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Sample records for jonathan stop global

  1. Can Global Warming be Stopped?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luria, M.

    2013-12-01

    Earlier this year, the CO2 levels exceeded the 400 ppm level and there is no sign that the 1-2 ppm annual increase is going to slow down. Concerns regarding the danger of global warming have been reported in numerous occasions for more than a generation, ever since CO2 levels reached the 350 ppm range in the mid 1980's. Nevertheless, all efforts to slow down the increase have showed little if any effect. Mobile sources, including surface and marine transportation and aviation, consist of 20% of the global CO2 emission. The only realistic way to reduce the mobile sources' CO2 signature is by improved fuel efficiency. However, any progress in this direction is more than compensated by continuous increased demand. Stationary sources, mostly electric power generation, are responsible for the bulk of the global CO2 emission. The measurements have shown, that the effect of an increase in renewable sources, like solar wind and geothermal, combined with conversion from coal to natural gas where possible, conservation and efficiency improvement, did not compensate the increased demand mostly in developing countries. Increased usage of nuclear energy can provide some relief in carbon emission but has the potential of even greater environmental hazard. A major decrease in carbon emission can be obtained by either significant reduction in the cost of non-carbon based energy sources or by of carbon sequestration. The most economical way to make a significant decrease in carbon emission is to apply carbon sequestration technology at large point sources that use coal. Worldwide there are about 10,000 major sources that burn >7 billion metric tons of coal which generate the equivalent of 30 trillion kwh. There is a limited experience in CO2 sequestration of such huge quantities of CO2, however, it is estimated that the cost would be US$ 0.01-0.1 per kwh. The cost of eliminating this quantity can be estimated at an average of 1.5 trillion dollars annually. The major emitters, US

  2. Interview: Jonathan Kozol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raney, Mardell

    1998-01-01

    A passionate and persistent advocate for American inner-city children, Jonathan Kozol has spent most of his adult life teaching, speaking, and writing about the conditions and problems of urban youth. In this interview, Kozol discusses his commitment to children who live in the poorest inner-city neighborhoods. (Author/AEF)

  3. NonStop University: Characteristics of a Global Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Thomas P.

    2004-01-01

    NonStop University is an online university community application service designed, developed, and deployed by Hewlett-Packard (HP) to serve the computer product training needs of 2,500 staff members in more than 50 countries. By identifying a set of learner characteristics that supported a set of key elements while using technology and focusing on…

  4. The challenge of sustaining effectiveness over time: the case of the global network to stop tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Quissell, Kathryn; Walt, Gill

    2016-04-01

    Where once global health decisions were largely the domain of national governments and the World Health Organization, today networks of international organizations, governments, private philanthropies and other entities are actively shaping public policy. However, there is still limited understanding of how global networks form, how they create institutions, how they promote and sustain collective action, and how they adapt to changes in the policy environment. Understanding these processes is crucial to understanding their effectiveness: whether and how global networks influence policy and public health outcomes. This study seeks to address these gaps through the examination of the global network to stop tuberculosis (TB) and the factors influencing its effectiveness over time. Drawing from ∼ 200 document sources and 16 interviews with key informants, we trace the development of the Global Partnership to Stop TB and its work over the past decade. We find that having a centralized core group and a strategic brand helped the network to coalesce around a primary intervention strategy, directly observed treatment short course. This strategy was created before the network was formalized, and helped bring in donors, ministries of health and other organizations committed to fighting TB-growing the network. Adaptations to this strategy, the creation of a consensus-based Global Plan, and the creation of a variety of participatory venues for discussion, helped to expand and sustain the network. Presently, however, tensions have become more apparent within the network as it struggles with changing internal political dynamics and the evolution of the disease. While centralization and stability helped to launch and grow the network, the institutionalization of governance and strategy may have constrained adaptation. Institutionalization and centralization may, therefore, facilitate short-term success for networks, but may end up complicating longer-term effectiveness. PMID

  5. Unexpected events induce motor slowing via a brain mechanism for action-stopping with global suppressive effects.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Jan R; Aron, Adam R

    2013-11-20

    When an unexpected event occurs in everyday life (e.g., a car honking), one experiences a slowing down of ongoing action (e.g., of walking into the street). Motor slowing following unexpected events is a ubiquitous phenomenon, both in laboratory experiments as well as such everyday situations, yet the underlying mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that unexpected events recruit the same inhibition network in the brain as does complete cancellation of an action (i.e., action-stopping). Using electroencephalography and independent component analysis in humans, we show that a brain signature of successful outright action-stopping also exhibits activity following unexpected events, and more so in blocks with greater motor slowing. Further, using transcranial magnetic stimulation to measure corticospinal excitability, we show that an unexpected event has a global motor suppressive effect, just like outright action-stopping. Thus, unexpected events recruit a common mechanism with outright action-stopping, moreover with global suppressive effects. These findings imply that we can now leverage the considerable extant knowledge of the neural architecture and functional properties of the stopping system to better understand the processing of unexpected events, including perhaps how they induce distraction via global suppression. PMID:24259571

  6. Savage Inequalities: An Interview with Jonathan Kozol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Theory, 1993

    1993-01-01

    An interview with Jonathan Kozol, author of "Savage Inequalities," documents disparities in spending between African-American and white public school students nationwide. The interview examines the disparities, issues about resegregation and integration in schools, and implications of the book for a progressive view of school reform. (SM)

  7. Digital Learning Network Event with Robotics Engineer Jonathan Rogers

    NASA Video Gallery

    Robotics engineer Jonathan Rogers and Public Affairs Officer Kylie Clem participate in a Digital Learning Network educational event, answering questions from students at Montgomery Middle School in...

  8. Implementing the Global Plan to Stop TB, 2011–2015 – Optimizing Allocations and the Global Fund’s Contribution: A Scenario Projections Study

    PubMed Central

    Korenromp, Eline L.; Glaziou, Philippe; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Floyd, Katherine; Hosseini, Mehran; Raviglione, Mario; Atun, Rifat; Williams, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Background The Global Plan to Stop TB estimates funding required in low- and middle-income countries to achieve TB control targets set by the Stop TB Partnership within the context of the Millennium Development Goals. We estimate the contribution and impact of Global Fund investments under various scenarios of allocations across interventions and regions. Methodology/Principal Findings Using Global Plan assumptions on expected cases and mortality, we estimate treatment costs and mortality impact for diagnosis and treatment for drug-sensitive and multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), including antiretroviral treatment (ART) during DOTS for HIV-co-infected patients, for four country groups, overall and for the Global Fund investments. In 2015, China and India account for 24% of funding need, Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA) for 33%, sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) for 20%, and other low- and middle-income countries for 24%. Scale-up of MDR-TB treatment, especially in EECA, drives an increasing global TB funding need – an essential investment to contain the mortality burden associated with MDR-TB and future disease costs. Funding needs rise fastest in SSA, reflecting increasing coverage need of improved TB/HIV management, which saves most lives per dollar spent in the short term. The Global Fund is expected to finance 8–12% of Global Plan implementation costs annually. Lives saved through Global Fund TB support within the available funding envelope could increase 37% if allocations shifted from current regional demand patterns to a prioritized scale-up of improved TB/HIV treatment and secondly DOTS, both mainly in Africa − with EECA region, which has disproportionately high per-patient costs, funded from alternative resources. Conclusions/Significance These findings, alongside country funding gaps, domestic funding and implementation capacity and equity considerations, should inform strategies and policies for international donors, national governments and disease

  9. Stopping Gluinos

    SciTech Connect

    Arvanitaki, A.; Dimopoulos, S.; Pierce, A.; Rajendran, S.; Wacker, J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2005-06-29

    Long lived gluinos are the trademark of split susy. They form R-hadrons that, when charged, efficiently lose energy in matter via ionization. Independent of R-spectroscopy and initial hadronization, a fraction of R-hadrons become charged while traversing a detector. This results in a large number of stopped gluinos at present and future detectors. For a 300 GeV gluino, 10{sup 6} will stop each year in LHC detectors, while several hundred stop in detectors during Run II at the Tevatron. The subsequent decays of stopped gluinos produce distinctive depositions of energy in calorimeters with no activity in either the tracker or the muon chamber.

  10. Savage Exaggerations: Worshiping the Cosmology of Jonathan Kozol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Marcus A.

    2006-01-01

    Jonathan Kozol has made a good living talking with students. His books chronicle travels among poor, minority children, most of them African Americans in struggling public schools. In the four decades that Kozol, now 70, has been writing books--11 so far--his message has hardly wavered: minority children are unsuccessful because rich, white…

  11. The Ties that Bind: A Response to Jonathan Jansen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sehoole, Chika Trevor

    2006-01-01

    In his critique of academic writing about and public consumption of government policy and law, Jonathan Jansen uses his argument of the symbolic functions of education law and education policy as a basis for explaining the lack of progress in achieving equity and justice under "Brown v. Board of Education" (1954) in the United States and the lack…

  12. Modeling Civic Engagement: A Student Conversation with Jonathan Kozol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thacker, Peter; Christen, Richard S.

    2006-01-01

    Jonathan Kozol's visit to Portland, Oregon, in April 2005 included a dialogue with 55 urban middle and high school students about inequities in American schools. Students left this conversation with a stronger sense of the systemic impediments to equal education. They also felt that their voice had been heard on a topic of national import. This…

  13. On Savage Inequalities: A Conversation with Jonathan Kozol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Marge

    1993-01-01

    "Savage Inequalities: Children in America's Schools" describes the contrasts between rich and poor schools located within a few miles of each other. The author, Jonathan Kozol, claims that contrasts are due to inequitable funding; he would abolish the property tax and replace it with equitable funding for every child deriving from a single federal…

  14. Attacking Apartheid Education: An interview with Jonathan Kozol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Jonathan Kozol. Topics discussed include: (1) On the root causes of school resegregation; (2) On strategies for solving the problem; (3) On guaranteeing education for all; (4) On forcing opponents of integration into the open; (5) On mechanisms for promoting integration; (6) On scripted curricula in…

  15. Reflections on Jonathan Boston's Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Nesta

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Nesta Devine responds to Jonathan Boston's article "Child Poverty in New Zealand: Why It Matters and How It Can Be Reduced" ("Educational Philosophy and Theory," v46 n9 p995-999, 2014). Devine wishes to consider Boston's position from two angles: one is to rehearse the point that these statistics are…

  16. California: 'the Stem Cell State'. Interview with Jonathan Thomas.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jonathan

    2011-11-01

    We talked to Jonathan Thomas, newly elected Chairman of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), a few weeks into a role he describes as "the opportunity of the lifetime" to find out what he sees as the key goals for the CIRM and why patient advocates are so critical to the future of the Institute. Jonathan Thomas was elected as Chairman of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) in June 2011, succeeding the Founder and former Chairman, Bob Klein. Thomas has had a successful career in finance and law and is a Co-Founding Partner at Saybrook Capital, an investment banking and private equity firm. His commitment to patient advocacy and keen interest in biological sciences, developed as a Biology Major at Yale, led him to stand for Chairman. PMID:21999272

  17. The Eastern Space and Missile Center - Jonathan Dickinson Instrumentation Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckner, H. E.; Clark, S. R.; Bonner, J. R.; Thomas, C. G.

    The Jonathan Dickinson Instrumentation Facility (JDIF) is an instrumentation station at the Eastern Test Range designed to provide space diversity tracking of all launches from the Eastern Space and Missile Center or Kennedy Space Center. The JDIF includes tracking radar, telemetry, command/control systems, timing, and communication systems and the Navy's Flight Test Support System in one integrated building. Since virtually all of the instrumentation at JDIF is critical to the success of launches, a concept was established to make it possible to run the Eastern Test Range site during mission support from a bank of diesel generators, and to use commercial power for normal day-to-day operations.

  18. The Next Stop of One-Stop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouman, Penny; Gomber, Gerri; Higgs, Ronnie; Westman, Craig

    2006-01-01

    This article focuses on the migration of the best practices of a one-stop setup to a communication center allowing for a one-stop shop experience via phone. Specifically, the article describes how enrollment managers at Ferris State University chose elements of their one-stop student service center to migrate into the Enrollment Services…

  19. Stop smoking support programs

    MedlinePlus

    Smokeless tobacco - stop smoking programs; Stop smoking techniques; Smoking cessation programs; Smoking cessation techniques ... It is hard to quit smoking if you are acting alone. Smokers may have a ... of quitting with a support program. Stop smoking programs ...

  20. Stopping movements: when others slow us down.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Andrea; Catmur, Caroline; Sowden, Sophie; Ianì, Francesco; Becchio, Cristina

    2014-09-01

    Previous research has shown that performing joint actions can lead to the representation of both one's own and others' actions. In the present study we explored the influence of co-representation on response stopping. Are joint actions more difficult to stop than solo actions? Using a variation of the stop-signal task, we found that participants needed more time to stop a planned joint action compared with a planned solo action (Experiment 1). This effect was not observed when participants performed the task in the presence of a passive observer (Experiment 2). A third transcranial magnetic stimulation experiment (Experiment 3) demonstrated that joint stopping recruited a more selective suppression mechanism than solo stopping. Taken together, these results suggest that participants used a global inhibition mechanism when acting alone; however, they recruited a more selective and slower suppression mechanism when acting with someone else. PMID:24925378

  1. Depression - stopping your medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000570.htm Depression - stopping your medicines To use the sharing features on this page, ... Why Do You Want to Stop Taking This Medicine? Write down all of the reasons you want ...

  2. Dialysis: Deciding to Stop

    MedlinePlus

    ... will mean. Is stopping dialysis considered suicide? Many religions teach that individuals have the right to stop ... 2016 - 4:00am Columbus, OH Register Now 2016 Eastern Iowa Kidney Walk Sun, 09/25/2016 - 2: ...

  3. Automobile Stopping Distances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logue, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the effect of vehicle mass on stopping distances. Analyzes an example of a sample vehicle and tire, and calculates the braking acceleration showing the effect of different factors on the stopping performance of the tires. (GA)

  4. Stop smoking support programs

    MedlinePlus

    Smokeless tobacco - stop smoking programs; Stop smoking techniques; Smoking cessation programs; Smoking cessation techniques ... also provide ongoing support for staying away from tobacco. Be wary of programs that: Are short and ...

  5. Stopping Speech Suppresses the Task-Irrelevant Hand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Weidong; Oldenkamp, Caitlin L.; Aron, Adam R.

    2012-01-01

    Some situations require one to quickly stop an initiated response. Recent evidence suggests that rapid stopping engages a mechanism that has diffuse effects on the motor system. For example, stopping the hand dampens the excitability of the task-irrelevant leg. However, it is unclear whether this "global suppression" could apply across wider motor…

  6. Political Identity and Moral Education: A Response to Jonathan Haidt's "The Righteous Mind"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    In "The Righteous Mind," Jonathan Haidt claims that liberals have a narrower moral outlook than conservatives--they are concerned with fairness and relief of suffering, which Haidt sees as individualistic values, while conservatives care about authority and loyalty too, values concerned with holding society together. I question…

  7. 78 FR 69663 - Jonathan and Jayne Chase Troy Mills Hydroelectric Inc.; Notice of Transfer of Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Jonathan and Jayne Chase Troy Mills Hydroelectric Inc.; Notice of Transfer... River in Orleans County, Vermont. The transfer of an exemption does not require Commission approval....

  8. The Scholarship of Jonathan Silin: A Reading through the Lens of Sexuality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grieshaber, Susan

    2013-01-01

    While Jonathan Silin's ideas have challenged early childhood educators to think seriously about the relationship between developmentalism and revisioning early education, they have done much more than this. They also challenge us to know who we are and how our identities might be enacted in our teacher-selves, whether in the classroom with young…

  9. A Pragma-Stylistic Analysis of President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan Inaugural Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abuya, Eromosele John

    2012-01-01

    The study was an examination through the pragma-stylistic approach to meaning of the linguistic acts that manifest in the Inaugural Speech of Goodluck Ebele Jonathan as the democratically elected president in May 2011 General Elections in Nigeria. Hence, the study focused on speech acts type of locution, illocutionary and perlocutionary in the…

  10. 76 FR 58805 - Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment; Jonathan and Jayne Chase

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment; Jonathan and Jayne Chase... Commission's regulations, 18 CFR Part 380 (Order No. 486, 52 FR 47879), the Office of Energy Projects has... Environmental Assessment (EA). In the EA, Commission staff analyzed the potential environmental effects of...

  11. The Devil in Mr. Smith: A Conversation with Jonathan Z. Smith

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jonathan Z.; Pearson, Thomas; Gallagher, Eugene V.; Jensen, Tim; Fujiwara, Satoko

    2014-01-01

    This interview was recorded in November 2012 in Jonathan Z. Smith's Hyde Park graystone. Professor Smith offers insights into how he thinks about his classroom teaching and his students' learning through descriptions of various assignments and classroom activities he has developed over more than forty years of teaching. The discussion…

  12. Loss, Failure, and an Awful Reputation: A Response to Jonathan Silin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britt, Clare

    2013-01-01

    In this article the author responds to Jonathan Silin's article "At a Loss: Scared and Excited", and in doing so, takes up his ideas around the generative potential of loss. She uses these notions of loss to illuminate how, in one diverse school community in Australia, loss, failure and an "awful reputation" have opened up spaces for re-imagining…

  13. Outcomes-based Education in South African Curricular Reform: A Response to Jonathan Jansen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Responds to the article "Curriculum Reform in South Africa: A Critical Analysis of Outcomes-Based Education" by Jonathan Jansen. States that "Curriculum 2005" too strongly emphasizes procedural knowledge. Proposes a less radical version of outcomes-based education in which teachers integrate propositional, procedural, and dispositional knowledge…

  14. The light stop window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Antonio; Giudice, Gian F.; Isidori, Gino; Pierini, Maurizio; Strumia, Alessandro

    2013-03-01

    We show that a right-handed stop in the 200-400 GeV mass range, together with a nearly degenerate neutralino and, possibly, a gluino below 1.5 TeV, follows from reasonable assumptions, is consistent with present data, and offers interesting discovery prospects at the LHC. Triggering on an extra jet produced in association with stops allows the experimental search for stops even when their mass difference with neutralinos is very small and the decay products are too soft for direct observation. Using a razor analysis, we are able to set stop bounds that are stronger than those published by ATLAS and CMS.

  15. Agutaynen Glottal Stop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quakenbush, J. Stephen

    A study investigated the phonemic and morphophonemic patterning of the glottal stop in Agutaynen, a Meso-Philippine language, and some comparison with two northern Philippine languages. Agutaynen glottal stop has as its sole origin a neutralization of contrast rule, the operation of which can be noted in three different linguistic environments.…

  16. Field trip stop descriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nummedal, D.

    1978-01-01

    Fifteen sites within the channeled scabland were selected as stops with the dual aim of visiting locations critical to the arguments for a catastrophic flood origin of the scablands, as well as permitting an examination of the variability in both erosional and depositional features. The stop locations are plotted on a generalized geologic map and their coordinates are given in table form.

  17. "Stop Diabetes Now!"

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Stop Diabetes Now!" Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... Tips for Seniors at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Lifestyle changes that lead to weight loss—such ...

  18. Vaccines Stop Illness

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of ... meningitis won't infect, cripple, or kill children. Vaccine Safety In light of recent questions about vaccine ...

  19. Sneaky light stop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eifert, Till; Nachman, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    A light supersymmetric top quark partner (stop) with a mass nearly degenerate with that of the standard model (SM) top quark can evade direct searches. The precise measurement of SM top properties such as the cross-section has been suggested to give a handle for this 'stealth stop' scenario. We present an estimate of the potential impact a light stop may have on top quark mass measurements. The results indicate that certain light stop models may induce a bias of up to a few GeV, and that this effect can hide the shift in, and hence sensitivity from, cross-section measurements. Due to the different initial states, the size of the bias is slightly different between the LHC and the Tevatron. The studies make some simplifying assumptions for the top quark measurement technique, and are based on truth-level samples.

  20. Breathing - slowed or stopped

    MedlinePlus

    ... can occur with obstructive sleep apnea, for example. Prolonged apnea means a person has stopped breathing. If ... that requires immediate medical attention and first aid. Prolonged apnea with no heart activity in a person ...

  1. Global action to prevent war: a programme for government and grassroots efforts to stop war, genocide and other forms of deadly conflict.

    PubMed

    Dean, J; Forsberg, R C; Mendlovitz, S

    2000-01-01

    At the end of history's bloodiest century and the outset of a new millennium, we have an opportunity to fulfil one of humanity's oldest dreams: making the world largely free of war. Global changes make this goal achievable. Nuclear weapons have shown the folly of war. For the first time, there is no war and no immediate prospect of war among the main military powers. For the first time, many proven measures to prevent armed conflict, distilled in the crucible of this century's wars, are available. If systematically applied, these measures can sharply decrease the frequency and violence of war, genocide, and other forms of deadly conflict. To seize the opportunity, nations should adopt a comprehensive programme to reduce conventional armaments and armed conflict. This programme will complement and strengthen efforts to eliminate nuclear arms. To assure its ongoing worldwide implementation, the conventional reduction programme should be placed in a treaty framework. We propose a four-phased process, with three treaties, each lasting five to ten years, to lay the groundwork for the fourth treaty, which will establish a permanent international security system. The main objectives of the treaties are to achieve: 1. A verified commitment to provide full transparency on conventional armed forces and military spending, not to increase forces during negotiations on arms reductions, and to increase the resources allocated to multilateral conflict prevention and peacekeeping. 2. Substantial worldwide cuts in national armed forces and military spending and further strengthening of United Nations and regional peacekeeping and peace-enforcement capabilities. 3. A trial of a watershed commitment by participating nations, including the major powers, not to deploy their armed forces beyond national borders except in a multilateral action under UN or regional auspices. 4. A permanent transfer to the UN and regional security organizations of the authority and capability for armed

  2. Sneaky light stop

    SciTech Connect

    Eifert, Till; Nachman, Benjamin

    2015-02-20

    A light supersymmetric top quark partner (stop) with a mass nearly degenerate with that of the standard model (SM) top quark can evade direct searches. The precise measurement of SM top properties such as the cross-section has been suggested to give a handle for this ‘stealth stop’ scenario. We present an estimate of the potential impact a light stop may have on top quark mass measurements. The results indicate that certain light stop models may induce a bias of up to a few GeV, and that this effect can hide the shift in, and hence sensitivity from, cross-section measurements. Due to the different initial states, the size of the bias is slightly different between the LHC and the Tevatron. The studies make some simplifying assumptions for the top quark measurement technique, and are based on truth-level samples.

  3. Sneaky light stop

    SciTech Connect

    Eifert, Till; Nachman, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    A light supersymmetric top quark partner (stop) with a mass nearly degenerate with that of the standard model (SM) top quark can evade direct searches. The precise measurement of SM top properties such as the cross-section has been suggested to give a handle for this ‘stealth stop’ scenario. We present an estimate of the potential impact a light stop may have on top quark mass measurements. The results indicate that certain light stop models may induce a bias of up to a few GeV, and that this effect can hide the shift in, and hence sensitivity from, cross-section measurements. Due to the different initial states, the size of the bias is slightly different between the LHC and the Tevatron. The studies make some simplifying assumptions for the top quark measurement technique, and are based on truth-level samples.

  4. Sneaky light stop

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Eifert, Till; Nachman, Benjamin

    2015-02-20

    A light supersymmetric top quark partner (stop) with a mass nearly degenerate with that of the standard model (SM) top quark can evade direct searches. The precise measurement of SM top properties such as the cross-section has been suggested to give a handle for this ‘stealth stop’ scenario. We present an estimate of the potential impact a light stop may have on top quark mass measurements. The results indicate that certain light stop models may induce a bias of up to a few GeV, and that this effect can hide the shift in, and hence sensitivity from, cross-section measurements. Duemore » to the different initial states, the size of the bias is slightly different between the LHC and the Tevatron. The studies make some simplifying assumptions for the top quark measurement technique, and are based on truth-level samples.« less

  5. Quick stop device

    DOEpatents

    Hipwell, Roger L.; Hazelton, Andrew J.

    1996-01-01

    A quick stop device for abruptly interrupting the cutting of a workpiece by a cutter is disclosed. The quick stop device employs an outer housing connected to an inner workpiece holder by at least one shear pin. The outer housing includes an appropriate shank designed to be received in the spindle of a machine, such as a machine tool. A cutter, such as a drill bit, is mounted in a stationary position and the workpiece, mounted to the workpiece holder, is rotated during engagement with the cutter. A trigger system includes at least one spring loaded punch disposed for movement into engagement with the workpiece holder to abruptly stop rotation of the workpiece holder. This action shears the shear pin and permits continued rotation of the spindle and outer housing without substantially disturbing the chip root formed during cutting.

  6. Stopping Illicit Procurement: Lessons from Global Finance

    SciTech Connect

    Hund, Gretchen; Kurzrok, Andrew J.

    2014-06-19

    Government regulators and the financial sector cooperate to combat money laundering and terrorist financing. This information-sharing relationship is built upon a strong legislative foundation and effective operational procedures. As with money-laundering and terrorist financing, halting the illicit procurement of dual-use commodities requires close coordination between government and industry. However, many of the legal and operational features present in financial threat cooperation do not exist in the export control realm. This article analyzes the applicability of financial industry cooperative measures to nonproliferation.

  7. Deciding where to Stop Speaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tydgat, Ilse; Stevens, Michael; Hartsuiker, Robert J.; Pickering, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated whether speakers strategically decide where to interrupt their speech once they need to stop. We conducted four naming experiments in which pictures of colored shapes occasionally changed in color or shape. Participants then merely had to stop (Experiment 1); or they had to stop and resume speech (Experiments 2-4). They…

  8. 75 FR 47585 - Jonathan and Jayne Chase; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ...: Jonathan and Jayne Chase. e. Name of Project: Troy Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: On the Missisquoi River, in the Town of Troy, Orleans County, Vermont. The project would not occupy lands of the United...., Washington, DC 20426. m. The application is not ready for environmental analysis at this time. n. The...

  9. A Persistent Reformer: Jonathan Kozol's Work to Promote Equality in America. Adolescent Cultures, School and Society. Volume 59

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ognibene, Richard, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Jonathan Kozol has been a leading educational critic and social activist since 1967 when "Death at an Early Age," his book about racism in Boston's schools, was published and won a National Book Award. Since then, Kozol has written eleven more books which focus on such issues as segregation in schools and society, poverty, inequitable school…

  10. Teaching Eighteenth-Century Poetic Satire with a Competency-Based Approach: Jonathan Swift and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modia, María Jesús Lorenzo; Álvarez, Begoña Lasa

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this essay is to analyse the teaching of literature with a competency-based approach. This is exemplified by means of a thorough study of a poetic duel between two relevant eighteenth-century writers, Jonathan Swift and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, and more specifically, by means of the satires entitled respectively "The Lady's…

  11. Jonathan Rosen: building a dynamic union-based health and safety program.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Jonathan; McLaughlin, Kaci; Slatin, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Jonathan Rosen has spent more than 30 years building union-based health and safety programs. In the 1970s he was a union activist. In 1980 he became a union health and safety committee chair at a Milwaukee manufacturing firm. Following that, he had a nearly 20-year career with the New York State Public Employees Federation (PEF). He trained as an industrial hygienist and developed a highly regarded public sector union-based health and safety program. PEF's Health and Safety Department supported a network of union health and safety committees. Program accomplishments included innovative work on workplace violence prevention, indoor environmental quality, infectious diseases, and ergonomics. Mr. Rosen promoted collaboration among unions, helped support new activists, advocated tirelessly for injured workers, and formed an effective alliance with researchers. Rosen discusses essential strategies for mobilizing union members and gaining commitment to health and safety from unions, employers, and policy makers. PMID:25053608

  12. Stop the RIKA BANARE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yoshio

    Children who want to study science & technology are decreasing continuously in Japan. This phenomenon is so called “Rika Banare” meaning literally science apart. Then, the number of students aiming at being engineers is decreasing. This will be a threat for Japanese industry. Many science & technology events are being held everywhere in Japan to overcome Rika Banare. However, most of them leave no sustainable influence over the students who reach to high school age. The reason why Rika Banare takes place is discussed. Then, it is insisted that the promotion of the attractive features of engineering career is important as well as improvement of the education system. In this article, eight proposals to stop Rika Banare are presented. Five of them are related to education system and the rest three to the improvement of social status of engineers.

  13. Stop Sign Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    With its rim eroded off by catastrophic floods in Tiu Vallis and its strangely angular shape, this 12 km diameter crater looks vaguely like a stop sign.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 8.6, Longitude 329.2 East (30.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  14. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences. PMID:23908778

  15. Language and memory disorder in the case of Jonathan Swift: considerations on retrospective diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Marjorie

    2006-11-01

    The cause of behavioural changes described by Alzheimer for his original case, Auguste D., has been recently reconfirmed by histological examination. However, there has been active speculation regarding the cause of behavioural changes exhibited by the political satirist Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) during the final three years of his life for over 250 years. Swift's symptoms of cognitive changes, memory impairment, personality alterations, language disorder and facial paralysis have all been apportioned differing levels of significance in various attempts at retrospective diagnosis. The various medical arguments put forward from the 18th through 20th centuries will be critically examined. The diagnoses considered refer to evolving theories of insanity, phrenology, localization of cortical function, hydrocephalus, psychoanalysis, aphasia, dementia and depression in ageing. Re-consideration of the attempts to re-diagnose Swift's final mental state by the leading neurological thinkers of the day, including Wilde (The Closing Years of Dean Swift's Life. Dublin: Hodges and Smith, 1849), Bucknill (1882), Osler [Osler's textbook Principles and Practice of Medicine (1892); published in St Thomas's Hospital Gazette (London) 1902; 12: 59-60), Brain (Irish Med J 1952: 320-1 and 337-346) and Boller and Forbes (J Neurol Sci 1998; 158: 125-133) reveal the changing attitudes regarding the significance of behavioural symptoms to neurological diagnosis from the 18th century to the present day. PMID:17028310

  16. Jonathan Osborne (1794-1864) and his recognition of conduction aphasia in 1834.

    PubMed

    Breathnach, C S

    2011-03-01

    In 1833 an accomplished 26-year-old linguist suffered a non-paralytic stroke. After he recovered, though he could utter a variety of syllables with ease, he spoke an unintelligible jargon that caused him to be mistaken as a foreigner. He was examined repeatedly over the course of a year by Jonathan Osborne (1794-1864), a Dublin physician and professor of materia medica, who found that the patient understood whatever was said to him, that he could read and write fluently, but had difficulty repeating words read to him or in reading aloud. Osborne recommended that he learn to speak English, his natural language, de novo and over 8 months measured his considerable improvement. To explain the patient's singular difficulty in repeating spoken words Osborne argued it was 'highly probable that, having been conversant with five languages, the muscular apparatus ranged among them, forming a kind of polyglot jargon [that was] wholly unintelligible' and the patient was 'unable to penetrate into and select the contents of the store according as the [words] were required'. The discrepancy between comprehension and repetition was later termed conduction aphasia. PMID:21052861

  17. Understanding Recent Home-Birth Research: An Interview With Drs. Melissa Cheyney and Jonathan Snowden.

    PubMed

    Cheyney, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    In the past month, two new studies have been released-one in The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM; Snowden et al., 2015) and the other in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (Hutton et al., 2015)-comparing out-of-hospital birth outcomes to hospital birth outcomes. These studies join a growing body of literature that consistently shows high rates of obstetric intervention in hospitals and also show low risk to neonates regardless of setting. However, the recent NEJM study found a small but statistically significant increase in risk for perinatal mortality for babies born out of hospital. Jeanette McCulloch of BirthSwell (http://www.birthswell.com) interviews Melissa Cheyney, PhD, CPM, LDM, medical anthropologist, chair of the Midwives Alliance Division of Research, and lead author on the largest study of outcomes for planned home births in the United States to date (Cheyney et al., 2014a), and Jonathan Snowden, PhD, epidemiologist and assistant professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and School of Public Health at Oregon Health and Science University. Snowden is also the lead author of the recent NEJM study. PMID:27445445

  18. [Jonathan Swift's asylum in Dublin--Ireland's introduction to institutional psychiatry 250 years ago].

    PubMed

    Reuber, M

    1995-09-01

    250 years ago, the satirical writer and clergyman Jonathan Swift from Dublin (1667-1745) founded the first Irish lunatic asylum. Rejecting the theories put forward by the English philosopher Thomas Hobbes and the doctor Thomas Willis, he was influenced by the ideas of the Scottish doctor and the "enlightened" thinker John Locke. Swift's St. Patrick's Hospital did not, however, realise a new philosophical concept: architecture and therapeutic approach of the new institution were clearly modelled on the much older Hospital of St. Mary of Bethlehem ( = Bedlam). Despite its conservative conceptual basis, the first institution dedicated to the mentally ill and intellectually subnormal in Ireland became a starting point for the apparantly unstoppable expansion of the, at one time, most comprehensive asylum system in the world. After Swift's Hospital had been enlarged twice at the tax-payers' expense (1778, 1793), the administration decided to relieve the institution by erecting the Richmond Asylum (1810), the first public asylum in Ireland. When this establishment also became overcrowded, in 1817, legislation was passed which led to the establishment of the oldest system of public asylums in Europe. PMID:7590563

  19. Sweet Spots and Door Stops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Michael; Tsui, Stella; Leung, Chi Fan

    2011-01-01

    A sweet spot is referred to in sport as the perfect place to strike a ball with a racquet or bat. It is the point of contact between bat and ball where maximum results can be produced with minimal effort from the hand of the player. Similar physics can be applied to the less inspiring examples of door stops; the perfect position of a door stop is…

  20. The Effects of Prompting and Feedback on Drivers' Stopping at Stop Signs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, John; Hackett, Stacey; Gravina, Nicole; Lebbon, Angela

    2006-01-01

    Complete stops at a high-traffic intersection on the campus of a public university were increased with a prompting and consequence intervention. Data were collected at two opposing stop signs (Stop A and Stop B); however, the intervention was implemented only at Stop A. During the intervention, a volunteer stood next to Stop A holding a poster…

  1. Mixing stops at the LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agrawal, Prateek; Frugiuele, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We study the phenomenology of a light stop NLSP in the presence of large mixing with either the first or the second generation. R-symmetric models provide a prime setting for this scenario, but our discussion also applies to the MSSM when a significant amount of mixing can be accommodated. In our framework the dominant stop decay is through the flavor violating mode into a light jet and the LSP in an extended region of parameter space. There are currently no limits from ATLAS and CMS in this region. We emulate shape-based hadronic SUSY searches for this topology, and find thatmore » they have potential sensitivity. If the extension of these analyses to this region is robust, we find that these searches can set strong exclusion limits on light stops. If not, then the flavor violating decay mode is challenging and may represent a blind spot in stop searches even at 13 TeV. Thus, an experimental investigation of this scenario is well motivated.« less

  2. Mixing stops at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Prateek; Frugiuele, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    We study the phenomenology of a light stop NLSP in the presence of large mixing with either the first or the second generation. R-symmetric models provide a prime setting for this scenario, but our discussion also applies to the MSSM when a significant amount of mixing can be accommodated. In our framework the dominant stop decay is through the flavor violating mode into a light jet and the LSP in an extended region of parameter space. There are currently no limits from ATLAS and CMS in this region. We emulate shape-based hadronic SUSY searches for this topology, and find that they have potential sensitivity. If the extension of these analyses to this region is robust, we find that these searches can set strong exclusion limits on light stops. If not, then the flavor violating decay mode is challenging and may represent a blind spot in stop searches even at 13 TeV. Thus, an experimental investigation of this scenario is well motivated.

  3. Plagiarism: Can It Be Stopped?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, G. Jay

    2011-01-01

    Plagiarism can be controlled, not stopped. The more appropriate question to ask is: What can be done to encourage students to "cheat" correctly by doing the assignment the way it was intended? Cheating by college students continues to reach epidemic proportions on selected campuses, as witnessed by the recent episode at Central Florida University,…

  4. In Defence of Thought Stopping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakker, Gary Maria

    2009-01-01

    Thought stopping (TS) has a long and established history as an effective mental control technique among the cognitive behavioural therapies (CBT). Recent claims have arisen, particularly from acceptance and mindfulness-based authors, that thought suppression--and therefore TS--is counterproductive. These claims take the syllogistic form: TS is a…

  5. Remote Shutoff Stops Runaway Lawnmower

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grambo, Alan A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how electronics students at Central Nine Career Center designed a kill switch circuit to stop a runaway lawnmower. This project is ideal for a career center since the electronics/robotics, small engines and horticulture classes can all work together on their respective parts of the modification, installation…

  6. Acquisition of Initial /s/-Stop and Stop-/s/ Sequences in Greek

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syrika, Asimina; Nicolaidis, Katerina; Edwards, Jan; Beckman, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Previous work on children's acquisition of complex sequences points to a tendency for affricates to be acquired before clusters, but there is no clear evidence of a difference in order of acquisition between clusters with /s/ that violate the Sonority Sequencing Principle (SSP), such as /s/ followed by stop in onset position, and other clusters…

  7. Report on ion stopping at the NSCL's gas stopping station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lofy, Patrick; Morrissey, David; Bollen, Georg; Davies, Deborah; Ringle, Ryan; Schury, Peter; Schwarz, Stefan; Sun, Tao; Vanwasshenova, Daniel; Weissman, Leonid; Wiggins, David

    2002-10-01

    We will present results from the first trials of stopping intermediate energy ions in gas at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), as part of the development of a high efficiency, high pressure, gas-filled ion source for radioactive ions. The source incorporates a high-pressure helium gas cell ( 1 bar x 50 cm) which will stop fast ( 100 MeV/nucleon) nuclei produced by in-flight separation. The exotic nuclei are thermalized in the helium and extracted with a combination of electric potentials and gas flow through a supersonic nozzle. The ions are captured in a rf-multipole rod structure in a differentially pumped expansion chamber and transported as a low-energy beam for precision nuclear science experiments. Argon ions with energies in the range of 100-140 MeV/nucleon were degraded in precision absorbers and stopped in helium. Measurements of the residual kinetic energy and the range will be presented and compared to calculations. This work supported by NSF Grant PHY01-10253 and by DOE Grant 00ER41144.

  8. Stopping power: Effect of the projectile deceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Kompaneets, Roman Ivlev, Alexei V.; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2014-11-15

    The stopping force is the force exerted on the projectile by its wake. Since the wake does not instantly adjust to the projectile velocity, the stopping force should be affected by the projectile deceleration caused by the stopping force itself. We address this effect by deriving the corresponding correction to the stopping force in the cold plasma approximation. By using the derived expression, we estimate that if the projectile is an ion passing through an electron-proton plasma, the correction is small when the stopping force is due to the plasma electrons, but can be significant when the stopping force is due to the protons.

  9. Apparatus for stopping a vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Wattenburg, Willard H.; McCallen, David B.

    2007-03-20

    An apparatus for externally controlling one or more brakes on a vehicle having a pressurized fluid braking system. The apparatus can include a pressurizable vessel that is adapted for fluid-tight coupling to the braking system. Impact to the rear of the vehicle by a pursuit vehicle, shooting a target mounted on the vehicle or sending a signal from a remote control can all result in the fluid pressures in the braking system of the vehicle being modified so that the vehicle is stopped and rendered temporarily inoperable. A control device can also be provided in the driver's compartment of the vehicle for similarly rendering the vehicle inoperable. A driver or hijacker of the vehicle preferably cannot overcome the stopping action from the driver's compartment.

  10. Quality of "Glottal" Stops in Tracheoesophageal Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rossum, M. A.; van As-Brooks, C. J.; Hilgers, F. J. M.; Roozen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Glottal stops are conveyed by an abrupt constriction at the level of the glottis. Tracheoesophageal (TE) speakers are known to have poor control over the new voice source (neoglottis), and this might influence the production of "glottal" stops. This study investigated how TE speakers realized "glottal" stops in abutting words that end and begin…

  11. On Predicting the Glottal Stop in Hualapai.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folarin, Antonia Y.

    Based on the unsubstantiated conclusion of many Hualapai analysts that the glottal stop is one of the phonemes of the language, this paper argues that the glottal stop is for the most part predictable. Data are presented to show the instability as well as the predictability of the glottal stop, and rules are presented, based on the Sound Pattern…

  12. On the Natural History of Preaspirated Stops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Ian D.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation makes two contributions, one empirical, the other theoretical. Empirically, the dissertation deepens our understanding of the lifecycle and behavior of the preaspirated stop, an extremely rare phonological feature. I show that in most confirmed cases, preaspirated stops develop from earlier voiceless geminate stops, less commonly…

  13. Stopping Rules for Turbo Decoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matache, A.; Dolinar, S.; Pollara, F.

    2000-04-01

    Decoders for turbo codes are iterative in nature, i.e., they have to perform a certain number of iterations before reaching a satisfactory degree of confidence regarding a frame to be decoded. Until now standard turbo decoders have used a fixed number of iterations. In this article, we propose some simple "stopping rules" that can be used to reduce the average number of iterations. This technique offers a trade-off between speed and performance and can provide a significant increase in the average decoding speed while not sacrificing decoder performance. We tested several types of stopping rules for turbo decoders. One type is based on comparing decoded bits (hard bit decisions) with previous decoded bits; a second type is based on comparing reliabilities (soft bit decisions) with a threshold; and a third type uses a cyclic redundancy check (CRC) code applied to hard decoded bits. We simulated turbo decoder performance using these rules (including several variations of t he first two types) and further required that the decoder cease after 20 iterations if the stopping rule is not yet satisfied. Specifically, we analyzed the decoder-error rates and the average number of iterations for each rule. We found that the average number of iterations was roughly between 4 and 7 for a bit signal-to-noise ratio, E_b/N_0, near the "waterfall" threshold, as compared with the 10 fixed iterations used by the current turbo decoder. In addition, the resulting error rates were noticeably lower than those for 10 fixed iterations, and in fact were very nearly equal to the error rates achieved by a decoder using 20 fixed iterations.

  14. Stops in the world's languages.

    PubMed

    Henton, C; Ladefoged, P; Maddieson, I

    1992-01-01

    This account of the great variety of stops in the world's languages shows that, apart from their place of articulation, these sounds can be described principally in terms of the activities that occur at three phases: onset, closure, and release. Other potentially contrastive features discussed include length, and the use of the glottalic airstream mechanism (other airstream mechanisms are not considered here). Phonologically only two phases--closure and release--are exploited; independent distinctions of features such as phonation type or articulatory manner cannot be found in the onset phase. We examine the combinatorial possibilities of the features that are used and discuss implications for phonological feature systems. PMID:1615036

  15. GPM's Last Stop Before Orbit

    NASA Video Gallery

    Art Azarbarzin, NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission project manager, and Mashahiro Kojima, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's GPM/DPR project manager, reflect on the long journey ...

  16. Optimal Stopping with Information Constraint

    SciTech Connect

    Lempa, Jukka

    2012-10-15

    We study the optimal stopping problem proposed by Dupuis and Wang (Adv. Appl. Probab. 34:141-157, 2002). In this maximization problem of the expected present value of the exercise payoff, the underlying dynamics follow a linear diffusion. The decision maker is not allowed to stop at any time she chooses but rather on the jump times of an independent Poisson process. Dupuis and Wang (Adv. Appl. Probab. 34:141-157, 2002), solve this problem in the case where the underlying is a geometric Brownian motion and the payoff function is of American call option type. In the current study, we propose a mild set of conditions (covering the setup of Dupuis and Wang in Adv. Appl. Probab. 34:141-157, 2002) on both the underlying and the payoff and build and use a Markovian apparatus based on the Bellman principle of optimality to solve the problem under these conditions. We also discuss the interpretation of this model as optimal timing of an irreversible investment decision under an exogenous information constraint.

  17. Precision stop control for motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David E. (Inventor); Montenegro, Justino (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved stop control system and method are provided for a motor having a drive mechanism in which the motor is coupled to a motor controller that controls the speed and position of the drive mechanism using a first signal indicative of a commanded position of the drive mechanism, a second signal indicative of the actual speed of the drive mechanism and a third signal indicative of the actual position of the drive mechanism. The improved system/method uses a first circuit that receives the first and third signal and generates an error signal indicative of a difference therebetween. A second circuit receives the error signal and compares same with a threshold position error. The result of this comparison is used to selectively supply the second signal (i.e., speed) to the motor controller at least whenever the error signal is less than the threshold position error so that the motor controller can use the second signal in conjunction with the third signal to stop the motor.

  18. Improving stopping construction to minimize leakage

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Roy H.; Mazzella, Andrew L.; Martikainen, Anu L.

    2015-01-01

    The proper sealing of stoppings is an important step in reducing leakage from the intake to the return airways. Leakage and the subsequent loss of ventilation resulting from improperly sealed stoppings can lead to unhealthy and unsafe working conditions. The research presented in this paper investigates the total leakage of a stopping, including air leakage through the stopping, at the stopping perimeter, and through the coalbed. The study also examines sealing considerations for stoppings that are constructed under roof control screen, the effects that wooden wedges had on inhibiting efficient application of polyurethane foam sealant, and airflow leakage through the surrounding coal. The work involved building a stopping in a dead end room of the NIOSH Safety Research Coal Mine and then pressurising the room using compressed air. Stopping leakage was evaluated by measuring air pressure loss in the enclosed room due to the air leakage. Part of the research utilises a diluted soap solution that was applied to the stopping and the surrounding coal to detect air leakage signified by bubble formations. The results show that stopping leakage can be minimised with proper sealing PMID:26379366

  19. Shell corrections in stopping powers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bichsel, H.

    2002-05-01

    One of the theories of the electronic stopping power S for fast light ions was derived by Bethe. The algorithm currently used for the calculation of S includes terms known as the mean excitation energy I, the shell correction, the Barkas correction, and the Bloch correction. These terms are described here. For the calculation of the shell corrections an atomic model is used, which is more realistic than the hydrogenic approximation used so far. A comparison is made with similar calculations in which the local plasma approximation is utilized. Close agreement with the experimental data for protons with energies from 0.3 to 10 MeV traversing Al and Si is found without the need for adjustable parameters for the shell corrections.

  20. Alternative aperture stop position designs for SIRTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Paul K.; Dinger, Ann S.

    1990-01-01

    Three designs of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) for a 100,000 high earth orbit are considered with particular attention given to the evaluation of the aperture stop position. The choice of aperture stop position will be based on stray light considerations which are being studied concurrently. It is noted that there are advantages in cost, mass, and astronomical aperture to placing the aperture stop at or near the primary mirror, if the stray light circumstances allow.

  1. All in One Stop? The Accessibility of Work Support Programs at One-Stop Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richer, Elise; Kubo, Hitomi; Frank, Abbey

    The accessibility of work support programs at one-stop centers was examined in a study during which 33 telephone directors or managers of one-stop centers in 22 states were interviewed by telephone. The interviews established the existence of extensive differences between one-stop centers from the standpoint of all aspects of their operation,…

  2. 36 CFR 1192.37 - Stop request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stop request. 1192.37 Section 1192.37 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY GUIDELINES FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Buses, Vans and Systems § 1192.37 Stop request....

  3. Stop the Violence: Overcoming Self-Destruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Nelson, Ed.

    The story of the Stop the Violence movement among rap music artists and music industry colleagues is told, along with the story of a video that was produced as part of this initiative. The Stop the Violence project grew out of the reaction to violence among concert goers at a 1987 rap concert on Long Island (New York). Rap musicians have joined…

  4. Electron and Positron Stopping Powers of Materials

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 7 NIST Electron and Positron Stopping Powers of Materials (PC database for purchase)   The EPSTAR database provides rapid calculations of stopping powers (collisional, radiative, and total), CSDA ranges, radiation yields and density effect corrections for incident electrons or positrons with kinetic energies from 1 keV to 10 GeV, and for any chemically defined target material.

  5. 14 CFR 29.675 - Stops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the loads corresponding to the design conditions for the system. (d) For each main rotor blade— (1) Stops that are appropriate to the blade design must be provided to limit travel of the blade about its hinge points; and (2) There must be means to keep the blade from hitting the droop stops during...

  6. 14 CFR 27.675 - Stops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the loads corresponding to the design conditions for the system. (d) For each main rotor blade— (1) Stops that are appropriate to the blade design must be provided to limit travel of the blade about its hinge points; and (2) There must be means to keep the blade from hitting the droop stops during...

  7. 14 CFR 29.675 - Stops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the loads corresponding to the design conditions for the system. (d) For each main rotor blade— (1) Stops that are appropriate to the blade design must be provided to limit travel of the blade about its hinge points; and (2) There must be means to keep the blade from hitting the droop stops during...

  8. 14 CFR 29.675 - Stops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the loads corresponding to the design conditions for the system. (d) For each main rotor blade— (1) Stops that are appropriate to the blade design must be provided to limit travel of the blade about its hinge points; and (2) There must be means to keep the blade from hitting the droop stops during...

  9. 14 CFR 27.675 - Stops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the loads corresponding to the design conditions for the system. (d) For each main rotor blade— (1) Stops that are appropriate to the blade design must be provided to limit travel of the blade about its hinge points; and (2) There must be means to keep the blade from hitting the droop stops during...

  10. 14 CFR 27.675 - Stops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the loads corresponding to the design conditions for the system. (d) For each main rotor blade— (1) Stops that are appropriate to the blade design must be provided to limit travel of the blade about its hinge points; and (2) There must be means to keep the blade from hitting the droop stops during...

  11. 14 CFR 29.675 - Stops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the loads corresponding to the design conditions for the system. (d) For each main rotor blade— (1) Stops that are appropriate to the blade design must be provided to limit travel of the blade about its hinge points; and (2) There must be means to keep the blade from hitting the droop stops during...

  12. 14 CFR 27.675 - Stops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the loads corresponding to the design conditions for the system. (d) For each main rotor blade— (1) Stops that are appropriate to the blade design must be provided to limit travel of the blade about its hinge points; and (2) There must be means to keep the blade from hitting the droop stops during...

  13. 14 CFR 29.675 - Stops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the loads corresponding to the design conditions for the system. (d) For each main rotor blade— (1) Stops that are appropriate to the blade design must be provided to limit travel of the blade about its hinge points; and (2) There must be means to keep the blade from hitting the droop stops during...

  14. 14 CFR 27.675 - Stops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the loads corresponding to the design conditions for the system. (d) For each main rotor blade— (1) Stops that are appropriate to the blade design must be provided to limit travel of the blade about its hinge points; and (2) There must be means to keep the blade from hitting the droop stops during...

  15. Stimulus devaluation induced by stopping action.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Jan R; O'Doherty, John P; Berkebile, Michael M; Linderman, David; Aron, Adam R

    2014-12-01

    Impulsive behavior in humans partly relates to inappropriate overvaluation of reward-associated stimuli. Hence, it is desirable to develop methods of behavioral modification that can reduce stimulus value. Here, we tested whether one kind of behavioral modification--the rapid stopping of actions in the face of reward-associated stimuli--could lead to subsequent devaluation of those stimuli. We developed a novel paradigm with three consecutive phases: implicit reward learning, a stop-signal task, and an auction procedure. In the learning phase, we associated abstract shapes with different levels of reward. In the stop-signal phase, we paired half those shapes with occasional stop-signals, requiring the rapid stopping of an initiated motor response, while the other half of shapes was not paired with stop signals. In the auction phase, we assessed the subjective value of each shape via willingness-to-pay. In 2 experiments, we found that participants bid less for shapes that were paired with stop-signals compared to shapes that were not. This suggests that the requirement to try to rapidly stop a response decrements stimulus value. Two follow-on control experiments suggested that the result was specifically due to stopping action rather than aversiveness, effort, conflict, or salience associated with stop signals. This study makes a theoretical link between research on inhibitory control and value. It also provides a novel behavioral paradigm with carefully operationalized learning, treatment, and valuation phases. This framework lends itself to both behavioral modification procedures in clinical disorders and research on the neural underpinnings of stimulus devaluation. PMID:25313953

  16. Stimulus devaluation induced by stopping action

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Jan R.; O’Doherty, John P.; Berkebile, Michael M.; Linderman, David; Aron, Adam R.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsive behavior in humans partly relates to inappropriate overvaluation of reward-associated stimuli. Hence, it is desirable to develop methods of behavioral modification that can reduce stimulus value. Here, we tested whether one kind of behavioral modification – the rapid stopping of actions in the face of reward-associated stimuli – could lead to subsequent devaluation of those stimuli. We developed a novel paradigm with three consecutive phases: implicit reward learning, a stop-signal task, and an auction procedure. In the learning phase, we associated abstract shapes with different levels of reward. In the stop-signal phase, we paired half those shapes with occasional stop-signals, requiring the rapid stopping of an initiated motor response, while the other half of shapes was not paired with stop signals. In the auction phase, we assessed the subjective value of each shape via willingness-to-pay. In two experiments, we found that participants bid less for shapes that were paired with stop-signals compared to shapes that were not. This suggests that the requirement to try to rapidly stop a response decrements stimulus value. Two follow-on control experiments suggested that the result was specifically due to stopping action rather than aversiveness, effort, conflict, or salience associated with stop signals. This study makes a theoretical link between research on inhibitory control and value. It also provides a novel behavioral paradigm with carefully operationalized learning, treatment, and valuation phases. This framework lends itself to both behavioral modification procedures in clinical disorders, and research on the neural underpinnings of stimulus devaluation. PMID:25313953

  17. Antiproton stopping at low energies: confirmation of velocity-proportional stopping power.

    PubMed

    Møller, S P; Csete, A; Ichioka, T; Knudsen, H; Uggerhøj, U I; Andersen, H H

    2002-05-13

    The stopping power for antiprotons in various solid targets has been measured in the low-energy range of 1-100 keV. In agreement with most models, in particular free-electron gas models, the stopping power is found to be proportional to the projectile velocity below the stopping-power maximum. Although a stopping power proportional to velocity has also been observed for protons, the interpretation of such measurements is difficult due to the presence of charge exchange processes. Hence, the present measurements constitute the first unambiguous support for a velocity-proportional stopping power due to target excitations by a pointlike projectile. PMID:12005631

  18. A light stop with a heavy gluino: enlarging the stop gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Kevin F.; Terning, John

    2016-05-01

    It is widely thought that increasing bounds on the gluino mass, which feeds down to the stop mass through renormalization group running, are making a light stop increasingly unlikely. Here we present a counter-example. We examine the case of the Minimal Composite Supersymmetric Standard Model which has a light composite stop. The large anomalous dimension of the stop from strong dynamics pushes the stop mass toward a quasi-fixed point in the infrared, which is smaller than standard estimates by a factor of a large logarithm. The gluino can be about three times heavier than the stop, which is comparable to hierarchy achieved with supersoft Dirac gluino masses. Thus, in this class of models, a heavy gluino is not necessarily indicative of a heavy stop.

  19. Research to stop tobacco deaths

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In 2003, governments adopted the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, the world’s first global health treaty. In the decade since the treaty was adopted by 178 member states of the World Health Organization, there have been substantial achievements in reducing tobacco use around the world. Research and evidence on the impact of interventions and policies have helped drive this policy progress. An increased and sustained focus on research is needed in the future to ensure that the gains of the global tobacco control movement are maintained, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, which are affected most strongly by the tobacco epidemic. In addition to current priorities, greater attention is needed to research related to trade agreements, prevention among girls, and the appropriate response to nicotine-based noncombustibles (including e-cigarettes). PMID:24886401

  20. Pilot Survey of Subway and Bus Stop Noise Levels

    PubMed Central

    Neitzel, Richard; Barrera, Marissa A.; Akram, Muhammad

    2006-01-01

    Excessive noise exposure is a serious global urban health problem, adversely affecting millions of people. One often cited source of urban noise is mass transit, particularly subway systems. As a first step in determining risk within this context, we recently conducted an environmental survey of noise levels of the New York City transit system. Over 90 noise measurements were made using a sound level meter. Average and maximum noise levels were measured on subway platforms, and maximum levels were measured inside subway cars and at several bus stops for comparison purposes. The average noise level measured on the subway platforms was 86 ± 4 dBA (decibel-A weighting). Maximum levels of 106, 112, and 89 dBA were measured on subway platforms, inside subway cars, and at bus stops, respectively. These results indicate that noise levels in subway and bus stop environments have the potential to exceed recommended exposure guidelines from the World Health Organization (WHO) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), given sufficient exposure duration. Risk reduction strategies following the standard hierarchy of control measures should be applied, where feasible, to reduce subway noise exposure. PMID:16802179

  1. Inhibitory motor control based on complex stopping goals relies on the same brain network as simple stopping

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Jan R.; Aron, Adam R.

    2014-01-01

    Much research has modeled action-stopping using the stop-signal task (SST), in which an impending response has to be stopped when an explicit stop-signal occurs. A limitation of the SST is that real-world action-stopping rarely involves explicit stop-signals. Instead, the stopping-system engages when environmental features match more complex stopping goals. For example, when stepping into the street, one monitors path, velocity, size, and types of objects; and only stops if there is a vehicle approaching. Here, we developed a task in which participants compared the visual features of a multidimensional go-stimulus to a complex stopping-template, and stopped their go-response if all features matched the template. We used independent component analysis of EEG data to show that the same motor inhibition brain network that explains action-stopping in the SST also implements motor inhibition in the complex-stopping task. Furthermore, we found that partial feature overlap between go-stimulus and stopping-template lead to motor slowing, which also corresponded with greater stopping-network activity. This shows that the same brain system for action-stopping to explicit stop-signals is recruited to slow or stop behavior when stimuli match a complex stopping goal. The results imply a generalizability of the brain’s network for simple action-stopping to more ecologically valid scenarios. PMID:25270603

  2. Smokeless Tobacco: Tips on How to Stop

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Tobacco Addiction | Smokeless Tobacco: Tips on how to stop Why is it hard to quit using smokeless tobacco? Like cigarettes, smokeless tobacco (snuff or chewing tobacco) contains ...

  3. Imagine stopping the progression of Alzheimer's

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue Past Issues Imagine stopping the progression of Alzheimer's Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents For ... I have friends and loved ones suffering from Alzheimer's. But I can imagine… and hope for… a ...

  4. What Would Happen If We Stopped Vaccinations?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletters Events What Would Happen If We Stopped Vaccinations? Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Before the ... City and Texas – mainly among groups with low vaccination rates. If vaccination rates dropped to low levels ...

  5. What Services Are Available to Stop Abuse?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Return to: What Communities Can Do What Services Are Available to Stop Abuse? A variety of ... Prosecution of offenders Assistance with obtaining restitution Support Services When abuse or neglect is related to the ...

  6. Scientists Try to Stop Another Deadly Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Try to Stop Another Deadly Virus Junin, an Ebola-like disease in Argentina, has a death rate ... companies that developed a similar treatment against the Ebola virus during the 2014-2015 outbreak. That drug, ...

  7. Galvanic etch stop for Si in KOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, E. J.; French, P. J.; Xia, X. H.; Kelly, J. J.

    2004-08-01

    Etch stops and etch-stopping techniques are essential 'tools' for 2D and 3D MEMS devices. Until now, use of a galvanic etch stop (ES) for micromachining in alkaline solutions was usually prohibited due to the large Au:Si area needed and/or high oxygen content required to achieve the ES. We report a new galvanic ES which requires a Au:exposed silicon area ratio of only ~1. Thus for the first time a practical galvanic ES for KOH has been achieved. The ES works by adding small amounts of sodium hypochlorite, NaOCl, to KOH solutions. Essentially the NaOCl increases the oxygen content in the KOH etchant. The dependancy of the galvanic ES on KOH concentration and temperature is investigated. Also, we report on the effects of the added NaOCl on etch rates. SEM images are used to examine the galvanically etch-stopped membranes and their surface morphology. For 33% KOH solutions the galvanic etch stop worked well, producing membranes with uniform thickness ~6 µm (i.e. slightly greater than the deposited epilayer). For 20% KOH solutions, the galvanic etch stop still worked, but the resulting membranes were a little thicker (~10 µm).

  8. GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH NEWS #16: POTENTIAL HEALTH IMPACTS OF CLIMATE VARIABILITY AND CHANGE FOR THE UNITED STATES, EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OF THE REPORT OF THE HEALTH SECTOR OF THE U.S. NATIONAL ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The health sector assessment was sponsored by and conducted in partnership with EPA's Global Change Research Program. The report was produced by a Health Sector Work Group, co-chaired by Dr. Jonathan Patz (Johns Hopkins University) and Dr. Michael McGeehin (CDC), and this report ...

  9. Inseparability of Go and Stop in Inhibitory Control: Go Stimulus Discriminability Affects Stopping Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ning; Yu, Angela J.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory control, the ability to stop or modify preplanned actions under changing task conditions, is an important component of cognitive functions. Two lines of models of inhibitory control have previously been proposed for human response in the classical stop-signal task, in which subjects must inhibit a default go response upon presentation of an infrequent stop signal: (1) the race model, which posits two independent go and stop processes that race to determine the behavioral outcome, go or stop; and (2) an optimal decision-making model, which posits that observers decides whether and when to go based on continually (Bayesian) updated information about both the go and stop stimuli. In this work, we probe the relationship between go and stop processing by explicitly manipulating the discrimination difficulty of the go stimulus. While the race model assumes the go and stop processes are independent, and therefore go stimulus discriminability should not affect the stop stimulus processing, we simulate the optimal model to show that it predicts harder go discrimination should result in longer go reaction time (RT), lower stop error rate, as well as faster stop-signal RT. We then present novel behavioral data that validate these model predictions. The results thus favor a fundamentally inseparable account of go and stop processing, in a manner consistent with the optimal model, and contradicting the independence assumption of the race model. More broadly, our findings contribute to the growing evidence that the computations underlying inhibitory control are systematically modulated by cognitive influences in a Bayes-optimal manner, thus opening new avenues for interpreting neural responses underlying inhibitory control. PMID:27047324

  10. Inseparability of Go and Stop in Inhibitory Control: Go Stimulus Discriminability Affects Stopping Behavior.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning; Yu, Angela J

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory control, the ability to stop or modify preplanned actions under changing task conditions, is an important component of cognitive functions. Two lines of models of inhibitory control have previously been proposed for human response in the classical stop-signal task, in which subjects must inhibit a default go response upon presentation of an infrequent stop signal: (1) the race model, which posits two independent go and stop processes that race to determine the behavioral outcome, go or stop; and (2) an optimal decision-making model, which posits that observers decides whether and when to go based on continually (Bayesian) updated information about both the go and stop stimuli. In this work, we probe the relationship between go and stop processing by explicitly manipulating the discrimination difficulty of the go stimulus. While the race model assumes the go and stop processes are independent, and therefore go stimulus discriminability should not affect the stop stimulus processing, we simulate the optimal model to show that it predicts harder go discrimination should result in longer go reaction time (RT), lower stop error rate, as well as faster stop-signal RT. We then present novel behavioral data that validate these model predictions. The results thus favor a fundamentally inseparable account of go and stop processing, in a manner consistent with the optimal model, and contradicting the independence assumption of the race model. More broadly, our findings contribute to the growing evidence that the computations underlying inhibitory control are systematically modulated by cognitive influences in a Bayes-optimal manner, thus opening new avenues for interpreting neural responses underlying inhibitory control. PMID:27047324

  11. Why does continental convergence stop

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, A.

    1985-01-01

    Convergence between India and Asia slowed at 45 Ma when they collided, but continues today. This requires that substantial proportions of the Indian and/or Asian lithospheric mantle are still being subducted. The resulting slab-pull is probably comparable with that from complete lithospheric slabs and may promote continued continental convergence even after collision. Since descending lithospheric slabs are present at all collision zones at the time of collision such continued convergence may be general after continental collisions. It may cease only when there is a major (global) plate reorganization which results in new forces on the convergent continents that may counteract the slab-pull. These inferences may be tested on the late Paleozoic collision between Gondwanaland and Laurasia. This is generally considered to have been complete by mid-Permian time (250 Ma). However, this may be only the time of docking of Gondwanaland with North America, not that of the cessation of convergence. Paleomagnetic polar-wander paths for the Gondwanide continents exhibit consistently greater latitudinal shifts from 250 Ma to 200 Ma than those of Laurasia when corrected for post-Triassic drift, suggesting that convergence continued through late Permian well into the Triassic. It may have been accommodated by crustal thickening under what is now the US Coastal Plain, or by strike-slip faulting. Convergence may have ceased only when Pangea began to fragment again, in which case the cause for its cessation may be related to the cause of continental fragmentation.

  12. Medical ethics--when to stop treatment.

    PubMed

    Stanley, J M

    1995-12-01

    Several misunderstandings regarding the question of when to stop treatment are examined by considering two frameworks for sorting out the different dimensions of the question. One framework addresses what is meant, and what is not meant, by 'stopping treatment'. The other plots various strategies of stopping treatment on a continuum of increasing degrees of invasiveness. While significant disagreements remain at important points, there is evidence of an emerging consensus in Western medicine: (1) that palliative care and counselling through the dying process should be increased whenever curative or life-sustaining treatment is curtailed; (ii) that any treatment that is not curative, but merely life-sustaining, should be stopped whenever a patient makes an authentic request to have it stopped; (iii) that genuinely futile treatment should not be offered even if requested; (iv) that much more thought and discussion is required to achieve a workable agreement about the definitions of 'futile' and 'inappropriate' treatment; and (v) that assistance in dying, although profoundly problematic, is no longer unthinkable. PMID:9422041

  13. Stopping is not an option: the evolution of unstoppable motion elements (primitives).

    PubMed

    Sosnik, Ronen; Chaim, Eliyahu; Flash, Tamar

    2015-08-01

    Stopping performance is known to depend on low-level motion features, such as movement velocity. It is not known, however, whether it is also subject to high-level motion constraints. Here, we report results of 15 subjects instructed to connect four target points depicted on a digitizing tablet and stop "as rapidly as possible" upon hearing a "stop" cue (tone). Four subjects connected target points with straight paths, whereas 11 subjects generated movements corresponding to coarticulation between adjacent movement components. For the noncoarticulating and coarticulating subjects, stopping performance was not correlated or only weakly correlated with motion velocity, respectively. The generation of a straight, point-to-point movement or a smooth, curved trajectory was not disturbed by the occurrence of a stop cue. Overall, the results indicate that stopping performance is subject to high-level motion constraints, such as the completion of a geometrical plan, and that globally planned movements, once started, must run to completion, providing evidence for the definition of a motion primitive as an unstoppable motion element. PMID:26041827

  14. Epoxy bond and stop etch fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Jerry A.; Weckwerth, Mark V.; Baca, Wes E.

    2000-01-01

    A class of epoxy bond and stop etch (EBASE) microelectronic fabrication techniques is disclosed. The essence of such techniques is to grow circuit components on top of a stop etch layer grown on a first substrate. The first substrate and a host substrate are then bonded together so that the circuit components are attached to the host substrate by the bonding agent. The first substrate is then removed, e.g., by a chemical or physical etching process to which the stop etch layer is resistant. EBASE fabrication methods allow access to regions of a device structure which are usually blocked by the presence of a substrate, and are of particular utility in the fabrication of ultrafast electronic and optoelectronic devices and circuits.

  15. 48 CFR 42.1303 - Stop-work orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stop-work orders. 42.1303... CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND AUDIT SERVICES Suspension of Work, Stop-Work Orders, and Government Delay of Work 42.1303 Stop-work orders. (a) Stop-work orders may be used, when appropriate, in any...

  16. 48 CFR 42.1303 - Stop-work orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Stop-work orders. 42.1303... CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND AUDIT SERVICES Suspension of Work, Stop-Work Orders, and Government Delay of Work 42.1303 Stop-work orders. (a) Stop-work orders may be used, when appropriate, in any...

  17. 48 CFR 42.1303 - Stop-work orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stop-work orders. 42.1303... CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND AUDIT SERVICES Suspension of Work, Stop-Work Orders, and Government Delay of Work 42.1303 Stop-work orders. (a) Stop-work orders may be used, when appropriate, in any...

  18. Can I Stop Myself From Having a Wet Dream?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can I Stop Myself From Having a Wet Dream? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can I Stop Myself From Having a Wet Dream? Print A A A Text Size Can I stop myself from having a wet dream? – Tom* You really can't stop wet dreams, ...

  19. 49 CFR 236.783 - Point, stop-indication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Point, stop-indication. 236.783 Section 236.783... Point, stop-indication. As applied to an automatic train stop or train control system without the use of roadway signals, a point where a signal displaying an aspect requiring a stop would be located....

  20. 49 CFR 236.783 - Point, stop-indication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Point, stop-indication. 236.783 Section 236.783... Point, stop-indication. As applied to an automatic train stop or train control system without the use of roadway signals, a point where a signal displaying an aspect requiring a stop would be located....

  1. Metallurgical examination of the LAMPF beam stop

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.D.; Cook, J.H.; Romero, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Clinton P. Anderson Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) provides physicists with 800-MeV protons and secondary particles with which to perform nuclear physics and other experiments. The secondary particles are generated by the interaction of the proton beam with graphite targets in the experimental area. Passage through these targets and those of the isotope production facility reduces the proton energy to approx. 500 MeV and spreads the beam out. At the face of the beam stop, the beam is believed to have a roughly Gaussian profile, with a full-width at half-maximum of approx. 60 mm. Allowing for beam attenuation in upstream targets, the power deposition in the beam stop is approx. 375 kW. In this paper, we report the results of metallographic examination of a beam stop that was used at LAMPF for approx. 3 yr. Examination of the copper plates and the Alloy 718 front plate shows that while both materials have become less ductile, only the copper plates have been sufficiently embrittled (along the grain boundaries) to lead to the breakup of the plates. The integrity of the beam stop system depends primarily on the condition of the front plate, which is the area of the pressure vessel most exposed to radiation damage. The tensile properties of the Alloy 718 sample tested indicate that the front plant of the beam stop should remain intact at similar proton doses. At present beam currents, this requires replacement of the beam stop approximately every 2 yr.

  2. Security Requirements for One Stop Government

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Georg E.

    The highest ranking e-government solutions are based on one-window, one-click or one stop government concepts. For Europe, the EU services directive sets new requirements for e-government, that have to be met till December 2009. Simple, easy to understand and complete information is one requirement. The other requirements are, that the services covered by this directive shall be available electronically and at a distance (which means mostly “by Internet”). Acceptable solutions are digitally signed mails and, as an alternative or supplement, transaction oriented online services. To implement this, a one stop government with document safe is best practice.

  3. Rotor self-lubricating axial stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blount, Dale H. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A plurality of lubricating plugs are disposed in the stationary backup face adjacent to the axial stop face of a rotating impeller mounted in a turbopump for pumping liquid oxygen or liquid hydrogen. The stop face and the backup face are those surfaces which engage when the axial load on the impeller exceeds the load balancing capability. The plugs have a truncated conical configuration so as to be trapped in the backup face, and are disposed at varying radii on the face to provide complete surface lubrication. The plugs may be formed from Teflon, Kel-F or bronze filled Teflon.

  4. Rotor self-lubricating axial stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blount, Dale H.

    1988-01-01

    A series of lubricating plugs is located in the stationary backup face adjacent to the axial stop face of a rotating impeller mounted in a turbopump for pumping liquid oxygen or liquid hydrogen. The stop face and the backup face are those surfaces which engage when the axial load on the impeller exceeds the load balancing capability. The plugs have a truncated conical configuration so as to be trapped in the backup face, and are placed at varying radii on the face to provide complete surface lubrication. The plugs may be formed from Teflon, Kel-F or bronze filled Teflon.

  5. Evaluating the Effects of Traffic on Driver Stopping and Turn Signal Use at a Stop Sign: A Systematic Replication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lebbon, Angela R.; Austin, John; Van Houten, Ron; Malenfant, Louis E.

    2007-01-01

    The current analyses of observational data found that oncoming traffic substantially affected driver stopping patterns and turn signal use at the target stop sign. The percentage of legal stops and turn signal use by drivers in the presence and absence of traffic was analyzed using a multi-element design. The results showed that legal stops were…

  6. Effects of Stop-Signal Probability in the Stop-Signal Paradigm: The N2/p3 Complex Further Validated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramautar, J.R.; Kok, A.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of frequency of occurrence of stop signals in the stop-signal paradigm. Presenting stop signals less frequently resulted in faster reaction times to the go stimulus and a lower probability of inhibition. Also, go stimuli elicited larger and somewhat earlier P3 responses when stop signals occurred…

  7. BEAM STOP DESIGN METHODOLOGY AND DESCRIPTION OF A NEW SNS BEAM STOP

    SciTech Connect

    Polsky, Yarom; Plum, Michael A; Geoghegan, Patrick J; Jacobs, Lorelei L; Lu, Wei; McTeer, Stephen Mark

    2010-01-01

    The design of accelerator components such as magnets, accelerator cavities and beam instruments tends to be a fairly standardized and collective effort within the particle accelerator community with well established performance, reliability and, in some cases, even budgetary criteria. Beam stop design, by contrast, has been comparatively subjective historically with much more general goals. This lack of rigor has lead to a variety of facility implementations with limited standardization and minimal consensus on approach to development within the particle accelerator community. At the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), for example, there are four high power beam stops in use, three of which have significantly different design solutions. This paper describes the design of a new off-momentum beam stop for the SNS. The technical description of the system will be complemented by a discussion of design methodology. This paper presented an overview of the new SNS HEBT off-momentum beam stop and outlined a methodology for beam stop system design. The new beam stop consists of aluminium and steel blocks cooled by a closed-loop forced-air system and is expected to be commissioned this summer. The design methodology outlined in the paper represents a basic description of the process, data, analyses and critical decisions involved in the development of a beam stop system.

  8. Car Stopping Distance on a Tabletop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugland, Ole Anton

    2013-05-01

    Stopping distances in car braking can be an intriguing topic in physics teaching. It illustrates some basic principles of physics, and sheds valuable light on students' attitude towards aggressive driving. Due to safety considerations, it can be difficult to make experiments with actual car braking.

  9. Car Stopping Distance on a Tabletop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haugland, Ole Anton

    2013-01-01

    Stopping distances in car braking can be an intriguing topic in physics teaching. It illustrates some basic principles of physics, and sheds valuable light on students' attitude towards aggressive driving. Due to safety considerations, it can be difficult to make experiments with actual car braking. (Contains 2 figures.)

  10. Brownian Optimal Stopping and Random Walks

    SciTech Connect

    Lamberton, D.

    2002-06-05

    One way to compute the value function of an optimal stopping problem along Brownian paths consists of approximating Brownian motion by a random walk. We derive error estimates for this type of approximation under various assumptions on the distribution of the approximating random walk.

  11. The Mathematics of Stopping your Car

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Eric

    2005-01-01

    In addition to looking for applications that can be profitably examined algebraically, numerically and geometrically it is also helpful to use ideas that typical students might find interesting. Most secondary students are eager to obtain their driving license and part of becoming a good driver is understanding how long it takes to stop your…

  12. Stop Rape Crisis Center: An Exemplary Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitcomb, Debra; And Others

    An exemplary project, the Stop Rape Crisis Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, which was initially funded by the Law Enforcement Assistance Administration (LEAA), is described. Issues addressed include the following: (1) initlal start-up and continuing program assessment; (2) staffing and the use of volunteers; (3) coordination with law enforcement…

  13. Proton stopping data from experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalbitzer, S.

    2005-10-01

    Proton stopping cross-sections in several solid and gaseous targets have been calculated by applying the Bethe-Bloch formalism to each electron shell. In addition, binary collision kinetics for both proton and electron in motion have been taken into account. The calculations closely match experimental data on C and Si by us and on He and Ne by TRIM.

  14. Why We Need to Stop Promoting Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollard, Mindy Miner

    2009-01-01

    Book displays have always been an important part of the library field. However, despite all the time and effort, children do not read them. In this article, the author stresses the need to stop promoting reading. Instead, she encourages library media specialists to help children find reading material they will be eager to read.

  15. Adolescents and AIDS: Stopping the Time Bomb.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yondorf, Barbara A.

    1990-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is spreading rapidly among teenagers. To stop this spread of HIV infection, experts agree that states need to include HIV/AIDS prevention and education as an integral part of comprehensive health education programs for…

  16. Bystanders Are the Key to Stopping Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padgett, Sharon; Notar, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    Bullying is the dominance over another. Bullying occurs when there is an audience. Peer bystanders provide an audience 85% of instances of bullying. If you remove the audience bullying should stop. The article is a review of literature (2002-2013) on the role of bystanders; importance of bystanders; why bystanders behave as they do; resources to…

  17. Computing Airplane Stopping Distance: Applications of Derivatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tylee, J. Louis

    1997-01-01

    Presents two real world applications that use derivatives and are related to computing the distance required to stop an airplane. Examines the curve-fitting techniques used to develop an equation for braking force and develops equations for the deceleration and speed. (DDR)

  18. Imager displays free fall in stop action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Microprocessor-controlled imaging system displays sequence of "frozen" images of free-falling object, using video cameras positioned along fall. Strobe lights flash as object passes each camera's viewfield. Sequence stored on video disk and displayed on television monitor is stop-action record of fall dynamics. With modification, system monitiors other high speed phenomena.

  19. Proton Stopping Power in Warm Dense Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginson, Drew; Chen, Sophia; Atzeni, Stefano; Gauthier, Maxence; Mangia, Feliciana; Marquès, Jean-Raphaël; Riquier, Raphaël; Fuchs, Julien

    2013-10-01

    Warm dense matter (WDM) research is fundamental to many fields of physics including fusion sciences, and astrophysical phenomena. In the WDM regime, particle stopping-power differs significantly from cold matter and ideal plasma due to free electron contributions, plasma correlation effects and electron degeneracy. The creation of WDM with temporal duration consistent with the particles probes is difficult to achieve experimentally. The short-pulse laser platform allows for the production of WDM along with relatively short bunches of protons compatible of such measurements, however, until recently, the intrinsic broadband proton spectrum was not well suited to investigate the stopping power directly. This difficulty has been overcome using a novel magnetic particle selector (ΔE/E = 10%) to select protons (in the range 100-1000 keV) as demonstrated with the ELFIE laser in LULI, France. These protons bunches probe high-density (5 × 1020 cm-3) gases (H, He) heated by a nanosecond laser to reach estimated temperatures above 100 eV. Measurement of the proton energy loss within the heated gas allows the stopping power to be determined quantitatively. The experimental results in cold matter are compared to preexisting models to give credibility to the measurement technique. The results from heated matter show that the stopping power of 450 keV protons is dramatically reduced within heated hydrogen plasma.

  20. The light stop quark with small stop-neutralino difference in the MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Milstene, C.; Carena, Marcela S.; Freitas, A.; Finch, A.; Sopczak, A.; Kluge, Hannelies

    2005-12-01

    The MSSM can explain electro-weak symmetry breaking if one scalar top quark (stop) is light. In addition, in this framework, the neutralino is a good dark matter candidate and for small stop-neutralino mass differences dm{sub i} = 30 GeV, co-annihilation plays an important role to match the results from WMAP and SDSS for the relic density in the universe. In this scenario, the stops mainly decays into charm and neutralino, making its discovery difficult at hadron colliders due to background and trigger limitations. They present results for the discovery reach of the ILC for a DM candidate as low as 0(5 GeV) based on a realistic experimental simulation. Moreover, the stop parameters could be measured with high precision.

  1. A simplified piping support system with seismic limit stops: Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, J.S.M.; Anderson, P.H.; McLean, J.L.

    1989-07-01

    An innovative method has been developed for providing seismic support to nuclear power plant piping. The method, called the Simplified Pipe Support System (SPSS), is based on the concept of permitting free thermal expansion but limiting seismic displacement through the use of pipe support stops with large clearances (Seismic Stops). The Seismic Stops are simple passive supports and are intended to replace the active snubbers that currently used through the nuclear industry. The development program reported here consisted of establishing a practical analytical method for determining the global nonlinear impact response; characterizing the local impact behavior; evaluating its applicability to current ASME Code criteria; demonstrating the concept through full-scale shake table testing; and lastly; verificating analysis methods by comparison to test data and to analyses of actual piping systems. 19 refs., 43 figs., 28 tabs.

  2. An active emergency stop design and protocol for unmanned vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Gary L.

    2006-05-01

    Emergency stop systems are an integral and lifesaving component of large unmanned vehicles. Some E-stop designs may require their own separate data radio link, and passive listening designs can fail due to false carrier signals, or be delayed by buffering of data if no protocol handshake is required. This paper describes an active emergency stop architecture with data handshake that can share a radio data link with primary command and control communications such as using JAUS. Given a data link where packet delivery latency is well below E-stop timeout time, the OCU and vehicle can exchange E-stop keepalive messages actively, with sequence numbers to guard against the possibility of old data deceiving the vehicle and keeping the E-stop from triggering. Since the vehicle and OCU are addressing each other and not merely looking for a carrier signal, E-stop communications can coexist with other data traffic so long as packet delivery time is well below E-stop timeout time. An example implementation is over a computer network link supporting TCP/IP, such as using common off-the-shelf 802.11 equipment, or similar radios that might achieve longer range with somewhat lower data rate. With 802.11, round-trip delivery times are generally below 10 milliseconds, providing margin for many retransmissions within a typical 500 millisecond E-stop timeout time. Another benefit of this active E-stop design is immediate triggering of a stop using an E-stop button. Rather than waiting for an E-stop timeout time to expire, an explicit message triggering a stop can be sent from the OCU-side E-stop button device to the vehicle E-stop circuitry (which can still be independent from the VCU). This will trigger a stop within the packet network delivery time, just 10 milliseconds in our example.

  3. Beam Stop For High-Power Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdermid, Iain S.; Williamson, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Graphite/aluminum plate absorbs most of light. Beam stop fits on standard optical mounting fixture. Graphite plate thick enough to absorb incident laser beam but thin enough to transfer heat quickly to heat sink. Device used for variety of blocking purposes. For example, blocks laser beam after it passes through experimental setup, or at each stage of setup so stages checked and tested in sequence. Negligible reflectance of device is valuable safety feature, protecting both users and equipment from reflections.

  4. USABC Development of 12 Volt Battery for Start-Stop Application: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Tataria, H.; Gross, O.; Bae, C.; Cunningham, B.; Barnes, J. A.; Deppe, J.; Neubauer, J.

    2015-02-01

    Global automakers are accelerating the development of fuel efficient vehicles, as a part of meeting regional regulatory CO2 emissions requirements. The micro hybrid vehicles with auto start-stop functionality are considered economical solutions for the stringent European regulations. Flooded lead acid batteries were initially considered the most economical solution for idle-stop systems. However, the dynamic charge acceptance (DCA) at lower state-of-charge (SOC) was limiting the life of the batteries. While improved lead-acid batteries with AGM and VRLA features have improved battery longevity, they do not last the life of the vehicle. The United States Advanced Battery Consortium (or USABC, a consortium of GM, Ford, and Chrysler) analyzed energy storage needs for a micro hybrid automobile with start-stop capability, and with a single power source. USABC has analyzed the start-stop behaviors of many drivers and has developed the requirements for the start-stop batteries (Table 3). The testing procedures to validate the performance and longevity were standardized and published. The guideline for the cost estimates calculations have also been provided, in order to determine the value of the newly developed modules. The analysis effort resulted in a set of requirements which will help the battery manufacturers to develop a module to meet the automotive Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) micro hybrid vehicle requirements. Battery developers were invited to submit development proposals and two proposals were selected for 50% cost share with USABC/DOE.

  5. Bucket shaking stops bunch dancing in Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; Tan, C.Y.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Bunches in Tevatron are known to be longitudinally unstable: their collective oscillations, also called dancing bunches, persist without any signs of decay. Typically, a damper is used to stop these oscillations, but recently, it was theoretically predicted that the oscillations can be stabilized by means of small bucket shaking. Dedicated measurements in Tevatron have shown that this method does stop the dancing. According to predictions of Refs. [2,3], the flattening of the bunch distribution at low amplitudes should make the bunch more stable against LLD. An experiment has been devised to flatten the distribution by modulating the RF phase at the low-amplitude synchrotron frequency for a few degrees of amplitude. These beam studies show that stabilisation really happens. After several consecutive shakings, the dancing disappears and the resulting bunch profile becomes smoother at the top. Although not shown in this report, sometimes a little divot forms at the centre of the distribution. These experiments confirm that resonant RF shaking flattens the bunch distribution at low amplitudes, and the dancing stops.

  6. Pattern playback revisited: unvoiced stop consonant perception.

    PubMed

    Kiefte, Michael; Kluender, Keith R

    2005-10-01

    Among the most influential publications in speech perception is Liberman, Delattre, and Cooper's [Am. J. Phys. 65, 497-516 (1952)] report on the identification of synthetic, voiceless stops generated by the Pattern Playback. Their map of stop consonant identification shows a highly complex relationship between acoustics and perception. This complex mapping poses a challenge to many classes of relatively simple pattern recognition models which are unable to capture the original finding of Liberman et al. that identification of /k/ was bimodal for bursts preceding front vowels but otherwise unimodal. A replication of this experiment was conducted in an attempt to reproduce these identification patterns using a simulation of the Pattern Playback device. Examination of spectrographic data from stimuli generated by the Pattern Playback revealed additional spectral peaks that are consistent with harmonic distortion characteristic of tube amplifiers of that era. Only when harmonic distortion was introduced did bimodal /k/ responses in front-vowel context emerge. The acoustic consequence of this distortion is to add, e.g., a high-frequency peak to midfrequency bursts or a midfrequency peak to a low-frequency burst. This likely resulted in additional /k/ responses when the second peak approximated the second formant of front vowels. Although these results do not challenge the main observations made by Liberman et al. that perception of stop bursts is context dependent, they do show that the mapping from acoustics to perception is much less complex without these additional distortion products. PMID:16266180

  7. Ion Stopping Powers and CT Numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Moyers, Michael F.; Sardesai, Milind; Sun, Sean; Miller, Daniel W.

    2010-10-01

    One of the advantages of ion beam therapy is the steep dose gradient produced near the ion's range. Use of this advantage makes knowledge of the stopping powers for all materials through which the beam passes critical. Most treatment planning systems calculate dose distributions using depth dose data measured in water and an algorithm that converts the kilovoltage X-ray computed tomography (CT) number of a given material to its linear stopping power relative to water. Some materials present in kilovoltage scans of patients and simulation phantoms do not lie on the standard tissue conversion curve. The relative linear stopping powers (RLSPs) of 21 different tissue substitutes and positioning, registration, immobilization, and beamline materials were measured in beams of protons accelerated to energies of 155, 200, and 250 MeV; carbon ions accelerated to 290 MeV/n; and iron ions accelerated to 970 MeV/n. These same materials were scanned with both kilovoltage and megavoltage CT scanners to obtain their CT numbers. Measured RLSPs and CT numbers were compared with calculated and/or literature values. Relationships of RLSPs to physical densities, electronic densities, kilovoltage CT numbers, megavoltage CT numbers, and water equivalence values converted by a treatment planning system are given. Usage of CT numbers and substitution of measured values into treatment plans to provide accurate patient and phantom simulations are discussed.

  8. CDC Vital Signs: New Hope for Stopping HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1.27 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips New Hope for Stopping HIV Testing and Medical Care ... AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) and early death. There's new hope today for stopping HIV in the US. ...

  9. The Impact on Traffic Safety in Bus Stop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kailun; Guang, Xiaoping; Qian, Yongsheng

    The article improves the attraction of public transportation system when the safety is taken into account during the selection of bus stops. In this paper, the characteristics of traffic conflict at bus stops is analyzed from various types of bus stops and the applicability of bus stations is proposed in comply with provisions of security. It has a certain reference value on selection of bus stops.

  10. 46 CFR 111.103-9 - Machinery stop stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Machinery stop stations. 111.103-9 Section 111.103-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Remote Stopping Systems § 111.103-9 Machinery stop stations. (a) Each forced...

  11. 46 CFR 111.103-9 - Machinery stop stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Machinery stop stations. 111.103-9 Section 111.103-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Remote Stopping Systems § 111.103-9 Machinery stop stations. (a) Each forced...

  12. 46 CFR 111.103-9 - Machinery stop stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Machinery stop stations. 111.103-9 Section 111.103-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Remote Stopping Systems § 111.103-9 Machinery stop stations. (a) Each forced...

  13. 46 CFR 111.103-9 - Machinery stop stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Machinery stop stations. 111.103-9 Section 111.103-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Remote Stopping Systems § 111.103-9 Machinery stop stations. (a) Each forced...

  14. 48 CFR 52.242-15 - Stop-Work Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stop-Work Order. 52.242-15... Stop-Work Order. As prescribed in 42.1305(b), insert the following clause. The 90-day period stated in the clause may be reduced to less than 90 days. Stop-Work Order (AUG 1989) (a) The Contracting...

  15. 48 CFR 52.242-15 - Stop-Work Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Stop-Work Order. 52.242-15... Stop-Work Order. As prescribed in 42.1305(b), insert the following clause. The 90-day period stated in the clause may be reduced to less than 90 days. Stop-Work Order (AUG 1989) (a) The Contracting...

  16. Post-Stop-Signal Adjustments: Inhibition Improves Subsequent Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissett, Patrick G.; Logan, Gordon D.

    2012-01-01

    Performance in the stop-signal paradigm involves a balance between going and stopping, and one way that this balance is struck is through shifting priority away from the go task, slowing responses after a stop signal, and improving the probability of inhibition. In 6 experiments, the authors tested whether there is a corresponding shift in…

  17. 32 CFR 636.30 - Stopping, standing and parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Stopping, standing and parking. 636.30 Section... Stewart, Georgia § 636.30 Stopping, standing and parking. (a) Drivers will not stop, park, or leave... or leave their vehicle off the roadway. In any case, parking or standing the vehicle upon the...

  18. 32 CFR 636.30 - Stopping, standing and parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stopping, standing and parking. 636.30 Section... Stewart, Georgia § 636.30 Stopping, standing and parking. (a) Drivers will not stop, park, or leave... or leave their vehicle off the roadway. In any case, parking or standing the vehicle upon the...

  19. 48 CFR 52.242-15 - Stop-Work Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stop-Work Order. 52.242-15... Stop-Work Order. As prescribed in 42.1305(b), insert the following clause. The 90-day period stated in the clause may be reduced to less than 90 days. Stop-Work Order (AUG 1989) (a) The Contracting...

  20. 14 CFR 25.109 - Accelerate-stop distance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... wet runway accelerate-stop distance, the stopping force from the wheel brakes may never exceed: (i) The wheel brakes stopping force determined in meeting the requirements of § 25.101(i) and paragraph (a) of this section; and (ii) The force resulting from the wet runway braking coefficient of...

  1. 14 CFR 25.109 - Accelerate-stop distance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... wet runway accelerate-stop distance, the stopping force from the wheel brakes may never exceed: (i) The wheel brakes stopping force determined in meeting the requirements of § 25.101(i) and paragraph (a) of this section; and (ii) The force resulting from the wet runway braking coefficient of...

  2. 14 CFR 25.109 - Accelerate-stop distance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... wet runway accelerate-stop distance, the stopping force from the wheel brakes may never exceed: (i) The wheel brakes stopping force determined in meeting the requirements of § 25.101(i) and paragraph (a) of this section; and (ii) The force resulting from the wet runway braking coefficient of...

  3. 14 CFR 25.109 - Accelerate-stop distance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... wet runway accelerate-stop distance, the stopping force from the wheel brakes may never exceed: (i) The wheel brakes stopping force determined in meeting the requirements of § 25.101(i) and paragraph (a) of this section; and (ii) The force resulting from the wet runway braking coefficient of...

  4. 33 CFR 183.528 - Fuel stop valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel stop valves. 183.528 Section...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.528 Fuel stop valves. (a) Each electrically operated fuel stop valve in a fuel line between the fuel tank and the...

  5. Some New Results on Stopping Power for Fast Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Helmut

    2009-03-10

    Using our large collection of experimental stopping power data, we compare these data with various theories and stopping codes, in order to judge the quality of both data and theories. We discuss the influence of the state of aggregation of the target upon stopping power, and the importance of choosing the best value of the ionization potential of water for medical applications.

  6. 14 CFR 398.8 - Number of intermediate stops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Number of intermediate stops. 398.8 Section 398.8 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION... Number of intermediate stops. (a) Except in Alaska, no more than one intermediate stop is permitted...

  7. 46 CFR 64.41 - Stop valve closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Stop valve closure. 64.41 Section 64.41 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.41 Stop valve closure. A stop valve that operates by a...

  8. 46 CFR 64.41 - Stop valve closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stop valve closure. 64.41 Section 64.41 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.41 Stop valve closure. A stop valve that operates by a...

  9. 46 CFR 64.41 - Stop valve closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stop valve closure. 64.41 Section 64.41 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.41 Stop valve closure. A stop valve that operates by a...

  10. 46 CFR 64.41 - Stop valve closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stop valve closure. 64.41 Section 64.41 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.41 Stop valve closure. A stop valve that operates by a...

  11. 33 CFR 183.528 - Fuel stop valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fuel stop valves. 183.528 Section...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.528 Fuel stop valves. (a) Each electrically operated fuel stop valve in a fuel line between the fuel tank and the...

  12. 33 CFR 183.528 - Fuel stop valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fuel stop valves. 183.528 Section...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.528 Fuel stop valves. (a) Each electrically operated fuel stop valve in a fuel line between the fuel tank and the...

  13. 33 CFR 183.528 - Fuel stop valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fuel stop valves. 183.528 Section...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.528 Fuel stop valves. (a) Each electrically operated fuel stop valve in a fuel line between the fuel tank and the...

  14. 46 CFR 64.41 - Stop valve closure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stop valve closure. 64.41 Section 64.41 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.41 Stop valve closure. A stop valve that operates by a...

  15. 33 CFR 183.528 - Fuel stop valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fuel stop valves. 183.528 Section...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.528 Fuel stop valves. (a) Each electrically operated fuel stop valve in a fuel line between the fuel tank and the...

  16. 46 CFR 111.103-9 - Machinery stop stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Machinery stop stations. 111.103-9 Section 111.103-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Remote Stopping Systems § 111.103-9 Machinery stop stations. (a) Each forced...

  17. A Class of Solvable Stopping Games

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Luis H. R.

    2008-12-15

    We consider a class of Dynkin games in the case where the underlying process evolves according to a one-dimensional but otherwise general diffusion. We establish general conditions under which both the value and the saddle point equilibrium exist and under which the exercise boundaries characterizing the saddle point strategy can be explicitly characterized in terms of a pair of standard first order necessary conditions for optimality. We also analyze those cases where an extremal pair of boundaries exists and investigate the overall impact of increased volatility on the equilibrium stopping strategies and their values.

  18. Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolognese, Jeffrey; Irish, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will be given at the 26th Annual Thermal Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 2015) hosted by the Goddard Spaceflight Center (GSFC) Thermal Engineering Branch (Code 545). A STOP analysis is a multidiscipline analysis, consisting of Structural, Thermal and Optical Performance Analyses, that is performed for all space flight instruments and satellites. This course will explain the different parts of performing this analysis. The student will learn how to effectively interact with each discipline in order to accurately obtain the system analysis results.

  19. Basal forebrain neuronal inhibition enables rapid behavioral stopping

    PubMed Central

    Mayse, Jeffrey D.; Nelson, Geoffrey M.; Avila, Irene; Gallagher, Michela; Lin, Shih-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive inhibitory control, the ability to rapidly suppress responses inappropriate for the context, is essential for flexible and adaptive behavior. While most studies on inhibitory control have focused on the fronto-basal-ganglia circuit, here we explore a novel hypothesis and show that rapid behavioral stopping is enabled by neuronal inhibition in the basal forebrain (BF). In rats performing the stop signal task, putative noncholinergic BF neurons with phasic bursting responses to the go signal were inhibited nearly completely by the stop signal. The onset of BF neuronal inhibition was tightly coupled with and temporally preceded the latency to stop, the stop signal reaction time. Artificial inhibition of BF activity in the absence of the stop signal was sufficient to reproduce rapid behavioral stopping. These results reveal a novel subcortical mechanism of rapid inhibitory control by the BF, which provides bidirectional control over the speed of response generation and inhibition. PMID:26368943

  20. Interaction between two stopped light pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yi-Hsin Lee, Meng-Jung Hung, Weilun Yu, Ite A.; Chen, Ying-Cheng; Chen, Yong-Fan

    2014-03-05

    The efficiency of a nonlinear optical process is proportional to the interaction time. We report a scheme of all-optical switching based on two motionless light pulses via the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency. One pulse was stopped as the stationary light pulse (SLP) and the other was stopped as stored light. The time of their interaction via the medium can be prolonged and, hence, the optical nonlinearity is greatly enhanced. Using a large optical density (OD) of 190, we achieved a very long interaction time of 6.9 μs. This can be analogous to the scheme of trapping light pulses by an optical cavity with a Q factor of 8×10{sup 9}. With the approach of using moving light pulses in the best situation, a switch can only be activated at 2 photons per atomic absorption cross section. With the approach of employing a SLP and a stored light pulse, a switch at only 0.56 photons was achieved and the efficiency is significantly improved. Moreover, the simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental data and show that the efficiency can be further improved by increasing the OD of the medium. Our work advances the technology in quantum information manipulation utilizing photons.

  1. To Stop or Not to Stop--Kinematics and the Yellow Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, J. Fred

    1981-01-01

    Describes an exercise involving the use of kinematics to decide if one should stop or try and get through an intersection when the traffic light turns yellow. Gives students' experience in recording data, doing simple calculations and connecting classroom studies to real world experiences. (Author/SK)

  2. Polio eradication in Nigeria and the role of the National Stop Transmission of Polio program, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Waziri, Ndadilnasiya E; Ohuabunwo, Chima J; Nguku, Patrick M; Ogbuanu, Ikechukwu U; Gidado, Saheed; Biya, Oladayo; Wiesen, Eric S; Vertefeuille, John; Townes, Debra; Oyemakinde, Akin; Nwanyanwu, Okey; Gassasira, Alex; Mkanda, Pascal; Muhammad, Ado J G; Elmousaad, Hashim A; Nasidi, Abdulsalami; Mahoney, Frank J

    2014-11-01

    To strengthen the Nigeria polio eradication program at the operational level, the National Stop Transmission of Polio (N-STOP) program was established in July 2012 as a collaborative effort of the National Primary Health Care Development Agency, the Nigerian Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program, and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Since its inception, N-STOP has recruited and trained 125 full-time staff, 50 residents in training, and 50 ad hoc officers. N-STOP officers, working at national, state, and district levels, have conducted enumeration outreaches in 46,437 nomadic and hard-to-reach settlements in 253 districts of 19 states, supported supplementary immunization activities in 236 districts, and strengthened routine immunization in 100 districts. Officers have also conducted surveillance assessments, outbreak response, and applied research as needs evolved. The N-STOP program has successfully enhanced Global Polio Eradication Initiative partnerships and outreach in Nigeria, providing an accessible, flexible, and culturally competent technical workforce at the front lines of public health. N-STOP will continue to respond to polio eradication program needs and remain a model for other healthcare initiatives in Nigeria and elsewhere. PMID:25316824

  3. Stop motion microphotography of laser driven plates

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A.M.; Trott, W.M.

    1994-09-01

    Laser driven plates have been used for several years for high velocity shock wave and impact studies. Recent questions about the integrity and ablation rates of these plates coupled with an improved capability for microscopic stop motion photography led to this study. For these experiments, the plates were aluminum, coated on the ends of optical fibers. A high power laser pulse in the fiber ionizes the aluminum at the fiber/coating interface. The plasma thus created accelerates the remaining aluminum to high velocities, several kilometers per second. We defined {open_quotes}thick{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}thin{close_quotes} coatings as those where a flying plate (flyer) was launched vs. the material being completely ionized. Here we were specifically interested in the thick/thin boundary to develop data for the numerical models attempting to predict flyer behavior.

  4. Remune trial will stop; new trials planned.

    PubMed

    James, J S

    1999-05-21

    A clinical trial using remune, the anti-HIV vaccine developed by the late Dr. Jonas Salk, has been ended. The study is a clinical-endpoint trial which looks for statistically significant differences in AIDS sickness or death between patients who add remune to their treatment regimens versus those who use a placebo. Agouron Pharmaceuticals and the Immune Response Corporation who were conducting the trial announced their decision to stop it after an analysis by the Data Safety Monitoring Board. No differences in clinical endpoints were found and it was projected that continuing the trial would likely not find any. The companies are now planning two new Phase III trials using viral load testing rather than clinical endpoints as study criteria. PMID:11366461

  5. Stop outbreak of SARS with infrared cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yigang M.

    2004-04-01

    SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, commonly known as Atypical Pneumonia in mainland China) caused 8422 people affected and resulting in 918 deaths worldwide in half year. This disease can be transmitted by respiratory droplets or by contact with a patient's respiratory secretions. This means it can be spread out very rapidly through the public transportations by the travelers with the syndrome. The challenge was to stop the SARS carriers traveling around by trains, airplanes, coaches and etc. It is impractical with traditional oral thermometers or spot infrared thermometers to screen the tens of travelers with elevated body temperature from thousands of normal travelers in hours. The thermal imager with temperature measurement function is a logical choice for this special application although there are some limitations and drawbacks. This paper discusses the real SARS applications of industrial infrared cameras in China from April to July 2003.

  6. Stop Codon Reassignment in the Wild

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, Natalia; Schwientek, Patrick; Tripp, H. James; Rinke, Christian; Pati, Amrita; Huntemann, Marcel; Visel, Axel; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Rubin, Edward

    2014-03-21

    Since the discovery of the genetic code and protein translation mechanisms (1), a limited number of variations of the standard assignment between unique base triplets (codons) and their encoded amino acids and translational stop signals have been found in bacteria and phages (2-3). Given the apparent ubiquity of the canonical genetic code, the design of genomically recoded organisms with non-canonical codes has been suggested as a means to prevent horizontal gene transfer between laboratory and environmental organisms (4). It is also predicted that genomically recoded organisms are immune to infection by viruses, under the assumption that phages and their hosts must share a common genetic code (5). This paradigm is supported by the observation of increased resistance of genomically recoded bacteria to phages with a canonical code (4). Despite these assumptions and accompanying lines of evidence, it remains unclear whether differential and non-canonical codon usage represents an absolute barrier to phage infection and genetic exchange between organisms. Our knowledge of the diversity of genetic codes and their use by viruses and their hosts is primarily derived from the analysis of cultivated organisms. Advances in single-cell sequencing and metagenome assembly technologies have enabled the reconstruction of genomes of uncultivated bacterial and archaeal lineages (6). These initial findings suggest that large scale systematic studies of uncultivated microorganisms and viruses may reveal the extent and modes of divergence from the canonical genetic code operating in nature. To explore alternative genetic codes, we carried out a systematic analysis of stop codon reassignments from the canonical TAG amber, TGA opal, and TAA ochre codons in assembled metagenomes from environmental and host-associated samples, single-cell genomes of uncultivated bacteria and archaea, and a collection of phage sequences

  7. Report on the first VLHC photon stop cryogenic design experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Geynisman et al.

    2003-09-15

    As part of Fermilab's study of a Very Large Hadron Collider, a water-cooled photon stop was proposed as a device to intercept the synchrotron radiation emitted by the high-energy proton beams in the high field superconducting magnets with minimal plug-cooling power. Photon stops are radiation absorbers operating at room temperature that protrude into the beam tube at the end of each bending magnet to scrape the synchrotron light emitted by the beam one magnet up-stream. Among the technological challenges regarding photon stops is their cryo-design. The photon stop is water-cooled and operates in a cryogenic environment. A careful cryo-design is therefore essential to enable operation at minimum heat transfer between the room temperature sections and the cryogenic parts. A photon stop cryo-design was developed and a prototype was built. This paper presents the results of the cryogenic experiments conducted on the first VLHC photon stop prototype.

  8. Sex between men in the context of HIV: The AIDS 2008 Jonathan Mann Memorial Lecture in health and human rights.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Jorge; Izazola-Licea, Jose Antonio; Beyrer, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) have been among the most affected populations by HIV since the AIDS pandemic was first identified in the 1980s. Evidence from a wide range of studies show that these men remain at the highest risk for HIV acquisition in both developed and developing countries, and that despite three decades of evidence of their vulnerability to HIV, they remain under-served and under-studied. Prevention strategies targeted to MSM are markedly under-funded in most countries, leading to limited access to health services including prevention, treatment, and care. We explore the global epidemic among MSM in 2008, the limited funding available globally to respond to these epidemics, and the human rights contexts and factors which drive HIV spread and limit HIV responses for these men.What do we mean by the term MSM? MSM is a construct from the 1990s that tries to capture behavior and not identity. It was crafted to avoid stigmatizing and culturally laden terms such as gay or bisexual, which do not capture the wide diversity of orientations, sexual practices, cultures, and contextual settings in which male same-sex behaviors occur, and where HIV transmission and acquisition risks are centered. MSM includes both gay and non-gay identified men, bisexual men, and MSM who identify themselves as heterosexuals. It also includes men engaging in "situational" sex between men, such as can occur in prisons, schools, militaries or other environments; and it includes male sex workers who may be of any orientation but are often at very high risk for HIV. MSM may include some biologically male transgender persons, though some do not identify as male. And MSM includes a wide array of traditional and local terms worldwide-with enormous cultural diversity in Asia, Africa, Latin America and elsewhere. We use the term MSM here at its most inclusive. PMID:19108725

  9. Sex between men in the context of HIV: The AIDS 2008 Jonathan Mann Memorial Lecture in health and human rights

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) have been among the most affected populations by HIV since the AIDS pandemic was first identified in the 1980s. Evidence from a wide range of studies show that these men remain at the highest risk for HIV acquisition in both developed and developing countries, and that despite three decades of evidence of their vulnerability to HIV, they remain under-served and under-studied. Prevention strategies targeted to MSM are markedly under-funded in most countries, leading to limited access to health services including prevention, treatment, and care. We explore the global epidemic among MSM in 2008, the limited funding available globally to respond to these epidemics, and the human rights contexts and factors which drive HIV spread and limit HIV responses for these men. What do we mean by the term MSM? MSM is a construct from the 1990s that tries to capture behavior and not identity. It was crafted to avoid stigmatizing and culturally laden terms such as gay or bisexual, which do not capture the wide diversity of orientations, sexual practices, cultures, and contextual settings in which male same-sex behaviors occur, and where HIV transmission and acquisition risks are centered. MSM includes both gay and non-gay identified men, bisexual men, and MSM who identify themselves as heterosexuals. It also includes men engaging in "situational" sex between men, such as can occur in prisons, schools, militaries or other environments; and it includes male sex workers who may be of any orientation but are often at very high risk for HIV. MSM may include some biologically male transgender persons, though some do not identify as male. And MSM includes a wide array of traditional and local terms worldwide–with enormous cultural diversity in Asia, Africa, Latin America and elsewhere. We use the term MSM here at its most inclusive. PMID:19108725

  10. CALCULATION OF STOPPING POWER VALUES AND RANGES OF FAST IONS.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-03-18

    STOPOW calculates a set of stopping power values and ranges of fast ions in matter for any materials. Furthermore STOPOW can calculate a set of values for one special auxiliary function (e.g. kinematic factors, track structure parameters, time of flight or correction factors in the stopping function) . The user chooses the physical units for stopping powers and ranges and the energy range for calculations.

  11. Barkas effect for antiproton stopping in H2.

    PubMed

    Lodi Rizzini, E; Bianconi, A; Bussa, M P; Corradini, M; Donzella, A; Venturelli, L; Bargiotti, M; Bertin, A; Bruschi, M; Capponi, M; De Castro, S; Fabbri, L; Faccioli, P; Galli, D; Giacobbe, B; Marconi, U; Massa, I; Piccinini, M; Poli, M; Semprini Cesari, N; Spighi, R; Vagnoni, V; Vecchi, S; Villa, M; Vitale, A; Zoccoli, A; Gorchakov, O E; Pontecorvo, G B; Rozhdestvensky, A M; Tretyak, V I; Guaraldo, C; Petrascu, C; Balestra, F; Busso, L; Denisov, O Y; Ferrero, L; Garfagnini, R; Grasso, A; Maggiora, A; Piragino, G; Tosello, F; Zosi, G; Margagliotti, G; Santi, L; Tessaro, S

    2002-10-28

    We report the stopping power of molecular hydrogen for antiprotons of kinetic energy above the maximum (approximately 100 keV) with the purpose of comparing with the proton one. Our result is consistent with a positive difference in antiproton-proton stopping powers above approximately 250 keV and with a maximum difference between the stopping powers of 21%+/-3% at around 600 keV. PMID:12398596

  12. Stopping of energetic light ions in elemental matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, J. F.

    1999-02-01

    The formalism for calculating the stopping of energetic light ions (H, He, and Li) at energies above 1 MeV/u, has advanced to the point that stopping powers may now be calculated with an accuracy of a few percent for all elemental materials. Although the subject has been of interest for a century, only recently have the final required corrections been understood and evaluated. The theory of energetic ion stopping is reviewed with emphasis on those aspects that pertain to the calculation of accurate stopping powers.

  13. Stop search in the compressed region via semileptonic decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Gao, Christina; Li, Lingfeng; Neill, Nicolás A.

    2016-05-01

    In supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, the superpartners of the top quark (stops) play the crucial role in addressing the naturalness problem. For direct pair-production of stops with each stop decaying into a top quark plus the lightest neutralino, the standard stop searches have difficulty finding the stop for a compressed spectrum where the mass difference between the stop and the lightest neutralino is close to the top quark mass, because the events look too similar to the large toverline{t} background. With an additional hard ISR jet, the two neutralinos from the stop decays are boosted in the opposite direction and they can give rise to some missing transverse energy. This may be used to distinguish the stop decays from the backgrounds. In this paper we study the semileptonic decay of such signal events for the compressed mass spectrum. Although the neutrino from the W decay also produces some missing transverse energy, its momentum can be reconstructed from the kinematic assumptions and mass-shell conditions. It can then be subtracted from the total missing transverse momentum to obtain the neutralino contribution. Because it suffers from less backgrounds, we show that the semileptonic decay channel has a better discovery reach than the fully hadronic decay channel along the compressed line {m}_{tilde{t}}-{m}_{tilde{χ}}≈ {m}_t . With 300 fb-1, the 13 TeV LHC can discover the stop up to 500 GeV, covering the most natural parameter space region.

  14. Legal briefing: voluntarily stopping eating and drinking.

    PubMed

    Pope, Thaddeus Mason; West, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    This issue's "Legal Briefing" column covers recent legal developments involving voluntarily stopping eating and drinking (VSED). Over the past decade, clinicians and bioethicists have increasingly recognized VSED as a medically and ethically appropriate means to hasten death. Most recently, in September 2013, the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO) called on its 2,000 member hospices to develop policies and guidelines addressing VSED. And VSED is getting more attention not only in healthcare communities, but also in the general public. For example, VSED was recently highlighted on the front page of the New York Times and in other national and local media. Nevertheless, despite the growing interest in VSED, there remains little on-point legal authority and only sparse bioethics literature analyzing its legality.This article aims to fill this gap. Specifically, we focus on new legislative, regulatory, and judicial acts that clarify the permissibility of VSED. We categorize these legal developments into the following seven categories: 1. Definition of VSED. 2. Uncertainty Whether Oral Nutrition and Hydration Are Medical Treatment. 3. Uncertainty Regarding Providers' Obligations to Patients Who Choose VSED. 4. Judicial Guidance from Australia. 5. Judicial Guidance from the United Kingdom. PMID:24779321

  15. IMPLEMENTATION OF SEISMIC STOPS IN PIPING SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    BEZLER,P.

    1993-02-01

    Commonwealth Edison has submitted a request to NRC to replace the snubbers in the Reactor Coolant Bypass Line of Byron Station -Unit 2 with gapped pipe supports. The specific supports intended for use are commercial units designated ''Seismic Stops'' manufactured by Robert L. Cloud Associates, Inc. (RLCA). These devices have the physical appearance of snubbers and are essentially spring supports incorporating clearance gaps sized for the Byron Station application. Although the devices have a nonlinear stiffness characteristic, their design adequacy is demonstrated through the use of a proprietary linear elastic piping analysis code ''GAPPIPE'' developed by RLCA. The code essentially has all the capabilities of a conventional piping analysis code while including an equivalent linearization technique to process the nonlinear spring elements. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has assisted the NRC staff in its evaluation of the RLCA implementation of the equivalent linearization technique and the GAPPIPE code. Towards this end, BNL performed a detailed review of the theoretical basis for the method, an independent evaluation of the Byron piping using the nonlinear time history capability of the ANSYS computer code and by result comparisons to the RLCA developed results, an assessment of the adequacy of the response estimates developed with GAPPIPE. Associated studies included efforts to verify the ANSYS analysis results and the development of bounding calculations for the Byron Piping using linear response spectrum methods.

  16. Implementation of Seismic Stops in Piping Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bezler, P.; Simos, N.; Wang, Y.K.

    1993-02-01

    Commonwealth Edison has submitted a request to NRC to replace the snubbers in the Reactor Coolant Bypass Line of Byron Station-Unit 2 with gapped pipe supports. The specific supports intended for use are commercial units designated ''Seismic Stops'' manufactured by Robert L. Cloud Associates, Inc. (RLCA). These devices have the physical appearance of snubbers and are essentially spring supports incorporating clearance gaps sized for the Byron Station application. Although the devices have a nonlinear stiffness characteristic, their design adequacy is demonstrated through the use of a proprietary linear elastic piping analysis code ''GAPPIPE'' developed by RLCA. The code essentially has all the capabilities of a conventional piping analysis code while including an equivalent linearization technique to process the nonlinear spring elements. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has assisted the NRC staff in its evaluation of the RLCA implementation of the equivalent Linearization technique and the GAPPIPE code. Towards this end, BNL performed a detailed review of the theoretical basis for the method, an independent evaluation of the Byron piping using the nonlinear time history capability of the ANSYS computer code and by result comparisons to the RLCA developed results, an assessment of the adequacy of the response estimates developed with GAPPIPE. Associated studies included efforts to verify the ANSYS analysis results and the development of bounding calculations for the Byron Piping using linear response spectrum methods.

  17. 48 CFR 42.1303 - Stop-work orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... fixed-price or cost-reimbursement supply, research and development, or service contract if work stoppage... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stop-work orders. 42.1303... CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND AUDIT SERVICES Suspension of Work, Stop-Work Orders, and Government Delay...

  18. 48 CFR 42.1303 - Stop-work orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... fixed-price or cost-reimbursement supply, research and development, or service contract if work stoppage... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stop-work orders. 42.1303... CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND AUDIT SERVICES Suspension of Work, Stop-Work Orders, and Government Delay...

  19. Nuclear stopping power in high-energy collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    1987-01-01

    We study the degree of nuclear stopping from the viewpoint of the slowing down of a nucleon as it passes through a nucleus. The analysis of the p + A ..-->.. p + X data of Bailey shows that the degree of nuclear stopping is large. 21 refs., 4 figs.

  20. The Glottal Stop in Siamese: Predictability in Phonological Description

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandour, Jack

    1974-01-01

    It is asserted that the glottal stop in Thai must be present in underlying forms, even though it could be derived by phonological rule. It is argued that unless the glottal stop is present in the underlying form, certain linguistically significant generalizations are either obscured or lost altogether. (RM)

  1. 46 CFR 169.692 - Remote stop stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remote stop stations. 169.692 Section 169.692 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Machinery and Electrical Electrical Installations on Vessels of 100 Gross Tons and Over § 169.692 Remote stop stations. In lieu of the remote...

  2. 49 CFR 37.201 - Intermediate and rest stops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... However, if the operator does not make the stop, the operator shall explain to the passenger making the request the reason for its decision not to do so. ... making an express run of three hours or more without a rest stop, and a passenger with a disability...

  3. Putting it All Together: Has One-Stop Shopping Arrived?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    Reviews the current state of "one-stop shopping" for telecom services. Discusses regulatory obstacles; administrative problems with single billing; and resistance of telecom providers to change. Concludes that the leading one-stop shopping providers will be individual carriers who offer cost savings. (AEF)

  4. Stopping supersonic beams with atomic and molecular coilguns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narevicius, Edvardas

    2008-05-01

    We report a method that enables the stopping and trapping of any paramagnetic atom or molecule using a series of pulsed electromagnetic coils. Results of stopping metastable neon and molecular oxygen with a 64 stage coilgun will be presented and applications to fundamental problems in physics and chemistry discussed.

  5. Solenoid permits remote control of stop watch and assures restarting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kodai, C.

    1964-01-01

    Stop watch which may be remotely controlled by the use of a solenoid mechanism is described. When the solenoid is energized, the coil spring pulls the lever arm and starts the balance wheel. When it is not energized, the spring pulls the lever and stops the watch.

  6. 46 CFR 169.692 - Remote stop stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Remote stop stations. 169.692 Section 169.692 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Machinery and Electrical Electrical Installations on Vessels of 100 Gross Tons and Over § 169.692 Remote stop stations. In lieu of the remote...

  7. 32 CFR 636.30 - Stopping, standing and parking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Stopping, standing and parking. 636.30 Section 636.30 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION (SPECIFIC INSTALLATIONS) Fort Stewart, Georgia § 636.30 Stopping, standing...

  8. A gas cell for stopping, storing and polarizing radioactive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sytema, A.; van den Berg, J. E.; Böll, O.; Chernowitz, D.; Dijck, E. A.; Grasdijk, J. O.; Hoekstra, S.; Jungmann, K.; Mathavan, S. C.; Meinema, C.; Mohanty, A.; Müller, S. E.; Nuñez Portela, M.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Pijpker, C.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W.

    2016-06-01

    A radioactive beam of 20Na is stopped in a gas cell filled with Ne gas. The stopped particles are polarized by optical pumping. The degree of polarization that can be achieved is studied. A maximum polarization of 50% was found. The dynamic processes in the cell are described with a phenomenological model.

  9. Stopping for School Buses. Traffic Laws Commentary Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaw, E. Eugene

    The degree of uniformity among State laws requiring drivers to stop for school buses receiving or discharging children is not such that drivers could reasonably be expected to know these laws. Because of the wide variation of State laws and the inherent vulnerability of school children and of any vehicle stopping on a highway, there can be no…

  10. [Loosening of a Calcaneo-Stop Screw after Trampolining].

    PubMed

    Trieb, K; Fingernagel, T; Petershofer, A; Hofstaetter, S G

    2015-06-01

    Flexible flatfoot is a common malalignment in the paediatric population. Arthroereisis with a calcaneo-stop screw is an effective surgical procedure for treating juvenile flexible flatfoot after conservative measures have been fully exploited. In the present report, we describe the case of a loosening of a calcaneo-stop screw in a 12-year-old youth after excessive trampolining. PMID:25710392

  11. Tongue-Palate Contact of Perceptually Acceptable Alveolar Stops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice; Gibbon, Fiona E.; O'Donovan, Cliona

    2013-01-01

    Increased tongue-palate contact for perceptually acceptable alveolar stops has been observed in children with speech sound disorders (SSD). This is a retrospective study that further investigated this issue by using quantitative measures to compare the target alveolar stops /t/, /d/ and /n/ produced in words by nine children with SSD (20 tokens of…

  12. 46 CFR 58.01-25 - Means of stopping machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Means of stopping machinery. 58.01-25 Section 58.01-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-25 Means of stopping machinery. Machinery...

  13. One-Stop Career Centers. Trends and Issues Alerts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imel, Susan

    In an effort to shift the focus of employment programs from unemployment to reemployment, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) is funding the development and implementation of a one-stop employment system. The DOL has largely left states free to design their one-stop systems provided programs have these features: (1) universality, (2) customer…

  14. One-Stop Career Centers. ERIC Digest No. 208.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imel, Susan

    Since the introduction of one-stop employment systems, many states have attempted to merge traditional employment and training services to provide consolidated programs and easier customer access to services. The Workforce Investment Act (WIA), passed in 1998, requires the formation of locally based one-stop service delivery systems to deliver…

  15. 46 CFR 58.01-25 - Means of stopping machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Means of stopping machinery. 58.01-25 Section 58.01-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-25 Means of stopping machinery. Machinery...

  16. 46 CFR 58.01-25 - Means of stopping machinery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Means of stopping machinery. 58.01-25 Section 58.01-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-25 Means of stopping machinery. Machinery...

  17. 77 FR 25788 - Request for Information Regarding Stop Loss Insurance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ... Loss Insurance AGENCIES: Internal Revenue Service, Department of the Treasury; Employee Benefits... information regarding the use of stop loss insurance by group health plans and their plan sponsors, with a focus on the prevalence and consequences of stop loss insurance at low attachment points. Given...

  18. Simulating fail-stop in asynchronous distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabel, Laura; Marzullo, Keith

    1994-01-01

    The fail-stop failure model appears frequently in the distributed systems literature. However, in an asynchronous distributed system, the fail-stop model cannot be implemented. In particular, it is impossible to reliably detect crash failures in an asynchronous system. In this paper, we show that it is possible to specify and implement a failure model that is indistinguishable from the fail-stop model from the point of view of any process within an asynchronous system. We give necessary conditions for a failure model to be indistinguishable from the fail-stop model, and derive lower bounds on the amount of process replication needed to implement such a failure model. We present a simple one-round protocol for implementing one such failure model, which we call simulated fail-stop.

  19. Stopping power of two-dimensional spin quantum electron gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ya; Jiang, Wei; Yi, Lin

    2015-04-01

    Quantum effects can contribute significantly to the electronic stopping powers in the interactions between the fast moving beams and the degenerate electron gases. From the Pauli equation, the spin quantum hydrodynamic (SQHD) model is derived and used to calculate the stopping power and the induced electron density for protons moving above a two-dimensional (2D) electron gas with considering spin effect under an external in-plane magnetic field. In our calculation, the stopping power is not only modulated by the spin direction, but also varied with the strength of the spin effect. It is demonstrated that the spin effect can obviously enhance or reduce the stopping power of a 2D electron gas within a laboratory magnetic field condition (several tens of Tesla), thus a negative stopping power appears at some specific proton velocity, which implies the protons drain energy from the Pauli gas, showing another significant example of the low-dimensional physics.

  20. Stop codons in bacteria are not selectively equivalent

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The evolution and genomic stop codon frequencies have not been rigorously studied with the exception of coding of non-canonical amino acids. Here we study the rate of evolution and frequency distribution of stop codons in bacterial genomes. Results We show that in bacteria stop codons evolve slower than synonymous sites, suggesting the action of weak negative selection. However, the frequency of stop codons relative to genomic nucleotide content indicated that this selection regime is not straightforward. The frequency of TAA and TGA stop codons is GC-content dependent, with TAA decreasing and TGA increasing with GC-content, while TAG frequency is independent of GC-content. Applying a formal, analytical model to these data we found that the relationship between stop codon frequencies and nucleotide content cannot be explained by mutational biases or selection on nucleotide content. However, with weak nucleotide content-dependent selection on TAG, -0.5 < Nes < 1.5, the model fits all of the data and recapitulates the relationship between TAG and nucleotide content. For biologically plausible rates of mutations we show that, in bacteria, TAG stop codon is universally associated with lower fitness, with TAA being the optimal for G-content < 16% while for G-content > 16% TGA has a higher fitness than TAG. Conclusions Our data indicate that TAG codon is universally suboptimal in the bacterial lineage, such that TAA is likely to be the preferred stop codon for low GC content while the TGA is the preferred stop codon for high GC content. The optimization of stop codon usage may therefore be useful in genome engineering or gene expression optimization applications. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Michail Gelfand, Arcady Mushegian and Shamil Sunyaev. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers’ Comments section. PMID:22974057

  1. Stopping power of light ions near the maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Some of the most interesting recent results are reviewed: in the regime of high ion velocities, there is large progress in the understanding of the stopping process beyond the first Born approximation (Bethe theory) due to theoretical and experimental investigations of the Barkas effect. Both investigations show that close collisions contribute to the Z31 correction, the importance of which becomes larger at lower ion velocities. For stopping measurements in metals and in semiconductors, the cooperation of two labs using different techniques has increased the attainable precision. The data may be compared to BEA calculations. The physical and chemical state of the material is of importance for ion stopping near the maximum on targets whose valence electrons dominate the stopping process. Ziegler has recently given a systematic treatment of the stopping of He and Li ions in hydrocarbons, using a core-and-bonds model. We have shown that, also for heavier compounds (Al 2O 3 and SiO 2), large chemical effects are found. The stopping properties of these compounds can be well described by BEA calculations. Sabin et al. (1985) have predicted large phase effects for alkalis: for lithium and sodium targets and protons as projectiles they find a stopping ratio (vapor to solid) which exceeds a factor of 2 near the stopping maximum. The concept of an "effective charge" is useful to predict stopping powers for heavier ions from proton stopping data. For low ion velocities (near the velocity proportional region) and for some substances, the value of the He effective charge may exceed the value suggested by Ziegler et al. considerably.

  2. Brain networks subserving fixed versus performance-adjusted delay stop trials in a stop signal task.

    PubMed

    Fauth-Bühler, Mira; de Rover, Mischa; Rubia, Katya; Garavan, Hugh; Abbott, Sanja; Clark, Luke; Vollstädt-Klein, Sabine; Mann, Karl; Schumann, Gunter; Robbins, Trevor W

    2012-11-01

    The stop signal task is a widely used tool for assessing inhibitory motor control. Two main task variants exist: (1) a fixed delay version, where all volunteers complete the same trials, resulting in performance differences due to individual variation in inhibitory capacity, and (2) a performance-adjusted version that uses a tracking algorithm to equate performance and task difficulty across subjects, leading to ∼50% successful inhibition for every participant. Our aim was to investigate commonalities, mean differences and between-subject variability in brain activation for successful response inhibition between the performance-adjusted and fixed delay version. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in 18 healthy individuals, using a within-subject, within-task design where both adjusting and fixed delay trials were analysed separately. Conjunction analyses identified a network of areas involved in successful response inhibition in both task versions. In comparing the fixed and performance-adjusted versions, we found no significant differences between delay conditions during successful inhibition. While activation measures in the inhibitory networks of both delay variants were highly comparable, the neural responses to fixed delay trials were more variable across participants. This suggests that performance-adjusted stop signal tasks may be more suitable for studies in which the performance differences need to be controlled for, such as for developmental or clinical studies. Fixed delay stop signal tasks may be more appropriate in studies assessing the neural basis of individual differences in performance, such as studies of personality traits or genetic associations. PMID:22820235

  3. Resources on Global Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, H. Thomas; Czarra, Frederick R.; Smith, Andrew F.

    1998-01-01

    Provides a selective list of 19 associations that offer resources for teachers. Includes contact and Internet information, and a list of selected publications for each association. Incorporates a review essay by Ron Herring and Jonathan Weil entitled, "The Contemporary World History Project for Culturally Diverse Students." (DSK)

  4. Electromyographic activity of lower limbs to stop baseball batting.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroki; Miura, Akito; Yoshie, Michiko; Kudo, Kazutoshi

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the muscle activation pattern of the lower limbs for the stopping motion of baseball batting by recording surface electromyography (EMG) from 8 muscles, the left and right rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), tibialis anterior (TA), and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles. First, muscle activities for 'Swing' and 'Stopping' trials were examined in 10 skilled baseball players and 10 unskilled novices. Second, the characteristics of EMG activities for 'Stopping' were compared between the 2 groups. The peak latencies of EMG were significantly shorter in 'Stopping' than in 'Swing' at the right-TA, left-BF, and left-MG between both groups. The peak amplitudes of EMG activity were significantly larger in 'Swing' than in 'Stopping' at the right-TA, left-BF, and left-MG in both groups. In addition, the peak amplitudes of EMG activity for 'Stopping' were significantly larger in the players than in novices at the right-RF and right-TA. The characteristics of EMG activity clearly differed between 'Swing' and 'Stopping,' and between baseball players and nonplayers, indicating that evaluating the EMG activity in batting enables the understanding of proficiency. Our findings should help players, novices, and coaches to optimize batting performance. PMID:22614137

  5. Structural basis for stop codon recognition in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Jason; Hegde, Ramanujan S.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2015-01-01

    Termination of protein synthesis occurs when a translating ribosome encounters one of three universally conserved stop codons: UGA, UAA, or UAG. Release factors recognise stop codons in the ribosomal A site to mediate release of the nascent chain and recycling of the ribosome. Bacteria decode stop codons using two separate release factors with differing specificities for the second and third bases1. By contrast, eukaryotes rely on an evolutionarily unrelated omnipotent release factor (eRF1) to recognise all three stop codons2. The molecular basis of eRF1 discrimination for stop codons over sense codons is not known. Here, we present electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) structures at 3.5 – 3.8 Å resolution of mammalian ribosomal complexes containing eRF1 interacting with each of the three stop codons in the A site. Binding of eRF1 flips nucleotide A1825 of 18S rRNA so that it stacks on the second and third stop codon bases. This configuration pulls the fourth position base into the A site, where it is stabilised by stacking against G626 of 18S rRNA. Thus, eRF1 exploits two rRNA nucleotides also used during tRNA selection to drive mRNA compaction. Stop codons are favoured in this compacted mRNA conformation by a hydrogen-bonding network with essential eRF1 residues that constrains the identity of the bases. These results provide a molecular framework for eukaryotic stop codon recognition and have implications for future studies on the mechanisms of canonical and premature translation termination3,4. PMID:26245381

  6. Light stops and observation of supersymmetry at LHC run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Bryan; Nath, Pran; Nelson, Brent D.; Spisak, Andrew B.

    2015-11-01

    Light stops consistent with the Higgs boson mass of ˜126 GeV are investigated within the framework of minimal supergravity. It is shown that models with light stops which are also consistent with the thermal relic density constraints require stop coannihilation with the neutralino LSP. The analysis shows that the residual set of parameter points with light stops satisfying both the Higgs mass and the relic density constraints lie within a series of thin strips in the m0-m1 /2 plane for different values of A0/m0. Consequently, this region of minimal supergravity parameter space makes a number of very precise predictions. It is found that light stops of mass down to 400 GeV or lower can exist consistent with all constraints. A signal analysis for this class of models at LHC run II is carried out and the dominant signals for their detection identified. Also computed is the minimum integrated luminosity for 5 σ discovery of the models analyzed. If supersymmetry is realized in this manner, the stop masses can be as low as 400 GeV or lower, and the mass gap between the lightest neutralino and lightest stop will be approximately 30-40 GeV. We have optimized the ATLAS signal regions specifically for stop searches in the parameter space and find that a stop with mass ˜375 GeV can be discovered with as little as ˜60 fb-1 of integrated luminosity at run II of the LHC; the integrated luminosity needed for discovery could be further reduced with more efficient signature analyses. The direct detection of dark matter in this class of models is also discussed. It is found that dark matter cross sections lie close to, but above, coherent neutrino scattering and would require multiton detectors such as LZ to see a signal of dark matter for this class of models.

  7. Electrophysiological evidence for the involvement of proactive and reactive control in a rewarded stop-signal task.

    PubMed

    Schevernels, Hanne; Bombeke, Klaas; Van der Borght, Liesbet; Hopf, Jens-Max; Krebs, Ruth M; Boehler, C Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Reward availability is known to facilitate various cognitive operations, which is usually studied in cue-based paradigms that allow for enhanced preparation in reward-related trials. However, recent research using tasks that signal reward availability via task-relevant stimuli suggests that reward can also rapidly promote performance independent of global strategic preparation. Notably, this effect was also observed in a reward-related stop-signal task, in which behavioral measures of inhibition speed were found to be shorter in trials signaling reward. Corresponding fMRI results implied that this effect relies on boosted reactive control as indicated by increased activity in the 'inhibition-related network' in the reward-related condition. Here, we used EEG to better characterize transient modulations of attentional processes likely preceding this ultimate implementation of response inhibition. Importantly, such modulations would probably reflect enhanced proactive control in the form of more top-down attention to reward-related features. Counter to the notion that behavioral benefits would rely purely on reactive control, we found increased stop-evoked attentional processing (larger N1 component) on reward-related trials. This effect was accompanied by enhanced frontal P3 amplitudes reflecting successful stopping, and earlier and larger ERP differences between successful and failed stop trials in the reward-related condition. Finally, more global proactive control processes in the form of a reward context modulation of reward-unrelated trials did not have an effect on stopping performance but did influence attentional processing of go stimuli. Together, these results suggest that proactive and reactive processes can interact to bring about stimulus-specific reward benefits when the task precludes differential global preparation. PMID:26188262

  8. Start/stop codon like trinucleotides extensions in primate alpha satellites.

    PubMed

    Rosandić, Marija; Glunčić, Matko; Paar, Vladimir

    2013-01-21

    The centromeres remain "the final frontier" in unexplored segments of genome landscape in primate genomes, characterized by 2-5 Mb arrays of evolutionary rapidly evolving alpha satellite (AS) higher order repeats (HORs). Alpha satellites as specific noncoding sequences may be also significant in light of regulatory role of noncoding sequences. Using the Global Repeat Map (GRM) algorithm we identify in NCBI assemblies of chromosome 5 the species-specific alpha satellite HORs: 13mer in human, 5mer in chimpanzee, 14mer in orangutan and 3mers in macaque. The suprachromosomal family (SF) classification of alpha satellite HORs and surrounding monomeric alpha satellites is performed and specific segmental structure was found for major alpha satellite arrays in chromosome 5 of primates. In the framework of our novel concept of start/stop Codon Like Trinucleotides (CLTs) as a "new DNA language in noncoding sequences", we find characteristics and differences of these species in CLT extensions, in particular the extensions of stop-TGA CLT. We hypothesize that these are regulators in noncoding sequences, acting at a distance, and that they can amplify or weaken the activity of start/stop codons in coding sequences in protein genesis, increasing the richness of regulatory phenomena. PMID:23026763

  9. Help Stop the Flu | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Flu Shot Help Stop the Flu Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of Contents The ... vaccinated (for everyone six months or older). Find Flu Clinics Near You At www.flu.gov Use ...

  10. Vaccines Stop Illness | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Diseases and Vaccinations Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of ... like polio and meningitis will affect their children. Vaccine Safety In light of recent questions about vaccine ...

  11. Stopping the Spread of Germs at Home, Work and School

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletters Stopping the Spread of Germs at Home, Work & School Language: English Español Recommend on Facebook ... and answers, and poster materials for schools At Work Flu Prevention at Work Learn more about how ...

  12. 6. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, road view after stop ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, road view after stop four. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  13. 5. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, vista at stop three. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, vista at stop three. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  14. Stopping mechanism for capsule endoscope using electrical stimulus.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sang Hyo; Kim, Tae Wan; Cho, Jin Ho

    2010-01-01

    An ingestible capsule, which has the ability to stop at certain locations in the small intestine, was designed and implemented to monitor intestinal diseases. The proposed capsule can contract the small intestine by using electrical stimuli; this contraction causes the capsule to stop when the maximum static frictional force (MSFF) is larger than the force of natural peristalsis. In vitro experiments were carried out to verify the feasibility of the capsule, and the results showed that the capsule was successfully stopped in the small intestine. Various electrodes and electrical stimulus parameters were determined on the basis of the MSFF. A moderate increment of the MSFF (12.7 +/- 4.6 gf at 5 V, 10 Hz, and 5 ms) and the maximum increment of the MSFF (56.5 +/- 9.77 gf at 20 V, 10 Hz, and 5 ms) were obtained, and it is sufficient force to stop the capsule. PMID:19911212

  15. Preventing the Flu: Good Health Habits Can Help Stop Germs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medscape Podcasts Public Service Announcements (PSAs) Virus Images Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Get ... What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Preventing the Flu: Good Health Habits Can Help Stop Germs Language: ...

  16. Scientists Explore Possible Way to Stop Zika in Its Tracks

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159433.html Scientists Explore Possible Way to Stop Zika in Its Tracks Gene pathway that allows virus ... they've identified a potential way to prevent Zika and similar viruses from spreading in the body. ...

  17. 9. DETAIL OF UMBILICAL MAST BASE WITH STEEL STOPS AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL OF UMBILICAL MAST BASE WITH STEEL STOPS AT EAST END OF MOBILE SERVICE STRUCTURE RAIL; VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28501, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  18. Optimal Stopping Rules For Some Blackjack Type Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzybowski, Andrzej Z.

    2010-03-01

    The paper deals with a class of optimal stopping problems having some features of blackjack type games. A decision maker observes sequentially the values of a finite sequence of non-negative random variables. After each observation he decides whether to stop or to continue. If he decides to stop, he obtains a payoff dependent on the sum of already observed values. The greater the sum, the more the decision maker gains, unless the sum exceeds a positive number T-a limit given in the problem. If so, the decision maker loses all or part of his payoff. A sufficient condition for existence of a simple optimal stopping rule for such problems is formulated. Then some special cases are considered in detail. Some numerical examples and practical questions are discussed as well.

  19. Depth indicator and stop aid machining to precise tolerances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laverty, J. L.

    1966-01-01

    Attachment for machine tools provides a visual indication of the depth of cut and a positive stop to prevent overcutting. This attachment is used with drill presses, vertical milling machines, and jig borers.

  20. 46 CFR 169.692 - Remote stop stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., remote stop stations must be provided as follows: (a) A propulsion shutdown in the pilothouse for each propulsion unit, (b) A bilge slop or dirty oil discharge shutdown at the deck discharge, (c) A...

  1. 46 CFR 169.692 - Remote stop stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., remote stop stations must be provided as follows: (a) A propulsion shutdown in the pilothouse for each propulsion unit, (b) A bilge slop or dirty oil discharge shutdown at the deck discharge, (c) A...

  2. 46 CFR 169.692 - Remote stop stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., remote stop stations must be provided as follows: (a) A propulsion shutdown in the pilothouse for each propulsion unit, (b) A bilge slop or dirty oil discharge shutdown at the deck discharge, (c) A...

  3. Calculation of the relativistic Bloch correction to stopping power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlen, S. P.

    1982-01-01

    Bloch's technique of joining the nonrelativistic Bethe and Bohr stopping-power expressions by taking into account wave-packet effects for close collisions is extended to the relativistic case. It is found that Bloch's nonrelativistic correction term must be modified and that charge asymmetric terms appear. Excellent agreement is observed by comparing the results of these calculations to recent data on the stopping power of relativistic heavy ions.

  4. One-Stop Career Center Concept. Employer Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Alliance of Business, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The purpose of the One-Stop Career Center Concept Employer Questionnaire was to provide a model instrument that could be used or adapted by a governing board that wants to go the extra mile in ensuring a customer-driven, one-stop career center system. The survey was distributed to 5,000 businesses in 19 states that received One-Step Implementation…

  5. Why don't we stop tuberculosis?

    PubMed

    Platt, A E

    1994-01-01

    Many people think of tuberculosis (TB) as a disease of the past of no current concern to modern society. This is not the case. Despite the medical establishment's ability to treat and cure TB, the disease has reemerged to assume the position as the leading killer worldwide among infectious or communicable diseases. TB threatens more people than AIDS, cholera, dengue fever, and other infectious diseases combined. Accordingly, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared a global state of emergency against TB in 1993. In 1993, 2.7 million people died from TB and another 8.1 million were infected. Worldwide, an estimated 1.7 billion people had inert TB infections. The current TB epidemic is expected to worsen, especially in the developing world due to the evolution of multi-drug-resistant strains and the emergence of AIDS which compromises human immune systems and makes them more susceptible to infectious diseases. By the year 2000, the global incidence of TB is expected to increase to 10.2 million cases per year, an increase of 36% over 1990's 7.5 million cases. 75% of the increase can be traced to poor TB control programs, population growth, and the advancing age of the population, while the remaining 25% is attributed to the interaction between the TB virus and HIV. More than 95% of TB cases reported in 1990 were in the developing world, with an estimated two thirds in Asia; India accounted for 2.1 million cases. Developing countries have a disproportionate number of cases because AIDS is spreading quickly, health services are inadequate, and little money is available for treatment. WHO points out that adherence to the complete and inexpensive drug regimen of rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol every day for six to eight months could reduce the rate of TB transmission and cut the number of TB deaths in half over the next ten years. Worldwide early treatment could prevent almost 12 million deaths over the next decade and save large amounts of money

  6. Structural Basis for Translation Termination on a Pseudouridylated Stop Codon.

    PubMed

    Svidritskiy, Egor; Madireddy, Rohini; Korostelev, Andrei A

    2016-05-22

    Pseudouridylation of messenger RNA emerges as an abundant modification involved in gene expression regulation. Pseudouridylation of stop codons in eukaryotic and bacterial cells results in stop-codon read through. The structural mechanism of this phenomenon is not known. Here we present a 3.1-Å crystal structure of Escherichia coli release factor 1 (RF1) bound to the 70S ribosome in response to the ΨAA codon. The structure reveals that recognition of a modified stop codon does not differ from that of a canonical stop codon. Our in vitro biochemical results support this finding by yielding nearly identical rates for peptide release from E. coli ribosomes programmed with pseudouridylated and canonical stop codons. The crystal structure also brings insight into E. coli RF1-specific interactions and suggests involvement of L27 in bacterial translation termination. Our results are consistent with a mechanism in which read through of a pseudouridylated stop codon in bacteria results from increased decoding by near-cognate tRNAs (miscoding) rather than from decreased efficiency of termination. PMID:27107638

  7. Arkypallidal Cells Send a Stop Signal to Striatum.

    PubMed

    Mallet, Nicolas; Schmidt, Robert; Leventhal, Daniel; Chen, Fujun; Amer, Nada; Boraud, Thomas; Berke, Joshua D

    2016-01-20

    The suppression of inappropriate actions is critical for flexible behavior. Cortical-basal ganglia networks provide key gating mechanisms for action suppression, yet the specific roles of neuronal subpopulations are poorly understood. Here, we examine Arkypallidal (‘‘Arky’’) and Prototypical (‘‘Proto’’) globus pallidus neurons during a Stop task, which requires abrupt cancellation of an imminent action. We first establish that Arky neurons can be identified by their firing properties across the natural sleep/wake cycle. We then show that Stop responses are earlier and stronger in the Arky compared to the Proto subpopulation. In contrast to other basal ganglia neurons, pallidal Stop responses are selective to Stop, rather than Go, cues. Furthermore, the timing of these Stop responses matches the suppression of developing striatal Go-related activity. Our results support a two-step model of action suppression: actions-inpreparation are first paused via a subthalamic-nigral pathway, then cancelled via Arky GABAergic projections to striatum. PMID:26777273

  8. Efficient data association for move-stop-move target tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyan, T.; McDonald, Mike; Kirubarajan, T.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, we present an efficient data association algorithm for tracking ground targets that perform move-stop-move maneuvers using ground moving target indicator (GMTI) radar. A GMTI radar does not detect the targets whose radial velocity falls below a certain minimum detectable velocity. Hence, to avoid detection enemy targets deliberately stop for some time before moving again. When targets perform move-stop-move maneuvers, a missed detection of a target by the radar leads to an ambiguity as to whether it is because the target has stopped or due to the probability of detection being less than one. A solution to track move-stop-move target tracking is based on the variable structure interacting multiple model (VS-IMM) estimator in an ideal scenario (single target tracking with no false measurements) has been proposed. This solution did not consider the data association problem. Another solution, called two-dummy solution, considered the data association explicitly and proposed a solution based on the multiframe assignment algorithm. This solution is computationally expensive, especially when the scenario is complex (e.g., high target density) or when one wants to perform high dimensional assignment. In this paper, we propose an efficient multiframe assignment-based solution that considers the second dummy measurement as a real measurement than a dummy. The proposed algorithm builds a less complex assignment hypothesis tree, and, as a result, is more efficient in terms of computational resource requirement.

  9. Kinetics of Stop Codon Recognition by Release Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Hetrick, Byron; Lee, Kristin; Joseph, Simpson

    2009-01-01

    Recognition of stop codons by class I release factors is a fundamental step in the termination phase of protein synthesis. Since premature termination is costly to the cell, release factors have to efficiently discriminate between stop and sense codons. In order to understand the mechanism of discrimination between stop and sense codons, we developed a new, pre-steady state kinetic assay to monitor the interaction of RF1 with the ribosome. Our results show that RF1 associates with similar association rate constants to ribosomes programmed with a stop or sense codons. However, dissociation of RF1 from sense codons is as much as three orders of magnitude faster than from stop codons. Interestingly, the affinity of RF1 for ribosomes programmed with different sense codons does not correlate with the defects in peptide release. Thus, discrimination against sense codons is achieved, both, by increasing the dissociation rates and by decreasing the rate of peptide release. These results suggest that sense codons inhibit conformational changes necessary for RF1 to stably bind to the ribosome and catalyze peptide release. PMID:19874047

  10. Bayesian parametric estimation of stop-signal reaction time distributions.

    PubMed

    Matzke, Dora; Dolan, Conor V; Logan, Gordon D; Brown, Scott D; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan

    2013-11-01

    The cognitive concept of response inhibition can be measured with the stop-signal paradigm. In this paradigm, participants perform a 2-choice response time (RT) task where, on some of the trials, the primary task is interrupted by a stop signal that prompts participants to withhold their response. The dependent variable of interest is the latency of the unobservable stop response (stop-signal reaction time, or SSRT). Based on the horse race model (Logan & Cowan, 1984), several methods have been developed to estimate SSRTs. None of these approaches allow for the accurate estimation of the entire distribution of SSRTs. Here we introduce a Bayesian parametric approach that addresses this limitation. Our method is based on the assumptions of the horse race model and rests on the concept of censored distributions. We treat response inhibition as a censoring mechanism, where the distribution of RTs on the primary task (go RTs) is censored by the distribution of SSRTs. The method assumes that go RTs and SSRTs are ex-Gaussian distributed and uses Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling to obtain posterior distributions for the model parameters. The method can be applied to individual as well as hierarchical data structures. We present the results of a number of parameter recovery and robustness studies and apply our approach to published data from a stop-signal experiment. PMID:23163766