Science.gov

Sample records for joint military operations

  1. Distance Learning in Advanced Military Education: Analysis of Joint Operations Course in the Taiwan Military

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tung, Ming-Chih; Huang, Jiung-yao; Keh, Huan-Chao; Wai, Shu-shen

    2009-01-01

    High-ranking officers require advanced military education in war tactics for future combat. However, line officers rarely have time to take such courses on campus. The conventional solution to this problem used to take the inefficient correspondence courses. Whereas Internet technologies progress, online course is the current trend for military…

  2. Operational Stress and Correlates of Mental Health Among Joint Task Force Guantanamo Bay Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Webb-Murphy, Jennifer A; De La Rosa, Gabriel M; Schmitz, Kimberly J; Vishnyak, Elizabeth J; Raducha, Stephanie C; Roesch, Scott C; Johnston, Scott L

    2015-12-01

    Military personnel deployed to Joint Task Force Guantanamo Bay (JTF-GTMO) faced numerous occupational stressors. As part of a program evaluation, personnel working at JTF-GTMO completed several validated self-report measures. Personnel were at the beginning, middle, or end of their deployment phase. This study presents data regarding symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, alcohol abuse, depression, and resilience among 498 U.S. military personnel deployed to JTF-GTMO in 2009. We also investigated individual and organizational correlates of mental health among these personnel. Findings indicated that tenure at JTF-GTMO was positively related to adverse mental health outcomes. Regression models including these variables had R2 values ranging from .02 to .11. Occupation at JTF-GTMO also related to mental health such that guards reported poorer mental health than medical staff. Reluctance to seek out mental health care was also related to mental health outcomes. Those who reported being most reluctant to seek out care tended to report poorer mental health than those who were more willing to seek out care. Results suggested that the JTF-GTMO deployment was associated with significant psychological stress, and that both job-related and attitude-related variables were important to understanding mental health symptoms in this sample. PMID:26595460

  3. Bladder operated robotic joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a robotic joint which is operated by inflatable bladders and which can be used in applications where it is desired to move or hold an object. A support block supports an elongated plate to which is pivotally attached a finger. A tension strip passes over a lever attached to the finger and is attached at its ends to the support block on opposite sides of the plate. Bladders positioned between the plate and the tension strip on opposite sides of the plate can be inflated by pumps to pivot the finger, with one of the bladders being inflated while the other is being deflated.

  4. Cultural intelligence support for military operations

    SciTech Connect

    Guthormsen, Amy M.; MacKerrow, Edward P; Merritt, Terence M; Morgart, Ruth E

    2010-04-08

    It has long been recognized that military success relies on knowledge of the enemy. In the context of standard warfare, adequate knowledge of the enemy may be gained by analyzing observable, measurable data. In the context of modern counterinsurgency operations and the global war on terror, the task of predicting the behavior of the enemy is vastly more complex and difficult. Without an understanding of the ways individuals in the host nation interpret and react to events, no amount of objective information can provide the insight required to accurately predict behavior. US military doctrine has begun to recognize the importance of the many ways that local culture can affect operation success. Increasingly military decision makers use cultural information in the service of operation planning, and troops are provided with pre-deployment cultural training. However, no amount of training can cover the breadth and depth of potentially useful cultural information, and no amount of careful planning can avoid the need to adapt as situations develop. Therefore, a critical challenge is to provide useful tools to US personnel in their efforts to collect, analyze, and utilize cultural information. Essential functions for cultural support tools include the following: (1) to narrow down a broad range of available data and focus the user's attention on context-relevant information, (2) to present cultural information in an easily understood form, (3) to prompt the user to seek relevant information in the environment, (4) to synthesize information, and (5) to predict outcomes based on possible courses of operation. In this paper, we begin by reviewing the ways in which military operations can benefit from cultural intelligence. We then discuss frameworks for analyzing cultural information in the context of a military operation. We conclude with a demonstration of our current efforts to develop a tool that meets the aforementioned functional challenges.

  5. The application of CRM to military operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavanagh, Dale E.; Williams, Kenneth R.

    1987-01-01

    The detailed content of the CRM training component of the C-5 Aircrew Training System (ATS) was left to the discretion of the contractor. As a part of determining what the content should be, United Airlines Services Corporation has made an effort to understand how the needs of MAC crews compare with those of civilian airline crews. There are distinct similarities between the crew roles in the cockpits of civilian airliners and military air transports. Many of the attitudes and behaviors exhibited by civil and military crew members are comparable, hence much of the training in the field referred to as Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) is equally appropriate to civil or military aircrews. At the same time, there are significant differences which require assessment to determine if modifications to what might be termed generic CRM are necessary. The investigation enabled the definition and specification of CRM training which is believed to address the needs of the C-5 operational community. The study has concentrated largely on military airlift, but the training objectives and course content of the CRM training are readily adaptable to a wider range of military cockpits than are found in strategic airlift. For instance, CRM training focusing on communication, leadership, situational awareness, and crew coordination is just as appropriate, with some modification, to the pilots manning a flight to Tactical Airlift Command A-7's as it is to the pilots, flight engineers, and loadmasters crewing a C-5.

  6. International military leaders' survey on operational stress.

    PubMed

    Adler, Amy B; Cawkill, Paul; van den Berg, Coen; Arvers, Philippe; Puente, José; Cuvelier, Yves

    2008-01-01

    Despite the importance of military leaders in moderating the impact of deployment stressors on unit members, little attention has focused on the training leaders receive in managing unit stress. As part of a NATO Research Panel (Human Factors and Medicine (HFM)-081/Research and Technology Organization Task Group (RTG)), 16 nations participated in a needs assessment survey of military leaders who had returned from an operation within the previous 2 years. Findings from 172 leaders emphasized the lack of training specifically geared for leaders to address operational stress issues for unit members and their families and the need for integrated mental health support across the deployment cycle. In general, most leaders regarded stress-related mental health problems as normal and were supportive of help-seeking. The information obtained here was used to develop a Human Factors and Medicine -081/RTG Leader's Guide on operational stress. PMID:18251326

  7. Medical supply on contingency military operations: experience from Operation GRITROCK.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J P; Reeves, P

    2015-01-01

    Medical supply during military operations has the ability to affect the efficacy of the operation being undertaken, either negatively or positively. An appropriately-managed maritime platform with a robust medical supply chain during transit and on arrival in theatre is the main aim. A secure supply chain will reduce any implications that logistics may have with regard to capability, and negate the effects of deficiencies of short shelf life items occurring over time and during use in high tempo operations. PMID:26867409

  8. Military Personnel: Joint Officer Development Has Improved, But a Strategic Approach Is Needed. Report to the Subcommittee on Military Personnel, Committee on Armed Services, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    In response to the need of military leaders to be better prepared to plan, support, and conduct joint (multi-service and multi-national) operations, Congress enacted the Goldwater- Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1986. Positive steps were taken to implement provisions in the Act that address the education, assignment, and…

  9. Challenges in applying artificial intelligence methodologies to military operations

    SciTech Connect

    Arrowood, L.F.; Hilliard, M.R.; Hwang, H.L.; Emrich, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    Artificial intelligence methodologies are being applied to support decision making at all levels of military operations. Applications being studied include assessing force readiness, reliability and capability; planning complex missions; and integrating data from multiple sources. Unclassified research is addressing the considerable challenges presented by supporting such decision making in time-sensitive environments. We examine current efforts to utilize artificial intelligence in the military, discuss difficulties which need to be resolved before intelligent systems can become fully operational, and identify potential applications of artificial intelligence for the Military Airlift Command of the US Air Force.

  10. An innovative medical civil-military operation training program.

    PubMed

    Lougee, Douglas; Kemmer, Teresa M; Lynch, Julia

    2007-02-01

    The San Antonio Military Pediatric Center has developed an innovative humanitarian civic assistance (HCA) program. Many medical HCA programs focus on short-term medical interventions and provide transient benefit. To have a more lasting impact, this program focuses on public health surveillance. U.S. military medics conduct random household nutritional surveys and train in austere settings and on rounds in Honduran hospitals. Since 2001, >200 military medics have been trained in population assessment, primary medical care in developing nations, and other skills critical for medical civil-military operations. All activities are coordinated with the host nation. Public health data are collected and reported to Honduran public health leaders, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and nongovernmental organizations, to assist with program and policy development. This innovative project is a potential model to improve both military training and host nation benefit from HCA programs. PMID:17357779

  11. 7 CFR 1400.203 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Joint operations. 1400.203 Section 1400.203... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.203 Joint operations. (a) A member of a joint operation will be considered to be actively engaged in farming with respect to...

  12. 49 CFR 225.23 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Joint operations. 225.23 Section 225.23....23 Joint operations. (a) Any reportable death, injury, or illness of an employee arising from an accident/incident involving joint operations must be reported on Form FRA F 6180.55a by the...

  13. 49 CFR 225.23 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Joint operations. 225.23 Section 225.23....23 Joint operations. (a) Any reportable death, injury, or illness of an employee arising from an accident/incident involving joint operations must be reported on Form FRA F 6180.55a by the...

  14. 49 CFR 225.23 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Joint operations. 225.23 Section 225.23....23 Joint operations. (a) Any reportable death, injury, or illness of an employee arising from an accident/incident involving joint operations must be reported on Form FRA F 6180.55a by the...

  15. 7 CFR 1400.203 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Joint operations. 1400.203 Section 1400.203... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.203 Joint operations. (a) A member of a joint operation will be considered to be actively engaged in farming with respect to...

  16. 7 CFR 1400.203 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Joint operations. 1400.203 Section 1400.203... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.203 Joint operations. (a) A member of a joint operation will be considered to be actively engaged in farming with respect to...

  17. 49 CFR 225.23 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Joint operations. 225.23 Section 225.23....23 Joint operations. (a) Any reportable death, injury, or illness of an employee arising from an accident/incident involving joint operations must be reported on Form FRA F 6180.55a by the...

  18. 49 CFR 225.23 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Joint operations. 225.23 Section 225.23....23 Joint operations. (a) Any reportable death, injury, or illness of an employee arising from an accident/incident involving joint operations must be reported on Form FRA F 6180.55a by the...

  19. 7 CFR 1400.203 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Joint operations. 1400.203 Section 1400.203... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.203 Joint operations. (a) A member of a joint operation will be considered to be actively engaged in farming with respect to...

  20. 7 CFR 1400.203 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Joint operations. 1400.203 Section 1400.203... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.203 Joint operations. (a) A member of a joint operation will be considered to be actively engaged in farming with respect to...

  1. Benign joint hypermobility syndrome in soldiers; what is the effect of military training courses on associated joint instabilities?

    PubMed Central

    Azma, Kamran; Mottaghi, Peyman; Hosseini, Alireza; Abadi, Hossein Hassan; Nouraei, Mohammad Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypermobile joints are joints with beyond normal range of motion and may be associated with joint derangements. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS) among soldiers and effect of training courses on related joint instabilities. Materials and Methods: In a prospective cohort study on 721 soldiers of Iran Army in Isfahan in 2013 the prevalence of joint hypermobility was obtained by using Beighton criteria. Soldiers divided in two groups of healthy and suffered based on their scores. The prevalence of ankle sprain, shoulder and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocations identified before beginning service by history-taking and reviewing paraclinical documents. After 3 months of military training, a recent occurrence of mentioned diseases was revaluated in two groups. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS-20 software using Independent-T and Chi-square tests. Results: The frequency of BJHS before military training was 29.4%. After passing military training period, the incidence of ankle sprain was significantly higher in suffered group achieving the minimum Beighton score (BS) of 4 (4.3%, P = 0.03), 5 (5.5%, P = 0.005) and also 6 out of 9 (6.5%, P = 0.01). The incidence of TMJ dislocation was not significantly different based on a minimum score of 4, while it was higher in suffered group when considering the score of 5 (2.1%) and 6 (2.6%) for discrimination of two groups (P = 0.03). There was no significant difference between two groups in case of shoulder dislocation anyway. Conclusion: Military training can increase the incidence of ankle sprains and TMJ dislocations in hypermobility persons with higher BS in comparison with healthy people. Therefore, screening of joint hypermobility may be useful in identifying individuals at increased risk for joint instabilities. PMID:25364364

  2. GIS applications for military operations in coastal zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, S.; Jordan, T.; Madden, M.; Usery, E. L.; Welch, R.

    In order to successfully support current and future US military operations in coastal zones, geospatial information must be rapidly integrated and analyzed to meet ongoing force structure evolution and new mission directives. Coastal zones in a military-operational environment are complex regions that include sea, land and air features that demand high-volume databases of extreme detail within relatively narrow geographic corridors. Static products in the form of analog maps at varying scales traditionally have been used by military commanders and their operational planners. The rapidly changing battlefield of 21st Century warfare, however, demands dynamic mapping solutions. Commercial geographic information system (GIS) software for military-specific applications is now being developed and employed with digital databases to provide customized digital maps of variable scale, content and symbolization tailored to unique demands of military units. Research conducted by the Center for Remote Sensing and Mapping Science at the University of Georgia demonstrated the utility of GIS-based analysis and digital map creation when developing large-scale (1:10,000) products from littoral warfare databases. The methodology employed-selection of data sources (including high resolution commercial images and Lidar), establishment of analysis/modeling parameters, conduct of vehicle mobility analysis, development of models and generation of products (such as a continuous sea-land DEM and geo-visualization of changing shorelines with tidal levels)-is discussed. Based on observations and identified needs from the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, formerly the National Imagery and Mapping Agency, and the Department of Defense, prototype GIS models for military operations in sea, land and air environments were created from multiple data sets of a study area at US Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Results of these models, along with methodologies for developing large

  3. Peacekeeping and stability operations: a military surgeon's perspective.

    PubMed

    Starnes, Benjamin W

    2006-06-01

    Military surgeons serve a unique role in peacekeeping and stability operations and in response to natural disasters. Military medical units are the best medical resource to respond early in times of cri-sis but are often less equipped for prolonged missions and subsequent management of the chronic health care needs of the masses. Because endemic and host-nation diseases often add complexity to the management of these cases, military surgeons must perform operations outside the scope of their usual civilian practice. The primary medical mission is to treat the peacekeeping force, but the reality lies in eventually treating the refugees and victims of hostile conflict, including women, small children, and the elderly. This article explores the unique features of a surgeon's role in the support of these missions. PMID:16781280

  4. Operation MEDIHC (Military Experience Directed into Health Careers). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Hospital Association, Denver.

    This Region VIII Operation MEDIHC (Military Experience Directed into Health Careers) comprehensive report covers the program's efforts to provide a state focal point of advice and assistance to all health-trained veterans seeking entrance into the civilian health services field during the period of June 1, 1970, through December 31, 1978. The…

  5. GIS applications for military operations in coastal zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, S.; Jordan, T.; Madden, M.; Usery, E.L.; Welch, R.

    2009-01-01

    In order to successfully support current and future US military operations in coastal zones, geospatial information must be rapidly integrated and analyzed to meet ongoing force structure evolution and new mission directives. Coastal zones in a military-operational environment are complex regions that include sea, land and air features that demand high-volume databases of extreme detail within relatively narrow geographic corridors. Static products in the form of analog maps at varying scales traditionally have been used by military commanders and their operational planners. The rapidly changing battlefield of 21st Century warfare, however, demands dynamic mapping solutions. Commercial geographic information system (GIS) software for military-specific applications is now being developed and employed with digital databases to provide customized digital maps of variable scale, content and symbolization tailored to unique demands of military units. Research conducted by the Center for Remote Sensing and Mapping Science at the University of Georgia demonstrated the utility of GIS-based analysis and digital map creation when developing large-scale (1:10,000) products from littoral warfare databases. The methodology employed-selection of data sources (including high resolution commercial images and Lidar), establishment of analysis/modeling parameters, conduct of vehicle mobility analysis, development of models and generation of products (such as a continuous sea-land DEM and geo-visualization of changing shorelines with tidal levels)-is discussed. Based on observations and identified needs from the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, formerly the National Imagery and Mapping Agency, and the Department of Defense, prototype GIS models for military operations in sea, land and air environments were created from multiple data sets of a study area at US Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Results of these models, along with methodologies for developing large

  6. 48 CFR 252.246-7004 - Safety of Facilities, Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations. 252.246-7004 Section 252.246-7004 Federal Acquisition..., Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations. As prescribed in 246.270-4, use the following clause: Safety of Facilities, Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations (OCT 2010) (a)...

  7. 48 CFR 252.246-7004 - Safety of Facilities, Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations. 252.246-7004 Section 252.246-7004 Federal Acquisition..., Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations. As prescribed in 246.270-4, use the following clause: Safety of Facilities, Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations (OCT 2010) (a)...

  8. 48 CFR 252.246-7004 - Safety of Facilities, Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations. 252.246-7004 Section 252.246-7004 Federal Acquisition..., Infrastructure, and Equipment for Military Operations. As prescribed in 246.270-4, use the following clause: SAFETY OF FACILITIES, INFRASTRUCTURE, AND EQUIPMENT FOR MILITARY OPERATIONS (OCT 2010) (a)...

  9. Military Exercises, Knee and Ankle Joint Position Sense, and Injury in Male Conscripts: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Farshid; Azma, Kamran; Naseh, Iman; Emadifard, Reza; Etemadi, Yasaman

    2013-01-01

    Context: The high incidence of lower limb injuries associated with physical exercises in military conscripts suggests that fatigue may be a risk factor for injuries. Researchers have hypothesized that lower limb injuries may be related to altered ankle and knee joint position sense (JPS) due to fatigue. Objective: To evaluate if military exercises could alter JPS and to examine the possible relation of JPS to future lower extremity injuries in military service. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 50 male conscripts (age = 21.4 ± 2.3 years, height = 174.5 ± 6.4 cm, mass = 73.1 ± 6.3 kg) from a unique military base were recruited randomly. Main Outcome Measure(s): Participants performed 8 weeks of physical activities at the beginning of a military course. In the first part of the study, we instructed participants to recognize predetermined positions before and after military exercises so we could examine the effects of military exercise on JPS. The averages of the absolute error and the variable error of 3 trials were recorded. We collected data on the frequency of lower extremity injuries over 8 weeks. Next, the participants were divided into 2 groups: injured and uninjured. Separate 2 × 2 × 2 (group-by-time-by-joint) mixed-model analyses of variance were used to determine main effects and interactions of these factors for each JPS measure. In the second part of the study, we examined whether the effects of fatigue on JPS were related to the development of injury during an 8-week training program. We calculated Hedges effect sizes for JPS changes postexercise in each group and compared change scores between groups. Results: We found group-by-time interactions for all JPS variables (F range = 2.86–4.05, P < .01). All participants showed increases in JPS errors postexercise (P < .01), but the injured group had greater changes for all the variables (P < .01). Conclusions: Military conscripts who sustained lower

  10. The oil and gas joint operating agreement

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: introduction to the AAPL model form operating agreement; property provisions of the operating agreement; Article 6---the drilling and development article; duties and obligations revisited---who bear what risk of loss; operator's liens; accounting procedure joint operations; insurance; taking gas in kind absent a balancing agreement; RMMLF Form 5 Gas Balancing Agreement; tax partnerships for nontax professionals; alternative agreement forms.

  11. An introduction to the special section on U.S. military operations: effects on military members' partners and children.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Michelle L; Jouriles, Ernest N

    2011-08-01

    The deployment of U.S. military personnel to global hot spots, whether as combatants or as peacekeepers, has increased attention to the psychological well-being of military personnel and their family members. Despite the growing awareness that deployments have reverberating effects on all family members, theoretical explanations and empirical research on the impact of deployment on couple, family, and child adjustment, factors that serve to protect families from the demands of military employment, and effective methods of treating the mental health needs of military families are needed. The seven papers in this section increase our understanding of how the demands of U.S. military operations impact couples, family functioning, parenting, and child psychological adjustment and provide an additional resource for mental health professionals who work with these families. PMID:21842993

  12. Novel Cooling Strategies for Military Training and Operations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason K W; Kenefick, Robert W; Cheuvront, Samuel N

    2015-11-01

    The deleterious effects of environmental heat stress, combined with high metabolic loads and protective clothing and equipment of the modern Warfighter, impose severe heat strain, impair task performance, and increase risk of heat illness, thereby reducing the chance for mission success. Despite the implementation of heat-risk mitigation procedures over the past decades, task performance still suffers and exertional heat illness remains a major military problem. We review 3 novel heat mitigation strategies that may be implemented in the training or operational environment to reduce heat strain and the risk of exertional heat illness. These strategies include ingestion of ice slurry, arm immersion cooling, and microclimate cooling. Each of these strategies is suitable for use in different scenarios and the choice of cooling strategy is contingent on the requirements, circumstances, and constraints of the training and operational scenario. Ingestion of ice slurry and arm immersion cooling are practical strategies that may be implemented during training scenarios; ice slurry can be ingested before and during exercise, whereas arm immersion cooling can be administered after exercise-heat exposure. In the operational environment, existing microclimate cooling can be implemented with retrofitted vehicles and as an unmounted system, and it has the potential for use in many military occupational scenarios. This review will discuss the efficacy, limitations, and practical considerations for field implementation of each strategy. PMID:26506203

  13. Medical support of military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Bochniak, Agnieszka

    2011-01-01

    The system of medical support in the territory of military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan is based on four levels of medical treatment. Level 4 is organized outside the war theatre, in the territories of the countries that are a part of the stabilization forces of international organizations (NATO). Both the tasks and the structure of medical support are adjusted to fit the requirements of the U.S. Forces. The same tasks and structure are also recognized by medical services of other NATO countries participating in military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Each subsequent level of medical support is progressively more highly specialized and capable of providing more advanced medical treatment in comparison to the preceding level. Medical evacuation is executed either by air or overland depending on the type of illness or injury as well as the tactical situation prevailing in the combat zone. The aim of this paper is to present the planning, challenges, and problems of medical assistance in the contemporary battlefield. PMID:21534227

  14. Cardiovascular Complaints Among Military Members During Operation Enduring Freedom.

    PubMed

    Watts, James A; Russo, Frank D; Villines, Todd C; Jones, Samuel O; Patino, Gilberto; Nasir, Javed M; Eckart, Robert E; Steel, Kevin E

    2016-01-01

    During Operation Enduring Freedom, the US military began deploying a dedicated theater cardiology consultant to Afghanistan in an effort to increase rates of return to duty in service members with cardiovascular complaints. This study was designed to categorize these complaints and determine the effect on both aeromedical evacuation and return to duty rates during a 2.5 year observation period. A total of 1,495 service members were evaluated, with 43% presenting due to chest pain followed by arrhythmias/palpitations (24.5%) and syncope (13.5%). Eighty-five percent of individuals returned to duty, most commonly with complaints of noncardiac chest pain, palpitations, or abnormal electrocardiograms. Fifteen percent were evacuated out of theater, most often with acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolus, or ventricular tachycardia. The forward-deployed theater cardiology consultant is vital in the disposition of military members by effectively parsing out life threatening cardiovascular conditions versus low risk diagnoses that can safely return to duty. PMID:27215883

  15. Effects of sleep deprivation with reference to military operations.

    PubMed

    Giam, G C

    1997-01-01

    This review discusses the need for sleep, effects of sleep deprivation on behaviour and performance in the military, and sleep management recommendations to optimise combat effectiveness. Most people, regardless of sex or race, prefer 7 to 8 hours of sleep each night. Sleeping during the day is less recuperative. Continuous sleep is more effective than multiple short naps-even when the total hours for naps is more. Ten to 20 minute naps are useful when continuous sleep is not possible. Sleep inertia is the 5 to 30 minute period of sluggishness after awakening and important military tasks should be avoided. Previously, continuous work episodes (CWEs) duration was restricted by limited night vision, unreliable equipment and reduced endurance of military personnel. With improved technology, CWEs are now restricted primarily by endurance which is affected by sleep deprivation. This was one of the experiences noted in recent conflicts (e.g. Desert Storm) by personnel in the air force, army and navy. Since there will be changes in operational requirements, several work-rest-sleep plans must be prepared. Sleeping the preferred 7 to 8 hours per 24 hours the week before an operation may help prepare for optimal performance. Personnel should be familiarised with conditions under which they may sleep. During combat, sleep management should ideally avoid situations where all personnel are exhausted at the same time. As sleep debt accumulates, a person's mood, motivation, attention, alertness, short-term memory, ability to complete routines, task performance (errors of omission more than errors of commission) and physical performance will become more negatively affected. Counter measures must then be taken (e.g. time for sleep or naps, changing routines or rotating jobs). Drugs like caffeine and amphetamine can help personnel stay awake. However, they may also keep them awake when they need to sleep- and on awakening, they could suffer from "hang-overs" and are less efficient

  16. Increased Protein Intake in Military Special Operations123

    PubMed Central

    Ferrando, Arny A.

    2013-01-01

    Special operations are so designated for the specialized military missions they address. As a result, special operations present some unique metabolic challenges. In particular, soldiers often operate in a negative energy balance in stressful and demanding conditions with little opportunity for rest or recovery. In this framework, findings inferred from the performance literature suggest that increased protein intake may be beneficial. In particular, increased protein intake during negative caloric balance maintains lean body mass and blood glucose production. The addition of protein to mixed macronutrient supplements is beneficial for muscle endurance and power endpoints, and the use of amino acids improves gross and fine motor skills. Increasing protein intake during periods of intense training and/or metabolic demand improves subsequent performance, improves muscular recovery, and reduces symptoms of psychological stress. Consumption of protein before sleep confers the anabolic responses required for the maintenance of lean mass and muscle recovery. A maximal response in muscle protein synthesis is achieved with the consumption of 20–25 g of protein alone. However, higher protein intakes in the context of mixed-nutrient ingestion also confer anabolic benefits by reducing protein breakdown. Restricted rations issued to special operators provide less than the RDA for protein ( ∼ 0.6 g/kg), and these soldiers often rely on commercial products to augment their rations. The provision of reasonable alternatives and/or certification of approved supplements by the U.S. Department of Defense would be prudent. PMID:24027188

  17. Challenges with jointed-pipe underbalanced operations

    SciTech Connect

    Saponja, J.

    1998-06-01

    Successful underbalanced operations demand a systematic approach with integration of engineering, operations, production, reservoir, and geology. There are significant advantages to underbalanced drilling (UD). Formation damage can be minimized if proper circulating fluids and operating parameters are chosen; there is an opportunity for reservoir evaluation and characterization while drilling; lost circulation and differential sticking can be avoided, combined with improvements in drilling rate of penetration (ROP); and it also provides an alternative method of well control. This paper discusses engineering challenges and considerations for underbalanced operations using multiphase flow as well as advances made during UD with rotary jointed pipe. Excluding air, mist, and foam, underbalanced techniques with multiphase fluids are reviewed. Much of the discussion and concepts also apply to coiled-tubing underbalanced operations.

  18. Medical civil-military operations: the deployed medical brigade's role in counterinsurgency operations.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Jeffrey; Miyamoto, Danelle; Holman, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Medical civil-military operations are a critical combat multiplier directly supporting the counterinsurgency fight. Army Medical Department Soldiers support medical civil affairs activities at all levels from platoon to the United States Mission-Iraq (Department of State) initiatives enhancing the legitimacy of medical services in the Iraq Ministry of Health, Ministry of Defense, Ministry of the Interior, and Ministry of Justice. The civil-military operations mission of the deployed Task Force 62 Medical Brigade has also evolved into a broad mission encompassing over 120 contractors including Iraqi-American, Bilingual Bicultural Advisors-Subject Matter Experts serving as case management liaison officers and medical trainers, as well as Iraqi Advisor Task Force members providing medical atmospherics, assessments, training, and the overall management of Iraqi linguists supporting all level III medical facilities. PMID:20088052

  19. Probing Emissions of Military Cargo Aircraft: Description of a Joint Field Measurement Program

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Mengdawn; Corporan, E.; DeWitt, M.; Spicer, C.; Holdren, M.; Cowen, K.; Harris, B.; Shores, R.; Hashmonay, R.; Kaganan, R.

    2008-01-01

    Direct emissions of NOx, volatile organic compounds, and particulate matter (PM) by aircraft contribute to the pollutant levels found in the atmosphere. Aircraft emissions can be injected at the ground level or directly at the high altitude in flight. Conversion of the precursor gases into secondary PM is one of the pathways for the increased atmospheric PM. Atmospheric PM interacts with solar radiation altering atmospheric radiation balance and potentially contributing to global and regional climate changes. Also, direct emissions of air toxics, ozone precursors and PM from aircraft in and around civilian airports and military air bases can worsen local air quality in non-attainment and/or maintenance areas. These emissions need to be quantified. However, the current EPA methods for particle emission measurements from such sources, modified Method 5 and Conditional Test Method 039, are gravimetric-based, and it is anticipated that these methods will not be suitable for current and future generations of aircraft turbine engines, whose particle mass emissions are low. To evaluate measurement approaches for military aircraft emissions, two complementary projects were initiated in 2005. A joint field campaign between these two programs was executed during the first week of October 2005 at the Kentucky Air National Guard (KYANG) base in Louisville, KY. This campaign represented the first in a series of field studies for each program funded by the DoD Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) and provided the basis for cross-comparison of the sampling approaches and measurement techniques employed by the respective program teams. This paper describes the overall programmatic of the multi-year SERDP aircraft emissions research and presents a summary of the results from the joint field campaign.

  20. Soldiers Working Internationally: Impacts of Masculinity, Military Culture, and Operational Stress on Cross-Cultural Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keats, Patrice A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the ramifications of masculinized military culture and operational stress on cross-cultural adaptation. The author examines how characteristics of military culture may obstruct effective cross-cultural adaptation by promoting a hypermasculinity that tends to oppose effective management of trauma, and thereby suppresses skills…

  1. Malaria in Tunisian Military Personnel after Returning from External Operation

    PubMed Central

    Ajili, Faïda; Battikh, Riadh; Laabidi, Janet; Abid, Rim; Bousetta, Najeh; Jemli, Bouthaina; Ben abdelhafidh, Nadia; Bassem, Louzir; Gargouri, Saadia; Othmani, Salah

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Malaria had been eliminated in Tunisia since 1979, but there are currently 40 to 50 imported cases annually. Soldiers are no exception as the incidence of imported malaria is increasing in Tunisian military personnel after returning from malaria-endemic area, often in Sub-Saharan Africa. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical and biological presentations, treatment, and outcomes of 37 Tunisian military personnel hospitalized at the Department of Internal Medicine, the Military Hospital of Tunis, between January 1993 and January 2011, for imported malaria. The clinical and laboratory features were obtained from the medical records and a questionnaire was filled by the patients about the compliance of malaria prophylaxis. Results. Thirty-seven male patients, with a mean age of 41 years, were treated for malaria infection. Twenty-two were due to Plasmodium falciparum. The outcome was favourable for all patients, despite two severe access. The long-term use of chemoprophylaxis has been adopted by only 21 (51%) of expatriate military for daily stresses. Moreover, poor adherence was found in 32 patients. Conclusion. The risk of acquiring malaria infection in Tunisian military personnel can largely be prevented by the regular use of chemoprophylactic drugs combined with protective measures against mosquito bites. PMID:23766922

  2. The expanding role of military entomologists in stability and counterinsurgency operations.

    PubMed

    Robert, Leon L; Rankin, Steven E

    2011-01-01

    Military entomologists function as part of medical civil-military operations and are an essential combat multiplier direction supporting COIN operations. They not only directly support US and coalition military forces by performing their traditional wartime mission of protecting personnel from vector-borne and rodent-borne diseases but also enhance the legitimacy of medical services by the host nation government such as controlling diseases promulgated by food, water, vectors, and rodents. These unique COIN missions demand a new skill set required of military entomologists that are not learned from existing training courses and programs. New training opportunities must be afforded military entomologists to familiarize them with how to interact with and synergize the efforts of host nation assets, other governmental agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and international military partners. Teamwork with previously unfamiliar groups and organizations is an essential component of working in the COIN environment and can present unfamiliar tasks for entomologists. This training should start with initial entry training and be a continual process throughout a military entomologist's career. Current COIN operations require greater tactical and operational flexibility and diverse entomological expertise. The skills required for today's full spectrum medical operations are different from those of the past. Counterinsurgency medical operations demand greater agility, rapid task-switching, and the ability to adequately address unfamiliar situations and challenges. PMID:21805451

  3. Emissions from Open Burning of Simulated Military Waste from Forward Operating Bases

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions from open burning of simulated military waste from forward operating bases (FOBs) were extensively characterized as an initial step in assessing potential inhalation exposure of FOB personnel and future disposal alternatives. Emissions from two different burning scenar...

  4. Emotional ambivalence and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in soldiers during military operations

    PubMed Central

    Jerg-Bretzke, Lucia; Walter, Steffen; Limbrecht-Ecklundt, Kerstin; Traue, Harald C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study examined the extent to which a specific mechanism of emotion regulation – namely, ambivalence concerning the expressiveness of German soldiers’ emotions – affects the severity of PTSD symptoms after a military operation. Methodology: A survey was conducted at three points in time among 66 soldiers deployed on military crisis operations. The Harvard Trauma Questionaire (HTQ), the Ambivalence over Emotional Expressiveness Questionnaire (AEQ-G18), and a questionnaire on the particular stress of German soldiers during military operations were used. Results: The study showed a significant correlation between emotional ambivalence and traumatization. Furthermore, it was shown that the subjective stress of soldiers leading up to deployment is more pronounced when emotional ambivalence is stronger in the context of military operations. This particular stress is greater before and during the military operation than after. Compared to a male control sample, the average AEQ-G18 scores of the soldier sample examined here are considerably lower. Conclusion: This pilot study clearly indicates that the AEQ-G18 could be a suitable predictor of the psychological burden on soldiers. The correlations between emotional ambivalence on the one hand and the particular and post-traumatic stressors on the other hand are not only statistically significant in the present pilot study, but may also be relevant as risk factors. It is, therefore, necessary to conduct more extensive studies on soldiers participating in military operations to verify the results of this pilot study. PMID:23798980

  5. The supply of pharmaceuticals in humanitarian assistance missions: implications for military operations.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Maysaa; Riley, Kevin; Bennett, David; Anderson, Warner

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we provide an overview of key international guidelines governing the supply of pharmaceuticals during disasters and complex emergencies. We review the World Health Organization?s guidelines on pharmaceutical supply chain management and highlight their relevance for military humanitarian assistance missions. Given the important role of pharmaceuticals in addressing population health needs during humanitarian emergencies, a good understanding of how pharmaceuticals are supplied at the local level in different countries can help military health personnel identify the most appropriate supply options. Familiarity with international guidelines involved in cross-border movement of pharmaceuticals can improve the ability of military personnel to communicate more effectively with other actors involved in humanitarian and development spheres. Enhancing the knowledge base available to military personnel in terms of existing supply models and funding procedures can improve the effectiveness of humanitarian military operations and invite policy changes necessary to establish more flexible acquisition and funding regulations. PMID:22113725

  6. The supply of pharmaceuticals in humanitarian assistance missions: implications for military operations.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Maysaa; Riley, Kevin; Bennett, David; Anderson, Warner

    2011-08-01

    In this article, we provide an overview of key international guidelines governing the supply of pharmaceuticals during disasters and complex emergencies. We review the World Health Organization's guidelines on pharmaceutical supply chain management and highlight their relevance for military humanitarian assistance missions. Given the important role of pharmaceuticals in addressing population health needs during humanitarian emergencies, a good understanding of how pharmaceuticals are supplied at the local level in different countries can help military health personnel identify the most appropriate supply options. Familiarity with international guidelines involved in cross-border movement of pharmaceuticals can improve the ability of military personnel to communicate more effectively with other actors involved in humanitarian and development spheres. Enhancing the knowledge base available to military personnel in terms of existing supply models and funding procedures can improve the effectiveness of humanitarian military operations and invite policy changes necessary to establish more flexible acquisition and funding regulations. PMID:21882772

  7. Dengue and US Military Operations from the Spanish–American War through Today

    PubMed Central

    Streitz, Matthew; Babina, Tatyana; Fried, Jessica R.

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is a major cause of illness among travelers and a threat to military troops operating in areas to which it is endemic. Before and during World War II, dengue frequently occurred in US military personnel in Asia and the South Pacific. From the 1960s into the 1990s, dengue often occurred in US troops in Vietnam, the Philippines, Somalia, and Haiti. We found attack rates as high as 80% and periods of convalescence up to 3-1/2 weeks beyond the acute illness. The increase in dengue throughout the world suggests that it will remain a problem for military personnel until an effective vaccine is licensed. PMID:22469290

  8. Roles for international military medical services in stability operations (security sector reform).

    PubMed

    Bricknell, M C M; Thompson, D

    2007-06-01

    This is the second in a series of three papers that examine the role of international military medical services in stability operations in unstable countries. The paper discusses security sector reform in general terms and highlights the interdependency of the armed forces, police, judiciary and penal systems in creating a 'secure environment'. The paper then looks at components of a local military medical system for a counter-insurgency campaign operating on interior lines and the contribution and challenges faced by the international military medical community in supporting the development of this system. Finally the paper highlights the importance of planning the medical support of the international military personnel who will be supporting wider aspects of security sector reform. The paper is based on background research and my personal experience as Medical Director in the Headquarters of the NATO International Stability Assistance Force in Afghanistan in 2006. PMID:17896536

  9. Joint Lead-Free Solder Test Program for High Reliability Military and Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Christina

    2004-01-01

    Current and future space and defense systems face potential risks from the continued use of tin-lead solder, including: compliance with current environmental regulations, concerns about potential environmental legislation banning lead-containing products, reduced mission readiness, and component obsolescence with lead surface finishes. For example, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has lowered the Toxic Chemical Release reporting threshold for lead to 100 pounds. Overseas, the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) and the Restriction on Hazardous Substances (RoHS) Dicctives in Europe and similar mandates in Japan have instilled concern that a legislative body will prohibit the use of lead in aerospace/military electronics soldering. Any potential banning of lead compounds could reduce the supplier base and adversely affect the readiness of missions led by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Before considering lead-free electronics for system upgrades or future designs, however, it is important for the DoD and NASA to know whether lead-free solders can meet their systems' requirements. No single lead-free solder is likely to qualify for all defense and space applications. Therefore, it is important to validate alternative solders for discrete applications. As a result of the need for comprehensive test data on the reliability of lead-free solders, a partnership was formed between the DoD, NASA, and several original equipment manufactures (OEMs) to conduct solder-joint reliability (laboratory) testing of three lead-free solder alloys on newly manufactured and reworked circuit cards to generate performance data for high-reliability (IPC Class 3) applications.

  10. Joint Committee on Aviation Pathology: II. Epidemiology of military air display accidents.

    PubMed

    McArthur, W J; Haakonson, N H

    1977-10-01

    The paper examines fatal Canadian military air display accidents occurring between March 1, 1956, and March 1, 1974. They are discussed in detail from a human factors point of view. It was found that single and separated pilots tended to be at high risk compared with their married counterparts and most of the fatally injured pilots had less than 2,000 h total flying time. Time on type was shown to be less important than total flight time, and age in itself was unrelated to the incidence of fatal accidents. Spontaneity and deviation from prearranged plans was featured in many of the accidents. Human failure in the cockpit appears to be less frequent in air display fatalities than in fatal accidents occurring in routine operations; however, human failure in supervision accounted for 30% of the display accident cause factors, a figure much higher than in nonaerobatic fatal accidents. Finally, evidence indicates that it is possible to select and operate an aerobatic team in which the risk of a fatality is low, provided a few simple guidelines are observed by the team selectors and the team members. PMID:921648

  11. Developing meaningful metrics of clinical productivity for military treatment facility anesthesiology departments and operative services.

    PubMed

    Mongan, Paul D; Van der Schuur, L T Brian; Damiano, Louis A; Via, Darin K

    2003-11-01

    Comparing clinical productivity is important for strategic planning and the evaluation of resource allocation in any large organization. This process of benchmarking performance allows for the comparison of groups with similar characteristics. However, this process is often difficult when comparing the operative service productivity of large and small military treatment facilities because of the significant heterogeneity in mission focus and case complexity. However, in this article, we describe the application of a new method of benchmarking operative service productivity based on normalizing data for operating room sites, cases, and total American Society of Anesthesiologists units produced per hour. We demonstrate how these benchmarks allow for valid comparisons of operative service productivity among these military treatment facilities and how the data could be used in expanding or contracting operating locations. In addition, these benchmarks are compared with those derived from the use of this system in the civilian sector. PMID:14680041

  12. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Computer System Operation, 4-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This program on instruction and programmed student texts for a secondary-postsecondary-level computer system operator course are one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. Purpose stated for the ten-lesson course is to provide the…

  13. 48 CFR 246.270 - Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations. 246.270 Section 246.270 Federal Acquisition Regulations... ASSURANCE Contract Quality Requirements 246.270 Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment...

  14. 48 CFR 246.270 - Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations. 246.270 Section 246.270 Federal Acquisition Regulations... ASSURANCE Contract Quality Requirements 246.270 Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment...

  15. 48 CFR 246.270 - Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations. 246.270 Section 246.270 Federal Acquisition Regulations... ASSURANCE Contract Quality Requirements 246.270 Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment...

  16. 48 CFR 246.270 - Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment for military operations. 246.270 Section 246.270 Federal Acquisition Regulations... ASSURANCE Contract Quality Requirements 246.270 Safety of facilities, infrastructure, and equipment...

  17. Assessing the service quality of Iran military hospitals: Joint Commission International standards and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) technique

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Ravangard, Ramin; Yaghoubi, Maryam; Alimohammadzadeh, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Background: Military hospitals are responsible for preserving, restoring and improving the health of not only armed forces, but also other people. According to the military organizations strategy, which is being a leader and pioneer in all areas, providing quality health services is one of the main goals of the military health care organizations. This study was aimed to evaluate the service quality of selected military hospitals in Iran based on the Joint Commission International (JCI) standards and comparing these hospitals with each other and ranking them using the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) technique in 2013. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional and descriptive study conducted on five military hospitals, selected using the purposive sampling method, in 2013. Required data collected using checklists of accreditation standards and nominal group technique. AHP technique was used for prioritizing. Furthermore, Expert Choice 11.0 was used to analyze the collected data. Results: Among JCI standards, the standards of access to care and continuity of care (weight = 0.122), quality improvement and patient safety (weight = 0.121) and leadership and management (weight = 0.117) had the greatest importance, respectively. Furthermore, in the overall ranking, BGT (weight = 0.369), IHM (0.238), SAU (0.202), IHK (weight = 0.125) and SAB (weight = 0.066) ranked first to fifth, respectively. Conclusion: AHP is an appropriate technique for measuring the overall performance of hospitals and their quality of services. It is a holistic approach that takes all hospital processes into consideration. The results of the present study can be used to improve hospitals performance through identifying areas, which are in need of focus for quality improvement and selecting strategies to improve service quality. PMID:25250364

  18. Use of eternal flight unmanned aircraft in military operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kök, Zafer

    2014-06-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), are planned to use solar energy, are being more common and interesting gradually. Today, these systems are very promising while fossil fuels are diminishing rapidly. Academic research is still being conducted to develop unmanned aerial systems which will store energy during day time and use it during night time. Development of unmanned aerial systems, which have eternal flight or very long loiter periods, could be possible by such an energy management. A UAV, which can fly very long time, could provide many advantages that cannot be obtained by conventional aircrafts and satellites. Such systems can be operated as fixed satellites on missions with very low cost in circumstances that require continuous intelligence. By improving automation systems these vehicles could be settled on operation area autonomously and can be grounded easily in case of necessities and maintenance. In this article, the effect of solar powered UAV on operation area has been done a literature review, to be used in surveillance and reconnaissance missions.

  19. Joint motion clusters in servomanipulator operation

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, J.V.; Sundstrom, E.; Herndon, J.N.

    1986-01-01

    The Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing advanced teleoperator systems for maintenance of future nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. Remote maintenance systems developed by the CFRP emphasize man-in-the-loop teleoperation. This paper reports the results of a recent experiment which investigated how users interact with a multi-degree-of-freedom servomanipulator. Principal components analysis performed on data collected during completion of typical remote maintenance tests indicates that joint motions may be summarized by two orthogonal clusters, one which represents fine-adjusting motions and one which represents slewing motions. Implications of these findings for servomanipulator design are discussed. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  20. Use of psychological decompression in military operational environments.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jamie G H Hacker; Earnshaw, N Mark; Greenberg, Neil; Eldridge, Rod; Fear, Nicola T; French, Claire; Deahl, Martin P; Wessely, Simon

    2008-06-01

    This article reviews the use of psychological decompression as applied to troops returning from active service in operational theaters. Definitions of the term are considered and a brief history is given. Current policies and practices are described and the question of mandatory decompression is considered. Finally, the evidence base for the efficacy of decompression is examined and some conclusions are drawn. This article highlights variations in the definition and practice of decompression and its use. Although there is, as yet, no evidence that decompression works, there is also no evidence to the contrary. Given the lack of knowledge as to the balance of risks and benefits of decompression and the absence of any definitive evidence that decompression is associated with improved mental health outcomes or that lack of decompression is associated with the reverse, it is argued that the use of decompression should remain a matter for discretion. PMID:18595415

  1. Joint Forward Operating Base Elements of Command and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, William C.

    2002-01-01

    Since the 1986 Goldwater-Nichols Act directed the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to develop doctrine for the joint employment of the armed forces, tactics, techniques, and procedures have evolved at different rates depending on the competency. Whereas the command of joint air forces is well prescribed within the structure of the air operations center and its associated leadership, command of air assets at a joint forward operating base lacks guidance. Today, the United States prosecutes an air war over Afghanistan from bases in Uzbekistan, Pakistan, and Afghanistan. Elements of the United States Army, Air Force, and Marines combine at these geographically minute locations, each bringing a certain complement of support and command and control. Evidence from operations during the 1999 air war for Kosovo at Tirana Rinas Airport in Albania suggests that when these service elements meet at the airfield for the first time, there are problems associated with local procedure. At best, time is wasted creating local joint systems to overcome the difficulties. At worst, safety and mission accomplishment are jeopardized. This thesis will address the need to develop doctrine and a jointly integrated organization to support the command and control function at a forward operating base.

  2. Higher-level fusion for military operations based on abductive inference: proof of principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantaleev, Aleksandar V.; Josephson, John

    2006-04-01

    The ability of contemporary military commanders to estimate and understand complicated situations already suffers from information overload, and the situation can only grow worse. We describe a prototype application that uses abductive inferencing to fuse information from multiple sensors to evaluate the evidence for higher-level hypotheses that are close to the levels of abstraction needed for decision making (approximately JDL levels 2 and 3). Abductive inference (abduction, inference to the best explanation) is a pattern of reasoning that occurs naturally in diverse settings such as medical diagnosis, criminal investigations, scientific theory formation, and military intelligence analysis. Because abduction is part of common-sense reasoning, implementations of it can produce reasoning traces that are very human understandable. Automated abductive inferencing can be deployed to augment human reasoning, taking advantage of computation to process large amounts of information, and to bypass limits to human attention and short-term memory. We illustrate the workings of the prototype system by describing an example of its use for small-unit military operations in an urban setting. Knowledge was encoded as it might be captured prior to engagement from a standard military decision making process (MDMP) and analysis of commander's priority intelligence requirements (PIR). The system is able to reasonably estimate the evidence for higher-level hypotheses based on information from multiple sensors. Its inference processes can be examined closely to verify correctness. Decision makers can override conclusions at any level and changes will propagate appropriately.

  3. Baseline burnout symptoms predict visuospatial executive function during survival school training in special operations military personnel.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Charles A; Russell, Bartlett; McNeil, Jeff; Maxwell, Jeff; Snyder, Peter J; Southwick, Steven M; Pietrzak, Robert H

    2011-05-01

    Burnout symptoms, which are characterized by exhaustion, cynicism, and a reduced sense of professional efficacy, may deleteriously affect cognitive function in military personnel. A total of 32 U.S. Military Special Operations personnel enrolled in Survival School completed measures of trauma history, dissociation, and burnout before training. They then completed the Groton Maze Learning Test (GMLT), a neuropsychological measure of integrative visuospatial executive function during three field-based phases of Survival School-enemy evasion, captivity/interrogation, and escape/release from captivity. Lower pre-training perceptions of professional efficacy were associated with reduced executive function during all of the field-based phases of Survival School, even after adjustment for years of education, cynicism, and baseline GMLT scores. Magnitudes of decrements in executive function in Marines with low efficacy relative to those with high efficacy increased as training progressed and ranged from .58 during enemy evasion to .99 during escape/release from captivity. Pre-training perceptions of burnout may predict visuospatial executive function during naturalistic training-related stress in military personnel. Assessment of burnout symptoms, particularly perceptions of professional efficacy, may help identify military personnel at risk for stress-related executive dysfunction. PMID:21466738

  4. Occupational exposure of personnel operating military radio equipment: measurements and simulation.

    PubMed

    Paljanos, Annamaria; Miclaus, Simona; Munteanu, Calin

    2015-09-01

    Technical literature provides numerous studies concerning radiofrequency exposure measurements for various radio communication devices, but there are few studies related to exposure of personnel operating military radio equipment. In order to evaluate exposure and identify cases when safety requirements are not entirely met, both measurements and simulations are needed for accurate results. Moreover, given the technical characteristics of the radio devices used in the military, personnel mainly operate in the near-field region so both measurements and simulation becomes more complex. Measurements were made in situ using a broadband personal exposimeter equipped with two isotropic probes for both electric and magnetic components of the field. The experiment was designed for three different operating frequencies of the same radio equipment, while simulations were made in FEKO software using hybrid numerical methods to solve complex electromagnetic field problems. The paper aims to discuss the comparative results of the measurements and simulation, as well as comparing them to reference levels specified in military or civilian radiofrequency exposure standards. PMID:26444196

  5. UAV-guided navigation for ground robot tele-operation in a military reconnaissance environment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jessie Y C

    2010-08-01

    A military reconnaissance environment was simulated to examine the performance of ground robotics operators who were instructed to utilise streaming video from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to navigate his/her ground robot to the locations of the targets. The effects of participants' spatial ability on their performance and workload were also investigated. Results showed that participants' overall performance (speed and accuracy) was better when she/he had access to images from larger UAVs with fixed orientations, compared with other UAV conditions (baseline- no UAV, micro air vehicle and UAV with orbiting views). Participants experienced the highest workload when the UAV was orbiting. Those individuals with higher spatial ability performed significantly better and reported less workload than those with lower spatial ability. The results of the current study will further understanding of ground robot operators' target search performance based on streaming video from UAVs. The results will also facilitate the implementation of ground/air robots in military environments and will be useful to the future military system design and training community. PMID:20658388

  6. MgB2 superconducting joints for persistent current operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Dipak; Hossain, Md Shahriar Al; See, Khay Wai; Xu, Xun; Barua, Shaon; Ma, Zongqing; Choi, Seyong; Tomsic, Mike; Kim, Jung Ho

    2015-06-01

    High-performance superconducting joints are essential for realizing persistent-mode magnets. Herein, we propose a concept and fabrication of such superconducting joints, which yielded reliable performance in the operating temperature range of 4.2-25 K. MgB2-MgB2 joints in magnets are known to result in deterioration of localized electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties. To overcome these problems, the ends of the two wires are inserted into a pellet press, which is then filled with a mixture of unreacted magnesium and boron powders, followed by heat treatment. The critical current capacity and joint resistance were precisely evaluated by the standard four-probe method in open-circuit and by field-decay measurements in a closed-loop, respectively. These joints demonstrated up to 66% of the current-carrying capacity of unjoined wire at 20 K, 2 T and joint resistance of 1.4 × 10-12 Ω at 4.2 K in self-field.

  7. 49 CFR 240.229 - Requirements for joint operations territory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... that is responsible for controlling the conduct of joint operations with another railroad shall permit... issued a certificate that complies with § 240.223. (b) Each railroad that is responsible for controlling... following conditions: (1) The controlling railroad shall determine: (i) That the person has been...

  8. 49 CFR 240.229 - Requirements for joint operations territory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... that is responsible for controlling the conduct of joint operations with another railroad shall permit... issued a certificate that complies with § 240.223. (b) Each railroad that is responsible for controlling... following conditions: (1) The controlling railroad shall determine: (i) That the person has been...

  9. Operational military helicopter interior noise and vibration measurements with comparisons to ride quality criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clevenson, S. A.; Leatherwood, J. D.; Hollenbaugh, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    Balka (1981) has identified the attainment of a 'jet-smooth' ride as a primary goal of the helicopter industry for commercial and certain military helicopters. It was noted that criteria accounting for both multiple axis vibration and interior noise are needed. The present investigation has the objective to present a vibration and interior noise data base in a format suitable for direct evaluation of aircraft ride quality. The investigation is also concerned with an assessment of the measured environment against available criteria as an indication of the state-of-the-art for current machines. Interior noise and vibration measurements were obtained on eight military helicopters during routine operational flights. The data are presented in the form of a number of parameters.

  10. Impact of phlebotomine sand flies on U.S. Military operations at Tallil Air Base, Iraq: 1. background, military situation, and development of a "Leishmaniasis Control Program".

    PubMed

    Coleman, Russell E; Burkett, Douglas A; Putnam, John L; Sherwood, Van; Caci, Jennifer B; Jennings, Barton T; Hochberg, Lisa P; Spradling, Sharon L; Rowton, Edgar D; Blount, Keith; Ploch, John; Hopkins, Grady; Raymond, Jo-Lynne W; O'Guinn, Monica L; Lee, John S; Weina, Peter J

    2006-07-01

    One of the most significant modern day efforts to prevent and control an arthropod-borne disease during a military deployment occurred when a team of U.S. military entomologists led efforts to characterize, prevent, and control leishmaniasis at Tallil Air Base (TAB), Iraq, during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Soon after arriving at TAB on 22 March 2003, military entomologists determined that 1) high numbers of sand flies were present at TAB, 2) individual soldiers were receiving many sand fly bites in a single night, and 3) Leishmania parasites were present in 1.5% of the female sand flies as determined using a real-time (fluorogenic) Leishmania-generic polymerase chain reaction assay. The rapid determination that leishmaniasis was a specific threat in this area allowed for the establishment of a comprehensive Leishmaniasis Control Program (LCP) over 5 mo before the first case of leishmaniasis was confirmed in a U.S. soldier deployed to Iraq. The LCP had four components: 1) risk assessment, 2) enhancement of use of personal protective measures by all personnel at TAB, 3) vector and reservoir control, and 4) education of military personnel about sand flies and leishmaniasis. The establishment of the LCP at TAB before the onset of any human disease conclusively demonstrated that entomologists can play a critical role during military deployments. PMID:16892621

  11. SOCAP: Lessons learned in applying SIPE-2 to the military operations crisis action planning domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desimone, Roberto

    1992-01-01

    This report describes work funded under the DARPA Planning and Scheduling Initiative that led to the development of SOCAP (System for Operations Crisis Action Planning). In particular, it describes lessons learned in applying SIPE-2, the underlying AI planning technology within SOCAP, to the domain of military operations deliberate and crisis action planning. SOCAP was demonstrated at the U.S. Central Command and at the Pentagon in early 1992. A more detailed report about the lessons learned is currently being prepared. This report was presented during one of the panel discussions on 'The Relevance of Scheduling to AI Planning Systems.'

  12. A system to project injury and illness incidence during military operations.

    PubMed

    Blood, C G; O'Donnell, E R

    1995-12-01

    Modeling of medical resource requirements during military operations requires projections of disease and non-battle injury (DNBI) and wounded-in-action (WIA) rates. Historical data were extracted from unit diaries of infantry and support troops deployed during four previous combat engagements. A planning tool (FORECAS) was developed that uses the statistical distributions of DNBI and WIA incidence from previous operations to simulate injury and illness arrival rates under future scenarios. Output of the simulated data reflects the nuances of the empirical data. PMID:8750376

  13. Health hazards in areas of military operations conducted in different climatic and sanitary conditions.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the most common health hazards occurring among personnel of peacekeeping and stabilization missions functioning within armed conflicts in the contemporary world. Military operations have been executed in diverse climatic and sanitary conditions, which are frequently unfamiliar for their participants. Some of them, e.g. the UN peacekeeping missions in the Middle East (Lebanon, the Golan Heights), have been carried out in a relatively stable geopolitical environment; whereas, stabilization missions in Iraq and Afghanistan, which are actually combat activities, undoubtedly fall into the group of the most perilous military operations in the world. Hot or cold climate, poor sanitary and hygienic conditions along with warfare facilitate the occurrence of numerous diseases and body injuries not only among the local people but also among peacekeepers, who represent the population of immigrants. Health hazards which pose major epidemiological threats in combat zones are arthropod-borne, food and water-borne, respiratory tract diseases, sexually transmitted diseases, enzootic diseases, battle injuries, and non- -battle injuries, e.g. traffic accidents. Another considerable health problem are psychiatric disorders, which can either appear directly after the occurrence of a traumatic event in a combat zone or indirectly, after some time had elapsed. In addition to the health hazards listed above, environmental factors such as changeable weather conditions and local fauna may also be life threatening. PMID:21534225

  14. Ultrasound and operative evaluation of arthritic shoulder joints

    PubMed Central

    Alasaarela, E; Leppilahti, J; Hakala, M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the diagnostic value of ultrasonography (US) in the evaluation of arthritic shoulder joints.
METHODS—Twenty shoulders of 20 inpatients with arthritis were evaluated by US one day before the shoulder operation. Changes in the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa, biceps tendon and tendon sheath, rotatof cuff, and glenohumeral joint were recorded and compared with findings at operation.
RESULTS—In the detection of effusion/hypertrophy in the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa, US had a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 83%. For a biceps tendon rupture US had a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity of 100%. US missed three intra-articular biceps tendon ruptures. For effusion/hypertrophy in the biceps tendon sheath US had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 83%. For a rotator cuff tear US had a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 57%. US missed two small longitudinal rotator cuff tears. Three thin membranous, but intact, rotator cuff tendons were classified as full thickness tears by US. Synovial effusion/hypertrophy was detected by US and at operation in all of the 12 glenohumeral joints that were evaluable at surgery.
CONCLUSION—US is a reliable method in experienced hands for the evaluation of inflammatory changes of an arthritic shoulder. In advanced stages of rheumatoid shoulder joints, however, US is not useful, because destructive bone changes and tendon ruptures change the normal anatomy and restrict shoulder motions, limiting the visibility of US.

 Keywords: ultrasound diagnostics; shoulder; surgery; rheumatoid arthritis PMID:9771210

  15. Performance assessments of Android-powered military applications operating on tactical handheld devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Brian A.; Fronczek, Lisa; Morse, Emile; Kootbally, Zeid; Schlenoff, Craig

    2013-05-01

    Transformative Apps (TransApps) is a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) funded program whose goal is to develop a range of militarily-relevant software applications ("apps") to enhance the operational-effectiveness of military personnel on (and off) the battlefield. TransApps is also developing a military apps marketplace to facilitate rapid development and dissemination of applications to address user needs by connecting engaged communities of endusers with development groups. The National Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST) role in the TransApps program is to design and implement evaluation procedures to assess the performance of: 1) the various software applications, 2) software-hardware interactions, and 3) the supporting online application marketplace. Specifically, NIST is responsible for evaluating 50+ tactically-relevant applications operating on numerous Android™-powered platforms. NIST efforts include functional regression testing and quantitative performance testing. This paper discusses the evaluation methodologies employed to assess the performance of three key program elements: 1) handheld-based applications and their integration with various hardware platforms, 2) client-based applications and 3) network technologies operating on both the handheld and client systems along with their integration into the application marketplace. Handheld-based applications are assessed using a combination of utility and usability-based checklists and quantitative performance tests. Client-based applications are assessed to replicate current overseas disconnected (i.e. no network connectivity between handhelds) operations and to assess connected operations envisioned for later use. Finally, networked applications are assessed on handhelds to establish baselines of performance for when connectivity will be common usage.

  16. ROUTEMAP model for predicting noise exposure from aircraft operations on Military Training Routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Michael J.; Plotkin, Kenneth J.

    1988-09-01

    Low altitude, high speed training operations are routinely conducted along specially designated Military Training Routes (MTRs). The location of these routes is continually changed for a variety of reasons. Each new route requires an environmental assessment to determine the community noise impact. A computer program, ROUTEMAP, is described which calculates the noise level on the ground along an MTR corridor. Program ROUTEMAP is a menu-driven program that runs on any IBM PC or PC-compatible computer. ROUTEMAP requires MS DOS Version 2.0 or later, with at least one megabyte of available disk space, 640 K of random access memory, and an 8087/80287 math coprocessor. The model requires the Air Force planner to specify the nature of the flight activity for the segment of the route in question. The information needed for each aircraft type are the number of day and night operations during a month, and nominal values for the airspeed, engine power setting, and altitude. In addition, the user must input whether the activity is usually under visual or instrument flying rules and if there are single or multiple flight tracks within the route corridor. With this input data, the program computes the onset rate-adjusted monthly day-night average A-weighted sound level, L sub dnmr in dB for ground positions located within 13 miles of the route centerline. For comparison purposes, the program also computes the monthly average A-weighted noise exposure level without the penalty for high onset rates and without the penalty for operations during the night. The program also computes the probability of being highly annoyed as a function of the L sub dnmr values. This information, along with the noise-compatible land-use guides normally associated with planning around airbases, can be used to interpret the noise resulting from military training route operations.

  17. Secure Multi-party Computation Protocol for Defense Applications in Military Operations Using Virtual Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Rohit; Joshi, Satyadhar

    With the advent into the 20th century whole world has been facing the common dilemma of Terrorism. The suicide attacks on US twin towers 11 Sept. 2001, Train bombings in Madrid Spain 11 Mar. 2004, London bombings 7 Jul. 2005 and Mumbai attack 26 Nov. 2008 were some of the most disturbing, destructive and evil acts by terrorists in the last decade which has clearly shown their evil intent that they can go to any extent to accomplish their goals. Many terrorist organizations such as al Quaida, Harakat ul-Mujahidin, Hezbollah, Jaish-e-Mohammed, Lashkar-e-Toiba, etc. are carrying out training camps and terrorist operations which are accompanied with latest technology and high tech arsenal. To counter such terrorism our military is in need of advanced defense technology. One of the major issues of concern is secure communication. It has to be made sure that communication between different military forces is secure so that critical information is not leaked to the adversary. Military forces need secure communication to shield their confidential data from terrorist forces. Leakage of concerned data can prove hazardous, thus preservation and security is of prime importance. There may be a need to perform computations that require data from many military forces, but in some cases the associated forces would not want to reveal their data to other forces. In such situations Secure Multi-party Computations find their application. In this paper, we propose a new highly scalable Secure Multi-party Computation (SMC) protocol and algorithm for Defense applications which can be used to perform computation on encrypted data. Every party encrypts their data in accordance with a particular scheme. This encrypted data is distributed among some created virtual parties. These Virtual parties send their data to the TTP through an Anonymizer layer. TTP performs computation on encrypted data and announces the result. As the data sent was encrypted its actual value can’t be known by TTP

  18. Operational Physical Performance and Fitness in Military Women: Physiological, Musculoskeletal Injury, and Optimized Physical Training Considerations for Successfully Integrating Women Into Combat-Centric Military Occupations.

    PubMed

    Nindl, Bradley C; Jones, Bruce H; Van Arsdale, Stephanie J; Kelly, Karen; Kraemer, William J

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes presentations from a 2014 United States Department of Defense (DoD) Health Affairs Women in Combat symposium addressing physiological, musculoskeletal injury, and optimized physical training considerations from the operational physical performance section. The symposium was held to provide a state-of-the-science meeting on the U.S. DoD's rescinding of the ground combat exclusion policy opening up combat-centric occupations to women. Physiological, metabolic, body composition, bone density, cardiorespiratory fitness, and thermoregulation differences between men and women were briefly reviewed. Injury epidemiological data are presented within military training and operational environments demonstrating women to be at a higher risk for musculoskeletal injuries than men. Physical training considerations for improved muscle strength and power, occupational task performance, load carriage were also reviewed. Particular focus of this article was given to translating physiological and epidemiological findings from the literature on these topics toward actionable guidance and policy recommendations for military leaders responsible for military physical training doctrine: (1) inclusion of resistance training with special emphasis on strength and power development (i.e., activation of high-threshold motor units and recruitment of type II high-force muscle fibers), upper-body strength development, and heavy load carriage, (2) moving away from "field expediency" as the major criteria for determining military physical training policy and training implementation, (3) improvement of load carriage ability with emphasis placed on specific load carriage task performance, combined with both resistance and endurance training, and (4) providing greater equipment resources, coaching assets, and increased training time dedicated to physical readiness training. PMID:26741902

  19. Interior noise and vibration measurements on operational military helicopters and comparisons with various ride quality criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clevenson, S. A.; Leatherwood, J. D.; Hollenbaugh, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The results of physical measurements of the interior noise and vibration obtained within eight operational military helicopters are presented. The data were extensively analyzed and are presented in the following forms: noise and vibration spectra, overall root-mean-square acceleration levels in three linear axes, peak accelerations at dominant blade passage frequencies, acceleration exceedance data, and overall and ""A'' weighted sound pressure levels. Peak acceleration levels were compared to the ISO 1-hr reduced comfort and fatigue decreased proficiency boundaries and the NASA discomfort criteria. The ""A'' weighted noise levels were compared to the NASA annoyance criteria, and the overall noise spectra were compared to MIL-STD-1294 (""Acoustical Noise Limits in Helicopters''). Specific vibration components at blade passage frequencies for several aircraft exceeded both the ISO reduced comfort boundary and the NASA passenger discomfort criteria. The ""A'' weighted noise levels, corrected for SPH-4 helmet attenuation characteristics, exceeded the NASA annoyance threshold for several aircraft.

  20. Seismo-acoustic effects of sonic booms on archeological sites, Valentine Military Operations Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battis, J. C.

    1983-11-01

    Seismo-acoustic recordings of sonic booms were made at two sites in the Valentine Military Operations Areas (MOA). Each location was selected as representative of a class of significant archeological sites found within the MOA. These studies indicate that sonic booms are unlikely to cause damage to the archeological finds. The expected motions are, at worst, 8 percent of the limits set by strict blasting codes and comparable to velocities that could be produced by local earthquakes which have occurred in the Valentine area. At these levels of motion, competent rock will be unaffected by the transmission of seismic waves. The predicted velocity levels are unlikely to initiate either fracture or spalling in rocks. However, it is possible that in rocks where natural meteorological action has initiated these erosive mechanisms the sonic boom induced motion accelerate the processes to some small, and probably insignificant, degree.

  1. National Military Family Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinton and Trump Stand Behind the Uniform? Military families have some questions... More Suicide Prevention Awareness Month ... quick fact sheet about this program. Operation Purple Family Retreats Operation Purple Family Retreats provide military families ...

  2. 76 FR 3157 - Joint Operations Center Relocation Project, Sacramento County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Joint Operations Center Relocation Project, Sacramento County, CA AGENCY: Bureau of..., will prepare a joint EIS/EIR for the proposed Joint Operations Center (JOC) Relocation...

  3. Respiratory disease among military personnel in Saudi Arabia during Operation Desert Shield.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, A L; Hyams, K C; Watts, D M; Rozmajzl, P J; Woody, J N; Merrell, B R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to determine whether respiratory disease due to crowded living conditions and high levels of suspended and blowing sand had a major adverse impact on US military personnel during Operation Desert Shield. METHODS. A questionnaire survey was administered to 2598 combat troops stationed in Northeast Saudi Arabia for a mean of 102 days. Samples of surface sand from seven different locations were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. RESULTS. Among surveyed troops, 34.4% reported a sore throat, 43.1% complained of a cough, 15.4% complained of chronic rhinorrhea, and 1.8% were unable to perform their routine duties because of upper respiratory symptoms. Evaluation of sleeping accommodations indicated that complaints of a sore throat and cough were most closely associated with sleeping in air-conditioned buildings; in contrast, complaints of rhinorrhea were associated with exposure to the outdoor environment while living in tents. Sand samples consisted mostly of quartz, with just 0.21% by weight of respirable size (< 10 microns in diameter). CONCLUSIONS. These findings indicate that upper respiratory complaints were frequent among Operation Desert Shield troops and were related both to the troops' housing and to their exposure to the outside environment. PMID:8363011

  4. Measurement and prediction of noise from low-altitude military aircraft operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Bernard F.; Payne, Richard C.; Harris, Anthony L.; Weston, Ralph J.

    1992-04-01

    In response to the rapid growth in demand for information on noise levels around military airfields in the UK, NPL developed AIRNOISE, a mathematical model for computing aircraft noise contours. Since its first applications in 1981, the model has been used to determine zones of eligibility within the MoD compensation scheme. The model has been subject to continuous development, e.g., the incorporation of Harrier V/STOL operations. We have now extended the model to include noise from high-speed, low-level operations. The model predicts not only maximum levels but the complete time-history, so that the time-onset rate can be estimated. To aid refinement and validation of the model, a special exercise has been conducted in which Tornado, Harrier, Jaguar, Hawk, F-15 and F-16 aircraft have flown straight and level at heights between about 100 and 400 feet, at various speeds and engine power settings over an array of microphones. This paper describes the trial and the results obtained. The prediction model is outlined and comparisons made between predictions and measurements.

  5. Decentralized operating procedures for orchestrating data and behavior across distributed military systems and assets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Nicholas

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we present a method for a highly decentralized yet structured and flexible approach to achieve systems interoperability by orchestrating data and behavior across distributed military systems and assets with security considerations addressed from the beginning. We describe an architecture of a tool-based design of business processes called Decentralized Operating Procedures (DOP) and the deployment of DOPs onto run time nodes, supporting the parallel execution of each DOP at multiple implementation nodes (fixed locations, vehicles, sensors and soldiers) throughout a battlefield to achieve flexible and reliable interoperability. The described method allows the architecture to; a) provide fine grain control of the collection and delivery of data between systems; b) allow the definition of a DOP at a strategic (or doctrine) level by defining required system behavior through process syntax at an abstract level, agnostic of implementation details; c) deploy a DOP into heterogeneous environments by the nomination of actual system interfaces and roles at a tactical level; d) rapidly deploy new DOPs in support of new tactics and systems; e) support multiple instances of a DOP in support of multiple missions; f) dynamically add or remove run-time nodes from a specific DOP instance as missions requirements change; g) model the passage of, and business reasons for the transmission of each data message to a specific DOP instance to support accreditation; h) run on low powered computers with lightweight tactical messaging. This approach is designed to extend the capabilities of existing standards, such as the Generic Vehicle Architecture (GVA).

  6. The Benefits of Deploying Health Physics Specialists to Joint Operation Areas.

    PubMed

    Mower, Scott; Bast, Joshua D; Myers, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Preventive Medicine Specialists (military occupational specialty [MOS] 68S) with the health physics specialist (N4) qualification identifier possess a unique force health protection skill set. In garrison, they ensure radiation exposures to patients, occupational workers and the public from hospital activities such as radioisotope therapy and x-ray machines do not to exceed Federal law limits and kept as low as reasonably achievable. Maintaining sufficient numbers of health physics specialists (HPSs) to fill authorizations has been a consistent struggle for the Army Medical Department due to the rigorous academic requirements of the additional skill identifier-producing program. This shortage has limited MOS 68SN4 deployment opportunities in the past and prevented medical planners from recognizing the capabilities these Soldiers can bring to the fight. In 2014, for the first time, HPSs were sourced to deploy as an augmentation capability to the 172nd Preventive Medicine Detachment (PM Det), the sole PM Det supporting the Combined Joint Operations Area-Afghanistan. Considerable successes in bettering radiation safety practices and improvements in incident and accident response were achieved as a result of their deployment. The purposes of this article are to describe the mission services performed by HPSs in Afghanistan, discuss the benefits of deploying HPSs with PM Dets, and demonstrate to senior medical leadership the importance of maintaining a health physics capability in a theater environment. PMID:26276950

  7. Automated ambulatory assessment of cognitive performance, environmental conditions, and motor activity during military operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, Harris R.; Kramer, F. Matthew; Montain, Scott J.; Niro, Philip; Young, Andrew J.

    2005-05-01

    Until recently scientists had limited opportunities to study human cognitive performance in non-laboratory, fully ambulatory situations. Recently, advances in technology have made it possible to extend behavioral assessment to the field environment. One of the first devices to measure human behavior in the field was the wrist-worn actigraph. This device, now widely employed, can acquire minute-by-minute information on an individual"s level of motor activity. Actigraphs can, with reasonable accuracy, distinguish sleep from waking, the most critical and basic aspect of human behavior. However, rapid technologic advances have provided the opportunity to collect much more information from fully ambulatory humans. Our laboratory has developed a series of wrist-worn devices, which are not much larger then a watch, which can assess simple and choice reaction time, vigilance and memory. In addition, the devices can concurrently assess motor activity with much greater temporal resolution then the standard actigraph. Furthermore, they continuously monitor multiple environmental variables including temperature, humidity, sound and light. We have employed these monitors during training and simulated military operations to collect information that would typically be unavailable under such circumstances. In this paper we will describe various versions of the vigilance monitor and how each successive version extended the capabilities of the device. Samples of data from several studies are presented, included studies conducted in harsh field environments during simulated infantry assaults, a Marine Corps Officer training course and mechanized infantry (Stryker) operations. The monitors have been useful for documenting environmental conditions experienced by wearers, studying patterns of sleep and activity and examining the effects of nutritional manipulations on warfighter performance.

  8. Teleradiology network to improve patient care in a peacekeeping military operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Kevin R.; Levine, Betty A.; Norton, Gary S.; Mun, Seong K.; Cramer, Timothy J.; de Treville, Robert E.

    1997-05-01

    The Imaging Science and Information Systems (ISIS) Center of the Department of Radiology at Georgetown University Medical Center recently collaborated with the US Army in developing an off-the-shelf teleradiology network for Operation Joint Endeavor, the peace-keeping mission in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The network is part of Operation Primetime III, a project to deploy advanced communications and medical equipment to provide state-of-the-art medical care to the 20,000 US troops stationed there. The network encompasses three major sites: the 212th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (MASH) near Tuzla, Bosnia-Herzegovina; the 67th Combat Support Hospital (CSH) in Taszar, Hungary; and the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center (LRMC) in Landstuhl, Germany. Planning for the project began in January 1996, and all three sites were operational by April 1996. Since the system was deployed, computed radiography (CR) has been sued almost exclusively at the MASH and CSH for all general x-ray exams. From mid- May to September 1996, over 2700 CR images were acquired at the MASH and over 1600 at the CSH. Since there was not a radiologist a the MASH, the images were transferred to the CSH for primary diagnosis and archiving. In the same time period, over 550 patient folders were sent from the MASH to the CSH.

  9. [Reconstructive correction of refractive-accommodative disorders in military personnel--operators of visual-intensive work with myopia].

    PubMed

    Ovechkin, I G; Shchukin, S Iu; Emel'ianov, G A

    2012-05-01

    The authors propose an integrated method of rehabilitation of the vision (a course of physiotherapy and incentive effects, additional medical and non-pharmacological treatment, application of self-correction), which provides military specialists--operators of visual-intensive work after the excimer laser correction of myopia higher level of visual performance, prevention of accommodative disorders, the progression of of myopia and astenopicheskih states. PMID:22830113

  10. Comparative Occupational Survey of Civilian and Military Members in the Pavements Maintenance and Construction Equipment Operator Specialties. Final Report for Period 1 October 1975-30 October 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Douglas K.

    A study was conducted to analyze and compare the job performance of civil service and military pavements maintenance workers and construction equipment operators. A military sample of 2,675 and a civilian sample of 1,974 were surveyed by means of a job inventory checklist and relative time spent rating method. Of the three job types that were…

  11. A Complexity Science-Based Framework for Global Joint Operations Analysis to Support Force Projection: LDRD Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    The military is undergoing a significant transformation as it modernizes for the information age and adapts to address an emerging asymmetric threat beyond traditional cold war era adversaries. Techniques such as traditional large-scale, joint services war gaming analysis are no longer adequate to support program evaluation activities and mission planning analysis at the enterprise level because the operating environment is evolving too quickly. New analytical capabilities are necessary to address modernization of the Department of Defense (DoD) enterprise. This presents significant opportunity to Sandia in supporting the nation at this transformational enterprise scale. Although Sandia has significant experience with engineering system of systems (SoS) and Complex Adaptive System of Systems (CASoS), significant fundamental research is required to develop modeling, simulation and analysis capabilities at the enterprise scale. This report documents an enterprise modeling framework which will enable senior level decision makers to better understand their enterprise and required future investments.

  12. 7 CFR 795.7 - Entities or joint operations not considered as a person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Entities or joint operations not considered as a person. 795.7 Section 795.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.7 Entities or joint operations...

  13. 78 FR 44436 - Safety Zone; Joint Operations Exercise, Lake Michigan, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... Department of Homeland Security DOD Department of Defense FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Joint Operations Exercise, Lake Michigan... vessels from a portion of Lake Michigan due to a joint operations exercise involving the Department...

  14. A Summary of Operating Conditions Experienced by Three Military Helicopters and a Mountain-Based Commercial Helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connor, Andrew B.

    1960-01-01

    The results of a survey of the flight conditions experienced by three military helicopters engaged in simulated and actual military missions, and a commercial helicopter operated in the mountainous terrain surrounding Denver, CO, are presented. The data, obtained with NASA helicopter VGHN recorders, represent 813 flights or 359 flying hours, and are compared where applicable to previous survey results. The current survey results show that none of the helicopters exceeded the maximum design airspeed. One military helicopter, used for instrument flight training, never exceeded 70 percent of its maximum design airspeed. The rates of climb and descent utilized by the IFR training helicopter and of the mountain-based helicopter were generally narrowly distributed within all the airspeed ranges. The number of landings per hour for all four of the helicopters ranged from 1.6 to 3.3. The turbine-engine helicopter experienced more frequent normal-acceleration increments above a threshold of +/-0.4g (where g is acceleration due to gravity) than the mountain-based helicopter, but the mountain-based helicopter experienced acceleration increments of greater magnitude. Limited rotor rotational speed time histories showed that all the helicopters were operated at normal rotor speeds during all flight conditions.

  15. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Petroleum Equipment and Technical Operations, QM0142, 19-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This subcourse containg lesson assignments, lesson texts, and programmed reviews covers the most frequently used equipment for transporting and storing petroleum products from the time they are purchased until they are consumed by the user. The course is one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to…

  16. Operational Applications of Autogenic Feedback Training Exercise as a Treatment for Airsickness in the Military

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gebreyesus, Fiyore; Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Airsickness is experienced by about 50% of military aviators some time in their career. Aviators who suffer from recurrent episodes of airsickness are typically referred to the Naval Aerospace Medical Institute (NAMI) at Pensacola where they undergo extensive evaluation and 8 weeks of training in the Self-Paced Airsickness Desensitization (SPAD) program. Researchers at NASA Ames have developed an alternative mitigation training program, Autogenic Feedback Training Exercise (AFTE) that has demonstrated an 80% success rate for improving motion sickness tolerance.

  17. Comparison of Five 2nd-Generation Supraglottic Airway Devices for Airway Management Performed by Novice Military Operators

    PubMed Central

    Henlin, Tomas; Sotak, Michal; Kovaricek, Petr; Tyll, Tomas; Balcarek, Lukas; Michalek, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Five different second-generation supraglottic airway devices, ProSeal LMA, Supreme LMA, i-gel, SLIPA, and Laryngeal Tube Suction-D, were studied. Operators were inexperienced users with a military background, combat lifesavers, nurses, and physicians. Methods. This was a prospective, randomized, single-blinded study. Devices were inserted in the operating room in low light conditions after induction of general anesthesia. Primary outcome was successful insertion on the first attempt while secondary aims were insertion time, number of attempts, oropharyngeal seal pressure, ease of insertion, fibre optic position of device, efficacy of ventilation, and intraoperative trauma or regurgitation of gastric contents. Results. In total, 505 patients were studied. First-attempt insertion success rate was higher in the Supreme LMA (96%), i-gel (87.9%), and ProSeal LMA (85.9%) groups than in the Laryngeal Tube Suction-D (80.6%) and SLIPA (69.4%) groups. Insertion time was shortest in the Supreme LMA (70.4 ± 32.5 s) and i-gel (74.4 ± 41.1 s) groups (p < 0.001). Oropharyngeal seal pressures were higher in the Laryngeal Tube Suction-D and ProSeal LMA groups than in other three devices. Conclusions. Most study parameters for the Supreme LMA and i-gel were found to be superior to the other three tested supraglottic airway devices when inserted by novice military operators. PMID:26495289

  18. [Environmental risk factors in the territory of military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan].

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof

    2008-07-01

    Military service in Iraq and Afghanistan is burdened by series of environmental factors such as high and low air temperature, wind, sand, dust, and local fauna. In summertime the main hazard are heat injuries. Sand and dust storms also become troublesome. In the winter another health problem is effect of low temperature. In Afghanistan additional threat pose mountain conditions, especially in wintertime when appear intense snowfalls. Hard conditions more than once characteristic for duty of Stabilization Forces soldiers in both countries can cause significant threat for health and life. PMID:18839605

  19. The Best of Both Worlds: Psychiatry Training at Combined Civilian-Military Programs.

    PubMed

    Welton, Randon S; Hamaoka, Derrick A; Broderick, Pamela J; Schillerstrom, Jason E

    2015-08-01

    Air Force psychiatry faces the task of training competent military psychiatrists in an era of continuing reductions. Beginning in the 1980s, the Air Force started collaborating with University partners to create hybrid training programs, civilian-military psychiatry residencies. These mergers provide stability for Air Force psychiatry training in the face of increased operational missions and uncertain military recruiting. As a result of these combined programs, Air Force psychiatry residents gain access to a broader range of civilian clinical experience and expertise while maintaining a focus on distinctive military requirements. The combining of programs opens up options for academic activities which may not have otherwise existed. Both military and civilian residents benefit from the occupational psychiatry experiences available within military clinical sites. These programs give civilian residents a chance to assist active duty members and their families and provide insight into the military "lifecycle." These collaborations benefit the universities by providing access to a larger pool of residents and faculty. The synthesis of the military and civilian programs raises some ongoing obstacles such as civilian residents' ability to gain access to military resources. The programs must also accommodate separate mechanisms for selecting residents (the National Residency Matching Program versus the Joint Selection Board for Graduate Medical Education). Military residents must also comply with military standards and requirements while maintaining the universities' standards of conduct and professionalism. Merging military training programs into university programs creates a vibrant opportunity to create exceptional military and civilian psychiatrists. PMID:25772128

  20. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military...

  1. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military...

  2. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Military pilots or former military pilots... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military...

  3. Door Opening Affects Operating Room Pressure During Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mears, Simon C; Blanding, Renee; Belkoff, Stephen M

    2015-11-01

    Many resources are expended to ensure a sterile operating room environment. Efforts are made to prevent exposure of patients to personnel and to achieve positive room pressure to keep out airborne contaminants. Foot traffic into and out of the operating room during surgery can undermine these efforts. The authors investigated the number and duration of operating room door openings during hip and knee arthroplasty procedures and the effect of the door openings on room pressure. They tested the hypothesis that door openings defeat positive pressure, permitting air flow into the room. Room pressure and door status were monitored electronically during 191 hip and knee arthroplasty procedures. Operating room staff were unaware that data were being collected. The authors evaluated the data with regression analysis to determine whether the number and duration of door openings had an effect on room pressure. Significance was set at P<.05. Doors were open, on average, 9.5 minutes per case. In 77 of 191 cases, positive pressure was defeated, allowing air flow to reverse into the operating room. Total time with the door open significantly affected the minimum pressure recorded in the room (P<.02), but did not significantly affect average room pressure (P=.7). This finding suggested that the loss of positive pressure was a transient event from which the room recovered. The number and duration of door openings showed a significant association with length of surgery. Door openings threaten positive pressure, potentially jeopardizing operating room sterility. The causes of excessive operating room traffic must be evaluated to identify ways to reduce this traffic and the associated risks. PMID:26558679

  4. Probing emissions of military cargo aircraft: description of a joint field measurement Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn; Corporan, Edwin; DeWitt, Matthew J; Spicer, Chester W; Holdren, Michael W; Cowen, Kenneth A; Laskin, Alex; Harris, David B; Shores, Richard C; Kagann, Robert; Hashmonay, Ram

    2008-06-01

    To develop effective air quality control strategies for military air bases, there is a need to accurately quantify these emissions. In support of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program project, the particulate matter (PM) and gaseous emissions from two T56 engines on a parked C-130 aircraft were characterized at the Kentucky Air National Guard base in Louisville, KY. Conventional and research-grade instrumentation and methodology were used in the field campaign during the first week of October 2005. Particulate emissions were sampled at the engine exit plane and at 15 m downstream. In addition, remote sensing of the gaseous species was performed via spectroscopic techniques at 5 and 15 m downstream of the engine exit. It was found that PM mass and number concentrations measured at 15-m downstream locations, after dilution-correction generally agreed well with those measured at the engine exhaust plane; however, higher variations were observed in the far-field after natural dilution of the downstream measurements was accounted for. Using carbon dioxide-normalized data we demonstrated that gas species measurements by extractive and remote sensing techniques agreed reasonably well. PMID:18581808

  5. [Fractures of the proximal interphalangeal joint: Diagnostic and operative therapy options].

    PubMed

    Unglaub, F; Langer, M F; Hahn, P; Müller, L P; Ahrens, C; Spies, C K

    2016-02-01

    Joint fractures of the fingers often entail operative interventions in contrast to extra-articular fractures. These types of fracture are inclined to dislocate in addition to the actual fracture. The proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint in particular often shows comminuted fractures due to the long leverage of the finger and a relatively small diameter of the joint. The clinical examination, X-ray diagnostics and if necessary computed tomography allow the classification into stable and unstable fractures. Unstable fractures must be treated by surgical reduction and fixation. A multitude of operative techniques are available for these mostly complicated fractures. The foremost goal is a stable osteosynthesis of the fracture with repositioning of the dislocation, which enables early physiotherapy in order to prevent tendon adhesion and contracture. This article presents the different types of PIP joint fractures, their specific surgical treatment and postoperative treatment regimens. PMID:26826026

  6. Millimeter wave case study of operational deployments: retail, airport, military, courthouse, and customs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tryon, Gary V.

    2008-04-01

    In the wake of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack on America, our security and defense industry was instantly tasked with delivering technologies that could be used to help prevent future terrorist activities. The general public world wide is asking for solutions that will foster a safe society and travel environment. Our best defenses rest in our talents within a free open society to prevent dangerous individuals from boarding planes, entering buildings, courthouses, transportations hubs and military bases with weapons capable of causing damage and bodily harm in the first place. Passive millimeter wave (PMMW) whole body imaging systems are based upon the principle that every physical entity emits, reflects, and/or absorbs electromagnetic energy. The term "passive" means that this approach does not bombard the test subject with energy radiation to further induce the discovery of hidden objects. PMMW whole body imaging systems focus on the human body's natural emission and reflection of millimeter wavelength energy. In physics, "millimeter waves" (MMW) are defined as extremely high-frequency (30-300 GHz) electromagnetic oscillations. On the electromagnetic spectrum these waves are just larger than infrared waves, but smaller than radio waves. The wavelength of a MMW is between 1 millimeter and 10 millimeters. That is approximately the thickness of a large paperclip up to the diameter of an "AAA" battery.

  7. Saving Lives on the Battlefield (Part II) ? One Year Later A Joint Theater Trauma System and Joint Trauma System Review of Prehospital Trauma Care in Combined Joint Operations Area?Afghanistan (CJOA-A) Final Report, 30 May 2014.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Samual W; Robinson, John B; Smith, Michael P; Gross, Kirby R; Kotwal, Russ S; Mabry, Robert L; Butler, Frank K; Stockinger, Zsolt T; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Mavity, Mark E; Gillies, Duncan A

    2015-01-01

    The United States has achieved unprecedented survival rates, as high as 98%, for casualties arriving alive at the combat hospital. Our military medical personnel are rightly proud of this achievement. Commanders and Servicemembers are confident that if wounded and moved to a Role II or III medical facility, their care will be the best in the world. Combat casualty care, however, begins at the point of injury and continues through evacuation to those facilities. With up to 25% of deaths on the battlefield being potentially preventable, the prehospital environment is the next frontier for making significant further improvements in battlefield trauma care. Strict adherence to the evidence-based Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) Guidelines has been proven to reduce morbidity and mortality on the battlefield. However, full implementation across the entire force and commitment from both line and medical leadership continue to face ongoing challenges. This report on prehospital trauma in the Combined Joint Operations Area?Afghanistan (CJOA-A) is a follow-on to the one previously conducted in November 2012 and published in January 2013. Both assessments were conducted by the US Central Command (USCENTCOM) Joint Theater Trauma System (JTTS). Observations for this report were collected from December 2013 to January 2014 and were obtained directly from deployed prehospital providers, medical leaders, and combatant leaders. Significant progress has been made between these two reports with the establishment of a Prehospital Care Division within the JTTS, development of a prehospital trauma registry and weekly prehospital trauma conferences, and CJOA-A theater guidance and enforcement of prehospital documentation. Specific prehospital trauma-care achievements include expansion of transfusion capabilities forward to the point of injury, junctional tourniquets, and universal approval of tranexamic acid. PMID:26125162

  8. Coordinated ground system for joint science operations for the ExoMars2016 TGO mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, Vladimir; Heather, David; Frew, David; Eismont, Natan; Manaud, Nicolas; Ledkov, Anton; Nazirov, Ravil; Metcalfe, Leo; Cardesin, Alejandro; Konoplev, Veniamin; Korotkov, Fedor; Batanov, Oleg; Brumfitt, Jon; Alvarez, Rub; Martin, Patrick; Melnik, Anton; Tretiakov, Alexey; Villacorta, Antonio

    International collaboration is increasingly important for space science missions, often requiring joint operations activity. Such an approach is extremely important for studies of planets and other bodies of the Solar system that usually require high budget for their realization. In addition, as the development of international payloads for such missions is a well-established practice, the establishment of common ground systems for joint science operations is an important feature. Benefits of such an approach are evident: • More science return • Reduced the cost • More redundancy • Technology exchange But on the other hand, common systems for joint operations pose some specific difficulties, such as: • Different review procedures in the developing organisations • Incompatible documentation structures (“document tree”) • A risk of producing a “multiheaded dragon” (inefficient/duplicated task distributions) • Different base technologies • Language problems This article describes approaches for resolving these problems on the basis of the coordinated system for joint science operations for the ExoMars2016 mission, which is at the design stage now. The architecture of the system, the scenario of distributed but joint data management, as well as some methodological and technological aspects, will be discussed

  9. Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC) Mission System (JMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, M.; Roberts, T.

    2011-09-01

    US space capabilities benefit the economy, national security, international relationships, scientific discovery, and our quality of life. Realizing these space responsibilities is challenging not only because the space domain is increasingly congested, contested, and competitive but is further complicated by the legacy space situational awareness (SSA) systems approaching end of life and inability to provide the breadth of SSA and command and control (C2) of space forces in this challenging domain. JMS will provide the capabilities to effectively employ space forces in this challenging domain. Requirements for JMS were developed based on regular, on-going engagement with the warfighter. The use of DoD Architecture Framework (DoDAF) products facilitated requirements scoping and understanding and transferred directly to defining and documenting the requirements in the approved Capability Development Document (CDD). As part of the risk reduction efforts, the Electronic System Center (ESC) JMS System Program Office (SPO) fielded JMS Capability Package (CP) 0 which includes an initial service oriented architecture (SOA) and user defined operational picture (UDOP) along with force status, sensor management, and analysis tools. Development efforts are planned to leverage and integrate prototypes and other research projects from Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Air Force Research Laboratories, Space Innovation and Development Center, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Lincoln Laboratories. JMS provides a number of benefits to the space community: a reduction in operational “transaction time” to accomplish key activities and processes; ability to process the increased volume of metric observations from new sensors (e.g., SBSS, SST, Space Fence), as well as owner/operator ephemerides thus enhancing the high accuracy near-real-time catalog, and greater automation of SSA data sharing supporting collaboration with government, civil, commercial, and foreign

  10. Nutrition research in the military.

    PubMed

    Hill, Neil E; Fallowfield, J L; Delves, S K; Wilson, D R

    2014-06-01

    Military research performed in an operational environment involves mission-specific considerations. The Institute of Naval Medicine was tasked in 2008 by the Surgeon General to investigate the nutritional status of deployed British military personnel, and how this might affect body composition, physical fitness and operational capability. This paper briefly describes the logistic and technical issues specific to military research that were encountered by the study team, how these issues were overcome and how this research has influenced military practice. PMID:24434764

  11. Selection of stirling engine parameter and modes of joint operation with the Topaz II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, E. Ya.; Ogloblin, B. G.; Shalaev, A. I.

    1996-03-01

    In addition to a high-temperature thermionic conversion cycle, application of a low-temperature machine cycle, such as the Stirling engine, is being considered. To select the optimum mode for joint operation of the Topaz II system and Stirling engine, output electric parameters are obtained as a function of thermal power released in the TFE fuel cores. The hydraulic diagram used for joint operation of the Topaz II and the Stirling engine is considered. Requirements to hydraulic characteristics of the Stirling engine heat exchanges are formulated. Scope of necessary modifications to mount the Stirling Engine on the Topaz II is estimated.

  12. Selection of stirling engine parameter and modes of joint operation with the Topaz II

    SciTech Connect

    Kirillov, E.Y.; Ogloblin, B.G.; Shalaev, A.I.

    1996-03-01

    In addition to a high-temperature thermionic conversion cycle, application of a low-temperature machine cycle, such as the Stirling engine, is being considered. To select the optimum mode for joint operation of the Topaz II system and Stirling engine, output electric parameters are obtained as a function of thermal power released in the TFE fuel cores. The hydraulic diagram used for joint operation of the Topaz II and the Stirling engine is considered. Requirements to hydraulic characteristics of the Stirling engine heat exchanges are formulated. Scope of necessary modifications to mount the Stirling Engine on the Topaz II is estimated. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. It is not their war: the impact of military operations on Philippine migrant care workers for elderly people in Israel

    PubMed Central

    Ron, Pnina

    2015-01-01

    Objective A majority of work immigrants from the Philippines came to Israel to fill positions involving personal and nursing care. Most of them were in Israel during the Second Lebanon War, the Cast Lead operation, and the Protective Edge Operation. These migrant care workers experienced these events no differently than did the Israeli population. The goal of this study was to examine the connections between the Philippine migrant care workers’ exposure to the military operations and the levels of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), death anxiety, and burnout among them. Methods A random sample of 147 Philippine migrant care workers was recruited through four agencies that employ migrant care workers. Participants completed a self-report questionnaire. Results Philippine migrant care workers reported high levels of PTSD, high levels of death anxiety, and low levels of burnout. Levels of exposure were positively associated with levels of PTSD, death anxiety, and negatively with burnout. A significant inverse relationship was found between interpersonal variables (self-esteem and sense of mastery) and the PTSD, death anxiety, and burnout levels reported by the participants. PMID:26170643

  14. Converting a commercial electric direct-drive robot to operate from joint torque commands

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, P.F.

    1991-07-01

    Many robot control algorithms for high performance in-contact operations including hybrid force/position, stiffness control and impedance control approaches require the command the joint torques. However, most commercially available robots do not provide joint torque command capabilities. The joint command at the user level is typically position or velocity and at the control developer level is voltage, current, or pulse-width, and the torque generated is a nonlinear function of the command and joint position. To enable the application of high performance in-contact control algorithms to commercially available robots, and thereby facilitate technology transfer from the robot control research community to commercial applications, an methodology has been developed to linearize the torque characteristics of electric motor-amplifier combinations. A four degree of freedom Adept 2 robot, having pulse-width modulation amplifiers and both variable reluctance and brushless DC motors, is converted to operate from joint torque commands to demonstrate the methodology. The commercial robot controller is replaced by a VME-based system incorporating special purpose hardware and firmware programmed from experimental data. The performance improvement is experimentally measured and graphically displayed using three-dimensional plots of torque vs command vs position. The average percentage torque deviation over the command and position ranges is reduced from as much as 76% to below 5% for the direct-drive joints 1, 2 and 4 and is cut by one half in the remaining ball-screw driven joint 3. Further, the torque deviation of the direct-drive joints drops below 2.5% if only the upper 90% of the torque range is considered. 23 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Selective non-operative management of abdominal injury in the military setting.

    PubMed

    Jansen, J O

    2011-09-01

    This article represents a consensus view of those TTWG members present in Birmingham and taking into account the views of the other group members via email discussion. We believe it represents clear guidance for the deployed clinician and recommend the use of selective non-operative management when appropriate. PMID:21977714

  16. Medium-fidelity medical simulators: use in a pre-hospital, operational, military environment.

    PubMed

    Morrison, J J; Forbes, K; Woolrich-Burt, L; Russell, R; Mahoney, P F

    2006-09-01

    On Operation Telic 6, the UK Med Group consisting of 3 Close Support Medical Regiment and 205 Field Hospital (Volunteers) deployed to provide medical support to coalition forces in Iraq. Personnel were drawn from Regular and Territorial Units, plus additional medical support from Armies of the Czech Republic and Denmark. The efficient delivery of operational emergency medical care hinged upon the successful integration of personnel from these units. We report on the use of a medium-fidelity simulator, in a pre-hospital and hospital environment over a three month period on an operational tour. In conducting 42 exercises (12 of which commenced in a pre-hospital environment), we have demonstrated the feasibility of the system in rehearsing the management of the major trauma patient. This training was used to enhance teamwork, identify system deficiencies and practise solutions in a safe environment. This paper discusses our experiences in relation to the current literature on this expanding area of trauma training. PMID:17295008

  17. 7 CFR 795.7 - Entities or joint operations not considered as a person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Entities or joint operations not considered as a person. 795.7 Section 795.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM... out-of-pocket input of a specified sum or an amount borrowed by the individual. If the...

  18. 76 FR 13445 - Lycoming Valley Railroad Company-Operation Exemption-SEDA-COG Joint Rail Authority

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Lycoming Valley Railroad Company-Operation Exemption--SEDA--COG Joint Rail Authority Lycoming Valley Railroad Company (LVRR), a Class III carrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.41 to...

  19. 76 FR 13445 - North Shore Railroad Company-Operation Exemption-SEDA-COG Joint Rail Authority

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board North Shore Railroad Company-Operation Exemption-SEDA-COG Joint Rail Authority North Shore Railroad Company (NSRR), a Class III carrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.41 to...

  20. 76 FR 13446 - Juniata Valley Railroad Company-Operation Exemption-SEDA-COG Joint Rail Authority

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Juniata Valley Railroad Company-Operation Exemption-SEDA-COG Joint Rail Authority Juniata Valley Railroad Company (JVRR), a Class III carrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.41 to...

  1. The effects of joint torque, pace and work:rest ratio on powered hand tool operations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-Hua; McGorry, Raymond W; Maikala, Rammohan V

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive use of hand-held power tools is associated with work-related upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders. Using a pneumatic nutrunner, 21 men completed twelve 360 repetitive fastener-driving sessions on three joints (hard, soft and control) at slow and fast pace, and two different work:rest patterns. Handgrip force and perceived exertions were collected throughout each session. For the control joint, the mean grip force exerted was 39.6% of maximum voluntary exertion (MVE) whereas during hard and soft joint sessions it was 48.9% MVE and 56.9% MVE, respectively. Throughout each session, the grip force decreased, more while operating soft and hard joints as compared with the control joint (regression slope: -0.022 and -0.023, compared with -0.007 N/drive, respectively), suggesting considerable upper extremity muscular effort by participants during torque buildup. Fast work pace resulted in higher average grip forces by participants but a greater decrease in the force as the session progressed. Providing rest breaks reduced perceived exertions. The findings gain additional knowledge for assembly task design to possibly reduce the hand/arm injury risks for the operator. Practitioner Summary: Powered hand tools are widely used in assembly and manufacturing industries. However, the nature of their repetitive use on human operator biomechanical and perceptual responses is not fully understood. This study examined work-related risk factors such as joint torque, pace and work:rest ratios on powered hand tool performance. PMID:22409173

  2. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military pilot who meets the requirements of this section may apply, on the basis of his or her military...

  3. 14 CFR 61.73 - Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.73 Military pilots or former military pilots: Special rules. (a... a disciplinary action involving aircraft operations, a U.S. military pilot or former military pilot who meets the requirements of this section may apply, on the basis of his or her military...

  4. Operational vector-borne disease surveillance and control: closing the capabilities gap through research at overseas military laboratories.

    PubMed

    Evans, Brian P; Clark, Jeffrey W; Barbara, Kathryn A; Mundal, Kirk D; Furman, Barry D; McAvin, James C; Richardson, Jason H

    2009-01-01

    Malaria, dengue fever, chikungunya virus, leishmaniasis, and a myriad of other vector-borne diseases pose significant threats to the warfighter and to the overall combat effectiveness of units. Military preventive medicine (PM) assets must accurately evaluate the vector-borne disease threat and then implement and/or advise the commander on countermeasures to reduce a particular threat. The success of these measures is contingent upon the biology of the disease vector and on the tools or methods used to conduct vector/pathogen surveillance and vector control. There is a significant gap between the tools available and those required for operational PM assets to provide real-time, effective surveillance and control. A network of US Army and US Navy overseas laboratories is focused on closing the current capabilities gap. Their mission is to develop and field test tools and methods to enhance the combatant commander's ability to identify and mitigate the threat posed by these vector-borne diseases. PMID:20084734

  5. Apparatus for maintaining aligment of a shrinking weld joint in an electron-beam welding operation

    DOEpatents

    Trent, J.B.; Murphy, J.L.

    1980-01-03

    The invention is directed to an apparatus for automatically maintaining a shrinking weld joint in alignement with an electron beam during an electron-beam multipass-welding operation. The apparatus utilizes a bias means for continually urging a workpiece-supporting face plate away from a carriage mounted base that rotatably supports the face plate. The extent of displacement of the face plate away from the base in indicative of the shrinkage occuring in the weld joint area. This displacement is measured and is used to move the base on the carriage a distance equal to one-half the displacement for aligning the weld joint with the electron beam during each welding pass.

  6. Apparatus for maintaining alignment of a shrinking weld joint in an electron-beam welding operation

    DOEpatents

    Trent, Jett B.; Murphy, Jimmy L.

    1981-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus for automatically maintaining a shrinking weld joint in alignment with an electron beam during an electron-beam multipass-welding operation. The apparatus utilizes a biasing device for continually urging a workpiece-supporting face plate away from a carriage mounted base that rotatably supports the face plate. The extent of displacement of the face plate away from the base is indicative of the shrinkage occuring in the weld joint area. This displacement is measured and is used to move the base on the carriage a distance equal to one-half the displacement for aligning the weld joint with the electron beam during each welding pass.

  7. Endocrine-metabolic responses to military field operations: Effects of cold and moderate altitude exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Floyd, E.; Hackney, A.C.; Hodgdon, J.A.; Coyne, J.T.; Kelleher, D.L. Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill )

    1991-03-11

    Select endocrine-metabolic responses of US Marines to 4.5 day field operations (FOPS) in different environments were examined. Blood and urine samples were collected in the field immediately before and after FOPS at: (1) sea level, neutral temperatures (Ts) (SLN; n = 14), (2) sea level, cold Ts (SLC; n = 16), (3) 2,500 M altitude, neutral Ts (ALN; n = 16), and (4) 2,500 M altitude, cold Ts (ALC; n = 45). Measures examined were testosterone (T), cortisol (C), glucose (Glu), triglycerides (Tg), and urinary ketones (Uket). T decreased pre-post the FOPS in the cold conditions ({bar X}; 6.7 to 5.5 hg/ml; n = 61) but did not change in neutral conditions. C increased pre-post FOPS at SLC (12.1 to 19.8 ug/dl, p < 0.01), ALN (9.3 to 13.9 ug/dl, p < 0.01), and ALC (16.7 to 19.0 ug/dl, p = 0.08). Normoglycemia was maintained under each condition. Tg decreased (p < 0.01) at SLC, ALN, and ALC ({bar X}{triangle}: {minus}59.1, {minus}102.2, {minus}93.3 mg/dl, respectively), but increased at SLN (+74.0 mg/dl). Uket increased post FOPS only at ALN and ALC ({bar X}{triangle}: 3.4 mg/dl and +11.3 mg/dl). The Uket increases were correlated to Tg decreases. Results suggest FOPS induces a slight endocrine stress response, which is augmented with moderate altitude or cold exposure. Furthermore FOPS at altitude, especially in the cold, seems to shift the body towards fat metabolism.

  8. The military healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Shelton, H H

    2001-09-01

    Throughout our Nation's history, healthcare has been a prominent issue for the military. TRICARE is the managed healthcare program for active duty and retired members of the uniformed services, their families, and survivors. During the past few years, the Joint Chiefs of Staff have put forth a concerted effort to work with the Congress and the Administration to ensure that TRICARE provides high quality healthcare for all members of the uniformed services, our retirees, and their families. Ensuring quality medical care for military retirees honors a promise made to those currently serving and to those who served their country in the past. PMID:11569432

  9. STS payloads mission control study continuation phase A-1. Volume 2-C, task 3: Identification of joint activities and estimation of resources in preparation for joint flight operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Payload mission control concepts are developed for real time flight operations of STS. Flight planning, training, simulations, and other flight preparations are included. Payload activities for the preflight phase, activity sequences and organizational allocations, and traffic and experience factors to establish composite man-loading for joint STS payload activities are identified for flight operations from 1980 to 1985.

  10. Derivation of operation rules for reservoirs in parallel with joint water demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiang; Hu, Tiesong; Xiong, Lihua; Cao, Zhixian; Xu, Chongyu

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to derive the general optimality conditions of the commonly used operating policies for reservoirs in parallel with joint water demand, which are defined in terms of system-wide release rules and individual reservoir storage balancing functions. Following that, a new set of release rules for individual reservoirs are proposed in analytical forms by considering the optimality conditions for the balance of total water delivery utility and carryover storage value of individual reservoirs. Theoretical analysis indicates that the commonly used operating policies are a special case of the newly derived rules. The derived release rules are then applied to simulating the operation of a parallel reservoir system in northeastern China. Compared to the performance of the commonly used policies, some advantages of the proposed operation rules are illustrated. Most notably, less water shortage occurrence and higher water supply reliability are obtained from the proposed operation rules.

  11. Joint operations planning for space surveillance missions on the MSX satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, Grant; Good, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    The Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite, sponsored by BMDO, is intended to gather broad-band phenomenology data on missiles, plumes, naturally occurring earthlimb backgrounds and deep space backgrounds. In addition the MSX will be used to conduct functional demonstrations of space-based space surveillance. The JHU/Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), located in Laurel, MD, is the integrator and operator of the MSX satellite. APL will conduct all operations related to the MSX and is charged with the detailed operations planning required to implement all of the experiments run on the MSX except the space surveillance experiments. The non-surveillance operations are generally amenable to being defined months ahead of time and being scheduled on a monthly basis. Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (LL), located in Lexington, MA, is the provider of one of the principle MSX instruments, the Space-Based Visible (SBV) sensor, and the agency charged with implementing the space surveillance demonstrations on the MSX. The planning timelines for the space surveillance demonstrations are fundamentally different from those for the other experiments. They are generally amenable to being scheduled on a monthly basis, but the specific experiment sequence and pointing must be refined shortly before execution. This allocation of responsibilities to different organizations implies the need for a joint mission planning system for conducting space surveillance demonstrations. This paper details the iterative, joint planning system, based on passing responsibility for generating MSX commands for surveillance operations from APL to LL for specific scheduled operations. The joint planning system, including the generation of a budget for spacecraft resources to be used for surveillance events, has been successfully demonstrated during ground testing of the MSX and is being validated for MSX launch within the year. The planning system developed for the MSX forms a

  12. Comparing military and civilian critical thinking and information processes in operational risk management: what are the lessons?

    PubMed

    VanVactor, Jerry D; Gill, Tony

    2010-03-01

    Business continuity has expanded into a discipline that spans most functional areas of large enterprises. Both the military and financial sectors have consistently demonstrated an aptitude to expand the boundaries of continuity planning and crisis mitigation. A comparison of both enterprises is provided to see how their respective methodologies compare. Interestingly, the similarities far outweigh the differences. The paper provides commentary related to comparative insight from risk practitioners' perspectives from within the US Army, one of the largest military organisations in the world, and the Bank of Montreal, one of Canada's leading financial institutions. PMID:20494875

  13. Joint operation and dynamic control of flood limiting water levels for mixed cascade reservoir systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanlai; Guo, Shenglian; Liu, Pan; Xu, Chongyu

    2014-11-01

    Reservoirs are one of the most efficient infrastructures for integrated water resources development and management; and play a more and more important role in flood control and conservation. Dynamic control of the reservoir flood limiting water level (FLWL) is a valuable and effective approach to compromise the flood control, hydropower generation and comprehensive utilization of water resources of river basins during the flood season. The dynamic control models of FLWL for a single reservoir and cascade reservoirs have been extended for a mixed reservoir system in this paper. The proposed model consists of a dynamic control operation module for a single reservoir, a dynamic control operation module for cascade reservoirs, and a joint operation module for mixed cascade reservoir systems. The Three Gorges and Qingjiang cascade reservoirs in the Yangtze River basin of China are selected for a case study. Three-hour inflow data series for representative hydrological years are used to test the model. The results indicate that the proposed model can make an effective tradeoff between flood control and hydropower generation. Joint operation and dynamic control of FLWL can generate 26.4 × 108 kW h (3.47%) more hydropower for the mixed cascade reservoir systems and increase the water resource utilization rate by 3.72% for the Three Gorges reservoir and 2.42% for the Qingjiang cascade reservoirs without reducing originally designed flood prevention standards.

  14. Military Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Richard W.

    1981-01-01

    Argues that while a certain level of fairness is necessary in considering the equity of compulsory military service, the most important issue is that of "winning the war." Also asserts that sex, age, and race discrimination are more important than social class discrimination in military service. (Author/GC)

  15. Risk mitigation for ITER by a prolonged and joint international operation of JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donne, Antonius J.; Cowley, Steve; Jones, Timothy; Litaudon, Xavier; JET Team; CCFE Team

    2015-11-01

    Prolonged operation of the Joint European Torus (JET) in a set-up involving all ITER partners will be beneficial for ITER. Experiments at JET with its ITER-like wall and using a D-T plasma mixture will help to mitigate risks in the ITER research plan. Training of the ITER operators, technicians and engineers at JET will save valuable time when ITER comes into operation. Moreover, the way in which the future ITER experiments will be organized can already be experienced at JET, by imposing a similar organisational structure. This paper will present arguments in favour of an extension of JET and additionally briefly discuss a number of enhancements that will make experiments on JET even more relevant for ITER.

  16. Static Analysis of Large-Scale Multibody System Using Joint Coordinates and Spatial Algebra Operator

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Mohamed A.

    2014-01-01

    Initial transient oscillations inhibited in the dynamic simulations responses of multibody systems can lead to inaccurate results, unrealistic load prediction, or simulation failure. These transients could result from incompatible initial conditions, initial constraints violation, and inadequate kinematic assembly. Performing static equilibrium analysis before the dynamic simulation can eliminate these transients and lead to stable simulation. Most exiting multibody formulations determine the static equilibrium position by minimizing the system potential energy. This paper presents a new general purpose approach for solving the static equilibrium in large-scale articulated multibody. The proposed approach introduces an energy drainage mechanism based on Baumgarte constraint stabilization approach to determine the static equilibrium position. The spatial algebra operator is used to express the kinematic and dynamic equations of the closed-loop multibody system. The proposed multibody system formulation utilizes the joint coordinates and modal elastic coordinates as the system generalized coordinates. The recursive nonlinear equations of motion are formulated using the Cartesian coordinates and the joint coordinates to form an augmented set of differential algebraic equations. Then system connectivity matrix is derived from the system topological relations and used to project the Cartesian quantities into the joint subspace leading to minimum set of differential equations. PMID:25045732

  17. Method and apparatus for preloading a joint by remotely operable means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Robert O. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a method and apparatus for joining structures, an active structure and a passive structure, and imposing a tensile pre-load on the joint by a remotely operable mechanism comprising a heat contractible joining element. The method and apparatus include mounting on the structure, a probe shaft of material which is transformable from an expanded length to a contracted length when heated to a specific temperature range. The shaft is provided with a probe head which is receivable in a receptacle opening formed in the passive structure, when the active structure is moved into engagement therewith by an appropriate manipulator mechanism. A latching system mounted on the structure adjacent to the receptacle opening captures the probe head, when the probe head is inserted a predetermined amount. A heating coil on the shaft is energizable by remote control for heating the shaft to a temperature range which transforms the shaft to its contracted length, whereby a latching shoulder thereof engages latching elements of the latching system and imposes a tensile preload on the structural joint. Provision is also made for manually adjusting the probe head on the shaft to allow for manual detachment of the structures or manual preloading of the structural joint.

  18. Static analysis of large-scale multibody system using joint coordinates and spatial algebra operator.

    PubMed

    Omar, Mohamed A

    2014-01-01

    Initial transient oscillations inhibited in the dynamic simulations responses of multibody systems can lead to inaccurate results, unrealistic load prediction, or simulation failure. These transients could result from incompatible initial conditions, initial constraints violation, and inadequate kinematic assembly. Performing static equilibrium analysis before the dynamic simulation can eliminate these transients and lead to stable simulation. Most exiting multibody formulations determine the static equilibrium position by minimizing the system potential energy. This paper presents a new general purpose approach for solving the static equilibrium in large-scale articulated multibody. The proposed approach introduces an energy drainage mechanism based on Baumgarte constraint stabilization approach to determine the static equilibrium position. The spatial algebra operator is used to express the kinematic and dynamic equations of the closed-loop multibody system. The proposed multibody system formulation utilizes the joint coordinates and modal elastic coordinates as the system generalized coordinates. The recursive nonlinear equations of motion are formulated using the Cartesian coordinates and the joint coordinates to form an augmented set of differential algebraic equations. Then system connectivity matrix is derived from the system topological relations and used to project the Cartesian quantities into the joint subspace leading to minimum set of differential equations. PMID:25045732

  19. Joint preserving surgery versus arthrodesis in operative treatment of patients with neuromuscular polyneuropathy: questionnaire assessment.

    PubMed

    Napiontek, Marek; Pietrzak, Krzysztof

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the paper was to present the results of surgical treatment of foot deformities in peripheral neuropathies using bone procedures: both joint preserving and with joint arthrodesis. The study included 26 patients, 14 males and 12 females (43 feet). The age of the patients at surgery ranged from 5 to 55 years (average 23 years). The follow-up ranged from 0.5 to 15 years (average 4.3 years). Seventeen patients presented Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, three Friedreich's ataxia and six peripheral motor and sensory neuropathies of undetermined nature. Sixteen patients had bilateral procedures. Four patients had to be re-operated during the follow-up. The patients were divided into four groups depending on the age and the surgical technique applied. The groups I and II (9 children, 17 feet) included patients with growth plate still present in the foot just before surgery. In the groups III and IV (17 adults, 26 feet), bone growth was completed. The assessment of all patients based on a modified AOFAS scale ranged from 44 to 105 points (mean 83.7; SD 17.5). The assessment on the subjective scale ranged from 3 to 10 points (mean 7.4; SD 2.1). The assessment of quality of life on the WOMAC scale ranged from 0 to 41 points (mean 15.7; SD 13.2). All patients stated that they would decide to undergo the treatment again. For groups I and II, joint preserving surgeries gave better results; however, the results could not be statistically confirmed. The results for the groups III and IV were inconclusive as to which surgical techniques should be preferred, arthrodesis or joint preserving. The results show that none of the surgical techniques used for correction of foot deformities in motor-sensory polyneuropathies seems to be preferable. PMID:24968792

  20. Past Trends and Current Status of Self-Reported Incidence and Impact of Disease and Nonbattle Injury in Military Operations in Southwest Asia and the Middle East

    PubMed Central

    Tribble, David R.; Putnam, Shannon D.; Mostafa, Manal; Brown, Theodore R.; Letizia, Andrew; Armstrong, Adam W.; Sanders, John W.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the evolutional changes in disease and nonbattle injury in a long-term deployment setting, we investigated trends of selected disease and nonbattle injury (NBI) incidence among US military personnel deployed in ongoing military operations in Southwest Asia and the Middle East. Methods. Participants completed an anonymous questionnaire concerning diarrhea, acute respiratory illness (ARI), and NBIs. We compared incidence, morbidity, and risk associations of disease and NBI incidence with historical data. We analyzed a clinic screening form to describe trends in diarrhea incidence over a 3-year period. Results. Between April 2006 and March 2007, 3374 troops completed deployment questionnaires. Incidence of diarrhea was higher than that of ARI and NBI (12.1, 7.1, and 2.5 episodes per 100 person-months, respectively), but ARI and NBI resulted in more-frequent health system utilization (both P < .001) and decreased work performance (P < .001 and P = .05, respectively) than did diarrhea. Compared with historical disease and NBI incidence rates, diarrhea and NBI incidence declined over a 4-year period, whereas ARI remained relatively constant. Conclusions. Diarrhea, ARI, and NBI are important health concerns among deployed military personnel. Public health and preventive measures are needed to mitigate this burden. PMID:18923114

  1. Single-Leg Balance Impairments Persist in Fully Operational Military Special Forces Operators With a Previous History of Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sell, Timothy C.; Clark, Nicholas C.; Wood, Dallas; Abt, John P.; Lovalekar, Mita; Lephart, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Single-leg balance (SLB) can be chronically impaired after low back pain (LBP). Impaired SLB is a risk factor for recurrent LBP and lower extremity injury. In the United States military, the special forces operator (SFO) deploys on high-risk missions under extreme conditions, and impaired SLB can potentially threaten SFO safety and mission success. Purpose: To compare SLB in fully operational SFOs with and without a history of LBP. The hypothesis was that SLB deficits would be present in SFOs with a history of LBP. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 226 SFOs were included in this analysis. Comparisons were made between SFOs with and without medical chart documented history of LBP (LBP group [n = 43]: mean age = 31.2 ± 10.3 years, mean height = 177.3 ± 7.2 cm, mean mass = 87.3 ± 11.8 kg; healthy group [n = 183]: mean age = 28.0 ± 6.0 years, mean height = 177.9 ± 6.0 cm, mean mass = 84.9 ± 8.8 kg). Bilateral SLB was tested (eyes open and eyes closed) in both groups using a force plate. The variability in the ground-reaction forces was averaged across 3 trials for each leg for both conditions. Comparisons were made between legs in the LBP and between the LBP and healthy group (α = .05). Results: There were significant between-group differences for each leg for both conditions, with the healthy group demonstrating better SLB compared with the LBP group. P values ranged from .01 to .03. Conclusion: Impaired SLB persists in SFOs with previously reported LBP. Balance assessments of individuals who report LBP may assist with designing targeted interventions to address potential deficits that may increase the risk of future injury. Clinical Relevance: SFOs with a known history of LBP would benefit from examination of SLB and may benefit from balance training to resolve any deficits that may be present to lower the potential risk for future injury. PMID:26535329

  2. Joint Assessment of ETRR-2 Research Reactor Operations Program, Capabilities, and Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bissani, M; O'Kelly, D S

    2006-05-08

    A joint assessment meeting was conducted at the Egyptian Atomic Energy Agency (EAEA) followed by a tour of Egyptian Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2) on March 22 and 23, 2006. The purpose of the visit was to evaluate the capabilities of the new research reactor and its operations under Action Sheet 4 between the U.S. DOE and the EAEA, ''Research Reactor Operation'', and Action Sheet 6, ''Technical assistance in The Production of Radioisotopes''. Preliminary Recommendations of the joint assessment are as follows: (1) ETRR-2 utilization should be increased by encouraging frequent and sustained operations. This can be accomplished in part by (a) Improving the supply-chain management for fresh reactor fuel and alleviating the perception that the existing fuel inventory should be conserved due to unreliable fuel supply; and (b) Promulgating a policy for sample irradiation priority that encourages the use of the reactor and does not leave the decision of when to operate entirely at the discretion of reactor operations staff. (2) Each experimental facility in operation or built for a single purpose should be reevaluated to focus on those that most meet the goals of the EAEA strategic business plan. Temporary or long-term elimination of some experimental programs might be necessary to provide more focused utilization. There may be instances of emerging reactor applications for which no experimental facility is yet designed or envisioned. In some cases, an experimental facility may have a more beneficial use than the purpose for which it was originally designed. For example, (a) An effective Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) program requires nearby high quality medical facilities. These facilities are not available and are unlikely to be constructed near the Inshas site. Further, the BNCT facility is not correctly designed for advanced research and therapy programs using epithermal neutrons. (b) The ETRR-2 is frequently operated to provide color-enhanced gemstones but is

  3. Military issues.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Elspeth Cameron; Owens, Mark

    2004-09-01

    This article reviews of some of the lessons in trauma psychiatry learned by the US military through wartime and other trauma experiences during the past century. Current practice in the military's employment of stress control teams is reviewed. The military's efforts to prevent and limit psychological casualties, to include the care of battle casualties and prisoners of war (POWs), are addressed. Recent experiences that have informed further, and are shaping the military's approach to managing the psychological aftermath of trauma (such as the Sept. 11, 2001, attack on the Pentagon and the current war with Iraq) are included. Guidelines developed after 9/11, and articulated in the "Mass Violence and Early Intervention" conference are presented. Finally, current ideas on preparation for and intervention after weapons of mass destruction will be outlined. PMID:15325487

  4. Joint Spacelab-J (SL-J) Activities at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The science laboratory, Spacelab-J (SL-J), flown aboard the STS-47 flight was a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a manned Spacelab module. The mission conducted 24 materials science and 20 life science experiments, of which 35 were sponsored by NASDA, 7 by NASA, and two collaborative efforts. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, and frogs and frog eggs. Featured together in joint ground activities during the SL-J mission are NASA/NASDA personnel at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  5. Longitudinal assessment of gender differences in the development of PTSD among US military personnel deployed in support of the operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Isabel G; Donoho, Carrie J; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F; Maguen, Shira

    2015-09-01

    Divergent findings from previous research examining gender differences in the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among US military members deployed to the operations in Iraq or Afghanistan (recent operations) prompted this study utilizing a matching approach to examine whether risk for new-onset PTSD and PTSD severity scores differed by gender. US military members from the Millennium Cohort Study deployed in support of the recent operations were followed for approximately 7 years from baseline through 2 follow-up periods between 2001 and 2008. Propensity score matching was used to match 1 male to each female using demographic, military, and behavioral factors including baseline sexual assault. Analyses were stratified by combat experience defined as reporting at least one of five exposures during follow-up. Outcome measures included a positive screen for PTSD and severity scores measured by the PTSD Patient Checklist-Civilian Version. Discrete-time survival analysis quantified the association between gender and incident PTSD. Among 4684 matched subjects (2342 women and men), 6.7% of women and 6.1% of men developed PTSD during follow-up. Results showed no significant gender differences for the likelihood of developing PTSD or for PTSD severity scores among women and men who reported combat experience and among those who did not. This study is the first of its kind to match a large population of male and female service members on important baseline characteristics including sexual assault. Findings suggest that while combat deployed personnel develop PTSD, women do not have a significantly different risk for developing PTSD than men after experiencing combat. PMID:26228397

  6. Operational space weather product development and validation at the joint SMC-AFRL Rapid Prototyping Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, S.

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/VSB) and Detachment 11, Space &Missile Systems Center (SMC, Det 11/CIT) have combined efforts to design, develop, test, and implement graphical products for the Air Force's space weather operations center. These products are generated to analyze, specify, and forecast the effects of the near-earth space environment on Department of Defense systems and communications. Jointly-developed products that have been, or will soon be added to real-time operations include: 1) the Operational Space Environment Network Display (OpSEND) suit - a set of four products that address HF communication, UHF satellite communication scintillation, radar auroral clutter, and GP S single- frequency errors; 2) a solar radio background and burst effects (SoRBE) product suite; and C) a meteor effects (ME) product suite. The RPC is also involved in a rather substantial "V&V" effort to produce multiple operational product verifications and validations, with an added end goal of a generalized validation software package. The presentation will provide a general overview of the RPC and each of the products mentioned above, to include background science, operational history, inputs, outputs, dissemination, and customer uses for each.

  7. The impact of U.S. military operations in Kuwait, Bosnia, and Kosovo (1991-2000) on environmental health surveillance.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Jeffrey S

    2011-07-01

    Deployments of U.S. Forces to the Persian Gulf (1991), Bosnia and Herzegovina (1995), and Kosovo (1999) were associated with diverse, potential environmental exposures. Health effects possibly associated with these exposures were cause for concern among service members, veterans, and military and civilian leaders. A need for the military to effectively respond to these exposures, and more importantly, to assess and mitigate exposures before deployments and to conduct environmental surveillance during deployments was identified. The Department of Defense encountered many obstacles in dealing with the exposures of 1991. Even though these obstacles were being identified, and in some cases, addressed, responses to historical exposure concerns continued to be reactive. In 1996, efforts were intensified to improve policy and doctrine, field sampling equipment, risk assessment processes, geographic information systems, and other tools needed to effectively identify and reduce the impact of exposures before troops deploy and to conduct environmental surveillance while deployed. Success in these efforts resulted in a comprehensive, planned approach being implemented to address environmental health concerns during the 1999 Kosovo deployment. PMID:21916329

  8. Atypical Presentation of Tuberculosis of Elbow Joint in Operated Case of Distal Humerus Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Gaikwad, Yogesh; Khadilkar, Madhav; Ranade, Ashish S.; Vartak, Devendra N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A typical presentations of tuberculosis are not uncommon. Periprosthetic infection with tuberculosis after total joint replacement has well published. Tuberculosis of the elbow following open reduction internal fixation of a distal humerus fraeture is extremely rare. Case Report: We report case of a healthy, immunocompetenet 49-year-old male who underwent open reduction and internal fixation with bicolumnar plating for distal humerus fracture and presented after 18 month with cystic swelling over medial aspect of operated site. There was no wound dehiscence and the underlying fracture was healed well without any signs of implant loosening or bony involvement. Cystic swelling was excised and histopathology provided the diagnosis of tuberculosis. Patient was treated with anti tubercular chemotherapy and patient made uneventful recovery. Conclusion: Although synovial tuberculosis after fracture fixation is a rare entity, tuberculosis should be kept as a differential diagnosis. Surgeons should have high index of suspicion to diagnose atypical presentations of tuberculosis. PMID:27299044

  9. The new phase of the Joint European Torus and prospects for future operation

    SciTech Connect

    Tubbing, B.J.D.; the JET Team

    1995-06-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) [Fusion Technol. {bold 11}, 1 (1987)] restarted operations in its new pumped divertor configuration. The main elements of the new configuration are four divertor coils, an inertially cooled divertor structure, and an internal cryogenic vacuum pump. Two major differences were observed with respect to the ``old`` JET. First, the heat load capability of the divertor is dramatically improved. Second, in the high confinement mode (H mode) the occurrence of edge localized modes (ELMs), is more prevalent. Quasi-steady-state ELMy H modes are now obtained in a wide variety of conditions. In the 1994 experimental campaign maximum plasma currents of 4 MA have been obtained. Steady-state H-mode operation has been obtained for a duration of 20 s. Detached divertor operation was established in Ohmic and L-mode plasmas, but not yet in H mode. In low current discharges a poloidal beta {beta}{sub {ital P}}=2.6 has been obtained in transient. The high {beta}{sub {ital P}} regime has been extended to long pulse ELMy H mode. Preliminary experiments have not shown an effect of magnitude shear reversal on the confinement. Using the new internal saddle coils, powered by high-frequency amplifiers, toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) were excited. The first direct measurements of the damping of TAE modes were carried out.

  10. Results of Operative and Nonoperative Treatment of Rockwood Types III and V Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Joukainen, Antti; Kröger, Heikki; Niemitukia, Lea; Mäkelä, E. Antero; Väätäinen, Urho

    2014-01-01

    Background: The optimal treatment of acute, complete dislocation of the acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) is still unresolved. Purpose: To determine the difference between operative and nonoperative treatment in acute Rockwood types III and V ACJ dislocation. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: In the operative treatment group, the ACJ was reduced and fixed with 2 transarticular Kirschner wires and ACJ ligament suturing. The Kirschner wires were extracted after 6 weeks. Nonoperatively treated patients received a reduction splint for 4 weeks. At the 18- to 20-year follow-up, the Constant, University of California at Los Angeles Shoulder Rating Scale (UCLA), Larsen, and Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores were obtained, and clinical and radiographic examinations of both shoulders were performed. Results: Twenty-five of 35 potential patients were examined at the 18- to 20-year follow-up. There were 11 patients with Rockwood type III and 14 with type V dislocations. Delayed surgical treatment for ACJ was used in 2 patients during follow-up: 1 in the operatively treated group and 1 in the nonoperatively treated group. Clinically, ACJs were statistically significantly less prominent or unstable in the operative group than in the nonoperative group (normal/prominent/unstable: 9/4/3 and 0/6/3, respectively; P = .02) and in the operative type III (P = .03) but not type V dislocation groups. In operatively and nonoperatively treated patients, the mean Constant scores were 83 and 85, UCLA scores 25 and 27, Larsen scores 11 and 11, and SST scores 11 and 12 at follow-up, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in type III and type V dislocations. In the radiographic analysis, the ACJ was wider in the nonoperative than the operative group (8.3 vs 3.4 mm; P = .004), and in the type V dislocations (nonoperative vs operative: 8.5 vs 2.4 mm; P = .007). There was no statistically significant difference between study groups in

  11. Joint Polar Satellite System's Operational and Research Applications from Suomi NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Joint Polar Satellite System is NOAA's new operational satellite program and includes the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) as a bridge between NOAA's operational Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite (POES) series, which began in 1978, and the first JPSS operational satellite scheduled for launch in 2017. JPSS provides critical data for key operational and research applications, and includes: 1) Weather forecasting - data from the JPSS Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) are needed to forecast weather events out to 7 days. Nearly 85% of all data used in weather forecasting are from polar orbiting satellites. 2) Environmental monitoring - data from the JPSS Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) are used to monitor the environment including the health of coastal ecosystems, drought conditions, fire, smoke, dust, snow and ice, and the state of oceans, including sea surface temperature and ocean color. 3) Climate monitoring - data from JPSS instruments, including OMPS and CERES will provide continuity to climate data records established using NOAA POES and NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite observations. These data records provide a unified and coherent long-term observation of the environment; the records and products are critical to climate modelers, scientists, and decision makers concerned with advancing climate change understanding, prediction, mitigation and adaptation strategies, and policies. To bridge the gap between products and applications, the JPSS Program has established a proving ground program to optimize the use of JPSS data with other data sources to improve key products and services. A number of operational and research applications will be discussed, including the use of CrIS and ATMS for improved weather forecasting, the use of VIIRS for environmental monitoring of sea ice, smoke, fire, floods, droughts, coastal water quality (e.g. harmful algal blooms

  12. Joint ASRS and NASA Callback on FANS-1 Datalink Operational Incidents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, John; Smith, Nancy; Morrison, Rowena; Palmer, Everett; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The recent certification and implementation of the Future Air Navigation System (FANS- 1) was based on the benefits of reduced separation minima, ability to optimize flight plans enroute, and the prompt transmission and reception of messages between oceanic controllers and 747-400 aircraft transiting the Pacific. In addition, FANS was intended to supersede High Frequency (HF) radio which has been the staple, yet problematic, long distance communication link for years. However, in the three initial years of operation, FANS has revealed its own unique operational issues. Although some technical and engineering problems have been studied and addressed, little research has been conducted on human factors issues associated with the use of FANS on the flight deck. This lack of prior data on the operational use of FANS prompted a joint NASA/Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) inquiry into FANS datalink. In addition, two foreign air carriers and their respective safety agencies were recruited to participate. This international FANS research effort consisting of three aviation safety agencies and three international commercial air-carriers has provided a unique opportunity for conducting human factors research in an operational environment. An ASRS 'callback' format was chosen for the study as a practical and viable method for capturing FANS events on the flight deck. Initially, 747-400 pilots were encouraged to submit reports to their respective safety agencies if they had experienced any positive or negative incidents with the use of FANS. Upon receipt of a report, it was evaluated and if deemed pertinent to the study, a telephone interview or 'callback' was conducted on the FANS incident to elicit further details, capture the key events, and gather contextual information. Once the operational data collection phase was completed, the reports and interviews were analyzed with two purposes in mind: primarily to identify and address problematic human factors issues with

  13. Two-axis hydraulic joint for high speed, heavy lift robotic operations

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, M.R.; Robinett, R.D.; Phelan, J.R.; VanZuiden, D.M.

    1994-04-01

    A hydraulically driven universal joint was developed for a heavy lift, high speed nuclear waste remediation application. Each axis is driven by a simple hydraulic cylinder controlled by a jet pipe servovalve. Servovalve behavior is controlled by a force feedback control system, which damps the hydraulic resonance. A prototype single joint robot was built and tested. A two joint robot is under construction.

  14. Military Authority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton; Hayes, Bill

    2001-01-01

    This issue of "Bill of Rights in Action" explores questions of military authority. The first article looks at the French Army mutinies in World War I and how the French Army dealt with them. The second article examines President Truman's firing of popular and powerful General Douglas MacArthur during the Korean War. The final article looks at how…

  15. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolated from U.S. military personnel participating in Operation Bright Star, Egypt, from 2005 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Nada, Rania A; Armstrong, Adam; Shaheen, Hind I; Nakhla, Isabelle; Sanders, John W; Riddle, Mark S; Young, Sylvia; Sebeny, Peter

    2013-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major health problem for travelers to the Middle East. During the autumn months of 2005, 2007, and 2009, U.S. military personnel participated in Operation Bright Star (OBS) exercises in Egypt. Out of 181 military personnel enrolled in a diarrheal surveillance study, E. coli-like colonies were isolated from 170 patients. Isolates were tested for the detection of ETEC enterotoxins and colonization factors (CFs) using phenotypic and genotypic methods. Additionally, we studied the secular trends of ETEC isolates obtained from OBS studies since 1999. ETEC was isolated from 51.2% and 60.0% of the patients based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. Heat stable (ST) was the dominant enterotoxin detected followed by heat labile (LT) and LTST. Additionally, we detected a CF in 59.7% and 67.6% of the ETEC-positive isolates using dot blot and PCR assays, respectively. The predominant CF isolated was CS6 followed by CS3. PMID:23639795

  16. Traffic in the operating room during joint replacement is a multidisciplinary problem

    PubMed Central

    Bédard, Martin; Pelletier-Roy, Rémi; Angers-Goulet, Mathieu; Leblanc, Pierre-Alexandre; Pelet, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Background Door openings disrupt the laminar air flow and increase the bacterial count in the operating room (OR). We aimed to define the incidence of door openings in the OR during primary total joint arthroplasty (TJA) surgeries and determine whether measures were needed and/or possible to reduce OR staff traffic. Methods We recorded the number of door openings during 100 primary elective TJA surgeries; the OR personnel were unaware of the observer’s intention. Operating time was divided into the preincision period, defined as the time from the opening of surgical trays to skin incision, and the postincision period, defined as time from incision to dressing application. Results The mean number of door openings during primary TJA was 71.1 (range 35–176) with a mean operative time of 111.9 (range 53–220) minutes, for an average of 0.64 (range 0.36–1.05) door openings/min. Nursing staff were responsible for 52.2% of total door openings, followed by anesthesia staff at 23.9% and orthopedic staff at 12.7%. In the preincision period, we observed an average of 0.84 door openings/min, with nursing and orthopedic personnel responsible for most of the door openings. The postincision period yielded an average of 0.54 door openings/min, with nursing and anesthesia personnel being responsible for most of the door openings. Conclusion There is a high incidence of door openings during TJA. Because we observed a range in the number of door openings per surgery, we believe it is possible to reduce this number during TJA. PMID:26022153

  17. Impacts from control operations on a recreationally hunted feral swine population at a large military installation in Florida.

    PubMed

    Engeman, Richard; Hershberger, Troy; Orzell, Steve; Felix, Rodney; Killian, Gary; Woolard, John; Cornman, Jon; Romano, David; Huddleston, Chet; Zimmerman, Pat; Barre, Chris; Tillman, Eric; Avery, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Feral swine were targeted for control at Avon Park Air Force Range in south-central Florida to avert damage to sensitive wetland habitats on the 40,000-ha base. We conducted a 5-year study to assess impacts from control to this population that had been recreationally hunted for many years. Control was initiated in early 2009. The feral swine population was monitored from 2008 to 2012 using a passive tracking index (PTI) during the dry and wet seasons and using recreational hunter take rates from the dry season. All three indices showed substantial feral swine declines after implementing control, with indices leveling for the final two study years. Military missions and recreational hunting seasons impacted temporal and spatial consistency of control application, thereby limiting further impacts of control efforts on the feral swine population. The PTI was also able to monitor coyotes, another invasive species on the base, and detect Florida black bear and Florida panther, species of particular concern. PMID:24622991

  18. 48 CFR 52.225-19 - Contractor Personnel in a Designated Operational Area or Supporting a Diplomatic or Consular...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...; (B) Humanitarian or peacekeeping operations; or (C) Other military operations; or military exercises...) Contingency operations; (ii) Humanitarian or peacekeeping operations; or (iii) Other military operations;...

  19. The challenges and ethical dilemmas of a military medical officer serving with a peacekeeping operation in regard to the medical care of the local population

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, J

    2005-01-01

    Medical Officers serving with their national contingents in peacekeeping operations are faced with difficult ethical decisions in regard to their obligations to the local civilian population. Such populations may be under-resourced in regard to medical care, and vulnerable to abuse and exploitation. Though the medical officer may support the local medical services, he/she should never undermine these resources. Adopting a human rights approach and observing the requirements of ethical medicine, aids the doctor in prioritising his/her duties. At times there may be conflict with one's own military superiors. It is wise to discuss potential difficulties prior to setting out on the mission. Human rights abuses cannot be ignored. The medical officer has a duty to do his/her best to report their observations so as to prevent abuse or to bring it to an end. PMID:16199596

  20. The challenges and ethical dilemmas of a military medical officer serving with a peacekeeping operation in regard to the medical care of the local population.

    PubMed

    Tobin, J

    2005-10-01

    Medical Officers serving with their national contingents in peacekeeping operations are faced with difficult ethical decisions in regard to their obligations to the local civilian population. Such populations may be under-resourced in regard to medical care, and vulnerable to abuse and exploitation. Though the medical officer may support the local medical services, he/she should never undermine these resources. Adopting a human rights approach and observing the requirements of ethical medicine, aids the doctor in prioritising his/her duties. At times there may be conflict with one's own military superiors. It is wise to discuss potential difficulties prior to setting out on the mission. Human rights abuses cannot be ignored. The medical officer has a duty to do his/her best to report their observations so as to prevent abuse or to bring it to an end. PMID:16199596

  1. 76 FR 13446 - Nittany Bald and Eagle Railroad Company-Operation Exemption-SEDA-COG Joint Rail Authority

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... Surface Transportation Board Nittany Bald and Eagle Railroad Company-Operation Exemption-SEDA- COG Joint Rail Authority Nittany Bald and Eagle Railroad Company (N&BE), a Class III carrier, has filed a... the Board in Susquehanna Union R.R.-Control Exemption- N. Shore R.R., Nittany & Bald Eagle...

  2. Joint Venture Partnerships: A Scarce Funds Approach to Acquiring and Operating New Facilities at State Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elam, Houston G.

    This book explores partnerships between state colleges and universities and local governments to build and operate facilities in light of increasingly scarce funds at the institutions. With new partnerships, institutions risk losing authority over new facilities, but the benefits of joint partnerships far outweigh the risks. Examined are three…

  3. 76 FR 21789 - ITS Joint Program Office; Vehicle to Infrastructure Core System Concept of Operations; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ... ITS Joint Program Office; Vehicle to Infrastructure Core System Concept of Operations; Notice of... host a free public meeting to discuss the Vehicle to Infrastructure (V2I) Core System Concept of... under the Vehicle Infrastructure Integration Proof of Concept (VII POC). The Core System supports...

  4. Joint operation of the superconducting fault current limiter and magnetic energy storage system in an electric power network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylov, S. I.; Balashov, N. N.; Ivanov, S. S.; Veselovsky, A. S.; Zhemerikin, V. D.

    2010-06-01

    An opportunity of using superconductors as active elements of electric power systems designed to control the electric power distribution, to enhance the systems operating modes and to limit fault currents, was very attractive for investigators for a long time. In this paper, is considered an opportunity to enhance the electric power systems with the aid of superconducting magnetic energy storage systems (SMES) and superconducting fault current limiters (SFCL) operating together. It has been shown that the joint operation of both these superconducting devices allows additional varying of their parameters, what in turn gives a further opportunity to reduce their mass and dimensions and consequently the costs. There had been also shown an additional advantage of the SMES and SFCL joint operation consisting in that they ensure a more effective protection for a power system, preventing its uncontrolled load-off and subsequent acceleration up to the inaccessible rotation speed.

  5. Overview of Carbon Dioxide Control Issues During International Space Station/Space Shuttle Joint Docked Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matty, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    Crewed space vehicles have a common requirement to remove the carbon dioxide (CO2) created by the metabolic processes of the crew. The space shuttle [Space Transportation System (STS)] and International Space Station (ISS) each have systems in place that allow control and removal of CO2 from the habitable cabin environment. During periods in which the space shuttle is docked to the ISS, known as "joint docked operations," the space shuttle and ISS share a common atmosphere environment. During this period, an elevated amount of CO2 is produced through the combined metabolic activity of the STS and ISS crews. This elevated CO2 production, together with the large effective atmosphere created by collective volumes of the docked vehicles, creates a unique set of requirements for CO2 removal. This paper will describe individual CO2 control plans implemented by STS and ISS engineering teams, as well as the integrated plans used when both vehicles are docked. The paper will also discuss some of the issues and anomalies experienced by both engineering teams.

  6. Overview of Carbon Dioxide Control Issues During International Space Station/Space Shuttle Joint Docked Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matty, Christopher M.; Hayley, Elizabeth P.

    2009-01-01

    Manned space vehicles have a common requirement to remove the Carbon Dioxide (CO2) created by the metabolic processes of the crew. The Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) each have systems in place to allow control and removal of CO2 from the habitable cabin environment. During periods where the Space Shuttle is docked to ISS, known as joint docked operations, the Space Shuttle and ISS share a common atmosphere environment. During this period there is an elevated production of CO2 caused by the combined metabolic activity of the Space Shuttle and ISS crew. This elevated CO2 production, combined with the large effective atmosphere created by the collective volumes of the docked vehicles, creates a unique set of requirements for CO2 removal. This paper will describe the individual CO2 control plans implemented by the Space Shuttle and ISS engineering teams, as well as the integrated plans used when both vehicles are docked. In addition, the paper will discuss some of the issues and anomalies experienced by both engineering teams.

  7. Military applications evolution and future. [meteorological satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaehn, A. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program is described with particular emphasis on the military applications of METSAT data. Satellite operational support, data processing and image quality requirements are discussed.

  8. 77 FR 5780 - Record of Decision for the White Elk Military Operations Area White Pine and Elko Counties...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... supersonic operations in the overlying Currie/Tippet Air Traffic Control Assigned Airspace (ATCAA) and use of training chafe and flare in the White Elk MOA and Currie/Tippet ATCAA airspace. The decision was based...

  9. 24 CFR 943.144 - What financial impact do operations of a subsidiary, affiliate, or joint venture have on a PHA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What financial impact do operations of a subsidiary, affiliate, or joint venture have on a PHA? 943.144 Section 943.144 Housing and Urban... financial impact do operations of a subsidiary, affiliate, or joint venture have on a PHA? Income...

  10. 24 CFR 943.144 - What financial impact do operations of a subsidiary, affiliate, or joint venture have on a PHA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What financial impact do operations of a subsidiary, affiliate, or joint venture have on a PHA? 943.144 Section 943.144 Housing and Urban... financial impact do operations of a subsidiary, affiliate, or joint venture have on a PHA? Income...

  11. Cooperative Extension Training Impact on Military Youth and 4-H Youth: The Case of Speak Out for Military Kids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwin, James; McKinley, Steve; Talbert, B. Allen

    2010-01-01

    Extension needs new venues to promote their programming skills to unfamiliar audiences. One new audience Extension is currently reaching is military children. By partnering with Operation: Military Kids to offer a Speak Out for Military Kids training, Extension supports military children and document changes in the behavior of this audience.…

  12. The Contribution of Operational and Research Applications from the Joint Polar Satellite System to Societal Benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, M.

    2015-12-01

    Applications of satellite data are paramount to transform science and technology to product and services which are used in critical decision making. For the satellite community, good representations of technology are the satellite sensors, while science provides the instrument calibration and derived geophysical parameters. Weather forecasting is an application of the science and technology provided by remote sensing satellites. The Joint Polar Satellite System, which includes the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) provides formidable science and technology to support many applications and includes support to 1) weather forecasting - data from the JPSS Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) are used to forecast weather events out to 7 days - nearly 85% of all data used in weather forecasting are from polar orbiting satellites; 2) environmental monitoring -data from the JPSS Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) are used to monitor the environment including the health of coastal ecosystems, drought conditions, fire, smoke, dust, snow and ice, and the state of oceans, including sea surface temperature and ocean color; and 3) climate monitoring - data from JPSS instruments, including OMPS and CERES will provide continuity to climate data records established using NOAA POES and NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite observations. To bridge the gap between products and applications, the JPSS Program has established a proving ground program to optimize the use of JPSS data with other data sources to improve key products and services. A number of operational and research applications will be presented along with how the data and applications support a large number of societal benefit areas of the Global Earth Observation Systems of Systems (GEOSS).

  13. Responses of Raptorial Birds to Low Level Military Jets and Sonic Booms: Results of the 1980-1981 Joint U.S. Air Force-U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    Summary: For this study, we gathered several kinds of data to determine the likely effects of low level jets and sonic booms on nesting Peregrine Falcons and other raptors. We directly observed responses to worst case stimulus loads: responses to extremely frequent and extremely nearby jet aircraft were often minimal, seldom significant and never associated with reproductive failure. Likewise, responses to real and simulated sonic booms were often minimal and never productivity limiting. In addition to directly observing behavioral responses, in 1981 we invited jet passes at four Prairie Falcon eyries during courtship and incubation when the adults were most likely to abandon, on an ad libitum basis. All four eyries fledged young. Nesting success and site reoccupancy rates were high for all eyries. In tests of two relatively naive captive Peregrine Falcons, we failed to detect significantly negative responses. Typically the birds either quickly resumed feeding or other activities within a few seconds following a pass or boom. The female falcon repeatedly made hunting forays as jets swept overhead. From heart rate (HR) data taken via a telemetering egg during incubation at a wild Prairie Falcon eyrie, we determined that stimulus induced HR alterations were comparable to rate changes of the birds settling to incubate following flight. No significant long term responses were identified. The falcons successfully fledged two young even with the more disruptive activities associated with entering the eyrie three times to position and recover the telemetering eggs. Significantly, birds ofprey of several genera commonly nest in the supersonic military operations areas in southern Arizona. In addition, raptor eyries are frequently found at locations where low level jet traffic naturally concentrates. For example, Prairie Falcon Site 11 is directly on the approach path to strafing and bombing targets. Prairie Falcon Site 1 is in a narrow canyon through which A-10 aircraft

  14. Military specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Philip

    1987-01-01

    The current situation relative to the military specification is that there is not one specific model of turbulence which people are using. Particular disagreement exists on how turbulence levels will vary with qualitative analysis. It does not tie one down to specifics. When it comes to flying quality specifications, many feel that one should stay with the definitions of the Cooper-Harper rating scale but allow the levels to shift depending on the level of turbulence. There is a ride quality specification in the MIL-SPEC having to do with flight control systems design that is related to a turbulence model. This spec (MIL-F8785C) and others are discussed.

  15. Engaging Military Partners: Supporting Connections to Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Harriett C.

    2009-01-01

    In the current Overseas Contingency Operation (OCO), families and communities have been impacted by multiple deployments. This is particularly challenging for families that are geographically isolated from military installations and resources typically available near these facilities. Operation Military Kids (OMK) is a national partnership…

  16. Preparing for joint operation of numerical modelling and observational data in IMPEx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ubaidi, Tarek; Khodachenko, Maxim; Kallio, Esa; Génot, Vincent; Modolo, Ronan; Hess, Sébastien; Schmidt, Walter; Topf, Florian; Alexeev, Igor; Gangloff, Michel; Budnik, Elena; Bouchemit, Myriam; Renard, Benjamin; Bourrel, Natacha; Penou, Emmanuel; André, Nicolas; Belenkaya, Elena

    2013-04-01

    The FP7-SPACE project IMPEx (http://impex-fp7.oeaw.ac.at) was established as a result of scientific collaboration between research teams from Austria, Finland, France, and Russia, working on the integration of a set of interactive data mining, analysis and modeling tools in the field of space plasma and planetary physics. The primary goal of the project is, to bridge the gap between spacecraft measurements and modern computational models of the planetary near-by space environments, enabling their joint operation for better understanding of related physical phenomena. The major challenge of IMPEx development consists in the need to connect different types of data sources, in particular numerical simulation results and observational data. To do so, every IMPEx tool must be able to handle both kinds of data in a consistent way. Thus, a considerable part of effort is dedicated to the development of standardized (web service-) interfaces and protocols for communication between the components, as well as a common approach to share user credentials. One of the systems' cornerstones is the specification of a standard for describing and storing the different data products involved that is able to include simulation outputs as well as observational data within a common standard, i.e. Data Model (DM). The IMPEx DM is an extension of the widely used SPASE DM and constitutes the first attempt in the field of space plasma physics worldwide, to create a unified data model that is able to store simulation outputs as well as observational data products in a shared data structure. To meet the requirement of extendibility, i.e. to have a possibility to include new computational models as well as analysis and visualization tools, the IMPEx DM as well as communication protocols have been designed to be as compact as possible and yet general and powerful enough to integrate a wide range of data sets and to allow for simple procedures when attaching new components to the system. A draft

  17. Co-operation at work: a process-oriented perspective on joint activity in inter-organizational relations.

    PubMed

    Wehner, T; Clases, C; Bachmann, R

    2000-07-01

    In this paper the authors present a conceptual framework for analysing co-operation between organizations as a situated process, highlighting co-operation, co-ordination and co-construction as different modes of joint activity. Within this framework, the analysis of unexpected events becomes a crucial issue. The analytic power of reconstructing the (psycho-) logics of unexpected events in inter-organizational relations will be demonstrated in the presentation of selected outcomes of a research project on the dynamics of producer-supplier relationships in the German automobile industry. Also in this empirical part, the significance of trust and confidence in inter-organizational relations will be reflected. PMID:10929832

  18. [Kapandji corrective operation of post-traumatic disorder of the distal radio-ulnar joint].

    PubMed

    Zilch, H; Kauschke, T

    1996-11-01

    The Sauvé-Kapandji procedure comprises distal radioulnar arthrodesis with screwing of the caput ulnae at the basis of the radius after the correction of the radioulnar length discrepancy. Therefore the best indications are posttraumatic changes of the distal radioulnar joint. At the same time a distal ulnar segment resection about 12 mm in length is necessary to restore forearm rotation, producing an iatrogenic pseudarthrosis. The proximal ulnar segment functionally assimilates to a rotating joint, as could be shown by X-rays. Between 1988 and 1993 this procedure was performed in 12 patients. Follow-up after an average of 38.2 months showed improvements in forearm rotation of 84% for pronation and 60% for supination. All patients had significant pain relief. Grip strength also improved, by 55%. No patient got worse postoperatively as measured by the score of Gartland and Werley. Neither non-union of the distal radioulnar joint fusion nor bony regeneration across the resected ulnar segment was seen. The good results are the consequence of adherence to a rigorous indication: no preexisting arthrosis at the radiocarpal joint. PMID:9036550

  19. Pre-Operative Status and Quality of Life Following Total Joint Replacement in a Developing Country: A Prospective Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Nina N.; Collins, Jamie E.; Thornhill, Thomas S.; Alcantara Abreu, Luis; Ghazinouri, Roya; Okike, Kanu; Katz, Jeffrey N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of medical relief organizations have launched programs to perform total joint replacements in the developing world. There is a paucity of data on the clinical outcomes of these procedures. We documented pre- and post-operative pain and functional status in a group of low income Dominicans who underwent total hip or knee replacement performed by an American relief organization. Methods: In March 2009 and 2010, we surveyed patients participating in Operation Walk Boston, a medical relief organization that provides total joint replacements to patients in the Dominican Republic. Questionnaires included the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) Index scales and the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) scales for physical activity and mental health. Scores were transformed to a 0 - 100 point scale (100 is best). Results: 81 individuals (mean age 61 years, 60% female) completed the pre-operative questionnaires. Twenty eight of the 35 who completed preoperative forms in 2009 also completed follow up forms in 2010 (follow-up rate 80%). Patients reported poor pre-operative WOMAC function (mean = 33.6, sd = 22.0) and WOMAC pain (mean = 38.4, sd = 22.9) scores preoperatively. Mean post-operative WOMAC pain and function scores were 86.4 (sd = 13.1) and 88.1 (sd = 11.4) respectively. Improvement in pain and function was similar for patients undergoing hip (n=11) and knee (n=17) replacements. Conclusion: Total joint replacement was effective in relieving pain and restoring function in this program. These results are useful for comparison to outcomes in developed countries and for establishing benchmarks for future programs. PMID:21886686

  20. Joint collaborative technology experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, Michael; Ciccimaro, Donny; Yee, See; Denewiler, Thomas; Stroumtsos, Nicholas; Messamore, John; Brown, Rodney; Skibba, Brian; Clapp, Daniel; Wit, Jeff; Shirts, Randy J.; Dion, Gary N.; Anselmo, Gary S.

    2009-05-01

    Use of unmanned systems is rapidly growing within the military and civilian sectors in a variety of roles including reconnaissance, surveillance, explosive ordinance disposal (EOD), and force-protection and perimeter security. As utilization of these systems grows at an ever increasing rate, the need for unmanned systems teaming and inter-system collaboration becomes apparent. Collaboration provides a means of enhancing individual system capabilities through relevant data exchange that contributes to cooperative behaviors between systems and enables new capabilities not possible if the systems operate independently. A collaborative networked approach to development holds the promise of adding mission capability while simultaneously reducing the workload of system operators. The Joint Collaborative Technology Experiment (JCTE) joins individual technology development efforts within the Air Force, Navy, and Army to demonstrate the potential benefits of interoperable multiple system collaboration in a force-protection application. JCTE participants are the Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Airbase Technologies Division, Force Protection Branch (AFRL/RXQF); the Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center Software Engineering Directorate (AMRDEC SED); and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center - Pacific (SSC Pacific) Unmanned Systems Branch operating with funding provided by the Joint Ground Robotics Enterprise (JGRE). This paper will describe the efforts to date in system development by the three partner organizations, development of collaborative behaviors and experimentation in the force-protection application, results and lessons learned at a technical demonstration, simulation results, and a path forward for future work.

  1. Institutional options and operational challenges in the management of a joint implementation regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mintzer, I.M.

    1995-11-01

    In 1992, the delegation from Norway introduced a concept into the negotiations of the Framework Convention on Climate Change which they called Joint Implementation. The term Joint Implementation (or simply JI) has been used subsequently to describe a range of cooperative arrangements between countries that are designed to reduce the risks of rapid climate change in a cost-effective manner. These arrangements may lead to the implementation of specific projects that seek to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases (also called GHGs) to the atmosphere or increase the absorptive capacity of terrestrial and oceanic sinks for these gases. As an outcome of these projects, the countries may divide any greenhouse {open_quotes}credits{close_quotes} that accrue and that are recognized by the international community pursuant to the terms of the Framework Convention.

  2. A technique for determining viable military logistics support alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Jesse Stuart

    A look at today's US military will see them operating much beyond the scope of protecting and defending the United States. These operations now consist of, but are not limited to humanitarian aid, disaster relief, peace keeping, and conflict resolution. This broad spectrum of operational environments has necessitated a transformation of the individual military services to a hybrid force that is attempting to leverage the inherent and emerging capabilities and strengths of all those under the umbrella of the Department of Defense (DOD), this concept has been coined Joint Operations. Supporting Joint Operations requires a new approach to determining a viable military logistics support system. The logistics architecture for these operations has to accommodate scale, time, varied mission objectives, and imperfect information. Compounding the problem is the human in the loop (HITL) decision maker (DM) who is a necessary component for quickly assessing and planning logistics support activities. Past outcomes are not necessarily good indicators of future results, but they can provide a reasonable starting point for planning and prediction of specific needs for future requirements. Adequately forecasting the necessary logistical support structure and commodities needed for any resource intensive environment has progressed well beyond stable demand assumptions to one in which dynamic and nonlinear environments can be captured with some degree of fidelity and accuracy. While these advances are important, a holistic approach that allows exploration of the operational environment or design space does not exist to guide the military logistician in a methodical way to support military forecasting activities. To bridge this capability gap, a method called Adaptive Technique for Logistics Architecture Solutions (ATLAS) has been developed. This method provides a process that facilitates the use of techniques and tools that filter and provide relevant information to the DM. By doing

  3. Analysis of operation of new construction of the frictional joint with the resistance wedge / Analiza pracy nowej konstrukcji złącza ciernego z klinem oporowym

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodny, Jarosław

    2012-10-01

    Frictional joint is the basic part of the friction props and yielding steel frames of dog headings. It constitutes a constructional connection and have decisive influence on the basic operational parameters of the steel frames and props, i.e. their loading capacity and yielding capacity. Currently applied constructions of frictional joints characterize with low loading capacity and unstable operation. In order to improve their operational parameters a new constructional solution of frictional joint, consisting on the application of resistance wedge assembled between the cooperating sections, was developed. Application of the resistance wedge caused an increase of resistances to motion in the frictional joint, what influenced on the increase of its loading capacity and on the increase of values of axial forces in the bolts of stirrups. In the paper results of stand tests of frictional joints with the resistance wedge, subjected to the static axial compression and impact of freely falling mass, were presented. In order to determine the influence of the resistance wedge on the operational parameters of the frictional joint, obtained results were compared with the results of studies of the frictional joints without the resistance wedge. On the basis of stand tests a physical and mathematical models of the frictional joint with the resistance wedge, were developed, and utilized to simulation analysis of its operation at impulse loading. On the basis of conducted tests and analysis one can state, that application of the resistance wedge influences on the enhancement of loading capacity, improves the state of loading the bolts in stirrups, and creates possibility of regulation of operational characteristics of the frictional joints

  4. Field testing of tele-operation versus shared and traded control for military assets: an evaluation involving real-time embedded simulation and soldier assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Jason S.; Alban, Jillyn; Cosenzo, Keryl; Johnson, Tony; Capstick, Erin

    2010-04-01

    Those applying autonomous technologies to military systems strive to enhance human-robot and robot-robot performance. Beyond performance, the military must be concerned with local area security. Characterized as "secure mobility", military systems must enable safe and effective terrain traversal concurrent with maintenance of situational awareness (SA). One approach to interleaving these objectives is supervisory control, with popular options being shared and traded control. Yet, with the scale and expense of military assets, common technical issues such as transition time and safeguarding become critical; especially as they interact with Soldier capabilities. Study is required to enable selection of control methods that optimize Soldier-system performance while safeguarding both individually. The current report describes a study utilizing experimental military vehicles and simulation systems enabling teleoperation and supervisory control. Automated triggering of SA demands was interspersed with a set of challenging driving maneuvers in a 'teleoperation-like' context to examine the influence of supervisory control on Soldier-system performance. Results indicated that direct application of supervisory control, while beneficial under particular demands, requires continued development to be perceived by Soldiers as useful. Future efforts should more tightly couple the information exchanged between the Soldier and system to overcome current challenges not addressed by standard control methods.

  5. The medial and lateral epicondyle as a reliable landmark for intra-operative joint line determination in revision knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sen, T.; Cankaya, D.; Kendir, S.; Basarır, K.; Tabak, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to develop an accurate, reliable and easily applicable method for determining the anatomical location of the joint line during revision knee arthroplasty. Methods The transepicondylar width (TEW), the perpendicular distance between the medial and lateral epicondyles and the distal articular surfaces (DMAD, DLAD) and the distance between the medial and lateral epicondyles and the posterior articular surfaces (PMAD, DLAD) were measured in 40 knees from 20 formalin-fixed adult cadavers (11 male and nine female; mean age at death 56.9 years, sd 9.4; 34 to 69). The ratios of the DMAD, PMAD, DLAD and PLAD to TEW were calculated. Results The mean TEW, DMAD, PMAD, DLAD and PLAD were 82.76 mm (standard deviation (sd) 7.74), 28.95 mm (sd 3.3), 28.57 mm (sd 3), 23.97 mm (sd 3.27) and 24.42 mm (sd 3.14), respectively. The ratios between the TEW and the articular distances (DMAD/TEW, DLAD/TEW, PMAD/TEW and PLAD/TEW) were calculated and their means were 0.35 (sd 0.02), 0.34 (sd 0.02), 0.28 (sd 0.03) and 0.29 (sd 0.03), respectively. Conclusion This method provides a simple, reproducible and reliable technique enabling accurate anatomical joint line restoration during revision total knee arthroplasty. Cite this article: B. Ozkurt, T. Sen, D. Cankaya, S. Kendir, K. Basarır, Y. Tabak. The medial and lateral epicondyle as a reliable landmark for intra-operative joint line determination in revision knee arthroplasty. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:280–286. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.57.BJR-2016-0002.R1. PMID:27388715

  6. STS payloads mission control study. Volume 2-A, Task 1: Joint products and functions for preflight planning of flight operations, training and simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Specific products and functions, and associated facility availability, applicable to preflight planning of flight operations were studied. Training and simulation activities involving joint participation of STS and payload operations organizations, are defined. The prelaunch activities required to prepare for the payload flight operations are emphasized.

  7. DEVELOPMENT, INSTALLATION AND OPERATION OF THE MPC&A OPERATIONS MONITORING (MOM) SYSTEM AT THE JOINT INSTITUTE FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH (JINR) DUBNA, RUSSIA

    SciTech Connect

    Kartashov,V.V.; Pratt,W.; Romanov, Y.A.; Samoilov, V.N.; Shestakov, B.A.; Duncan, C.; Brownell, L.; Carbonaro, J.; White, R.M.; Coffing, J.A.

    2009-07-12

    The Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Operations Monitoring (MOM) systems handling at the International Intergovernmental Organization - Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) is described in this paper. Category I nuclear material (plutonium and uranium) is used in JINR research reactors, facilities and for scientific and research activities. A monitoring system (MOM) was installed at JINR in April 2003. The system design was based on a vulnerability analysis, which took into account the specifics of the Institute. The design and installation of the MOM system was a collaborative effort between JINR, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Financial support was provided by DOE through BNL. The installed MOM system provides facility management with additional assurance that operations involving nuclear material (NM) are correctly followed by the facility personnel. The MOM system also provides additional confidence that the MPC&A systems continue to perform effectively.

  8. THE TECHNOLOGY OF MILITARY TRAINING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WALLIS, D.

    THIS DOCUMENT IS PART OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF A CONFERENCE ON OPERATIONAL AND PERSONNEL RESEARCH IN THE MANAGEMENT OF MANPOWER SYSTEMS, HELD IN BRUSSELS IN 1965. A MODEL ILLUSTRATES THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED MILITARY INSTRUCTIONAL SYSTEM WHICH PROVIDES CONTINUOUS FEEDBACK AND CONTROL OF LEARNING. THE TRAINING COURSE INCLUDES--(1) A CLEAR…

  9. 76 FR 41307 - NASA Advisory Council; Space Operations Committee and Exploration Committee; Joint Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... CONTACT: Dr. Bette Siegel, Exploration Systems Mission Directorate, National Aeronautics and Space... Report. Space Operations Mission Directorate/Exploration Systems Mission Directorate Merger Update. ] International Space Station Mars Analog Status Update. Commercial Orbital Transportation Services/Cargo...

  10. Recognizing connotative meaning in military chat communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budlong, Emily R.; Walter, Sharon M.; Yilmazel, Ozgur

    2009-05-01

    Over the last five to seven years the use of chat in military contexts has expanded quite significantly, in some cases becoming a primary means of communicating time-sensitive data to decision makers and operators. For example, during humanitarian operations with Joint Task Force-Katrina, chat was used extensively to plan, task, and coordinate predeployment and ongoing operations. The informal nature of chat communications allows the relay of far more information than the technical content of messages. Unlike formal documents such as newspapers, chat is often emotive. "Reading between the lines" to understand the connotative meaning of communication exchanges is now feasible, and often important. Understanding the connotative meaning of text is necessary to enable more useful automatic intelligence exploitation. The research project described in this paper was directed at recognizing user connotations of uncertainty and urgency. The project built a matrix of speech features indicative of these categories of meaning, developed data mining software to recognize them, and evaluated the results.

  11. Addressing Needs of Military Families during Deployment: Military Service Providers' Perceptions of Integrating Support Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Seth Christian Walter

    2011-01-01

    Service providers are increasingly recognizing the need to develop effective methods for delivering supporting services to military families during deployment. Research suggests that military families experience increased levels of stress during the cycle of deployment. Bronfenbrenner (1979) conceptualized the family operating within the context…

  12. Classification of vegetation types in military region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Miguel; Silva, Jose Silvestre; Bioucas-Dias, Jose

    2015-10-01

    In decision-making process regarding planning and execution of military operations, the terrain is a determining factor. Aerial photographs are a source of vital information for the success of an operation in hostile region, namely when the cartographic information behind enemy lines is scarce or non-existent. The objective of present work is the development of a tool capable of processing aerial photos. The methodology implemented starts with feature extraction, followed by the application of an automatic selector of features. The next step, using the k-fold cross validation technique, estimates the input parameters for the following classifiers: Sparse Multinomial Logist Regression (SMLR), K Nearest Neighbor (KNN), Linear Classifier using Principal Component Expansion on the Joint Data (PCLDC) and Multi-Class Support Vector Machine (MSVM). These classifiers were used in two different studies with distinct objectives: discrimination of vegetation's density and identification of vegetation's main components. It was found that the best classifier on the first approach is the Sparse Logistic Multinomial Regression (SMLR). On the second approach, the implemented methodology applied to high resolution images showed that the better performance was achieved by KNN classifier and PCLDC. Comparing the two approaches there is a multiscale issue, in which for different resolutions, the best solution to the problem requires different classifiers and the extraction of different features.

  13. Predicting the Unpredictable : A joint numerical weather prediction / operational forecasting perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewson, T. D.

    2003-04-01

    Errors in numerical weather forecasts can be classed as random or systematic. In generating forecast guidance the forecaster ideally aims to remove the effect of systematic errors, and minimise any random errors. The end product typically comprises two components: (1) a 'most-likely' deterministic solution, and (2) guidance on possible spread around that solution. Ways in which operational forecast runs from around the world are combined with ensemble output to achieve this aim will be demonstrated, together with verification results that illustrate a generally positive impact. Examples of model systematic errors will be included. Examples will also be used to show the pitfalls of relying on just ensembles for longer ranges and just deterministic model output for short ranges. Whilst deterministic forecast output (1) is quite rigid in its definition, the spread component (2) is flexible. A bimodal distribution may warrant issue of an 'alternative solution', whilst potential severe weather is often reflected as a regional probability table. Examples will be presented. One software tool we use to highlight possible solutions is 'field modification', which enables dynamically consistent changes to be made to forecast temperature and wind fields, and also allows precipitation rates and types and cloud cover to be modified interactively. This will be illustrated. In the future there should be a strong push towards greater use of probabilistic output at short ranges, thereby countering any claims that we are trying to 'predict the unpredictable'.

  14. Operation of lumbar zygoapophyseal joint cysts using a full-endoscopic interlaminar and transforaminal approach: prospective 2-year results of 74 patients.

    PubMed

    Komp, Martin; Hahn, Patrick; Ozdemir, Semih; Merk, Harry; Kasch, Richard; Godolias, Georgios; Ruetten, Sebastian

    2014-12-01

    In appropriate situations, extensive decompression with laminectomy often continues to be described as the method of choice for operations involving lumbar zygoapophyseal joint (z-joint) cysts. Tissue-sparing procedures are nevertheless becoming more common. Endoscopic techniques have become the standard procedures in many areas because of the advantages they offer in terms of surgical technique and in rehabilitation. One key aspect in spinal surgery was the development of instruments for sufficient bone resection carried out under continuous visual control. This enabled endoscopes to be used when operating on z-joint cysts. The objective of this prospective study was to examine the technical possibilities for the full-endoscopic interlaminar and transforaminal technique in lumbar z-joint cysts. A total of 74 patients were followed up for 2 years. The results show that 85% of the patients no longer have any leg pain or that the pain had been almost completely eliminated, and 11 % experience occasional pain. The complication rate was low. The full-endoscopic techniques brought advantages in the following areas: operation, complications, traumatization, and rehabilitation. The recorded results show that full-endoscopic resection of a z-joint cyst using an interlaminar and transforaminal approach provides an adequate and safe supplement, and is an alternative to conventional procedures when the indication criteria are fulfilled. It also offers the advantages of a minimally invasive intervention. PMID:24667524

  15. [French European military haemovigilance guidelines].

    PubMed

    Sailliol, A; Clavier, B; Cap, A; Ausset, S

    2010-12-01

    European military transfusion services follow operational guidelines established by their respective national health systems and conform with European Union directives and NATO standards as applicable to member countries. Certain features are common to all of these standards, especially the pre-selection of volunteer, almost exclusively unpaid donors. NATO requirements are very close to European guidelines, with the exception that NATO permits the use of blood products collected in emergency conditions in theater when circumstances allow no better option. Blood product traceability exists for every country but is not always centralized or computerized. Serious adverse event reporting relies on national haemovigilance networks. Military considerations become important mainly in overseas operations, where the overall policy is to implement the relevant national, European or NATO guidelines with adjustments made for unique wartime circumstances and the risk/benefit ratio for the individual patient needing a transfusion. PMID:21051263

  16. Comparing Marital Status and Divorce Status in Civilian and Military Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karney, Benjamin R.; Loughran, David S.; Pollard, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Since military operations began in Afghanistan and Iraq, lengthy deployments have led to concerns about the vulnerability of military marriages. Yet evaluating military marriages requires some benchmark against which marital outcomes in the military may be compared. These analyses drew from personnel records from the entire male population of the…

  17. 42 CFR 71.34 - Carriers of U.S. military services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carriers of U.S. military services. 71.34 Section... Carriers of U.S. military services. (a) Carriers belonging to or operated by the military services of the... regulations of the military services which also meet the requirements of the regulations in this part....

  18. 42 CFR 71.34 - Carriers of U.S. military services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carriers of U.S. military services. 71.34 Section... Carriers of U.S. military services. (a) Carriers belonging to or operated by the military services of the... regulations of the military services which also meet the requirements of the regulations in this part....

  19. 42 CFR 71.34 - Carriers of U.S. military services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carriers of U.S. military services. 71.34 Section... Carriers of U.S. military services. (a) Carriers belonging to or operated by the military services of the... regulations of the military services which also meet the requirements of the regulations in this part....

  20. Solar Radio Burst Effects and Meteor Effects: Operational Products Under Development at the Joint SMC-AFRL Rapid Prototyping Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, S.

    2002-05-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/VSB) and Detachment 11, Space & Missile Systems Center (SMC, Det 11/CIT) have combined efforts to design, develop, test, and implement graphical products for the Air Force's space weather operations center. These products are generated to analyze, specify, and forecast the effects of the near-earth space environment on Department of Defense systems and communications. Jointly-developed products that will be added to real-time operations in the near future include a solar radio background and burst effects (SoRBE) product suite, and a meteor effects (ME) product suite. The SoRBE product addresses the effect of background and event-level solar radio output on operational DoD systems. Strong bursts of radio wave emissions given off by the sun during solar ``events'' can detrimentally affect radar and satellite communication systems that have operational receiving geometries within the field of view of the sun. For some systems, even the background radiation from the sun can produce effects. The radio frequency interference (RFI) of interest occurs on VHF, UHF, and SHF frequency bands, usually lasting several minutes during a solar flare. While such effects are limited in time and area (typically a few degrees in viewing angle), they can be quite severe in magnitude. The result can be a significant lack in a radar system's ability to detect and/or track an object, and loss of a communication system's ability to receive satellite signals. The ME product will address the detrimental effects of meteors on operational DoD systems. These include impacts on satellites, visible trail observations, and radar clutter. While certain types of individual meteors can produce system effects, the initial ME product will address the more generalized range of meteor shower activity and associated affects. These effects can result in damage to satellites, incorrect assessment of satellite sensor observations, and false target returns on radar

  1. Military applications of reusable launch vehicles (RLVs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sponable, Jess M.

    1996-03-01

    With the development and operational fielding of fully reusable launch vehicles (RLVs) becoming imminent, coupled with the ``end of the Cold War'' and fractionalization of the former ``bi-polar'' world into a ``multi-polar'' one, the need and potential for military versions of RLVs are being recognized by the military strategic planner. Recognizing the instability of the world order, especially with the potential for terrorism from all quarters, planning for the development of systems capable of defending our critical space based assests is becoming more essential. This paper presents some of the potential military applications of RLVs to support the Nation's defense and security interests world-wide.

  2. Joint NASA Ames/Langley Experimental Evaluation of Integrated Air/Ground Operations for En Route Free Maneuvering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhydt, Richard; Kopardekar, Parimal; Battiste, Vernol; Doble, Nathan; Johnson, Walter; Lee, Paul; Prevot, Thomas; Smith, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    In order to meet the anticipated future demand for air travel, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is investigating a new concept of operations known as Distributed Air-Ground Traffic Management (DAG-TM). Under the En Route Free Maneuvering component of DAG-TM, appropriately equipped autonomous aircraft self separate from other autonomous aircraft and from managed aircraft that continue to fly under today s Instrument Flight Rules (IFR). Controllers provide separation services between IFR aircraft and assign traffic flow management constraints to all aircraft. To address concept feasibility issues pertaining to integrated air/ground operations at various traffic levels, NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers conducted a joint human-in-the-loop experiment. Professional airline pilots and air traffic controllers flew a total of 16 scenarios under four conditions: mixed autonomous/managed operations at three traffic levels and a baseline all-managed condition at the lowest traffic level. These scenarios included en route flights and descents to a terminal area meter fix in airspace modeled after the Dallas Ft. Worth area. Pilots of autonomous aircraft met controller assigned meter fix constraints with high success. Separation violations by subject pilots did not appear to vary with traffic level and were mainly attributable to software errors and procedural lapses. Controller workload was lower for mixed flight conditions, even at higher traffic levels. Pilot workload was deemed acceptable under all conditions. Controllers raised several safety concerns, most of which pertained to the occurrence of near-term conflicts between autonomous and managed aircraft. These issues are being addressed through better compatibility between air and ground systems and refinements to air and ground procedures.

  3. Effects of military load carriage on kinematics of gait.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Deepti; Pal, Madhu Sudan; Majumdar, Dhurjati

    2010-06-01

    Manual load carriage is a universal activity and an inevitable part of the daily schedule of a soldier. Indian Infantry soldiers carry loads on the waist, back, shoulders and in the hands for a marching order. There is no reported study on the effects of load on gait in this population. It is important to evaluate their kinematic responses to existing load carriage operations and to provide guidelines towards the future design of heavy military backpacks (BPs) for optimising soldiers' performance. Kinematic changes of gait parameters in healthy male infantry soldiers whilst carrying no load (NL) and military loads of 4.2-17.5 kg (6.5-27.2% body weight) were investigated. All comparisons were conducted at a self-selected speed. Soldier characteristics were: mean (SD) age 23.3 (2.6) years; height 172.0 (3.8) cm; weight 64.3 (7.4) kg. Walk trials were collected using a 3-D Motion Analysis System. Results were subjected to one-way ANOVA followed by Dunnett post hoc test. There were increases in step length, stride length, cadence and midstance with the addition of a load compared to NL. These findings were resultant of an adaptive phenomenon within the individual to counterbalance load effect along with changes in speed. Ankle and hip ranges of motion (ROM) were significant. The ankle was more dorsiflexed, the knee and hip were more flexed during foot strike and helped in absorption of the load. The trunk showed more forward leaning with the addition of a load to adjust the centre of mass of the body and BP system back to the NL condition. Significant increases in ankle and hip ROM and trunk forward inclination (> or =10 degrees ) with lighter loads, such as a BP (10.7 kg), BP with rifle (14.9 kg) and BP with a light machine gun (17.5 kg), may cause joint injuries. It is concluded that the existing BP needs design improvisation specifically for use in low intensity conflict environments. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The present study evaluates spatial, temporal and angular

  4. Use of modern control theory in military command and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Timothy E.

    2001-09-01

    This paper discusses the use of modern control theoretic approaches in military command and control. The military enterprise is a highly dynamic and nonlinear environment. The desire on the part of military commanders to operate at faster operational tempos while still maintaining a stable and robust system, naturally leads to the consideration of a control theoretic approach to providing decision aids. I will present a brief history of the science of command and control of military forces and discuss how modern control theory might be applied to air operations.

  5. Metatarsal phalangeal joint arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shonka, T E

    1991-01-01

    An overview of metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) arthroscopy is presented. Indications, technique, and perioperative management are discussed. The author believes it is the operative treatment of choice for various pathology encountered in this joint. PMID:2002183

  6. PRA in Design: Increasing Confidence in Pre-Operational Assessments of Risks (Results of a Joint NASA/NRC Workshop)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngblood, Robert; Dezfuli, Homayoon; Siu, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    In late 2009, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) jointly organized a workshop to discuss technical issues associated with application of risk assessments to early phases of system design. The workshop, which was coordinated by the Idaho National Laboratory, involved invited presentations from a number of PRA experts in the aerospace and nuclear fields and subsequent discussion to address the following questions: (a) What technical issues limit decision-makers' confidence in PRA results, especially at a pre-operational phase of the system life cycle? (b) What is being done to address these issues'? (c) What more can be done ? The workshop resulted in participant observations and suggestions on several technical issues, including the pursuit of non-traditional approaches to risk assessment and the verification and validation of risk models. The workshop participants also identified several important non-technical issues, including risk communication with decision makers, and the integration of PRA into the overall design process.

  7. Early Childhood Military Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelo, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Does the country's national security rely on top-quality early childhood education? Yes, say the military leaders of Mission: Readiness, an organization led by retired military commanders that promotes investment in education, child health, and parenting support. Actually, the generals are right, but for all the wrong reasons. The generals' aim is…

  8. Application of Mobile Router to Military Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David H.; Ivancic, William D.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Shell, Dan; Leung, Kent

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems and NASA Glenn Research Center under a NASA Space Act Agreement have been performing joint networking research to apply Internet technologies and protocols to space-based communications. During this time, Cisco Systems developed the mobile-router which NASA and Cisco jointly tested. The early field trials of this technology have been successfully completed. The mobile-router is software code that resides in a network router. A Mobile-Router allows entire networks to roam while maintaining connectivity to the Internet. This router code is pertinent to a myriad of applications for both the government and commercial sectors. This technology will be applied to the wireless battlefield. NASA and the Department of Defense will utilize this technology for near-planetary observation and sensing spacecraft. It is the enabling technology for communication via the Internet or Intranets to aircraft. Information such as weather, air traffic control, voice and video can be easily and inexpensively transmitted to the aircraft using Internet protocols. The mobile router can be incorporated into emergency vehicles particularly ambulances and life-flight aircraft to provide real-time connectivity back to the hospital and healthcare experts. Commercial applications include entertainment services, IP telephone, and Internet connectivity for cruise ships, commercial shipping, tour busses, aircraft, and eventually cars. This paper will briefly describe the mobile router operation. An upcoming wide area network field test with application to US Coast Guard communications will be described. The paper will also highlight military and government networks that will benefit from the deployment of mobile router and the associated applications.

  9. ARPA-E: Improving Military Energy Security

    SciTech Connect

    Willson, Bryan; Mahvi, Allison; Stepien, Tom; Wasco, Mick

    2014-02-24

    The U.S. military has a vested interest in advancing microgrid technologies that can power forward operating bases. These technologies could not only help the military significantly reduce its energy demand both at home and abroad, but also they could reduce the number of fuel-supply convoys required on the battlefield and the number of troops killed in fuel-supply convoy attacks. This video highlights two ARPA-E projects that have formed strategic partnerships with the military to enable these microgrids at forward operating bases. Georgia Tech is developing an innovative absorption heat pump that utilizes exhaust heat to provide heating and cooling, which could cut the amount of energy used to heat and cool forward operating bases by 50%. Primus Power is developing a low-cost, energy-dense storage system that could store enough energy to operate a base for several days in the event of a disruption.

  10. [Haemovigilance and blood safety in overseas military].

    PubMed

    Sailliol, A; Plang, S; Martinaud, C; Pouget, T; Vedy, S; Clavier, B; Cellarier, V; Roche, C; Civadier, C; Ausset, S

    2014-11-01

    The French military blood institute (FMBI) is the only military blood supplier in France. FMBI operates independently and autonomously under the Ministry of Defense's supervision, and accordingly, to the French, European and NATO technical and safety guidelines. FMBI is in charge of the collection, preparation and distribution of blood products to supply transfusion support to armed forces, especially during overseas operations. In overseas military, a primary physician is responsible for haemovigilance in permanent relation with an expert in the FMBI to manage any adverse reaction. Additionally, traceability of delivered or collected blood products during overseas operation represents a priority, allowing an appropriate management of transfusion inquiries and assessment of practices aiming to improve and update procedures and training. Transfusion safety in overseas operation is based on regular and specific training of people concerned by blood supply chain in exceptional situation. PMID:25284434

  11. ARPA-E: Improving Military Energy Security

    ScienceCinema

    Willson, Bryan; Mahvi, Allison; Stepien, Tom; Wasco, Mick

    2014-03-13

    The U.S. military has a vested interest in advancing microgrid technologies that can power forward operating bases. These technologies could not only help the military significantly reduce its energy demand both at home and abroad, but also they could reduce the number of fuel-supply convoys required on the battlefield and the number of troops killed in fuel-supply convoy attacks. This video highlights two ARPA-E projects that have formed strategic partnerships with the military to enable these microgrids at forward operating bases. Georgia Tech is developing an innovative absorption heat pump that utilizes exhaust heat to provide heating and cooling, which could cut the amount of energy used to heat and cool forward operating bases by 50%. Primus Power is developing a low-cost, energy-dense storage system that could store enough energy to operate a base for several days in the event of a disruption.

  12. Inaugural editorial: Military Medical Research.

    PubMed

    Ren, Guo-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Military medicine is one of the most innovative part of human civilization. Along with the rapid development of medicine and advances in military techniques, military medicine has become the focus and intersection of new knowledge and new technologies. Innovation and development within military medicine are always ongoing, with a long and challenging path ahead. The establishment of "Military Medical Research" is expected to be a bounden responsibility in the frontline of Chinese military medicine. PMID:25722860

  13. MAST (Military Assistance to Safety and Traffic. Report of Test Program by the Interagency Study Group (July-December 1970).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense, Washington, DC.

    As a joint endeavor by the Departments of Defense, Transportation, and Health, Education, and Welfare to demonstrate military resources and techniques which are utilized in combat, the Military Assistance to Safety and Traffic (MAST) program was pilot-tested in 1970 at five military bases. Undertaken to explore the feasibility of utilizing…

  14. Joint swelling

    MedlinePlus

    Swelling of a joint ... Joint swelling may occur along with joint pain . The swelling may cause the joint to appear larger or abnormally shaped. Joint swelling can cause pain or stiffness. After an ...

  15. Evaluation of a rapid immunodiagnostic rabies field surveillance test on samples collected from military operations in Africa, Europe, and the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Voehl, Kristen M; Saturday, Greg A

    2014-01-01

    The Anigen Rapid Rabies Antigen Test Kit (Bionote, Inc, Hwaseong, Korea) was evaluated using 80 clinical samples collected by US military veterinary units. Samples for the study were obtained from brain specimens of domestic and wildlife animals that were submitted to the US Army Public Health Command's Veterinary Laboratory Europe in Landstuhl, Germany, for rabies testing with the direct fluorescent antibody test. The rapid immunodiagnostic test was able to detect rabies virus antigen in clinical samples of brain tissue. The rapid immunodiagnostic test had an overall sensitivity of 96.9% and specificity of 100% when compared to the direct fluorescent antibody test. The rapid immunodiagnostic test for rabies virus antigen detection is a straightforward test that can be run under field conditions and without a microscope or electricity, and yield results in 5 to 10 minutes. This rapid immunodiagnostic test is a quick, inexpensive, and easy to use surveillance tool that can identify rabies positive animals and help focus targeted control measures with the goal of reducing the rabies burden. PMID:25074599

  16. Improved resiliency and well-being among military personnel in a Swedish Naval Force after a counter-piracy operation off the coast of Somalia.

    PubMed

    Bäccman, Charlotte; Hjärthag, Fredrik; Almqvist, Kjerstin

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore: (1) how the psychological health of the members of the first European Union Naval Force (ME01) was affected by international deployment off the coast of Somalia; and (2) if and how organizational and personal factors (e.g., type of personnel category, previous experiences, and resilience) affected their psychological health and well-being post-deployment. The study had an exploratory longitudinal design, where the participants were assessed both before and after deployment (i.e., T1 and T2). The participants (n = 129, 120 men, 9 women) were equally distributed between officers (n = 68; 64 men, 4 women) and sailors (n = 61; 56 men, 5 women). The members' average age was 31 years, ranging from 20 to 61. For the majority (78%) ME01 was their first international deployment and officers were, in general, more experienced than sailors. The overall results showed that the members' reported a positive experience with improved resilience and well-being (e.g., sense of coherence). However, the result also showed that type of personnel category (i.e., officer or sailor) affected their psychological health. Why and how these differences among military personnel arise is discussed, but deserves further attention. PMID:27253612

  17. PRE- AND POST-OPERATIVE SELF-REPORTED FUNCTION AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN WOMEN WITH AND WITHOUT GENERALIZED JOINT LAXITY UNDERGOING HIP ARTHROSCOPY FOR FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Pontiff, Mattie; Ithurburn, Matthew P.; Ellis, Thomas; Cenkus, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Generalized joint laxity is more prevalent in women than men and may lead to poorer post-operative outcomes in select orthopedic populations. There are no studies examining peri-operative function in patients with generalized joint laxity (GJL) and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the difference in perceived function and quality of life as measured by the Hip Outcome Score ADL subscale (HOS-ADL), International Hip Outcomes Tool (iHOT-33) and the Short Form 12-Item Health Survey (SF-12) in women with and without GJL prior to and six months after undergoing hip arthroscopy for FAI. Study Design Cohort Study Methods Peri-operative data were collected from women with FAI from November 2011-September 2014. Lax subjects were women with laxity scores ≥4/9 on the Beighton and Horan Joint Mobility Index; Nonlax subjects were women with laxity scores <4/9. Functional outcomes were evaluated using the HOS-ADL, iHOT-33, PCS-12, and the MCS-12 pre-operatively and at 6 months post-operatively. Change scores (post-score – pre-score) were calculated for each outcome measure and compared between groups, along with pre-operative and post-operative means, using Mann-Whitney U tests. Results 166 women met the inclusion criteria: Nonlax (n = 131), Lax (n = 35). There were no statistically significant differences between groups in pre-operative functional outcomes (all p > .05). Additionally, there were no statistically significant differences between groups in post-operative means or change scores, respectively, for HOS-ADL (p = .696, .358), iHOT-33 (p = .550, .705), PCS-12 (p = .713, .191), and MCS-12 (p = .751, .082). Laxity score was not associated with any post-operative functional outcome score or change score (all p > .05). Conclusion Women with and without generalized joint laxity do not appear to report differences in hip function in the 6-month peri-operative period before and after hip

  18. Myocarditis and the military patient.

    PubMed

    Cox, Andrew T; White, S; Ayalew, Y; Boos, C; Haworth, K; McKenna, W J

    2015-09-01

    Myocarditis, simply defined as inflammation of the heart muscle, is a commonly encountered cardiac disease in primary and secondary care, both in the UK and on Operational deployments. In the UK Armed Forces, myocarditis results in deaths as well as the premature termination of military careers on medical grounds. The aetiology is usually the result of a number of infectious aetiologies with viruses being the most common pathogens in the vast majority of cases. However, it may also be the result of autoimmune activation, chemical or pharmacological toxins, environmental insult or hypersensitivity reactions. Particular aetiologies that are more likely to be seen in a military population are discussed and include certain infections, smallpox vaccine, and hyperthermia and hypothermia. The clinical features can be highly variable ranging from an asymptomatic infection to fulminant heart failure. Features pertinent to the military doctor, including the natural history, investigative modalities and management strategies, with a particular emphasis on the occupational impact of myocarditis in the UK Armed Forces are reviewed. PMID:26246350

  19. WAR & Military Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Pols, Hans; Oak, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    Involvement in warfare can have dramatic consequences for the mental health and well-being of military personnel. During the 20th century, US military psychiatrists tried to deal with these consequences while contributing to the military goal of preserving manpower and reducing the debilitating impact of psychiatric syndromes by implementing screening programs to detect factors that predispose individuals to mental disorders, providing early intervention strategies for acute war-related syndromes, and treating long-term psychiatric disability after deployment. The success of screening has proven disappointing, the effects of treatment near the front lines are unclear, and the results of treatment for chronic postwar syndromes are mixed. After the Persian Gulf War, a number of military physicians made innovative proposals for a population-based approach, anchored in primary care instead of specialty-based care. This approach appears to hold the most promise for the future. PMID:17971561

  20. Music in the Military.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Amanda

    1981-01-01

    Following a very brief history of military bands, the author describes the musical performance opportunities currently available in the United States Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Coast Guard, for young musicians who may wish to enlist. (SJL)

  1. Families in the Military

    MedlinePlus

    ... have led to deployment of large numbers of military personnel (active duty, Reserves, National Guard). As a result ... worries and plans for the future. Let your child know that the family member is making a ...

  2. Vaccines for military use.

    PubMed

    Artenstein, Andrew W

    2009-11-01

    Vaccines have long been used by military forces in order to prevent communicable diseases and thereby preserve the fighting force. A tradition that began with the mass vaccination of the Continental Army against smallpox during the War of the American Revolution in the late 18th century continues today with routine and deployment-based vaccination of military forces against potential pathogens of nature and biological weapon threats. As their role has expanded in recent years to include humanitarian and peacekeeping missions, the military's use of vaccines against infectious diseases has concomitantly broadened to include civilian populations worldwide. The emergence of new threats and the recognition of additional global challenges will continue to compel the development and promotion of vaccines to combat infectious diseases of military significance. PMID:19837279

  3. Radiometry in military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, Krzysztof

    2001-08-01

    Missiles guided using optoelectronic methods, optoelectronic imaging systems (thermal imaging systems, night vision devices, LLLTV cameras, TV cameras), and optoelectronic countermeasures (smoke screens, camouflage paints and nets, IR flares, decoys, jamming systems, warning systems) are one of the most important components of modern military armament. There are numerous military standards, some of them secret, that precise radiometric parameters to be measured and the testing methods to be used. There is also much literature on the subject of testing of the systems mentioned above, although mostly on subject of testing of the thermal imaging systems. In spite of this apparently numerous literature, there still significant confusion in this area due to secrecy of some parameters and testing methods, differences in recommendations of different military standards, fast progress in military optoelectronics, and also due to enormous number of different types of optoelectronics systems used in the military armament. A review of testing methods of the three basic groups of optoelectronics systems used in modern military armament: the missiles guided using optoelectronics methods, the optoelectronic imaging systems, and the optoelectronic countermeasures is presented in this paper. Trends in the measuring sets.

  4. Military Bases and Conservation Markets

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Ankeny

    2007-09-01

    Over time, DoD is likely to be one of the largest buyers and sellers in a water quality trading market. The Department of Defense (DoD) operates military bases that resemble small cities in infrastructure. As units redeploy, bases are likely to find themselves well within their environmental limits at the originating base and potentially bumping against limits such as nitrate and phosphate loading at the destination base. Stricter rules and heavier loadings in growing watersheds also present challenges to local bases and municipalities as regulators clamp down on loadings from existing Waste Water Treatment Plants (WWTPs) to meet water quality standards.

  5. Military Careers: A Guide to Military Occupations and Selected Military Career Paths, 1992-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense, Washington, DC.

    This book was developed to help educators and youth learn about career opportunities in the military. It is a compendium of military occupational, training, and career information and is designed for use by students interested in the military. The first section, military occupations, contains descriptions of 197 enlisted and officer occupations.…

  6. [Military telemedicine: a network of networks].

    PubMed

    Menu, Jean-Pierre; Comtet, Gérald; Di Giusto, Vincent; Colomb, François; de Saint-Julien, Jacques

    2006-02-01

    Military telemedicine is a form of collaborative medicine based on the use of communication and information networks. It is more a network of networks than of independent systems. It comprises electronic medical files, epidemiological networks, and surgical and medical databases. Each system must be able to communicate with the others, thereby enabling the development of remote consultation, expertise and assistance. This requires networking between the army, the navy, and the air force communication networks, especially during special operations conducted abroad. We must also develop interoperability with systems in other countries, and with the French civilian health service. This means respecting the general rules governing these networks. The military health network is unique, in that it focuses on battlefield injuries. In addition, the French military health service operates under a single headquarters, governing nurses, paramedics and physicians. PMID:17001864

  7. COST EFFECTIVE VOC EMISSION CONTROL STARTEGIES FOR MILITARY, AEROSPACE,AND INDUSTRIAL PAINT SPRAY BOOTH OPERATIONS: COMBINING IMPROVED VENTILATION SYSTEMS WITH INNOVATIVE, LOW COST EMISSION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a full-scale demonstration program in which several paint booths were modified for recirculation ventilation; the booth exhaust streams are vented to an innovative volatile organic compound (VOC) emission control system having extremely low operating costs. ...

  8. The command of biotechnology and merciful conquest in military opposition.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ji-Wei

    2006-11-01

    Biotechnology has an increasingly extensive use for military purposes. With the upcoming age of biotechnology, military operations are depending more on biotechnical methods. Judging from the evolving law of the theory of command, the command of biotechnology is feasible and inevitable. The report discusses some basic characteristics of modern theories of command, as well as the mature possibility of the command theory of military biotechnology. The evolution of the command theory is closely associated with the development of military medicine. This theory is expected to achieve successes in wars in an ultramicro, nonlethal, reversible, and merciful way and will play an important role in biotechnological identification and orientation, defense and attack, and the maintenance of fighting powers and biological monitoring. The command of military biotechnology has not become a part of the virtual military power yet, but it is an exigent strategic task to construct and perfect this theory. PMID:17153559

  9. Butt Joint Tool Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N

    2007-12-06

    ITER Central Solenoid uses butt joints for connecting the pancakes in the CS module. The principles of the butt joining of the CICC were developed by the JAPT during CSMC project. The difference between the CSMC butt joint and the CS butt joint is that the CS butt joint is an in-line joint, while the CSMC is a double joint through a hairpin jumper. The CS butt joint has to carry the hoop load. The straight length of the joint is only 320 mm, and the vacuum chamber around the joint has to have a split in the clamp shell. These requirements are challenging. Fig.1 presents a CSMC joint, and Fig.2 shows a CS butt joint. The butt joint procedure was verified and demonstrated. The tool is capable of achieving all specified parameters. The vacuum in the end was a little higher than the target, which is not critical and readily correctable. We consider, tentatively that the procedure is established. Unexpectedly, we discover significant temperature nonuniformity in the joint cross section, which is not formally a violation of the specs, but is a point of concern. All testing parameters are recorded for QA purposes. We plan to modify the butt joining tool to improve its convenience of operation and provide all features necessary for production of butt joints by qualified personnel.

  10. Military Experience Directed into Health Careers. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Research and Educational Fund of New Jersey, Princeton, NJ.

    Operation MEDIHC's (Military Experience Directed into Health Careers) program to help veterans trained in health skills while in military service capitalize on those skills when they return to civilian life is examined. The goal of the program was to help find civilian career opportunities and to provide free counseling and vocational guidance to…

  11. GIS EROSION ASSESSMENT AT A MILITARY TRAINING SITE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    U.S. military training facilities often experience significant environmental damage from soil erosion. Much of this erosion occurs on roads and trails created by repeated military vehicle traffic during training operations. If the roads are located on steep slopes or in areas of concentrated runoff,...

  12. The military physician and contested medical humanitarianism: a dueling identity?

    PubMed

    Gordon, Stuart

    2014-11-01

    A critical issue in the study of humanitarianism is who counts as a medical humanitarian. Military physicians are often characterized as caught between the potentially incompatible roles of physician and military professional. Medical NGOs, such as Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), have also vociferously rejected military medical humanitarianism: questioning the mandate, skills, and appropriateness of military involvement in humanitarian medicine as well as the potential impact on 'humanitarian space'. Yet many military doctors contest this. Consequently this study examines the ways in which primarily British military physicians identify and manage their identities as both medical humanitarians and soldiers. The research utilized a mixed method, grounded theory approach involving systematic document searches/expert identification of a core literature of 300 policy and peer reviewed documents, plus grey literature and 53 formal medical post operational reports from units serving in Iraq and Afghanistan between 2004 and 2012. Semi structured interviews involved purposive sampling (34 respondents) ranging from a former Surgeon General to more junior staff. Methods also included an analysis of the original data and literature from the 2003 Medical Services Delphi study (involving an additional 40 experts and an extensive literature review) on military medical identity/future roles as well as direct observation of military doctors in Iraq and Afghanistan (two, 2 month research trips). The research concluded that military physicians conceived of themselves as autonomous medical humanitarians with an individual morality rooted in civilian medical ethics that facilitated resistance to the potentially hegemonic military identity. Nevertheless military physicians were part of a medical organization with fundamentally different priorities from those of civilian humanitarian physicians. Furthermore, the perceived emergence of multiple civilian 'humanitarianisms' has

  13. Military Beliefs and PTSD in Active Duty U.S. Army Soldiers

    PubMed Central

    Loew, Benjamin; Carter, Sarah; Allen, Elizabeth; Markman, Howard; Stanley, Scott; Rhoades, Galena

    2014-01-01

    Post-traumatic distress after military combat is a major cost of war. One under-investigated factor potentially associated with PTSD symptoms is specific beliefs about one’s military service. This study examined post-deployment self-reports from 272 active-duty U.S. Army soldiers, to investigate potential associations between military-related PTSD symptom severity and three beliefs about the military: the importance and value ascribed to one’s own work in the Army, to current military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, and to military service in general. Higher scores on these three beliefs were negatively correlated with military-related PTSD symptom severity. However, in a combined regression model that controlled for recent combat exposure, only the belief about current military operations had a significant, unique association with PTSD symptom severity. That is, more positive beliefs about the value of operations in Iraq or Afghanistan were associated with lower PTSD symptoms. PMID:25530729

  14. Aerospace and military

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, J.A.; Esch, K

    1990-01-01

    This article reviews military and aerospace developments of 1989. The Voyager spacecraft returned astounding imagery from Neptune, sophisticated sensors were launched to explore Venus and Jupiter, and another craft went into earth orbit to explore cosmic rays, while a huge telescope is to be launched early in 1990. The U.S. space shuttle redesign was completed and access to space has become no longer purely a governmental enterprise. In the military realm, events within the Soviet bloc, such as the Berlin Wall's destruction, have popularized arms control. Several big treaties could be signed within the year. Massive troop, equipment, and budget reductions are being considered, along with a halt or delay of major new weapons systems. For new missions, the U.S. military is retreating to its role of a century ago - patrolling the nation's borders, this time against narcotics traffickers.

  15. UK role 4 military infection services: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Dufty, Ngozi E; Bailey, M S

    2013-09-01

    NATO describes 'Role 4' military medical services as those provided for the definitive care of patients who cannot be treated within a theatre of operations and these are usually located in a military force's country of origin and may include the involvement of civilian medical services. The UK Defence Medical Services have a proud history of developing and providing clinical services in infectious diseases and tropical medicine, sexual health and HIV medicine, and medical microbiology and virology. These UK Role 4 Military Infection Services have adapted well to recent overseas deployments, but new challenges will arise due to current military cutbacks and a greater diversity of contingency operations in the future. Further evidence-based development of these services will require leadership by military clinicians and improved communication and support for 'reach-back' services. PMID:24109133

  16. Role of Human Health Care Providers and Medical Treatment Facilities in Military Working Dog Care and Accessibility Difficulties with Military Working Dog Blood Products.

    PubMed

    Giles Iii, James T

    2016-01-01

    The use of military working dogs (MWDs) in support of military operations has increased dramatically over recent years, as they have proven to be our most reliable deterrent to improvised explosive devices. Healthcare delivery for MWDs in combat presents unique challenges and requires extensive collaboration between veterinarians and human health care providers (HCPs). A successful example is the incorporation of MWD emergency care for nonveterinary HCPs into the Joint Trauma System Clinical Practice Guidelines, which has proven to be a helpful product. Additional challenges that need further solutions include MWDs as patients in human medical treatment facilities (MTFs) and the procurement of appropriate canine blood components in an operational environment. It is often necessary for MWDs to be treated as patients in human MTFs, however, there is no Department of Defense guidance to support this activity. Access to MWD blood products is limited to collection of fresh whole blood in the operational setting. Similar to humans, specific blood component therapy, such as fresh frozen plasma, is often indicated for sick or injured MWDs. Currently there is no formal system in place to deliver any blood products for MWDs or to facilitate collection in theater. PMID:27215885

  17. Implications drawn from a military bioterror exercise in Israel.

    PubMed

    Berger, Tamar; Fogel, Itay; Poles, Lion; Aran, Adi Avniel; Shental, Omri; Kassirer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Orange Flame is an Israeli preparedness build-up project, conducted by the Ministry of Health, that is aimed at improving national readiness and preparedness for unusual biological events. The project is intended for both medical and nonmedical organizations, and, since 2011, the exercise has also included operational units outside the medical corps. This has provided valuable insights into the consequences of bioterror or naturally occurring outbreaks for operative functionality and for the unique medical, logistical, and administrative efforts required from the armed forces in such an event. The 2-day drill reported on here executed a notional scenario in which category A bioterror agents were dispersed, causing civil and military casualties. Military personnel observed and assessed the performances of all participating organizations and observed the employment of emergency protocols during the drill. Military sustainment and operative capabilities were significantly affected by the occurrence of an unusual biological event. Comprehensive actions to be executed during such a scenario included quarantining military bases, considering postponement of military operations, and transferring on-call missions to other bases. Logistic consequences included the need for manpower and equipment reinforcement, as well as food and water supplies in cases of suspected source contamination. The project unveiled many operational and logistic quandaries and exposed various potential effects of a bioterror attack in the military. Lessons learned were used to revise preevent national and military doctrine for unusual biological events. PMID:25813977

  18. Resilience among Military Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easterbrooks, M. Ann; Ginsburg, Kenneth; Lerner, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors present their approach to understanding resilience among military connected young people, and they discuss some of the gaps in their knowledge. They begin by defining resilience, and then present a theoretical model of how young people demonstrate resilient functioning. Next they consider some of the research on…

  19. Why Military History?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunting, Josiah, III

    2008-01-01

    Interest in military history is as strong as it has ever been--except on American college campuses. Lt. Gen. Josiah Bunting III examines why today's undergraduates need to study the facts of war, and why knowing its causes and consequences remain a vital part of our common knowledge.

  20. Substance Abuse in the Military

    MedlinePlus

    ... Although illicit drug use is lower among U.S. military personnel than among civilians, heavy alcohol and tobacco use, ... in identifying and treating substance use problems in military personnel, as does lack of confidentiality that deters many ...

  1. Preventing Suicides in the Military

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Preventing Suicides Preventing Suicides in the Military Past Issues / Winter 2010 ... Family Hotline 1-800-984-8523 Read More "Preventing Suicides" Articles Preventing Suicides in the Military / Who's ...

  2. GIS interoperability: current activities and military implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Sylvia

    1997-07-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) are gaining importance in military operations because of their capability to spatially and visually integrate various kinds of information. In an era of limited resources, geospatial data must be shared efficiently whenever possible. The military-initiated Global Geospatial Information and Services (GGI&S) Project aims at developing the infrastructure for GIS interoperability for the military. Current activities in standardization and new technology have strong implications on the design and development of GGI&S. To facilitate data interoperability at both the national and international levels, standards and specifications in geospatial data sharing are being studied, developed and promoted. Of particular interest to the military community are the activities related to the NATO DIGEST, ISO TC/211 Geomatics standardization and the industry-led Open Geodata Interoperability Specifications (OGIS). Together with new information technology, standardization provides the infrastructure for interoperable GIS for both civilian and military environments. The first part of this paper describes the major activities in standardization. The second part presents the technologies developed at DREV in support of the GGI&S. These include the Open Geospatial Datastore Interface (OGDI) and the geospatial data warehouse. DREV has been working closely with Defence Geomatics and private industry in the research and development of new technology for the GGI&S project.

  3. Joint assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A joint assembly is provided which includes a drive assembly and a swivel mechanism. The drive assembly features a motor operatively associated with a plurality of drive shafts for driving auxiliary elements, and a plurality of swivel shafts for pivoting the drive assembly. The swivel mechanism engages the swivel shafts and has a fixable element that may be attached to a foundation. The swivel mechanism is adapted to cooperate with the swivel shafts to pivot the drive assembly with at least two degrees of freedom relative to the foundation. The joint assembly allows for all components to remain encased in a tight, compact, and sealed package, making it ideal for space, exploratory, and commercial applications.

  4. 48 CFR 217.173 - Multiyear contracts for military family housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... military family housing. 217.173 Section 217.173 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Mulityear Contracting 217.173 Multiyear contracts for military family housing. The head of the agency may... management, maintenance, and operation of military family housing and may pay the costs of such contracts...

  5. 48 CFR 217.173 - Multiyear contracts for military family housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... military family housing. 217.173 Section 217.173 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Mulityear Contracting 217.173 Multiyear contracts for military family housing. The head of the agency may... management, maintenance, and operation of military family housing and may pay the costs of such contracts...

  6. 48 CFR 217.173 - Multiyear contracts for military family housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... military family housing. 217.173 Section 217.173 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Mulityear Contracting 217.173 Multiyear contracts for military family housing. The head of the agency may... management, maintenance, and operation of military family housing and may pay the costs of such contracts...

  7. 48 CFR 217.173 - Multiyear contracts for military family housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... military family housing. 217.173 Section 217.173 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Mulityear Contracting 217.173 Multiyear contracts for military family housing. The head of the agency may... management, maintenance, and operation of military family housing and may pay the costs of such contracts...

  8. Hypertension in the military patient.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Alys; Holdsworth, D A; D'Arcy, J; Bailey, K; Casadei, B

    2015-09-01

    Hypertension and hypertension-related diseases are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. A diagnosis of hypertension can have serious occupational implications for military personnel. This article examines the diagnosis and management of hypertension in military personnel, in the context of current international standards. We consider the consequences of hypertension in the military environment and potential military-specific issues relating to hypertension. PMID:26253125

  9. A CONTENT ANALYSIS OF MILITARY COMMANDER MESSAGES ABOUT TOBACCO AND OTHER HEALTH ISSUES IN MILITARY INSTALLATION NEWSPAPERS: WHAT DO MILITARY COMMANDERS SAY ABOUT TOBACCO?

    PubMed Central

    Poston, Walker S.C.; Haddock, Christopher K.; Jahnke, Sara A.; Hyder, Melissa L.; Jitnarin, Nattinee

    2014-01-01

    Military installation newspapers are a primary means used by military commanders to communicate information about topics important to military personnel including leadership, training issues, installation events, safety concerns, and vital health issues. We conducted a content analysis of military commanders’ messages about health issues that were published in online military installation newspapers/newsfeeds. We identified a total of 75 publicly accessible installation newspapers/newsfeeds with commanders’ messages (n=39 Air Force, n=19 Army, n=7 Navy, n=1 Marine, and n=9 Joint Bases). Commander messages published between January 2012–December 2012 were collected, screened, and coded. Coder inter-rater reliability was 98.9%. Among the 2,479 coded commanders’ messages, 132 (5.3%) addressed a health topic as the primary focus. There were no significant differences between service branches in the percentage of health-oriented messages (χ2=5.019, p=0.285). The most commonly addressed health topics were exercise/fitness (23.5%), other mental health concerns (19.7%), alcohol/DUI (13.6%), and suicide (12.1%). Tobacco use was directly addressed as a primary health aim in only two commanders’ messages (1.5%). Health topics, and particularly tobacco-related content, are rarely written about by military commanders. The absence of tobacco-related health messages from line leadership contributes to the perception that tobacco control is a low priority. PMID:26032388

  10. Evolution of US military space doctrine: precedents, prospects, and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    This dissertation examines the evolution of US military space doctrine by: (1) defining military doctrine, its importance, and how it should be evaluated; (2) identifying principles of geopolitics, strategy, and war applicable to military space operations; (3) establishing how well does Air Force aerospace doctrine treat space issues and requirements for itself and the other Services: (4) identifying future directions for military space doctrine; and (5) postulating what might constitute a US military space doctrine in the future. The approach utilized incorporates analyses of the space environment, geopolitics, strategy, the principles of war, and the development of air power and sea power to provide a framework of constants or invariants within which military space operations must be conducted. It also utilizes a framework of inconstants or variants, consisting of technology impacts and organizational requirements, to which military space doctrine must respond. Other doctrinal requirements are derived from the 1987 DOD space policy, the Strategic Defense Initiative, and international space law. Finally, an assessment is made of future concepts and directions of US military space doctrine.