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1

Joint time-frequency analysis of micro-acoustic devices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, a novel analysis technique for the performance evaluation of micro-acoustic devices has been proposed. Whereas traditional techniques typically focus solely on the frequency domain characteristics, we employ a Joint Time-Frequency Analysis (JTFA), which has been shown to provide a more complete characterisation of overall device performance and underlying physical phenomena. Although an emphasis is placed on a Flexural Plate Wave (FPW) device, the analysis technique presented is applicable to a wider range of micro-acoustic devices including Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) structures and Thin-Film Bulk Acoustic Wave Resonators (TFBARs). SAWdevices, and indeed general filters, are typically described by a frequency domain characteristic, whereby the entire time domain information is discarded. This type of analysis assumes that the device has reached quasistationary conditions. By employing JTFA, the device performance can simultaneously be studied as a function of both time and frequency. This type of analysis is typically useful where spurious acoustic modes are generated which may influence the overall filter characteristic. We have investigated the functional properties of various JTFA kernels, including those appearing in the Wigner-Ville, Choi-Williams and Page distributions. A known deficiency associated with JTFA is the appearance of a number of spurious cross-terms in the computations. Whereas the cross-terms are relatively simple to detect for "monochromatic" (single-component) signals, it is not a trivial task to minimise such artifacts for "polychromatic" (multi-component) signals, which are typical in micro-acoustic devices. We propose novel methods for reducing the cross-terms interference appearing in JTFA, thereby improving the performance of the analysis technique. To investigate the application of the proposed technique, the simulated time domain response of a FPW device was investigated. The Finite Element Method (FEM) package ANSYS 8.0 was utilised to obtain the impulse response of the FPW structure under a dynamic transient analysis. A comparison is also made with the spectral domain Green's function to verify the FEM solution, where excellent agreement is obtained. Based on the FEM solutions, the insertion loss characteristics is calculated which represents a commonly applied frequency domain method of analysing micro-acoustic devices. A comparison has been made between the insertion loss characteristics and the proposed approach, where it is clearly demonstrated that the problem-adapted technique provides significantly more detailed information.

Matthews, Glenn I.; Baghai-Wadji, Alireza

2008-12-01

2

Detection and characterization of cultural noise sources in magnetotelluric data: individual and joint analysis of the polarization attributes of the electric and magnetic field time-series in the time-frequency domain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magnetotelluric (MT) method is a passive electromagnetic technique, which is currently used to characterize sites for the geological storage of CO2. These later ones are usually located nearby industrialized, urban or farming areas, where man-made electromagnetic (EM) signals contaminate the MT data. The identification and characterization of the artificial EM sources which generate the so-called "cultural noise" is an important challenge to obtain the most reliable results with the MT method. The polarization attributes of an EM signal (tilt angle, ellipticity and phase difference between its orthogonal components) are related to the character of its source. In a previous work (Escalas et al. 2011), we proposed a method to distinguish natural signal from cultural noise in the raw MT data. It is based on the polarization analysis of the MT time-series in the time-frequency domain, using a wavelet scheme. We developed an algorithm to implement the method, and was tested with both synthetic and field data. In 2010, we carried out a controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) experiment in the Hontomín site (the Research Laboratory on Geological Storage of CO2 in Spain). MT time-series were contaminated at different frequencies with the signal emitted by a controlled artificial EM source: two electric dipoles (1 km long, arranged in North-South and East-West directions). The analysis with our algorithm of the electric field time-series acquired in this experiment was successful: the polarization attributes of both the natural and artificial signal were obtained in the time-frequency domain, highlighting their differences. The processing of the magnetic field time-series acquired in the Hontomín experiment has been done in the present work. This new analysis of the polarization attributes of the magnetic field data has provided additional information to detect the contribution of the artificial source in the measured data. Moreover, the joint analysis of the polarization attributes of the electric and magnetic field has been crucial to fully characterize the properties and the location of the noise source. Escalas, M., Queralt, P., Ledo, J., Marcuello, A., 2011. Identification of cultural noise sources in magnetotelluric data: estimating polarization attributes in the time-frequency domain using wavelet analysis. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 13, EGU2011-6085. EGU General Assembly 2011.

Escalas, M.; Queralt, P.; Ledo, J.; Marcuello, A.

2012-04-01

3

Orthogonal time-frequency domain multiplexing with multilevel signaling.  

PubMed

In this paper, we propose and investigate an optical multiplexing technique, called orthogonal time-frequency domain multiplexing (OTFDM) with multilevel signaling, that enables ultrafast, high-spectral-efficiency transmission. On the transmitter side, optical rectangular combs generated from electro-optic modulators are data modulated and multiplexed into the time-frequency domain. On the receiver side, the OTFDM signal is demultiplexed and coherently demodulated by coherent matched detection in which multi-frequency homodyne mixing with a locally generated comb down-converts a target OTFDM tributary channel into baseband frequencies. These multiplexing and demultiplexing processes are fully performed in the optical domain using optoelectronic devices, without the use of fast Fourier transform circuits or optical channel selection filters. It is analytically and numerically proved that multilevel signals such as nPSK and nQAM can be OTFDM-multiplexed and demultiplexed while retaining orthogonality between tributaries. The spectral efficiency of this method reaches as high as 1 Baud/Hz per single polarization, i.e., the Nyquist limit, enabling high-bandwidth operation unrestricted by an electronic response in the transmitter or receiver. PMID:24515037

Sakamoto, Takahide

2014-01-13

4

Body waves separation in the time-frequency domain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Arrival times of body waves generated by small magnitude microseismic events are usually very close and their limited bandwidth can cause even partial overlap in the time and frequency domains. The separation of P and S waves is then a challenging task that if solved could bring more insights about nature and location of the generating source. Differences in arrival times and frequency content of P and S waves can be seen by using time-frequency decomposition. The traditional time-frequency representation based on the Fourier Transform is limited by its trade-off between time and frequency resolutions, while other alternatives like the Wavelet Transform are still limited by the Heisenberg box. A new derivation of the Continuous Wavelet Transform, called Synchrosqueezing, stretches these boundaries using a mixture of the reassignment method with instantaneous frequency, giving a better frequency representation with improved time localization. Furthermore, all the individual components of the signal are separated in the time domain. This means that we are able to isolate the waveforms of a complex microseismic trace. Each spectral component can then be matched with a body wave plus its associated coda. Proper parameters have to be selected prior to the computation, such as the central frequency and bandwidth of the mother wavelet. We thus include a signal characterization first to find the best matching mother wavelet. In this paper we use the Synchrosqueezing transform to perform the time frequency representation of short brittle events recorded during microseismic experiments. Decomposition results for these examples show that the Synchrosqueezing transform outperforms the Short-Time Fourier Transform. The different components of each body waves (first arrival, coda, frequency components) can then be identified in the time-frequency plane. For some microseismic events, a first P-wave arrival is followed by another arrival at lower frequency that could be a P-wave converted to S-wave (P-S). This arrival is followed by a spectral component at the same frequency potentially corresponding to its coda. The main S-wave comprises a few spectral components of lower frequency. Each signal components can then be extracted by the inverse Synchrosqueezing transform, to be analyzed separately. The same approach could be extrapolated to the time-frequency representation of other seismic signals such as resonance frequencies and long-period events. Microseismic event from a hydraulic fracturing treatment. Zoom in the T-F representations of the STFT (left) and SST (right) of the microseismic event.

Herrera, R. H.; Tary, J.; Van der Baan, M.

2013-12-01

5

Efficient radar target classification using adaptive joint time-frequency processing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a new target recognition scheme via adaptive Gaussian representation, which uses adaptive joint time-frequency processing techniques. The feature extraction stage of the proposed scheme utilizes the geometrical moments of the adaptivity spectrogram. For this purpose, we have derived exact and closed form expressions of geometrical moments of the adaptive spectrogram in the time, frequency, and joint time-frequency

Kyung-Tae Kim; In-Sik Choi; Hyo-Tae Kim

2000-01-01

6

Estimation of modal parameters using bilinear joint time frequency distributions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, a new method is proposed for modal parameter estimation using time-frequency representations. Smoothed Pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution which is a member of the Cohen's class distributions is used to decouple vibration modes completely in order to study each mode separately. This distribution reduces cross-terms which are troublesome in Wigner-Ville distribution and retains the resolution as well. The method was applied to highly damped systems, and results were superior to those obtained via other conventional methods.

Roshan-Ghias, A.; Shamsollahi, M. B.; Mobed, M.; Behzad, M.

2007-07-01

7

Seismic waveform tomography in the time-frequency domain with applications to the Australian upper mantle  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a novel approach to full waveform tomography based on misfits in the time-frequency domain and adjoint methods. Our focus is on theoretical developments and synthetic inversions for heterogeneities in the Australian upper mantle. The centrepieces of our methodology are envelope and instantaneous phase misfits defined on time-frequency transforms of the seismograms. These misfits allow us to extract the

A. Fichtner; P. Bunge; H. Igel; B. Kennett

2007-01-01

8

Time-frequency distributions in spectroscopic Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Current analysis for spectroscopic optical coherence tomography (SOCT) signals is limited by an uncertainty relationship between time (depth) and frequency (wavelength). Various joint time-frequency distributions (TFDs) can meliorate the limits to obtain the best information. Synthesized signals which correspond to three typical SOCT signals in the Fourier-domain under different SOCT imaging schemes, were generated and validate several different TFDs, including short time Fourier transform (STFT), continuous wavelet transform (CWT), Wigner-Villy distribution (WVD), and smoothed pseudo WVD (SPWVD). We found that different SOCT imaging scheme requires different optimal TFDs. STFT offers the most reliable and fast time-frequency (TF) analysis, which is appreciate for retrieving the absorption spectra from a homogeneously absorbing media; WT offers the best spatial resolution or the best spectral resolution locally; WVD generate the most compact TF analysis, but suffers from the artifacts due to the cross terms. SPWVD is applied to yields high spectral and spatial resolution and be free from the artifacts and limitations commonly observed with WVD.

Wang, Ling; Guan, Minghao; Yang, Yong; Chen, Minghui

2009-11-01

9

Bubble Pulse Cancelation in the Time-Frequency Domain Using Warping Operators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The received shock waves produced by explosive charges are often polluted by bubble pulses in underwater acoustic experiments. A method based on warping operators is proposed to cancel the bubble pulses in the time-frequency domain. This is applied to the explosive data collected during the Yellow Sea experiment in November 2000. The original received signal is first transformed into a warped signal by warping operators. Then, the warped signal is analyzed in the time-frequency domain. Due to the different features between the shock waves and the bubble pulses in the time-frequency domain for the warped signal, the bubble pulses can be easily filtered out. Furthermore, the shock waves in the original time domain can be retrieved by the inverse warping transformation. The autocorrelation functions and the time-frequency representation show that the bubble pulses can be canceled effectively.

Niu, Hai-Qiang; Zhang, Ren-He; Li, Zheng-Lin; Guo, Yong-Gang; He, Li

2013-08-01

10

Design of a time-frequency domain matched filter for detection of non-stationary signals  

Microsoft Academic Search

A practical and effective approach is proposed to detect a transient or non-stationary signal component of interest from a composite signal waveform. The detection problem has been re-formulated in terms of time-frequency analysis, and, thus, the conventional 1D (ie, time-domain) matched filter approach is extended to the 2D (here, time-frequency domain) optimal filtering. For that purpose, the reduced interference distribution

YongJune Shin; Sang-Won Nam; Chong-Koo An; Edward J. Powers

2001-01-01

11

Joint Time-Frequency Analysis: A tool for exploratory analysis and filtering of non-stationary time series  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is the purpose of the paper to describe the virtues of time-frequency methods for signal processing applications, having astronomical time series in mind. Different methods are considered and their potential usefulness respectively drawbacks are discussed and illustrated by examples. As areas where one can hope for a successful application of joint time-frequency analysis (JTFA), we describe specifically the problem

R. Vio; W. Wamsteker

2002-01-01

12

Comparison of pulse and SFCW GPR in time, frequency and wavelet domain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ground penetrating radar (GPR) systems operating in the time- or frequency domain are two fundamentally different concepts, pursuing the same objective: non-invasive characterization of the subsurface. The aim of this study is to compare the performance of these two GPR systems in the time, frequency and wavelet domain. The time domain GPR investigated is the Utilityscan DF. This is a ground coupled GPR with a digital dual-frequency antenna (300 and 800 MHz). The Geoscope GS3F and VX1213 antenna array from 3DRadar is the frequency domain GPR used in this comparison. It is an air coupled stepped frequency continuous wave (SFCW) GPR with a frequency bandwidth from 200 MHz to 3000 MHz. Using data from several test sites of various soil types, the data is evaluated in the time domain, the frequency domain and the wavelet domain. Each of these domains contains specific information regarding the data quality. Presenting the data in the time domain, allows visualizing the subsurface reflections. This makes it visible how strong the data is affected by internal interference, ringing and other noise. To compensate for the attenuation of the signal in time, automatic gain control is applied. The maximum of this gain function indicates the time where the signal is attenuated completely and noise becomes more dominant, corresponding with the maximal penetration depth of the different GPR systems. In the frequency domain, the data allows to investigate which frequencies contain most valuable information and which ones are affected by noise. Finally, by performing a wavelet transformation the data is transformed to the time-frequency domain. Due to frequency dependent attenuation of electromagnetic signals in the soil, low frequencies will be more dominant in deeper layers, and high frequencies will not be present anymore. This is determining for the range resolution of the data throughout the traveltime of the signal. This work is a contribution to COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar".

De Pue, Jan; Van De Vijver, Ellen; Cornelis, Wim; Van Meirvenne, Marc

2014-05-01

13

Automatic de-noising of knee-joint vibration signals using adaptive time-frequency representations.  

PubMed

A novel de-noising method for improving the signal-to-noise ratio of knee-joint vibration signals (also known as vibro-arthrographic (VAG) signals) is proposed. The de-noising methods considered are based on signal decomposition techniques, such as wavelets, wavelet packets and the matching pursuit (MP) method. Performance evaluation with synthetic signals simulated with the characteristics expected of VAG signals indicates good de-noising results with the MP method. Statistical pattern classification of non-stationary signal features extracted from time-frequency distributions of 37 (19 normal and 18 abnormal) MP method-de-noised VAG signals shows a sensitivity of 83.3%, a specificity of 84.2% and an overall accuracy of 83.8%. PMID:10829383

Krishnan, S; Rangayyan, R M

2000-01-01

14

Time-frequency domain SNR estimation and its application in seismic data processing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Based on an approach estimating frequency domain signal-to-noise ratio (FSNR), we propose a method to evaluate time-frequency domain signal-to-noise ratio (TFSNR). This method adopts short-time Fourier transform (STFT) to estimate instantaneous power spectrum of signal and noise, and thus uses their ratio to compute TFSNR. Unlike FSNR describing the variation of SNR with frequency only, TFSNR depicts the variation of SNR with time and frequency, and thus better handles non-stationary seismic data. By considering TFSNR, we develop methods to improve the effects of inverse Q filtering and high frequency noise attenuation in seismic data processing. Inverse Q filtering considering TFSNR can better solve the problem of amplitude amplification of noise. The high frequency noise attenuation method considering TFSNR, different from other de-noising methods, distinguishes and suppresses noise using an explicit criterion. Examples of synthetic and real seismic data illustrate the correctness and effectiveness of the proposed methods.

Zhao, Yan; Liu, Yang; Li, Xuxuan; Jiang, Nansen

2014-08-01

15

UWB micro-doppler radar for human gait analysis using joint range-time-frequency representation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we present a novel, standalone ultra wideband (UWB) micro-Doppler radar sensor that goes beyond simple range or micro-Doppler detection to combined range-time-Doppler frequency analysis. Moreover, it can monitor more than one human object in both line-of-sight (LOS) and through wall scenarios, thus have full human objects tracking capabilities. The unique radar design is based on narrow pulse transceiver, high speed data acquisition module, and wideband antenna array. For advanced radar post-data processing, joint range-time-frequency representation has been performed. Characteristics of human walking activity have been analyzed using the radar sensor by precisely tracking the radar object and acquiring range-time-Doppler information simultaneously. The UWB micro-Doppler radar prototype is capable of detecting Doppler frequency range from -180 Hz to +180 Hz, which allows a maximum target velocity of 9 m/s. The developed radar sensor can also be extended for many other applications, such as respiration and heartbeat detection of trapped survivors under building debris.

Wang, Yazhou; Fathy, Aly E.

2013-05-01

16

Analysis of cardiac signals using spatial filling index and time-frequency domain  

PubMed Central

Background Analysis of heart rate variation (HRV) has become a popular noninvasive tool for assessing the activities of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). HRV analysis is based on the concept that fast fluctuations may specifically reflect changes of sympathetic and vagal activity. It shows that the structure generating the signal is not simply linear, but also involves nonlinear contributions. These signals are essentially non-stationary; may contain indicators of current disease, or even warnings about impending diseases. The indicators may be present at all times or may occur at random in the time scale. However, to study and pinpoint abnormalities in voluminous data collected over several hours is strenuous and time consuming. Methods This paper presents the spatial filling index and time-frequency analysis of heart rate variability signal for disease identification. Renyi's entropy is evaluated for the signal in the Wigner-Ville and Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT) domain. Results This Renyi's entropy gives lower 'p' value for scalogram than Wigner-Ville distribution and also, the contours of scalogram visually show the features of the diseases. And in the time-frequency analysis, the Renyi's entropy gives better result for scalogram than the Wigner-Ville distribution. Conclusion Spatial filling index and Renyi's entropy has distinct regions for various diseases with an accuracy of more than 95%.

Faust, Oliver; Acharya U, Rajendra; Krishnan, SM; Min, Lim Choo

2004-01-01

17

Seismic waveform tomography in the time-frequency domain with applications to the Australian upper mantle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a novel approach to full waveform tomography based on misfits in the time-frequency domain and adjoint methods. Our focus is on theoretical developments and synthetic inversions for heterogeneities in the Australian upper mantle. The centrepieces of our methodology are envelope and instantaneous phase misfits defined on time-frequency transforms of the seismograms. These misfits allow us to extract the maximum robust information from seismograms for the purpose of high-resolution tomography. We derive Fréchet kernels for different definitions of the envelope and phase misfits using adjoint methods. The Fréchet kernels for instantaneous phase measurements agree with those obtained from waveform cross- correlation only in the special - though unrealistic - case of monochromatic waves. Examples of Fréchet kernels for data collected during the SKIPPY project are computed by means of a recently developed spectral element method. With synthetic inversions we demonstrate that lateral heterogeneities can be determined efficiently by using instantaneous phase measurements of S waves and surface wave trains without explicitly dissecting the seismograms. Special attention is given to the following questions relating to the inversion, i.e., the misfit minimisation algorithm: 1) determination of the optimal step length for gradient methods, 2) acceptance/rejection criteria for the updated models and 3) the pre-conditioning of the steepest descent direction. Finally, we examine the possibility of using enevelope or amplitude measurements and their corresponding Fréchet kernels for seismic waveform tomography.

Fichtner, A.; Bunge, P.; Igel, H.; Kennett, B.

2007-12-01

18

Characterizing Long Interval Cortical Inhibition over the Time-Frequency Domain  

PubMed Central

Objective Long-interval cortical inhibition (LICI) can be recorded from motor and non-motor regions of the cortex through combined transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with electroencephalography (EEG). This study aimed to evaluate additional dimensions of LICI characteristics over an extended time-frequency and spatial domain. This was done by introducing two alternative measures of LICI signal amplitude: the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) and the Hilbert transform (HT). Both approaches estimate signal amplitude not taking into account the phase. In both cases LICI was measured as the difference between the unconditioned and conditioned activity evoked by the test pulse. Finally, we evaluated whether the topographical patterns of single and paired responses differed beyond the expected variations in amplitude. Materials and Methods LICI was delivered as single and paired pulses to the motor cortex (MC) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in 33 healthy subjects with TMS-EEG. Results Significant differences (p<0.0001) between the unconditioned and conditioned evoked activity were found for both the DLPFC and MC using both methods (i.e., DFT and HT) after correcting for multiple comparisons in the time-frequency domain. The influence of inhibition was found to be significantly larger in space and time than previously considered. Single and paired conditions differ in intensity, but also in their topographic pattern (i.e., the specific spatiotemporal configuration of active sources). Conclusion Similar results were found by both DFT and HT. The effect of inhibition across the cortex was also found to be complex and extended. In particular, it was found that LICI may be measured with high sensitivity in areas that were relatively distant from the stimulation site, which may have important practical applications. The analysis presented in this study overcomes some limitations of previous studies and could serve as a key reference for future studies examining TMS-indices of inhibition/excitation in healthy and diseased states.

Garcia Dominguez, Luis; Radhu, Natasha; Farzan, Faranak; Daskalakis, Zafiris J.

2014-01-01

19

Maximum likelihood estimator of operational modal analysis for linear time-varying structures in time-frequency domain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper investigates the problem of modal parameter estimation of time-varying structures under unknown excitation. A time-frequency-domain maximum likelihood estimator of modal parameters for linear time-varying structures is presented by adapting the frequency-domain maximum likelihood estimator to the time-frequency domain. The proposed estimator is parametric, that is, the linear time-varying structures are represented by a time-dependent common-denominator model. To adapt the existing frequency-domain estimator for time-invariant structures to the time-frequency methods for time-varying cases, an orthogonal polynomial and z-domain mapping hybrid basis function is presented, which has the advantageous numerical condition and with which it is convenient to calculate the modal parameters. A series of numerical examples have evaluated and illustrated the performance of the proposed maximum likelihood estimator, and a group of laboratory experiments has further validated the proposed estimator.

Zhou, Si-Da; Heylen, Ward; Sas, Paul; Liu, Li

2014-05-01

20

Time-frequency-domain dispersion measurement in rare earth doped large effective mode area multicore fibers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ytterbium doped multicore fibers have been recently employed in the field of high power and Quasi-Gaussian beam lasers to design truly single-mode multicore fiber lasers. The special design of these fibers offers low bending loss even for compact high power lasers and amplifiers. Moreover, the Multi-core fiber amplifier possesses a large effective mode area which results in a significant decrease of the related nonlinear effects. In the paper, modal resolved group-velocity dispersion measurements in active multicore fibers are performed using time-frequency-domain white-light interferometry. A Mach-Zehnder-type interferometer with dual-channel detection in the spectral range from 0.4 ?m up to 1.7 ?m and a home-made supercontinuum source are used. Temporally resolved spectrograms recorded at distinct delay positions enable the detection of interference fringes for the equalizationwavelength. The group-velocity dispersion can be derived by applying a Sellmeier polynomial fit to the wavelength dependent differential group delay function. The dispersion parameters for several LMA fibers are investigated over a broad spectral range of about 1.3 ?m.

Baselt, T.; Taudt, Ch.; Hartmann, P.

2014-03-01

21

Joint time-frequency measurements of modelocked semiconductor diode lasers and dynamics using frequency-resolved optical gating  

Microsoft Academic Search

Joint time-frequency ultrafast measurements using frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) have been used to provide a fundamental understanding of: (1) ultrashort pulse propagation in semiconductor optical amplifiers; (2) the modelocking dynamics in external cavity semiconductor diode lasers; and (3) correlated multiple-wavelength generation from mode locked semiconductor lasers. The pulse shaping and chirping effects measured by FROG are shown to be attributed

Peter J. Delfyett; Hong Shi; S. Gee; Ikuko Nitta; John C. Connolly; Gerard A. Alphonse

1999-01-01

22

Review of time-frequency domain concepts with application to ultrashort laser pulses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We review the application of time-frequency concepts in the field of ultrashort laser science. We consider the Wigner distribution, the spectrogram, and the sonogram, and show how each of these distributions are used in ultrafast laser science. We also plot four example pulses in each of the three representations.

Delong, Kenneth W.; Trebino, Rick P.; Fittinghoff, David N.; Ladera, Celso L.

1995-04-01

23

Measuring ultrashort laser pulses in the time-frequency domain using frequency-resolved optical gating  

Microsoft Academic Search

We summarize the problem of measuring an ultrashort laser pulse and describe in detail a technique that completely characterizes a pulse in time: frequency-resolved optical gating. Emphasis is placed on the choice of experimental beam geometry and the implementation of the iterative phase-retrieval algorithm that together yield an accurate measurement of the pulse time-dependent intensity and phase over a wide

Rick Trebino; Kenneth W. DeLong; David N. Fittinghoff; John N. Sweetser; Bruce A. Richman; Daniel J. Kane

1997-01-01

24

Joint channel estimation and time-frequency synchronization for uplink TDS-OFDMA systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

As one of the key technologies of the Chinese national digital television terrestrial broadcasting (DTTB) standard, time domain synchronous OFDM (TDS-OFDM) is used in the downlink broadcasting transmission scenarios. Based on TDS-OFDM, the uplink multiple access scheme called TDS-OFDMA has been recently proposed. The TDSOFDMA system assumes perfect timing and frequency synchronization, both of which are difficult to be achieved

Linglong Dai; Zhaocheng Wang; Jun Wang; Zhixing Yang

2010-01-01

25

Aspect dependence of impulse radar extracted signature features in the combined time-frequency domain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the scattering interaction of electromagnetic pulses of short duration with a target of either simple or complex shape. The complex targets are plastic scale models of two aircraft with metallized surface. The form-function in the back-scattering direction, filtered by the complete system of radar and digitizing signal analyzer, is determined from measured data when the target is illuminated at each one of several different aspect angles. The experimental data are obtained with the aid of an impulse radar system located in an anechoic chamber. We examine the details of how various resonance features of the returned echo evolve in time using a PWD with a suitably selected Gaussian time-window. The results are displayed in a series of 3-D surface plots and 2-D contour plots together with the recorded waveforms and their spectra. Time-frequency signatures from the two scale models of aircraft are examined.

Strifors, Hans C.; Brusmark, B.; Abrahamson, Steffan; Gaunaurd, Guillermo C.

1994-07-01

26

Methods of EEG Signal Features Extraction Using Linear Analysis in Frequency and Time-Frequency Domains  

PubMed Central

Technically, a feature represents a distinguishing property, a recognizable measurement, and a functional component obtained from a section of a pattern. Extracted features are meant to minimize the loss of important information embedded in the signal. In addition, they also simplify the amount of resources needed to describe a huge set of data accurately. This is necessary to minimize the complexity of implementation, to reduce the cost of information processing, and to cancel the potential need to compress the information. More recently, a variety of methods have been widely used to extract the features from EEG signals, among these methods are time frequency distributions (TFD), fast fourier transform (FFT), eigenvector methods (EM), wavelet transform (WT), and auto regressive method (ARM), and so on. In general, the analysis of EEG signal has been the subject of several studies, because of its ability to yield an objective mode of recording brain stimulation which is widely used in brain-computer interface researches with application in medical diagnosis and rehabilitation engineering. The purposes of this paper, therefore, shall be discussing some conventional methods of EEG feature extraction methods, comparing their performances for specific task, and finally, recommending the most suitable method for feature extraction based on performance.

Al-Fahoum, Amjed S.; Al-Fraihat, Ausilah A.

2014-01-01

27

Joint discrepancy evaluation of an existing steel bridge using time-frequency and wavelet-based approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of this study is to bring out the errors introduced during construction which are overlooked during the physical verification of the bridge. Such errors can be pointed out if the symmetry of the structure is challenged. This paper thus presents the study of downstream and upstream truss of newly constructed steel bridge using time-frequency and wavelet-based approach. The variation in the behavior of truss joints of bridge with variation in the vehicle speed has been worked out to determine their flexibility. The testing on the steel bridge was carried out with the same instrument setup on both the upstream and downstream trusses of the bridge at two different speeds with the same moving vehicle. The nodal flexibility investigation is carried out using power spectral density, short-time Fourier transform, and wavelet packet transform with respect to both the trusses and speed. The results obtained have shown that the joints of both upstream and downstream trusses of the bridge behave in a different manner even if designed for the same loading due to constructional variations and vehicle movement, in spite of the fact that the analytical models present a simplistic model for analysis and design. The difficulty of modal parameter extraction of the particular bridge under study increased with the increase in speed due to decreased excitation time.

Walia, Suresh Kumar; Patel, Raj Kumar; Vinayak, Hemant Kumar; Parti, Raman

2013-12-01

28

A robust watermarking algorithm based on time-frequency analysis in S transformation domain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, a robust image watermarking method in two-dimensional space/spatial-frequency distributions domain is proposed which is robust against geometric distortion. This watermarking is detected by a linear frequency change. The one-dimensional S transformation is used to detect the watermark. The chirp signals are used as watermarks and this type of signals is resistant to all stationary filtering methods and exhibits geometrical symmetry. In the two-dimensional Radon-Wigner transformation domain, the chirp signals used as watermarks change only its position in space/spatialfrequency distribution, after applying linear geometrical attack, such as scale rotation and cropping. But the two-dimensional Radon-Wigner transformation needs too much difficult computing. So the image is put into a series of 1D signals by choosing scalable local time windows. The watermark embedded in the 1D S transformation domain. The watermark thus generated is invisible and performs well in StirMark test and is robust to geometrical attacks. Compared with other watermarking algorithms, this algorithm is more robust, especially against geometric distortion, while having excellent frequency properties.

Deng, Minghui; Zhen, Jingbo

2010-02-01

29

Deriving Lifetime Maps in the Time/Frequency Domain of Coherent Structures in the Turbulent Boundary Layer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The lifetimes of coherent structures are derived from data correlated over a 3 sensor array sampling streamwise sidewall pressure at high Reynolds number (> 10(exp 8)). The data were acquired at subsonic, transonic and supersonic speeds aboard a Tupolev Tu-144. The lifetimes are computed from a variant of the correlation length termed the lifelength. Characteristic lifelengths are estimated by fitting a Gaussian distribution to the sensors cross spectra and are shown to compare favorably with Efimtsov s prediction of correlation space scales. Lifelength distributions are computed in the time/frequency domain using an interval correlation technique on the continuous wavelet transform of the original time data. The median values of the lifelength distributions are found to be very close to the frequency averaged result. The interval correlation technique is shown to allow the retrieval and inspection of the original time data of each event in the lifelength distributions, thus providing a means to locate and study the nature of the coherent structure in the turbulent boundary layer. The lifelength data are converted to lifetimes using the convection velocity. The lifetime of events in the time/frequency domain are displayed in Lifetime Maps. The primary purpose of the paper is to validate these new analysis techniques so that they can be used with confidence to further characterize the behavior of coherent structures in the turbulent boundary layer.

Palumbo, Dan

2008-01-01

30

Experimental research on anti-vibration interferometry based on time-frequency-domain analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Phase-shifting interferometry is a non-contact precision precise measuring method for optical surface, but it is highly sensitive to external vibrations. A time-and-frequency-domain (TFD) anti-noise phase-shifting interferometry is proposed to eliminate the effect of vibrations and improve the precision of measurement. According to simulations and preliminary experiments, active phase-shifting speed as well as interferogram capture speed should be increased to improve the anti-vibration capability of the TFD method. In this paper, a fast phase-shifting approach based on PZT actuator and interferogram detection with high-speed camera is proposed. Preliminary experimental results are given to demonstrate the approach.

Hu, Yao; Hao, Qun; Zhang, Fanghua; Tian, Yuhan

2013-10-01

31

An enhanced algorithm for knee joint sound classification using feature extraction based on time-frequency analysis.  

PubMed

Vibroarthrographic (VAG) signals, generated by human knee movement, are non-stationary and multi-component in nature and their time-frequency distribution (TFD) provides a powerful means to analyze such signals. The objective of this paper is to improve the classification accuracy of the features, obtained from the TFD of normal and abnormal VAG signals, using segmentation by the dynamic time warping (DTW) and denoising algorithm by the singular value decomposition (SVD). VAG and knee angle signals, recorded simultaneously during one flexion and one extension of the knee, were segmented and normalized at 0.5 Hz by the DTW method. Also, the noise within the TFD of the segmented VAG signals was reduced by the SVD algorithm, and a back-propagation neural network (BPNN) was used to classify the normal and abnormal VAG signals. The characteristic parameters of VAG signals consist of the energy, energy spread, frequency and frequency spread parameter extracted by the TFD. A total of 1408 segments (normal 1031, abnormal 377) were used for training and evaluating the BPNN. As a result, the average classification accuracy was 91.4 (standard deviation +/-1.7) %. The proposed method showed good potential for the non-invasive diagnosis and monitoring of joint disorders such as osteoarthritis. PMID:19217685

Kim, Keo Sik; Seo, Jeong Hwan; Kang, Jin U; Song, Chul Gyu

2009-05-01

32

Theoretical background for continental- and global-scale full-waveform inversion in the time-frequency domain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a new approach to full seismic waveform inversion on continental and global scales. This is based on the time-frequency transform of both data and synthetic seismograms with the use of time- and frequency-dependent phase and envelope misfits. These misfits allow us to provide a complete quantification of the differences between data and synthetics while separating phase and amplitude information. The result is an efficient exploitation of waveform information that is robust and quasi-linearly related to Earth's structure. Thus, the phase and envelope misfits are usable for continental- and global-scale tomography, that is, in a scenario where the seismic wavefield is spatially undersampled and where a 3-D reference model is usually unavailable. Body waves, surface waves and interfering phases are naturally included in the analysis. We discuss and illustrate technical details of phase measurements such as the treatment of phase jumps and instability in the case of small amplitudes. The Fréchet kernels for phase and envelope misfits can be expressed in terms of their corresponding adjoint wavefields and the forward wavefield. The adjoint wavefields are uniquely determined by their respective adjoint-source time functions. We derive the adjoint-source time functions for phase and envelope misfits. The adjoint sources can be expressed as inverse time-frequency transforms of a weighted phase difference or a weighted envelope difference. In a comparative study, we establish connections between the phase and envelope misfits and the following widely used measures of seismic waveform differences: (1) cross-correlation time-shifts; (2) relative rms amplitude differences; (3) generalized seismological data functionals and (4) the L2 distance between data and synthetics used in time-domain full-waveform inversion. We illustrate the computation of Fréchet kernels for phase and envelope misfits with data from an event in the West Irian region of Indonesia, recorded on the Australian continent. The synthetic seismograms are computed for a heterogeneous 3-D velocity model of the Australian upper mantle, with a spectral-element method. The examples include P body waves, Rayleigh waves and S waves, interfering with higher-mode surface waves. All the kernels differ from the more familar kernels for cross-correlation time-shifts or relative rms amplitude differences. The differences arise from interference effects, 3-D Earth's structure and waveform dissimilarities that are due to waveform dispersion in the heterogeneous Earth.

Fichtner, Andreas; Kennett, Brian L. N.; Igel, Heiner; Bunge, Hans-Peter

2008-11-01

33

IDENTIFICATION OF TEMPORAL SPECTRAL ATTRIBUTES OF SEISMIC RECORDS BY MEAN OF JOINT TIME-FREQUENCY SPECTRAL DECOMPOSITION  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spectral characteristics of stationary time series data are generally portrayed with the aid of the classical power spectrum. This latter spectrum is usually calculated from the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of the time series data. Unfortunately, such approach provides no temporal information and is unsuitable for examining seismic records, which exhibit transient nonstationary behavior. A classical approach to obtaining the desired time-frequency information contained in a seismic record is to use a Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT), which gives rise to a spectrogram. The spectrogram indicates how the energy in the record is distributed over time and frequency. The uncertainty principle precludes to simultaneously obtaining arbitrary fine resolution in both time and frequency. In order to overcome various shortcomings associated with the STFT, a class, known as Cohen's class, of time-frequency energy distributions has been developed in recent years. This class includes the Wigner-Ville (WV), Choi-Williams (CW), and reduced interference distribution (RID). Each possesses certain advantages and disadvantages. The objective of this paper is to compare the performance of these state-of-the-art time-frequency distributions when applied to seismic records associated with seismic data collected from free-field stations, as well as vibrations recorded from a building at four different levels. Tradeoffs between time and frequency resolution, suppression of so-called interference terms, and methodologies to portray large dynamic range will be described in detail.

Huerta-Lopez, C. I.; Upegui-Botero, F. M.; Martínez-Cruzado, J. A.

2009-12-01

34

Time-Frequency Domain Analysis of Vibration Signals for Machinery Diagnostics. 2: The Weighted Wigner-Ville Distribution.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The application of sliding weighting functions to the Wigner-Ville distribution is examined. The effect of the weighting function on the time frequency distribution is discussed and it is shown that the level of the interference terms, the production of a...

P. D. Mcfadden W. J. Wang

1991-01-01

35

Theoretical background for continental- and global-scale full-waveform inversion in the time-frequency domain  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a new approach to full seismic waveform inversion on continental and global scales. This is based on the time-frequency transform of both data and synthetic seismograms with the use of time- and frequency-dependent phase and envelope misfits. These misfits allow us to provide a complete quantification of the differences between data and synthetics while separating phase and amplitude

Andreas Fichtner; Brian L. N. Kennett; Heiner Igel; Hans-Peter Bunge

2008-01-01

36

Measuring Multi-Joint Stiffness during Single Movements: Numerical Validation of a Novel Time-Frequency Approach  

PubMed Central

This study presents and validates a Time-Frequency technique for measuring 2-dimensional multijoint arm stiffness throughout a single planar movement as well as during static posture. It is proposed as an alternative to current regressive methods which require numerous repetitions to obtain average stiffness on a small segment of the hand trajectory. The method is based on the analysis of the reassigned spectrogram of the arm's response to impulsive perturbations and can estimate arm stiffness on a trial-by-trial basis. Analytic and empirical methods are first derived and tested through modal analysis on synthetic data. The technique's accuracy and robustness are assessed by modeling the estimation of stiffness time profiles changing at different rates and affected by different noise levels. Our method obtains results comparable with two well-known regressive techniques. We also test how the technique can identify the viscoelastic component of non-linear and higher than second order systems with a non-parametrical approach. The technique proposed here is very impervious to noise and can be used easily for both postural and movement tasks. Estimations of stiffness profiles are possible with only one perturbation, making our method a useful tool for estimating limb stiffness during motor learning and adaptation tasks, and for understanding the modulation of stiffness in individuals with neurodegenerative diseases.

Piovesan, Davide; Pierobon, Alberto; DiZio, Paul; Lackner, James R.

2012-01-01

37

Isometric fatigue patterns in time and time-frequency domains of triceps surae muscle in different knee positions.  

PubMed

The occurrence of fatigue in triceps surae (TS) muscles during sustained plantar flexion contraction is investigated by means of the RMS electromyogram (EMG) and the instantaneous median frequency (IMF) of the short time Fourier transform (STFT). Six male subjects realized a 40% maximal plantar flexion isometric voluntary contraction until fatigue in two knee positions. Electrodes were positioned on gastrocnemius medialis, gastrocnemius lateralis and soleus muscles. The torque (TO) and EMG signals were synchronized. The RMS and the median of the IMF values were obtained, respectively, for each 250 ms and 1s windows of signal. Each signal was segmented into 10 epochs, from which the mean values of IMF, RMS and TO were obtained and submitted to linear regressions to determine parameter trends. Friedman test with the Dunn's post hoc were used to test for differences among muscles activation for each knee position and among slopes of regression curves, as well as to observe changes in TS RMS values over time. The results indicate different activation strategies with the knee extended (KE) in contrast to knee flexed (KF). With the KE, the gastrocnemii showed typical fatigue behavior with significant (p<0.05) IMF reductions and RMS increases over time, while soleus showed concomitant RMS and IMF increases (p<0.05) suggesting an increased soleus contribution to the torque production. With KF, the gastrocnemii were under activated, increasing the role of soleus. Thus, time-frequency analysis represented an important tool for TS muscular fatigue evaluation, allowing differentiates the role of soleus muscle. PMID:21565529

Pereira, Glauber Ribeiro; de Oliveira, Liliam Fernandes; Nadal, Jurandir

2011-08-01

38

Analysis in the joint time-frequency domain of the identifying signatures of submerged targets insonified by dolphin clicks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the scattering interaction of dolphin-emitted acoustic pulses ('clicks') with various elastic shells located, underwater, in front of the animal in a large test site in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. A carefully instrumented analog- to-digital system continuously captured the emitted clicks and also the returned, backscattered echoes. Using standard conditioning techniques and food reinforcers, the dolphin is taught to push

Hans C. Strifors; Guillermo C. Gaunaurd; Patrick W. Moore

1997-01-01

39

Time-Frequency Data Reduction for Event Related Potentials: Combining Principal Component Analysis and Matching Pursuit.  

PubMed

Joint time-frequency representations offer a rich representation of event related potentials (ERPs) that cannot be obtained through individual time or frequency domain analysis. This representation, however, comes at the expense of increased data volume and the difficulty of interpreting the resulting representations. Therefore, methods that can reduce the large amount of time-frequency data to experimentally relevant components are essential. In this paper, we present a method that reduces the large volume of ERP time-frequency data into a few significant time-frequency parameters. The proposed method is based on applying the widely-used matching pursuit (MP) approach, with a Gabor dictionary, to principal components extracted from the time-frequency domain. The proposed PCA-Gabor decomposition is compared with other time-frequency data reduction methods such as the time-frequency PCA approach alone and standard matching pursuit methods using a Gabor dictionary for both simulated and biological data. The results show that the proposed PCA-Gabor approach performs better than either the PCA alone or the standard MP data reduction methods, by using the smallest amount of ERP data variance to produce the strongest statistical separation between experimental conditions. PMID:20730031

Aviyente, Selin; Bernat, Edward M; Malone, Stephen M; Iacono, William G

2010-01-01

40

Time-Frequency Data Reduction for Event Related Potentials: Combining Principal Component Analysis and Matching Pursuit  

PubMed Central

Joint time-frequency representations offer a rich representation of event related potentials (ERPs) that cannot be obtained through individual time or frequency domain analysis. This representation, however, comes at the expense of increased data volume and the difficulty of interpreting the resulting representations. Therefore, methods that can reduce the large amount of time-frequency data to experimentally relevant components are essential. In this paper, we present a method that reduces the large volume of ERP time-frequency data into a few significant time-frequency parameters. The proposed method is based on applying the widely-used matching pursuit (MP) approach, with a Gabor dictionary, to principal components extracted from the time-frequency domain. The proposed PCA-Gabor decomposition is compared with other time-frequency data reduction methods such as the time-frequency PCA approach alone and standard matching pursuit methods using a Gabor dictionary for both simulated and biological data. The results show that the proposed PCA-Gabor approach performs better than either the PCA alone or the standard MP data reduction methods, by using the smallest amount of ERP data variance to produce the strongest statistical separation between experimental conditions.

Aviyente, Selin; Bernat, Edward M.; Malone, Stephen M.; Iacono, William G.

2010-01-01

41

Filtering in the joint time/chirp-rate domain for separation of quadratic and cubic phase chirp signals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article investigates the possibility and convenience of a filtering operation in the joint time/chirp-rate (TCR) domain, and proposes a novel linear TCR filter for decomposing multicomponent signals into their quadratic and/or cubic phase chirp components with monotonic instantaneous chirp-rate (ICR) laws only. The TCR domain mask of the filter is selected on a display of a TCR representation of an input signal to isolate the desired chirp component. Projecting the input signal onto the phase signal associated with the TCR mask and approximating the phase difference in this projection operation in terms of ICR values result in the proposed TCR filter that recovers the selected component. Simulations illustrate the proposed filtering in recovery of undersampled cubic phase signals and in resolving back-to-back objects from in-line holograms for which cases it is easier to design filter masks in the TCR domain than in the time-frequency domain.

Özgen, Mehmet Tankut

2012-12-01

42

Time-frequency distributions - A review  

Microsoft Academic Search

A review and tutorial of the fundamental ideas and methods of joint time-frequency distributions is presented. The objective of the field is to describe how the spectral content of a signal changes in time and to develop the physical and mathematical ideas needed to understand what a time-varying spectrum is. The basic goal is to devise a distribution that represents

Leon Cohen

1989-01-01

43

On the use of time-frequency domains for the improvement of the Stochastic Matched Filter Pulse Compression scheme with a high speed computing architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

In several domains of engineering technologies, such as telecommunication, sonar imaging, positioning systems, radar, medical imaging ..., the main problem is to identify a transmitted useful pulse in a noise-corrupted received signal. A solution to this problem consists in using a modulated pulse for emission and a matched filter for reception. Such a concept is known as pulse-compression. Taking into

Philippe Courmontagne; G. Julien; M. E. Bouhier

2010-01-01

44

Semi-blind space-time-frequency multiuser receiver for STBC MC-CDMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel multiuser detection scheme for space-time block coded multicarrier code-division multiple-access (STBC MC-CDMA) systems is proposed. More specifically, a semi-blind space-time-frequency minimum mean square error based parallel interference cancellation receiver (STF-MMSE\\/PIC) is developed for an STBC MC-CDMA system. The signal processing of this new detector is jointly carried out in space, time and frequency domains, which leads to a

Zexian Li; Matti Latva-aho

2004-01-01

45

Time-Frequency Domain Memory and Processing.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report summarizes the results of a 3-year program of research on the physics and technology needed to develop high-performance optical memory and optical processing systems based on the concept called the stimulated photon echo (SPE). The research go...

D. L. Huestis G. W. Faris E. A. Arons

2002-01-01

46

Sparse time-frequency representations  

PubMed Central

Auditory neurons preserve exquisite temporal information about sound features, but we do not know how the brain uses this information to process the rapidly changing sounds of the natural world. Simple arguments for effective use of temporal information led us to consider the reassignment class of time-frequency representations as a model of auditory processing. Reassigned time-frequency representations can track isolated simple signals with accuracy unlimited by the time-frequency uncertainty principle, but lack of a general theory has hampered their application to complex sounds. We describe the reassigned representations for white noise and show that even spectrally dense signals produce sparse reassignments: the representation collapses onto a thin set of lines arranged in a froth-like pattern. Preserving phase information allows reconstruction of the original signal. We define a notion of “consensus,” based on stability of reassignment to time-scale changes, which produces sharp spectral estimates for a wide class of complex mixed signals. As the only currently known class of time-frequency representations that is always “in focus” this methodology has general utility in signal analysis. It may also help explain the remarkable acuity of auditory perception. Many details of complex sounds that are virtually undetectable in standard sonograms are readily perceptible and visible in reassignment.

Gardner, Timothy J.; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

2006-01-01

47

Nonblind and semiblind space-time-frequency multiuser detection for space-time block-coded MC-CDMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, a novel space-time-frequency minimum mean squared error (STF-MMSE)-based parallel interference cancellation receiver is proposed for space-time block-coded multicarrier code division multiple access systems in time-varying fading channels. The signal processing of this new detector is jointly implemented in space, time, and frequency domains, which leads to a powerful capability of combating interference coming from different sources. An

Zexian Li; Matti Latva-aho

2005-01-01

48

Time-frequency component analysis of somatosensory evoked potentials in rats  

PubMed Central

Background Somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) signal usually contains a set of detailed temporal components measured and identified in a time domain, giving meaningful information on physiological mechanisms of the nervous system. The purpose of this study is to measure and identify detailed time-frequency components in normal SEP using time-frequency analysis (TFA) methods and to obtain their distribution pattern in the time-frequency domain. Methods This paper proposes to apply a high-resolution time-frequency analysis algorithm, the matching pursuit (MP), to extract detailed time-frequency components of SEP signals. The MP algorithm decomposes a SEP signal into a number of elementary time-frequency components and provides a time-frequency parameter description of the components. A clustering by estimation of the probability density function in parameter space is followed to identify stable SEP time-frequency components. Results Experimental results on cortical SEP signals of 28 mature rats show that a series of stable SEP time-frequency components can be identified using the MP decomposition algorithm. Based on the statistical properties of the component parameters, an approximated distribution of these components in time-frequency domain is suggested to describe the complex SEP response. Conclusion This study shows that there is a set of stable and minute time-frequency components in SEP signals, which are revealed by the MP decomposition and clustering. These stable SEP components have specific localizations in the time-frequency domain.

Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Yang, Jun-Lin; Chan, Shing-Chow; Luk, Keith Dip-Kei; Hu, Yong

2009-01-01

49

Applying the joint Wigner time-frequency distribution to characterization of ultra-short optical dissipative solitary pulses in the actively mode-locked semiconductor laser with an external single-mode fiber cavity  

Microsoft Academic Search

We discuss specifically elaborated technique for characterizing the train-average parameters of low-power picosecond optical pulses with the frequency chirp, arranged in high-repetition-frequency trains, in both time and frequency domains. This technique is applied to rather important case of pulse generation when a single-mode semiconductor heterolaser operates in a multi-pulse regime of the active mode-locking. In fact, the trains of optical

Alexandre S. Shcherbakov; P. Moreno Zarate; Joaquin Campos Acosta; Yurij V. Il'N; Il'ya S. Tarasov

2010-01-01

50

Tracking of instantaneous spectrum components using time-frequency methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper serves the idea of applying joint time-frequency representations for analysis of non-stationary signals in electrical engineering. Main directions of researches are concentrated around Cohenpsilas class of transformation which gives some possibilities of adaptation to analyzed signal by choosing appropriate kernel function. Additionally, novel approach delivered by S-transform is also introduced. In order to investigate the methods several experiments

T. Lobos; T. Sikorski; K. Wozniak

2008-01-01

51

Time-Frequency Methods for Multicomponents Signals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Instantaneous frequency (IF) is a very important parameter in a large number of applications. Generally, the IF is a non-linear function of time. For such cases the analysis of time-frequency content provides an efficient solution. This paper is a comparative study of the performances in IF estimation of the two time-frequency based methods. Limitations of the two methods are presented

Marius Salagean; I. Nafornita

2007-01-01

52

Brain connectivity study of joint attention using frequency-domain optical imaging technique  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Autism is a socio-communication brain development disorder. It is marked by degeneration in the ability to respond to joint attention skill task, from as early as 12 to 18 months of age. This trait is used to distinguish autistic from nonautistic populations. In this study, diffuse optical imaging is being used to study brain connectivity for the first time in response to joint attention experience in normal adults. The prefrontal region of the brain was non-invasively imaged using a frequency-domain based optical imager. The imaging studies were performed on 11 normal right-handed adults and optical measurements were acquired in response to joint-attention based video clips. While the intensity-based optical data provides information about the hemodynamic response of the underlying neural process, the time-dependent phase-based optical data has the potential to explicate the directional information on the activation of the brain. Thus brain connectivity studies are performed by computing covariance/correlations between spatial units using this frequency-domain based optical measurements. The preliminary results indicate that the extent of synchrony and directional variation in the pattern of activation varies in the left and right frontal cortex. The results have significant implication for research in neural pathways associated with autism that can be mapped using diffuse optical imaging tools in the future.

Chaudhary, Ujwal; Zhu, Banghe; Godavarty, Anuradha

2010-02-01

53

Time/Frequency Analysis of Terrestrial Impack Crater Records  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The terrestrial impact cratering record recently has been examined in the time domain by Chang & Moon (2005). It was found that the ˜ 26 Myr periodicity in the impact cratering rate exists over the last ˜ 250 Myrs. Such a periodicity can be found regardless of the lower limit of the diameter up to D ˜ 35 km. It immediately called pros and cons. The aim of this paper is two-fold: (1) to test if reported periodicities can be obtained with an independent method, (2) to see, as attempted earlier, if the phase is modulated. To achieve these goals we employ the time/frequency analysis and for the first time apply this method to the terrestrial impact cratering records. We have confirmed that without exceptions noticeable peaks appear around ˜ 25 Myr, corresponding to a frequency of ˜ 0.04 (Myr)^{-1}. We also find periodicities in the data base including small impact craters, which are longer. Though the time/frequency analysis allows us to observe directly phase variations, we cannot find any indications of such changes. Instead, modes display slow variations of power in time. The time/frequency analysis shows a nonstationary behavior of the modes. The power can grow from just above the noise level and then decrease back to its initial level in a time of order of 10 Myrs.

Chang, Heon-Young

2006-09-01

54

Optical interferometry experiment in the time-frequency domain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have developed an optical heterodyning experiment for the undergraduate physics laboratory curriculum that permits observation of optical beat phenomena associated with the interference of two light beams with slightly different frequencies. For optical beat frequencies below 10 Hz the interference of the light beams is observed on a viewing screen as a slowly drifting Michelson interference fringe pattern. For beat frequencies greater than 10 Hz the drift of the interference fringes is too rapid to be observed visually; however, if a photodetector is placed so as to detect light from within the rapidly drifting fringe pattern, the time variation of the detected light signal can be amplified and fed to a loudspeaker, allowing an individual student or a lecture audience to hear the beating of the two light beams. Since commercial amateur radio transceivers are used to control the frequencies of the two interfering light beams, the transceivers can be modulated with a voice signal to generate single sideband modulated light beams that can be demodulated using standard optical homodyne detection techniques. This simple optical communications system demonstrates clearly how transmitter and receiver design principles at radio frequencies can be transferred to optical frequencies for the implementation of modern lightwave communication systems.

Dunham, Jeffrey S.; Appleby, James E.; Bennett, Stephen C.; Butler, Crispin O.

1992-03-01

55

Time-frequency characterisation of paediatric heart sounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The operation of the heart can be monitored by the sounds it emits. Structural defects or malfunction of the heart valves will cause additional abnormal sounds such as murmurs and ejection clicks. This thesis aims to characterise the heart sounds of three groups of children who either have an Atrial Septal Defect (ASD), a Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD), or are normal. Two aspects of heart sounds have been specifically investigated; the time-frequency analysis of systolic murmurs and the identification of splitting patterns in the second heart sound. The analysis is based on 42 paediatric heart sound recordings. Murmurs are sounds generated by turbulent flow of blood in the heart. They can be found in patients with both pathological and non-pathological conditions. The acoustic quality of the murmurs generated in each heart condition are different. The first aspect of this work is to characterise the three types of murmurs in the time- frequency domain. Modern time-frequency methods including, the Wigner-Ville Distribution, Smoothed Pseudo Wigner-Ville Distribution, Choi-Williams Distribution and spectrogram have been applied to characterise the murmurs. It was found that the three classes of murmurs exhibited different signatures in their time-frequency representations. By performing Discriminant Analysis, it was shown that spectral features extracted from the time- frequency representations can be used to distinguish between the three classes. The second aspect of the research is to identify splitting patterns in the second heart sound, which consists of two acoustic components due to the closure of the aortic valve and pulmonary valve. The aortic valve usually closes before the pulmonary valve, introducing a time delay known as 'split'. The split normally varies in duration over the respiratory cycle. In certain pathologies such as the ASD, the split becomes fixed over the respiration cycle. A technique based on adaptive signal decomposition is developed to measure the split and hence to identify the splitting pattern as either 'variable' or 'fixed'. This work has successfully characterised the murmurs and splitting patterns in the three groups of patients. Features extracted can be used for diagnostic purposes.

Leung, Terence Sze-Tat

1998-08-01

56

Radon transformation of time-frequency distributions for analysis of multicomponent signals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Radon transform of a time-frequency distribution produces local areas of signal concentration that facilitate interpretation of multicomponent signals. The Radon-Wigner transform can be efficiently implemented with dechirping in the time domain, however, only half of the possible projections through the time-frequency plane can be realized because of aliasing. We show here that the frequency dual to dechirping exists, so

John C. Wood; Daniel T. Barry

1994-01-01

57

Time--Frequency Masking for Speech Separation and Its Potential for Hearing Aid Design  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new approach to the separation of speech from speech-in-noise mixtures is the use of time-frequency (T-F) masking. Originated in the field of computational auditory scene analysis, T-F masking performs separa- tion in the time-frequency domain. This article intro- duces the T-F masking concept and reviews T-F masking algorithms that separate target speech from either mon- aural or binaural mixtures,

DeLiang Wang

2008-01-01

58

Time-frequency signatures based on a fuzzy-cluster representation as a means for automatic classification of targets buried underground  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the backscattered echoes from selected targets that are extracted by an impulse radar system playing the role of a ground penetrating radar (GPR). The targets are metal and nonmetal objects buried to a selected depth in dry sand in an indoor sandbox. The recorded time-series data are analyzed in the joint time-frequency domain using a pseudo-Wigner distribution (PWD). These distributions with their extracted features in the two-dimensional time-frequency domain are viewed as the target signatures. To be useful for target identification purposes, a signature representation should display a 'sufficient' amount of distinguishing features, yet be robust enough to suppress the interference of noise contained in the received signals. Multiple scattering between a target and the surface of the ground is another obstacle for successful target recognition that time-frequency distributions could counteract by unveiling the time progression of the returned target information. We have previously demonstrated the merits of the PWD relative to various competing time-frequency distributions, in particular its capability of extracting a target's time-frequency signature when the target is buried at different depths. We have also used a classification method developed from the fuzzy C-means clustering technique to reduce the number and kind of features in the PWD signature templates. This is accomplished by converting the PWD signature into a point cluster representation and then reducing the cluster to a (smaller) number of cluster centers. This classification method has been further developed by associating a weight with each point in the cluster representation. We put the classification algorithm to a test against validation data taken from an additional set of returned echoes. The same targets are used but they are buried at a different location in the sand. Class membership of a target is then decided using a simple metric. The results of our investigation serve to assess the possibility of identifying subsurface targets using a GPR.

Strifors, Hans C.; Abrahamson, Steffan; Gustafsson, Anders; Gaunaurd, Guillermo C.

1998-09-01

59

Nonlinear optical security system based on a joint transform correlator in the Fresnel domain.  

PubMed

A new optical security system for image encryption based on a nonlinear joint transform correlator (JTC) in the Fresnel domain (FrD) is proposed. The proposal of the encryption process is a lensless optical system that produces a real encrypted image and is a simplified version of some previous JTC-based encryption systems. We use a random complex mask as the key in the nonlinear system for the purpose of increasing the security of the encrypted image. In order to retrieve the primary image in the decryption process, a nonlinear operation has to be introduced in the encrypted function. The optical decryption process is implemented through the Fresnel transform and the fractional Fourier transform. The security system proposed in this paper preserves the shift-invariance property of the JTC-based encryption system in the Fourier domain, with respect to the lateral displacement of the key random mask in the decryption process. This system shows an improved resistance to chosen-plaintext and known-plaintext attacks, as they have been proposed in the cryptanalysis of the JTC encrypting system. Numerical simulations show the validity of this new optical security system. PMID:24663426

Vilardy, Juan M; Millán, María S; Pérez-Cabré, Elisabet

2014-03-10

60

Comparison of fuzzy-cluster-based time-frequency signatures for automatic classification of underground minelike targets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Metal and nonmetal objects, buried to a selected depth in dry sand in an indoor sandbox, are illuminated by an impulse radar system playing the role of a ground penetrating radar (GPR). The recorded time-series data of backscattered echoes from these targets are analyzed in the joint time-frequency domain using a pseudo-Wigner distribution (PWD). These distributions with their extracted features in the two-dimensional time- frequency domain are viewed as the target signatures. We have previously demonstrated the usefulness of the PWD for target identification purposes, in particular the merits of the PWD relative to various competing time-frequency distributions for targets buried at different depths. We have also used a classification method developed from the fuzzy C-means (FCM) clustering technique to reduce the number and kind of features in the PWD signature templates. This is accomplished by converting the PWD signature into a representation by a cluster of points associated with a weight and then reducing the cluster to a number of (weightless) cluster centers. We investigate here how the selected number of cluster centers and the choice of a governing parameter in the FCM algorithm influence the target recognition capability of the resulting signature representations. The classification algorithm is tested against validation data taken from an additional set of returned echoes. The same targets are used but they are buried at a different location in the sand. Class membership of a target is then decided using a simple metric. The results of our investigation serve to assess the possibility of identifying subsurface targets using a GPR, by means of the present technique.

Abrahamson, Steffan; Ericsson, Anders; Gustafsson, Anders; Strifors, Hans C.; Gaunaurd, Guillermo C.

1999-08-01

61

Time-Frequency Analysis of the Dispersion of Lamb Modes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Accurate knowledge of the velocity dispersion of Lamb modes is important for ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation methods used in detecting and locating flaws in thin plates and in determining their elastic stiffness coefficients. Lamb mode dispersion is also important in the acoustic emission technique for accurately triangulating the location of emissions in thin plates. In this research, the ability to characterize Lamb mode dispersion through a time-frequency analysis (the pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution) was demonstrated. A major advantage of time-frequency methods is the ability to analyze acoustic signals containing multiple propagation modes, which overlap and superimpose in the time domain signal. By combining time-frequency analysis with a broadband acoustic excitation source, the dispersion of multiple Lamb modes over a wide frequency range can be determined from as little as a single measurement. In addition, the technique provides a direct measurement of the group velocity dispersion. The technique was first demonstrated in the analysis of a simulated waveform in an aluminum plate in which the Lamb mode dispersion was well known. Portions of the dispersion curves of the AO, A I , So, and S2 Lamb modes were obtained from this one waveform. The technique was also applied for the analysis of experimental waveforms from a unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite plate. Measurements were made both along and perpendicular to the fiber direction. In this case, the signals contained only the lowest order symmetric and antisymmetric modes. A least squares fit of the results from several source to detector distances was used. Theoretical dispersion curves were calculated and are shown to be in good agreement with experimental results.

Prosser, W. H.; Seale, Michael D.; Smith, Barry T.

1999-01-01

62

Accurate time-frequency-wavenumber analysis to study coda waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An accurate method is developed to characterize the seismic coda phases recorded by small-aperture arrays. The coda is modelled as a superposition of several interfering wavelets identified by their arrival time, frequency content, backazimuth and apparent velocity of propagation. The wavelets are caused by the diffraction and refraction of the direct wavefield by heterogeneities of the propagation medium. The deterministic modelling is different from the statistical one generally used to retrieve mean parameters of the medium. As the complexity of the medium increases, separation of interfering wavelets needs an accurate time-frequency-wavenumber decomposition method that consists of detection and characterization of the different coherent wavelets propagating through the array. Detection is realized by mean time-frequency decomposition, based on the ridges algorithm. The MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm, allowing a higher separation of simultaneous wavelets in the wavenumber domain, is then used to characterize the propagation parameters of the detected components. An optimal use of the MUSIC algorithm assumes the knowledge of the number of sources that simultaneously propagate through the array. The new iterative technique presented here allows the automatic determination of this number of sources. This methodology is applied to synthetic signals simulated in a heterogeneous medium. Results obtained show that: (i) the diffracted wavefield may be more energetic than the primary direct one and (ii) the relative energy diffracted by each heterogeneity is strongly dependent on the location of the array within the medium. The well-controlled results obtained for the synthetic examples allow interpretations of the observations made during the Annot experiment in the southern French Alps in 1998, where four small-aperture arrays were deployed, with small distances between each array (~10 km). The time-azimuth-velocity evolutions determined for the earthquakes recorded during this experiment are used to characterize the heterogeneous structures of the medium.

Schisselé, Estelle; Guilbert, Jocelyn; Gaffet, Stéphane; Cansi, Yves

2004-08-01

63

A time-frequency classifier for human gait recognition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radar has established itself as an effective all-weather, day or night sensor. Radar signals can penetrate walls and provide information on moving targets. Recently, radar has been used as an effective biometric sensor for classification of gait. The return from a coherent radar system contains a frequency offset in the carrier frequency, known as the Doppler Effect. The movements of arms and legs give rise to micro Doppler which can be clearly detailed in the time-frequency domain using traditional or modern time-frequency signal representation. In this paper we propose a gait classifier based on subspace learning using principal components analysis(PCA). The training set consists of feature vectors defined as either time or frequency snapshots taken from the spectrogram of radar backscatter. We show that gait signature is captured effectively in feature vectors. Feature vectors are then used in training a minimum distance classifier based on Mahalanobis distance metric. Results show that gait classification with high accuracy and short observation window is achievable using the proposed classifier.

Mobasseri, Bijan G.; Amin, Moeness G.

2009-05-01

64

CFAR detection and extraction of unknown signal in noise with time-frequency Gabor transform  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detection and extraction of unknown signal in noise is an important issue in radar. When signal is an unknown transient, the representation in terms of basis functions which are localized in both time and frequency, such as Gabor representation, is very useful for signal detection. By taking time-frequency decomposition, the noise tends to spread its energy into entire time-frequency domain, while the signal often concentrates its energy within a small region with a limited time interval and frequency band. Therefore, the signal embedded in noise is much easier to be recognized in the time-frequency domain than that in either time or frequency domain. Constant false alarm rate (CFAR) processing is an optimal way to set up a threshold for detecting signals in noise environment. In this paper, we extend the CFAR processing to the time-frequency domain. By setting a CFAR threshold for the time-frequency Gabor coefficients, we can examine the Gabor coefficients and determine whether there is a signal. Then, the signal can be extracted by using the detected signal's Gabor coefficients. Therefore, the time location, the time duration, the frequency range, and other parameters of the unknown signal can be measured. The SNR of the extracted signal is improved about 10 - 12 dB over the observed noisy signal.

Chen, Victor C.; Qian, Shie

1996-03-01

65

Enhanced joint spectral and time domain optical coherence tomography for quantitative flow velocity measurement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, a new method called joint spectral and time domain optical coherence tomography (STdOCT) for flow velocity measurement in spectral domain OCT (SD OCT) was presented. This method analyzes the detected timeresolved interference fringe spectra by using a two-dimensional fast Fourier transformation (2D FFT) to determine directly the Doppler frequency shift instead of calculating the phase difference at each depth position of adjacent A-scans. There, it was found that STdOCT is more robust for measurements with low signal to noise ratio than the classic phase-resolved Doppler OCT (DOCT) making it attractive first for imaging fast flow velocities at which a strong Doppler angle dependent signal damping occurs due to interference fringe washout and second for investigating large blood vessels with a big diameter and a highly damped signal of blood with increasing depth due to strong scattering and absorption in the near-infrared wavelength range. In the present study, we would like to introduce an enhanced algorithm for STdOCT permitting a more precise flow velocity measurement in comparison to the conventional STdOCT. The new method determines the amplitude of the broadened Doppler frequency shift by calculating the center of gravity via the complex analytical signal as a result of the second FFT instead of detecting the maximum intensity signal. Furthermore, the comparison with phase-resolved DOCT was done experimentally by using a flow phantom consisting of a 1% Intralipid emulsion and a 320 ?m glass capillary. As a result, the enhanced STdOCT and DOCT processed data are completely equivalent.

Walther, Julia; Koch, Edmund

2011-06-01

66

Time-Frequency Methods in a Study of Voluntary Movements.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Two methods operating in time-frequency space were applied to analysis of brain activity accompanying voluntary finger movements. The first one, based on Matching Pursuit approach, provided high-resolution distributions of power in time-frequency space. T...

J. J. Ginter K. J. Blinowska M. Kaminski P. J. Durka

2001-01-01

67

Music Onset Detection Based on Resonator Time Frequency Image  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a new method for music onset detection. The novelty of the approach consists mainly of two elements: the time-frequency processing and the detection stages. The resonator time frequency image (RTFI) is the basic time-frequency analysis tool. The time-frequency processing part is in charge of transforming the RTFI energy spectrum into more natural energy- change and pitch-change cues

Ruohua Zhou; Marco Mattavelli; Giorgio Zoia

2008-01-01

68

Time-frequency representation of audio signals using Hilbert spectrum with effective frequency scaling  

Microsoft Academic Search

The efficiency of Hilbert spectrum (HS) in time-frequency representation (TFR) of audio signals is investigated in this paper. HS is derived by applying empirical mode decomposition (EMD), a newly developed data adaptive method for nonlinear and non-stationary signal analysis together with Hilbert transform. EMD represents any time domain signal as a sum of a finite number of bases called intrinsic

Khademul Islam Molla; M. Shaikh; K. Hirose

2008-01-01

69

Bionic wavelet transform: a new time-frequency method based on an auditory model  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new adaptive wavelet transform, named bionic wavelet transform (BWT), is developed based on a model of the active auditory system. The most distinguishing characteristic of BWT is that its resolution in the time-frequency domain can be adaptively adjusted not only by the signal frequency but also by the signal instantaneous amplitude and its first-order differential. The automatically adjusted resolution,

Jun Yao; Yuan-Ting Zhang

2001-01-01

70

An introduction to wavelet transforms for chemometricians: A time-frequency approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

One way to obtain an intuitive understanding of the wavelet transform is to explain it in terms of segmentation of the time-frequency\\/scale domain. The ordinary Fourier transform does not contain information about frequency changes over time and the short time Fourier transform (STFT) technique was suggested as a solution to this problem. The wavelet transform has similarities to STFT, but

Bjørn K. Alsberg; Andrew M. Woodward; Douglas B. Kell

1997-01-01

71

The LxVP and PxIxIT NFAT Motifs Bind Jointly to Overlapping Epitopes on Calcineurin's Catalytic Domain Distant to the Regulatory Domain.  

PubMed

The serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin (Cn) targets the nuclear factors of activated T cells (NFATs) that activate cytokine genes. Calcium influx activates Cn to dephosphorylate multiple serine residues within the ?200 residue NFAT regulatory domain, which triggers joint nuclear translocation of NFAT and Cn. The dephosphorylation process relies on the interaction between Cn and the conserved motifs PxIxIT and LxVP, which are located N- and C-terminal to the phosphorylation sites in NFAT's regulatory domain. Here, we show that an NFATc1-derived 15-residue peptide segment containing the conserved LxVP motif binds to an epitope on Cn's catalytic domain (CnA), which overlaps with the previously established PxIxIT binding site on CnA and is distant to the regulatory domain (CnB). Both NFAT motifs partially compete for binding but do not fully displace each other on the CnA epitope, revealing that both segments bind simultaneously to the same epitope on the catalytic domain. PMID:24954618

Gal, Maayan; Li, Shuai; Luna, Rafael E; Takeuchi, Koh; Wagner, Gerhard

2014-07-01

72

Study of chaotic dynamical systems via time-frequency analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Time-frequency representation is helpful in studying the frequency pattern of nonlinear dynamical systems. Specifically, the Wigner-Gabor-Qian (WGQ) spectrogram, a synthesis of the Wigner distribution and the Gabor expansion through time-frequency distribution series, is a very useful tool because it achieves a good solution in time-frequency representation as well as few cross-interferences. The fine structure of frequency patterns, such as sub-harmonics

Ping Chen; Ilya Prigogine

1994-01-01

73

Minimum entropy approach to denoising time-frequency distributions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Signals used in time-frequency analysis are usually corrupted by noise. Therefore, denoising the time-frequency representation is a necessity for producing readable time-frequency images. Denoising is defined as the operation of smoothing a noisy signal or image for producing a noise free representation. Linear smoothing of time-frequency distributions (TFDs) suppresses noise at the expense of considerable smearing of the signal components. For this reason, nonlinear denoising has been preferred. A common example to nonlinear denoising methods is the wavelet thresholding. In this paper, we introduce an entropy based approach to denoising time-frequency distributions. This new approach uses the spectrogram decomposition of time-frequency kernels proposed by Cunningham and Williams.In order to denoise the time-frequency distribution, we combine those spectrograms with smallest entropy values, thus ensuring that each spectrogram is well concentrated on the time-frequency plane and contains as little noise as possible. Renyi entropy is used as the measure to quantify the complexity of each spectrogram. The threshold for the number of spectrograms to combine is chosen adaptively based on the tradeoff between entropy and variance. The denoised time-frequency distributions for several signals are shown to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. The improvement in performance is quantitatively evaluated.

Aviyente, Selin; Williams, William J.

2001-11-01

74

On complex demodulation and time-frequency distributions for broadband reflectometry signals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Complex demodulation is used to generate a positive joint time-frequency distribution for broadband reflectometry signals, the so-called demodulogram, which is actually the dual of the well-known spectrogram and which, for a given signal, is obtained by squaring the modulus of the inverse Fourier transform of the signal frequency-windowed Fourier spectrum. The demodulogram and its properties are discussed, and the former

João P. S. Bizarro; Anto´nio C. Figueiredo

1999-01-01

75

An application of multidimensional time-frequency analysis as a base for the unified watermarking approach.  

PubMed

A watermarking approach based on multidimensional time-frequency analysis is proposed. It represents a unified concept that can be used for different types of data such as audio, speech signals, images or video. Time-frequency analysis is employed for speech signals, while space/spatial-frequency analysis is used for images. Their combination is applied for video signals. Particularly, we focus on the 2-D case: space/spatial-frequency based image watermarking procedure that will be subsequently extended to video signal. A method that selects coefficients for watermarking by estimating the local frequency content is proposed. In order to provide watermark imperceptibility, the nonstationary filtering is used to model the watermark which corresponds to the host signal components. Furthermore, the watermark detection within the multidimensional time-frequency domain is proposed. The efficiency and robustness of the procedure in the presence of various attacks is proven experimentally. PMID:20172773

Stankovic, Srdjan; Orovic, Irena; Zaric, Nikola

2010-03-01

76

Gamma Transform: A Local Time-Frequency Analysis Method.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In this paper we introduce the gamma transform, a local time-frequency analysis method which applies to causal signals. The gamma transform resolves the identity, has good time-frequency resolution, and adapts resolution windows according to the time dela...

N. T. Ueng L. L. Scharf

1996-01-01

77

A mortise-tenon joint in the transmembrane domain modulates autotransporter assembly into bacterial outer membranes.  

PubMed

Bacterial autotransporters comprise a 12-stranded membrane-embedded ?-barrel domain, which must be folded in a process that entraps segments of an N-terminal passenger domain. This first stage of autotransporter folding determines whether subsequent translocation can deliver the N-terminal domain to its functional form on the bacterial cell surface. Here, paired glycine-aromatic 'mortise and tenon' motifs are shown to join neighbouring ?-strands in the C-terminal barrel domain, and mutations within these motifs slow the rate and extent of passenger domain translocation to the surface of bacterial cells. In line with this, biophysical studies of the autotransporter Pet show that the conserved residues significantly quicken completion of the folding reaction and promote stability of the autotransporter barrel domain. Comparative genomics demonstrate conservation of glycine-aromatic residue pairings through evolution as a previously unrecognized feature of all autotransporter proteins. PMID:24967730

Leyton, Denisse L; Johnson, Matthew D; Thapa, Rajiv; Huysmans, Gerard H M; Dunstan, Rhys A; Celik, Nermin; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Loo, Dorothy; Belousoff, Matthew J; Purcell, Anthony W; Henderson, Ian R; Beddoe, Travis; Rossjohn, Jamie; Martin, Lisandra L; Strugnell, Richard A; Lithgow, Trevor

2014-01-01

78

Time-frequency analysis of event-related potentials: a brief tutorial.  

PubMed

Event-related potentials (ERPs) reflect cognitive processes and are usually analyzed in the so-called time domain. Additional information on cognitive functions can be assessed when analyzing ERPs in the frequency domain and treating them as event-related oscillations (EROs). This procedure results in frequency spectra but lacks information about the temporal dynamics of EROs. Here, we describe a method-called time-frequency analysis-that allows analyzing both the frequency of an ERO and its evolution over time. In a brief tutorial, the reader will learn how to use wavelet analysis in order to compute time-frequency transforms of ERP data. Basic steps as well as potential artifacts are described. Rather than in terms of formulas, descriptions are in textual form (written text) with numerous figures illustrating the topics. Recommendations on how to present frequency and time-frequency data in journal articles are provided. Finally, we briefly review studies that have applied time-frequency analysis to mismatch negativity paradigms. The deviant stimulus of such a paradigm evokes an ERO in the theta frequency band that is stronger than for the standard stimulus. Conversely, the standard stimulus evokes a stronger gamma-band response than does the deviant. This is interpreted in the context of the so-called match-and-utilization model. PMID:24194116

Herrmann, Christoph S; Rach, Stefan; Vosskuhl, Johannes; Strüber, Daniel

2014-07-01

79

Study on the Time-Frequency Two Dimensional CFAR Algorithm for Moving Targets on Ground in PRC-CW Radar  

Microsoft Academic Search

PRC-CW radar is mainly used to detect moving targets on ground. Ground clutter heaves fiercely, and its distribution is complex, which makes it difficult to detect targets correctly from time domain. The characteristics of moving targets and ground clutter differ in frequency domain. And the spectrum of targets may change with time, so, this paper designs the time-frequency two dimensional

Han Ning; Liu Limin; Han Zhuangzhi; Shang Chaoxuan

2010-01-01

80

Adaptive Interference Mitigation for Galileo L1 Band Receivers in Time and Frequency Domains  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes a method for interference mitigation (IM) in the Galileo system based on a joint time- frequency domain (TFD) technique. In particular, the proposed approach is based on the use of an open loop adaptive filter, which introduces a notch in correspondence of the instantaneous frequency (IF) of the jammer. The filter coefficients are adapted to both jammer

Chiara Togni; Raffaella Pedone; Marco Villanti; Matteo Iubatti; Giovanni E. Corazza

81

Joint Entropy for Space and Spatial Frequency Domains Estimated from Psychometric Functions of Achromatic Discrimination  

PubMed Central

We used psychometric functions to estimate the joint entropy for space discrimination and spatial frequency discrimination. Space discrimination was taken as discrimination of spatial extent. Seven subjects were tested. Gábor functions comprising unidimensionalsinusoidal gratings (0.4, 2, and 10 cpd) and bidimensionalGaussian envelopes (1°) were used as reference stimuli. The experiment comprised the comparison between reference and test stimulithat differed in grating's spatial frequency or envelope's standard deviation. We tested 21 different envelope's standard deviations around the reference standard deviation to study spatial extent discrimination and 19 different grating's spatial frequencies around the reference spatial frequency to study spatial frequency discrimination. Two series of psychometric functions were obtained for 2%, 5%, 10%, and 100% stimulus contrast. The psychometric function data points for spatial extent discrimination or spatial frequency discrimination were fitted with Gaussian functions using the least square method, and the spatial extent and spatial frequency entropies were estimated from the standard deviation of these Gaussian functions. Then, joint entropy was obtained by multiplying the square root of space extent entropy times the spatial frequency entropy. We compared our results to the theoretical minimum for unidimensional Gábor functions, 1/4? or 0.0796. At low and intermediate spatial frequencies and high contrasts, joint entropy reached levels below the theoretical minimum, suggesting non-linear interactions between two or more visual mechanisms. We concluded that non-linear interactions of visual pathways, such as the M and P pathways, could explain joint entropy values below the theoretical minimum at low and intermediate spatial frequencies and high contrasts. These non-linear interactions might be at work at intermediate and high contrasts at all spatial frequencies once there was a substantial decrease in joint entropy for these stimulus conditions when contrast was raised.

Silveira, Vladimir de Aquino; Souza, Givago da Silva; Gomes, Bruno Duarte; Rodrigues, Anderson Raiol; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima

2014-01-01

82

Joint entropy for space and spatial frequency domains estimated from psychometric functions of achromatic discrimination.  

PubMed

We used psychometric functions to estimate the joint entropy for space discrimination and spatial frequency discrimination. Space discrimination was taken as discrimination of spatial extent. Seven subjects were tested. Gábor functions comprising unidimensionalsinusoidal gratings (0.4, 2, and 10 cpd) and bidimensionalGaussian envelopes (1°) were used as reference stimuli. The experiment comprised the comparison between reference and test stimulithat differed in grating's spatial frequency or envelope's standard deviation. We tested 21 different envelope's standard deviations around the reference standard deviation to study spatial extent discrimination and 19 different grating's spatial frequencies around the reference spatial frequency to study spatial frequency discrimination. Two series of psychometric functions were obtained for 2%, 5%, 10%, and 100% stimulus contrast. The psychometric function data points for spatial extent discrimination or spatial frequency discrimination were fitted with Gaussian functions using the least square method, and the spatial extent and spatial frequency entropies were estimated from the standard deviation of these Gaussian functions. Then, joint entropy was obtained by multiplying the square root of space extent entropy times the spatial frequency entropy. We compared our results to the theoretical minimum for unidimensional Gábor functions, 1/4? or 0.0796. At low and intermediate spatial frequencies and high contrasts, joint entropy reached levels below the theoretical minimum, suggesting non-linear interactions between two or more visual mechanisms. We concluded that non-linear interactions of visual pathways, such as the M and P pathways, could explain joint entropy values below the theoretical minimum at low and intermediate spatial frequencies and high contrasts. These non-linear interactions might be at work at intermediate and high contrasts at all spatial frequencies once there was a substantial decrease in joint entropy for these stimulus conditions when contrast was raised. PMID:24466158

Silveira, Vladímir de Aquino; Souza, Givago da Silva; Gomes, Bruno Duarte; Rodrigues, Anderson Raiol; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima

2014-01-01

83

Fuzzy-cluster representation of time-frequency signatures as a means for classification of targets buried underground  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the backscattered echoes from selected targets that are extracted by an impulse radar system playing the role of a ground penetrating radar (GPR). The targets are metal and non-metal objects buried in dry sand to a selected depth. These echoes are studied in the joint time-frequency domain using a pseudo-Wigner distribution (PWD), which, in particular, makes it possible to analyze how each one of each target's signature features evolves in time. These distributions are viewed as the target signatures, and they are then used as templates for target classification. To be useful for target identification purposes, a signature representation should display a 'sufficient' amount of distinguishing features, yet be robust enough to suppress the interference of noise contained in the received signals. Multiple scattering between a target and the surface of the ground is another obstacle for successful target recognition that time-frequency distributions could counteract by unveiling the time progression of the returned target information. A classification method based on a fuzzy cluster estimation technique (the fuzzy C-means algorithm) is then used to reduce the number and kind of features in the templates. We put the classification algorithm to a test against validation data taken from an additional set of returned echoes. The same targets are used but they are illuminated with the GPR antennas at different positions. Class membership of a target is then decided using a simple metric. The results of our investigation serve to assess the possibility of identifying subsurface targets using a GPR.

Strifors, Hans C.; Gustafsson, Anders; Gaunaurd, Guillermo C.

1997-06-01

84

Precision Frequency Synthesizing Sources with Excellent Time/Frequency Performances.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Precision frequency synthesizing sources are needed in the time / frequency measuring system, atomic frequency standards, telemetry, communication, and radar systems. This kind of frequency synthesizing source possesses high frequency accuracy and excelle...

L. Zhou H. Lin

1994-01-01

85

ROTATING MACHINERY FAULT DIAGNOSIS USING TIME-FREQUENCY METHODS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Time-frequency analysis has been found to be effective in monitoring the transient or time-varying characteristics of machinery vibration signals, and therefore its use in machine condition monitoring is increasing. This paper proposes the application of time-frequency methods, which can provide more information about a signal in time and in frequency and gives a better representation of the signal than the

A. A. LAKIS

2007-01-01

86

On time-frequence analysis of heart rate variability  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this research is to develop a time-frequency method suitable to study\\u000aHRV in greater detail. The following approach was used:\\u000a• two known time-frequency representations were applied to HRV to understand its\\u000aadvantages and disadvantages in describing HRV in frequency and in amplitude,\\u000aover time;\\u000a• a new method was developed that describes the time-varying fluctuations in

Steenis van H. G

2002-01-01

87

Communication over Multipath Fading Channels: A Time-Frequency Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dynamics of multipath fading have a major effect on the performance of mobilewireless communication systems. The inherently time-varying nature of the mobilewireless channel makes nonstationary signal processing techniques particularly attractivefor system design. Time-frequency representations are powerful tools for timevaryingsignal processing, and in this paper, we present a time-frequency view ofwireless communication over multipath channels. Our discussion is anchored on afundamental

Akbar M. Sayeed; Behnaam Aazhang

1997-01-01

88

Optimal GPR bandwidth for time-frequency landmine discrimination  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work we investigate which bandwidth of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) is optimal for time-frequency landmine discrimination. We extracted three time-frequency features of the early-time target response from the Wigner distribution. The features were found to be relatively invariant to target depth for a data acquired with a stepped-frequency ultra-wideband GPR. The frequency sweep was from 0.3 GHz

Timofei G. Savelyev; Motoyuki Sato

2005-01-01

89

Time-frequency analysis of spike-wave discharges using a modified wavelet transform.  

PubMed

The continuous Morlet wavelet transform was used for the analysis of the time-frequency pattern of spike-wave discharges (SWD) as can be recorded in a genetic animal model of absence epilepsy (rats of the WAG/Rij strain). We developed a new wavelet transform that allows to obtain the time-frequency dynamics of the dominating rhythm during the discharges. SWD were analyzed pre- and post-administration of certain drugs. SWD recorded predrug demonstrate quite uniform time-frequency dynamics of the dominant rhythm. The beginning of the discharge has a short period with the highest frequency value (up to 15 Hz). Then the frequency decreases to 7-9 Hz and frequency modulation occurs during the discharge in this range with a period of 0.5-0.7 s. Specific changes of SWD time-frequency dynamics were found after the administration of psychoactive drugs, addressing different brain mediator and modulator systems. Short multiple SWDs appeared under low (0.5 mg/kg) doses of haloperidol, they are characterized by a fast frequency decrease to 5-6 Hz at the end of every discharge. The frequency of the dominant frequency of SWD was not stable in long lasting SWD after 1.0 mg/kg or more haloperidol: then two periodicities were found. Long lasting SWD seen after the administration of vigabatrin showed a stable frequency of the discharge. The EEG after Ketamin showed a distinct 5 s quasiperiodicity. No clear changes of time-frequency dynamics of SWD were found after perilamine. It can be concluded that the use of the modified Morlet wavelet transform allows to describe significant parameters of the dynamics in the time-frequency domain of the dominant rhythm of SWD that were not previously detected. PMID:16434106

Bosnyakova, Daria; Gabova, Alexandra; Kuznetsova, Galina; Obukhov, Yuri; Midzyanovskaya, Inna; Salonin, Dmitrij; van Rijn, Clementina; Coenen, Anton; Tuomisto, Leene; van Luijtelaar, Gilles

2006-06-30

90

Focusing ISAR Images using Fast Adaptive Time-Frequency and 3D Motion Detection on Simulated and Experimental Radar Data.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Optimization algorithms were developed for use with the Adaptive Joint Time-Frequency (AJFT) algorithm to reduce Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR) image blurring caused by higher-order target motion. A specific optimization was then applied to 3D mo...

W. Brinkman

2005-01-01

91

The Separate, Relative, and Joint Effects of Employee Job Performance Domains on Supervisors' Willingness to Mentor  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of our study was to further elucidate how employees should behave at work to increase their chances of being mentored by their immediate supervisor. To that end, we experimentally tested how three domains of employee performance [task performance (TP), organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) targeting the supervisor, and…

Lapierre, Laurent M.; Bonaccio, Silvia; Allen, Tammy D.

2009-01-01

92

Recognition of Swallowing Sounds Using Time-Frequency Decomposition and Limited Receptive Area Neural Classifier  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we propose a novel swallowing sound recognition technique based on the limited receptive area (LIRA) neural classifier and time-frequency decomposition. Time-frequency decomposition methods commonly used in sound recognition increase dimensionality of the signal and require steps of feature selection and extraction. Quite often feature selection is based on a set of empirically chosen statistics, making the pattern recognition dependent on the intuition and skills of the investigator. A limited set of extracted features is then presented to a classifier. The proposed method avoids the steps of feature selection and extraction by delegating them to a limited receptive area neural (LIRA) classifier. LIRA neural classifier utilizes the increase in dimensionality of the signal to create a large number of random features in the time-frequency domain that assure a good description of the signal without prior assumptions of the signal properties. Features that do not provide useful information for separation of classes do not obtain significant weights during classifier training. The proposed methodology was tested on the task of recognition of swallowing sounds with two different algorithms of time-frequency decomposition, short-time Fourier transform (STFT) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT). The experimental results suggest high efficiency and reliability of the proposed approach.

Makeyev, O.; Sazonov, E.; Schuckers, S.; Lopez-Meyer, P.; Baidyk, T.; Melanson, E.; Neuman, M.

93

Time-frequency scaling transformation of the phonocardiogram based of the matching pursuit method.  

PubMed

A time-frequency scaling transformation based on the matching pursuit (MP) method is developed for the phonocardiogram (PCG). The MP method decomposes a signal into a series of time-frequency atoms by using an iterative process. The modification of the time scale of the PCG can be performed without perceptible change in its spectral characteristics. It is also possible to modify the frequency scale without changing the temporal properties. The technique has been tested on 11 PCG's containing heart sounds and different murmurs. A scaling/inverse-scaling procedure was used for quantitative evaluation of the scaling performance. Both the spectrogram and a MP-based Wigner distribution were used for visual comparison in the time-frequency domain. The results showed that the technique is suitable and effective for the time-frequency scale transformation of both the transient property of the heart sounds and the more complex random property of the murmurs. It is also shown that the effectiveness of the method is strongly related to the optimization of the parameters used for the decomposition of the signals. PMID:9691572

Zhang, X; Durand, L G; Senhadji, L; Lee, H C; Coatrieux, J L

1998-08-01

94

A joint watermarking/encryption algorithm for verifying medical image integrity and authenticity in both encrypted and spatial domains.  

PubMed

In this paper, we propose a new joint watermarking/encryption algorithm for the purpose of verifying the reliability of medical images in both encrypted and spatial domains. It combines a substitutive watermarking algorithm, the quantization index modulation (QIM), with a block cipher algorithm, the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), in CBC mode of operation. The proposed solution gives access to the outcomes of the image integrity and of its origins even though the image is stored encrypted. Experimental results achieved on 8 bits encoded Ultrasound images illustrate the overall performances of the proposed scheme. By making use of the AES block cipher in CBC mode, the proposed solution is compliant with or transparent to the DICOM standard. PMID:22256213

Bouslimi, D; Coatrieux, G; Roux, Ch

2011-01-01

95

Speckle reduction by energy time-frequency filtering.  

PubMed

Structural noise is a very important limitation to the visibility of flaw echoes in ultrasonic testing and evaluation of highly scattering materials. In order to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, different algorithms have been developed. One of these techniques is based on filtering the spectrum low band of the received echo to obtain a significant improvement of the defect visibility. Based on this idea, in this work a new time-frequency technique is presented. In this method, block-processing autoregressive techniques are used to estimate the instantaneous center frequency of the traveling wave. From this information, a time-frequency filter is designed tuned at half the estimated instantaneous center frequency. Experimental results and the comparison with the non-time-frequency filtering technique are also included, showing that the proposed method has an excellent performance on SNR enhancement. PMID:15047394

Izquierdo, M A G; Hernández, M G; Anaya, J J; Martinez, O

2004-04-01

96

Image hiding in Fourier domain by use of joint transform correlator architecture and holographic technique.  

PubMed

Based on joint transform correlator (JTC) architecture and holographic techniques, a new method for image hiding is presented. A hidden image encrypted by JTC architecture is embedded in the Fourier hologram of the host image. Inverse Fourier transform can be used to obtain the watermarked image, and JTC architecture is used to decode the hidden image from the watermarked hologram. Unlike other watermarking techniques, by prechoosing information, the noise added to the recovered hidden image by the host can be reduced. Unlike other watermarking systems based on double random-phase encoding, no conjugate key is used to recover the hidden image. Theoretical analyses have shown the system's feasibility. Computer simulations are presented to verify the system's validity and efficiency. Numerical simulations also show that the proposed system is robust enough to resist attacks, such as occlusion, noise, and filtering. PMID:21343999

Shi, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Daomu

2011-02-10

97

Comparison of Signals from Gravitational Wave Detectors with Instantaneous Time-Frequency Maps  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gravitational wave astronomy relies on the use of multiple detectors, so that coincident detections may distinguish real signals from instrumental artifacts, and also so that relative timing of signals can provide the sky position of sources. We show that the comparison of instantaneous time-frequency and time-amplitude maps provided by the Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) can be used effectively for relative signal timing of common signals, to discriminate between the case of identical coincident signals and random noise coincidences and to provide a classification of signals based on their time-frequency trajectories. The comparison is done with a X(sup 2) goodness-offit method which includes contributions from both the instantaneous amplitude and frequency components of the HHT to match two signals in the time domain. This approach naturally allows the analysis of waveforms with strong frequency modulation.

Stroeer, A.; Blackburn, L.; Camp, J.

2011-01-01

98

[The research on time-frequency detection method of respiratory component in ballistocardiogram signal].  

PubMed

Based on the fact that the respiratory component modulates the cardiac cycle component in the ballistocardiogram (BCG) signal, we propose a method that detects respiratory with time-frequency analysis for the sitting ballistocardiography system. Firstly, we demodulated the BCG signal by using the variable frequency complex demodulation (VFCDM) to obtain the output for different center frequency of interest. Then we calculated the instantaneous frequencies and the instantaneous amplitudes by the time-frequency representation. We reconstructed the time-domain waveform of respiratory at last. In order to verify the feasibility and accuracy of this method, we applied wavelet transform and nasal thermistor signal to compare qualitatively and quantitatively. The simulation results showed that the proposed method could detect the respiratory rate from BCG signal more accurately, which provided meaningful attempt for monitoring the multiple physiological parameters synchronously and unconsciously. PMID:22826926

Jiang, Fangfang; Wang, Xu; Yang, Dan

2012-06-01

99

A time-frequency approach for the analysis of normal and arrhythmia cardiac signals.  

PubMed

Previously, electrocardiogram (ECG) signals have been analyzed in either a time-indexed or spectral form. The reality, is that the ECG and all other biological signals belong to the family of multicomponent nonstationary signals. Due to this reason, the use of time-frequency analysis can be unavoidable for these signals. The Husimi and Wigner distributions are normally used in quantum mechanics for phase space representations of the wavefunction. In this paper, we introduce the Husimi distribution (HD) to analyze the normal and abnormal ECG signals in time-frequency domain. The abnormal cardiac signal was taken from a patient with supraventricular arrhythmia. Simulation results show that the HD has a good performance in the analysis of the ECG signals comparing with the Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD). PMID:17959438

Mahmoud, Seedahmed S; Fang, Qiang; Davidovi?, Dragomir M; Cosic, Irena

2006-01-01

100

Instantaneous frequency and time-frequency signature estimation using compressive sensing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper considers compressive sensing for time-frequency signal representation (TFSR) of nonstationary radar signals which can be considered as instantaneously narrowband. Under-sampling and random sampling of the signal stem from avoiding aliasing and relaxing Nyquist sampling constraints. Unlike previous work on compressive sensing (CS) and TFSR based on the ambiguity function, reduced observations in the underlying problem are time-domain data. In the reconstruction process, Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP) is used. Since the frequency index in the first iteration of OMP is the same as the one obtained by finding the frequency position of the highest Spectrogram peak, it becomes necessary to consider several OMP iterations to improve over Spectrograms performance. We examine various methods for estimating IF from higher number of OMP iterations, including the S-method. The paper also applies CS for signal time-frequency signature estimations corresponding to human gait radar returns.

Jokanovi?, Branka; Amin, Moeness; Stankovi?, Srdjan

2013-05-01

101

Gabor frames and directional time–frequency analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

We introduce a directionally sensitive time–frequency decomposition and representation of functions. The coefficients of this representation allow us to measure the “amount” of frequency a function (signal, image) contains in a certain time interval, and also in a certain direction. This has been previously achieved using a version of wavelets called ridgelets [E.J. Candès, Harmonic analysis of neural networks, Appl.

Loukas Grafakos; Christopher Sansing

2008-01-01

102

Time-Frequency Analysis for Nonlinear Lamb Wave Signal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lamb wave for ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (UNDE) by its nonlinear effects is investigated theoretically and experimentally with time-frequency analysis. The complication of Lamb wave propagation due to its dispersive nature makes the received signal of UNDE hard to explain. Two transducers are employed in pitch-catch way together with a wedge to meet the excitation condition of low order fundamental and

Hanhui Xu; Chunguang Xu; Shiyuan Zhou; Yong Hu

2009-01-01

103

Linear and quadratic time-frequency signal representations  

Microsoft Academic Search

A tutorial review of both linear and quadratic representations is given. The linear representations discussed are the short-time Fourier transform and the wavelet transform. The discussion of quadratic representations concentrates on the Wigner distribution, the ambiguity function, smoothed versions of the Wigner distribution, and various classes of quadratic time-frequency representations. Examples of the application of these representations to typical problems

F. Hlawatsch; G. F. Boudreaux-Bartels

1992-01-01

104

Instantaneous parameter estimation in cardiovascular time series by harmonic and time-frequency analysis.  

PubMed

Time-frequency distributions, such as smoothed pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution (SPWVD), complex demodulation (CDM), and provide useful time-varying spectral parameter estimators. However, each of these methods has limitations that a joint utilization could largely reduce, due to their interesting complementary features. The aim of this paper is to validate the joint SPWVD-CDM method on synthetic and real cardiovascular time series with normal and reduced variability such as in autonomic blockade or autonomic deficiency. We propose two indexes related to the noise present in the signal and to the dispersion of the power spectrum in order to validate instantaneous parameter estimation. In the low-frequency band, the interpretation of the instantaneous frequency and phase of cardiovascular time-series should be discarded in many real-life situations. Conversely, in the high frequency band, under paced breathing, the reliability of the instantaneous parameters is demonstrated even in conditions of reduced cardiovascular variability. PMID:12549736

Monti, Alessandro; Médigue, Claire; Mangin, Laurence

2002-12-01

105

Backscattering of transients by tilted truncated cylindrical shells: Time-frequency identification of ray contributions from measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Impulse backscattering measurements by a thick-walled finite cylindrical shell are examined in the time-frequency domain to identify and characterize individual ray contributions from generalized Lamb waves excited on the shell. Previous experiments and analysis in the frequency-aspect angle domain [S. F. Morse et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 103, 785-794 (1998)] indicate that large backscattering enhancements occur in the midfrequency

Scot F. Morse; Philip L. Marston

2002-01-01

106

Subspace array processing using spatial time-frequency distributions: applications for denoising structural echoes of elastic targets.  

PubMed

Structural echoes of underwater elastic targets, used for detection and classification purposes, can be highly localized in the time-frequency domain and can be aspect-dependent. Hence such structural echoes recorded along a distributed (synthetic) aperture, e.g., using a moving receiver platform, would not meet the stationarity and multiple snapshots requirements of common subspace array processing methods used for denoising array data based on their estimated covariance matrix. To address this issue, this article introduces a subspace array processing method based on the space-time-frequency distribution (STFD) of single-snapshots of non-stationary signals. This STFD is obtained by computing Cohen's class time-frequency distributions between all pairwise combination of the recorded signals along an arbitrary aperture array. This STFD is interpreted as a generalized array covariance matrix which automatically accounts for the inherent coherence across the time-frequency plane of the received nonstationary echoes emanating from the same target. Hence, identifying the signal's subspace from the eigenstructure of this STFD provides a means for denoising these non-stationary structural echoes by spreading the clutter and noise power in the time-frequency domain; as demonstrated here numerically and experimentally using the structural echoes of a thin steel spherical shell measured along a synthetic aperture. PMID:24815264

Sabra, Karim G; Anderson, Shaun D

2014-05-01

107

Time-frequency manifold correlation matching for periodic fault identification in rotating machines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For rotating machines, the localized faults of key components generally represent as periodic transient impulses in vibration signals. The existence of background noise will corrupt transient impulses in practice, and will thus increase the difficulty to identify specific faults. This paper combines the concepts of time-frequency manifold (TFM) and image template matching, and proposes a novel TFM correlation matching method to enhance identification of the periodic faults. This method is to conduct correlation matching of a vibration signal in the time-frequency domain by using the TFM with a short duration as a template. By this method, the time-frequency distribution (TFD) of a vibration signal is firstly achieved by the Smoothed Pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution (SPWVD) method. Then the TFM template is learned to do correlation matching with the TFD of the analyzed signal. Finally, the ridge is extracted from the correlation matching image and the ridge coefficients are analyzed for periodic fault identification. The proposed method takes advantages of the TFM in noise suppression and template matching in object enhancement, and can enhance the fault impulses of interest in a unified scale. The novel method is verified to be superior to traditional enveloping method with providing smoother and clearer fault impulse component via applications to gearbox fault detection and bearing defect identification.

He, Qingbo; Wang, Xiangxiang

2013-05-01

108

Predicting sleep apnoea syndrome from heart period: a time-frequency wavelet analysis.  

PubMed

Heart rate fluctuations are a typical finding during obstructive sleep apnoea, characterised by bradycardia during the apnoeic phase and tachycardia at the restoration of ventilation. In this study, a time-frequency domain analysis of the nocturnal heart rate variability (HRV) was evaluated as the single diagnostic marker for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). The predictive accuracy of time-frequency HRV variables (wavelet (Wv) decomposition parameters from level 2 (Wv2) to level 256 (Wv256)) obtained from nocturnal electrocardiogram Holter monitoring were analysed in 147 consecutive patients aged 53.8+/-11.2 yrs referred for possible OSAS. OSAS was diagnosed in 66 patients (44.9%) according to an apnoea/hypopnoea index > or = 10. Using receiver-operating characteristic curves analysis, the most powerful predictor variable was Wv32 (W 0.758, p<0.0001), followed by Wv16 (W 0.729, p<0.0001) and Wv64 (W 0.700, p<0.0001). Classification and Regression Trees methodology generated a decision tree for OSAS prediction including all levels of Wv coefficients, from Wv2 to Wv256 with a sensitivity reaching 92.4% and a specificity of 90.1% (percentage of agreement 91.2%) with this nonparametric analysis. Time-frequency parameters calculated using wavelet transform and extracted from the nocturnal heart period analysis appeared as powerful tools for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome diagnosis. PMID:14680082

Roche, F; Pichot, V; Sforza, E; Court-Fortune, I; Duverney, D; Costes, F; Garet, M; Barthélémy, J C

2003-12-01

109

Communication in time-frequency spread media using adaptive equalization  

Microsoft Academic Search

In high-speed communication through a medium with time-frequency spread (such as in HF ionospheric, sonic underwater, and voice-quality telephone line transmission), the transmission speed and system errors are determined by an overall system variance (or equivalent noise). This overall variance comprises: 1) the intersymbol interference variance from time spread (or dispersion in the unit impulse response of the medium); 2)

MICHAEL J. DI TORO

1968-01-01

110

Options for time-frequency processing in ISAR ATR  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An ISAR image formation approach has been developed that incorporates advanced imaging and exploitation techniques for non-cooperative moving target feature extraction and ATR. A unique signal based motion compensation algorithm has been developed that works for both SAR and ISAR. Advanced Time-frequency (T-F) processing has been incorporated, which includes both slow time-Doppler frequency and fast time-RF.

Kirk, John C.

2001-03-01

111

A Note on Time-Frequency Analysis of Finger Tapping  

PubMed Central

Finger tapping involves 3 important features: time, spatial amplitude, and frequency. In classical analysis, investigators examine timing parameters; in spectral analysis, they examine frequency parameters. Both types of analysis are based on stationary tap information. The authors propose that time–frequency analysis is a useful tool for analyzing nonstationary finger tapping. They describe the method and give examples of frequency modulation, age difference, and speed transition that demonstrate additional insights one can gain by using this analysis.

Liu, Wei; Forrester, Larry; Whitall, Jill

2008-01-01

112

Time-frequency dynamics in neurally mediated syncope  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, the responses during syncope were determined by noninvasive beat-to-beat analysis during passive orthostasis. Twenty patients with recurrent unexplained syncope (13 men and seven women) and ten healthy age-matched control subjects were studied during 80° head-up tilt for 25 min. Time-frequency mapping of R-R intervals, systolic and diastolic pressures and respiration was used to determine the responses to

Vera Lepicovska; Peter Novak; Réginald Nadeau

1992-01-01

113

Time-Frequency Approach for Stochastic Signal Detection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The detection of events in a stochastic signal has been a subject of great interest. One of the oldest signal processing technique, Fourier Transform of a signal contains information regarding frequency content, but it cannot resolve the exact onset of changes in the frequency, all temporal information is contained in the phase of the transform. On the other hand, Spectrogram is better able to resolve temporal evolution of frequency content, but has a trade-off in time resolution versus frequency resolution in accordance with the uncertainty principle. Therefore, time-frequency representations are considered for energetic characterisation of the non-stationary signals. Wigner Ville Distribution (WVD) is the most prominent quadratic time-frequency signal representation and used for analysing frequency variations in signals.WVD allows for instantaneous frequency estimation at each data point, for a typical temporal resolution of fractions of a second. This paper through simulations describes the way time frequency models are applied for the detection of event in a stochastic signal.

Ghosh, Ripul; Akula, Aparna; Kumar, Satish; Sardana, H. K.

2011-10-01

114

A discoidin domain receptor 1 knock-out mouse as a novel model for osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint.  

PubMed

Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR-1)-deficient mice exhibited a high incidence of osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) as early as 9 weeks of age. They showed typical histological signs of OA, including surface fissures, loss of proteoglycans, chondrocyte cluster formation, collagen type I upregulation, and atypical collagen fibril arrangements. Chondrocytes isolated from the TMJs of DDR-1-deficient mice maintained their osteoarthritic characteristics when placed in culture. They expressed high levels of runx-2 and collagen type I, as well as low levels of sox-9 and aggrecan. The expression of DDR-2, a key factor in OA, was increased. DDR-1-deficient chondrocytes from the TMJ were positively influenced towards chondrogenesis by a three-dimensional matrix combined with a runx-2 knockdown or stimulation with extracellular matrix components, such as nidogen-2. Therefore, the DDR-1 knock-out mouse can serve as a novel model for temporomandibular disorders, such as OA of the TMJ, and will help to develop new treatment options, particularly those involving tissue regeneration. PMID:23912900

Schminke, Boris; Muhammad, Hayat; Bode, Christa; Sadowski, Boguslawa; Gerter, Regina; Gersdorff, Nikolaus; Bürgers, Ralf; Monsonego-Ornan, Efrat; Rosen, Vicki; Miosge, Nicolai

2014-03-01

115

Prevention of spinal cord injury with time-frequency analysis of evoked potentials: an experimental study  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES—To verify the applicability and validity of time-frequency analysis (TFA) of evoked potential (EP) signals in detecting the integrity of spinal cord function and preventing spinal cord injury.?METHODS—The spinal cord was simulated during surgery in 20 mature rats by mechanically damaging the spinal cord. Cortical somatosensory evoked potential (CSEP), spinal somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP), cortical motor evoked potential (CMEP), and spinal cord evoked potential (SCEP) were used to monitor spinal cord function. Short time Fourier transform (STFT) was applied to the CSEP signal, and cone shaped distribution (CSD) was used as the TFA algorithm for SSEP, CMEP, and SCEP signals. The changes in the latency and amplitude of EP signals were measured in the time domain, and peak time, peak frequency, and peak power were measured in the time-frequency distribution (TFD).?RESULTS—The TFDs of EPs were found to concentrate in a certain location under normal conditions. When injury occurred, the energy decreased in peak power, and there was a greater dispersion of energy across the time-frequency range. Strong relations were found between latency and peak time, and amplitude and peak power. However, the change in peak power after injury was significantly larger than the corresponding change in amplitude (p<0.001 by ANOVA).?CONCLUSIONS—It was found that TFA of EPs provided an earlier and more sensitive indication of injury than time domain monitoring alone. It is suggested that TFA of EP signals should therefore be useful in preventing spinal cord injury during surgery.??

Hu, Y; Luk, K; Lu, W; Holmes, A; Leong, J

2001-01-01

116

Performance evaluation of space-time-frequency spreading for MIMO OFDM-CDMA systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this article, we propose a multiple-input-multiple-output, orthogonal frequency division multiplexing, code-division multiple-access (MIMO OFDM-CDMA) scheme. The main objective is to provide extra flexibility in user multiplexing and data rate adaptation, that offer higher system throughput and better diversity gains. This is done by spreading on all the signal domains; i.e, space-time frequency spreading is employed to transmit users' signals. The flexibility to spread on all three domains allows us to independently spread users' data, to maintain increased system throughput and to have higher diversity gains. We derive new accurate approximations for the probability of symbol error and signal-to-interference noise ratio (SINR) for zero forcing (ZF) receiver. This study and simulation results show that MIMO OFDM-CDMA is capable of achieving diversity gains significantly larger than that of the conventional 2-D CDMA OFDM and MIMO MC CDMA schemes.

Dahman, Haysam; Shayan, Yousef

2011-12-01

117

A time-frequency algorithm for noisy BSS model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In most practical blind source separation (BSS) applications, the observations contain additive source noise that limits the performances of most existing BSS algorithms. In this paper, we propose a new BSS approach exploiting the difference in the time-frequency (t-f) signatures of these sources to be separated. The approach uses smooth pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution (SPWVD) to obtain t-f distribution, then localizes the signal energy by Hough transform and selects a set of spatial t-f points based on the dominant eigenvalue of SPWVD of observations. Finally, numerical performance simulations are provided highlighting its effectiveness.

Guo, Jing; Zeng, Xiao-Ping

2011-10-01

118

Human Time-Frequency Acuity Beats the Fourier Uncertainty Principle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The time-frequency uncertainty principle states that the product of the temporal and frequency extents of a signal cannot be smaller than 1/(4?). We study human ability to simultaneously judge the frequency and the timing of a sound. Our subjects often exceeded the uncertainty limit, sometimes by more than tenfold, mostly through remarkable timing acuity. Our results establish a lower bound for the nonlinearity and complexity of the algorithms employed by our brains in parsing transient sounds, rule out simple “linear filter” models of early auditory processing, and highlight timing acuity as a central feature in auditory object processing.

Oppenheim, Jacob N.; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

2013-01-01

119

Optimal GPR bandwidth for time-frequency landmine discrimination  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work we investigate which bandwidth of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) is optimal for time-frequency landmine discrimination. We extracted three time-frequency features of the early-time target response from the Wigner distribution. The features were found to be relatively invariant to target depth for a data acquired with a stepped-frequency ultra-wideband GPR. The frequency sweep was from 0.3 GHz up to 6 GHz. The features allowed discrimination of two different low-metal landmines from a mine-like stone. The results were visualized in the three-dimensional feature space where each point related to a certain target represents a certain GPR scenario. For a number of scenarios we obtained two separated clusters for the landmines and the stone respectively. Numerically the quality of target discrimination can be evaluated with the Mahalanobis distance which estimates the separation between such feature clusters accounting for their size. Here we use the Mahalanobis distance as a criterion of optimality for the GPR bandwidth. Having obtained good results for the large data bandwidth, we reduce it by digital filtering with a small step in changing the cut-off frequencies, then extract the features and compute the Mahalanobis distance between the landmines and the stone. Its maximal value defines the optimal GPR lower and upper frequencies.

Savelyev, Timofei G.; Sato, Motoyuki

2005-06-01

120

The Application of Time-Frequency Methods to HUMS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper reports the study of four time-frequency transforms applied to vibration signals and presents a new metric for comparing them for fault detection. The four methods to be described and compared are the Short Time Frequency Transform (STFT), the Choi-Williams Distribution (WV-CW), the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) and the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). Vibration data of bevel gear tooth fatigue cracks, under a variety of operating load levels, are analyzed using these methods. The new metric for automatic fault detection is developed and can be produced from any systematic numerical representation of the vibration signals. This new metric reveals indications of gear damage with all of the methods on this data set. Analysis with the CWT detects mechanical problems with the test rig not found with the other transforms. The WV-CW and CWT use considerably more resources than the STFT and the DWT. More testing of the new metric is needed to determine its value for automatic fault detection and to develop methods of setting the threshold for the metric.

Pryor, Anna H.; Mosher, Marianne; Lewicki, David G.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

121

Degraded time-frequency acuity to time-reversed notes.  

PubMed

Time-reversal symmetry breaking is a key feature of many classes of natural sounds, originating in the physics of sound production. While attention has been paid to the response of the auditory system to "natural stimuli," very few psychophysical tests have been performed. We conduct psychophysical measurements of time-frequency acuity for stylized representations of "natural"-like notes (sharp attack, long decay) and the time-reversed versions of these notes (long attack, sharp decay). Our results demonstrate significantly greater precision, arising from enhanced temporal acuity, for such sounds over their time-reversed versions, without a corresponding decrease in frequency acuity. These data inveigh against models of auditory processing that include tradeoffs between temporal and frequency acuity, at least in the range of notes tested and suggest the existence of statistical priors for notes with a sharp-attack and a long-decay. We are additionally able to calculate a minimal theoretical bound on the sophistication of the nonlinearities in auditory processing. We find that among the best studied classes of nonlinear time-frequency representations, only matching pursuit, spectral derivatives, and reassigned spectrograms are able to satisfy this criterion. PMID:23799012

Oppenheim, Jacob N; Isakov, Pavel; Magnasco, Marcelo O

2013-01-01

122

Degraded Time-Frequency Acuity to Time-Reversed Notes  

PubMed Central

Time-reversal symmetry breaking is a key feature of many classes of natural sounds, originating in the physics of sound production. While attention has been paid to the response of the auditory system to “natural stimuli,” very few psychophysical tests have been performed. We conduct psychophysical measurements of time-frequency acuity for stylized representations of “natural”-like notes (sharp attack, long decay) and the time-reversed versions of these notes (long attack, sharp decay). Our results demonstrate significantly greater precision, arising from enhanced temporal acuity, for such sounds over their time-reversed versions, without a corresponding decrease in frequency acuity. These data inveigh against models of auditory processing that include tradeoffs between temporal and frequency acuity, at least in the range of notes tested and suggest the existence of statistical priors for notes with a sharp-attack and a long-decay. We are additionally able to calculate a minimal theoretical bound on the sophistication of the nonlinearities in auditory processing. We find that among the best studied classes of nonlinear time-frequency representations, only matching pursuit, spectral derivatives, and reassigned spectrograms are able to satisfy this criterion.

Oppenheim, Jacob N.; Isakov, Pavel; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

2013-01-01

123

A Time-Frequency Approach to Feature Extraction for a Brain-Computer Interface with a Comparative Analysis of Performance Measures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents an investigation into a time-frequency (t-f) method for extracting features from the electroencephalogram (EEG) recorded from subjects performing imagination of left and right hand movement. The feature extraction procedure (FEP) extracts frequency domain information to form features whilst time-frequency resolution is attained by localising the Fast Fourier Transformations (FFTs) of the signals to specific windows localised in

Damien Coyle; Girijesh Prasad; T. Martin McGinnity

2005-01-01

124

Faster learning algorithm convergence utilizing a combined time-frequency representation as basis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Light is capable of directly manipulating and probing molecular dynamics at its most fundamental level. One versatile approach to influencing such dynamics exploits temporally shaped femtosecond laser pulses. Oftentimes the control mechanisms necessary to induce a desired reaction cannot be determined theoretically a priori. However under certain circumstances these mechanisms can be extracted experimentally through trial and error. This can be implemented systematically by using an evolutionary learning algorithm (LA) with closed loop feedback. Most frequently, pulse shaping algorithms operate within either the time or frequency domain, however seldom both. This may influence the physical insight gained due to dependence on the search basis, as well as influence the speed the algorithm takes to converge. As an alternative to the Fourier domain basis, we make use of a combined time-frequency representation known as the von Neumann basis where we observe temporal and spectral effects at the same time. We report on the numerical and experimental results obtained using the Fourier, as well as the von Neumann basis to maximize the second harmonic generation (SHG) output in a non-linear crystal. We show that the von Neumann representation converges faster than the Fourier domain when compared to searches in the Fourier domain. We also show a reduced parameter space is required for the Fourier domain to converge efficiently, but not for von Neumann domain. Finally we show the highest SHG signal is not only a consequence of the shortest pulse, but that the pulse central frequency also plays a key role. Taken together these results suggest that the von Neumann basis can be used as a viable alternative to the Fourier domain with improved convergence time and potentially deeper physical insight.

Hendriks, A. J.; Uys, Hermann; du Plessis, Anton; Steenkamp, Christine

2013-10-01

125

Time-Frequency Methods for Structural Health Monitoring †  

PubMed Central

Detection of early warning signals for the imminent failure of large and complex engineered structures is a daunting challenge with many open research questions. In this paper we report on novel ways to perform Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of flood protection systems (levees, earthen dikes and concrete dams) using sensor data. We present a robust data-driven anomaly detection method that combines time-frequency feature extraction, using wavelet analysis and phase shift, with one-sided classification techniques to identify the onset of failure anomalies in real-time sensor measurements. The methodology has been successfully tested at three operational levees. We detected a dam leakage in the retaining dam (Germany) and “strange” behaviour of sensors installed in a Boston levee (UK) and a Rhine levee (Germany).

Pyayt, Alexander L.; Kozionov, Alexey P.; Mokhov, Ilya I.; Lang, Bernhard; Meijer, Robert J.; Krzhizhanovskaya, Valeria V.; Sloot, Peter M. A.

2014-01-01

126

Time-frequency analysis of synthetic aperture radar signals  

SciTech Connect

Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has become an important tool for remote sensing of the environment. SAR is a set of digital signal processing algorithms that are used to focus the signal returned to the radar because radar systems in themselves cannot produce the high resolution images required in remote sensing applications. To reconstruct an image, several parameters must be estimated and the quality of output image depends on the degree of accuracy of these parameters. In this thesis, we derive the fundamental SAR algorithms and concentrate on the estimation of one of its critical parameters. We show that the common technique for estimating this particular parameter can sometimes lead to erroneous results and reduced quality images. We also employ time-frequency analysis techniques to examine variations in the radar signals caused by platform motion and show how these results can be used to improve output image quality.

Johnston, B.

1996-08-01

127

A comparison between advanced time-frequency analyses of non-stationary magnetization dynamics in spin-torque oscillators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report re`sults of different time-frequency analyses (Wavelet and Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT)) of voltage measurements related to a spin-torque oscillator working in a regime of non-stationary dynamics. Our results indicate that the Wavelet analysis identifies the non-stationary magnetization dynamics revealing the existence of intermittent and independent excited modes while the HHT is able to accurately extract the time domain traces of each independent mode. Overall performance indicates a route for a complete characterization of time-frequency domain data of a STO, pointing out that the combined Wavelet-HHT methodology developed is general and can be also used for a variety of other different scenarios.

Siracusano, Giulio; Corte, Aurelio La

2014-02-01

128

Assessing Joint Time-Frequency Methods in the Detection of Dysfunctional Movement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Movement disorders affect millions of people and lead to increased rates of mortality and morbidity in the elderly population. To explore new treatments and facilitate preventative medicine, researchers are actively studying the epidemiology of movement disorder and employing technology to help expose its symptoms. A wearable device, TEMPO, developed at the University of Virginia, has enabled the collection of inertial

M. A. Hanson; J. Lach

2006-01-01

129

Measuring high-frequency wave propagation in railroad tracks by joint time–frequency analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The behavior of high-frequency elastic waves propagating in railroad tracks is relevant to the field of rail noise generation and long-range rail inspection. While a large amount of theoretical and numerical work exists to predict transient vibrations propagating in rails, obtaining experimental data has been particularly challenging due to the multimode and dispersive behavior of the waves.In this work a

F. Lanza di Scalea; J. McNamara

2004-01-01

130

Content based audio classification and retrieval using joint time-frequency analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present an audio classification and retrieval technique that exploits the non-stationary behavior of music signals and extracts features that characterize their spectral change over time. Audio classification provides a solution to incorrect and inefficient manual labelling of audio files on computers by allowing users to extract music files based on content similarity rather than labels. In our technique, classification

S. Esmaili; S. Krishnan; K. Raahemifar

2004-01-01

131

Signal analysis by means of time-frequency (Wigner-type) distributions-applications to sonar and radar echoes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Time series data have been traditionally analyzed in either the time or the frequency domains. For signals with a time-varying frequency content, the combined time-frequency (TF) representations, based on the Cohen class of (generalized) Wigner distributions (WD's) offer a powerful analysis tool. Using them, it is possible to: (1) trace the time-evolution of the resonance features usually present in a

G. C. Gaunaurd; H. C. Strifors

1996-01-01

132

Dim moving target detection method based on time-frequency analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The signal-to-clutter ratio couldn't be improved effectively for conventional spatial or temporal high-pass filter is difficult to remove clutter, especially clutter edge, and a dim moving target detection method based on the timefrequency characters difference among target, noise and clutter is presented in this paper. Theoretical analysis shows that the waveform at the target location in time-frequency domain is a small wave packet, the magnitude of the wave packet is consistent with the target amplitude, and the width of the packet is inversely proportional to target speed; the waveform at clutter edge is an "uphill" or "downhill". This target detection method takes two-stage filters to detect dim target. At first, a threshold based on false alarm ratio criteria in the time-frequency is adopted to remove noise, and then the ratio between "main lobe" and "side lobe" in the wave packet is counted to remove clutter and detect target. The dim target detection experiment under cloud is included and the result shows that the method is effective.

Li, Zhengzhou; Tian, Lei; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Yuehua; Jin, Gang

2011-06-01

133

Time-frequency effects in wireless communication systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Time-frequency effects in wireless communication systems caused by narrowband resonances and coupled with device nonlinearities are revealed as new sources of co-site interference, exploited for the metrology of bandpass circuits, and employed to linearize amplitude-modulated transmissions. The transient properties of bandpass filters are found to last much longer than traditional time/bandwidth rules-of-thumb. The cause of this long-tail behavior is attributed to the coupled-resonator structure of the filter circuit. A solution method which uses lowpass prototyping is developed to reduce, by a factor of two, the complexity of the differential equation set describing a narrowband filter's transient response. Pulse overlap caused by the frequency dependence of long tails produced by filters is shown to cause intersymbol interference and intermodulation distortion in RF front-ends during frequency-hopped communications. The same properties which cause the ISI and IMD are used to develop three new transient methods for measuring resonant circuit parameters and a one-port method for extracting the operating band of a filter. A new signal-processing technique which combines time- and frequency-selectivity, Linear Amplification by Time-Multiplexed Spectrum, is developed to reduce IMD associated with amplitude modulation. Distortion reduction is demonstrated experimentally for multisines up to 20 tones.

Mazzaro, Gregory James

134

Analysis and synthesis of room reverberation based on a statistical time-frequency model  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews a statistical time-frequency model of late reverberation decays, and describes an associated analysis procedure for deriving the time-frequency envelope of the reverberation from a measured impulse response, based on the notion of \\

Jean-Marc Jot; Laurent Cerveau; Olivier Warusfel

1997-01-01

135

Time\\/Frequency Analysis of Terrestrial Impack Crater Records  

Microsoft Academic Search

The terrestrial impact cratering record recently has been examined in the time domain by Chang & Moon (2005). It was found that the ˜ 26 Myr periodicity in the impact cratering rate exists over the last ˜ 250 Myrs. Such a periodicity can be found regardless of the lower limit of the diameter up to D ˜ 35 km. It

Heon-Young Chang

2006-01-01

136

THE ANALYSIS OF NON-STATIONARY SIGNALS USING TIME-FREQUENCY METHODS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper deals with the time–frequency analysis of deterministic and stochastic non-stationary signals. It includes the following: a brief review of the fundamentals of time–frequency analysis and various time–frequency distributions; a summary of the inter-relations between time–frequency distributions, emphasizing links between evolutionary spectra, the Wigner-Ville distribution, and Cohen-class distribution; demonstration of the effects of using different analysis methods on sample

J. K. Hammond; P. R. White

1996-01-01

137

Time-Frequency Analyses of Tide-Gauge Sensor Data  

PubMed Central

The real world phenomena being observed by sensors are generally non-stationary in nature. The classical linear techniques for analysis and modeling natural time-series observations are inefficient and should be replaced by non-linear techniques of whose theoretical aspects and performances are varied. In this manner adopting the most appropriate technique and strategy is essential in evaluating sensors’ data. In this study, two different time-series analysis approaches, namely least squares spectral analysis (LSSA) and wavelet analysis (continuous wavelet transform, cross wavelet transform and wavelet coherence algorithms as extensions of wavelet analysis), are applied to sea-level observations recorded by tide-gauge sensors, and the advantages and drawbacks of these methods are reviewed. The analyses were carried out using sea-level observations recorded at the Antalya-II and Erdek tide-gauge stations of the Turkish National Sea-Level Monitoring System. In the analyses, the useful information hidden in the noisy signals was detected, and the common features between the two sea-level time series were clarified. The tide-gauge records have data gaps in time because of issues such as instrumental shortcomings and power outages. Concerning the difficulties of the time-frequency analysis of data with voids, the sea-level observations were preprocessed, and the missing parts were predicted using the neural network method prior to the analysis. In conclusion the merits and limitations of the techniques in evaluating non-stationary observations by means of tide-gauge sensors records were documented and an analysis strategy for the sequential sensors observations was presented.

Erol, Serdar

2011-01-01

138

Radar classification of landmines by time-frequency analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A flying platform illuminates a land mine field with mixtures of various landmines (i.e., buried, on the surface, plastic or metallic) and some "confusers", with an ultra-wideband (UWB) radar. The polarimetric echoes returned by the mine field are mapped into an overall synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image, which is then analyzed pixel-by-pixel by modern time-frequency (t-f) techniques. The t-f analysis of any echo from any of the individual scatterers in the mine field can be performed using a number of t-f distributions, which in turn generate two-dimensional plots of each such scatterer in t-f space. These plots are richer in information than those in the original SAR image, and they offer a larger variety of clues useful for the discrimination of each type of mine from the others or from the confusers. Several t-f distributions are employed in the study, and it is found that some are better than others for the present purpose of target detection and classification. From the images obtained we can conclude that the Pseudo-Wigner-Ville and the Choi-Williams distributions provide the best discrimination results. It is also found that the larger mines such as those denoted here as of "type-1" are the easiest to identify. Using the above-mentioned distributions it follows that the distinction between actual mines and clutter objects (or "confusers") becomes clearer, particularly when the latter objects are metallic. Numerous images generated in this study confirm the above conclusions.

Wong, D.; Nguyen, L.; Gaunaurd, G.

2007-04-01

139

Naval Space Surveillance Center uses of time, frequency, and phase  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Naval Space Surveillance Center (NAVSPASUR) is an operational naval command that has the mission of determining the location of all manmade objects in space and transmitting information on objects of interest to the fleet. NAVSPASUR operates a 217 MHz radar fence that has 9 transmitting and receiving stations deployed in a line across southern Continental United States (CONUS). This surveillance fence provides unalerted detection of satellites overflying CONUS. NAVSPASUR also maintains a space catalog of all orbiting space objects. NAVSPASUR plays an important role as operational alternate to the primary national Space Surveillance Center (SSC) and Space Defence Operations Center (SPADOC). In executing these responsibilities, NAVSPASUR needs precise and/or standardized time and frequency in a number of applications. These include maintenance of the radar fence references to specification, and coordination with other commands and agencies for data receipt and dissemination. Precise time and frequency must be maintained within each site to enable proper operation of the interferometry phasing technique used. Precise time-of-day clocking must exist between sites for proper intersite coordination. Phase may be considered a derivative of time and frequency. Its control within each transmitter or receiver site is of great importance to NAVSPASUR because of the operation of the sensor as an interferometer system, with source direction angles as the primary observable. Determination of the angular position of a satellite is directly dependent on the accuracy with which the differential phase between spaced subarrays can be measured at each receiver site. Various aspects of the NAVSPASUR are discussed with respect to time, frequency, and phase.

Hayden, Carroll C.; Knowles, Stephen H.

1992-01-01

140

Time-frequency analyses of tide-gauge sensor data.  

PubMed

The real world phenomena being observed by sensors are generally non-stationary in nature. The classical linear techniques for analysis and modeling natural time-series observations are inefficient and should be replaced by non-linear techniques of whose theoretical aspects and performances are varied. In this manner adopting the most appropriate technique and strategy is essential in evaluating sensors' data. In this study, two different time-series analysis approaches, namely least squares spectral analysis (LSSA) and wavelet analysis (continuous wavelet transform, cross wavelet transform and wavelet coherence algorithms as extensions of wavelet analysis), are applied to sea-level observations recorded by tide-gauge sensors, and the advantages and drawbacks of these methods are reviewed. The analyses were carried out using sea-level observations recorded at the Antalya-II and Erdek tide-gauge stations of the Turkish National Sea-Level Monitoring System. In the analyses, the useful information hidden in the noisy signals was detected, and the common features between the two sea-level time series were clarified. The tide-gauge records have data gaps in time because of issues such as instrumental shortcomings and power outages. Concerning the difficulties of the time-frequency analysis of data with voids, the sea-level observations were preprocessed, and the missing parts were predicted using the neural network method prior to the analysis. In conclusion the merits and limitations of the techniques in evaluating non-stationary observations by means of tide-gauge sensors records were documented and an analysis strategy for the sequential sensors observations was presented. PMID:22163829

Erol, Serdar

2011-01-01

141

Perception-Based Audio Authentication Watermarking in the Time-Frequency Domain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current systems and protocols based on cryptographic methods for integrity and authenticity verification of media data do\\u000a not distinguish between legitimate signal transformation and malicious tampering that manipulates the content. Furthermore,\\u000a they usually provide no localization or assessment of the relevance of such manipulations with respect to human perception\\u000a or semantics. We present an algorithm for a authentication audio watermarking

Sascha Zmudzinski; Martin Steinebach

2009-01-01

142

Time-Frequency Analysis in Terahertz-Pulsed Imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent advances in laser and electro-optical technologies have made the previously underutilized terahertz frequency band\\u000a of the electromagnetic spectrum accessible for practical imaging. Applications are emerging, notably in the biomedical domain.\\u000a In this chapter the technique of terahertz-pulsed imaging is introduced in some detail. The need for special computer vision\\u000a methods, which arises from the use of pulses of radiation

Elizabeth Berry; Roger D Boyle; Anthony J Fitzgerald; James Handley

143

A real-time weighted-eigenvector MUSIC method for time-frequency analysis of electrogastrogram slow wave.  

PubMed

The surface electrogastrogram (EGG) records the electrical slow wave of the stomach noninvasively, whose frequency is a useful clinical indicator of the state of gastric motility. Estimators based on the periodogram method are widely adopted to obtain this parameter. But they are with a poor frequency domain resolution when the data window is short in time-frequency analysis, and have not taken full advantage of the slow wave model. We present a modified multiple signal classification (MUSIC) method for computing the frequency from surface EGG records, developing it into a real-time time-frequency analysis algorithm. Simulations indicate that the modified MUSIC method has better performance in resolution and precision in the sinusoid-like resultant signal frequency detecting than periodogram. Volunteer data tests show that the modified MUSIC method is stable and efficient for clinical applications, and reduces the danger of pseudo peaks for the diagnosis. PMID:21097197

Qin, Shujia; Miao, Lei; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Yang, Chunmin

2010-01-01

144

Compressive sensing for sparse time-frequency representation of nonstationary signals in the presence of impulsive noise  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A modified robust two-dimensional compressive sensing algorithm for reconstruction of sparse time-frequency representation (TFR) is proposed. The ambiguity function domain is assumed to be the domain of observations. The two-dimensional Fourier bases are used to linearly relate the observations to the sparse TFR, in lieu of the Wigner distribution. We assume that a set of available samples in the ambiguity domain is heavily corrupted by an impulsive type of noise. Consequently, the problem of sparse TFR reconstruction cannot be tackled using standard compressive sensing optimization algorithms. We introduce a two-dimensional L-statistics based modification into the transform domain representation. It provides suitable initial conditions that will produce efficient convergence of the reconstruction algorithm. This approach applies sorting and weighting operations to discard an expected amount of samples corrupted by noise. The remaining samples serve as observations used in sparse reconstruction of the time-frequency signal representation. The efficiency of the proposed approach is demonstrated on numerical examples that comprise both cases of monocomponent and multicomponent signals.

Orovi?, Irena; Stankovi?, Srdjan; Amin, Moeness

2013-05-01

145

Separating cognitive processes with principal components analysis of EEG time-frequency distributions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measurement of EEG event-related potential (ERP) data has been most commonly undertaken in the time-domain, which can be complicated to interpret when separable activity overlaps in time. When the overlapping activity has distinct frequency characteristics, however, time-frequency (TF) signal processing techniques can be useful. The current report utilized ERP data from a cognitive task producing typical feedback-related negativity (FRN) and P300 ERP components which overlap in time. TF transforms were computed using the binomial reduced interference distribution (RID), and the resulting TF activity was then characterized using principal components analysis (PCA). Consistent with previous work, results indicate that the FRN was more related to theta activity (3-7 Hz) and P300 more to delta activity (below 3 Hz). At the same time, both time-domain measures were shown to be mixtures of TF theta and delta activity, highlighting the difficulties with overlapping activity. The TF theta and delta measures, on the other hand, were largely independent from each other, but also independently indexed the feedback stimulus parameters investigated. Results support the view that TF decomposition can greatly improve separation of overlapping EEG/ERP activity relevant to cognitive models of performance monitoring.

Bernat, Edward M.; Nelson, Lindsay D.; Holroyd, Clay B.; Gehring, William J.; Patrick, Christopher J.

2008-08-01

146

TIME-FREQUENCY Analysis of a Suspension Bridge Based on GPS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the results obtained from full-scale measurements of Humen bridge, which is the second longest suspension bridge in China. A real-time kinematic (RTK) global positioning system (GPS) has been developed and installed on the Humen bridge for on-line monitoring of bridge deck movements. The field wind-induced vibration data were measured by this monitoring system. Three system identification techniques are then adopted in the modal analysis of the wind-induced vibration response: the time-frequency Wigner distribution (WD) technique, the frequency-domain fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique and the time-domain auto-regressive moving average vector (ARMAV) technique. The WD technique can recognize close modal coupling and non-stationary response. The FFT technique can on site verify the quality of the measurements, but its frequency resolution is low and damping estimates are unreliable. The ARMAV method allows for gaining high-frequency resolution. However, it is strictly related to the stationary hypothesis. It is a general conclusion that we can improve the quality of the analysis and get more precise characteristics of the signal by these three methods. In addition, the WD combined with ARMAV seems to be the best case in quantitative analysis of fast-changing vibration signals.

XU, L.; GUO, J. J.; JIANG, J. J.

2002-06-01

147

Experimental measure of arm stiffness during single reaching movements with a time-frequency analysis.  

PubMed

We tested an innovative method to estimate joint stiffness and damping during multijoint unfettered arm movements. The technique employs impulsive perturbations and a time-frequency analysis to estimate the arm's mechanical properties along a reaching trajectory. Each single impulsive perturbation provides a continuous estimation on a single-reach basis, making our method ideal to investigate motor adaptation in the presence of force fields and to study the control of movement in impaired individuals with limited kinematic repeatability. In contrast with previous dynamic stiffness studies, we found that stiffness varies during movement, achieving levels higher than during static postural control. High stiffness was associated with elevated reflexive activity. We observed a decrease in stiffness and a marked reduction in long-latency reflexes around the reaching movement velocity peak. This pattern could partly explain the difference between the high stiffness reported in postural studies and the low stiffness measured in dynamic estimation studies, where perturbations are typically applied near the peak velocity point. PMID:23945781

Piovesan, Davide; Pierobon, Alberto; DiZio, Paul; Lackner, James R

2013-11-01

148

Time-Frequency Mixed-Norm Estimates: Sparse M/EEG imaging with non-stationary source activations  

PubMed Central

Magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) allow functional brain imaging with high temporal resolution. While solving the inverse problem independently at every time point can give an image of the active brain at every millisecond, such a procedure does not capitalize on the temporal dynamics of the signal. Linear inverse methods (Minimum-norm, dSPM, sLORETA, beamformers) typically assume that the signal is stationary: regularization parameter and data covariance are independent of time and the time varying signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Other recently proposed non-linear inverse solvers promoting focal activations estimate the sources in both space and time while also assuming stationary sources during a time interval. However such an hypothesis only holds for short time intervals. To overcome this limitation, we propose time-frequency mixed-norm estimates (TF-MxNE), which use time-frequency analysis to regularize the ill-posed inverse problem. This method makes use of structured sparse priors defined in the time-frequency domain, offering more accurate estimates by capturing the non-stationary and transient nature of brain signals. State-of-the-art convex optimization procedures based on proximal operators are employed, allowing the derivation of a fast estimation algorithm. The accuracy of the TF-MxNE is compared to recently proposed inverse solvers with help of simulations and by analyzing publicly available MEG datasets.

Gramfort, A.; Strohmeier, D.; Haueisen, J.; Hamalainen, M.; Kowalski, M.

2013-01-01

149

Decomposition of biomedical signals for enhancement of their time–frequency distributions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bilinear time–frequency distributions have been widely utilized in the analysis of nonstationary biomedical signals. A problem often arises where the time–frequency components with small-amplitude values cannot be displayed clearly. This problem results from a masking effect on these components caused by the presence of high-energy slow waves and sharp patterns in the input which produce large values in the time–frequency

Mingui Sun; Mark L. Scheuer; Robert J. Sclabassi

2000-01-01

150

Time-frequency conversion, temporal filtering, and temporal imaging using graded-index time lenses.  

PubMed

We propose several applications of graded-index (GRIN) time lenses including time-frequency conversion (time-to-frequency conversion and frequency-to-time conversion simultaneously), temporal filtering, and temporal imaging. The evolution of the signal pulses in these systems is demonstrated. As two important parameters, the focal length and the time-frequency conversion factors of time-frequency conversion based on GRIN time lenses are evaluated. PMID:23027252

Li, Bo; Lou, Shuqin

2012-10-01

151

Recurrent Dominant Mutations Affecting Two Adjacent Residues in the Motor Domain of the Monomeric Kinesin KIF22 Result in Skeletal Dysplasia and Joint Laxity  

PubMed Central

Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity, leptodactylic type (lepto-SEMDJL, aka SEMDJL, Hall type), is an autosomal dominant skeletal disorder that, in spite of being relatively common among skeletal dysplasias, has eluded molecular elucidation so far. We used whole-exome sequencing of five unrelated individuals with lepto-SEMDJL to identify mutations in KIF22 as the cause of this skeletal condition. Missense mutations affecting one of two adjacent amino acids in the motor domain of KIF22 were present in 20 familial cases from eight families and in 12 other sporadic cases. The skeletal and connective tissue phenotype produced by these specific mutations point to functions of KIF22 beyond those previously ascribed functions involving chromosome segregation. Although we have found Kif22 to be strongly upregulated at the growth plate, the precise pathogenetic mechanisms remain to be elucidated.

Boyden, Eric D.; Campos-Xavier, A. Belinda; Kalamajski, Sebastian; Cameron, Trevor L.; Suarez, Philippe; Tanackovich, Goranka; Andria, Generoso; Ballhausen, Diana; Briggs, Michael D.; Hartley, Claire; Cohn, Daniel H.; Davidson, H. Rosemarie; Hall, Christine; Ikegawa, Shiro; Jouk, Pierre-Simon; Konig, Rainer; Megarbane, Andre; Nishimura, Gen; Lachman, Ralph S.; Mortier, Geert; Rimoin, David L.; Rogers, R. Curtis; Rossi, Massimiliano; Sawada, Hirotake; Scott, Richard; Unger, Sheila; Valadares, Eugenia Ribeiro; Bateman, John F.; Warman, Matthew L.; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Bonafe, Luisa

2011-01-01

152

Recurrent dominant mutations affecting two adjacent residues in the motor domain of the monomeric kinesin KIF22 result in skeletal dysplasia and joint laxity.  

PubMed

Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity, leptodactylic type (lepto-SEMDJL, aka SEMDJL, Hall type), is an autosomal dominant skeletal disorder that, in spite of being relatively common among skeletal dysplasias, has eluded molecular elucidation so far. We used whole-exome sequencing of five unrelated individuals with lepto-SEMDJL to identify mutations in KIF22 as the cause of this skeletal condition. Missense mutations affecting one of two adjacent amino acids in the motor domain of KIF22 were present in 20 familial cases from eight families and in 12 other sporadic cases. The skeletal and connective tissue phenotype produced by these specific mutations point to functions of KIF22 beyond those previously ascribed functions involving chromosome segregation. Although we have found Kif22 to be strongly upregulated at the growth plate, the precise pathogenetic mechanisms remain to be elucidated. PMID:22152678

Boyden, Eric D; Campos-Xavier, A Belinda; Kalamajski, Sebastian; Cameron, Trevor L; Suarez, Philippe; Tanackovic, Goranka; Tanackovich, Goranka; Andria, Generoso; Ballhausen, Diana; Briggs, Michael D; Hartley, Claire; Cohn, Daniel H; Davidson, H Rosemarie; Hall, Christine; Ikegawa, Shiro; Jouk, Pierre-Simon; König, Rainer; Megarbané, André; Nishimura, Gen; Lachman, Ralph S; Mortier, Geert; Rimoin, David L; Rogers, R Curtis; Rossi, Massimiliano; Sawada, Hirotake; Scott, Richard; Unger, Sheila; Valadares, Eugenia Ribeiro; Bateman, John F; Warman, Matthew L; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Bonafé, Luisa

2011-12-01

153

Acoustic modeling, phantom echolocation experiments, and time-frequency analysis of dolphin sonar for improved technological sonar systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dolphin echolocation has been demonstrated to be a remarkable natural sonar system, one which may greatly exceed the performance of technological sonar systems in terms of detection and discrimination of targets. A dolphin's ability to discriminate targets may depend on the characteristics of echo highlights within a received signal. Previous experiments with dolphins varied the physical parameters of targets, but did not fully investigate how changes in individual echo components within the scattered waveforms affected the dolphin's subsequent response. The experiments utilize a phantom echo system to test a dolphin's detection response to relative amplitude differences of echo highlights and time separation differences between echo highlights. By electronically manipulating the amplitude and temporal separation of the highlights, the underlying acoustic cues are more efficiently investigated. Based on the dolphin's performance, the animal is sensitive to changes in the relative amplitudes and temporal separations of the highlights. Center frequency and rms bandwidth are calculated for the clicks collected during the experiments and the clicks are clustered into four classes using model based clustering. Echo signatures are obtained from elastic, isotropic spheres for each class of clicks with an acoustic scattering model. The results from the model are compared with experimentally obtained results. The joint time-frequency content of the resulting echo signals are obtained by the reduced interference distribution (RID). The RIDs are examined for each signal class for four different spherical targets. RID correlation values are obtained for a standard target versus comparison targets using a time-frequency correlator. Matching pursuit decomposition is applied to the signals to study frequency changes within the dolphin's functional bandwidth during discrimination tasks. The matching pursuit algorithm extracts subtle frequency differences that traditional time-frequency analysis techniques do not reveal. Furthermore, ROC analysis is applied to the relative energies of the matched waveforms to determine probability of discrimination. The results support the hypothesis that dolphins may discriminate by altering outgoing clicks and utilizing the time-frequency information returned by the targets. In a similar manner, by altering transmission signals and incorporating time-frequency signal processing algorithms, it may be possible to improve technological sonar models.

Muller, Mark W.

154

Non-invasive baroreflex sensitivity assessment using wavelet transfer function-based time-frequency analysis.  

PubMed

A novel approach for the estimation of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is introduced based on time-frequency analysis of the transfer function (TF). The TF method (TF-BRS) is a well-established non-invasive technique which assumes stationarity. This condition is difficult to meet, especially in cardiac patients. In this study, the classical TF was replaced with a wavelet transfer function (WTF) and the classical coherence was replaced with wavelet transform coherence (WTC), adding the time domain as an additional degree of freedom with dynamic error estimation. Error analysis and comparison between WTF-BRS and TF-BRS were performed using simulated signals with known transfer function and added noise. Similar comparisons were performed for ECG and blood pressure signals, in the supine position, of 19 normal subjects, 44 patients with a history of previous myocardial infarction (MI) and 45 patients with chronic heart failure. This yielded an excellent linear association (R > 0.94, p < 0.001) for time-averaged WTF-BRS, validating the new method as consistent with a known method. The additional advantage of dynamic analysis of coherence and TF estimates was illustrated in two physiological examples of supine rest and change of posture showing the evolution of BRS synchronized with its error estimations and sympathovagal balance. PMID:20585147

Keissar, K; Maestri, R; Pinna, G D; La Rovere, M T; Gilad, O

2010-07-01

155

Image analysis through high-order entropy measures extracted from time-frequency representations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Entropy is used as a number indicating the amount of uncertainty or information of a source. That means that noise can not be distinguished from information by simply measuring entropy. Nevertheless, the Renyi entropy can be used to calculate the entropy in a pixel-wise basis. When the source of information is a digital image, a value of entropy can be assigned to each pixel of the image. Consequently, entropy histograms of images can be obtained. Entropy histograms give information about the image information contents in a similar way as image histograms give information about the distribution of gray-levels. Hence, histograms of entropy can be used to quantify differences in the information contents of images. The pixel-wise entropy of digital images has been calculated through the use of a spatial/spatial-frequency distribution. The generalized Renyi entropy and a normalized windowed pseudo-Wigner distribution (PWD) have been selected to obtain particular pixel-wise entropy values. In this way, a histogram of entropy values has been derived. In this paper, first we present a review on the use of the Renyi entropy as a measure of the information contents extracted from a time-frequency representation. Second, a particular measure based on a high-order Renyi entropy distribution has been analyzed. Examples are presented in the areas of image fusion and blind image quality assessment. Experiments on real data in different applications domains illustrate the robustness and utilization of this method.

Gabarda, Salvador; Cristóbal, Gabriel

2008-08-01

156

Signature features in time-frequency of simple targets extracted by ground penetrating radar  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the scattering interaction of electromagnetic pulses of short duraction with two targets of simple shape. The targets are metal spheres buried at different depths in sand contained in an indoor sandbox of length and width of about 5 m and depth of 2 m. The spectrum of the backscattered echo is determined from measured data when the target is illuminated by an impulse radar system. In general, however, the signature features extracted when the antenna and the target are located in different half-spaces having different electrical properties are distorted by multiple scattering becomes less significant and, as the distance increases, the backscattering signature will ultimately approach that of the target in free space. We examine here the effect of multiple scattering on the target's signature will ultimately approach that of the target in free space. We examine here the effect of multiple scattering on the target's signatures when they are buried at different depths. In particular, we examine how the signature features evolve in time, both the primary signature feature and the subsequent features caused by multiple scattering. This is carried out using a pseudo-Wigner distribution (PWD) with a Gaussian time-window, having its width properly adjusted to suppress the interference of cross-terms in the PWD, yet retaining the desired property of concentrating the extracted features in the time-frequency domain. The results serve to assess the possibility if identifying subsurface targets using a ground penetrating radar (GPR).

Strifors, Hans C.; Abrahamson, Steffan; Brusmark, B.; Gaunaurd, Guillermo C.

1995-07-01

157

Estimating the local viscoelastic properties from dispersive shear waves using time-frequency ridge analysis.  

PubMed

Modulated low-frequency shear waves can be non-invasively generated locally within a medium, by the oscillatory acoustic radiation force resulting from the interference of two focused quasi-CW ultrasound beams of slightly different frequencies. The propagation of such shear waves within a viscoelastic medium is known to be affected by the dispersive effects of viscosity. Specifically, a low-frequency (LF) spectral component was shown to arise with increased viscosities and higher modulation frequencies and appear as a 'slow' wave at the end of the shear waveform. In this paper, the shear dispersion characteristics are studied based on the Pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution (PWVD) in the time-frequency domain. The ridges of the PWVD are then extracted and used to calculate the frequency-dependent shear speed, by identifying the LF dispersive component both in time and frequency. Using numerical simulations, it is shown that this way of estimating the shear dispersion is more efficient and robust than the conventional phase-delay Fourier method. Thus, more accurate estimates of the local shear modulus and viscosity of the propagating medium could be achieved. The effects of noise on the proposed method are also discussed. PMID:23106858

Giannoula, Alexia; Cobbold, Richard S C; Bezerianos, Anastasios

2013-02-01

158

Time-frequency Analysis on low-resistivity Shielding Layer in TEM Soundings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The transient electromagnetic (TEM) method will be influenced by shielding effect of the low-resistivity overburden layer. By adopting the smooth pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution (SPWD), the responses simulated with a finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD) of D- and G-type models by a 2D line source and H-, A-, K- and Q-type models by a loop source are transformed to the time-frequency (T-F) plane. It is indicated that in low-resistivity, the TEM wave aggregates and will consume more energy, it transmits faster in high-resistivity layers but slower in low-resistivity ones. For A-type models widely in distribution of the North China type coalfield of our country, energy of the TEM field has been almost depleted when arriving at the bottom interface (interfaces of Ordovician limestone and coal series) during the TEM exploration in this area, influence of the low resistive shielding layer shall be taken into full consideration, and relatively longer observing time window shall be selected to ensure the detection depth and high-power instruments shall be adopted to increase the signal-noise ratio during construction design.

Shi, Xianxin; Wu, Kai

159

Coherent electron-phonon interaction in Si observed in time-frequency space  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Si is the most fundamental component of modern electronic devices such as integrated circuits (ICs). To date, only the incoherent population relaxation process of photogenerated carriers in Si have been studied by pump-probe methods. However, the direct observation of coherent electron-phonon interaction has not yet been reported for Si. Here we report on the ultrafast coherent electron-phonon interaction and subsequent generation of a coherent phonon in Si observed with 10 fs time resolution. The Electro-optic sampling method was employed to measure anisotropic reflectivity change ? R_eo/R. The light source was 406 nm light generated by frequency doubling a Ti:sapphire oscillator. The sample used was n-Si with doping level of ˜ 1 x 10^15cm-3, whereas the photoexcited carrier density was ˜ 4 x 10^19cm-3. ? R_eo/R exhibits complicated transient response of photoexcited carriers and the oscillatory part due to the coherent LO phonon. The time domain data were converted into a time-frequency chronogram using a continuos wavelet transform, revealing an antiresonance (or a dip) at 22 fs and 15.3 THz. We attribute this dip to the coupling of the coherent LO phonon and electron-hole pair continuum via impulsive Raman scattering process, as well as by direct electron-phonon interaction, leading to the Fano interference.

Hase, Muneaki; Kitajima, Masahiro; Monia Constantinescu, Anca; Petek, Hrvoje

2004-03-01

160

A joint estimation detection of Glaucoma progression in 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography optic nerve head images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Glaucoma is an ocular disease characterized by distinctive changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) and visual field. Glaucoma can strike without symptoms and causes blindness if it remains without treatment. Therefore, early disease detection is important so that treatment can be initiated and blindness prevented. In this context, important advances in technology for non-invasive imaging of the eye have been made providing quantitative tools to measure structural changes in ONH topography, an essential element for glaucoma detection and monitoring. 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), an optical imaging technique, has been commonly used to discriminate glaucomatous from healthy subjects. In this paper, we present a new framework for detection of glaucoma progression using 3D SD-OCT images. In contrast to previous works that the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurement provided by commercially available spectral-domain optical coherence tomograph, we consider the whole 3D volume for change detection. To integrate a priori knowledge and in particular the spatial voxel dependency in the change detection map, we propose the use of the Markov Random Field to handle a such dependency. To accommodate the presence of false positive detection, the estimated change detection map is then used to classify a 3D SDOCT image into the "non-progressing" and "progressing" glaucoma classes, based on a fuzzy logic classifier. We compared the diagnostic performance of the proposed framework to existing methods of progression detection.

Belghith, Akram; Bowd, Christopher; Weinreb, Robert N.; Zangwill, Linda M.

2014-03-01

161

Hilbert-Huang transformation-based time-frequency analysis methods in biomedical signal applications.  

PubMed

Hilbert-Huang transformation, wavelet transformation, and Fourier transformation are the principal time-frequency analysis methods. These transformations can be used to discuss the frequency characteristics of linear and stationary signals, the time-frequency features of linear and non-stationary signals, the time-frequency features of non-linear and non-stationary signals, respectively. The Hilbert-Huang transformation is a combination of empirical mode decomposition and Hilbert spectral analysis. The empirical mode decomposition uses the characteristics of signals to adaptively decompose them to several intrinsic mode functions. Hilbert transforms are then used to transform the intrinsic mode functions into instantaneous frequencies, to obtain the signal's time-frequency-energy distributions and features. Hilbert-Huang transformation-based time-frequency analysis can be applied to natural physical signals such as earthquake waves, winds, ocean acoustic signals, mechanical diagnosis signals, and biomedical signals. In previous studies, we examined Hilbert-Huang transformation-based time-frequency analysis of the electroencephalogram FPI signals of clinical alcoholics, and 'sharp I' wave-based Hilbert-Huang transformation time-frequency features. In this paper, we discuss the application of Hilbert-Huang transformation-based time-frequency analysis to biomedical signals, such as electroencephalogram, electrocardiogram signals, electrogastrogram recordings, and speech signals. PMID:22558835

Lin, Chin-Feng; Zhu, Jin-De

2012-03-01

162

IGS/BIPM pilot project: GPS carrier phase for time/frequency transfer and timescale formation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development within the International GPS Service (IGS) of a suite of clock products, for both satellites and tracking receivers, offers some experiences which mirror the operations of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) in its formation of TAI/UTC but some aspects differ markedly. The IGS relies exclusively on the carrier phase-based geodetic technique whereas BIPM time/frequency transfers use only common-view and two-way satellite (TWSTFT) methods. The carrier-phase approach has the potential of very high precision but suitable instrumental calibration procedures are only in the initial phases of deployment; the current BIPM techniques are more mature and widely used among timing labs, but are either less precise (common-view) or much more expensive (TWSTFT). In serving its geodetic users, the essential requirement for IGS clock products is that they be fully self-consistent in relative terms and also fully consistent with all other IGS products, especially the satellite orbits, in order to permit an isolated user to apply them with accuracy of a few centimetres. While there is no other strong requirement for the IGS timescale except to be reasonably close to broadcast GPS time, it is nonetheless very desirable for the IGS clock products to possess additional properties, such as being highly stable and being accurately relatable to UTC. These qualities enhance the value of IGS clock products for applications other than pure geodesy, especially for timing operations. The jointly sponsored `IGS/BIPM Pilot Project to Study Accurate Time and Frequency Comparisons using GPS Phase and Code Measurements' is developing operational strategies to exploit geodetic GPS methods for improved global time/frequency comparisons to the mutual benefit of both organizations. While helping the IGS to refine its clock products and link them to UTC, this collaboration will also provide new time transfer results for the BIPM that may eventually improve the formation of TAI and allow meaningful comparisons of new cold atom clocks. Thus far, geodetic receivers have been installed at many timing labs, a new internally realized IGS timescale has been produced using a weighted ensemble algorithm, and instrumental calibration procedures developed. Formulating a robust frequency ensemble from a globally distributed network of clocks presents unique challenges compared with intra-laboratory timescales. We have used these products to make a detailed study of the observed time transfer performance for about 30 IGS stations equipped with H-maser frequency standards. The results reveal a large dispersion in quality which can often be related to differences in local station factors. The main elements of the Project's original plan are now largely completed or in progress. In major ways, the experiences of this joint effort can serve as a useful model for future distributed timing systems, for example, Galileo and other GNSS operations.

Ray, J.; Senior, K.

2003-06-01

163

Time-frequency analysis of nonlinear and non-stationary weak signals of corona discharge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is very useful to study the signals radiated from corona discharges for the purposes of high-voltage line monitoring. Time-frequency analysis can clearly reveal the time-varying spectrum characteristics of such signals, which is very useful for analyzing and processing the non-linear and non-stationary weak signals, such as the signals radiated from corona discharges. Several time-frequency analysis methods, such as the Short-Time Fourier Transform (STFT), Wigner-Ville distribution and the Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) and so on, are used in this paper. The simulation data with the same and different amplitudes are comparatively analyzed by these time-frequency distribution methods. It can be concluded that the time-frequency analysis method based on HHT is more efficient to identify and suitable for the non-linear and non-stationary weak signals.

Wang, Lei; Liu, Shanghe; Wei, Ming; Hu, Xiao Feng

2013-03-01

164

Fixed and Data Adaptive Kernels in Cohen's Class of Time-Frequency Distributions.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Estimating the spectra of non-stationary signals represents a difficult challenge. Classical techniques employing the Fourier transform and local stationarity have been employed with limited success. A more promising approach is the use of time-frequency ...

R. E. Parker

1992-01-01

165

Combining Time Frequency Representation and Parametric Analysis for the Enhancement of Transients in Sleep EEG Signal.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study of the electroencephalographic (EEG) signal contributes to sleep analysis. In the microstructure of the sleep EEG signal, transient patterns are characterized by their frequency content and their time duration. The Time-Frequency Representations...

E. Fortunato H. Rix G. Suisse O. Meste

2001-01-01

166

Time-Frequency Analysis of Beach Bacteria Variations and its Implication for Recreational Water Quality Modeling  

EPA Science Inventory

This paper explores the potential of time-frequency wavelet analysis in resolving beach bacteria concentration and possible explanatory variables across multiple time scales with temporal information still preserved. The wavelet scalograms of E. coli concentrations and the explan...

167

Linear Time-Frequency Representations for Transient Signal Detection and Classification.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This dissertation examines the use of linear time frequency representations in the detection and classification of transient signals. In particular, the Gabor transform and short time Fourier transform (STFT) are shown to be effective tools in detecting a...

N. Lee S. C. Schwartz

1995-01-01

168

Non-stationary vibration signal analysis of rotating machinery via time-frequency and wavelet techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces an efficient and powerful approach to fault detection in rotating machinery using time-frequency analysis based on both Fourier and wavelet transforms of the monitored vibration signal. Time-frequency techniques are powerful tools for analyzing transient information in vibration signature for both condition monitoring and fault detection purposes. Our work on fault detection reported in this paper is two-fold:

F. Al-Badour; L. Cheded; M. Sunar

2010-01-01

169

Analysis and synthesis of emotional voice by time-frequency method  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes an analysis method for emotional voice and application to emotional voice synthesis in man-machine interaction. The analysis is based on a high resolution time-frequency method and the clustering technique of four types of basic emotion. Based on the emotional analysis, a voice with the neutral emotion is transformed to the particular emotional voice according to time-frequency emotional

Yosuke Masui; Shigeo Wada

2004-01-01

170

Time-Frequency Analysis of the Delta Modulation and PWM Control for the Asynchronous Motors  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work presents some considerations on a control method for a three-phase asynchronous motor and a time-frequency analysis of the proposed system. The control method uses the delta modulation principle to generate the command signals for a full bridge power inverter that drives three phase asynchronous motor. The time-frequency analysis can bring more new information that could be used to

Daniel N. Trip; Comelia Gordan; M. I. Gordan; A. Schiop; R. Reiz

2005-01-01

171

Travels through the time-frequency zone: advanced Doppler ultrasound processing techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

Doppler ultrasound echoes from cardiac structures is rich in detail and highly nonstationary. The goal of time frequency analysis is to extract features from these echo signals for high confidence visual and machine classification of cardiovascular condition. Presented are side-by-side comparisons of numerous time-frequency representations (TFRs) of Doppler ultrasound data. The techniques illustrated include the short-time Fourier transform, the wavelet

L. Marple; T. Brotherton; R. Barton; E. Lugo; D. Jones

1993-01-01

172

An ECoG Based Brain Computer Interface with Spatially Adapted Time-Frequency Patterns  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we describe an adaptive approach for the classification of multichannel electrocorticogram (ECoG) recordings for a Brain Computer Interface. In particular the proposed approach implements a time- frequency plane feature extraction strategy from multichannel ECoG signals by using a dual-tree undecimated wavelet packet transform. The dual-tree undecimated wavelet packet transform generates a redundant feature dictionary with different time-frequency

Nuri F. Ince; Fikri Goksu; Ahmed H. Tewfik

2008-01-01

173

Digital channelized receiver based on time-frequency analysis for signal interception  

Microsoft Academic Search

A digital channelized receiver is presented for the interception of a wide variety of signals of complex structure, including those with low probability of interception. The receiver is designed from the perspective of the time-frequency analysis. It uses an extended time-frequency representation based on the noncoherent integration of the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) on which the detection system and the

G. Lopez-Risueno; J. Grajal; A. Sanz-Osorio

2005-01-01

174

Time-frequency manifold for nonlinear feature extraction in machinery fault diagnosis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Time-frequency feature is beneficial to representation of non-stationary signals for effective machinery fault diagnosis. The time-frequency distribution (TFD) is a major tool to reveal the synthetic time-frequency pattern. However, the TFD will also face noise corruption and dimensionality reduction issues in engineering applications. This paper proposes a novel nonlinear time-frequency feature based on a time-frequency manifold (TFM) technique. The new TFM feature is generated by mainly addressing manifold learning on the TFDs in a reconstructed phase space. It combines the non-stationary information and the nonlinear information of analyzed signals, and hence exhibits valuable properties. Specifically, the new feature is a quantitative low-dimensional representation, and reveals the intrinsic time-frequency pattern related to machinery health, which can effectively overcome the effects of noise and condition variance issues in sampling signals. The effectiveness and the merits of the proposed TFM feature are confirmed by case study on gear wear diagnosis, bearing defect identification and defect severity evaluation. Results show the value and potential of the new feature in machinery fault pattern representation and classification.

He, Qingbo

2013-02-01

175

Estimation of respiratory rate from ECG, photoplethysmogram, and piezoelectric pulse transducer signals: a comparative study of time-frequency methods.  

PubMed

We compare the performance of two different time-frequency-based breathing rate (BR) detection algorithms when used on three different physiological signals: the ECG, the photoplethysmogram (PPG), and the piezoelectric pulse transducer (PZO) signal. Studies carried out over the past have shown the existence of amplitude and/or FMs due to respiration in physiological signals, such as those mentioned. In a recent study, we analyzed the PPG signal and detected the FM and amplitude modulation effect that controlled breathing had on it, and inferred the rate of respiration using the time-frequency spectrum (TFS) (via a wavelet (WT) or complex demodulation (CDM) approach). We showed that such TFS BR detection methods were very accurate and consistently outperformed the exclusively time-domain autoregressive modeling (AR) method, especially in the real-time (data length of 1 min) case. We now explore the possibility of using these methods on the ECG and the finger PZO signal, of which only the former has been previously used with some success to derive BR. Testing performed on 15 healthy human subjects for a range of BR and two body positions showed that though the PPG signal gave the most consistently high performance, the ECG and PZO also proved to be reasonably accurate over longer time segments. Furthermore, the CDM approach was on average either better than or comparable to the WT method in terms of both accuracy and repeatability of the detection. PMID:20659821

Dash, Shishir; Shelley, Kirk H; Silverman, David G; Chon, Ki H

2010-05-01

176

Inhibition of synovitis and joint destruction by a new single domain antibody specific for cyclophilin A in two different mouse models of rheumatoid arthritis  

PubMed Central

Introduction Cyclophilin A (CypA) is implicated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis. We studied whether a novel anti-CypA single domain antibody (sdAb) treatment would modulate the severity of the disease in two different animal models of RA. Methods A novel sdAb, named sdAbA1, was screened from an immunized camel sdAb library and found to have a high binding affinity (KD?=?6.9?×?10-9 M) for CypA. The SCID-HuRAg model and the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice were used to evaluate the effects of sdAbA1 treatment on inflammation and joint destruction. For in vitro analysis, monocytes/macrophages were purified from synovial fluid and peripheral blood of patients with RA and were tested for the effect of anti-CypA sdAb on metalloproteinase (MMP) production. Human monocyte cell line THP-1 cells were selected and western blot analyses were performed to examine the potential signaling pathways. Results In the CIA model of RA, the sdAbA1 treatment resulted in a significant decrease in clinical symptoms as well as of joint damage (P <0.05). In the SCID-HuRAg model, treatment with anti-CypA antibody sdAbA1 significantly reduced cartilage erosion, inflammatory cell numbers and MMP-9 production in the implanted tissues (P <0.05). It also significantly reduced the levels of human inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 in mouse serum (P <0.05). No toxic effects were observed in the two animal models. In vitro results showed that sdAbA1 could counteract CypA-dependent MMP-9 secretion and IL-8 production by interfering with the ERK-NF-?B pathway. Conclusions Blockade of CypA significantly inhibited synovitis and cartilage/bone erosion in the two tested animal models of RA. Our findings provide evidence that sdAbA1 may be a potential therapeutic agent for RA.

2013-01-01

177

Adaptive signal processing and higher order time- frequency analysis for acoustic and vibration signatures in condition monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This thesis is concerned with the development of a useful engineering technique to detect and analyse faults in rotating machinery. The methods developed are based on the advanced signal processing such as the adaptive signal processing and higher-order time frequency methods. The two-stage Adaptive Line Enhancer (ALE), using adaptive signal processing, has been developed for increasing the Signal to Noise Ratio of impulsive signals. The enhanced signal can then be analysed using time frequency methods to identify fault characteristics. However, if after pre-processing by the two stage ALE, the SNR of the signals is low, the residual noise often hinders clear identification of the fault characteristics in the time-frequency domain. In such cases, higher order time-frequency methods have been proposed and studied. As examples of rotating machinery, the internal combustion engine and an industrial gear box are considered in this thesis. The noise signal from an internal combustion engine and vibration signal measured on a gear box are studied in detail. Typically an impulsive signal manifests itself when the fault occurs in the machinery and is embedded in background noise, such as the fundamental frequency and its harmonic orders of the rotation speed and broadband noise. The two-stage ALE is developed for reducing this background noise. Conditions for the choice of adaptive filter parameters are studied and suitable adaptive algorithms given. The enhanced impulsive signal is analysed in the time- frequency domain using the Wigner higher order moment spectra (WHOMS) and the multi-time WHOMS (which is a dual form of the WHOMS). The WHOMS suffers from unwanted cross-terms, which increase dramatically as the order increases. Novel expressions for the cross-terms in WHOMS have been presented. The number of cross-terms can be reduced by taking the principal slice of the WHOMS. The residual cross-terms are smoothed by using a general class of kernel functions and the ?-method kernel function which is a novel development in this thesis. The WVD and the sliced WHOMS for synthesised signals and measured data from rotating machinery are analysed. The estimated ROC (Receive Operating Characteristic) curves for these methods are computed. These results lead to the conclusion that the detection performance when using the sliced WHOMS, for impulsive signals in embedded in broadband noise, is better than that of the Wigner-Ville distribution. Real data from a faulty car engine and faulty industrial gears are analysed. The car engine radiates an impulsive noise signal due to the loosening of a spark plug. The faulty industrial gear produces an impulsive vibration signal due to a spall on the tooth face in gear. The two- stage ALE and WHOMS are successfully applied to detection and analysis of these impulsive signals.

Lee, Sang-Kwon

178

Time-frequency data fusion technique with application to vibration signal analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To overcome the inherent deficiencies of conventional time-frequency analysis (TFA) methods, i.e., different TFA methods or the same TFA method with different control parameters will present different results for the same target signal, a novel scheme named as the time-frequency data fusion (TFDF) is developed in this study by extending the idea of data fusion technique. By combining the results produced by two or more different TFA methods, the TFDF technique can present a more accurate time-frequency presentation for the target signal than what can be achieved by any individual TFA method. Therefore, the TFDF has potential to render a significantly improved time-frequency representation and greatly facilitates extracting time-frequency features of target signals. This will promote the applications of TFA in engineering practices and make TFA methods more acceptable to field engineers. The effectiveness of the TFDF technique is validated by three numerical case studies and the analysis of a rubbing-impact signal collected from a rotor test rig.

Peng, Z. K.; Zhang, W. M.; Lang, Z. Q.; Meng, G.; Chu, F. L.

2012-05-01

179

Fault diagnosis for diesel valve trains based on time frequency images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, the Wigner-Ville distributions (WVD) of vibration acceleration signals which were acquired from the cylinder head in eight different states of valve train were calculated and displayed in grey images; and the probabilistic neural networks (PNN) were directly used to classify the time-frequency images after the images were normalized. By this way, the fault diagnosis of valve train was transferred to the classification of time-frequency images. As there is no need to extract further fault features (such as eigenvalues or symptom parameters) from time-frequency distributions before classification, the fault diagnosis process is highly simplified. The experimental results show that the faults of diesel valve trains can be classified accurately by the proposed methods.

Wang, Chengdong; Zhang, Youyun; Zhong, Zhenyuan

2008-11-01

180

Automatic classification of sleep stages based on the time-frequency image of EEG signals.  

PubMed

In this paper, a new method for automatic sleep stage classification based on time-frequency image (TFI) of electroencephalogram (EEG) signals is proposed. Automatic classification of sleep stages is an important part for diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders. The smoothed pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution (SPWVD) based time-frequency representation (TFR) of EEG signal has been used to obtain the time-frequency image (TFI). The segmentation of TFI has been performed based on the frequency-bands of the rhythms of EEG signals. The features derived from the histogram of segmented TFI have been used as an input feature set to multiclass least squares support vector machines (MC-LS-SVM) together with the radial basis function (RBF), Mexican hat wavelet, and Morlet wavelet kernel functions for automatic classification of sleep stages from EEG signals. The experimental results are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed method for classification of sleep stages from EEG signals. PMID:24008250

Bajaj, Varun; Pachori, Ram Bilas

2013-12-01

181

Time-frequency analysis of visual evoked potentials by means of matching pursuit with chirplet atoms.  

PubMed

Detection of visual evoked potentials (VEP) elicited by repetitive stimuli is valuable in both laboratorial research and clinical practice. Therefore, knowing the characteristics of VEPs is of fundamental importance for adequate design of a signal detector. Usually, the signal is modeled as a steady-state VEP (ssVEP) consisting of the fundamental frequency and the higher harmonics, while ignoring the information contained in its transients (tVEP). We propose here to characterize both tVEP and ssVEP by chirplet time-frequency representation of VEP signal using a matching pursuit (MP) algorithm. Compared to the time-frequency analysis with short-time-Fourier-transform (STFT) and linear-prediction-coding (LPC) method, MP with chirplet shows not only clear characteristics of ssVEP, but a clear spindle-like time-frequency component of tVEP as well, which is not obvious in the other two methods. PMID:17271661

Cui, J; Wong, W; Mann, S

2004-01-01

182

Time-frequency microstructure and statistical significance of ERD and ERS.  

PubMed

ERD and ERS were introduced as the time courses of the average changes of energy in given frequency bands. These curves are naturally embedded in the time-frequency plane. Time-frequency density of signals energy can be estimated by means of a variety of transforms. In general, resolution of these methods depends on a priori choices of parameters regulating the tradeoff between the time and frequency resolutions. As an exception, adaptive time-frequency approximations adapt resolution to the local structures of the analyzed signal. Matching pursuit (MP) algorithm is a reliable implementation of this approach. Its application to the event-related EEG allows for a detailed presentation of the time-frequency microstructure of changes of the average energy density, as well as calculation of high-resolution maps of ERD/ERS in the time-frequency plane. However, even with such a detailed picture of the signal energy changes, their significance remains an open issue. Owing to a stochastic character of the EEG, a visible increase or decrease of energy can occur due to a pure chance or a phenomenon unrelated to the event. For a proper estimation of the statistical significance of ERD/ERS, that is, the average changes of signals energy density in relation to the reference period, we must take into account possibly non-normal distributions of energy, and, especially, the problem of multiple comparisons appearing in hypotheses related to different frequency bands and time epochs. This chapter presents and discusses a complete framework for high-resolution estimation of the ERD/ERS microstructure in the time-frequency regions, revealing statistically significant changes. PMID:17071227

Durka, P J

2006-01-01

183

Time-frequency analysis of single pulse electrical stimulation to assist delineation of epileptogenic cortex.  

PubMed

Epilepsy surgery depends on reliable pre-surgical markers of epileptogenic tissue. The current gold standard is the seizure onset zone in ictal, i.e. chronic, electrocorticography recordings. Single pulse electrical stimulation can evoke epileptic, spike-like responses in areas of seizure onset also recorded by electrocorticography. Recently, spontaneous pathological high-frequency oscillations (80-520 Hz) have been observed in the electrocorticogram that are related to epileptic spikes, but seem more specific for epileptogenic cortex. We wanted to see whether a quantitative electroencephalography analysis using time-frequency information including the higher frequency range could be applied to evoked responses by single pulse electrical stimulation, to enhance its specificity and clinical use. Electrocorticography data were recorded at a 2048-Hz sampling rate from 13 patients. Single pulse electrical stimulation (10 stimuli, 1 ms, 8 mA, 0.2 Hz) was performed stimulating pairs of adjacent electrodes. A time-frequency analysis based on Morlet wavelet transformation was performed in a [-1 s : 1 s] time interval around the stimulus and a frequency range of 10-520 Hz. Significant (P = 0.05) changes in power spectra averaged for 10 epochs were computed, resulting in event-related spectral perturbation images. In these images, time-frequency analysis of single pulse-evoked responses, in the range of 10-80 Hz for spikes, 80-250 Hz for ripples and 250-520 Hz for fast ripples, were scored by two observers independently. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive value of time-frequency single pulse-evoked responses in the three frequency ranges were compared with seizure onset zone and post-surgical outcome. In all patients, evoked responses included spikes, ripples and fast ripples. For the seizure onset zone, the median sensitivity of time-frequency single pulse-evoked responses decreased from 100% for spikes to 67% for fast ripples and the median specificity increased from 17% for spikes to 79% for fast ripples. A median positive predictive value for the evoked responses in the seizure onset zone of 17% was found for spikes, 26% for ripples and 37% for fast ripples. Five out of seven patients with <50% of fast ripples removed by resection had a poor outcome. A wavelet transform-based time-frequency analysis of single pulse electrical stimulation reveals evoked responses in the frequency range of spikes, ripples and fast ripples. We demonstrate that time-frequency analysis of single pulse electrical stimulation can assist in delineation of the epileptogenic cortex using time-frequency single pulse-evoked fast ripples as a potential new marker. PMID:21900209

van 't Klooster, Maryse A; Zijlmans, Maeike; Leijten, Frans S S; Ferrier, Cyrille H; van Putten, Michel J A M; Huiskamp, Geertjan J M

2011-10-01

184

On the Use of Time-Frequency Representation in Multicomponent Signal Separation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we address the problem of separating unknown multi- component signals from their instantaneous mixtures. Using linear time-frequency (TF) representation of the mixtures along with vec- tors classification scheme provide us a simple and efficient technique to separate multicomponent signals. The proposed algorithm can handle monocomponent as well as multicomponent sources and its assumptions about the mixing matrix

Braham Barkat; Farook Sattar; Karim Abed-meraim

2006-01-01

185

Damage Classification Structural Health Monitoring in Bolted Structures Using Time-frequency Techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

The analysis, detection, and classification of damage in complex bolted structures is an important component of structural health monitoring. In this article, an advanced signal processing and classification method is introduced based on time-frequency techniques. The time-varying signals collected from sensors are decomposed into linear combinations of highly localized Gaussian functions using the matching pursuit decomposition algorithm. These functions are

Debejyo Chakraborty; Narayan Kovvali; Jun Wei; Antonia Papandreou-Suppappola; Douglas Cochran; Aditi Chattopadhyay

2009-01-01

186

Enhanced Performance by Time-Frequency-Phase Feature for EEG-Based BCI Systems  

PubMed Central

We introduce a new motor parameter imagery paradigm using clench speed and clench force motor imagery. The time-frequency-phase features are extracted from mu rhythm and beta rhythms, and the features are optimized using three process methods: no-scaled feature using “MIFS” feature selection criterion, scaled feature using “MIFS” feature selection criterion, and scaled feature using “mRMR” feature selection criterion. Support vector machines (SVMs) and extreme learning machines (ELMs) are compared for classification between clench speed and clench force motor imagery using the optimized feature. Our results show that no significant difference in the classification rate between SVMs and ELMs is found. The scaled feature combinations can get higher classification accuracy than the no-scaled feature combinations at significant level of 0.01, and the “mRMR” feature selection criterion can get higher classification rate than the “MIFS” feature selection criterion at significant level of 0.01. The time-frequency-phase feature can improve the classification rate by about 20% more than the time-frequency feature, and the best classification rate between clench speed motor imagery and clench force motor imagery is 92%. In conclusion, the motor parameter imagery paradigm has the potential to increase the direct control commands for BCI control and the time-frequency-phase feature has the ability to improve BCI classification accuracy.

Xu, Baolei; Fu, Yunfa; Shi, Gang; Yin, Xuxian; Wang, Zhidong; Li, Hongyi; Jiang, Changhao

2014-01-01

187

Dynamic EEG Analysis via the Variability of Band Relative Intensity Ratio: A Time-Frequency Method  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effectiveness of band relative intensity ratio (BRIR) based on time-frequency representations (TFRS) was explored as a method to depict brain dynamics in this paper. Electroencephalographic (EEG) signals from 20 subjects through 16 channels have been studied under open eyes state and closed eyes state. The results indicate that EEG rhythm features and the dynamic process of brain activity can

Li Zhang; Wei He; Xiaobo Miao; Jianhong Yang

2005-01-01

188

A hybrid time-frequency method based on improved Morlet wavelet and auto terms window  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, a hybrid time-frequency method (HTM) based on the improved Morlet wavelet and auto terms window (ATW) is presented. The Morlet wavelet, for its shape is similar to the mechanical shock signals, is added two parameters which decide the shape of the mother wavelet. The added parameters and the appropriate scale parameter for continuous wavelet transformation (CWT) are

Wenyi Liu; Baoping Tang

2011-01-01

189

A signal-dependent time-frequency representation: optimal kernel design  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new time-frequency distribution (TFD) that adapts to each signal and so offers a good performance for a large class of signals is introduced. The design of the signal-dependent TFD is formulated in Cohen's class as an optimization problem and results in a special linear program. Given a signal to be analyzed, the solution to the linear program yields the

Richard G. Baraniuk; Douglas L. Jones

1993-01-01

190

Algorithm for the instantaneous frequency estimation using time-frequency distributions with adaptive window width  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method for minimization of the mean square error (MSE) of the instantaneous frequency estimation using time-frequency distributions, in the case of a discrete optimization parameter, is presented. It does not require a knowledge of the estimation bias. The method is illustrated on adaptive window width determination in the Wigner distribution

L. Stankovic; V. Katkovnik

1998-01-01

191

Performance of quadratic time-frequency distributions as instantaneous frequency estimators  

Microsoft Academic Search

General performance analysis of the shift covariant class of quadratic time-frequency distributions (TFDs) as instantaneous frequency (IF) estimators, for an arbitrary frequency-modulated (FM) signal, is presented. Expressions for the estimation bias and variance are derived. This class of distributions behaves as an unbiased estimator in the case of monocomponent signals with a linear IF. However, when the IF is not

Veselin N. Ivanovic; M. Dakovic; L. Stankovic

2003-01-01

192

Vibration sensor data denoising using a time-frequency manifold for machinery fault diagnosis.  

PubMed

Vibration sensor data from a mechanical system are often associated with important measurement information useful for machinery fault diagnosis. However, in practice the existence of background noise makes it difficult to identify the fault signature from the sensing data. This paper introduces the time-frequency manifold (TFM) concept into sensor data denoising and proposes a novel denoising method for reliable machinery fault diagnosis. The TFM signature reflects the intrinsic time-frequency structure of a non-stationary signal. The proposed method intends to realize data denoising by synthesizing the TFM using time-frequency synthesis and phase space reconstruction (PSR) synthesis. Due to the merits of the TFM in noise suppression and resolution enhancement, the denoised signal would have satisfactory denoising effects, as well as inherent time-frequency structure keeping. Moreover, this paper presents a clustering-based statistical parameter to evaluate the proposed method, and also presents a new diagnostic approach, called frequency probability time series (FPTS) spectral analysis, to show its effectiveness in fault diagnosis. The proposed TFM-based data denoising method has been employed to deal with a set of vibration sensor data from defective bearings, and the results verify that for machinery fault diagnosis the method is superior to two traditional denoising methods. PMID:24379045

He, Qingbo; Wang, Xiangxiang; Zhou, Qiang

2013-01-01

193

Time-Frequency Sparsity by Removing Perceptually Irrelevant Components Using a Simple Model of Simultaneous Masking  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present an algorithm for removing time-frequency components, found by a standard Gabor transform, of a ldquoreal-worldrdquo sound while causing no audible difference to the original sound after resynthesis. Thus, this representation is made sparser. The selection of removable components is based on a simple model of simultaneous masking in the auditory system. Important goals were the applicability to any

Péter Balázs; Bernhard Laback; Gerhard Eckel; Werner A. Deutsch

2010-01-01

194

Damage detection in composite structures using Lamb wave analysis and time-frequency approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

A methodology based on Lamb wave analysis and time-frequency signal processing has been developed for damage detection and structural health monitoring of composite structures. Because the Lamb wave signals are complex in nature, robust signal processing techniques are required to extract damage features. In this paper, Lamb wave mode conversion is used to detect the damage in composite structures. Matching

Yingtao Liu; Masoud Yekani Fard; Seung B. Kim; Aditi Chattopadhyay; Derek Doyle

2011-01-01

195

Prevention of spinal cord injury with time-frequency analysis of evoked potentials: an experimental study  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVESTo verify the applicability and validity of time-frequency analysis (TFA) of evoked potential (EP) signals in detecting the integrity of spinal cord function and preventing spinal cord injury.METHODSThe spinal cord was simulated during surgery in 20 mature rats by mechanically damaging the spinal cord. Cortical somatosensory evoked potential (CSEP), spinal somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP), cortical motor evoked potential (CMEP), and

Yong Hu

2001-01-01

196

Estimation of Respiratory Rate From Photoplethysmogram Data Using Time–Frequency Spectral Estimation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a new method that uses the pulse oximeter signal to estimate the respiratory rate. The method uses a recently developed time-frequency spectral estimation method, variable-frequency complex demodulation (VFCDM), to identify frequency modulation (FM) of the photoplethysmogram waveform. This FM has a measurable periodicity, which provides an estimate of the respiration period. We compared the performance of VFCDM to

K. H. Chon; S. Dash; Kihwan Ju

2009-01-01

197

A Time-Frequency Well-localized Pulse for Multiple Carrier Transmission  

Microsoft Academic Search

In multicarrier transmission schemes, the essential requirement on the elementary pulse or envelope function is the orthogonality with its time-frequency shifted versions. However, the time and frequency dispersion of the mobile radio channel leads to the loss of orthogonality which produces intersymbol interference (ISI) and interchannel interference (ICI). Therefore, another requirement on the elementary pulse has to be imposed: the

Ralf Haas; Jean-Claude Belfiore

1997-01-01

198

Time-frequency phase differences and phase locking to characterize dynamic interactions between cardiovascular signals  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper cross time-frequency (TF) analysis is used to estimate the phase differences and the phase locking between cardiovascular signals. Phase differences give a measure of the changes in the synchronization between two oscillations, while phase locking measures the degree of similarity of these changes across subjects. The methodology is based on the smoothed pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution and includes

Michele Orini; Raquel Bailon; Luca T. Mainardi; Pablo Laguna

2011-01-01

199

Radar detection of multiple moving targets in clutter using time-frequency radon transform  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we analyze features of radar returns from moving targets, introduce the basic concept of time-frequency-Radon transforms, describe the Radon transform for line feature detection, discuss their applications to detection of multiple moving targets in clutter, and demonstrate two examples of moving target detection using simulated radar data.

Chen, Victor C.

2002-08-01

200

Improving the readability of time-frequency and time-scale representations by the reassignment method  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the use of the reassignment method, first applied by Kodera, Gendrin, and de Villedary (1976) to the spectrogram, is generalized to any bilinear time-frequency or time-scale distribution. This method creates a modified version of a representation by moving its values away from where they are computed, so as to produce a better localization of the signal components.

Franqois Auger; Patrick Flandrin

1995-01-01

201

Underwater shell type target classification using time-frequency features of acoustic backscatter signals  

Microsoft Academic Search

An efficient technique for the computation of the form function of a thin elastic spherical shell target is proposed. Using the form function it is shown how various target identification parameters could be obtained. These target identification parameters are obtained from the time-frequency distribution of the target's acoustic backscatter signal

Saman S. Abeysekera

1998-01-01

202

Inverse synthetic aperture radar processing using parametric time-frequency estimators Phase I  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work performed for the Office of the Chief of Naval Research (ONR) during the period of 1 September 1997 through 31 December 1997. The primary objective of this research was aimed at developing an alternative time-frequency approach which is recursive-in-time to be applied to the Inverse Synthethic Aperture Radar (ISAR) imaging problem discussed subsequently. Our short term (Phase I) goals were to: 1. Develop an ISAR stepped-frequency waveform (SFWF) radar simulator based on a point scatterer vehicular target model incorporating both translational and rotational motion; 2. Develop a parametric, recursive-in-time approach to the ISAR target imaging problem; 3. Apply the standard time-frequency short-term Fourier transform (STFT) estimator, initially to a synthesized data set; and 4. Initiate the development of the recursive algorithm. We have achieved all of these goals during the Phase I of the project and plan to complete the overall development, application and comparison of the parametric approach to other time-frequency estimators (STFT, etc.) on our synthesized vehicular data sets during the next phase of funding. It should also be noted that we developed a batch minimum variance translational motion compensation (TMC) algorithm to estimate the radial components of target motion (see Section IV). This algorithm is easily extended to recursive solution and will probably become part of the overall recursive processing approach to solve the ISAR imaging problem. Our goals for the continued effort are to: 1. Develop and extend a complex, recursive-in-time, time- frequency parameter estimator based on the recursive prediction error method (RPEM) using the underlying Gauss- Newton algorithms. 2. Apply the complex RPEM algorithm to synthesized ISAR data using the above simulator. 3. Compare the performance of the proposed algorithm to standard time-frequency estimators applied to the same data sets.

Candy, J.V., LLNL

1997-12-31

203

Quadratic Time-Frequency Analysis of Hydroacoustic Signals as Applied to Acoustic Emissions of Large Whales  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to enrich the set of attributes in setting up a large database of whale signals, as envisioned in the Baleakanta project, we investigate methods of time-frequency analysis. The purpose of establishing the database is to increase and refine knowledge of the emitted signal and of its propagation characteristics, leading to a better understanding of the animal migrations in a non-invasive manner and to characterize acoustic propagation in oceanic media. The higher resolution for signal extraction and a better separation from other signals and noise will be used for various purposes, including improved signal detection and individual animal identification. The quadratic class of time-frequency distributions (TFDs) is the most popular set of time-frequency tools for analysis and processing of non-stationary signals. Two best known and most studied members of this class are the spectrogram and the Wigner-Ville distribution. However, to be used efficiently, i.e. to have highly concentrated signal components while significantly suppressing interference and noise simultaneously, TFDs need to be optimized first. The optimization method used in this paper is based on the Cross-Wigner-Ville distribution, and unlike similar approaches it does not require prior information on the analysed signal. The method is applied to whale signals, which, just like the majority of other real-life signals, can generally be classified as multicomponent non-stationary signals, and hence time-frequency techniques are a natural choice for their representation, analysis, and processing. We present processed data from a set containing hundreds of individual calls. The TFD optimization method results into a high resolution time-frequency representation of the signals. It allows for a simple extraction of signal components from the TFD's dominant ridges. The local peaks of those ridges can then be used for the signal components instantaneous frequency estimation, which in turn can be used as one of the features in any subsequent classification of the whale signals.

Le Bras, Ronan; Victor, Sucic; Damir, Malnar; Götz, Bokelmann

2014-05-01

204

Assessment of time-frequency representation techniques for thoracic sounds analysis.  

PubMed

A step forward in the knowledge about the underlying physiological phenomena of thoracic sounds requires a reliable estimate of their time-frequency behavior that overcomes the disadvantages of the conventional spectrogram. A more detailed time-frequency representation could lead to a better feature extraction for diseases classification and stratification purposes, among others. In this respect, the aim of this study was to look for an omnibus technique to obtain the time-frequency representation (TFR) of thoracic sounds by comparing generic goodness-of-fit criteria in different simulated thoracic sounds scenarios. The performance of ten TFRs for heart, normal tracheal and adventitious lung sounds was assessed using time-frequency patterns obtained by mathematical functions of the thoracic sounds. To find the best TFR performance measures, such as the 2D local (?mean) and global (?) central correlation, the normalized root-mean-square error (NRMSE), the cross-correlation coefficient (?IF) and the time-frequency resolution (resTF) were used. Simulation results pointed out that the Hilbert-Huang spectrum (HHS) had a superior performance as compared with other techniques and then, it can be considered as a reliable TFR for thoracic sounds. Furthermore, the goodness of HHS was assessed using noisy simulated signals. Additionally, HHS was applied to first and second heart sounds taken from a young healthy male subject, to tracheal sound from a middle-age healthy male subject, and to abnormal lung sounds acquired from a male patient with diffuse interstitial pneumonia. It is expected that the results of this research could be used to obtain a better signature of thoracic sounds for pattern recognition purpose, among other tasks. PMID:24680639

Reyes, B A; Charleston-Villalobos, S; González-Camarena, R; Aljama-Corrales, T

2014-05-01

205

Optimum Time-Frequency Decomposition For Seismic Data Using Continuous Wavelet Transform  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Time-frequency decomposition is an important signal analysis tool for seismic data. The overall frequency content of a signal can be obtained from the Fourier transform. However, for a non-stationary signal, such as seismic signal, whose frequency content varies with time, 1D transformation in frequency is not sufficient. Traditionally, 2D representation in time and frequency space for a 1D signal is achieved by taking Fourier transform over a short-time window. This method is commonly known as short-time Fourier transform (STFT). Time-frequency resolution in STFT is limited by the choice of a window length. Windowing problem in time-frequency analysis is absent in the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) method. CWT utilizes the property of dilation and translation of a wavelet and produces time-scale map where scale, defined in terms of length of time support of a wavelet, represents a frequency band. However, scale can be converted to frequency and the time-frequency map thus produced is called TFCWT. It is produced from CWT in two steps: 1. producing time-scale map, and 2. converting the scale to frequency. TFCWT has optimum time-frequency resolution, i.e. higher frequency resolution at lower frequencies and higher time resolution at higher frequencies, which makes it useful for seismic data interpretation. Visualization and interpretation of seismic sections in frequency space using single frequencies from the TFCWT spectra can be utilized to enhance low frequency shadows caused by hydrocarbon reservoirs. This idea can also be extended in interpreting time slices from 3D seismic data in frequency space. This method has been used to identify thin beds below tuning thickness.

Sinha, S.; Routh, P.; Anno, P.

2003-12-01

206

Time-frequency analysis of visual evoked potentials for interhemispheric transfer time and proportion in callosal fibers of different diameters.  

PubMed

This study is an extension of the experimental research of Nalçaci et al., who presented 16 subjects with a reversal of checkerboard pattern as stimuli in the right visual field or left visual field and recorded EEG at O1, O2, P3, and P4. They applied the chosen bandpass filters (4-8, 8-15, 15-20, 20-32 Hz) to the VEPs of subjects and obtained four different components for each VEP. The first aim of this study is to improve the previous report using some methods in time-frequency domain to estimate interhemispheric delays and amplitudes in a time window. Using the improved estimates of interhemispheric delays, the second aim is to estimate the proportion of callosal fibers of different diameters that are activated by visual stimuli by comparing amplitudes of VEPs in different frequency bands. If the relation between frequency components of VEP and delays for callosal fibers of different dimension were reliable, it would give us an opportunity to deal with amplitude of bandpass-filtered VEPs in order to see approximately the proportion of these fibers activated by a certain stimulus. By using frequency-dependent shifts in time and maximizing the cross correlation of direct VEP (DVEP-VEP obtained from contralateral hemisphere)-indirect VEP (IVEP-VEP obtained from ipsilateral hemisphere) pairs in the time-frequency domain, we examined the delay not only at P100 and N160 peaks but along a meaningful time interval as well. Furthermore, by shifting back the IVEP according to the delay estimated at each time window, both the amplitudes and energies of the synchronized DVEP-IVEP pairs were compared at the chosen frequency bands. The percentages of IVEPs at each band was then examined further in conjunction with the distribution of axon diameters in the posterior pole of the CC, questioning the relation between the distributions of the axon diameters and activations at each band. We established an energy definition to express the activation in the fibers. When the energy percentages of IVEPs in theta and alpha were totaled, they were found to be between 76.2% and 81.6%, which is close to the value 74-77% for fibers of 0.4-1 microm in diameter obtained from anatomical study of human CC. The sum of energy percentages in the beta1 and beta2 bands was between 20.1% and 24.2%, which probably reflects the proportion of activation of callosal fibers 1-3 microm in diameter. PMID:15085348

Ulusoy, Ilkay; Halici, Ugur; Nalçaci, Erhan; Anaç, Ilker; Leblebicio Ero?lu, Kemal; Ba?ar-Ero?lu, Canan

2004-04-01

207

Considering the influence of artificial environmental noise to study cough time-frequency features  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In general the study of the cough mechanism and sound in both animal and human is performed by eliciting coughing in a reproducible way by nebulization of an irritating substance. Due to ventilation the controlled evaporation-protocol causes artificial noises from a mechanical origin. The resulting environmental low-frequency noises complicate cough time-frequency features. In order to optimize the study of the cough-sound the research described in this paper attempts on the one hand to characterize and model the environmental noises and on the other hand to evaluate the influence of the noise on the time-frequency representation for the intended cough sounds by comparing different de-noising approaches. Free field acoustic sound is continuously registered during 30 min citric acid cough-challenges on individual Belgian Landrace piglets and during respiratory infection experiments, with a duration of about 10 days, where room-ventilation was present.

Van Hirtum, A.; Berckmans, D.

2003-09-01

208

Aurally-adequate time-frequency analysis for scattered sound in auditoria  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The goal of this work was to apply an aurally-adequate time-frequency analysis technique to the analysis of sound scattering effects in auditoria. Time-frequency representations were developed as a motivated effort that takes into account binaural hearing, with a specific implementation of interaural cross-correlation process. A model of the human auditory system was implemented in the MATLAB platform based on two previous models [A. Härmä and K. Palomäki, HUTear, Espoo, Finland; and M. A. Akeroyd, A. Binaural Cross-correlogram Toolbox for MATLAB (2001), University of Sussex, Brighton]. These stages include proper frequency selectivity, the conversion of the mechanical motion of the basilar membrane to neural impulses, and binaural hearing effects. The model was then used in the analysis of room impulse responses with varying scattering characteristics. This paper discusses the analysis results using simulated and measured room impulse responses. [Work supported by the Frank H. and Eva B. Buck Foundation.

Norris, Molly K.; Xiang, Ning; Kleiner, Mendel

2005-04-01

209

Time-frequency analysis of myoelectric signals during dynamic contractions: a comparative study.  

PubMed

In this paper, we introduce the nonstationary signal analysis methods to analyze the myoelectric (ME) signals during dynamic contractions by estimating the time-dependent spectral moments. The time-frequency analysis methods including the short-time Fourier transform, the Wigner-Ville distribution, the Choi-Williams distribution, and the continuous wavelet transform were compared for estimation accuracy and precision on synthesized and real ME signals. It is found that the estimates provided by the continuous wavelet transform have better accuracy and precision than those obtained with the other time-frequency analysis methods on simulated data sets. In addition, ME signals from four subjects during three different tests (maximum static voluntary contraction, ramp contraction, and repeated isokinetic contractions) were also examined. PMID:10721630

Karlsson, S; Yu, J; Akay, M

2000-02-01

210

Single-shot time-frequency imaging spectroscopy using an echelon mirror.  

PubMed

We demonstrate single-shot time-frequency imaging spectroscopy with an echelon mirror for measuring ultrashort laser pulses as well as ultrafast responses of materials using the same optical setup. The echelon mirror produces a spatially encoded time delay for the probe pulse whereby both the probe and pump pulses are focused on samples with small spot size. Using the optical Kerr gate apparatus, we successfully mapped the time-frequency images of ultrashort laser pulses and subsequently evaluated the chirp characteristics with the phase-retrieval procedure on a single-shot basis. By simply replacing the Kerr medium with samples, we could also visualize the phonon-polariton oscillations in ferroelectric LiNbO3. PMID:22446244

Sakaibara, Hiroyuki; Ikegaya, Yuki; Katayama, Ikufumi; Takeda, Jun

2012-03-15

211

Detection of temperature rise in Bi2223/Ag tape by time frequency visualization of AE signals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents the electric insulated type detection method of the temperature rise in the Bi2223/Ag tape using the time-frequency visualization of AE signals based on the wavelet transform. At the high operation temperature, the specific heat and the normal zone propagation velocity of the Bi2223/Ag tape are high and low, respectively, and therefore the local and excessive temperature rise is easy to generate in the superconducting-to-normal transition. As a result, the Bi2223/Ag tape is degraded or burned. In the proposed method, AE signals accompanying with the temperature rise are measured by an AE sensor, and furthermore AE signals are precisely and visually measured and estimated by the time-frequency visualization using the wavelet transform. Experimental results show the feasibility of the proposed method as the detection method of the temperature rise in the Bi2223/Ag tape.

Nanato, N.

2007-01-01

212

GPR antipersonnel mine detection: improved deconvolution and time-frequency feature extraction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work deals with the processing of GPR (ground penetrating radar) signals for AP (anti-personnel) mine detection. It focuses on two steps in this processing, namely the deconvolution of the system impulse response, and the extraction of target features for classification. The objective of the work is to find discriminant and robust target features by means of time-frequency analysis. Deconvolution is an ill-posed inverse problem, which can be solved with regularization methods. In this paper a deconvolution algorithm, based on the iterative v-method, is proposed. For discriminant feature selection the Wigner distribution (WD) is considered. Singular value decomposition (SVD) along with the concept of the center of mass as the most robust feature are used for feature extraction from the WD. The proposed normalized time-frequency-energetic features have a good discriminant power, which doesn't degrade with increasing object depth.

Savelyev, Timofei G.; van Kempen, Luc; Sahli, Hichem

2003-08-01

213

Unbiased high resolution method of EEG analysis in time-frequency space.  

PubMed

Matching Pursuit (MP)--a method of high-resolution signal analysis--is described in the context of other methods operating in time-frequency space. The method relies on an adaptive approximation of a signal by means of waveforms chosen from a very large and redundant dictionary of functions. The MP performance is illustrated by simulations and examples of sleep spindles and slow wave activity analysis. An improvement of the original procedure, relying on the introduction of stochastic dictionaries, is proposed. A comparison of the performance of dyadic and stochastic dictionaries is presented. MP with stochastic dictionaries is characterized by an unmatched resolution in time-frequency space; moreover it allows for parametric description of all (periodic and transient) signal features in the framework of the same formalism. Matching pursuit is especially suitable for analysis of non-stationary signals and is a unique tool for the investigation of dynamic changes of brain activity. PMID:11584449

Blinowska, K J; Durka, P J

2001-01-01

214

Ecological prediction with nonlinear multivariate time-frequency functional data models  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Time-frequency analysis has become a fundamental component of many scientific inquiries. Due to improvements in technology, the amount of high-frequency signals that are collected for ecological and other scientific processes is increasing at a dramatic rate. In order to facilitate the use of these data in ecological prediction, we introduce a class of nonlinear multivariate time-frequency functional models that can identify important features of each signal as well as the interaction of signals corresponding to the response variable of interest. Our methodology is of independent interest and utilizes stochastic search variable selection to improve model selection and performs model averaging to enhance prediction. We illustrate the effectiveness of our approach through simulation and by application to predicting spawning success of shovelnose sturgeon in the Lower Missouri River.

Yang, Wen-Hsi; Wikle, Christopher K.; Holan, Scott H.; Wildhaber, Mark L.

2013-01-01

215

MULTIPLE TARGETS DETECTION METHOD BASED ON BINARY HOUGH TRANSFORM AND ADAPTIVE TIME-FREQUENCY FILTERING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract—When the echo energy of multiple targets of vehicle volume detecting radar diverge greatly, small targets are easily masked by the platform of large targets, it is difficult to detect the all the targets by the Wigner-Hough Transform simultaneously. In this paper, a method based on binary Hough Transform and adaptive time-frequency filtering is proposed, which can avoid the problems

Wei Xue; Sun X. w

2007-01-01

216

The Hilbert-Huang Transform for Detection of Otoacoustic Emissions and Time-Frequency Mapping  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract. This paper presents an application of the Hilbert–Huang transform (HHT) and ensem- ble correlation for detection of the transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs), and high resolution time–frequency mapping. The HHT provides a powerful tool for nonlinear analysis of nonstationary signals such as TEOAEs. Since the HHT itself does not distinguish between,sig- nal and noise it was,used with ensemble,correlation to

Arturas Janusauskas; Vaidotas Marozas; Arunas Lukosevicius; Leif Sörnmo

2006-01-01

217

Dynamics characterization and health monitoring of membrane structures by time-frequency analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Membrane dynamics is often nonlinear and nonstationary because of geometric nonlinearity induced by high local flexibility, non-uniform pre-tension, light weight, dynamic coupling with surrounding air, wave propagation, supportinduced nonlinearity, and others. Hence, dynamics characterization and health monitoring of membrane structures require advanced time-frequency analysis, and the focus is on how to obtain accurate time-varying frequency and amplitude of a nonlinear

Xin Qian; Xingwen Du; P. Frank Pai

2010-01-01

218

A time-frequency method for ultrasonic flaw inspection based on HHT  

Microsoft Academic Search

A time-frequency analysis method based on Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) was employed to character ultrasonic flaw echo signals. In this method, time and frequency characteristics of ultrasonic transducers used in inspection were considered to eliminate noises and identify the flaws. First, the flaw echo signals were decomposed into a series of mono-components called intrinsic mode functions (IMF) using the theories of

Tao Kong; Chunguang Xu; Shiyuan Zhou

2010-01-01

219

Time-Frequency Analysis of Three Phase Signals Using Wigner Distribution  

Microsoft Academic Search

New method of observation and diagnosis of inverter-fed induction motor drives is developed and tested. Unsymmetrical conditions concerning the machine impedances or valves operation are reflected in the spectrum of the current space-phasor. The spectrum of the space-phasor was estimated with the help of the Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD) and its time-frequency representation with excellent time and frequency resolution has been

Zbigniew Leonowicz; Tomasz Sikorski

220

Robust L-estimation based forms of signal transforms and time-frequency representations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The L-estimation based signal transforms and time-frequency (TF) representations are introduced by considering the corresponding minimization problems in the Huber (1981, 1998) estimation theory. The standard signal transforms follow as the maximum likelihood solutions for the Gaussian additive noise environment. For signals corrupted by an impulse noise, the median-based transforms produce robust estimates of the non-noisy signal transforms. When the

Igor Djurovic ´; L. J. Stankovic; J. F. Bohme

2003-01-01

221

Vibration Signal Analysis of Rotor System Based on Time-Frequency Attributes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The time-frequency analysis by Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) plays on a significant role in the analysis of singularities, which hide in the signal, and is an effective method for non-stationary signal. Based on empirical mode decomposition (EMD), the Hilbert-Huang method can obtain a true instantaneous frequency representation of a signal. The analytical background of the HHT is introduced, and its effectiveness

Ling Xiang; Guiji Tang; Yongli Zhu

2008-01-01

222

A new method of radar target recognition based on time-frequency analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, focused on three targets with simple structure, such as cone, sphere and cone, cylinder and cone, dynamic RCS echo signals is predicted with the improved Greco software. The Dynamic RCS echo signals of targets with micro-movement are preprocessed by using short time Fourier transform, and high-resolution time-frequency distribution images are obtained. A new radar target recognition method

Weixing Sheng; Kang Pan; Fang Wang; Xiaofeng Ma; Hao Wang

2010-01-01

223

The Application of Time-Frequency Transform in Mode Identification of Lamb Waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is focused on the problem of mode identification o f Lamb waves in ultrasonic testing, and the principle and process of two time-frequency transf orm method, smooth pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution and two-dimensional Fourier transform, wer e discussed. The experimental work were carried out in aluminium plates, and the single and mul timode Lamb waves were excited by 5MHz

Jian LI; Songping LIU

224

Time-Frequency Analysis of Power Distortion under Fault Conditions for Grid Connected Wind Turbine  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper serves the idea of designing appropriate method for complex investigations of transient states in wind power plants. Proposed algorithms belong to two-dimensional time-frequency representations. Additional dimension allows to obtain simultaneous information about frequency of distortion components as well as its duration time. Two algorithms were proposed: short-time Fourier transform (STFT) and Choi-Williams Distribution (CWD). In order to explore

P. Janik; T. Lobos; J. Rezmer; T. Sikorski

2007-01-01

225

Space-Time-Frequency Diversity Hybrid ARQ for MIMO-OFDM Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

MIMO-OFDM is a promising technology for supporting high data rate communication. Meanwhile, HARQ is known as an effective method to ensure highly reliable communications. The challenges on HARQ for MIMO-OFDM systems lie on coping with multidimensional resource and large feedback. In this paper, one space-time-frequency diversity HARQ is proposed to explore the multidimensional resource efficiently. Moreover, its subcarrier grouping scheme

Fang Liu; Lan Chen

2006-01-01

226

Time-frequency analysis of Transitory\\/Permanent frequency decrease in civil engineering structures during earthquakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The analysis of strong motion recordings in structures is crucial to understand the damaging process during earthquakes. A very precise time-frequency representation, the reassigned smoothed pseudo-Wigner-Ville method, allowed us to follow the variation of the Millikan Library (California) and the Grenoble City Hall building (France) resonance frequencies during earthquakes. Under strong motions, a quick frequency drop, attributed to damage of

Clotaire Michel; Philippe Guéguen

2008-01-01

227

A procedure based on proper orthogonal decomposition for time-frequency analysis of time series  

Microsoft Academic Search

A procedure for time-frequency analysis of time series is described, which is mainly inspired by singular-spectrum analysis,\\u000a but it presents some modifications that allow checking the convergence of the results and extracting the detected spectral\\u000a components through a more efficient technique, especially for real applications. This technique is adaptive, completely data\\u000a dependent with no a priori assumption and applicable to

Giacomo Valerio Iungo; Edoardo Lombardi

2011-01-01

228

Comparing the applications of EMD and EEMD on time-frequency analysis of seismic signal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) is a novel signal analysis method in seismic exploration. It integrates empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and classical Hilbert transform (HT), which can express the intrinsic essence using simple and understandable algorithm. But there is a serious mode mixing phenomenon in EMD. To solve the mode mixing problem, a noise-assisted data analysis method called ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) is adopted instead of EMD. In this paper, the applications of EMD and EEMD on time-frequency analyzing behaviors were compared, and the results show that (1) EMD decomposes an original nonlinear and non-stationary signal into a series of simple intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), but with the mode mixing phenomenon. (2) EEMD skillfully solves the mode mixing problem by adding a white noise to the original signal. (3) The synthetic signal example reveals the remarkable ability of EEMD to decompose the signal into different IMFs and analyze the time-frequency distribution of the signal. (4) The time-frequency spectrum obtained by EEMD more realistically reflects the real geology than by EMD.

Wang, Tong; Zhang, Mingcai; Yu, Qihao; Zhang, Huyuan

2012-08-01

229

Transient analysis with fast Wilson-Daubechies time-frequency transform  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The time-frequency transforms are important tools for identification of transient events in the output of the gravitational-wave detectors. Produced by the terrestrial and possibly by astrophysical sources, the transient events can be identified as patterns on the time-frequency plane with the excess power above stationary detector noise. In this paper we consider a particular case of the Wilson-Daubechies time-frequency transform for use in the gravitational-wave burst analysis. The presented Wilson-Daubechies basis shares some properties with the Gabor frames, but circumvents the Balian-Low theorem. It also shares similarity with the Meyer wavelet, which is actively used in the gravitational-wave burst analysis. The main advantages of the Wilson-Daubechies transform are the low computational cost, spectral leakage control, flexible structure of the frequency sub-bands, and the existence of the analytic time-delay filters, which are important for localization of the gravitational-wave sources in the sky. These properties of the Wilson-Daubechies transform may prove useful not only in the transient analysis, but also in other areas of the gravitational wave data analysis and detector characterization.

Necula, V.; Klimenko, S.; Mitselmakher, G.

2012-06-01

230

Time frequency analysis for automated sleep stage identification in fullterm and preterm neonates.  

PubMed

This work presents a new methodology for automated sleep stage identification in neonates based on the time frequency distribution of single electroencephalogram (EEG) recording and artificial neural networks (ANN). Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD), Hilbert-Hough spectrum (HHS) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) time frequency distributions were used to represent the EEG signal from which features were extracted using time frequency entropy. The classification of features was done using feed forward back-propagation ANN. The system was trained and tested using data taken from neonates of post-conceptual age of 40 weeks for both preterm (14 recordings) and fullterm (15 recordings). The identification of sleep stages was successfully implemented and the classification based on the WVD outperformed the approaches based on CWT and HHS. The accuracy and kappa coefficient were found to be 0.84 and 0.65 respectively for the fullterm neonates' recordings and 0.74 and 0.50 respectively for preterm neonates' recordings. PMID:20703521

Fraiwan, Luay; Lweesy, Khaldon; Khasawneh, Natheer; Fraiwan, Mohammad; Wenz, Heinrich; Dickhaus, Hartmut

2011-08-01

231

Application of time-frequency transforms to processing of full waveforms from acoustic logs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper deals with the application of time-frequency methods, Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) and Matching Pursuit algorithm (MP), to acoustic full waveform processing. The goal of the research is to present possible ways of application of these methods, particularly for the precise identification of selected acoustic waves, waveform decomposition into separate waves, and determination of zones of different elastic parameters in the geological profiles. The simulations, developed methodology, and results of each method are discussed in detail. The Continuous Wavelet Transform is used to improve qualitative interpretation. Time-depth-frequency plots for a given frequency are constructed to distinguish the waves and identify gas-bearing zones. The Matching Pursuit has a better resolution in time-frequency space than CWT; thus, it is used to extract individual waves from the whole acoustic waveform, i.e., decompose the signal. For the extracted waves, the slowness is calculated. Results from MP methods are compared with their counterpart parameters obtained from the original waveforms. Additionally, time-frequency decompositions are used for the determination of the frequency content of each wave packet to get unique information about formation in situ.

Wawrzyniak, Kamila

2010-02-01

232

Time-frequency domain fundamental frequency estimation and localization of quasiperiodic, pulsatic signal in a correlated mixture  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a method for estimating the fundamental frequency and localizing a pulsatic, quasiperiodic signal in a correlated mixture. The spectra of the correlated signal is obtained by using the short-time Fourier transform (STFT). For a quasiperiodic, pulsatic signal, the frequency signal variation over the frame index is itself quasiperiodic and pulsatic. In a mixture, the overlap of the spectra

S. M. A. Salehin; T. D. Abhayapala

2010-01-01

233

Time-frequency analysis of single-point engine-block vibration measurements for multiple excitation-event identification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The short-term-Fourier-transform (STFT) is used to identify different sources of IC engine-block vibration from single-point acceleration measurements taken with a commercial knock sensor. Interest is focused on using the STFT to distinguish normal combustion from other sources of excitation including valve impact, injector pulses, and abnormal combustion, such as knocking. Positive identification of these other events using a single method can be useful for pre-processing of measured knock-sensor data for neural-network-based reconstruction of cylinder pressure. It can also be useful separately as part of a fast knock detection system. A series of experiments is discussed to create the data to isolate these different events on a 3-cylinder gasoline engine. In each case, the measured data is processed using the STFT to attempt to isolate the occurrence of particular events in the time domain. Four classes of experiments are undertaken: (i) an un-fired (motored) engine, driven by a dynamometer, with spark plugs fitted, and then removed, to isolate valve impact; (ii) a fired engine running under idle conditions, to contrast no-load combustion with no combustion; (iii) a part-loaded engine running normally, and then running with one injector switched-off, and (iv) a fully-loaded engine running normally, and then running with knock-control switched-off. The paper shows that a single Time-frequency analysis method, applied to knock sensor data in the form of an appropriately-tuned STFT, can effectively identify the occurrence of these events in the time domain if responses are adequately separated and strong enough.

Vulli, S.; Dunne, J. F.; Potenza, R.; Richardson, D.; King, P.

2009-04-01

234

GEAR FAULT DIAGNOSIS USING TIME-FREQUENCY METHODS DIAGNOSTIC DE DEFAUTS D'ENGRENAGE PAR ANALYSE TEMPS-FREQUENCE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Time-frequency analysis has been found to be effective in monitoring the transient or time- varying characteristics of machinery vibration signals, and therefore its use in machine condition monitoring is increasing. This paper proposes the application of time-frequency methods, which can provide more information about a signal in time and in frequency and gives a better representation of the signal than

Mir Saeed Safizadeh; Aouni A. Lakis; Marc Thomas

235

Mutations in v-Src SH3 and catalytic domains that jointly confer temperature-sensitive transformation with minimal temperature-dependent changes in cellular tyrosine phosphorylation.  

PubMed Central

We have analyzed two functionally significant amino acid alterations encoded by the temperature-sensitive (ts) v-src mutant of Rous sarcoma virus, LA32. The G-to-V change at residue 300 in the catalytic domain nonconditionally impairs morphological transformation, in vitro kinase activity, in vivo tyrosine phosphorylation, and the cytoskeletal association of v-Src while rendering anchorage- and serum-independent growth ts. The R-to-P mutation in the SH3 domain subtly enhances morphological transformation but has no phenotype if the catalytic domain is inactivated. In the presence of the G-300-to-V mutation, this SH3 domain lesion does not affect v-Src in vitro kinase activity and cytoskeletal association, but it nonconditionally enhances cellular tyrosine phosphorylation and restores morphological transformation at the permissive temperature only. This ability to induce a ts transformed morphology, in concert with nonconditional elevations of cellular phosphotyrosine, suggest that a subset of v-Src targets that are crucial to transformation may be affected in ts fashion by the SH3 mutation. Consistent with this, we find that the R-107-to-P mutation confers ts activity and tyrosine phosphorylation on the SH3-binding enzyme phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase. Thus, both the SH3 and catalytic domain mutations in LA32 have some ts attributes and they cooperate in determining the mutant's behavior. The ts SH3 mutation is unique and offers the potential for deeper understanding of the function of this domain. Images

Catling, A D; Fincham, V J; Frame, M C; Haefner, B; Wyke, J A

1994-01-01

236

Reassigned time-frequency peak filtering for seismic random noise attenuation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seismic noise attenuation for the aim of improving signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) plays an important role in seismic data processing for detailed description of oil and gas reservoirs. In particular, strong seismic random noise, which is unpredictable and incoherent in space and time, always degrades the qualities of seismic exploration and much more difficult to be suppressed than coherent noise, since only its statistical properties can be used. It is a common problem in random noise attenuation to keep the signal with minimized distortion. Multi-direction, multi-scale and time-varying methods can be considered as appropriate for tracking the signal characteristics varying in time. In particular, time-frequency based methods might better recover the local characteristics of the non-stationary seismic signal, which is important to produce a satisfactory random noise attenuation result. Time-frequency peak filtering(TFPF), which has already proved to be a powerful tool for Gaussian random noise attenuation in linear signal, can be alternative tool for seismic random noise attenuation. Indeed, seismic noise sometimes may have an asymmetric Wigner-Ville spectrum(WVS) and the seismic signal is nonlinear in time, which might induce amplitude attenuation and residual random noise in the results. This work reports the preliminary results from an improved TFPF method planned to obtain more accurate estimation of the seismic signal by increasing the signal concentration of the time-frequency distribution(TFD) during TFPF. At the beginning the improved reassignment TFPF(RTFPF) encoded the seismic trace as an instantaneous frequency (IF) of the analytic signal generated by frequency modulation. After that the smooth pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution(SPWVD) of the coded analytic signal was computed. The separate frequency window of the SPWVD helps to smooth away the random oscillations introduced by the WVS of seismic noise and nonlinear signal component in the pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution (PWVD) used by conventional TFPF. Moreover, the time-frequency reassignment method is adopted with the aim to concentrate the SPWVD to the IF of the coded signal to obtain accurate filtering signal. The coordinates of the reassigned SPWVD are the center of the gravity of the TFD, which is the estimation of the IF. Subsequently, RTFPF took the peaks of the reassigned SPWVD over the frequency to obtain the filtering signal. The RTFPF were applied to the synthetic seismic data and a common-shot-point gather. The results were compared with the conventional TFPF using the PWVD. The preliminary results seem to be encouraged in random noise attenuation and precision of the signal when applying RTFPF. Example on a field seismic record.

Lin, H.; Li, Y.; Ma, H.

2012-12-01

237

Missing data outside the detector range. II. Application to time-frequency entanglement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In a previous paper, we pointed out the problem of missing data outside the detector range for continuous-variable entanglement verification and quantum key distribution, and we provided a straightforward solution based on entropic separability criteria (as those work better than variance-based criteria). We apply that solution here to the verification of time-frequency entanglement of photon pairs, particularly to the quantum key distribution scheme proposed by Nunn [Opt. ExpressOPEXFF1094-408710.1364/OE.21.015959 21, 15959 (2013)]. We find that the scheme does lead to verifiable entanglement, but that transmission noise quickly destroys the ability to verify the entanglement.

Ray, Megan R.; van Enk, S. J.

2013-12-01

238

Time-Frequency Method Based Activation Detection in Functional MRI Time-Series  

Microsoft Academic Search

A time-frequency method based on Cohen’s class of distribution is proposed for analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging\\u000a (fMRI) data and to detect activation in the brain regions. The Rihaczek-Margenau distribution among the various distributions\\u000a of Cohen’s class produces the least amount of cross products and is used here for calculating the spectrum of fMRI time-series.\\u000a This method also does

Arun Kumar; Jagath C. Rajapakse

2007-01-01

239

Time-frequency representation of a highly nonstationary signal via the modified Wigner distribution  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new signal analysis technique called the modified Wigner distribution (MWD) is presented. The new signal processing tool has been very successful in determining time frequency representations of highly non-stationary multicomponent signals in both simulations and trials involving actual Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high frequency data. The MWD departs from the classic Wigner distribution (WD) in that it effectively eliminates the cross coupling among positive frequency components in a multiple component signal. This attribute of the MWD, which prevents the generation of 'phantom' spectral peaks, will undoubtedly increase the utility of the WD for real world signal analysis applications which more often than not involve multicomponent signals.

Zoladz, T. F.; Jones, J. H.; Jong, J.

1992-01-01

240

Audio source separation with multiple microphones on time-frequency representations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents various source separation methods that utilize multiple microphones. We classify them into two classes. Methods that fall into the first class apply independent component analysis (ICA) or Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to frequency bin-wise observations, and then solve the permutation problem to reconstruct separated signals. The second type of method extends non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) to a multimicrophone situation, in which NMF bases are clustered according to their spatial properties. We have a unified understanding that all methods analyze a time-frequency representation with an additional microphone axis.

Sawada, Hiroshi

2013-05-01

241

Superposition frames for adaptive time-frequency analysis and fast reconstruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article we introduce a broad family of adaptive, linear\\u000atime-frequency representations termed superposition frames, and show that they\\u000aadmit desirable fast overlap-add reconstruction properties akin to standard\\u000ashort-time Fourier techniques. This approach stands in contrast to many\\u000aadaptive time-frequency representations in the extant literature, which, while\\u000amore flexible than standard fixed-resolution approaches, typically fail to\\u000aprovide efficient reconstruction

Daniel Rudoy; Prabahan Basu; Patrick J. Wolfe

2010-01-01

242

Large dynamic range time-frequency signal analysis with application to helicopter Doppler radar data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Despite the enhanced time-frequency analysis (TFA) detailing capability of quadratic TFAs like the Wigner and Cohen representations, their performance with signals of large dynamic range (DNR in excess of 40 dB) is not acceptable due to the inability to totally suppress the cross-term artifacts which typically are much stronger than the weakest signal components that they obscure. AMTI and GMTI radar targets exhibit such high dynamic range when microDoppler is present, with the aspects of interest being the weakest components. This paper presents one of two modifications of linear TFA to provide the enhanced detailing behavior of quadratic TFAs without introducing cross terms, making it possible to see the time-frequency detail of extremely weak signal components. The technique described here is based on subspace-enhanced linear predictive extrapolation of the data within each analysis window to create a longer data sequence for conventional STFT TFA. The other technique, based on formation of a special two-dimensional transformed data matrix analyzed by high-definition two-dimensional spectral analysis methods such as 2-D AR or 2-D minimum variance, is compared to the new technique using actual AMTI and GMTI radar data.

Marple, Stanley L., Jr.; Marino, Claudio S.; Strange, Shawn

2003-12-01

243

Time-frequency analysis using damped-oscillator pseudo-wavelets: application to electrophysiological recordings  

PubMed Central

The damped-oscillator pseudo-wavelet is presented as a method of time-frequency analysis along with a new spectral density measure, the data power. An instantaneous phase can be defined for this pseudo-wavelet, and it is easily inverted. The data power measure is tested on both computer generated data and in vivo intrahippocampal electrophysiological recordings from a rat. The data power spectral density is found to give better time and frequency resolution than the more conventional total energy measure, and additionally shows intricate time-frequency structure in the rat that is altered in association with the emergence of epilepsy. With epileptogenesis, the baseline theta oscillation is severely degraded and is absorbed into a broader gamma band. There are also broad 600 Hz and 2000 Hz bands which localize to hippocampal layers that are distinct from those of the theta and gamma bands. The 600 Hz band decreases in prominence with epileptogenesis while the 2000 Hz band increases in prominence. The origins of these high frequency bands await further study. In general, we find that the damped-oscillator pseudo-wavelet is easy to use and is particularly suitable for problems where a wide range of oscillator frequencies is expected.

Hsu, David; Hsu, Murielle; Grabenstatter, Heidi L.; Worrell, Gregory A.; Sutula, Thomas P.

2010-01-01

244

Using the discrete wavelet transform for time-frequency analysis of the surface EMG signal.  

PubMed

The frequency content of the surface electromyographic (SEMG) signal is used to study neural activity, and force development and fatigue in muscle. The fast Fourier transform (FFT), or short time Fourier transform (STFT), are commonly used to determine the frequency content of the SEMG, but have the drawback of assumed signal stationarity. A relatively new technique, the wavelet transform (WT), is well suited to nonstationary signals, and has gained widespread use in speech and image processing. We applied the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) based on the Daubechies wavelet to SEMG data. The DWT decomposed the SEMG into 11 time-frequency bands; the data was also processed with an FFT algorithm. Comparison of these results show that the DWT provided information in the correct frequency bands. These results are encouraging, as time-frequency signal decomposition will allow movement and force generation patterns to be directly related to SEMG frequency components. The main disadvantage of the DWT seems to be that because the signal is down sampled at each successive DWT scale, the transform is sparse at lower frequency scales. However, we believe that the continuous discrete wavelet transform will overcome this deficiency and provide an additional method of SEMG frequency analysis. PMID:8329582

Constable, R; Thornhill, R J

1993-01-01

245

Time-frequency analysis of arterial pressure oscillations in anesthetized dogs: effects of standardized hemorrhages.  

PubMed

The purpose of this preliminary study was to investigate the advantages of the time-frequency analysis through the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) compared to classical Fourier analysis using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) in arterial pressure signals from anesthetized mongrel dogs before and during standardized hemorrhages. Systemic arterial pressure pulsations were recorded using catheter-tip manometers. CWT and FFT were applied to arterial pressure pulsations to obtain module coefficients of this transformation and its associated contours during the evolution of progressive hemorrhages, in amounts of 15, 34, and 66% of the estimated total blood volume. This mathematical analysis enabled us to identify the evolution of the frequency components of aortic valve functions, heart dynamics, respiratory influences, and vasomotor activities. Furthermore, we isolated the modulating signal of amplitude modulation phenomenon present in the arterial pressure records, as described in previous papers, being the heart rate carrier frequency. The CWT is a very sensitive and reliable procedure to analyze (time-frequency) the oscillatory phenomena in two dimensions, and to provide more information than the FFT. This new analytical procedure may provide new insights in the study of shock pathophysiology. PMID:11220643

Jiménez, R F; Günther, B; Torres, P

2001-02-01

246

Determination of transient disturbance energy flow in electric power systems via cross time-frequency distribution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In electric power systems, the flow of electric power is an important issue for the control and management of the system. However, under transient-states caused by electrical disturbances, it is not a simple task to determine the flow of transient disturbance energy in an analytic way with high accuracy. The proposed algorithm for the determination of transient disturbance energy flow is based on cross time-frequency analysis that provides time- and frequency- localized phase difference information. Hence, based on the cross time-frequency distribution of the transient voltage and current, the classical parameters in power systems are modified for transient analysis. The transient power factor angle will determine the direction of transient disturbance energy (real and reactive) flows in power distribution system networks. For the verification of the proposed algorithm, a practical model of a power system is simulated by EMTP (Electromagnetic Transient Program). In addition, knowledge of this nature should greatly facilitate automatic identification of transient events and determination of the physical location of the source of various transient disturbances.

Shin, Yong-June; Powers, Edward J.; Grady, W. M.; Arapostathis, Ari

2004-10-01

247

Classification of time-frequency representations using improved morphological pattern spectrum for engine fault diagnosis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Time-frequency representations (TFR) have been intensively employed for analyzing vibration signals in the field of mechanical faults diagnosis. However, in many applications, TFR are simply utilized as a visual aid. It is very attractive to investigate the utility of TFR for automatic classification of vibration signals. A key step for this work is to extract discriminative parameters from TFR as input feature vector for classifiers. This paper contributes to this ongoing investigation by developing an improved morphological pattern spectrum (IMPS) for feature extraction from TFR. The S transform, which combines the separate strengths of the short time Fourier transform and wavelet transforms, is chosen to perform the time-frequency analysis of vibration signals. Then, we present an improved morphological pattern spectrum (IMPS) scheme, which utilizes the first moment replace of the volume measure used in traditional morphological pattern spectrum (MPS) method. The promise of IMPS is illustrated by performing our procedure on vibration signals measured from an engine with five operating states. Experimental results have demonstrated the presented IMPS to be an effective approach for characterizing the TFR of vibration signals in engine fault diagnosis.

Li, Bing; Mi, Shuang-shan; Liu, Peng-yuan; Wang, Zheng-jun

2013-06-01

248

Time-frequency analysis of CHAMP scalar and vector magnetic data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wavelet transforms began to be used in geophysics in the early 1980s for the analysis of seismic signals. The advantage of analyzing a signal with wavelets as the analyzing kernels, is that it enables one to study features of the signal locally with a detail matched to their scale. Owing to their unique time-frequency localization property, wavelet analysis is especially useful for signals that are non-stationary, have short-lived transient components, have features at different scales, or have singularities. Unfortunately, many studies using time-frequency analysis have suffered from an apparent lack of quantitative results. We have applied the continuous wavelet transform to analyze 3 years of Fluxgate and Overhauser magnetometer data of the CHAMP satellite mission. We have detected and classified not only artificial source noise (e.g. instrument problems and pre-processing errors) but also high frequency natural signals of external fields (e.g. F-region currents and pulsations). The results of this analysis will be used for: (a) consequent correction and flagging of the data, (b) derivation of a suitable (undisturbed) dataset for the purposes of crustal and main field modeling, and, (c) study of natural signals (e.g. F-region currents, pulsations) contained in the data.

Balasis, G.; Maus, S.; Luehr, H.; Rother, M.

2003-12-01

249

Models of the Joint Structure of Domain-Related and Global Distress: Implications for the Reconciliation of Quality of Life and Mental Health Perspectives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on subjective wellbeing includes studies of both domain-related and global distress. The mental health literature, though, focuses almost exclusively on global distress. This seems to be partly due to a common belief that psychological distress, and the moods that comprise distress, necessarily lack referential content. However, if that…

Magee, William; St-Arnaud, Sebastien

2012-01-01

250

Looking for activity cycles in late-type Kepler stars using time-frequency analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We analyse light curves covering four years of 39 fast-rotating (Prot ? 1 d) late-type active stars from the Kepler data base. Using time-frequency analysis (short-term Fourier transform), we find hints for activity cycles of 300-900 d at nine targets from the changing typical latitude of the starspots, which with the differential rotation of the stellar surface change the observed rotation period over the activity cycle. We also give a lowest estimation for the shear parameter of the differential rotation, which is ?0.001 for the cycling targets. These results populate the less studied, short-period end of the rotation-cycle length relation.

Vida, K.; Oláh, K.; Szabó, R.

2014-07-01

251

Time-frequency analysis methods for detecting effects of diabetic neuropathy.  

PubMed

There have been several research studies on efficient methods for analysis and classification of electromyography (EMG) signals and adoption of wavelet functions, which is a promising approach for determining the spectral distribution of the signal. This study compares distinct time-frequency analysis methods for investigating the EMG activity of the thigh and calf muscles during gait among non-diabetic subjects and diabetic neuropathic patients. It also attempts to verify, by adaptive optimal kernel and discrete wavelet transform, whether there are EMG alterations related to diabetic neuropathy in the lower limb muscles during gait. The results show that diabetics might not keep up with the mechanical demands of walking by changing muscle fibre recruitment strategies, as seen in the control group. Moreover, principal components analysis indicates more alterations in diabetic motor strategies, and we identify that diabetic subjects need other strategies with different muscle energy production and frequencies to carry out their daily activities. PMID:23620093

Weiderpass, H A; Pachi, C G F; Yamamoto, J F; Hamamoto, A; Onodera, A N; Sacco, I C N

2013-09-01

252

Time-frequency analysis of movement-related spectral power in EEG during repetitive movements: a comparison of methods  

PubMed Central

During dynamic voluntary movements, power in the ?-and ?-bands resulting from synchronized neuronal activity is modulated in a manner that is time-locked to movement onset. These signals can be readily recorded from the scalp surface using electroencephalography. Abnormalities in the magnitude and timing of these oscillations are present in a wide variety of movement disorders including Parkinson’s disease and dystonia. Most studies have examined movement-related oscillations in the context of single discrete movements, yet marked impairments are often seen during the performance of repetitive movements. For this reason, there is considerable need for analysis methods that can resolve the modulation of these oscillations in both the frequency and time domains. Presently, there is little consensus on which is the most appropriate method for this purpose. In this paper, a comparison of commonly used time-frequency methods is presented for the analysis of movement-related power in the ?-and ?-bands during repetitive movements. The same principles hold, however, for any form of repetitive or rhythmic input-output processes in the brain. In particular, methods based on band-pass filtering, the short-time Fourier transform (STFT), continuous wavelet transform and reduced interference distributions are discussed. The relative merits and limitations in terms of spectral or temporal resolution of each method are shown with the use of simulated and experimental data. It is shown that the STFT provides the best compromise between spectral and temporal resolution and thus is the most appropriate approach for the analysis and interpretation of repetitive movement-related oscillations in health and disease. (250 words)

MacKinnon, Colum D.

2009-01-01

253

Time-frequency methods and voluntary ramped-frequency breathing: a powerful combination for exploration of human neurophysiological mechanisms.  

PubMed

We experimentally altered the timing of respiratory motoneuron activity as a means to modulate and better understand otherwise hidden human central neural and hemodynamic oscillatory mechanisms. We recorded the electrocardiogram, finger photoplethysmographic arterial pressure, tidal carbon dioxide concentrations, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity in 13 healthy supine young men who gradually increased or decreased their breathing frequencies between 0.05 and 0.25 Hz over 9-min periods. We analyzed results with traditional time- and frequency-domain methods, and also with time-frequency methods (wavelet transform, wavelet phase coherence, and directional coupling). We determined statistical significance and identified frequency boundaries by comparing measurements with randomly generated surrogates. Our results support several major conclusions. First, respiration causally modulates both sympathetic (weakly) and vagal motoneuron (strongly) oscillations over a wide frequency range-one that extends well below the frequency of actual breaths. Second, breathing frequency broadly modulates vagal baroreflex gain, with peak gains registered in the low frequency range. Third, breathing frequency does not influence median levels of sympathetic or vagal activity over time. Fourth, phase relations between arterial pressure and sympathetic and vagal motoneurons are unaffected by breathing, and are therefore likely secondary to intrinsic responsiveness of these motoneurons to other synaptic inputs. Finally, breathing frequency does not affect phase coherence between diastolic pressure and muscle sympathetic oscillations, but it augments phase coherence between systolic pressure and R-R interval oscillations over a limited portion of the usual breathing frequency range. These results refine understanding of autonomic oscillatory processes and those physiological mechanisms known as the human respiratory gate. PMID:24114700

Stankovski, Tomislav; Cooke, William H; Rudas, László; Stefanovska, Aneta; Eckberg, Dwain L

2013-12-01

254

Time-frequency analysis of fiber-optic temperature data on groundwater-surface water interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accurate characterization of the hydrogeological framework and groundwater-surface water interactions in particular, is crucial to understanding contaminant transport between aquifers and rivers. Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FODTS) is a novel tool that offers unprecedented resolution for characterizing groundwater-surface water interaction. Time-frequency analysis of FODTS data provides a means to distinguish between a wide range of hydrologic processes at various scales. This work demonstrates the use of the S-Transform to analyze FODTS time series and synchronous river stage time series. Our study focused on improving understanding of the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction at the Hanford 300-Area Richland, WA. We used ~1.5 km long fiber optic cable to continuously monitor real time temperature variations along the hyporheic corridor at ~1 m spatial resolution and 5 minutes temporal resolution. It is generally recognized that contaminated groundwater discharge in Hanford site 300-Area is highly controlled by fluctuations in the Columbia River stage. Using S-Transform analysis of the temperature data along the river corridor we investigated in more detail the contributions of periodicity in the river stage to focused groundwater discharge. This time-frequency analysis of the DTS data uniquely identified areas of stage-controlled enhanced exchange along the hyporheic corridor. Dam operations upstream of the site were identified as a factor controlling stage fluctuations with relatively long periods (4 - 8 days). S-Transform analysis was used to map areas of high amplitude in these diagnostic periods indicative of stage-driven exchange along the river corridor.

Mwakanyamale, K. E.; Slater, L. D.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Alwasif, M. H.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Johnson, C. D.

2011-12-01

255

The local maxima method for enhancement of time-frequency map and its application to local damage detection in rotating machines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper a new method of fault detection in rotating machinery is presented. It is based on a vibration time series analysis in time-frequency domain. A raw vibration signal is decomposed via the short-time Fourier transform (STFT). The time-frequency map is considered as matrix (M×N) with N sub-signals with length M. Each sub-signal is considered as a time series and might be interpreted as energy variation for narrow frequency bins. Each sub-signal is processed using a novel approach called the local maxima method. Basically, we search for local maxima because they should appear in the signal if local damage in bearings or gearbox exists. Finally, information for all sub-signals is combined in order to validate impulsive behavior of energy. Due to random character of the obtained time series, each maximum occurrence has to be checked for its significance. If there are time points for which the average number of local maxima for all sub-signals is significantly higher than for the other time instances, then location of these maxima is “weighted” as more important (at this time instance local maxima create for a set of ?f a pattern on the time-frequency map). This information, called vector of weights, is used for enhancement of spectrogram. When vector of weights is applied for spectrogram, non-informative energy is suppressed while informative features on spectrogram are enhanced. If the distribution of local maxima on spectrogram creates a pattern of wide-band cyclic energy growth, the machine is suspected of being damaged. For healthy condition, the vector of the average number of maxima for each time point should not have outliers, aggregation of information from all sub-signals is rather random and does not create any pattern. The method is illustrated by analysis of very noisy both real and simulated signals.

Obuchowski, Jakub; Wy?oma?ska, Agnieszka; Zimroz, Rados?aw

2014-06-01

256

Joint frequency-domain differential detection and equalization for DS-CDMA signal transmissions in a frequency-selective fading channel  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has been revealed that direct sequence code-di- vision multiple access (DS-CDMA) can achieve a good bit-error rate (BER) performance, comparable to multicarrier CDMA (MC-CDMA), by using coherent frequency-domain equalization (FDE) instead of coherent Rake combining. However, coherent FDE requires accurate channel estimation. Pilot-assisted channel estimation is a practical solution, but its accuracy is sensitive to the Doppler spread. In

Le Liu; Fumiyuki Adachi

2006-01-01

257

Time-Frequency Analysis of a Noisy Ultrasound Doppler Signal With a 2nd Figure Eight Kernel.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Nonstationary ultrasound Doppler signals, those are changing with time and frequency simultaneously, are widely observed in biological and speech signals. A Cohen's class time-frequency (TF) analysis can analyze nonstationary signals with high resolution ...

Y. Noguchi E. Kashiwagi K. Watanabe F. Matsumoto S. Sugimoto

2001-01-01

258

2-D FFT and time-frequency analysis techniques for multi-target recognition of FMCW radar signal  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study of multi-object recognition method of a linear frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) radar system is presented. Principles of FMCW signal with its relation to the characteristics of the detected objects are reviewed. Two-dimensional fast Fourier transform (FFT) and time-frequency analysis (TFA) techniques are performed calculating information of detected objects from received radar signals. In time-frequency analysis, techniques including Gabor transform

Li Su; Hsien Shun Wu; Ching-Kuang C. Tzuang

2011-01-01

259

A methodology for detection and classification of some underwater acoustic signals using time-frequency analysis techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

Signal detection techniques based on time-frequency signal analysis with the Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD) and the cross Wigner-Ville distribution (XWVD) are presented. These techniques are shown to provide high-resolution signal characterization in a time-frequency space, and good noise rejection performance. This type of detection is applied to the signaturing, detection, and classification of specific machine sounds: the individual cylinder firings of

BOUALEM BOASHASH; P. O'Shea

1990-01-01

260

Recent advances in time-frequency analysis methods for machinery fault diagnosis: A review with application examples  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nonstationary signal analysis is one of the main topics in the field of machinery fault diagnosis. Time-frequency analysis can identify the signal frequency components, reveals their time variant features, and is an effective tool to extract machinery health information contained in nonstationary signals. Various time-frequency analysis methods have been proposed and applied to machinery fault diagnosis. These include linear and bilinear time-frequency representations (e.g., wavelet transform, Cohen and affine class distributions), adaptive parametric time-frequency analysis (based on atomic decomposition and time-frequency auto-regressive moving average models), adaptive non-parametric time-frequency analysis (e.g., Hilbert-Huang transform, local mean decomposition, and energy separation), and time varying higher order spectra. This paper presents a systematic review of over 20 major such methods reported in more than 100 representative articles published since 1990. Their fundamental principles, advantages and disadvantages, and applications to fault diagnosis of machinery have been examined. Some examples have also been provided to illustrate their performance.

Feng, Zhipeng; Liang, Ming; Chu, Fulei

2013-07-01

261

Detection and classification of defects in ultrasonic NDE signals using time-frequency representations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ultrasonic wave, generated by a piezoelectric transducer coupled to the test specimen, propagates through the material and part of its energy is reflected when it encounters an non-homogeneity or discontinuity in its path, while the remainder is reflected by the back surface of the test specimen. Defect echo signals are masked by the characteristics of the measuring instruments, the propagation paths taken by the ultrasonic wave, and are corrupted by additive noise. This leads to difficulties in comparing and analyzing signals, particularly in automated defect identification systems employing different transducers. Further, the multi-component nature of material defects can add to the complexity of the defect identification criteria. With many one-dimensional (1-D) approaches, the multi-component defects can not be detected. Another drawback is that these techniques are not very robust for sharp ultrasonic peaks especially in a very hazardous environment. This paper proposes a technique based on the time-frequency representations (TFRs) of the real defect signals corresponding to artificially produced defects of various geometries in metals. Cohen's class (quadratic) TFRs with Gaussian kernels are then used to represent the signals in the time-frequency (TF) plane. Once the TFR is obtained, various image processing morphological techniques are applied to the TFR (e.g. region of interest masking, edge detection, and profile separation). Based on the results of these operations, a binary image is produced which, in turn, leads to a novel set of features. Using these new features, defects have not only been detected but also classified as flat-cut, angular-cut, and circular-drills. Moreover, with some modifications of the threshold levels of the TFR kernel design, our technique can be used in relatively hostile environments with SNRs as low as 0 dB. Another important characteristic of our approach is the detection of multiple defects. This consists of detection of the number of defects present on a given time signal as well as their types. The calculation time required is suitable for pseudo real-time applications. .

Qidwai, Uvais; Costa, Antonio H.; Chen, C. H.

2000-05-01

262

Frequency and time-frequency analysis of intraoperative ECoG during awake brain stimulation.  

PubMed

Electrocortical stimulation remains the standard for functional brain mapping of eloquent areas to prevent postoperative functional deficits. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the short-train technique (monopolar stimulation) and Penfield's technique (bipolar stimulation) would induce different effects on brain oscillatory activity in awake patients, as quantified by electrocorticography (ECoG). The study population was seven patients undergoing brain tumor surgery. Intraoperative bipolar and monopolar electrical stimulation for cortical mapping was performed during awake surgery. ECoG was recorded using 1 × 8 electrode strip. Spectral estimation was calculated using a parametric approach based on an autoregressive model. Wavelet-based time-frequency analysis was then applied to evaluate the temporal evolution of brain oscillatory activity. Both monopolar and bipolar stimulation produced an increment in delta and a decrease in beta powers for the motor and the sensory channels. These phenomena lasted about 4 s. Comparison between monopolar and bipolar stimulation showed no significant difference in brain activity. Given the importance of quantitative signal analysis for evaluating response accuracy, ECoG recording during electrical stimulation is necessary to characterize the dynamic processes underlying changes in cortical responses in vivo. This study is a preliminary approach to the quantitative analysis of post-stimulation ECoG signals. PMID:23443302

Formaggio, Emanuela; Storti, Silvia F; Tramontano, Vincenzo; Casarin, Agnese; Bertoldo, Alessandra; Fiaschi, Antonio; Talacchi, Andrea; Sala, Francesco; Toffolo, Gianna M; Manganotti, Paolo

2013-01-01

263

Phase retrieval and time-frequency methods in the measurement of ultrashort laser pulses  

SciTech Connect

Recently several techniques have become available to measure the time- (or frequency-) dependent intensity and phase of ultrashort laser pulses. One of these, Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating (FROG), is rigorous and has achieved single-laser-shot operation. FROG combines the concepts of time-frequency analysis in the form of spectrogram generation (in order to create a two-dimensional problem), and uses a phase-retrieval-based algorithm to invert the experimental data to yield the intensity and phase of the laboratory laser pulse. In FROG it is easy to generate a spectrogram of the unknown signal, and inversion of the spectrogram to recover the signal is the main goal. Because the temporal width of a femtosecond laser pulse is much shorter than anything achievable by electronics, FROG uses the pulse to measure itself. In FROG, the laser pulse is split into two replicas of itself by a partially reflecting beamsplitter, and the two replicas interact with each other in a medium with an instantaneous nonlinear-optical response. This interaction generates a signal field that is then frequency-resolved using a spectrometer. The spectrum of the signal field is measured for all relevant values of the temporal delay between the two pulses. Here, the authors employ FROG and FROG related techniques to measure the time-dependent intensity and phase of an ultrashort laser pulse.

DeLong, K.W.; Fittinghoff, D.N.; Ladera, C.L.; Trebino, R.

1995-02-01

264

Analysis of concert hall acoustics via visualizations of time-frequency and spatiotemporal responses.  

PubMed

Acousticians and other practitioners alike often describe acoustic conditions in performance spaces with standard objective parameters. Apart from a few exceptions, the parameters are calculated by integrating the sound energy of the impulse responses over time; this makes them inadequate for researching the acoustics in detail, especially in the early part of the room impulse response. This paper proposes a method based on time-frequency and spatiotemporal presentations to overcome the lack of detail in the standard analysis. In brief, the proposed methods visualize the cumulative development of the sound field as a function of frequency or direction by forward-integrating the energy in the impulse response in short time frames. Analysis on the measurements from six concert halls concentrates particularly on interpreting the results in light of the seat dip effect. Earlier research has concluded that the seat dip effect is reduced by reflection from low overhead surfaces. In contrast, the current results indicate that the seat dip attenuation in the frequency response is corrected the best when the hall provides most lateral reflections. These findings suggest that the proposed analysis is suitable for explaining concert hall acoustics in detail. PMID:23363103

Pätynen, Jukka; Tervo, Sakari; Lokki, Tapio

2013-02-01

265

Dynamics characterization and health monitoring of membrane structures by time-frequency analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Membrane dynamics is often nonlinear and nonstationary because of geometric nonlinearity induced by high local flexibility, non-uniform pre-tension, light weight, dynamic coupling with surrounding air, wave propagation, supportinduced nonlinearity, and others. Hence, dynamics characterization and health monitoring of membrane structures require advanced time-frequency analysis, and the focus is on how to obtain accurate time-varying frequency and amplitude of a nonlinear nonstationary signal. Here we propose the use of a conjugate-pair decomposition (CPD) method with the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) for characterization of membrane dynamics. First, EMD with signal conditioning techniques is used to separate a compound membrane response into well-behaved intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) without assuming the signal to be harmonic. Then, a pair of sliding conjugate functions is used to accurately extract the time-varying frequency and amplitude of each IMF by using only three neighboring data points for each time instant. Because the variations of frequencies and amplitudes of IMFs contain system characteristics, they can be used for system identification and damage detection. Experimental nonlinear responses of a horizontally tensioned Kapton membrane subjected to a transverse harmonic excitation provided by a shaker at one end are used to validate the proposed methodology. Results show that the clamped-clamped supports and pre-tension cause the first-mode vibration to have a hardening cubic nonlinearity, and several other nonlinear phenomena are identified.

Qian, Xin; Du, Xingwen; Pai, P. Frank

2010-03-01

266

Time-frequency model for echo-delay resolution in wideband biosonar  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A time/frequency model of the bat's auditory system was developed to examine the basis for the fine (~2 ?s) echo-delay resolution of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), and its performance at resolving closely spaced FM sonar echoes in the bat's 20-100-kHz band at different signal-to-noise ratios was computed. The model uses parallel bandpass filters spaced over this band to generate envelopes that individually can have much lower bandwidth than the bat's ultrasonic sonar sounds and still achieve fine delay resolution. Because fine delay separations are inside the integration time of the model's filters (~250-300 ?s), resolving them means using interference patterns along the frequency dimension (spectral peaks and notches). The low bandwidth content of the filter outputs is suitable for relay of information to higher auditory areas that have intrinsically poor temporal response properties. If implemented in fully parallel analog-digital hardware, the model is computationally extremely efficient and would improve resolution in military and industrial sonar receivers.

Neretti, Nicola; Sanderson, Mark I.; Intrator, Nathan; Simmons, James A.

2003-04-01

267

Time-Frequency Analysis of Rocket Nozzle Wall Pressures During Start-up Transients  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Surveys of the fluctuating wall pressure were conducted on a sub-scale, thrust- optimized parabolic nozzle in order to develop a physical intuition for its Fourier-azimuthal mode behavior during fixed and transient start-up conditions. These unsteady signatures are driven by shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions which depend on the nozzle pressure ratio and nozzle geometry. The focus however, is on the degree of similarity between the spectral footprints of these modes obtained from transient start-ups as opposed to a sequence of fixed nozzle pressure ratio conditions. For the latter, statistically converged spectra are computed using conventional Fourier analyses techniques, whereas the former are investigated by way of time-frequency analysis. The findings suggest that at low nozzle pressure ratios -- where the flow resides in a Free Shock Separation state -- strong spectral similarities occur between fixed and transient conditions. Conversely, at higher nozzle pressure ratios -- where the flow resides in Restricted Shock Separation -- stark differences are observed between the fixed and transient conditions and depends greatly on the ramping rate of the transient period. And so, it appears that an understanding of the dynamics during transient start-up conditions cannot be furnished by a way of fixed flow analysis.

Baars, Woutijn J.; Tinney, Charles E.; Ruf, Joseph H.

2011-01-01

268

A high resolution approach to estimating time-frequency spectra and their amplitudes.  

PubMed

A high resolution approach to estimating time-frequency spectra (TFS) and associated amplitudes via the use of variable frequency complex demodulation (VFCDM) is presented. This is a two-step procedure in which the previously developed time-varying optimal parameter search (TVOPS) technique is used to obtain TFS, followed by using the VFCDM to obtain even greater TFS resolution and instantaneous amplitudes associated with only the specific frequencies of interest. This combinational use of the TVOPS and the VFCDM is termed the TVOPS-VFCDM. Simulation examples are provided to demonstrate the performance of the TVOPS-VFCDM for high resolution TFS as well as instantaneous amplitude estimation. The simulation results show that the TVOPS-VFCDM approach provides the highest resolution and most accurate amplitude estimates when compared to the smoothed pseudo Wigner-Ville, continuous wavelet transform and Hilbert-Huang transform methods. Application of the TVOPS-VFCDM to renal blood flow data indicates some promise of a quantitative approach to understanding the dynamics of renal autoregulatory mechanisms as well as a possible approach to quantitatively discriminating between different strains of rats. PMID:16463086

Wang, Hengliang; Siu, Kin; Ju, Kihwan; Chon, Ki H

2006-02-01

269

Estimation of respiratory rate from photoplethysmogram data using time-frequency spectral estimation.  

PubMed

We present a new method that uses the pulse oximeter signal to estimate the respiratory rate. The method uses a recently developed time-frequency spectral estimation method, variable-frequency complex demodulation (VFCDM), to identify frequency modulation (FM) of the photoplethysmogram waveform. This FM has a measurable periodicity, which provides an estimate of the respiration period. We compared the performance of VFCDM to the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and autoregressive (AR) model approaches. The CWT method also utilizes the respiratory sinus arrhythmia effect as represented by either FM or AM to estimate respiratory rates. Both CWT and AR model methods have been previously shown to provide reasonably good estimates of breathing rates that are in the normal range (12-26 breaths/min). However, to our knowledge, breathing rates higher than 26 breaths/min and the real-time performance of these algorithms are yet to be tested. Our analysis based on 15 healthy subjects reveals that the VFCDM method provides the best results in terms of accuracy (smaller median error), consistency (smaller interquartile range of the median value), and computational efficiency (less than 0.3 s on 1 min of data using a MATLAB implementation) to extract breathing rates that varied from 12-36 breaths/min. PMID:19369147

Chon, Ki H; Dash, Shishir; Ju, Kihwan

2009-08-01

270

Time-frequency model for echo-delay resolution in wideband biosonar.  

PubMed

A time/frequency model of the bat's auditory system was developed to examine the basis for the fine (approximately 2 micros) echo-delay resolution of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), and its performance at resolving closely spaced FM sonar echoes in the bat's 20-100-kHz band at different signal-to-noise ratios was computed. The model uses parallel bandpass filters spaced over this band to generate envelopes that individually can have much lower bandwidth than the bat's ultrasonic sonar sounds and still achieve fine delay resolution. Because fine delay separations are inside the integration time of the model's filters (approximately 250-300 micros), resolving them means using interference patterns along the frequency dimension (spectral peaks and notches). The low bandwidth content of the filter outputs is suitable for relay of information to higher auditory areas that have intrinsically poor temporal response properties. If implemented in fully parallel analog-digital hardware, the model is computationally extremely efficient and would improve resolution in military and industrial sonar receivers. PMID:12703724

Neretti, Nicola; Sanderson, Mark I; Intrator, Nathan; Simmons, James A

2003-04-01

271

Continuous Time-Frequency Transform for Unevenly Sampled Time Series and Significance Testing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spectral analysis is a common approach for the interpretation of climate time series. In particular, the continuous wavelet transform and the Gabor transform are generally well-suited for non-stationary, multi-periodic and highly noisy data. The purpose of this contribution is to propose a rigorous framework to estimate the significance of wavelet spectra given unevenly sampled data. To this end, we expand the theory developed by G. Foster [1], originally targeted for astronomical data, as follows: (i) Define the model: Significance testing is always based on a model, that needs to be properly defined. (ii) Define the parametric hypotheses H0 (null case) and H1 (alternative case), and attempt to find an appropriate statistical summary. The idea is to obtain a well-known distribution under H0, allowing an analytical approach and avoiding most of Monte-Carlo simulations which can be expensive in time. We also discuss the choice to be done for the analysis function of the time-frequency transform. Indeed, Morlet wavelet is often chosen, but it is not always the best option. Some examples of paleoclimate time series analysis will be given. Finally, we investigate whether considering the interpolated data to get a constant time step and using the traditional tools may lead to significant errors. Reference: [1] G. Foster. Wavelets for period analysis of unevenly sampled time series. The Astronomical Journal, 112(4):1709-1729, 1996.

Lenoir, Guillaume; Crucifix, Michel

2014-05-01

272

Electrocorticographic signal classification based on time-frequency decomposition and nonparametric statistical modeling.  

PubMed

In this paper, we propose a novel statistical framework based on time-frequency decomposition and nonparametric modelling of electrocortical (ECoG) signals in the context of a Brain Computer Interface. The proposed method decomposes the ECoG signals into subbands (with no down-sampling) using Gabor filters. The subband signals are then encoded using a nonparametric statistical modeling and the distance between the resulting empirical distributions is as used as the classification criterion. Cross-validation experiments were carried out to pre-select the channel (from the multi-channel sources) and subbands which can archive the best classification scores. The proposed framework has been evaluated using Data Set I from the BCI Competition III and results indicate a superiority over conventional vector quantization method particularly when the number of training samples is small. It was found that the proposed nonparametric distribution modeling based on empirical inverse cumulative distribution distance is fast, robust and applicable to the mobile systems. PMID:17945704

Dat, Tran Huy; Shue, Louis; Guan, Cuntai

2006-01-01

273

Time-frequency analysis of transient pressure signals for a mechanical heart valve cavitation study.  

PubMed

A series of transient pressure signals (TPSs) can be measured using a miniature pressure transducer mounted near the tip of the inflow side of a mechanical heart valve (MHV) occluder during closure. A relationship appears to exist between the intensity and pattern of the TPS and the cavitation potential of a MHV. To study the relationship between MHV cavitation and the TPSs, we installed an MHV in a valve testing chamber of a digitally controlled burst test loop. A charge coupled device (CCD) camera and a personal computer based image grabbing program was used to visualize cavitation bubbles appearing on or near the occluder surface. One bileaflet MHV was used as the model for this study. Cavitation bubbles were observed within 300 microsec of the leaflet/housing impact. The valve was tested at various driving pressures between 100 and 1,300 mmHg. MHV cavitation bubble intensities were qualitatively classified into three categories: 1) strong, 2) weak, and 3) none. Digital images of the MHV occluder inflow surface were recorded simultaneously with the TPSs. TPSs were studied by the time-frequency analysis method (spectrogram) and correlated to MHV cavitation potential. The intensity of the cavitation bubbles was found to be associated with burst test loop driving pressures during leaflet closure. PMID:9804476

Yu, A A; White, J A; Hwang, N H

1998-01-01

274

Toward an EEG-based recognition of music liking using time-frequency analysis.  

PubMed

Affective phenomena, as reflected through brain activity, could constitute an effective index for the detection of music preference. In this vein, this paper focuses on the discrimination between subjects' electroencephalogram (EEG) responses to self-assessed liked or disliked music, acquired during an experimental procedure, by evaluating different feature extraction approaches and classifiers to this end. Feature extraction is based on time-frequency (TF) analysis by implementing three TF techniques, i.e., spectrogram, Zhao-Atlas-Marks distribution and Hilbert-Huang spectrum (HHS). Feature estimation also accounts for physiological parameters that relate to EEG frequency bands, reference states, time intervals, and hemispheric asymmetries. Classification is performed by employing four classifiers, i.e., support vector machines, k-nearest neighbors (k -NN), quadratic and Mahalanobis distance-based discriminant analyses. According to the experimental results across nine subjects, best classification accuracy {86.52 (±0.76)%} was achieved using k-NN and HHS-based feature vectors ( FVs) representing a bilateral average activity, referred to a resting period, in ? (13-30 Hz) and ? (30-49 Hz) bands. Activity in these bands may point to a connection between music preference and emotional arousal phenomena. Furthermore, HHS-based FVs were found to be robust against noise corruption. The outcomes of this study provide early evidence and pave the way for the development of a generalized brain computer interface for music preference recognition. PMID:23033323

Hadjidimitriou, Stelios K; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J

2012-12-01

275

Detection of transient, regional cardiac repolarization alternans by time-frequency analysis of synthetic electrograms.  

PubMed

Repolarization alternans (RA), originating at the cellular level, is thought to produce an arrhythmogenic substrate, and surface ECG T-wave alternans (TWA) is a marker of risk for sudden cardiac death. In this paper we study RA in the unipolar electrograms (EGM), which represent the electrical activity of the heart at the tissue level. We first describe a simple analytical model to study how RA, simulated as alternating variations of action potential duration, affects EGM-TWA, and then we propose a novel methodology based on time-frequency analysis to detect EGM-TWA which occurs intermittently in few consecutive beats. In a simulation study, we used a 257-node whole heart model to reproduce several patterns of RA. RA involved specific subsets of adjacent nodes (11, 65 and 257), exhibited different amplitudes (0.25, 0.5 and 1 ms) and lasted for 40 consecutive beats of a 80-beat-long test sequence. Results show a relationship between the spatial distribution of RA and EGM-TWA: the smaller the region where RA occurs, the higher the extent of EGM-TWA. With the proposed methodology, we localized those portions of myocardium which exhibited EGM-TWA with an accuracy higher than 90%. PMID:24110552

Orini, Michele; Hanson, Ben; Taggart, Peter; Lambiase, Pier

2013-01-01

276

Tuning time-frequency methods for the detection of metered HF speech  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Speech is metered if the stresses occur at a nearly regular rate. Metered speech is common in poetry, and it can occur naturally in speech, if the speaker is spelling a word or reciting words or numbers from a list. In radio communications, the CQ request, call sign and other codes are frequently metered. In tactical communications and air traffic control, location, heading and identification codes may be metered. Moreover metering may be expected to survive even in HF communications, which are corrupted by noise, interference and mistuning. For this environment, speech recognition and conventional machine-based methods are not effective. We describe Time-Frequency methods which have been adapted successfully to the problem of mitigation of HF signal conditions and detection of metered speech. These methods are based on modeled time and frequency correlation properties of nearly harmonic functions. We derive these properties and demonstrate a performance gain over conventional correlation and spectral methods. Finally, in addressing the problem of HF single sideband (SSB) communications, the problems of carrier mistuning, interfering signals, such as manual Morse, and fast automatic gain control (AGC) must be addressed. We demonstrate simple methods which may be used to blindly mitigate mistuning and narrowband interference, and effectively invert the fast automatic gain function.

Nelson, Douglas J.; Smith, Lawrence H.

2002-12-01

277

Evaluation of the importance of time-frequency contributions to speech intelligibility in noise.  

PubMed

Recent studies on binary masking techniques make the assumption that each time-frequency (T-F) unit contributes an equal amount to the overall intelligibility of speech. The present study demonstrated that the importance of each T-F unit to speech intelligibility varies in accordance with speech content. Specifically, T-F units are categorized into two classes, speech-present T-F units and speech-absent T-F units. Results indicate that the importance of each speech-present T-F unit to speech intelligibility is highly related to the loudness of its target component, while the importance of each speech-absent T-F unit varies according to the loudness of its masker component. Two types of mask errors are also considered, which include miss and false alarm errors. Consistent with previous work, false alarm errors are shown to be more harmful to speech intelligibility than miss errors when the mixture signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is below 0?dB. However, the relative importance between the two types of error is conditioned on the SNR level of the input speech signal. Based on these observations, a mask-based objective measure, the loudness weighted hit-false, is proposed for predicting speech intelligibility. The proposed objective measure shows significantly higher correlation with intelligibility compared to two existing mask-based objective measures. PMID:24815280

Yu, Chengzhu; Wójcicki, Kamil K; Loizou, Philipos C; Hansen, John H L; Johnson, Michael T

2014-05-01

278

Time-frequency analysis of vibrotactile driving responses by matching pursuit.  

PubMed

A new method of time-frequency analysis, based on the Matching Pursuit (MP) algorithm, was used to extract and quantify EEG 'driving' or frequency-following responses produced in human primary somatosensory cortex (SI) by 33 Hz vibrotactile stimulation of the right index fingertip in a single subject. EEG signals were recorded from a 5 x 5 array of electrodes centered over the left hand area, time-locked to repeated presentations of four vibratory stimulus amplitudes. The MP algorithm was used to decompose the edited and and filtered EEG signals into waveforms selected from a large and redundant dictionary. Statistical discrimination of the vibratory stimulus amplitudes was then readily achieved in terms of trial-by-trial measures of response amplitude constructed in automated fashion from the calculated MP parameters. The results were orderly and physiologically coherent, and potentially open the way to correlation of psychophysical magnitude estimates with measures of neurophysiological response on a trial-by-trial basis. The approach developed here appears well suited to detection and characterisation of time dependent or transient target signals embedded in a noisy background. PMID:9696317

Zygierewicz, J; Kelly, E F; Blinowska, K J; Durka, P J; Folger, S E

1998-06-01

279

Automated extraction and classification of time-frequency contours in humpback vocalizations.  

PubMed

A time-frequency contour extraction and classification algorithm was created to analyze humpback whale vocalizations. The algorithm automatically extracted contours of whale vocalization units by searching for gray-level discontinuities in the spectrogram images. The unit-to-unit similarity was quantified by cross-correlating the contour lines. A library of distinctive humpback units was then generated by applying an unsupervised, cluster-based learning algorithm. The purpose of this study was to provide a fast and automated feature selection tool to describe the vocal signatures of animal groups. This approach could benefit a variety of applications such as species description, identification, and evolution of song structures. The algorithm was tested on humpback whale song data recorded at various locations in Hawaii from 2002 to 2003. Results presented in this paper showed low probability of false alarm (0%-4%) under noisy environments with small boat vessels and snapping shrimp. The classification algorithm was tested on a controlled set of 30 units forming six unit types, and all the units were correctly classified. In a case study on humpback data collected in the Auau Chanel, Hawaii, in 2002, the algorithm extracted 951 units, which were classified into 12 distinctive types. PMID:23297903

Ou, Hui; Au, Whitlow W L; Zurk, Lisa M; Lammers, Marc O

2013-01-01

280

Optical phase noise from atmospheric fluctuations and its impact on optical time-frequency transfer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The time of flight for a laser beam through the atmosphere will fluctuate as the path-averaged index of refraction varies with atmospheric turbulence, air temperature, and pressure. We measure these fluctuations by transmitting optical pulses from a frequency comb across a 2-km horizontal path and detecting variations in their time of flight through linear optical sampling. This technique is capable of continuous measurements, with femtosecond resolution, over time scales of many hours despite turbulence-induced signal fading. The power spectral density for the time of flight, or equivalently for the optical phase, follows a simple power-law response of ?f-2.3 measured down to Fourier frequencies, f, of 100 ?Hz. There is no evidence of a roll-off at low frequencies associated with an outer scale for turbulence. Both of these results depart from the predictions of turbulence theory, but are consistent with some other results in the literature. We discuss the implications for the stability and accuracy of one-way optical time-frequency transfer.

Sinclair, L. C.; Giorgetta, F. R.; Swann, W. C.; Baumann, E.; Coddington, I.; Newbury, N. R.

2014-02-01

281

A time-frequency method for multiple fault detection in three-phase induction machines  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is well known that induction machine stator current is a nonstationary signal and its properties change with respect to operating conditions. The computed spectrum using the fast Fourier transform (FFT) does not provide accurate time-domain information about the operating conditions. As a result, the FFT spectrum analysis makes difficult to recognize fault conditions from the normal operation of the

K. Bacha; M. Gossa; H. Henao; G. A. Capolino

2005-01-01

282

Adaptive multicarrier modulation: a convenient framework for time-frequency processing in wireless communications  

Microsoft Academic Search

A historical perspective of orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) is given with reference to its literature. Its advantages and disadvantages are reviewed, and its performance is characterized over highly dispersive channels. The effects of both time- and frequency-domain synchronization errors are quantified, and a range of solutions proposed in the recent literature are reviewed. One of the main objectives of this

THOMAS KELLER; LAJOS HANZO

2000-01-01

283

Kernel design for time-frequency signal analysis using the Radon transform  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors present a kernel design technique based on using the Radon transform of the modulus of the ambiguity function of the signal for determination of angles and distances of radially distributed contents of the autoterms in the ambiguity domain. The proposed kernel effectively reduces the cross-terms and noise for linear FM signals. The result is a tool for high-resolution

B. Ristic; B. Boashash

1993-01-01

284

Condition monitoring of wooden railway sleepers using time-frequency techniques and pattern classification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Railway sleepers are a key engineering element of all railways. Lack of much sophistication in monitoring railway sleepers makes it a key problem within the rail transportation domain. Current day condition monitoring applications involving wooden railway sleepers are mostly carried out through visual inspection and if necessary some impact acoustic examination is carried out. Decision making is largely based on

Siril Yella; Samira Ghiamati; Marc Dougherty

2009-01-01

285

Non-identical smoothing operators for estimating time-frequency interdependence in electrophysiological recordings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Synchronization of neural activity from distant parts of the brain is crucial for the coordination of cognitive activities. Because neural synchronization varies both in time and frequency, time-frequency (T-F) coherence is commonly employed to assess interdependences in electrophysiological recordings. T-F coherence entails smoothing the cross and power spectra to ensure statistical consistency of the estimate, which reduces its T-F resolution. This trade-off has been described in detail when the cross and power spectra are smoothed using identical smoothing operators, which may yield spurious coherent frequencies. In this article, we examine the use of non-identical smoothing operators for the estimation of T-F interdependence, i.e., phase synchronization is characterized by phase locking between signals captured by the cross spectrum and we may hence improve the trade-off by selectively smoothing the auto spectra. We first show that the frequency marginal density of the present estimate is bound within [0,1] when using non-identical smoothing operators. An analytic calculation of the bias and variance of present estimators is performed and compared with the bias and variance of standard T-F coherence using Monte Carlo simulations. We then test the use of non-identical smoothing operators on simulated data, whose T-F properties are known through construction. Finally, we analyze empirical data from eyes-closed surface electroencephalography recorded in human subjects to investigate alpha-band synchronization. These analyses show that selectively smoothing the auto spectra reduces the bias of the estimator and may improve the detection of T-F interdependence in electrophysiological data at high temporal resolution.

Mehrkanoon, Saeid; Breakspear, Michael; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Boonstra, Tjeerd W.

2013-12-01

286

A comparative study on hydrocarbon detection using three EMD-based time-frequency analysis methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to strong heterogeneity of marine carbonate reservoir, seismic signals become more complex, thus, it is very difficult for hydrocarbon detection. In hydrocarbon reservoir, there usually exist some changes in seismic wave energy and frequency. In their instantaneous spectrums there often exist such phenomena that show the characteristics of attenuation of high frequency energy and enhancement of low-frequency energy. The three EMD-based time-frequency analysis methods' instantaneous spectra all have certain oil and gas detection capability. In this paper, we introduced the Normalized Hilbert Transform (NHT) and a new method named the HU method for hydrocarbon detection. The model results in the Jingbian Gas Field which is located in the eastern Ordos Basin, China, show that NHT and HU methods can be adopted. They also detect the gas-bearing reservoir efficiently as the HHT method does. The three EMD-based methods, that is, the Hilbert-Huang transformation (HHT) and NHT and HU methods, were respectively applied to analyze the seismic data from the Jingbian Gas Field. Firstly, the seismic signals were decomposed into a finite number of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by empirical mode decomposition (EMD) method. The second IMF signal (IMF2) of the original seismic section better indicates the distribution of the reservoir. Information on hydrocarbon-bearing reservoir is mainly in IMF2. Secondly, the HHT, NHT and HU methods were respectively used to obtain different frequency division sections from IMF2. Hydrocarbon detection was realized from the energy distribution of the different frequency division sections with these three EMD-based methods. The practical application results show that the three EMD-based methods can all be employed to hydrocarbon detection. Frequency division section of IMF2 using NHT method was better for the seismic data from the Jingbian Gas Field than when using the HHT method and HU method.

Xue, Ya-juan; Cao, Jun-xing; Tian, Ren-fei

2013-02-01

287

Astrophysically motivated time frequency clustering for burst gravitational wave search: application to TAMA300 data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have developed a method of 'time frequency (TF) clustering' to find burst gravitational waves for TAMA data analysis. The TF clustering method on the sonogram (spectrogram) shows some characteristics of short-duration signals. Burst gravitational waveforms from stellar-core collapse of supernovae that are predicted by Dimmelmeier et al [1, 2] (DFM waveforms) have short durations on the order of 10 ms and have a large spike and ringing tail in time series. On the other hand, typical detector instrumental noise transients of the same timescale have different waveforms as like as simpler spikes. Since the numerically predicted waveforms may not be reliable given conditions and model dependency, using one search algorithm is not robust to differentiate gravitational waves from instrumental noises. Our proposal for performing the separation is to compare many parameters of the cluster that represent the signal waveform. This approach will be useful for cases when the difference between gravitational waves and noise is not clear for one parameter. We employ TF clustering to represent the waveform characteristics. We calculated the parameters of each respective cluster, such as the magnitude and the Nth momentum around the center of a power distribution of the cluster. Using these parameters, we can efficiently identify some predicted gravitational waveforms and can exclude the TAMA detector's typical unstable spike-like noises due to the instruments. Our selection criteria for TF cluster shape parameters achieved an average efficiency of roughly 50% for injected DFM waveforms of h_rss\\sim 2 \\times 10^{-20}\\; {Hz^{-1/2}} (source distance of 350 pc) with false alarm rate of ~1 Hz. In addition, the false alarm rate for larger noises, such as SNR > 100, is improved 10-fold by applying the selection criteria for TF cluster parameters.

Honda, Ryota; Yamagishi, Shougo; Kanda, Nobuyuki; TAMA Collaboration

2008-09-01

288

Feature extraction from parametric time-frequency representations for heart murmur detection.  

PubMed

The detection of murmurs from phonocardiographic recordings is an interesting problem that has been addressed before using a wide variety of techniques. In this context, this article explores the capabilities of an enhanced time-frequency representation (TFR) based on a time-varying autoregressive model. The parametric technique is used to compute the TFR of the signal, which serves as a complete characterization of the process. Parametric TFRs contain a large quantity of data, including redundant and irrelevant information. In order to extract the most relevant features from TFRs, two specific approaches for dimensionality reduction are presented: feature extraction by linear decomposition, and tiling partition of the t-f plane. In the first approach, the feature extraction was carried out by means of eigenplane-based PCA and PLS techniques. Likewise, a regular partition and a refined Quadtree partition of the t-f plane were tested for the tiled-TFR approach. As a result, the feature extraction methodology presented, which searches for the most relevant information immersed on the TFR, has demonstrated to be very effective. The features extracted were used to feed a simple k-nn classifier. The experiments were carried out using 45 phonocardiographic recordings (26 normal and 19 records with murmurs), segmented to extract 548 representative individual beats. The results using these methods point out that better accuracy and flexibility can be accomplished to represent non-stationary PCG signals, showing evidences of improvement with respect to other approaches found in the literature. The best accuracy obtained was 99.06 +/- 0.06%, evidencing high performance and stability. Because of its effectiveness and simplicity of implementation, the proposed methodology can be used as a simple diagnostic tool for primary health-care purposes. PMID:20517648

Avendaño-Valencia, L D; Godino-Llorente, J I; Blanco-Velasco, M; Castellanos-Dominguez, G

2010-08-01

289

Using wavelets to decompose the time frequency effects of monetary policy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Central banks have different objectives in the short and long run. Governments operate simultaneously at different timescales. Many economic processes are the result of the actions of several agents, who have different term objectives. Therefore, a macroeconomic time series is a combination of components operating on different frequencies. Several questions about economic time series are connected to the understanding of the behavior of key variables at different frequencies over time, but this type of information is difficult to uncover using pure time-domain or pure frequency-domain methods. To our knowledge, for the first time in an economic setup, we use cross-wavelet tools to show that the relation between monetary policy variables and macroeconomic variables has changed and evolved with time. These changes are not homogeneous across the different frequencies.

Aguiar-Conraria, Luís; Azevedo, Nuno; Soares, Maria Joana

2008-05-01

290

Study of the time-frequency characteristics of continuous gravity data sequence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The continuous gravity measurements contained much valuable signal which was maybe caused by internal and external change of the Earth, which offered abundant information to study activities of the Earth. In the past decades, researchers mostly focused on discussing the relationship between the gravity variation and geodynamical processes. Here we studied the temporal variation of the gravity field through the continuous gravity records. Our goal was to detect certain geophysical signal on the order of a few tens of micro-Gal from the gravity data sequence. The gravity data sequences were recorded by the Scintrex g-Phone relative gravimeters those were located at the numerous observation stations of mainland China which had well-controlled observation systems. We presented a two-step procedure to study the signal of gravity variation. Firstly, we developed a Linear Similarity filtering technique which could reduce the drift of gravity instrument effectively by using two relative gravimeters at the same station by the reason of the short-term liner drift feature of gravimeters. Based on the method above, we gained non-tidal gravity variation more accurate that contained much geophysical signal which was associated with geodynamical phenomena. Secondly, we employed the time-frequency analysis techniques to analyze the feature of different temporal variation signal and tried to find some periodic and non-periodic characteristics of the continuous gravity data sequence. Moreover, we compared the results to the mobile repeated gravity measurements on ground and acquired the spatial and temporal gravity variation at last. We also expected to find some anomaly signal related to the activities of tectogenesis and fault movement prior to the destructive earthquakes from the continuous gravity data sequence. Acknowledgment: We acknowledge the financial support of the Basic Scientific Research Foundation of Institute of Geophysics CEA (DQJB12B20, DQJB12C03 and DQJB12B14), the Scientific and Technological Support Foundation of CEA (2012BAK19B01-05-02) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41104046).

Weimin, X.; Shi, C.; Lei, S.; Hongyan, L.

2013-12-01

291

A multivariate, spatiotemporal analysis of electromagnetic time-frequency data of recognition memory.  

PubMed

Electromagnetic indices of "fast" (above 12 Hz) oscillating brain activity are much more likely to be considerably attenuated by time-averaging across multiple trials than "slow" (below 12 Hz) oscillating brain activity. To the extent that both types of oscillations represent the activity of temporally and topographically separable neural populations, time averaging can cause a loss of brain activity information that is important both conceptually and for multimodal integration with hemodynamic techniques. To address this issue for recognition memory, simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of explicit word recognition from 11 healthy subjects were analyzed in two different ways. First, the time course of neural oscillations ranging from theta (4.5 Hz) to gamma (42 Hz) frequencies were identified using single-trial continuous wavelet transforms. Second, traditional analyses of amplitude variations of time-averaged EEG and MEG signals, event-related potentials (ERPs), and fields (ERFs) were performed and submitted to distributed source analyses. To identify data patterns that covaried with the difference between correctly recognized studied (old) words and correctly rejected nonstudied (new) words, a multivariate statistical tool, partial least squares (PLS), was applied to both types of analyses. The results show that ERPs and ERFs are mainly displaying those neural indices of recognition memory that oscillate in the theta (4.5-7.5 Hz), alpha (8-11.5), and to some extent in the beta1 (12-19.5 Hz) frequency range. The sources of the ERPs/ERFs were in good agreement with the topography of theta/alpha/beta 1 oscillations in being confined to the anterior temporal lobe at 400 ms and being distributed across temporal, parietal, and occipital areas between 500 and 700 ms. Gamma oscillations covaried either positively or negatively with theta/alpha/beta1 oscillations. A positive covariance, for instance, was detected over left anterior temporal sensors as early as 200-350 ms and is compatible with studies in rodents showing that gamma and theta oscillations emerge together out of the interaction of the hippocampus and the entorhinal and perirhinal cortices. Fast beta oscillations (20-29.5 Hz), on the other hand, did not strongly covary with slow oscillations and were likely to arise from neural populations not adequately represented in ERPs/ERFs. In summary, by providing a more comprehensive description of electromagnetic signals, time-frequency data are of potential benefit for integrating electrophysiological and hemodynamic indices of brain activity and also for integrating human and animal electrophysiology. PMID:12595175

Düzel, E; Habib, R; Schott, B; Schoenfeld, A; Lobaugh, N; McIntosh, A R; Scholz, M; Heinze, H J

2003-02-01

292

Pg-pPg Time Delays from Sparse Networks Using the Time-Frequency Correlation Method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The arrival times of primary phases generally produce poor estimates of focal depth, particularly for shallow events. While depth phases may be detected at teleseismic distances, no reliable methods currently exist for identifying regional depth phase time delays, such as Pg-pPg. Scattering from crustal heterogeneities obscures the Pg-pPg time delay by producing multiplicative noise within the Pg time window. The theory of Time Reversed Acoustics (TRA) states that the autocorrelation of Pg time windows produces a clear sidelobe at the Pg-pPg time delay. Using large Pg time windows (i.e. including more scattering) and stacking the autocorrelations from an array of receivers improves the reconstruction of the sidelobe at the Pg-pPg time delay. In this paper, we expand the TRA concept to develop the Time-Frequency Correlation (TFC) method for measuring Pg-pPg time delays, which incorporates signal-processing techniques used in Sonar and Radar applications. The TFC method applies a 2D correlation function in time delay and frequency delay to the analytic representation of each Pg time window. Stacking the 2D correlation functions better identifies the sidelobe at the Pg-pPg time delay. Tests of the TFC method on synthetic Pg time windows provide guidance in detecting the Pg-pPg time delays for events with different source time functions, focal depths, and scattering distributions. We apply the TFC method to measure Pg-pPg time delays for 33 local earthquakes from the Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC) catalog. We include only catalog events with the most accurate locations ('A'), catalog depths between 2 and 16 km (±2 km), and magnitudes between 3.0 and 6.0. For each event, the TFC method uses a station array that is sparse (N < 20), narrow aperture (?? < 90°), and located greater than 300 km from the catalog epicenter. The Pg-pPg time delays are converted to focal depths assuming vertical propagation within the SCEDC 3D model at each event's epicenter. In general, the focal depths from the TFC method are strongly correlated with the catalog depths (R2 ~ 0.9).

Pearce, F.; Lu, R.; Toksoz, M. N.

2008-12-01

293

Early Detection of Alzheimer's Disease by Blind Source Separation, Time Frequency Representation, and Bump Modeling of EEG Signals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The early detection Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an important chal- lenge. In this paper, we propose a novel method for early detection of AD using electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings: first a blind source separation algo- rithm is applied to extract the most significant spatio-temporal components; these components are subsequently wavelet transformed; the resulting time- frequency representation is approximated by sparse \\

François B. Vialatte; Andrzej Cichocki; Gérard Dreyfus; Toshimitsu Musha; Sergei L. Shishkin; Rémi Gervais

2005-01-01

294

An adaptive statistical time-frequency method for detection of broken bars and bearing faults in motors using stator current  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is well known that motor current is a nonstationary signal, the properties of which vary with respect to the time-varying normal operating conditions of the motor. As a result, Fourier analysis makes it difficult to recognize fault conditions from the normal operating conditions of the motor. Time-frequency analysis, on the other hand, unambiguously represents the motor current which makes

B. Yazici; G. B. Kliman

1999-01-01

295

Joint Problems  

MedlinePLUS

... ankles and toes. Other types of arthritis include gout or pseudogout. Sometimes, there is a mechanical problem ... for more information on osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and gout. How Common are Joint Problems? Osteoarthritis, which affects ...

296

Signal Existence Verification (SEV) for GPS Low Received Power Signal Detection Using the Time-Frequency Approach  

PubMed Central

The detection of low received power of global positioning system (GPS) signals in the signal acquisition process is an important issue for GPS applications. Improving the miss-detection problem of low received power signal is crucial, especially for urban or indoor environments. This paper proposes a signal existence verification (SEV) process to detect and subsequently verify low received power GPS signals. The SEV process is based on the time-frequency representation of GPS signal, and it can capture the characteristic of GPS signal in the time-frequency plane to enhance the GPS signal acquisition performance. Several simulations and experiments are conducted to show the effectiveness of the proposed method for low received power signal detection. The contribution of this work is that the SEV process is an additional scheme to assist the GPS signal acquisition process in low received power signal detection, without changing the original signal acquisition or tracking algorithms.

Jan, Shau-Shiun; Sun, Chih-Cheng

2010-01-01

297

Point process time-frequency analysis of dynamic respiratory patterns during meditation practice.  

PubMed

Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is largely mediated by the autonomic nervous system through its modulating influence on the heart beats. We propose a robust algorithm for quantifying instantaneous RSA as applied to heart beat intervals and respiratory recordings under dynamic breathing patterns. The blood volume pressure-derived heart beat series (pulse intervals, PIs) are modeled as an inverse Gaussian point process, with the instantaneous mean PI modeled as a bivariate regression incorporating both past PIs and respiration values observed at the beats. A point process maximum likelihood algorithm is used to estimate the model parameters, and instantaneous RSA is estimated via a frequency domain transfer function evaluated at instantaneous respiratory frequency where high coherence between respiration and PIs is observed. The model is statistically validated using Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit analysis, as well as independence tests. The algorithm is applied to subjects engaged in meditative practice, with distinctive dynamics in the respiration patterns elicited as a result. The presented analysis confirms the ability of the algorithm to track important changes in cardiorespiratory interactions elicited during meditation, otherwise not evidenced in control resting states, reporting statistically significant increase in RSA gain as measured by our paradigm. PMID:22350435

Kodituwakku, Sandun; Lazar, Sara W; Indic, Premananda; Chen, Zhe; Brown, Emery N; Barbieri, Riccardo

2012-03-01

298

Point process time-frequency analysis of respiratory sinus arrhythmia under altered respiration dynamics.  

PubMed

Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is largely mediated by the autonomic nervous system through its modulating influence on the heartbeat. We propose an algorithm for quantifying instantaneous RSA as applied to heart beat interval and respiratory recordings under dynamic respiration conditions. The blood volume pressure derived heart beat series (pulse intervals, PI) are modeled as an inverse gaussian point process, with the instantaneous mean PI modeled as a bivariate regression incorporating both past PI and respiration values observed at the beats. A point process maximum likelihood algorithm is used to estimate the model parameters, and instantaneous RSA is estimated by a frequency domain transfer function approach. The model is statistically validated using Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) goodness-of-fit analysis, as well as independence tests. The algorithm is applied to subjects engaged in meditative practice, with distinctive dynamics in the respiration patterns elicited as a result. Experimental results confirm the ability of the algorithm to track important changes in cardiorespiratory interactions elicited during meditation, otherwise not evidenced in control resting states. PMID:21096135

Kodituwakku, Sandun; Lazar, Sara W; Indic, Premananda; Brown, Emery N; Barbieri, Riccardo

2010-01-01

299

Time-frequency analysis of the heart-rate variability during physical and physical-pharmacological tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the time-frequency analysis of the heart-rate variability (HRV) during the tilt test, the Valsalva maneuver, and controlled breathing. The tests were carried out both with and without dicyclomine hydrochloride which is an anticholinergic drug. In this paper, the authors employ the short-time Fourier transform (STFT), the Wigner-Ville distribution (WD), and Choi-Williams distribution (CWD) to characterize the HRV.

Mohammed Dehkordi; Abbas Erfanian; Abbas Foroutan

1999-01-01

300

Application of time–frequency entropy method based on Hilbert–Huang transform to gear fault diagnosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

When faults occur in the gear, energy distribution of gear vibration signals measured in time–frequency plane would be different from the distribution under the normal state. Therefore, it is possible to detect a fault by comparing the energy distribution of gear vibration signals with and without fault conditions. Hilbert–Huang transform can offer a complete and accurate energy–frequency–time distribution. On the

Dejie Yu; Yu Yang; Junsheng Cheng

2007-01-01

301

On-Silicon Neural Activity Monitoring and Time-Frequency Analysis for Early Detection of Epileptic Seizures  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present an architecture and very-large-scale integration (VLSI) implementation of a microsystem for neural activity monitoring and time-frequency analysis. The key functional blocks of the microsystem, the integrated neural interface and the wavelet transform processor, have been prototyped in a 0.35-m standard complementary metal- oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. Its utility is vali- dated in autonomous early detection of epileptic seizures in

Joseph N. Y. Aziz; Rafal Karakiewicz; Roman Genov; Alan W. L. Chiu; Berj L. Bardakjian; Miron Derchansky; Peter L. Carlen

302

Localization and tracking for simultaneous speakers based on time-frequency method and Probability Hypothesis Density filter  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we present the two steps system of localization and tracking to work in context of simultaneous speakers. The localization algorithm is based on time-frequency method which uses an array of three microphones and it enables to locate multiple sound sources in a single time-frame. Localization results with missing detection and clutter are post-processed by the Probability Hypothesis

Quang Nguyen; JongSuk Choi

2011-01-01

303

Comparative analysis of time-frequency methods estimating the time-varying microstructure of sleep EEG spindles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parameter estimation for an assumed sleep EEG spindle model (AM-FM signal) is performed by using four time-frequency analysis methods. Results from simulated as well as from real data are presented. In simulated data, the Hilbert Transform-based method has the lowest average percentage error but produces considerable signal distortion. The Complex Demodulation and the Matching Pursuit-based methods have error rates below

P. Xanthopoulos; S. Golemati; V. Sakkalis; P. Y. Ktonas; M. D. Ortigueira; M. Zervakis; T. Paparrigopoulos; H. Tsekou; C. R. Soldatos

304

Estimation of Respiratory Rate From ECG, Photoplethysmogram, and Piezoelectric Pulse Transducer Signals: A Comparative Study of Time–Frequency Methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

We compare the performance of two different time-frequency-based breathing rate (BR) detection algorithms when used on three different physiological signals: the ECG, the photoplethysmogram (PPG), and the piezoelectric pulse transducer (PZO) signal. Studies carried out over the past have shown the existence of amplitude and\\/or FMs due to respiration in physiological signals, such as those mentioned. In a recent study,

Shishir Dash; Kirk H. Shelley; David G. Silverman; Ki H. Chon

2010-01-01

305

A Random Walk or Color Chaos on the Stock Market? Time-Frequency Analysis of S&P Indexes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The random-walk (white-noise) model and the harmonic model are two polar models in linear systems. A model in between is color chaos, which generates irregular oscillations with a narrow frequency (color) band. Time-frequency analysis is introduced for evolutionary time-series analysis. The deterministic component from noisy data can be recovered by a time-variant filter in Gabor space. The characteristic frequency is

Ping Chen; Ilya Prigogine

1996-01-01

306

Application of time-frequency analysis to the classification of Bjork-Shiley Convexo-Concave heart valve condition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Presents the results of a time-frequency analysis of the acoustic signals generated during the closing of a Bjork-Shiley Convexo-Concave prosthetic heart valve. The objective of this analysis is to identify features in the acoustic signature to classify the heart valve condition as Intact or Single-Leg Separated (SLS). The SLS condition occurs when one of the legs of the BSCC valve

Kent Scarbrough; Rebecca S Inderbitzen

1994-01-01

307

Decomposing delta, theta, and alpha time-frequency ERP activity from a visual oddball task using PCA  

PubMed Central

Objective Time–frequency (TF) analysis has become an important tool for assessing electrical and magnetic brain activity from event-related paradigms. In electrical potential data, theta and delta activities have been shown to underlie P300 activity, and alpha has been shown to be inhibited during P300 activity. Measures of delta, theta, and alpha activity are commonly taken from TF surfaces. However, methods for extracting relevant activity do not commonly go beyond taking means of windows on the surface, analogous to measuring activity within a defined P300 window in time-only signal representations. The current objective was to use a data driven method to derive relevant TF components from event-related potential data from a large number of participants in an oddball paradigm. Methods A recently developed PCA approach was employed to extract TF components [Bernat, E. M., Williams, W. J., and Gehring, W. J. (2005). Decomposing ERP time-frequency energy using PCA. Clin Neurophysiol, 116(6), 1314–1334] from an ERP dataset of 2068 17 year olds (979 males). TF activity was taken from both individual trials and condition averages. Activity including frequencies ranging from 0 to 14 Hz and time ranging from stimulus onset to 1312.5 ms were decomposed. Results A coordinated set of time–frequency events was apparent across the decompositions. Similar TF components representing earlier theta followed by delta were extracted from both individual trials and averaged data. Alpha activity, as predicted, was apparent only when time–frequency surfaces were generated from trial level data, and was characterized by a reduction during the P300. Conclusions Theta, delta, and alpha activities were extracted with predictable time-courses. Notably, this approach was effective at characterizing data from a single-electrode. Finally, decomposition of TF data generated from individual trials and condition averages produced similar results, but with predictable differences. Specifically, trial level data evidenced more and more varied theta measures, and accounted for less overall variance.

Bernat, Edward M.; Malone, Stephen M.; Williams, William J.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Iacono, William G.

2008-01-01

308

Time-domain analysis of antennas used for EMC  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article consists of a Powerpoint presentation on time-domain analysis of antennas. The areas discussed include: time-domain antenna; time-frequency relationship; biconical dipole antenna; dual ridged horn antenna; log periodic dipole array antenna; half-wave dipole antenna; EMC and DRG antenna.

D. Camell

2008-01-01

309

Time-Frequency Transform Techniques Applied to Ultra-wideband Ground-Penetrating Radar  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Background Recently, Dauvignac et al [1] utilized a ground penetrating radar unit consisting of an exponentially tapered slot antenna (ETSA) of the Vivaldi type, connected to an Agilent vector network analyzer to obtain a densely-sampled profile in the anti-blast tunnel of LSBB (Low-Noise inter-Disciplinary Underground Science & Technology Laboratory) located in Rustrel, France. The frequency data, from 150 MHz to 2 GHz, was inverse Fourier-transformed to obtain the time dependent data. Simultaneously, the same profile was obtained using a RAMAC 500 MHz ground-penetrating radar unit. Initial comparison of both data sets was done in the time-domain. Data obtained from the ETSA will be inverted using a constrained least squares algorithm, in order that the depth-dependent permittivity can be inferred. As a quality control, the RAMAC data will also be inverted. The resulting permittivity profiles obtained in both inversions will be used to image water content over a depth of several meters. Proposed Research It is well-known, qualitatively in the ground penetrating radar literature that high frequencies appear at early times, but generally are attenuated at later times, essentially due to the skin effect. However, a signal-processing verification of this well-known result is needed. We propose to use the Stockwell or S transform [2] to determine the temporal location of frequencies in both of the foregoing datasets. The S transform, a short-time Fourier transform with a frequency-dependent window, will be described and applied to synthetic data. Then the application of the S transform to the RAMAC and ETSA data will be presented, after each data set has undergone the same pre-processing. The S transform is completely linear and preserves the phase of the data, which allows for easy interpretation of the operations of filtering, due to the linear inverse of the forward S transform. Thus the S transform is ideal for comparing the temporal distribution of frequency in these two datasets. BIBLIOGRAPHY [1] DAUVIGNAC J.-Y., N. FORTINO, G. SENECHAL, A. CRESP, M. YEDLIN, S. GAFFET, D. ROUSSET, and C. PICHOT, "Ultra-Wideband GPR Imaging of the Vaucluse Karst Aquifer", American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting 2008, Abstract #NS51A-08. [2] STOCKWELL R. G., L. MANSINHA, R. P. LOWE, "Localization of the complex spectrum: the S transform", IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, vol.44, n°4, pp 998-1001, April 1996.

Yedlin, M.; Cresp, A.; Dauviganc, J. Y.; Gaffet, S.; Sénéchal, G.; Fortino, N.; Pichot, C.; Aliferis, I.

2009-04-01

310

Large-alphabet time-frequency entangled quantum key distribution by means of time-to-frequency conversion.  

PubMed

We introduce a novel time-frequency quantum key distribution (TFQKD) scheme based on photon pairs entangled in these two conjugate degrees of freedom. The scheme uses spectral detection and phase modulation to enable measurements in the temporal basis by means of time-to-frequency conversion. This allows large-alphabet encoding to be implemented with realistic components. A general security analysis for TFQKD with binned measurements reveals a close connection with finite-dimensional QKD protocols and enables analysis of the effects of dark counts on the secure key size. PMID:23842382

Nunn, J; Wright, L J; Söller, C; Zhang, L; Walmsley, I A; Smith, B J

2013-07-01

311

CFAR detection and extraction of maneuvering air target in strong sea-clutter via time-frequency-based S-method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we present a time-frequency-based detection scheme for the high-frequency surface-wave radar (HFSWR) for the detection of maneuvering air targets in the presence of strong sea-clutter. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated using both synthetic and experimental data. In addition, the proposed time-frequency detection scheme is examined in detail with different signal-to-noise ratio and various examples are considered. The time-frequency-based detection method is then compared with the Fourier-based detector. Results clearly demonstrate that the time-frequency-based detector can significantly improve the detection performance of the HFSWR and add considerable physical insight over what can be achieved by conventional Fourier-based detector currently used by HFSWRs. These results distinctly suggest that the Fourier-based detector is optimal for stationary signals, whereas the Time-Frequency-based detector is optimal for non-stationary signals.

Thayaparan, Thayananthan; Darkovic, Milos; Stankovic, Ljubisa

2009-05-01

312

Effects of the air-sea coupling time frequency on the ocean response during Mediterranean intense events  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The near-sea surface meteorological conditions associated with the Mediterranean heavy precipitation events constitute, on a short time scale, a strong forcing on the ocean mixed layer. This study addresses the question of the optimal time frequency of the atmospheric forcing to drive an ocean model in order to make it able to capture the fine scale ocean mixed layer response to severe meteorological conditions. The coupling time frequency should allow the ocean model to reproduce the formation of internal low-salty boundary layers due to sudden input of intense precipitation, as well as the cooling and deepening of the ocean mixed layer through large latent heat fluxes and stress under the intense low-level jet associated with these events. In this study, the one-dimensional ocean model is driven by 2.4-km atmospheric simulated fields on a case of Mediterranean heavy precipitation, varying the time resolution of the atmospheric forcing. The results show that using a finer temporal resolution than 1 h for the atmospheric forcing is not necessary, but a coarser temporal resolution (3 or 6 h) modifies the event course and intensity perceived by the ocean. Consequently, when using a too coarse temporal resolution forcing, typically 6 h, the ocean model fails to reproduce the ocean mixed layer fine scale response under the heavy rainfall pulses and the strong wind gusts.

Lebeaupin Brossier, Cindy; Ducrocq, Véronique; Giordani, Hervé

2009-08-01

313

Normal and hypoacoustic infant cry signal classification using time-frequency analysis and general regression neural network.  

PubMed

Crying is the most noticeable behavior of infancy. Infant cry signals can be used to identify physical or psychological status of an infant. Recently, acoustic analysis of infant cry signal has shown promising results and it has been proven to be an excellent tool to investigate the pathological status of an infant. This paper proposes short-time Fourier transform (STFT) based time-frequency analysis of infant cry signals. Few statistical features are derived from the time-frequency plot of infant cry signals and used as features to quantify infant cry signals. General Regression Neural Network (GRNN) is employed as a classifier for discriminating infant cry signals. Two classes of infant cry signals are considered such as normal cry signals and pathological cry signals from deaf infants. To prove the reliability of the proposed features, two neural network models such as Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) and Time-Delay Neural Network (TDNN) trained by scaled conjugate gradient algorithm are also used as classifiers. The experimental results show that the GRNN classifier gives very promising classification accuracy compared to MLP and TDNN and the proposed method can effectively classify normal and pathological infant cries. PMID:21824676

Hariharan, M; Sindhu, R; Yaacob, Sazali

2012-11-01

314

Joint pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Joint pain may result from traumas or repeated microtraumas, as in sports injuries. Pain in osteoarthritis starts before any\\u000a objective finding. It has been demonstrated that in the first stages of this disease, pain is due to intraosseous venous engorgement\\u000a for the earlier thickening of the cortical bone under the articular cartilage. The mechanisms of inflammatory pain are more\\u000a complex

Massimo Zoppi; Elisabetta Beneforti

1999-01-01

315

Research on vibration response of a multi-faulted rotor system using LMD-based time-frequency representation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Unbalance, fatigue crack and rotor-stator rub are the three common and important faults in a rotor-bearing system. They are originally interconnected each other, and their vibration behaviors do often show strong nonlinear and transient characteristic, especially when more than one of them coexist in the system. This article is aimed to study the vibration response of the rotor system in presence of multiple rotor faults such as unbalance, crack, and rotor-stator rub, using local mean decomposition-based time-frequency representation. Equations of motion of the multi-faulted Jeffcott rotor, including unbalance, crack, and rub, are presented. By solving the motion equations, steady-state vibration response is obtained in presence of multiple rotor faults. As a comparison, Hilbert-Huang transformation, based on empirical mode decomposition, is also applied to analyze the multi-faults data. By the study some diagnostic recommendations are derived.

Jiao, Weidong; Qian, Suxiang; Chang, Yongping; Yang, Shixi

2012-12-01

316

Numerical determination of modal dispersion and AE signal characterization in waveguides through LBIE/BEM and time-frequency analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the present paper a meshless local boundary integral equation (LBIE) method is employed for the numerical determination of dispersion curves in plate like waveguides. Next, the LBIE method is properly combined with the boundary element method (BEM) for the characterization of acoustic emission signals derived from nucleating surface-breaking and body cracks in plate-like waveguides being in contact with a fluid. The time history of the propagating guided waves is computed by means of either the LBIE method or the hybrid LBIE/BEM scheme and the representation of mode dispersion is accomplished through the Reassigned Smoothed Pseudo Wigner-Ville time-frequency analysis. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated through representative numerical examples.

Vavourakis, V.; Protopappas, V. I. C.; Fotiadis, D.; Polyzos, D.

2009-02-01

317

Quantum logic gates in iodine vapor using time-frequency resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering: a theoretical study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a numerical investigation of the implementation of quantum logic gates through time-frequency resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (TFRCARS) in iodine vapour. A specific scheme is given whereby two qubits are encoded in the tensor product space of vibrational and rotational molecular eigenstates. Single-qubit and controlled-logic gates are applied to test the viability of this encoding scheme. Possible experimental constraints are investigated, including the necessary precision in the timing of successive CARS pulses and the minimum resolution of spectral components within a given pulse. It is found that these requirements can be satisfied by current technology. The two-qubit Grover search is performed to demonstrate the implementation of a sequence of quantum operations. The results of our simulations suggest that TFRCARS is a promising experimental system for simple quantum information processing applications.

Glenn, David R.; Lidar, Daniel A.; Ara Apkarian, V.

318

Performance analysis for time-frequency MUSIC algorithm in presence of both additive noise and array calibration errors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article deals with the application of Spatial Time-Frequency Distribution (STFD) to the direction finding problem using the Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC)algorithm. A comparative performance analysis is performed for the method under consideration with respect to that using data covariance matrix when the received array signals are subject to calibration errors in a non-stationary environment. An unified analytical expression of the Direction Of Arrival (DOA) error estimation is derived for both methods. Numerical results show the effect of the parameters intervening in the derived expression on the algorithm performance. It is particularly observed that for low Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and high Signal to sensor Perturbation Ratio (SPR) the STFD method gives better performance, while for high SNR and for the same SPR both methods give similar performance.

Khodja, Mohamed; Belouchrani, Adel; Abed-Meraim, Karim

2012-12-01

319

Affective Domain  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The affective domain can significantly enhance, inhibit or even prevent student learning. The affective domain includes factors such as student motivation, attitudes, perceptions and values. Teachers can increase their effectiveness by considering the affective domain in planning courses, delivering lectures and activities, and assessing student learning. This module contains information and resources for incorporating the affective domain into teaching.

320

Time-frequency characteristics and dynamics of sleep spindles in WAG/Rij rats with absence epilepsy.  

PubMed

In rat models of absence epilepsy, epileptic spike-wave discharges appeared in EEG spontaneously, and the incidence of epileptic activity increases with age. Spike-wave discharges and sleep spindles are known to share common thalamo-cortical mechanism, suggesting that absence seizures might affect some intrinsic properties of sleep spindles. This paper examines time-frequency EEG characteristics of anterior sleep spindles in non-epileptic Wistar and epileptic WAG/Rij rats at the age of 7 and 9 months. Considering non-stationary features of sleep spindles, EEG analysis was performed using Morlet-based continuous wavelet transform. It was found, first, that the average frequency of sleep spindles in non-epileptic Wistar rats was higher than in WAG/Rij (13.2 vs 11.2 Hz). Second, the instantaneous frequency ascended during a spindle event in Wistar rats, but it was constant in WAG/Rij. Third, in WAG/Rij rats, the number and duration of epileptic discharges increased in a period between 7 and 9 months of age, but duration and mean value of intra-spindle frequency did not change. In general, age-dependent aggravation of absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats did not affect EEG properties of sleep spindles; it was suggested that pro-epileptic changes in thalamo-cortical network in WAG/Rij rats might prevent dynamic changes of sleep spindles that were detected in Wistar. PMID:24231550

Sitnikova, Evgenia; Hramov, Alexander E; Grubov, Vadim; Koronovsky, Alexey A

2014-01-16

321

Space-time-frequency analysis of EEG data using within-subject statistical tests followed by sequential PCA.  

PubMed

A new method is developed for analyzing the time-varying spectral content of EEG data collected in cognitive tasks. The goal is to extract and summarize the most salient features of numerical results, which span space, time, frequency, task conditions, and multiple subjects. Direct generalization of an established approach for analyzing event-related potentials, which uses sequential PCA followed by ANOVA to test for differences between conditions across subjects, gave unacceptable results. The new method, termed STAT-PCA, advocates statistical testing for differences between conditions within single subjects, followed by sequential PCA across subjects. In contrast to PCA-ANOVA, it is demonstrated that STAT-PCA gives results which: 1) isolate task-related spectral changes, 2) are insensitive to the precise definition of baseline power, 3) are stable under deletion of a random subject, and 4) are interpretable in terms of the group-averaged power. Furthermore, STAT-PCA permits the detection of activity that is not only different between conditions, but also common to both conditions, providing a complete yet parsimonious view of the data. It is concluded that STAT-PCA is well suited for analyzing the time-varying spectral content of EEG during cognitive tasks. PMID:18992350

Ferree, Thomas C; Brier, Matthew R; Hart, John; Kraut, Michael A

2009-03-01

322

Recognition of speech in noise after application of time-frequency masks: Dependence on frequency and threshold parameters  

PubMed Central

Binary time-frequency (TF) masks can be applied to separate speech from noise. Previous studies have shown that with appropriate parameters, ideal TF masks can extract highly intelligible speech even at very low speech-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Two psychophysical experiments provided additional information about the dependence of intelligibility on the frequency resolution and threshold criteria that define the ideal TF mask. Listeners identified AzBio Sentences in noise, before and after application of TF masks. Masks generated with 8 or 16 frequency bands per octave supported nearly-perfect identification. Word recognition accuracy was slightly lower and more variable with 4 bands per octave. When TF masks were generated with a local threshold criterion of 0?dB SNR, the mean speech reception threshold was ?9.5?dB SNR, compared to ?5.7?dB for unprocessed sentences in noise. Speech reception thresholds decreased by about 1?dB per dB of additional decrease in the local threshold criterion. Information reported here about the dependence of speech intelligibility on frequency and level parameters has relevance for the development of non-ideal TF masks for clinical applications such as speech processing for hearing aids.

Sinex, Donal G.

2013-01-01

323

Time-Frequency and ERP Analyses of EEG to Characterize Anticipatory Postural Adjustments in a Bimanual Load-Lifting Task  

PubMed Central

Anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) compensate in advance for the destabilizing effect of a movement. This study investigated the specific involvement of each primary motor cortex (M1) during a bimanual load-lifting task in which subjects were required to maintain a stable forearm position during voluntary unloading. Kinematics, electromyographic, and electroencephalographic (EEG) data were recorded in eight right-handed healthy subjects lifting a load placed on their left forearm. Two EEG analyses were performed: a time–frequency (TF) analysis and an event-related potential (ERP) analysis. The TF analysis revealed a mean power decrease in the mu rhythm over the left and right M1 concomitant with lifting onset. Each decrease showed specific features: over the right M1, contralateral to the postural forearm, there was a steeper slope and a greater amplitude than over the left M1. Although a mu rhythm desynchronization has until now been the signature of cortical activity related to a motor component, we show that it can also be related to postural stabilization. We discuss the involvement of the mu rhythm desynchronization over the postural M1 in the high temporal precision enabling efficient APAs. ERP analysis showed a negative wave over the left M1 and a concomitant positive wave over the right M1. While the negative wave classically reflects M1 recruitment related to the forthcoming lifting, the novelty here is that the positive wave reflects the transmission of inhibitory commands toward the postural forearm.

Barlaam, Fanny; Descoins, Mederic; Bertrand, Olivier; Hasbroucq, Thierry; Vidal, Franck; Assaiante, Christine; Schmitz, Christina

2011-01-01

324

Increasing sensitivity in the measurement of heart rate variability: the method of non-stationary RR time-frequency analysis.  

PubMed

A novel method of the time-frequency analysis of non-stationary heart rate variability (HRV) is developed which introduces the fragmentary spectrum as a measure that brings together the frequency content, timing and duration of HRV segments. The fragmentary spectrum is calculated by the similar basis function algorithm. This numerical tool of the time to frequency and frequency to time Fourier transformations accepts both uniform and non-uniform sampling intervals, and is applicable to signal segments of arbitrary length. Once the fragmentary spectrum is calculated, the inverse transform recovers the original signal and reveals accuracy of spectral estimates. Numerical experiments show that discontinuities at the boundaries of the succession of inter-beat intervals can cause unacceptable distortions of the spectral estimates. We have developed a measure that we call the "RR deltagram" as a form of the HRV data that minimises spectral errors. The analysis of the experimental HRV data from real-life and controlled breathing conditions suggests transient oscillatory components as functionally meaningful elements of highly complex and irregular patterns of HRV. PMID:22306071

Melkonian, D; Korner, A; Meares, R; Bahramali, H

2012-10-01

325

Timing, Frequency and Environmental Conditions Associated with Mainstem-Tributary Movement by a Lowland River Fish, Golden Perch (Macquaria ambigua)  

PubMed Central

Tributary and mainstem connections represent important links for the movement of fish and other biota throughout river networks. We investigated the timing, frequency and environmental conditions associated with movements by adult golden perch (Macquaria ambigua) between the mainstem of the mid-Murray River and a tributary, the Goulburn River, in south-eastern Australia, using acoustic telemetry over four years (2007–2011). Fish were tagged and released in autumn 2007–2009 in the mid-Murray (n?=?42) and lower Goulburn (n?=?37) rivers within 3–6 km of the mid-Murray-lower Goulburn junction. 38% of tagged fish undertook mainstem–tributary movements, characterised mostly by temporary occupation followed by return of fish to the original capture river. Approximately 10% of tagged fish exhibited longer-term shifts between the mainstem and tributary. Movement of fish from the tributary into the mainstem occurred primarily during the spawning season and in some years coincided with the presence of golden perch eggs/larvae in drift samples in the mainstem. Many of the tributary-to-mainstem movements occurred during or soon after changes in flow. The movements of fish from the mainstem into the tributary were irregular and did not appear to be associated with spawning. The findings show that golden perch moved freely across the mainstem–tributary interface. This demonstrates the need to consider the spatial, behavioural and demographic interdependencies of aquatic fauna across geographic management units such as rivers.

Koster, Wayne M.; Dawson, David R.; O'Mahony, Damien J.; Moloney, Paul D.; Crook, David A.

2014-01-01

326

Timing, Frequency and Environmental Conditions Associated with Mainstem-Tributary Movement by a Lowland River Fish, Golden Perch (Macquaria ambigua).  

PubMed

Tributary and mainstem connections represent important links for the movement of fish and other biota throughout river networks. We investigated the timing, frequency and environmental conditions associated with movements by adult golden perch (Macquaria ambigua) between the mainstem of the mid-Murray River and a tributary, the Goulburn River, in south-eastern Australia, using acoustic telemetry over four years (2007-2011). Fish were tagged and released in autumn 2007-2009 in the mid-Murray (n?=?42) and lower Goulburn (n?=?37) rivers within 3-6 km of the mid-Murray-lower Goulburn junction. 38% of tagged fish undertook mainstem-tributary movements, characterised mostly by temporary occupation followed by return of fish to the original capture river. Approximately 10% of tagged fish exhibited longer-term shifts between the mainstem and tributary. Movement of fish from the tributary into the mainstem occurred primarily during the spawning season and in some years coincided with the presence of golden perch eggs/larvae in drift samples in the mainstem. Many of the tributary-to-mainstem movements occurred during or soon after changes in flow. The movements of fish from the mainstem into the tributary were irregular and did not appear to be associated with spawning. The findings show that golden perch moved freely across the mainstem-tributary interface. This demonstrates the need to consider the spatial, behavioural and demographic interdependencies of aquatic fauna across geographic management units such as rivers. PMID:24788137

Koster, Wayne M; Dawson, David R; O'Mahony, Damien J; Moloney, Paul D; Crook, David A

2014-01-01

327

Time-frequency analysis of short-lasting modulation of EEG induced by TMS during wake, sleep deprivation and sleep.  

PubMed

The occurrence of dynamic changes in spontaneous electroencephalogram (EEG) rhythms in the awake state or sleep is highly variable. These rhythms can be externally modulated during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with a perturbation method to trigger oscillatory brain activity. EEG-TMS co-registration was performed during standard wake, during wake after sleep deprivation and in sleep in six healthy subjects. Dynamic changes in the regional neural oscillatory activity of the cortical areas were characterized using time-frequency analysis based on the wavelet method, and the modulation of induced oscillations were related to different vigilance states. A reciprocal synchronizing/desynchronizing effect on slow and fast oscillatory activity was observed in response to focal TMS after sleep deprivation and sleep. We observed a sleep-related slight desynchronization of alpha mainly over the frontal areas, and a widespread increase in theta synchronization. These findings could be interpreted as proof of the interference external brain stimulation can exert on the cortex, and how this could be modulated by the vigilance state. Potential clinical applications may include evaluation of hyperexcitable states such as epilepsy or disturbed states of consciousness such as minimal consciousness. PMID:24302903

Manganotti, Paolo; Formaggio, Emanuela; Del Felice, Alessandra; Storti, Silvia F; Zamboni, Alessandro; Bertoldo, Alessandra; Fiaschi, Antonio; Toffolo, Gianna M

2013-01-01

328

Set Domains  

Microsoft Academic Search

Set domains are intended to give semantics to a data type of sets together with a wide range ofuseful set operations. The classical power domain constructions are shown to be inappropriatefor this purpose. Lower and upper domain do not support quantification, whereas Plotkin'sdomain does not contain the empty set. This is an immense defect, since the empty set is notonly

Reinhold Heckmann; Bundesrepublik Deutschland

1990-01-01

329

Jointness: A Selected Bibliography.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

JDEIS is the Joint Doctrine, Education and Training Community Electronic Information System. It encompasses a searchable Joint Doctrine Database, a Joint Education section that includes the JPME Prospective Research Topics Database, as well as award-winni...

L. Garder

2010-01-01

330

Joint Advanced Warfighting School.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

When the United States employs military power, it does so as a joint force. The cornerstone for effective joint force employment remains Service competency, but truly effective Service warfighters must think, plan and fight jointly. The key to developing ...

J. M. Davis K. C. Bowen L. W. Schonenberg

2003-01-01

331

Understanding Joint Warfighting Experiments.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In October 1998 the United States Joint Forces Command (USJFCOM) established a Joint Warfighting Experimentation program to support Joint Concept Development. Experimentation is the unique scientific method for establishing whether hypothesized concepts a...

R. A. Kass

2001-01-01

332

Arthritis: Metacarpophalangeal (MP) Joint  

MedlinePLUS

... Z Hand Anatomy Find a Hand Surgeon Arthritis - MP Joint Email to a friend * required fields From * ... drift (See Figure 2). When arthritis affects the MP joints, the condition is called MP joint arthritis. ...

333

Spacesuit mobility joints  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Joints for use in interconnecting adjacent segments of an hermetically sealed spacesuit which have low torques, low leakage and a high degree of reliability are described. Each of the joints is a special purpose joint characterized by substantially constant volume and low torque characteristics. Linkages which restrain the joint from longitudinal distension and a flexible, substantially impermeable diaphragm of tubular configuration spanning the distance between pivotally supported annuli are featured. The diaphragms of selected joints include rolling convolutions for balancing the joints, while various joints include wedge-shaped sections which enhance the range of motion for the joints.

Vykukal, H. C. (inventor)

1978-01-01

334

Perfectly matched plane wave source in FDTD via an efficient mixed time-frequency block filter formulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The total field scattered field formulation (TF\\/SF) in the FDTD method is a powerful tool for simulating scattered fields reflected from objects with extremely complex geometries and heterogeneities. In this communication, we propose a mixed time and frequency domain solution to optimize the AFP memory storage by an integer M factor. We also provide a practical sampling condition to guarantee

Tengmeng Tan; Mike E. Potter

2009-01-01

335

Stage level, volume, and time-frequency information content of Lake Tana using stochastic and wavelet analysis methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lake Tana is the largest fresh water body situated in the north western highlands of Ethiopia. It serves for local transport, electric power generation, fishing, ecological restoration, recreational purposes, and dry season irrigation supply. Evidence show, the lake has dried at least once at about 15 000-17 000 BP (before present) due to a combination of high evaporation and low precipitation events. Past attempts to observe historical fluctuation of Lake Tana based on simplistic water balance approach of inflow, out-flow and storage have failed to capture well known events of drawdown and rise of the lake that have happened in the last 44 years. This study is aimed at simulating the lake level, specifically extreme events of the lake variation using stochastic approaches. Fourty-four years of daily, monthly and mean annual lake level data has showed a Gaussian variation with goodness of fit at 0.01 significant levels of the Konglomorov-Simrnov test. Three stochastic methods were employed, namely perturbations approach, Monte-Carlo methods and wavelet analysis, and the results were compared with the stage level measurements. The stochastic simulations predicted the lake stage level of the 1972, 1984 and 2002/2003 historical droughts 99% of the time. The information content (frequency) of fluctuation of Lake Tana for various periods was resolved using Wigner's Time-Frequency Decomposition method. The wavelet analysis agreed with the perturbations and Monte Carlo simulations resolving the time (1970s, 1980s and 2000s) in which low frequency and high spectral power fluctuation has occurred. In summary, the Monte-Carlo and perturbations methods have shown their superiority for risk analysis over deterministic methods while wavelet analysis has met reconstructing stage level historical record at multiple time scales. A further study is recommended on dynamic forecasting of the Lake Tana stage level using a combined approach of the perturbation and wavelet analysis methods.

Chebud, Y.; Melesse, A.

2010-08-01

336

Selection of dynamic features based on time-frequency representations for heart murmur detection from phonocardiographic signals.  

PubMed

This work discusses a method for the selection of dynamic features, based on the calculation of the spectral power through time applied to the detection of systolic murmurs from phonocardiographic recordings. To investigate the dynamic properties of the spectral power during murmurs, several quadratic energy distributions have been studied, namely Wigner-Ville, Choi-Williams, smoothed pseudo Wigner-Ville, exponential, and hyperbolic T-distribution. The classification performance has been compared with that using a Short Time Fourier Transform and Continuous Wavelet Transform representations. Furthermore, this work discusses a variety of nonparametric techniques to estimate the spectral power contours as dynamic features that characterize the heart sounds (HS): instantaneous energy, eigenvectors, instantaneous frequency, equivalent bandwidth, subband spectral centroids, and Mel cepstral coefficients. In this way, the aforementioned time-frequency representations and their dynamic features were evaluated by means of their ability to detect the presence of murmurs using a simple k-Nearest Neighbors classifier. Moreover, the relevancies of the proposed dynamic features have been evaluated using a time-varying principal component analysis. The work presented is carried out using a database containing 22 phonocardiographic recordings (16 normal and 6 records with murmurs), segmented to extract 402 representative individual beats (201 per class). The results suggest that the smoothing given by the quadratic energy distribution significantly improves the classification performance for the detection of murmurs in HS. Moreover, it is shown that the power dynamic features which give the best overall classification performance are the MFCC contours. As a result, the proposed method can be implemented as a simple diagnostic tool for primary health-care purposes with high accuracy (up to 98%) discriminating between normal and pathologic beats. PMID:19921435

Quiceno-Manrique, A F; Godino-Llorente, J I; Blanco-Velasco, M; Castellanos-Dominguez, G

2010-01-01

337

A joint digital watermarking and encryption method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper a joint watermarking and ciphering scheme for digital images is presented. Both operations are performed on a key-dependent transform domain. The commutative property of the proposed method allows to cipher a watermarked image without interfering with the embedded signal or to watermark an encrypted image still allowing a perfect deciphering. Furthermore, the key dependence of the transform domain increases the security of the overall system. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

Cancellaro, M.; Battisti, F.; Carli, M.; Boato, G.; De Natale, F. G. B.; Neri, A.

2008-03-01

338

[Vascularized joint transfer for finger joint reconstruction].  

PubMed

In a retrospective clinical study 16 vascularized joint transfers to the hand with an average follow-up of 8.2 (3 - 15) years were evaluated. The finger joint defect was caused by trauma in 12 patients, tumour in 2 patients and infection and congenital deformity in 1 patient each. There were 14 men and 2 women. The mean age range was 26 (2 - 42) years. In 6 cases a partial vascularized joint transfer was carried out, with the transplant being harvested in two cases from non-replantable finger according to the "tissue bank concept" according to Chase and in the other two cases from the PIP-joint of the second toe. In 10 patients a complete vascularized joint transfer was carried out, with the joint being harvested from the hand in 6 cases and from the 2nd toe in 4 cases. The following criteria were evaluated: active range of motion (neutral-0-method), postoperative arthritis, growth and complications. Active range of motion of the transplanted joint was for partial PIP-joint transfer Ex/Flex 0/20/65 degrees und for partial MP-joint transfer 0/20/30 degrees . After DIP-to-PIP-joint transposition active range of motion was measured Ex/Flex 0/20/60 degrees , after PIP-to-PIP transposition 0/30/60 degrees , PIP-to-MP-transposition 0/20/80 degrees and after MP-to-MP-transposition 0/20/57 degrees . The results after microvascular PIP-joint transfer from the 2nd toe for PIP-joint reconstruction were 0/25/58 degrees for PIP-joint reconstruction and 0/15/70 degrees for MP-joint reconstruction. Arthritic changes could be seen in 3 out of 4 patients with partial vascularized joint transfer. In all complete joint transfers there was no clinical and radiological evidence of arthritis even after 15 years. In the two skeletal immature patients at the time of transfer, normal growth compared to the contralateral donor site could be seen. In 8 out of 14 patients complications occurred. In 4 cases tendolysis of the extensor tendon was necessary. In 4 patients skeletal malalignment (3 x sagittal plane, 1 x rotation) was diagnosed. In one patient flexor pulley reconstruction was necessary in order to correct a bowstring deformity. Indications for vascularized joint transfer at the finger in children is set because of lack of therapy option offering normal growth potential. In adults vascularized joint transfer is indicated in case of contraindication for prosthetic joint replacement or arthrodesis. PMID:17724645

Hierner, R; Berger, A K; Shen, Z-L

2007-08-01

339

Proprioception and joint stability  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present paper the current clinical knowledge about proprioception is given for the shoulder, knee, ankle, elbow and the radiocarpal joint. Proprioceptive capabilities are decreased after joint injuries such as ACL or meniscus tears, shoulder dislocation, ankle sprain and in joints with degenerative joint disease. Some surgical procedures seem to restore the proprioceptive abilities; others do not. Elastic knee

J. Jerosch; M. Prymka

1996-01-01

340

Joint spectrogram segmentation and ridge-extraction method for separating multimodal guided waves in long bones  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ultrasonic guided waves (GWs) can be used to evaluate long bones effectively because of the ability to provide the information of the whole bone. In this study, a joint spectrogram segmentation and ridge-extraction (JSSRE) method was proposed to separate multiple modes in long bones. First, the Gabor time-frequency transform was applied to obtain the spectrogram of multimodal signals. Then, a multi-class image segmentation algorithm was used to find the corresponding region of each mode in the spectrogram, including an improved watershed transform and a region growing procedure. Finally, the ridges were extracted and the time domain signals representing individual modes were reconstructed from these ridges in each region. The validations of this method were discussed by simulated multimodal signals with different signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). The correlation coefficients between the original signals without noise and the reconstructed signals were calculated to analyze the results quantitatively. The results showed that the extracted ridges were in good agreement with generated theoretical dispersion curves, and the reconstructed signals were highly related to the original signals, even under the SNR=3 dB situation.

Zhang, ZhengGang; Xu, KaiLiang; Ta, DeAn; Wang, WeiQi

2013-07-01

341

[Total joint arthroplasty].  

PubMed

Control of the disease activity is enabled due to the progress of drug therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. However, surgical treatments are necessary for unresponsive cases to the drug or for achieving higher QOL, and we can attain more tight control or cure by combination of drug therapy and surgical treatments. Total joint arthroplasty provides indolence, mobility, stability and is an useful joint reconstruction method. Shoulder and elbow joint work as a reach function together, and total joint arthroplasty become adaptation when extensive joint destruction or severe pain occurrs. With the usage of biologic agents joint repair is possible in small joints, but if the joint destruction progress in weight-bearing joints, repair is impossible and total joint arthroplasty can be required. PMID:23961679

Mibe, Junya; Yamamoto, Kengo

2013-07-01

342

Characterization by a time-frequency method of classical waves propagation in one-dimensional lattice : effects of the dispersion and localized nonlinearities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an application of time-frequency methods to characterize the dispersion of acoustic waves travelling in a one-dimensional periodic or disordered lattice made up of Helmholtz resonators connected to a cylindrical tube. These methods allow (1) to evaluate the velocity of the wave energy when the input signal is an acoustic pulse ; (2) to display the evolution of

Olivier Richoux; Claude Depollier; Jean Hardy

2009-01-01

343

Butt Joint Tool Commissioning  

SciTech Connect

ITER Central Solenoid uses butt joints for connecting the pancakes in the CS module. The principles of the butt joining of the CICC were developed by the JAPT during CSMC project. The difference between the CSMC butt joint and the CS butt joint is that the CS butt joint is an in-line joint, while the CSMC is a double joint through a hairpin jumper. The CS butt joint has to carry the hoop load. The straight length of the joint is only 320 mm, and the vacuum chamber around the joint has to have a split in the clamp shell. These requirements are challenging. Fig.1 presents a CSMC joint, and Fig.2 shows a CS butt joint. The butt joint procedure was verified and demonstrated. The tool is capable of achieving all specified parameters. The vacuum in the end was a little higher than the target, which is not critical and readily correctable. We consider, tentatively that the procedure is established. Unexpectedly, we discover significant temperature nonuniformity in the joint cross section, which is not formally a violation of the specs, but is a point of concern. All testing parameters are recorded for QA purposes. We plan to modify the butt joining tool to improve its convenience of operation and provide all features necessary for production of butt joints by qualified personnel.

Martovetsky, N N

2007-12-06

344

Performance of time-frequency representation techniques to measure blood flow turbulence with pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound.  

PubMed

The current processing performed by commercial instruments to obtain the time-frequency representation (TFR) of pulsed-wave Doppler signals may not be adequate to characterize turbulent flow motions. The assessment of the intensity of turbulence is of high clinical importance and measuring high-frequency (small-scale) flow motions, using Doppler ultrasound (US), is a difficult problem that has been studied very little. The objective was to optimize the performance of the spectrogram (SPEC), autoregressive modeling (AR), Choi-Williams distribution (CWD), Choi-Williams reduced interference distribution (CW-RID), Bessel distribution (BD), and matching pursuit method (MP) for mean velocity waveform estimation and turbulence detection. The intensity of turbulence was measured from the fluctuations of the Doppler mean velocity obtained from a simulation model under pulsatile flow. The Kolmogorov spectrum, which is used to determine the frequency of the fluctuations and, thus, the scale of the turbulent motions, was also computed for each method. The best set of parameters for each TFR method was determined by minimizing the error of the absolute frequency fluctuations and Kolmogorov spectral bandwidth measured from the simulated and computed Doppler spectra. The results showed that different parameters must be used for each method to minimize the velocity variance of the estimator, to optimize the detection of the turbulent frequency fluctuations, and to estimate the Kolmogorov spectrum. To minimize the variance and to measure the absolute turbulent frequency fluctuations, four methods provided similar results: SPEC (10-ms sine-cosine windows), AR (10-ms rectangular windows, model order = 8), CWD (w(N) and w(M) = 10-ms rectangular windows, sigma = 0.01), and BD (w(N) = 10-ms rectangular windows, alpha = 16). The velocity variance in the absence of turbulence was on the order of 0.04 m/s (coefficient of variation ranging from 8.0% to 14.5%, depending on the method). With these spectral techniques, the peak of the turbulence intensity was adequately estimated (velocity bias < 0.01 m/s). To track the frequency of turbulence, the best method was BD (w(N) = 2-ms rectangular windows, alpha = 2). The bias in the estimate of the -10 dB bandwidth of the Kolmogorov spectrum was 354 +/- 51 Hz in the absence of turbulence (the true bandwidth should be 0 Hz), and -193 +/- 371 Hz with turbulence (the simulated -10-dB bandwidth was estimated at 1256 Hz instead of 1449 Hz). In conclusion, several TFR methods can be used to measure the magnitude of the turbulent fluctuations. To track eddies ranging from large vortex to small turbulent fluctuations (wide Kolmogorov spectrum), the Bessel distribution with appropriate set of parameters is recommended. PMID:11368865

Cloutier, G; Chen, D; Durand, L G

2001-04-01

345

Pressure suit joint analyzer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A measurement system for simultaneously measuring torque and angular flexure in a pressure suit joint is described. One end of a joint under test is held rigid. A torque transducer is pivotably supported on the other movable end of a joint. A potentiometer is attached to the transducer by an arm. The wiper shaft of the potentiometer is gripped by a reference arm that rotates the wiper shaft the same angle as the flexure of joint. A signal is generated by the potentiometer which is representative of the joint flexure. A compensation circuit converts the output of the transducer to a signal representative of joint torque.

Vykukal, H. C.; Webbon, B. W. (inventors)

1982-01-01

346

Kalman filter methods for real-time frequency and mode number estimation of MHD activity in tokamak plasmas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity in magnetically confined fusion experiments is often associated with detrimental effects such as increased radial transport and consequent loss of confinement. In particular, the (2,1) neoclassical tearing mode (NTM), when proceeding to mode-locking, is a potentially disruptive instability hence with the potential to compromise the mechanical integrity of the machine. It is therefore quite significant to be able to characterize in real-time the most virulent and performance limiting instabilities such that adequate mitigation or complete stabilization using feedback control methods are employed during the plasma discharge. This work proposes a Kalman filter (KF) based mechanism for providing, in real-time, the amplitude and phase evolution of instabilities within a predefined set of mode numbers. The method relies on two KF implementations: a non-linear KF isolating the non-stationary dominant signal component of a sensor measurement and subsequently a linear KF which projects the former, for a collection of sensors, onto a predefined set of mode numbers. A basic overview of algorithms commonly used for real-time mode number analysis is also presented along with applications of the proposed algorithm to recently recorded data of the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak.

Alves, D.; Coelho, R.; JET EFDA contributors, the

2013-10-01

347

Investigating the effect of maternal alcohol intake on human fetal breathing rate using adaptive time-frequency analysis methods.  

PubMed

In this study, the matching pursuit (MP) method which is a modified version of the wavelet transform (WT) method was proposed to examine the effects of alcohol on human fetal breathing rates in both time and frequency domains. The matching pursuit method was chosen since the classical Fourier transform may not represent signals which have stationary characteristics and wavelet transform may not represent signals whose Fourier transforms have a narrow frequency support. Our results show that the horizontal structured atoms representing the sinusoidal activity at all frequency ranges disappeared and the vertical structured atoms representing the discontinuous spike type activity increased. In addition, the circular structured atoms at the high frequency range shifted to the low frequencies after the alcohol intake. The results also suggested that the matching pursuit is most suitable for analyzing the fetal breathing rate signals with and without alcohol intake. PMID:8899363

Akay, M; Mulder, E J

1996-09-20

348

Interaural cross-correlation coefficient, apparent source width, and time/frequency characteristics of binaural running cross-correlation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The interaural cross-correlation coefficient (IACC) descriptors attempt to characterize in a single number the binaural cross-correlation function at the expense of losing much detail in a manner similar to, but more problematic than, such descriptors as NC, STC, and NRC because much frequency- and rich time-domain information is lost. Recent computer simulations by Mason illuminated these problems and further stimulated the present study. Old binaural impulse recordings run through an analog computer algorithm (drawn from physiological modeling) were re-examined in an attempt to reveal trends and relationships that the current descriptors cannot. Issues of the time and frequency variance of the measured running coefficient are discussed in terms of apparent source width (ASW) for music in Troy Music Hall and simpler spaces.

Conant, David A.

2004-10-01

349

Jointness A Selected Bibliography.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

To assist researchers in a better understanding of how the United States armed services work together, the U.S. Army War College Library presents Jointness: A Selected Bibliography. A revised and updated version of our earlier bibliographies on jointness,...

2000-01-01

350

Large displacement spherical joint  

DOEpatents

A new class of spherical joints has a very large accessible full cone angle, a property which is beneficial for a wide range of applications. Despite the large cone angles, these joints move freely without singularities.

Bieg, Lothar F. (Albuquerque, NM); Benavides, Gilbert L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01

351

Joints and Movements.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report contains an explanation of anatomical concepts of joints and movements necessary in biomedical and physical therapy education. Upon completion of pamphlet, reader will be able to: (1) identify movements at any joint in the human body, (2) diffe...

P. Jacoby-Lockhart H. B. Slotnick

1979-01-01

352

Time–frequency and principal-component methods for the analysis of EMGs recorded during a mildly fatiguing exercise on a cycle ergometer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electromyographic signals contain the information on muscle activity and have to be frequently averaged, compared, classified or details need to be extracted. A time–frequency analysis, based on wavelets, was previously presented. The analysis transformed an EMG signal into an EMG-intensity-pattern showing the intensities at any point in time for the frequencies filtered out by the wavelets. The purpose of the

Vinzenz von Tscharner

2002-01-01

353

Area Spectral Efficiency of Soft-Decision Space–Time–Frequency Shift-Keying-Aided Slow-Frequency-Hopping Multiple Access  

Microsoft Academic Search

Slow-frequency-hopping multiple access (SFHMA) can provide inherent frequency diversity and beneficially randomize the effects of cochannel interference. It may also be advantageously combined with our novel space–time–frequency shift keying (STFSK) scheme. The proposed system's area spectral efficiency is investigated in various cellular frequency reuse structures. Furthermore, it is compared to both classic Gaussian minimum shift keying (GMSK)-aided SFHMA and GMSK-assisted

Hoang Anh Ngo; Lajos Hanzo

2012-01-01

354

Domain descriptions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ideas about the meaning of descriptions, aimed at clarifying the relationship between a formal specification and the domain of the system to be specified, are introduced. Understanding of specifications must rest on explicit statements of what they are about and what they assert. The authors argue that current formal specification techniques are inadequate in this respect, and therefore cannot offer

Michael Jackson; P. Zave

1993-01-01

355

Active rigidity joint  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Unimorph active rigidity joints, constructed from Shape Memory Alloy and Shape Memory Polymer and capable of bending actuation, are reported in this work. An embedded aluminum shim was added to each joint as a structural element to facilitate actuation. Joints were actuated using ohmic Tri-Phase and pulse heating processes with different results. It appeared that openloop position control could be achieved using pulse heating. Actuator improvements and future experiments are proposed.

Geeng, Franklin; Manzo, Justin; Garcia, Ephrahim

2010-03-01

356

Monitoring groundwater-surface water interaction using time-series and time-frequency analysis of transient three-dimensional electrical resistivity changes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Time-lapse resistivity imaging is increasingly used to monitor hydrologic processes. Compared to conventional hydrologic measurements, surface time-lapse resistivity provides superior spatial coverage in two or three dimensions, potentially high-resolution information in time, and information in the absence of wells. However, interpretation of time-lapse electrical tomograms is complicated by the ever-increasing size and complexity of long-term, three-dimensional (3-D) time series conductivity data sets. Here we use 3-D surface time-lapse electrical imaging to monitor subsurface electrical conductivity variations associated with stage-driven groundwater-surface water interactions along a stretch of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford 300 near Richland, Washington, USA. We reduce the resulting 3-D conductivity time series using both time-series and time-frequency analyses to isolate a paleochannel causing enhanced groundwater-surface water interactions. Correlation analysis on the time-lapse imaging results concisely represents enhanced groundwater-surface water interactions within the paleochannel, and provides information concerning groundwater flow velocities. Time-frequency analysis using the Stockwell (S) transform provides additional information by identifying the stage periodicities driving groundwater-surface water interactions due to upstream dam operations, and identifying segments in time-frequency space when these interactions are most active. These results provide new insight into the distribution and timing of river water intrusion into the Hanford 300 Area, which has a governing influence on the behavior of a uranium plume left over from historical nuclear fuel processing operations.

Johnson, T. C.; Slater, L. D.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Elwaseif, M.

2012-07-01

357

Monitoring groundwater-surface water interaction using time-series and time-frequency analysis of transient three-dimensional electrical resistivity changes  

SciTech Connect

Time-lapse resistivity imaging is increasingly used to monitor hydrologic processes. Compared to conventional hydrologic measurements, surface time-lapse resistivity provides (1) superior spatial coverage in two or three dimensions, (2) potentially high-resolution information in time, and (3) information in the absence of wells. However, interpretation of time-lapse electrical tomograms is complicated by the ever increasing size and complexity of long-term, three-dimensional time-series conductivity datasets. Here, we use three-dimensional (3D) surface time-lapse electrical imaging to monitor subsurface electrical conductivity variations associated with stage-driven groundwater/surface-water interaction along a stretch of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford 300 Area, Hanford WA, USA. We reduce the resulting 3D conductivity time series using both correlation and time-frequency analysis to isolate a paleochannel causing enhanced groundwater/river-water interaction. Correlation analysis on the time-lapse imaging results concisely represents enhanced ground water/surface-water interaction within the paleochannel, and provides information concerning groundwater flow velocities. Time-frequency analysis using the Stockwell (S) Transform provides additional information by 1) identifying the stage periodicities driving ground water/river-water interaction due to upstream dam operations, 2) identifying segments in time-frequency space when these interactions are most active. These results provide new insight into the distribution and timing of river water intrusion into the Hanford 300 area, which has a governing influence on the behavior of a uranium plume left over from historical nuclear fuel processing operations.

Johnson, Timothy C.; Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Elwaseif, Mehrez

2012-08-22

358

Monitoring groundwater-surface water interaction using time-series and time-frequency analysis of transient three-dimensional electrical resistivity changes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Time-lapse resistivity imaging is increasingly used to monitor hydrologic processes. Compared to conventional hydrologic measurements, surface time-lapse resistivity provides superior spatial coverage in two or three dimensions, potentially high-resolution information in time, and information in the absence of wells. However, interpretation of time-lapse electrical tomograms is complicated by the ever-increasing size and complexity of long-term, three-dimensional (3-D) time series conductivity data sets. Here we use 3-D surface time-lapse electrical imaging to monitor subsurface electrical conductivity variations associated with stage-driven groundwater-surface water interactions along a stretch of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford 300 near Richland, Washington, USA. We reduce the resulting 3-D conductivity time series using both time-series and time-frequency analyses to isolate a paleochannel causing enhanced groundwater-surface water interactions. Correlation analysis on the time-lapse imaging results concisely represents enhanced groundwater-surface water interactions within the paleochannel, and provides information concerning groundwater flow velocities. Time-frequency analysis using the Stockwell (S) transform provides additional information by identifying the stage periodicities driving groundwater-surface water interactions due to upstream dam operations, and identifying segments in time-frequency space when these interactions are most active. These results provide new insight into the distribution and timing of river water intrusion into the Hanford 300 Area, which has a governing influence on the behavior of a uranium plume left over from historical nuclear fuel processing operations.

Johnson, Timothy C.; Slater, Lee D.; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitris; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Elwaseif, Mehrez

2012-01-01

359

Tape Joint Stiffness.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This redport evaluates the stiffness for a standard tape-joint structural connection. This stiffness is frequently necessary when modeling a structure (e.g., a shock model). In general, for a standard cylindrical tape joint, the stiffness is 1.2 times gre...

R. P. Rechard

1986-01-01

360

Behavior of jointed pipelines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experimental data on the axial, bending and torsional behavior of ductile cast iron pipes with rubber gasket joints is presented. Analytical expressions are provided which predict the resistance mechanisms and behavior of the joints. The bending mechanism is found to be quite different from the axial and torsional mechanism. By repeating the tests in a specially designed soil box, the

Singhal

1984-01-01

361

Investigation of joint disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of nuclear medicine in the diagnosis and management of the major arthropathies is critically reviewed, with particular reference to osteoarthritis, rheumatoid and similar forms of arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, non-specific back pain, gout, the neuropathic joint, avascular necrosis, infection and the consequences of prosthetic joint insertion. Attention is drawn both to practical applications and deficiencies in current techniques and

M. V. Merrick

1992-01-01

362

Bone and joint infections  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infections involving bone and joint are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. They can result in prolonged hospital stays, long courses of systemic antibiotics and frequently will require surgical intervention. In this review we will cover the commonest infections seen clinically. We have also chosen to divide the review into two sections; infections involving native tissue\\/joints and infections relating

Tom Darton; Robert Townsend

2010-01-01

363

Campylobacter prosthetic joint infection.  

PubMed

A 75-year-old man was diagnosed with probable Campylobacter jejuni prosthetic knee infection after a diarrheal illness. Joint aspirate and operative cultures were negative, but PCR of prosthesis sonicate fluid was positive, as was stool culture. Nineteen additional cases of Campylobacter prosthetic joint infection reported in the literature are reviewed. PMID:24523462

Vasoo, Shawn; Schwab, Jeramy J; Cunningham, Scott A; Robinson, Trisha J; Cass, Joseph R; Berbari, Elie F; Walker, Randall C; Osmon, Douglas R; Patel, Robin

2014-05-01

364

Prosthetic Elbow Joint.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An artificial manually positionable elbow joint for use in an upper extremity, above-elbow, prosthetic which provides a locking feature that is easily controlled by the wearer is described. The instant elbow joint is very strong and durable to withstand t...

B. Weddendorf

1992-01-01

365

Joint warfare system (JWARS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Joint Warfare System (JWARS) is a campaign-level model of military operations that is currently being developed under contract by the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) for use by OSD, the Joint Staff, the Services, and the War fighting Commands. The behavior of military forces can be simulated from ports of embarkation through to their activities in combat.

A. Simlote

2003-01-01

366

General joint laxity  

Microsoft Academic Search

General joint laxity is measured with the hyperextensometer, and by analyzing the values obtained in a group of European subjects norm curves are drawn up related to age and sex. The values found in various orthopedic diseases are put into these curves, and the importance of general joint laxity is discussed.

L. Dubs; N. Gschwend

1988-01-01

367

Joint Seal Materials.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Three major experimental field installations of approximately 7 types of joint sealing materials were used to compare and evaluate the products of numerous sealant manufacturers. The sealants were placed in contraction joints (3/8 in. x 2 in.) which were ...

J. G. F. Hiss J. R. Lambert W. M. McCarty

1968-01-01

368

Event-Related EEG Time-Frequency Analysis: An Overview of Measures and An Analysis of Early Gamma Band Phase Locking in Schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

An increasing number of schizophrenia studies have been examining electroencephalography (EEG) data using time-frequency analysis, documenting illness-related abnormalities in neuronal oscillations and their synchronization, particularly in the gamma band. In this article, we review common methods of spectral decomposition of EEG, time-frequency analyses, types of measures that separately quantify magnitude and phase information from the EEG, and the influence of parameter choices on the analysis results. We then compare the degree of phase locking (ie, phase-locking factor) of the gamma band (36–50 Hz) response evoked about 50 milliseconds following the presentation of standard tones in 22 healthy controls and 21 medicated patients with schizophrenia. These tones were presented as part of an auditory oddball task performed by subjects while EEG was recorded from their scalps. The results showed prominent gamma band phase locking at frontal electrodes between 20 and 60 milliseconds following tone onset in healthy controls that was significantly reduced in patients with schizophrenia (P?=?.03). The finding suggests that the early-evoked gamma band response to auditory stimuli is deficiently synchronized in schizophrenia. We discuss the results in terms of pathophysiological mechanisms compromising event-related gamma phase synchrony in schizophrenia and further attempt to reconcile this finding with prior studies that failed to find this effect.

Roach, Brian J.; Mathalon, Daniel H.

2008-01-01

369

[Age-related changes in time-frequency structure of sleep spindles in EEG in rats with genetic predisposition to absence epilepsy (Wag/Rij)].  

PubMed

It is known that sleep spindles are produced by thalamo-cortical system spontaneously during the slow-wave sleep; pathological processes in thalamo-cortical network might cause absence epilepsy. The aim of this study was to examine age-dependent changes in time-frequency structure of sleep spindles in parallel to a progressive increase in amount of absence seizures in WAG/Rij rat model. EEG was consistently recorded at the age of 5, 7 and 9 months by means of epidural electrodes implanted in the frontal cortex. Continuous wavelet transform was used for automatic identification and further time-frequency analysis of sleep spindles in EEG. It was found that the mean duration of epileptic discharges and total duration of epileptic activity increased with age, whereas the length of sleep spindles decreased. Mean frequency of oscillations within a spindle was used as a criterion for dividing sleep spindles in three categories: "slow" (9.3 Hz), "tr ansitional" (11.4 Hz) and "fast" (13.5 Hz). "Slow" and "transitional" spindles in 5-months animals displayed an increase in frequency from the beginning towards the end. It was shown that the higher incidence of epilepsy corresponded to the lower duration of sleep spindles (all types). Mean frequency of "transitional" and "fast" spindles was higher in rats with more intensive epileptic discharges. In general, high epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats corresponded to the most substantial changes within "transitional" spindles, whereas changes within slow and fast spindles were moderate. PMID:23530451

Sitnikova, E Iu; Grubov, V V; Khramov, A E; Koronovski?, A A

2012-01-01

370

Common time-frequency analysis of local field potential and pyramidal cell activity in seizure-like events of the rat hippocampus  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To study cell-field dynamics, physiologists simultaneously record local field potentials and the activity of individual cells from animals performing cognitive tasks, during various brain states or under pathological conditions. However, apart from spike shape and spike timing analyses, few studies have focused on elucidating the common time-frequency structure of local field activity relative to surrounding cells across different periods of phenomena. We have used two algorithms, multi-window time frequency analysis and wavelet phase coherence (WPC), to study common intracellular-extracellular (I-E) spectral features in spontaneous seizure-like events (SLEs) from rat hippocampal slices in a low magnesium epilepsy model. Both algorithms were applied to 'pairs' of simultaneously observed I-E signals from slices in the CA1 hippocampal region. Analyses were performed over a frequency range of 1-100 Hz. I-E spectral commonality varied in frequency and time. Higher commonality was observed from 1 to 15 Hz, and lower commonality was observed in the 15-100 Hz frequency range. WPC was lower in the non-SLE region compared to SLE activity; however, there was no statistical difference in the 30-45 Hz band between SLE and non-SLE modes. This work provides evidence of strong commonality in various frequency bands of I-E SLEs in the rat hippocampus, not only during SLEs but also immediately before and after.

Cotic, M.; Chiu, A. W. L.; Jahromi, S. S.; Carlen, P. L.; Bardakjian, B. L.

2011-08-01

371

A generalized time-frequency subtraction method for robust speech enhancement based on wavelet filter banks modeling of human auditory system.  

PubMed

We present a new speech enhancement scheme for a single-microphone system to meet the demand for quality noise reduction algorithms capable of operating at a very low signal-to-noise ratio. A psychoacoustic model is incorporated into the generalized perceptual wavelet denoising method to reduce the residual noise and improve the intelligibility of speech. The proposed method is a generalized time-frequency subtraction algorithm, which advantageously exploits the wavelet multirate signal representation to preserve the critical transient information. Simultaneous masking and temporal masking of the human auditory system are modeled by the perceptual wavelet packet transform via the frequency and temporal localization of speech components. The wavelet coefficients are used to calculate the Bark spreading energy and temporal spreading energy, from which a time-frequency masking threshold is deduced to adaptively adjust the subtraction parameters of the proposed method. An unvoiced speech enhancement algorithm is also integrated into the system to improve the intelligibility of speech. Through rigorous objective and subjective evaluations, it is shown that the proposed speech enhancement system is capable of reducing noise with little speech degradation in adverse noise environments and the overall performance is superior to several competitive methods. PMID:17702286

Shao, Yu; Chang, Chip-Hong

2007-08-01

372

Joint Power Allocation for Nonregenerative MIMO-OFDM Relay Links  

Microsoft Academic Search

We consider a two-hop MIMO-OFDM communication scheme with a source, a relay, and a destination. The relay is assumed to be nonregenerative (or amplify-and-forward (AF)). We assume channel state information at each transmitter (CSIT), source and relay. We present a jointly optimized power allocation (PA) over the subchannels in space and frequency domain at source and relay with a joint

I. Hammerstrom; Armin Wittneben

2006-01-01

373

Design of solder joints for self-aligned optoelectronic assemblies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Self-aligning soldering is the critical technology for precision optoelectronic assembly. The pre-assembly solder joint design can improve the final alignment accuracy. In this paper, a public domain software Surface Evolver is modified as a modeling tool for the design of solder joints for self-aligned assemblies. Furthermore, for convenient and efficient design, the results from the numerical model are nondimensionalized and

Wei Lin; Susan K. Patra; Y. C. Lee

1995-01-01

374

Superconducting cable joint resistance  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on results of a parametric study of the 4.2 K resistance of lap joints between two 27-strand cables of multifilamentary Nb{sub 3}Sn wire. All joints were between ribbon terminations made rolling copper-encapsulated cable ends flat. Resistances as functions of current were inferred from current decay time constants of cable-in-conduit conductor loops connected by the joints. The resistances of twenty three samples were measured (range of 0.2 to 3 n{Omega}). It was found that lap joint resistance was a function of current. The influences of solder versus no solder, solder thickness, indium versus tin-lead, ribbon surface oxidation, solder flux, cable twist pitch, wire chrome plating, clamping pressure during heat treatment, ribbon aspect ratio, and joint length are reported.

Herbelot, O.; Steeves, M.M.; Hoening, M.O. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center)

1991-03-01

375

Uniqueness domains and regions of feasible paths for cuspidal manipulators  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses the kinematics of cuspidal manipulators, i.e., nonredundant manipulators which can change posture without meeting a singularity. It focuses on the uniqueness domains and on the regions of feasible paths in the workspace. For cuspidal manipulators, the uniqueness domains are not the singularity-free regions of the joint space. It is shown that additional surfaces, called characteristic surfaces, separate

Philippe Wenger

2004-01-01

376

MISR JOINT_AS Data  

MISR Data and Information Joint Aerosol Product (JOINT_AS) The MISR Level 3 Products are ... campaigns at daily and monthly time scales. The Joint Aerosol product provides a monthly global statistical summary of MISR Level 2 ...

2014-03-24

377

Cover For Duct Expansion Joint  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Size and shape of cover reduces stress and increases strength. Cover for expansion joints on duct-work seals tightly while accommodating movement of joint. Provides ample bonding area on both members of joint.

Brown, A. R.

1988-01-01

378

Appendicular joint dislocations.  

PubMed

This study defines the incidence and epidemiology of joint dislocations and subluxations of the appendicular skeleton. All patients presenting acutely to hospital with a dislocation or subluxation of the appendicular skeleton from a defined population were included in the study. There were 974 dislocations or subluxations over one year between the 1st November 2008 and the 31st October 2009. There was an overall joint dislocation incidence of 157/10(5)/year (188/10(5)/year in males and 128/10(5)/year in females). Males demonstrated a bimodal distribution with a peak incidence of 446/10(5)/year at 15-24 years old and another of 349/10(5)/year in those over 90 years. Females demonstrate an increasing incidence from the seventh decade with a maximum incidence of 520/10(5)/year in those over 90 years. The most commonly affected joints are the glenohumeral (51.2/10(5)/year), the small joints of the hand (29.9/10(5)/year), the patellofemoral joint (21.6/10(5)/year), the prosthetic hip (19.0/10(5)/year), the ankle (11.5/10(5)/year), the acromioclavicular joint (8.9/10(5)/year) and the elbow (5.5/10(5)/year). Unlike fractures, dislocations are more common in the both the most affluent and the most socially deprived sections of the population. Joint disruptions are more common than previously estimated. PMID:23433660

Hindle, Paul; Davidson, Eleanor K; Biant, Leela C; Court-Brown, Charles M

2013-08-01

379

Pressure vessel flex joint  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An airtight, flexible joint is disclosed for the interfacing of two pressure vessels such as between the Space Station docking tunnel and the Space Shuttle Orbiter bulkhead adapter. The joint provides for flexibility while still retaining a structural link between the two vessels required due to the loading created by the internal/external pressure differential. The joint design provides for limiting the axial load carried across the joint to a specific value, a function returned in the Orbiter/Station tunnel interface. The flex joint comprises a floating structural segment which is permanently attached to one of the pressure vessels through the use of an inflatable seal. The geometric configuration of the joint causes the tension between the vessels created by the internal gas pressure to compress the inflatable seal. The inflation pressure of the seal is kept at a value above the internal/external pressure differential of the vessels in order to maintain a controlled distance between the floating segment and pressure vessel. The inflatable seal consists of either a hollow torus-shaped flexible bladder or two rolling convoluted diaphragm seals which may be reinforced by a system of straps or fabric anchored to the hard structures. The joint acts as a flexible link to allow both angular motion and lateral displacement while it still contains the internal pressure and holds the axial tension between the vessels.

Kahn, Jon B. (inventor)

1992-01-01

380

Compliant Joints For Robots  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Compliant joints devised to accommodate misalignments of tools and/or workpieces with respect to robotic manipulators. Has characteristics and appearance of both universal-joint and cable-spring-type flexible shaft coupling. Compliance derived from elastic properties of short pieces of cable. Compliance of joint determined by lengths, distances between, relative orientations, thickness of strands, number of strands, material, amount of pretwist, and number of short pieces of cable. Worm-drive mechanism used to adjust lengths to vary compliance as needed during operation.

Kerley, James J., Jr.

1990-01-01

381

Separable processes before, during, and after the N400 elicited by previously inferred and new information: evidence from time-frequency decompositions.  

PubMed

Successful comprehension during reading often requires inferring information not explicitly presented. This information is readily accessible when subsequently encountered, and a neural correlate of this is an attenuation of the N400 event-related potential (ERP). We used ERPs and time-frequency (TF) analysis to investigate neural correlates of processing inferred information after a causal coherence inference had been generated during text comprehension. Participants read short texts, some of which promoted inference generation. After each text, they performed lexical decisions to target words that were unrelated or inference-related to the preceding text. Consistent with previous findings, inference-related words elicited an attenuated N400 relative to unrelated words. TF analyses revealed unique contributions to the N400 from activity occurring at 1-6 Hz (theta) and 0-2 Hz (delta), supporting the view that multiple, sequential processes underlie the N400. PMID:23165117

Steele, Vaughn R; Bernat, Edward M; van den Broek, Paul; Collins, Paul F; Patrick, Christopher J; Marsolek, Chad J

2013-01-25

382

Separable Processes Before, During, and After the N400 Elicited by Previously Inferred and New Information: Evidence from Time-Frequency Decompositions  

PubMed Central

Successful comprehension during reading often requires inferring information not explicitly presented. This information is readily accessible when subsequently encountered, and a neural correlate of this is an attenuation of the N400 event-related potential (ERP). We used ERPs and time-frequency (TF) analysis to investigate neural correlates of processing inferred information after a causal coherence inference had been generated during text comprehension. Participants read short texts, some of which promoted inference generation. After each text, they performed lexical decisions to target words that were unrelated or inference-related to the preceding text. Consistent with previous findings, inference-related words elicited an attenuated N400 relative to unrelated words. TF analyses revealed unique contributions to the N400 from activity occurring at 1–6 Hz (theta) and 0–2 Hz (delta), supporting the view that multiple, sequential processes underlie the N400.

Steele, Vaughn R.; Bernat, Edward M.; van den Broek, Paul; Collins, Paul F.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Marsolek, Chad J.

2012-01-01

383

Joint Injection/Aspiration  

MedlinePLUS

... bursa or tendon sheath to treat bursitis and tendonitis, respectively. What benefit is derived from a joint ... conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, gout, tendonitis, bursitis and, occasionally, osteoarthritis. What usually is injected ...

384

Joint Contingency Contracting.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this Master of Business Administration (MBA) Professional Report is to investigate and analyze the means by which Contingency Contracting Officers (CCO) can effectively operate in a Joint contingency environment and to validate the Defense ...

E. K. Johnson B. H. Paton E. W. Threat L. A. Haptonstall

2005-01-01

385

Joint Aspiration (Arthrocentesis)  

MedlinePLUS

... arthritis, or JRA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and Lyme disease. Joint aspiration is diagnostic but it also can ... Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Evaluate Your Child's Lyme Disease Risk Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Living With Lupus Bones, ...

386

Temporomandibular Joint, Open  

MedlinePLUS

... Dental Research Loan Repayment Programs NIH Loan Repayment Programs ... glide along the joint socket of the temporal bone. The condyles slide back to their original position when we close our mouths. To keep ...

387

Acromioclavicular Joint Separations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Acromioclavicular (AC) joint separations are common injuries of the shoulder girdle, especially in the young and active population. Typically the mechanism of this injury is a direct force against the lateral aspect of the adducted shoulder, the magnitude...

F. Martetschlaeger P. J. Millett R. J. Warth T. R. Gaskill

2013-01-01

388

Heuristics for Joint Architecting.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

There is no question that Department of Defense and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff directives have increased the development of operational and systems architectures. The DoD Architectural Framework (DoDAF) and its associated governing publications...

A. Piepkorn G. J. Miller J. Kennedy R. Mills T. Wieser

2006-01-01

389

Joint fluid Gram stain  

MedlinePLUS

Gram stain of joint fluid ... result means no bacteria are present on the Gram stain. Note: Normal value ranges may vary slightly ... Abnormal results mean bacteria were seen on the Gram stain. This may be a sign of a ...

390

Joint Contact Stress  

PubMed Central

A joint's normal mechanical history contributes to the maintenance of articular cartilage and underlying bone. Loading facilitates the flow of nutrients into cartilage and waste products away, and additionally provides the mechanical signals essential for normal cell and tissue maintenance. Deleteriously low or high contact stresses have been presumed to result in joint deterioration, and particular aspects of the mechanical environment may facilitate repair of damaged cartilage. For decades, investigators have explored static joint contact stresses (under some more or less arbitrary condition) as a surrogate of the relevant mechanical history. Contact stresses have been estimated in vitro in many joints and in a number of species, although only rarely in vivo. Despite a number of widely varying techniques (and spatial resolutions) to measure these contact stresses, reported ranges of static peak normal stresses are relatively similar from joint to joint across species, and in the range of 0.5 to 5.0 MPa. This suggests vertebrate diarthrodial joints have evolved to achieve similar mechanical design criteria. Available evidence also suggests some disorders of cartilage deterioration are associated with somewhat higher peak pressures ranging from 1-20 MPa, but overlapping the range of normal pressures. Some evidence and considerable logic suggests static contact stresses per se do not predict cartilage responses, but rather temporal aspects of the contact stress history. Static contact stresses may therefore not be a reasonable surrogate for biomechanical studies. Rather, temporal and spatial aspects of the loading history undoubtedly induce beneficial and deleterious biological responses. Finally, since all articular cartilage experiences similar stresses, the concept of a "weight-bearing" versus a "non-weight-bearing" joint seems flawed, and should be abandoned.

Brand, Richard A

2005-01-01

391

Prosthetic Joint Infections  

PubMed Central

Prosthetic joint infections represent a major therapeutic challenge for both healthcare providers and patients. This paper reviews the predisposing factors, pathogenesis, microbiology, diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis of prosthetic joint infection. The most optimal management strategy should be identified based on a number of considerations including type and duration of infection, antimicrobial susceptibility of the infecting pathogen, condition of infected tissues and bone stock, patient wishes and functional status.

Aslam, Saima; Darouiche, Rabih O.

2012-01-01

392

High pressure ceramic joint  

DOEpatents

Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

Ward, Michael E. (Poway, CA); Harkins, Bruce D. (San Diego, CA)

1993-01-01

393

High pressure ceramic joint  

DOEpatents

Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 4 figures.

Ward, M.E.; Harkins, B.D.

1993-11-30

394

BUILDING MODEL ANALYSIS APPLICATIONS WITH THE JOINT UNIVERSAL PARAMETER IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATION OF RELIABILITY (JUPITER) API  

EPA Science Inventory

The open-source, public domain JUPITER (Joint Universal Parameter IdenTification and Evaluation of Reliability) API (Application Programming Interface) provides conventions and Fortran-90 modules to develop applications (computer programs) for analyzing process models. The input ...

395

Dissimilar metals joint evaluation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dissimilar metals tubular joints between 2219-T851 aluminum alloy and 304L stainless steel were fabricated and tested to evaluate bonding processes. Joints were fabricated by four processes: (1) inertia (friction) weldings, where the metals are spun and forced together to create the weld; (2) explosive welding, where the metals are impacted together at high velocity; (3) co-extrusion, where the metals are extruded in contact at high temperature to promote diffusion; and (4) swaging, where residual stresses in the metals after a stretching operation maintain forced contact in mutual shear areas. Fifteen joints of each type were prepared and evaluated in a 6.35 cm (2.50 in.) O.D. size, with 0.32 cm (0.13 in.) wall thickness, and 7.6 cm (3.0 in) total length. The joints were tested to evaluate their ability to withstand pressure cycle, thermal cycle, galvanic corrosion and burst tests. Leakage tests and other non-destructive test techniques were used to evaluate the behavior of the joints, and the microstructure of the bond areas was analyzed.

Wakefield, M. E.; Apodaca, L. E.

1974-01-01

396

Periprosthetic Joint Infections  

PubMed Central

Implantation of joint prostheses is becoming increasingly common, especially for the hip and knee. Infection is considered to be the most devastating of prosthesis-related complications, leading to prolonged hospitalization, repeated surgical intervention, and even definitive loss of the implant. The main risk factors to periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs) are advanced age, malnutrition, obesity, diabetes mellitus, HIV infection at an advanced stage, presence of distant infectious foci, and antecedents of arthroscopy or infection in previous arthroplasty. Joint prostheses can become infected through three different routes: direct implantation, hematogenic infection, and reactivation of latent infection. Gram-positive bacteria predominate in cases of PJI, mainly Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. PJIs present characteristic signs that can be divided into acute and chronic manifestations. The main imaging method used in diagnosing joint prosthesis infections is X-ray. Computed tomography (CT) scan may assist in distinguishing between septic and aseptic loosening. Three-phase bone scintigraphy using technetium has high sensitivity, but low specificity. Positron emission tomography using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) presents very divergent results in the literature. Definitive diagnosis of infection should be made by isolating the microorganism through cultures on material obtained from joint fluid puncturing, surgical wound secretions, surgical debridement procedures, or sonication fluid. Success in treating PJI depends on extensive surgical debridement and adequate and effective antibiotic therapy. Treatment in two stages using a spacer is recommended for most chronic infections in arthroplasty cases. Treatment in a single procedure is appropriate in carefully selected cases.

Lima, Ana Lucia L.; Oliveira, Priscila R.; Carvalho, Vladimir C.; Saconi, Eduardo S.; Cabrita, Henrique B.; Rodrigues, Marcelo B.

2013-01-01

397

Transform domain LMS algorithm  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of transform domain adaptive filtering is introduced. In certain applications, filtering in the transform domain results in great improvements in convergence rate over the conventional time-domain adaptive filtering. The relationship between several existing frequency domain adaptive filtering algorithms is established. Applications of the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) and the discrete cosine transform (DCT) domain adaptive filtering algorithms in

S. Narayan; A. M. Peterson; M. J. Narasimha

1983-01-01

398

Robotic Bladder Joint  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Reliable, lightweight robotic joint suitable for variety of applications, actuated hydraulically, without need for heavy mechanical cylinders or gears on joint itself. Includes two members; first member rotates about pin at end of second member. Includes cam, over which tension line stretched. Ends of tension line anchored at end of second member opposite end that holds pin. Bladder placed on each side of second member, squeezed between second member and tension line. Pressures and/or amounts of fluid in bladders controlled by use of conventional equipment like pumps, valves, and reservoirs. Bladder on one side inflated more than on other side; greater inflation on one side causes greater stretching of tension line on that side. Greater tension pulls on cam, turning first member toward that side. Angle of joint controlled by controlling differential inflation of two bladders.

Robertson, Glen A.

1995-01-01

399

Time-frequency characterization of electrocorticographic recordings of epileptic patients using frequency-entropy similarity: a comparison to other bi-variate measures.  

PubMed

Expert evaluation of electrocorticographic (ECoG) recordings forms the linchpin of seizure onset zone localization in the evaluation of epileptic patients for surgical resection. Numerous methods have been developed to analyze these complex recordings, including uni-variate (characterizing single channels), bi-variate (comparing channel pairs) and multivariate measures. Developing reliable algorithms may be helpful in clinical tasks such as localization of epileptogenic zones and seizure anticipation, as well as enabling better understanding of neuronal function and dynamics. Recently we have developed the frequency-entropy (F-E) similarity measure, and have tested its capability in mapping the epileptogenic zones. The F-E similarity measure compares time-frequency characterizations of two recordings. In this study, we examine the method's principles and utility and compare it to previously described bi-variate correspondence measures such as correlation, coherence, mean phase coherence and spectral comparison methods. Specially designed synthetic signals were used for illuminating theoretical differences between the measures. Intracranial recordings of four epileptic patients were then used for the measures' comparative analysis by creating a mean inter-electrode matrix for each of the correspondence measures and comparing the structure of these matrices during the inter-ictal and ictal periods. We found that the F-E similarity measure is able to discover spectral and temporal features in data which are hidden for the other measures and are important for foci localization. PMID:20969891

Gazit, T; Doron, I; Sagher, O; Kohrman, M H; Towle, V L; Teicher, M; Ben-Jacob, E

2011-01-15

400

Spatially variable stage-driven groundwater-surface water interaction inferred from time-frequency analysis of distributed temperature sensing data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Characterization of groundwater-surface water exchange is essential for improving understanding of contaminant transport between aquifers and rivers. Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FODTS) provides rich spatiotemporal datasets for quantitative and qualitative analysis of groundwater-surface water exchange. We demonstrate how time-frequency analysis of FODTS and synchronous river stage time series from the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford 300-Area, Richland, Washington, provides spatial information on the strength of stage-driven exchange of uranium contaminated groundwater in response to subsurface heterogeneity. Although used in previous studies, the stage-temperature correlation coefficient proved an unreliable indicator of the stage-driven forcing on groundwater discharge in the presence of other factors influencing river water temperature. In contrast, S-transform analysis of the stage and FODTS data definitively identifies the spatial distribution of discharge zones and provided information on the dominant forcing periods (?2 d) of the complex dam operations driving stage fluctuations and hence groundwater-surface water exchange at the 300-Area.

Mwakanyamale, Kisa; Slater, Lee; Day-Lewis, Frederick; Elwaseif, Mehrez; Johnson, Carole

2012-03-01

401

Modeling time-dependent current through electronic open channels using a mixed time-frequency solution to the electronic equations of motion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A nonequilibrium Green’s function model based on time-dependent perturbation theory is developed to propagate electronic structure and molecular conductance of extended electrode-molecule-electrode nanostructures. In this model, we use the two-time variable nature of the Kadanoff-Baym equations of motion to formulate a mixed time-frequency representation for the electronic density expressed by the appropriate Green’s function (G<) . This allows for the dynamical treatment of open systems. Furthermore, highly informative time-dependent Wigner distributions are used to shed light on the features of dynamical observables, such as electron current. Calculations, performed on model systems, resolve the dynamic current into direct and alternating components. The direct current is due to electronic open channels near the Fermi level and the alternating response is due to interference fringes from a superposition of extended states. We analyze the transient conductance with respect to the fundamental system’s parameters, the effect of bound states, and the conductance driven by laser-induced coherence affected by detuning due to an applied dc bias. The amplitude of the alternating transient current can be adjusted by reshaping the bias pulse or by controlling the electronic coupling terms. Bound states may yield a persisting oscillating response depending on their relative electronic densities. In the analysis we utilize the calculated highly informative time-dependent current distributions.

Prociuk, Alexander; Dunietz, Barry D.

2008-10-01

402

Externalizing Psychopathology and Gain/Loss Feedback in a Simulated Gambling Task: Dissociable Components of Brain Response Revealed by Time-Frequency Analysis  

PubMed Central

Externalizing is a broad construct that reflects propensity toward a variety of impulse control problems, including antisocial personality disorder and substance use disorders. Two event-related potential responses known to be reduced among individuals high in externalizing proneness are the P300, which reflects post-perceptual processing of a stimulus, and the error-related negativity (ERN), which indexes performance monitoring based on endogenous representations. The current study employed a simulated gambling task to examine the relationship between externalizing proneness and the feedback-related negativity (FRN), a brain response that indexes performance monitoring related to exogenous cues, which is thought to be highly related to the ERN. Time-frequency (TF) analysis was used to disentangle the FRN from the accompanying P300 response to feedback cues by parsing the overall feedback-locked potential into distinctive theta (4–7 Hz) and delta (< 3 Hz) TF components. Whereas delta-P300 amplitude was reduced among individuals high in externalizing proneness, theta-FRN response was unrelated to externalizing. These findings suggest that, in contrast with previously reported deficits in endogenously-based performance monitoring (as indexed by the ERN), individuals high in externalizing tendencies show intact monitoring of exogenous cues (as indexed by the FRN). The results also contribute to a growing body of evidence indicating that the P300 is attenuated across a broad range of task conditions in high-externalizing individuals.

Bernat, Edward M.; Nelson, Lindsay D.; Steele, Vaughn R.; Gehring, William J.; Patrick, Christopher J.

2010-01-01

403

Time and time-frequency analysis of near-infrared signals for the assessment of ozone autohemotherapy long-term effects in multiple sclerosis.  

PubMed

Ozone autohemotherapy is an emerging therapeutic technique that is gaining increasing importance in treating neurological disorders. A validated and standard methodology to assess the effect of such therapy on brain metabolism and circulation is however still lacking. We used a near-infrared spectroscopy system (NIRS) to monitor the cerebral oxygenation of 9 subjects: 4 remitting-relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) sufferers and 5 controls. Subjects were tested before, during, and after ozone autohemotherapy. We monitored the concentration changes in the level of oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin, and in the level of the Cytochrome-c-oxidase (CYT-c). From the time and time-frequency analysis of the NIRS signals we extracted 128 variables, which were used to characterize the metabolic brain pattern during the therapy. We showed that by using only 7 NIRS variables out of 128 it is possible to characterize the metabolic brain pattern of the two groups of subjects. The MS subjects showed a marked increase of the CYT-c activity and concentration about 40 minutes after the end of the autohemotherapy, possibly revealing a reduction of the chronic oxidative stress level typical of MS sufferers. From a technical point of view, this preliminary study showed that NIRS could be useful to show the effects of ozone autohemotherapy at cerebral level, in a long term monitoring. The clinical result of this study is the quantitative measurement of the CYT-c level changes in MS induced by ozone autohemotherapy. PMID:24111149

Lintas, G; Molinari, F; Simonetti, V; Franzini, M; Liboni, W

2013-01-01

404

Spatially variable stage-driven groundwater-surface water interaction inferred from time-frequency analysis of distributed temperature sensing data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Characterization of groundwater-surface water exchange is essential for improving understanding of contaminant transport between aquifers and rivers. Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FODTS) provides rich spatiotemporal datasets for quantitative and qualitative analysis of groundwater-surface water exchange. We demonstrate how time-frequency analysis of FODTS and synchronous river stage time series from the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford 300-Area, Richland, Washington, provides spatial information on the strength of stage-driven exchange of uranium contaminated groundwater in response to subsurface heterogeneity. Although used in previous studies, the stage-temperature correlation coefficient proved an unreliable indicator of the stage-driven forcing on groundwater discharge in the presence of other factors influencing river water temperature. In contrast, S-transform analysis of the stage and FODTS data definitively identifies the spatial distribution of discharge zones and provided information on the dominant forcing periods (?2 d) of the complex dam operations driving stage fluctuations and hence groundwater-surface water exchange at the 300-Area.

Mwakanyamale, Kisa; Slater, Lee; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Elwaseif, Mehrez; Johnson, Carole D.

2012-01-01

405

Studying Eco Climatic Domains  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Activity is a Project BudBurst/National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) exploration of eco-climactic domains, as defined by NEON, by investigating characteristics of a specific domain and studying two representative plants in that domain.

Neon; Budburst, Project

406

New Joint Sealants. Criteria, Design and Materials.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contents include--(1) sealing concrete joints, (2) sealing glass and metal joints, (3) metal and glass joint sealants from a fabricator's viewpoint, (4) a theory of adhesion for joint sealants, (5) geometry of simple joint seals under strain, (6) joint sealant specifications from a manufacturer's viewpoint, (7) joint sealant requirements from an…

Building Research Inst., Inc., Washington, DC.

407

Joint Fires Training Guide for a Corps Joint Task Force.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A detailed analysis of responsibilities, inputs, processes, outputs, and interactions was conducted for the staff elements and cells involved in joint fires at the Corps Joint Task Force level. This research product documents that analysis. The purpose of...

J. F. Love

1998-01-01

408

Principles of Jointness.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Despite all the attention given to jointness since World War II, there is no comprehensive theory that underpins the concept in doctrine. This is unusual in light of the large body of literature on operational art. Most military practitioners find operati...

R. C. Rubel

2001-01-01

409

Periprosthetic Joint Infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The orthopedic community has begun to witness a worrisome rise in the incidence of periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs) caused by resistant organisms. Besides other challenges associated with treating these infections, it appears that these infections may pose a higher cost compared to infections caused by sensitive organisms. Significantly higher cost of care for treatment of infections due to methicillin-resistant organisms

Javad Parvizi; Ian M. Pawasarat; Khalid A. Azzam; Ashish Joshi; Erik N. Hansen; Kevin J. Bozic

2010-01-01

410

Lubrication of Fretting Joints.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The performance and optimum application domains of antifretting lubricants were assessed, using a specially designed test apparatus. Over 70 tests were carried out on 5, 11 and 18 mm samples, with steel, titanium and aluminum substrates. Results show that...

M. Maillat H. E. Hintermann H. Boving H. R. Kocher G. Mondin

1983-01-01

411

Joints in a Cornstarch Analog  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Joints are very important to problems in applied geology (fluid flow, slope stability), but three-dimensional exposures of simple joint sets are not readily accessible from my campus. I developed this exercise based on the experiments of Miller (2001) to give students hands-on practice describing and interpreting joints. For the exercise, I prepare a cornstarch-water mixture a few days in advance and pour it into plastic petri dishes. I add a "flaw" to each dish (typically a small pebble). As the cornstarch dries, vertical joints develop. In class, each group of 3-4 students is provided a petri dish of desiccated cornstarch. Students are asked to draw a map of the joints, paying particular attention to intersection angles. (The joints curve to intersect at 90 degrees.) They determine relative ages of the joints using abutting relationships. (Typically 3-6 generations of joints.) Students next dissect the sample and describe the surface textures of the larger joints and the location of the flaw. The cornstarch produces beautiful plumose structure (hackles). Students then interpret the joint propagation direction from the surface textures, and note the origin of the joint. (Typically, a first- or second-generation joint initiates at the flaw.) Students discuss the role of flaws in the initiation of joints in their groups.

Crider, Juliet

412

Comparison of 2 temporomandibular joint total joint prosthesis systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: The study goal was to evaluate the comparative outcomes of patients treated with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) total joint prostheses, using either the Christensen prosthesis (TMJ Inc, Golden, CO) (CP) or the TMJ Concepts prosthesis (TMJ Concepts Inc, Camarillo, CA; formerly Techmedica Inc) (TP). Patients and Methods: Forty-five consecutive patients treated with either CP or TP total joint prostheses were

Larry M. Wolford; Douglas J. Dingwerth; Reena M. Talwar; Marcos C. Pitta

2003-01-01

413

Mapping knowledge domains: Characterizing PNAS  

PubMed Central

A review of data mining and analysis techniques that can be used for the mapping of knowledge domains is given. Literature mapping techniques can be based on authors, documents, journals, words, and/or indicators. Most mapping questions are related to research assessment or to the structure and dynamics of disciplines or networks. Several mapping techniques are demonstrated on a data set comprising 20 years of papers published in PNAS. Data from a variety of sources are merged to provide unique indicators of the domain bounded by PNAS. By using funding source information and citation counts, it is shown that, on an aggregate basis, papers funded jointly by the U.S. Public Health Service (which includes the National Institutes of Health) and non-U.S. government sources outperform papers funded by other sources, including by the U.S. Public Health Service alone. Grant data from the National Institute on Aging show that, on average, papers from large grants are cited more than those from small grants, with performance increasing with grant amount. A map of the highest performing papers over the 20-year period was generated by using citation analysis. Changes and trends in the subjects of highest impact within the PNAS domain are described. Interactions between topics over the most recent 5-year period are also detailed.

Boyack, Kevin W.

2004-01-01

414

What is Joint Interdependence Anyway.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

There is much ado lately about the concept of 'joint interdependence' in future military operations. More than one four-star general has praised Operation Desert Storm's joint deconfliction; that is, the conduct of relatively independent service operation...

C. R. Paparone J. A. Crupi

2004-01-01

415

Cellular Pressure-Actuated Joint  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A modification of a pressure-actuated joint has been proposed to improve its pressure actuation in such a manner as to reduce the potential for leakage of the pressurizing fluid. The specific joint for which the modification is proposed is a field joint in a reusable solid-fuel rocket motor (RSRM), in which the pressurizing fluid is a mixture of hot combustion gases. The proposed modification could also be applicable to other pressure-actuated joints of similar configuration.

McGuire, John R.

2003-01-01

416

Understanding the Public Domain.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This overview of the public domain covers: defining the public domain; figuring out if a work is protected by copyright; being sure a work is in the public domain; asserting the copyright protection and term; the Creative Commons initiative; building the Information Commons; when permission is needed for using a public domain work; and special…

Russell, Carrie

2003-01-01

417

Double slotted socket spherical joint  

DOEpatents

A new class of spherical joints is disclosed. These spherical joints are capable of extremely large angular displacements (full cone angles in excess of 270.degree.), while exhibiting no singularities or dead spots in their range of motion. These joints can improve or simplify a wide range of mechanical devices.

Bieg, Lothar F. (Albuquerque, NM); Benavides, Gilbert L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-05-22

418

The Challenges of Joint Attention  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the concept of joint at- tention and the dierent skills underlying its development. We argue that joint attention is much more than gaze following or simul- taneous looking because it implies a shared intentional relation to the world. The current state-of-the-art in robotic and computational models of the dierent prerequisites of joint attention is discussed in relation

Frederic Kaplan; Verena V. Hafner

2004-01-01

419

Glued joints in hardwood timber  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of glued joints offers an option with ample aesthetic and functional possibilities in the design of wood structures. This type of joint is used since years 1970 in countries of North and Central Europe, for the design and construction of glulam (glued laminated timber) structures. This has led to diverse investigations in the experimental analysis of joints made

D Otero Chans; J. Estévez Cimadevila; E. Martín Gutiérrez

2008-01-01

420

Phase 1 Program Joint Report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report consists of inputs from each of the Phase I Program Joint Working Groups. The Working Groups were tasked to describe the organizational structure and work processes that they used during the program, joint accomplishments, lessons learned, and applications to the International Space Station Program. This report is a top-level joint reference document that contains information of interest to both countries.

Nield, George C. (Editor); Vorobiev, Pavel Mikhailovich (Editor)

1999-01-01

421

Shoulder joint tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Summary Background: Despite the fact that joint tuberculosis is one of the most common forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, it is a disease entity that is very rare in Poland (less than 100 cases a year in the last 10 years). The symptoms are non-specific, and thus the disease is rarely taken into account in preliminary differential diagnosis. Case Report: A 68-year-old female patient was admitted to the Internal Diseases Clinic due to oedema and pain of the right shoulder joint. The pain has been increasing for about 8 months. Physical examination revealed increased circumference and elevated temperature of the right shoulder joint. Limb function was retained. The full range of radiological and laboratory diagnostic examinations was performed, including the biopsy of the affected tissue which revealed the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the bacterial culture. Clinical improvement was obtained after introduction of TB drugs. Conclusions: Radiological diagnostic methods (X-ray, CT scans, MRI scans) provide high precision monitoring of articular lesions. However, the decisive diagnosis requires additional laboratory tests as well as histopathological and bacteriological assays.

Ostrowska, Monika; Gietka, Jan; Nesteruk, Tomasz; Piliszek, Agnieszka; Walecki, Jerzy

2012-01-01

422

Ruscoe 983 Joint Sealant: Product Evaluation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report contains a product evaluation of Ruscoe's 983 joint sealant. Ruscoe 983 is an asphalt base single compound joint sealant. It contains an aluminum fortified adhesive and is designed for use on highway expansion joints, bridge joints, and random...

S. L. Tritsch T. M. Wolfe

1986-01-01

423

38 CFR 4.45 - The joints.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...The joints. As regards the joints the factors of disability...movement than normal (from flail joint, resections, nonunion of...movements smoothly. (f) Pain on movement, swelling...and ankle are considered major joints; multiple involvements of...

2012-07-01

424

38 CFR 4.45 - The joints.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...The joints. As regards the joints the factors of disability...movement than normal (from flail joint, resections, nonunion of...movements smoothly. (f) Pain on movement, swelling...and ankle are considered major joints; multiple involvements of...

2010-07-01

425

38 CFR 4.45 - The joints.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...The joints. As regards the joints the factors of disability...movement than normal (from flail joint, resections, nonunion of...movements smoothly. (f) Pain on movement, swelling...and ankle are considered major joints; multiple involvements of...

2011-07-01

426

49 CFR 213.121 - Rail joints.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.121 Section 213.121 Transportation...SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.121 Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise...

2013-10-01

427

Heterogeneous domain adaptation and classification by exploiting the correlation subspace.  

PubMed

We present a novel domain adaptation approach for solving cross-domain pattern recognition problems, i.e., the data or features to be processed and recognized are collected from different domains of interest. Inspired by canonical correlation analysis (CCA), we utilize the derived correlation subspace as a joint representation for associating data across different domains, and we advance reduced kernel techniques for kernel CCA (KCCA) if nonlinear correlation subspace are desirable. Such techniques not only makes KCCA computationally more efficient, potential over-fitting problems can be alleviated as well. Instead of directly performing recognition in the derived CCA subspace (as prior CCA-based domain adaptation methods did), we advocate the exploitation of domain transfer ability in this subspace, in which each dimension has a unique capability in associating cross-domain data. In particular, we propose a novel support vector machine (SVM) with a correlation regularizer, named correlation-transfer SVM, which incorporates the domain adaptation ability into classifier design for cross-domain recognition. We show that our proposed domain adaptation and classification approach can be successfully applied to a variety of cross-domain recognition tasks such as cross-view action recognition, handwritten digit recognition with different features, and image-to-text or text-to-image classification. From our empirical results, we verify that our proposed method outperforms state-of-the-art domain adaptation approaches in terms of recognition performance. PMID:24710401

Yeh, Yi-Ren; Huang, Chun-Hao; Wang, Yu-Chiang Frank

2014-05-01

428

Testing of explosive welding and welded joints: joint mechanism and properties of explosive welded joints  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study physical mechanism of explosive welding joint was analysed. The mechanism refers to wavy joint with interpass\\u000a and without one. Plastic strain, viscosity and acoustic waves were applied to explain the problem. The own model of the mechanism\\u000a of oxide removal for the direct joint and test results confirming the bonding mechanism were showed.

Bogumil Wronka

2010-01-01

429

Multitarget detection using spatial synthesis joint transform correlation.  

PubMed

A spatial synthesis method that improves accuracy of detection for joint transform multitarget recognition is discussed. The reference function used for the conventional joint transform correlation is replaced by a synthesized function for sharpening correlation profiles without the use of a filter in the Fourier domain. It is shown that the synthesized function can be truncated spatially to fit multiplereference applications and that the effectiveness of this technique is not affected by the number of references. The implementation of the synthesized function, effects caused by noise disturbance, background cluttering, and spectral fringe binarization are investigated. PMID:20856493

Cheng, F; Yu, F T; Gregory, D A

1993-11-10

430

Laboratory characterization of rock joints  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory characterization of the Apache Leap tuff joints under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loads has been undertaken to obtain a better understanding of dynamic joint shear behavior and to generate a complete data set that can be used for validation of existing rock-joint models. Study has indicated that available methods for determining joint roughness coefficient (JRC) significantly underestimate the roughness coefficient of the Apache Leap tuff joints, that will lead to an underestimation of the joint shear strength. The results of the direct shear tests have indicated that both under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loadings the joint resistance upon reverse shearing is smaller than that of forward shearing and the joint dilation resulting from forward shearing recovers during reverse shearing. Within the range of variation of shearing velocity used in these tests, the shearing velocity effect on rock-joint behavior seems to be minor, and no noticeable effect on the peak joint shear strength and the joint shear strength for the reverse shearing is observed.

Hsiung, S.M.; Kana, D.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Chowdhury, A.H.; Ghosh, A. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

1994-05-01

431

Soldering of mild steels: functional joints  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, adhesive joints have replaced numerous soldered joints, especially in applications where electrical conductivity is not required from the members of the joint. Nevertheless, soldered joints are still used in applications ranging from electronics to high-technology components. The present work seeks to demonstrate that soldered joints, which can be considered as functional joints, have very good mechanical properties

F. Molleda; J. Mora; E. Carillo; B. G Mellor

2003-01-01

432

Performance of MIMO with Frequency Domain Packet Scheduling in UTRAN LTE Downlink  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses the performance of spatial division multiplexing (SDM) multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) techniques together with frequency domain packet scheduling (FDPS) based on UTRAN long term evolution (LTE) downlink. Two SDM concepts currently considered in 3GPP are the single-user (SU-) and the multi-user (MU-) MIMO. For MU-MIMO, multiple users can be scheduled on different streams on the same time-frequency resource,

Na Wei; Akhilesh Pokhariyal; Troels B. Sørensen; Troels E. Kolding; Preben E. Mogensen

2007-01-01

433

Joint attention studies in normal and autistic children using NIRS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Autism is a socio-communication brain development disorder. It is marked by degeneration in the ability to respond to joint attention skill task, from as early as 12 to 18 months of age. This trait is used to distinguish autistic from nonautistic. In this study Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is being applied for the first time to study the difference in activation and connectivity in the frontal cortex of typically developing (TD) and autistic children between 4-8 years of age in response to joint attention task. The optical measurements are acquired in real time from frontal cortex using Imagent (ISS Inc.) - a frequency domain based NIRS system in response to video clips which engenders a feeling of joint attention experience in the subjects. A block design consisting of 5 blocks of following sequence 30 sec joint attention clip (J), 30 sec non-joint attention clip (NJ) and 30 sec rest condition is used. Preliminary results from TD child shows difference in brain activation (in terms of oxy-hemoglobin, HbO) during joint attention interaction compared to the nonjoint interaction and rest. Similar activation study did not reveal significant differences in HbO across the stimuli in, unlike in an autistic child. Extensive studies are carried out to validate the initial observations from both brain activation as well as connectivity analysis. The result has significant implication for research in neural pathways associated with autism that can be mapped using NIRS.

Chaudhary, Ujwal; Hall, Michael; Gutierrez, Anibal; Messinger, Daniel; Rey, Gustavo; Godavarty, Anuradha

2011-02-01

434

Bladder operated robotic joint  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This invention is a robotic joint which is operated by inflatable bladders and which can be used in applications where it is desired to move or hold an object. A support block supports an elongated plate to which is pivotally attached a finger. A tension strip passes over a lever attached to the finger and is attached at its ends to the support block on opposite sides of the plate. Bladders positioned between the plate and the tension strip on opposite sides of the plate can be inflated by pumps to pivot the finger, with one of the bladders being inflated while the other is being deflated.

Robertson, Glen A. (inventor)

1993-01-01

435

Tarsometatarsal/Lisfranc joint.  

PubMed

Accurate early diagnosis with adequate reduction and maintenance of anatomic alignment of the dislocation or fracture within the Lisfranc joint complex have been found to be the key to successful outcomes regarding this injury. Because of the anatomic variations, the thin soft tissue envelop, and the abundance of ligamentous and capsular structures in the region, repair of these injuries can be a challenge. The classification systems used to describe these injuries aid in describing the mechanism of injury or displacement type present, which may aid in determining what treatment modality can provide the best outcome. PMID:22424486

DiDomenico, Lawrence A; Cross, Davi

2012-04-01

436

Limited Domain Synthesis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This work presents a reliable and efficient method for building limited domain speech synthesis voices. By constructing databases close to the targeted domain of the speech application, unit selection synthesis techniques can be used to reliably give very...

A. W. Black K. A. Lenzo

2000-01-01

437

Metal to ceramic sealed joint  

DOEpatents

A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system. 11 figures.

Lasecki, J.V.; Novak, R.F.; McBride, J.R.

1991-08-27

438

Metal to ceramic sealed joint  

DOEpatents

A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system.

Lasecki, John V. (Livonia, MI); Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI); McBride, James R. (Ypsilanti, MI)

1991-01-01

439

Glenohumeral Joint Injections  

PubMed Central

Context: Intra-articular injections into the glenohumeral joint are commonly performed by musculoskeletal providers, including orthopaedic surgeons, family medicine physicians, rheumatologists, and physician assistants. Despite their frequent use, there is little guidance for injectable treatments to the glen