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Sample records for joo tiago mexia

  1. CURRICULUM VITAE EUN JOO LEE

    E-print Network

    Wu, Mingshen

    · Physicochemical properties and eating quality of rice #12;Eun Joo Lee 2 Awards, Honors and Recognition · P.S. Studies on Correlation between Physicochemical Properties and Eating Quality of Rice. 1995, Korea, 2013, Chemical Hydrolysis of Phosvitin and the Functional Properties of the Hydrolysates. International

  2. Breast Cancer Prognosis via Gaussian Mixture Regression Tiago H. Falk

    E-print Network

    Shatkay, Hagit

    Breast Cancer Prognosis via Gaussian Mixture Regression Tiago H. Falk Electrical and Computer Eng. Keywords--Prognosis prediction, breast cancer, time-to-recur, auto- matic feature selection, Gaussian, breast cancer continues to be the most common cancer among Canadian women. According to the Canadian Can

  3. March an t Pereira 954, Providen cia, San tiago. fon os: (56-2) 2690223 -2690224 -2690225. web: www.cn ach ile.cl

    E-print Network

    Pérez, Carlos E.

    March an t Pereira 954, Providen cia, San tiago. fon os: (56-2) 2690223 - 2690224 - 2690225. web-Ch ile March an t Pereira 954, Providen cia, San tiago. fon os: (56-2) 2690223 - 2690224 - 2690225. web March an t Pereira 954, Providen cia, San tiago. fon os: (56-2) 2690223 - 2690224 - 2690225. web: www

  4. On Word-of-Mouth Based Discovery of the Web Tiago Rodrigues

    E-print Network

    Gummadi, Krishna P.

    On Word-of-Mouth Based Discovery of the Web Tiago Rodrigues Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais by browsing or searching. Recently, word-of-mouth has emerged as a popular way of discovering the Web, partic by following URLs posted by their friends. Such word-of-mouth based content discovery has become a major driver

  5. Evolution of Magnetism in Iron from the Atom to the Bulk Murilo L. Tiago,1

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yunkai

    problem because of the extensive technological applications of magnetic phenomena and an incomplete theory orbitals. In solids, ferromag- netism may be understood in terms of the itinerant electron model [1], whichEvolution of Magnetism in Iron from the Atom to the Bulk Murilo L. Tiago,1 Yunkai Zhou,2,* M. M. G

  6. Human Attribute Recognition by Rich Appearance Dictionary Jungseock Joo1

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Song Chun

    Human Attribute Recognition by Rich Appearance Dictionary Jungseock Joo1 , Shuo Wang1,2 , and Song-Chun Zhu1 1 Center for Vision, Cognition, Learning and Art, Depts. of Statistics and Computer Science, UCLA dictionary of human with signifi- cantly less supervision by decomposing image lattice into overlapping

  7. Long-term Digital Archiving Based on Selection of Repositories Over P2P Tiago Vignatti, Luis C. E. Bona, Marcos S. Sunye

    E-print Network

    Vignatti, André L.

    Long-term Digital Archiving Based on Selection of Repositories Over P2P Networks Tiago Vignatti, sunye}@inf.ufpr.br André L. Vignatti University of Campinas Institute of Computing vignatti-term archiving systems. The archiving sys- tem is modeled as a set of storage repositories where each repository

  8. In-Page Logging B-Tree for Flash Memory Gap-Joo Na1

    E-print Network

    Moon, Bongki

    physical location of flash memory, specifically, in the same erase unit. Since we only need to accessIn-Page Logging B-Tree for Flash Memory Gap-Joo Na1 , Bongki Moon2 , and Sang-Won Lee1 1 as a flash-aware index structure by adopting the in-page logging (IPL) scheme. The IPL scheme has been

  9. Drop Probability Assurance for Delay-insensitive Applications Changhee Joo, Jaesung Hong, and Saewoong Bahk

    E-print Network

    Bahk, Saewoong

    Drop Probability Assurance for Delay-insensitive Applications Changhee Joo°, Jaesung Hong provided by an Assured Forwarding (AF) Per-Hop Behavior (PHB) in Differentiated Service (Diff a desirable property of assured drop probability. We modify an existing AQM algorithm for the property so

  10. Jump Detection In A Regression Curve And Its Derivative Jong-Hoon Joo and Peihua Qiu

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Peihua

    ; Jumps; Local polynomial kernel smoothing; Nonparametric regression; Roof edges. 1 Introduction CurveJump Detection In A Regression Curve And Its Derivative Jong-Hoon Joo and Peihua Qiu School regression curve may have singularities, including jumps and roofs/valleys (i.e., jumps in the first order

  11. Jump Detection In A Regression Curve And Its Derivative JongHoon Joo and Peihua Qiu

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Peihua

    ; Jumps; Local polynomial kernel smoothing; Nonparametric regression; Roof edges. 1 Introduction CurveJump Detection In A Regression Curve And Its Derivative Jong­Hoon Joo and Peihua Qiu School regression curve may have singularities, including jumps and roofs/valleys (i.e., jumps in the first order

  12. Enhancing the Thermoelectric Power Factor with Highly Mismatched Isoelectronic Doping Joo-Hyoung Lee,1,4

    E-print Network

    Wu, Junqiao

    Enhancing the Thermoelectric Power Factor with Highly Mismatched Isoelectronic Doping Joo; published 8 January 2010) We investigate the effect of O impurities on the thermoelectric properties of Zn performance thermoelectric applications. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.016602 PACS numbers: 72.20.Pa, 71.15.Àm

  13. REMOVAL OF PROCESSING AIDS FROM CERAMIC/POLYMER GREGORY C. STANGLE, DONG-JOO RHEE, AND ILHAN A. AKSAY

    E-print Network

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    171 REMOVAL OF PROCESSING AIDS FROM CERAMIC/POLYMER COMPOSITES GREGORY C. STANGLE, DONG-JOO RHEE issues in the removal of processing aids from ceramic compacts prior to sintering have been investigated materials. The kinetics of pyrolytic degradation of organic processing aids were studied using

  14. Vacuum-ultraviolet ionization spectroscopy of the jet-cooled RNA-base Kyo-Won Choi, Joo-Hee Lee and Sang Kyu Kim*

    E-print Network

    Kim, Sang Kyu

    Vacuum-ultraviolet ionization spectroscopy of the jet-cooled RNA-base uracil Kyo-Won Choi, Joo accurately and precisely determined for the first time using a vacuum-ultraviolet mass-analyzed threshold be used for the clarification of the latter in this report. Here, we employ a vacuum-ultraviolet mass

  15. Bio-LDH nanohybrid for gene therapy Seo-Young Kwak, Yong-Joo Jeong, Jong-Sang Park, Jin-Ho Choy*

    E-print Network

    Park, Jong-Sang

    Bio-LDH nanohybrid for gene therapy Seo-Young Kwak, Yong-Joo Jeong, Jong-Sang Park, Jin-Ho Choy. Introduction Gene therapy is gaining growing attention for the treatment of genetic deficiencies and life of a targeting ligand and a DNA-binding moiety, have great potential for gene therapy due to their safety

  16. Effects of best-management practices in Eagle and Joos Valley Creeks in the Waumandee Creek Priority Watershed, Wisconsin, 1990-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graczyk, David J.; Walker, John F.; Bannerman, Roger T.; Rutter, Troy D.

    2012-01-01

    In many watersheds, nonpoint-source contamination is a major contributor to water-quality problems. In response to the recognition of the importance of nonpoint sources, the Wisconsin Nonpoint Source Water Pollution Abatement Program (Nonpoint Program) was enacted in 1978. This report summarizes the results of a study to assess the effectiveness of watershed-management practices for controlling nonpoint-source contamination for the Eagle Creek and Joos Valley Creek Watersheds. Streamflow-gaging stations equipped for automated sample collection and continuous recording of stream stage were installed in July 1990 at Eagle and Joos Valley Creeks and were operated through September 2007. In October 1990, three rain gages were installed in each watershed and were operated through September 2007. Best-Management Practices (BMPs) were installed during 1993 to 2000 in Eagle and Joos Valley Creeks and were tracked throughout the study period. By the year 2000, a majority of the BMPs were implemented in the two watersheds and goals set by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and the local Land Conservation Department had been achieved for the two study watersheds (Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, 1990). The distributions of the rainstorms that produced surface runoff and storm loads were similar in the pre-BMP (1990-93) and post-BMP implementation (2000-07) periods for both Eagle and Joos Valley Creeks. The highest annual streamflow occurred at both sites in water year 1993, which corresponded to the greatest above normal nonfrozen precipitation measured at two nearby NOAA weather stations. The minimum streamflow occurred in water year 2007 at both sites. Base-flow and stormwater samples were collected and analyzed for suspended solids, total phosphorus, and ammonia nitrogen. For both Eagle and Joos Valley Creeks the median concentrations of suspended solids and total phosphorus in base flow were lower during the post-BMP period compared to the pre-BMP period and were statistically significant at the 0.05 significance level. The decrease in median concentrations of ammonia nitrogen at both sites was not statistically significant at the 0.05 significance level. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to remove the effects of climatologic conditions and seasonality from computed storm loads. For both Eagle and Joos Valley Creeks, the median storm loads for suspended solids, total phosphorus, and ammonia nitrogen were lower during the post-BMP period compared to the pre-BMP period and were statistically significant at the 0.05 significance level. The decreases in storm-load regression residuals from the pre- to the post-BMP periods for both Eagle and Joos Valley Creeks were statistically significant for all three constituents at the 0.05 significance level and indicated an apparent improvement in water-quality in the post-BMP period. Because the rainfall characteristics for individual storms in the pre- and post-BMP periods are likely to be different, separate pre- and post-BMP regressions were used to estimate the theoretical pre- and post-BMP storm loads to allow estimates of precent reductions between the pre- and post-BMP periods. The estimated percent reductions in storm loads for suspended solids, total phosphorus, and ammonia nitrogen were 89, 77, and 66 respectively for Eagle Creek and 84, 67, and 60 respectively for Joos Valley Creek. The apparent improvement in water quality is attributed to the implemented BMPs and to a reduction in the number of cattle in the watersheds.

  17. Fabrication of Si1-xGex alloy nanowire field-effect transistors Cheol-Joo Kim, Jee-Eun Yang, Hyun-Seung Lee, Hyun M. Jang, and Moon-Ho Joa

    E-print Network

    Jo, Moon-Ho

    Fabrication of Si1-xGex alloy nanowire field-effect transistors Cheol-Joo Kim, Jee-Eun Yang, Hyun; published online 17 July 2007 The authors present the demonstration of nanowire field-effect transistors incorporating group IV alloy nanowires, Si1-xGex. Single-crystalline Si1-xGex alloy nanowires were grown by a Au

  18. Beatriz Gonalves Joo Santos

    E-print Network

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    Rehabilitation Phase Main Goal: Restore normal range of motion of the ankle joints Gentle movement in the sagital,70 Support 20-30g - 0,40-0,60 Total 454-464g 23:42 +-9,00 · Prusa i3 Hephestos by bq · 0,4mm nozzle · 215x200

  19. Optimizao Matemtica Joo Luis Soares

    E-print Network

    Soares, João Luís Cardoso

    2004. 1 Introdução Imagine duas pessoas, o Alexandre e o João, jogando o jogo que passamos a descrever. Suponha que os intervenientes pretendem repetir o jogo várias vezes. Do seu ponto de vista, o João

  20. Discover Implicit Relationships Between Researchers Using Email Tiago Ferreira1

    E-print Network

    da Silva, Alberto Rodrigues

    social networks (e.g. LinkedIn), social computing developments tools (e.g. wikis), documents sharing to the non-exploitation of hidden relationships between individuals, and between individuals and information

  1. Usability Evaluation Practices within Agile Development Tiago Silva da Silva

    E-print Network

    Maurer, Frank

    traditional user testing sessions due to the tight schedules inherent to Agile. Finally, we describe a set to successfully evaluate software product usability. 1. Introduction Agile methods have transformed how teams of field test leading up to a release, agile methods organize software development into short iterations

  2. Joo P. Hespanha November 15, 2013

    E-print Network

    Hespanha, João Pedro

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.2 Multi-stage games: War of attrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13.4 Security v.s. Regret: Alternate play . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 3.5 Security v.s. Regret: Simultaneous plays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 3.6 Saddle

  3. Convex Ultrasound Image Reconstruction with Log-Euclidean Priors Jos Seabra, Joo Xavier and Joo Sanches

    E-print Network

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    produces images where speckle noise is effectively suppressed and important clinical details (organ called speckle that accompanies all coherent imaging modalities. It appears when images are obtained of the echoes scattered from heterogeneous tissues and organs [1]. The characteristic granular speckle pattern

  4. Estimating cetacean density from passive acoustic arrays Tiago A. Marques and Len Thomas

    E-print Network

    Marques, Tiago A.

    References Barlow, J. and Taylor, B. 2005. Estimates of sperm whale abundance in the Northeastern Temperate, G. D., Swift, R. J., Gordon, J. C., Slesser, G., and Turrell, W. R. 2003. Sperm whale distribution, A. 2007. Sperm whale abundance estimates from acoustic surveys of the Ionian Sea and Straits

  5. Bolsa de Objectos de Joo Miguel de Melo Martins Carlota

    E-print Network

    da Silva, Alberto Rodrigues

    que me deu ao longo de todo o trabalho. � Patrícia Dinis, "pioneira" do BOA, pelas sugestões e Aprendizagem (BOA) é um repositório de objectos de aprendizagem com funcionalidades particulares com o objectivo de maximizar a participação dos seus utilizadores. A particularidade do BOA é a adopção da

  6. Cellular senescence: unravelling complexity Joo F. Passos & Cedric Simillion &

    E-print Network

    Gent, Universiteit

    of senescence. Keywords Senescence . Oxidative stress . Mitochondria . Secretory phenotype . Systems biology classically as the result of the loss of DNA sequences called telomeres at the end of chromosomes. However of numerous studies. A major breakthrough occurred when it was sug- gested that the shortening of telomeres

  7. Orbifolds and Wallpaper Patterns 1 Joo Guerreiro 2

    E-print Network

    Fernandes, Rui Loja

    Orbifolds and Wallpaper Patterns 1 João Guerreiro 2 LMAC Instituto Superior Técnico 2009 1 of orbifolds 15 6 Wallpaper patterns classification 17 7 Images of the wallpaper patterns 24 2 #12 additional structure. Recall that a manifold is a space locally modeled in Rn. A wallpaper pattern is exactly

  8. O FASCNIO DO UNIVERSO Editores: Augusto Damineli e Joo Steiner

    E-print Network

    Neto, Gastão Bierrenbach Lima

    telescópios é o marco de uma nova era nas atividades de pesquisa astronômica no Brasil. Além da alta qualidade sociedade e atrair voca- ções para a carreira de pesquisa em Astronomia. (Crédito: Polo Astronômico de Foz

  9. IR-Case Tool Joo Ferreira1, Alberto Silva2

    E-print Network

    da Silva, Alberto Rodrigues

    IR-Case Tool João Ferreira1, Alberto Silva2 , and José Delgado3 1 ISEL, 2 INESC-ID, 2,3 IST, 1. country code 3rd E-mail ABSTRACT We propose a new approach based on a methodology assisted by a IR-Case tool for the creation of IR (Information Retrieval) systems inspired on a set of best practices

  10. Computao de Superfcies Mnimas Discretas JOO PAULO BENTO

    E-print Network

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    energia, além da tensão superficial [Brakke (1992)]. Um método recente para o problema de Plateau foi R 2 ® R 3 a parametrização de uma superfície S = f(W). A área A(f(W)) de S e a energia de Dirichlet+1 � R 3 superfícies com fronteira G, tais que a energia de Dirichlet de f M : S i ® S i+1 é mínima

  11. Observational Constraints on Models of Hydri Joo Fernandes

    E-print Network

    Monteiro, Mário João

    the HR Diagram analysis is discussed. We briefly describe how the seismic study of the star can help.2±2.0 Bedding et al. (2001) 2. Models and HR Diagram Analysis The stellar evolution calculations were computed. Observations of Hydri Hydri (HD 2151, HR 98, HIP 2021) is a G2 IV star, in the neighbourhood of the Sun

  12. and Zengyi Chang Jiafeng Liu, Keehyoung Joo, Jooyoung Lee

    E-print Network

    Lee, Jooyoung

    by Small Heat Shock Protein IbpB Acts as a Protein Structure and Folding: doi: 10.1074/jbc.M113.450437 originally published online March 13, 2013 2013, 288:11897-11906.J. Biol. Chem. 10.1074/jbc.M113.450437Access, DOI 10.1074/jbc.M113.450437 Xinmiao Fu1,2 , Xiaodong Shi§1 , Linxiang Yin , Jiafeng Liu , Keehyoung

  13. No Need for Conspiracy: Self-Organized Cartel Formation in a Modified Trust Game Tiago P. Peixoto* and Stefan Bornholdt

    E-print Network

    Bornholdt, Stefan

    , for car owners who must buy gasoline, people who must buy groceries, bank account and credit card owners such as gasoline, which is known to fluctuate con- siderably between gas stations [13­15], both in space and time

  14. Can face anti-spoofing countermeasures work in a real world scenario? Tiago de Freitas Pereira1 2

    E-print Network

    authentication is an important step to protect in- formation and in this field face biometrics is advantageous to gain illegitimate access to secured re- sources protected by a biometric authentication system. Re. Face biometrics is natural, easy to use and less human- invasive. Unfortunately, recent work has

  15. COMPLEXITY-CONSTRAINED H.264 HD VIDEO CODING THROUGH MODE RANKING Tiago A. da Fonseca and Ricardo L. de Queiroz

    E-print Network

    de Queiroz, Ricardo L.

    prediction module since the "in- tra" and "inter" prediction steps are responsible for almost all computation be partitioned into blocks of 4×4, 8×8 or 16×16 pixels. The former ones have a total of nine optional prediction to be encoded, or use rate- distortion optimization [6]. Because of all these prediction mode options, the H.264

  16. ADMM For Consensus On Colored Networks Joo F. C. Mota1,2, Joo M. F. Xavier2, Pedro M. Q. Aguiar2, and Markus Pschel3

    E-print Network

    Aguiar, Pedro M. Q.

    algorithms have been proposed for solving the averaging consensus problem: "given a net- work of nodes, where problems in networks: the average consensus. We view the average consensus as an optimization problem with other state-of-the- art consensus algorithms show that the proposed algorithm is the one exhibiting

  17. Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy Imaging Denoising with Photobleaching Isabel Rodrigues1,2, Joo Xavier2,3 and Joo Sanches2,3

    E-print Network

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    of energy radiated by the fluorophore and the huge light amplification performed by the photon detector energy function is minimized. Tests using synthetic and real data are presented to illustrate molecules, e.g. green fluorescent protein (GFP), that radiate in a wave length different from the one

  18. Recycling Test Cases to Detect Security Vulnerabilities Joo Antunes Nuno Neves

    E-print Network

    Neves, Nuno

    Recycling Test Cases to Detect Security Vulnerabilities João Antunes Nuno Neves LASIGE. In the paper, we propose a new methodology that addresses this issue by recycling test cases from several of servers. To address this issue, the paper describes an approach that recycles existing test cases, making

  19. Prof. Joo Sentieiro ISR 1 Semestre 2003 / 04 1. Reviso Matemtica

    E-print Network

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    Sx , f diz-se continuamente diferenciável em S. Uma tal função é tambem contínua em S e tem aberto I , então para qualquer Iyx, , existe algum [ ]yx, tal que ))(()()( xyfxfyf -=- #12;Prof. João esfera aberta S centrada num vector x. (a) para todo o y tal que Syx + , (b) para todo o y tal que Syx

  20. Prof. Joo Sentieiro ISR 1 Semestre 2003 / 04 1. Reviso Matemtica

    E-print Network

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    · Uma sequência { }k x diz-se uma sequência de Cauchy se para qualquer >0 algum K (dependente de ) tal que : · Uma sequência { }k x diz-se ser limitada superiormente (inferiormente) se algum escalar b tal escalar x tal que yx para Ay NOTA: Se um tal escalar não existir, diz-se que o supremo de A é . · O

  1. Ethical Perspectives in Biogerontology Sebastian Sethe and Joo Pedro de Magalhes

    E-print Network

    de Magalhães, João Pedro

    , Health Policy and (Anti-) Aging: Mixed Blessings, 173 Ethics and Health Policy 1, DOI 10 on the biology of aging, ethical themes can be classified as either belonging to an `inner sphere' where the conduct of the aging research itself is under ethi- cal scrutiny; or, secondly, an `outer sphere' where

  2. Domains of Steels with Identical Properties Minsung Joo, Joohyun Ryu and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    strength or tensile elongation to failure. The neural network model was then combined with a genetic properties, genetic algorithms, neural network 1. Introduction Hot-rolled steels with a microstructure the input space. The problem can be resolved by combining the method with a genetic algorithm which in its

  3. Business-Specific Languages for Organizational Modeling Joo Paulo Pedro Mendes de Sousa Saraiva 1

    E-print Network

    da Silva, Alberto Rodrigues

    , there are many languages for business modeling, such as UML, BPMN and EPBE, which are well suited to describe Language (UML) Activity diagrams [UML], the Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN) [BPMN], the Erikson-Penker Business Extensions (EPBE) [Penker 2000] or the CEO Framework [CEO]; these languages are suitable

  4. THE DREAM OF ELIXIR VITAE Joo Pedro de Magalhes, Ph.D.

    E-print Network

    de Magalhães, João Pedro

    related to a given pathology. Antibiotics, pain-killers, corticosteroids, anti-depressants, and many more products fit this description. Yet present therapies transmit relatively simple instructions: a pain-killer

  5. Fast Hashing on the Pentium Antoon Bosselaers, Rene Govaerts and Joos Vandewalle

    E-print Network

    Bernstein, Daniel

    that provides the additional property of collision resistance, i.e., it must be compu- tationally infeasible parallelization finally became available to Intel based computer systems. One of the de- sign principles of the MD that these implementations are very close to optimal. It will also be shown that the performance penalty incurred by non

  6. COMPLEXITY-SCALABLE H.264/AVC IN AN IPP-BASED VIDEO ENCODER Tiago A. da Fonseca, Ricardo L. de Queiroz

    E-print Network

    de Queiroz, Ricardo L.

    and quantized through the use of integer transforms [7]. The data set composed by block size and Intra (extrapo in terms of rate and distortion, we constrain the process to fit within a certain time budget. We present an RDC- optimized framework which allows for real-time HD video compression. Index Terms-- H.264, mode

  7. Mechanical Anisotropy in Steels for Pipelines M. S. Joo, D.-W. Suh and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    , for example in exceptionally deep oceans off the coast of Brazil, on undulating land surfaces, and in freezing in ensuring the arrest of high­velocity cracks [2­4]. Low­grade petroleum wells contain hy- drogen sulphide

  8. LXService: Web Services of Language Technology for Portuguese Antnio Branco, Francisco Costa, Pedro Martins, Filipe Nunes, Joo Silva, Sara Silveira

    E-print Network

    Branco, António Horta

    LXService: Web Services of Language Technology for Portuguese António Branco, Francisco Costa, Pedro Martins, Filipe Nunes, João Silva, Sara Silveira University of Lisbon Dep. Informática, Faculdade on the development of a cluster of web services of language technology for Portuguese that we named as LXService

  9. "Cherty" stringers in the Barnett Shale are agglutinated foraminifera Kitty Milliken a,, Suk-Joo Choh b

    E-print Network

    Schieber, Juergen

    "Cherty" stringers in the Barnett Shale are agglutinated foraminifera Kitty Milliken a,, Suk within several lithologies in the Barnett Shale (lower Mississippian) of central Texas. A typical quartz-rich masses in the Barnett Shale are interpreted as agglutinated foraminifera that have been dramatically

  10. Energy Efficient Wifi Tethering on a Smartphone Kyoung-Hak Jung, Yuepeng Qi, Chansu Yu, and Young-Joo Suh

    E-print Network

    Yu, Chansu

    Energy Efficient Wifi Tethering on a Smartphone Kyoung-Hak Jung, Yuepeng Qi, Chansu Yu, and Young that E-MAP reduces the energy consumption of a Wifi tethering smartphone by up to 54% with a little While the coverage of cellular networks is much larger than that of Wifi networks in the US (99% vs. 49

  11. A Iniciativa VemAprender Alberto Rodrigues da Silva, Patrcia Dinis, David Ferreira, Joo Saraiva, Alexandre Baro

    E-print Network

    da Silva, Alberto Rodrigues

    an umbrella program involving the following specific projects: BOA, EscolaNaNet and SNARE, each one with its seguintes projectos específicos: BOA, EscolaNaNet e SNARE, cada qual com os seus objectivos e agenda deAprender agrega actualmente os seguintes projectos, que endereçam aspectos complementares: BOA, EscolaNaNet, e

  12. S. Gerber F. Joos P. Bru gger T.F. Stocker M.E. Mann S. Sitch M. Scholze

    E-print Network

    Fortunat, Joos

    against a significant amplification of the response of global or hemispheric annual mean temperature­biogeo- chemical climate model that includes the Lund- Potsdam-Jena dynamic global vegetation model (LPJ irradiance changes is increased yield a mismatch between model results and CO2 data, providing evidence

  13. Web Services and Seamless Interoperability1 Joo Paulo A. Almeida, Lus Ferreira Pires, Marten J. van Sinderen

    E-print Network

    van Sinderen, Marten

    the context of the Model-Driven Architecture. Keywords: web services, interoperability, platforms, ModelWeb Services and Seamless Interoperability1 João Paulo A. Almeida, Luís Ferreira Pires, Marten J platforms and implementation environments. Ideally, application developers and integrators should

  14. Ultrafast Phenomena in Semiconductors and Nanostructure Materials XII, Edited by Jin-Joo Song; Kong-Thon Tsen; Markus Betz; Abdulhakem Y. Elezzabi

    E-print Network

    Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    for guiding CO2 laser light, has been shown to successfully guide in the THz region. A thin Cu layer-Thon Tsen; Markus Betz; Abdulhakem Y. Elezzabi Proc. of SPIE Vol. 6892, doi: 10.1117/12.762332 51 Designs 3A7 ABSTRACT We propose various designs of porous polymer fibers for guiding terahertz radiation

  15. Reconfiguring photonic metamaterials with currents and magnetic fields Joo Valente, Jun-Yu Ou, Eric Plum, Ian J. Youngs, and Nikolay I. Zheludev

    E-print Network

    Zheludev, Nikolay

    and magnetic fields. Mechanical deformation of metamaterial arrays is driven by both resistive heatingReconfiguring photonic metamaterials with currents and magnetic fields João Valente, Jun-Yu Ou.1063/1.4878400 Ultrafast all-optical switching via coherent modulation of metamaterial absorption Appl. Phys. Lett. 104

  16. Thin-foil reflection gratings for Constellation-X Ralf K. Heilmann, Mireille Akilian, Chih-Hao Chang, Craig R. Forest, Chulmin Joo, Andrew

    E-print Network

    Thin-foil reflection gratings for Constellation-X Ralf K. Heilmann, Mireille Akilian, Chih) on Constellation-X is designed to supply astronomers with high spectral resolution in the soft x-ray band from 0, Constellation-X, reflection gratings, thin-foil optics, blaze, sawtooth, replication, nanoimprint lithography

  17. Gold(I)-Catalyzed Enantioselective Intramolecular Hydroamination of Allenes Rebecca L. LaLonde, Benjamin D. Sherry, Eun Joo Kang, and F. Dean Toste*

    E-print Network

    Toste, Dean

    Gold(I)-Catalyzed Enantioselective Intramolecular Hydroamination of Allenes Rebecca L. La on the utility of gold(I) complexes as homogeneous catalysts for organic synthesis has recently dramati- cally reported.2 Within this handful of reactions, the most well-developed enantioselective gold- (I

  18. Nome do aluno(a) Curso do aluno Evento Cidade/Estado Gabriel Frnk Viegas Cincias Farmacuticas Conselho Nacional de Entidades Estudantis de Farmcia Joo Pessoa/PB

    E-print Network

    Maier, Rudolf Richard

    Engenharia Eletrônica Pan American Health Care Exchanges Brasília/DF Edelvan Correia Araújo Ciências Naturais Pereira Aranha Engenharia de Software Pan American Health Care Exchanges Brasília/DF Rubem Vinícius Souza Sales Engenharia Eletrônica Pan American Health Care Exchanges Brasília/DF Rafaela Rodrigues dos Santos

  19. Social evolution sex allocation theory

    E-print Network

    West, Stuart

    -evolution of soldier production and brood allocation in polyembryonic parasitoid wasps 161 Chapter 6: Discussion 203, Tiago, Paula, Dave, André and Clara, for making me feel at home in a new country, and to Manuela

  20. This article was downloaded by:[Luck, Steven J.] On: 29 July 2008

    E-print Network

    Woodman, Geoffrey F.

    ://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t713683696 The role of attention in the binding of surface features to locations Joo-seok Hyun a ; Geoffrey F this Article: Hyun, Joo-seok, Woodman, Geoffrey F. and Luck, Steven J. (2008) 'The role of attentionBy:[Luck,StevenJ.]At:17:5129July2008 The role of attention in the binding of surface features to locations Joo-seok Hyun

  1. Development of the juxta-oral organ in rat embryo.

    PubMed

    Velasco, J R Mérida; De La Cuadra Blanco, C; Velasco, J A Mérida

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this work is to clarify the development and morphology of the juxta-oral organ (JOO) in rat embryos from Day (E)14 to 19. Furthermore, in the region of the JOO, an analysis was made of the expression of the monoclonal antibody HNK-1, which recognizes cranial neural-crest cells. In this study, we report that JOO develops from an epithelial condensation at the end of the transverse groove of the primitive mouth at E14. During E15, it invaginates and is disconnected from the oral epithelium. At E16, the JOO forms an solid epithelial cord with three parts (anterior, middle, and posterior) and is related to the masseter, temporal, medial pterygoid, and tensor veli palatini muscles. During E17-19, no significant changes were detected in their position. Both the mesenchyme caudal to the anlage of the JOO at E14, as well as the mesenchyme that surrounds the bud of the JOO at E15, expressed positivity for HNK-1. Our results suggest that the mesenchyme surrounding the JOO at E15 could emit some inductive signal for the JOO to reach its position at E16. This work shows for the first time that the cranial neural-crest-derived mesenchyme participates in the development of the JOO. PMID:22431151

  2. Many-body electronic structure and Kondo properties of cobalt-porphyrin molecules Luis G. G. V. Dias da Silva,1,2,* Murilo L. Tiago,1 Sergio E. Ulloa,3 Fernando A. Reboredo,1 and Elbio Dagotto1,2

    E-print Network

    Dias, Luis Gregório

    Many-body electronic structure and Kondo properties of cobalt-porphyrin molecules Luis G. G. V-group technique to study the Kondo regime of cobalt-porphyrin compounds adsorbed on a Cu 111 surface. We find

  3. Effects of applied voltages and dissolved oxygen on sustained power generation by microbial fuel cells

    E-print Network

    fuel cell stack, voltage reversal INTRODUCTION A microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a bio cells S. E. Oh, J. R. Kim, J.-H. Joo and B. E. Logan ABSTRACT S. E. Oh (corresponding author) J.-H. Joo, called exoelec- trogens, that are capable of transferring electrons outside their cell. In order

  4. Spectroscopic characterization of atmospheric pressure argon plasmas sustained with the Torche à Injection Axiale sur Guide d'Ondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincón, R.; Muñoz, J.; Sáez, M.; Calzada, M. D.

    2013-03-01

    An argon microwave (2.45 GHz) plasma produced by a microwave plasma torch known as "Torche à Injection Axiale sur Guide d'Ondes" (TIAGO) in air ambience at atmospheric pressure was experimentally characterized. The conditions for appropriate TIAGO torch operation in argon and flame morphology were researched under several experimental conditions of gas flow (0.15-5.00 L · min-1) rates and microwave input powers (100-1000 W). Gas temperature and electron density values were studied by means of optical emission spectroscopy. Besides, the processes inside the discharge and their interaction with the surrounding atmosphere were described according to the recorded spectra.

  5. A Model for Parent-Teacher Collaboration to Promote Self-Determination in Young Children With Disabilities

    E-print Network

    Lee, Suk-Hyang; Palmer, Susan B.; Turnbull, Ann P.; Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    neighborhood friend to play basketball, and that Young should prac- tice by himself every day. Joo used a calendar to help Young record the num- ber of minutes he practiced shooting the basketball and the name of the child who came to play to encourage Young... with friends, or doing art projects with a friend. Young chose "playing basketball with friends." Joo simplified the model questions so Young would understand them, and wrote down his answers. Phase 2: Take Action [What is my plan?) Young and Joo established a...

  6. SCFS: a Shared Cloud-backed File System Alysson Bessani1

    E-print Network

    Correia, Miguel

    SCFS: a Shared Cloud-backed File System Alysson Bessani1 , Ricardo Mendes1 , Tiago Oliveira1 Nuno and inefficient file sharing. We present SCFS, a cloud- backed file system that addresses these issues and pro services through a set of novel ideas for cloud-backed file systems: always write / avoid reading, modular

  7. SCFS: A Shared Cloud-backed File System Alysson Bessani,1

    E-print Network

    Neves, Nuno

    synchro- nization services (e.g., DropBox) and (2) cloud-backed file systems (e.g., S3FS [6]). Services access protocols such as NFS and CIFS. The proxy im- plements the core file system functionalitySCFS: A Shared Cloud-backed File System Alysson Bessani,1 Ricardo Mendes,1 Tiago Oliveira,1 Nuno

  8. Exposing Photo Manipulation From User-Guided 3-D Lighting Analysis

    E-print Network

    Bucci, David J.

    Exposing Photo Manipulation From User-Guided 3-D Lighting Analysis Tiago Carvalhoa, Hany Faridb inconsistencies in lighting. This technique explicitly measures the 3-D lighting properties for individual people specify 3-D shape in a single image from which 3-D lighting can be automatically estimated. A perturbation

  9. Many-body electronic structure and Kondo properties of cobalt-porphyrin molecules. Luis G. G. V. Dias da Silva,1, 2,

    E-print Network

    Tennessee, University of

    of cobalt-porphyrin molecules. Luis G. G. V. Dias da Silva,1, 2, Murilo L. Tiago,1, Sergio E. Ulloa,3 of cobalt-porphyrin compounds adsorbed on a Cu(111) surface. We find the Kondo temperature to be highly

  10. Review of methods for estimating cetacean density from passive

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Len

    Review of methods for estimating cetacean density from passive acoustics Len Thomas and Tiago Marques SIO Symposium: Estimating cetacean density from Passive Acoustics 16th July 2009 www for estimating the density of cetaceans from fixed passive acoustic devices. Methods should be applicable

  11. Programmable IP core for motion estimation: comparison of FPGA and ASIC based implementations

    E-print Network

    Sousa, Leonel

    Programmable IP core for motion estimation: comparison of FPGA and ASIC based implementations Tiago distinct implementation technologies: a high performance FPGA device, from Xilinx Virtex-II Pro family of motion vectors in real-time. Nevertheless, the reconfigurability properties of the FPGA implementation

  12. HARDWARE/SOFTWARE CO-DESIGN OF H.264/AVC ENCODERS FOR MULTI-CORE EMBEDDED SYSTEMS

    E-print Network

    Sousa, Leonel

    processing cores. Experimental re- sults obtained with the implementation in a Virtex4 FPGA of an H.264/AVC encoder using an ASIP IP core as a ME hard- ware accelerator have proven the advantages of this methodolHARDWARE/SOFTWARE CO-DESIGN OF H.264/AVC ENCODERS FOR MULTI-CORE EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Tiago Dias, Nuno

  13. Outsourcing Resource-Intensive Tasks from Mobile Apps to Clouds: Android and Aneka Integration

    E-print Network

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    in semiconductor technology enabled the design of mobile devices increasingly powerful and compact [1]. AlthoughOutsourcing Resource-Intensive Tasks from Mobile Apps to Clouds: Android and Aneka Integration, Australia {tiago.vieira, rbuyya}@unimelb.edu.au Abstract--Mobile Cloud Computing enables augmenting mo- bile

  14. Web API Fragility: How Robust Is Your Mobile Application?

    E-print Network

    Zaidman, Andy

    Web API Fragility: How Robust Is Your Mobile Application? Tiago Espinha Delft University-Gerhard.Gross@hs-esslingen.de Abstract--Web APIs provide a systematic and extensible ap- proach for application-to-application interaction. A large number of mobile applications makes use of web APIs to integrate services into apps. Each

  15. Telomeres avoid end detection by severing the checkpoint signal transduction pathway

    E-print Network

    Nakamura, Toru M.

    LETTERS Telomeres avoid end detection by severing the checkpoint signal transduction pathway Tiago Godinho Ferreira1 Telomeres protect the normal ends of chromosomes from being recognizedasdeleterious DNA, several proteins involved in DNA damage processing and checkpoint responses are recruited to telomeres

  16. VOLUME 8, ISSUE 3 JULY 2012 Remote Sensing of Animals

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Len

    Modeling University of St. Andrews, The Observatory, Buchanan Gardens, Fife KY16 9LZ, Scotland and Tiago A, The Observatory, Buchanan Gardens, Fife KY16 9LZ, Scotland and Centro de Estatística e Aplicações da Universidade, some ani- mals are inherently hard to see, for example because they live underwater or in thick forest

  17. The FG 2015 Kinship Verification in the Wild Evaluation Jiwen Lu1, Junlin Hu2, Venice Erin Liong1, Xiuzhuang Zhou3, Andrea Bottino4,

    E-print Network

    Wolf, Christian

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  18. Master Thesis Combined Neural Networks and

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    in steel design Joo, Min Sung ( ) Department of Ferrous Technology (Computational Metallurgy) Graduate of Ferrous Technology (Computational Metallurgy) Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology Pohang University of Ferrous Technology (Computational Metallurgy) Pohang, Korea June 23th , 2008 Approved by #12;Combined

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    E-print Network

    Sugar, Robert

    Liu Robert Mawhinney Azusa Yamaguchi BNL (SciDAC): Robert Bennett Chulwoo Jung Konstantin Petrov David Stampf UKQCD (PPARC): Peter Boyle Michael Clark Balint Joo RBRC (RIKEN): Shigemi Ohta (KEK) Tilo Wettig

  20. 34 Intersentia RECENT EVOLUTIONS IN COSTING SYSTEMS

    E-print Network

    Siguenza-GuzmanisadoctoralstudentattheCentreforIndustrialManagementTraffic&Infrastructure, KU Leuven, Belgium. She is also lecturer at the Faculty of Engineering, University of Cuenca, Ecuador: joos.vandewalle@esat. kuleuven.be. **** Henri Verhaaren was professor at the Department of Pediatrics

  1. On the intrinsic complexity of point finding in real singular hypersurfaces

    E-print Network

    , and Departamento de Matem´aticas, Estad´istica y Computaci´on, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cantabria, 39071 Santander, Spain. joos@dc.uba.ar 5 Departamento de Matem´aticas, Estad´istica y Computaci

  2. Poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(L-lysine) Dendrimer: Novel Linear Polymer/Dendrimer Block Copolymer Forming a Spherical

    E-print Network

    Park, Jong-Sang

    Copolymer Forming a Spherical Water-Soluble Polyionic Complex with DNA Joon Sig Choi, Eun Jung Lee, Young Hun Choi, Yong Joo Jeong, and Jong Sang Park* Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, San

  3. COMMUNICATIONS Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2000, 39, No. 22 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH, D-69451 Weinheim, 2000 1433-7851/00/3922-4041 $ 17.50+.50/0 4041

    E-print Network

    Park, Jong-Sang

    Inorganic Layered Double Hydroxides as Nonviral Vectors** Jin-Ho Choy,* Seo-Young Kwak, Yong-Joo Jeong, and Jong-Sang Park Layered double hydroxides (LDHs), the so-called anionic clays, consist of cationic

  4. Multicentury changes in ocean and land contributions to the climate-carbon feedback

    E-print Network

    Hoffman, Forrest M.

    , ice sheet melt, sea level rise, and drought effects persist for many centuries after the abatement of emissions [Solomon et al., 2009; Froelicher and Joos, 2010; Boucher et al., 2012; Collins et al., 2013

  5. The 3rd DBCLS BioHackathon: improving life science data integration with Semantic Web technologies

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    Katayama, Toshiaki; Wilkinson, Mark D.; Micklem, Gos; Kawashima, Shuichi; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Nakao, Mitsuteru; Yamamoto, Yasunori; Okamoto, Shinobu; Oouchida, Kenta; Chun, Hong-Woo; Aerts, Jan; Afzal, Hammad; Antezana, Erick; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Aranda, Bruno; Belleau, Francois; Bolleman, Jerven; Bonnal, Raoul J. P.; Chapman, Brad; Cock, Peter J. A.; Eriksson, Tore; Gordon, Paul M. K.; Goto, Naohisa; Hayashi, Kazuhiro; Horn, Heiko; Ishiwata, Ryosuke; Kaminuma, Eli; Kasprzyk, Arek; Kawaji, Hideya; Kido, Nobuhiro; Kim, Young Joo; Kinjo, Akira R.; Konishi, Fumikazu; Kwon, Kyung-Hoon; Labarga, Alberto; Lamprecht, Anna-Lena; Lin, Yu; Lindenbaum, Pierre; McCarthy, Luke; Morita, Hideyuki; Murakami, Katsuhiko; Nagao, Koji; Nishida, Kozo; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Nishizawa, Tatsuya; Ogishima, Soichi; Ono, Keiichiro; Oshita, Kazuki; Park, Keun-Joon; Prins, Pjotr; Saito, Taro L.; Samwald, Matthias; Satagopam, Venkata P.; Shigemoto, Yasumasa; Smith, Richard; Splendiani, Andrea; Sugawara, Hideaki; Taylor, James; Vos, Rutger A.; Withers, David; Yamasaki, Chisato; Zmasek, Christian M.; Kawamoto, Shoko; Okubo, Kosaku; Asai, Kiyoshi; Takagi, Toshihisa

    2013-02-11

    Kaminuma, Arek Kasprzyk, Hideya Kawaji, Nobuhiro Kido, Young Joo Kim, Akira R Kinjo, Fumikazu Konishi, Kyung-Hoon Kwon, Alberto Labarga, Anna-Lena Lamprecht, Yu Lin, Pierre Lindenbaum, Luke McCarthy, Hideyuki Morita, Katsuhiko Murakami, Koji Nagao, Kozo...

  6. Under review What is where's influence on short-term visual recognition?

    E-print Network

    Sekuler, Robert

    Chad Dube for thoughtful comments on an earlier ver- sion of this manuscript. We also thank Joo-Seok Hyun, Shivaku- mar Viswanathan and Kristina Visscher for help with this project, whose results were

  7. Volume 57(5): 469476, 2009 Journal of Histochemistry & Cytochemistry

    E-print Network

    Gronostajski, Richard M.

    Junctions and Aberrant Odontoblast Differentiation Tae-Yeon Lee, Dong-Seol Lee, Hyun-Man Kim, Jea Seung Ko, Richard M. Gronostajski, Moon-Il Cho, Ho-Hyun Son, and Joo-Cheol Park Department of Conservative Dentistry

  8. POPULATION ECOLOGY Chris C. Nice James A. Fordyce

    E-print Network

    Fordyce, James

    POPULATION ECOLOGY Chris C. Nice Æ James A. Fordyce How caterpillars avoid overheating: behavioral.e., tents) (Casey et al. 1988; Joos et al. 1988) have been shown to effectively regulate body temperatures

  9. Surface dilational rheology of mixed beta-lactoglobulin/surfactant layers at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Miller, R; Leser, M E; Michel, M; Fainerman, V B

    2005-07-14

    The general theoretical model by Garrett and Joos proposed in 1976 for the estimation of the dilational elasticity of mixed surfactant solutions, and also the theoretical model proposed by Joos for the limiting elasticity of such mixtures, demonstrate quite satisfactory agreement with experimental results obtained from the oscillating bubble shape method for mixtures of a nonionic surfactant and a protein, that is, beta-lactoglobuline and decyl dimethyl phosphine oxide, C10DMPO. PMID:16852663

  10. PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [2007-2008 Seoul National University

    E-print Network

    Park, Jong-Sang

    ://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t713644168 Layered Double Hydroxide as Gene Reservoir Jin-Ho Choy a ; Jong-Sang Park a ; Seo-Young Kwak this Article Choy, Jin-Ho, Park, Jong-Sang, Kwak, Seo-Young, Jeong, Yong-Joo and Han, Yang-Su(2000)'Layered-HO CHOY, JONG-SANG PARK, SEO-YOUNG KWAK, YONG-JOO JEONG and YANG-SU HAN Depurtment of Chemistty, Centerfor

  11. Computer Coupling of Phase Diagrams and Thermochemistry 32 (2008) 669674 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-print Network

    Jo, Moon-Ho

    2008-01-01

    .elsevier.com/locate/calphad Thermodynamic analysis for the size-dependence of Si1-xGex nanowire composition grown by a vapor­liquid­solid method Inyoung Sa, Byeong-Moon Lee, Cheol-Joo Kim, Moon-Ho Jo, Byeong-Joo Lee Department of Materials of the Si1-xGex alloy nanowire composition grown by a vapor­liquid­solid method is proposed. It is shown

  12. Master thesis Model for Mechanical Properties

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    of Ferrous Technology (Computational Metallurgy) Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology Pohang University-Rolled Steels By Ryu, Joo Hyun Department of Ferrous Technology (Computational Metallurgy) Graduate Institute of Science in the Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology (Computational Metallurgy) Pohang, Korea December

  13. Fluid-Structure Interaction of a Variable Camber Compliant Wing

    E-print Network

    Rumpfkeil, Markus Peer

    , Dayton, OH, 45469, USA James J. Joo Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, 45433, USA this development and eventually help to improve efficiency and to optimize the design. The Air Force ResearchFluid-Structure Interaction of a Variable Camber Compliant Wing Samuel C. Miller Air Force

  14. Multi-ScaleMulti-Scale Computational HomogenizationComputational Homogenization

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  15. Title: Early neural signatures of visual short-term memory Yigal Agam1

    E-print Network

    Sekuler, Robert

    Title: Early neural signatures of visual short-term memory Authors: Yigal Agam1 , Joo-Seok Hyun2 activity underlying the processing of visual information in short-term memory. Introduction Visual short-term Short-term memory (VSTM) relies on a distributed network including sensory-related, posterior regions

  16. Tidal Effects on Intermediate Waters: A Case Study in the East/Japan Sea HO JIN LEE,* JAE-HUN PARK, AND MARK WIMBUSH

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    directly simulated open-ocean circulation including tides. Because the East/Japan Sea (EJS) has been KYUNG TAE JUNG AND CHAN JOO JANG Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute, Ansan, South Korea YANG Korea YOUNG-KYO SEO AND JONG HO NAM College of Ocean Science and Technology, Korea Maritime University

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    Magnetic bead-based phage anti-immunocomplex assay (PHAIA) for the detection of the urinary biomarker 3-phenoxybenzoic acid to assess human exposure to pyrethroid insecticides Hee-Joo Kim a , Ki Chang Phage ELISA Noncompetitive immunoassay 3-Phenoxybenzoic acid Pyrethroid insecticides a b s t r a c

  18. Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Departement Elektrotechniek ESATSISTA/TR 199744

    E-print Network

    of Mobile Phone Fraud using Supervised Neural Networks: A First Prototype 1 Yves Moreau and Joos Vandewalle.moreau@esat.kuleuven.ac.be, www: http://www.esat.kuleuven.ac.be/¸moreau/ . #12; Detection of Mobile Phone Fraud using Supervised on a supervised neural network for the detection of fraud in mobile communications. This prototype is being

  19. Ferroelectrics, 331:103120, 2006 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

    E-print Network

    Mast, T. Douglas

    of a Ferroelectric Hyperthermia Phased Array OSAMA M. AL-BATAINEH,1 T. DOUGLAS MAST,2 EUN-JOO PARK,1, VICTOR W probe for hyperthermia treatment of prostate cancer. A 3D acous- tical prostate model was created arrays com- posed the 80 elements hyperthermia array. Good agreement between the exposimetry and the k

  20. STAG UK Newsletter Issue 47 

    E-print Network

    1981-01-01

    Babeth Butler; poetry by Katy Deery, Ann F'legg, Tina Pole. Make cheques, etc, payable to S~'AG. Please include a self-addressed label. F'oreign orders .? if you pay by dollar cheque, please add ?J..OO to the toyal towards bank charges. Also available - LE 37...

  1. Financial Stress, Self-Efficacy, and Financial Help-Seeking Behavior of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, HanNa; Heckman, Stuart J.; Letkiewicz, Jodi C.; Montalto, Catherine P.

    2014-01-01

    Financial stress and self-efficacy are examined in relationship to college students' financial help-seeking behavior utilizing Grable and Joo's (1999) framework. A cognitive approach is taken by focusing on the moderating role of financial self-efficacy on the relationship between financial stress and financial help-seeking. Data from…

  2. Search for single top quark production in pp collisions at s = 1.96 TeV in the

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    . Calancha,32 S. Camarda,4 M. Campanelli,31 M. Campbell,35 F. Canelli14 ,18 A. Canepa,46 B. Carls,25 D.K. Jha,6 S. Jindariani,18 W. Johnson,8 M. Jones,49 K.K. Joo,28 S.Y. Jun,13 J.E. Jung,28 T.R. Junk,18 T

  3. Search for the Decays B0 in CDF Run II

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    . Campanelli,36 M. Campbell,35 F. Canelli,14,18 A. Canepa,46 B. Carls,25 D. Carlsmith,60 R. Carosi,47a S. K. Joo,28 S. Y. Jun,13 J. E. Jung,28 T. R. Junk,18 T. Kamon,54 D. Kar,19 P. E. Karchin,59 Y. Kato,42

  4. Search for the Production of Scalar Bottom Quarks in pp Collisions at s = 1.96 TeV

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    . Campbell,35 F. Canelli14 ,18 A. Canepa,46 B. Carls,25 D. Carlsmith,60 R. Carosi,47 S. Carrillon ,19 S. Johnson,8 M. Jones,49 K.K. Joo,28 S.Y. Jun,13 J.E. Jung,28 T.R. Junk,18 T. Kamon,54 D. Kar,19 P.E. Karchin

  5. Measurements of the top-quark mass using charged particle tracking T. Aaltonen,24

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    . Campbell,35 F. Canelli14 ,18 A. Canepa,46 B. Carls,25 D. Carlsmith,60 R. Carosi,47 S. Carrillon ,19 S. Jindariani,18 W. Johnson,8 M. Jones,49 K.K. Joo,28 S.Y. Jun,13 J.E. Jung,28 T.R. Junk,18 T. Kamon,54 D. Kar

  6. Measurement of d =dy of Drell-Yan e + e pairs in the Z Mass Region from p p Collisions at p

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    M. Campanelli, 36 M. Campbell, 35 F. Canelli 14 , 18 A. Canepa, 46 B. Carls, 25 D. Carlsmith, 60 R, 6 S. Jindariani, 18 W. Johnson, 8 M. Jones, 49 K.K. Joo, 28 S.Y. Jun, 13 J.E. Jung, 28 T.R. Junk, 18

  7. Search for narrow resonances lighter than mesons T. Aaltonen,24

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    ,35 F. Canelli14 ,18 A. Canepa,46 B. Carls,25 D. Carlsmith,60 R. Carosi,47 S. Carrillon ,19 S. Carron. Jindariani,18 W. Johnson,8 M. Jones,49 K.K. Joo,28 S.Y. Jun,13 J.E. Jung,28 T.R. Junk,18 T. Kamon,54 D. Kar

  8. Search for new particles decaying into dijets in proton-antiproton collisions at s = 1.96 TeV

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    M. Campanelli,36 M. Campbell,35 F. Canelli14 ,18 A. Canepa,46 B. Carls,25 D. Carlsmith,60 R. Carosi.K. Jha,6 S. Jindariani,18 W. Johnson,8 M. Jones,49 K.K. Joo,28 S.Y. Jun,13 J.E. Jung,28 T.R. Junk,18 T

  9. Observation of Baryon and Measurement of the Properties of the b

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    . Campbell, 35 F. Canelli 14 , 18 A. Canepa, 46 B. Carls, 25 D. Carlsmith, 60 R. Carosi, 47 S. Carrillo n, 6 S. Jindariani, 18 W. Johnson, 8 M. Jones, 49 K.K. Joo, 28 S.Y. Jun, 13 J.E. Jung, 28 T.R. Junk, 1

  10. CDF/PUB/TOP/CDFR/9491 Top Quark Mass Measurement in the Lepton plus Jets Channel

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    M. Campanelli, 36 M. Campbell, 35 F. Canelli 14 , 18 A. Canepa, 46 B. Carls, 25 D. Carlsmith, 60 R, 6 S. Jindariani, 18 W. Johnson, 8 M. Jones, 49 K.K. Joo, 28 S.Y. Jun, 13 J.E. Jung, 28 T.R. Junk, 18

  11. Program of KOTAC 2002 Operator Theory and Its Applications

    E-print Network

    Lee, Woo Young

    :50-14:30 On the invariant subspace problem Carl Pearcy (Texas A&M Univ, USA) 14:30-14:40 Coffee Break Chairman: Joo Ho Kang operators Il Bong Jung (Kyungpook National Univ, Korea) 13:50-14:10 Notes on the Heinz

  12. Precision Measurement of the X(3872) Mass in J/+ T. Aaltonen,24

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    ,35 F. Canelli14 ,18 A. Canepa,46 B. Carls,25 D. Carlsmith,60 R. Carosi,47 S. Carrillon ,19 S. Carron. Jindariani,18 W. Johnson,8 M. Jones,49 K.K. Joo,62 S.Y. Jun,13 J.E. Jung,62 T.R. Junk,18 T. Kamon,54 D. Kar

  13. Measurement of Z Production in pp Collisions at s = 1.96 TeV

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    . Canelli14 ,61 A. Canepa,61 B. Carls,61 D. Carlsmith,61 R. Carosi,61 S. Carrillon ,61 S. Carron,61 B. Casal. Jones,61 K.K. Joo,61 S.Y. Jun,61 J.E. Jung,61 T.R. Junk,61 T. Kamon,61 D. Kar,61 P.E. Karchin,61 Y

  14. Measurement of the tt Production Cross Section in 2 fb-1 of pp Collisions at

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    ,46 B. Carls,25 D. Carlsmith,60 R. Carosi,47 S. Carrillon ,19 S. Carron,34 B. Casal,12 M. Casarsa,18 A.K. Jha,6 S. Jindariani,18 W. Johnson,8 M. Jones,49 K.K. Joo,28 S.Y. Jun,13 J.E. Jung,28 T.R. Junk,18 T

  15. A search for high-mass resonances decaying to dimuons at CDF T. Aaltonen,24

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    . Campbell,35 F. Canelli,18 A. Canepa,46 B. Carls,25 D. Carlsmith,60 R. Carosi,47 S. Carrillom ,19 S. Carron. Jones,49 K.K. Joo,28 S.Y. Jun,13 J.E. Jung,28 T.R. Junk,18 T. Kamon,54 D. Kar,19 P.E. Karchin,59 Y. Kato

  16. First Measurement of the b-jet Cross Section in Events with a W Boson in pp Collisions at

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    . Cabrerav ,17 C. Calancha,32 M. Campanelli,36 M. Campbell,35 F. Canelli14 ,18 A. Canepa,46 B. Carls,25 D. Jones,49 K.K. Joo,62 S.Y. Jun,13 J.E. Jung,62 T.R. Junk,18 T. Kamon,54 D. Kar,19 P.E. Karchin,59 Y

  17. Measurement of W-Boson Polarization in Top-quark Decay in pp Collisions at p T. Aaltonen, 24 J. Adelman, 14 B.

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    , 35 F. Canelli 14 , 18 A. Canepa, 46 B. Carls, 25 D. Carlsmith, 60 R. Carosi, 47 S. Carrillo n , 19 S.K. Jha, 6 S. Jindariani, 18 W. Johnson, 8 M. Jones, 49 K.K. Joo, 28 S.Y. Jun, 13 J.E. Jung, 28 T.R. Junk

  18. Direct Measurement of the W Production Charge Asymmetry in pp Collisions at # s = 1.96 TeV

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    , 18 A. Canepa, 46 B. Carls, 25 D. Carlsmith, 60 R. Carosi, 47 S. Carrillo n , 19 S. Carron, 34 B.J. Jeon, 28 M.K. Jha, 6 S. Jindariani, 18 W. Johnson, 8 M. Jones, 49 K.K. Joo, 28 S.Y. Jun, 13 J.E. Jung

  19. Fermilab-Pub-09-400-E A Search for the Higgs Boson Produced in Association with Z + -

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    . Cabrerav ,17 C. Calancha,32 M. Campanelli,36 M. Campbell,35 F. Canelli14 ,18 A. Canepa,46 B. Carls,25 D. Jones,49 K.K. Joo,28 S.Y. Jun,13 J.E. Jung,28 T.R. Junk,18 T. Kamon,54 D. Kar,19 P.E. Karchin,59 Y

  20. Production of (2S) Mesons in pp Collisions at 1.96 TeV T. Aaltonen,24

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    ,35 F. Canelli14 ,18 A. Canepa,46 B. Carls,25 D. Carlsmith,60 R. Carosi,47 S. Carrillon ,19 S. Carron. Jindariani,18 W. Johnson,8 M. Jones,49 K.K. Joo,62 S.Y. Jun,13 J.E. Jung,62 T.R. Junk,18 T. Kamon,54 D. Kar

  1. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass Using the Invariant Mass of Lepton Pairs in Soft Muon btagged Events

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    . Campanelli, 36 M. Campbell, 35 F. Canelli 14 , 18 A. Canepa, 46 B. Carls, 25 D. Carlsmith, 60 R. Carosi, 47 S.J. Jeon, 62 M.K. Jha, 6 S. Jindariani, 18 W. Johnson, 8 M. Jones, 49 K.K. Joo, 62 S.Y. Jun, 13 J.E. Jung

  2. Search for Fermion-Pair Decays QQ (tW )(tW ) in Same-Charge Dilepton Events

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    . Campbell,37 F. Canelli14 ,20 A. Canepa,48 B. Carls,27 D. Carlsmith,63 R. Carosi,49 S. Carrillon ,21 S W. Johnson,8 M. Jones,51 K.K. Joo,30 S.Y. Jun,14 J.E. Jung,30 T.R. Junk,20 T. Kamon,57 D. Kar,21 P

  3. Exclusion of an Exotic Top Quark with -4/3 Electric Charge Using Soft Lepton T. Aaltonen,24

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    . Campbell,35 F. Canelli14 ,18 A. Canepa,46 B. Carls,25 D. Carlsmith,60 R. Carosi,47 S. Carrillon ,19 S. Johnson,8 M. Jones,49 K.K. Joo,28 S.Y. Jun,13 J.E. Jung,28 T.R. Junk,18 T. Kamon,54 D. Kar,19 P.E. Karchin

  4. Search for exclusive Z boson production and observation of high mass pp pp p + -

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    ,46 B. Carls,25 D. Carlsmith,60 R. Carosi,47 S. Carrillol ,19 S. Carron,62 B. Casal,12 M. Casarsa,18 A.K. Jha,6 S. Jindariani,18 W. Johnson,8 M. Jones,49 K.K. Joo,28 S.Y. Jun,13 J.E. Jung,28 T.R. Junk,18 T

  5. First Measurement of the Ratio of Branching Fractions B ( 0 c ) =B ( 0

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    , 32 M. Campanelli, 36 M. Campbell, 35 F. Canelli, 18 A. Canepa, 46 B. Carls, 25 D. Carlsmith, 60 R.K. Jha, 6 S. Jindariani, 18 W. Johnson, 8 M. Jones, 49 K.K. Joo, 28 S.Y. Jun, 13 J.E. Jung, 28 T.R. Junk

  6. Search for WW and WZ production in lepton plus jets final state at CDF T. Aaltonen,24

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    . Campbell,35 F. Canelli14 ,18 A. Canepa,46 B. Carls,25 D. Carlsmith,60 R. Carosi,47 S. Carrillon ,19 S. Jindariani,18 W. Johnson,8 M. Jones,49 K.K. Joo,28 S.Y. Jun,13 J.E. Jung,28 T.R. Junk,18 T. Kamon,54 D. Kar

  7. A study of the associated production of photons and bquark jets in pp collisions at # s = 1.96 TeV

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    , 18 A. Canepa, 46 B. Carls, 25 D. Carlsmith, 60 R. Carosi, 47 S. Carrillo n , 19 S. Carron, 18 B.K. Joo, 28 S.Y. Jun, 13 J.E. Jung, 28 T.R. Junk, 18 T. Kamon, 54 D. Kar, 19 P.E. Karchin, 59 Y. Kato m

  8. Evidence for a Narrow NearThreshold Structure in the J/## Mass Spectrum # J/##K + Decays

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    . Canelli 14 , 18 A. Canepa, 46 B. Carls, 25 D. Carlsmith, 60 R. Carosi, 47 S. Carrillo n , 19 S. Carron, 34 S. Jindariani, 18 W. Johnson, 8 M. Jones, 49 K.K. Joo, 28 S.Y. Jun, 13 J.E. Jung, 28 T.R. J

  9. Global Search for New Physics with 2.0 fb-1 T. Aaltonen,24

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    . Cabrerau ,17 C. Calancha,32 M. Campanelli,36 M. Campbell,35 F. Canelli,18 A. Canepa,46 B. Carls,25 D.J. Jeon,28 M.K. Jha,6 S. Jindariani,18 W. Johnson,8 M. Jones,49 K.K. Joo,28 S.Y. Jun,13 J.E. Jung,28 T

  10. CDF/PUB/TOP/CDFR/9664 First Measurement of the tt Differential Cross Section d/dMtt in

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    ,46 B. Carls,25 D. Carlsmith,60 R. Carosi,47 S. Carrillon ,19 S. Carron,34 B. Casal,12 M. Casarsa,18 A.K. Jha,6 S. Jindariani,18 W. Johnson,8 M. Jones,49 K.K. Joo,28 S.Y. Jun,13 J.E. Jung,28 T.R. Junk,18 T

  11. Search for WW and WZ resonances decaying to electron, missing ET , and two jets in pp collisions at

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    . Camarda,4 M. Campanelli,31 M. Campbell,35 F. Canelli14 ,18 A. Canepa,46 B. Carls,25 D. Carlsmith,60 R W. Johnson,8 M. Jones,49 K.K. Joo,28 S.Y. Jun,13 J.E. Jung,28 T.R. Junk,18 T. Kamon,54 D. Kar,19 P

  12. Measurement of the k T Distribution of Particles in Jets Produced in p p Collisions at

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    M. Campbell, 35 F. Canelli, 18 A. Canepa, 46 B. Carls, 25 D. Carlsmith, 60 R. Carosi, 47 S. Carrillo. Jindariani, 18 W. Johnson, 8 M. Jones, 49 K.K. Joo, 28 S.Y. Jun, 13 J.E. Jung, 28 T.R. Junk, 18 T. Kamon, 54

  13. CDF/PHYS/EXOTIC/CDFR/9907 PRL draft version 2.1

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    . Camarda,4 M. Campanelli,31 M. Campbell,35 F. Canelli14 ,18 A. Canepa,46 B. Carls,25 D. Carlsmith,60 R.K. Jha,6 S. Jindariani,18 W. Johnson,8 M. Jones,49 K.K. Joo,28 S.Y. Jun,13 J.E. Jung,28 T.R. Junk,18 T

  14. First Observation of Electroweak Single Top Quark Production T. Aaltonen,24

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    . Campbell,35 F. Canelli14 ,18 A. Canepa,46 B. Carls,25 D. Carlsmith,60 R. Carosi,47 S. Carrillon ,19 S. Jindariani,18 W. Johnson,8 M. Jones,49 K.K. Joo,28 S.Y. Jun,13 J.E. Jung,28 T.R. Junk,18 T. Kamon,54 D. Kar

  15. First Measurement of the Ratio tt/Z/ll and Precise Extraction of the tt Cross T. Aaltonen,24

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    . Campbell,35 F. Canelli14 ,18 A. Canepa,46 B. Carls,25 D. Carlsmith,60 R. Carosi,47 S. Carrillon ,19 S. Johnson,8 M. Jones,49 K.K. Joo,28 S.Y. Jun,13 J.E. Jung,28 T.R. Junk,18 T. Kamon,54 D. Kar,19 P.E. Karchin

  16. Search for Anomalous Production of Events with Two Photons and Additional Energetic Objects at CDF

    E-print Network

    Quigg, Chris

    , 18 A. Canepa, 46 B. Carls, 25 D. Carlsmith, 60 R. Carosi, 47 S. Carrillo n , 19 S. Carron, 18 B. Jones, 49 K.K. Joo, 28 S.Y. Jun, 13 J.E. Jung, 28 T.R. Junk, 18 T. Kamon, 54 D. Kar, 19 P.E. Karchin, 59

  17. Home / Chemistry / Chemistry (general) Angewandte Chemie International Edition

    E-print Network

    Jo, Moon-Ho

    Papers Hot Papers are chosen by the Editors for their importance in a rapidly evolving field of high current interest. Many of the "Very Important Papers" (VIPs) would certainly qualify to be included here Gradient Geunhee Lee, Yun Sung Woo, Jee-Eun Yang, Donghun Lee, Cheol-Joo Kim, Moon-Ho Jo* Going straight

  18. Reo2MC: a Tool Chain for Performance Analysis of Coordination Models

    E-print Network

    Oxford, University of

    , and Young-Joo Moon CWI, Amsterdam, The Netherlands {Farhad.Arbab,M.Sun,Y.J.Moon}@cwi.nl Marta Kwiatkowska and importance of coordination mod- els in software applications necessarily lead to a higher relevance of such models plays an important role in the quality of the final software system. Unfor- tunately, the lack

  19. Results of the 4th JCO Grant Call JCO is pleased to announce that out of a total of 10 proposals submitted for the 4th

    E-print Network

    Yao, Shao Q

    into Cardiomyocytes BTI SIMTech/ I2R Tong Joo Chuan Molecular Profiling of Non- small Cell Lung Cancer: From SNP Participating Institutions Steve Oh Real-time Video Monitoring of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Development Development of Scalable High Throughput Characterization of -cell Electrical Properties and Quantification

  20. Nephrol Dial Transplant (2006) 21: 24322438 doi:10.1093/ndt/gfl070

    E-print Network

    Park, Jong-Sang

    2006-01-01

    Kwon1 , Sung Joo Kim3 , Ghee Young Kwon4 , Hyun Jung Jeon1 , Hyun Jung Lim2 , Woo Kyoung Lee2 , Jong-sang Park2 , Jai Young Ko6 and Dae Joong Kim5 1 Clinical Research Center, Samsung Biomedical Research

  1. Large Electroabsorption Susceptibility Mediated by Internal Photoconductive Gain in Ge Nanowires

    E-print Network

    Jo, Moon-Ho

    Hyun-Seung Lee, Cheol-Joo Kim, Donghun Lee, Ru Ri Lee, Kibum Kang, Inchan Hwang, and Moon-Ho Jo and optical gain in light absorption, due to the dielectric, optical, and electronic confinements,14-19 size) Ge NW of a given diameter (50-130 nm) is ohmic-contacted to Ni/Au electrodes (source and drain) (see

  2. Critical-temperature/Peierls-stress dependent size effects in body centered cubic nanopillars

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yi

    Min Han, Gang Feng, Joo Young Jung, Hee Joon Jung, James R. Groves et al. Citation: Appl. Phys. Lett with improved magnetic property J. Appl. Phys. 113, 044314 (2013) Thermal conductivity measurement of individual Bi2Se3 nano-ribbon by self-heating three- method Appl. Phys. Lett. 102, 043104 (2013) Structural

  3. A Framework for Interaction and Cognitive Engagement in Connectivist Learning Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Zhijun; Chen, Li; Anderson, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Interaction has always been highly valued in education, especially in distance education (Moore, 1989; Anderson, 2003; Chen, 2004a; Woo & Reeves, 2007; Wang, 2013; Conrad, in press). It has been associated with motivation (Mahle, 2011; Wen-chi, et al., 2011), persistence (Tello, 2007; Joo, Lim, & Kim, 2011), deep learning (Offir, et al.,…

  4. Nuclear Modification Factors in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at

    E-print Network

    +Au collisions, suppression effects due to nuclear shadowing and/or gluon saturation are expected at large in the longitudinal direction. The nuclear medium effects on hadron production are quantified by the use of nuclearNuclear Modification Factors in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV Eun-Joo Kim a, Hongyan

  5. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (86th, Kansas City, Missouri, July 30-August 2, 2003). Communication Theory & Methodology Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    The Communication Theory & Methodology Division of the proceedings contains the following 14 papers: "Interaction As a Unit of Analysis for Interactive Media Research: A Conceptualization" (Joo-Hyun Lee and Hairong Li); "Towards a Network Approach of Human Action: Theoretical Concepts and Empirical Observations in Media Organizations" (Thorsten…

  6. General Purpose Computation using Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU) (GPU)

    E-print Network

    of complex polyhedral models, ACM Symposium on Solid Modeling and Applications, June 2003 Yoo-Joo Choi, Young, 22(2), 2006 Xinyu Zhang, Young J. Kim, Interactive collision detection for deformable models using GAMMA . interactive computer graphics, GPGPU, haptics, geometric and physically-based modeling

  7. Disentangling Depression and Distress Networks in the Tinnitus Brain

    E-print Network

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Disentangling Depression and Distress Networks in the Tinnitus Brain Kathleen Joos, Sven Vanneste stimulus. This permanent sound often affects a person's emotional state inducing distress and depressive feelings changes in 6­25% of the affected population. Distress and depression are two distinct emotional

  8. Development of Drug-Loaded PLGA Microparticles Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2011, Vol. 32, No. 3 867 DOI 10.5012/bkcs.2011.32.3.867

    E-print Network

    Park, Jong-Sang

    Patterns for Prolonged Drug Delivery Yeonsoon Choi, Jae-ryang Joo, Areum Hong, and Jong-Sang Park to an initial burst effect by rapid drug diffusion through the polymer matrix. Since PLGA microparticles enabled, the initial burst could be repressed properly and drug release rate could decrease. Key Words : Drug delivery

  9. Comparison of structures of laminar methaneoxygen and methaneair diffusion flames from atmospheric to 60 atm

    E-print Network

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    atmospheric. The presence of the two- zone structure in the methane­oxygen flames was attributedComparison of structures of laminar methane­oxygen and methane­air diffusion flames from atmospheric to 60 atm Peter H. Joo, Marc R.J. Charest, Clinton P.T. Groth, Ömer L. Gülder University

  10. Invited Reaction: Investigating the Influences of Core Self-Evaluations, Job Autonomy, and Intrinsic Motivation on In-Role Job Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    The authors of this featured article (Joo, Jeung, & Yoon, 2010) respond to calls for further examination of how individual differences and workplace environment jointly impact organizational behavior. The authors integrate social psychology and management research to examine employee behavior and its relation to human resource development.…

  11. A V-Band Waveguide Transition Design Appropriate for Monolithic Integration

    E-print Network

    Rieh, Jae-Sung

    A V-Band Waveguide Transition Design Appropriate for Monolithic Integration Kook Joo Lee, Dong Ho for monolithic integration is presented. The transition size is minimized by using a dipole instead of a tapered transition; dipole antenna; monolithic integration I. INTRODUCTION There are several components

  12. Challenges and Opportunities for Introducing Basic Circuits and Systems in Electrical Engineering Education

    E-print Network

    recruit 30% of STEM students in higher education, while many European countries only have figures around Education Joos Vandewalle Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT) Katholieke Universiteit Leuven B-3001 are essential ingredients of electrical engineering education at most universities around the world. However

  13. Effect of Deformation on Hydrogen Trapping and Effusion in TRIPAssisted Steel

    E-print Network

    Cambridge, University of

    Effect of Deformation on Hydrogen Trapping and Effusion in TRIP­Assisted Steel Joo Hyun Ryua of hydrogen at a variety of sites in multiphase transformation­induced plasticity (TRIP) steels has been transformation. An interesting outcome is that the mechanical degradation of the steel by hydrogen is more

  14. Cyanobacterial macrophytes in an Early Silurian (Llandovery) continental biota: Passage Creek, lower Massanutten Sandstone,

    E-print Network

    Tomescu, Alexandru MF

    similarities to modern organisms in terms of overall morphology and production of copious extracellular, Arcata, CA 95521, USA; Gar W. Rothwell [rothwell@ohio.edu], Department of Environmental and Plant Biology in peritidal environ- ments for at least 2,000 Ma (Golubic & Seong-Joo 1999), and sedimentary structures

  15. Prediction of feather damage in laying hens using optical flows and

    E-print Network

    Roberts, Stephen

    Prediction of feather damage in laying hens using optical flows and Markov models Hyoung-joo Lee1, and 2 Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK Feather pecking in laying hens of production as well as welfare issues for the damaged birds. Damaging outbreaks of feather pecking

  16. Brush-and-Drag: A Multi-touch Interface For Photo Triaging

    E-print Network

    Winkler, Stefan

    photo software provides very limited computational or interface support for photo triaging. For exampleBrush-and-Drag: A Multi-touch Interface For Photo Triaging Seon Joo Kim,1 Hongwei Ng, Stefan of the same scene with only slight variations. To enhance photo triaging, which is a very common photowork

  17. Dynamic In-Page Logging for Flash-Aware B-Tree Index School of Info & Comm Engr

    E-print Network

    Moon, Bongki

    flash block such that the amount of physical writes is minimized at the nominal over- This workDynamic In-Page Logging for Flash-Aware B-Tree Index Gap-Joo Na School of Info & Comm Engr B+ -tree (d-IPL in short) as a B+ -tree index variant for flash-based storage systems. The d-IPL B

  18. Examination of protein degradation in continuous flow, microbial electrolysis cells treating fermentation wastewater

    E-print Network

    fermentation wastewater Joo-Youn Nam a,b , Matthew D. Yates a , Zehra Zaybak a,c , Bruce E. Logan a Chester, PA 19383, USA h i g h l i g h t s Continuous H2 gas production from fermentation wastewater August 2014 Keywords: Carbohydrate Fermentation Hydrogen Microbial electrolysis cell Protein a b s t r

  19. Author's personal copy Comparison of microbial electrolysis cells operated with

    E-print Network

    Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Microbial electrolysis cellsAuthor's personal copy Comparison of microbial electrolysis cells operated with added voltage or by setting the anode potential Joo-Youn Nam, Justin C. Tokash, Bruce E. Logan* Department of Civil

  20. IEEE SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS MAGAZINE FALL 2014 1 VOL. 6 NO. 4

    E-print Network

    Shepard, Kenneth

    as a Role Model for Reversing the Negative Spiral of Basic Circuits and Systems Education By Joos Vandewalle about this image: Columbia's mixed-signal group in the late 1980s. Find out who's who in "Exploring, and Maurits Ortmanns #12;SCOPE: Each issue of IEEE Solid-State Circuits Magazine is envisioned as a self

  1. Publication List Department of Statistics & Applied Probability

    E-print Network

    Chen, Zehua

    pages, 2012. doi:10.1155/2012/642403. 9. J. Joo, M. Kwak, Z. Chen and G. Zheng (2010). Tutorial in bio for trait distribution with a spike. Genetics, 182:337-342. 13. W. Li and Z. Chen (2009). A New Approach selected sib- pairs. Annals of Human Genetics, 70, 857-866. 19. H. Chen and Z. Chen (2005). Asymptotic

  2. Global Optimization with Coupled Local Minimizers Excited by Gaussian White Noise

    E-print Network

    Global Optimization with Coupled Local Minimizers Excited by Gaussian White Noise Serkan G:{serkan.gunel,johan.suykens,joos.vandewalle}@esat.kuleuven.be Abstract--In this paper, Stochastic Coupled Local Minimizers (SCLMs) are presented for global optimization methods for global optimization incorporate random- ness to achieve global exploration of the search space

  3. Methods for Accurate Homology Modeling by Global Optimization

    E-print Network

    Lee, Jooyoung

    Methods for Accurate Homology Modeling by Global Optimization Keehyoung Joo, Jinwoo Lee, Jooyoung. In order to obtain accurate protein models, we have combined a powerful global optimization method) multiple sequence/structure alignment by global optimization 3) 3D structure modeling 4) assessment

  4. Read

    E-print Network

    Fineprint Bookclub

    2009-01-01

    on. ClIlIJi:j .. nd • gi~ to odJooI, So I dooidod \\I:> A bookstore for book lovers Explore the world through books BOOK PARADISE .-my .cpSon, _""11 ..... '" CIII~".may. '_

  5. Fast and Accurate Wi-Fi Localization in Large-Scale Indoor Venues

    E-print Network

    Yu, Chansu

    FiSLAM. WLAN (IEEE 802.11)-based Positioning System (WPS) attracts a lot of attention for this purpose becauseFast and Accurate Wi-Fi Localization in Large-Scale Indoor Venues Seokseong Jeon1 , Young-Joo Suh1@kaist.ac.kr Abstract. An interest and development of indoor localization has grown along with the scope of applications

  6. Development of Sensitive Immunoassays for the Detection of the Glucuronide Conjugate of 3-Phenoxybenzyl Alcohol, a

    E-print Network

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    the benzyl alcohol and the benzoic acid may undergo further metabolism to glucuronide, glycine, taurine- benzyl alcohol (3-PBAlc-Gluc) should be a useful biomarker for exposure to type I pyrethroids-Phenoxybenzyl Alcohol, a Putative Human Urinary Biomarker for Pyrethroid Exposure HEE-JOO KIM, KI CHANG AHN

  7. Teaching to Unlearn Community in Order to Make a Claim to Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwak, Duck-Joo

    2010-01-01

    In this essay Duck-Joo Kwak explores a moral perfectionist approach to citizenship education, which is distinct from liberal and communitarian models. One of educational challenges to this approach is how to cultivate our students' sense of membership, which is shaped by a thick sense of the good life, while being not merely compatible with but…

  8. Supplement 4, Authors: A To K 

    E-print Network

    Segal, Dorothy B.; Doss, Mildred A.; Humphrey, Judith M.

    1955-01-01

    ?stico del parasitisme intestinal en una zona de Bogot?. Periodo de tres a?os : 1947-1948-1949 MIGUEL. 1952 a.?Microflaremia congenita. (Nota...-knot nematodes on the decline in vigor of the red Spanish va- riety of pineapple in Puerto Rico Ferreira, Jos? Maria; and Alves Meria, Jo?o J 1944 a...

  9. Algebraic Attacks on SOBER-t32 and SOBER-t16 without stuttering

    E-print Network

    Algebraic Attacks on SOBER-t32 and SOBER-t16 without stuttering Joo Yeon Cho and Josef Pieprzyk on SOBER-t32 and SOBER-t16 without stuttering. For unstuttered SOBER-t32, two differ- ent attacks without stuttering. The attack takes around O(285 ) CPU clocks with 278 keystream observations. Keywords

  10. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 68356852, 2014 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/14/6835/2014/

    E-print Network

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    and radiative properties of orographic cirrus clouds H. Joos1, P. Spichtinger2, P. Reutter2, and F. Fusina1,* 1 of orographic cirrus clouds has been simulated with the large eddy simulation model EULAG. Idealised simulations velocities but also for dynamically dominated regimes like orographic cirrus. 1 Introduction Cirrus clouds, i

  11. Carbon sources and sinks from an Ensemble Kalman Filter ocean data assimilation

    E-print Network

    Fortunat, Joos

    Click Here for Full Article Carbon sources and sinks from an Ensemble Kalman Filter ocean data by an Ensemble Kalman Filter assimilation of interior ocean observations and compare results with published, M., and F. Joos (2010), Carbon sources and sinks from an Ensemble Kalman Filter ocean data

  12. UNCORRECTED 2 Target selection in visual search as revealed by movement trajectories

    E-print Network

    Nakayama, Ken

    UNCORRECTED PROOF 1 2 Target selection in visual search as revealed by movement trajectories 3 Joo movements in visual search, in which participants reached to an odd-col- 9 ored target presented with two between red and green, and the location of the target was varied. Therefore either color could

  13. Departure from Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium in argon plasmas sustained in a Torche à Injection Axiale sur Guide d'Ondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincón, R.; Muñoz, J.; Calzada, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma torches are suitable plasma sources for a wide range of applications. The capability of these discharges to produce processes like sample excitation or decomposition of molecules inside them depends on the density of the plasma species and their energies (temperatures). The relation between these parameters determines the specific state of thermodynamic equilibrium in the discharge. Thus, the understanding of plasma possibilities for application purposes is related to the knowledge of the plasma thermodynamic equilibrium degree. In this paper a discussion about the equilibrium state for Ar plasmas generated by using a Torche à Injection Axiale sur Guide d'Ondes, TIAGO device, is presented. Emission spectroscopy techniques were used to measure gas temperature and electron density at the exit of the nozzle torch and along the dart. Boltzmann-plots as well as bp parameters were calculated to characterize the type and degree of departure from partial Local Saha Equilibrium (pLSE). This study indicates that the closer situation to Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) of the plasma corresponds to larger Ar flows which highlights the importance of the nitrogen (atmosphere surrounding the plasma) in the kinetics of Ar-TIAGO discharges.

  14. (CO sub 2 uptake in an Ocean Circulation Model)

    SciTech Connect

    Siegenthaler, U.C.

    1990-11-06

    The traveler collaborated with Drs. J. L. Sarmiento and J. C. Orr of the Program in Atmospheric Sciences at Princeton University to finish the article A Perturbation Simulation of CO{sub 2} Uptake in an Ocean Circulation Model,'' which has been submitted to the Journal of Geophysical Research for publication. With F. Joos, a graduate student from the University of Bern, the traveler started writing a journal article describing a box model of the global carbon cycle that is an extension of the one-dimensional box-diffusion model. The traveler further collaborated with F. Joos and Dr. J. L. Sarmiento on modeling the potential enhancement of oceanic CO{sub 2} uptake by fertilizing the southern ocean with iron. A letter describing the results is currently being written for the journal Nature.

  15. XVIth International Workshop on Numerical Methods for Non-Newtonian Flows

    E-print Network

    Rothstein, Jonathan

    :00-3:40 Sunday PM Session I ­ Blood Flow 2:00-2:25 Low-dimensional red blood cell suspen- sions Wenxiao Pan, Fernando Escobedo, Yong Lak Joo 4:50-5:15 Slip-link simulations of Entangled Worm- like and ILC chains 9:35-10:00 On The Use Of Proper Generalized De- compostions In Polymer Science and Pro- cessing F

  16. Science to practice: can intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted MR imaging be used to assess tumor response to antivascular drugs?

    PubMed

    Koh, Dow-Mu

    2014-08-01

    In the study by Joo et al (1), perfusion-sensitive parameters derived from diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) analysis were significantly decreased 4 hours after administration of a vascular disrupting agent (VDA) (CKD-516), in keeping with drug-induced vascular collapse. A larger decrease in the perfusion-sensitive IVIM parameters was correlated with smaller tumor size increase 7 days after treatment. PMID:25058129

  17. Decoherence in quantum mechanics and quantum cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, James B.

    1992-01-01

    A sketch of the quantum mechanics for closed systems adequate for cosmology is presented. This framework is an extension and clarification of that of Everett and builds on several aspects of the post-Everett development. It especially builds on the work of Zeh, Zurek, Joos and Zeh, and others on the interactions of quantum systems with the larger universe and on the ideas of Griffiths, Omnes, and others on the requirements for consistent probabilities of histories.

  18. Different Signaling and Cell Death Roles of Heterotrimeric G Protein a and b Subunits in the Arabidopsis Oxidative

    E-print Network

    Jones, Alan M.

    in the Arabidopsis Oxidative Stress Response to Ozone W Junghee H. Joo,a Shiyu Wang,a J.G. Chen,b A.M. Jones than wild-type Columbia-0 plants. The first peak of the bimodal oxidative burst elicited by O3 in wild responses of plants to pathogen attack and abiotic stress (Mehdy, 1994; Lamb and Dixon, 1997; Alvarez et al

  19. Axially graded heteroepitaxy and Raman spectroscopic characterizations of Si1-xGex nanowires

    E-print Network

    Jo, Moon-Ho

    -Eun Yang,1 Won-Hwa Park,2 Cheol-Joo Kim,1 Zee Hwan Kim,2,a and Moon-Ho Jo1,b 1 Department of Materials electron microscope studies demonstrate that the relative composition of Si and Ge is continuously graded of an individual one-dimensional Si1-xGex alloy crystal,2­4 where the relative composition of Si and Ge

  20. An ultrafast phase-change logic device driven by melting processes

    E-print Network

    Loke, D.; Skelton, J. M.; Wang, W. J.; Lee, T. H.; Zhao, R.; Chong, T. C.; Elliott, S. R.

    2014-09-02

    .R.E. wrote the paper, which incorporates critical inputs from all authors. 17 References 1. Joo S, et al. (2013) Magnetic-field-controlled reconfigurable semiconductor logic. Nature 494(7425):72-76. 2. Dery H, Dalal P, Sham, LJ (2007) Spin... stream_source_info OA1406_PNAS-Logic-Manuscript.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 40602 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name OA1406_PNAS-Logic-Manuscript.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 1 Title...

  1. Development of In-Situ Fan Curve Measurement with One Airflow Measurement 

    E-print Network

    Liu, G.; Joo, I. S.; Song, L.; Liu, M.

    2003-01-01

    -situ Fan Curve Measurement with One Airflow Measurement Guopeng Liu, Ik-Seong Joo, Li Song, Mingsheng Liu, Ph.D., P.E. Energy Systems Laboratory University of Nebraska ABSTRACT Fan airflow is the key parameter for air volume tracking control..., it is very important to find an effective way to measure the airflow accurately. An airflow control named VSD volumetric tracking (VSDVT) has been developed by Liu [13] recently. This method uses fan airflow station to control the fan airflow. The fan...

  2. Optimizing HVAC Control to Improve Building Comfort and Energy Performance 

    E-print Network

    Song, L.; Joo, I.; Dong, D.; Liu, M.; Wang, J.; Hansen, K.; Quiroz, L.; Swiatek, A.

    2003-01-01

    Control to Improve Building Comfort and Energy Performance L. Song, I. Joo, D. Dong, and M. Liu, Ph.D., P.E. Energy Systems Laboratory University of Nebraska J. Wang, K. Hansen Business Energy Solutions & Technologies Omaha Public Power... saved $9,932/yr for a 34,173 square foot school building by converting a constant air handler to variable air volume, adding economizers, dampers and actuators, and replacing three-way valves with two-way valves. M. Liu [9] reduced the utility cost...

  3. Second order theory of $(j,0)\\oplus (0,j)$ single high spins as Lorentz tensors

    E-print Network

    E. G. Delgado-Acosta; M. Kirchbach

    2013-12-20

    We show that higher order differential equations and matrix spinor calculus are completely avoidable in the description of pure high spin-$j$ Weinberg-Joos states, $(j,0)\\oplus (0,j)$. The case is made on the example of $(3/2,0)\\oplus(0,3/2)$, for the sake of concreteness and without loss of generality. Namely, we use as a vehicle for the aforementioned covariant single spin-$3/2$ description the antisymmetric tensor of second rank with Dirac spinor components, $\\Psi_{[\\mu\

  4. Encounter with Molecular Biology

    E-print Network

    Macfarlane, Alan

    2014-08-28

    no supervisor; was at Trinity where my tutor was William Hamilton who was not much help; originally thought I might do a 28 Part II but he thought I knew enough for a PhD; finally taken on by D.R. Hartree, Professor of Mathematical Physics, to work on a... at the Joos-Leeder School of Modern Dance; the school had been housed by Alice Roughton in Adams Road, Cambridge, during the war but had moved by the time we arrived in Cambridge; my wife kept herself by teaching in a Secondary Modern school; never worked...

  5. Deep structure of the Texas Gulf passive margin and its Ouachita-Precambrian basement: Results of the COCORP San Marcos arch survey

    SciTech Connect

    Culotta, R.; Latham, T.; Oliver, J.; Brown, L.; Kaufman, S. ); Sydow, M. )

    1992-02-01

    This COCORP deep seismic survey provides a comprehensive image of the southeast-Texas part of the Gulf passive margin and its accreted Ouachita arc foundation. Beneath the updip limit of the Cenozoic sediment wedge, a prominent antiformal structure is imaged within the interior zone of the buried late Paleozoic Ouachita orogen. The structure appears to involve Precambrian Grenville basement. The crest of the antiform is coincident with the Cretaceous-Tertiary Luling-Mexia-Talco fault zone. Some of these faults dip to the northwest, counter to the general regional pattern of down-to-the-basin faulting, and appear to sole into the top of the antiform, suggesting that the Ouachita structure has been reactivated as a hingeline to the subsiding passive margin. The antiform may be tied via this fault system and the Ouachita gravity gradient to the similar Devils River, Waco, and Benton uplifts, interpreted as Precambrian basement-cored massifs. Above the Paleozoic sequence, a possible rift-related graben is imaged near the updip limit of Jurassic salt. Paleoshelf edges of the major Tertiary depositional sequences are marked by expanded sections disrupted by growth faults and shale diapirs. Within the Wilcox Formation, the transect crosses the mouth of the 900-m-deep Yoakum Canyon, a principal pathway of sediment delivery from the Laramide belt to the Gulf. Beneath the Wilcox, the Comanchean (Lower Cretaceous) shelf edge, capped by the Stuart City reef, is imaged as a pronounced topographic break onlapped by several moundy sediment packages. Because this segment of the line parallels strike, the topographic break may be interpreted as a 2,000-m-deep embayment in the Cretaceous shelf-edge, and possibly a major submarine canyon older and deeper than the Yoakum Canyon.

  6. Environmental Assessment: geothermal direct heat project, Marlin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The Federal action addressed by this Environmental Assessment (EA) is joint funding the retrofitting of a heating and hot water system in a hospital at Marlin, Texas, with a geothermal preheat system. The project will be located within the existing hospital boiler room. One supply well was drilled in an existing adjacent parking lot. It was necessary to drill the well prior to completion of this environmental assessment in order to confirm the reservoir and to obtain fluids for analysis in order to assess the environmental effects of fluid disposal. Fluid from operation will be disposed of by discharging it directly into existing street drains, which will carry the fluid to Park Lake and eventually the Brazos River. Fluid disposal activities are regulated by the Texas Railroad Commission. The local geology is determined by past displacements in the East Texas Basin. Boundaries are marked by the Balcones and the Mexia-Talco fault systems. All important water-bearing formations are in the cretaceous sedimentary rocks and are slightly to highly saline. Geothermal fluids are produced from the Trinity Group; they range from approximately 3600 to 4000 ppM TDS. Temperatures are expected to be above 64/sup 0/C (147/sup 0/F). Surface water flows southeastward as a part of the Brazos River Basin. The nearest perennial stream is the Brazos River 5.6 km (3.5 miles) away, to which surface fluids will eventually discharge. Environmental impacts of construction were small because of the existing structures and paved areas. Construction run-off and geothermal flow-test fluid passed through a small pond in the city park, lowering its water quality, at least temporarily. Construction noise was not out of character with existing noises around the hospital.

  7. Energy Accounting in Shared Savings Programs 

    E-print Network

    Cherry, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    '/lli("-5 rr." SI:P OCT Dr.C -n.21l1l n,191 O. O<;~ n.312 1"'.'''"''", I -fl.31)7 tf,."Iril !'... ?ff.n -1,742 -LAS7 I,'.H 175 2,4]) S .<:;IIVfO -D. 9J~ -34.771 n,'H 7.1)9 4fli,"4' FIG prOdllClion llnit c.lC'ulrtliOllS 235 ESL-IE-83.../l1/81 )0 2,607,JOO 16,;,31S ,064.TV' 1"81 ltll1 1/22.1111 TO 8/19/111 2<) 2,S48,ROO 16'1,2)7 .06'; 'iEP 19111 Q120/fll TO 9120/1'11 )2 2,86.~,JOO 1119,<))4 .066 I 'Ill:! OCT I III 9121/111 TO 10/2n/fll JO 2,783,700 17'),00\\ .064 1'l1l2...

  8. Energy Analysis of the Texas Capitol Restoration 

    E-print Network

    Hunn, B. D.; Banks, J. A.; Reddy, S. N.

    1992-01-01

    Design Alternative Combinations ~m11J ELECTRIC PEAK KW MllTU OI\\S Y?ARLY ELE('''TRlC EXPENSE 1$1 GAS TOTAL YEARLY SAVINGS (COST) IS] ELECl'RlC GAS TOTAL PEKCENT SA VINGS ALTI~H.N"nVE 14 DOC, TIIr:J(MOSTAT OJ?FSG.T, 2-sI'E..ElJ Or...ERATION, ~1(jlrr-cya.r:: CONrROL 50' ~nS1Ml;M AIRFI,OW ]1,466 2.205 13,310 414.900 47,400 462,'JOO 97,400 109,ROO 207,200 :30.9 75% ~ll~IM{:.\\1 AIRfl.oW 32,306 2,205 13,056 AL1r:H.NA11VE 15 DOC, TIII,RMOS"TAT orPscr, VARlAl.ILA VULUMli 426.000 46.500 472...

  9. Test of the Peierls-Nabarro model for dislocations in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Q.; Joos, B.; Duesbery, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    We show, using an atomistic model with a Stillinger-Weber potential (SWP), that in the absence of reconstruction, the basic assumption of the Peierls-Nabarro (PN) model that the dislocation core is spread within the glide plane is verified for silicon. The Peierls stress (PS) obtained from the two models are in quantitative agreement ({approx}0.3{mu}), when restoring forces obtained from first principles generalized stacking-fault energy surfaces are used in the PN model [B. Joos, Q. Ren, and M. S. Duesbery, Phys. Rev. B {bold 50}, 5890 (1994)]. The PS was found to be isotropic in the glide plane. Within the SWP model no evidence of dissociation in the shuffle dislocations is found but glide sets do separate into two partials.

  10. Does Magnetic-field-Rotation Misalignment Solve the Magnetic Braking Catastrophe in Protostellar Disk Formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Yun; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien

    2013-09-01

    Stars form in dense cores of molecular clouds that are observed to be significantly magnetized. In the simplest case of a laminar (non-turbulent) core with the magnetic field aligned with the rotation axis, both analytic considerations and numerical simulations have shown that the formation of a large, 102 AU scale, rotationally supported protostellar disk is suppressed by magnetic braking in the ideal MHD limit for a realistic level of core magnetization. This theoretical difficulty in forming protostellar disks is termed the "magnetic braking catastrophe." A possible resolution to this problem, proposed by Hennebelle & Ciardi and Joos et al., is that misalignment between the magnetic field and rotation axis may weaken the magnetic braking enough to enable disk formation. We evaluate this possibility quantitatively through numerical simulations. We confirm the basic result of Joos et al. that the misalignment is indeed conducive to disk formation. In relatively weakly magnetized cores with dimensionless mass-to-flux ratio >~ 4, it enabled the formation of rotationally supported disks that would otherwise be suppressed if the magnetic field and rotation axis are aligned. For more strongly magnetized cores, disk formation remains suppressed, however, even for the maximum tilt angle of 90°. If dense cores are as strongly magnetized as indicated by OH Zeeman observations (with a mean dimensionless mass-to-flux ratio ~2), it would be difficult for the misalignment alone to enable disk formation in the majority of them. We conclude that, while beneficial to disk formation, especially for the relatively weak field case, misalignment does not completely solve the problem of catastrophic magnetic braking in general.

  11. Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-11-01

    Leadership Team of the IAHR Committee for Hydraulic Machinery and Systems Eduard EGUSQUIZA, UPC Barcelona, Spain, Chair François AVELLAN, EPFL-LMH, Switzerland, Past Chair Richard K FISHER, Voith Hydro Inc., USA, Past Chair Fidel ARZOLA, Edelca, Venezuela Michel COUSTON, Alstom Hydro, France Niklas DAHLBÄCKCK, Vatenfall, Sweden Normand DESY, Andritz VA TECH Hydro Ltd., Canada Chisachi KATO, University of Tokyo, Japan Andrei LIPEJ, Turboinstitut, Slovenija Torbjørn NIELSEN, NTNU, Norway Romeo SUSAN-RESIGA, 'Politehnica' University Timisoara, Romania Stefan RIEDELBAUCH, Stuggart University, Germany Albert RUPRECHT, Stuttgart University, Germany Qing-Hua SHI, Dong Fang Electrical Machinery Co., China Geraldo TIAGO, Universidade Federal de Itajubá, Brazil International Advisory Committee Shouqi YUAN (principal) Jiangsu University China QingHua SHI (principal) Dong Fang Electrical Machinery Co. China Fidel ARZOLA EDELCA Venezuela Thomas ASCHENBRENNER Voith Hydro GmbH & Co. KG Germany Anton BERGANT Litostroj Power doo Slovenia B C BHAOYAL Research & Technology Centre India Hermod BREKKE NTNU Norway Stuart COULSON Voith Hydro Inc. USA Paul COOPER Fluid Machinery Research Inc USA V A DEMIANOV Power Machines OJSC Russia Bart van ESCH Technische Universiteit Eindhoven Netherland Arno GEHRER Andritz Hydro Graz Austria Akira GOTO Ebara Corporation Japan Adiel GUINZBURG The Boeing Company USA D-H HELLMANN KSB AG Germany Ashvin HOSANGADI Combustion Research and Flow Technology USA Byung-Sun HWANG Korea Institute of Material Science Korea Toshiaki KANEMOTO Kyushu Institute of Technology Japan Mann-Eung KIM Korean Register of Shipping Korea Jiri KOUTNIK Voith Hydro GmbH & Co. KG Germany Jinkook LEE Eaton Corporation USA Young-Ho LEE Korea Maritime University Korea Woo-Seop LIM Hyosung Goodsprings Inc Korea Jun MATSUI Yokohama National University Japan Kazuyoshi Mitsubishi H I Ltd, Japan MIYAGAWA Christophe NICOLET Power Vision Engineering Srl Switzerland Maryse PAGE Hydro Quebec IREQ, Varennes Canada Etienne PARKINSON Andritz Hydro Ltd. Switzerland B V S S S PRASAD Indian Institute of Technology Madras India Stefan RIEDELBAUCH Stuttgart University Germany Michel SABOURIN Alstom Hydro Canada Inc Canada Bruno SCHIAVELLO Flowserve Corporation USA Katsumasa SHIMMEI Hitachi Ltd Japan Christoph SINGRTüN VDMA Germany Ale? SKOTAK CKD Blansko Engineering, a s Czech Republic Toshiaki SUZUKI Toshiba Corporation Japan Andy C C TAN Queensland University of Technology Australia Geraldo TIAGO FILHO Universidade Federal de Itajuba Brazi Thi C VU Andritz Hydro Ltd Canada Satoshi WATANABE Kyushu University Japan S H WINOTO National University of Singapore Singapore Woo-Seong WOO STX Institute of Technology Korea International Technical Committee François AVELLAN (principal) EPFL-LMH Switzerland Xingqi LUO (principal) Xi'an University of Technology China Martin BÖHLE Kaiserslautern University Germany Gerard BOIS ENSAM France Young-Seok CHOI KITECH Korea Luca d'AGOSTINO University of Pisa Italy Eduard EGUSQUIZA Polytechnical University Catalonia Spain Arpad FAY University of Miskolcz Hungary Richard FISHER Voith Hydro Inc USA Regiane FORTES-PATELLA Institute Polytechnique de Grenoble France Aleksandar GAJIC University of Belgrade Serbia José GONZÁLEZ Universidad de Oviedo Spain François GUIBAULT Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal Canada Toshiaki IKOHAGI Tohoku University Japan Chisachi KATO University of Tokyo Japan Kwang-Yong KIM Inha University Korea Youn-Jea KIM Sungkyunkwan University Korea Smaine KOUIDRI Université Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6) France Shengcai LI Warwick University UK Adrian LUNGU Dunarea de Jos University of Galati Romania Torbjøm K NIELSEN NTNU Norway Michihiro NISHI Tsinghua University China Peter PELZ Darmstadt University Germany Frantisek POCHYLY Brno University Czech Republic Albert RUPRECHT University of Stuttgart Germany Rudolf SCHILLING Technische University München Germany Wei SHYY HKUST Hong Kong,China Romeo SUSAN-RESIGA Politehnica University of Timisoara Romania Kazuhiro TANAKA Kyushu Institute of

  12. Selections from 2015: An Ancient System of Small Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:In these last two weeks of 2015, well be looking at a few selections from among the most-downloaded paperspublished in AAS journals this year. The usual posting schedule will resume after the AAS winter meeting.An Ancient Extrasolar System with Five Sub-Earth-Size PlanetsPublished January2015Main takeaway:Transit light curves for the five planets orbiting Kepler-444. [Campante et al. 2015]A team led by Tiago Campante (University of Birmingham, Aarhus University) reported Kepler spacecraft observations of Kepler-444, a system of five transiting exoplanets around a metal-poor, Sun-like star. All five planets are sub-Earth-sized. Furthermore, the system is measured to be over 11 billion years old making this the oldest known system of terrestrial-size planets.Why its interesting:While gas-giant planets show a preference for forming around metal-rich stars, smaller planets appear to be less picky. This suggests that Earth-size planets may have been able to form at earlier times in the universes history, when metals were scarcer. The determination that Kepler-444 is 11.2 billion years old confirms that terrestrial-size planets have been able to form throughout most of the universes 13.8 billion year history.Awesome technical achievement:The age of the Kepler-444 system was determined from asteroseismology of the host star. The fact that we can measure oscillations in the interior of this ancient star located 116 light-years away and use this to determine its age to a precision of 9%! is a remarkable achievement made possible by 4 years of continuous, high-quality observations of the system.CitationT. L. Campante et al 2015 ApJ 799 170. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/799/2/170

  13. How threshold behaviour affects the use of subgraphs for network comparison

    PubMed Central

    Rito, Tiago; Wang, Zi; Deane, Charlotte M.; Reinert, Gesine

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: A wealth of protein–protein interaction (PPI) data has recently become available. These data are organized as PPI networks and an efficient and biologically meaningful method to compare such PPI networks is needed. As a first step, we would like to compare observed networks to established network models, under the aspect of small subgraph counts, as these are conjectured to relate to functional modules in the PPI network. We employ the software tool GraphCrunch with the Graphlet Degree Distribution Agreement (GDDA) score to examine the use of such counts for network comparison. Results: Our results show that the GDDA score has a pronounced dependency on the number of edges and vertices of the networks being considered. This should be taken into account when testing the fit of models. We provide a method for assessing the statistical significance of the fit between random graph models and biological networks based on non-parametric tests. Using this method we examine the fit of Erdös–Rényi (ER), ER with fixed degree distribution and geometric (3D) models to PPI networks. Under these rigorous tests none of these models fit to the PPI networks. The GDDA score is not stable in the region of graph density relevant to current PPI networks. We hypothesize that this score instability is due to the networks under consideration having a graph density in the threshold region for the appearance of small subgraphs. This is true for both geometric (3D) and ER random graph models. Such threshold behaviour may be linked to the robustness and efficiency properties of the PPI networks. Contact: tiago@stats.ox.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:20823329

  14. Ground-water geology of Bexar County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnow, Ted

    1963-01-01

    The investigation in Bexar County was part of a comprehensive study of a large area in south-central Texas underlain by the Edwards and associated limestones (Comanche Peak and Georgetown) of Cretaceous age. The limestones form an aquifer which supplies water to the city of San Antonio, several military installations, many industrial plants, and many irrigated farms. The geologic formations that yield water to wells in Bexar County are sedimentary rocks of Mesozoic and Cenozoic age. The rocks strike northeastward and dip southeastward toward the Gulf of Mexico. In the northern part of the county, in an erosional remnant of the Edwards Plateau, the rocks are clearly flat and free from faulting. In the central and southern parts of the county, however, the rocks dip gulfward at gentle to moderately steep angles and are extensively faulted in the Balcones and Mexia fault zones. Individual faults or shatter zones were traced as much as 25 miles; the maximum displacement is at least 600 feet. In general, the formations are either monoclinal or slightly folded; in the western part of the county the broad Culebra anticline plunges southwestward. Most of the large-capacity wells in Bexar County draw water from the Edwards and associated limestones, but a few draw from the Glen Rose limestone, the Austin chalk, and surficial sand and gravel. The Hosston formation, Glen Rose limestone, Buda limestone, and Austin chalk, all of Cretaceous age, generally yield small to large supplies of water; the Wilcox group and Carrizo sand of Tertiary age yield moderate supplies and alluvium of Pleistocene and Recent age generally yield small supplies. The Edwards and associated limestones are recharged primarily by groundwater underflow into Bexar County from the west, and secondarily by seepage from streams that cross the outcrop of the aquifer in Bexar County. During the period 1934-47 the recharge to the aquifer in Bexar County is estimated to have averaged between 400,000 and 430,000 acre-feet per year. Discharge from the aquifer takes place by means of wells and springs and by underflow into Comal and Guadalupe Counties on the northeast. During the period 1934-47 the estimated average discharge from wells and springs was about 174,000 acre-feet per year. The discharge by underflow out of the county during the same period is estimated to have averaged between 220,000 and 260.000 acre-feet per year. Probably only a small amount of water moves downdip southeast of San Antonio. The presence of highly mineralized water in that area suggests that the circulation of water is poor because of the low permeability of the aquifer. During the period 1934-56 the discharge from the Edwards and associated limestones greatly exceeded the recharge; consequently, water levels in wells declined. The decline was greatest in the northwestern part of the county, where the water levels in wells dropped as much as 100 feet. The decline was progressively less toward the east, averaging 40 feet along the Bexar-Comal County line. The area of the greatest concentration of discharge, which includes San Antonio and extends to the southwest and northeast, coincides with the area of maximum faulting and maximum recorded yields from wells and is not the area of greatest decline. The ability of the Edwards and associated limestones to transmit and store water in the San Antonio area apparently is so great that the discharge from wells results in much smaller declines of water level than do similar or even smaller discharges in other areas. The water from the Edwards is almost uniformly a calcium bicarbonate water of good quality, although hard. In the southern part of the San Antonio area the water is charged with hydrogen sulfide; farther downdip it becomes highly mineralized.

  15. Maximum warming occurs about one decade after a carbon dioxide emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricke, Katharine L.; Caldeira, Ken

    2014-12-01

    It is known that carbon dioxide emissions cause the Earth to warm, but no previous study has focused on examining how long it takes to reach maximum warming following a particular CO2 emission. Using conjoined results of carbon-cycle and physical-climate model intercomparison projects (Taylor et al 2012, Joos et al 2013), we find the median time between an emission and maximum warming is 10.1 years, with a 90% probability range of 6.6-30.7 years. We evaluate uncertainties in timing and amount of warming, partitioning them into three contributing factors: carbon cycle, climate sensitivity and ocean thermal inertia. If uncertainty in any one factor is reduced to zero without reducing uncertainty in the other factors, the majority of overall uncertainty remains. Thus, narrowing uncertainty in century-scale warming depends on narrowing uncertainty in all contributing factors. Our results indicate that benefit from avoided climate damage from avoided CO2 emissions will be manifested within the lifetimes of people who acted to avoid that emission. While such avoidance could be expected to benefit future generations, there is potential for emissions avoidance to provide substantial benefit to current generations.

  16. Effects of Noise on Ecological Invasion Processes: Bacteriophage-mediated Competition in Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Jaewook; Eric, Harvill; Albert, Reka

    2007-03-01

    Pathogen-mediated competition, through which an invasive species carrying and transmitting a pathogen can be a superior competitor to a more vulnerable resident species, is one of the principle driving forces influencing biodiversity in nature. Using an experimental system of bacteriophage-mediated competition in bacterial populations and a deterministic model, we have shown in [Joo et al 2005] that the competitive advantage conferred by the phage depends only on the relative phage pathology and is independent of the initial phage concentration and other phage and host parameters such as the infection-causing contact rate, the spontaneous and infection-induced lysis rates, and the phage burst size. Here we investigate the effects of stochastic fluctuations on bacterial invasion facilitated by bacteriophage, and examine the validity of the deterministic approach. We use both numerical and analytical methods of stochastic processes to identify the source of noise and assess its magnitude. We show that the conclusions obtained from the deterministic model are robust against stochastic fluctuations, yet deviations become prominently large when the phage are more pathological to the invading bacterial strain.

  17. Erratum.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Yeon Joo Lee, Sun Mi Choi, Ju Hee Park, & Jae-Joon Yim (2015). Notes From the Field: Changes in the Attentional Capacity and Emotional State of Physicians After Working at Busy Outpatient Clinics. Evaluation & the Health Professions, 38, 423-428 (DOI: 10.1177/0163278715589346).The above article that appeared in issue 38:3 of Evaluation & the Health Professions has underlines under certain texts on page 425 and 427. These underlines were placed in error and have no significance to the text.On page 425, lines 7-9, for the text that reads "…by the nurse aide, who checked for physicians' self-corrections in prescriptions and requests for laboratory or radiographic tests in the outpatient clinic" should not have been underlined.On page 427 lines 8-9, for the text which reads "However, there may be a level of workload that could impair performance but which has not yet been reached by two thirds of participants." should not have been underlined. PMID:26585688

  18. Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection (ESD) Training and Performing ESD with Accurate and Safe Techniques.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Chang-Il

    2012-11-01

    Introduction of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has brought about a renaissance in therapeutic endoscopy. For the globalization and universalization of ESD, the number of physicians who can perform ESD has rapidly increased with general ex vivo and in vivo training using animal models and hand-on courses. In this focused review series, world-renowned ESD experts described the published studies or their own precious experiences about ESD training and performing ESD with accurate and safe techniques. First, Dr. Adolfo Parra-Blanco reviewed on ex vivo and in vivo models for ESD training. Next, Dr. Joo Young Cho described detailed practical settings and current status of hands-on courses using ex vivo and in vivo models in Korea. Dr. Takashi Toyonaga described quality controlled ESD and basic techniques to prevent complications. Dr. Tsuneo Oyama reviewed recently published methods to facilitate ESD. Dr. Jae-Young Jang reviewed the usefulness of magnifying and narrow band imaging to measure the depth of invasion before ESD. PMID:23251880

  19. Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection (ESD) Training and Performing ESD with Accurate and Safe Techniques

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has brought about a renaissance in therapeutic endoscopy. For the globalization and universalization of ESD, the number of physicians who can perform ESD has rapidly increased with general ex vivo and in vivo training using animal models and hand-on courses. In this focused review series, world-renowned ESD experts described the published studies or their own precious experiences about ESD training and performing ESD with accurate and safe techniques. First, Dr. Adolfo Parra-Blanco reviewed on ex vivo and in vivo models for ESD training. Next, Dr. Joo Young Cho described detailed practical settings and current status of hands-on courses using ex vivo and in vivo models in Korea. Dr. Takashi Toyonaga described quality controlled ESD and basic techniques to prevent complications. Dr. Tsuneo Oyama reviewed recently published methods to facilitate ESD. Dr. Jae-Young Jang reviewed the usefulness of magnifying and narrow band imaging to measure the depth of invasion before ESD. PMID:23251880

  20. Evaluation of nonpoint-source contamination, Wisconsin: water year 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, John F.; Graczyk, D.J.; Corsi, Steven R.; Wierl, J.A.; Owens, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    For two of the eight rural streams (Rattlesnake and Kuenster Creeks) minimal BMP implementation has occurred, hence a comparison of pre- BMP and data collected after BMP implementation began is not warranted. For two other rural streams (Brewery and Garfoot Creeks), BMP implementation is complete. For the four remaining rural streams (Bower, Otter, Eagle, and Joos Valley Creeks), the pre-BMP load data were compared to the transitional data to determine if significant reductions in the loads have occurred as a result of the BMP implementation to date. For all sites, the actual constituent loads for suspended solids and total phosphorus exhibit no statistically significant reductions after BMP installation. Multiple regressions were used to remove some of the natural variability in the data. Based on the residual analysis, for Otter Creek, there is a significant difference in the suspended-solids regression residuals between the pre-BMP and transitional periods, indicating a potential reduction as a result of the BMP implementation after

  1. Temperature response to an emission of carbon dioxide today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricke, Katharine; Caldeira, Ken

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions cause the Earth to warm, but there is substantial uncertainty in just how much warming will be caused by any particular CO2 emission. Here, by combining the results of a carbon-cycle model intercomparison project (Joos et al, 2013) and CMIP5 physical-climate model intercomparison project (Taylor et al, 2012), we estimate the amount and timing of warming caused by an individual CO2 emission occurring today. We quantify the uncertainty in these estimates, portioning it into three different contributing factors: the carbon cycle response, climate sensitivity and ocean thermal inertia. We find that uncertainty in equilibrium climate sensitivity is the largest contributor to aggregate uncertainty in the temperature change resulting from a CO2 emission, but carbon-cycle uncertainties and uncertainty in the thermal inertia of the climate system also play important roles. The time interval between an emission and maximum warming is estimated to have a median value of 10 years, with a likely (66% probability) range of 8 to 18 years. The amount of maximum warming is estimated to have a maximum value of 2.2 mK GtC-1, with a likely range of 1.8 to 2.6 mK GtC-1. Thus, the greatest warming from a typical emission today is likely to occur during the lifetime of the person doing the emitting. Our analysis provides an approximation of the time series for incremental warming caused by CO2 emitted today that spans the uncertainty range of model results, yet is simple enough to be employed in a broad range of climate change assessment applications.

  2. Effect of intergenic consensus sequence flanking sequences on coronavirus transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Makino, S; Joo, M

    1993-01-01

    Insertion of a region, including the 18-nucleotide-long intergenic sequence between genes 6 and 7 of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) genomic RNA, into an MHV defective interfering (DI) RNA leads to transcription of subgenomic DI RNA in helper virus-infected cells (S. Makino, M. Joo, and J. K. Makino, J. Virol. 66:6031-6041, 1991). In this study, the subgenomic DI RNA system was used to determine how sequences flanking the intergenic region affect MHV RNA transcription and to identify the minimum intergenic sequence required for MHV transcription. DI cDNAs containing the intergenic region between genes 6 and 7, but with different lengths of upstream or downstream flanking sequences, were constructed. All DI cDNAs had an 18-nucleotide-long intergenic region that was identical to the 3' region of the genomic leader sequence, which contains two UCUAA repeat sequences. These constructs included 0 to 1,440 nucleotides of upstream flanking sequence and 0 to 1,671 nucleotides of downstream flanking sequence. An analysis of intracellular genomic DI RNA and subgenomic DI RNA species revealed that there were no significant differences in the ratios of subgenomic to genomic DI RNA for any of the DI RNA constructs. DI cDNAs which lacked the intergenic region flanking sequences and contained a series of deletions within the 18-nucleotide-long intergenic sequence were constructed to determine the minimum sequence necessary for subgenomic DI RNA transcription. Small amounts of subgenomic DI RNA were synthesized from genomic DI RNAs with the intergenic consensus sequences UCUAAAC and GCUAAAC, whereas no subgenomic DI RNA transcription was observed from DI RNAs containing UCUAAAG and GCTAAAG sequences. These analyses demonstrated that the sequences flanking the intergenic sequence between genes 6 and 7 did not play a role in subgenomic DI RNA transcription regulation and that the UCUAAAC consensus sequence was sufficient for subgenomic DI RNA transcription. Images PMID:8388500

  3. Effect of Modafinil on Cerebral Blood Flow in Narcolepsy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Eun Yeon; Seo, Dae Won; Tae, Woo Suk; Hong, Seung Bong

    2008-01-01

    Background: To investigate the effects of modafinil on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in narcolepsy, we performed 99mTc-ethylcysteinate dimer single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) before and after modafinil or placebo medication. Methods: Brain SPECT was performed twice during the awake state before and after modafinil or placebo administration for 4 weeks in 43 drug-naïive narcoleptics with cataplexy (M/F = 23/20, 29.5 ± 5.8 years). For SPM analysis, all SPECT images were spatially normalized to the standard SPECT template and then smoothed using a 12-mm full width at half-maximum Gaussian kernel. The paired t-test was used to compare pre- and post-modafinil or placebo SPECT images. Results: The mean modafinil dose used was 207.8 ± 62.3 mg/day. Modafinil significantly reduced Epworth Sleepiness Scale scores from 20.3 ± 2.1 to 5.2 ± 3.1 (P < 0.01), while placebo did not. Compared to the off-modafinil condition, the on-modafinil condition showed significantly increased rCBF in the right dorsolateral and bilateral medial prefrontal cortices. Conversely, after modafinil administration, rCBF was decreased in bilateral precentral gyri, left hippocampus, left fusiform gyrus, bilateral lingual gyri, and cerebellum. There was no significant rCBF change after placebo administration. Conclusion: By a chronic administration of modafinil in narcoleptic patients, rCBF increased in the bilateral prefrontal cortices, whereas it decreased in left mesio/basal, temporal, bilateral occipital areas, and cerebellum. Citation: Joo EY; Seo DW; Tae WS; Hong SB. Effect of modafinil on cerebral blood flow in narcolepsy patients. SLEEP 2008;31(6):868-873. PMID:18548832

  4. State-dependent climate sensitivity of the last 5 million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Peter; de Boer, Bas; von der Heydt, Anna; Stap, Lennert; van de Wal, Roderik

    2015-04-01

    Equilibrium temperature rise in response to increase in radiative forcing is called equilibrium climate sensitivity, an important quantity calculated by climate models to project future warming. For model validation comparisons with estimates based on paleo reconstructions are necessary. Here we use an energy balance model (Köhler et al., 2010) to estimate climate sensitivity using CO2 proxy data together with model-based reconstruction of land ice (de Boer et al., 2014) over the last 5 million years. We find that equilibrium climate sensitivity containing the radiative forcing of CO2 and land ice albedo depends on the background climate. This state-dependency is mainly contained in the non-linearity of the land-ice forcing. Results differ in detail if based on ice core CO2 of the last 800,000 years covering mainly colder than present climates (von der Heydt et al., 2014) or on CO2 proxies of the last 5 million years. Nevertheless, the climate sensitivity of the warm Pliocene, a paleo-analogy for a warmer future, is at least about a third higher than for preindustrial background climates. References: de Boer, B., Lourens, L. J. & van de Wal, R. S. Persistent 400,000-year variability of Antarctic ice volume and the carbon cycle is revealed throughout the Plio-Pleistocene. Nature Communications 5, 2999 (2014). doi: 10.1038/ncomms3999. Köhler, P. Bintanja, R., Fischer, H., Joos, F., Knutti, R., Lohmann, G. & Masson-Delmotte, V. What caused Earth's temperature variations during the last 800,000 years? Data-based evidences on radiative forcing and constraints on climate sensitivity. Quaternary Science Reviews 29, 129-145 (2010). doi: 10.1016/j.quascirev.2009.09.026. von der Heydt, A. S., Köhler, P., van de Wal, R. S. & Dijkstra, H. A. On the state dependency of fast feedback processes in (paleo) climate sensitivity. Geophysical Research Letters 41, 6484-6492 (2014). doi: 10.1002/2014GL061121.

  5. A Record of Deglacial Ventilation from Foraminiferal Radiocarbon at Intermediate Depths in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umling, N. E.; Thunell, R.

    2014-12-01

    Ice core records reveal episodes of rapid atmospheric CO2 rise and ?14C excursions during deglaciation. Recent evidence suggests that this CO2 was sequestered in deep and intermediate waters during glacial periods and then released to the atmosphere due to changes in ocean circulation. Scenarios involving a more efficient biological pump and reduced ventilation of Southern Ocean deep waters have been cited as likely methods for glacial carbon storage (Sigman and Boyle, 2000). A more efficient biological pump calls on increased CaCO3 compensation as a buffer for reduced deep ocean alkalinity along with increased nutrient supply and primary production as a method of sequestering carbon from the surface ocean to the deep ocean (Marchitto et al., 2005). Modeling studies suggest that reduced ventilation of Southern Ocean waters due to increased sea ice cover and reduced upwelling is the dominant mechanism for carbon storage with a smaller contribution from the biological pump (Joos et al., 2011; Toggweiler., 2006). This study further examines the issue of changes in ocean ventilation by providing records of paired benthic and planktonic foraminiferal 14C ages from the deglacial sections of Eastern Equatorial Pacific marine sediment cores TR163-23 and TR163-18 at 2730 and 2030 meters depth, respectively. An Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) sourced record of ventilation aids in the constraint of carbon previously sequestered through the Southern Ocean during periods of enhanced brine rejection and increased sea-ice extent (Marchitto et al., 2007; Pahnke et al., 2008; Keeling and Stephens, 2001). North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW) production has also been found to vary on millennial time scales reaching as far south as 8°N during glacial periods (Leduc et al., 2010). However, both cores used in this study are sufficiently deep and far enough south (0.41°N, 92.16°W and 2.81°N, 89.85°W) to avoid intrusion of NPIW that might obscure the AAIW signal.

  6. Bioenergetics of Continental Serpentinites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardace, D.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Serpentinization is the aqueous alteration of ultramafic (Fe- and Mg-rich) rocks, resulting in secondary mineral assemblages of serpentine, brucite, iron oxyhydroxides and magnetite, talc, and possibly carbonate and silica-rich veins and other minor phases-all depending on the evolving pressure-temperature-composition of the system. The abiotic evolution of hydrogen and possibly organic compounds via serpentinization (McCollom and Bach, 2009) highlights the relevance of this geologic process to carbon and energy sources for the deep biosphere. Serpentinization may fuel life over long stretches of geologic time, throughout the global seabed and in exposed, faulted peridotite blocks (as at Lost City Hydrothermal Field, Kelley et al., 2005), and in obducted oceanic mantle units in ophiolites (e.g., Tiago et al., 2004). Relatively little work has been published on life in continental serpentinite settings, though they likely host a unique resident microbiota. In this work, we systematically model the serpentinizing fluid as an environmental niche. Reported field data for high and moderate pH serpentinizing fluids were modeled from Cyprus, the Philippines, Oman, Northern California, New Caledonia, Yugoslavia, Portugal, Italy, Newfoundland Canada, New Zealand, and Turkey. Values for Gibbs Energy of reaction (?Gr), kJ per mole of electrons transferred for a given metabolism, are calculated for each field site. Cases are considered both for (1) modest assumptions of 1 nanomolar hydrogen and 1 micromolar methane, based on unpublished data for a similar northern California field site (Cardace and Hoehler, in prep.) and (2) an upper estimate of 10 nanomolar hydrogen and 500 micromolar methane. We survey the feasibility of microbial metabolisms for key steps in the nitrogen cycle, oxidation of sulfur in pyrite, iron oxidation or reduction reactions, sulfate reduction coupled to hydrogen or methane oxidation, methane oxidation coupled to the reduction of oxygen, and methanogenesis. We find that there is strong energetic yield from most reactions considered, except for transformation of nitrite to nitrate, ammonia to nitrite, ferrous to ferric iron, and carbon dioxide to methane. Laying out foundational metabolic models for microbiological communities sustained by chemosynthesis in this setting (mining energy from ultramafic rocks and chemical systems, not tied to photosynthesis in any way) has enticing relevance to the search for extraterrestrial life, in that similar rocks have been detected on our sibling planet Mars, with transient atmospheric detection of hydrogen and methane (Schulte et al., 2006, Mumma et al., 2009). To a first order, this work explores the intersection of serpentinite groundwater chemistry and bioenergetics to determine what kinds of life can be sustained in these significant subsurface settings. References cited: Kelley et al. 2005. Science 307:1428-1434. McCollom and Bach. 2009. GCA 73:856-875. Mumma et al., 2009. Science 323:1041-1045. Schulte et al., 2006. Astrobiology 6:364-376.

  7. PREFACE: Introduction to the proceedings of Dynamics Days South America 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macau, Elbert E. N.; Pereira, Tiago; Prado, Antonio F. B. A.; Turci, Luiz F. R.; Winter, Othon C.

    2011-03-01

    This proceedings presents selected contributions from the participants of South America Dynamics Days 2011, which was hosted by the National Institute for Space Research (INPE), Brazil, in July 2010. Dynamics Days was founded in 1980 and is the longest standing and most respected international series of meetings devoted to the field of dynamics and nonlinearity. Traditionally it has brought together researchers from a wide range of backgrounds - including physics, biology, engineering, chemistry and mathematics - for interdisciplinary research into nonlinear science. Dynamics Days South America 2010 marked the beginning of the South American branch of Dynamics Days. It brought together, for the first time in South America, researchers from a wide range of backgrounds who share a common interest in the theory and applications of nonlinear dynamics. Thus, South American researchers had a forum to promote regional as well as international scientific and technological exchange and collaboration especially, but not exclusively, on problems that are particularly relevant for the development of science and technology in the South American region. Furthermore, the conference also brought together prominent scientists from around the world to review recent developments in nonlinear science. This conference comprised plenary invited talks, minisymposia, contributed talks and poster sessions. The articles that are compiled here were chosen from among the works that were presented as contributed talks and posters. They represent a good selection which allows one to put issues that were discussed during the conference into perspective. It is possible to evaluate the success of an initiative by using several indices. In relation to attendees, the conference had 311 participants from 22 countries, who presented 341 works. About 86% of the participants came from South American countries. These figures allow one to classify this Dynamics Days conference as that with the greatest number of attendees ever. Finally, we would like to express our gratitude to all the participants for their presentations, discussions, and remarkable interactions with one another. The tireless work undertaken by all the members of the International Advisory Committee and the Organizing Committee must also be recognized. We also wish to express our deep appreciation for the Scientific Societies and Research Support Agencies which supported the conference and provided all the resources which were necessary to make this idea of a South American Dynamics Days come true. Elbert E N Macau, Tiago Pereira, Antonio F B A Prado, Luiz F R Turci, and Othon C WinterEditors Conference photograph Conference photograph Conference photograph Conference photograph International Advisory Committee Adilson E MotterNorthwestern UniversityEvanston - IL - USA Alfredo OzorioCentro Brasileiro de Pesquisas FísicasRio de Janeiro - RJ - Brazil Celso Grebogi (Chair)University of AberdeenAberdeen - UK Ed OttUniversity of MarylandCollege Park - MD - USA Epaminondas Rosa JrIllinois State UniversityNormal - IL - USA Hans Ingo WeberPontifícia Universidade CatólicaRio de Janeiro - RJ - Brazil Holger KantzMax Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex SystemsDresden - Germany Jason Gallas (Co-chair)Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do SulPorto Alegre - RS - Brazil José Roberto Rios LeiteUniv. Federal de PernanbucoRecife - PE - Brazil Jürgen KurthsPotsdam Institute for climate Impact ResearchHumboldt University, Berlin - Germany Kenneth ShowalterWest Virginia UniversityMorgantown - WV - USA Lou PecoraNaval Research LabWashington - DC - USA Luis Antonio AguirreUniversidade Federal de Minas GeraisBelo Horizonte - MG - Brazil Marcelo VianaIMPA - Instituto Nacional de Matemática Pura e AplicadaRio de Janeiro - RJ - Brazil Miguel A F SanjuánUniversidad Rey Juan CarlosMadrid - Spain Paulo Roberto de Souza MendesPontifícia Universidade CatólicaRio de Janeiro - RJ - Brazil Roland KorbeleUniversidade de São PauloSão Carlos - SP - Brazil Rubens SampaioPontifícia Universidade CatólicaRio de Ja

  8. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabitz, Herschel

    2009-10-01

    Control of quantum phenomena has grown from a dream to a burgeoning field encompassing wide-ranging experimental and theoretical activities. Theoretical research in this area primarily concerns identification of the principles for controlling quantum phenomena, the exploration of new experimental applications and the development of associated operational algorithms to guide such experiments. Recent experiments with adaptive feedback control span many applications including selective excitation, wave packet engineering and control in the presence of complex environments. Practical procedures are also being developed to execute real-time feedback control considering the resultant back action on the quantum system. This focus issue includes papers covering many of the latest advances in the field. Focus on Quantum Control Contents Control of quantum phenomena: past, present and future Constantin Brif, Raj Chakrabarti and Herschel Rabitz Biologically inspired molecular machines driven by light. Optimal control of a unidirectional rotor Guillermo Pérez-Hernández, Adam Pelzer, Leticia González and Tamar Seideman Simulating quantum search algorithm using vibronic states of I2 manipulated by optimally designed gate pulses Yukiyoshi Ohtsuki Efficient coherent control by sequences of pulses of finite duration Götz S Uhrig and Stefano Pasini Control by decoherence: weak field control of an excited state objective Gil Katz, Mark A Ratner and Ronnie Kosloff Multi-qubit compensation sequences Y Tomita, J T Merrill and K R Brown Environment-invariant measure of distance between evolutions of an open quantum system Matthew D Grace, Jason Dominy, Robert L Kosut, Constantin Brif and Herschel Rabitz Simplified quantum process tomography M P A Branderhorst, J Nunn, I A Walmsley and R L Kosut Achieving 'perfect' molecular discrimination via coherent control and stimulated emission Stephen D Clow, Uvo C Holscher and Thomas C Weinacht A convenient method to simulate and visually represent two-photon power spectra of arbitrarily and adaptively shaped broadband laser pulses M A Montgomery and N H Damrauer Accurate and efficient implementation of the von Neumann representation for laser pulses with discrete and finite spectra Frank Dimler, Susanne Fechner, Alexander Rodenberg, Tobias Brixner and David J Tannor Coherent strong-field control of multiple states by a single chirped femtosecond laser pulse M Krug, T Bayer, M Wollenhaupt, C Sarpe-Tudoran, T Baumert, S S Ivanov and N V Vitanov Quantum-state measurement of ionic Rydberg wavepackets X Zhang and R R Jones On the paradigm of coherent control: the phase-dependent light-matter interaction in the shaping window Tiago Buckup, Jurgen Hauer and Marcus Motzkus Use of the spatial phase of a focused laser beam to yield mechanistic information about photo-induced chemical reactions V J Barge, Z Hu and R J Gordon Coherent control of multiple vibrational excitations for optimal detection S D McGrane, R J Scharff, M Greenfield and D S Moore Mode selectivity with polarization shaping in the mid-IR David B Strasfeld, Chris T Middleton and Martin T Zanni Laser-guided relativistic quantum dynamics Chengpu Liu, Markus C Kohler, Karen Z Hatsagortsyan, Carsten Muller and Christoph H Keitel Continuous quantum error correction as classical hybrid control Hideo Mabuchi Quantum filter reduction for measurement-feedback control via unsupervised manifold learning Anne E B Nielsen, Asa S Hopkins and Hideo Mabuchi Control of the temporal profile of the local electromagnetic field near metallic nanostructures Ilya Grigorenko and Anatoly Efimov Laser-assisted molecular orientation in gaseous media: new possibilities and applications Dmitry V Zhdanov and Victor N Zadkov Optimization of laser field-free orientation of a state-selected NO molecular sample Arnaud Rouzee, Arjan Gijsbertsen, Omair Ghafur, Ofer M Shir, Thomas Back, Steven Stolte and Marc J J Vrakking Controlling the sense of molecular rotation Sharly Fleischer, Yuri Khodorkovsky, Yehiam Prior and Ilya Sh Averbukh Optimal control of interacting particles: a

  9. Peer review statement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-08-01

    All papers published in this Volume 12 of IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science have been peer reviewed through processes administered by the editors of the 25th IAHR Symposium on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems proceedings, Professor Romeo Susan-Resiga, Dr Sebastian Muntean and Dr Sandor Bernad. Reviews were conducted by expert referees from the Scientific Committee to the professional and scientific standards expected of a proceedings journal published by IOP Publishing. The members of the Scientific Committee who selected and reviewed the papers included in the Proceedings of the 25th IAHR Symposium on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems are: Anton ANTONTechnical University of Civil Engineering, BucharestRomania François AVELLANEcole Polytechnique Fédérale de LausanneSwitzerland Fidel ARZOLAEDELCAVenezuela Thomas ASCHENBRENNERVoith Hydro Gmb H & Co. KG, HeidenheimGermany Anton BERGANTLitostroj Power d.o.o., LjubljanaSlovenia Gerard BOISENSAM, LilleFrance Hermod BREKKENTNU, TrondheimNorway Stuart COULSON Voith Hydro Inc., YorkUSA Eduard EGUSQUIZAPolytechnical University Catalonia BarcelonaSpain Arpad FAYUniversity of MiskolczHungary Richard FISHERVoith Hydro Inc., York USA Regiane FORTES-PATELLAInstitut Polytechnique de GrenobleFrance Aleksandar GAJICUniversity of BelgradeSerbia Arno GEHRERAndritz Hydro GrazAustria José GONZÁLEZUniversidad de OviedoSpain François GUIBAULTEcole Polytechnique de MontrealCanada Chisachi KATOUniversity of TokyoJapan Kwang-Yong KIMInha University, IncheonKorea Jiri KOUTNIKVoith Hydro Gmb H & Co. KG, HeidenheimGermany Adrian LUNGUDunarea de Jos University of GalatiRomania Christophe NICOLETPower Vision Engineering Sàrl, LausanneSwitzerland Torbjøm K. NIELSENNTNU, TrodheimNorway Michihiro NISHIKyushu Institute of TechnologyJapan Maryse PAGEHydro Quebec IREQ, VarennesCanada Etienne PARKINSONAndritz Hydro LtdSwitzerland František POCHYLYBrno UniversityCzech Republic Stefan RIEDELBAUCHVoith Hydro Gmb H & Co. KG, HeidenheimGermany Albert RUPRECHTUniversity of StuttgartGermany Michel SABOURINAlstom Hydro Canada Inc.Canada Rudolf SCHILLINGTechnische Universität MünchenGermany Qing-Hua SHIDong Fang Electrical Machinery Co.China Aleš SKOTAKCKD Blansko Engineering, a. s.Czech Republic Romeo F. SUSAN-RESIGAPolitehnica University of TimisoaraRomania Geraldo TIAGO FILHOUniversidade Federal de ItajubaBrazil Yoshinobu TSUJIMOTOOsaka UniversityJapan Bart van ESCHTechnische Universiteit EindhovenNetherland Thi C. VUAndritz Hydro Ltd, QuebecCanada Satoshi WATANABEKyushu University, FukuokaJapan Yulin WUTsinghua University, BeijingChina The reviewing process was organized in several steps. First, the 238 abstracts submitted for the symposium were reviewed, and 197 were accepted, with 30 abstracts having recommendations. Second, the authors have submitted 152 full-length papers, and each paper has been reviewed by two referees. The recommendations have been sent back to the authors, in order to prepare the final form or the paper. Third, 118 papers have been received in final form, accounting for the referees recommendations, to be included in the proceedings and to be presented at the symposium.

  10. Maximum warming occurs about one decade after carbon dioxide emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricke, K.; Caldeira, K.

    2014-12-01

    There has been a long tradition of estimating the amount of climate change that would result from various carbon dioxide emission or concentration scenarios but there has been relatively little quantitative analysis of how long it takes to feel the consequences of an individual carbon dioxide emission. Using conjoined results of recent carbon-cycle and physical-climate model intercomparison projects, we find the median time between an emission and maximum warming is 10.1 years, with a 90% probability range of 6.6 to 30.7 years. We evaluate uncertainties in timing and amount of warming, partitioning them into three contributing factors: carbon cycle, climate sensitivity and ocean thermal inertia. To characterize the carbon cycle uncertainty associated with the global temperature response to a carbon dioxide emission today, we use fits to the time series of carbon dioxide concentrations from a CO2-impulse response function model intercomparison project's 15 ensemble members (1). To characterize both the uncertainty in climate sensitivity and in the thermal inertia of the climate system, we use fits to the time series of global temperature change from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5; 2) abrupt4xco2 experiment's 20 ensemble's members separating the effects of each uncertainty factors using one of two simple physical models for each CMIP5 climate model. This yields 6,000 possible combinations of these three factors using a standard convolution integral approach. Our results indicate that benefits of avoided climate damage from avoided CO2 emissions will be manifested within the lifetimes of people who acted to avoid that emission. While the relevant time lags imposed by the climate system are substantially shorter than a human lifetime, they are substantially longer than the typical political election cycle, making the delay and its associated uncertainties both economically and politically significant. References: 1. Joos F et al. (2013) Carbon dioxide and climate impulse response functions for the computation of greenhouse gas metrics: a multi-model analysis. Atmos Chem Phys 13:2793-2825. 2. Taylor KE, Stouffer RJ, Meehl GA (2011) An Overview of CMIP5 and the Experiment Design. Bull Am Meteorol Soc 93:485-498.

  11. Grammar of Binding in the languages of the world: Innate or learned?

    PubMed

    Cole, Peter; Hermon, Gabriella; Yanti

    2015-08-01

    Languages around the world often appear to manifest nearly identical grammatical properties, but, at the same time, the grammatical differences can also be great, sometimes even seeming to support Joos's (1958) claim that "languages can differ from each other without limit and in unpredictable way" (p. 96). This state of affairs provides a puzzle for both nativist approaches to language like Generative Grammar that posit a fixed "Universal Grammar", and for approaches that minimize the contribution of innate grammatical structure. We approach this puzzling state of affairs by looking at one area of grammar, "Binding", the system of local and long distance anaphoric elements in a language. This is an area of grammar that has long been central to the Generative approach to language structure. We compare the anaphoric systems found in "familiar" (European-like) languages that contain dedicated classes of bound and free anaphors (pronouns and reflexives) with the anaphoric systems in endangered Austronesian languages of Indonesia, languages in which there is overlap or no distinction between pronouns and reflexives (Peranakan Javanese and Jambi Malay). What is of special interest about Jambi anaphora is not only that conservative dialects of Jambi Malay do not distinguish between pronouns and reflexives, but that Jambi anaphora appear to constitute a live snapshot of a unitary class of anaphora in the process of grammaticalization as a distinct system of pronouns and reflexives. We argue that the facts of Jambi anaphora cannot be explained by theories positing a Universal Grammar of Binding. Thus, these facts provide evidence that complex grammatical systems like Binding cannot be innate. Our results from Austronesian languages are confirmed by data from signed and creole languages. Our conclusion is that the human language learning capacity must include the ability to model the full complexity found in the syntax of the world's languages. From the perspective of child language acquisition, these conclusions suggest that Universal Grammar does not provide a general solution to the problem of poverty of the stimulus, and the solution to that problem must reside at least in part in special properties of the grammar construction tools available to the language learner rather than simply in a fixed set of grammatical rules hard wired into the brains of speakers. PMID:25988914

  12. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsch, Kornelius

    2012-01-01

    On 1 January 2012 I will be assuming the position of Editor-in-Chief of the journal Semiconductor Science and Technology (SST). I am flattered by the confidence expressed in my ability to carry out this challenging job and I will try hard to justify this confidence. The previous Editor-in-Chief, Laurens Molenkamp, University of Würzburg, Germany, has worked tirelessly for the last ten years and has done an excellent job for the journal. Everyone at the journal is profoundly grateful for his leadership and for his achievements In 2012 several new members will join the Editorial Board: Professor Deli Wang (University of California, San Diego) with considerable expertise in semiconductor nanowires, Professor Saskia Fischer (Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany) with a background in semiconductor quantum devices, and Professor Erwin Kessels (Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands) with extensive experience in plasma processing of thin films and gate oxides. In particular, I want to express my gratitude to Professor Israel Bar-Joseph (Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel) and Professor Maria Tamargo (The City College of New York, USA), who will leave next year and who have vigorously served the Editorial Board for years. The journal has recently introduced a fast-track option for manuscripts. This option is a high-quality, high-profile outlet for new and important research across all areas of semiconductor research. Authors can expect to receive referee reports in less than 20 days from submission. Once accepted, you can expect the articles to be online within two or three weeks from acceptance and to be published in print in less than a month. Furthermore, all fast-track communications published in 2011 will be free to read for ten years. More detailed information on fast-track publication can be found on the following webpage: http://iopscience.iop.org/0268-1242/page/Fast track communications It is encouraging to see that since the journal introduced pre-review, with the aim to raise the quality of our content, three years later the number of published articles has remained stable at around 220 per year, whilst the number of downloads and citations to the journal has grown. In 2011, three topical issues have been published, on: (Nano)characterization of semiconductor materials and structures (Guest Editor: Alberta Bonanni, University of Linz, Austria) Flexible OLEDs and organic electronics (Guest Editors: Jang-Joo Kim, Min-Koo Han, Cambridge University, UK, and Yong-Young Noh, Seoul National University, Korea) From heterostructures to nanostructures: an 80th birthday tribute to Zhores Alferov (Guest Editor: Dieter Bimberg, Technische Universität Berlin, Germany) For the coming years, I will strongly support that the number of published topical issues will continue on the same level or slightly rise. SST has planned the publication of the following topical issues for 2012: Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors (Guest Editors: Jung Han, Yale University, USA, and Michael Kneissl, Technische Universität Berlin, Germany) Topological insulators (Guest Editors: Alberto Morpurgo, Université de Genève, Switzerland and Björn Trauzettel, Universität Basel, Switzerland) Atomic layer deposition (Guest Editor: Marek Godlewski, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland) 50th Anniversary of the laser diode (Guest Editors: Mike Adams, Univeristy of Essex, UK and Stephane Calvez, University of Strathclyde, UK) In addition to the traditional topics of SST, I as Editor-in-chief, strongly support and welcome the submission of manuscripts on organic semiconductors, topological insulators, semiconductor nanostructures for photovoltaic, solid-state lighting and energy harvesting, IC application beyond Moore's law and fundamental works on semiconductors based on abundant materials. I am extremely optimistic about the future of SST. I believe that we will raise the standards of acceptance while maintaining the short time from submission to first decision. I am confident that we will continue to improve the quality of the papers pu

  13. Spatial performance of RegEM climate field reconstruction techniques in a realistic pseudoproxy context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Emile-Geay, J.; Guillot, D.

    2011-12-01

    Several methods of climate field reconstructions (CFRs) have been introduced in the past few years to estimate past climate variability from proxy data over the Common Era. The pseudoproxy framework has become a tool of choice for assessing the relative merits of such methods. Here we compare four variants of the RegEM algorithm [Schneider, 2001], using a pseudoproxy network mimicking the key spatio-temporal characteristics of the network of Mann et al., 2008 (hereinafter M08); the methods are (1) RegEM TTLS (2) RegEM iTTLS (3) GraphEM and (4) RegEM iRIDGE. To ensure continuity with previous work [Smerdon et al. 2011], pseudoproxy series are designed as a white-noise degraded version of the simulated temperature field [Amman et al. 2007] over 850-1980 C.E. colocated with 1138 M08 proxies. We use signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of: ? (no noise), 1.0, 0.5 and 0.25, to simulate differences in proxy quality. Two novelties in pseudoproxy design are introduced here: (1) the decrease in proxy availability over time follows that found in M08, (2) a realistic case where the SNR is empirically derived from correlations between each M08 proxy and the HadCRUT3v temperature field. It is found that this realistic SNR is clustered around 0.3, but ranges from 0.1 to 0.8. Verification statistics such as RE, CE, r2, bias, standard deviation ratio and RMSE are presented for each method at each SNR level. The results show that all methods perform relatively well at SNR levels higher than 0.5, but display drastically different performances at lower SNR levels. Compared with results using pseudoproxy network of Mann et al., 1998, (hereinafter MBH98), the reconstruction skill of the M08 network is relatively improved, in line with the findings of Smerdon et al., 2011. Overall, we find that GraphEM and iTTLS tend to produce more robust estimates of the temperature field at low SNR levels than other schemes, while preserving a higher amount of variance in the target field. Ammann, C. M., F. Joos, D. S. Schimel, B. L. Otto-Bliesner, and R. A. Tomas (2007), Solar influence on climate during the past millennium: Results from transient simulations with the NCAR Climate System Model, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 104, 3713-3718, doi:10.1073/pnas.0605064103. Mann, M. E., R. S. Bradley, and M. K. Hughes (1998), Global-scale temperaturepatterns and climate forcing over the past six centuries, Nature, 392, 779-787, doi:10.1038/33859. Mann, M. E., S. Rutherford, E. Wahl, and C. Ammann (2007), Robustness of proxy-based climate field reconstruction methods, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D12109, doi:10.1029/2006JD008272. Mann, M. E., et al. (2008), Proxy-based reconstructions of hemispheric and global surface temperature variations over the past two millennia, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 105, 13,252-13,257, doi:10.1073/pnas.0805721105. Schneider, T. (2001), Analysis of incomplete climate data: Estimation of mean values and covariance matrices and imputation of missing values, J. Clim., 14, 853-871, doi:10.1175/1520-0442(2001)014<0853: AOICDE>2.0.CO;2. Smerdon, J. E., A. Kaplan, E. Zorita, J. F. González-Rouco, and M. N. Evans (2011), Spatial performance of four climate field reconstruction methods targeting the Common Era, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L11705, doi:10.1029/2011GL047372.

  14. Quantitative multiplex detection of biomarkers on a waveguide-based biosensor using quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Hongzhi; Mukundan, Harshini; Martinez, Jennifer S; Swanson, Basil I; Anderson, Aaron S; Grace, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The quantitative, simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers with high sensitivity and specificity is critical for biomedical diagnostics, drug discovery and biomarker characterization [Wilson 2006, Tok 2006, Straub 2005, Joos 2002, Jani 2000]. Detection systems relying on optical signal transduction are, in general, advantageous because they are fast, portable, inexpensive, sensitive, and have the potential for multiplex detection of analytes of interest. However, conventional immunoassays for the detection of biomarkers, such as the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbant Assays (ELISAs) are semi-quantitative, time consuming and insensitive. ELISA assays are also limited by high non-specific binding, especially when used with complex biological samples such as serum and urine (REF). Organic fluorophores that are commonly used in such applications lack photostability and possess a narrow Stoke's shift that makes simultaneous detection of multiple fluorophores with a single excitation source difficult, thereby restricting their use in multiplex assays. The above limitations with traditional assay platforms have resulted in the increased use of nanotechnology-based tools and techniques in the fields of medical imaging [ref], targeted drug delivery [Caruthers 2007, Liu 2007], and sensing [ref]. One such area of increasing interest is the use of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) for biomedical research and diagnostics [Gao and Cui 2004, Voura 2004, Michalet 2005, Chan 2002, Jaiswal 2004, Gao 2005, Medintz 2005, So 2006 2006, Wu 2003]. Compared to organic dyes, QDs provide several advantages for use in immunoassay platforms, including broad absorption bands with high extinction coefficients, narrow and symmetric emission bands with high quantum yields, high photostablility, and a large Stokes shift [Michalet 2005, Gu 2002]. These features prompted the use of QDs as probes in biodetection [Michalet 2005, Medintz 2005]. For example, Jaiswal et al. reported long term multiple color imaging of live cells using QD-bioconjugates [Jaiswal 2003]. Gao [Gao 2004] and So [So 2006] have used QDs as probes for in-vivo cancer targeting and imaging. Medintz et al. reported self-assembled QD-based biosensors for detection of analytes based on energy transfer [Medintz 2003]. Others have developed an approach for multiplex optical encoding of biomolecules using QDs [Han 2001]. Immunoassays have also benefited from the advantages of QDs. Recently, dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) capped-QDs have been attached to antibodies and used as fluorescence reporters in plate-based multiplex immunoassays [Goodman 2004]. However, DHLA-QDs are associated with low quantum efficiency and are unstable at neutral pH. These problems limit the application of this technology to the sensitive detection of biomolecules, especially in complex biological samples. Thus, the development of a rapid, sensitive, quantitative, and specific multiplex platform for the detection of biomarkers in difficult samples remains an elusive target. The goal stated above has applications in many fields including medical diagnostics, biological research, and threat reduction. The current decade alone has seen the development of a need to rapidly and accurately detect potential biological warfare agents. For example, current methods for the detection of anthrax are grossly inadequate for a variety of reasons including long incubation time (5 days from time of exposure to onset of symptoms) and non-specific ('flu-like') symptoms. When five employees of the United State Senate were exposed to B. anthracis in the mail (2001), only one patient had a confirmed diagnosis before death. Since then, sandwich immunoassays using both colorimetric and fluorescence detectors have been developed for key components of the anthrax lethal toxin, namely protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and the edema factor [Mourez 2001]. While these platforms were successful in assays against anthrax toxins, the sensitivity was poor. Furthermore, no single platform exists for the simultaneous and quantitative detection of mul

  15. EDITORIAL: Terahertz nanotechnology Terahertz nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna; Tonouchi, Masayoshi; Reno, John L.

    2013-05-01

    A useful synergy is being established between terahertz research and nanotechnology. High power sources [1-3] and detectors [4] in what was once considered the terahertz 'frequency gap' [5] in the electromagnetic spectrum have stimulated research with huge potential benefits in a range of industries including food, medicine and security, as well as fundamental physics and astrophysics. This special section, with guest editors Masayoshi Tonouchi and John Reno, gives a glimpse of the new horizons nanotechnology is broaching in terahertz research. While the wavelengths relevant to the terahertz domain range from hundreds of micrometres to millimetres, structures at the nanoscale reveal interesting low energy dynamics in this region. As a result terahertz spectroscopy techniques are becoming increasingly important in nanomaterial characterization, as demonstrated in this special section by colleagues at the University of Oxford in the UK and the Australian National University. They use terahertz spectroscopy to identify the best nanostructure parameters for specific applications [6]. The low energy dynamics in nanostructures also makes them valuable tools for terahertz detection [7]. In addition the much sought after terahertz detection over broadband frequency ranges has been demonstrated, providing versatility that has been greatly in demand, particularly in spectroscopy applications [8, 9]. Also in this special section, researchers in Germany and China tackle some of the coupling issues in terahertz time domain spectroscopy with an emitter specifically well suited for systems operated with an amplified fibre [3]. 'In medical imaging, the advantage of THz radiation is safety, because its energy is much lower than the ionization energy of biological molecules, in contrast to hazardous x-ray radiation,' explains Joo-Hiuk Son from the University of Seoul in Korea in his review [10]. As he also points out, the rotational and vibrational energies of water molecules are within the THz spectral region providing an additional benefit. His review describes the principle, characteristics, and applications of terahertz molecular imaging, where the use of nanoparticle probes allows dramatically enhanced sensitivity. Jiaguang Han and Weili Zhang and colleagues in China, Saudi Arabia, Japan and the US report exciting developments for optoelectronics [11]. They describe work on plasmon-induced transparency (PIT), an analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) where interference leads to a sharp transparency window that may be useful for nonlinear and slow-light devices, optical switching, pulse delay, and storage for optical information processing. While PIT has advantages over the cumbersome experimental systems required for EIT, it has so far been constrained to very narrow band operation. Now Zhang and colleagues present the simulation, implementation, and measurement of a broadband PIT metamaterial functioning across a frequency range greater than 0.40 THz in the terahertz regime. 'We can foresee a historic breakthrough for science and technology through terahertz research,' concluded Masayoshi Tonouchi in his review over five years ago as momentum in the field was mounting [12]. He added, 'It is also noteworthy that THz research is built on many areas of science and the coordination of a range of disciplines is giving birth to a new science.' With the inherently multidisciplinary nature of nanotechnology research it is not so strange to see the marriage of the two fields form such a fruitful partnership, as this special section highlights. References [1] Williams B S, Kumar S, Hu Q and Reno J L 2006 High-power terahertz quantum-cascade lasers Electron. Lett. 42 89-91 [2] Köhler R et al 2002 Terahertz semiconductor-heterostructure laser Nature 417 156-9 [3] Mittendorff M, Xu M, Dietz R J B, K¨unzel H, Sartorius B, Schneider H, Helm M and Winnerl S 2013 Large area photoconductive THz emitter for 1.55 ?m excitation based on an InGaAs heterostructure Nanotechnology 24 214007 [4] Chen H-T, Padilla W J, Zide J M O, Gossa

  16. Quantification of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from various waste treatment facilities by tracer dilution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mønster, Jacob; Rella, Chris; Jacobson, Gloria; Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2013-04-01

    Urban activities generate solid and liquid waste, and the handling and aftercare of the waste results in the emission of various compounds into the surrounding environment. Some of these compounds are emitted as gasses into the atmosphere, including methane and nitrous oxide. Methane and nitrous oxide are strong greenhouse gases and are considered to have 25 and 298 times the greenhouse gas potential of carbon dioxide on a hundred years term (Solomon et al. 2007). Global observations of both gasses have shown increasing concentrations that significantly contribute to the greenhouse gas effect. Methane and nitrous oxide are emitted from both natural and anthropogenic sources and inventories of source specific fugitive emissions from the anthropogenic sources of methane and nitrous oxide of are often estimated on the basis of modeling and mass balance. Though these methods are well-developed, actual measurements for quantification of the emissions is a very useful tool for verifying the modeling and mass balance as well as for validation initiatives done for lowering the emissions of methane and nitrous oxide. One approach to performing such measurements is the tracer dilution method (Galle et al. 2001, Scheutz et al. 2011), where the exact location of the source is located and a tracer gas is released at this source location at a known flow. The ratio of downwind concentrations of the tracer gas and the methane and nitrous oxide gives the emissions rates of the greenhouse gases. This tracer dilution method can be performed using both stationary and mobile measurements and in both cases, real-time measurements of both tracer and quantified gas are required, placing high demands on the analytical detection method. To perform the methane and nitrous oxide measurements, two robust instruments capable of real-time measurements were used, based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy and operating in the near-infrared spectral region. One instrument measured the methane and tracer gas concentrations while another measured the nitrous oxide concentration. We present the performance of these instruments at different waste treatment facilities (waste water treatment plants, composting facilities, sludge mineralization beds, anaerobic digesters and landfills) in Denmark, and discuss the strengths and limitations of the method of the method for quantifying methane and nitrous oxide emissions from the different sources. Furthermore, we have measured the methane emissions from 10 landfills with emission rates ranging from 5 to 135 kg/h depending on the age, state, content and aftercare of the landfill. In addition, we have studied 3 waste water treatment plants, and found nitrous oxide emission of 200 to 700 g/h from the aeration tanks and a total methane emission ranging from 2 to 15 kg/h, with the primary emission coming from the sludge treatment. References Galle, B., Samuelsson, J., Svensson, B.H., and Börjesson, G. (2001). Measurements of methane emissions from landfills using a time correlation tracer method based on FTIR absorption spectroscopy. Environmental Science & Technology 35 (1), 21-25 Scheutz, C., Samuelsson, J., Fredenslund, A. M., and Kjeldsen, P. (2011). Quantification of multiple methane emission sources at landfills using a double tracer technique. Waste Management, 31(5), 1009-17 Solomon, S., D. Qin, M. Manning, R.B. Alley, T. Berntsen, N.L. Bindoff, Z. Chen, A. Chidthaisong, J.M. Gregory, G.C. Hegerl, M. Heimann, B. Hewitson, B.J. Hoskins, F. Joos, J. Jouzel, V. Kattsov, U. Lohmann, T.Matsuno, M. Molina, N. Nicholls, J.Overpeck, G. Raga, V. Ramaswamy, J. Ren, M. Rusticucci, R. Somerville, T.F. Stocker, P. Whetton, R.A.Wood and D. Wratt, 2007: Technical Summary. In: Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA.

  17. Interglacial climate dynamics and advanced time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudelsee, Manfred; Bermejo, Miguel; Köhler, Peter; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2013-04-01

    Studying the climate dynamics of past interglacials (IGs) helps to better assess the anthropogenically influenced dynamics of the current IG, the Holocene. We select the IG portions from the EPICA Dome C ice core archive, which covers the past 800 ka, to apply methods of statistical time series analysis (Mudelsee 2010). The analysed variables are deuterium/H (indicating temperature) (Jouzel et al. 2007), greenhouse gases (Siegenthaler et al. 2005, Loulergue et al. 2008, L¨ü thi et al. 2008) and a model-co-derived climate radiative forcing (Köhler et al. 2010). We select additionally high-resolution sea-surface-temperature records from the marine sedimentary archive. The first statistical method, persistence time estimation (Mudelsee 2002) lets us infer the 'climate memory' property of IGs. Second, linear regression informs about long-term climate trends during IGs. Third, ramp function regression (Mudelsee 2000) is adapted to look on abrupt climate changes during IGs. We compare the Holocene with previous IGs in terms of these mathematical approaches, interprete results in a climate context, assess uncertainties and the requirements to data from old IGs for yielding results of 'acceptable' accuracy. This work receives financial support from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Project ClimSens within the DFG Research Priority Program INTERDYNAMIK) and the European Commission (Marie Curie Initial Training Network LINC, No. 289447, within the 7th Framework Programme). References Jouzel J, Masson-Delmotte V, Cattani O, Dreyfus G, Falourd S, Hoffmann G, Minster B, Nouet J, Barnola JM, Chappellaz J, Fischer H, Gallet JC, Johnsen S, Leuenberger M, Loulergue L, Luethi D, Oerter H, Parrenin F, Raisbeck G, Raynaud D, Schilt A, Schwander J, Selmo E, Souchez R, Spahni R, Stauffer B, Steffensen JP, Stenni B, Stocker TF, Tison JL, Werner M, Wolff EW (2007) Orbital and millennial Antarctic climate variability over the past 800,000 years. Science 317:793. Köhler P, Bintanja R, Fischer H, Joos F, Knutti R, Lohmann G, Masson-Delmotte V (2010) What caused Earth's temperature variations during the last 800,000 years? Data-based evidence on radiative forcing and constraints on climate sensitivity. Quaternary Science Reviews 29:129. Loulergue L, Schilt A, Spahni R, Masson-Delmotte V, Blunier T, Lemieux B, Barnola J-M, Raynaud D, Stocker TF, Chappellaz J (2008) Orbital and millennial-scale features of atmospheric CH4 over the past 800,000 years. Nature 453:383. L¨ü thi D, Le Floch M, Bereiter B, Blunier T, Barnola J-M, Siegenthaler U, Raynaud D, Jouzel J, Fischer H, Kawamura K, Stocker TF (2008) High-resolution carbon dioxide concentration record 650,000-800,000 years before present. Nature 453:379. Mudelsee M (2000) Ramp function regression: A tool for quantifying climate transitions. Computers and Geosciences 26:293. Mudelsee M (2002) TAUEST: A computer program for estimating persistence in unevenly spaced weather/climate time series. Computers and Geosciences 28:69. Mudelsee M (2010) Climate Time Series Analysis: Classical Statistical and Bootstrap Methods. Springer, Dordrecht, 474 pp. [www.manfredmudelsee.com/book] Siegenthaler U, Stocker TF, Monnin E, L¨ü thi D, Schwander J, Stauffer B, Raynaud D, Barnola J-M, Fischer H, Masson-Delmotte V, Jouzel J (2005) Stable carbon cycle-climate relationship during the late Pleistocene. Science 310:1313.

  18. On the linkages between the global carbon-nitrogen-phosphorus cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Katsumasa; Mackenzie, Fred; Bouchez, Julien; Knutti, Reto

    2013-04-01

    State-of-the-art earth system models used for long-term climate projections are becoming ever more complex in terms of not only spatial resolution but also the number of processes. Biogeochemical processes are beginning to be incorporated into these models. The motivation of this study is to quantify how climate projections are influenced by biogeochemical feedbacks. In the climate modeling community, it is virtually accepted that climate-Carbon (C) cycle feedbacks accelerate the future warming (Cox et al. 2000; Friedlingstein et al. 2006). It has been demonstrated that the Nitrogen (N) cycle suppresses climate-C cycle feedbacks (Thornton et al. 2009). On the contrary, biogeochemical studies show that the coupled C-N-Phosphorus (P) cycles are intimately interlinked via biosphere and the N-P cycles amplify C cycle feedbacks (Ver et al. 1999). The question as to whether the N-P cycles enhance or attenuate C cycle feedbacks is debated and has a significant implication for projections of future climate. We delve into this problem by using the Terrestrial-Ocean-aTmosphere Ecosystem Model 3 (TOTEM3), a globally-aggregated C-N-P cycle box model. TOTEM3 is a process-based model that describes the biogeochemical reactions and physical transports involving these elements in the four domains of the Earth system: land, atmosphere, coastal ocean, and open ocean. TOTEM3 is a successor of earlier TOTEM models (Ver et al. 1999; Mackenzie et al. 2011). In our presentation, we provide an overview of fundamental features and behaviors of TOTEM3 such as the mass balance at the steady state and the relaxation time scales to various types of perturbation. We also show preliminary results to investigate how the N-P cycles influence the behavior of the C cycle. References Cox PM, Betts RA, Jones CD, Spall SA, Totterdell IJ (2000) Acceleration of global warming due to carbon-cycle feedbacks in a coupled climate model. Nature, 408, 184-187. Friedlingstein P, Cox P, Betts R, Bopp L, von Bloh W, Brovkin V, Cadule P, Doney S, Eby M, Fung I, Bala G, John J, Jones C, Joos F, Kato T, Kawamiya M, Knorr W, Lindsay K, Matthews HD, Raddatz T, Rayner P, Reick C, Roeckner E, Schnitzler KG, Schnur R, Strassmann K, Weaver AJ, Yoshikawa C, Zeng N (2006) Climate-Carbon Cycle Feedback Analysis: Results from the C4MIP Model Intercomparison. Journal of Climate, 19, 3337-3353. Mackenzie FT, De Carlo EH, Lerman A (2011) Coupled C, N, P, and O biogeochemical cycling at the land-ocean interface. In: Wolanski E, McLusky DS (eds) Treatise on Estuarine and Coastal Science, vol 5. Academic Press, Waltham, pp 317-342. Thornton PE, Doney SC, Lindsay K, Moore JK, Mahowald N, Randerson JT, Fung I, Lamarque JF, Feddema JJ, Lee YH (2009) Carbon-nitrogen interactions regulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks: results from an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model. Biogeosciences, 6, 2099-2120. Ver LMB, Mackenzie FT, Lerman A (1999) Biogeochemical responses of the carbon cycle to natural and human perturbations: Past, present, and future. American Journal of Science, 299, 762-801.

  19. A new graphical version of STROTAB: The analysis and fitting of singlet triplet spectra of asymmetric top molecules in the prolate or oblate limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodet, John; Judge, Richard H.

    2007-05-01

    The original version of STROTAB has been modified to run under Microsoft Windows using the C++ programming language. The new version takes full advantage of the Microsoft Foundation Classes available within the Microsoft Visual C++ Version 6 development environment. Specifically, windows can be created that edit the input file, summarize the results of the least-squares fit, display the calculated and observed spectra, display whole or partial sections of the calculated spectra as a stick or Gaussian de-convoluted spectrum. A listing of the rotational quantum numbers in the cases (a) and (b) limits for each of the displayed lines is provided. A branch annotating routine provides a quick visual guide to the assignment of the spectrum. A new eigenvalue sorting method has been added as an option that complements the existing method based on the eigenvector coefficients. The new sorting method has eliminated some difficulties that may arise using the existing "Least Ambiguous Method". The program has been extended to handle near-oblate asymmetric tops using a type III r representation. New version summaryTitle of program: STROTAB Version number: 2 Catalogue identifier:ADCA_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADCA_v2_0 Program obtainable from:CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Reference in CPC to previous version: 93 (1996) 241-264 Catalog identifier of previous version: ADCA Authors of previous version: R.H. Judge, E.D. Womeldorf, R.A. Morris, D.E. Shimp, D.J. Clouthier, D.L. Joo, D.C. Moule Does the new version supersede the original program: Yes Computers for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: Pentium Xenon, Pentium Pro and Later Operating systems or monitors under which program has been tested: Windows 98, Windows 2000, Windows XP Programming language used in the new version: ANSI C, C++, Microsoft Foundation Class (MFC) No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:11 913 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 816 652 Memory required to execute with typical data: 7 Meg No of bits in a word: 16 No of processors used: 1 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: No No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: ˜3.2 MB (compressed) Distribution format: zip file Additional keywords:near oblate top, bootstrap eigenvalue sorting, graphical environment, band contour Nature of physical problem: The least-squares/band contour fitting of the singlet-triplet spectra of asymmetric tops of orthorhombic symmetry using a basis set appropriate to the symmetric top limit (prolate or oblate) of the molecule in either Hund's case (a) or case (b) coupling situations. Method of solution: The calculation of the eigenvectors and eigenvalues remains unchanged from the earlier version. An option to sort the eigenvalues of the current J by fitting them to regular progressions formed from earlier J values (bootstrap method) can be used as an option in place of the existing method based on eigenvector coefficients. Reasons for the new version: The earlier version can only handle oblate tops by diagonalizing using the prolate limit. This has turned out to be unacceptable. An improved method of sorting eigenvalues under certain conditions is also needed. A graphical interface has been added to ease the use of the program. Summary of revisions: The Hamiltonian can now be constructed in a limit appropriate the representation for of the molecule. Sorting by an alternate method is now offered. Numerous graphical features have been added. Restrictions on complexity of the problem: The rotational quantum number restrictions are J?255 and K (or P) ?127. The allowed transition frequency minus the band origin frequency must be in the range of ±10 000 cm -1. Up to five decimal places may be reported. The number of observed lines is limited by the dynamic memory and the amount of disk space available. Only molecules of symmetry D 2h, D 2 and C 2v can be accommodated in this version. Only constant

  20. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Kong, M. G.; Zimmermann, J. L.

    2009-11-01

    'Plasma Healthcare' is an emerging interdisciplinary research topic of rapidly growing importance, exploring considerable opportunities at the interface of plasma physics, chemistry and engineering with life sciences. Some of the scientific discoveries reported so far have already demonstrated clear benefits for healthcare in areas of medicine, food safety, environmental hygiene, and cosmetics. Examples include ongoing studies of prion inactivation, chronic wound treatment and plasma-mediated cancer therapy. Current research ranges from basic physical processes, plasma chemical design, to the interaction of plasmas with (i) eukaryotic (mammalian) cells; (ii) prokaryotic (bacteria) cells, viruses, spores and fungi; (iii) DNA, lipids, proteins and cell membranes; and (iv) living human, animal and plant tissues in the presence of biofluids. Of diverse interests in this new field is the need for hospital disinfection, in particular with respect to the alarming increase in bacterial resistance to antibiotics, the concomitant needs in private practices, nursing homes etc, the applications in personal hygiene—and the enticing possibility to 'design' plasmas as possible pharmaceutical products, employing ionic as well as molecular agents for medical treatment. The 'delivery' of the reactive plasma agents occurs at the gaseous level, which means that there is no need for a carrier medium and access to the treatment surface is optimal. This focus issue provides a close look at the current state of the art in Plasma Medicine with a number of forefront research articles as well as an introductory review. Focus on Plasma Medicine Contents Application of epifluorescence scanning for monitoring the efficacy of protein removal by RF gas-plasma decontamination Helen C Baxter, Patricia R Richardson, Gaynor A Campbell, Valeri I Kovalev, Robert Maier, James S Barton, Anita C Jones, Greg DeLarge, Mark Casey and Robert L Baxter Inactivation factors of spore-forming bacteria using low-pressure microwave plasmas in an N2 and O2 gas mixture M K Singh, A Ogino and M Nagatsu Degradation of adhesion molecules of G361 melanoma cells by a non-thermal atmospheric pressure microplasma H J Lee, C H Shon, Y S Kim, S Kim, G C Kim and M G Kong The acidification of lipid film surfaces by non-thermal DBD at atmospheric pressure in air A Helmke, D Hoffmeister, N Mertens, S Emmert, J Schuette and W Vioel Reduction and degradation of amyloid aggregates by a pulsed radio-frequency cold atmospheric plasma jet D L Bayliss, J L Walsh, G Shama, F Iza and M G Kong The effect of low-temperature plasma on bacteria as observed by repeated AFM imaging René Pompl, Ferdinand Jamitzky, Tetsuji Shimizu, Bernd Steffes, Wolfram Bunk, Hans-Ulrich Schmidt, Matthias Georgi, Katrin Ramrath, Wilhelm Stolz, Robert W Stark, Takuya Urayama, Shuitsu Fujii and Gregor Eugen Morfill Removal and sterilization of biofilms and planktonic bacteria by microwave-induced argon plasma at atmospheric pressure Mi Hee Lee, Bong Joo Park, Soo Chang Jin, Dohyun Kim, Inho Han, Jungsung Kim, Soon O Hyun, Kie-Hyung Chung and Jong-Chul Park Cell permeabilization using a non-thermal plasma M Leduc, D Guay, R L Leask and S Coulombe Physical and biological mechanisms of direct plasma interaction with living tissue Danil Dobrynin, Gregory Fridman, Gary Friedman and Alexander Fridman Nosocomial infections-a new approach towards preventive medicine using plasmas G E Morfill, T Shimizu, B Steffes and H-U Schmidt Generation and transport mechanisms of chemical species by a post-discharge flow for inactivation of bacteria Takehiko Sato, Shiroh Ochiai and Takuya Urayama Low pressure plasma discharges for the sterilization and decontamination of surfaces F Rossi, O Kylián, H Rauscher, M Hasiwa and D Gilliland Contribution of a portable air plasma torch to rapid blood coagulation as a method of preventing bleeding S P Kuo, O Tarasenko, J Chang, S Popovic, C Y Chen, H W Fan, A Scott, M Lahiani, P Alusta, J D Drake and M Nikolic A two-dimensional cold atmospheric plasma jet array for uniform treatment of large-area