artifact-free reconstruction of non-overlapping focus-field data is feasible by using a joint reconstruction algorithm. This enables maximum scanning efficiency in multi-station focus-field experiments, which is key for reaching sufficiently short acquisition times to image the human heart.

  12. Computed Tomographic Image Analysis Based on FEM Performance Comparison of Segmentation on Knee Joint Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Seong-Wook; Seo, Young-Jin; Yoo, Yon-Sik

    2014-01-01

    The demand for an accurate and accessible image segmentation to generate 3D models from CT scan data has been increasing as such models are required in many areas of orthopedics. In this paper, to find the optimal image segmentation to create a 3D model of the knee CT data, we compared and validated segmentation algorithms based on both objective comparisons and finite element (FE) analysis. For comparison purposes, we used 1 model reconstructed in accordance with the instructions of a clinical professional and 3 models reconstructed using image processing algorithms (Sobel operator, Laplacian of Gaussian operator, and Canny edge detection). Comparison was performed by inspecting intermodel morphological deviations with the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm, and FE analysis was performed to examine the effects of the segmentation algorithm on the results of the knee joint movement analysis. PMID:25538950

  13. Computed tomographic image analysis based on FEM performance comparison of segmentation on knee joint reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seong-Wook; Seo, Young-Jin; Yoo, Yon-Sik; Kim, Yoon Sang

    2014-01-01

    The demand for an accurate and accessible image segmentation to generate 3D models from CT scan data has been increasing as such models are required in many areas of orthopedics. In this paper, to find the optimal image segmentation to create a 3D model of the knee CT data, we compared and validated segmentation algorithms based on both objective comparisons and finite element (FE) analysis. For comparison purposes, we used 1 model reconstructed in accordance with the instructions of a clinical professional and 3 models reconstructed using image processing algorithms (Sobel operator, Laplacian of Gaussian operator, and Canny edge detection). Comparison was performed by inspecting intermodel morphological deviations with the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm, and FE analysis was performed to examine the effects of the segmentation algorithm on the results of the knee joint movement analysis. PMID:25538950

  14. Prediction of radiographic progression in synovitis-positive joints on maximum intensity projection of magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Akai, Takanori; Taniguchi, Daigo; Oda, Ryo; Asada, Maki; Toyama, Shogo; Tokunaga, Daisaku; Seno, Takahiro; Kawahito, Yutaka; Fujii, Yosuke; Ito, Hirotoshi; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-04-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging with maximum intensity projection (MRI-MIP) is an easy, useful imaging method to evaluate synovitis in rheumatoid hands. However, the prognosis of synovitis-positive joints on MRI-MIP has not been clarified. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between synovitis visualized by MRI-MIP and joint destruction on X-rays in rheumatoid hands. The wrists, metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints, and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints of both hands (500 joints in total) were evaluated in 25 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Synovitis was scored from grade 0 to 2 on the MRI-MIP images. The Sharp/van der Heijde score and Larsen grade were used for radiographic evaluation. The relationships between the MIP score and the progression of radiographic scores and between the MIP score and bone marrow edema on MRI were analyzed using the trend test. As the MIP score increased, the Sharp/van der Heijde score and Larsen grade progressed severely. The rate of bone marrow edema-positive joints also increased with higher MIP scores. MRI-MIP imaging of RA hands is a clinically useful method that allows semi-quantitative evaluation of synovitis with ease and can be used to predict joint destruction. PMID:26861034

  15. Joint inversion of 3-D seismic, gravimetric and magnetotelluric data for sub-basalt imaging in the Faroe-Shetland Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heincke, B.; Moorkamp, M.; Jegen, M.; Hobbs, R. W.

    2012-12-01

    collected along parallel lines by a shipborne gradiometer and the marine MT data set is composed of 41 stations that are distributed over the whole investigation area. Logging results from a borehole located in the central part of the investigation area enable us to derive parameter relationships between seismic velocities, resistivities and densities that are adequately describe the rock property behaviors of both the basaltic lava flows and sedimentary layers in this region. In addition, a 3-D reflection seismic survey covering the central part allows us to incorporate the top of basalt and other features as constraints in the joint inversions and to evaluate the quality of the final results. Literature: D. Colombo, M. Mantovani, S. Hallinan, M. Virgilio, 2008. Sub-basalt depth imaging using simultaneous joint inversion of seismic and electromagnetic (MT) data: a CRB field study. SEG Expanded Abstract, Las Vegas, USA, 2674-2678. M. Jordan, J. Ebbing, M. Brönner, J. Kamm , Z. Du, P. Eliasson, 2012. Joint Inversion for Improved Sub-salt and Sub-basalt Imaging with Application to the More Margin. EAGE Expanded Abstracts, Copenhagen, DK. M. Moorkamp, B. Heincke, M. Jegen, A.W.Roberts, R.W. Hobbs, 2011. A framework for 3-D joint inversion of MT, gravity and seismic refraction data. Geophysical Journal International, 184, 477-493.

  16. Temperature imaging in nonpremixed flames by joint filtered Rayleigh and Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Sean P; Schefer, Robert W; Beresh, Steven J; Grasser, Thomas W

    2005-03-20

    Joint fuel Raman and filtered Rayleigh-scattering (FRS) imaging is demonstrated in a laminar methane-air diffusion flame. These experiments are, to our knowledge, the first reported extension of the FRS technique to nonpremixed combustion. This joint imaging approach allows for correction of the FRS images for the large variations in Rayleigh cross section that occur in diffusion flames and for a secondary measurement of fuel mole fraction. The temperature-dependent filtered Rayleigh cross sections are computed with a six-moment kinetic model for calculation of major-species Rayleigh-Brillouin line shapes and a flamelet-based model for physically judicious estimates of gas-phase chemical composition. Shot-averaged temperatures, fuel mole fractions, and fuel number densities from steady and vortex-strained diffusion flames stabilized on a Wolfhard-Parker slot burner are presented, and a detailed uncertainty analysis reveals that the FRS-measured temperatures are accurate to within +/- 4.5 to 6% of the local absolute temperature. PMID:15813256

  17. A Robust Image Watermarking in the Joint Time-Frequency Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, Mahmut; Akan, Aydın; Çekiç, Yalçın

    2010-12-01

    With the rapid development of computers and internet applications, copyright protection of multimedia data has become an important problem. Watermarking techniques are proposed as a solution to copyright protection of digital media files. In this paper, a new, robust, and high-capacity watermarking method that is based on spatiofrequency (SF) representation is presented. We use the discrete evolutionary transform (DET) calculated by the Gabor expansion to represent an image in the joint SF domain. The watermark is embedded onto selected coefficients in the joint SF domain. Hence, by combining the advantages of spatial and spectral domain watermarking methods, a robust, invisible, secure, and high-capacity watermarking method is presented. A correlation-based detector is also proposed to detect and extract any possible watermarks on an image. The proposed watermarking method was tested on some commonly used test images under different signal processing attacks like additive noise, Wiener and Median filtering, JPEG compression, rotation, and cropping. Simulation results show that our method is robust against all of the attacks.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Image Evaluation of Temporomandibular Joint Osteophytes: Influence of Clinical Factors and Artrogenics Changes.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Eduardo; Remedi, Marcelo Pereira; Ferreira, Luciano Ambrosio; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires

    2016-03-01

    This research aims to examine the presence of osteophyte in patients with arthrogenic temporomandibular disorders through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); to investigate the influence of sex and clinical symptoms in its prevalence; and the position of the osteophytes in the condyle. The study was based on 100 MRI and on reports of patients, which corresponded to the evaluation of 200 joints. Patients of both sexes were aged from 18 to 82 years (average = 49.48) and were subjected to the aforementioned examination from January 2006 to March 2009. The assessment considered the type of disc displacement, the presence of effusion, bone marrow edema, condyle changes, joint noise and pain. The MRI machine used was the GE Signa HDX (General Electric, Milwaukee, WI), with T1 and T2-weighted, 1.5 T magnetic field, sagittal oblique (mouth closed, mouth open) and coronal (mouth closed) imaging, with spherical surface coil and an asymmetric matrix. All images were interpreted by an experienced radiologist. A total of 28% (n = 56) of the temporomandibular joints showed osteophytes on the anterior surface of the mandible. No relationship was found between sex and osteophytes. The authors found a statistically significant difference between osteophytes and disc displacement without reduction (P < 0.001). The presence of osteophytes suggested a possible cause and effect relationship between osteoarthritis and disc displacement without reduction; the osteophyte was always located in the anterior surface of condyle, regardless of the sex variable; no significant difference was found between osteophytes and the main complaints of the patient. PMID:26825745

  19. Cardiac diffusion tensor imaging based on compressed sensing using joint sparsity and low-rank approximation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianping; Wang, Lihui; Chu, Chunyu; Zhang, Yanli; Liu, Wanyu; Zhu, Yuemin

    2016-04-29

    Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance (DTMR) imaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have been widely used to probe noninvasively biological tissue structures. However, DTI suffers from long acquisition times, which limit its practical and clinical applications. This paper proposes a new Compressed Sensing (CS) reconstruction method that employs joint sparsity and rank deficiency to reconstruct cardiac DTMR images from undersampled k-space data. Diffusion-weighted images acquired in different diffusion directions were firstly stacked as columns to form the matrix. The matrix was row sparse in the transform domain and had a low rank. These two properties were then incorporated into the CS reconstruction framework. The underlying constrained optimization problem was finally solved by the first-order fast method. Experiments were carried out on both simulation and real human cardiac DTMR images. The results demonstrated that the proposed approach had lower reconstruction errors for DTI indices, including fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivities (MD), compared to the existing CS-DTMR image reconstruction techniques. PMID:27163322

  20. Alterations of the Temporomandibular Joint on Magnetic Resonance Imaging according to Growth and Development in Schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tatsurou; Konoo, Tetsuro; Habu, Manabu; Oda, Masafumi; Kito, Shinji; Kodama, Masaaki; Kokuryo, Shinya; Wakasugi-Sato, Nao; Matsumoto-Takeda, Shinobu; Nishida, Ikuko; Morikawa, Kazumasa; Saeki, Katsura; Maki, Kenshi; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Masumi, Shin-ichi; Terashita, Masamichi; Morimoto, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The paper explains the alterations of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) according to the growth and development of schoolchildren. Appearance and disappearance of a “double contour-like structure” (DCLS) of the mandibular condyle on MRI according to the growth and development of schoolchildren were demonstrated. In addition, possible constituents of DCLS and the significance of detection of DCLS on MRI were also speculated. The relationship between red marrow and yellow marrow in the articular eminence of temporal bone, the disappearance of DCLS, and alterations of the mandibular condyle have been elucidated. PMID:23316233

  1. Wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, W.; Chen, Z. Y. Jin, W.; Huang, D. W.; Ding, Y. H.; Li, J. C.; Zhang, X. Q.; Zhuang, G.; Lee, S. G.; Shi, Y. J.

    2014-11-15

    The wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer is a key issue for the measurements of plasma rotation. For the lack of available standard radiation source near 3.95 Å and there is no other diagnostics to measure the core rotation for inter-calibration, an indirect method by using tokamak plasma itself has been applied on joint Texas experimental tokamak. It is found that the core toroidal rotation velocity is not zero during locked mode phase. This is consistent with the observation of small oscillations on soft x-ray signals and electron cyclotron emission during locked-mode phase.

  2. Wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Yan, W; Chen, Z Y; Jin, W; Huang, D W; Ding, Y H; Li, J C; Zhang, X Q; Lee, S G; Shi, Y J; Zhuang, G

    2014-11-01

    The wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer is a key issue for the measurements of plasma rotation. For the lack of available standard radiation source near 3.95 Å and there is no other diagnostics to measure the core rotation for inter-calibration, an indirect method by using tokamak plasma itself has been applied on joint Texas experimental tokamak. It is found that the core toroidal rotation velocity is not zero during locked mode phase. This is consistent with the observation of small oscillations on soft x-ray signals and electron cyclotron emission during locked-mode phase. PMID:25430323

  3. High-Resolution Geophysical 3D Imaging for Archaeology by Magnetic and EM data: The Case of the Iron Age Settlement of Torre Galli, Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cella, Federico; Fedi, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic and electromagnetic surveying are effective techniques frequently used in archaeology because the susceptibility and the electric resistivity contrast between the cover soil and several buried finds often lead to detectable anomalies. Significant advances were recently achieved by 3D imaging methods of potential field data that provide an estimate of the magnetization distribution within the subsurface. They provide a high-resolution image of the source distribution, thanks to the differentiation of the field and to the stability of the process. These techniques are fast and quite effective in the case of a compact, isolated, and depth-limited source, i.e., just the kind of source generally occurring in archaeological investigations. We illustrate the high-resolution imaging process for a geophysical study carried out at Torre Galli ( Vibo Valentia, Calabria, Italy), one of the most significant sites of the early Iron Age in Italy. Multi-scale derivative analysis of magnetic data revealed the trends of anomalies shaped and aligned with a regular geometry. This allowed us to make an outline of the buried structures, and then to characterize them in terms of size, shape, and depth by means of the imaging technique. Targeted excavations were therefore addressed to the locations selected by our analysis, revealing structures showing exactly the predicted features and confirming the archaeological hypothesis concerning the settlement organization partitioned in terms of functional differentiation: an intermediate area occupied mostly by defensive structures placed between the village, westward, and the necropolis, eastward.

  4. Comparison of Landsat Thematic Mapper and Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer data for the Cuprite mining district, Esmeralda, and Nye counties, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierein-Young, Kathryn S.; Kruse, Fred A.

    1989-01-01

    Landsat TM images and Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer (GERIS) data were analyzed for the Cuprite mining district and compared to available geologic and alteration maps of the area. The TM data, with 30 m resolution and 6 broadbands, allowed discrimination of general mineral groups. Clay minerals, playa deposits, and unaltered rocks were mapped as discrete spectral units using the TM data, but specific minerals were not determined, and definition of the individual alteration zones was not possible. The GERIS, with 15 m spatial resolution and 63 spectral bands, permitted construction of complete spectra and identification of specific minerals. Detailed spectra extracted from the images provided the ability to identify the minerals alunite, kaolinite, hematite, and buddingtonite by their spectral characteristics. The GERIS data show a roughly concentrically zoned hydrothermal system. The mineralogy mapped with the aircraft system conforms to previous field and multispectral image mapping. However, identification of individual minerals and spatial display of the dominant mineralogy add information that can be used to help determine the morphology and genetic origin of the hydrothermal system.

  5. Knee joint examinations by magnetic resonance imaging: The correlation of pathology, age, and sex

    PubMed Central

    Avcu, Serhat; Altun, Ersan; Akpinar, Ihsan; Bulut, Mehmet Deniz; Eresov, Kemal; Biren, Tugrul

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The aim of our study was to investigate the incidence and coexistence of multiple knee joint pathologies and the distribution of knee joint pathologies according to age and sex. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed using the clinical data of patients evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee joint. Data from 308 patients examined between August 2002 and July 2003 were included into this study. A Pearson correlation analysis was performed to examine the relationship between the pathological findings and the age and sex of the patients. Results: The ages of the patients ranged between 1 and 74 years (mean: 43.3 years). Age was significantly correlated with meniscal degeneration and tears, medial collateral ligament degeneration, parameniscal cyst, and chondromalacia patellae. There was a significant correlation between male gender and anterior cruciate ligament injury. Meniscal injury was significantly correlated with bursitis, as well as medial collateral ligament injury. Bone bruise was significantly correlated with medial collateral ligament injury, lateral collateral ligament injury, Baker's cyst, and anterior cruciate ligament injury. Chondromalacia patellae was significantly correlated with anterior cruciate ligament injury, patellae alta, and osteochondral lesion. Bursitis (in 53.2% of the patients) followed by grade-II meniscal degeneration (in 43% of the patients) were the most common knee pathologies observed by MRI. Conclusions: MRI findings of select knee pathologies are significantly correlated with each other and the age and sex of the patient. PMID:22624141

  6. Geophysical Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, E.

    1998-01-01

    Of the many geophysical remote-sensing techniques available today, a few are suitable for the water ice-rich, layered material expected at the north martian ice cap. Radio echo sounding has been used for several decades to determine ice thickness and internal structure. Selection of operating frequency is a tradeoff between signal attenuation (which typically increases with frequency and ice temperature) and resolution (which is proportional to wavelength). Antenna configuration and size will be additional considerations for a mission to Mars. Several configurations for ice-penetrating radar systems are discussed: these include orbiter-borne sounders, sounding antennas trailed by balloons and penetrators, and lander-borne systems. Lander-borne systems could include short-wave systems capable of resolving fine structure and layering in the upper meters beneath the lander. Spread-spectrum and deconvolution techniques can be used to increase the depth capability of a radar system. If soundings over several locations are available (e.g., with balloons, rovers, or panning short-wave systems), then it will be easier to resolve internal layering, variations in basal reflection coefficient (from which material properties may be inferred), and the geometry of nonhorizontal features. Sonic sounding has a long history in oil and gas exploration. It is, however, unlikely that large explosive charges, or even swept-frequency techniques such as Vibroseis, would be suitable for a Polar lander -- these systems are capable of penetrating several kilometers of material at frequencies of 10-200 Hz, but the energy required to generate the sound waves is large and potentially destructive. The use of audio-frequency and ultrasonic sound generated by piezoelectric crystals is discussed as a possible method to explore layering and fine features in the upper meters of the ice cap. Appropriate choice of transducer(s) will permit operation over a range of fixed or modulated frequencies

  7. Optimization and geophysical inverse problems

    SciTech Connect

    Barhen, J.; Berryman, J.G.; Borcea, L.; Dennis, J.; de Groot-Hedlin, C.; Gilbert, F.; Gill, P.; Heinkenschloss, M.; Johnson, L.; McEvilly, T.; More, J.; Newman, G.; Oldenburg, D.; Parker, P.; Porto, B.; Sen, M.; Torczon, V.; Vasco, D.; Woodward, N.B.

    2000-10-01

    or distance from a prior model. Various other constraints may also be imposed upon the process. Inverse problems are not restricted to geophysics, but can be found in a wide variety of disciplines where inferences must be made on the basis of indirect measurements. For instance, most imaging problems, whether in the field of medicine or non-destructive evaluation, require the solution of an inverse problem. In this report, however, the examples used for illustration are taken exclusively from the field of geophysics. The generalization of these examples to other disciplines should be straightforward, as all are based on standard second-order partial differential equations of physics. In fact, sometimes the non-geophysical inverse problems are significantly easier to treat (as in medical imaging) because the limitations on data collection, and in particular on multiple views, are not so severe as they generally are in geophysics. This report begins with an introduction to geophysical inverse problems by briefly describing four canonical problems that are typical of those commonly encountered in geophysics. Next the connection with optimization methods is made by presenting a general formulation of geophysical inverse problems. This leads into the main subject of this report, a discussion of methods for solving such problems with an emphasis upon newer approaches that have not yet become prominent in geophysics. A separate section is devoted to a subject that is not encountered in all optimization problems but is particularly important in geophysics, the need for a careful appraisal of the results in terms of their resolution and uncertainty. The impact on geophysical inverse problems of continuously improving computational resources is then discussed. The main results are then brought together in a final summary and conclusions section.

  8. Coupled geophysical-hydrological modeling of controlled NAPL spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalsky, M. B.; Majer, E.; Peterson, J. E.; Finsterle, S.; Mazzella, A.

    2006-12-01

    model that takes advantage of radial symmetry in the experimental setup. The flow model is coupled to forward models for simulating the GPR and seismic measurements, and joint inversion of the multiple data types results in images of time-varying NAPL saturation distributions. Comparison of the two approaches with results of the post-experiment excavation indicate that combining geophysical data types and incorporating hydrological constraints improves estimates of NAPL saturation relative to the conventional interpretation of the geophysical data sets. Notice: Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for publication, it may not necessarily reflect the official Agency policy. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation by EPA for use. This work was supported, in part, by the U.S. Dept. of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231.

  9. Geophysical event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagan Volcano, Mariana Islands, Western Pacific Ocean (18.13°N, 145.80°E). All times are local (GMT+10 h). A strong explosive eruption from North Pagan, the larger of the two stratovolcanos that form the Pagan volcano complex, began on May 15. While reporting strong felt seismicity on the island, radio operator Pedro Castro suddenly announced at 0915 that the volcano was erupting. Communication was then cut off. An infrared image returned from the Japanese geostationary weather satellite at 1000 showed a very bright circular cloud about 80 km in diameter over the volcano. The cloud spread SE at about 70 km/h, and by 1600 its maximum height was estimated at 13.5 km from satellite imagery. Weakening of activity was evident on the image returned at 1900, and on the next image, at 2200, feeding of the eruption cloud had stopped, with the proximal end of the cloud located about 120 km SE of the volcano. No additional activity has been detected on the satellite images, but by 0400 the next morning, remnants of the plume had reached 10°N and 155°E.

  10. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (151). Acromioclavicular joint geyser sign with chronic full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (SST) tear.

    PubMed

    Khor, Andrew Yu Keat; Wong, Steven Bak Siew

    2014-02-01

    An 82-year-old man presented with neck pain, right upper limb radiculopathy and right shoulder pain. Physical examination revealed a soft lump over the right shoulder joint, as well as reduced range of shoulder movements. On magnetic resonance imaging, the soft lump was shown to be a cystic mass over the acromioclavicular joint and was related to a full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear. This is the classic geyser sign. The pathophysiology and clinical features of the geyser sign, and its imaging features with various imaging modalities, are discussed. PMID:24570312

  11. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (151). Acromioclavicular joint geyser sign with chronic full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (SST) tear.

    PubMed Central

    Khor, Andrew Yu Keat; Wong, Steven Bak Siew

    2014-01-01

    An 82-year-old man presented with neck pain, right upper limb radiculopathy and right shoulder pain. Physical examination revealed a soft lump over the right shoulder joint, as well as reduced range of shoulder movements. On magnetic resonance imaging, the soft lump was shown to be a cystic mass over the acromioclavicular joint and was related to a full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear. This is the classic geyser sign. The pathophysiology and clinical features of the geyser sign, and its imaging features with various imaging modalities, are discussed. PMID:24570312

  12. Joint detection and segmentation of vertebral bodies in CT images by sparse representation error minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korez, Robert; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2016-03-01

    Automated detection and segmentation of vertebral bodies from spinal computed tomography (CT) images is usually a prerequisite step for numerous spine-related medical applications, such as diagnosis, surgical planning and follow-up assessment of spinal pathologies. However, automated detection and segmentation are challenging tasks due to a relatively high degree of anatomical complexity, presence of unclear boundaries and articulation of vertebrae with each other. In this paper, we describe a sparse representation error minimization (SEM) framework for joint detection and segmentation of vertebral bodies in CT images. By minimizing the sparse representation error of sampled intensity values, we are able to recover the oriented bounding box (OBB) and segmentation binary mask for each vertebral body in the CT image. The performance of the proposed SEM framework was evaluated on five CT images of the thoracolumbar spine. The resulting Euclidean distance of 1:75+/-1:02 mm, computed between the center points of recovered and corresponding reference OBBs, and Dice coefficient of 92:3+/-2:7%, computed between the resulting and corresponding reference segmentation binary masks, indicate that the proposed framework can successfully detect and segment vertebral bodies in CT images of the thoracolumbar spine.

  13. Dictionary learning method for joint sparse representation-based image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiheng; Fu, Yuli; Li, Haifeng; Zou, Jian

    2013-05-01

    Recently, sparse representation (SR) and joint sparse representation (JSR) have attracted a lot of interest in image fusion. The SR models signals by sparse linear combinations of prototype signal atoms that make a dictionary. The JSR indicates that different signals from the various sensors of the same scene form an ensemble. These signals have a common sparse component and each individual signal owns an innovation sparse component. The JSR offers lower computational complexity compared with SR. First, for JSR-based image fusion, we give a new fusion rule. Then, motivated by the method of optimal directions (MOD), for JSR, we propose a novel dictionary learning method (MODJSR) whose dictionary updating procedure is derived by employing the JSR structure one time with singular value decomposition (SVD). MODJSR has lower complexity than the K-SVD algorithm which is often used in previous JSR-based fusion algorithms. To capture the image details more efficiently, we proposed the generalized JSR in which the signals ensemble depends on two dictionaries. MODJSR is extended to MODGJSR in this case. MODJSR/MODGJSR can simultaneously carry out dictionary learning, denoising, and fusion of noisy source images. Some experiments are given to demonstrate the validity of the MODJSR/MODGJSR for image fusion.

  14. Improvement of image deblurring for opto-electronic joint transform correlator under projective motion vector estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xiao; Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Yang

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we propose an efficient algorithm to improve the performance of image deblurring based on opto-electronic joint transform correlator (JTC) that is capable of detecting the motion vector of a space camera. Firstly, the motion vector obtained from JTC is divided into many sub-motion vectors according to the projective motion path, which represents the degraded image as an integration of the clear scene under a sequence of planar projective transforms. Secondly, these sub-motion vectors are incorporated into the projective motion Richardson-Lucy (RL) algorithm to improve deblurred results. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm and the influence of noise on the algorithm performance is also statically analyzed.

  15. Joint source/channel coding for image transmission with JPEG2000 over memoryless channels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenyu; Bilgin, Ali; Marcellin, Michael W

    2005-08-01

    The high compression efficiency and various features provided by JPEG2000 make it attractive for image transmission purposes. A novel joint source/channel coding scheme tailored for JPEG2000 is proposed in this paper to minimize the end-to-end image distortion within a given total transmission rate through memoryless channels. It provides unequal error protection by combining the forward error correction capability from channel codes and the error detection/localization functionality from JPEG2000 in an effective way. The proposed scheme generates quality scalable and error-resilient codestreams. It gives competitive performance with other existing schemes for JPEG2000 in the matched channel condition case and provides more graceful quality degradation for mismatched cases. Furthermore, both fixed-length source packets and fixed-length channel packets can be efficiently formed with the same algorithm. PMID:16121451

  16. Joint image formation and anisotropy characterization in wide-angle SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Kush R.; Çetin, Müjdat; Fisher, John W., III; Willsky, Alan S.

    2006-05-01

    We consider the problem of jointly forming images and characterizing anisotropy from wide-angle synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements. Conventional SAR image formation techniques assume isotropic scattering, which is not valid with wide-angle apertures. We present a method based on a sparse representation of aspect-dependent scattering with an overcomplete basis composed of basis vectors with varying levels of angular persistence. Solved as an inverse problem, the result is a complex-valued, aspect-dependent response for each spatial location in a scene. Our non-parametric approach does not suffer from reduced cross-range resolution inherent in subaperture methods and considers all point scatterers in a scene jointly. The choice of the overcomplete basis set incorporates prior knowledge of aspect-dependent scattering, but the method is flexible enough to admit solutions that may not match a family of parametric functions. We enforce sparsity through regularization based on the l k-norm, k < 1. This formulation leads to an optimization problem that is solved through a robust quasi-Newton method. We also develop a graph-structured interpretation of the overcomplete basis leading towards approximate algorithms using guided depth-first search with appropriate stopping conditions and search heuristics. We present experimental results on synthetic scenes and the backhoe public release dataset.

  17. In-vitro and in-vivo imaging of MMP activity in cartilage and joint injury

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Tomoaki; Tenborg, Elizabeth; Yik, Jasper H. N.; Haudenschild, Dominik R.

    2015-01-01

    Non-destructive detection of cartilage-degrading activities represents an advance in osteoarthritis (OA) research, with implications in studies of OA pathogenesis, progression, and intervention strategies. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are principal cartilage degrading enzymes that contribute to OA pathogenesis. MMPSense750 is an in-vivo fluorimetric imaging probe with the potential to continuously and non-invasively trace real-time MMP activities, but its use in OA-related research has not been reported. Our objective is to detect and characterize the early degradation activities shortly after cartilage or joint injury with MMPSense750. We determined the appropriate concentration, assay time, and linear range using various concentrations of recombinant MMPs as standards. We then quantified MMP activity from cartilage explants subjected to either mechanical injury or inflammatory cytokine treatment in-vitro. Finally, we performed invivo MMP imaging of a mouse model of post-traumatic OA. Our in-vitro results showed that the optimal assay time was highly dependent on the MMP enzyme. In cartilage explant culture media, mechanical impact or cytokine treatment increased MMP activity. Injured knees of mice showed significantly higher fluorescent signal than uninjured knees. We conclude that MMPSense750 detects human MMP activities and can be used for in-vitro study with cartilage, as well as in-vivo studies of knee injury, and can offering real-time insight into the degradative processes that occurring within the joint before structural changes become evident radiographically. PMID:25817731

  18. Imaging the magmatic system of Newberry Volcano using Joint active source and teleseismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Benjamin A.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Bezada, Maximiliano J.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we combine active and passive source P wave seismic data to tomographically image the magmatic system beneath Newberry Volcano, located east of the Cascade arc. By using both travel times from local active sources and delay times from teleseismic earthquakes recorded on closely spaced seismometers (300-800 m), we significantly improve recovery of upper crustal velocity structure (<10 km depth). The tomographic model reveals a low-velocity feature between 3 and 5 km depth that lies beneath the caldera, consistent with a magma body. In contrast to earlier tomographic studies, where elevated temperatures were sufficient to explain the recovered low velocities, the larger amplitude low-velocity anomalies in our joint tomography model require low degrees of partial melt (˜10%), and a minimum melt volume of ˜2.5 km3. Furthermore, synthetic tests suggest that even greater magnitude low-velocity anomalies, and by inference larger volumes of magma (up to 8 km3), are needed to explain the observed waveform variability. The lateral extent and shape of the inferred magma body indicates that the extensional tectonic regime at Newberry influences the emplacement of magmatic intrusions. Our study shows that jointly inverting active source and passive source seismic data improves tomographic imaging of the shallow crustal seismic structure of volcanic systems and that active source experiments would benefit from longer deployment times to also record teleseismic sources.

  19. Imaging and Analysis of Void-defects in Solder Joints Formed in Reduced Gravity using High-Resolution Computed Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easton, John W.; Struk, Peter M.; Rotella, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    As a part of efforts to develop an electronics repair capability for long duration space missions, techniques and materials for soldering components on a circuit board in reduced gravity must be developed. This paper presents results from testing solder joint formation in low gravity on a NASA Reduced Gravity Research Aircraft. The results presented include joints formed using eutectic tin-lead solder and one of the following fluxes: (1) a no-clean flux core, (2) a rosin flux core, and (3) a solid solder wire with external liquid no-clean flux. The solder joints are analyzed with a computed tomography (CT) technique which imaged the interior of the entire solder joint. This replaced an earlier technique that required the solder joint to be destructively ground down revealing a single plane which was subsequently analyzed. The CT analysis technique is described and results presented with implications for future testing as well as implications for the overall electronics repair effort discussed.

  20. Interpretation of Borehole Geophysical Logs, Aquifer-Isolation Tests, and Water-Quality Data for Sites 1, 3, and 5 at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station/Joint Reserve Base, Horsham Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania: 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.

    2007-01-01

    Borehole geophysical logging, heatpulse-flowmeter measurements, borehole television surveys, and aquifer-isolation tests were conducted in 2005 at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station/Joint Reserve Base (NAS/JRB) in Horsham Township, Montgomery County, Pa. This study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the U.S. Navy in support of hydrogeological investigations to address ground-water contamination. Data collected for this study are valuable for understanding ground-water flow in the Stockton Formation at the local and regional scale. The Willow Grove NAS/JRB is underlain by the Stockton Formation, which consists of sedimentary rocks of Triassic age. The rocks of the Stockton Formation form a complex, heterogeneous aquifer with partially connected zones of high permeability. Borehole geophysical logs, heatpulse-flowmeter measurements, and borehole television surveys made in seven boreholes ranging from 70 to 350 ft deep were used to identify potential water-producing fractures and fracture zones and to select intervals for aquifer-isolation tests. An upward vertical hydraulic gradient was measured in one borehole, a downward vertical hydraulic gradient was measured in four boreholes, both an upward and a downward vertical hydraulic gradient were measured in one borehole, and no flow was measurable in one borehole. The aquifer-isolation tests isolated 30 discrete fractures in the seven boreholes for collection of depth-discrete hydraulic and water-quality data. Of the 30 fractures identified as potentially water producing, 26 fractures (87 percent) produced more than 1 gallon per minute of water. The specific capacity of the isolated intervals producing more than 1 gallon per minute ranged from 0.02 to 5.2 gallons per minute per foot. There was no relation between specific capacity and depth of the fracture. Samples for analysis for volatile organic compounds were collected from each isolated zone. Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) was the most

  1. High-Resolution Interleaved Water-Fat MR Imaging of Finger Joints with Chemical-Shift Elimination

    PubMed Central

    You, Zhigang; Seo, Gwysuk; Lerner, Amy; Totterman, Saara; Ritchlin, Christopher; Monu, Johnny

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study the use of an interleaved water-fat (IWF) sequence with a custom-made RF coil for high-resolution imaging of arthritic finger joints. Materials and Methods High-resolution finger MRI was performed using a custom-made dedicated RF receiver coil and an IWF sequence. A phantom, a cadaver finger specimen and the fingers of two normal controls and six arthritic subjects were imaged with a resolution of 156×156×600 microns. The appearance of anatomic structures on the IWF images were compared with images acquired with a regular sequence. The images were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists for the depiction of anatomical structures and for the presence of abnormalities. Results The high-resolution images revealed detailed structures of the finger joints not detectable using typical clinical resolution. The IWF sequence gave more realistic depiction of subchondral bone thickness, and avoided false bone erosions displayed in the regular sequence. It also allowed better visualization of ligaments and tendons. Conclusion This pilot study shows the feasibility and the potential usefulness of high-resolution IWF imaging for finger joint evaluation. This technique may be useful for the diagnosis and treatment assessment of arthritis, and for the study of joint disease pathogenesis. PMID:21182147

  2. Characterization of Anisotropy of Joint Surface Roughness and Aperture by Variogram Approach Based on Digital Image Processing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. J.; Zhu, W. C.; Yu, Q. L.; Liu, X. G.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanical and hydraulic anisotropy of rock joints are strongly dependent on the surface roughness and aperture. To date, accurate quantification of the anisotropic characteristics of joint surfaces remains a key issue. For this purpose, the digital image processing (DIP) technique was used to retrieve the joint surface topography, and a variogram function was used to characterize the anisotropy of the joint surface roughness and estimate the joint aperture. A new index, SR V , related to both the sill and the range of the variogram is proposed to describe the anisotropy of the joint surface roughness, and a new aperture index, b, is derived to quantify the joint aperture. These newly proposed indexes, SR V and b, were validated by characterizing three artificial triangular joint surfaces, then the values of both SR V and b were calculated along 42 directions on an artificial joint surface. The range of SR V was between 0.058622 and 0.331283, while that of b was from 0.270433 to 0.397715 mm. The results show that the newly proposed indexes SR V and b are effective for quantifying the anisotropic roughness and aperture of joint surfaces, respectively. In addition, based on the hypothesis that there exists a smooth upper wall for the artificial joint, a relationship between the indexes SR V and b was obtained based on the data analysis. It indicates that the trends of the indexes SR V and b tend to coincide, although some of their individual values differ. In this respect, the hydraulic aperture of rock joints is related to not only surface roughness but also the distribution of asperities on the surface. In addition, this method can also be used to characterize the roughness of real rock joints when the joint surface is treated by dying with ink before taking digital photos. This study provides a new method for properly quantifying the directional variability of joint surface roughness and estimating the mechanical and hydraulic properties of rock joints based

  3. Imaging modalities to access bony tumors and hyperplasic reactions of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Shintaku, Werner H; Venturin, Jaqueline S; Langlais, Robert P; Clark, Glenn T

    2010-08-01

    Benign and malignant tumors in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are rare. However, when a patient presents with clinical findings such as altered occlusion or facial asymmetry, a morphologic alteration in the condyle should be ruled out. The differential diagnosis for benign hyperplastic bony lesions in the TMJ should include condylar hyperplasia, osteochondroma, osteoma, chondroma, and osteoblastoma. If malignant features are present, chondrosarcoma and osteosarcoma should be considered. For the differential diagnosis, imaging is the most noninvasive method to evaluate the integrity of the TMJ. Imaging can be classified as morphologic or functional according to the information provided. The current scientific data have shown that panoramic images have 97% sensitivity and 45% specificity for identifying hyperplastic conditions in the TMJ. The sensitivity and specificity of medical computed tomography (CT) and cone-beam CT is 70% and 100%, and 80% and 100%, respectively, for the detection of bony abnormalities. To differentiate benign and malignant bony tumors, magnetic resonance imaging has a sensitivity and specificity of 44% and 95%, respectively. The corresponding percentages for single positron emission CT are 91% and 94%, for single positron emission CT/CT are 100% and 100%, for positron emission tomography are 88% and 72%, and for positron emission tomography/CT are 100% and 97%. The combination of morphologic and functional (single positron emission CT and positron emission tomography) modalities appears to improve the sensitivity and specificity to assess a hyperplastic condyle, facilitating treatment planning and providing a better prognosis for the patient. PMID:20452115

  4. Interpretation of borehole geophysical logs, aquifer-isolation tests, and water quality, supply wells 1 and 2, Willow Grove Naval Air Station/Joint Reserve Base, Horsham Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Goode, Daniel J.; Frasch, Steven M.

    2002-01-01

    Ground water pumped from supply wells 1 and 2 on the Willow Grove Naval Air Station/Joint Reserve Base (NAS/JRB) provides water for use at the base, including potable water for drinking. The supply wells have been contaminated by volatile organic compounds (VOC?s), particularly trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and the water is treated to remove the VOC?s. The Willow Grove NAS/JRB and surrounding area are underlain by sedimentary rocks of the Triassic-age Stockton Formation, which form a complex, heterogeneous aquifer. The ground-water-flow system for the supply wells was characterized by use of borehole geophysical logs and heatpulse-flowmeter measurements. The heatpulse-flowmeter measurements showed upward and downward borehole flow under nonpumping conditions in both wells. The hydraulic and chemical properties of discrete water-bearing fractures in the supply wells were characterized by isolating each water-bearing fracture with straddle packers. Eight fractures in supply well 1 and five fractures in supply well 2 were selected for testing on the basis of the borehole geophysical logs and borehole television surveys. Water samples were collected from each isolated fracture and analyzed for VOC?s and inorganic constituents. Fractures at 50?59, 79?80, 196, 124?152, 182, 241, 256, and 350?354 ft btoc (feet below top of casing) were isolated in supply well 1. Specific capacities ranged from 0.26 to 5.7 (gal/min)/ft (gallons per minute per foot) of drawdown. The highest specific capacity was for the fracture isolated at 179.8?188 ft btoc. Specific capacity and depth of fracture were not related in either supply well. The highest concentrations of PCE were in water samples collected from fractures isolated at 236.8?245 and 249.8?258 ft btoc, which are hydraulically connected. The concentration of PCE generally increased with depth to a maximum of 39 mg/L (micrograms per liter) at a depth of 249.8? 258 ft btoc and then decreased to 21 mg/L at a

  5. Joint seismic-geodynamic-mineral physical modelling of African geodynamics: A reconciliation of deep-mantle convection with surface geophysical constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, A M; Quere, S; Moucha, R; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P; Mitrovica, J X; Rowley, D B

    2008-08-22

    Recent progress in seismic tomography provides the first complete 3-D images of the combined thermal and chemical anomalies that characterise the unique deep mantle structure below the African continent. With these latest tomography results we predict flow patterns under Africa that reveal a large-scale, active hot upwelling, or superplume, below the western margin of Africa under the Cape Verde Islands. The scale and dynamical intensity of this West African superplume (WASP) is comparable to that of the south African superplume (SASP) that has long been assumed to dominate the flow dynamics under Africa. On the basis of this new tomography model, we find the dynamics of the SASP is strongly controlled by chemical contributions to deep mantle buoyancy that significantly compensate its thermal buoyancy. In contrast, the WASP appears to be entirely dominated by thermal buoyancy. New calculations of mantle convection incorporating these two superplumes reveal that the plate-driving forces due to the flow generated by the WASP is as strong as that due to the SASP. We find that the chemical buoyancy of the SASP exerts a strong stabilising control on the pattern and amplitude of shallow mantle flow in the asthenosphere below the southern half of the African plate. The asthenospheric flow predictions provide the first high resolution maps of focussed upwellings that lie below the major centres of Late Cenozoic volcanism, including the Kenya domes and Hoggar massif that lies above a remnant plume head in the upper mantle. Inferences of sublithospheric deformation from seismic anisotropy data are shown to be sensitive to the contributions of chemical buoyancy in the SASP.

  6. Spinal Inflammation in the Absence of Sacroiliac Joint Inflammation on Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients With Active Nonradiographic Axial Spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijde, Désirée; Sieper, Joachim; Maksymowych, Walter P; Brown, Matthew A; Lambert, Robert G W; Rathmann, Suchitrita S; Pangan, Aileen L

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the presence of spinal inflammation with and without sacroiliac (SI) joint inflammation on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with active nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis (SpA), and to compare the disease characteristics of these subgroups. Methods ABILITY-1 is a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial of adalimumab versus placebo in patients with nonradiographic axial SpA classified using the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society axial SpA criteria. Baseline MRIs were centrally scored independently by 2 readers using the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) method for the SI joints and the SPARCC 6–discovertebral unit method for the spine. Positive evidence of inflammation on MRI was defined as a SPARCC score of ≥2 for either the SI joints or the spine. Results Among patients with baseline SPARCC scores, 40% had an SI joint score of ≥2 and 52% had a spine score of ≥2. Forty-nine percent of patients with baseline SI joint scores of <2, and 58% of those with baseline SI joint scores of ≥2, had a spine score of ≥2. Comparison of baseline disease characteristics by baseline SI joint and spine scores showed that a greater proportion of patients in the subgroup with a baseline SPARCC score of ≥2 for both SI joints and spine were male, and patients with spine and SI joint scores of <2 were younger and had shorter symptom duration. SPARCC spine scores correlated with baseline symptom duration, and SI joint scores correlated negatively with the baseline Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, but neither correlated with the baseline Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score, total back pain, the patient's global assessment of disease activity, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, morning stiffness, nocturnal pain, or C-reactive protein level. Conclusion Assessment by experienced readers showed that spinal inflammation on MRI might be observed in half of

  7. Application of near surface geophysical methods to image water table response in an Alpine Meadow, Northern California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayers, M.; Blacic, T. M.; Craig, M. S.; Yarnell, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Meadows are recognized for their value to the ecological, hydrologic, and aesthetic functions of a watershed. As natural water retention sinks, meadows attenuate floods, improve water quality and support herbaceous vegetation that stabilize streambanks and promote high biodiversity. Alpine meadows are especially vital, serving as freshwater sources and distributing to lower lying provinces through ground and surface water interaction. These complexes are highly vulnerable to drought conditions, altered seasonal precipitation patterns, and mismanaged land use. One such location, Van Norden meadow located in the Donner Summit area west of Lake Tahoe, is one of the largest sub-alpine meadows in the Sierra Nevada mountain range of Northern California. Van Norden meadow offers a natural hydrologic laboratory. Ownership transfer of the area from a local land trust to the Forestry Service requires restoration toward natural meadow conditions, and involves notching the dam in 2016 to reduce currently impounded water volumes from 250 to less than 50 acre-feet. To monitor the effects of notching the dam on the upstream meadow conditions, better understanding of the surface and groundwater hydrology both pre-and post-base level alteration is required. Comprehensive understanding of groundwater flux that supports meadow reaches relies on knowledge of their often complex stratigraphic and structural subsurface framework. In recent years hydrogeophysics has emphasized the combination of near surface geophysical techniques, collaborated with well and borehole measures, to qualitatively define these parameters. Building on a preliminary GPR investigation conducted in 2014, in which 44 270 MHz transect lines were collected, we returned to Van Norden meadow in late summer 2015 to collect lower frequency GPR (50 and 100 MHz) and electrical resistivity profiles to better define the groundwater table, sedimentary, and structural features of the meadow.

  8. Imaging of posterior element axial pain generators: facet joints, pedicles, spinous processes, sacroiliac joints, and transitional segments.

    PubMed

    Kotsenas, Amy L

    2012-07-01

    The role of the posterior elements in generating axial back and neck pain is well established; the imaging detection of posterior element pain generators remains problematic. Morphologic imaging findings have proved to be nonspecific and are frequently present in asymptomatic patients. Edema, inflammation, and hypervascularity are more specific for sites of pain generation, but are often overlooked by imagers if physiologic imaging techniques such as fat-suppressed T2 or contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, radionuclide bone scanning with single-photon emission computed tomography (CT), or (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with CT are not used. PMID:22643392

  9. Imaging Science Panel. Multispectral Imaging Science Working Group joint meeting with Information Science Panel: Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of multispectral sensing is reviewed and recommendations for future research and development are proposed. specifically, two generic sensor concepts were discussed. One is the multispectral pushbroom sensor utilizing linear array technology which operates in six spectral bands including two in the SWIR region and incorporates capabilities for stereo and crosstrack pointing. The second concept is the imaging spectrometer (IS) which incorporates a dispersive element and area arrays to provide both spectral and spatial information simultaneously. Other key technology areas included very large scale integration and the computer aided design of these devices.

  10. Automated bone segmentation from large field of view 3D MR images of the hip joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ying; Fripp, Jurgen; Chandra, Shekhar S.; Schwarz, Raphael; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart

    2013-10-01

    Accurate bone segmentation in the hip joint region from magnetic resonance (MR) images can provide quantitative data for examining pathoanatomical conditions such as femoroacetabular impingement through to varying stages of osteoarthritis to monitor bone and associated cartilage morphometry. We evaluate two state-of-the-art methods (multi-atlas and active shape model (ASM) approaches) on bilateral MR images for automatic 3D bone segmentation in the hip region (proximal femur and innominate bone). Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired at 3T from 30 volunteers. Image sequences included water-excitation dual echo stead state (FOV 38.6 × 24.1 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.61 mm) in all subjects and multi-echo data image combination (FOV 37.6 × 23.5 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.70 mm) for a subset of eight subjects. Following manual segmentation of femoral (head-neck, proximal-shaft) and innominate (ilium+ischium+pubis) bone, automated bone segmentation proceeded via two approaches: (1) multi-atlas segmentation incorporating non-rigid registration and (2) an advanced ASM-based scheme. Mean inter- and intra-rater reliability Dice's similarity coefficients (DSC) for manual segmentation of femoral and innominate bone were (0.970, 0.963) and (0.971, 0.965). Compared with manual data, mean DSC values for femoral and innominate bone volumes using automated multi-atlas and ASM-based methods were (0.950, 0.922) and (0.946, 0.917), respectively. Both approaches delivered accurate (high DSC values) segmentation results; notably, ASM data were generated in substantially less computational time (12 min versus 10 h). Both automated algorithms provided accurate 3D bone volumetric descriptions for MR-based measures in the hip region. The highly computational efficient ASM-based approach is more likely suitable for future clinical applications such as extracting bone-cartilage interfaces for potential cartilage segmentation.